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Sample records for isolated rhodococcus erythropolis

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus erythropolis NSX2, an Actinobacterium Isolated from a Cadmium-Contaminated Environment

    PubMed Central

    Egidi, Eleonora; Wood, Jennifer L.; Fox, Edward M.; Liu, Wuxing

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis NSX2 is a rhizobacterium isolated from a heavy metal–contaminated environment. The 6.2-Mb annotated genome sequence shows that this strain harbors genes associated with heavy-metal resistance and xenobiotics degradation. PMID:27795276

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Carbendazim-degrading Rhodococcus erythropolis djl-11

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Paul R.; Li, Hongmei; Ren, Yan; Li, Jishun; Wang, Jianing; Yang, Hetong

    2013-01-01

    Carbendazim (methyl 1H-benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate) is one of the most widely used fungicides in agriculture worldwide, but has been reported to have adverse effects on animal health and ecosystem function. A highly efficient carbendazim-degrading bacterium (strain dj1-11) was isolated from carbendazim-contaminated soil samples via enrichment culture. Strain dj1-11 was identified as Rhodococcus erythropolis based on morphological, physiological and biochemical characters, including sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. In vitro degradation of carbendazim (1000 mg·L−1) by dj1-11 in minimal salts medium (MSM) was highly efficient, and with an average degradation rate of 333.33 mg·L−1·d−1 at 28°C. The optimal temperature range for carbendazim degradation by dj1-11 in MSM was 25–30°C. Whilst strain dj1-11 was capable of metabolizing cabendazim as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, degradation was significantly (P<0.05) increased by addition of 12.5 mM NH4NO3. Changes in MSM pH (4–9), substitution of NH4NO3 with organic substrates as N and C sources or replacing Mg2+ with Mn2+, Zn2+ or Fe2+ did not significantly affect carbendazim degradation by dj1-11. During the degradation process, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) detected the metabolites 2-aminobenzimidazole and 2-hydroxybenzimidazole. A putative carbendazim-hydrolyzing esterase gene was cloned from chromosomal DNA of djl-11 and showed 99% sequence homology to the mheI carbendazim-hydrolyzing esterase gene from Nocardioides sp. SG-4G. PMID:24098350

  3. Degradation of 2,5-dimethylpyrazine by Rhodococcus erythropolis strain DP-45 isolated from a waste gas treatment plant of a fishmeal processing company.

    PubMed

    Rappert, Sugima; Li, Renjie; Kokova, Mariya; Antholz, Mathias; Nagorny, Stephanie; Francke, Wittko; Müller, Rudolf

    2007-10-01

    A bacterium, strain DP-45, capable of degrading 2,5-dimethylpyrazine (2,5-DMP) was isolated and identified as Rhodococcus erythropolis. The strain also grew on many other pyrazines found in the waste gases of food industries, like 2,3-dimethylpyrazine (2,3-DMP), 2,6-dimethylpyrazine (2,6-DMP), 2-ethyl-5(6)-dimethylpyrazine (EMP), 2-ethylpyrazine (EP), 2-methylpyrazine (MP), and 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine (TMP). The strain utilized 2,5-DMP as sole source of carbon and nitrogen and grew optimally at 25 degrees C with a doubling time of 7.6 h. The degradation of 2,5-DMP was accompanied by the growth of the strain and by the accumulation of a first intermediate, identified as 2-hydroxy-3,6-dimethylpyrazine (HDMP). The disappearance of HDMP was accompanied by the release of ammonium into the medium. No other metabolite was detected. The degradation of 2,5-DMP and HDMP by strain DP-45 required molecular oxygen. The expression of the first enzyme in the pathway was induced by 2,5-DMP and HDMP whereas the second enzyme was constitutively expressed. The activity of the first enzyme was inhibited by diphenyliodonium (DPI), a flavoprotein inhibitor, methimazole, a competitive inhibitor of flavin-containing monooxygenases, and by cytochrome P450 inhibitors, 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT) and phenylhydrazine (PHZ). The activity of the second enzyme was inhibited by DPI, ABT, and PHZ. Sodium tungstate, a specific antagonist of molybdate, had no influence on growth and consumption of 2,5-DMP by strain DP-45. These results led us to propose that a flavin-dependent monooxygenase or a cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase rather than a molybdenum hydroxylase catalyzed the initial hydroxylation step and that a cytochrome P450 enzyme is responsible for the transformation of HDMP in the second step.

  4. Enhanced desulfurization in a transposon-mutant strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kimiko; Noda, Ken-ichi; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2003-08-01

    The dsz desulfurization gene cluster from Rhodococcus erythropolis strain KA2-5-1 was transferred into R. erythropolis strain MC1109, unable to desulfurize light gas oil (LGO), using a transposon-transposase complex. As a result, two recombinant strains, named MC0203 and MC0122, were isolated. Resting cells of strain MC0203 decreased the sulfur concentration of LGO from 120 mg l(-1) to 70 mg l(-1) in 2 h. The LGO-desulfurization activity of strain MC0203 was about twice that of strain MC0122 and KA2-5-1. The 10-methyl fatty acids of strain MC0203 were about 28%-41% that of strain MC1109. It is likely that strain MC0203 had a mutation involving alkylenation or methylation of delta9-unsaturated fatty acids caused by the transposon inserted in the chromosome, which increased the fluidity of cell membranes and enhanced the desulfurization activity.

  5. Catabolic pathway of gamma-caprolactone in the biocontrol agent Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Cirou, Amélie; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Faure, Denis; Dessaux, Yves; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-caprolactone (GCL) is well-known as a food flavor and has been recently described as a biostimulant molecule promoting the growth of bacteria with biocontrol activity against soft-rot pathogens. Among these biocontrol agents, Rhodococcus erythropolis, characterized by a remarkable metabolic versatility, assimilates various γ-butyrolactone molecules with a branched-aliphatic chain, such as GCL. The assimilative pathway of GCL in R. erythropolis was investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. This analysis suggests the involvement of the lactonase QsdA in ring-opening, a feature confirmed by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. According to proteome analysis, the open-chain form of GCL was degraded by β- and ω-oxidation coupled to the Krebs cycle and β-ketoadipate pathway. Ubiquity of qsdA gene among environmental R. erythropolis isolates was verified by PCR. In addition to a previous N-acyl homoserine lactone catabolic function, QsdA may therefore be involved in an intermediate degradative step of cyclic recalcitrant molecules or in synthesis of flavoring lactones. PMID:22085026

  6. Optimization of nutrient component for diesel oil degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Ma, Ting; Li, Dan; Liang, Feng-lai; Liu, Ru-Lin; Li, Guo-qiang

    2008-10-01

    A novel bacterium T7-2 was isolated from the oil-polluted sea-bed mud of Bohai Sea, northern China, which can degrade diesel oil at 15 degrees C. This bacterium was identified as a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis according to its 16S rDNA gene. In order to enhance degradation efficiency, a five-level, three-factor central composite design was employed to optimize the nutrition supplied to artificial seawater. The results indicate that a supplement of 2.53 g (NH(4))(2)SO(4)L(-1), 2.75 g Na(2)HPO(4)L(-1) and 0.01 g yeast extract L(-1) to artificial seawater increases the degradation rate from 12.61% to 75% within 7d.

  7. Cesium accumulation of Rhodococcus erythropolis CS98 strain immobilized in hydrogel matrices.

    PubMed

    Takei, Takayuki; Yamasaki, Mika; Yoshida, Masahiro

    2014-04-01

    Agarose gels were superior to calcium-alginate gels for immobilizing Rhodococcus erythropolis CS98 strain to remove cesium from water. Suitable incubation time of the immobilized cells in cesium solutions, cell number in the gels and volume ratio of the cesium solution to the gels for efficient cesium removal were identified.

  8. Intracellular accumulation of trehalose and glycogen in an extreme oligotroph, Rhodococcus erythropolis N9T-4.

    PubMed

    Yano, Takanori; Funamizu, Yuhei; Yoshida, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    An extreme oligotroph, Rhodococcus erythropolis N9T-4, showed intracellular accumulation of trehalose and glycogen under oligotrophic conditions. No trehalose accumulation was observed in cells grown on the rich medium. Deletion of the polyphosphate kinase genes enhanced the trehalose accumulation and decreases the intracellular glycogen contents, suggesting an oligotrophic relationship between among the metabolic pathways of trehalose, glycogen, and inorganic polyphosphate biosyntheses.

  9. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme.

  10. Degradation of 2,4-dinitrophenol by two Rhodococcus erythropolis strains, HL 24-1 and HL 24-2.

    PubMed Central

    Lenke, H; Pieper, D H; Bruhn, C; Knackmuss, H J

    1992-01-01

    Two Rhodococcus erythropolis strains, HL 24-1 and HL 24-2, were isolated from soil and river water by their abilities to utilize 2,4-dinitrophenol (0.5 mM) as the sole source of nitrogen. Although succinate was supplied as a carbon and energy source during selection, both isolates could utilize 2,4-dinitrophenol also as the sole source of carbon. Both strains metabolized 2,4-dinitrophenol under concomitant liberation of stoichiometric amounts of nitrite and 4,6-dinitrohexanoate as a minor dead-end metabolite. PMID:1444407

  11. Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 Contains a Novel Degradation Pathway for Limonene

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Mariët J.; Swarts, Henk J.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1999-01-01

    Strain DCL14, which is able to grow on limonene as a sole source of carbon and energy, was isolated from a freshwater sediment sample. This organism was identified as a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis by chemotaxonomic and genetic studies. R. erythropolis DCL14 also assimilated the terpenes limonene-1,2-epoxide, limonene-1,2-diol, carveol, carvone, and (−)-menthol, while perillyl alcohol was not utilized as a carbon and energy source. Induction tests with cells grown on limonene revealed that the oxygen consumption rates with limonene-1,2-epoxide, limonene-1,2-diol, 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and carveol were high. Limonene-induced cells of R. erythropolis DCL14 contained the following four novel enzymatic activities involved in the limonene degradation pathway of this microorganism: a flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NADH-dependent limonene 1,2-monooxygenase activity, a cofactor-independent limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase activity, a dichlorophenolindophenol-dependent limonene-1,2-diol dehydrogenase activity, and an NADPH-dependent 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene 1,2-monooxygenase activity. Product accumulation studies showed that (1S,2S,4R)-limonene-1,2-diol, (1S,4R)-1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and (3R)-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate were intermediates in the (4R)-limonene degradation pathway. The opposite enantiomers [(1R,2R,4S)-limonene-1,2-diol, (1R,4S)-1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and (3S)-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate] were found in the (4S)-limonene degradation pathway, while accumulation of (1R,2S,4S)-limonene-1,2-diol from (4S)-limonene was also observed. These results show that R. erythropolis DCL14 metabolizes both enantiomers of limonene via a novel degradation pathway that starts with epoxidation at the 1,2 double bond forming limonene-1,2-epoxide. This epoxide is subsequently converted to limonene-1,2-diol, 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and 7-hydroxy-4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone. This lactone spontaneously rearranges to form 3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate. In

  12. Response of Rhodococcus erythropolis strain IBBPo1 to toxic organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Stancu, Mihaela Marilena

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a lot of interest in the utilization of rhodococci in the bioremediation of petroleum contaminated environments. This study investigates the response of Rhodococcus erythropolis IBBPo1 cells to 1% organic solvents (alkanes, aromatics). A combination of microbiology, biochemical, and molecular approaches were used to examine cell adaptation mechanisms likely to be pursued by this strain after 1% organic solvent exposure. R. erythropolis IBBPo1 was found to utilize 1% alkanes (cyclohexane, n-hexane, n-decane) and aromatics (toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene) as the sole carbon source. Modifications in cell viability, cell morphology, membrane permeability, lipid profile, carotenoid pigments profile and 16S rRNA gene were revealed in R. erythropolis IBBPo1 cells grown 1 and 24 h on minimal medium in the presence of 1% alkanes (cyclohexane, n-hexane, n-decane) and aromatics (toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene). Due to its environmental origin and its metabolic potential, R. erythropolis IBBPo1 is an excellent candidate for the bioremediation of soils contaminated with crude oils and other toxic compounds. Moreover, the carotenoid pigments produced by this nonpathogenic Gram-positive bacterium have a variety of other potential applications. PMID:26691458

  13. Response of Rhodococcus erythropolis strain IBBPo1 to toxic organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Stancu, Mihaela Marilena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recently, there has been a lot of interest in the utilization of rhodococci in the bioremediation of petroleum contaminated environments. This study investigates the response of Rhodococcus erythropolis IBBPo1 cells to 1% organic solvents (alkanes, aromatics). A combination of microbiology, biochemical, and molecular approaches were used to examine cell adaptation mechanisms likely to be pursued by this strain after 1% organic solvent exposure. R. erythropolis IBBPo1 was found to utilize 1% alkanes (cyclohexane, n-hexane, n-decane) and aromatics (toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene) as the sole carbon source. Modifications in cell viability, cell morphology, membrane permeability, lipid profile, carotenoid pigments profile and 16S rRNA gene were revealed in R. erythropolis IBBPo1 cells grown 1 and 24 h on minimal medium in the presence of 1% alkanes (cyclohexane, n-hexane, n-decane) and aromatics (toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene). Due to its environmental origin and its metabolic potential, R. erythropolis IBBPo1 is an excellent candidate for the bioremediation of soils contaminated with crude oils and other toxic compounds. Moreover, the carotenoid pigments produced by this nonpathogenic Gram-positive bacterium have a variety of other potential applications. PMID:26691458

  14. Formaldehyde removal in synthetic and industrial wastewater by Rhodococcus erythropolis UPV-1.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Lopategi, A; Prieto, M; Serra, J L; Llama, M J

    2002-02-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis strain UPV-1 is able to grow on phenol as the only carbon and energy source and to remove formaldehyde completely from both synthetic and industrial wastewater. The rate of formaldehyde removal is independent of either initial biomass or formaldehyde concentration. The presence of viable, intact cells is strictly necessary for this removal to take place. Discontinuous and continuous formaldehyde-feed systems were successfully tested with synthetic wastewater in shaken flasks. Once biodegradation was well established in model synthetic wastewater, a real wastewater sample was obtained from a local phenolic and melamine resin-manufacturing company. Incubation of biomass with this wastewater at subtoxic concentrations of formaldehyde resulted in the complete removal of the pollutant. Parameters, such as chemical oxygen demand and toxicity, were assessed as indicators of wastewater cleanup progress.

  15. An Evaluation of Kinetic Models in the Biodesulfurization of Synthetic Oil by Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277.

    PubMed

    Maass, D; Mayer, D A; Moritz, D E; Oliveira, D; de Souza, A A Ulson; Souza, S M A Guelli

    2015-10-01

    Biodesulfurization is an eco-friendly technology applied in the removal of sulfur from fossil fuels. This technology is based on the use of microorganisms as biocatalysts to convert the recalcitrant sulfur compounds into others easily treatable, as sulfides. Despite it has been studied during the last decades, there are some unsolved questions, as per example the kinetic model which appropriately describes the biodesulfurization globally. In this work, different kinetic models were tested to a batch desulfurization process using dibenzothiophene (DBT) as a model compound, n-dodecane as organic solvent, and Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277 as biocatalyst. The models were solved by ODE45 function in the MATLAB. Monod model was capable to describe the biodesulfurization process predicting all experimental data with a very good fitting. The coefficients of determination achieved to organic phase concentrations of 20, 80, and 100 % (v/v) were 0.988, 0.995, and 0.990, respectively. R. erythropolis ATCC 4277 presented a good affinity with the substrate (DBT) since the coefficients of saturation obtained to reaction medium containing 20, 80, and 100 % (v/v) were 0.034, 0.07, and 0.116, respectively. This kinetic evaluation provides an improvement in the development of biodesulfurization technology because it showed that a simple model is capable to describe the throughout process. PMID:26201481

  16. Biodesulfurization of a system containing synthetic fuel using Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277.

    PubMed

    Maass, Danielle; de Oliveira, Débora; de Souza, Antônio A Ulson; Souza, Selene M A Guelli U

    2014-11-01

    The burning of fossil fuels has released a large quantity of pollutants into the atmosphere. In this context, sulfur dioxide is one of the most noxious gas which, on reacting with moist air, is transformed into sulfuric acid, causing the acid rain. In response, many countries have reformulated their legislation in order to enforce the commercialization of fuels with very low sulfur levels. The existing desulfurization processes cannot remove such low levels of sulfur and thus a biodesulfurization has been developed, where the degradation of sulfur occurs through the action of microorganisms. Rhodococcus erythropolis has been identified as one of the most promising bacteria for use in the biodesulfurization. In this study, the effectiveness of the strain R. erythropolis ATCC 4277 in the desulfurization of dibenzothiophene (DBT) was evaluated in a batch reactor using an organic phase (n-dodecane or diesel) concentrations of 20, 80, and 100 % (v/v). This strain was able to degrade 93.3, 98.0, and 95.5 % of the DBT in the presence of 20, 80, and 100 % (v/v) of dodecane, respectively. The highest value for the specific DBT degradation rate was 44 mmol DBT · kg DCW(-1) · h(-1), attained in the reactor containing 80 % (v/v) of n-dodecane as the organic phase.

  17. Biodesulfurization of a system containing synthetic fuel using Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277.

    PubMed

    Maass, Danielle; de Oliveira, Débora; de Souza, Antônio A Ulson; Souza, Selene M A Guelli U

    2014-11-01

    The burning of fossil fuels has released a large quantity of pollutants into the atmosphere. In this context, sulfur dioxide is one of the most noxious gas which, on reacting with moist air, is transformed into sulfuric acid, causing the acid rain. In response, many countries have reformulated their legislation in order to enforce the commercialization of fuels with very low sulfur levels. The existing desulfurization processes cannot remove such low levels of sulfur and thus a biodesulfurization has been developed, where the degradation of sulfur occurs through the action of microorganisms. Rhodococcus erythropolis has been identified as one of the most promising bacteria for use in the biodesulfurization. In this study, the effectiveness of the strain R. erythropolis ATCC 4277 in the desulfurization of dibenzothiophene (DBT) was evaluated in a batch reactor using an organic phase (n-dodecane or diesel) concentrations of 20, 80, and 100 % (v/v). This strain was able to degrade 93.3, 98.0, and 95.5 % of the DBT in the presence of 20, 80, and 100 % (v/v) of dodecane, respectively. The highest value for the specific DBT degradation rate was 44 mmol DBT · kg DCW(-1) · h(-1), attained in the reactor containing 80 % (v/v) of n-dodecane as the organic phase. PMID:25163887

  18. [Effect of citric acid on synthesis of surfactants in Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017].

    PubMed

    Pyroh, T P; Shevchuk, T A; Shuliakova, M O; Tarasenko, D O

    2011-01-01

    Expediency of sodium citrate (regulator of lipids synthesis) substitution is shown in the medium of cultivation of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 with ethanol (or hexadecane) and fumarate (gluconeogenesis precursor) by citric acid for pH maintenance at the level optimal for synthesis of surfactants. It has been established the maximum synthesis of surfactants of R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 was observed at pH 8.0. Introduction of 0.2% sodium fumarate at the end of experimental growth phase of the strain IMV Ac-5017 in the medium with 2% of ethanol with further periodic acidification of culture liquid by citric acid up to pH 8.0 was accompanied by the increase of conditional concentration of surfactants by 30, 40 and 95% as compared with an analogous process without pH regulation, by the use of sodium citrate as the regulator of lipids synthesis on the medium with ethanol as well as without organic acids, respectively.

  19. An Evaluation of Kinetic Models in the Biodesulfurization of Synthetic Oil by Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277.

    PubMed

    Maass, D; Mayer, D A; Moritz, D E; Oliveira, D; de Souza, A A Ulson; Souza, S M A Guelli

    2015-10-01

    Biodesulfurization is an eco-friendly technology applied in the removal of sulfur from fossil fuels. This technology is based on the use of microorganisms as biocatalysts to convert the recalcitrant sulfur compounds into others easily treatable, as sulfides. Despite it has been studied during the last decades, there are some unsolved questions, as per example the kinetic model which appropriately describes the biodesulfurization globally. In this work, different kinetic models were tested to a batch desulfurization process using dibenzothiophene (DBT) as a model compound, n-dodecane as organic solvent, and Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277 as biocatalyst. The models were solved by ODE45 function in the MATLAB. Monod model was capable to describe the biodesulfurization process predicting all experimental data with a very good fitting. The coefficients of determination achieved to organic phase concentrations of 20, 80, and 100 % (v/v) were 0.988, 0.995, and 0.990, respectively. R. erythropolis ATCC 4277 presented a good affinity with the substrate (DBT) since the coefficients of saturation obtained to reaction medium containing 20, 80, and 100 % (v/v) were 0.034, 0.07, and 0.116, respectively. This kinetic evaluation provides an improvement in the development of biodesulfurization technology because it showed that a simple model is capable to describe the throughout process.

  20. [Effect of biosurfactants Acinetobacter calcoaceticus K-4 and Rhodococcus erythropolis EK-1 on some microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Konon, A D; Sofilkanich, A P; Skochko, A B

    2011-01-01

    It has been established that the preparations of biosurfactants Rhodococcus erythropolis EK-1 (0.61 -2.1 mg/ml) and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus K-4 (0.15 - 0.22 mg/ml) in a form of supernatants of the cultural liquid show antimicrobial effect in respect of a number of microorganisms (Bacillus subtilis BT-2, Escherichia coli IEM-1, Candida tropicalis BT-5, Candida albicans D6, Candida utilis BVC-65, Saccharomyces cerevisiae OB-3). No inhibiting effect of biosurfactant preparations of R. erythropolis EK-1 on the cells of S. cerevisiae OB-3 and E. coli IEM-I and antifungal effect of the both studied surfactants on Aspergillus niger P-3 and Fusarium culmorum T-7 were revealed. The survival of microbe cells depend on biosurfactants concentration in the preparations, on exposure time as well as on physiological state of test-cultures. It has been established that the surfactant preparations of A. calcoaceticus K-4 had a higher effect on the spores of B. subtilis BT-2, than on vegetative cells, thus decreasing the spore culture survival by 75% in 2 h of exposure.

  1. Transcriptome of the quorum-sensing signal-degrading Rhodococcus erythropolis responds differentially to virulent and avirulent Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Kwasiborski, A; Mondy, S; Chong, T-M; Barbey, C; Chan, K-G; Beury-Cirou, A; Latour, X; Faure, D

    2015-05-01

    Social bacteria use chemical communication to coordinate and synchronize gene expression via the quorum-sensing (QS) regulatory pathway. In Pectobacterium, a causative agent of the blackleg and soft-rot diseases on potato plants and tubers, expression of the virulence factors is collectively controlled by the QS-signals N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHLs). Several soil bacteria, such as the actinobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis, are able to degrade NAHLs, hence quench the chemical communication and virulence of Pectobacterium. Here, next-generation sequencing was used to investigate structural and functional genomics of the NAHL-degrading R. erythropolis strain R138. The R. erythropolis R138 genome (6.7 Mbp) contained a single circular chromosome, one linear (250 kbp) and one circular (84 kbp) plasmid. Growth of R. erythropolis and P. atrosepticum was not altered in mixed-cultures as compared with monocultures on potato tuber slices. HiSeq-transcriptomics revealed that no R. erythropolis genes were differentially expressed when R. erythropolis was cultivated in the presence vs absence of the avirulent P. atrosepticum mutant expI, which is defective for QS-signal synthesis. By contrast 50 genes (<1% of the R. erythropolis genome) were differentially expressed when R. erythropolis was cultivated in the presence vs absence of the NAHL-producing virulent P. atrosepticum. Among them, quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase-PCR confirmed that the expression of some alkyl-sulfatase genes decreased in the presence of a virulent P. atrosepticum, as well as deprivation of organic sulfur such as methionine, which is a key precursor in the synthesis of NAHL by P. atrosepticum.

  2. [Conversion of soybean sterols into 3,17-diketosteroids using actinobacteria Mycobacterium neoaurum, Pimelobacter simplex, and Rhodococcus erythropolis].

    PubMed

    Andriushina, V A; Rodina, N V; Stytsenko, T C; Luu, Duc Huy; Druzhinina, A V; Iaderets, V V; Voîshvillo, N E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract-Soybean sterols were converted into androst-4-ene-3,17-dione (AD) and 9alpha-hydroxyandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione (9-OH-AD) using three actinobacterium strains. The transformation of a microcrystallic substrate (particle size 5-15 nm) or the transformation in the presence of randomly methylated beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) were carried out by Mycobacterium neoaurum with a phytosterol load of 30 g/l over 144 h with an AD content of 14.5 and 15.2 g/l, respectively. AD obtained in the presence of MCD was transformed into ADD (13.5 g/l) by Pimelobacter simplex cells over 3 h and into 9-OH-AD by Rhodococcus erythropolis cells after 22 h without the isolation of AD from the cultural liquid. The technical product ADD was obtained in 75% yield, based on phytosterol. It contained as impurity 1.25% of AD and 1.5% of 1,2-dehydrotestosterone. In a control experiment-the process of 1,2-dehydrogenation of 20 g/l AD in the water solution of MCD-no by products were isolated. Thus, it is more expedient to introduce the 1,2-double bond into pure AD, whereas R. erythropolis strain with low destructive activity towards steroid nucleus can be used in the mixed culture with M. neoaurum. The crystal product contained, according to HPLC, 80% of 9-OH-AD, and 1.5 AD was combined. The yield of 9-OH-AD (m.p. 218-220 degrees C) based on transformed phytosterol was 56%. PMID:21790029

  3. [Synthesis of surfactants acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5070 in the medium with glycerol].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Shevchuk, T A; Konon, A D; Shuliakova, M A; Iutinskaia, G A

    2012-01-01

    It was established that glycerol, a byproduct of biodiesel production, may be used as substrate for synthesis of surfactants Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241. Maximum indices of surfactants synthesis by the strain IMV B-7241 have been fixed, when the medium with glycerol included yeast autolysate and trace elements. It was shown that the surfactants synthesis could be intensified when cultivating A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 on the mixture of hexadecane and glycerol in concentration of 0.5-1.0% (in volume). When using inoculate grown on hexadecane, the conditional concentration of the surfactant A.calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 on the mixed substrate was higher by 56-100, and that of R. erythropolis IMVAc-5017 by 260-320 % than on the monosubstrate glycerol. The paper is presented in Russian.

  4. Improvement of desulfurization activity in Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1 by genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, K; Ishii, Y; Kobayashi, M; Koizumi, K; Maruhashi, K

    2001-02-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1 can desulfurize dibenzothiophene (DBT) into 2-hydroxybiphenyl. A cryptic plasmid, pRC4, which was derived from R. rhodochrous IFO3338, was combined with an Escherichia coli vector to construct an E. coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector. The complete nucleotide sequence of 2582-bp pRC4 was analyzed. Based on the characteristics of its putative replication genes, pRC4 was assigned to the family of pAL5000-related replicons. The desulfurization gene cluster, dszABC, and the related reductase gene, dszD, cloned from KA2-5-1, were reintroduced into KA2-5-1 and efficiently expressed. The DBT desulfurization ability of the transformant carrying two dszABC clusters and one dszD on the vector was about 4-fold higher than that of the parent strain, and the transformant also showed improved desulfurization activity for light gas oil (LGO). Sulfur components in LGO before and after the reaction were analyzed with gas chromatography-atomic emission detection.

  5. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600ppm) in 3months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique.

  6. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600ppm) in 3months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique. PMID:26697744

  7. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique.

  8. Metabolic responses of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 grown on diesel oil and various hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Laczi, Krisztián; Kis, Ágnes; Horváth, Balázs; Maróti, Gergely; Hegedüs, Botond; Perei, Katalin; Rákhely, Gábor

    2015-11-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 is able to degrade diesel oil, normal-, iso- and cycloparaffins and aromatic compounds. The complete DNA content of the strain was previously sequenced and numerous oxygenase genes were identified. In order to identify the key elements participating in biodegradation of various hydrocarbons, we performed a comparative whole transcriptome analysis of cells grown on hexadecane, diesel oil and acetate. The transcriptomic data for the most prominent genes were validated by RT-qPCR. The expression of two genes coding for alkane-1-monooxygenase enzymes was highly upregulated in the presence of hydrocarbon substrates. The transcription of eight phylogenetically diverse cytochrome P450 (cyp) genes was upregulated in the presence of diesel oil. The transcript levels of various oxygenase genes were determined in cells grown in an artificial mixture, containing hexadecane, cycloparaffin and aromatic compounds and six cyp genes were induced by this hydrocarbon mixture. Five of them were not upregulated by linear and branched hydrocarbons. The expression of fatty acid synthase I genes was downregulated by hydrocarbon substrates, indicating the utilization of external alkanes for fatty acid synthesis. Moreover, the transcription of genes involved in siderophore synthesis, iron transport and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis was also upregulated, indicating their important role in hydrocarbon metabolism. Based on the results, complex metabolic response profiles were established for cells grown on various hydrocarbons. Our results represent a functional annotation of a rhodococcal genome, provide deeper insight into molecular events in diesel/hydrocarbon utilization and suggest novel target genes for environmental monitoring projects.

  9. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s−1, respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  10. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn; Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s(-1), respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  11. Enhancement and stabilization of desulfurization activity of Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1 by feeding ethanol and sulfur components.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Osamu; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Koizumi, Ken-Ichi; Ohshiro, Takashi; Izumi, Yoshikazu; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    We developed a fed-batch culture system fed with ethanol and restricted amounts of sulfur compounds to enhance and stabilize the desulfurizing activity in bacterial cells. In this system using dibenzothiophene (DBT) as the sole sulfur source, a desulfurizing bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1 cultivated with small amounts of sulfur showed stable desulfurizing activity and a low rate of growth. However, the cells cultured with excess amounts of sulfur showed unstable activity and a high growth rate. DBT had disadvantages as a sulfur source for cultivation because it is immiscible with water and toxic to cells. We then investigated water-soluble sulfur compounds for use as the sole sulfur source for the cultivation of R. erythropolis KA2-5-1 with desulfurizing activity, and found 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid to be the most effective. When 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid was used instead of DBT as the sole sulfur source in the fed-batch fermentation system, R. erythropolis KA2-5-1 showed the highest desulfurizing activity, 111 mmol of 2-HBP/kg-cells/h, a high growth rate (mu = 0.37/h) and a final cell concentration of 20.0 g-dry cells/l during 89 h of cultivation. The production levels of the desulfurizing enzymes in the bacterial cells cultivated with DBT or 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid were evaluated by immunoblot analysis with specific antisera, indicating that the same quantity of desulfurizing enzymes was expressed in both cases.

  12. Structural analysis of the 6 kb cryptic plasmid pFAJ2600 from Rhodococcus erythropolis NI86/21 and construction of Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vectors.

    PubMed

    De Mot, R; Nagy, I; De Schrijver, A; Pattanapipitpaisal, P; Schoofs, G; Vanderleyden, J

    1997-10-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the 5936 bp cryptic plasmid pFAJ2600 from Rhodococcus erythropolis NI86/21 was determined. Based on the characteristics of its putative replication genes, repA and repB, pFAJ2600 was assigned to the family of pAL5000-related small replicons identified in Mycobacterium (pAL5000), Corynebacterium (pXZ10142), Brevibacterium (pRBL1), Bifidobacterium (pMB1) and Neisseria (pJD1). The replication systems of these plasmids show striking similarities to the ones used by the ColE2 family of plasmids from Enterobacteria with respect to both trans-acting factors and ori sequences. Two possible plasmid stabilization systems are encoded on pFAJ2600: a site-specific recombinase (PmrA) related to the Escherichia coli Xer proteins for plasmid multimer resolution and an ATPase (ParA) related to the A-type of proteins in sop/par partitioning systems. The proposed replication termination region of pFAJ2600 has features in common with the Ter loci of Bacillus subtilis. Chimeras composed of a pUC18-Cmr derivative inserted in the parA-repA intergenic region of vector pFAJ2600 produced vectors that could be shuttled between Escherichia coli and several Rhodococcus species (R. erythropolis, R. fascians, R. rhodochrous, R. ruber). The pFAJ2600-based shuttle vector pFAJ2574 was stably maintained in R. erythropolis and R. fascians growing under non-selective conditions.

  13. Simple Preparation of Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 44534 as Biocatalyst to Oxidize Diols into the Optically Active Lactones.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Olejniczak, Teresa; Neumann, Konrad; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Boratyñski, Filip

    2016-09-01

    In the current study, we present a green toolbox to produce ecological compounds like lactone moiety. Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 44534 cells have been used to oxidize both decane-1,4-diol () and decane-1,5-diol () into the corresponding γ- () and δ-decalactones () with yield of 80% and enantiomeric excess (ee) = 75% and ee = 90%, respectively. Among oxidation of meso diols, (-)-(1S,5R)-cis-3-oxabicyclo[4.3.0]non-7-en-2-one (5a) with 56% yield and ee = 76% as well as (-)-(2R,3S)-cis-endo-3-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]dec-7-en-2-one (6a) with 100% yield and ee = 90% were formed. It is worth mentioning that R. erythropolis DSM 44534 grew in a mineral medium containing ethanol as the sole source of energy and carbon Chirality 28:623-627, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27496202

  14. Limonene-1,2-Epoxide Hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 Belongs to a Novel Class of Epoxide Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Mariët J.; Overkamp, Karin M.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1998-01-01

    An epoxide hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 catalyzes the hydrolysis of limonene-1,2-epoxide to limonene-1,2-diol. The enzyme is induced when R. erythropolis is grown on monoterpenes, reflecting its role in the limonene degradation pathway of this microorganism. Limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase was purified to homogeneity. It is a monomeric cytoplasmic enzyme of 17 kDa, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined. No cofactor was required for activity of this colorless enzyme. Maximal enzyme activity was measured at pH 7 and 50°C. None of the tested inhibitors or metal ions inhibited limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase activity. Limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase has a narrow substrate range. Of the compounds tested, only limonene-1,2-epoxide, 1-methylcyclohexene oxide, cyclohexene oxide, and indene oxide were substrates. This report shows that limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase belongs to a new class of epoxide hydrolases based on (i) its low molecular mass, (ii) the absence of any significant homology between the partial amino acid sequence of limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase and amino acid sequences of known epoxide hydrolases, (iii) its pH profile, and (iv) the inability of 2-bromo-4′-nitroacetophenone, diethylpyrocarbonate, 4-fluorochalcone oxide, and 1,10-phenanthroline to inhibit limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase activity. PMID:9748436

  15. [Effect of Cu2+ on synthesis of biosurfactants of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Konon, A D; Sofilkanich, A P; Shevchuk, T A; Parfeniuk, S A

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of biosurfactants (surface-active substances, SAS) was investigated under the conditions of growth of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 on hydrophobic (n-hexadecane, liquid paraffins, sunflower oil) and hydrophilic (ethanol) substrates depending on concentration (0.01-0.5 mM) and time of copper cations introduction in the medium. It is established that Cu2+ addition in the exponential phase of growth of the strains IMV B-7241 and IMV Ac-5017 on all studied substrates was accompanied by the increase of conventional concentration of SAS by 25-140% as compared with the indices in the medium without copper cations. Maximum synthesis intensification of SAS of A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 was observed in the case of Cu2+ introduction in the medium with hydrocarbons. The increase of SAS synthesis in the presence of copper cations is determined by their activating effect on activity of alkane hydroxylase of the both strains, as well as 4-nitroso-N,N-dimethylaniline-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase and enzymes of biosynthesis of surface active glyco-(phosphoenolpyruvate-synthetase) and aminolipids (NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase) in A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241.

  16. The cbs mutant strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1 expresses high levels of Dsz enzymes in the presence of sulfate.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Osamu; Maruhashi, Kenji; Kurane, Ryuichiro

    2002-11-01

    Two mutants of the dibenzothiophene-desulfurizing Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1, strains MS51 and MS316, which express a high level of desulfurizing activity in the presence of sulfate, were isolated using the transposome technique. The level of dibenzothiophene-desulfurization by cell-free extracts prepared from mutants MS51 and MS316 grown on sulfate was about five-fold higher than that by cell-free extracts of the wild-type. This result was consistent with results of Western-blot analysis using antisera specific for DszA, DszB and DszC, the enzymes involved in the desulfurization of dibenzothiophene. Gene analysis of the mutants revealed that the same gene was disrupted in mutants MS51 and MS316 and that the transposon-inserted gene in these strains was the gene for cystathionine beta-synthase, cbs. The cbs mutants also expressed high levels of Dsz enzymes when methionine was used as the sole source of sulfur.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of 3-ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1

    PubMed Central

    Rohman, Ali; van Oosterwijk, Niels; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2012-01-01

    3-Ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenase plays a crucial role in the early steps of steroid degradation by introducing a double bond between the C1 and C2 atoms of the A-ring of its 3-ketosteroid substrates. The 3-ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1, a 56 kDa flavoprotein, was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at room temperature. The crystals grew in various buffers over a wide pH range (from pH 5.5 to 10.5), but the best crystallization condition consisted of 2%(v/v) PEG 400, 0.1 M HEPES pH 7.5, 2.0 M ammonium sulfate. A native crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.0 Å resolution. It belonged to the primitive orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 107.4, b = 131.6, c = 363.2 Å, and contained eight molecules in the asymmetric unit. The initial structure of the enzyme was solved using multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) data collected from a Pt-derivatized crystal. PMID:22691786

  18. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of a Novel Monoterpene ɛ-Lactone Hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14

    PubMed Central

    van der Vlugt-Bergmans, Cécile J. B; van der Werf, Mariët J.

    2001-01-01

    A monoterpene ɛ-lactone hydrolase (MLH) from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14, catalyzing the ring opening of lactones which are formed during degradation of several monocyclic monoterpenes, including carvone and menthol, was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a monomeric enzyme of 31 kDa that is active with (4R)-4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone and (6R)-6-isopropenyl-3-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone, lactones derived from (4R)-dihydrocarvone, and 7-isopropyl-4-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone, the lactone derived from menthone. Both enantiomers of 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone were converted at equal rates, suggesting that the enzyme is not stereoselective. Maximal enzyme activity was measured at pH 9.5 and 30°C. Determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified MLH enabled cloning of the corresponding gene by a combination of PCR and colony screening. The gene, designated mlhB (monoterpene lactone hydrolysis), showed up to 43% similarity to members of the GDXG family of lipolytic enzymes. Sequencing of the adjacent regions revealed two other open reading frames, one encoding a protein with similarity to the short-chain dehydrogenase reductase family and the second encoding a protein with similarity to acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenases. Both enzymes are possibly also involved in the monoterpene degradation pathways of this microorganism. PMID:11157238

  19. [Synthesis of surfactants by Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 on industrial waste].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Sofilkanich, A P; Pokora, K A; Shevchuk, T A; Iutinskaia, G A

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of surfactants by Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 on industrial waste (food and oil-processing industry, production of biodiesel) was investigated. The possibility of replacing the expensive substrates (n-hexadecane and ethanol) by industrial waste (oil and fat industry, fried sunflower oil, glycerol, liquid paraffin) for the surfactant biosynthesis was established. The conditional concentration of surfactants was maximal on oil containing substrates and exceeded those on n-hexadecane and ethanol 2-3 times. The highest rates of surfactants synthesis were observed on fried sunflower oil with the use of inoculum grown on carbohydrate substrates (glucose, molasses). It was established that the addition of glucose (0.1%) was accompanied by 2-4-fold intensification of surfactants synthesis by R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 on fried sunflower oil (2%).

  20. Optimizing Polychlorinated Biphenyl Degradation by Flavonoid-Induced Cells of the Rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Thanh My; Pino Rodriguez, Nancy Johanna; Hijri, Mohamed; Sylvestre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that many plant secondary metabolites may act as signal molecules to trigger the bacterial ability to metabolize polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during the rhizoremediation process. However, the bases for the PCB rhizoremediation process are still largely unknown. The rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A is unable to use flavanone as a growth substrate. However, on the basis of an assay that monitors the amount of 4-chlorobenzoate produced from 4-chlorobiphenyl by cells grown co-metabolically on flavanone plus sodium acetate, this flavonoid was previously found to be a potential inducer of the U23A biphenyl catabolic pathway. In this work, and using the same assay, we identified ten other flavonoids that did not support growth, but that acted as inducers of the U23A biphenyl pathway, and we confirmed flavonoid induction of the biphenyl catabolic pathway using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) on the bphA gene. We also examined the effect of the growth co-substrate on flavonoid induction. Sodium acetate was replaced by glucose, mannose, sucrose, or mannitol, which are sugars found in plant root exudates. The data showed that the level of induction of strain U23A biphenyl-degrading enzymes was significantly influenced by the nature and concentration of the flavonoid in the growth medium, as well as by the substrate used for growth. Sucrose allowed for an optimal induction response for most flavonoids. Some flavonoids, such as flavone and isoflavone, were better inducers of the biphenyl catabolic enzymes than biphenyl itself. We also found that all flavonoids tested in this work were metabolized by strain U23A during co-metabolic growth, but that the metabolite profiles, as well as the level of efficiency of degradation, differed for each flavonoid. To obtain insight into how flavonoids interact with strain U23A to promote polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation, we determined the concentration of flavanone at

  1. Optimizing Polychlorinated Biphenyl Degradation by Flavonoid-Induced Cells of the Rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A

    PubMed Central

    Hijri, Mohamed; Sylvestre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that many plant secondary metabolites may act as signal molecules to trigger the bacterial ability to metabolize polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during the rhizoremediation process. However, the bases for the PCB rhizoremediation process are still largely unknown. The rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A is unable to use flavanone as a growth substrate. However, on the basis of an assay that monitors the amount of 4-chlorobenzoate produced from 4-chlorobiphenyl by cells grown co-metabolically on flavanone plus sodium acetate, this flavonoid was previously found to be a potential inducer of the U23A biphenyl catabolic pathway. In this work, and using the same assay, we identified ten other flavonoids that did not support growth, but that acted as inducers of the U23A biphenyl pathway, and we confirmed flavonoid induction of the biphenyl catabolic pathway using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) on the bphA gene. We also examined the effect of the growth co-substrate on flavonoid induction. Sodium acetate was replaced by glucose, mannose, sucrose, or mannitol, which are sugars found in plant root exudates. The data showed that the level of induction of strain U23A biphenyl-degrading enzymes was significantly influenced by the nature and concentration of the flavonoid in the growth medium, as well as by the substrate used for growth. Sucrose allowed for an optimal induction response for most flavonoids. Some flavonoids, such as flavone and isoflavone, were better inducers of the biphenyl catabolic enzymes than biphenyl itself. We also found that all flavonoids tested in this work were metabolized by strain U23A during co-metabolic growth, but that the metabolite profiles, as well as the level of efficiency of degradation, differed for each flavonoid. To obtain insight into how flavonoids interact with strain U23A to promote polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation, we determined the concentration of flavanone at

  2. Molecular biological enhancement of coal desulfurization: Cloning and expression of the sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate genes in Pseudomonads and Thiobacillae. [Rhodococcus erythropolis, Thiobacillus acidophilus, Thiobacillus novellus

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, S.

    1992-01-01

    Research continues on desulfurization of coal using microorganisms. Topics reported on this quarter include: desulfurization with N1-36 (presumptively identified as Rhodochrous erythropolis), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA's of Thiobacillus spp., and fresh isolates with the presumptive capacity to desulfurize dibenzothiophenes.

  3. [Effect of surface-active substances of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, and Nocardia vaccinii K-8 on phytopathogenic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Konon, A D; Sofilkanich, A P; Iutinskaia, G A

    2013-01-01

    The effect of surface-active substances (SAS's) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, and Nocardia vaccinii K-8 on phytopathogenic bacteria has been studied. It was shown that the survival of cells (10(5)-10(7) in a milliliter) of the Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas phytopathogenic bacteria was found to be 0-33% after treatment with SAS preparations of the IMV Ac-5017 and IMV B-7241 strains for 2 h (0.15-0.4 mg/mL). In the presence of N. vaccinii K-8 SAS preparations (0.085-0.85 mg/mL), the number of cells of the majority of the studied phytopathogenic bacteria decreased by 95-100%. These data show prospects for using microbial SAS's for the construction of ecologically friendly drugs for regulating the number of phytopathogenic bacteria.

  4. [Destruction of oil in the presence of Cu2+ and surfactants of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Konon, A D; Sofilkanich, A P; Shevchuk, T A; Iutinska, G O

    2015-01-01

    The effect of copper cations (0.01-1.0 mM) and surface-active agents (surfactants) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Alc-5017 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 in the form of culture liquid on the destruction of oil in water (3.0-6.0 g/L) and soil (20 g/kg), including in the presence of Cd2+ and Pb2+ (0.01-0.5 mM), was investigated. It was shown that the degree of oil degradation in water and soil after 20 days in the presence of low concentrations of Cu2+ (0.01-0.05 mM) and culture liquid of strains IMV B-7241, IMV Ac-5017, and IMV B-7405 was 15 - 25% higher than without copper cations. The activating effect of Cu2+ on the decomposition of complex oil and Cd2+ and Pb2+ pollution was established: after treatment with surfactant of A. calcoacelicus IMV B-7241 and R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 destruction of oil in water and soil was 85-95%, and after removal of the copper cations decreased to 45-70%. Intensification of oil destruction in the presence of copper cations may be due to their stimulating effect on the activity of alkane hydroxylases as in surfactant-producing strains, and natural (autochthonous) oxidizing microbiota.

  5. [Antiadhesive properties of the surfactants of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMB B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMB Ac-5017, and Nocardia vaccinii IMB B-7405].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Konon, A D; Beregovaya, K A; Shulyakova, M A

    2014-01-01

    Attachment of the cells of some bacteria, yeasts, and micromycetes to various surfaces (catheters, dentures, plastic, polyvinyl chloride, tiles, and steel) treated with the surfactants fromAcinetobacter calcoace- ticus IMB B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMB Ac-5017, and Nocardia vaccinii IMB B-7405 was studied. Adhesion of microorganisms to all the studied surfaces depended on the surfactant concentration and purity, kind of surface, and the test culture. Treatment with the surfactants from N. vaccinii IMB B-7405 (0.005- 0.05 mg/mL), A. calcoaceticus IMB B-7241 (0.003-0.036 mg/mL), and R. erythropolis IMB Ac-5017 (0.03- 0.12 mg/mL) resulted in adhesion decreased respectively by 35-75, 60-75, and 25-90% for bacteria (Es- cherichia coli IEM-1, Bacillus subtilis BT-2, etc.), by 80-85, 55-90, and 15-60% for yeasts Candida albicans D-6, and by 40-50, 35-45, and 10-20% for micromycetes (Aspergillus niger P-3 and Fusarium culmorum T-7).

  6. LplR, a Repressor Belonging to the TetR Family, Regulates Expression of the l-Pantoyl Lactone Dehydrogenase Gene in Rhodococcus erythropolis

    PubMed Central

    Si, Dayong; Urano, Nobuyuki; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2012-01-01

    The l-pantoyl lactone (l-PL) dehydrogenase (LPLDH) gene (lpldh) has been cloned from Rhodococcus erythropolis AKU2103, and addition of 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) was shown to be required for lpldh expression in this strain. In this study, based on an exploration of the nucleotide sequence around lpldh, a TetR-like regulator gene, which we designated lplR, was found upstream of lpldh, and three putative open reading frames existed between the two genes. Disruption of lplR led to 22.8 times higher lpldh expression, even without 1,2-PD induction, than that in wild-type R. erythropolis AKU2103 without 1,2-PD addition. Introduction of a multicopy vector carrying lplR (multi-lplR) into the wild-type and ΔlplR strains led to no detectable LPLDH activity even in the presence of 1,2-PD. The results of an electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that purified LplR bound to a 6-bp inverted-repeat sequence located in the promoter/operator region of the operon containing lpldh. These results indicated that LplR is a negative regulator in lpldh expression. Based on the clarification of the expression mechanism of lpldh, recombinant cells showing high LPLDH activity were constructed and used as a catalyst for the conversion of l-PL to ketopantoyl lactone. Finally, a promising production process of d-PL from dl-PL was constructed. PMID:22941082

  7. Nonlinear changes in the activity of the oxygen-dependent demethylase system in Rhodococcus erythropolis cells in the presence of low and very low doses of formaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The effect of exogenous, highly diluted formaldehyde on the rate of demethylation/re-methylation of veratric acid by the bacteria Rhodococcus erythropolis was studied using electrophoretic and microscopic techniques. The activity of 4-O-demethylase, responsible for accumulation of vanillic acid, and the levels of veratric and vanillic acids were determined using capillary electrophoresis. Formaldehyde was serially diluted at 1:100 ratios, and the total number of iterations was 20. After incubation of the successive dilutions of formaldehyde with the bacteria, demethylase activity oscillated in a sinusoidal manner. It was established using capillary electrophoresis that methylation of vanillic acid to veratric acid occurred at a double rate, as shown by the doubled fluctuation in the concentration of veratrate. There were also changes in the NADH oxidase activity, which is associated with methylation processes. Microscopic observations revealed the presence of numerous enlarged vacuoles in bacterial cells during the accumulation of large amounts of vanillic acid, and their disappearance together with a decrease in 4-O-demethylase activity. The presented results give evidence for the ability of living cells to detect the presence of submolecular concentrations of biological effectors in their environment and provide a basis for a scientific explanation of the law of hormesis and the therapeutic effect of homeopathic dilutions. PMID:22104369

  8. Purification and characterization of a Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 involved in three different monocyclic monoterpene degradation pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Werf, M J

    2000-01-01

    A Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase (BVMO), catalysing the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent oxidation of the monocyclic monoterpene ketones 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone, was purified to homogeneity from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. Monocyclic monoterpene ketone mono-oxygenase (MMKMO) is a monomeric enzyme of molecular mass 60 kDa. It contains 1 mol of FAD/monomer as the prosthetic group. The N-terminal amino acid sequence showed homology with many other NADPH-dependent and FAD-containing (Type 1) BVMOs. Maximal enzyme activity was measured at pH 9 and 35 degrees C. MMKMO has a broad substrate specificity, catalysing the lactonization of a large number of monocyclic monoterpene ketones and substituted cyclohexanones. The natural substrates 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone were converted stoichiometrically into 3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate (the spontaneous rearrangement product of the lactone formed by MMKMO), 4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone and 7-isopropyl-4-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone respectively. The MMKMO-catalysed conversion of iso-dihydrocarvone showed an opposite regioselectivity to that of dihydrocarvone; in this case, 6-isopropenyl-3-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone was formed as the product. MMKMO converted all enantiomers of the natural substrates with almost equal efficiency. MMKMO is involved in the conversion of the monocyclic monoterpene ketone intermediates formed in the degradation pathways of all stereoisomers of three different monocyclic monoterpenes, i.e. limonene, (dihydro)carveol and menthol. PMID:10769172

  9. Crystal Structure and Site-directed Mutagenesis of 3-Ketosteroid Δ1-Dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 Explain Its Catalytic Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Rohman, Ali; van Oosterwijk, Niels; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2013-01-01

    3-Ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenases are FAD-dependent enzymes that catalyze the 1,2-desaturation of 3-ketosteroid substrates to initiate degradation of the steroid nucleus. Here we report the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of the 56-kDa enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 (Δ1-KSTD1). The enzyme contains two domains: an FAD-binding domain and a catalytic domain, between which the active site is situated as evidenced by the 2.3 Å resolution structure of Δ1-KSTD1 in complex with the reaction product 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione. The active site contains four key residues: Tyr119, Tyr318, Tyr487, and Gly491. Modeling of the substrate 4-androstene-3,17-dione at the position of the product revealed its interactions with these residues and the FAD. The C1 and C2 atoms of the substrate are at reaction distance to the N5 atom of the isoalloxazine ring of FAD and the hydroxyl group of Tyr318, respectively, whereas the C3 carbonyl group is at hydrogen bonding distance from the hydroxyl group of Tyr487 and the backbone amide of Gly491. Site-directed mutagenesis of the tyrosines to phenylalanines confirmed their importance for catalysis. The structural features and the kinetic properties of the mutants suggest a catalytic mechanism in which Tyr487 and Gly491 work in tandem to promote keto-enol tautomerization and increase the acidity of the C2 hydrogen atoms of the substrate. With assistance of Tyr119, the general base Tyr318 abstracts the axial β-hydrogen from C2 as a proton, whereas the FAD accepts the axial α-hydrogen from the C1 atom of the substrate as a hydride ion. PMID:24165124

  10. Spheroplast formation and plasmid isolation from Rhodococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Assaf, N A; Dick, W A

    1993-12-01

    The genus Rhodococcus comprises aerobic gram-positive actinomycetes that show considerable morphological and metabolic diversity and are known to be involved in the development of plant diseases and degradation of environmental pollutants. We describe a method for cell lysis and large plasmid DNA isolation from Rhodococcus by creating lysozyme susceptible cells by predigestion with the enzyme mutanolysin. Mutanolysin action resulted in the liberation of reducing sugars and free amino acids from the peptidoglycan layers of the cell wall. A 1-h predigestion with mutanolysin followed by a 0.5-h incubation with lysozyme resulted in spheroplast formation. Complete lysis of cells and efficient isolation of intact large plasmid DNA (108 kb) from wild-type Rhodococcus strains was confirmed.

  11. Rhodococcus aerolatus sp. nov., isolated from subarctic rainwater.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C Y; Lee, I; Cho, Y; Lee, Y M; Baek, K; Jung, Y-J; Yang, Y Y; Lee, T; Rhee, T S; Lee, H K

    2015-02-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped and non-motile strain, designated PAMC 27367(T), was isolated from rainwater collected on the Bering Sea. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the strain showed an affiliation with the genus Rhodococcus. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain PAMC 27367(T) formed a robust clade with the type strains of Rhodococcus rhodnii, Rhodococcus aetherivorans and Rhodococcus ruber with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 96.3 %, 95.8 % and 95.5 %, respectively. Cells of the strain grew optimally at 25 °C and at pH 6.5-7.0 in the presence of 0-2 % (w/v) sea salts. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside and three unknown phospholipids. The major cellular fatty acids (>10 %) were iso-C16 : 0, C17 : 1ω8c and 10-methyl C17 : 0. Cell wall analysis showed that strain PAMC 27367(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The genomic DNA G+C content was 77.1 mol%. Based on the phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data presented here, we propose a novel species with the name Rhodococcus aerolatus sp. nov., with PAMC 27367(T) ( = KCTC 29240(T) = JCM 19485(T)) as the type strain.

  12. Rhodococcus nanhaiensis sp. nov., an actinobacterium isolated from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Zhao, Guo-Zhen; Long, Li-Juan; Wang, Fa-Zuo; Tian, Xin-Peng; Zhang, Si; Li, Wen-Jun

    2012-10-01

    In this study, two strains (SCSIO 10187(T) and SCSIO 10197) were isolated from a sediment sample collected from the South China Sea and characterized by using a polyphasic approach. Growth was observed at 15-35 °C (optimum 28 °C) and pH 5.0-8.0 (optimum pH 6.0). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the strains were identified as members of the genus Rhodococcus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the two strains clustered together and the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between them and other members of the genus Rhodococcus were 93.2-97.7 %. The menaquinone type was MK-8(H(2)). Major cellular fatty acids were C(16 : 0), C(18 : 1)ω9c, C(17 : 0), 10-methyl C(18 : 0), C(18 : 0), C(19 : 0) and C(17 : 1)ω8c. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannoside. The DNA G+C contents of strains SCSIO 10187(T) and SCSIO 10197 were 63.7 and 63.2 mol%, respectively. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data showed that the two strains represent a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus, for which the name Rhodococcus nanhaiensis is proposed; the type strain is SCSIO 10187(T) ( = DSM 45608(T) = CCTCC AB 2011024(T)), with SCSIO 10197 ( = DSM 45609 = CCTCC AB 2011025) as a reference strain.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of a Rhodococcus Species Isolated from the Winter Skate Leucoraja ocellata

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Julia; Ho, Ryan; Fernando, Dinesh; Kumar, Ayush; Loewen, Peter C.; Anderson, W. Gary

    2016-01-01

    We report here a genome sequence for Rhodococcus sp. isolate UM008 isolated from the renal/interrenal tissue of the winter skate Leucoraja ocellata. Genome sequence analysis suggests that Rhodococcus bacteria may act in a novel mutualistic relationship with their elasmobranch host, serving as biocatalysts in the steroidogenic pathway of 1α-hydroxycorticosterone. PMID:27587827

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Rhodococcus Species Isolated from the Winter Skate Leucoraja ocellata.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Julia; Ho, Ryan; Fernando, Dinesh; Kumar, Ayush; Loewen, Peter C; Brassinga, Ann Karen C; Anderson, W Gary

    2016-01-01

    We report here a genome sequence for Rhodococcus sp. isolate UM008 isolated from the renal/interrenal tissue of the winter skate Leucoraja ocellata Genome sequence analysis suggests that Rhodococcus bacteria may act in a novel mutualistic relationship with their elasmobranch host, serving as biocatalysts in the steroidogenic pathway of 1α-hydroxycorticosterone. PMID:27587827

  15. Enhanced Translocation and Growth of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 in the Alkane Phase of Aqueous-Alkane Two Phase Cultures Were Mediated by GroEL2 Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Takihara, Hayato; Ogihara, Jun; Yoshida, Takao; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakajima, Mutsuyasu; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sunairi, Michio

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that R. erythropolis PR4 translocated from the aqueous to the alkane phase, and then grew in two phase cultures to which long-chain alkanes had been added. This was considered to be beneficial for bioremediation. In the present study, we investigated the proteins involved in the translocation of R. erythropolis PR4. The results of our proteogenomic analysis suggested that GroEL2 was upregulated more in cells that translocated inside of the pristane (C19) phase than in those located at the aqueous-alkane interface attached to the n-dodecane (C12) surface. PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) and PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) strains were constructed to confirm the effects of the upregulation of GroEL2 in translocated cells. The expression of GroEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) was 15.5-fold higher than that in PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) in two phase cultures containing C12. The growth and cell surface lipophilicity of PR4 were enhanced by the introduction of pK4-EL2-1. These results suggested that the plasmid overexpression of groEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) led to changes in cell localization, enhanced growth, and increased cell surface lipophilicity. Thus, we concluded that the overexpression of GroEL2 may play an important role in increasing the organic solvent tolerance of R. erythropolis PR4 in aqueous-alkane two phase cultures. PMID:25311591

  16. Can whole genome analysis refine the taxonomy of the genus Rhodococcus?

    PubMed

    Gürtler, Volker; Mayall, Barrie C; Seviour, Robert

    2004-06-01

    The current systematics of the genus Rhodococcus is unclear, partly because many members were originally included before the application of a polyphasic taxonomic approach, central to which is the acquisition of 16S rRNA sequence data. This has resulted in the reclassification and description of many new species. Hence, the literature is replete with new species names that have not been brought together in an organized and easily interpreted form. This taxonomic confusion has been compounded by assigning many xenobiotic degrading isolates with phylogenetic positions but without formal taxonomic descriptions. In order to provide a framework for a taxonomic approach based on multiple genetic loci, a survey was undertaken of the known genome characteristics of members of the genus Rhodococcus including: (i) genetics of cell envelope biosynthesis; (ii) virulence genes; (iii) gene clusters involved in metabolic degradation and industrially relevant pathways; (iv) genetic analysis tools; (v) rapid identification of bacteria including rhodococci with specific gene RFLPs; (vi) genomic organization of rrn operons. Genes encoding virulence factors have been characterized for Rhodococcus equi and Rhodococcus fascians. Based on peptide signature comparisons deduced from gene sequences for cytochrome P-450, mono- and dioxygenases, alkane degradation, nitrile metabolism, proteasomes and desulfurization, phylogenetic relationships can be deduced for Rhodococcus erythropolis, Rhodococcus globerulus, Rhodococcus ruber and a number of undesignated Rhodococcus spp. that may distinguish the genus Rhodococcus into two further genera. The linear genome topologies that exist in some Rhodococcus species may alter a previously proposed model for the analysis of genomic fingerprinting techniques used in bacterial systematics.

  17. Complete Genome and Plasmid Sequences for Rhodococcus fascians D188 and Draft Sequences for Rhodococcus Isolates PBTS 1 and PBTS 2

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, Rio A.; Vereecke, Danny; Zhang, Yucheng; Schilkey, Faye; Devitt, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus fascians, a phytopathogen that alters plant development, inflicts significant losses in plant production around the world. We report here the complete genome sequence of R. fascians D188, a well-characterized model isolate, and Rhodococcus species PBTS (pistachio bushy top syndrome) 1 and 2, which were shown to be responsible for a disease outbreak in pistachios. PMID:27284129

  18. Complete Genome and Plasmid Sequences for Rhodococcus fascians D188 and Draft Sequences for Rhodococcus Isolates PBTS 1 and PBTS 2.

    PubMed

    Stamler, Rio A; Vereecke, Danny; Zhang, Yucheng; Schilkey, Faye; Devitt, Nico; Randall, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus fascians, a phytopathogen that alters plant development, inflicts significant losses in plant production around the world. We report here the complete genome sequence of R. fascians D188, a well-characterized model isolate, and Rhodococcus species PBTS (pistachio bushy top syndrome) 1 and 2, which were shown to be responsible for a disease outbreak in pistachios. PMID:27284129

  19. Draft Genome of Rhodococcus rhodochrous TRN7, Isolated from the Coast of Trindade Island, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Edmo M; Pylro, Victor S; Dobbler, Priscila T; Victoria, Filipe; Roesch, Luiz F W; Tótola, Marcos R

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a draft genome and annotation of Rhodococcus rhodochrous TRN7, isolated from Trindade Island, Brazil, which will provide genetic data to benefit the understanding of its metabolism. PMID:26941155

  20. Draft Genome of Rhodococcus rhodochrous TRN7, Isolated from the Coast of Trindade Island, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Edmo M.; Pylro, Victor S.; Dobbler, Priscila T.; Victoria, Filipe

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a draft genome and annotation of Rhodococcus rhodochrous TRN7, isolated from Trindade Island, Brazil, which will provide genetic data to benefit the understanding of its metabolism. PMID:26941155

  1. Mg2+-Dependent Control of the Spatial Arrangement of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 Cells in Aqueous-Alkane Two Phase Culture Containing n-Dodecane

    PubMed Central

    Takihara, Hayato; Akase, Yumiko; Sunairi, Michio; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that a close relationship exists between alkane carbon-chain length, cell growth, and translocation frequency in Rhodococcus. In the present study, we examined the regulation of the spatial arrangement of cells in aqueous-alkane two phase cultures. An analysis of the effects of minerals on cell localization revealed that changes in the concentration of MgSO4 in two phase cultures containing n-dodecane (C12) altered cell localization from translocation to adhesion and vice versa. Our results indicate that the spatial arrangement of cells in two phase culture systems is controlled through the regulation of MgSO4 concentrations. PMID:27180641

  2. Rhodococcus soli sp. nov., an actinobacterium isolated from soil using a resuscitative technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan-Hui; Yu, Xiao-Yun; Park, Dong-Jin; Hozzein, Wael N; Kim, Chang-Jin; Shu, Wen-Sheng; Wadaan, Mohammed A M; Ding, Lin-Xian; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-02-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile, non-spore forming strain, designated DSD51W(T), was isolated using a resuscitative technique from a soil sample collected from Kyoto park, Japan, and characterized by using a polyphasic approach. The morphological and chemotaxonomic properties of the isolate were typical of those of members of the genus Rhodococcus. Strain DSD51W(T) was found to form a coherent cluster with Rhodococcus hoagii ATCC 7005(T), Rhodococcus equi NBRC 101255(T), Rhodococcus defluvii Call(T) and Rhodococcus kunmingensis YIM 45607(T) as its closest phylogenetic neighbours in 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. However, the DNA-DNA hybridization values with the above strains were 58.2 ± 2.2, 58.4 ± 1.9, 45.1 ± 1.4 and 40.3 ± 4.7 %, respectively. In combination with differences in physiological and biochemical properties, strain DSD51W(T) can be concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus, for which the name Rhodococcus soli sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain DSD51W(T) (=KCTC 29259(T) = JCM 19627(T) = DSM 46662(T) = KACC 17838(T)).

  3. A novel enzyme, 2'-hydroxybiphenyl-2-sulfinate desulfinase (DszB), from a dibenzothiophene-desulfurizing bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1: gene overexpression and enzyme characterization.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Norikazu; Matsubara, Toshiyuki; Ohshiro, Takashi; Moroto, Yuko; Kawata, Yasushi; Koizumi, Kenichi; Hirakawa, Yasuto; Suzuki, Masanori; Maruhashi, Kenji; Izumi, Yoshikazu; Kurane, Ryuichiro

    2002-07-29

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model of organic sulfur compound in petroleum, is microbially desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP), and the gene operon dszABC was required for DBT desulfurization. The final step in the microbial DBT desulfurization is the conversion of 2'-hydroxybiphenyl-2-sulfinate (HBPSi) to 2-HBP catalyzed by DszB. In this study, DszB of a DBT-desulfurizing bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli by coexpression with chaperonin genes, groEL/groES, at 25 degrees C. The recombinant DszB was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The optimal temperature and pH for DszB activity were 35 degrees C and about 7.5, respectively. The K(m) and k(cat) values for HBPSi were 8.2 microM and 0.123.s(-1), respectively. DszB has only one cysteine residue, and the mutant enzyme completely lost the activity when the cysteine residue was changed to a serine residue. This result together with experiments using inhibitors showed that the cysteine residue contributes to the enzyme activity. DszB was also inhibited by a reaction product, 2-HBP (K(i)=0.25 mM), and its derivatives, but not by the other reaction product, sulfite. The enzyme showed a narrow substrate specificity: only 2-phenylbenzene sulfinate except HBPSi served as a substrate among the aromatic and aliphatic sulfinates or sulfonates tested. DszB was thought to be a novel enzyme (HBPSi desulfinase) in that it could specifically cleave the carbon-sulfur bond of HBPSi to give 2-HBP and sulfite ion without the aid of any other proteinic components and coenzymes.

  4. Rhodococcus baikonurensis BTM4c, a boron-tolerant actinobacterial strain isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Miwa, Hiroki; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Yokota, Akira; Fujiwara, Toru

    2010-01-01

    By screening a bacterial population from the soil in Tokyo, Japan, we isolated a boron-tolerant bacterium, strain BTM4c. Strain BTM4c grew under the boron excess conditions with 100 mM boric acid, which is generally toxic to bacteria. Molecular phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic, and physiological data showed that the strain belongs to the genus Rhodococcus, and is to be identified as Rhodococcus baikonurensis. PMID:20057133

  5. Rhodococcus agglutinans sp. nov., an actinobacterium isolated from a soil sample.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qian-Qian; Ming, Hong; Meng, Xiao-Ling; Duan, Yan-Yan; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Huang, Jian-Rong; Li, Wen-Jun; Nie, Guo-Xing

    2015-05-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile and non-spore forming strain, designated CFH S0262(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from Catba island in Halong Bay, Vietnam. A polyphasic approach was used to study the taxonomic position of this new isolate. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain CFH S0262(T) belongs to the genus Rhodococcus and clustered with Rhodococcus soli DSD51W(T), Rhodococcus hoagii NBRC 103062(T), Rhodococcus defluvii Call(T) and Rhodococcus kunmingensis YIM 45607(T) (98.7, 98.5, 97.9 and 97.6% similarities, respectively). Strain CFH S0262(T) could grow in the presence of NaCl (0-4%, optimum 0-3%), at pH 6.0-8.0 (optimum, pH 7.0) and at 10-40 °C (optimum, 28 °C). The predominant menaquinones of strain CFH S0262(T) were identified as MK-8 (H2) and MK-8 (H4). The major fatty acids (≥10%) were found to be C(16:0) and C(18:1)ω9c. The polar lipids detected were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside, a glycolipid and two unidentified phospholipids. The DNA G+C content was determined to be 71.4 mol%. Based on a comparative analysis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, in combination with low values of DNA-DNA hybridization between strain CFH S0262(T) and its closest neighbours, it is proposed that strain CFH S0262(T) represents a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus, for which the name Rhodococcus agglutinans sp. nov., is proposed, with the type strain CFH S0262(T) (=CCTCC AB2014297(T)=KCTC 39118(T)).

  6. Comparison of three techniques for isolation of Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi from contaminated sources.

    PubMed

    Barton, M D; Hughes, K L

    1981-01-01

    Inoculation of a liquid medium comprised of Trypticase soy broth (BBL Microbiology Systems), cycloheximide, nalidixic acid, penicillin, and potassium tellurite and subcultured onto M3 medium plus potassium tellurite was highly successful for the isolation of Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi from soil. PMID:7007424

  7. Isolation and characterization of RDX-degrading Rhodococcus species from a contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Anat; Adar, Eilon; Nejidat, Ali; Ronen, Zeev

    2011-09-01

    Groundwater contamination by the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a global problem. Israel's coastal aquifer was contaminated with RDX. This aquifer is mostly aerobic and we therefore sought aerobic bacteria that might be involved in natural attenuation of the compound in the aquifer. RDX-degrading bacteria were captured by passively sampling the indigenous bacteria onto sterile sediments placed within sampling boreholes. Aerobic RDX biodegradation potential was detected in the sediments sampled from different locations along the plume. RDX degradation with the native sampled consortium was accompanied by 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal formation. Two bacterial strains of the genus Rhodococcus were isolated from the sediments and identified as aerobic RDX degraders. The xplA gene encoding the cytochrome P450 enzyme was partially (~500 bp) sequenced from both isolates. The obtained DNA sequences had 99% identity with corresponding gene fragments of previously isolated RDX-degrading Rhodococcus strains. RDX degradation by both strains was prevented by 200 μM of the cytochrome P450 inhibitor metyrapone, suggesting that cytochrome P450 indeed mediates the initial step in RDX degradation. RDX biodegradation activity by the T7 isolate was inhibited in the presence of nitrate or ammonium concentrations above 1.6 and 5.5 mM, respectively (100 mg l(-1)) while the T9N isolate's activity was retarded only by ammonium concentrations above 5.5 mM. This study shows that bacteria from the genus Rhodococcus, potentially degrade RDX in the saturated zone as well, following the same aerobic degradation pathway defined for other Rhodococcus species. RDX-degrading activity by the Rhodococcus species isolate T9N may have important implications for the bioremediation of nitrate-rich RDX-contaminated aquifers.

  8. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Niewerth, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:25239889

  9. Draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain ATCC 17895

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Otten, Linda G.; Resch, Verena; Muyzer, Gerard; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC 17895 possesses an array of mono- and dioxygenases, as well as hydratases, which makes it an interesting organism for biocatalysis. R. rhodochrous is a Gram-positive aerobic bacterium with a rod-like morphology. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 6,869,887 bp long genome contains 6,609 protein-coding genes and 53 RNA genes. Based on small subunit rRNA analysis, the strain is more likely to be a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis rather than Rhodococcus rhodochrous. PMID:24501654

  10. Plasmid Profiles of Virulent Rhodococcus equi Strains Isolated from Infected Foals in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Marcin; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Jarosz, Łukasz; Kato, Kiyoko; Hieda, Yu; Kakuda, Tsutomu; Takai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important bacterial pathogen in foals up to 6 months old, widespread in horse farms all over the world. It was found that only virulent R. equi strains expressing 15-17 kDa virulence-associated protein (VapA) and having large virulence plasmid of 85-90 kb containing vapA gene are pathogenic for horses. To date, 12 plasmid types have been reported in VapA positive strains from horses. There are no data concerning plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains isolated from horses and horse farm environment. The aim of the study is to determine plasmid profiles of virulent R. equi strains isolated in Poland from dead foals as well as from soil samples taken from horse breeding farms. Plasmid profiles of 10 clinical strains derived from 8 farms and 11 environmental strains from 3 farms, confirmed as virulent by PCR, were compared with 12 reference strains containing the known plasmid size and type. Plasmid DNAs were analysed by digestion with the restriction endonucleases BamHI, EcoRI, EcoT22I, and HindIII for detailed comparison and estimation of plasmid sizes. The results of RFLP analysis revealed that all except one isolates used in the study are classified as VapA 85 kb type I plasmid. One strain harboured VapA 87 kb type I plasmid. This is the first report of plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains. The results of our preliminary investigations on horse farms located in central and eastern Poland indicate that the virulent R. equi strains thus far isolated from diseased foals and horse farms environment represent a highly uniform plasmid pattern. PMID:27074033

  11. Plasmid Profiles of Virulent Rhodococcus equi Strains Isolated from Infected Foals in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowski, Marcin; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Jarosz, Łukasz; Kato, Kiyoko; Hieda, Yu; Kakuda, Tsutomu; Takai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important bacterial pathogen in foals up to 6 months old, widespread in horse farms all over the world. It was found that only virulent R. equi strains expressing 15–17 kDa virulence-associated protein (VapA) and having large virulence plasmid of 85–90 kb containing vapA gene are pathogenic for horses. To date, 12 plasmid types have been reported in VapA positive strains from horses. There are no data concerning plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains isolated from horses and horse farm environment. The aim of the study is to determine plasmid profiles of virulent R. equi strains isolated in Poland from dead foals as well as from soil samples taken from horse breeding farms. Plasmid profiles of 10 clinical strains derived from 8 farms and 11 environmental strains from 3 farms, confirmed as virulent by PCR, were compared with 12 reference strains containing the known plasmid size and type. Plasmid DNAs were analysed by digestion with the restriction endonucleases BamHI, EcoRI, EcoT22I, and HindIII for detailed comparison and estimation of plasmid sizes. The results of RFLP analysis revealed that all except one isolates used in the study are classified as VapA 85 kb type I plasmid. One strain harboured VapA 87 kb type I plasmid. This is the first report of plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains. The results of our preliminary investigations on horse farms located in central and eastern Poland indicate that the virulent R. equi strains thus far isolated from diseased foals and horse farms environment represent a highly uniform plasmid pattern. PMID:27074033

  12. Analysis and optimization of triacylglycerol synthesis in novel oleaginous Rhodococcus and Streptomyces strains isolated from desert soil.

    PubMed

    Röttig, Annika; Hauschild, Philippa; Madkour, Mohamed H; Al-Ansari, Ahmed M; Almakishah, Naief H; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-05-10

    As oleaginous microorganisms represent an upcoming novel feedstock for the biotechnological production of lipids or lipid-derived biofuels, we searched for novel, lipid-producing strains in desert soil. This was encouraged by the hypothesis that neutral lipids represent an ideal storage compound, especially under arid conditions, as several animals are known to outlast long periods in absence of drinking water by metabolizing their body fat. Ten lipid-accumulating bacterial strains, affiliated to the genera Bacillus, Cupriavidus, Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces, were isolated from arid desert soil due to their ability to synthesize poly(β-hydroxybutyrate), triacylglycerols or wax esters. Particularly two Streptomyces sp. strains and one Rhodococcus sp. strain accumulate significant amounts of TAG under storage conditions under optimized cultivation conditions. Rhodococcus sp. A27 and Streptomyces sp. G49 synthesized approx. 30% (w/w) fatty acids from fructose or cellobiose, respectively, while Streptomyces isolate G25 reached a cellular fatty acid content of nearly 50% (w/w) when cultivated with cellobiose. The stored triacylglycerols were composed of 30-40% branched fatty acids, such as anteiso-pentadecanoic or iso-hexadecanoic acid. To date, this represents by far the highest lipid content described for streptomycetes. A biotechnological production of such lipids using (hemi)cellulose-derived raw material could be used to obtain sustainable biodiesel with a high proportion of branched-chain fatty acids to improve its cold-flow properties and oxidative stability. PMID:27034020

  13. Analysis and optimization of triacylglycerol synthesis in novel oleaginous Rhodococcus and Streptomyces strains isolated from desert soil.

    PubMed

    Röttig, Annika; Hauschild, Philippa; Madkour, Mohamed H; Al-Ansari, Ahmed M; Almakishah, Naief H; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-05-10

    As oleaginous microorganisms represent an upcoming novel feedstock for the biotechnological production of lipids or lipid-derived biofuels, we searched for novel, lipid-producing strains in desert soil. This was encouraged by the hypothesis that neutral lipids represent an ideal storage compound, especially under arid conditions, as several animals are known to outlast long periods in absence of drinking water by metabolizing their body fat. Ten lipid-accumulating bacterial strains, affiliated to the genera Bacillus, Cupriavidus, Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces, were isolated from arid desert soil due to their ability to synthesize poly(β-hydroxybutyrate), triacylglycerols or wax esters. Particularly two Streptomyces sp. strains and one Rhodococcus sp. strain accumulate significant amounts of TAG under storage conditions under optimized cultivation conditions. Rhodococcus sp. A27 and Streptomyces sp. G49 synthesized approx. 30% (w/w) fatty acids from fructose or cellobiose, respectively, while Streptomyces isolate G25 reached a cellular fatty acid content of nearly 50% (w/w) when cultivated with cellobiose. The stored triacylglycerols were composed of 30-40% branched fatty acids, such as anteiso-pentadecanoic or iso-hexadecanoic acid. To date, this represents by far the highest lipid content described for streptomycetes. A biotechnological production of such lipids using (hemi)cellulose-derived raw material could be used to obtain sustainable biodiesel with a high proportion of branched-chain fatty acids to improve its cold-flow properties and oxidative stability.

  14. Biodegradation of buprofezin by Rhodococcus sp. strain YL-1 isolated from rice field soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Ji; Wu, Zhi-Guo; Cao, Li; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-03-14

    A buprofezin-degrading bacterium, YL-1, was isolated from rice field soil. YL-1 was identified as Rhodococcus sp. on the basis of the comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. The strain could use buprofezin as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen for growth and was able to degrade 92.4% of 50 mg L(-1) buprofezin within 48 h in liquid culture. During the degradation of buprofezin, four possible metabolites, 2-tert-butylimino-3-isopropyl-1,3,5-thiadiazinan-4-one, N-tert-butyl-thioformimidic acid formylaminomethyl ester, 2-isothiocyanato-2-methyl-propane, and 2-isothiocyanato-propane, were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was strongly induced during the degradation of buprofezin. A novel microbial biodegradation pathway for buprofezin was proposed on the basis of these metabolites. The inoculation of soils treated with buprofezin with strain YL-1 resulted in a higher degradation rate than that observed in noninoculated soils, indicating that strain YL-1 has the potential to be used in the bioremediation of buprofezin-contaminated environments.

  15. Evaluation of the Conformational Stability of Recombinant Desulfurizing Enzymes from a Newly Isolated Rhodococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, Federica; Brocca, Stefania; Lotti, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways of aerobic bacteria able to assimilate sulfur can provide biocatalysts for biodesulfurization of petroleum and of other sulfur-containing pollutants. Of major interest is the so-called "4S pathway," in that C-S bonds are specifically cleaved leaving the carbon skeleton of substrates intact. This pathway is carried out by four enzymes, named Dsz A, B, C, and D. In view of a possible application of recombinant Dsz enzymes in biodesulfurization treatments, we have investigated the structural features of enzymes cloned from a Rhodococcus strain isolated from polluted environmental samples and their resistance to temperature (20-95 °C) and to organic solvents (5, 10, and 20 % v/v methanol, acetonitrile, hexane, and toluene). Changes in protein structures were assessed by circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that all Dsz proteins are unfolded by temperatures in the range 45-60 °C and by all solvents tested, with the most dramatic effect being produced by toluene. These results suggest that stabilization of the biocatalysts by protein engineering will be necessary for developing biodesulfurization technologies based on Dsz enzymes.

  16. Isolation and characterization of aniline-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain AN5.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Rensheng; Zhong, Wenhui; Yao, Jun; Chen, Huilun; Tian, Lin; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Fei; Bramanti, Emilia; Zaray, Gyula

    2007-11-01

    A pure culture using aniline as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated by selective enrichment culturing on a minimum salt medium (MSM) from the Nanjing Chemical Plant, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China. An analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and morphological and physiological characteristics showed that this strain was a member of the genus Rhodococcus, and it was designated as strain AN5. Its optimal conditions for aniline biodegradation were 30 degrees C (pH 7.0). Due to the water insolubility of aniline, growth of strain AN5 at various aniline concentrations was studied via spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry in different culture mediums. Strain AN5 not only utilized aniline as its sole carbon and energy resources, but also degraded phenol, benzoic acid and naphthalin. Glucose, peptone and ammonium sulfate, when utilized as its secondary carbon and nitrogen sources, had no active effect on the aniline biodegradation. Such findings would be valuable in the application of strain AN5 to depurate industrial waste water. PMID:17990163

  17. Cold adaptive traits revealed by comparative genomic analysis of the eurypsychrophile Rhodococcus sp. JG3 isolated from high elevation McMurdo Dry Valley permafrost, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Goordial, Jacqueline; Raymond-Bouchard, Isabelle; Zolotarov, Yevgen; de Bethencourt, Luis; Ronholm, Jennifer; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Stromvik, Martina; Greer, Charles W; Bakermans, Corien; Whyte, Lyle

    2016-02-01

    The permafrost soils of the high elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys are the most cold, desiccating and oligotrophic on Earth. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is one of very few bacterial isolates from Antarctic Dry Valley permafrost, and displays subzero growth down to -5°C. To understand how Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is able to survive extreme permafrost conditions and be metabolically active at subzero temperatures, we sequenced its genome and compared it to the genomes of 14 mesophilic rhodococci. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possessed a higher copy number of genes for general stress response, UV protection and protection from cold shock, osmotic stress and oxidative stress. We characterized genome wide molecular adaptations to cold, and identified genes that had amino acid compositions favourable for increased flexibility and functionality at low temperatures. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possesses multiple complimentary strategies which may enable its survival in some of the harshest permafrost on Earth.

  18. Cold adaptive traits revealed by comparative genomic analysis of the eurypsychrophile Rhodococcus sp. JG3 isolated from high elevation McMurdo Dry Valley permafrost, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Goordial, Jacqueline; Raymond-Bouchard, Isabelle; Zolotarov, Yevgen; de Bethencourt, Luis; Ronholm, Jennifer; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Stromvik, Martina; Greer, Charles W; Bakermans, Corien; Whyte, Lyle

    2016-02-01

    The permafrost soils of the high elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys are the most cold, desiccating and oligotrophic on Earth. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is one of very few bacterial isolates from Antarctic Dry Valley permafrost, and displays subzero growth down to -5°C. To understand how Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is able to survive extreme permafrost conditions and be metabolically active at subzero temperatures, we sequenced its genome and compared it to the genomes of 14 mesophilic rhodococci. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possessed a higher copy number of genes for general stress response, UV protection and protection from cold shock, osmotic stress and oxidative stress. We characterized genome wide molecular adaptations to cold, and identified genes that had amino acid compositions favourable for increased flexibility and functionality at low temperatures. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possesses multiple complimentary strategies which may enable its survival in some of the harshest permafrost on Earth. PMID:26637477

  19. Gene Cloning and Nucleotide Sequencing and Properties of a Cocaine Esterase from Rhodococcus sp. Strain MB1

    PubMed Central

    Bresler, Matthew M.; Rosser, Susan J.; Basran, Amrik; Bruce, Neil C.

    2000-01-01

    A strain of Rhodococcus designated MB1, which was capable of utilizing cocaine as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen for growth, was isolated from rhizosphere soil of the tropane alkaloid-producing plant Erythroxylum coca. A cocaine esterase was found to initiate degradation of cocaine, which was hydrolyzed to ecgonine methyl ester and benzoate; both of these esterolytic products were further metabolized by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB1. The structural gene encoding a cocaine esterase, designated cocE, was cloned from Rhodococcus sp. strain MB1 genomic libraries by screening recombinant strains of Rhodococcus erythropolis CW25 for growth on cocaine. The nucleotide sequence of cocE corresponded to an open reading frame of 1,724 bp that codes for a protein of 574 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of cocaine esterase has a region of similarity with the active serine consensus of X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidases, suggesting that the cocaine esterase is a serine esterase. The cocE coding sequence was subcloned into the pCFX1 expression plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant cocaine esterase was purified to apparent homogeneity and was found to be monomeric, with an Mr of approximately 65,000. The apparent Km of the enzyme (mean ± standard deviation) for cocaine was measured as 1.33 ± 0.085 mM. These findings are of potential use in the development of a linked assay for the detection of illicit cocaine. PMID:10698749

  20. Identification of Atypical Rhodococcus-Like Clinical Isolates as Dietzia spp. by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing▿

    PubMed Central

    Pilares, Lilian; Agüero, Jesús; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navas, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi and Dietzia spp. are closely related actinomycetes that show similar phenotypic properties. In humans, R. equi is an opportunistic pathogen associated with severe immunodeficiency. Dietzia spp. are environmental bacteria that have been isolated recently from clinical material and are presumptively associated with human infections. During the last 5 years, 15 bacterial isolates from human clinical samples collected at the Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain, were identified as R. equi by the API Coryne test. 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed seven isolates to be true R. equi strains, whereas the other eight were identified as members of the genus Dietzia, including Dietzia maris (four isolates), Dietzia natronolimnaea (two isolates), and Dietzia timorensis and Dietzia sp. (one isolate each). The eight Dietzia isolates were highly sensitive to 12 antimicrobial compounds. PMID:20220156

  1. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 and the involvement of an alkane hydroxylase system in the metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus R7 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soil for its versatile metabolism; indeed the strain is able to grow on naphthalene, o-xylene, and several long- and medium-chain n-alkanes. In this work we determined the degradation of n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 in presence of n-dodecane (C12), n-hexadecane (C16), n-eicosane (C20), n-tetracosane (C24) and the metabolic pathway in presence of C12. The consumption rate of C12 was 88%, of C16 was 69%, of C20 was 51% and of C24 it was 78%. The decrement of the degradation rate seems to be correlated to the length of the aliphatic chain of these hydrocarbons. On the basis of the metabolic intermediates determined by the R7 growth on C12, our data indicated that R. opacus R7 metabolizes medium-chain n-alkanes by the primary alcohol formation. This represents a difference in comparison with other Rhodococcus strains, in which a mixture of the two alcohols was observed. By GC-MSD analysis we also identified the monocarboxylic acid, confirming the terminal oxidation. Moreover, the alkB gene cluster from R. opacus R7 was isolated and its involvement in the n-alkane degradation system was investigated by the cloning of this genomic region into a shuttle-vector E. coli-Rhodococcus to evaluate the alkane hydroxylase activity. Our results showed an increased biodegradation of C12 in the recombinant strain R. erythropolis AP (pTipQT1-alkR7) in comparison with the wild type strain R. erythropolis AP. These data supported the involvement of the alkB gene cluster in the n-alkane degradation in the R7 strain. PMID:25401074

  2. Isolation of Rhodococcus sp. Strain ECU0066, a New Sulfide Monooxygenase-Producing Strain for Asymmetric Sulfoxidation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ai-Tao; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Xu, Jian-He; Lu, Wen-Ya; Lin, Guo-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    A new and efficient sulfide monooxygenase-producing strain, ECU0066, was isolated and identified as a Rhodococcus sp. that could transform phenylmethyl sulfide (PMS) to (S)-sulfoxide with 99% enantiomeric excess via two steps of enantioselective oxidations. Its enzyme activity could be effectively induced by adding PMS or phenylmethyl sulfoxide (PMSO) directly to a rich medium at the early log phase (6 h) of fermentation, resulting in over 10-times-higher production of the enzyme. This bacterial strain also displayed fairly good activity and enantioselectivity toward seven other sulfides, indicating a good potential for practical application in asymmetric synthesis of chiral sulfoxides. PMID:18836022

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous Strain KG-21, a Soil Isolate from Oil Fields of Krishna-Godavari Basin, India

    PubMed Central

    Dawar, Chhavi

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the 6.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain KG-21, a soil isolate from the oil fields of Krishna-Godavari Basin in Andhra Pradesh, India. This genomic resource may help in the identification of the gene(s) involved in hydrocarbon degradation and their possible deployment for bioremediation. PMID:26472842

  4. Isolation and characterization of styrene metabolism genes from styrene-assimilating soil bacteria Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroshi; Itoh, Nobuya

    2012-01-01

    Styrene metabolism genes were isolated from styrene-assimilating bacteria Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10. Strain ST-5 had a gene cluster containing four open reading frames which encoded styrene degradation enzymes. The genes showed high similarity to styABCD of Pseudomonas sp. Y2. On the other hand, strain ST-10 had only two genes which encoded styrene monooxygenase and flavin oxidoreductase (styAB). Escherichia coli transformants possessing the sty genes of strains ST-5 and ST-10 produced (S)-styrene oxide from styrene, indicating that these genes function as styrene degradation enzymes. Metabolite analysis by resting-cell reaction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that strain ST-5 converts styrene to phenylacetaldehyde via styrene oxide by styrene oxide isomerase (styC) reaction. On the other hand, strain ST-10 lacked this enzyme, and thus accumulated styrene oxide as an intermediate. HPLC analysis showed that styrene oxide was spontaneously isomerized to phenylacetaldehyde by chemical reaction. The produced phenylacetaldehyde was converted to phenylacetic acid (PAA) in strain ST-10 as well as in strain ST-5. Furthermore, phenylacetic acid was converted to phenylacetyl-CoA by the catalysis of phenylacetate-CoA ligase in strains ST-5 and ST-10. This study proposes possible styrene metabolism pathways in Rhodococcus sp. strains ST-5 and ST-10. PMID:21996027

  5. An Invertron-Like Linear Plasmid Mediates Intracellular Survival and Virulence in Bovine Isolates of Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Valero-Rello, Ana; Hapeshi, Alexia; Anastasi, Elisa; Alvarez, Sonsiray; Scortti, Mariela; Meijer, Wim G.; MacArthur, Iain

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel host-associated virulence plasmid in Rhodococcus equi, pVAPN, carried by bovine isolates of this facultative intracellular pathogenic actinomycete. Surprisingly, pVAPN is a 120-kb invertron-like linear replicon unrelated to the circular virulence plasmids associated with equine (pVAPA) and porcine (pVAPB variant) R. equi isolates. pVAPN is similar to the linear plasmid pNSL1 from Rhodococcus sp. NS1 and harbors six new vap multigene family members (vapN to vapS) in a vap pathogenicity locus presumably acquired via en bloc mobilization from a direct predecessor of equine pVAPA. Loss of pVAPN rendered R. equi avirulent in macrophages and mice. Mating experiments using an in vivo transconjugant selection strategy demonstrated that pVAPN transfer is sufficient to confer virulence to a plasmid-cured R. equi recipient. Phylogenetic analyses assigned the vap multigene family complement from pVAPN, pVAPA, and pVAPB to seven monophyletic clades, each containing plasmid type-specific allelic variants of a precursor vap gene carried by the nearest vap island ancestor. Deletion of vapN, the predicted “bovine-type” allelic counterpart of vapA, essential for virulence in pVAPA, abrogated pVAPN-mediated intramacrophage proliferation and virulence in mice. Our findings support a model in which R. equi virulence is conferred by host-adapted plasmids. Their central role is mediating intracellular proliferation in macrophages, promoted by a key vap determinant present in the common ancestor of the plasmid-specific vap islands, with host tropism as a secondary trait selected during coevolution with specific animal species. PMID:25895973

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Strain Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10, a Potential Biodegrading and Antibacterial Bacterium Isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chi Eun; Jo, Sung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The organism showed mild antibacterial activity against the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This study reports the genome sequence of R. kyotonensis KB10. This bacterium contains an ectoine biosynthesis gene cluster and has the potential to degrade nitroaromatic compounds. The identified bacterium may be a suitable biocontrol agent and degrader of environmental pollutants. PMID:27389269

  7. ChoG is the main inducible extracellular cholesterol oxidase of Rhodococcus sp. strain CECT3014.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Las Heras, Laura; Mascaraque, Victoria; García Fernández, Esther; Navarro-Llorens, Juana María; Perera, Julián; Drzyzga, Oliver

    2011-07-20

    Cholesterol catabolism has been reported in different bacteria and particularly in several Rhodococcus species, but the genetic of this complex pathway is not yet very well defined. In this work we report the isolation and sequencing of a 9.8 kb DNA fragment of Rhodococcus sp. strain CECT3014, a bacterial strain that we here identify as a Rhodococcus erythropolis strain. In this DNA fragment we found several ORF that are probably involved in steroid catabolism, and choG, a gene encoding a putative cholesterol oxidase whose functional characterization we here report. ChoG protein is a class II cholesterol oxidase with all the structural features of the enzymes of this group. The disruption of the choG gene does not alter the ability of strain CECT3014 cells to grow on cholesterol, but it abolishes the production of extracellular cholesterol oxidase. This later effect is reverted when the mutant cells are transformed with a plasmid expressing choG. We conclude that choG is the gene responsible for the inducible extracellular cholesterol oxidase activity of strain CECT3014. This activity distributes between the cellular membrane and the culture supernatant in a way that suggests it is produced by the same ChoG protein that occurs in two different locations. RT-PCR transcript analysis showed a dual scheme of choG expression: a low constitutive independent transcription, plus a cholesterol induced transcription of choG into a polycistronic kstD-hsd4B-choG mRNA. PMID:20630728

  8. Isolation, characterization of Rhodococcus sp. P14 capable of degrading high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaohui; Xu, Yan; Li, Gangmin; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Tongwang; Hu, Zhong

    2011-10-01

    Rhodococcus sp. P14 was isolated from crude oil-contaminated sediments. This strain was capable of utilizing three to five rings polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including phenanthrene (Phe), pyrene (Pyr), and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) as a sole carbon and energy source. After cultivated with 50mg/L of each PAH, strain P14 removed 43% Phe, 34% Pyr and 30% BaP in 30 d. Four different hydroxyphenanthrene products derived from Phe by strain P14 (1,2,3,4-hydroxyphenanthrene) were detected using SPME-GC-MS. Strain P14 also was capable of degrading mineral oil with n-alkanes of C17 to C21 carbon chain length. Compared with glucose-grown cells, PAHs-grown cells had decreased contents of shorter-chain length fatty acids (≤ C16:0), increased contents of C18:0, Me-C19:0 and disappeared odd-number carbon chain fatty acids. The contents of unsaturated C19:1, Me-C19:0 increased and C18:0 decreased in mineral oil-grown cells. At the same time, the strain P14 tended to float when cultivated in mineral oil-supplemented liquid medium. The degradation capability of P14 to alkane and PAHs and its floating characteristics will be very helpful for future's application in oil-spill bioremediation. PMID:21871639

  9. Isolation and characterization of a thermotolerant ene reductase from Geobacillus sp. 30 and its heterologous expression in Rhodococcus opacus.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Naoto; Honda, Kohsuke; Wada, Mayumi; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao

    2014-07-01

    Rhodococcus opacus B-4 cells are adhesive to and even dispersible in water-immiscible hydrocarbons owing to their highly lipophilic nature. In this study, we focused on the high operational stability of thermophilic enzymes and applied them to a biocatalytic conversion in an organic reaction medium using R. opacus B-4 as a lipophilic capsule of enzymes to deliver them into the organic medium. A novel thermo- and organic-solvent-tolerant ene reductase, which can catalyze the enantioselective reduction of ketoisophorone to (6R)-levodione, was isolated from Geobacillus sp. 30, and the gene encoding the enzyme was heterologously expressed in R. opacus B-4. Another thermophilic enzyme which catalyzes NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol was identified from the gene-expression library of Thermus thermophilus and the gene was coexpressed in R. opacus B-4 for cofactor regeneration. While the recombinant cells were not viable in the mixture due to high reaction temperature, 634 mM of (6R)-levodione could be produced with an enantiopurity of 89.2 % ee by directly mixing the wet cells of the recombinant R. opacus with a mixture of ketoisophorone and cyclohexanol at 50 °C. The conversion rate observed with the heat-killed recombinant cells was considerably higher than that obtained with a cell-free enzyme solution, demonstrating that the accessibility between the substrates and enzymes could be improved by employing R. opacus cells as a lipophilic enzyme capsule. These results imply that a combination of thermophilic enzymes and lipophilic cells can be a promising approach for the biocatalytic production of water-insoluble chemicals.

  10. Cloning systems for Rhodococcus and related bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Finnerty, William R.; Singer, Mary E.

    1990-01-01

    A plasmid transformation system for Rhodococcus was developed using an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle plasmid. Rhodococcus sp. H13-A contains three cryptic indigenous plasmids, designated pMVS100, pMVS200 and pMVS300, of 75, 19.5 and 13.4 kilobases (Kb), respectively. A 3.8 Kb restriction fragment of pMVS300 was cloned into pIJ30, a 6.3 Kb pBR322 derivative, containing the E. coli origin of replication (ori) and ampicillin resistance determinant (bla) as well as a Streptomyces gene for thiostrepton resistance, tsr. The resulting 10.1 Kb recombinant plasmid, designated pMVS301, was isolated from E. coli DH1 (pMVS301) and transformed into Rhodococcus sp. AS-50, a derivative of strain H13-A, by polyethylene glycol-assisted transformation of Rhodococcus protoplasts and selection for thiostrepton-resistant transformants. This strain was deposited with the ATCC on Feb. 1, 1988 and assigned ATCC 53719. The plasmid contains the Rhodococcus origin of replication. The plasmid and derivatives thereof can therefore be used to introduce nucleic acid sequences to and from Rhodococcus for subsequent expression and translation into protein. The isolated origin of replication can also be used in the construction of new vectors.

  11. Cloning systems for Rhodococcus and related bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Finnerty, W.R.; Singer, M.E.

    1990-08-28

    A plasmid transformation system for Rhodococcus was developed using an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle plasmid. Rhodococcus sp. H13-A contains three cryptic indigenous plasmids, designated pMVS100, pMVS200 and pMVS300, of 75, 19.5 and 13.4 kilobases (Kb), respectively. A 3.8 Kb restriction fragment of pMVS300 was cloned into pIJ30, a 6.3 Kb pBR322 derivative, containing the E. coli origin of replication (ori) and ampicillin resistance determinant (bla) as well as a Streptomyces gene for thiostrepton resistance, tsr. The resulting 10.1 Kb recombinant plasmid, designated pMVS301, was isolated from E. coli DH1 (pMVS301) and transformed into Rhodococcus sp. AS-50, a derivative of strain H13-A, by polyethylene glycol-assisted transformation of Rhodococcus protoplasts and selection for thiostrepton-resistant transformants. This strain was deposited with the ATCC on Feb. 1, 1988 and assigned ATCC 53719. The plasmid contains the Rhodococcus origin of replication. The plasmid and derivatives thereof can therefore be used to introduce nucleic acid sequences to and from Rhodococcus for subsequent expression and translation into protein. The isolated origin of replication can also be used in the construction of new vectors. 2 figs.

  12. Isolation of Rhodococcus equi from the feces of indigenous animals and soil from the Lower Zambezi National Park and Lochinvar National Park, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shinji; Syakalima, Michelo; Yasuda, Jun; Sasaki, Yukako; Tsutsumi, Hisako; Miyagawa, Emiko; Wada, Kaya; Kakuda, Tsutomu; Tsubaki, Shiro; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2004-06-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen in foals; however, its incidence in African indigenous animals is poorly understood. Fecal samples (92 from nine indigenous species) and 43 soil samples were collected from two Zambian National Parks. The presence of R. equi was investigated and 533 isolates were tested for the presence of 15- to 17-kDa antigens (VapA) and a 20-kDa antigen (VapB) by immunoblotting and PCR. R. equi was isolated (10(2)-10(4) colony forming units/g) from 75% of fecal and 74% of soil samples. Neither antigen was detected; however, about 20% of the isolates contained cryptic plasmids of various sizes. There was no evidence of virulent R. equi, but the avirulent form was widespread in the animals and the soil.

  13. Molecular characterization of Rhodococcus equi Isolates of horse breeding farms from an endemic region in South of Brazil by multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Krewer, Cristina da Costa; Spricigo, Dênis Augusto; de Avila Botton, Sônia; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Schrank, Irene; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna

    2008-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a gram-positive coco-bacillus and an intracellular opportunistic pathogen which causes pneumonia in foals. It is widely detected in environment and has been isolated from several sources, as soil, feces and gut from health and sick foals. The goal of this study was to characterize the epidemiological status (endemic, sporadic or no infection) of horse breeding farms from Bage County in South of Brazil, using a multiplex PCR. One hundred and eighteen R. equi isolates were identified by biochemical tests and submitted to a specie-specific and vapA multiplex PCR. These isolates were obtained from: three farms where the R. equi infection has been noticed, two farms where the disease has been not reported and one farm where the disease is frequent. All clinical isolates from horse breeding farms where the disease is endemic and/or sporadic were vapA-positive. None environmental isolates were vapA-positive. In three horse breeding farms with sporadic R. equi infection, 11.54% of the isolates from adult horse feces were vapA-positive. The multiplex PCR technique has proven to be effective for the molecular and epidemiological characterization of the R. equi isolates in horse breeding farms. An important finding in this study was the isolation of vapApositive R. equi from adult horse feces, which is an evidence for other routes of dissemination of this pathogen in the farms. PMID:24031201

  14. Characterization of Rhodococcus equi isolates from submaxillary lymph nodes of wild boars (Sus scrofa), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus).

    PubMed

    Rzewuska, Magdalena; Witkowski, Lucjan; Cisek, Agata A; Stefańska, Ilona; Chrobak, Dorota; Stefaniuk, Elżbieta; Kizerwetter-Świda, Magdalena; Takai, Shinji

    2014-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a soil saprophyte and an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in animals, and rarely in humans. The presence of R. equi in tissues and faeces of some wild animal species was demonstrated previously. In this study we characterized R. equi isolates from submaxillary lymph nodes of free-living wild boars (n=23), red deer (n=2) and roe deer (n=2). This is the first description of R. equi strains isolated from tissues of the Cervidae. All isolates were initially recognized as R. equi based on the phenotypic properties. Their identification was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, detection of the choE gene and by sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and rpoB genes. The presence of three plasmidic genes (traA, vapA and vapB) associated with R. equi virulence was investigated by PCR. In 16 wild boar isolates the traA and vapB genes were detected and they were located on virulence plasmids type 5, 7 or 11. The isolates from cervids and the remaining wild boar isolates were classified as avirulent based on a genotype traA(-)/vapA(-)B(-). In summary, these results confirm that wild boars can be a source of intermediately virulent R. equi strains, and indicate that red deer and roe deer can be a reservoir of avirulent R. equi strains. PMID:24878324

  15. Isolation of the fenoxaprop-ethyl (FE)-degrading bacterium Rhodococcus sp. T1, and cloning of FE hydrolase gene feh.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Tao, Jian; Shen, Wenjing; Liu, Juan; Li, Jingquan; Li, Yongfeng; Cao, Hui; Cui, Zhongli

    2011-10-01

    An enrichment culture which completely degraded fenoxaprop-ethyl (FE) was acquired by using FE as sole carbon source. An efficient FE-degrading strain T1 was isolated from the enrichment culture and identified as Rhodococcus sp. Strain T1 could degrade 94% of 100 mg L(-1) FE within 24 h and the metabolite fenoxaprop acid (FA) was identified by HPLC/MS analysis. This strain converted FE by cleavage of the ester bond, but could not further degrade FA. Strain T1 could also efficiently degrade haloxyfop-R-methyl, quizalofop-p-ethyl, cyhalofop-butyl and clodinafop-propargyl. FE hydrolase capable of hydrolysing FE to FA was found in the cell-free extract of strain T1 by zymogram analysis. A novel gene feh encoding FE hydrolase was cloned by shotgun library construction and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli.

  16. Uptake of radioiodide by Paenibacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., Burkholderia sp. and Rhodococcus sp. isolated from a boreal nutrient-poor bog.

    PubMed

    Lusa, Merja; Lehto, Jukka; Aromaa, Hanna; Knuutinen, Jenna; Bomberg, Malin

    2016-06-01

    Radionuclides, like radioiodine ((129)I), may escape deep geological nuclear waste repositories and migrate to the surface ecosystems. In surface ecosystems, microorganisms can affect their movement. Iodide uptake of six bacterial strains belonging to the genera Paenibacillus, Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus isolated from an acidic boreal nutrient-poor bog was tested. The tests were run in four different growth media at three temperatures. All bacterial strains removed iodide from the solution with the highest efficiency shown by one of the Paenibacillus strains with >99% of iodide removed from the solution in one of the used growth media. Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus and one of the two Paenibacillus strains showed highest iodide uptake in 1% yeast extract with maximum values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) ranging from 90 to 270L/kg DW. The Burkholderia strain showed highest uptake in 1% Tryptone (maximum Kd 170L/kg DW). The Paenibacillus strain V0-1-LW showed exceptionally high uptake in 0.5% peptone +0.25% yeast extract broth (maximum Kd>1,000,000L/kg DW). Addition of 0.1% glucose to the 0.5% peptone +0.25% yeast extract broth reduced iodide uptake at 4°C and 20°C and enhanced iodide uptake at 37°C compared to the uptake without glucose. This indicates that the uptake of glucose and iodide may be competing processes in these bacteria. We estimated that in in situ conditions of the bog, the bacterial uptake of iodide accounts for approximately 0.1%-0.3% of the total sorption of iodide in the surface, subsurface peat, gyttja and clay layers.

  17. Uptake of radioiodide by Paenibacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., Burkholderia sp. and Rhodococcus sp. isolated from a boreal nutrient-poor bog.

    PubMed

    Lusa, Merja; Lehto, Jukka; Aromaa, Hanna; Knuutinen, Jenna; Bomberg, Malin

    2016-06-01

    Radionuclides, like radioiodine ((129)I), may escape deep geological nuclear waste repositories and migrate to the surface ecosystems. In surface ecosystems, microorganisms can affect their movement. Iodide uptake of six bacterial strains belonging to the genera Paenibacillus, Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus isolated from an acidic boreal nutrient-poor bog was tested. The tests were run in four different growth media at three temperatures. All bacterial strains removed iodide from the solution with the highest efficiency shown by one of the Paenibacillus strains with >99% of iodide removed from the solution in one of the used growth media. Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus and one of the two Paenibacillus strains showed highest iodide uptake in 1% yeast extract with maximum values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) ranging from 90 to 270L/kg DW. The Burkholderia strain showed highest uptake in 1% Tryptone (maximum Kd 170L/kg DW). The Paenibacillus strain V0-1-LW showed exceptionally high uptake in 0.5% peptone +0.25% yeast extract broth (maximum Kd>1,000,000L/kg DW). Addition of 0.1% glucose to the 0.5% peptone +0.25% yeast extract broth reduced iodide uptake at 4°C and 20°C and enhanced iodide uptake at 37°C compared to the uptake without glucose. This indicates that the uptake of glucose and iodide may be competing processes in these bacteria. We estimated that in in situ conditions of the bog, the bacterial uptake of iodide accounts for approximately 0.1%-0.3% of the total sorption of iodide in the surface, subsurface peat, gyttja and clay layers. PMID:27266299

  18. Physiological and genetic differences amongst Rhodococcus species for using glycerol as a source for growth and triacylglycerol production.

    PubMed

    Herrero, O Marisa; Moncalián, Gabriel; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2016-02-01

    We analysed the ability of five different rhodococcal species to grow and produce triacylglycerols (TAGs) from glycerol, the main byproduct of biodiesel production. Rhodococcus fascians and Rhodococcus erythropolis grew fast on glycerol, whereas Rhodococcus opacus and Rhodococcus jostii exhibited a prolonged lag phase of several days before growing. Rhodococcus equi only exhibited poor growth on glycerol. R. erythropolis DSMZ 43060 and R. fascians F7 produced 3.9-4.3 g cell biomass l(-1) and 28.4-44.6% cellular dry weight (CDW) of TAGs after 6 days of incubation; whereas R. opacus PD630 and R. jostii RHA1 produced 2.5-3.8 g cell biomass l(-1) and 28.3-38.4% CDW of TAGs after 17 days of growth on glycerol. Genomic analyses revealed two different sets of genes for glycerol uptake and degradation (here named clusters 1 and 2) amongst rhodococci. Those species that possessed cluster 1 (glpFK1D1) (R. fascians and R. erythropolis) exhibited fast growth and lipid accumulation, whereas those that possessed cluster 2 (glpK2D2) (R. opacus, R. jostii and R. equi) exhibited delayed growth and lipid accumulation during cultivation on glycerol. Three glycerol-negative strains were complemented for their ability to grow and produce TAGs by heterologous expression of glpK2 from R. opacus PD630. In addition, we significantly reduced the extension of the lag phase and improved glycerol assimilation and oil production of R. opacus PD630 when expressing glpK1D1 from R. fascians. The results demonstrated that rhodococci are a flexible and amenable biological system for further biotechnological applications based on the reutilization of glycerol.

  19. Isolation of hydrocarbon-degrading and biosurfactant-producing bacteria and assessment their plant growth-promoting traits.

    PubMed

    Pacwa-Płociniczak, Magdalena; Płociniczak, Tomasz; Iwan, Joanna; Żarska, Monika; Chorążewski, Mirosław; Dzida, Marzena; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-03-01

    Forty-two hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial strains were isolated from the soil heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Forty-one strains were identified based on their whole-cell fatty acid profiles using the MIDI-MIS method. Thirty-three of them belong to species Rhodococcus erythropolis, while the others to the genera Rahnella (4), Serratia (3) and Proteus (1). Isolates were screened for their ability to produce biosurfactants/bioemulsifiers. For all of them the activity of several mechanisms characteristic for plant growth-promoting bacteria was also determined. In order to investigate surface active and emulsifying abilities of isolates following methods: oil-spreading, blood agar, methylene blue agar and determination of emulsification index, were used. Among studied bacteria 12 strains (CD 112, CD 126, CD 131, CD 132, CD 135, CD 147, CD 154, CD 155, CD 158, CD 161, CD 166 and CD 167) have been chosen as promising candidates for the production of biosurfactants and/or bioemulsifiers. Among them 2 strains (R. erythropolis CD 126 and Rahnella aquatilis CD 132) had the highest potential to be used in the bioaugmentation of PH-contaminated soil. Moreover, 15 of tested strains (CD 105, CD 106, CD 108, CD 111, CD 116, CD 120, CD 124, CD 125, CD 130, CD 132, CD 134, CD 154, CD 156, CD 161 and CD 170) showed the activity of four mechanisms (ACC deaminase activity, IAA and siderophore production, phosphate solubilization) considered to be characteristic for plant growth-promoting bacteria. Two of them (R. erythropolis CD 106 and R. erythropolis CD 111) showed the highest activity of above-mentioned mechanisms and thus are considered as promising agents in microbe assisted phytoremediation. PMID:26708648

  20. Degradation of 17α-methyltestosterone by Rhodococcus sp. and Nocardioides sp. isolated from a masculinizing pond of Nile tilapia fry.

    PubMed

    Homklin, Supreeda; Ong, Say Kee; Limpiyakorn, Tawan

    2012-06-30

    17α-Methyltestosterone (MT), a synthetic anabolic androgenic steroid, is widely used in aquafarming for the production of an all male fish population such as Nile tilapia. This study isolated, identified and characterized MT-degrading bacteria in the sediment and water from a masculinizing pond of Nile tilapia fry. Based on the phylogeny, physiological properties and cell morphology, the three isolated MT-degrading bacteria were related closely to Rhodococcus equi, Nocardioides aromaticivorans, and Nocardioides nitrophenolicus. Growth of the three isolated strains was found to be inhibited for MT concentrations in the range of 1.0-10mg/L. The inhibition of cell growth was found to be modeled using the Haldane's substrate inhibition model. The kinetic constants ranged from 0.13 to 0.19h(-1) for μ(max), 0.7-24.8mg/L for K(s) and 19.6-76.2mg/L for K(i). Androgenic activity using β-galactosidase assay showed that all strains degraded MT to the products with no androgenic potency.

  1. Differences in Rhodococcus equi Infections Based on Immune Status and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Clinical Isolates in a Case Series of 12 Patients and Cases in the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Ribes, Julie A.; Thornton, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an unusual zoonotic pathogen that can cause life-threatening diseases in susceptible hosts. Twelve patients with R. equi infection in Kentucky were compared to 137 cases reported in the literature. Although lungs were the primary sites of infection in immunocompromised patients, extrapulmonary involvement only was more common in immunocompetent patients (P < 0.0001). Mortality in R. equi-infected HIV patients was lower in the HAART era (8%) than in pre-HAART era (56%) (P < 0.0001), suggesting that HAART improves prognosis in these patients. Most (85–100%) of clinical isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, clarithromycin, rifampin, aminoglycosides, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem. Interestingly, there was a marked difference in susceptibility of the isolates to cotrimoxazole between Europe (35/76) and the US (15/15) (P < 0.0001). Empiric treatment of R. equi infection should include a combination of two antibiotics, preferably selected from vancomycin, imipenem, clarithromycin/azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, rifampin, or cotrimoxazole. Local antibiograms should be checked prior to using cotrimoxazole due to developing resistance. PMID:27631004

  2. Differences in Rhodococcus equi Infections Based on Immune Status and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Clinical Isolates in a Case Series of 12 Patients and Cases in the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Ribes, Julie A.; Thornton, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an unusual zoonotic pathogen that can cause life-threatening diseases in susceptible hosts. Twelve patients with R. equi infection in Kentucky were compared to 137 cases reported in the literature. Although lungs were the primary sites of infection in immunocompromised patients, extrapulmonary involvement only was more common in immunocompetent patients (P < 0.0001). Mortality in R. equi-infected HIV patients was lower in the HAART era (8%) than in pre-HAART era (56%) (P < 0.0001), suggesting that HAART improves prognosis in these patients. Most (85–100%) of clinical isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, clarithromycin, rifampin, aminoglycosides, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem. Interestingly, there was a marked difference in susceptibility of the isolates to cotrimoxazole between Europe (35/76) and the US (15/15) (P < 0.0001). Empiric treatment of R. equi infection should include a combination of two antibiotics, preferably selected from vancomycin, imipenem, clarithromycin/azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, rifampin, or cotrimoxazole. Local antibiograms should be checked prior to using cotrimoxazole due to developing resistance.

  3. Isolation of endosulfan sulfate-degrading Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1 from endosulfan contaminated soil and identification of a novel metabolite, endosulfan diol monosulfate.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koji; Kawashima, Fujimasa; Takagi, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Ryota; Kotake, Masaaki; Kiyota, Hiromasa; Yamazaki, Kenichi; Sakakibara, Futa; Okada, Sanae

    2016-05-13

    An aerobic endosulfan sulfate-degrading bacterium, Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1, was isolated from soil to which endosulfan had been applied annually for more than 10 years until 2008. The strain isolated in this work reduced the concentration of endosulfan sulfate (2) from 12.25 μM to 2.11 μM during 14 d at 30 °C. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (UPLC-ESI-MS), a new highly water-soluble metabolite possessing six chlorine atoms was found to be endosulfan diol monosulfate (6), derived from 2 by hydrolysis of the cyclic sulfate ester ring. The structure of 6 was elucidated by chemical synthesis of the candidate derivatives and by HR-MS and UPLC-MS analyses. Therefore, it was suggested that the strain S1-1 has a new metabolic pathway of 2. In addition, 6 was expected to be less toxic among the metabolites of 1 because of its higher water-solubility. PMID:27073164

  4. Differences in Rhodococcus equi Infections Based on Immune Status and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Clinical Isolates in a Case Series of 12 Patients and Cases in the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gundelly, Praveen; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Ribes, Julie A; Thornton, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an unusual zoonotic pathogen that can cause life-threatening diseases in susceptible hosts. Twelve patients with R. equi infection in Kentucky were compared to 137 cases reported in the literature. Although lungs were the primary sites of infection in immunocompromised patients, extrapulmonary involvement only was more common in immunocompetent patients (P < 0.0001). Mortality in R. equi-infected HIV patients was lower in the HAART era (8%) than in pre-HAART era (56%) (P < 0.0001), suggesting that HAART improves prognosis in these patients. Most (85-100%) of clinical isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, clarithromycin, rifampin, aminoglycosides, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem. Interestingly, there was a marked difference in susceptibility of the isolates to cotrimoxazole between Europe (35/76) and the US (15/15) (P < 0.0001). Empiric treatment of R. equi infection should include a combination of two antibiotics, preferably selected from vancomycin, imipenem, clarithromycin/azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, rifampin, or cotrimoxazole. Local antibiograms should be checked prior to using cotrimoxazole due to developing resistance. PMID:27631004

  5. Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC12674 becomes alkane-tolerant upon GroEL2 overexpression and survives in the n-octane phase in two phase culture.

    PubMed

    Takihara, Hayato; Matsuura, Chiaki; Ogihara, Jun; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sunairi, Michio

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the overexpression of GroEL2 played an important role in increasing the alkane tolerance of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4. In the present study, we examined the effects of the introduction of groEL2 on the alkane tolerance of other Rhodococcus strains. The introduction of groEL2 into Rhodococcus strains led to increased alkane tolerance. The translocation of R. rhodochrous ATCC12674 cells to and survival in the n-octane (C8) phase in two phase culture were significantly enhanced by the introduction of groEL2 derived from strain PR4, suggesting that engineering cells to overexpress GroEL2 represents an effective strategy for enhancing organic solvent tolerance in Rhodococcus.

  6. Isolation of an aryloxyphenoxy propanoate (AOPP) herbicide-degrading strain Rhodococcus ruber JPL-2 and the cloning of a novel carboxylesterase gene (feh).

    PubMed

    Hongming, Liu; Xu, Lou; Zhaojian, Ge; Fan, Yang; Dingbin, Chen; Jianchun, Zhu; Jianhong, Xu; Shunpeng, Li; Qing, Hong

    2015-06-01

    The strain JPL-2, capable of degrading fenoxaprop-P-ethyl (FE), was isolated from the soil of a wheat field and identified as Rhodococcus ruber. This strain could utilize FE as its sole carbon source and degrade 94.6% of 100 mg L(-1) FE in 54 h. Strain JPL-2 could also degrade other aryloxyphenoxy propanoate (AOPP) herbicides. The initial step of the degradation pathway is to hydrolyze the carboxylic acid ester bond. A novel esterase gene feh, encoding the FE-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase (FeH) responsible for this initial step, was cloned from strain JPL-2. Its molecular mass was approximately 39 kDa, and the catalytic efficiency of FeH followed the order of FE > quizalofop-P-ethyl > clodinafop-propargyl > cyhalofop-butyl > fluazifop-P-butyl > haloxyfop-P-methyl > diclofop-methy, which indicated that the chain length of the alcohol moiety strongly affected the hydrolysis activity of the FeH toward AOPP herbicides.

  7. Isolation of an aryloxyphenoxy propanoate (AOPP) herbicide-degrading strain Rhodococcus ruber JPL-2 and the cloning of a novel carboxylesterase gene (feh)

    PubMed Central

    Hongming, Liu; Xu, Lou; Zhaojian, Ge; Fan, Yang; Dingbin, Chen; Jianchun, Zhu; Jianhong, Xu; Shunpeng, Li; Qing, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The strain JPL-2, capable of degrading fenoxaprop-P-ethyl (FE), was isolated from the soil of a wheat field and identified as Rhodococcus ruber. This strain could utilize FE as its sole carbon source and degrade 94.6% of 100 mg L−1 FE in 54 h. Strain JPL-2 could also degrade other aryloxyphenoxy propanoate (AOPP) herbicides. The initial step of the degradation pathway is to hydrolyze the carboxylic acid ester bond. A novel esterase gene feh, encoding the FE-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase (FeH) responsible for this initial step, was cloned from strain JPL-2. Its molecular mass was approximately 39 kDa, and the catalytic efficiency of FeH followed the order of FE > quizalofop-P-ethyl > clodinafop-propargyl > cyhalofop-butyl > fluazifop-P-butyl > haloxyfop-P-methyl > diclofop-methy, which indicated that the chain length of the alcohol moiety strongly affected the hydrolysis activity of the FeH toward AOPP herbicides. PMID:26273257

  8. Isolation and functional analysis of a glycolipid producing Rhodococcus sp. strain IITR03 with potential for degradation of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT).

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Abhay; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Manickam, Natesan

    2014-09-01

    A 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) degrading bacterium strain IITR03 producing trehalolipid was isolated and characterized from a pesticides contaminated soil. The strain IITR03 was identified as a member of the genus Rhodococcus based on polyphasic studies. Under aqueous culture conditions, the strain IITR03 degraded 282 μM of DDT and could also utilize 10mM concentration each of 4-chlorobenzoic acid, 3-chlorobenzoic acid and benzoic acid as sole carbon and energy source. The catechol 1,2-dioxygenase enzyme activity resulted in conversion of catechol to form cis,cis-muconic acid. Cloning and sequencing of partial nucleotide sequence of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase gene (cat) from strain IITR03 revealed its similarity to catA gene present in Rhodococcus sp. strain Lin-2 (97% identity) and Rhodococcus strain AN22 (96% identity) degrading benzoate and aniline, respectively. The results suggest that the strain IITR03 could be useful for field bioremediation studies of DDT-residues and chlorinated aromatic compounds present in contaminated sites.

  9. Use of whole genome sequences to develop a molecular phylogenetic framework for Rhodococcus fascians and the Rhodococcus genus

    PubMed Central

    Creason, Allison L.; Davis, Edward W.; Putnam, Melodie L.; Vandeputte, Olivier M.; Chang, Jeff H.

    2014-01-01

    The accurate diagnosis of diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria requires a stable species classification. Rhodococcus fascians is the only documented member of its ill-defined genus that is capable of causing disease on a wide range of agriculturally important plants. Comparisons of genome sequences generated from isolates of Rhodococcus associated with diseased plants revealed a level of genetic diversity consistent with them representing multiple species. To test this, we generated a tree based on more than 1700 homologous sequences from plant-associated isolates of Rhodococcus, and obtained support from additional approaches that measure and cluster based on genome similarities. Results were consistent in supporting the definition of new Rhodococcus species within clades containing phytopathogenic members. We also used the genome sequences, along with other rhodococcal genome sequences to construct a molecular phylogenetic tree as a framework for resolving the Rhodococcus genus. Results indicated that Rhodococcus has the potential for having 20 species and also confirmed a need to revisit the taxonomic groupings within Rhodococcus. PMID:25237311

  10. Alkylated benzothiophene desulfurization by Rhodococcus sp. strain T09.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Onaka, T; Tanaka, Y; Tezuka, T; Suzuki, M; Kurane, R

    2000-03-01

    A benzothiophene desulfurizing bacterium was isolated and identified as Rhodococcus sp. strain T09. Growth assays revealed that this strain assimilated, as the sole sulfur source, various organosulfur compounds that cannot be assimilated by the well-studied dibenzothiophene-desulfurizing Rhodococcus sp. IGTS8. The cellular growth rate of strain T09 for the alkylated benzothiophenes depended on the alkylated position and the length of the alkyl moiety.

  11. Biodegradation of the Organic Disulfide 4,4′-Dithiodibutyric Acid by Rhodococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Heba; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Four Rhodococcus spp. exhibited the ability to use 4,4′-dithiodibutyric acid (DTDB) as a sole carbon source for growth. The most important step for the production of a novel polythioester (PTE) using DTDB as a precursor substrate is the initial cleavage of DTDB. Thus, identification of the enzyme responsible for this step was mandatory. Because Rhodococcus erythropolis strain MI2 serves as a model organism for elucidation of the biodegradation of DTDB, it was used to identify the genes encoding the enzymes involved in DTDB utilization. To identify these genes, transposon mutagenesis of R. erythropolis MI2 was carried out using transposon pTNR-TA. Among 3,261 mutants screened, 8 showed no growth with DTDB as the sole carbon source. In five mutants, the insertion locus was mapped either within a gene coding for a polysaccharide deacetyltransferase, a putative ATPase, or an acetyl coenzyme A transferase, 1 bp upstream of a gene coding for a putative methylase, or 176 bp downstream of a gene coding for a putative kinase. In another mutant, the insertion was localized between genes encoding a putative transcriptional regulator of the TetR family (noxR) and an NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (nox). Moreover, in two other mutants, the insertion loci were mapped within a gene encoding a hypothetical protein in the vicinity of noxR and nox. The interruption mutant generated, R. erythropolis MI2 noxΩtsr, was unable to grow with DTDB as the sole carbon source. Subsequently, nox was overexpressed and purified, and its activity with DTDB was measured. The specific enzyme activity of Nox amounted to 1.2 ± 0.15 U/mg. Therefore, we propose that Nox is responsible for the initial cleavage of DTDB into 2 molecules of 4-mercaptobutyric acid (4MB). PMID:26407888

  12. Identification and environmental detection of Rhodococcus species by 16S rDNA-targeted PCR.

    PubMed

    Bell, K S; Kuyukina, M S; Heidbrink, S; Philp, J C; Aw, D W; Ivshina, I B; Christofi, N

    1999-10-01

    Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus can degrade a wide range of organic pollutants and catalyse many useful biotransformations. There is a need for improved tests to identify Rhodococcus species. PCR-based methods for species identification offer advantages in terms of speed and accuracy over traditional methods and can allow direct detection of microbes in environmental samples., PCR tests, using primers targeted at species-specific sequences in the 16S rRNA gene, were successfully developed for R. globerulus, R. erythropolis, R. opacus and R. ruber. These tests gave positive results with all or most strains of target species but did not generally cross-react with other species. Cases of apparent cross-reaction were shown to be due to prior misclassification of strains of R. opacus as R. erythropolis and of strains of R. ruber as R. rhodochrous. A simple and rapid method for the extraction and purification of DNA from soil was developed and successfully applied to the PCR detection of indigenous R. erythropolis in an environmental sample. Cell lysis in the samples was achieved by lysozyme and sarkosyl treatment, aided by freeze-thaw cycles. Removal of humic compounds inhibitory to PCR was accomplished by CTAB treatment with solvent extraction and, if necessary, passage of extracts through Sepharose CL-6B in a spun-column format. Extracts prepared using a tris-EDTA buffer were much clearer than those prepared using a sodium phosphate buffer, indicating lower levels of humic compounds. A detection limit of 104 cfu g-1 of soil was achieved and the use of a secondary PCR allowed detection of 1 cfu g-1.

  13. [Isolation and identification of a low temperature hydrocarbon-degrading strain and its degradation characteristics].

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Li, Dan; Sun, Dan; Xie, Yu-juan; Ma, Ting; Liang, Feng-lai; Liu, Ru-lin

    2007-09-01

    A low-temperature hydrocarbon-degrading strain T7-2 was isolated from sea-mud of Bohai polluted area and identified as Rhodococcus erythropolis, which could use diesel oil as carbon source. The optimal temperature and pH for the strain utilizing ethanol was 15 degrees C and 7.8, and the optimal concentration of ethanol and the seed culture was 0.5% and 10(8) CFU/mL, respectively. Inoculated to artificial seawater which was added (NH4)2SO5 2.64 g/L, Na2HPO4 2.5 g/L and yeast extract 0.015 g/L after 7 days of culture at the temperature of 15 degrees C, the rate of degradation was 73.2%. The strain could degrade a large range of n-alkane from C12 to C36.

  14. Isolation and characterization of alkane degrading bacteria from petroleum reservoir waste water in Iran (Kerman and Tehran provenances).

    PubMed

    Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Ahmadinejad, Mohammad; Tebyanian, Hamid; Kariminik, Ashraf

    2013-08-15

    Petroleum products spill and leakage have become two major environmental challenges in Iran. Sampling was performed in the petroleum reservoir waste water of Tehran and Kerman Provinces of Iran. Alkane degrading bacteria were isolated by enrichment in a Bushnel-Hass medium, with hexadecane as sole source of carbon and energy. The isolated strains were identified by amplification of 16S rDNA gene and sequencing. Specific primers were used for identification of alkane hydroxylase gene. Fifteen alkane degrading bacteria were isolated and 8 strains were selected as powerful degradative bacteria. These 8 strains relate to Rhodococcus jostii, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter piechaudii, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Rhodococcus erythropolis, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa genera. The optimum concentration of hexadecane that allowed high growth was 2.5%. Gas chromatography results show that all strains can degrade approximately half of hexadecane in one week of incubation. All of the strains have alkane hydroxylase gene which are important for biodegradation. As a result, this study indicates that there is a high diversity of degradative bacteria in petroleum reservoir waste water in Iran.

  15. Rhodococcus equi: an animal and human pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, J F

    1991-01-01

    Recent isolations of Rhodococcus equi from cavitatory pulmonary disease in patients with AIDS have aroused interest among medical microbiologists in this unusual organism. Earlier isolations from humans had also been in immunosuppressed patients following hemolymphatic tumors or renal transplantation. This organism has been recognized for many years as a cause of a serious pyogranulomatous pneumonia of young foals and is occasionally isolated from granulomatous lesions in several other species, in some cases following immunosuppression. The last decade has seen many advances in understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and immunity to infection in foals. The particular susceptibility of the foal is not understood but can be explained in part by a combination of heavy challenge through the respiratory route coinciding with declining maternally derived antibody in the absence of fully competent foal cellular immune mechanisms. R. equi is largely a soil organism but is widespread in the feces of herbivores. Its growth in soil is considerably improved by simple nutrients it obtains from herbivore manure. About one-third of human patients who have developed R. equi infections had contact in some way with herbivores or their manure. Others may have acquired infection from contact with soil or wild bird manure. R. equi is an intracellular parasite, which explains the typical pyogranulomatous nature of R. equi infections, the predisposition to infection in human patients with defective cell-mediated immune mechanisms, and the efficacy of antimicrobial drugs that penetrate phagocytic cells. Images PMID:2004346

  16. Genome and Phenotype Microarray Analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7: Genetic Determinants and Metabolic Abilities with Environmental Relevance

    PubMed Central

    D’Ursi, Pasqualina; Milanesi, Luciano; Di Canito, Alessandra; Zampolli, Jessica; Collina, Elena; Decorosi, Francesca; Viti, Carlo; Fedi, Stefano; Presentato, Alessandro; Zannoni, Davide; Di Gennaro, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comparative genome and phenotype microarray analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7 were performed. Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 was selected for its ability to grow on short-chain n-alkanes and R. opacus R7 was isolated for its ability to grow on naphthalene and on o-xylene. Results of genome comparison, including BCP1, R7, along with other Rhodococcus reference strains, showed that at least 30% of the genome of each strain presented unique sequences and only 50% of the predicted proteome was shared. To associate genomic features with metabolic capabilities of BCP1 and R7 strains, hundreds of different growth conditions were tested through Phenotype Microarray, by using Biolog plates and plates manually prepared with additional xenobiotic compounds. Around one-third of the surveyed carbon sources was utilized by both strains although R7 generally showed higher metabolic activity values compared to BCP1. Moreover, R7 showed broader range of nitrogen and sulphur sources. Phenotype Microarray data were combined with genomic analysis to genetically support the metabolic features of the two strains. The genome analysis allowed to identify some gene clusters involved in the metabolism of the main tested xenobiotic compounds. Results show that R7 contains multiple genes for the degradation of a large set of aromatic and PAHs compounds, while a lower variability in terms of genes predicted to be involved in aromatic degradation was found in BCP1. This genetic feature can be related to the strong genetic pressure exerted by the two different environment from which the two strains were isolated. According to this, in the BCP1 genome the smo gene cluster involved in the short-chain n-alkanes degradation, is included in one of the unique regions and it is not conserved in the Rhodococcus strains compared in this work. Data obtained underline the great potential of these two Rhodococcus spp. strains for biodegradation and environmental decontamination

  17. Salt-tolerant phenol-degrading microorganisms isolated from Amazonian soil samples.

    PubMed

    Bastos, A E; Moon, D H; Rossi, A; Trevors, J T; Tsai, S M

    2000-11-01

    Two phenol-degrading microorganisms were isolated from Amazonian rain forest soil samples after enrichment in the presence of phenol and a high salt concentration. The yeast Candida tropicalis and the bacterium Alcaligenes faecoalis were identified using several techniques, including staining, morphological observation and biochemical tests, fatty acid profiles and 16S/18S rRNA sequencing. Both isolates, A. faecalis and C. tropicalis, were used in phenol degradation assays, with Rhodococcus erythropolis as a reference phenol-degrading bacterium, and compared to microbial populations from wastewater samples collected from phenol-contaminated environments. C. tropicalis tolerated higher concentrations of phenol and salt (16 mM and 15%, respectively) than A. faecalis (12 mM and 5.6%). The yeast also tolerated a wider pH range (3-9) during phenol degradation than A. faecalis (pH 7-9). Phenol degradation was repressed in C. tropicalis by acetate and glucose, but not by lactate. Glucose and acetate had little effect, while lactate stimulated phenol degradation in A. faecalis. To our knowledge, these soils had never been contaminated with man-made phenolic compounds and this is the first report of phenol-degrading microorganisms from Amazonian forest soil samples. The results support the idea that natural uncontaminated environments contain sufficient genetic diversity to make them valid choices for the isolation of microorganisms useful in bioremediation.

  18. Isolation and Characterisation of 1-Alkyl-3-Methylimidazolium Chloride Ionic Liquid-Tolerant and Biodegrading Marine Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Megaw, Julianne; Busetti, Alessandro; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and identify marine-derived bacteria which exhibited high tolerance to, and an ability to biodegrade, 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquids. The salinity and hydrocarbon load of some marine environments may induce selective pressures which enhance the ability of microbes to grow in the presence of these liquid salts. The isolates obtained in this study generally showed a greater ability to grow in the presence of the selected ionic liquids compared to microorganisms described previously, with two marine-derived bacteria, Rhodococcus erythropolis and Brevibacterium sanguinis growing in concentrations exceeding 1 M 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. The ability of these bacteria to degrade the selected ionic liquids was assessed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), and three were shown to degrade the selected ionic liquids by up to 59% over a 63-day test period. These bacterial isolates represent excellent candidates for further potential applications in the bioremediation of ionic liquid-containing waste or following accidental environmental exposure. PMID:23560109

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Polychlorinated Biphenyl Degrader Rhodococcus sp. WB1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Man; Shen, Alin

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. WB1 is a polychlorinated biphenyl degrader which was isolated from contaminated soil in Zhejiang, China. Here, we present the complete genome sequence. The analysis of this genome indicated that a biphenyl-degrading gene cluster and several xenobiotic metabolism pathways are harbored. PMID:27738025

  20. In Vitro Activities of Polycationic Peptides Alone and in Combination with Clinically Used Antimicrobial Agents against Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giacometti, A.; Cirioni, O.; Ancarani, F.; Del Prete, M. S.; Fortuna, M.; Scalise, G.

    1999-01-01

    The in vitro activities of magainin II, nisin, and ranalexin alone and in combination with other antimicrobial agents against six clinical isolates of Rhodococcus equi were investigated by MIC and time-kill studies. All isolates were more susceptible to nisin. A positive interaction was observed when the peptides were combined with ampicillin, ceftriaxone, rifabutin, rifampin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and vancomycin. PMID:10428947

  1. In vitro activities of polycationic peptides alone and in combination with clinically used antimicrobial agents against Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, A; Cirioni, O; Ancarani, F; Del Prete, M S; Fortuna, M; Scalise, G

    1999-08-01

    The in vitro activities of magainin II, nisin, and ranalexin alone and in combination with other antimicrobial agents against six clinical isolates of Rhodococcus equi were investigated by MIC and time-kill studies. All isolates were more susceptible to nisin. A positive interaction was observed when the peptides were combined with ampicillin, ceftriaxone, rifabutin, rifampin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and vancomycin. PMID:10428947

  2. Rhodococcus empyema in a heart transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Richard; Nord, John; Lanspa, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a rare cause of pneumonia and empyema almost exclusively occurring in immunocompromised patients. Most people who become infected have direct exposure to livestock. We present a case where the exposure was presumed to be through a family member in close contact with horses. Our case describes an infection in a heart transplant patient that was initially identified as a probable intra-abdominal infection and later reidentified as Rhodococcus equi empyema, and was treated with surgery and prolonged antibiotics. PMID:25473561

  3. Survival and replication of Rhodococcus equi in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hondalus, M K; Mosser, D M

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterium of macrophages that can cause serious pneumonia in both young horses and immunocompromised people. Essential to understanding rhodococcus pathogenesis is a quantitative documentation of the intracellular events that follow macrophage phagocytosis of the organism. By using a bacterial immunofluorescence staining assay, we verified the intracellular survival and replicative potential of R. equi in both murine peritoneal macrophages and equine alveolar macrophages in vitro. Following an initial lag period of 6 to 12 h, the intracellular numbers of R. equi begin to rise, often reaching macrophage-compromising levels by 48 h. A quantitative determination of bacterial growth by a novel image analysis cytometry technique confirmed our fluorescence microscopic results. By 48 h postinfection, bacterial numbers had increased by more than fivefold, and the majority of infected macrophages in the monolayer contained 10 or more bacteria per cell. The intracellular organisms were viable, as evidenced by the ability to incorporate radiolabeled uracil. The use of these techniques has identified differences in the in vitro replicative capacities of a virulent strain and an avirulent strain of R. equi. A clinical isolate of R. equi expressing a 17-kDa virulence-associated plasmid-encoded antigen was able to survive and replicate within macrophages, whereas an avirulent, non-plasmid-containing strain replicated poorly. These results suggest that plasmid-encoded bacterial virulence factors may contribute to the ability of R. equi to replicate within its host cell, the macrophage. Images PMID:7927672

  4. Investigation of the biotransformation of TNT by a Rhodococcus sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Tharakan, J.P.; Welsh, G.; Johnson, J.H. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Tri-nitro-toluene (TNT) has contaminated waterways and soils as a result of its widespread military and non-military uses. Several researches have isolated or constructed strains of microorganisms that are able to utilize TNT as sole carbon, nitrogen or energy sources. Researchers have also reported high TNT concentrations (> 50 mg/l) as inhibitory to bacteria, yeast and fungi. This study examines the degradation of TNT and pyrene using a Rhodococcus sp. isolated based on its ability to survive on pyrene as the sole carbon source. The experiments were designed to study both the direct and cometabolic transformation of TNT by the microbes in both batch and continuous modes, and to determine the optimum conditions under which TNT would be degradable.

  5. Vanillin catabolism in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao-Ping; Chow, Mindy; Liu, Chi-Chun; Lau, Alice; Liu, Jie; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2012-01-01

    Genes encoding vanillin dehydrogenase (vdh) and vanillate O-demethylase (vanAB) were identified in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 using gene disruption and enzyme activities. During growth on vanillin or vanillate, vanA was highly upregulated while vdh was not. This study contributes to our understanding of lignin degradation by RHA1 and other actinomycetes.

  6. Biofilm development of the polyethylene-degrading bacterium Rhodococcus ruber.

    PubMed

    Sivan, A; Szanto, M; Pavlov, V

    2006-09-01

    We have recently isolated a biofilm-producing strain (C208) of Rhodococcus ruber that degraded polyethylene at a rate of 0.86% per week (r2=0.98). Strain C208 adheres to polyethylene immediately upon exposure to the polyolefin. This initial biofilm differentiates (in a stepwise process that lasts about 20 h) into cell-aggregation-forming microcolonies. Further organization yields "mushroom-like" three-dimensional structures on the mature biofilm. The ratio between the population densities of the biofilm and the planktonic C208 cells after 10 days of incubation was about 60:1, indicating a high preference for the biofilm mode of growth. Analysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the biofilm of C208 revealed that the polysaccharides level was up to 2.5 folds higher than that of the protein. The biofilm showed a high viability even after 60 days of incubation, apparently due to polyethylene biodegradation. PMID:16534612

  7. Degradation of a Mixture of Hydrocarbons, Gasoline, and Diesel Oil Additives by Rhodococcus aetherivorans and Rhodococcus wratislaviensis▿

    PubMed Central

    Auffret, Marc; Labbé, Diane; Thouand, Gérald; Greer, Charles W.; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise

    2009-01-01

    Two strains, identified as Rhodococcus wratislaviensis IFP 2016 and Rhodococcus aetherivorans IFP 2017, were isolated from a microbial consortium that degraded 15 petroleum compounds or additives when provided in a mixture containing 16 compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, octane, hexadecane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane [isooctane], cyclohexane, cyclohexanol, naphthalene, methyl tert-butyl ether [MTBE], ethyl tert-butyl ether [ETBE], tert-butyl alcohol [TBA], and 2-ethylhexyl nitrate [2-EHN]). The strains had broad degradation capacities toward the compounds, including the more recalcitrant ones, MTBE, ETBE, isooctane, cyclohexane, and 2-EHN. R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016 degraded and mineralized to different extents 11 of the compounds when provided individually, sometimes requiring 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN) as a cosolvent. R. aetherivorans IFP 2017 degraded a reduced spectrum of substrates. The coculture of the two strains degraded completely 13 compounds, isooctane and 2-EHN were partially degraded (30% and 73%, respectively), and only TBA was not degraded. Significant MTBE and ETBE degradation rates, 14.3 and 116.1 μmol of ether degraded h−1 g−1 (dry weight), respectively, were measured for R. aetherivorans IFP 2017. The presence of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEXs) had a detrimental effect on ETBE and MTBE biodegradation, whereas octane had a positive effect on the MTBE biodegradation by R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016. BTEXs had either beneficial or detrimental effects on their own degradation by R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016. Potential genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation in the two strains were identified and partially sequenced. PMID:19837842

  8. A new cellulose-producing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. MI 2: screening and optimization of culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Tanskul, Somporn; Amornthatree, Korntip; Jaturonlak, Nathakan

    2013-01-30

    A total of 59 bacterial strains were isolated from ripe fruits and vegetables and tested for their ability to produce cellulose. Only one identified as Rhodococcus sp. MI 2 based on its taxonomic characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The glucose was the only product of digestion by cellulase confirmed by TLC and reversed phase HPLC. Rhodococcus sp. MI 2 produced significantly more cellulose with the SH medium containing glucose than with the coconut juice medium. Rhodococcus sp. MI 2 initially produced 3.91 ± 0.091, 2.20 ± 0.090 and 0.19 ± 0.051 g/L/6 days cellulose under static, agitated and stirred conditions, respectively, whereas A. xylinum 998 produced 1.17 ± 0.065, 1.34 ± 0.115 and 0.12 ± 0.046 g/L/6 days cellulose under the same conditions, respectively. The optimum culture conditions for cellulose production in SH medium were room temperature (25 °C), a 5% (v/v) inoculum, peptone 0.7%, yeast extract 0.9%, and sucrose 1.5%, at a pH of 3.5. The cellulose yield was increased by adding 0.5% CaCO(3) to the SH medium with sucrose but added agar had no effect. The cellulose yield under optimum and static conditions was increased about twice, from 3.7 to 7.4 g/L/14 days.

  9. Trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus actinobacteria with diverse immunomodulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Kuyukina, Maria S; Ivshina, Irena B; Baeva, Tatiana A; Kochina, Olesia A; Gein, Sergey V; Chereshnev, Valery A

    2015-12-25

    Actinobacteria of the genus Rhodococcus produce trehalolipid biosurfactants with versatile biochemical properties and low toxicity. In recent years, these biosurfactants are increasingly studied as possible biomedical agents with expressed immunological activities. Applications of trehalolipids from Rhodococcus, predominantly cell-bound, in biomedicine are also attractive because their cost drawback could be less significant for high-value products. The review summarizes recent findings in immunomodulatory activities of trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus and related actinobacteria and compares their biomedical potential with well-known immunomodifying properties of trehalose dimycolates from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular mechanisms of trehalolipid interactions with immunocompetent cells are also discussed.

  10. Catabolism of 1,3-dinitrobenzene by Rhodococcus sp. QT-1.

    PubMed

    Dickel, O; Knackmuss, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 1,3-dinitrobenzene-degrading Rhodococcus strain QT-1 was isolated under nitrogen limiting conditions from contaminated soil samples. Experimental data indicate tha 1,3-dinitrobenzene is metabolized via 4-nitrocatechol. Both compounds were oxidized by resting cells and nitro groups were completely eliminated as nitrite. Strain QT-1 utilizes both 1,3-dinitrobenzene and 4-nitrocatechol as source of nitrogen in the absence as well as in the presence of high amounts of ammonia. Growth on 4-nitrocatechol does not induce the enzyme(s) for the initial oxidation of 1,3-dinitrobenzene.

  11. [Biodegradation of di-n-butyl phthalate by mangrove microorganism Rhodococcus ruber 1K].

    PubMed

    Li, Kuixiao; Gu, Jidong

    2005-08-01

    A di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP)degrading bacterium Rhodococcus ruber was isolated from mangrove soil, and its degrading characteristics were studied. The results showed that the bacterium could grow well on the substrate with DBP as the sole source of carbon and energy, and the DBP of 50 mg x L(-1) could be completely degraded after 48 h. Under aerobic condition, the tentative pathway proposed for DBP degradation was through monoester initially, then phthalic acid, and finally CO2 and H2O.

  12. Isolation of a recombinant desulfurizing 4,6-diproply dibenzothiophene in n-tetradecane.

    PubMed

    Noda, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kimiko; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis strain KA2-5-1 is unable to desulfurize 4,6-dipropyl dibenzothiophene (DBT) in the oil phase. The dsz desulfurization gene cluster from R. erythropolis strain KA2-5-1 was transferred into 22 rhodococcal and mycobacterial strains using a transposon-transposase complex. The recombinant strain MR65, from Mycobacterium sp. NCIMB10403, was able to grow on a minimal medium supplemented with 1.0 mM 4,6-dipropyl DBT in n-tetradecane (50%, v v ) as the sole sulfur source. Resting cells of recombinant strain MR65 could desulfurize 68 mg l- of sulfur in light gas oil (LGO) containing 126 mg sulfur l-. Strain MR65 had about 1.5-times the LGO desulfurization activity of R. erythropolis strain KA2-5-1. The application of a recombinant, which is able to utilize 4,6-dipropyl DBT in the oil phase, was effective in enhancing LGO biodesulfurization.

  13. Epidemiology of Rhodococcus equi infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Prescott, J F

    1987-08-01

    Current understanding of the epidemiology of Rhodococcus equi infection on horse farms is reviewed. Infection is widespread in herbivores and their environment, because herbivore manure supplies the simple organic acid substrates on which the organism thrives. There is a progressive development of infection in the soil on horse farms with prolonged use, because: (1) there is a continual supply of nutrients; (2) the organism multiplies progressively as temperatures rise; (3) the bacterium has a robust nature. While this aerobic organism fails to multiply in the largely anaerobic intestine of the adult horse, multiplication to very large numbers may occur in the intestine of a foal in its first 8-12 weeks of life. Farms used for foal breeding over many years may thus become particularly dangerous for foals. Areas for future study include the effectiveness of decontamination, manure-removal programs and dust reduction in reducing challenge to susceptible foals.

  14. Triacylglycerol accumulation and oxidative stress in Rhodococcus species: differential effects of pro-oxidants on lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Susana Bequer; Di Capua, Cecilia; Cortez, Néstor; Farías, María E; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2014-03-01

    In general, members of Rhodococcus genus are highly resistant to desiccation. Desiccation is a complex process which includes the formation of reactive oxygen species that results in significant damage to cells. In this study, we demonstrate that extremophile actinobacterial strains isolated from diverse environments, mainly belonging to Rhodococcus genus, exhibited high tolerance to the pro-oxidants hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and methyl viologen (MV). In addition, we investigated the possible interconnections between the responses of the oleaginous Rhodococcus opacus PD630 to oxidative stress and lipid metabolism, since both processes demand a metabolic reorganization of cells. Experiments with metabolic inhibitors showed differential effects of both pro-oxidants on lipid metabolism in PD630 cells. The inhibition of carotenoid biosynthesis by the addition of diphenylamine to the media negatively affected the tolerance of cells to H2O2, but not to MV. The inhibition of triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and accumulation in PD630 did not affect the tolerance of cells to H2O2 and MV; whereas, the blockage of lipolysis decreased the tolerance of cells to H2O2 (but not MV) under carbon-starvation conditions. Interestingly, the addition of MV to the media (but not H2O2) induced a reduction of TAG accumulation by cells. Resuming, results of this study revealed metabolic connections between lipid metabolism and oxidative stress responses in R. opacus PD630, and probably in other extremophile TAG-accumulating rhodococci.

  15. Trans-membrane transport of fluoranthene by Rhodococcus sp. BAP-1 and optimization of uptake process.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wang, Hongqi; Hua, Fei; Su, Mengyuan; Zhao, Yicun

    2014-03-01

    The mechanism of transport of (14)C-fluoranthene by Rhodococcus sp. BAP-1, a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from crude oil-polluted soil, was examined. Our finding demonstrated that the mechanism for fluoranthene travel across the cell membrane in Rhodococcus sp. BAP-1 requires energy. Meanwhile, the transport of fluoranthene involves concurrent catabolism of (14)C, that leading to the generation of significant amount of (14)CO2. Combined with trans-membrane transport dynamic and response surface methodology, a significant influence of temperature, pH and salinity on cellular uptake rate was screened by Plackett-Burman design. Then, Box-Behnken design was employed to optimize and enhanced the trans-membrane transport process. The results predicted by Box-Behnken design indicated that the maximum cellular uptake rate of fluoranthene could be achieve to 0.308μmolmin(-1)mg(-1)·protein (observed) and 0.304μmolmin(-1)mg(-1)·protein (predicted) when the initial temperature, pH and salinity were set at 20°C, 9% and 1%, respectively.

  16. [Degradation of p-nitrophenol by a mangrove bacterial Rhodococcus sp. Ns].

    PubMed

    Wan, Nian-Sheng; Gu, Ji-Dong; Hao, Fu-Qin; Xiao, Xiang-Qun

    2007-02-01

    A bacterium capable of utilizing p-nitrophenol (PNP) as the sole nitrogen, carbon, and energy source was isolated from mangrove sediment. This bacterium was confirmed based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis and taxonomic analysis as being a member of the genus Rhodococcus and was designated strain Ns. The strain Ns could tolerate high concentrations of PNP up to 1.5 mmol/L and complete degradation was achieved in four days at 30 degrees C in the dark under aerobic conditions. Biodegradation of PNP quickly occurred at optimal pH above 5.0, and at least 5 per thousand salinity. Bacterial growth on PNP was observed with the simultaneous production of 4-nitrocatechol, which was also degraded by the same bacterium, as a degradation intermediate, Moreover, Rhodococcus sp. Ns was able to also deplete 2-nitrophenol(ONP) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen and energy, but not 3-nitrophenol. The experimental results show that bacteria indigenous to the natural wetland sediment are capable of complete degradation of PNP and ONP.

  17. Characterization of Rhodococcus wratislaviensis strain J3 that degrades 4-nitrocatechol and other nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Navrátilová, Jitka; Tvrzová, Ludmila; Durnová, Eva; Spröer, Cathrin; Sedlácek, Ivo; Neca, Jirí; Nemec, Miroslav

    2005-02-01

    The bacterial strain J3 was isolated from soil by selective enrichment on mineral medium containing 4-nitrocatechol as the sole carbon and energy source. This strain was identified as Rhodococcus wratislaviensis on the basis of morphology, biochemical, physiological and chemotaxonomic characterization and complete sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene. The isolated bacterium could utilize 4-nitrocatechol, 3-nitrophenol and 5-nitroguaiacol as sole carbon and energy sources. Stoichiometric release of nitrites was measured during degradation of 4-nitrocatechol both in growing cultures and for stationary phase cells. The J3 strain was unable to degrade 4-nitroguaiacol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrobenzoic acid, 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzoic acid and 2,3-difluoro-6-nitrophenol. The J3 strain is deposited in the Czech Collection of Microorganisms as CCM 4930.

  18. Influence of Plasmid Type on the Replication of Rhodococcus equi in Host Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M.; Berghaus, Londa J.; Giguère, Steeve

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The soil-dwelling, saprophytic actinomycete Rhodococcus equi is a multihost, facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages. When inhaled by susceptible foals, it causes severe bronchopneumonia. It is also a pathogen of pigs, which may develop submaxillary lymphadenitis upon exposure. R. equi isolates obtained from foals and pigs possess conjugative plasmids housing a pathogenicity island (PAI) containing a novel family of genes of unknown function called the virulence-associated protein or vap family. The PAI regions of the equine and swine plasmids differ in vap gene composition, with equine isolates possessing six vap genes, including the major virulence determinant vapA, while the PAIs of swine isolates house vapB and five other unique vap genes. Possession of the pVAPA-type virulence plasmid by equine isolates bestows the capacity for intramacrophage replication essential for disease development in vivo. Swine isolates of R. equi are largely unstudied. Here, we show that R. equi isolates from pigs, carrying pVAPB-type plasmids, are able to replicate in a plasmid-dependent manner in macrophages obtained from a variety of species (murine, swine, and equine) and anatomical locations. Similarly, equine isolates carrying pVAPA-type plasmids are capable of replication in swine macrophages. Plasmid swapping between equine and swine strains through conjugation did not alter the intracellular replication capacity of the parental strain, indicating that coevolution of the plasmid and chromosome is not crucial for this attribute. These results demonstrate that while distinct plasmid types exist among R. equi isolates obtained from equine and swine sources, this tropism is not determined by host species-specific intramacrophage replication capabilities. IMPORTANCE This work greatly advances our understanding of the opportunistic pathogen Rhodococcus equi, a disease agent of animals and immunocompromised people. Clinical isolates from diseased foals carry a

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous Strain ATCC 21198

    SciTech Connect

    Shields-Menard, Sara A.; Brown, Steven D; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Indest, Karl; Hancock, Dawn; Wewalwela, Jayani; French, Todd; Donaldson, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous is a Gram-positive red-pigmented bacterium commonly found in the soil. The draft genome sequence for R. rhodochrous strain ATCC 21198 is presented here to provide genetic data for a better understanding of its lipid-accumulating capabilities.

  20. Detection of genes for alkane and naphthalene catabolism in Rhodococcus sp. strain 1BN.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, V; Bernasconi, S; Colombo, M; van Beilen, J B; Cavalca, L

    2000-10-01

    Rhodococcus sp. 1BN was isolated from a contaminated site and showed various biodegradative capabilities. Besides naphthalene, strain 1BN degraded medium- (C6) and long-chain alkanes (C16-C28), benzene and toluene, alone or when the hydrocarbons were mixed in equal proportions. The nucleotide sequence of an alk polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment revealed a 59% nucleotide homology to the Pseudomonas oleovorans alkB gene. The nar fragments were highly homologous to genes coding for large and small subunits of cis-naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase (narAa and narAb) and to cis-naphthalene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (narB) from other rhodococci. The oxidation of indene to cis-(1S,2R)-1,2-dihydroxyindan by toluene-induced cells allows to hypothesize that strain 1BN also carries a toluene dioxygenase-like system. PMID:11233165

  1. Specificity of catechol ortho-cleavage during para-toluate degradation by Rhodococcus opacus 1cp.

    PubMed

    Suvorova, M M; Solianikova, I P; Golovleva, L A

    2006-12-01

    Degradation of para-toluate by Rhodococcus opacus 1cp was investigated. Activities of the key enzymes of this process, catechol 1,2-dioxygenase and muconate cycloisomerase, are detected in this microorganism. Growth on p-toluate was accompanied by induction of two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases. The substrate specificity and physicochemical properties of one enzyme are identical to those of chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase; induction of the latter enzyme was observed during R. opacus 1cp growth on 4-chlorophenol. The other enzyme isolated from the biomass grown on p-toluate exhibited lower rate of chlorinated substrate cleavage compared to the catechol substrate. However, this enzyme is not identical to the catechol 1,2-dioxygenase cloned in this strain within the benzoate catabolism operon. This supports the hypothesis on the existence of multiple forms of dioxygenases as adaptive reactions of microorganisms in response to environmental stress.

  2. [Genetics and biochemistry of surfactant synthesis in Rhodococcus sp. H13-A]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The rationale for these studies resides is that biosurfactant synthesis occurs only when cells are grown with alkanes as sole source of carbon and energy. It is reasoned that biosurfactant synthesis is linked genetically to alkane oxidation and that the identification and characterization of the alk genes would provide information about the structural and regulator genes involved, in biosurfactant synthesis. Rhodococcus H13-A chromosomal DNA was isolated and digested with the restriction endonuclease Sau3A. The shuttle vector, pMVS301, was single site cleaved with Bgl II, phosphorylated, and the chromosomal DNA fragments agated into linearized pMVS301. The ligation mixture was used to transform competent E. coli HB101. The chromosomal DNA fragment has been cloned into pMVS301 which appears to contain genes encoding the initial oxidation of alkane. Electrophoration of Rhodococaus indicates transformation by this technique. Further studies are required to optimize conditions.

  3. (Genetics and biochemistry of surfactant synthesis in Rhodococcus sp. H13-A)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The rationale for these studies resides is that biosurfactant synthesis occurs only when cells are grown with alkanes as sole source of carbon and energy. It is reasoned that biosurfactant synthesis is linked genetically to alkane oxidation and that the identification and characterization of the alk genes would provide information about the structural and regulator genes involved, in biosurfactant synthesis. Rhodococcus H13-A chromosomal DNA was isolated and digested with the restriction endonuclease Sau3A. The shuttle vector, pMVS301, was single site cleaved with Bgl II, phosphorylated, and the chromosomal DNA fragments agated into linearized pMVS301. The ligation mixture was used to transform competent E. coli HB101. The chromosomal DNA fragment has been cloned into pMVS301 which appears to contain genes encoding the initial oxidation of alkane. Electrophoration of Rhodococaus indicates transformation by this technique. Further studies are required to optimize conditions.

  4. Rhodococcus equi peritonitis in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: a first in Australia.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Omar; Crowe, Amy; Sajiv, Cherian; Pawar, Basant

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old Caucasian man with end-stage renal disease secondary to biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy, managed with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (PD), presented with PD-related peritonitis, the causal organism being a non-branching Gram-positive bacillus, Rhodococcus equi. Initial empirical Gram positive and negative coverage with cefazolin and ceftazidime was unsuccessful, but following isolation of the organism, and conversion to intraperitoneal vancomycin and oral ciprofloxacin, the peritonitis episode resolved. At day 10, vancomycin was switched to azithromycin for a total of 6 weeks of antimicrobial therapy. The PD catheter was preserved, and the patient remained peritonitis-free at 6 months of follow-up.

  5. Dioxygenases of Chlorobiphenyl-Degrading Species Rhodococcus wratislaviensis G10 and Chlorophenol-Degrading Species Rhodococcus opacus 1CP Induced in Benzoate-Grown Cells and Genes Potentially Involved in These Processes.

    PubMed

    Solyanikova, I P; Borzova, O V; Emelyanova, E V; Shumkova, E S; Prisyazhnaya, N V; Plotnikova, E G; Golovleva, L A

    2016-09-01

    Dioxygenases induced during benzoate degradation by the actinobacterium Rhodococcus wratislaviensis G10 strain degrading haloaromatic compounds were studied. Rhodococcus wratislaviensis G10 completely degraded 2 g/liter benzoate during 30 h and 10 g/liter during 200 h. Washed cells grown on benzoate retained respiration activity for more than 90 days, and a high activity of benzoate dioxygenase was recorded for 10 days. Compared to the enzyme activities with benzoate, the activity of benzoate dioxygenases was 10-30% with 13 of 35 substituted benzoate analogs. Two dioxygenases capable of cleaving the aromatic ring were isolated and characterized: protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. Catechol inhibited the activity of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. Protocatechuate did not affect the activity of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. A high degree of identity was shown by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for protein peaks of the R. wratislaviensis G10 and Rhodococcus opacus 1CP cells grown on benzoate or LB. DNA from the R. wratislaviensis G10 strain was specifically amplified using specific primers to variable regions of genes coding α- and β-subunits of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase and to two genes of the R. opacus 1CP coding catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. The products were 99% identical with the corresponding regions of the R. opacus 1CP genes. This high identity (99%) between the genes coding degradation of aromatic compounds in the R. wratislaviensis G10 and R. opacus 1CP strains isolated from sites of remote location (1400 km) and at different time (20-year difference) indicates a common origin of biodegradation genes of these strains and a wide distribution of these genes among rhodococci. PMID:27682171

  6. Rhodococcus percolatus sp. nov., a bacterium degrading 2,4,6-trichlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Briglia, M; Rainey, F A; Stackebrandt, E; Schraa, G; Salkinoja-Salonen, M S

    1996-01-01

    A bacterial strain that was able to mineralize 2,4,6-trichlorophenol was isolated from a chlorophenol-fed percolator and was identified as a member of the genus Rhodococcus on the basis of chemotaxonomic characteristics and 16S RNA phylogenetic inference data. This organism (strain MBS1T [T = type strain]) exhibited a typical irregular rod-coccus cycle, and the cells had fimbria-like structures on their surfaces. The diagnostic cell wall amino acid was meso-diaminopimelic acid, and the sugars were arabinose and galactose; the mycolic acids contained 46 to 54 carbon atoms. The main menaquinone was MK-8(H2), and MK-9(H2) was a minor component. The cellular phospholipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositolmannoside, phosphatidylglycerol, and diphosphatidylglycerol. Tuberculostearic acid was present. The whole-cell fatty acids were straight-chain acids with 14 to 18 C atoms. The G+C content of the DNA was 67.4 mol%. This organism grew on sucrose, pyruvate, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and it oxidized a large number of carbon compounds, including catechol, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and phenol. It also exhibited beta-galactosidase, urease, and 2-acetyl-lactate decarboxylase activities. On a phylogenetic tree that was based on 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequences strain MBS1T was found among the rhodococci on an independent branch. On the basis of the chemotaxonomic and phenotypic characteristics of strain MBS1T and its phylogenetic position we suggest that this bacterium should be placed in a new species, Rhodococcus percolatus; the specific epithet was chosen because the organism was isolated by using an enriched percolator. The type strain is strain MBS1. PMID:8573500

  7. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. [Rhodococcus rhodochrous

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J.; Bielaga, B.A.

    1990-07-01

    The overall objective of this project is to sue molecular genetics to develop strains of bacteria with enhanced ability to remove sulfur from coal and to obtain data that will allow the performance and economics of a coal biodesulfurization process to be predicted. The work planned for the current quarter (May 1990 to July 1990) includes the following activities: (1) Construct a cloning vector that can be used in Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 from the small cryptic plasmid found in Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC 190607; (2) Develop techniques for the genetic analysis of IGTS8; (3) Continue biochemical experiments, particularly those that may allow the identification of desulfurization-related enzymes; (4) Continue experiments with coal to determine the kinetics of organic sulfur removal.

  8. Rhodococcus equi (Prescottella equi) vaccines; the future of vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Giles, C; Vanniasinkam, T; Ndi, S; Barton, M D

    2015-09-01

    For decades researchers have been targeting prevention of Rhodococcus equi (Rhodococcus hoagui/Prescottella equi) by vaccination and the horse breeding industry has supported the ongoing efforts by researchers to develop a safe and cost effective vaccine to prevent disease in foals. Traditional vaccines including live, killed and attenuated (physical and chemical) vaccines have proved to be ineffective and more modern molecular-based vaccines including the DNA plasmid, genetically attenuated and subunit vaccines have provided inadequate protection of foals. Newer, bacterial vector vaccines have recently shown promise for R. equi in the mouse model. This article describes the findings of key research in R. equi vaccine development and looks at alternative methods that may potentially be utilised.

  9. Three new serotypes of Rhodococcus equi in Prescott's serotyping system - Short communication.

    PubMed

    Makrai, László; Fodor, László; Hajtós, István; Varga, János; Dénes, Béla

    2015-09-01

    Three new serotypes were found among Rhodococcus equi strains, which could not be assigned into any of the seven serotypes of Prescott's system. Fortythree R. equi strains out of 44 previously nontypable ones isolated in Hungary could be allocated into one of the three new serotypes using the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test. The three new suggested serotypes are serotype 8 (proposed reference strain: HNCMB-138003), serotype 9 (proposed reference strain: HNCMB-138004) and serotype 10 (proposed reference strain: HNCMB-138005). Hyperimmune sera produced in rabbits against the new serotypes and reference strains gave precipitation only with their homologous antigens, and no crossreactions were observed. All of the previously nontypable isolates from clinical samples of horses (lung abscesses, intestinal lymph nodes, mediastinal lymph nodes) proved to be serotype 8, while strains of serotypes 8, 9 and 10 could be isolated from nasal and rectal swabs of horses and from the soil. Serotype 9 dominated among the previously nontypable strains of swine origin. One of the previously nontypable human strains was serotype 10. This serotype was also isolated from pigs, horses and the soil. The description of the three new serotypes can help us reveal new correlations between the host species, geographical origin and serotype of R. equi isolates.

  10. [Variation in the composition of Rhodococcus rodochrous GNP-OHP-38r cell membrane fatty acids in response to temperature and salinity].

    PubMed

    Pucci, G N; Pucci, H

    2004-01-01

    The members of the genus Rhodococcus are frequent and abundant inhabitants of polluted areas with hydrocarbons and they resist the salinity present in the central Patagonia. This genus has good capacity to eliminate pollution produced by hydrocarbons that constitutes the biggest pollutant agent in the region. The present work studies the answer in the composition of its fatty acids under the combined action of the temperature and saline concentration of an isolated stump of a landfarming system. The strategy of Rhodococcus rodochrous strain GNP-OHP-38r in front of the thermal-osmotic stress is the increase of the percentage of the total saturated fatty acids (n:0); fatty acids branched in the terminal carbon with hidroxyl group in position 2 (n:0 iso 2 OH) and saturated with group methyl in carbon 10 (n:0 10 metil) when the temperature is increased. These acids increase while the percentage of n:1 cis decrease.

  11. Enzymatic cyanide degradation by cell-free extract of Rhodococcus UKMP-5M.

    PubMed

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Latif Ibrahim, Abdul; Cass, Anthony E G

    2015-01-01

    The cell-free extract of locally isolated Rhodococcus UKMP-5M strain was used as an alternative to develop greener and cost effective cyanide removal technology. The present study aims to assess the viability of the cell-free extract to detoxify high concentrations of cyanide which is measured through the monitoring of protein concentration and specific cyanide-degrading activity. When cyanide-grown cells were subjected to grinding in liquid nitrogen which is relatively an inexpressive and fast cell disruption method, highest cyanide-degrading activity of 0.63 mM min(-1) mg(-1) protein was obtained in comparison to enzymatic lysis and agitation with fine glass beads. The cell-free extracts managed to degrade 80% of 20 mM KCN within 80 min and the rate of cyanide consumption increased linearly as the concentration of protein was raised. In both cases, the addition of co-factor was not required which proved to be advantageous economically. The successful formation of ammonia and formate as endproducts indicated that the degradation of cyanide by Rhodococcus UKMP-5M proceeded via the activity of cyanidase and the resulting non-toxic products are safe for disposal into the environment. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Thus, the utilization of cell-free extracts as an alternative to live microbial in cyanide degradation offers numerous advantageous such as the potential to tolerate and degrade higher concentration of cyanide and total reduction in the overall cost of operation since the requirement for nutrient support is irrelevant. PMID:25723061

  12. Enzymatic cyanide degradation by cell-free extract of Rhodococcus UKMP-5M.

    PubMed

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Latif Ibrahim, Abdul; Cass, Anthony E G

    2015-01-01

    The cell-free extract of locally isolated Rhodococcus UKMP-5M strain was used as an alternative to develop greener and cost effective cyanide removal technology. The present study aims to assess the viability of the cell-free extract to detoxify high concentrations of cyanide which is measured through the monitoring of protein concentration and specific cyanide-degrading activity. When cyanide-grown cells were subjected to grinding in liquid nitrogen which is relatively an inexpressive and fast cell disruption method, highest cyanide-degrading activity of 0.63 mM min(-1) mg(-1) protein was obtained in comparison to enzymatic lysis and agitation with fine glass beads. The cell-free extracts managed to degrade 80% of 20 mM KCN within 80 min and the rate of cyanide consumption increased linearly as the concentration of protein was raised. In both cases, the addition of co-factor was not required which proved to be advantageous economically. The successful formation of ammonia and formate as endproducts indicated that the degradation of cyanide by Rhodococcus UKMP-5M proceeded via the activity of cyanidase and the resulting non-toxic products are safe for disposal into the environment. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Thus, the utilization of cell-free extracts as an alternative to live microbial in cyanide degradation offers numerous advantageous such as the potential to tolerate and degrade higher concentration of cyanide and total reduction in the overall cost of operation since the requirement for nutrient support is irrelevant.

  13. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    SciTech Connect

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V.; Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H.; Murzin, Alexey G.; Meijer, Wim G.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2014-08-01

    VapD is one of a set of highly homologous virulence-associated proteins from the multi-host pathogen Rhodococcus equi. The crystal structure reveals an eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel fold and a glycine rich ‘bald’ surface. Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins.

  14. Rhodococcus equi Infection after Alemtuzumab Therapy for T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, Herman G.; van Assen, Sander; Leduc, Dominique; Daenen, Simon M.G.J.; Arends, Jan P.; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2007-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, mainly known from veterinary medicine as a pathogen in domestic animals, can also cause infections in immunocompromised humans, especially in those with defects in cellular immunity. Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, causes lymphocytopenia by eliminating CD52-positive cells. We report a patient in whom Rhodococcus equi infection developed after alemtuzumab therapy. PMID:18258054

  15. Biodegradation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 to N-isopropylammelide with subsequent assessment of toxicity of biodegraded metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kolekar, Parag D; Phugare, Swapnil S; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2014-02-01

    Atrazine is a persistent organic pollutant in the environment which affects not only terrestrial and aquatic biota but also human health. Since its removal from the environment is needed, atrazine biodegradation is achieved in the present study using the bacterium Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 isolated from soil, long-term treated with atrazine. The bacterium was capable of degrading about 75 % atrazine in liquid medium having pH 7 under aerobic and dark condition within 7 days. The degradation ability of the bacterium at various temperatures (20-60 °C), pH (range 3-11), carbon (glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch, lactose, and maltose), and nitrogen (ammonium molybdate, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, and urea) sources were studied for triumph optimum atrazine degradation. The results indicate that atrazine degradation at higher concentrations (100 ppm) was pH and temperature dependent. However, glucose and potassium nitrate were optimum carbon and nitrogen source, respectively. Atrazine biodegradation analysis was carried out by using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (LC/Q-TOF-MS) techniques. LC/Q-TOF-MS analysis revealed formation of various intermediate metabolites including hydroxyatrazine, N-isopropylammelide, deisopropylhydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and deisopropyldeethylatrazine which was helpful to propose biochemical degradation pathway of atrazine. Furthermore, the toxicological studies of atrazine and its biodegraded metabolites were executed on earthworm Eisenia foetida as a model organism with respect to enzymatic (SOD and Catalase) antioxidant defense mechanism and lipid peroxidation studies. These results suggest innocuous degradation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 in nontoxic form. Therefore the Rhodococcus sp.BCH2 could prove a valuable source for the eco-friendly biodegradation of atrazine pesticide.

  16. Prevalence and Antibiogram study of Rhodococcus equi in equines of Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    PubMed

    Mir, Irfan Ahmad; Kumar, Bablu; Taku, Anil; Bhardwaj, Rajinder Kumar; Bhat, Mohd Altaf; Badroo, Gulzar Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Rhodococcus equi infection in equines of Jammu and Kashmir, India, and evaluate the zoonotic threat posed by this organism to equine owners and tourists. One hundred and forty-one samples (98 samples from adult animals ≥5 years old and 43 samples from foals less than 6 months old) were collected in duplicate from nasopharyngeal tract of equines for isolation and direct PCR. A total of 12 isolates of R. equi were recovered, of which 9 were from foals and 3 from adult animals. Therefore, the present study recorded prevalence rates of 20.93% and 3.06% among foals and adult equines respectively. The prevalence rates were found to be 25.58% and 4.08% by 16S rRNA species-specific PCR among foals and adult animals respectively. Thus, the PCR-based assay was found to be more sensitive and helped in quick detection of R. equi than the culture based method which is time consuming and laborious. However, the culture-based method is still preferred due to some limitations of PCR. The antibiogram of the isolates revealed that erythromycin and rifampicin were the most effective antimicrobials with 100% sensitivity, followed by amoxicillin (66.67%), lincomycin (58.3%) and kanamycin (58.3%). The results also revealed that resistance was highest for penicillin G (50%), followed by kanamycin (25%) and streptomycin (25%).

  17. Degradation of chloronitrobenzenes by a coculture of Pseudomonas putida and a Rhodococcus sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.S.; Lim, S.J.; Chang, Y.K.; Kim, H.S.; Livingston, A.G.

    1999-03-01

    A single microorganism able to mineralize chloronitrobenzenes (CNBs) has not been reported, and degradation of CNBs of coculture of two microbial strains was attempted. Pseudomonas putida HS12 was first isolated by analogue enrichment culture using nitrobenzene (NB) as the substrate, and this strain was observed to possess a partial reductive pathway for the degradation of NB. From high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, NB-grown cells of P. putida HS12 were found to convert 3- and 4-CNBs to the corresponding 5- and 4-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, respectively, by partial reduction and subsequent acetylation. For the degradation of CNBs, Rhodococcus sp. strain HS51, which degrades 4- and 5-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, was isolated and combined with P. putida HS12 to give a coculture. This coculture was confirmed to mineralize 3- and 4-CNBs in the presence of an additional carbon source. A degradation pathway for 3- and 4-CNBs by the two isolated strains was also proposed.

  18. Comparative Genomics and Metabolic Analysis Reveals Peculiar Characteristics of Rhodococcus opacus Strain M213 Particularly for Naphthalene Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Jochen; Indest, Karl J.; Jung, Carina M.; Stothard, Paul; Bera, Gopal; Green, Stefan J.; Ogram, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Rhodococcus opacus strain M213, isolated from a fuel-oil contaminated soil, was sequenced and annotated which revealed a genome size of 9,194,165 bp encoding 8680 putative genes and a G+C content of 66.72%. Among the protein coding genes, 71.77% were annotated as clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs); 55% of the COGs were present as paralog clusters. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of M213 revealed the presence of three different sized replicons- a circular chromosome and two megaplasmids (pNUO1 and pNUO2) estimated to be of 750Kb 350Kb in size, respectively. Conversely, using an alternative approach of optical mapping, the plasmid replicons appeared as a circular ~1.2 Mb megaplasmid and a linear, ~0.7 Mb megaplasmid. Genome-wide comparative analysis of M213 with a cohort of sequenced Rhodococcus species revealed low syntenic affiliation with other R. opacus species including strains B4 and PD630. Conversely, a closer affiliation of M213, at the functional (COG) level, was observed with the catabolically versatile R. jostii strain RHA1 and other Rhodococcii such as R. wratislaviensis strain IFP 2016, R. imtechensis strain RKJ300, Rhodococcus sp. strain JVH1, and Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17, respectively. An in-depth, genome-wide comparison between these functional relatives revealed 971 unique genes in M213 representing 11% of its total genome; many associating with catabolic functions. Of major interest was the identification of as many as 154 genomic islands (GEIs), many with duplicated catabolic genes, in particular for PAHs; a trait that was confirmed by PCR-based identification of naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) as a representative gene, across PFGE-resolved replicons of strain M213. Interestingly, several plasmid/GEI-encoded genes, that likely participate in degrading naphthalene (NAP) via a peculiar pathway, were also identified in strain M213 using a combination of bioinformatics, metabolic analysis and gene

  19. Comparative Genomics and Metabolic Analysis Reveals Peculiar Characteristics of Rhodococcus opacus Strain M213 Particularly for Naphthalene Degradation.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Blom, Jochen; Indest, Karl J; Jung, Carina M; Stothard, Paul; Bera, Gopal; Green, Stefan J; Ogram, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Rhodococcus opacus strain M213, isolated from a fuel-oil contaminated soil, was sequenced and annotated which revealed a genome size of 9,194,165 bp encoding 8680 putative genes and a G+C content of 66.72%. Among the protein coding genes, 71.77% were annotated as clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs); 55% of the COGs were present as paralog clusters. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of M213 revealed the presence of three different sized replicons- a circular chromosome and two megaplasmids (pNUO1 and pNUO2) estimated to be of 750Kb 350Kb in size, respectively. Conversely, using an alternative approach of optical mapping, the plasmid replicons appeared as a circular ~1.2 Mb megaplasmid and a linear, ~0.7 Mb megaplasmid. Genome-wide comparative analysis of M213 with a cohort of sequenced Rhodococcus species revealed low syntenic affiliation with other R. opacus species including strains B4 and PD630. Conversely, a closer affiliation of M213, at the functional (COG) level, was observed with the catabolically versatile R. jostii strain RHA1 and other Rhodococcii such as R. wratislaviensis strain IFP 2016, R. imtechensis strain RKJ300, Rhodococcus sp. strain JVH1, and Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17, respectively. An in-depth, genome-wide comparison between these functional relatives revealed 971 unique genes in M213 representing 11% of its total genome; many associating with catabolic functions. Of major interest was the identification of as many as 154 genomic islands (GEIs), many with duplicated catabolic genes, in particular for PAHs; a trait that was confirmed by PCR-based identification of naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) as a representative gene, across PFGE-resolved replicons of strain M213. Interestingly, several plasmid/GEI-encoded genes, that likely participate in degrading naphthalene (NAP) via a peculiar pathway, were also identified in strain M213 using a combination of bioinformatics, metabolic analysis and gene

  20. Deep-sea Rhodococcus sp. BS-15, lacking the phytopathogenic fas genes, produces a novel glucotriose lipid biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Nishi, Shinro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai; Watsuji, Tomo-O; Nagano, Yuriko; Yabuki, Akinori; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Hatada, Yuji; Horiuchi, Jun-Ichi

    2014-08-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactant-producing bacteria were isolated from deep-sea sediment collected from the Okinawa Trough. Isolate BS15 produced the largest amount of the glycolipid, generating up to 6.31 ± 1.15 g l(-1) after 4 days at 20 °C. Glucose was identified in the hydrolysate of the purified major component of the biosurfactant glycolipid. According to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis, the hydrophobic moieties in the major component were hexadecanoate, octadecanoate, 3-hydroxyhexadecanoate, 2-hydroxyoctanoate, and succinate. The molecular weight of the purified major glycolipid was calculated to be 1,211, while (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra confirmed that the major component consisted of 2 mol of α-glucoside and 1 mol of β-glucoside. The molecular structure was assigned as novel trisaccharide-type glycolipid biosurfactant, glucotriose lipids. The critical micelle concentration of the purified major glycolipid was 2.3 × 10(-6) M, with a surface tension of 29.5 mN m(-1). Phylogenetic analysis showed isolate BS15 was closely related to a Rhodococcus strains isolated from Antarctica, and to Rhodococcus fascians, a phytopathogen. PCR analysis showed that the fasA, fasB, fasC, fasD, fasE, and fasF genes, which are involved in phytohormone-like cytokinin production, were not present in the genome of BS15; however, analysis of a draft genome sequence of BS15 (5.5 Mb) identified regions with 31 %, 53 %, 46 %, 30 %, and 31 % DNA sequence identity to the fasA, fasB, fasC, and fasD genes, respectively.

  1. Benzoate degradation by Rhodococcus opacus 1CP after dormancy: Characterization of dioxygenases involved in the process.

    PubMed

    Solyanikova, Inna P; Emelyanova, Elena V; Borzova, Oksana V; Golovleva, Ludmila A

    2016-01-01

    The process of benzoate degradation by strain Rhodococcus opacus 1CP after a five-year dormancy was investigated and its peculiarities were revealed. The strain was shown to be capable of growth on benzoate at a concentration of up to 10 g L(-1). The substrate specificity of benzoate dioxygenase (BDO) during the culture growth on a medium with a low (200-250 mg L(-1)) and high (4 g L(-1)) concentration of benzoate was assessed. BDO of R. opacus 1CP was shown to be an extremely narrow specificity enzyme. Out of 31 substituted benzoates, only with one, 3-chlorobenzoate, its activity was higher than 9% of that of benzoate. Two dioxygenases, catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (Cat 1,2-DO) and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (PCA 3,4-DO), were identified in a cell-free extract, purified and characterized. The substrate specificity of Cat 1,2-DO isolated from cells of strain 1CP after the dormancy was found to differ significantly from that of Cat 1,2-DO isolated earlier from cells of this strain grown on benzoate. By its substrate specificity, the described Cat 1,2-DO was close to the Cat 1,2-DO from strain 1CP grown on 4-methylbenzoate. Neither activity nor inhibition by protocatechuate was observed during the reaction of Cat 1,2-DO with catechol, and catechol had no inhibitory effect on the reaction of PCA 3,4-DO with protocatechuate. PMID:26669259

  2. Importance of Rhodococcus strains in a bacterial consortium degrading a mixture of hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives revealed by metatranscriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Auffret, Marc D; Yergeau, Etienne; Labbé, Diane; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Greer, Charles W

    2015-03-01

    A bacterial consortium (Mix3) composed of microorganisms originating from different environments (soils and wastewater) was obtained after enrichment in the presence of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives. After addition of the mixture, the development of the microbial composition of Mix3 was monitored at three different times (35, 113, and 222 days) using fingerprinting method and dominant bacterial species were identified. In parallel, 14 bacteria were isolated after 113 days and identified. Degradation capacities for Mix3 and the isolated bacterial strains were characterized and compared. At day 113, we induced the expression of catabolic genes in Mix3 by adding the substrate mixture to resting cells and the metatranscriptome was analyzed. After addition of the substrate mixture, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased at day 222 while a shift between Rhodococcus and Mycobacterium was observed after 113 days. Mix3 was able to degrade 13 compounds completely, with partial degradation of isooctane and 2-ethylhexyl nitrate, but tert-butyl alcohol was not degraded. Rhodococcus wratislaviensis strain IFP 2016 isolated from Mix3 showed almost the same degradation capacities as Mix3: these results were not observed with the other isolated strains. Transcriptomic results revealed that Actinobacteria and in particular, Rhodococcus species, were major contributors in terms of total and catabolic gene transcripts while other species were involved in cyclohexane degradation. Not all the microorganisms identified at day 113 were active except R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016 that appeared to be a major player in the degradation activity observed in Mix3.

  3. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain BCP1, a Biodegrader of Alkanes and Chlorinated Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, M.; Di Gennaro, P.; D’Ursi, P.; Orro, A.; Mezzelani, A.; Landini, M.; Fedi, S.; Frascari, D.; Presentato, A.; Milanesi, L.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 cometabolizes chlorinated compounds and mineralizes a broad range of alkanes, as it is highly tolerant to them. The high-quality draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1, consisting of 6,231,823 bp, with a G+C content of 70.4%, 5,902 protein-coding genes, and 58 RNA genes, is presented here. PMID:24158549

  4. Identification of pathogens and virulence profile of Rhodococcus equi and Escherichia coli strains obtained from sand of parks

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, M.C.; Takai, S.; Leite, D.S.; Pinto, J.P.A.N.; Brandão, P.E.; Santarém, V.A.; Listoni, F.J.P.; Da Silva, A.V.; Ribeiro, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of pathogens of viral (Rotavirus, Coronavirus), parasitic (Toxocara spp.) and bacterial (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Rhodococcus equi) origin shed in feces, and the virulence profile of R. equi and E. coli isolates were investigated in 200 samples of sand obtained from 40 parks, located in central region of state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, using different diagnostic methods. From 200 samples analyzed, 23 (11.5%) strains of R. equi were isolated. None of the R. equi isolates showed a virulent (vapA gene) or intermediately virulent (vapB gene) profiles. Sixty-three (31.5%) strains of E. coli were identified. The following genes encoding virulence factors were identified in E. coli: eae, bfp, saa, iucD, papGI, sfa and hly. Phylogenetic classification showed that 63 E. coli isolates belonged to groups B1 (52.4%), A (25.4%) and B2 (22.2%). No E. coli serotype O157:H7 was identified. Eggs of Toxocara sp. were found in three parks and genetic material of bovine Coronavirus was identified in one sample of one park. No Salmonella spp. and Rotavirus isolates were identified in the samples of sand. The presence of R. equi, Toxocara sp, bovine Coronavirus and virulent E. coli isolates in the environment of parks indicates that the sanitary conditions of the sand should be improved in order to reduce the risks of fecal transmission of pathogens of zoonotic potential to humans in these places. PMID:24294244

  5. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals. PMID:27008624

  6. Radiological findings in nine AIDS patients with Rhodococcus equi pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wicky, S; Cartei, F; Mayor, B; Frija, J; Gevenois, P A; Giron, J; Laurent, F; Perri, G; Schnyder, P

    1996-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) infections have been incidentally reported as a cause of pulmonary infection in severely immunocompromised hosts, including AIDS patients. Our purpose is to describe the radiological findings in nine AIDS patients with R. equi pneumonia assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), biopsies, cultures of sputum, and hemocultures. All patients were examined by chest radiographs and contrast-medium-enhanced chest CT. Dense pulmonary consolidations with or without cavitations accounted for the most striking radiological patterns. Chest CT also revealed six mediastinal involvements, strongly mimicking a lymphoma. Two of them had multiple bilateral pulmonary nodular opacities. Pleural effusion was not identified. Although intensive therapies were administered, seven among nine patients died within few months. In an AIDS patient living in a rural area or exposed to horses and presenting these radiological patterns, the possibility of R. equi pneumonia should be considered in the differential diagnosis along with other infectious diseases or lymphomas. PMID:8972317

  7. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D.; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals. PMID:27008624

  8. Development of a genetic transformation system for benzene-tolerant Rhodococcus opacus strains.

    PubMed

    Na, Kyung-Su; Nagayasu, Kan; Kuroda, Akio; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Ohtake, Hisao; Kato, Junichi

    2005-04-01

    Rhodococcus opacus B-4 and B-9 are tolerant to various organic solvents including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and styrene, and are suitable bacterial hosts for the production of chemical products from hydrophobic substrates. A 4.4-kb endogenous plasmid (pKNR 01) was isolated from R. opacus B-4 and sequenced completely. Plasmid pKNR 01 encodes proteins that share similarity to replication proteins from the enteric bacterial and actinomycete theta-replication plasmids. A 7.4-kb chimeric plasmid, designated pKNR 01.1, was constructed by fusing XhoI-digested pKNR 01 and Escherichia coli vector pSTV 28. Plasmid pKNR 01.1 had the ability to replicate in B-4 and B-9. A protocol for transformation of B-9 by electroporation was optimized employing pKNR 01.1. Frequencies of 4.1 x 10(5) transformants per mug of plasmid DNA were obtained for B-9 cells, whereas B-4 harboring naturally occurring pKNR 01 was transformed at lower frequencies (approximately 1 x 10(4) transformants per mug of plasmid DNA). Deletion analysis of pKNR 01.1 showed that the 1.9-kb SphI-XhoI region containing the repA and rep B genes and the 0.6-kb region upstream of repA was essential for plasmid maintenance in R. opacus strains.

  9. Induction of Viable but Nonculturable State in Rhodococcus and Transcriptome Analysis Using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaomei; Guo, Li; Ding, Linxian; Qu, Kun; Shen, Chaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Viable but nonculturable (VBNC) bacteria, which maintain the viability with loss of culturability, universally exist in contaminated and non-contaminated environments. In this study, two strains, Rhodococcus sp. TG13 and TN3, which were isolated from PCB-contaminated sediment and non-contaminated sediment respectively, were investigated under low temperature and oligotrophic conditions. The results indicated that the two strains TG13 and TN3 could enter into the VBNC state with different incubation times, and could recover culturability by reversal of unfavourable factors and addition of resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf), respectively. Furthermore, the gene expression variations in the VBNC response were clarified by Illumina high throughput RNA-sequencing. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis demonstrated that up-regulated genes in the VBNC cells of the strain TG13 related to protein modification, ATP accumulation and RNA polymerase, while all differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the VBNC cells of the strain TN3 were down-regulated. However, the down-regulated genes in both the two strains mainly encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit, catalase, oxidoreductase, which further verified that cold-induced loss of ability to defend oxidative stress may play an important role in induction of the VBNC state. This study further verified that the molecular mechanisms underlying the VBNC state varied with various bacterial species. Study on the VBNC state of non-pathogenic bacteria will provide new insights into the limitation of environmental micro-bioremediation and the cultivation of unculturable species. PMID:26808070

  10. Induction of Viable but Nonculturable State in Rhodococcus and Transcriptome Analysis Using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaomei; Guo, Li; Ding, Linxian; Qu, Kun; Shen, Chaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Viable but nonculturable (VBNC) bacteria, which maintain the viability with loss of culturability, universally exist in contaminated and non-contaminated environments. In this study, two strains, Rhodococcus sp. TG13 and TN3, which were isolated from PCB-contaminated sediment and non-contaminated sediment respectively, were investigated under low temperature and oligotrophic conditions. The results indicated that the two strains TG13 and TN3 could enter into the VBNC state with different incubation times, and could recover culturability by reversal of unfavourable factors and addition of resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf), respectively. Furthermore, the gene expression variations in the VBNC response were clarified by Illumina high throughput RNA-sequencing. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis demonstrated that up-regulated genes in the VBNC cells of the strain TG13 related to protein modification, ATP accumulation and RNA polymerase, while all differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the VBNC cells of the strain TN3 were down-regulated. However, the down-regulated genes in both the two strains mainly encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit, catalase, oxidoreductase, which further verified that cold-induced loss of ability to defend oxidative stress may play an important role in induction of the VBNC state. This study further verified that the molecular mechanisms underlying the VBNC state varied with various bacterial species. Study on the VBNC state of non-pathogenic bacteria will provide new insights into the limitation of environmental micro-bioremediation and the cultivation of unculturable species. PMID:26808070

  11. Aerobic debromination of BDE-209 by Rhodococcus sp. coupled with zerovalent iron/activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Zhang, Yacong; Liu, Ruihong; Wang, Zhiping; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yilun; Lin, Kuangfei

    2016-02-01

    In this study, an aerobic strain identified as Rhodococcus sp. was isolated from the sediment of a typical electronic waste disassemble site, Taizhou, China. This strain could use BDE-209 as the sole carbon and energy source and degrade 65.1% of BDE-209 (initial concentration being 50 mg/L) within 144 h. To explore the BDE-209 degradation properties of this strain with the co-existed electronic donor, zerovalent iron/activated carbon (ZVI/AC) was introduced to build a microbial-chemical coupling system, which was found to promote the degradation of BDE-209 slightly (74.7% in 144 h). Moreover, the debromination products in both of the batch experiments were determined with GC/MS, which showed that lower brominated PBDE congeners were produced almost in order of the number of bromine ions, ranged from nona- to di-BDEs. In addition, the possible debromination pathways of BDE-209 for each system were proposed respectively, which confirmed the microbial activity of BDE-209 debromination. Since some of the lower-brominated BDE congeners are much toxic than BDE-209, these microbial activities might bring potential hazards to the environment with BDE-209 contamination. It is the first time to investigate the transformation of BDE-209 with microbial-chemical coupling system, which is universal in the nature, thus suggesting that the ecological safety of environment exposed to PBDEs should be focused in the future.

  12. Genomic and Functional Analyses of Rhodococcus equi Phages ReqiPepy6, ReqiPoco6, ReqiPine5, and ReqiDocB7 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Summer, E. J.; Liu, M.; Gill, J. J.; Grant, M.; Chan-Cortes, T. N.; Ferguson, L.; Janes, C.; Lange, K.; Bertoli, M.; Moore, C.; Orchard, R. C.; Cohen, N. D.; Young, R.

    2011-01-01

    The isolation and results of genomic and functional analyses of Rhodococcus equi phages ReqiPepy6, ReqiDocB7, ReqiPine5, and ReqiPoco6 (hereafter referred to as Pepy6, DocB7, Pine5, and Poco6, respectively) are reported. Two phages, Pepy6 and Poco6, more than 75% identical, exhibited genome organization and protein sequence likeness to Lactococcus lactis phage 1706 and clostridial prophage elements. An unusually high fraction, 27%, of Pepy6 and Poco6 proteins were predicted to possess at least one transmembrane domain, a value much higher than the average of 8.5% transmembrane domain-containing proteins determined from a data set of 36,324 phage protein entries. Genome organization and protein sequence comparisons place phage Pine5 as the first nonmycobacteriophage member of the large Rosebush cluster. DocB7, which had the broadest host range among the four isolates, was not closely related to any phage or prophage in the database, and only 23 of 105 predicted encoded proteins could be assigned a functional annotation. Because of the relationship of Rhodococcus to Mycobacterium, it was anticipated that these phages should exhibit some of the features characteristic of mycobacteriophages. Traits that were identified as shared by the Rhodococcus phages and mycobacteriophages include the prevalent long-tailed morphology and the presence of genes encoding LysB-like mycolate-hydrolyzing lysis proteins. Application of DocB7 lysates to soils amended with a host strain of R. equi reduced recoverable bacterial CFU, suggesting that phage may be useful in limiting R. equi load in the environment while foals are susceptible to infection. PMID:21097585

  13. Adsorption of Rhodococcus Strain GIN-1 (NCIMB 40340) on Titanium Dioxide and Coal Fly Ash Particles

    PubMed Central

    Shabtai, Y.; Fleminger, G.

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococcus strain GIN-1 (NCIMB 40340) can be used to enrich and isolate a titanium-rich fraction from coal fly ash. The gram-positive bacterium was isolated by its ability to adhere strongly and rapidly to suspended particles of pure titanium dioxide or coal fly ash. Adsorption depends on the salt concentration and occurs in seawater. Lowering of the salt concentration or washing of particles with pure water did not, however, cause desorption of the bacteria from TiO2 particles; this was achieved by strong alkaline treatment or combined treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate and urea but not with dilute acids, alcohols, or cationic or nonionic detergents. The bacterium exhibits higher affinity towards oxides of Ti and Zn than to other oxides with similar distribution of particle size. Moreover, it adheres much faster to TiO2 than to magnetite (Fe3O4) or Al2O3. After about 1 min, more than 85% of the cells were adsorbed on TiO2, compared with adsorption of only 10 and 8% to magnetite and Al2O3, respectively. Adsorption of the bacteria on TiO2 occurs over a pH range of 1.0 to 9.0 and at temperatures from 4 to over 80°C. Scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray analysis revealed preferential adherence of the bacterium to coal ash particles richer in Ti. Stronger adhesion to TiO2 was also demonstrated in the translocation of bacteria, preadsorbed on magnetite, to TiO2 particles. The temporary co-adhesion to magnetite and TiO2 was exploited for the design of a prototype biomagnetic separation process in which bacterial cells serve as an adhesive mediator between magnetite and TiO2 particles in a mixture of Al, Si, and Ti oxides that simulates their proportion in the ash. Images PMID:16349369

  14. Assessment of alkaline cholesterol oxidase purified from Rhodococcus sp. PKPD-CL for its halo tolerance, detergent and organic solvent stability.

    PubMed

    Kasabe, Pramod J; Mali, Geetanjali T; Dandge, Padma B

    2015-12-01

    The novel bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. PKPD-CL was isolated and identified from the 'Chilika Lake' located at Odisha state of India, which is a largest brackish water habitat in Asia. Rhodococcus sp. PKPD-CL produces extracellular halo tolerant, detergent and organic solvent stable alkaline cholesterol oxidase. It has apparent molecular weight of 60 kDa and was purified 59 fold by using 60% saturated ammonium sulfate fractionation, anion exchange followed by size exclusion chromatographic techniques with 37% recovery. It showed substrate specificity for 3β-hydroxysteroids with Km of 1.1 × 10(-4)M for cholesterol. The pH, 8.0 and the temperature, 37 °C were required for its optimum activity. Enzyme is considerably stable at pH 6.0-8.5 and temperature up to 50 °C. At 4 and 30 °C it maintained its 100% activity up to 60 days. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was 9.5. It showed 80% residual activity with 20% NaCl (3.42 M) and 83% relative activity with 12% NaCl (2.05 M) concentration. The metal ions like Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Ag+, Fe(3+), Ba(2+) inhibited the enzyme activity >60% while Hg(2+) served a potent inhibitor whereas Mg(2+) found to be a good enhancer for it. The enzyme was stable in presence of chemical reagents (NaN3, EDTA), detergents (Tween-80, Tween-20, Triton X-100, sodium cholate) and various organic solvents (isopropanol, ethanol, benzene, chloroform, methanol, toluene, ethyl acetate, butanol and dimethylsulfoxide). Such a multi stress tolerant and versatile enzyme produced by Rhodococcus sp. PKPD-CL may serve as a good choice for industrial applications.

  15. Assessment of alkaline cholesterol oxidase purified from Rhodococcus sp. PKPD-CL for its halo tolerance, detergent and organic solvent stability.

    PubMed

    Kasabe, Pramod J; Mali, Geetanjali T; Dandge, Padma B

    2015-12-01

    The novel bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. PKPD-CL was isolated and identified from the 'Chilika Lake' located at Odisha state of India, which is a largest brackish water habitat in Asia. Rhodococcus sp. PKPD-CL produces extracellular halo tolerant, detergent and organic solvent stable alkaline cholesterol oxidase. It has apparent molecular weight of 60 kDa and was purified 59 fold by using 60% saturated ammonium sulfate fractionation, anion exchange followed by size exclusion chromatographic techniques with 37% recovery. It showed substrate specificity for 3β-hydroxysteroids with Km of 1.1 × 10(-4)M for cholesterol. The pH, 8.0 and the temperature, 37 °C were required for its optimum activity. Enzyme is considerably stable at pH 6.0-8.5 and temperature up to 50 °C. At 4 and 30 °C it maintained its 100% activity up to 60 days. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was 9.5. It showed 80% residual activity with 20% NaCl (3.42 M) and 83% relative activity with 12% NaCl (2.05 M) concentration. The metal ions like Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Ag+, Fe(3+), Ba(2+) inhibited the enzyme activity >60% while Hg(2+) served a potent inhibitor whereas Mg(2+) found to be a good enhancer for it. The enzyme was stable in presence of chemical reagents (NaN3, EDTA), detergents (Tween-80, Tween-20, Triton X-100, sodium cholate) and various organic solvents (isopropanol, ethanol, benzene, chloroform, methanol, toluene, ethyl acetate, butanol and dimethylsulfoxide). Such a multi stress tolerant and versatile enzyme produced by Rhodococcus sp. PKPD-CL may serve as a good choice for industrial applications. PMID:26276474

  16. Molecular characterization of Rhodococcus equi from horse-breeding farms by means of multiplex PCR for the vap gene family.

    PubMed

    Monego, Fernanda; Maboni, Franciele; Krewer, Cristina; Vargas, Agueda; Costa, Mateus; Loreto, Elgion

    2009-04-01

    This study evaluated the molecular characteristics of Rhodococcus equi isolates obtained from horses by a multiplex PCR assay that amplifies the vap gene family (vapA, -B, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, and -H). A total of 180 R. equi isolates were studied from four different sources, namely healthy horse feces (112), soil (12), stalls (23), and clinical isolates (33) from horse-breeding farms. The technique was performed and confirmed by sequencing of amplified vap gene family controls. Thirty-two (17.8%) of the R. equi isolates were positive for the vapA gene and carried at least three other vap genes. All 147 isolates from equine feces, stalls, and soil failed to demonstrate any genes associated with virulence-inducing proteins. About 32 (97.0%) out of the 33 clinical equine isolates tested positive for the multiplex PCR assay for the vap gene family. They demonstrated six molecular profiles: 100% featured the vapA, vapD, and vapG genes, 86.6% vapF, 76.6% vapH, 43.3% vapC, 36.6% vapE, and none vapB. The most frequent molecular profile was vap A, -D, -F, G, and -H, where this profile was present in 37.5% of the strains. Moreover, there was no molecular epidemiological pattern for R. equi isolates that uniquely mapped to each horse-breeding farm studied. Our proposed technique allows the identification of eight members of the vap gene family (vapA, B, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, and -H). It is a practical and efficient method of conducting clinical and epidemiological studies on R. equi isolates.

  17. Microbial strain improvement for organosulfur removal from coal. [Rhodococcus rhodochrous

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II.

    1991-01-01

    IGT has developed a microbial culture of Rhodococcus rhodochrous, designated as IGTS8, that is capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds in a range of organosulfur model compounds and is capable of removing organic sulfur from coal and petroleum without sacrificing the calorific value of the fuel. Although IGTS8 possesses the ability to specifically remove organic sulfur from coal, a major research need is to develop improved strains of microorganisms that possess higher levels of desulfurization activity and therefore will permit more favorable biodesulfurization process conditions: faster rates, more complete removal, and smaller reactor size. Strain improvement is the single most important aspect to the development of a practical coal desulfurization process. Microbial strain improvement can be accomplished using genetic engineering recombinant DNA techniques as well as by non-recombinant techniques of microbiology and genetics. Both approaches will be employed in the proposed research, with the objective of developing derivatives of IGTS8 with markedly enhanced levels of desulfurization activity and evaluating the ability of improved cultures to remove organic sulfur from coal. During the current quarter, desulfurization-deficient mutants of IGTS8 have been obtained and characterized, improved cloning vectors have been constructed, the construction and screening of geonomic libraries has been initiated, and a derivative of IGTS8 with enhanced desulfurization ability has been obtained.

  18. A 2-Hydroxypyridine Catabolism Pathway in Rhodococcus rhodochrous Strain PY11.

    PubMed

    Vaitekūnas, Justas; Gasparavičiūtė, Renata; Rutkienė, Rasa; Tauraitė, Daiva; Meškys, Rolandas

    2015-12-11

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11 (DSM 101666) is able to use 2-hydroxypyridine as a sole source of carbon and energy. By investigating a gene cluster (hpo) from this bacterium, we were able to reconstruct the catabolic pathway of 2-hydroxypyridine degradation. Here, we report that in Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11, the initial hydroxylation of 2-hydroxypyridine is catalyzed by a four-component dioxygenase (HpoBCDF). A product of the dioxygenase reaction (3,6-dihydroxy-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-2-one) is further oxidized by HpoE to 2,3,6-trihydroxypyridine, which spontaneously forms a blue pigment. In addition, we show that the subsequent 2,3,6-trihydroxypyridine ring opening is catalyzed by the hypothetical cyclase HpoH. The final products of 2-hydroxypyridine degradation in Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11 are ammonium ion and α-ketoglutarate.

  19. A 2-Hydroxypyridine Catabolism Pathway in Rhodococcus rhodochrous Strain PY11

    PubMed Central

    Gasparavičiūtė, Renata; Rutkienė, Rasa; Tauraitė, Daiva; Meškys, Rolandas

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11 (DSM 101666) is able to use 2-hydroxypyridine as a sole source of carbon and energy. By investigating a gene cluster (hpo) from this bacterium, we were able to reconstruct the catabolic pathway of 2-hydroxypyridine degradation. Here, we report that in Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11, the initial hydroxylation of 2-hydroxypyridine is catalyzed by a four-component dioxygenase (HpoBCDF). A product of the dioxygenase reaction (3,6-dihydroxy-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-2-one) is further oxidized by HpoE to 2,3,6-trihydroxypyridine, which spontaneously forms a blue pigment. In addition, we show that the subsequent 2,3,6-trihydroxypyridine ring opening is catalyzed by the hypothetical cyclase HpoH. The final products of 2-hydroxypyridine degradation in Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11 are ammonium ion and α-ketoglutarate. PMID:26655765

  20. Association between radiographic pattern and outcome in foals with pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Steeve; Roberts, Gregory D

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to characterize the association between types of radiographic findings and outcome in foals with pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi. Admission lateral thoracic radiographs of 62 foals with culture-confirmed R. equi pneumonia were reviewed retrospectively. A scoring system was developed to individually assess the severity of alveolar pattern, interstitial pattern, tracheobronchial lymphadenopathy, pleural effusion, and the number of nodular opacities and cavitary lesions. Individual scores were added to obtain a total radiographic score ranging from 0 (normal) to 22. Forty-three of 62 foals (69%) survived to discharge. The median total radiographic score of nonsurvivors (14; range, 9-16) was significantly (P = 0.007) higher than that of survivors (11; range, 4-15). Foals with a total radiographic score of greater than or equal to 15 were 6.15 times (95% CI: 1.35 to 28.2) less likely to survive than foals with a lower score (P = 0.019). A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify the potential associations between specific types of radiographic lesions and outcome. The model was statistically significant (P = 0.002) and correctly classified 75.8% of foals. Only severity of alveolar pattern and number of cavitary lesions made statistically significant contributions to the model. There was no significant association between concurrent isolation of other bacteria along with R. equi and the types or severity of radiographic lesions. Based on the results of this study, severity of alveolar pattern and number of cavitary lesions are the radiographic findings significantly associated with a poor outcome in foals with R. equi pneumonia. PMID:22742474

  1. Purification and properties of cholesterol oxidase and choline phosphohydrolase from Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed Central

    Machang'u, R S; Prescott, J F

    1991-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase (CO) and choline phosphohydrolase (CPH) exoenzymes were isolated from culture supernatants of Rhodococcus equi ATCC 33701 and their hemolytic and cytotoxic activities examined. The purifications involved differential ammonium sulphate precipitation, ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. A purification of 32.8-fold and a yield of 0.3% of CO were determined by synergistic hemolysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) presensitized with Staphylococcus aureus beta toxin. The enzymatic activity of CO was also demonstrated by oxidation of aqueous cholesterol suspensions. The activity of CO was reversibly inhibited by concentration. A purification of 412.4-fold and a yield of 1.7% of CPH were determined by hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyphosphorylcholine. Purity of both exoenzymes was confirmed by immunoblotting. On sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the CO had a molecular mass (Mr) of 60 kd and the CPH a Mr of 65 kd. Choline phosphohydrolase did not hydrolyse sphingomyelin. Sphingomyelinase C (SMC) activity was however demonstrated in concentrated culture supernatants. This dissociation of SMC from CPH activity indicates that R. equi produces two distinct phospholipase C exoenzymes, a CPH and a SMC. Both CO and CPH combined, or individually, did not lyse native SRBC even with subsequent chilling of the cells at 4 degrees C ("hot-cold" treatment). Purified CO lysed beta toxin-sensitized SRBC. The CPH showed only minor hemolytic activity against such sensitized SRBC even at high concentrations. Combination of CO and CPH in lysis of beta toxin sensitized SRBC showed only minor additive rather than synergistic effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. Fig. 5. PMID:1790488

  2. Biofilm formation and partial biodegradation of polystyrene by the actinomycete Rhodococcus ruber: biodegradation of polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Mor, Roi; Sivan, Alex

    2008-11-01

    Polystyrene, which is one of the most utilized thermoplastics, is highly durable and is considered to be non-biodegradable. Hence, polystyrene waste accumulates in the environment posing an increasing ecological threat. In a previous study we have isolated a biofilm-producing strain (C208) of the actinomycete Rhodococcus ruber that degraded polyethylene films. Formation of biofilm, by C208, improved the biodegradation of polyethylene. Consequently, the present study aimed at monitoring the kinetics of biofilm formation by C208 on polystyrene, determining the physiological activity of the biofilm and analyzing its capacity to degrade polystyrene. Quantification of the biofilm biomass was performed using a modified crystal violet (CV) staining or by monitoring the protein content in the biofilm. When cultured on polystyrene flakes, most of the bacterial cells adhered to the polystyrene surface within few hours, forming a biofilm. The growth of the on polystyrene showed a pattern similar to that of a planktonic culture. Furthermore, the respiration rate, of the biofilm, exhibited a pattern similar to that of the biofilm growth. In contrast, the respiration activity of the planktonic population showed a constant decline with time. Addition of mineral oil (0.005% w/v), but not non-ionic surfactants, increased the biofilm biomass. Extended incubation of the biofilm for up to 8 weeks resulted in a small reduction in the polystyrene weight (0.8% of gravimetric weight loss). This study demonstrates the high affinity of C208 to polystyrene which lead to biofilm formation and, presumably, induced partial biodegradation. PMID:18401686

  3. Lipid storage in high-altitude Andean Lakes extremophiles and its mobilization under stress conditions in Rhodococcus sp. A5, a UV-resistant actinobacterium.

    PubMed

    Bequer Urbano, Susana; Albarracín, Virginia H; Ordoñez, Omar F; Farías, María E; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2013-03-01

    The production of triacylglycerols (TAG) or wax esters (WS) seems to be a widespread feature among extremophile bacteria living in high-altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL), Argentina. Twelve out of twenty bacterial strains isolated from HAAL were able to produce TAG or WS (between 2 and 17 % of cellular dry weight) under nitrogen-limiting culture conditions. Among these strains, the extremophile Rhodococcus sp. A5 accumulated significant amounts of TAG during growth on glucose (17 %, CDW) and hexadecane (32 %, CDW) as sole carbon sources. The role of accumulated TAG in the response to carbon starvation, osmotic stress, UV-radiation and desiccation was investigated in Rhodococcus sp. A5 using an inhibitor of TAG degradation. Cells degraded TAG during these stresses in the absence of the inhibitor. The inhibition of TAG mobilization affected cell survival during osmotic stress only during the initial growth stage. Little or no surviving cells were observed after carbon starvation, UV-treatment and desiccation, when TAG mobilization was inhibited. These results suggested that TAG metabolism is relevant for the adaptation and survival of A5 cells under carbon starvation, osmotic stress and UV irradiation, and essential under desiccation conditions, which prevail in HAAL environments.

  4. Saccharification of Cellulose by Recombinant Rhodococcus opacus PD630 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Hetzler, Stephan; Bröker, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The noncellulolytic actinomycete Rhodococcus opacus strain PD630 is the model oleaginous prokaryote with regard to the accumulation and biosynthesis of lipids, which serve as carbon and energy storage compounds and can account for as much as 87% of the dry mass of the cell in this strain. In order to establish cellulose degradation in R. opacus PD630, we engineered strains that episomally expressed six different cellulase genes from Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484 (cenABC, cex, cbhA) and Thermobifida fusca DSM43792 (cel6A), thereby enabling R. opacus PD630 to degrade cellulosic substrates to cellobiose. Of all the enzymes tested, five exhibited a cellulase activity toward carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and/or microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) as high as 0.313 ± 0.01 U · ml−1, but recombinant strains also hydrolyzed cotton, birch cellulose, copy paper, and wheat straw. Cocultivations of recombinant strains expressing different cellulase genes with MCC as the substrate were carried out to identify an appropriate set of cellulases for efficient hydrolysis of cellulose by R. opacus. Based on these experiments, the multicellulase gene expression plasmid pCellulose was constructed, which enabled R. opacus PD630 to hydrolyze as much as 9.3% ± 0.6% (wt/vol) of the cellulose provided. For the direct production of lipids from birch cellulose, a two-step cocultivation experiment was carried out. In the first step, 20% (wt/vol) of the substrate was hydrolyzed by recombinant strains expressing the whole set of cellulase genes. The second step was performed by a recombinant cellobiose-utilizing strain of R. opacus PD630, which accumulated 15.1% (wt/wt) fatty acids from the cellobiose formed in the first step. PMID:23793636

  5. Deep Desulfurization of Extensively Hydrodesulfurized Middle Distillate Oil by Rhodococcus sp. Strain ECRD-1

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, M. J.; Lee, M. K.; Prince, R. C.; Minak-Bernero, V.; George, G. N.; Pickering, I. J.

    2001-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), and in particular substituted DBTs, are resistant to hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and can persist in fuels even after aggressive HDS treatment. Treatment by Rhodococcus sp. strain ECRD-1 of a middle distillate oil whose sulfur content was virtually all substituted DBTs produced extensive desulfurization and a sulfur level of 56 ppm. PMID:11282654

  6. Establishment of Cellobiose Utilization for Lipid Production in Rhodococcus opacus PD630

    PubMed Central

    Hetzler, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus PD630, which is known for its ability to accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAG), was metabolically engineered, and a cellobiose utilization pathway was introduced. Activities of β-glucosidases were determined, and recombinant strains accumulated fatty acids up to 39.5 ± 5.7% (wt/wt) of cell dry mass from cellobiose. PMID:23435878

  7. Rhodococcus equi hyperimmune plasma decreases pneumonia severity after a randomised experimental challenge of neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M G; Loynachan, A; Horohov, D W

    2016-03-12

    Since a vaccine is not available against Rhodococcus equi, R equi-specific hyperimmune plasma (HIP) is commonly used, although its efficacy remains controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a commercially available HIP to prevent clinical rhodococcal pneumonia in neonatal foals after experimental challenge. PMID:26932206

  8. Pyogenic Liver Abscess Due to Rhodococcus equi in an Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Napoleão, Fátima; Vieira Damasco, Paulo; Ferreira Camello, Thereza Cristina; Damasceno do Vale, Márcio; Braga de Andrade, Arnaldo Feitosa; Hirata, Raphael; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2005-01-01

    A case of pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) due to Rhodococcus equi in an immunocompetent individual was successfully treated by combining surgery and antibiotics. The R. equi-targeted antimicrobial agents erythromycin and rifampin were used only after surgical resection of the lesion and identification of the infective organism. PMID:15695730

  9. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus opacus Strain R7, a Biodegrader of Mono- and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Zampolli, J.; Presti, I.; Cappelletti, M.; D’Ursi, P.; Orro, A.; Mezzelani, A.; Milanesi, L.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus strain R7 (CIP107348) degrades several mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of strain R7, consisting of 10,118,052 bp, with a G+C content of 67.0%, 9,602 protein-coding genes, and 62 RNAs genes. PMID:25146139

  10. Comparative and Functional Genomics of Rhodococcus opacus PD630 for Biofuels Development

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Jason W.; Ulrich, Jil C.; DeBono, Anthony C.; Godfrey, Paul A.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Zucker, Jeremy; Zeng, Qiandong; Leach, Alex L. B.; Ghiviriga, Ion; Dancel, Christine; Abeel, Thomas; Gevers, Dirk; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Desany, Brian; Affourtit, Jason P.; Birren, Bruce W.; Sinskey, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    The Actinomycetales bacteria Rhodococcus opacus PD630 and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 bioconvert a diverse range of organic substrates through lipid biosynthesis into large quantities of energy-rich triacylglycerols (TAGs). To describe the genetic basis of the Rhodococcus oleaginous metabolism, we sequenced and performed comparative analysis of the 9.27 Mb R. opacus PD630 genome. Metabolic-reconstruction assigned 2017 enzymatic reactions to the 8632 R. opacus PD630 genes we identified. Of these, 261 genes were implicated in the R. opacus PD630 TAGs cycle by metabolic reconstruction and gene family analysis. Rhodococcus synthesizes uncommon straight-chain odd-carbon fatty acids in high abundance and stores them as TAGs. We have identified these to be pentadecanoic, heptadecanoic, and cis-heptadecenoic acids. To identify bioconversion pathways, we screened R. opacus PD630, R. jostii RHA1, Ralstonia eutropha H16, and C. glutamicum 13032 for growth on 190 compounds. The results of the catabolic screen, phylogenetic analysis of the TAGs cycle enzymes, and metabolic product characterizations were integrated into a working model of prokaryotic oleaginy. PMID:21931557

  11. Characterization of biphenyl catabolic genes of gram-positive polychlorinated biphenyl degrader rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1

    SciTech Connect

    Masai, Eiji; Hatta, Takashi; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    1995-06-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1 is a gram-positive polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrader which can degrade 10 ppm of PCB-48 (equivalent to Aroclor 1248), including tri-, tetra-, and pentachlorobiphenyls, in a few days. We isolated the 7.6-kb EcoRI-BamHI fragment carrying the biphenyl catabolic genes of RHA1 and determined their nucleotide sequence. On the basis of deduced amino acid sequence homology, we identified six bph genes, bphA1A2A3A4, bphB, and bphC, that are responsible for the initial three steps of biphenyl degradation. The order of bph genes in RHA1 is bphA1A2A3A4-bphC-bphB. This gene order differs from that of other PCB degraders reported previously. The amino acid sequences deduced from the RHA1 bph genes have a higher degree of homology with the tod genes from Pseudomonas putida F1 (49 to 79%) than with the bph genes of Pseudomonas sp. strains KF707 and KKS102 (30-65%). FIn Escherichia coli, bphA gene activity was not observed even when expression vectors were used. The activities of bphB and bphC, however, were confirmed by observing the transformation of biphenyl to a meta-cleavage compound with the aid of benzene dioxygenase activity that complemented the bphA gene activity (S. Irie, S. Djoi, T. Yorifuji, M. Takagi, and K. Yano, J. Bacteriol. 169:5174-5179, 1987). The expected products of the cloned bph genes, except bphA3, were observed in E. coli in an in vitro transcription-translation system. Insertion mutations of bphA1 and bphC of Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1 were constructed by gene replacement with cloned gene fragments. The bphA1 and bphC insertion mutants lost the ability to grow on biphenyl, demonstrating that the cloned bph genes are essential for biphenyl catabolism in this strain. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Regulation of plasmid-encoded isoprene metabolism in Rhodococcus, a representative of an important link in the global isoprene cycle

    PubMed Central

    Crombie, Andrew T; Khawand, Myriam El; Rhodius, Virgil A; Fengler, Kevin A; Miller, Michael C; Whited, Gregg M; McGenity, Terry J; Murrell, J Colin

    2015-01-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) form an important part of the global carbon cycle, comprising a significant proportion of net ecosystem productivity. They impact atmospheric chemistry and contribute directly and indirectly to greenhouse gases. Isoprene, emitted largely from plants, comprises one third of total VOCs, yet in contrast to methane, which is released in similar quantities, we know little of its biodegradation. Here, we report the genome of an isoprene degrading isolate, Rhodococcus sp. AD45, and, using mutagenesis shows that a plasmid-encoded soluble di-iron centre isoprene monooxygenase (IsoMO) is essential for isoprene metabolism. Using RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to analyse cells exposed to isoprene or epoxyisoprene in a substrate-switch time-course experiment, we show that transcripts from 22 contiguous genes, including those encoding IsoMO, were highly upregulated, becoming among the most abundant in the cell and comprising over 25% of the entire transcriptome. Analysis of gene transcription in the wild type and an IsoMO-disrupted mutant strain showed that epoxyisoprene, or a subsequent product of isoprene metabolism, rather than isoprene itself, was the inducing molecule. We provide a foundation of molecular data for future research on the environmental biological consumption of this important, climate-active compound. PMID:25727256

  13. Pulmonary disposition of tilmicosin in foals and in vitro activity against Rhodococcus equi and other common equine bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Womble, A; Giguère, S; Murthy, Y V S N; Cox, C; Obare, E

    2006-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the serum and pulmonary disposition of tilmicosin in foals and to investigate the in vitro activity of the drug against Rhodococcus equi and other common bacterial pathogens of horses. A single dose of a new fatty acid salt formulation of tilmicosin (10 mg/kg of body weight) was administered to seven healthy 5- to 8-week-old foals by the intramuscular route. Concentrations of tilmicosin were measured in serum, lung tissue, pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells, and blood neutrophils. Mean peak tilmicosin concentrations were significantly different between sampling sites with highest concentrations measured in blood neutrophils (66.01+/-15.97 microg/mL) followed by BAL cells (20.1+/-5.1 microg/mL), PELF (2.91+/-1.15 microg/mL), lung tissue (1.90+/-0.65 microg/mL), and serum (0.19+/-0.09 microg/mL). Harmonic mean terminal half-life in lung tissue (193.3 h) was significantly longer than that of PELF (73.3 h), bronchoalveolar cells (62.2 h), neutrophils (47.9 h), and serum (18.4 h). The MIC90 of 56 R. equi isolates was 32 microg/mL. Tilmicosin was active in vitro against most streptococci, Staphylococcus spp., Actinobacillus spp., and Pasteurella spp. The drug was not active against Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Enterobacteriaceae.

  14. Rhodococcus jostii porin A (RjpA) functions in cholate uptake.

    PubMed

    Somalinga, Vijayakumar; Mohn, William W

    2013-10-01

    RjpA in Rhodococcus jostii is the ortholog of a channel-forming porin, MspA. Deletion of rjpA delayed growth of R. jostii on cholate but not on cholesterol. Eventual growth on cholate involved increased expression of other porins, namely, RjpB, RjpC, and RjpD. Porins appear essential for the uptake of bile acids by mycolic acid bacteria.

  15. Metabolism of naphthalene, 1-naphthol, indene, and indole by Rhodococcus sp. strain NCIMB 12038

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.C.R.; Boyd, D.R.; Larkin, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Naphthalene and its 1-hydroxy derivative, 1-naphthol, are examples of common bicyclic aromatics often released into the environment. Bacteria which degrade these compounds under aerobic conditions are widely distributed; however, the metabolism of naphthalene in gram-positive nocardioform bacteria has not been well investigated. This study described the independent regulation of 1-naphthol and naphthalene metabolism in Rhodococcus strain 12038. 45 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Rhodococcus sp. F92 immobilized on polyurethane foam shows ability to degrade various petroleum products.

    PubMed

    Quek, Eugene; Ting, Yen-Peng; Tan, Hai Meng

    2006-01-01

    This work reports on the immobilization and performance of a hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism on polyurethane foam (PUF) in the bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons. The ability of four different microorganisms to immobilize on PUF and to degrade various petroleum products (Arabian light crude (ALC), Al-Shaheen crude (ASC), diesel and oil slops) was assessed by measuring the n-alkane fraction remaining in the petroleum products over time. A Rhodococcus sp. (designated as F92) had the highest number of immobilized viable cells (10(9) cells per cm3 PUF) and a maximum attachment efficiency of 90% on PUF of a density of 14 kg/m3. Scanning electron microscopy showed the presence of extracellular structures that could play an important role in the immobilization of F92 on PUF. Analysis by GC-MS revealed that both free and immobilized F92 cells were able to degrade approximately 90% of the total n-alkanes in the petroleum products tested within 1 week at 30 degrees C. Rhodococcus sp. F92 was efficiently immobilized onto PUF and the immobilized cells were able to degrade a variety of petroleum products such as ALC, ASC, diesel and oil slops. The results suggest the potential of using PUF-immobilized Rhodococcus sp. F92 to bioremediate petroleum hydrocarbons in an open marine environment.

  17. Membrane transport systems and the biodegradation potential and pathogenicity of genus Rhodococcus

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Carla C. C. R.; Costa, Sofia S.; Fernandes, Pedro; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The Rhodococcus genus contains species with remarkable ability to tolerate toxic compounds and to degrade a myriad of substrates. These substrates have to cross a distinctive cell envelope dominated by mycolic acids anchored in a scaffold of arabinogalactan covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan, and a cellular membrane with phospholipids, whose composition in fatty acids can be rapidly altered in response to environmental conditions. The hydrophobic nature of the cell envelope facilitates the entrance of hydrophobic molecules but some substrates require active transport systems. Additionally, toxic compounds may also be extruded by energy spending efflux systems. In this review, physiological evidences of the use of transport systems by Rhodococcus strains and genomic studies that corroborate their existence are presented and discussed. The recently released complete genomes of several Rhodococcus strains will be the basis for an in silico correlation analysis between the efflux pumps present in the genome and their role on active transport of substrates. These transport systems will be placed on an integrative perspective of the impact of this important genus on biotechnology and health, ranging from bioremediation to antibiotic and biocide resistance. PMID:24772091

  18. Characterization and genome functional analysis of a novel metamitron-degrading strain Rhodococcus sp. MET via both triazinone and phenyl rings cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hua; Xu, Tianheng; Cao, Duantao; Cheng, Longyin; Yu, Yunlong

    2016-08-01

    A novel bacterium capable of utilizing metamitron as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated from contaminated soil and identified as Rhodococcus sp. MET based on its morphological characteristics, BIOLOG GP2 microplate profile, and 16S rDNA phylogeny. Genome sequencing and functional annotation of the isolate MET showed a 6,340,880 bp genome with a 62.47% GC content and 5,987 protein-coding genes. In total, 5,907 genes were annotated with the COG, GO, KEGG, Pfam, Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and nr databases. The degradation rate of metamitron by the isolate MET obviously increased with increasing substrate concentrations from 1 to 10 mg/l and subsequently decreased at 100 mg/l. The optimal pH and temperature for metamitron biodegradation were 7.0 and 20–30 °C, respectively. Based on genome annotation of the metamitron degradation genes and the metabolites detected by HPLC-MS/MS, the following metamitron biodegradation pathways were proposed: 1) Metamitron was transformed into 2-(3-hydrazinyl-2-ethyl)-hydrazono-2-phenylacetic acid by triazinone ring cleavage and further mineralization; 2) Metamitron was converted into 3-methyl-4-amino-6(2-hydroxy-muconic acid)-1,2,4-triazine-5(4H)-one by phenyl ring cleavage and further mineralization. The coexistence of diverse mineralization pathways indicates that our isolate may effectively bioremediate triazinone herbicide-contaminated soils.

  19. Analysis of Genes for Succinoyl Trehalose Lipid Production and Increasing Production in Rhodococcus sp. Strain SD-74

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Tomohiro; Tokumoto, Yuta; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Inoue, Naoyuki; Maseda, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo

    2013-01-01

    Succinoyl trehalose lipids (STLs) are promising glycolipid biosurfactants produced from n-alkanes that are secreted by Rhodococcus species bacteria. These compounds not only exhibit unique interfacial properties but also demonstrate versatile biochemical actions. In this study, three novel types of genes involved in the biosynthesis of STLs, including a putative acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) transferase (tlsA), fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (fda), and alkane monooxygenase (alkB), were identified. The predicted functions of these genes indicate that alkane metabolism, sugar synthesis, and the addition of acyl groups are important for the biosynthesis of STLs. Based on these results, we propose a biosynthesis pathway for STLs from alkanes in Rhodococcus sp. strain SD-74. By overexpressing tlsA, we achieved a 2-fold increase in the production of STLs. This study advances our understanding of bacterial glycolipid production in Rhodococcus species. PMID:24038682

  20. Distribution of a Nocardia brasiliensis catalase gene fragment in members of the genera Nocardia, Gordona, and Rhodococcus.

    PubMed

    Vera-Cabrera, L; Johnson, W M; Welsh, O; Resendiz-Uresti, F L; Salinas-Carmona, M C

    1999-06-01

    An immunodominant protein from Nocardia brasiliensis, P61, was subjected to amino-terminal and internal sequence analysis. Three sequences of 22, 17, and 38 residues, respectively, were obtained and compared with the protein database from GenBank by using the BLAST system. The sequences showed homology to some eukaryotic catalases and to a bromoperoxidase-catalase from Streptomyces violaceus. Its identity as a catalase was confirmed by analysis of its enzymatic activity on H2O2 and by a double-staining method on a nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine and ferricyanide; the result showed only catalase activity, but no peroxidase. By using one of the internal amino acid sequences and a consensus catalase motif (VGNNTP), we were able to design a PCR assay that generated a 500-bp PCR product. The amplicon was analyzed, and the nucleotide sequence was compared to the GenBank database with the observation of high homology to other bacterial and eukaryotic catalases. A PCR assay based on this target sequence was performed with primers NB10 and NB11 to confirm the presence of the NB10-NB11 gene fragment in several N. brasiliensis strains isolated from mycetoma. The same assay was used to determine whether there were homologous sequences in several type strains from the genera Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Gordona, and Streptomyces. All of the N. brasiliensis strains presented a positive result but only some of the actinomycetes species tested were positive in the PCR assay. In order to confirm these findings, genomic DNA was subjected to Southern blot analysis. A 1.7-kbp band was observed in the N. brasiliensis strains, and bands of different molecular weight were observed in cross-reacting actinomycetes. Sequence analysis of the amplicons of selected actinomycetes showed high homology in this catalase fragment, thus demonstrating that this protein is highly conserved in this group of bacteria. PMID:10325357

  1. Biodegradation of 4-nitrotoluene with biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus pyridinivorans NT2: metabolic pathway, cell surface properties and toxicological characterization.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Debasree; Hazra, Chinmay; Dandi, Navin; Chaudhari, Ambalal

    2013-11-01

    A novel 4-nitrotoluene-degrading bacterial strain was isolated from pesticides contaminated effluent-sediment and identified as Rhodococcus pyridinivorans NT2 based on morphological and biochemical properties and 16S rDNA sequencing. The strain NT2 degraded 4-NT (400 mg l(-1)) with rapid growth at the end of 120 h, reduced surface tension of the media from 71 to 29 mN m(-1) and produced glycolipidic biosurfactants (45 mg l(-1)). The biosurfactant was purified and characterized as trehalose lipids. The biosurfactant was stable in high salinity (10 % w/v NaCl), elevated temperatures (120 °C for 15 min) and a wide pH range (2.0-10.0). The noticeable changes during biodegradation were decreased hydrophobicity; an increase in degree of fatty acid saturation, saturated/unsaturated ratio and cyclopropane fatty acid. Biodegradation of 4-NT was accompanied by the accumulation of ammonium (NH4 (+)) and negligible amount of nitrite ion (NO2 (-)). Product stoichiometry showed a carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) mass balance of 37 and 35 %, respectively. Biodegradation of 4-NT proceeded by oxidation at the methyl group to form 4-nitrobenzoate, followed by reduction and hydrolytic deamination yielding protocatechuate, which was metabolized through β-ketoadipate pathway. In vitro and in vivo acute toxicity assays in adult rat (Rattus norvegicus) showed sequential detoxification and the order of toxicity was 4-NT >4-nitrobenzyl alcohol >4-nitrobenzaldehyde >4-nitrobenzoate > protocatechuate. Taken together, the strain NT2 could be used as a potential bioaugmentation candidate for the bioremediation of contaminated sites.

  2. Rhodococcus equi Sepsis in a Renal Transplant Recipient: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Macken, Eline; de Jonge, Hylke; Van Caesbroeck, Daniël; Verhaegen, Jan; Van Kerkhoven, Dana; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Kuypers, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rhodococcus equi is an unusual cause of infection in humans, but has emerged as an opportunistic pathogen among immunocompromised patients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common clinical presentation, although the spectrum of disease is broad. Diagnosing R. equi infections remains challenging, both from clinical and microbiological view, and no standard treatment has been established. In this report, we present a detailed case of a 57-year-old male renal transplant recipient who developed R. equi bacteremia with a concomitant Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We describe the clinical features of R. equi infections, highlight the importance of an early diagnosis, and briefly review treatment options for this rare infection. PMID:27500216

  3. Rhodococcus equi Sepsis in a Renal Transplant Recipient: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Macken, Eline; de Jonge, Hylke; Van Caesbroeck, Daniël; Verhaegen, Jan; Van Kerkhoven, Dana; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Kuypers, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an unusual cause of infection in humans, but has emerged as an opportunistic pathogen among immunocompromised patients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common clinical presentation, although the spectrum of disease is broad. Diagnosing R. equi infections remains challenging, both from clinical and microbiological view, and no standard treatment has been established. In this report, we present a detailed case of a 57-year-old male renal transplant recipient who developed R. equi bacteremia with a concomitant Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We describe the clinical features of R. equi infections, highlight the importance of an early diagnosis, and briefly review treatment options for this rare infection. PMID:27500216

  4. Combination of degradation pathways for naphthalene utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB

    PubMed Central

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Gómez-Álvarez, Helena; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB is a metabolic versatile bacterium able to grow on naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source. Applying proteomic, genetic and biochemical approaches, we propose in this paper that, at least, three coordinated but independently regulated set of genes are combined to degrade naphthalene in TFB. First, proteins involved in tetralin degradation are also induced by naphthalene and may carry out its conversion to salicylaldehyde. This is the only part of the naphthalene degradation pathway showing glucose catabolite repression. Second, a salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that converts salicylaldehyde to salicylate is detected in naphthalene-grown cells but not in tetralin-or salicylate-grown cells. Finally, we describe the chromosomally located nag genes, encoding the gentisate pathway for salicylate conversion into fumarate and pyruvate, which are only induced by salicylate and not by naphthalene. This work shows how biodegradation pathways in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB could be assembled using elements from different pathways mainly because of the laxity of the regulatory systems and the broad specificity of the catabolic enzymes. PMID:24325207

  5. Combination of degradation pathways for naphthalene utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Gómez-Álvarez, Helena; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2014-03-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB is a metabolic versatile bacterium able to grow on naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source. Applying proteomic, genetic and biochemical approaches, we propose in this paper that, at least, three coordinated but independently regulated set of genes are combined to degrade naphthalene in TFB. First, proteins involved in tetralin degradation are also induced by naphthalene and may carry out its conversion to salicylaldehyde. This is the only part of the naphthalene degradation pathway showing glucose catabolite repression. Second, a salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that converts salicylaldehyde to salicylate is detected in naphthalene-grown cells but not in tetralin- or salicylate-grown cells. Finally, we describe the chromosomally located nag genes, encoding the gentisate pathway for salicylate conversion into fumarate and pyruvate, which are only induced by salicylate and not by naphthalene. This work shows how biodegradation pathways in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB could be assembled using elements from different pathways mainly because of the laxity of the regulatory systems and the broad specificity of the catabolic enzymes.

  6. Influence of Rhodococcus equi on the respiratory burst of resident alveolar macrophages from horses

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbaugh, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the etiologic agent of a devastating pneumonia of sporadic incidence in foals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of R. equi on the superoxide anion production, measured spectrophotometrically as the reduction of cytochrome C, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity, measured by /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ liberation from /sup 14/C-1-D-glucose, of alveolar macrophages from horses. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from 6 anesthetized, healthy, light-breed, adult horses by bronchoalveolar lavage. Following a randomized complete block design, the suspension of cells was divided into aliquots of 10/sup 6/ viable alveolar macrophages which were exposed to 1, 10 or 100 g. of opsonized R. equi or opsonized zymosan A at 37 C for 2 hours. In this study the respiratory burst of equine alveolar macrophages was only evidenced by the hexose monophosphate shunt activity and superoxide anion was not coincidentally produced. Rhodococcus equi did not adversely affect that response. The insignificant superoxide anion production by the alveolar macrophages suggests that this may not be a significant oxygen metabolite in those cells.

  7. Characterization of the desulfurization genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed Central

    Denome, S A; Oldfield, C; Nash, L J; Young, K D

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 possesses an enzymatic pathway that can remove covalently bound sulfur from dibenzothiophene (DBT) without breaking carbon-carbon bonds. The DNA sequence of a 4.0-kb BstBI-BsiWI fragment that carries the genes for this pathway was determined. Frameshift and deletion mutations established that three open reading frames were required for DBT desulfurization, and the genes were designated soxABC (for sulfur oxidation). Each sox gene was subcloned independently and expressed in Escherichia coli MZ1 under control of the inducible lambda pL promoter with a lambda cII ribosomal binding site. SoxC is an approximately 45-kDa protein that oxidizes DBT to DBT-5,5'-dioxide. SoxA is an approximately 50-kDa protein responsible for metabolizing DBT-5,5'-dioxide to an unidentified intermediate. SoxB is an approximately 40-kDa protein that, together with the SoxA protein, completes the desulfurization of DBT-5,5'-dioxide to 2-hydroxybiphenyl. Protein sequence comparisons revealed that the predicted SoxC protein is similar to members of the acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase family but that the SoxA and SoxB proteins have no significant identities to other known proteins. The sox genes are plasmidborne and appear to be expressed as an operon in Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 and in E. coli. Images PMID:7961424

  8. Sequence and molecular characterization of a DNA region encoding the dibenzothiophene desulfurization operon of Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed

    Piddington, C S; Kovacevich, B R; Rambosek, J

    1995-02-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model compound for sulfur-containing organic molecules found in fossil fuels, can be desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. Complementation of a desulfurization (dsz) mutant provided the genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 responsible for desulfurization. A 6.7-kb TaqI fragment cloned in Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector pRR-6 was found to both complement this mutation and confer desulfurization to Rhodococcus fascians, which normally is not able to desulfurize DBT. Expression of this fragment in E. coli also conferred the ability to desulfurize DBT. A molecular analysis of the cloned fragment revealed a single operon containing three open reading frames involved in the conversion of DBT to 2-HBP. The three genes were designated dszA, dszB, and dszC. Neither the nucleotide sequences nor the deduced amino acid sequences of the enzymes exhibited significant similarity to sequences obtained from the GenBank, EMBL, and Swiss-Prot databases, indicating that these enzymes are novel enzymes. Subclone analyses revealed that the gene product of dszC converts DBT directly to DBT-sulfone and that the gene products of dszA and dszB act in concert to convert DBT-sulfone to 2-HBP.

  9. Structural insights into substrate specificity and solvent tolerance in alcohol dehydrogenase ADH-'A' from Rhodococcus ruber DSM 44541.

    PubMed

    Karabec, Martin; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Tauber, Katharina C; Steinkellner, Georg; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Grogan, Gideon; Gruber, Karl

    2010-09-14

    The structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase ADH-'A' from Rhodococcus ruber reveals possible reasons for its remarkable tolerance to organic co-solvents and suggests new directions for structure-informed mutagenesis to produce enzymes of altered substrate specificity or improved selectivity.

  10. Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Kocuria, Gordonia, Tsukamurella, and Listeria Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Fen; Du, Shin-Hei; Teng, Shih-Hua; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Hui; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated whether the Bruker Biotyper matrix-associated laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system provides accurate species-level identifications of 147 isolates of aerobically growing Gram-positive rods (GPRs). The bacterial isolates included Nocardia (n = 74), Listeria (n = 39), Kocuria (n = 15), Rhodococcus (n = 10), Gordonia (n = 7), and Tsukamurella (n = 2) species, which had all been identified by conventional methods, molecular methods, or both. In total, 89.7% of Listeria monocytogenes, 80% of Rhodococcus species, 26.7% of Kocuria species, and 14.9% of Nocardia species (n = 11, all N. nova and N. otitidiscaviarum) were correctly identified to the species level (score values, ≥2.0). A clustering analysis of spectra generated by the Bruker Biotyper identified six clusters of Nocardia species, i.e., cluster 1 (N. cyriacigeorgica), cluster 2 (N. brasiliensis), cluster 3 (N. farcinica), cluster 4 (N. puris), cluster 5 (N. asiatica), and cluster 6 (N. beijingensis), based on the six peaks generated by ClinProTools with the genetic algorithm, i.e., m/z 2,774.477 (cluster 1), m/z 5,389.792 (cluster 2), m/z 6,505.720 (cluster 3), m/z 5,428.795 (cluster 4), m/z 6,525.326 (cluster 5), and m/z 16,085.216 (cluster 6). Two clusters of L. monocytogenes spectra were also found according to the five peaks, i.e., m/z 5,594.85, m/z 6,184.39, and m/z 11,187.31, for cluster 1 (serotype 1/2a) and m/z 5,601.21 and m/z 11,199.33 for cluster 2 (serotypes 1/2b and 4b). The Bruker Biotyper system was unable to accurately identify Nocardia (except for N. nova and N. otitidiscaviarum), Tsukamurella, or Gordonia species. Continuous expansion of the MALDI-TOF MS databases to include more GPRs is necessary. PMID:24759706

  11. Characterization and genome functional analysis of a novel metamitron-degrading strain Rhodococcus sp. MET via both triazinone and phenyl rings cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hua; Xu, Tianheng; Cao, Duantao; Cheng, Longyin; Yu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    A novel bacterium capable of utilizing metamitron as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated from contaminated soil and identified as Rhodococcus sp. MET based on its morphological characteristics, BIOLOG GP2 microplate profile, and 16S rDNA phylogeny. Genome sequencing and functional annotation of the isolate MET showed a 6,340,880 bp genome with a 62.47% GC content and 5,987 protein-coding genes. In total, 5,907 genes were annotated with the COG, GO, KEGG, Pfam, Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and nr databases. The degradation rate of metamitron by the isolate MET obviously increased with increasing substrate concentrations from 1 to 10 mg/l and subsequently decreased at 100 mg/l. The optimal pH and temperature for metamitron biodegradation were 7.0 and 20–30 °C, respectively. Based on genome annotation of the metamitron degradation genes and the metabolites detected by HPLC-MS/MS, the following metamitron biodegradation pathways were proposed: 1) Metamitron was transformed into 2-(3-hydrazinyl-2-ethyl)-hydrazono-2-phenylacetic acid by triazinone ring cleavage and further mineralization; 2) Metamitron was converted into 3-methyl-4-amino-6(2-hydroxy-muconic acid)-1,2,4-triazine-5(4H)-one by phenyl ring cleavage and further mineralization. The coexistence of diverse mineralization pathways indicates that our isolate may effectively bioremediate triazinone herbicide-contaminated soils. PMID:27578531

  12. Characterization and genome functional analysis of a novel metamitron-degrading strain Rhodococcus sp. MET via both triazinone and phenyl rings cleavage.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Xu, Tianheng; Cao, Duantao; Cheng, Longyin; Yu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    A novel bacterium capable of utilizing metamitron as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated from contaminated soil and identified as Rhodococcus sp. MET based on its morphological characteristics, BIOLOG GP2 microplate profile, and 16S rDNA phylogeny. Genome sequencing and functional annotation of the isolate MET showed a 6,340,880 bp genome with a 62.47% GC content and 5,987 protein-coding genes. In total, 5,907 genes were annotated with the COG, GO, KEGG, Pfam, Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and nr databases. The degradation rate of metamitron by the isolate MET obviously increased with increasing substrate concentrations from 1 to 10 mg/l and subsequently decreased at 100 mg/l. The optimal pH and temperature for metamitron biodegradation were 7.0 and 20-30 °C, respectively. Based on genome annotation of the metamitron degradation genes and the metabolites detected by HPLC-MS/MS, the following metamitron biodegradation pathways were proposed: 1) Metamitron was transformed into 2-(3-hydrazinyl-2-ethyl)-hydrazono-2-phenylacetic acid by triazinone ring cleavage and further mineralization; 2) Metamitron was converted into 3-methyl-4-amino-6(2-hydroxy-muconic acid)-1,2,4-triazine-5(4H)-one by phenyl ring cleavage and further mineralization. The coexistence of diverse mineralization pathways indicates that our isolate may effectively bioremediate triazinone herbicide-contaminated soils. PMID:27578531

  13. Simultaneous species-specific PCR detection and viability testing of poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel-entrapped Rhodococcus spp. after their exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Kuyukina, Maria S; Ivshina, Irena B; Serebrennikova, Marina K; Rubtsova, Ekaterina V; Krivoruchko, Anastasiya V

    2013-08-01

    A method of simultaneous species-specific PCR detection and viability testing of poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel-entrapped Rhodococcus spp. was developed that allowed the estimation of immobilized Rhodococcus opacus and Rhodococcus ruber survival after their exposure to petroleum hydrocarbon mixture. Spectrophotometric INT assay revealed high tolerance of gel-immobilized rhodococci to petroleum hydrocarbons, while among two Rhodococcus strains studied, R. ruber tolerated better to hydrocarbons compared to R. opacus. These findings were confirmed by respirometry results that showed increased respiratory activity of gel-immobilized Rhodococcus strains after 10-day incubation with 3% (v/v) petroleum hydrocarbon mixture. Moreover, jointly incubated rhodococcal strains demonstrated higher oxidative activities toward petroleum hydrocarbons than individual strains. Both Rhodococcus species were recovered successfully in cryogel granules using 16S rDNA-targeted PCR, even though the granules were previously stained with INT and extracted with ethanol. The method developed can be used for rapid detection and monitoring of gel-immobilized bacterial inocula in bioreactors or contaminated soil systems.

  14. The fas operon of Rhodococcus fascians encodes new genes required for efficient fasciation of host plants.

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, M; Vereecke, D; Temmerman, W; Van Montagu, M; Desomer, J

    1994-01-01

    Three virulence loci (fas, att, and hyp) of Rhodococcus fascians D188 have been identified on a 200-kb conjugative linear plasmid (pFiD188). The fas locus was delimited to a 6.5-kb DNA fragment by insertion mutagenesis, single homologous disruptive recombination, and in trans complementation of different avirulent insertion mutants. The locus is arranged as a large operon containing six open reading frames whose expression is specifically induced during the interaction with host plants. One predicted protein is homologous to P-450 cytochromes from actinomycetes. The putative ferredoxin component is of a novel type containing additional domains homologous to transketolases from chemoautotrophic, photosynthetic, and methylotrophic microorganisms. Genetic analysis revealed that fas encodes, in addition to the previously identified ipt, at least two new genes that are involved in fasciation development, one of which is only required on older tobacco plants. PMID:8169198

  15. Enzymatic degradation of aliphatic nitriles by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2, a versatile nitrile-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shumei; An, Xuejiao; Liu, Hongyuan; Cheng, Yi; Hou, Ning; Feng, Lu; Huang, Xinning; Li, Chunyan

    2015-06-01

    Nitriles are common environmental pollutants, and their removal has attracted increasing attention. Microbial degradation is considered to be the most acceptable method for removal. In this work, we investigated the biodegradation of three aliphatic nitriles (acetonitrile, acrylonitrile and crotononitrile) by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 and the expression of their corresponding metabolic enzymes. This organism can utilize all three aliphatic nitriles as sole carbon and nitrogen sources, resulting in the complete degradation of these compounds. The degradation kinetics were described using a first-order model. The degradation efficiency was ranked according to t1/2 as follows: acetonitrile>trans-crotononitrile>acrylonitrile>cis-crotononitrile. Only ammonia accumulated following the three nitriles degradation, while amides and carboxylic acids were transient and disappeared by the end of the assay. mRNA expression and enzyme activity indicated that the tested aliphatic nitriles were degraded via both the inducible NHase/amidase and the constitutive nitrilase pathways, with the former most likely preferred.

  16. Requirement of duplicated operons for maximal metabolism of phthalate by Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki Young; Kim, Dockyu; Chae, Jong-Chan; Zylstra, Gerben J; Kim, Eungbin

    2007-06-01

    The operons encoding the transformation of phthalate to protocatechuate are duplicated and present on two different megaplasmids [pDK2 (330 kb) and pDK3 (750 kb)] in Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17. RT-PCR experiments using gene-specific primers showed that both the pDK2- and the pDK3-encoded dihydroxyphthalate decarboxylase genes are simultaneously expressed during growth on phthalate. The doubling time of the pDK2-cured mutant strain DK176 in minimal liquid medium with 5mM phthalate is 52.5% of that of the wild-type strain DK17. The data indicate that both copies of the phthalate operon are equally functional in DK17, and gene dosage is the main reason for slower growth of DK176 on phthalate. PMID:17449009

  17. Equid herpesvirus 1 and rhodococcus equi coinfection in a foal with bronchointerstitial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    PEREZ-ECIJA, Alejandro; MENDOZA, Francisco Javier; ESTEPA, José Carlos; BAUTISTA, María José; PÉREZ, José

    2016-01-01

    A 2-month-old foal with septic shock and severe respiratory distress was referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Due to poor prognosis, the foal was euthanized. Histopathology showed lesions suggestive of Rhodococcus equi infection associated with a diffuse interstitial infiltrate of foamy macrophages and syncytial cells presenting large acidophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies, fibrin exudates and hyaline membranes. Bacteriological examination from lung and respiratory exudates confirmed R. equi infection, whilst immunohistochemistry and PCR yielded a positive result for Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1). Several etiologies have been proposed for bronchointerstitial pneumonia in foals, although a multifactorial origin for this lesional pattern could be possible. This work is the first one describing a combined EHV-1 and R. equi infection in a foal affected with bronchointerstitial pneumonia. PMID:27264610

  18. Biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates from low-rank coal liquefaction products by Pseudomonas oleovorans and Rhodococcus ruber

    PubMed

    Fuchtenbusch; Steinbuchel

    1999-07-01

    A screening identified several bacteria that were able to use chemically heterogeneous low-rank coal liquefaction products as complex carbon sources for growth. Pseudomonas oleovorans and Rhodococcus ruber accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoic acids (PHA) amounting to 2%-8% of the cell dry weight when the cells were cultivated on these liquefaction products in the absence of any other carbon source. R. ruber accumulated, in addition to PHA, small amounts of triacylglycerols. The accumulated PHA consisted of 3-hydroxyhexanoate, 3-hydroxydecanoate, and 3-hydroxydodecanoate (P. oleovorans) or 3-hydroxybutyric acid and 3-hydroxyvaleric acid (R. ruber). Low-rank coal liquefaction products obtained from Trichoderma atroviride were better substrates for P. oleovorans than chemically produced fulvic acids.

  19. Nitrile Hydratase and Amidase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous Hydrolyze Acrylic Fibers and Granular Polyacrylonitriles

    PubMed Central

    Tauber, M. M.; Cavaco-Paulo, A.; Robra, K.-H.; Gübitz, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 11216 produced nitrile hydratase (320 nkat mg of protein−1) and amidase activity (38.4 nkat mg of protein−1) when grown on a medium containing propionitrile. These enzymes were able to hydrolyze nitrile groups of both granular polyacrylonitriles (PAN) and acrylic fibers. Nitrile groups of PAN40 (molecular mass, 40 kDa) and PAN190 (molecular mass, 190 kDa) were converted into the corresponding carbonic acids to 1.8 and 1.0%, respectively. In contrast, surfacial nitrile groups of acrylic fibers were only converted to the corresponding amides. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 16% of the surfacial nitrile groups were hydrolyzed by the R. rhodochrous enzymes. Due to the enzymatic modification, the acrylic fibers became more hydrophilic and thus, adsorption of dyes was enhanced. This was indicated by a 15% increase in the staining level (K/S value) for C.I. Basic Blue 9. PMID:10742253

  20. The Genome of a Pathogenic Rhodococcus: Cooptive Virulence Underpinned by Key Gene Acquisitions

    PubMed Central

    Letek, Michal; González, Patricia; MacArthur, Iain; Rodríguez, Héctor; Freeman, Tom C.; Valero-Rello, Ana; Blanco, Mónica; Buckley, Tom; Cherevach, Inna; Fahey, Ruth; Hapeshi, Alexia; Holdstock, Jolyon; Leadon, Desmond; Navas, Jesús; Ocampo, Alain; Quail, Michael A.; Sanders, Mandy; Scortti, Mariela M.; Prescott, John F.; Fogarty, Ursula; Meijer, Wim G.; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.; Vázquez-Boland, José A.

    2010-01-01

    We report the genome of the facultative intracellular parasite Rhodococcus equi, the only animal pathogen within the biotechnologically important actinobacterial genus Rhodococcus. The 5.0-Mb R. equi 103S genome is significantly smaller than those of environmental rhodococci. This is due to genome expansion in nonpathogenic species, via a linear gain of paralogous genes and an accelerated genetic flux, rather than reductive evolution in R. equi. The 103S genome lacks the extensive catabolic and secondary metabolic complement of environmental rhodococci, and it displays unique adaptations for host colonization and competition in the short-chain fatty acid–rich intestine and manure of herbivores—two main R. equi reservoirs. Except for a few horizontally acquired (HGT) pathogenicity loci, including a cytoadhesive pilus determinant (rpl) and the virulence plasmid vap pathogenicity island (PAI) required for intramacrophage survival, most of the potential virulence-associated genes identified in R. equi are conserved in environmental rhodococci or have homologs in nonpathogenic Actinobacteria. This suggests a mechanism of virulence evolution based on the cooption of existing core actinobacterial traits, triggered by key host niche–adaptive HGT events. We tested this hypothesis by investigating R. equi virulence plasmid-chromosome crosstalk, by global transcription profiling and expression network analysis. Two chromosomal genes conserved in environmental rhodococci, encoding putative chorismate mutase and anthranilate synthase enzymes involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly coregulated with vap PAI virulence genes and required for optimal proliferation in macrophages. The regulatory integration of chromosomal metabolic genes under the control of the HGT–acquired plasmid PAI is thus an important element in the cooptive virulence of R. equi. PMID:20941392

  1. Web-type evolution of rhodococcus gene clusters associated with utilization of naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Kulakov, Leonid A; Chen, Shenchang; Allen, Christopher C R; Larkin, Michael J

    2005-04-01

    Clusters of genes which include determinants for the catalytic subunits of naphthalene dioxygenase (narAa and narAb) were analyzed in naphthalene-degrading Rhodococcus strains. We demonstrated (i) that in the region analyzed homologous gene clusters are separated from each other by nonhomologous DNA, (ii) that there are various degrees of homology between related genes, and (iii) that nar genes are located on plasmids in strains NCIMB12038 and P400 and on a chromosome in P200. These observations suggest that genetic exchange and reshuffling of genetic modules, as well as vertical descent of the genetic information, were the main routes in the evolution of naphthalene degradation in Rhodococcus. These conclusions were supported by studies of transcription patterns in the region analyzed. It was found that the nar region is not organized into a single operon but there are several transcription units which differ in the strains investigated. The narA and narB genes were found to be transcribed as a single unit in all strains analyzed, and their transcription was induced by naphthalene. The putative aldolase gene (narC) was found on the same transcript only in strains P200 and P400. In NCIMB12038 transcription of two more gene clusters was induced by growth on naphthalene. Transcription start sites for narA and narB were found to be different in all of the strains studied. Putative regulatory genes (narR1 and narR2) were transcribed as a single mRNA in naphthalene-induced cells. At the same time, a number of the genes known to be essential for naphthalene catabolism in gram-negative bacteria were not found in the region analyzed.

  2. The Hydroxamate Siderophore Rhequichelin Is Required for Virulence of the Pathogenic Actinomycete Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, Garry B.; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Aleksandra; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Hondalus, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that the facultative intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi produces a nondiffusible and catecholate-containing siderophore (rhequibactin) involved in iron acquisition during saprophytic growth. Here, we provide evidence that the rhbABCDE cluster directs the biosynthesis of a hydroxamate siderophore, rhequichelin, that plays a key role in virulence. The rhbC gene encodes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase that is predicted to produce a tetrapeptide consisting of N5-formyl-N5-hydroxyornithine, serine, N5-hydroxyornithine, and N5-acyl-N5-hydroxyornithine. The other rhb genes encode putative tailoring enzymes mediating modification of ornithine residues incorporated into the hydroxamate product of RhbC. Transcription of rhbC was upregulated during growth in iron-depleted medium, suggesting that it plays a role in iron acquisition. This was confirmed by deletion of rhbCD, rendering the resulting strain R. equi SID2 unable to grow in the presence of the iron chelator 2,2-dipyridyl. Supernatant of the wild-type strain rescued the phenotype of R. equi SID2. The importance of rhequichelin in virulence was highlighted by the rapid increase in transcription levels of rhbC following infection and the inability of R. equi SID2 to grow within macrophages. Unlike the wild-type strain, R. equi SID2 was unable to replicate in vivo and was rapidly cleared from the lungs of infected mice. Rhequichelin is thus a key virulence-associated factor, although nonpathogenic Rhodococcus species also appear to produce rhequichelin or a structurally closely related compound. Rhequichelin biosynthesis may therefore be considered an example of cooption of a core actinobacterial trait in the evolution of R. equi virulence. PMID:22966042

  3. Structure of Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein B (VapB) reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel consisting of two Greek-key motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Geerds, Christina; Wohlmann, Jens; Haas, Albert; Niemann, Hartmut H.

    2014-06-18

    The structure of VapB, a member of the Vap protein family that is involved in virulence of the bacterial pathogen R. equi, was determined by SAD phasing and reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel similar to avidin, suggestive of a binding function. Made up of two Greek-key motifs, the topology of VapB is unusual or even unique. Members of the virulence-associated protein (Vap) family from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi regulate virulence in an unknown manner. They do not share recognizable sequence homology with any protein of known structure. VapB and VapA are normally associated with isolates from pigs and horses, respectively. To contribute to a molecular understanding of Vap function, the crystal structure of a protease-resistant VapB fragment was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The structure was solved by SAD phasing employing the anomalous signal of one endogenous S atom and two bound Co ions with low occupancy. VapB is an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a single helix. Structural similarity to avidins suggests a potential binding function. Unlike other eight- or ten-stranded β-barrels found in avidins, bacterial outer membrane proteins, fatty-acid-binding proteins and lysozyme inhibitors, Vaps do not have a next-neighbour arrangement but consist of two Greek-key motifs with strand order 41238567, suggesting an unusual or even unique topology.

  4. A Glutathione S-Transferase with Activity towards cis-1,2-Dichloroepoxyethane Is Involved in Isoprene Utilization by Rhodococcus sp. Strain AD45

    PubMed Central

    van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.; Kingma, Jaap; van den Wijngaard, Arjan J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    1998-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45 was isolated from an enrichment culture on isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene). Isoprene-grown cells of strain AD45 oxidized isoprene to 3,4-epoxy-3-methyl-1-butene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene to cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane, and trans-1,2-dichloroethene to trans-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane. Isoprene-grown cells also degraded cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane and trans-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane. All organic chlorine was liberated as chloride during degradation of cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane. A glutathione (GSH)-dependent activity towards 3,4-epoxy-3-methyl-1-butene, epoxypropane, cis-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane, and trans-1,2-dichloroepoxyethane was detected in cell extracts of cultures grown on isoprene and 3,4-epoxy-3-methyl-1-butene. The epoxide-degrading activity of strain AD45 was irreversibly lost upon incubation of cells with 1,2-epoxyhexane. A conjugate of GSH and 1,2-epoxyhexane was detected in cell extracts of cells exposed to 1,2-epoxyhexane, indicating that GSH is the physiological cofactor of the epoxide-transforming activity. The results indicate that a GSH S-transferase is involved in the metabolism of isoprene and that the enzyme can detoxify reactive epoxides produced by monooxygenation of chlorinated ethenes. PMID:9687433

  5. Cloning, Sequencing, and Characterization of the Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine Degradation Gene Cluster from Rhodococcus rhodochrous

    PubMed Central

    Seth-Smith, Helena M. B.; Rosser, Susan J.; Basran, Amrik; Travis, Emma R.; Dabbs, Eric R.; Nicklin, Steve; Bruce, Neil C.

    2002-01-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a high explosive which presents an environmental hazard as a major land and groundwater contaminant. Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain 11Y was isolated from explosive contaminated land and is capable of degrading RDX when provided as the sole source of nitrogen for growth. Products of RDX degradation in resting-cell incubations were analyzed and found to include nitrite, formaldehyde, and formate. No ammonium was excreted into the medium, and no dead-end metabolites were observed. The gene responsible for the degradation of RDX in strain 11Y is a constitutively expressed cytochrome P450-like gene, xplA, which is found in a gene cluster with an adrenodoxin reductase homologue, xplB. The cytochrome P450 also has a flavodoxin domain at the N terminus. This study is the first to present a gene which has been identified as being responsible for RDX biodegradation. The mechanism of action of XplA on RDX is thought to involve initial denitration followed by spontaneous ring cleavage and mineralization. PMID:12324318

  6. Cloning of a rhodococcal promoter using a transposon for dibenzothiophene biodesulfurization.

    PubMed

    Noda, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Kimiko; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2003-02-01

    The expression of biodesulfurization genes (dsz) in Rhodococcus erythropolis strain KA2-5-1 is repressed by sulfate which is the product of biodesulfurization. The application of a sulfate non-repressible promoter could be effective in enhancing biodesulfurization. A promoter-probe transposon was constructed using the promoterless, red-shifted green fluorescence protein gene (rsgfp). A 340 bp putative promoter element, designated kap1, was isolated from a strain KA2-5-1 recombinant that had shown high fluorescence intensity. The activity of kap1 was not affected by 1 mM sulfate. It gave about a 2-fold greater activity than the 16S ribosomal RNA promoter in R. erythropolis strain KA2-5-1 and is therefore useful for expressing desulfurization genes in rhodococcal strains.

  7. Clinical application of a polymerase chain reaction assay in the diagnosis of pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi in a horse.

    PubMed

    Vivrette, S L; Sellon, D C; Gibbons, D S

    2000-11-01

    Diagnosis of pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi can be made more rapidly by use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay than by use of conventional bacteriologic culture techniques. Use of a PCR assay aids in the differentiation between virulent and avirulent strains of R equi, and the assay may be used to identify R equi in feces and soil of breeding farms. PMID:11061388

  8. Overexpression of a phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 leads to an increase in triacylglycerol production in oleaginous Rhodococcus strains.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Martín A; Comba, Santiago; Arabolaza, Ana; Gramajo, Hugo; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2015-03-01

    Oleaginous Rhodococcus strains are able to accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerol (TAG). Phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) enzyme catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA) to yield diacylglycerol (DAG), a key precursor for TAG biosynthesis. Studies to establish its role in lipid metabolism have been mainly focused in eukaryotes but not in bacteria. In this work, we identified and characterized a putative PAP type 2 (PAP2) encoded by the ro00075 gene in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1. Heterologous expression of ro00075 in Escherichia coli resulted in a fourfold increase in PAP activity and twofold in DAG content. The conditional deletion of ro00075 in RHA1 led to a decrease in the content of DAG and TAG, whereas its overexpression in both RHA1 and Rhodococcus opacus PD630 promoted an increase up to 10 to 15 % by cellular dry weight in TAG content. On the other hand, expression of ro00075 in the non-oleaginous strain Rhodococcus fascians F7 promoted an increase in total fatty acid content up to 7 % at the expense of free fatty acid (FFA), DAG, and TAG fractions. Moreover, co-expression of ro00075/atf2 genes resulted in a fourfold increase in total fatty acid content by a further increase of the FFA and TAG fractions. The results of this study suggest that ro00075 encodes for a PAP2 enzyme actively involved in TAG biosynthesis. Overexpression of this gene, as single one or with an atf gene, provides an alternative approach to increase the biosynthesis and accumulation of bacterial oils as a potential source of raw material for biofuel production.

  9. Isolation and characterization of novel chitinolytic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürkök, Sümeyra; Görmez, Arzu

    2016-04-01

    Chitin, a linear polymer of β-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine units, is one of the most abundant biopolymers widely distributed in the marine and terrestrial environments. It is found as a structural component of insects, crustaceans and the cell walls of fungi. Chitinases, the enzymes degrading chitin by cleaving the β-(1-4) bond, have gained increased attention due to their wide range of biotechnological applications, especially for biocontrol of harmful insects and phytopathogenic fungi in agriculture. In the present study, 200 bacterial isolates from Western Anatolia Region of Turkey were screened for chitinolytic activity on agar media amended with colloidal chitin. Based on the chitin hydrolysis zone, 13 isolates were selected for further study. Bacterial isolates with the highest chitinase activity were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Arthrobacter oxydans, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Brevibacillus reuszeri, Kocuria erythromyxa, Kocuria rosea, Novosphingobium capsulatum, Rhodococcus bratislaviensis, Rhodococcus fascians and Staphylococcus cohnii by MIS and BIOLOG systems. The next aims of the study are to compare the productivity of these bacteria quantitatively, to purify the enzyme from the most potent producer and to apply the pure enzyme for the fight against the phytopathogenic fungi and harmful insects.

  10. Characterization of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, K.J.; Bielaga, B.A.; Jackowski, K.; Oduson, O.; Kilbane, J. II

    1992-12-31

    Growth assays reveal that Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 can utilize a wide range of organosulfur compounds as the sole source of sulfur. Compounds that are utilized include thiophenes, sulfides, disulfides, mercaptans, sulfoxides, and sulfones. None of the organosulfur compounds tested can serve as a carbon source. A convenient spectrophotometric assay (Gibbs assay) based on the chromogenic reaction of 2,6-dichloroquinone-4-chloroimide with aromatic hydroxyl groups was developed and used in conjunction with GC/MS analysis to examine the kinetics of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cell cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8. The desulfurization trait is expressed at uniform levels during the mid-exponential phase, reaches a maximum during idiophase, and then declines in stationary-phase cells. Desulfurization rates for dibenzothiophene (DBT) range from 8 to 15 {mu}M of DBT/10{sup 12} cells/hour. Mixtures of genetically marked Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 and an organisms incapable of cleaning carbon-sulfur bonds in relevant test compounds, Enterobacter cloacae, were prepared in ratios that varied over six orders of magnitude. Growth studies revealed that Enterobacter cloacae was able to gain access to sulfur liberated from organosulfur compounds by IGTS8; however, cell-to-cell contact was required. These data also indicate that the desulfurization activity of IGTS8 cells in mixed cultures may be as much as 200-fold higher than in axenic cultures.

  11. The roles of bacterial biofilm and oxidizing enzymes in the biodegradation of plastic by the bacterium Rhodococcus ruber (C208)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivan, A.; Gilan, I.; Santo, M.

    2011-12-01

    Synthetic polymers such as polyethylene are amongst the most durable plastic materials and, therefore are resistant to natural biodegradation resulting in their accumulation in the environment posing a global hazard. We have carried out a two-step enrichment procedure aimed at the isolation of polyethylene-degrading bacteria from soil. The initial enrichment was carried out in soil and the second, in a liquid mineral medium supplemented with linear low-density polyethylene (LDPE; MW 191,000) as the sole carbon source. UV-photooxidation may enhance biodegradation by the formation of carbonyl residues that can be utilized by microorganisms. This screening gave rise to several bacterial strains that were capable of degrading polyethylene. One of these strains (C208), identified as the actinomycete Rhodococcus ruber, colonized the polyethylene producing a biofilm which eventually lead to the degradation of the polyethylene. Adherence and colonization of planktonic C208 cells to the polyethylene surface occurred within minutes from exposure to the polyolefin. This resulted in formation of an initial biofilm that differentiated into cell-aggregation-forming microcolonies. Further organization yielded three-dimensional sessile structures as the mature biofilm. The ratio between the population densities, of the biofilm and planktonic, was about 60:1, indicating a high preference for the biofilm mode of growth. Analysis of the extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the biofilm of C208 revealed that the polysaccharides level was up to 2.5 folds higher than that of the protein. Surprisingly, the EPS also contained DNA that is actively excreted from live bacterial cells. This is supported by the reduction in biofilm content (but not in viability) following addition, of DNase 1 and RNAse A. The biofilm showed a high viability even after 60 days of incubation in a carbon free medium. This durability of the biofilm, can be attributed to biodegradation of polyethylene. A

  12. Summary report on the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel and the degradation of toluene under aerobic, denitrifying and sulfate reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, P.; Smith, G.

    1995-08-15

    This report contains a number of studies that were performed to better understand the technology of the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Topics of investigation include the following: diesel fuel degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis; BTEX degradation by soil isolates; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-respirometry; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-shake culture; aerobic toluene degradation by A3; effect of HEPES, B1, and myo-inositol addition on the growth of A3; aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation by contaminated soils; denitrifying bacteria MPNs; sulfate-reducing bacteria MPNs; and aerobic, DNB and SRB enrichments.

  13. Development and evaluation of the internal-controlled real-time PCR assay for Rhodococcus equi detection in various clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    STEFAŃSKA, Ilona; WITKOWSKI, Lucjan; RZEWUSKA, Magdalena; DZIECIĄTKOWSKI, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the causative agent of rhodococcosis in horses, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in foals. This bacterium has also been isolated from a variety of animals and is being increasingly reported as a cause of infection in humans, mainly in immunosuppressed individuals. Laboratory diagnostics of R. equi infections based only on conventional microbiological methods shows low accuracy and can lead to misidentification. The objective of the study was to develop and evaluate a real-time PCR assay for direct detection of R. equi in various clinical specimens, including tissue samples. The species-specific region of the gene encoding R. equi cholesterol oxidase, choE, was used as a qPCR-target. The diagnostic applicability of the assay was confirmed by testing various tissue specimens obtained from horses with clinical signs of rhodoccocal infection and swine submaxillary lymph nodes. The rate of R. equi detection in clinical specimens by the developed assay was higher in comparison to the culture method (90% vs. 60.0% of positive samples) and conventional PCR (90.0% vs. 20.0% of positive samples). In case of 13 samples that were negative in the culture-based method, R. equi was detected by the developed assay. Only in one case, it gave negative result for culture-positive sample. The assay may provide a simple and rapid tool to complement the classical methods of R. equi detection based on culture and phenotypic identification of isolates, as the performed evaluation indicated a high specificity and accuracy of the results. PMID:26655770

  14. High cell density cultivation of Rhodococcus opacus for lipid production at a pilot-plant scale.

    PubMed

    Voss, I; Steinbüchel, A

    2001-05-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG)-accumulating bacterium Rhodococcus opacus strain PD630 was investigated with respect to the fermentative production of TAGs consisting of an unusually high fraction of fatty acids with an odd-number of carbon atoms and unsaturated monoenic fatty acids from sugar beet molasses and sucrose. Fed-batch fermentations were optimized at the 30-1 scale in a stirred tank bioreactor at 30 degrees C using a mineral salts medium, which contained sugar beet molasses and sucrose as sole carbon sources. Approximately 37.5 g cell dry matter (CDM) per liter was the highest cell density that was obtained at that scale with a TAG content in the cells of 52%. This fermentative process was also applied to a 500-1 pilot-plant scale. Cell densities as high as 18.4 g CDM per liter were obtained, and 42% of the sucrose present in the medium was converted into cell mass which consisted of 38.4% TAGs. PMID:11414319

  15. Growth rate and nutrient limitation affect the transport of Rhodococcus sp. strain DN22 through sand.

    PubMed

    Priestley, James T; Coleman, Nicholas V; Duxbury, Trevor

    2006-12-01

    Rhodococcus strain DN22 grows on the nitramine explosive RDX as a sole nitrogen source, and is potentially useful for bioremediation of explosives-contaminated soil. In order for strain DN22 to be effectively applied in situ, inoculum cells must reach zones of RDX contamination via passive transport, a process that is difficult to predict at field-scale. We examined the effect of growth conditions on the transport of DN22 cells through sand columns, using chemostat-grown cultures. Strain DN22 formed smaller coccoid cells at low dilution rate (0.02 h(-1)) and larger rods at high dilution rate (0.1 h(-1)). Under all nutrient limitation conditions studied, smaller cells grown at low dilution rate were retained more strongly by sand columns than larger cells grown at high dilution rate. At a dilution rate of 0.05, cells from nitrate-limited cultures were retained more strongly than cells from RDX-limited or succinate-limited cultures. Breakthrough concentrations (C/C (0)) from sand columns ranged from 0.04 (nitrate-limited, D=0.02 h(-1)) to 0.98 (succinate-limited, D=0.1 h(-1)). The observed strong effect of culture conditions on transport of DN22 cells emphasizes the importance of physiology studies in guiding the development of bioremediation technologies.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of chloromuconolactone dehalogenase from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Christian; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; Gröning, Janosch A. D.; Handrek, Thomas; Schlömann, Michael; Sträter, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Chloroaromatic compounds are often very persistent environmental pollutants. Nevertheless, numerous bacteria are able to metabolize these compounds and to utilize them as sole energy and carbon sources. Rhodococcus opacus 1CP is able to degrade several chloroaromatic compounds, some of them via a variation of the 3-chlorocatechol branch of the modified ortho-cleavage pathway. This branch in R. opacus differs from that in Proteobacteria in the inability of the chloromuconate cycloisomerase to dehalogenate. Instead, a unique enzyme designated as chloromuconolactone dehalogenase (ClcF) is recruited. ClcF dehalogenates 5-chloromuconolactone to cis-dienelactone and shows a high similarity to muconolactone isomerases (EC 5.3.3.4). However, unlike the latter enzymes, it is unable to catalyse the isomerization of muconolactone to 3-­oxoadipate enollactone. In order to characterize the catalytic mechanism of this unusual dehalogenase, the enzyme was crystallized and subjected to X-ray structural analysis. Data sets to up to 1.65 Å resolution were collected from two different crystal forms using synchrotron radiation. Crystal form I (space group P21) contained 40 subunits in the asymmetric unit, whereas ten subunits were present in crystal form II (space group P212121). The self-rotation function revealed the orientations of the molecular symmetry axes of the homodecamer of 52 symmetry. PMID:22691795

  17. Septic pleuritis and abdominal abscess formation caused by Rhodococcus equi in a foal.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Alejandro; Johnson, Jill R

    2005-09-15

    A 3-month-old female Arabian horse was evaluated because of fever, respiratory distress, lethargy, and decreased appetite of 5 days' duration. Pleural effusion was diagnosed on the basis of ultrasonographic and radiographic examinations. Cytologic examination of pleural fluid collected via thoracocentesis revealed septic inflammation; bacteriologic culture of a sample of that fluid yielded Rhodococcus equi. A large intra-abdominal mass adjacent to the body wall was identified ultrasonographically. A specimen of the mass was collected via aspiration; the specimen was identified cytologically as purulent exudate that contained large numbers of rod-shaped bacteria, which confirmed abdominal abscess formation. Bacteriologic culture of a sample of the exudate also yielded R. equi. The foal was treated with azithromycin (10 mg/kg [4.5 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h for 5 days then q 48 h) and rifampin (5 mg/kg [2.3 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h) for 8 weeks and metronidazole (15 mg/kg [6.8 mg/lb], PO, q 8 h) for 3 weeks. Clinically, the foal responded to antimicrobial treatment within 2 weeks. At 8 weeks after the initial evaluation, ultrasonographic examination of the foal revealed resolution of the pleural effusion and abdominal abscess. In foals, R. equi infection typically results in pyogranulomatous pneumonia, and pleural effusion is an uncommon clinical sign. The combination of azithromycin and rifampin appears to be an effective treatment for R. equi infection in foals. PMID:16190597

  18. Aerobic Biodegradation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine by the Propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425▿

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Diane; Hawari, Jalal; Halasz, Annamaria; Streger, Sheryl H.; McClay, Kevin R.; Masuda, Hisako; Hatzinger, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    The propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425 was observed to rapidly biodegrade N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) after growth on propane, tryptic soy broth, or glucose. The key degradation intermediates were methylamine, nitric oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and formate. Small quantities of formaldehyde and dimethylamine were also detected. A denitrosation reaction, initiated by hydrogen atom abstraction from one of the two methyl groups, is hypothesized to result in the formation of n-methylformaldimine and nitric oxide, the former of which decomposes in water to methylamine and formaldehyde and the latter of which is then oxidized further to nitrite and then nitrate. Although the strain mineralized more than 60% of the carbon in [14C]NDMA to 14CO2, growth of strain ENV425 on NDMA as a sole carbon and energy source could not be confirmed. The bacterium was capable of utilizing NDMA, as well as the degradation intermediates methylamine and nitrate, as sources of nitrogen during growth on propane. In addition, ENV425 reduced environmentally relevant microgram/liter concentrations of NDMA to <2 ng/liter in batch cultures, suggesting that the bacterium may have applications for groundwater remediation. PMID:19542346

  19. Differential Degradation of Bicyclics with Aromatic and Alicyclic Rings by Rhodococcus sp. Strain DK17 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dockyu; Yoo, Miyoun; Choi, Ki Young; Kang, Beom Sik; Kim, Tai Kyoung; Hong, Soon Gyu; Zylstra, Gerben J.; Kim, Eungbin

    2011-01-01

    The metabolically versatile Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17 is able to grow on tetralin and indan but cannot use their respective desaturated counterparts, 1,2-dihydronaphthalene and indene, as sole carbon and energy sources. Metabolite analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry clearly show that (i) the meta-cleavage dioxygenase mutant strain DK180 accumulates 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,2-naphthalene diol, 1,2-indene diol, and 3,4-dihydro-naphthalene-1,2-diol from tetralin, indene, and 1,2-dihydronaphthalene, respectively, and (ii) when expressed in Escherichia coli, the DK17 o-xylene dioxygenase transforms tetralin, indene, and 1,2-dihydronaphthalene into tetralin cis-dihydrodiol, indan-1,2-diol, and cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, respectively. Tetralin, which is activated by aromatic hydroxylation, is degraded successfully via the ring cleavage pathway to support growth of DK17. Indene and 1,2-dihydronaphthalene do not serve as growth substrates because DK17 hydroxylates them on the alicyclic ring and further metabolism results in a dead-end metabolite. This study reveals that aromatic hydroxylation is a prerequisite for proper degradation of bicyclics with aromatic and alicyclic rings by DK17 and confirms the unique ability of the DK17 o-xylene dioxygenase to perform distinct regioselective hydroxylations. PMID:21965391

  20. Purification and characterization of an amidase from an acrylamide-degrading Rhodococcus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, M S; Khan, A A; Seng, J E; Leakey, J E; Siitonen, P H; Cerniglia, C E

    1994-01-01

    A constitutively expressed aliphatic amidase from a Rhodococcus sp. catalyzing acrylamide deamination was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to be 360,000. Upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the purified preparation yielded a homogeneous protein band having an apparent molecular weight of about 44,500. The amidase had pH and temperature optima of 8.5 and 40 degrees C, respectively, and its isoelectric point was pH 4.0. The amidase had apparent K(m) values of 1.2, 2.6, 3.0, 2.7, and 5.0 mM for acrylamide, acetamide, butyramide, propionamide, and isobutyramide, respectively. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectometry analysis indicated that the enzyme contains 8 mol of iron per mol of the native enzyme. No labile sulfide was detected. The amidase activity was enhanced by, but not dependent on Fe(2+), Ba(2+), and Cr(2+). However, the enzyme activity was partially inhibited by Mg(2+) and totally inhibited in the presence of Ni(2+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), specific iron chelators, and thiol blocking reagents. The NH2-terminal sequence of the first 18 amino acids displayed 88% homology to the aliphatic amidase of Brevibacterium sp. strain R312. Images PMID:7944367

  1. Calcium carbonate formation on mica supported extracellular polymeric substance produced by Rhodococcus opacus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra; Czemierska, Magdalena; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) extracted from Rhodococcus opacus bacterial strain was used as a matrix for calcium carbonate precipitation using the vapour diffusion method. The total exopolymer and water-soluble exopolymer fraction of different concentrations were spread on the mica surface by the spin-coating method. The obtained layers were characterized using the atomic force microscopy measurement and XPS analysis. The effects of polymer concentration, initial pH of calcium chloride solution and precipitation time on the obtained crystals properties were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the precipitated minerals. It was found that the type of precipitated CaCO3 polymorph and the crystal size depend on the kind of EPS fraction. The obtained results indicates that the water soluble fraction favours vaterite dissolution and calcite growth, whereas the total EPS stabilizes vaterite and this effect is stronger at basic pH. It seems to be due to different contents of the functional group of EPS fractions.

  2. Engineering L-arabinose metabolism in triacylglycerol-producing Rhodococcus opacus for lignocellulosic fuel production.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kazuhiko; Plassmeier, Jens; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2015-07-01

    Advanced biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass have been considered as a potential solution for the issues of energy sustainability and environmental protection. Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are potential precursors for the production of lipid-based liquid biofuels. Rhodococcus opacus PD630 can accumulate large amounts of TAGs when grown under physiological conditions of high carbon and low nitrogen. However, R. opacus PD630 does not utilize the sugar L-arabinose present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Here, we report the engineering of R. opacus to produce TAGs on L-arabinose. We constructed a plasmid (pASC8057) harboring araB, araD and araA genes derived from a Streptomyces bacterium, and introduced the genes into R. opacus PD630. One of the engineered strains, MITAE-348, was capable of growing on high concentrations (up to 100 g/L) of L-arabinose. MITAE-348 was grown in a defined medium containing 16 g/L L-arabinose or a mixture of 8 g/L L-arabinose and 8 g/L D-glucose. In a stationary phase occurring 3 days post-inoculation, the strain was able to completely utilize the sugar, and yielded 2.0 g/L for L-arabinose and 2.2 g/L for L-arabinose/D-glucose of TAGs, corresponding to 39.7% or 42.0%, respectively, of the cell dry weight. PMID:25936337

  3. Trehalose promotes Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL colonization in activated sludge under tetrahydrofuran (THF) stress

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhixing; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Haixia; Lv, Zhenmei

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the role of compatible solutes in changing the microbial community structure in bioaugmentation systems. In this study, we investigated the influence of trehalose as a biostimulant on the microbial community in tetrahydrofuran (THF)-treated wastewater bioaugmentation systems with Rhodococcus sp. YYL. Functional gene profile changes were used to study the variation in the microbial community. Soluble di-iron monooxygenases (SDIMO), particularly group-5 SDIMOs (i.e., tetrahydrofuran and propane monooxygenases), play a significant role in the initiation of the ring cleavage of tetrahydrofuran. Group-5 SDIMOs genes are enriched upon trehalose addition, and exogenous tetrahydrofuran monooxygenase (thmA) genes can successfully colonize bioaugmentation systems. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) have a significant role in catalyzing the region- and stereospecific oxidation of non-activated hydrocarbons, and THF was reported to inhibit P450s in the environment. The CYP153 family was chosen as a representative P450 to study the inhibitory effects of THF. The results demonstrated that CYP153 family genes exhibited significant changes upon THF treatment and that trehalose helped maintain a rich diversity and high abundance of CYP153 family genes. Biostimulation with trehalose could alleviate the negative effects of THF stress on microbial diversity in bioaugmentation systems. Our results indicated that trehalose as a compatible solute plays a significant role for environmental strains under extreme conditions. PMID:26029182

  4. Identification, characterization and molecular analysis of the viable but nonculturable Rhodococcus biphenylivorans

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaomei; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Yalin; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Guo, Li; Ding, Linxian; Shen, Chaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Numerous bacteria, including pollutant-degrading bacteria can enter the viable but nonculturable state (VBNC) when they encounter harsh environmental conditions. VBNC bacteria, as a vast majority of potent microbial resource can be of great significance in environmental rehabilitation. It is necessary to study the VBNC state of pollutant-degrading bacteria under various stress conditions. The aim of this study was to determine whether Rhodococcus biphenylivorans could enter the VBNC state under oligotrophic and low temperature conditions, and to examine the changes of morphology, enzymatic activity and gene expressions that might underline such state. The obtained results indicated that R. biphenylivorans TG9T could enter into the VBNC state and recover culturability under favorable environmental conditions. Results from Illumina high throughput RNA-sequencing revealed that the up-regulated genes related to ATP accumulation, protein modification, peptidoglycan biosynthesis and RNA polymerase were found in the VBNC cells, and the down-regulated genes mainly encoded hypothetical protein, membrane protein and NADH dehydrogenase subunit, which render VBNC cells more tolerant to survive under inhospitable conditions. This study provides new insights into prevention and control of the VBNC state of pollutant-degrading bacteria for their better capabilities in environmental rehabilitation. PMID:26687808

  5. Effect of extracellular polymeric substances on the mechanical properties of Rhodococcus.

    PubMed

    Pen, Yu; Zhang, Zhenyu J; Morales-García, Ana L; Mears, Matthew; Tarmey, Drew S; Edyvean, Robert G; Banwart, Steven A; Geoghegan, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical properties of Rhodococcus RC291 were measured using force spectroscopy equipped with a bacterial cell probe. Rhodococcal cells in the late growth stage of development were found to have greater adhesion to a silicon oxide surface than those in the early growth stage. This is because there are more extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that contain nonspecific binding sites available on the cells of late growth stage. It is found that EPS in the late exponential phase are less densely bound but consist of chains able to extend further into their local environment, while the denser EPS at the late stationary phase act more to sheath the cell. Contraction and extension of the EPS could change the density of the binding sites, and therefore affect the magnitude of the adhesion force between the EPS and the silicon oxide surface. By treating rhodococcal EPS as a surface-grafted polyelectrolyte layer and using scaling theory, the interaction between EPS and a solid substrate was modelled for the cell approaching the surface which revealed that EPS possess a large capacity to store charge. Changing the pH of the surrounding medium acts to change the conformation of EPS chains.

  6. Comparative transcriptomics elucidates adaptive phenol tolerance and utilization in lipid-accumulating Rhodococcus opacus PD630

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yoneda, Aki; Henson, William R.; Goldner, Nicholas K.; Park, Kun Joo; Forsberg, Kevin J.; Kim, Soo Ji; Pesesky, Mitchell W.; Foston, Marcus; Dantas, Gautam; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-02-02

    Lignin-derived (e.g. phenolic) compounds can compromise the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals due to their toxicity and recalcitrance. The lipid-accumulating bacterium Rhodococcus opacus PD630 has recently emerged as a promising microbial host for lignocellulose conversion to value-added products due to its natural ability to tolerate and utilize phenolics. To gain a better understanding of its phenolic tolerance and utilization mechanisms, we adaptively evolved R. opacus over 40 passages using phenol as its sole carbon source (up to 373% growth improvement over wild-type), and extensively characterized two strains from passages 33 and 40. The two adapted strains showedmore » higher phenol consumption rates (~20 mg/l/h) and ~2-fold higher lipid production from phenol than the wild-type strain.Whole-genome sequencing and comparative transcriptomics identified highly-upregulated degradation pathways and putative transporters for phenol in both adapted strains, highlighting the important linkage between mechanisms of regulated phenol uptake, utilization, and evolved tolerance. Our study shows that the R. opacus mutants are likely to use their transporters to import phenol rather than export them, suggesting a new aromatic tolerance mechanism. The identified tolerance genes and pathways are promising candidates for future metabolic engineering in R. opacus for improved lignin conversion to lipid-based products.« less

  7. Comparative transcriptomics elucidates adaptive phenol tolerance and utilization in lipid-accumulating Rhodococcus opacus PD630.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Aki; Henson, William R; Goldner, Nicholas K; Park, Kun Joo; Forsberg, Kevin J; Kim, Soo Ji; Pesesky, Mitchell W; Foston, Marcus; Dantas, Gautam; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-03-18

    Lignin-derived (e.g. phenolic) compounds can compromise the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals due to their toxicity and recalcitrance. The lipid-accumulating bacterium Rhodococcus opacus PD630 has recently emerged as a promising microbial host for lignocellulose conversion to value-added products due to its natural ability to tolerate and utilize phenolics. To gain a better understanding of its phenolic tolerance and utilization mechanisms, we adaptively evolved R. opacus over 40 passages using phenol as its sole carbon source (up to 373% growth improvement over wild-type), and extensively characterized two strains from passages 33 and 40. The two adapted strains showed higher phenol consumption rates (∼20 mg/l/h) and ∼2-fold higher lipid production from phenol than the wild-type strain. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative transcriptomics identified highly-upregulated degradation pathways and putative transporters for phenol in both adapted strains, highlighting the important linkage between mechanisms of regulated phenol uptake, utilization, and evolved tolerance. Our study shows that the R. opacus mutants are likely to use their transporters to import phenol rather than export them, suggesting a new aromatic tolerance mechanism. The identified tolerance genes and pathways are promising candidates for future metabolic engineering in R. opacus for improved lignin conversion to lipid-based products.

  8. Molecular and biochemical analysis of phthalate and terephthalate degradation by Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki Young; Kim, Dockyu; Sul, Woo Jun; Chae, Jong-Chan; Zylstra, Gerben J; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Eungbin

    2005-11-15

    Alkylbenzene-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17 is able to utilize phthalate and terephthalate as growth substrates. The genes encoding the transformation of phthalate and terephthalate to protocatechuate are organized as two separate operons, located 6.7kb away from each other. Interestingly, both the phthalate and terephthalate operons are induced in response to terephthalate while expression of the terephthalate genes is undetectable in phthalate-grown cells. In addition to two known plasmids (380-kb pDK1 and 330-kb pDK2), a third megaplasmid (750-kb pDK3) was newly identified in DK17. The phthalate and terephthalate operons are duplicated and are present on both pDK2 and pDK3. RT-PCR experiments, coupled with sequence analysis, suggest that phthalate and terephthalate degradation in DK17 proceeds through oxygenation at carbons 3 and 4 and at carbons 1 and 2 to form 3,4-dihydro-3,4-dihydroxyphthalate and 1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxyterephthalate, respectively. The 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate pathway was further corroborated through colorometric tests. Apparently, the two dihydrodiol metabolites are subsequently dehydrogenated and decarboxylated to form protocatechuate, which is further degraded by a protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase as confirmed by a ring-cleavage enzyme assay. PMID:16181748

  9. Elucidation of the metabolic pathway for dibenzothiophene desulphurization by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 (ATCC 53968).

    PubMed

    Oldfield, C; Pogrebinsky, O; Simmonds, J; Olson, E S; Kulpa, C F

    1997-09-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 (ATCC 53968) is able to utilize dibenzothiophene (DBT) as a sole source of sulphur. The carbon skeleton of DBT is not metabolized and is conserved as 2-hydroxybiphenyl (HBP), which accumulates in the medium. This phenotype is due to the expression of the plasmid-encoded DBT-desulphurization (dsz) operon, which encodes three proteins, DszA, B and C. In this paper it is shown, using [35S]DBT radiolabelling studies, that sulphur is released in the form of inorganic sulphite. The pathway of DBT desulphurization is described in detail. In summary, DszC catalyses the stepwise S-oxidation of DBT, first to dibenzothiophene 5-oxide (DBTO) and then to dibenzothiophene 5,5-dioxide (DBTO2); DszA catalyses the conversion of DBTO2 to 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzene sulphinate (HBPSi-) and DszB catalyses the desulphination of HBPSi- to give HBP and sulphite. Studies with cell-free extracts show that DszA and DszC, but not DszB, require NADH for activity. 18O2-labelling studies show that each incorporated oxygen atom is derived directly from molecular oxygen. These results are consistent with the role of DszC as a mono-oxygenase, of DszA as an apparently unique enzyme which catalyses the reductive hydroxylation of DBTO2 leading to cleavage of the thiophene ring, and of DszB as an aromatic sulphinic acid hydrolase.

  10. Aerobic biodegradation of N-nitrosodimethylamine by the propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Diane; Hawari, Jalal; Halasz, Annamaria; Streger, Sheryl H; McClay, Kevin R; Masuda, Hisako; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2009-08-01

    The propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425 was observed to rapidly biodegrade N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) after growth on propane, tryptic soy broth, or glucose. The key degradation intermediates were methylamine, nitric oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and formate. Small quantities of formaldehyde and dimethylamine were also detected. A denitrosation reaction, initiated by hydrogen atom abstraction from one of the two methyl groups, is hypothesized to result in the formation of n-methylformaldimine and nitric oxide, the former of which decomposes in water to methylamine and formaldehyde and the latter of which is then oxidized further to nitrite and then nitrate. Although the strain mineralized more than 60% of the carbon in [(14)C]NDMA to (14)CO(2), growth of strain ENV425 on NDMA as a sole carbon and energy source could not be confirmed. The bacterium was capable of utilizing NDMA, as well as the degradation intermediates methylamine and nitrate, as sources of nitrogen during growth on propane. In addition, ENV425 reduced environmentally relevant microgram/liter concentrations of NDMA to <2 ng/liter in batch cultures, suggesting that the bacterium may have applications for groundwater remediation. PMID:19542346

  11. Comparative transcriptomics elucidates adaptive phenol tolerance and utilization in lipid-accumulating Rhodococcus opacus PD630

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Aki; Henson, William R.; Goldner, Nicholas K.; Park, Kun Joo; Forsberg, Kevin J.; Kim, Soo Ji; Pesesky, Mitchell W.; Foston, Marcus; Dantas, Gautam; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-01-01

    Lignin-derived (e.g. phenolic) compounds can compromise the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals due to their toxicity and recalcitrance. The lipid-accumulating bacterium Rhodococcus opacus PD630 has recently emerged as a promising microbial host for lignocellulose conversion to value-added products due to its natural ability to tolerate and utilize phenolics. To gain a better understanding of its phenolic tolerance and utilization mechanisms, we adaptively evolved R. opacus over 40 passages using phenol as its sole carbon source (up to 373% growth improvement over wild-type), and extensively characterized two strains from passages 33 and 40. The two adapted strains showed higher phenol consumption rates (∼20 mg/l/h) and ∼2-fold higher lipid production from phenol than the wild-type strain. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative transcriptomics identified highly-upregulated degradation pathways and putative transporters for phenol in both adapted strains, highlighting the important linkage between mechanisms of regulated phenol uptake, utilization, and evolved tolerance. Our study shows that the R. opacus mutants are likely to use their transporters to import phenol rather than export them, suggesting a new aromatic tolerance mechanism. The identified tolerance genes and pathways are promising candidates for future metabolic engineering in R. opacus for improved lignin conversion to lipid-based products. PMID:26837573

  12. Immunogenicity of an electron beam inactivated Rhodococcus equi vaccine in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bordin, Angela I; Pillai, Suresh D; Brake, Courtney; Bagley, Kaytee B; Bourquin, Jessica R; Coleman, Michelle; Oliveira, Fabiano N; Mwangi, Waithaka; McMurray, David N; Love, Charles C; Felippe, Maria Julia B; Cohen, Noah D

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen of foals that causes severe pneumonia. To date, there is no licensed vaccine effective against R. equi pneumonia of foals. The objectives of our study were to develop an electron beam (eBeam) inactivated vaccine against R. equi and evaluate its immunogenicity. A dose of eBeam irradiation that inactivated replication of R. equi while maintaining outer cell wall integrity was identified. Enteral administration of eBeam inactivated R. equi increased interferon-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi and generated naso-pharyngeal R. equi-specific IgA in newborn foals. Our results indicate that eBeam irradiated R. equi administered enterally produce cell-mediated and upper respiratory mucosal immune responses, in the face of passively transferred maternal antibodies, similar to those produced in response to enteral administration of live organisms (a strategy which previously has been documented to protect foals against intrabronchial infection with virulent R. equi). No evidence of adverse effects was noted among vaccinated foals. PMID:25153708

  13. Immunogenicity of an Electron Beam Inactivated Rhodococcus equi Vaccine in Neonatal Foals

    PubMed Central

    Bordin, Angela I.; Pillai, Suresh D.; Brake, Courtney; Bagley, Kaytee B.; Bourquin, Jessica R.; Coleman, Michelle; Oliveira, Fabiano N.; Mwangi, Waithaka; McMurray, David N.; Love, Charles C.; Felippe, Maria Julia B.; Cohen, Noah D.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen of foals that causes severe pneumonia. To date, there is no licensed vaccine effective against R. equi pneumonia of foals. The objectives of our study were to develop an electron beam (eBeam) inactivated vaccine against R. equi and evaluate its immunogenicity. A dose of eBeam irradiation that inactivated replication of R. equi while maintaining outer cell wall integrity was identified. Enteral administration of eBeam inactivated R. equi increased interferon-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi and generated naso-pharyngeal R. equi-specific IgA in newborn foals. Our results indicate that eBeam irradiated R. equi administered enterally produce cell-mediated and upper respiratory mucosal immune responses, in the face of passively transferred maternal antibodies, similar to those produced in response to enteral administration of live organisms (a strategy which previously has been documented to protect foals against intrabronchial infection with virulent R. equi). No evidence of adverse effects was noted among vaccinated foals. PMID:25153708

  14. Viability of Rhodococcus equi and Parascaris equorum eggs exposed to high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Laurent; Cauchard, Julien; Doligez, Pauline; Quitard, Lola; Laugier, Claire; Petry, Sandrine

    2010-01-01

    There is great concern about the potential pathogen contamination of horse manure compost spread in the same fields horses graze in. To ensure that pathogen destruction occurs, temperatures need to be sufficiently high during composting. Here, we investigated the survival rate of two marker organisms, Rhodococcus equi and Parascaris equorum eggs, exposed to temperatures potentially encountered during horse manure composting. Our results show that the time required to achieve a 1 log10 reduction in R. equi population (D-value) are 17.1 h (+/-1.47) at 45 degrees C, 8.6 h (+/-0.28) at 50 degrees C, 2.9 h (+/-0.04) at 55 degrees C and 0.7 h (+/-0.04) at 60 degrees C. For P. equorum eggs we show that at 45 and 50 degrees C, 2 log10 reduction of viability is reached between 8 and 24 h of incubation and that it takes less than 2 h at 55 and 60 degrees C to achieve a viability reduction of 2 log10. These results are useful for identifying composting conditions that will reduce the risk of environmental contamination by R. equi and P. equorum eggs.

  15. Label-free and redox proteomic analyses of the triacylglycerol-accumulating Rhodococcus jostii RHA1.

    PubMed

    Dávila Costa, José Sebastián; Herrero, O Marisa; Alvarez, Héctor M; Leichert, Lars

    2015-03-01

    The bacterium Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 synthesizes large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAGs) under conditions of nitrogen starvation. To better understand the molecular mechanisms behind this process, we performed proteomic studies in this oleaginous bacterium. Upon nitrogen starvation, we observed a re-routing of the carbon flux towards the formation of TAGs. Under these conditions, the cellular lipid content made up more than half of the cell's dry weight. On the proteome level, this coincided with a shift towards non-glycolytic carbohydrate-metabolizing pathways. These pathways (Entner-Doudoroff and pentose-phosphate shunt) contribute NADPH and precursors of glycerol 3-phosphate and acetyl-CoA to lipogenesis. The expression of proteins involved in the degradation of branched-chain amino acids and the methylmalonyl-CoA pathway probably provided propionyl-CoA for the biosynthesis of odd-numbered fatty acids, which make up almost 30 % of RHA1 fatty acid composition. Additionally, lipolytic and glycerol-degrading enzymes increased in abundance, suggesting a dynamic cycling of cellular lipids. Conversely, abundance of proteins involved in consuming intermediates of lipogenesis decreased. Furthermore, we identified another level of lipogenesis regulation through redox-mediated thiol modification in R. jostii. Enzymes affected included acetyl-CoA carboxylase and a β-ketoacyl-[acyl-carrier protein] synthase II (FabF). An integrative metabolic model for the oleaginous RHA1 strain is proposed on the basis of our results. PMID:25564499

  16. Disseminated rhodococcus equi infection in HIV infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodococcus equi (R.equi) is an acid fast, GRAM + coccobacillus, which is widespread in the soil and causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections in immunocompromised people. In the context of HIV infection, R.equi infection (rhodococcosis) is regarded as an opportunistic disease, and its outcome is influenced by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Case presentation We report two cases of HIV-related rhodococcosis that disseminated despite suppressive HAART and anti-rhodococcal treatment; in both cases there was no immunological recovery, with CD4+ cells count below 200/μL. In the first case, pulmonary rhodococcosis presented 6 months after initiation of HAART, and was followed by an extracerebral intracranial and a cerebral rhodococcal abscess 1 and 8 months, respectively, after onset of pulmonary infection. The second case was characterized by a protracted course with spread of infection to various organs, including subcutaneous tissue, skin, colon and other intra-abdominal tissues, and central nervous system; the spread started 4 years after clinical resolution of a first pulmonary manifestation and progressed over a period of 2 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the importance of an effective immune recovery, despite fully suppressive HAART, along with anti-rhodococcal therapy, in order to clear rhodococcal infection. PMID:22168333

  17. Engineering L-arabinose metabolism in triacylglycerol-producing Rhodococcus opacus for lignocellulosic fuel production.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kazuhiko; Plassmeier, Jens; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2015-07-01

    Advanced biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass have been considered as a potential solution for the issues of energy sustainability and environmental protection. Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are potential precursors for the production of lipid-based liquid biofuels. Rhodococcus opacus PD630 can accumulate large amounts of TAGs when grown under physiological conditions of high carbon and low nitrogen. However, R. opacus PD630 does not utilize the sugar L-arabinose present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Here, we report the engineering of R. opacus to produce TAGs on L-arabinose. We constructed a plasmid (pASC8057) harboring araB, araD and araA genes derived from a Streptomyces bacterium, and introduced the genes into R. opacus PD630. One of the engineered strains, MITAE-348, was capable of growing on high concentrations (up to 100 g/L) of L-arabinose. MITAE-348 was grown in a defined medium containing 16 g/L L-arabinose or a mixture of 8 g/L L-arabinose and 8 g/L D-glucose. In a stationary phase occurring 3 days post-inoculation, the strain was able to completely utilize the sugar, and yielded 2.0 g/L for L-arabinose and 2.2 g/L for L-arabinose/D-glucose of TAGs, corresponding to 39.7% or 42.0%, respectively, of the cell dry weight.

  18. Immunogenicity of an electron beam inactivated Rhodococcus equi vaccine in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bordin, Angela I; Pillai, Suresh D; Brake, Courtney; Bagley, Kaytee B; Bourquin, Jessica R; Coleman, Michelle; Oliveira, Fabiano N; Mwangi, Waithaka; McMurray, David N; Love, Charles C; Felippe, Maria Julia B; Cohen, Noah D

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen of foals that causes severe pneumonia. To date, there is no licensed vaccine effective against R. equi pneumonia of foals. The objectives of our study were to develop an electron beam (eBeam) inactivated vaccine against R. equi and evaluate its immunogenicity. A dose of eBeam irradiation that inactivated replication of R. equi while maintaining outer cell wall integrity was identified. Enteral administration of eBeam inactivated R. equi increased interferon-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi and generated naso-pharyngeal R. equi-specific IgA in newborn foals. Our results indicate that eBeam irradiated R. equi administered enterally produce cell-mediated and upper respiratory mucosal immune responses, in the face of passively transferred maternal antibodies, similar to those produced in response to enteral administration of live organisms (a strategy which previously has been documented to protect foals against intrabronchial infection with virulent R. equi). No evidence of adverse effects was noted among vaccinated foals.

  19. Aliphatic amidase of Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34: Purification, characterization and application in synthesis of acrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Neerja; Kumar, Vijay; Sharma, Nirmal Kant; Thakur, Shikha; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2016-01-01

    An intracellular aliphatic amide degrading inducible amidase produced by Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34 was characterized and acrylic acid synthesis from acrylamide was carried out using whole cell amidase. A bioprocess was developed at 50 ml fed batch reaction using 400 mM acrylamide feeding at an interval of 30 min resulted in the production of 4 g acrylic acid with volumetric and catalytic productivity of 80 g/l and 19 g/g/h respectively. The amidase of this organism had molecular weight of 40 kDa and was purified to 8.5 fold with 8% yield. This enzyme was active within the temperature range of 30 to 60 °C, with optimum temperature 45 °C and pH 7.5. The Vmax, Km, and kcat of purified amidase were calculated as 250 U/mg protein, 4.5 mM, and 166 sec-1 for acrylamide. The enzyme showed tolerance to metal chelating agent (EDTA) and was strongly inhibited by heavy metal ions Hg2+, Ag2+, Cu2+ and Co2+. R. rhodochrous PA-34 amidase preferentially hydrolyzed small aliphatic toxic amide such as acrylamide. Thus, the amidase of R. rhodochrous PA-34 is promising biocatalyst for the synthesis of industrially important acids and biodegradation of toxic amides. PMID:26667322

  20. Characterization of the Gene Cluster Involved in Isoprene Metabolism in Rhodococcus sp. Strain AD45

    PubMed Central

    van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.; Leemhuis, Hans; Spelberg, Jeffrey H. Lutje; Janssen, Dick B.

    2000-01-01

    The genes involved in isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45 were cloned and characterized. Sequence analysis of an 8.5-kb DNA fragment showed the presence of 10 genes of which 2 encoded enzymes which were previously found to be involved in isoprene degradation: a glutathione S-transferase with activity towards 1,2-epoxy-2-methyl-3-butene (isoI) and a 1-hydroxy-2-glutathionyl-2-methyl-3-butene dehydrogenase (isoH). Furthermore, a gene encoding a second glutathione S-transferase was identified (isoJ). The isoJ gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and was found to have activity with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 3,4-dichloro-1-nitrobenzene but not with 1,2-epoxy-2-methyl-3-butene. Downstream of isoJ, six genes (isoABCDEF) were found; these genes encoded a putative alkene monooxygenase that showed high similarity to components of the alkene monooxygenase from Xanthobacter sp. strain Py2 and other multicomponent monooxygenases. The deduced amino acid sequence encoded by an additional gene (isoG) showed significant similarity with that of α-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase. The results are in agreement with a catabolic route for isoprene involving epoxidation by a monooxygenase, conjugation to glutathione, and oxidation of the hydroxyl group to a carboxylate. Metabolism may proceed by fatty acid oxidation after removal of glutathione by a still-unknown mechanism. PMID:10715003

  1. Mining the genome of Rhodococcus fascians, a plant growth-promoting bacterium gone astray.

    PubMed

    Francis, Isolde M; Stes, Elisabeth; Zhang, Yucheng; Rangel, Diana; Audenaert, Kris; Vereecke, Danny

    2016-09-25

    Rhodococcus fascians is a phytopathogenic Gram-positive Actinomycete with a very broad host range encompassing especially dicotyledonous herbaceous perennials, but also some monocots, such as the Liliaceae and, recently, the woody crop pistachio. The pathogenicity of R. fascians strain D188 is known to be encoded by the linear plasmid pFiD188 and to be dictated by its capacity to produce a mixture of cytokinins. Here, we show that D188-5, the nonpathogenic plasmid-free derivative of the wild-type strain D188 actually has a plant growth-promoting effect. With the availability of the genome sequence of R. fascians, the chromosome of strain D188 was mined for putative plant growth-promoting functions and the functionality of some of these activities was tested. This analysis together with previous results suggests that the plant growth-promoting activity of R. fascians is due to production of plant growth modulators, such as auxin and cytokinin, combined with degradation of ethylene through 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. Moreover, R. fascians has several functions that could contribute to efficient colonization and competitiveness, but there is little evidence for a strong impact on plant nutrition. Possibly, the plant growth promotion encoded by the D188 chromosome is imperative for the epiphytic phase of the life cycle of R. fascians and prepares the plant to host the bacteria, thus ensuring proper continuation into the pathogenic phase. PMID:26877150

  2. Diversion of phagosome trafficking by pathogenic Rhodococcus equi depends on mycolic acid chain length.

    PubMed

    Sydor, Tobias; von Bargen, Kristine; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Huth, Gitta; Holst, Otto; Wohlmann, Jens; Becken, Ulrike; Dykstra, Tobias; Söhl, Kristina; Lindner, Buko; Prescott, John F; Schaible, Ulrich E; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2013-03-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a close relative of Mycobacterium spp. and a facultative intracellular pathogen which arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages before the late endocytic stage. We have screened a transposon mutant library of R. equi for mutants with decreased capability to prevent phagolysosome formation. This screen yielded a mutant in the gene for β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein)-synthase A (KasA), a key enzyme of the long-chain mycolic acid synthesizing FAS-II system. The longest kasA mutant mycolic acid chains were 10 carbon units shorter than those of wild-type bacteria. Coating of non-pathogenic E. coli with purified wild-type trehalose dimycolate reduced phagolysosome formation substantially which was not the case with shorter kasA mutant-derived trehalose dimycolate. The mutant was moderately attenuated in macrophages and in a mouse infection model, but was fully cytotoxic.Whereas loss of KasA is lethal in mycobacteria, R. equi kasA mutant multiplication in broth was normal proving that long-chain mycolic acid compounds are not necessarily required for cellular integrity and viability of the bacteria that typically produce them. This study demonstrates a central role of mycolic acid chain length in diversion of trafficking by R. equi. PMID:23078612

  3. Directed Evolution and Mutant Characterization of Nitrilase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous tg1-A6.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hui; Ma, Jinwei; Chang, Yanhong; Yu, Huimin; Shen, Zhongyao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a molecularly directed evolution-based approach was applied to modify the nitrilase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous tg1-A6 for improving properties in catalyzing nitriles. In the process of error-prone polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the wild-type nitrilase gene acting as the template, a library of the randomly mutated nitrilase gene was constructed. Since the pH value of catalyzing solution decreased when glycolonitrile was used as the substrate of nitrilase, a high-throughput strategy based on the color change of a pH-sensitive indicator was established for rapid screening of the mutated nitrilase. After three rounds of random mutation and screening about 5000 clones, a variant (Mut3) with 5.3-fold activity of the wild-type counterpart was obtained. Five amino acid substitutions (D27E, N97K, L246F, D108E, and S111R) were found in the variant Mut3. The properties of three mutated enzymes obtained in the three-round mutation were investigated. In the conversion of glycolonitrile, the variant (Mut2) accumulated the highest concentration of glycolic acid at 10.6 g l(-1), a much higher value than the wild type (3.2 g l(-1)). PMID:26712248

  4. Engineering of an L-arabinose metabolic pathway in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaochao; Wang, Xi; Chen, Shulin

    2016-07-01

    The oleaginous bacterium, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 has attracted considerable attention due to its capability to accumulate significant levels of triacylglycerol as renewable hydrocarbon. To enable the strain to utilize arabinose derived from lignocellulosic biomass, the metabolic pathway of L-arabinose utilization was introduced into R. jostii RHA1 by heterogenous expression of the operon, araBAD from Escherichia coli. The results showed that recombinant bearing araBAD could grow on L-arabinose as the sole carbon source, and additional expression of araFGH encoding the arabinose transporter from E. coli could improve the cell biomass yield from high contents of arabinose. We further increased the content of lipid produced from arabinose in the recombinants from 47.9 to 56.8 % of the cell dry weight (CDW) by overexpression of a gene, atf1 encoding a diglyceride acyltransferase from R. opacus PD630. This work demonstrated the feasibility of producing lipid from arabinose by genetic modification of the rhodococci strain.

  5. Aerobic biodegradation of N-nitrosodimethylamine by the propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Diane; Hawari, Jalal; Halasz, Annamaria; Streger, Sheryl H; McClay, Kevin R; Masuda, Hisako; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2009-08-01

    The propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425 was observed to rapidly biodegrade N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) after growth on propane, tryptic soy broth, or glucose. The key degradation intermediates were methylamine, nitric oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and formate. Small quantities of formaldehyde and dimethylamine were also detected. A denitrosation reaction, initiated by hydrogen atom abstraction from one of the two methyl groups, is hypothesized to result in the formation of n-methylformaldimine and nitric oxide, the former of which decomposes in water to methylamine and formaldehyde and the latter of which is then oxidized further to nitrite and then nitrate. Although the strain mineralized more than 60% of the carbon in [(14)C]NDMA to (14)CO(2), growth of strain ENV425 on NDMA as a sole carbon and energy source could not be confirmed. The bacterium was capable of utilizing NDMA, as well as the degradation intermediates methylamine and nitrate, as sources of nitrogen during growth on propane. In addition, ENV425 reduced environmentally relevant microgram/liter concentrations of NDMA to <2 ng/liter in batch cultures, suggesting that the bacterium may have applications for groundwater remediation.

  6. Transformation of Rhodococcus fascians by High-Voltage Electroporation and Development of R. fascians Cloning Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Desomer, Jan; Dhaese, Patrick; Montagu, Marc Van

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the virulence determinants of phytopathogenic Rhodococcus fascians has been hampered by the lack of a system for introducing exogenous DNA. We investigated the possibility of genetic transformation of R. fascians by high-voltage electroporation of intact bacterial cells in the presence of plasmid DNA. Electrotransformation in R. fascians D188 resulted in transformation frequencies ranging from 105/μg of DNA to 107/μg of DNA, depending on the DNA concentration. The effects of different electrical parameters and composition of electroporation medium on transformation efficiency are presented. By this transformation method, a cloning vector (pRF28) for R. fascians based on an indigenous 160-kilobase (chloramphenicol and cadmium resistance-encoding) plasmid pRF2 from strain NCPPB 1675 was developed. The origin of replication and the chloramphenicol resistance gene on pRF28 were used to construct cloning vectors that are capable of replication in R. fascians and Escherichia coli. The electroporation method presented was efficient enough to allow detection of the rare integration of replication-deficient pRF28 derivatives in the R. fascians D188 genome via either homologous or illegitimate recombination. Images PMID:16348290

  7. Isolation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene affecting uptake of dibenzothiophene in n-tetradecane.

    PubMed

    Noda, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kimiko; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    The dsz desulfurization gene cluster from Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1 was transferred into the chromosomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NCIMB9571 using a transposon vector. All of the recombinant strains completely desulfurized 1 mM dibenzothiophene (DBT) in n-tetradecane (n-TD) except one, named strain PARMI. Strain PARMI was unable to desulfurize DBT in n-TD, but was able to desulfurize it in water. The n-alkane utilization ability, the biosurfactant production and the fatty acid composition of cells in strain PARMI were the same level as those of the other recombinants. The transposon insertion area of strain PARMI was analyzed by transposon tagging. We cloned three possible open reading frames (ORFs), designated hcuA, hcuB and hcuC, from the genomic DNA of P. aeruginosa NCIMB9571 using the transposon insertion area of strain PARMI as a DNA probe. Examination of the sequence revealed the transposon was inserted into hcuA. The full length of the hcuABC genes transformed into strain PARMI achieved 87% recovery of the desulfurization activity of DBT in n-TD, but partial hcuABC genes achieved only 0-12%. These results indicate that DBT desulfurization in the oil phase by recombinant P. aeruginosa strain NCIMB9571 requires the full length of the hcuABC gene cluster. The hcuABC gene cluster relates to DBT uptake from the oil phase to inside of the cell, and the uptake ability is independent of the n-alkane utilization ability, the biosurfactant production and the fatty acid composition of cells.

  8. Growth of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 on gaseous n-alkanes: new metabolic insights and transcriptional analysis of two soluble di-iron monooxygenase genes

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, Martina; Presentato, Alessandro; Milazzo, Giorgio; Turner, Raymond J.; Fedi, Stefano; Frascari, Dario; Zannoni, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 was initially isolated for its ability to grow on gaseous n-alkanes, which act as inducers for the co-metabolic degradation of low-chlorinated compounds. Here, both molecular and metabolic features of BCP1 cells grown on gaseous and short-chain n-alkanes (up to n-heptane) were examined in detail. We show that propane metabolism generated terminal and sub-terminal oxidation products such as 1- and 2-propanol, whereas 1-butanol was the only terminal oxidation product detected from n-butane metabolism. Two gene clusters, prmABCD and smoABCD—coding for Soluble Di-Iron Monooxgenases (SDIMOs) involved in gaseous n-alkanes oxidation—were detected in the BCP1 genome. By means of Reverse Transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis, a set of substrates inducing the expression of the sdimo genes in BCP1 were assessed as well as their transcriptional repression in the presence of sugars, organic acids, or during the cell growth on rich medium (Luria–Bertani broth). The transcriptional start sites of both the sdimo gene clusters were identified by means of primer extension experiments. Finally, proteomic studies revealed changes in the protein pattern induced by growth on gaseous- (n-butane) and/or liquid (n-hexane) short-chain n-alkanes as compared to growth on succinate. Among the differently expressed protein spots, two chaperonins and an isocytrate lyase were identified along with oxidoreductases involved in oxidation reactions downstream of the initial monooxygenase reaction step. PMID:26029173

  9. Biotransformations of Bile Acids with Bacteria from Cayambe Slaughterhouse (Ecuador): Synthesis of Bendigoles.

    PubMed

    Costa, Stefania; Maldonado Rodriguez, Maria Elena; Rugiero, Irene; De Bastiani, Morena; Medici, Alessandro; Tamburini, Elena; Pedrini, Paola

    2016-08-01

    The biotransformations of cholic acid (1a), deoxycholic acid (1b), and hyodeoxycholic acid (1c) to bendigoles and other metabolites with bacteria isolated from the rural slaughterhouse of Cayambe (Pichincha Province, Ecuador) were reported. The more active strains were characterized, and belong to the genera Pseudomonas and Rhodococcus. Various biotransformation products were obtained depending on bacteria and substrates. Cholic acid (1a) afforded the 3-oxo and 3-oxo-4-ene derivatives 2a and 3a (45% and 45%, resp.) with P. mendocina ECS10, 3,12-dioxo-4-ene derivative 4a (60%) with Rh. erythropolis ECS25, and 9,10-secosteroid 6 (15%) with Rh. erythropolis ECS12. Bendigole F (5a) was obtained in 20% with P. fragi ECS22. Deoxycholic acid (1b) gave 3-oxo derivative 2b with P. prosekii ECS1 and Rh. erythropolis ECS25 (20% and 61%, resp.), while 3-oxo-4-ene derivative 3b was obtained with P. prosekii ECS1 and P. mendocina ECS10 (22% and 95%, resp.). Moreover, P. fragi ECS9 afforded bendigole A (8b; 80%). Finally, P. mendocina ECS10 biotransformed hyodeoxycholic acid (1c) to 3-oxo derivative 2c (50%) and Rh. erythropolis ECS12 to 6α-hydroxy-3-oxo-23,24-dinor-5β-cholan-22-oic acid (9c, 66%). Bendigole G (5c; 13%) with P. prosekii ECS1 and bendigole H (8c) with P. prosekii ECS1 and Rh. erythropolis ECS12 (20% and 16%, resp.) were obtained. PMID:27358241

  10. Ketoreductase TpdE from Rhodococcus jostii TMP1: characterization and application in the synthesis of chiral alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Kutanovas, Simonas; Rutkienė, Rasa; Tauraitė, Daiva; Striela, Romualdas; Meškys, Rolandas

    2015-01-01

    Background. Production of highly pure enantiomers of vicinal diols is desirable, but difficult to achieve. Enantiomerically pure diols and acyloins are valuable bulk chemicals, promising synthones and potential building blocks for chiral polymers. Enzymatic reduction of ketones is a useful technique for the synthesis of the desired enantiomeric alcohols. Here, we report on the characterization of a ketoreductase TpdE from Rhodococcus jostii TMP1 that is a prospective tool for the synthesis of such compounds. Results. In this study, NADPH-dependent short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase TpdE from Rhodococcus jostii TMP1 was characterized. The enzyme exhibited broad substrate specificity towards aliphatic 2,3-diketones, butan-3-one-2-yl alkanoates, as well as acetoin and its acylated derivatives. TpdE stereospecifically reduced α-diketones to the corresponding diols. The GC-MS analysis of the reduction products of 2,3- and 3,4-diketones indicated that TpdE is capable of reducing both keto groups in its substrate leading to the formation of two new chiral atoms in the product molecule. Bioconversions of diketones to corresponding diols occurred using either purified enzyme or a whole-cell Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) biocatalyst harbouring recombinant TpdE. The optimum temperature and pH were determined to be 30–35 °C and 7.5, respectively. Conclusions. The broad substrate specificity and stereoselectivity of TpdE from Rhodococcus jostii TMP1 make it a promising biocatalyst for the production of enantiomerically pure diols that are difficult to obtain by chemical routes. PMID:26587349

  11. Functional divergence of HBHA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its evolutionary relationship with TadA from Rhodococcus opacus.

    PubMed

    Lanfranconi, Mariana P; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2016-08-01

    Rhodococcus opacus PD630 and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 are oleaginous bacteria able to synthesize and accumulate triacylglycerols (TAG) in lipid bodies (LB). Highly relevant to the structure of LB is a protein homologous to heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) (called TadA in rhodococci), which is a virulence factor found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. HBHA is an adhesin involved in binding to non-phagocytic cells and extrapulmonary dissemination. We observed a conserved synteny of three genes encoding a transcriptional regulator (TR), the HBHA protein and a membrane protein (MP) between TAG-accumulating actinobacteria belonging to Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium, Nocardia and Dietzia genera, among others. A 354 bp-intergenic spacing containing a SigF-binding site was found between hbha and the TR genes in M. tuberculosis, which was absent in genomes of other investigated actinobacteria. Analyses of available "omic" information revealed that TadA and TR were co-induced in rhodococci under TAG-accumulating conditions; whereas in M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis, HBHA and TR were regulated independently under stress conditions occurring during infection. We also found differences in protein lengths, domain content and distribution between HBHA and TadA proteins from mycobacteria and rhodococci, which may explain their different roles in cells. Based on the combination of results obtained in model actinobacteria, we hypothesize that HBHA and TadA proteins originated from a common ancestor, but later suffered a process of functional divergence during evolution. Thus, rhodococcal TadA probably has maintained its original role; whereas HBHA may have evolved as a virulence factor in pathogenic mycobacteria.

  12. Fite stain positivity in Rhodococcus equi: yet another acid-fast organism in respiratory cytology--a case report.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, C; Matherne, J; Jorgensen, J H; Fowler, L J

    2001-04-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an aerobic Gram-positive and acid-fast coccobacillus that may cause cavitary pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts such as HIV-infected patients. Numerous Grocott's methenamine silver (GMS)-positive organisms were initially noted on the direct smear; a minor number of acid-fast organisms were seen in the Thin-Prep slide. Since the abundant mucous material with the attached organisms seen in conventional smears may be lost in liquid-based preparations, more sensitive stains such as Fite, as well as a more diligent search for organisms, is needed. This case illustrates the importance of careful selection and evaluation of special stains in sputum specimens.

  13. Catabolism of Benzoate and Phthalate in Rhodococcus sp. Strain RHA1: Redundancies and Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Patrauchan, Marianna A.; Florizone, Christine; Dosanjh, Manisha; Mohn, William W.; Davies, Julian; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2005-01-01

    Genomic and proteomic approaches were used to investigate phthalate and benzoate catabolism in Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1, a polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading actinomycete. Sequence analyses identified genes involved in the catabolism of benzoate (ben) and phthalate (pad), the uptake of phthalate (pat), and two branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway (catRABC and pcaJIHGBLFR). The regulatory and structural ben genes are separated by genes encoding a cytochrome P450. The pad and pat genes are contained on a catabolic island that is duplicated on plasmids pRHL1 and pRHL2 and includes predicted terephthalate catabolic genes (tpa). Proteomic analyses demonstrated that the β-ketoadipate pathway is functionally convergent. Specifically, the pad and pat gene products were only detected in phthalate-grown cells. Similarly, the ben and cat gene products were only detected in benzoate-grown cells. However, pca-encoded enzymes were present under both growth conditions. Activity assays for key enzymes confirmed these results. Disruption of pcaL, which encodes a fusion enzyme, abolished growth on phthalate. In contrast, after a lag phase, growth of the mutant on benzoate was similar to that of the wild type. Proteomic analyses revealed 20 proteins in the mutant that were not detected in wild-type cells during growth on benzoate, including a CatD homolog that apparently compensated for loss of PcaL. Analysis of completed bacterial genomes indicates that the convergent β-ketoadipate pathway and some aspects of its genetic organization are characteristic of rhodococci and related actinomycetes. In contrast, the high redundancy of catabolic pathways and enzymes appears to be unique to RHA1 and may increase its potential to adapt to new carbon sources. PMID:15937168

  14. Two Transporters Essential for Reassimilation of Novel Cholate Metabolites by Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Kendra; Casabon, Israël; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial uptake of steroids and their metabolites remains poorly understood. We investigated two transporters associated with cholate catabolism in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1. Reverse transcriptase quantitative-PCR indicated that an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter and a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter were upregulated 16.7- and 174-fold, respectively, during the exponential phase of growth on cholate compared to growth on pyruvate. Gene knockout analysis established that these transporters are required for the reassimilation of distinct metabolites that accumulate during growth on cholate. The ABC transporter, encoded by camABCD, was essential for uptake of 1β(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″(R)-hydroxy-3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone and a desaturated analog. The MFS transporter, encoded by camM, was essential for uptake of 3,7(R),12(S)-trihydroxy-9-oxo-9,10-seco-23,24-bisnorchola-1,3,5(10)-trien-22-oate. These metabolites differ from cholate metabolites reported to be excreted by proteobacteria in that they retain an isopropanoyl side chain at C-17. The uptake of these metabolites was necessary for maximal growth on cholate: a ΔcamB mutant lacking the permease component of the ABC transporter and a ΔcamM mutant lacking the MFS transporter grew to 74% and 77%, respectively, of the yield of the wild type. This study demonstrates for the first time the requirement for specific transporters for uptake of cholate metabolites and highlights the importance and complexity of transport processes associated with bacterial steroid catabolism. PMID:23024344

  15. Foal Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Become Activated upon Rhodococcus equi Infection▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Flaminio, M. Julia B. F.; Nydam, Daryl V.; Marquis, Hélène; Matychak, Mary Beth; Giguère, Steeve

    2009-01-01

    Susceptibility of foals to Rhodococcus equi pneumonia is exclusive to the first few months of life. The objective of this study was to investigate the immediate immunologic response of foal and adult horse antigen-presenting cells (APCs) upon infection with R. equi. We measured the activation of the antigen-presenting major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule, costimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86, the cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12), and the transcriptional factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) in monocyte-derived macrophages (mMOs) and dendritic cells (mDCs) of adult horses and foals of different ages (from birth to 3 months of age) infected with virulent R. equi or its avirulent, plasmid-cured derivative. Infection with virulent or avirulent R. equi induced (P ≤ 0.01) the expression of IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 mRNAs in foal mMOs and mDCs at different ages. This response was likely mediated by the higher (P = 0.008) expression of IRF-1 in foal mDCs at birth than in adult horse mDCs. R. equi infection promoted comparable expression of costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40 in foal and adult horse cells. The cytokine and costimulatory response by foal mDCs was not accompanied by robust MHC class II molecule expression. These data suggest that foal APCs detect the presence of R. equi and respond with the expression of the Th1-inducing cytokine IL-12. Nevertheless, there seems to be a limitation to MHC class II molecule expression which we hypothesize may compromise the efficient priming of naïve effector cells in early life. PMID:19109450

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Survival of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 during Carbon Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Patrauchan, Marianna A.; Miyazawa, Daisuke; LeBlanc, Justin C.; Aiga, Carol; Florizone, Christine; Dosanjh, Manisha; Davies, Julian; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, a catabolically diverse soil actinomycete, is highly resistant to long-term nutrient starvation. After 2 years of carbon starvation, 10% of the bacterial culture remained viable. To study the molecular basis of such resistance, we monitored the abundance of about 1,600 cytosolic proteins during a 2-week period of carbon source (benzoate) starvation. Hierarchical cluster analysis elucidated 17 major protein clusters and showed that most changes occurred during transition to stationary phase. We identified 196 proteins. A decrease in benzoate catabolic enzymes correlated with benzoate depletion, as did induction of catabolism of alternative substrates, both endogenous (lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins) and exogenous. Thus, we detected a transient 5-fold abundance increase for phthalate, phthalate ester, biphenyl, and ethyl benzene catabolic enzymes, which coincided with at least 4-fold increases in phthalate and biphenyl catabolic activities. Stationary-phase cells demonstrated an ∼250-fold increase in carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) concurrent with a 130-fold increase in CODH activity, suggesting a switch to CO or CO2 utilization. We observed two phases of stress response: an initial response occurred during the transition to stationary phase, and a second response occurred after the cells had attained stationary phase. Although SigG synthesis was induced during starvation, a ΔsigG deletion mutant showed only minor changes in cell survival. Stationary-phase cells underwent reductive cell division. The extreme capacity of RHA1 to survive starvation does not appear to involve novel mechanisms; rather, it seems to be due to the coordinated combination of earlier-described mechanisms. PMID:22798368

  17. Identification of genomic loci associated with Rhodococcus equi susceptibility in foals.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Cole M; Doan, Ryan; Dindot, Scott V; Bourquin, Jessica R; Zlatev, Zlatomir Z; Chaffin, M Keith; Blodgett, Glenn P; Ivanov, Ivan; Cohen, Noah D

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi is a common cause of disease and death in foals. Although agent and environmental factors contribute to the incidence of this disease, the genetic factors influencing the clinical outcomes of R. equi pneumonia are ill-defined. Here, we performed independent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)- and copy number variant (CNV)-based genome-wide association studies to identify genomic loci associated with R. equi pneumonia in foals. Foals at a large Quarter Horse breeding farm were categorized into 3 groups: 1) foals with R. equi pneumonia (clinical group [N = 43]); 2) foals with ultrasonographic evidence of pulmonary lesions that never developed clinical signs of pneumonia (subclinical group [N = 156]); and, 3) foals without clinical signs or ultrasonographic evidence of pneumonia (unaffected group [N = 49]). From each group, 24 foals were randomly selected and used for independent SNP- and CNV-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The SNP-based GWAS identified a region on chromosome 26 that had moderate evidence of association with R. equi pneumonia when comparing clinical and subclinical foals. A joint analysis including all study foals revealed a 3- to 4-fold increase in odds of disease for a homozygous SNP within the associated region when comparing the clinical group with either of the other 2 groups of foals or their combination. The region contains the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 2 (TRPM2) gene, which is involved in neutrophil function. No associations were identified in the CNV-based GWAS. Collectively, these data identify a region on chromosome 26 associated with R. equi pneumonia in foals, providing evidence that genetic factors may indeed contribute to this important disease of foals. PMID:24892408

  18. Identification of Genomic Loci Associated with Rhodococcus equi Susceptibility in Foals

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, Cole M.; Doan, Ryan; Dindot, Scott V.; Bourquin, Jessica R.; Zlatev, Zlatomir Z.; Chaffin, M. Keith; Blodgett, Glenn P.; Ivanov, Ivan; Cohen, Noah D.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi is a common cause of disease and death in foals. Although agent and environmental factors contribute to the incidence of this disease, the genetic factors influencing the clinical outcomes of R. equi pneumonia are ill-defined. Here, we performed independent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)- and copy number variant (CNV)-based genome-wide association studies to identify genomic loci associated with R. equi pneumonia in foals. Foals at a large Quarter Horse breeding farm were categorized into 3 groups: 1) foals with R. equi pneumonia (clinical group [N = 43]); 2) foals with ultrasonographic evidence of pulmonary lesions that never developed clinical signs of pneumonia (subclinical group [N = 156]); and, 3) foals without clinical signs or ultrasonographic evidence of pneumonia (unaffected group [N = 49]). From each group, 24 foals were randomly selected and used for independent SNP- and CNV-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The SNP-based GWAS identified a region on chromosome 26 that had moderate evidence of association with R. equi pneumonia when comparing clinical and subclinical foals. A joint analysis including all study foals revealed a 3- to 4-fold increase in odds of disease for a homozygous SNP within the associated region when comparing the clinical group with either of the other 2 groups of foals or their combination. The region contains the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 2 (TRPM2) gene, which is involved in neutrophil function. No associations were identified in the CNV-based GWAS. Collectively, these data identify a region on chromosome 26 associated with R. equi pneumonia in foals, providing evidence that genetic factors may indeed contribute to this important disease of foals. PMID:24892408

  19. Transcriptomic Assessment of Isozymes in the Biphenyl Pathway of Rhodococcus sp. Strain RHA1†

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Edmilson R.; Hara, Hirofumi; Miyazawa, Daisuke; Davies, Julian E.; Eltis, Lindsay D.; Mohn, William W.

    2006-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. RHA1 grows on a broad range of aromatic compounds and vigorously degrades polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Previous work identified RHA1 genes encoding multiple isozymes for most of the seven steps of the biphenyl (BPH) pathway, provided evidence for coexpression of some of these isozymes, and indicated the involvement of some of these enzymes in the degradation of BPH, ethylbenzene (ETB), and PCBs. To investigate the expression of these isozymes and better understand how they contribute to the robust degradative capacity of RHA1, we comprehensively analyzed the 9.7-Mb genome of RHA1 for BPH pathway genes and characterized the transcriptome of RHA1 growing on benzoate (BEN), BPH, and ETB. Sequence analyses revealed 54 potential BPH pathway genes, including 28 not previously reported. Transcriptomic analysis with a DNA microarray containing 70-mer probes for 8,213 RHA1 genes revealed a suite of 320 genes of diverse functions that were upregulated during growth both on BPH and on ETB, relative to growth on the control substrate, pyruvate. By contrast, only 65 genes were upregulated during growth on BEN. Quantitative PCR assays confirmed microarray results for selected genes and indicated that some of the catabolic genes were upregulated over 10,000-fold. Our analysis suggests that up to 22 enzymes, including 8 newly identified ones, may function in the BPH pathway of RHA1. The relative expression levels of catabolic genes did not differ for BPH and ETB, suggesting a common regulatory mechanism. This study delineated a suite of catabolic enzymes for biphenyl and alkyl-benzenes in RHA1, which is larger than previously recognized and which may serve as a model for catabolism in other environmentally important bacteria having large genomes. PMID:16957245

  20. Detection of virulent Rhodococcus equi in exhaled air samples from naturally infected foals.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, G; Gilkerson, J R; Browning, G F

    2009-03-01

    Virulent Rhodococcus equi causes pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia in foals. The route of infection of foals has been considered to be inhalation of aerosolized bacteria from soil that is contaminated with equine feces. Thus, disease caused by R. equi has been regarded as an opportunistic infection of environmental origin and not a contagious disease. In this study, we report the exhalation of virulent R. equi from the respiratory tract of naturally infected foals. A handheld air-monitoring system was used to recover virulent R. equi from the exhaled breath of foals, and the concentration of virulent R. equi organisms in exhaled air was compared to the concentration in environmental air samples taken from the holding pens and lane areas on farms. R. equi strains carrying the vapA gene of the virulence plasmid were detected by using colony blotting and DNA hybridization techniques in cultures of exhaled air from 67% (37/55) of foals tested. The concentration of virulent R. equi organisms in exhaled air from foals was significantly higher than that in environmental air (P<0.001). There were no significant differences in the median concentrations of virulent R. equi bacteria exhaled by clinically healthy or diseased foals. The high concentrations of virulent R. equi bacteria in exhaled air suggested that aerosol transmission between foals is possible and may have a significant impact on the prevalence of R. equi pneumonia on farms. The air sampling technique described is potentially useful as a noninvasive method for the detection and quantification of virulent R. equi in the respiratory tract of foals.

  1. Seroepidemiological survey of Rhodococcus equi infection in asymptomatic horses and donkeys from southeast Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tel, O Y; Arserim, N B; Keskin, O

    2011-12-01

    In order to assess the level of Rhodococcus equi infection in southeast Turkey, 679 sera from healthy foals and adult horses and 78 sera from donkeys were tested by indirect ELISA using a R. equi reference strain (ATCC 33701) as antigen. Eighty (11.7%) sera from horses and 9 (11.5%) sera from donkeys with titres >0.85 were positive. The prevalence of seropositive horses in Sanliurfa Province was higher than in Diyarbakir Province; 56 (13.9%) horses in Sanliurfa Province and 24 (8.7%) horses in Diyarbakir Province were defined as seropositive. In Sanliurfa Province 14.5% of female (n=343) and 10.1% of male (n = 59) horses tested were defined as seropositive, while in Diyarbakir Province more males (11.4%, n=114) were seropositive than females (6.7%, n=163). Horses 1 to 5 years of age were found to have the highest seropositivity rate in both provinces. A total of 78 sera from donkeys were investigated in Sanliurfa Province, of which 9 (11.5%) were positive by ELISA. Among the 9 positive sera, 6 (12.8%) were from donkeys 1-5 years old and 3 (13.6%) were from donkeys >5 years of age. No positive sera were found in donkeys less than 1 year old. Five (12.5%) sera of females and 4 (10.5%) sera of males tested were positive. These results indicate the existence of R. equi in the horse populations in Sanliurfa and Diyarbakir Provinces. Similar infection rates were found for donkeys in Sanliurfa. This suggests the importance of serological surveys to diagnose R. equi infection in the region and to prevent the zoonotic risk.

  2. γ-Resorcylate Catabolic-Pathway Genes in the Soil Actinomycete Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Daisuke; Araki, Naoto; Motoi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Shota; Iino, Toju; Imai, Shunsuke; Masai, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 gene cluster required for γ-resorcylate (GRA) catabolism was characterized. The cluster includes tsdA, tsdB, tsdC, tsdD, tsdR, tsdT, and tsdX, which encode GRA decarboxylase, resorcinol 4-hydroxylase, hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase, maleylacetate reductase, an IclR-type regulator, a major facilitator superfamily transporter, and a putative hydrolase, respectively. The tsdA gene conferred GRA decarboxylase activity on Escherichia coli. Purified TsdB oxidized NADH in the presence of resorcinol, suggesting that tsdB encodes a unique NADH-specific single-component resorcinol 4-hydroxylase. Mutations in either tsdA or tsdB resulted in growth deficiency on GRA. The tsdC and tsdD genes conferred hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase and maleylacetate reductase activities, respectively, on E. coli. Inactivation of tsdT significantly retarded the growth of RHA1 on GRA. The growth retardation was partially suppressed under acidic conditions, suggesting the involvement of tsdT in GRA uptake. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the tsd genes constitute three transcriptional units, the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons and tsdR. Transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons was induced during growth on GRA. Inactivation of tsdR derepressed transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons in the absence of GRA, suggesting that tsd gene transcription is negatively regulated by the tsdR-encoded regulator. Binding of TsdR to the tsdR-tsdB and tsdT-tsdR intergenic regions was inhibited by the addition of GRA, indicating that GRA interacts with TsdR as an effector molecule. PMID:26319878

  3. Methylated Cytokinins from the Phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians Mimic Plant Hormone Activity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, Venkatesan; Ueda, Nanae; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Kojima, Mikiko; Kikuchi, Jun; Kudo, Takuji; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins (CKs), a class of phytohormones that regulate plant growth and development, are also synthesized by some phytopathogens to disrupt the hormonal balance and to facilitate niche establishment in their hosts. Rhodococcus fascians harbors the fasciation (fas) locus, an operon encoding several genes homologous to CK biosynthesis and metabolism. This pathogen causes unique leafy gall symptoms reminiscent of CK overproduction; however, bacterial CKs have not been clearly correlated with the severe symptoms, and no virulence-associated unique CKs or analogs have been identified. Here, we report the identification of monomethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine and dimethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine (collectively, methylated cytokinins [MeCKs]) from R. fascians. MeCKs were recognized by a CK receptor and up-regulated type-A ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RESPONSE REGULATOR genes. Treatment with MeCKs inhibited root growth, a hallmark of CK action, whereas the receptor mutant was insensitive. MeCKs were retained longer in planta than canonical CKs and were poor substrates for a CK oxidase/dehydrogenase, suggesting enhanced biological stability. MeCKs were synthesized by S-adenosyl methionine-dependent methyltransferases (MT1 and MT2) that are present upstream of the fas genes. The best substrate for methylation was isopentenyl diphosphate. MT1 and MT2 catalyzed distinct methylation reactions; only the MT2 product was used by FAS4 to synthesize monomethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine. The MT1 product was dimethylated by MT2 and used as a substrate by FAS4 to produce dimethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine. Chemically synthesized MeCKs were comparable in activity. Our results strongly suggest that MeCKs function as CK mimics and play a role in this plant-pathogen interaction. PMID:26251309

  4. The Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi Produces a Catecholate Siderophore Required for Saprophytic Growth▿

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Prescott, John F.; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Meijer, Wim G.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the iron acquisition systems of the soilborne facultative intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi. We previously reported that expression of iupABC, encoding a putative siderophore ABC transporter system, is iron regulated and required for growth at low iron concentrations. Here we show that disruption of iupA leads to the concomitant accumulation of catecholates and a chromophore with absorption maxima at 341 and 528 nm during growth under iron-replete conditions. In contrast, the wild-type strain produces these compounds only in iron-depleted medium. Disruption of iupU and iupS, encoding nonribosomal peptide synthetases, prevented growth of the corresponding R. equi SID1 and SID3 mutants at low iron concentrations. However, only R. equi SID3 did not produce the chromophore produced by the wild-type strain during growth at low iron concentrations. The phenotype of R. equi SID3, but not that of R. equi SID1, could be rescued by coculture with the wild type, allowing growth at low iron concentrations. This strongly suggests that the product of the iupS gene is responsible for the synthesis of a diffusible compound required for growth at low iron concentrations. Transcription of iupU was constitutive, but that of iupS was iron regulated, with an induction of 3 orders of magnitude during growth in iron-depleted compared to iron-replete medium. Neither mutant was attenuated in vivo in a mouse infection model, indicating that the iupU- and iupS-encoded iron acquisition systems are primarily involved in iron uptake during saprophytic life. PMID:18156254

  5. Reduction kinetics of 3-hydroxybenzoate 6-hydroxylase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1.

    PubMed

    Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Montersino, Stefania; van Berkel, Willem J H; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2012-05-29

    3-Hydroxybenzoate 6-hydroxylase (3HB6H) from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-specific flavoprotein monooxygenase involved in microbial aromatic degradation. The enzyme catalyzes the para hydroxylation of 3-hydroxybenzoate (3-HB) to 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (2,5-DHB), the ring-fission fuel of the gentisate pathway. In this study, the kinetics of reduction of the enzyme-bound flavin by NADH was investigated at pH 8.0 using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer, and the data were analyzed comprehensively according to kinetic derivations and simulations. Observed rate constants for reduction of the free enzyme by NADH under anaerobic conditions were linearly dependent on NADH concentrations, consistent with a one-step irreversible reduction model with a bimolecular rate constant of 43 ± 2 M(-1) s(-1). In the presence of 3-HB, observed rate constants for flavin reduction were hyperbolically dependent on NADH concentrations and approached a limiting value of 48 ± 2 s(-1). At saturating concentrations of NADH (10 mM) and 3-HB (10 mM), the reduction rate constant is ~51 s(-1), whereas without 3-HB, the rate constant is 0.43 s(-1) at a similar NADH concentration. A similar stimulation of flavin reduction was found for the enzyme-product (2,5-DHB) complex, with a rate constant of 45 ± 2 s(-1). The rate enhancement induced by aromatic ligands is not due to a thermodynamic driving force because Em 0 for the enzyme-substrate complex is -179 ± 1 mV compared to an E(m)(0) of -175 ± 2 mV for the free enzyme. It is proposed that the reduction mechanism of 3HB6H involves an isomerization of the initial enzyme-ligand complex to a fully activated form before flavin reduction takes place. PMID:22559817

  6. Potential of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterial Isolates to Contribute to Soil Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Chirima, George Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon- (PAH-) polluted sites is presently a major challenge in agroforestry. Consequently, microorganisms with PAH-degradation ability and soil fertility improvement attributes are sought after in order to achieve sustainable remediation of polluted sites. This study isolated PAH-degrading bacteria from enriched cultures of spent automobile engine-oil polluted soil. Isolates' partial 16S rRNA genes were sequenced and taxonomically classified. Isolates were further screened for their soil fertility attributes such as phosphate solubilization, atmospheric nitrogen fixation, and indoleacetic acid (IAA) production. A total of 44 isolates were obtained and belong to the genera Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Flavobacterium, Microbacterium, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Pseudoxanthomonas, Rhodococcus, and Stenotrophomonas. Data analysed by principal component analysis showed the Bacillus and Ochrobactrum isolates displayed outstanding IAA production. Generalized linear modelling statistical approaches were applied to evaluate the contribution of the four most represented genera (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, and Rhodococcus) to soil fertility. The Pseudomonas isolates were the most promising in all three soil fertility enhancement traits evaluated and all isolates showed potential for one or more of the attributes evaluated. These findings demonstrate a clear potential of the isolates to participate in restorative bioremediation of polluted soil, which will enhance sustainable agricultural production and environmental protection. PMID:27774456

  7. Expression and characterization of styrene monooxygenases of Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10 for synthesizing enantiopure (S)-epoxides.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroshi; Imae, Ryouta; Komio, Tomoko; Itoh, Nobuya

    2012-10-01

    Styrene monooxygenase (StyA, SMOA)- and flavin oxidoreductase (StyB, SMOB)-coding genes of styrene-assimilating bacteria Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10 were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Determined amino acid sequences of StyAs and StyBs of ST-5 and ST-10 showed more similarity with those of Pseudomonas than with self-sufficient styrene monooxygenase (StyA2B) of Rhodococcus. Recombinant enzymes were purified from E. coli cells as functional proteins, and their properties were characterized in detail. StyBs (flavin oxidoreductase) of strains ST-5 and ST-10 have similar enzymatic properties to those of Pseudomonas, but StyB of strain ST-10 exhibited higher temperature stability than that of strain ST-5. StyAs of strains ST-5 and ST-10 catalyzed the epoxidation of vinyl side-chain of styrene and its derivatives and produced (S)-epoxides from styrene derivatives and showed high stereoselectivity. Both StyAs showed higher specific activity on halogenated styrene derivatives than on styrene itself. Additionally, the enzymes could catalyze the epoxidation of short-chain 1-alkenes to the corresponding (S)-epoxides. Aromatic compounds including styrene, 3-chlorostyrene, styrene oxide, and benzene exhibited marked inhibition of SMO reaction, although linear 1-alkene showed no inhibition of SMO activity at any concentration. PMID:22258641

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of a Versatile Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium, Rhodococcus pyridinivorans Strain KG-16, Collected from Oil Fields in India

    PubMed Central

    Dawar, Chhavi; Phanindranath, R.; Mutnuri, Lakshmi; Dayal, Anurodh M.

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a 5.8-Mb draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus pyridinivorans strain KG-16, which was obtained from the soil samples collected from the oilfields of Krishna-Godavari basin in India. This genomic resource can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms of hydrocarbon degradation and potentially aid in bioremediation applications. PMID:26868394

  9. Biodegradation of crude oil by individual bacterial strains and a mixed bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Santisi, Santina; Cappello, Simone; Catalfamo, Maurizio; Mancini, Giuseppe; Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Genovese, Lucrezia; Giuliano, Laura; Yakimov, Michail M.

    2015-01-01

    Three bacterial isolates identified as Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2, Rhodococcus erythropolis HS4 and Pseudomonas stutzeri SDM, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, were isolated from crude oil enrichments of natural seawater. Single strains and four bacterial consortia designed by mixing the single bacterial cultures respectively in the following ratios: (Alcanivorax: Pseudomonas, 1:1), (Alcanivorax: Rhodococcus, 1:1), (Pseudomonas: Rhodococcus, 1:1), and (Alcanivorax: Pseudomonas: Rhodococcus, 1:1:1), were analyzed in order to evaluate their oil degrading capability. All experiments were carried out in microcosms systems containing seawater (with and without addition of inorganic nutrients) and crude oil (unique carbon source). Measures of total and live bacterial abundance, Card-FISH and quali-, quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons (GC-FID) were carried out in order to elucidate the co-operative action of mixed microbial populations in the process of biodegradation of crude oil. All data obtained confirmed the fundamental role of bacteria belonging to Alcanivorax genus in the degradation of linear hydrocarbons in oil polluted environments. PMID:26273252

  10. Engineering xylose metabolism in triacylglycerol-producing Rhodococcus opacus for lignocellulosic fuel production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been a great deal of interest in fuel productions from lignocellulosic biomass to minimize the conflict between food and fuel use. The bioconversion of xylose, which is the second most abundant sugar present after glucose in lignocellulosic biomass, is important for the development of cost effective bioprocesses to fuels. Rhodococcus opacus PD630, an oleaginous bacterium, accumulates large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAGs), which can be processed into advanced liquid fuels. However, R. opacus PD630 does not metabolize xylose. Results We generated DNA libraries from a Streptomyces bacterium capable of utilizing xylose and introduced them into R. opacus PD630. Xsp8, one of the engineered strains, was capable of growing on up to 180 g L-1 of xylose. Xsp8 grown in batch-cultures derived from unbleached kraft hardwood pulp hydrolysate containing 70 g L-1 total sugars was able to completely and simultaneously utilize xylose and glucose present in the lignocellulosic feedstock, and yielded 11.0 g L-1 of TAGs as fatty acids, corresponding to 45.8% of the cell dry weight. The yield of total fatty acids per gram of sugars consumed was 0.178 g, which consisted primarily of palmitic acid and oleic acid. The engineered strain Xsp8 was introduced with two heterologous genes from Streptomyces: xylA, encoding xylose isomerase, and xylB, encoding xylulokinase. We further demonstrated that in addition to the introduction and the concomitant expression of heterologous xylA and xylB genes, there is another molecular target in the R. opacus genome which fully enables the functionality of xylA and xylB genes to generate the robust xylose-fermenting strain capable of efficiently producing TAGs at high xylose concentrations. Conclusion We successfully engineered a R. opacus strain that is capable of completely utilizing high concentrations of xylose or mixed xylose/glucose simultaneously, and substantiated its suitability for TAG production. This study demonstrates

  11. A potential role for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in Rhodococcus equi infection.

    PubMed

    Heller, M C; Drew, C P; Jackson, K A; Griffey, S; Watson, J L

    2010-12-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen of foals and immunocompromised humans that infects and proliferates within host macrophages and dendritic cells (DC). Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), the initial enzyme in the tryptophan catabolism pathway, is upregulated in R. equi infected equine monocyte-derived DC and alveolar macrophages. Tryptophan requirement of R. equi for extracellular and intracellular growth was assessed. Growth of R. equi in minimal media did not require tryptophan and pharmacologic inhibition of IDO had no effect on intracellular proliferation of R. equi in equine alveolar macrophages. To investigate an immune-regulatory role for INDO in R. equi infection, IDO(-/-) (B6.129-(Indotm1Alm)/J) (n=22) and strain matched control (C57BL/6J) (n=20) mice were infected with R. equi by intraperitoneal injection, for 3 and 6 days. There was no difference in bacterial counts in liver or spleen between the two groups. Histological sections of liver and spleen were assigned inflammation scores and RT-PCR for interferon-gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-23, forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) was performed on liver and spleen. Liver tissue of IDO(-/-) had higher inflammation scores at 6 days post-infection (PI) (P=0.05) and had decreased expression of TGFβ at 3 days PI (P=0.01), and FOXP3 at 3 days (P=0.02) and 6 days (P=0.03) compared to control mice. Immunostaining for FOXP3 showed lower numbers of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in liver of IDO(-/-) mice 6 days PI. Prolonged inflammation in the liver tissue of IDO(-/-) mice corresponded with lower expression of FOXP3 and TGFβ in that tissue, and also with lower numbers of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. We conclude that IDO expression by activated macrophages and DC plays a role in dampening the inflammatory response to R. equi infection in mice.

  12. Use of mycelia as paths for the isolation of contaminant‐degrading bacteria from soil

    PubMed Central

    Furuno, Shoko; Remer, Rita; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mycelia of fungi and soil oomycetes have recently been found to act as effective paths boosting bacterial mobility and bioaccessibility of contaminants in vadose environments. In this study, we demonstrate that mycelia can be used for targeted separation and isolation of contaminant‐degrading bacteria from soil. In a ‘proof of concept’ study we developed a novel approach to isolate bacteria from contaminated soil using mycelia of the soil oomycete Pythium ultimum as translocation networks for bacteria and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon naphthalene (NAPH) as selective carbon source. NAPH‐degrading bacterial isolates were affiliated with the genera Xanthomonas, Rhodococcus and Pseudomonas. Except for Rhodococcus the NAPH‐degrading isolates exhibited significant motility as observed in standard swarming and swimming motility assays. All steps of the isolation procedures were followed by cultivation‐independent terminal 16S rRNA gene terminal fragment length polymorphism (T‐RFLP) analysis. Interestingly, a high similarity (63%) between both the cultivable NAPH‐degrading migrant and the cultivable parent soil bacterial community profiles was observed. This suggests that mycelial networks generally confer mobility to native, contaminant‐degrading soil bacteria. Targeted, mycelia‐based dispersal hence may have high potential for the isolation of bacteria with biotechnologically useful properties. PMID:22014110

  13. Immobilization of Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 (an acetonitrile-degrading bacterium) with biofilm-forming bacteria for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Li, Yue; Cheng, Xiaosong; Feng, Liping; Xi, Chuanwu; Zhang, Ying

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a unique biofilm consisting of three bacterial strains with high biofilm-forming capability (Bacillus subtilis E2, E3, and N4) and an acetonitrile-degrading bacterium (Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2) was established for acetonitrile-containing wastewater treatment. The results indicated that this biofilm exhibited strong resistance to acetonitrile loading shock and displayed a typical spatial and structural heterogeneity and completely depleted the initial concentration of acetonitrile (800mgL(-1)) within 24h in a moving-bed-biofilm reactor (MBBR) after operation for 30days. The immobilization of BX2 cells in the biofilm was confirmed by PCR-DGGE. It has been demonstrated that biofilm-forming bacteria can promote the immobilization of contaminant-degrading bacteria in the biofilms and can subsequently improve the degradation of contaminants in wastewater. This approach offers a novel strategy for enhancing biological oxidation of toxic pollutants in wastewater. PMID:23376196

  14. Multiple reuses of Rhodococcus ruber TH3 free cells to produce acrylamide in a membrane dispersion microreactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiahui; Liu, Junqi; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yujun; Luo, Guangsheng; Yu, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    In this work, multiple reuses of Rhodococcus ruber TH3 free cells for the hydration of acrylonitrile to produce acrylamide in a membrane dispersion microreactor were carried out. Through using a centrifuge, the reactions reached 39.9, 39.5, 38.6 and 38.0wt% of the final acrylamide product concentration respectively within 35min in a four cycle reuse of free cells. In contrast, using a stirring tank, free cells could only be used once with the same addition speed of acrylonitrile with a microreactor. Through observing the dissolution behavior of acrylonitrile microdroplets in a free cell solution using a coaxial microfluidic device and microscope, it was found that the acrylonitrile microdroplets with a diameter of 75μm were rarely observed within a length of 2cm channel within 10s, which illustrated that the microreactor can intensify the reaction rate to reduce the inhibition of acrylonitrile and acrylamide.

  15. The Rhodococcus opacus TadD protein mediates triacylglycerol metabolism by regulating intracellular NAD(P)H pools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Gram-positive actinomycete Rhodococcus opacus is widely studied for its innate ability to store large amounts of carbon in the form of triacylglycerol (TAG). Several groups have demonstrated that R. opacus PD630 is capable of storing anywhere from 50 to 76% of its cell dry weight as TAG. While numerous studies have focused on phenomenological aspects of this process, few have sought to identify the underlying molecular and biochemical mechanisms responsible for the biosynthesis and storage of this molecule. Results Herein we further our previous efforts to illuminate the black box that is lipid metabolism in actinomycetes using a genetic approach. Utilizing a simple, colorimetric genetic screen, we have identified a gene, referred to herein as tadD (triacylglycerol accumulation deficient), which is critical for TAG biosynthesis in R. opacus PD630. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the purified protein product of this gene is capable of oxidizing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, while simultaneously reducing NAD(P)+ to NAD(P)H. Supporting this biochemical data, we observed that the ratio of NAD(P)H to NAD(P)+ is elevated in wildtype cultures grown under lipid production conditions as compared to cultures grown under vegetative growth conditions, while the mutant strain demonstrated no change irrespective of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrate that over-expressing a putative phosphorylative glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase leads to decreased TAG production during growth on TAG accumulation conditions. Conclusion Taken together, the data support the identification of a key metabolic branch point separating vegetative growth and lipid accumulation lifestyles in Rhodococcus. PMID:24209886

  16. Isolation of bacteria capable of growth with 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin as the sole carbon and energy sources.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Lior; van Rijn, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    Using a relatively simple enrichment technique, geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB)-biodegrading bacteria were isolated from a digestion basin in an aquaculture unit. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences affiliated one of the three isolates with the Gram-positive genus Rhodococcus, while the other two isolates were found to be closely related to the Gram-negative family Comamonadaceae (Variovorax and Comamonas). Growth rates and geosmin and MIB removal rates by the isolates were determined under aerated and nonaerated conditions in mineral medium containing either of the two compounds as the sole carbon and energy source. All isolates exhibited their fastest growth under aerobic conditions, with generation times ranging from 3.1 to 5.7 h, compared to generation times of up to 19.1 h in the nonaerated flasks. Incubation of the isolates with additional carbon sources caused a significant increase in their growth rates, while removal rates of geosmin and MIB were significantly lower than those for incubation with only geosmin or MIB. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, members of the genera Rhodococcus and Comamonas were detected in geosmin- and MIB-enriched sludge from the digestion basin.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Ethane, Propane, and Butane Consuming Bacteria from Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, M. C.; Valentine, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    Three strains of ethane, propane, or butane consuming bacteria were isolated from marine hydrocarbon seep sediments at Coal Oil Point, off shore Santa Barbara, CA. These three isolates (MR1, MR2 and MR3) were capable of growth at natural environmental temperatures and salinity. Isolate MR2 was capable of growth on ethane or propane as the sole carbon source, isolate MR4 on propane or butane, and isolate MR3 on ethane, propane, or butane. All three isolates were also able to grow on other carbon-containing molecules, including ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, acetate, butyrate, sucrose, and dextrose, and isolates MR3 and MR4 were able to grow on 1-butanol and 2-butanol. None showed significant growth with methane, methanol, or formate as the sole carbon source. 16S rDNA sequencing indicated that isolate MR2 was most closely related to the gamma-Proteobacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri, while isolates MR3 and MR4 were both Gram-positive and most similar to Rhodococcus wratislaviensis and Rhodococcus opacus, respectively. Compared to methanotrophs, relatively little is known about the organisms that consume the C2-C4 alkanes, but both our isolates and the previously described species appear to be capable of metabolizing a wide variety of carbon compounds, including several common pollutants. The growth of these hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria on other organic compounds raises the possibility that the abundance and distribution of organic matter might be expected to impact the oxidation of C2-C4 hydrocarbons. Additional studies will further characterize the range of metabolism, and will investigate the importance of these organisms in natural hydrocarbon seep environments.

  18. Hemolytic activity of a bacterial trehalose lipid biosurfactant produced by Rhodococcus sp.: evidence for a colloid-osmotic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Ana; Aranda, Francisco J; Espuny, María J; Teruel, José A; Marqués, Ana; Manresa, Angeles; Ortiz, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    A succinoyl trehalose lipid produced by Rhodococcus sp. behaves as a biological surfactant and also displays various interesting biological activities. Trehalose lipid has been shown to have a great tendency to partition into phospholipid membranes; therefore, the characterization of its interaction with biological membranes is of central importance. In this work, human red blood cells have been used as an experimental model. Trehalose lipid causes the swelling of human erythrocytes followed by hemolysis at concentrations well below its critical micellar concentration. Kinetic measurements show that, upon addition of trehalose lipid, K(+) release precedes that of hemoglobin. Osmotic protectants of the appropriate size added to the external medium make it possible to avoid hemolysis. The results indicate that trehalose lipid causes the hemolysis of human erythrocytes by a colloid-osmotic mechanism, most likely by formation of enhanced permeability domains, or "pores" enriched in the biosurfactant, within the erythrocyte membrane. Scanning electron microscopy shows trehalose lipid-induced spherocytosis and echinocytosis of red blood cells, which fits well within the framework of the bilayer-couple hypothesis. The presented results contribute to establishing a molecular basis for the biological properties of this trehalose lipid biosurfactant. PMID:20146489

  19. Adaptive response of Rhodococcus opacus PWD4 to salt and phenolic stress on the level of mycolic acids.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Fischer, Martin A; Kirsten, Sandra; Würz, Birgit; Wick, Lukas Y; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-12-01

    Mycolata form a group of Gram-positive bacteria with unique cell envelope structures that are known for their high tolerance against antibiotics and both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. An important part of the unique surface structure of the mycolata is the presence of long chain α-alkyl-β-hydroxy fatty acids, the mycolic acids. In order to investigate the adaptive changes in the mycolic acid composition, we investigated the composition of mycolic acids during the response both to osmotic stress caused by NaCl and to 4-chlorophenol in Rhodococcus opacus PWD4. This bacterium was chosen as it is known to adapt to different kinds of stresses. In addition, it is a potential biocatalyst in bioremediation as well as for biotechnological applications. In the present study, cells of R. opacus PWD4, grown in liquid cultures, responded to toxic concentrations of NaCl by increasing the ratio between mycolic acids and membrane phospholipid fatty acids (MA/PLFA-ratio). Cells reacted to both NaCl and 4-chlorophenol by decreasing both the average chain length and the unsaturation index of their mycolic acids. These changes in mycolic acid composition correlated with increases in cell surface hydrophobicity and saturation of membrane fatty acids, demonstrating the relation between mycolic acid and phospholipid synthesis and their contribution to cell surface properties of R. opacus PWD4. PMID:27620730

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a bacterial l-amino-acid oxidase from Rhodococcus opacus

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, Annette; Geueke, Birgit; Niefind, Karsten; Hummel, Werner; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2006-03-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a bacterial l-amino acid oxidase from R. opacus is described. The homodimeric protein contains one molecule of non-covalently bound FAD per monomer. Crystals with good diffraction properties were grown in two different orthorhombic space groups (P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and C222{sub 1}). l-Amino-acid oxidases (EC 1.4.3.2) catalyse the stereospecific oxidative deamination of an l-amino-acid substrate to an α-keto acid with the production of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a bacterial l-amino-acid oxidase from Rhodococcus opacus (RoLAAO) is described. RoLAAO is a dimeric protein consisting of two identical subunits of 489 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 54.2 kDa and a non-covalently bound FAD molecule. RoLAAO was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method in two different space groups: P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 65.7, b = 109.7, c = 134.4 Å) and C222{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 68.3, b = 88.4, c = 186.6 Å). Both crystal forms diffracted X-rays to a resolution of at least 1.6 Å.

  1. Modulation of the Hormone Setting by Rhodococcus fascians Results in Ectopic KNOX Activation in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Depuydt, Stephen; Doležal, Karel; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Moritz, Thomas; Holsters, Marcelle; Vereecke, Danny

    2008-01-01

    The biotrophic actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians has a profound impact on plant development and a common aspect of the symptomatology is the deformation of infected leaves. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the serrated leaf margins formed upon infection resemble the leaf phenotype of transgenic plants with ectopic expression of KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOX) genes. Through transcript profiling, we demonstrate that class-I KNOX genes are transcribed in symptomatic leaves. Functional analysis revealed that BREVIPEDICELLUS/KNOTTED-LIKE1 and mainly SHOOT MERISTEMLESS were essential for the observed leaf dissection. However, these results also positioned the KNOX genes downstream in the signaling cascade triggered by R. fascians infection. The much faster activation of ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR5 and the establishment of homeostatic and feedback mechanisms to control cytokinin (CK) levels support the overrepresentation of this hormone in infected plants due to the secretion by the pathogen, thereby placing the CK response high up in the cascade. Hormone measurements show a net decrease of tested CKs, indicating either that secretion by the bacterium and degradation by the plant are in balance, or, as suggested by the strong reaction of 35S:CKX plants, that other CKs are at play. At early time points of the interaction, activation of gibberellin 2-oxidase presumably installs a local hormonal setting favorable for meristematic activity that provokes leaf serrations. The results are discussed in the context of symptom development, evasion of plant defense, and the establishment of a specific niche by R. fascians. PMID:18184732

  2. Adaptive response of Rhodococcus opacus PWD4 to salt and phenolic stress on the level of mycolic acids.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Fischer, Martin A; Kirsten, Sandra; Würz, Birgit; Wick, Lukas Y; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-12-01

    Mycolata form a group of Gram-positive bacteria with unique cell envelope structures that are known for their high tolerance against antibiotics and both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. An important part of the unique surface structure of the mycolata is the presence of long chain α-alkyl-β-hydroxy fatty acids, the mycolic acids. In order to investigate the adaptive changes in the mycolic acid composition, we investigated the composition of mycolic acids during the response both to osmotic stress caused by NaCl and to 4-chlorophenol in Rhodococcus opacus PWD4. This bacterium was chosen as it is known to adapt to different kinds of stresses. In addition, it is a potential biocatalyst in bioremediation as well as for biotechnological applications. In the present study, cells of R. opacus PWD4, grown in liquid cultures, responded to toxic concentrations of NaCl by increasing the ratio between mycolic acids and membrane phospholipid fatty acids (MA/PLFA-ratio). Cells reacted to both NaCl and 4-chlorophenol by decreasing both the average chain length and the unsaturation index of their mycolic acids. These changes in mycolic acid composition correlated with increases in cell surface hydrophobicity and saturation of membrane fatty acids, demonstrating the relation between mycolic acid and phospholipid synthesis and their contribution to cell surface properties of R. opacus PWD4.

  3. Functional characterization and stability improvement of a ‘thermophilic-like’ ene-reductase from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Anika; Mehnert, Marika; Paul, Caroline E.; Westphal, Adrie H.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.; Tischler, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Ene-reductases (ERs) are widely applied for the asymmetric synthesis of relevant industrial chemicals. A novel ER OYERo2 was found within a set of 14 putative old yellow enzymes (OYEs) obtained by genome mining of the actinobacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP. Multiple sequence alignment suggested that the enzyme belongs to the group of ‘thermophilic-like’ OYEs. OYERo2 was produced in Escherichia coli and biochemically characterized. The enzyme is strongly NADPH dependent and uses non-covalently bound FMNH2 for the reduction of activated α,β-unsaturated alkenes. In the active form OYERo2 is a dimer. Optimal catalysis occurs at pH 7.3 and 37°C. OYERo2 showed highest specific activities (45-50 U mg-1) on maleimides, which are efficiently converted to the corresponding succinimides. The OYERo2-mediated reduction of prochiral alkenes afforded the (R)-products with excellent optical purity (ee > 99%). OYERo2 is not as thermo-resistant as related OYEs. Introduction of a characteristic intermolecular salt bridge by site-specific mutagenesis raised the half-life of enzyme inactivation at 32°C from 28 to 87 min and improved the tolerance toward organic co-solvents. The suitability of OYERo2 for application in industrial biocatalysis is discussed. PMID:26483784

  4. Fasciation induction by the phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians depends upon a linear plasmid encoding a cytokinin synthase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, M; Messens, E; Caplan, A B; van Montagu, M; Desomer, J

    1992-01-01

    Rhodococcus fascians is a nocardiform bacteria that induces leafy galls (fasciation) on dicotyledonous and several monocotyledonous plants. The wild-type strain D188 contained a conjugative, 200 kb linear extrachromosomal element, pFiD188. Linear plasmid-cured strains were avirulent and reintroduction of this linear element restored virulence. Pulsed field electrophoresis indicated that the chromosome might also be a linear molecule of 4 megabases. Three loci involved in phytopathogenicity have been identified by insertion mutagenesis of this Fi plasmid. Inactivation of the fas locus resulted in avirulent strains, whereas insertions in the two other loci affected the degree of virulence, yielding attenuated (att) and hypervirulent (hyp) bacteria. One of the genes within the fas locus encoded an isopentenyltranferase (IPT) with low homology to analogous proteins from Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria. IPT activity was detected after expression of this protein in Escherichia coli cells. In R.fascians, ipt expression could only be detected in bacteria induced with extracts from fasciated tissue. R.fascians strains without the linear plasmid but containing this fas locus alone could not provoke any phenotype on plants, indicating additional genes from the linear plasmid were also essential for virulence. These studies, the first genetic analysis of the interaction of a Gram-positive bacterium with plants, suggest that a novel mechanism for plant tumour induction has evolved in R.fascians independently from the other branches of the eubacteria. Images PMID:1547783

  5. Biocatalytic Properties and Structural Analysis of Eugenol Oxidase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1: A Versatile Oxidative Biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quoc-Thai; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Binda, Claudia; Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Mattevi, Andrea; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-07-15

    Eugenol oxidase (EUGO) from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 had previously been shown to convert only a limited set of phenolic compounds. In this study, we have explored the biocatalytic potential of this flavoprotein oxidase, resulting in a broadened substrate scope and a deeper insight into its structural properties. In addition to the oxidation of vanillyl alcohol and the hydroxylation of eugenol, EUGO can efficiently catalyze the dehydrogenation of various phenolic ketones and the selective oxidation of a racemic secondary alcohol-4-(1-hydroxyethyl)-2-methoxyphenol. EUGO was also found to perform the kinetic resolution of a racemic secondary alcohol. Crystal structures of the enzyme in complexes with isoeugenol, coniferyl alcohol, vanillin, and benzoate have been determined. The catalytic center is a remarkable solvent-inaccessible cavity on the si side of the flavin cofactor. Structural comparison with vanillyl alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum highlights a few localized changes that correlate with the selectivity of EUGO for phenolic substrates bearing relatively small p-substituents while tolerating o-methoxy substituents. PMID:27123962

  6. Evaluation of biosurfactants grown in corn oil by Rhodococcus rhodochrous on removing of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanti, Venty; Hastuti, Sri; Pujiastuti, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    The potential application of biosurfactants to remove heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by batch technique was examined. The glycolipids type biosurfactants were grown in a media containing of 20% v/v corn oil with 7 days of fermentation by Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The biosurfactants reduced the surface tension of water of about 51% from 62 mN/m to 30 mN/m. The biosurfactant increased the E24 of water-palm oil emulsion of about 55% from 43% to 97% and could maintain this E24 value of above 50% for up to 9 days. Heavy metal ion removal, in this case cadmium ion, by crude and patially purified biosurfactants has been investigated from aqueous solution at pH 6. Adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 1.74 and 1.82 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by partially purified biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 0.79 and 1.34 mg/g, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant was higher than that of by partially purified biosurfactant. The results suggested that the biosurfactant could be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

  7. Cloning and Characterization of a Novel Esterase from Rhodococcus sp. for Highly Enantioselective Synthesis of a Chiral Cilastatin Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Pan, Jiang; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-01-01

    A novel nonheme chloroperoxidase (RhEst1), with promiscuous esterase activity for enantioselective hydrolysis of ethyl (S)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate, was identified from a shotgun library of Rhodococcus sp. strain ECU1013. RhEst1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), purified to homogeneity, and functionally characterized. Fingerprinting analysis revealed that RhEst1 prefers para-nitrophenyl (pNP) esters of short-chain acyl groups. pNP esters with a cyclic acyl moiety, especially that with a cyclobutanyl group, were also substrates for RhEst1. The Km values for methyl 2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate (DmCpCm) and ethyl 2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylate (DmCpCe) were 0.25 and 0.43 mM, respectively. RhEst1 could serve as an efficient hydrolase for the bioproduction of optically pure (S)-2,2-dimethyl cyclopropane carboxylic acid (DmCpCa), which is an important chiral building block for cilastatin. As much as 0.5 M DmCpCe was enantioselectively hydrolyzed into (S)-DmCpCa, with a molar yield of 47.8% and an enantiomeric excess (ee) of 97.5%, indicating an extremely high enantioselectivity (E = 240) of this novel and unique biocatalyst for green manufacturing of highly valuable chiral chemicals. PMID:25239898

  8. Optimization of biosurfactant production in soybean oil by rhodococcus rhodochrous and its utilization in remediation of cadmium-contaminated solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanti, Venty; Hastuti, Sri; Andriani, Dewi

    2016-02-01

    Biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus rhodochrous in soybean oil was developed, where the effect of medium composition and fermentation time were evaluated. The optimum condition for biosurfactant production was achieved when a medium containing 30 g/L TSB (tryptic soy broth) and 20% v/v soybean oil was used as media with 7 days of fermentation. Biosurfactant was identified as glycolipids type biosurfactant which had critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 896 mg/L. The biosurfactant had oil in water emulsion type and was able to reduce the surface tension of palm oil about 52% which could stabilize the emulsion up to 12 days. The batch removal of cadmium metal ion by crude and partially purified biosurfactants have been examined from synthetic aqueous solution at pH 6. The results exhibited that the crude biosurfactant had a much better adsorption ability of Cd(II) than that of partially purified biosurfactant. However, it was found that there was no significant difference in the adsorption of Cd(II) with 5 and 10 minutes of contact time. The results indicated that the biosurfactant could be used in remediation of heavy metals from contaminated aqueous solution.

  9. Optimization of macroelement concentrations, pH and osmolarity for triacylglycerol accumulation in Rhodococcus opacus strain PD630

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The refinement of biodiesel or renewable diesel from bacterial lipids has a great potential to make a contribution for energy production in the future. This study provides new data concerning suitable nutrient concentrations for cultivation of the Gram-positive Rhodococcus opacus PD630, which is able to accumulate large amounts of lipids during nitrogen limitation. Enhanced concentrations of magnesium have been shown to increase the final optical density and the lipid content of the cells. Elevated phosphate concentrations slowed down the onset of the accumulation phase, without a clear effect on the final optical density and the cell’s lipid content. A robust growth of R. opacus was possible in the presence of ammonium concentrations of up to 1.4 g l-1 and sucrose concentrations of up to 240 g l-1, with an optimum regarding growth and lipid storage observed in the range of 0.2 to 0.4 g l-1 ammonium and 20 to 40 g l-1 sucrose, respectively. Moreover, R. opacus showed tolerance to high salt concentrations. PMID:23855965

  10. Degradation of recalcitrant aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons by a dioxin-degrader Rhodococcus sp. strain p52.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Yan; Jia, Rui-Bao; Chen, Bin; Li, Li

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the ability of Rhodococcus sp. strain p52, a dioxin degrader, to biodegrade petroleum hydrocarbons. Strain p52 can use linear alkanes (tetradecane, tetracosane, and dotriacontane), branched alkane (pristane), and aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene and phenanthrene) as sole carbon and energy sources. Specifically, the strain removes 85.7 % of tetradecane within 48 h at a degradation rate of 3.8 mg h(-1) g(-1) dry cells, and 79.4 % of tetracosane, 66.4 % of dotriacontane, and 63.9 % of pristane within 9-11 days at degradation rates of 20.5, 14.7, and 20.3 mg day(-1) g(-1) dry cells, respectively. Moreover, strain p52 consumes 100 % naphthalene and 55.3 % phenanthrene within 9-11 days at respective degradation rates of 16 and 12.9 mg day(-1) g(-1) dry cells. Metabolites of the petroleum hydrocarbons by strain p52 were analyzed. Genes encoding alkane-hydroxylating enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme (CYP185) and two alkane-1-monooxygenases, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The transcriptional activities of these genes in the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed potential of strain p52 to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:24859700

  11. A novel method to generate unmarked gene deletions in the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi using 5-fluorocytosine conditional lethality

    PubMed Central

    van der Geize, R.; de Jong, W.; Hessels, G. I.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel method to efficiently generate unmarked in-frame gene deletions in Rhodococcus equi was developed, exploiting the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) by the action of cytosine deaminase (CD) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) enzymes. The opportunistic, intracellular pathogen R. equi is resistant to high concentrations of 5-FC. Introduction of Escherichia coli genes encoding CD and UPRT conferred conditional lethality to R. equi cells incubated with 5-FC. To exemplify the use of the codA::upp cassette as counter-selectable marker, an unmarked in-frame gene deletion mutant of R. equi was constructed. The supA and supB genes, part of a putative cholesterol catabolic gene cluster, were efficiently deleted from the R. equi wild-type genome. Phenotypic analysis of the generated ΔsupAB mutant confirmed that supAB are essential for growth of R. equi on cholesterol. Macrophage survival assays revealed that the ΔsupAB mutant is able to survive and proliferate in macrophages comparable to wild type. Thus, cholesterol metabolism does not appear to be essential for macrophage survival of R. equi. The CD-UPRT based 5-FC counter-selection may become a useful asset in the generation of unmarked in-frame gene deletions in other actinobacteria as well, as actinobacteria generally appear to be 5-FC resistant and 5-FU sensitive. PMID:18984616

  12. Highly enantioselective oxidation of phenyl methyl sulfide and its derivatives into optically pure (S)-sulfoxides with Rhodococcus sp. CCZU10-1 in an n-octane-water biphasic system.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Cai; Ma, Cui-Luan; Yang, Zhen-Xing; Zhou, Min; Xing, Zhen; Ma, Jiang-Tao; Yu, Hui-Lei

    2013-12-01

    Enantiopure sulfoxides can be prepared via the asymmetric oxidation of sulfides using sulfide monooxygenases. The n-octane-water biphasic system was chosen for the bio-oxidation of a water-insoluble phenyl methyl sulfide (PMS) by Rhodococcus sp. CCZU10-1. In this n-octane-water system, the optimum reaction conditions were obtained. (S)-phenyl methyl sulfoxide ((S)-PMSO) with >99.9 % enantiomeric excess formed at 55.3 mM in the n-octane-water biphasic system. Using fed-batch method, a total of 118 mM (S)-PMSO accumulated in 1-L reaction mixture after the 7th feed, and no (R)-PMSO and sulfone were detected. Moreover, Rhodococcus sp. CCZU10-1 displayed fairly good activity and enantioselectivity toward other sulfides. In conclusion, Rhodococcus sp. CCZU10-1 is a promising biocatalyst for synthesizing highly optically active sulfoxides.

  13. Characterization of the microbial community structure and nitrosamine-reducing isolates in drinking water biofilters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanfeng; Guo, Yanling; Yang, Qingxiang; Huang, Yao; Zhu, Chunyou; Fan, Jing; Pan, Feng

    2015-07-15

    Two biofilters were constructed using biological activated carbon (BAC) and nitrosamine-containing water from two drinking water treatment plants. The microbiome of each biofilter was characterized by 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing, and one nitrosamine-reducing bacterium was isolated. The results showed that nitrosamines changed the relative abundance at both the phylum and class levels, and the new genera were observed in the microbial communities of the two BAC filters after cultivation. As such, the genus Rhodococcus, which includes many nitrosamine-reducing strains reported in previous studies, was only detected in the BAC2 filter after cultivation. These findings indicate that nitrosamines can significantly affect the genus level in the microbial communities. Furthermore, the isolated bacterial culture Rhodococcus cercidiphylli A41 AS-1 exhibited the ability to reduce five nitrosamines (N-nitrosodimethylamine, N-nitrosodiethylamine, N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine, N-nitrosopyrrolidine, and N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine) with removal ratios that ranged from 38.1% to 85.4%. The isolate exhibited a better biodegradation ability with nitrosamine as the carbon source when compared with nitrosamine as the nitrogen source. This study increases our understanding of the microbial community in drinking water biofilters with trace quantities of nitrosamines, and provides information on the metabolism of nitrosamine-reducing bacteria.

  14. Diversity of actinomycetes isolated from subseafloor sediments after prolonged low-temperature storage.

    PubMed

    Ulanova, Dana; Goo, Kian-Sim

    2015-05-01

    Subseafloor sediments present an untapped source of novel bacterial species with industrially important bioactivities. Subseafloor core samples collected during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expeditions 315, 316, and 331 and stored in Kochi Core Center at -80 °C for 1 to 4 years were used for cultivation-based study of viable actinomycetes. In total, more than 100 actinomycete-like colonies were isolated from two deep-frozen subseafloor sediment samples. Isolated actinomycetes showed close similarity to known Actinotalea, Dietzia, Gordonia, Isoptericola, Microbacterium, Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, and Tsukamurella species and were halotolerant. Bioactivity assays revealed that two of the isolates were producing potent antibacterial compound(s) and one isolate was having antifungal activity. Our study demonstrated that deep-frozen subseafloor core samples could be a potential source of viable actinomycetes, which may be used in drug discovery. PMID:25381631

  15. Structural definition of trehalose 6-monomycolates and trehalose 6,6'-dimycolates from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi by multiple-stage linear ion-trap mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Fong-Fu; Wohlmann, Jens; Turk, John; Haas, Albert

    2011-12-01

    The cell wall of the pathogenic bacterium Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) contains abundant trehalose monomycolate (TMM) and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), the glycolipids bearing mycolic acids. Here, we describe multiple-stage (MS(n)) linear ion-trap (LIT) mass spectrometric approaches toward structural characterization of TMM and TDM desorbed as [M + Alk](+) (Alk = Na, Li) and as [M + X](-) (X = CH(3)CO(2), HCO(2)) ions by electrospray ionization (ESI). Upon MS(n) (n=2, 3, 4) on the [M + Alk](+) or the [M + X](-) adduct ions of TMM and TDM, abundant structurally informative fragment ions are readily available, permitting fast assignment of the length of the meromycolate chain and of the α-branch on the mycolyl residues. In this way, structures of TMM and TDM isolated from pathogenic R. equi strain 103 can be determined. Our results indicate that the major TMM and TDM molecules possess 6, and/or 6'-mycolyl groups that consist of mainly C14 and C16 α-branches with meromycolate branches ranging from C18 to C28, similar to the structures of the unbound mycolic acids found in the cell envelope. Up to 60 isobaric isomers varying in chain length of the α-branch and of the meromycolate backbone were observed for some of the TDM species in the mixture. This mass spectrometric approach provides a direct method that affords identification of various TMM and TDM isomers in a mixture of which the complexity of this lipid class has not been previously reported using other analytical methods. PMID:21972013

  16. Structural characterisation of the virulence-associated protein VapG from the horse pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Okoko, Tebekeme; Blagova, Elena V.; Whittingham, Jean L.; Dover, Lynn G.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Virulence and host range in Rhodococcus equi depends on the variable pathogenicity island of their virulence plasmids. Notable gene products are a family of small secreted virulence-associated proteins (Vaps) that are critical to intramacrophagic proliferation. Equine-adapted strains, which cause severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals, produce a cell-associated VapA that is necessary for virulence, alongside five other secreted homologues. In the absence of biochemical insight, attention has turned to the structures of these proteins to develop a functional hypothesis. Recent studies have described crystal structures for VapD and a truncate of the VapA orthologue of porcine-adapted strains, VapB. Here, we crystallised the full-length VapG and determined its structure by molecular replacement. Electron density corresponding to the N-terminal domain was not visible suggesting that it is disordered. The protein core adopted a compact elliptical, anti-parallel β-barrel fold with β1–β2–β3–β8–β5–β6–β7–β4 topology decorated by a single peripheral α-helix unique to this family. The high glycine content of the protein allows close packing of secondary structural elements. Topologically, the surface has no indentations that indicate a nexus for molecular interactions. The distribution of polar and apolar groups on the surface of VapG is markedly uneven. One-third of the surface is dominated by exposed apolar side-chains, with no ionisable and only four polar side-chains exposed, giving rise to an expansive flat hydrophobic surface. Other surface regions are more polar, especially on or near the α-helix and a belt around the centre of the β-barrel. Possible functional significance of these recent structures is discussed. PMID:25746683

  17. Metabolism of 2-Chloro-4-Nitroaniline via Novel Aerobic Degradation Pathway by Rhodococcus sp. Strain MB-P1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pal, Deepika; Vikram, Surendra; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA) is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium, the degradation of 2-C-4-NA occurs with the release of nitrite ions, chloride ions, and ammonia. During the resting cell studies, the 2-C-4-NA-induced cells of strain MB-P1 transformed 2-C-4-NA stoichiometrically to 4-amino-3-chlorophenol (4-A-3-CP), which subsequently gets transformed to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ) metabolite. Enzyme assays by cell-free lysates prepared from 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells, demonstrated that the first enzyme in the 2-C-4-NA degradation pathway is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the stoichiometric removal of nitro group and production of 4-A-3-CP. Oxygen uptake studies on 4-A-3-CP and related anilines by 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells demonstrated the involvement of aniline dioxygenase in the second step of 2-C-4-NA degradation. This is the first report showing 2-C-4-NA degradation and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:23614030

  18. Identification and characterization of another 4-nitrophenol degradation gene cluster, nps, in Rhodococcus sp. strain PN1.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Nishimura, Munehiro; Kato, Dai-ichiro; Takeo, Masahiro; Negoro, Seiji

    2011-06-01

    4-Nitrophenol (4-NP) is a toxic compound formed in soil by the hydrolysis of organophosphorous pesticides, such as parathion. We previously reported the presence of the 4-NP degradation gene cluster (nphRA1A2) in Rhodococcus sp. strain PN1, which encodes a two-component 4-NP hydroxylase system that oxidizes 4-NP into 4-nitrocatechol. In the current study, another gene cluster (npsC and npsRA2A1B) encoding a similar 4-NP hydroxylase system was cloned from strain PN1. The enzymes from this 4-NP hydroxylase system (NpsA1 and NpsA2) were purified as histidine-tagged (His-) proteins and then characterized. His-NpsA2 showed NADH/FAD oxidoreductase activity, and His-NpsA1 showed 4-NP oxidizing activity in the presence of His-NpsA2. In the 4-NP oxidation using the reconstituted enzyme system (His-NpsA1 and His-NpsA2), hydroquinone (35% of 4-NP disappeared) and hydroxyquinol (59% of 4-NP disappeared) were detected in the presence of ascorbic acid as a reducing reagent, suggesting that, without the reducing reagent, 4-NP was converted into their oxidized forms, 1,4-benzoquinone and 2-hydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone. In addition, in the cell extract of recombinant Escherichia coli expressing npsB, a typical spectral change showing conversion of hydroxyquinol into maleylacetate was observed. These results indicate that this nps gene cluster, in addition to the nph gene cluster, is also involved in 4-NP degradation in strain PN1.

  19. Extracellular production of Streptomyces exfoliatus poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerase in Rhodococcus sp. T104: determination of optimal biocatalyst conditions.

    PubMed

    García-Hidalgo, Javier; Hormigo, Daniel; Prieto, María Auxiliadora; Arroyo, Miguel; de la Mata, Isabel

    2012-03-01

    The phaZ ( Sex ) gene encoding poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerase from Streptomyces exfoliatus has been successfully cloned and expressed in Rhodococcus sp. T104 for the first time. Likewise, the recombinant enzyme was efficiently produced as an extracellular active form and purified to homogeneity by two hydrophobic chromatographic steps. MALDI-TOF analysis showed that the native enzyme is a monomer. Circular dichroism studies have revealed a secondary structure showing 25.6% α-helix, 21.4% β-sheet, 17.1% β-turns, and 35.2% random coil, with a midpoint transition temperature (T (m)) of 55.8 °C. Magnesium and calcium ions enhanced the enzyme activity, whereas manganese inhibited it. EDTA moderately decreased the activity, and the enzyme was completely deactivated at 3 M NaCl. Chemical modification studies indicated the presence of the catalytic triad serine-histidine-carboxylic acid in the active site. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of PHB products of enzymatic hydrolysis showed monomers and dimers of 3-hydroxybutyric acid, demonstrating that PHB depolymerase is an exo-hydrolase. Addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin simultaneously increased the activity as well as preserved the enzyme during lyophilization. Finally, thermoinactivation studies showed that the enzyme is highly stable at 40 °C. All these features support the potential industrial application of this recombinant enzyme in the production of (R)-3-hydroxyalkanoic acid derivatives as well as in the degradation of bioplastics. PMID:21845385

  20. Age-Related Changes following In Vitro Stimulation with Rhodococcus equi of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes from Neonatal Foals

    PubMed Central

    Kachroo, Priyanka; Ivanov, Ivan; Seabury, Ashley G.; Liu, Mei; Chowdhary, Bhanu P.; Cohen, Noah D.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular bacterium primarily known as an equine pathogen that infects young foals causing a pyogranulomatuous pneumonia. The molecular mechanisms mediating the immune response of foals to R. equi are not fully elucidated. Hence, global genomic high-throughput tools like gene expression microarrays might identify age-related gene expression signatures and molecular pathways that contribute to the immune mechanisms underlying the inherent susceptibility of foals to disease caused by R. equi. The objectives of this study were 2-fold: 1) to compare the expression profiles at specific ages of blood leukocytes from foals stimulated with virulent R. equi with those of unstimulated leukocytes; and, 2) to characterize the age-related changes in the gene expression profile associated with blood leukocytes in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi. Peripheral blood leukocytes were obtained from 6 foals within 24 hours (h) of birth (day 1) and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after birth. The samples were split, such that half were stimulated with live virulent R. equi, and the other half served as unstimulated control. RNA was extracted and the generated cDNA was labeled with fluorescent dyes for microarray hybridizations using an equine microarray. Our findings suggest that there is age-related differential expression of genes involved in host immune response and immunity. We found induction of genes critical for host immunity against pathogens (MHC class II) only at the later time-points (compared to birth). While it appears that foals up to 8-weeks of age are able to initiate a protective inflammatory response against the bacteria, relatively decreased expression of various other immune-related genes points toward inherent diminished immune responses closer to birth. These genes and pathways may contribute to disease susceptibility in foals if infected early in life, and might thus be targeted for developing preventative or therapeutic strategies. PMID

  1. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  2. Biotechnological methods for chalcone reduction using whole cells of Lactobacillus, Rhodococcus and Rhodotorula strains as a way to produce new derivatives.

    PubMed

    Stompor, Monika; Kałużny, Mateusz; Żarowska, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Microbial strains of the genera Dietzia, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Gordonia, Streptomyces, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Penicillium, Rhodotorula and Lactobacillus were screened for the ability to convert chalcones. Synthesis of chalcones was performed by the Claisen-Schmidt reaction. There were three groups of chalcones obtained as the products, which included the derivatives containing 4-substituted chalcone, 2'-hydroxychalcone and 4'-methoxychalcone. The B ring of the chalcones was substituted in the para position with different groups, such as halide, hydroxyl, nitro, methyl, ethyl and ethoxy one. The structure-activity relationship of the tested chalcones in biotransformation processes was studied. It has been proven that Gram-positive bacterial strains Rhodococcus and Lactobacillus catalyzed reduction of C=C bond in the chalcones to give respective dihydrochalcones. The strain Rhodotorula rubra AM 82 transformed chalcones into dihydrochalcones and respective secondary alcohols. These results suggest that the probiotic strain of Lactobacillus can be used for biotransformations of chalcones, which has not been described before. The structure of new metabolites 14a and 15b were established as 4-ethoxy-4'-methoxydihydrochalcone and 3-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(4'-O-methylphenyl)-2-propan-1-ol, respectively, which was confirmed by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR analysis.

  3. Methylation of halogenated phenols and thiophenols by cell extracts of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. [Rhodococcus sp. ; Pseudomonas sp. ; Acinetobacter sp

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, A.H.; Lindgren, C.; Hynning, P.A.; Remberger, M.

    1988-02-01

    O-methylation of 2,6-dibromophenol was studied in cell extracts prepared from Rhodococcus sp. strain 1395. O-methylation activity was also demonstrated in extracts from two other Rhodococcus sp. strains, an Acinetobacter sp. strain, and a Pseudomonas sp. strain. A diverse range of chloro- and bromophenols, chlorothiophenols, chloro- and bromoguaiacols, and chloro- and bromocatechols were assayed as the substrates by using extracts prepared from strain 1395; all of the compounds were methylated to the corresponding anisoles, veratroles, or guaiacols. The specific activity of the enzyme towards the thiophenols was significantly higher than it was towards all the other substrates-high activity was found with pentafluorothiophenol, although the activity with pentafluorophenol was undetectable with the incubation times used. For the chlorophenols, the position of the substituents was of cardinal importance. The enzyme had higher activity towards the halogenated catechols than towards the corresponding guaiacols, and selective O-methylation of the 3,4,5-trihalogenocatechols yielded predominantly the 3,4,5-trihalogenoguaiacols. Neither 2,4-dinitrophenol, hexachlorophene, nor 5-chloro- or 5-bromovanillin was O-methylated. The results showed conclusively that the methylation reactions were enzymatic and confirmed the conclusion from extensive studies using whole cells that methylation of halogenated phenols may be a significant alternative to biodegradation.

  4. Biotechnological methods for chalcone reduction using whole cells of Lactobacillus, Rhodococcus and Rhodotorula strains as a way to produce new derivatives.

    PubMed

    Stompor, Monika; Kałużny, Mateusz; Żarowska, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Microbial strains of the genera Dietzia, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Gordonia, Streptomyces, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Penicillium, Rhodotorula and Lactobacillus were screened for the ability to convert chalcones. Synthesis of chalcones was performed by the Claisen-Schmidt reaction. There were three groups of chalcones obtained as the products, which included the derivatives containing 4-substituted chalcone, 2'-hydroxychalcone and 4'-methoxychalcone. The B ring of the chalcones was substituted in the para position with different groups, such as halide, hydroxyl, nitro, methyl, ethyl and ethoxy one. The structure-activity relationship of the tested chalcones in biotransformation processes was studied. It has been proven that Gram-positive bacterial strains Rhodococcus and Lactobacillus catalyzed reduction of C=C bond in the chalcones to give respective dihydrochalcones. The strain Rhodotorula rubra AM 82 transformed chalcones into dihydrochalcones and respective secondary alcohols. These results suggest that the probiotic strain of Lactobacillus can be used for biotransformations of chalcones, which has not been described before. The structure of new metabolites 14a and 15b were established as 4-ethoxy-4'-methoxydihydrochalcone and 3-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(4'-O-methylphenyl)-2-propan-1-ol, respectively, which was confirmed by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR analysis. PMID:27209040

  5. Molecular characterization of a lipid-modified virulence-associated protein of Rhodococcus equi and its potential in protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Tan, C; Prescott, J F; Patterson, M C; Nicholson, V M

    1995-01-01

    Virulent strains of Rhodococcus equi produce plasmid-mediated 15- and 17-kDa proteins, which are thermoregulated and apparently surface-expressed. We demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) that R. equi produce three antigenically-related virulence-associated proteins, a diffuse 18-22-kDa, a 17.5-kDa and a 15-kDa protein. Phase partitioning of whole cells of R. equi strain 103 with Triton X-114 (TX-114) and labelling with [3H]-labelled palmitic acid showed that the two higher molecular weight proteins are hydrophobic and lipid modified. The 15-kDa protein did not partition into TX-114 and was not lipid modified. Cloning and expression of a fragment of the R. equi virulence plasmid in Escherichia coli showed that the three proteins were expressed from a single gene. Sequence analysis of this gene (designated vapA) revealed a 570-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 189 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 19,175 Da. The mature, nonlipid modified protein had a calculated mass of 16,246 Da. The 17.5- and 18-22-kDa forms of the protein are therefore due to lipid modification. No significant sequence homology of the vapA gene with other reported nucleotide sequences were found. Opsonization of virulent R. equi with an IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb103) to the VapA protein significantly enhanced uptake in the murine macrophage cell line IC-21. Intraperitoneal injection of mice with Mab103 enhanced initial clearance from the liver of mice challenged intravenously with R. equi. Immunization of mice with the lipid-modified VapA purified by SDS-PAGE fractionation or with acetone precipitated VapA protein following TX-114 extraction resulted in significantly enhanced clearance from the liver and spleen following intravenous challenge. The VapA protein of R. equi appears therefore to be a protective immunogen. PMID:7704843

  6. The Steroid Catabolic Pathway of the Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi Is Important for Pathogenesis and a Target for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    van der Geize, R.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Hessels, G. I.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pulmonary diseases. Recently, we have shown that essential steps in the cholesterol catabolic pathway are involved in the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a similar cholesterol catabolic gene cluster in R. equi. Orthologs of predicted M. tuberculosis virulence genes located within this cluster, i.e. ipdA (rv3551), ipdB (rv3552), fadA6 and fadE30, were identified in R. equi RE1 and inactivated. The ipdA and ipdB genes of R. equi RE1 appear to constitute the α-subunit and β-subunit, respectively, of a heterodimeric coenzyme A transferase. Mutant strains RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, were impaired in growth on the steroid catabolic pathway intermediates 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD) and 3aα-H-4α(3′-propionic acid)-5α-hydroxy-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1-indanone (5α-hydroxy-methylhexahydro-1-indanone propionate; 5OH-HIP). Interestingly, RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, also displayed an attenuated phenotype in a macrophage infection assay. Gene products important for growth on 5OH-HIP, as part of the steroid catabolic pathway, thus appear to act as factors involved in the pathogenicity of R. equi. Challenge experiments showed that RE1ΔipdAB could be safely administered intratracheally to 2 to 5 week-old foals and oral immunization of foals even elicited a substantial protective immunity against a virulent R. equi strain. Our data show that genes involved in steroid catabolism are promising targets for the development of a live-attenuated vaccine against R. equi infections. PMID:21901092

  7. Spectrum of disease caused by Rhodococcus equi in human immunodeficiency virus infection: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Willsie-Ediger, Sandra K; Stanford, James F; Salzman, Gary A; Bamberger, David M

    1990-01-01

    Since the first report of Rhodococcus equi infection in an acquired immune deficiency syndrome patient in 1986, seven additional cases have been described. A patient is described in whom the diagnosis was delayed due to misidentification of the organism as an atypical mycobacterial species. The literature regarding R equi infection in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus is reviewed. The most common presentation is one of a chronic, indolent pulmonary infiltrative disease (78%). Fever (78%), cough (67%), and hemoptysis (44%) are frequently present. Coexistent opportunistic illnesses are common (67%). In the laboratory identification of this organism, it is important to communicate the clinical setting to the microbiologist and to recognize the potential for the organism to be overlooked as normal flora or a contaminant, or misidentified as an organism with similar phenotypic characteristics (Nocardia species or a rapidly growing mycobacterium). Based on experience in foals, therapy with erythromycin and rifampin is suggested. PMID:22553450

  8. Three different 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase genes in the gram-positive polychlorobiphenyl-degrading bacterium Rhodococcus globerulus P6.

    PubMed Central

    Asturias, J A; Timmis, K N

    1993-01-01

    Rhodococcus globerulus P6 (previously designated Acinetobacter sp. strain P6, Arthrobacter sp. strain M5, and Corynebacterium sp. strain MB1) is able to degrade a wide range of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners. The genetic and biochemical analyses of the PCB catabolic pathway reported here have revealed the existence of a PCB gene cluster--bphBC1D--and two further bphC genes--bphC2 and bphC3--that encode three narrow-substrate-specificity enzymes (2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenases) that meta cleave the first aromatic ring. None of the bphC genes show by hybridization homology to each other or to bphC genes in other bacteria, and the three bphC gene products have different kinetic parameters and sensitivities to inactivation by 3-chlorocatechol. This suggests that there exists a wide diversity in PCB meta cleavage enzymes. Images PMID:8335622

  9. Calcite Biomineralization by Bacterial Isolates from the Recently Discovered Pristine Karstic Herrenberg Cave

    PubMed Central

    Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M.; Nietzsche, Sándor; Eusterhues, Karin; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Neu, Thomas R.; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Keiner, Robert; Geletneky, Jörn; Katzschmann, Lutz; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Karstic caves represent one of the most important subterranean carbon storages on Earth and provide windows into the subsurface. The recent discovery of the Herrenberg Cave, Germany, gave us the opportunity to investigate the diversity and potential role of bacteria in carbonate mineral formation. Calcite was the only mineral observed by Raman spectroscopy to precipitate as stalactites from seepage water. Bacterial cells were found on the surface and interior of stalactites by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities inhabiting stalactites, representing more than 70% of total 16S rRNA gene clones. Proteobacteria formed 22 to 34% of the detected communities in fluvial sediments, and a large fraction of these bacteria were also metabolically active. A total of 9 isolates, belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Serratia, and Stenotrophomonas, grew on alkaline carbonate-precipitating medium. Two cultures with the most intense precipitate formation, Arthrobacter sulfonivorans and Rhodococcus globerulus, grew as aggregates, produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and formed mixtures of calcite, vaterite, and monohydrocalcite. R. globerulus formed idiomorphous crystals with rhombohedral morphology, whereas A. sulfonivorans formed xenomorphous globular crystals, evidence for taxon-specific crystal morphologies. The results of this study highlighted the importance of combining various techniques in order to understand the geomicrobiology of karstic caves, but further studies are needed to determine whether the mineralogical biosignatures found in nutrient-rich media can also be found in oligotrophic caves. PMID:22179248

  10. Calcite biomineralization by bacterial isolates from the recently discovered pristine karstic herrenberg cave.

    PubMed

    Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M; Nietzsche, Sándor; Eusterhues, Karin; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Neu, Thomas R; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Keiner, Robert; Geletneky, Jörn; Katzschmann, Lutz; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Küsel, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    Karstic caves represent one of the most important subterranean carbon storages on Earth and provide windows into the subsurface. The recent discovery of the Herrenberg Cave, Germany, gave us the opportunity to investigate the diversity and potential role of bacteria in carbonate mineral formation. Calcite was the only mineral observed by Raman spectroscopy to precipitate as stalactites from seepage water. Bacterial cells were found on the surface and interior of stalactites by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities inhabiting stalactites, representing more than 70% of total 16S rRNA gene clones. Proteobacteria formed 22 to 34% of the detected communities in fluvial sediments, and a large fraction of these bacteria were also metabolically active. A total of 9 isolates, belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Serratia, and Stenotrophomonas, grew on alkaline carbonate-precipitating medium. Two cultures with the most intense precipitate formation, Arthrobacter sulfonivorans and Rhodococcus globerulus, grew as aggregates, produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and formed mixtures of calcite, vaterite, and monohydrocalcite. R. globerulus formed idiomorphous crystals with rhombohedral morphology, whereas A. sulfonivorans formed xenomorphous globular crystals, evidence for taxon-specific crystal morphologies. The results of this study highlighted the importance of combining various techniques in order to understand the geomicrobiology of karstic caves, but further studies are needed to determine whether the mineralogical biosignatures found in nutrient-rich media can also be found in oligotrophic caves.

  11. Extracellular biosynthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles using Rhodococcus pyridinivorans NT2: multifunctional textile finishing, biosafety evaluation and in vitro drug delivery in colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Debasree; Hazra, Chinmay; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Chaudhari, Ambalal; Mishra, Satyendra

    2014-11-01

    In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) were rapidly synthesized from zinc sulfate solution at room temperature using a metabolically versatile actinobacteria Rhodococcus pyridinivorans NT2. The morphology, structure and stability of the synthesized ZnO NPs were studied using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Zeta potential, and thermogravimetry. The data indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles were moderately stable, hexagonal phase, roughly spherical with average particle diameter in the range of 100-120 nm. Results obtained on examination of protein expression revealed that cell enzymes and extracellular protein systems of Rhodococcus sp. may take part in synthesis process. Furthermore, the ZnO NPs were coated onto textile fabrics to enhance UV-blocking, self-cleaning and antibacterial properties. Ultraviolet protecting factor (UPF) indicating UV-blocking properties of ZnO NPs coated textile fabrics were determined as 65, 88, 121, 172 and 241 for 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 gm(-2) of ZnO NPs, respectively. Besides, self-cleaning activity was assessed by investigating photocatalytic activity on malachite green as well as antibacterial activity against aerobic Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis NCIM 2493 (ATCC 12228). The antibacterial effects of these textiles were evaluated using ISO 20743 standard. In addition, ZnO NPs exhibited a preferential ability to kill HT-29 cancerous cells as compared with normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs).

  12. On the Kinetic and Allosteric Regulatory Properties of the ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase from Rhodococcus jostii: An Approach to Evaluate Glycogen Metabolism in Oleaginous Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cereijo, Antonela E.; Asencion Diez, Matías D.; Dávila Costa, José S.; Alvarez, Héctor M.; Iglesias, Alberto A.

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus spp. are oleaginous bacteria that accumulate glycogen during exponential growth. Despite the importance of these microorganisms in biotechnology, little is known about the regulation of carbon and energy storage, mainly the relationship between glycogen and triacylglycerols metabolisms. Herein, we report the molecular cloning and heterologous expression of the gene coding for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27) of Rhodococcus jostii, strain RHA1. The recombinant enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity to accurately characterize its oligomeric, kinetic, and regulatory properties. The R. jostii ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is a homotetramer of 190 kDa exhibiting low basal activity to catalyze synthesis of ADP-glucose, which is markedly influenced by different allosteric effectors. Glucose-6P, mannose-6P, fructose-6P, ribose-5P, and phosphoenolpyruvate were major activators; whereas, NADPH and 6P-gluconate behaved as main inhibitors of the enzyme. The combination of glucose-6P and other effectors (activators or inhibitors) showed a cross-talk effect suggesting that the different metabolites could orchestrate a fine regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in R. jostii. The enzyme exhibited some degree of affinity toward ATP, GTP, CTP, and other sugar-1P substrates. Remarkably, the use of glucosamine-1P was sensitive to allosteric activation. The relevance of the fine regulation of R. jostii ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is further analyzed in the framework of proteomic studies already determined for the bacterium. Results support a critical role for glycogen as a temporal reserve that provides a pool of carbon able of be re-routed to produce long-term storage of lipids under certain conditions. PMID:27313571

  13. Overproduction of the Escherichia coli Chaperones GroEL-GroES in Rhodococcus ruber Improves the Activity and Stability of Cell Catalysts Harboring a Nitrile Hydratase.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuxuan; Chen, Jie; Yu, Huimin; Shen, Zhongyao

    2016-02-01

    Three combinations of molecular chaperones from Escherichia coli (i.e., DnaK-DnaJ-GrpEGroEL- GroES, GroEL-GroES, and DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE) were overproduced in E. coli BL21, and their in vitro stabilizing effects on a nitrile hydratase (NHase) were assessed. The optimal gene combination, E. coli groEL-groES (ecgroEL-ES), was introduced into Rhodococcus ruber TH3. A novel engineered strain, R. ruber TH3G was constructed with the native NHase gene on its chromosome and the heterologous ecgroEL-ES genes in a shuttle plasmid. In R. ruber TH3G, NHase activity was enhanced 37.3% compared with the control, TH3. The in vivo stabilizing effect of ecGroEL-ES on the NHase was assessed using both acrylamide immersion and heat shock experiments. The inactivation behavior of the in vivo NHase after immersion in a solution of dynamically increased concentrations of acrylamide was particularly evident. When the acrylamide concentration was increased to 500 g/l (50%), the remaining NHase activity in TH3G was 38%, but in TH3, activity was reduced to 10%. Reactivation of the in vivo NHases after varying degrees of inactivation was further assessed. The activity of the reactivated NHase was more than 2-fold greater in TH3G than in TH3. The hydration synthesis of acrylamide catalyzed by the in vivo NHase was performed with continuous acrylonitrile feeding. The final concentration of acrylamide was 640 g/l when catalyzed by TH3G, compared with 490 g/l acrylamide by TH3. This study is the first to show that the chaperones ecGroEL-ES work well in Rhodococcus and simultaneously possess protein-folding assistance functions and the ability to stabilize and reactivate the native NHases. PMID:26562693

  14. Extracellular biosynthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles using Rhodococcus pyridinivorans NT2: multifunctional textile finishing, biosafety evaluation and in vitro drug delivery in colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Debasree; Hazra, Chinmay; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Chaudhari, Ambalal; Mishra, Satyendra

    2014-11-01

    In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) were rapidly synthesized from zinc sulfate solution at room temperature using a metabolically versatile actinobacteria Rhodococcus pyridinivorans NT2. The morphology, structure and stability of the synthesized ZnO NPs were studied using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Zeta potential, and thermogravimetry. The data indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles were moderately stable, hexagonal phase, roughly spherical with average particle diameter in the range of 100-120 nm. Results obtained on examination of protein expression revealed that cell enzymes and extracellular protein systems of Rhodococcus sp. may take part in synthesis process. Furthermore, the ZnO NPs were coated onto textile fabrics to enhance UV-blocking, self-cleaning and antibacterial properties. Ultraviolet protecting factor (UPF) indicating UV-blocking properties of ZnO NPs coated textile fabrics were determined as 65, 88, 121, 172 and 241 for 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 gm(-2) of ZnO NPs, respectively. Besides, self-cleaning activity was assessed by investigating photocatalytic activity on malachite green as well as antibacterial activity against aerobic Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis NCIM 2493 (ATCC 12228). The antibacterial effects of these textiles were evaluated using ISO 20743 standard. In addition, ZnO NPs exhibited a preferential ability to kill HT-29 cancerous cells as compared with normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PMID:25169770

  15. Genetic and phenotypic diversity of carbofuran-degrading bacteria isolated from agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Uk; Seong, Chi-Nam; Song, Hong-Gyu; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-04-01

    Thirty-seven carbofuran-degrading bacteria were isolated from agricultural soils, and their genetic and phenotypic characteristics were investigated. The isolates were able to utilize carbofuran as a sole source of carbon and energy. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the isolates were related to members of the genera Rhodococcus, Sphingomonas, and Sphingobium, including new types of carbofuran-degrading bacteria, Bosea and Microbacterium. Among the 37 isolates, 15 different chromosomal DNA patterns were obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences. Five of the 15 representative isolates were able to degrade carbofuran phenol, fenoxycarb, and carbaryl, in addition to carbofuran. Ten of the 15 representative isolates had 1 to 8 plasmids. Among the 10 plasmid-containing isolates, plasmid-cured strains were obtained from 5 strains. The cured strains could not degrade carbofuran and other pesticides anymore, suggesting that the carbofuran degradative genes were on the plasmid DNAs in these strains. When analyzed with PCR amplification and dot-blot hybridization using the primers targeting for the previously reported carbofuran hydrolase gene (mcd), all of the isolates did not show any positive signals, suggesting that their carbofuran hydrolase genes had no significant sequence homology with the mcd gene.

  16. Biodiversity, Anti-Trypanosomal Activity Screening, and Metabolomic Profiling of Actinomycetes Isolated from Mediterranean Sponges.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; MacIntyre, Lynsey; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Horn, Hannes; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Hentschel, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponge-associated actinomycetes are considered as promising sources for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds. In the present study, a total of 64 actinomycetes were isolated from 12 different marine sponge species that had been collected offshore the islands of Milos and Crete, Greece, eastern Mediterranean. The isolates were affiliated to 23 genera representing 8 different suborders based on nearly full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Four putatively novel species belonging to genera Geodermatophilus, Microlunatus, Rhodococcus and Actinomycetospora were identified based on a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of < 98.5% to currently described strains. Eight actinomycete isolates showed bioactivities against Trypanosma brucei brucei TC221 with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values <20 μg/mL. Thirty four isolates from the Milos collection and 12 isolates from the Crete collection were subjected to metabolomic analysis using high resolution LC-MS and NMR for dereplication purposes. Two isolates belonging to the genera Streptomyces (SBT348) and Micromonospora (SBT687) were prioritized based on their distinct chemistry profiles as well as their anti-trypanosomal activities. These findings demonstrated the feasibility and efficacy of utilizing metabolomics tools to prioritize chemically unique strains from microorganism collections and further highlight sponges as rich source for novel and bioactive actinomycetes. PMID:26407167

  17. Biodiversity, Anti-Trypanosomal Activity Screening, and Metabolomic Profiling of Actinomycetes Isolated from Mediterranean Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; MacIntyre, Lynsey; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Horn, Hannes; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Hentschel, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponge–associated actinomycetes are considered as promising sources for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds. In the present study, a total of 64 actinomycetes were isolated from 12 different marine sponge species that had been collected offshore the islands of Milos and Crete, Greece, eastern Mediterranean. The isolates were affiliated to 23 genera representing 8 different suborders based on nearly full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Four putatively novel species belonging to genera Geodermatophilus, Microlunatus, Rhodococcus and Actinomycetospora were identified based on a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of < 98.5% to currently described strains. Eight actinomycete isolates showed bioactivities against Trypanosma brucei brucei TC221 with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values <20 μg/mL. Thirty four isolates from the Milos collection and 12 isolates from the Crete collection were subjected to metabolomic analysis using high resolution LC-MS and NMR for dereplication purposes. Two isolates belonging to the genera Streptomyces (SBT348) and Micromonospora (SBT687) were prioritized based on their distinct chemistry profiles as well as their anti-trypanosomal activities. These findings demonstrated the feasibility and efficacy of utilizing metabolomics tools to prioritize chemically unique strains from microorganism collections and further highlight sponges as rich source for novel and bioactive actinomycetes. PMID:26407167

  18. Biodegradation of pyrene by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RS1 isolated from refinery sludge.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrani; Jasmine, Jublee; Mukherji, Suparna

    2014-08-01

    High molecular weight (HMW) polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with more than three rings are inherently difficult to degrade. Degradation of HMW PAHs is primarily reported for actinomycetes, such as, Rhodococcus and Mycobacterium. This study reports pyrene degradation by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from tank bottom sludge in a refinery. High cell surface hydrophobicity induced during growth on pyrene facilitated its utilization as sole carbon source. Specific growth rate (μ) in the range of 0.03-0.085 h(-1) could be achieved over the concentration range 25-500 mg/L. The specific growth rate and specific pyrene utilization rate increased linearly with increase in total pyrene concentration. Although various degradation intermediates were identified in the aqueous phase, accumulation of total organic carbon (TOC) in the aqueous phase was only a small fraction of TOC equivalents of pyrene lost from the cultures. The degradation pathway appears to be similar to that reported for Mycobacterium sp. PYR-I.

  19. Production, Purification, and Identification of Cholest-4-en-3-one Produced by Cholesterol Oxidase from Rhodococcus sp. in Aqueous/Organic Biphasic System.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ke; Li, Wei; Song, Jianrui; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Cholest-4-en-3-one has positive uses against obesity, liver disease, and keratinization. It can be applied in the synthesis of steroid drugs as well. Most related studies are focused on preparation of cholest-4-en-3-one by using whole cells as catalysts, but production of high-quality cholest-4-en-3-one directly from cholesterol oxidase (COD) using an aqueous/organic two-phase system has been rarely explored. This study set up an enzymatic reaction system to produce cholest-4-en-3-one. We developed and optimized the enzymatic reaction system using COD from COX5-6 (a strain of Rhodococcus) instead of whole-cell biocatalyst. This not only simplifies and accelerates the production but also benefits the subsequent separation and purification process. Through extraction, washing, evaporation, column chromatography, and recrystallization, we got cholest-4-en-3-one with purity of 99.78%, which was identified by nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. In addition, this optimized process of cholest-4-en-3-one production and purification can be easily scaled up for industrial production, which can largely decrease the cost and guarantee the purity of the product.

  20. Oral Administration of Electron-Beam Inactivated Rhodococcus equi Failed to Protect Foals against Intrabronchial Infection with Live, Virulent R. equi.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Joana N; Cohen, Noah D; Bordin, Angela I; Brake, Courtney N; Giguère, Steeve; Coleman, Michelle C; Alaniz, Robert C; Lawhon, Sara D; Mwangi, Waithaka; Pillai, Suresh D

    2016-01-01

    There is currently no licensed vaccine that protects foals against Rhodococcus equi-induced pneumonia. Oral administration of live, virulent R. equi to neonatal foals has been demonstrated to protect against subsequent intrabronchial challenge with virulent R. equi. Electron beam (eBeam)-inactivated R. equi are structurally intact and have been demonstrated to be immunogenic when administered orally to neonatal foals. Thus, we investigated whether eBeam inactivated R. equi could protect foals against developing pneumonia after experimental infection with live, virulent R. equi. Foals (n = 8) were vaccinated by gavaging with eBeam-inactivated R. equi at ages 2, 7, and 14 days, or gavaged with equal volume of saline solution (n = 4), and subsequently infected intrabronchially with live, virulent R. equi at age 21 days. The proportion of vaccinated foals that developed pneumonia following challenge was similar among the vaccinated (7/8; 88%) and unvaccinated foals (3/4; 75%). This vaccination regimen did not appear to be strongly immunogenic in foals. Alternative dosing regimens or routes of administration need further investigation and may prove to be immunogenic and protective. PMID:26828865

  1. Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of 3-Ketosteroid-Δ4-(5α)-dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 Genome*

    PubMed Central

    van Oosterwijk, Niels; Knol, Jan; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van der Geize, Robert; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2012-01-01

    3-Ketosteroid Δ4-(5α)-dehydrogenases (Δ4-(5α)-KSTDs) are enzymes that introduce a double bond between the C4 and C5 atoms of 3-keto-(5α)-steroids. Here we show that the ro05698 gene from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 codes for a flavoprotein with Δ4-(5α)-KSTD activity. The 1.6 Å resolution crystal structure of the enzyme revealed three conserved residues (Tyr-319, Tyr-466, and Ser-468) in a pocket near the isoalloxazine ring system of the FAD co-factor. Site-directed mutagenesis of these residues confirmed that they are absolutely essential for catalytic activity. A crystal structure with bound product 4-androstene-3,17-dione showed that Ser-468 is in a position in which it can serve as the base abstracting the 4β-proton from the C4 atom of the substrate. Ser-468 is assisted by Tyr-319, which possibly is involved in shuttling the proton to the solvent. Tyr-466 is at hydrogen bonding distance to the C3 oxygen atom of the substrate and can stabilize the keto-enol intermediate occurring during the reaction. Finally, the FAD N5 atom is in a position to be able to abstract the 5α-hydrogen of the substrate as a hydride ion. These features fully explain the reaction catalyzed by Δ4-(5α)-KSTDs. PMID:22833669

  2. Biodegradation of butachlor by Rhodococcus sp. strain B1 and purification of its hydrolase (ChlH) responsible for N-dealkylation of chloroacetamide herbicides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Ming; Cao, Li; Lu, Peng; Ni, Haiyan; Li, Yun-Xiang; Yan, Xin; Hong, Qing; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-12-19

    Rhodococcus sp. strain B1 could degrade 100 mg/L butachlor within 5 days. Butachlor was first hydrolyzed by strain B1 through N-dealkylation, which resulted in the production of butoxymethanol and 2-chloro-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)acetamide. Butoxymethanol could be further degraded and utilized as the carbon source for the growth of strain B1, whereas 2-chloro-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)acetamide could not be degraded further. The hydrolase designated ChlH, responsible for the N-dealkylation of the side chain of butachlor, was purified 185.1-fold to homogeneity with 16.1% recovery. The optimal pH and temperature of ChlH were observed to be 7.0-7.5 and 30 °C, respectively. This enzyme was also able to catalyze the N-dealkylation of other chloroacetamide herbicides; the catalytic efficiency followed the order alachlor > acetochlor >butachlor > pretilachlor, which indicated that the alkyl chain length influenced the N-dealkylation of the chloroacetamide herbicides. This is the first report on the biodegradation of chloroacetamide herbicides at the enzyme level.

  3. Multiplicity of 3-Ketosteroid-9α-Hydroxylase Enzymes in Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM43269 for Specific Degradation of Different Classes of Steroids ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Petrusma, Mirjan; Hessels, Gerda; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van der Geize, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The well-known large catabolic potential of rhodococci is greatly facilitated by an impressive gene multiplicity. This study reports on the multiplicity of kshA, encoding the oxygenase component of 3-ketosteroid 9α-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in steroid catabolism. Five kshA homologues (kshA1 to kshA5) were previously identified in Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM43269. These KshADSM43269 homologues are distributed over several phylogenetic groups. The involvement of these KshA homologues in the catabolism of different classes of steroids, i.e., sterols, pregnanes, androstenes, and bile acids, was investigated. Enzyme activity assays showed that all KSH enzymes with KshADSM43269 homologues are C-9 α-hydroxylases acting on a wide range of 3-ketosteroids, but not on 3-hydroxysteroids. KshA5 appeared to be the most versatile enzyme, with the broadest substrate range but without a clear substrate preference. In contrast, KshA1 was found to be dedicated to cholic acid catabolism. Transcriptional analysis and functional complementation studies revealed that kshA5 supported growth on any of the different classes of steroids tested, consistent with its broad expression induction pattern. The presence of multiple kshA genes in the R. rhodochrous DSM43269 genome, each displaying unique steroid induction patterns and substrate ranges, appears to facilitate a dynamic and fine-tuned steroid catabolism, with C-9 α-hydroxylation occurring at different levels during microbial steroid degradation. PMID:21642460

  4. Preliminary report on a catalyst derived from induced cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain DAP 96253 that delays the ripening of selected climacteric fruit: bananas, avocados, and peaches.

    PubMed

    Pierce, G E; Drago, G K; Ganguly, S; Tucker, T-A M; Hooker, J W; Jones, S; Crow, S A

    2011-09-01

    Despite the use of refrigeration, improved packaging, adsorbents, and ethylene receptor blockers, on average, nearly 40% of all fruits and vegetables harvested in the US are not consumed. Many plant products, especially fruit, continue to ripen after harvesting, and as they do so, become increasingly susceptible to mechanical injury, resulting in increased rot. Other plant products during transportation and storage are susceptible to chill injury (CI). There is a real need for products that can delay ripening or mitigate the effects of CI, yet still permit full ripeness and quality to be achieved. Preliminary results are discussed where catalyst derived from cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous DAP 96253, grown under conditions that induced high levels of nitrile hydratase, were able to extend the ripening and thus the shelf-life of selected climacteric fruits (banana, avocado, and peach). A catalyst, when placed in proximity to, but not touching, the test fruit delayed the ripening but did not alter the final ripeness of the fruit tested. Organoleptic evaluations conducted with control peaches and with peaches exposed to, but not in contact with, the catalyst showed that the catalyst-treated peaches achieved full, natural levels of ripeness with respect to aroma, flavor, sweetness, and juice content. Furthermore, the results of delayed ripening were achieved at ambient temperatures (without the need for refrigeration). PMID:21409422

  5. Structural basis for the substrate specificity and the absence of dehalogenation activity in 2-chloromuconate cycloisomerase from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP.

    PubMed

    Kolomytseva, Marina; Ferraroni, Marta; Chernykh, Alexey; Golovleva, Ludmila; Scozzafava, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    2-Chloromuconate cycloisomerase from the Gram-positive bacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP (Rho-2-CMCI) is an enzyme of a modified ortho-pathway, in which 2-chlorophenol is degraded using 3-chlorocatechol as the central intermediate. In general, the chloromuconate cycloisomerases catalyze not only the cycloisomerization, but also the process of dehalogenation of the chloromuconate to dienelactone. However Rho-2-CMCI, unlike the homologous enzymes from the Gram-negative bacteria, is very specific for only one position of the chloride on the substrate chloromuconate. Furthermore, Rho-2-CMCI is not able to dehalogenate the 5-chloromuconolactone and therefore it cannot generate the dienelactone. The crystallographic structure of the homooctameric Rho-2-CMCI was solved by molecular replacement using the coordinates of the structure of chloromuconate cycloisomerase from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. The structure was analyzed and compared to the other already known structures of (chloro)muconate cycloisomerases. In addition to this, molecular docking calculations were carried out, which allowed us to determine the residues responsible for the high substrate specificity and the lack of dehalogenation activity of Rho-2-CMCI. Our studies highlight that a histidine, located in a loop that closes the active site cavity upon the binding of the substrate, could be related to the dehalogenation inability of Rho-2-CMCI and in general of the muconate cycloisomerases.

  6. Preliminary report on a catalyst derived from induced cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain DAP 96253 that delays the ripening of selected climacteric fruit: bananas, avocados, and peaches.

    PubMed

    Pierce, G E; Drago, G K; Ganguly, S; Tucker, T-A M; Hooker, J W; Jones, S; Crow, S A

    2011-09-01

    Despite the use of refrigeration, improved packaging, adsorbents, and ethylene receptor blockers, on average, nearly 40% of all fruits and vegetables harvested in the US are not consumed. Many plant products, especially fruit, continue to ripen after harvesting, and as they do so, become increasingly susceptible to mechanical injury, resulting in increased rot. Other plant products during transportation and storage are susceptible to chill injury (CI). There is a real need for products that can delay ripening or mitigate the effects of CI, yet still permit full ripeness and quality to be achieved. Preliminary results are discussed where catalyst derived from cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous DAP 96253, grown under conditions that induced high levels of nitrile hydratase, were able to extend the ripening and thus the shelf-life of selected climacteric fruits (banana, avocado, and peach). A catalyst, when placed in proximity to, but not touching, the test fruit delayed the ripening but did not alter the final ripeness of the fruit tested. Organoleptic evaluations conducted with control peaches and with peaches exposed to, but not in contact with, the catalyst showed that the catalyst-treated peaches achieved full, natural levels of ripeness with respect to aroma, flavor, sweetness, and juice content. Furthermore, the results of delayed ripening were achieved at ambient temperatures (without the need for refrigeration).

  7. Purification and characterization of a 14-kilodalton protein that is bound to the surface of polyhydroxyalkanoic acid granules in Rhodococcus ruber.

    PubMed Central

    Pieper-Fürst, U.; Madkour, M. H.; Mayer, F.; Steinbüchel, A.

    1994-01-01

    The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the polyhydroxyalkanoic acid (PHA) granule-associated M(r)-15,500 protein of Rhodococcus ruber (the GA14 protein) was analyzed. The sequence revealed that the corresponding structural gene is represented by open reading frame 3, encoding a protein with a calculated M(r) of 14,175 which was recently localized downstream of the PHA synthase gene (U. Pieper and A. Steinbüchel, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 96:73-80, 1992). A recombinant strain of Escherichia coli XL1-Blue carrying the hybrid plasmid (pSKXA10*) with open reading frame 3 overexpressed the GA14 protein. The GA14 protein was subsequently purified in a three-step procedure including chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel, phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, and Superose 12. Determination of the molecular weight by gel filtration as well as electron microscopic studies indicates that a tetrameric structure of the recombinant, native GA14 protein is most likely. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated a localization of the GA14 protein at the periphery of PHA granules as well as close to the cell membrane in R. ruber. Investigations of PHA-leaky and PHA-negative mutants of R. ruber indicated that expression of the GA14 protein depended strongly on PHA synthesis. Images PMID:8021220

  8. Metabolomic-Based Study of the Leafy Gall, the Ecological Niche of the Phytopathogen Rhodococcus Fascians, as a Potential Source of Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nacoulma, Aminata P.; Vandeputte, Olivier M.; De Lorenzi, Manuella; El Jaziri, Mondher; Duez, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Leafy gall is a plant hyperplasia induced upon Rhodococcus fascians infection. Previously, by genomic and transcriptomic analysis, it has been reported that, at the early stage of symptom development, both primary and secondary metabolisms are modified. The present study is based on the hypothesis that fully developed leafy gall, could represent a potential source of new bioactive compounds. Therefore, non-targeted metabolomic analysis of aqueous and chloroform extracts of leafy gall and non-infected tobacco was carried out by 1H-NMR coupled to principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projections to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Polar metabolite profiling reflects modifications mainly in the primary metabolites and in some polyphenolics. In contrast, main modifications occurring in non-polar metabolites concern secondary metabolites, and gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) evidenced alterations in diterpenoids family. Analysis of crude extracts of leafy galls and non-infected tobacco leaves exhibited a distinct antiproliferative activity against all four tested human cancer cell lines. A bio-guided fractionation of chloroformic crude extract yield to semi-purified fractions, which inhibited proliferation of glioblastoma U373 cells with IC50 between 14.0 and 2.4 μg/mL. Discussion is focused on the consequence of these metabolic changes, with respect to plant defense mechanisms following infection. Considering the promising role of diterpenoid family as bioactive compounds, leafy gall may rather be a propitious source for drug discovery. PMID:23771021

  9. Involvement of a Novel ABC Transporter and Monoalkyl Phthalate Ester Hydrolase in Phthalate Ester Catabolism by Rhodococcus jostii RHA1▿

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Hirofumi; Stewart, Gordon R.; Mohn, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Phthalate esters (PEs) are important environmental pollutants. While the biodegradation of the parent compound, phthalate (PTH), is well characterized, the biodegradation of PEs is not well understood. In particular, prior to this study, genes involved in the uptake and hydrolysis of these compounds were not conclusively identified. We found that Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 could grow on a variety of monoalkyl PEs, including methyl, butyl, hexyl, and 2-ethylhexyl PTHs. Strain RHA1 could not grow on most dialkyl PEs, but suspensions of cells grown on PTH transformed dimethyl, diethyl, dipropyl, dibutyl, dihexyl and di-(2-ethylhexyl) PTHs. The major products of these dialkyl PEs were PTH and the corresponding monoalkyl PEs, and minor products resulted from the shortening of the alkyl side chains. RHA1 exhibited an inducible, ATP-dependent uptake system for PTH with a Km of 22 μM. The deletion and complementation of the patB gene demonstrated that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter encoded by patDABC is required for the uptake of PTH and monoalkyl PEs by RHA1. The hydrolase encoded by patE of RHA1 was expressed in Escherichia coli. PatE specifically hydrolyzed monoalkyl PEs to PTH but did not transform dialkyl PEs or other aromatic esters. This investigation of RHA1 elucidates key processes that are consistent with the environmental fate of PEs. PMID:20038686

  10. Biological activity and mechanical stability of sol-gel-based biofilters using the freeze-gelation technique for immobilization of Rhodococcus ruber.

    PubMed

    Pannier, Angela; Mkandawire, Martin; Soltmann, Ulrich; Pompe, Wolfgang; Böttcher, Horst

    2012-02-01

    Biofilters with long lifetime and high storage stability are very important for bioremediation processes to ensure the readiness at the occurrence of sudden contaminations. By using the freeze-gelation technique, living cells can be immobilized within a mechanically and chemically stable ceramic-like matrix. Due to a freeze-drying step, the embedded microorganisms are converted into a preserved form. In that way, they can be stored under dry conditions, which comply better with storage, transport, and handling requirements. Thus, in contrast to other immobilization techniques, there is no need for storage in liquid or under humid atmosphere. The biological activity, mechanical strength, and the structure of the biologically active ceramic-like composites (biocers) produced by freeze gelation have been investigated by using the phenol-degrading bacteria Rhodococcus ruber as model organism. Samples of freeze-gelation biocers have been investigated after defined storage periods, demonstrating nearly unchanged mechanical strength of the immobilization matrix as well as good storage stability of the activity of the immobilized cells over several months of storage at 4 °C. Repeated-batch tests demonstrated further that the freeze-gelation biocers can be repeatedly used over a period of more than 12 months without losing its bioactivity. Thus, these results show that freeze-gelation biocers have high potential of being scaled up from laboratory test systems to applications in real environment because of their long bioactivity as well as mechanical stability.

  11. Cytochrome P450-catalyzed dealkylation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. strain NI86/21 involves hydrogen atom transfer rather than single electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Armin H; Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka; Alaimo, Peter J; Geronimo, Inacrist; Sanchez, Ariana D; Cramer, Christopher J; Elsner, Martin

    2014-08-28

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are responsible for a multitude of natural transformation reactions. For oxidative N-dealkylation, single electron (SET) and hydrogen atom abstraction (HAT) have been debated as underlying mechanisms. Combined evidence from (i) product distribution and (ii) isotope effects indicate that HAT, rather than SET, initiates N-dealkylation of atrazine to desethyl- and desisopropylatrazine by the microorganism Rhodococcus sp. strain NI86/21. (i) Product analysis revealed a non-selective oxidation at both the αC and βC-atom of the alkyl chain, which is expected for a radical reaction, but not SET. (ii) Normal (13)C and (15)N as well as pronounced (2)H isotope effects (εcarbon: -4.0‰ ± 0.2‰; εnitrogen: -1.4‰ ± 0.3‰, KIEH: 3.6 ± 0.8) agree qualitatively with calculated values for HAT, whereas inverse (13)C and (15)N isotope effects are predicted for SET. Analogous results are observed with the Fe(iv)[double bond, length as m-dash]O model system [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin-iron(iii)-chloride + NaIO4], but not with permanganate. These results emphasize the relevance of the HAT mechanism for N-dealkylation by P450.

  12. Bacterial and Plant Signal Integration via D3-Type Cyclins Enhances Symptom Development in the Arabidopsis-Rhodococcus fascians Interaction1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Stes, Elisabeth; Biondi, Stefania; Holsters, Marcelle; Vereecke, Danny

    2011-01-01

    The phytopathogenic actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians drives its host to form a nutrient-rich niche by secreting a mixture of cytokinins that triggers plant cell division and shoot formation. The discrepancy between the relatively low amount of secreted cytokinins and the severe impact of R. fascians infection on plant development has puzzled researchers for a long time. Polyamine and transcript profiling of wild-type and cytokinin receptor mutant plants revealed that the bacterial cytokinins directly stimulated the biosynthesis of plant putrescine by activating arginine decarboxylase expression. Pharmacological experiments showed that the increased levels of putrescine contributed to the severity of the symptoms. Thus, putrescine functions as a secondary signal that impinges on the cytokinin-activated pathway, amplifying the hormone-induced changes that lead to the formation of a leafy gall. Exogenous putrescine and treatment with polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors combined with transcript and polyamine analyses of wild-type and mutant plants indicated that the direct target of both the bacterial cytokinins and plant putrescine was the expression of D3-type cyclins. Hence, the activated d-type cyclin/retinoblastoma/E2F transcription factor pathway integrates both external and internal hormonal signals, stimulating mitotic cell divisions and inducing pathological plant organogenesis. PMID:21459976

  13. Composition and Diversity of the Fecal Microbiome and Inferred Fecal Metagenome Does Not Predict Subsequent Pneumonia Caused by Rhodococcus equi in Foals

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield-Cargile, Canaan M.; Cohen, Noah D.; Suchodolski, Jan; Chaffin, M. Keith; McQueen, Cole M.; Arnold, Carolyn E.; Dowd, Scot E.; Blodgett, Glenn P.

    2015-01-01

    In equids, susceptibility to disease caused by Rhodococcus equi occurs almost exclusively in foals. This distribution might be attributable to the age-dependent maturation of immunity following birth undergone by mammalian neonates that renders them especially susceptible to infectious diseases. Expansion and diversification of the neonatal microbiome contribute to development of immunity in the gut. Moreover, diminished diversity of the gastrointestinal microbiome has been associated with risk of infections and immune dysregulation. We thus hypothesized that varying composition or reduced diversity of the intestinal microbiome of neonatal foals would contribute to increased susceptibility of their developing R. equi pneumonia. The composition and diversity indices of the fecal microbiota at 3 and 5 weeks of age were compared among 3 groups of foals: 1) foals that subsequently developed R. equi pneumonia after sampling; 2) foals that subsequently developed ultrasonographic evidence of pulmonary abscess formation or consolidation but not clinical signs (subclinical group); and, 3) foals that developed neither clinical signs nor ultrasonographic evidence of pulmonary abscess formation or consolidation. No significant differences were found among groups at either sampling time, indicating absence of evidence of an influence of composition or diversity of the fecal microbiome, or predicted fecal metagenome, on susceptibility to subsequent R. equi pneumonia. A marked and significant difference identified between a relatively short interval of time appeared to reflect ongoing adaptation to transition from a milk diet to a diet including available forage (including hay) and access to concentrate fed to the mare. PMID:26305682

  14. Oral Administration of Electron-Beam Inactivated Rhodococcus equi Failed to Protect Foals against Intrabronchial Infection with Live, Virulent R. equi

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Joana N.; Cohen, Noah D.; Bordin, Angela I.; Brake, Courtney N.; Giguère, Steeve; Coleman, Michelle C.; Alaniz, Robert C.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Mwangi, Waithaka; Pillai, Suresh D.

    2016-01-01

    There is currently no licensed vaccine that protects foals against Rhodococcus equi–induced pneumonia. Oral administration of live, virulent R. equi to neonatal foals has been demonstrated to protect against subsequent intrabronchial challenge with virulent R. equi. Electron beam (eBeam)-inactivated R. equi are structurally intact and have been demonstrated to be immunogenic when administered orally to neonatal foals. Thus, we investigated whether eBeam inactivated R. equi could protect foals against developing pneumonia after experimental infection with live, virulent R. equi. Foals (n = 8) were vaccinated by gavaging with eBeam-inactivated R. equi at ages 2, 7, and 14 days, or gavaged with equal volume of saline solution (n = 4), and subsequently infected intrabronchially with live, virulent R. equi at age 21 days. The proportion of vaccinated foals that developed pneumonia following challenge was similar among the vaccinated (7/8; 88%) and unvaccinated foals (3/4; 75%). This vaccination regimen did not appear to be strongly immunogenic in foals. Alternative dosing regimens or routes of administration need further investigation and may prove to be immunogenic and protective. PMID:26828865

  15. Microbial production of aliphatic (S)-epoxyalkanes by using Rhodococcus sp. strain ST-10 styrene monooxygenase expressed in organic-solvent-tolerant Kocuria rhizophila DC2201.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroshi; Ohuchi, Takuya; Imae, Ryouta; Itoh, Nobuya

    2015-03-01

    We describe the development of biocatalysis for producing optically pure straight-chain (S)-epoxyalkanes using styrene monooxygenase of Rhodococcus sp. strain ST-10 (RhSMO). RhSMO was expressed in the organic solvent-tolerant microorganism Kocuria rhizophila DC2201, and the bioconversion reaction was performed in an organic solvent-water biphasic reaction system. The biocatalytic process enantioselectively converted linear terminal alkenes to their corresponding (S)-epoxyalkanes using glucose and molecular oxygen. When 1-heptene and 6-chloro-1-hexene were used as substrates (400 mM) under optimized conditions, 88.3 mM (S)-1,2-epoxyheptane and 246.5 mM (S)-1,2-epoxy-6-chlorohexane, respectively, accumulated in the organic phase with good enantiomeric excess (ee; 84.2 and 95.5%). The biocatalysis showed broad substrate specificity toward various aliphatic alkenes, including functionalized and unfunctionalized alkenes, with good to excellent ee. Here, we demonstrate that this biocatalytic system is environmentally friendly and useful for producing various enantiopure (S)-epoxyalkanes. PMID:25556188

  16. Microbial Production of Aliphatic (S)-Epoxyalkanes by Using Rhodococcus sp. Strain ST-10 Styrene Monooxygenase Expressed in Organic-Solvent-Tolerant Kocuria rhizophila DC2201

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Hiroshi; Ohuchi, Takuya; Imae, Ryouta

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of biocatalysis for producing optically pure straight-chain (S)-epoxyalkanes using styrene monooxygenase of Rhodococcus sp. strain ST-10 (RhSMO). RhSMO was expressed in the organic solvent-tolerant microorganism Kocuria rhizophila DC2201, and the bioconversion reaction was performed in an organic solvent-water biphasic reaction system. The biocatalytic process enantioselectively converted linear terminal alkenes to their corresponding (S)-epoxyalkanes using glucose and molecular oxygen. When 1-heptene and 6-chloro-1-hexene were used as substrates (400 mM) under optimized conditions, 88.3 mM (S)-1,2-epoxyheptane and 246.5 mM (S)-1,2-epoxy-6-chlorohexane, respectively, accumulated in the organic phase with good enantiomeric excess (ee; 84.2 and 95.5%). The biocatalysis showed broad substrate specificity toward various aliphatic alkenes, including functionalized and unfunctionalized alkenes, with good to excellent ee. Here, we demonstrate that this biocatalytic system is environmentally friendly and useful for producing various enantiopure (S)-epoxyalkanes. PMID:25556188

  17. Genetic diversity of culturable bacteria in oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Minna M; Jurgens, German; Lindström, Kristina; Suominen, Leena

    2006-01-01

    A collection of 50 indigenous meta-toluate tolerating bacteria isolated from oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis on selective medium was characterized and identified by classical and molecular methods. 16S rDNA partial sequencing showed the presence of five major lineages of the Bacteria domain. Gram-positive Rhodococcus, Bacillus and Arthrobacter and gram-negative Pseudomonas were the most abundant genera. Only one-fifth of the strains that tolerated m-toluate also degraded m-toluate. The inoculum Pseudomonas putida PaW85 was not found in the rhizosphere samples. The ability to degrade m-toluate by the TOL plasmid was detected only in species of the genus Pseudomonas. However, a few Rhodococcus erythropolis strains were found which were able to degrade m-toluate. A new finding was that Pseudomonas migulae strains and a few P. oryzihabitans strains were able to grow on m-toluate and most likely contained the TOL plasmid. Because strain specific differences in degradation abilities were found for P. oryzihabitans, separation at the strain level was important. For strain specific separation (GTG)5 fingerprinting was the best method. A combination of the single locus ribotyping and the whole genomic fingerprinting techniques with the selective partial sequencing formed a practical molecular toolbox for studying genetic diversity of culturable bacteria in oil-contaminated rhizosphere.

  18. Genetic diversity of culturable bacteria in oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Minna M; Jurgens, German; Lindström, Kristina; Suominen, Leena

    2006-01-01

    A collection of 50 indigenous meta-toluate tolerating bacteria isolated from oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis on selective medium was characterized and identified by classical and molecular methods. 16S rDNA partial sequencing showed the presence of five major lineages of the Bacteria domain. Gram-positive Rhodococcus, Bacillus and Arthrobacter and gram-negative Pseudomonas were the most abundant genera. Only one-fifth of the strains that tolerated m-toluate also degraded m-toluate. The inoculum Pseudomonas putida PaW85 was not found in the rhizosphere samples. The ability to degrade m-toluate by the TOL plasmid was detected only in species of the genus Pseudomonas. However, a few Rhodococcus erythropolis strains were found which were able to degrade m-toluate. A new finding was that Pseudomonas migulae strains and a few P. oryzihabitans strains were able to grow on m-toluate and most likely contained the TOL plasmid. Because strain specific differences in degradation abilities were found for P. oryzihabitans, separation at the strain level was important. For strain specific separation (GTG)5 fingerprinting was the best method. A combination of the single locus ribotyping and the whole genomic fingerprinting techniques with the selective partial sequencing formed a practical molecular toolbox for studying genetic diversity of culturable bacteria in oil-contaminated rhizosphere. PMID:16055251

  19. EKG isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, E.; Rasquin, J. R.; Smith, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Light beam transmits heartbeat signal from electrodes on patient to electrocardiograph without exposing patient to possible severe electrical shock. System provides complete isolation between patient and EKG instrumentation.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a novel bacteriophage against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Basra, Simone; Anany, Hany; Brovko, Lioubov; Kropinski, Andrew M; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's disease, has a doubling time of 24 hours, making rapid detection very difficult. Mycobacteriophages can be used in the detection of disease-causing mycobacteria such as MAP. Isolation and sequencing the genomes of lytic MAP bacteriophages are important preliminary steps towards designing phage-based rapid detection assays for this bacterium. A simple optimized protocol was developed to allow reproducible production of confluent growth of MAP on plates within four to six weeks of incubation at 30 °C. This protocol was applied to the screening of environmental and fecal samples for bacteriophages inhibiting the growth of MAP. As a result, a lytic phage, vB_MapS_FF47, was isolated from bovine feces. FF47 contains a double-stranded DNA genome ~48 kb in length with 73 protein coding sequences. It does not carry temperate or known virulence genes. This phage was shown to be most closely related to Mycobacterium phage Muddy, isolated in South Africa, and Gordonia phage GTE2; however, it could not infect any of the tested Gordonia, Rhodococcus, or Nocardia spp. that GTE2 could. The protocols that were developed for growth and phage isolation have potential applications in a high-throughput screening for compounds inhibiting the growth of MAP. This work describes the first time that a phage was isolated against M. paratuberculosis.

  1. Diversity and antibacterial activity of culturable actinobacteria isolated from five species of the South China Sea gorgonian corals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; He, Fei; Wang, Guang-Hua; Bao, Jie; Xu, Xin-Ya; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2013-06-01

    This study describes the diversity and antibacterial activity of culturable actinobacteria isolated from five species of gorgonian corals (Echinogorgia aurantiaca, Melitodes squamata, Muricella flexuosa, Subergorgia suberosa, and Verrucella umbraculum) collected in shallow water of the South China Sea. A total of 123 actinobacterial isolates were recovered using ten different isolation media, and assigned to 11 genera, including Streptomyces and Micromonospora as the dominant genera, followed by Nocardia, Verrucosispora, Nocardiopsis, Rhodococcus, Pseudonocardia, Agrococcus, Saccharomonospora, Saccharopolyspora and Dietzia. Comparable analysis indicated that the numbers of actinobacterial genera and isolates from the five gorgonian coral species varied significantly. It was found that 72 isolates displayed antibacterial activity against at least one indicator bacterium, and the antibacterial strains isolated from different gorgonians had almost the same proportion (~50 %). These results provide direct evidence for the hypotheses that gorgonian coral species contain large and diverse communities of actinobacteria, and suggest that many gorgonian-associated actinobacteria could produce some antibacterial agents to protect their hosts against pathogens. To our knowledge, this is the first report about the diversity of culturable actinobacteria isolated from gorgonian corals.

  2. Involvement of the Cytochrome P450 System EthBAD in the N-Deethoxymethylation of Acetochlor by Rhodococcus sp. Strain T3-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Dong, Weiliang; Hou, Ying; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Acetochlor [2-chloro-N-(ethoxymethyl)-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-acetamide] is a widely applied herbicide with potential carcinogenic properties. N-Deethoxymethylation is the key step in acetochlor biodegradation. N-Deethoxymethylase is a multicomponent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of acetochlor to 2′-methyl-6′-ethyl-2-chloroacetanilide (CMEPA). Fast detection of CMEPA by a two-enzyme (N-deethoxymethylase–amide hydrolase) system was established in this research. Based on the fast detection method, a three-component enzyme was purified from Rhodococcus sp. strain T3-1 using ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The molecular masses of the components of the purified enzyme were estimated to be 45, 43, and 11 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Based on the results of peptide mass fingerprint analysis, acetochlor N-deethoxymethylase was identified as a cytochrome P450 system, composed of a cytochrome P450 oxygenase (43-kDa component; EthB), a ferredoxin (45 kDa; EthA), and a reductase (11 kDa; EthD), that is involved in the degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether. The gene cluster ethABCD was cloned by PCR amplification and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Resting cells of a recombinant E. coli strain showed deethoxymethylation activity against acetochlor. Subcloning of ethABCD showed that ethABD expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) has the activity of acetochlor N-deethoxymethylase and is capable of converting acetochlor to CMEPA. PMID:25595756

  3. Identification of the region of a 14-kilodalton protein of Rhodococcus ruber that is responsible for the binding of this phasin to polyhydroxyalkanoic acid granules.

    PubMed Central

    Pieper-Fürst, U; Madkour, M H; Mayer, F; Steinbüchel, A

    1995-01-01

    The function of the polyhydroxyalkanoic acid (PHA) granule-associated GA14 protein of Rhodococcus ruber was investigated in Escherichia coli XL1-Blue, which coexpressed this protein with the polyhydroxybutyric acid (PHB) biosynthesis operon of Alcaligenes eutrophus. The GA14 protein had no influence on the biosynthesis rate of PHB in E. coli XL1-Blue(pSKCO7), but this recombinant E. coli strain formed smaller PHB granules than were formed by an E. coli strain that expressed only the PHB operon. Immunoelectron microscopy with GA14-specific antibodies demonstrated the binding of GA14 protein to these mini granules. In a previous study, two hydrophobic domains close to the C terminus of the GA14 protein were analyzed, and a working hypothesis that suggested an anchoring of the GA14 protein in the phospholipid monolayer surrounding the PHA granule core by these hydrophobic domains was developed (U. Pieper-Fürst, M. H. Madkour, F. Mayer, and A. Steinbüchel, J. Bacteriol. 176:4328-4337, 1994). This hypothesis was confirmed by the construction of C-terminally truncated variants of the GA14 protein lacking the second or both hydrophobic domains and by the demonstration of their inability to bind to PHB granules. Further confirmation of the hypothesis was obtained by the construction of a fusion protein composed of the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase II of A. eutrophus and the C terminus of the GA14 protein containing both hydrophobic domains and by its affinity to native and artificial PHB granules. PMID:7730285

  4. Identification of a novel dioxygenase involved in metabolism of o-xylene, toluene, and ethylbenzene by Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dockyu; Chae, Jong-Chan; Zylstra, Gerben J; Kim, Young-Soo; Kim, Seong-Ki; Nam, Myung Hee; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Eungbin

    2004-12-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17 is able to grow on o-xylene, benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene. DK17 harbors at least two megaplasmids, and the genes encoding the initial steps in alkylbenzene metabolism are present on the 330-kb pDK2. The genes encoding alkylbenzene degradation were cloned in a cosmid clone and sequenced completely to reveal 35 open reading frames (ORFs). Among the ORFs, we identified two nearly exact copies (one base difference) of genes encoding large and small subunits of an iron sulfur protein terminal oxygenase that are 6 kb apart from each other. Immediately downstream of one copy of the dioxygenase genes (akbA1a and akbA2a) is a gene encoding a dioxygenase ferredoxin component (akbA3), and downstream of the other copy (akbA1b and akbA2b) are genes putatively encoding a meta-cleavage pathway. RT-PCR experiments show that the two copies of the dioxygenase genes are operonic with the downstream putative catabolic genes and that both operons are induced by o-xylene. When expressed in Escherichia coli, AkbA1a-AkbA2a-AkbA3 transformed o-xylene into 2,3- and 3,4-dimethylphenol. These were apparently derived from an unstable o-xylene cis-3,4-dihydrodiol, which readily dehydrates. This indicates a single point of attack of the dioxygenase on the aromatic ring. In contrast, attack of AkbA1a-AkbA2a-AkbA3 on ethylbenzene resulted in the formation of two different cis-dihydrodiols resulting from an oxidation at the 2,3 and the 3,4 positions on the aromatic ring, respectively. PMID:15574904

  5. Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals: an assessment of the early diagnostic value of serum amyloid A and plasma fibrinogen concentrations in equine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Passamonti, F; Vardi, D M; Stefanetti, V; Marenzoni, M L; Prato, S; Cévese, P; Coletti, M; Pepe, M; Casagrande Proietti, P; Olea-Popelka, F

    2015-02-01

    Early diagnosis and prevention of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals represent important goals for equine clinicians. Recent protocols for diagnosis and treatment of Rhodococcosis in foals typically rely on a multimodal approach based on sonographic evidence suggestive of pyogranulomas, sonographic abscess scores and laboratory findings including plasma fibrinogen concentrations, blood biochemistry testing and platelet and leukocyte counts. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of weekly testing of serum amyloid A (SAA) and plasma fibrinogen concentrations in foals to achieve early diagnosis of R. equi pneumonia prior to the onset of clinical signs. This testing was used to simulate a clinically practical screening procedure and compared with thoracic ultrasonography performed in parallel. The present study suggests that SAA does not represent a reliable early marker of Rhodococcosis when plasma concentrations are tested weekly. However, when clinical signs of R. equi pneumonia are present, SAA concentrations may allow clinicians to obtain 'real-time' indications concerning both the progress of infection and the effectiveness of therapy. This study raises the possibility that plasma fibrinogen monitoring starting at 1 week of age and repeated on a weekly basis, could serve as a screening test allowing clinicians to identify foals as suspected of R. equi infection. Future investigations regarding both physiological plasma fibrinogen concentrations in foals as well as fibrinogen kinetics in foals affected with R. equi pneumonia, including the establishment of appropriate reference intervals for the test method employed in this study, will be necessary in order to clarify this possibility.

  6. A Two-Component para-Nitrophenol Monooxygenase Initiates a Novel 2-Chloro-4-Nitrophenol Catabolism Pathway in Rhodococcus imtechensis RKJ300

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jun; Zhang, Jun-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus imtechensis RKJ300 (DSM 45091) grows on 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP) and para-nitrophenol (PNP) as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. In this study, by genetic and biochemical analyses, a novel 2C4NP catabolic pathway different from those of all other 2C4NP utilizers was identified with hydroxyquinol (hydroxy-1,4-hydroquinone or 1,2,4-benzenetriol [BT]) as the ring cleavage substrate. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the pnp cluster located in three operons is likely involved in the catabolism of both 2C4NP and PNP. The oxygenase component (PnpA1) and reductase component (PnpA2) of the two-component PNP monooxygenase were expressed and purified to homogeneity, respectively. The identification of chlorohydroquinone (CHQ) and BT during 2C4NP degradation catalyzed by PnpA1A2 indicated that PnpA1A2 catalyzes the sequential denitration and dechlorination of 2C4NP to BT and catalyzes the conversion of PNP to BT. Genetic analyses revealed that pnpA1 plays an essential role in both 2C4NP and PNP degradations by gene knockout and complementation. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of CHQ to BT, PnpA1A2 was also found to be able to catalyze the hydroxylation of hydroquinone (HQ) to BT, revealing the probable fate of HQ that remains unclear in PNP catabolism by Gram-positive bacteria. This study fills a gap in our knowledge of the 2C4NP degradation mechanism in Gram-positive bacteria and also enhances our understanding of the genetic and biochemical diversity of 2C4NP catabolism. PMID:26567304

  7. Social isolation

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, John T.; Hawkley, Louise C.; Norman, Greg J.; Berntson, Gary G.

    2011-01-01

    Social species, by definition, form organizations that extend beyond the individual. These structures evolved hand in hand with behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms to support them because the consequent social behaviors helped these organisms survive, reproduce, and care for offspring sufficiently long that they too reproduced. Social isolation represents a lens through which to investigate these behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms. Evidence from human and nonhuman animal studies indicates that isolation heightens sensitivity to social threats (predator evasion) and motivates the renewal of social connections. The effects of perceived isolation in humans share much in common with the effects of experimental manipulations of isolation in nonhuman social species: increased tonic sympathetic tonus and HPA activation, and decreased inflammatory control, immunity, sleep salubrity, and expression of genes regulating glucocorticoid responses. Together, these effects contribute to higher rates of morbidity and mortality in older adults. PMID:21651565

  8. Actinobacteria possessing antimicrobial and antioxidant activities isolated from the pollen of scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) grown on the Baikal shore.

    PubMed

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V; Voytsekhovskaya, Irina V; Rebets, Yuriy V; Tokovenko, Bogdan T; Penzina, Tatyana A; Gornostay, Tatyana G; Adelshin, Renat V; Protasov, Eugenii S; Luzhetskyy, Andriy N; Timofeyev, Maxim A

    2016-10-01

    Isolated ecosystems existing under specific environmental conditions have been shown to be promising sources of new strains of actinobacteria. The taiga forest of Baikal Siberia has not been well studied, and its actinobacterial population remains uncharacterized. The proximity between the huge water mass of Lake Baikal and high mountain ranges influences the structure and diversity of the plant world in Siberia. Here, we report the isolation of eighteen actinobacterial strains from male cones of Scots pine trees (Pinus sylvestris) growing on the shore of the ancient Lake Baikal in Siberia. In addition to more common representative strains of Streptomyces, several species belonging to the genera Rhodococcus, Amycolatopsis, and Micromonospora were isolated. All isolated strains exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities. We identified several strains that inhibited the growth of the pathogen Candida albicans but did not hinder the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several isolates were active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The high proportion of biologically active strains producing antibacterial and specific antifungal compounds may reflect their role in protecting pollen against phytopathogens. PMID:27392610

  9. Siderophore production by actinomycetes isolates from two soil sites in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joanna; Postmaster, Armin; Soon, Hooi Peng; Keast, David; Carson, Kerry C

    2012-04-01

    The actinomycetes are metabolically flexible soil micro-organisms capable of producing a range of compounds of interest, including siderophores. Siderophore production by actinomycetes sampled from two distinct and separate geographical sites in Western Australia were investigated and found to be generally similar in the total percentage of siderophore producers found. The only notable difference was the proportion of isolates producing catechol siderophores with only 3% found in site 1 (from the north-west of Western Australia and reportedly containing 40% magnetite) and 17% in site 2 (a commercial stone fruit orchard in the hills east of Perth with a soil base ranging from sandy loam to laterite). Further detailed characterization of isolates of interest identified a Streptomyces that produced extracellularly excreted enterobactin, the characteristic Enterobacteriaceae siderophore, and also revealed some of the conditions required for enterobactin production. Carriage of the entF gene, which codes for the synthetase responsible for the final assembly of the tri-cyclic structure of enterobactin, was confirmed by PCR in this isolate. Another separate Streptomyces produced a compound that matched the UV/VIS spectra of heterobactin, a siderophore previously only described in Rhodococcus and Nocardia. PMID:22038645

  10. Siderophore production by actinomycetes isolates from two soil sites in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joanna; Postmaster, Armin; Soon, Hooi Peng; Keast, David; Carson, Kerry C

    2012-04-01

    The actinomycetes are metabolically flexible soil micro-organisms capable of producing a range of compounds of interest, including siderophores. Siderophore production by actinomycetes sampled from two distinct and separate geographical sites in Western Australia were investigated and found to be generally similar in the total percentage of siderophore producers found. The only notable difference was the proportion of isolates producing catechol siderophores with only 3% found in site 1 (from the north-west of Western Australia and reportedly containing 40% magnetite) and 17% in site 2 (a commercial stone fruit orchard in the hills east of Perth with a soil base ranging from sandy loam to laterite). Further detailed characterization of isolates of interest identified a Streptomyces that produced extracellularly excreted enterobactin, the characteristic Enterobacteriaceae siderophore, and also revealed some of the conditions required for enterobactin production. Carriage of the entF gene, which codes for the synthetase responsible for the final assembly of the tri-cyclic structure of enterobactin, was confirmed by PCR in this isolate. Another separate Streptomyces produced a compound that matched the UV/VIS spectra of heterobactin, a siderophore previously only described in Rhodococcus and Nocardia.

  11. Designing recombinant Pseudomonas strains to enhance biodesulfurization.

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, M E; Ferrández, A; De Lorenzo, V; García, J L; Díaz, E

    1997-01-01

    The dsz biodesulfurization cluster from Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 has been engineered under the control of heterologous broad-host-range regulatory signals to alleviate the mechanism of sulfur repression, and it was stably inserted into the chromosomes of different Pseudomonas strains. The recombinant bacteria were able to desulfurize dibenzothiophene more efficiently than the native host. Furthermore, these new biocatalysts combine relevant industrial and environmental traits, such as production of biosurfactants, with the enhanced biodesulfurization phenotype. PMID:9371464

  12. Isolation and characterization of gasoline-degrading bacteria from gas station leaking-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Lu, Si-Jin; Wang, Hong-qi; Yao, Zhi-hua

    2006-01-01

    The effects of culture conditions in vitro and biosurfactant detection were studied on bacterial strains capable of degrading gasoline from contaminated soils near gas station. The main results were summarized as follows. Three bacteria (strains Q 10, Q14 and Q18) that were considered as efficiently degrading strains were isolated and identified as Pseudomonas sp., Flavobacterium sp. and Rhodococcus sp., respectively. The optimal growth conditions of three bacteria including pH, temperature and the concentration of gasoline were similar. The reduction in surface tension was observed with all the three bacteria, indicating the production of biosurfactant compounds. The value of surface tension reduced by the three strains Q10, Q14 and Q18 was 32.6 mN x m, 12.4 mNx m and 21.9 mN x m, respectively. Strain Q10 could be considered as a potential biosurfactant producer. Gasoline, diesel oil, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) could easily be degraded by the three isolates. The consortium was more effective than the individual cultures in degrading added gasoline, diesel oil, and BTEX. These results indicate that these strains have great potential for in situ remediation of soils contaminated by gas station leaking.

  13. Antibiotic resistance of bacteria isolated from the internal organs of edible snow crabs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Misoon; Kwon, Tae-Hyung; Jung, Su-Mi; Cho, Seung-Hak; Jin, Seon Yeong; Park, Nyun-Ho; Kim, Choong-Gon; Kim, Jong-Shik

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance and microbiota within edible snow crabs are important for the Chionoecetes (snow crab) fishing industry. We investigated these parameters using culture methods and antibiotic susceptibility tests with six internal organs from three species of Chionoecetes. Each sample revealed many unexpected microbial species within Chionoecetes internal organs. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analysis of 381 isolates, the most abundant genera identified in Chionoecetes opilio were Acinetobacter spp. (24%), Bacillus spp. (4%), Pseudomonas spp. (34%), Stenotrophomonas spp. (28%), and Agreia spp. (11%). In Chionoecetes sp. crabs, Acinetobacter spp. (23%), Bacillus spp. (12%), and Psychrobacter spp. (20%) were most prevalent, while Agreia spp. (11%), Bacillus spp. (31%), Microbacterium spp. (10%), Rhodococcus spp. (12%), and Agrococcus spp. (6%) were most abundant in C. japonicus. Our antibiotic resistance test found resistance to all nine antibiotics tested in 19, 14, and two of the isolates from C. opilio, Chionoecetes sp., and, C. japonicus respectively. Our results are the first to show that microbes with antibiotic resistance are widely distributed throughout the internal organs of natural snow crabs. PMID:23990916

  14. Antibiotic Resistance of Bacteria Isolated from the Internal Organs of Edible Snow Crabs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Misoon; Kwon, Tae-Hyung; Jung, Su-Mi; Cho, Seung-Hak; Jin, Seon Yeong; Park, Nyun-Ho; Kim, Choong-Gon; Kim, Jong-Shik

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance and microbiota within edible snow crabs are important for the Chionoecetes (snow crab) fishing industry. We investigated these parameters using culture methods and antibiotic susceptibility tests with six internal organs from three species of Chionoecetes. Each sample revealed many unexpected microbial species within Chionoecetes internal organs. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analysis of 381 isolates, the most abundant genera identified in Chionoecetes opilio were Acinetobacter spp. (24%), Bacillus spp. (4%), Pseudomonas spp. (34%), Stenotrophomonas spp. (28%), and Agreia spp. (11%). In Chionoecetes sp. crabs, Acinetobacter spp. (23%), Bacillus spp. (12%), and Psychrobacter spp. (20%) were most prevalent, while Agreia spp. (11%), Bacillus spp. (31%), Microbacterium spp. (10%), Rhodococcus spp. (12%), and Agrococcus spp. (6%) were most abundant in C. japonicus. Our antibiotic resistance test found resistance to all nine antibiotics tested in 19, 14, and two of the isolates from C. opilio, Chionoecetes sp., and, C. japonicus respectively. Our results are the first to show that microbes with antibiotic resistance are widely distributed throughout the internal organs of natural snow crabs. PMID:23990916

  15. Natural Guided Genome Engineering Reveals Transcriptional Regulators Controlling Quorum-Sensing Signal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mothe, Nicolas; Velours, Christophe; Legrand, Pierre; Moréra, Solange; Faure, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-quenching (QQ) are natural or engineered processes disrupting the quorum-sensing (QS) signalling which controls virulence and persistence (e.g. biofilm) in numerous bacteria. QQ involves different enzymes including lactonases, amidases, oxidases and reductases which degrade the QS molecules such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHL). Rhodococcus erythropolis known to efficiently degrade NAHL is proposed as a biocontrol agent and a reservoir of QQ-enzymes for biotechnology. In R. erythropolis, regulation of QQ-enzymes remains unclear. In this work, we performed genome engineering on R. erythropolis, which is recalcitrant to reverse genetics, in order to investigate regulation of QQ-enzymes at a molecular and structural level with the aim to improve the QQ activity. Deep-sequencing of the R. erythropolis enhanced variants allowed identification of a punctual mutation in a key-transcriptional factor QsdR (Quorum sensing degradation Regulation) which regulates the sole QQ-lactonase QsdA identified so far. Using biophysical and structural studies on QsdR, we demonstrate that QQ activity can be improved by modifying the regulation of QQ-enzymes degrading QS signal. This modification requiring the change of only one amino-acid in a transcriptional factor leads to an enhanced R. erythropolis in which the QS-signal degradation pathway is strongly activated. PMID:26554837

  16. Isolated neurosarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Bianca; Crişan, Doiniţa; Tompa, I; Szabo, I

    2011-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory granulomatous disease affecting multiple organ systems. Neurosarcoidosis (central nervous system involvement) is seen in approximately 25% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis, although it is subclinical in most of these cases. Clinical presentations and imaging findings in nervous system were varied. Cranial nerve abnormalities were the most common clinical presentation and involvement of the optic nerve in particular was associated with a poor prognosis for visual recovery. A patient is described who presented with decreased visual acuity, hypoesthesia of the face and multiple tumors of the eyelids on both eyes. Initial biopsy of one of the tumor of the eyelids revealed a non-caseating granulomatous inflammatory process with nodular infiltrates made up of epithelioid cells, Langhans-type giant multinucleated cells and mononuclear cells; the diagnosis of sarcoidosis was suspected. After two years of clinical and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) follow up, the diagnosis of isolated neurosarcoidosis was confirmed by histology. In this study, we analyzed clinical and radiologic records of this patient with biopsy proven and clinically diagnosed neurosarcoidosis for the following reasons: (1) to assess the concordance between abnormalities noted on MRI with neurologic symptoms at presentation; (2) to correlate changes in imaging findings during follow-up with clinical worsening; and (3) to show up the characteristic feature of this case with no general sign/symptoms of sarcoidosis.

  17. Isolated sleep paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep paralysis - isolated; Parasomnia - isolated sleep paralysis ... Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from a few seconds to 1 or 2 minutes. During these episodes the person is unable to move ...

  18. Isolation and antimicrobial activities of actinobacteria closely associated with liquorice plants Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza inflate BAT. in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke; Zhao, Chong; Liao, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Li, Yanbing; Liu, Maoke; Ao, Xiaoling; Gu, Yunfu; Liao, Decong; Xu, Kaiwei; Yu, Xiumei; Xiang, Quanju; Huang, Chengyi; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Xiaoping; Penttinen, Petri

    2016-07-01

    A total of 218 actinobacteria strains were isolated from wild perennial liquorice plants Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza. inflate BAT. Based on morphological characteristics, 45 and 32 strains from G. inflate and G. glabra, respectively, were selected for further analyses. According to 16S rRNA sequence analysis, most of the strains belonged to genus Streptomyces and a few strains represented the rare actinobacteria Micromonospora, Rhodococcus and Tsukamurella. A total of 39 strains from G. inflate and 27 strains from G. glabra showed antimicrobial activity against at least one indicator organism. The range of the antimicrobial activity of the strains isolated from G. glabra and G. inflate was similar. A total of 34 strains from G. inflate and 29 strains from G. glabra carried at least one of the genes encoding polyketide synthases, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and FADH2-dependent halogenase. In the type II polyketide synthase KSα gene phylogenetic analysis, the strains were divided into two major clades: one included known spore pigment production-linked KSα sequences and other sequences were linked to the production of different types of aromatic polyketide antibiotics. Based on the antimicrobial range, the isolates that carried different KSα types were not separated from each other or from the isolates that did not carry KSα. The incongruent phylogenies of 16S rRNA and KSα genes indicated that the KSα genes were possibly horizontally transferred. In all, the liquorice plants were a rich source of biocontrol agents that may produce novel bioactive compounds. PMID:27145982

  19. Isolation and antimicrobial activities of actinobacteria closely associated with liquorice plants Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza inflate BAT. in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke; Zhao, Chong; Liao, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Li, Yanbing; Liu, Maoke; Ao, Xiaoling; Gu, Yunfu; Liao, Decong; Xu, Kaiwei; Yu, Xiumei; Xiang, Quanju; Huang, Chengyi; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Xiaoping; Penttinen, Petri

    2016-07-01

    A total of 218 actinobacteria strains were isolated from wild perennial liquorice plants Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza. inflate BAT. Based on morphological characteristics, 45 and 32 strains from G. inflate and G. glabra, respectively, were selected for further analyses. According to 16S rRNA sequence analysis, most of the strains belonged to genus Streptomyces and a few strains represented the rare actinobacteria Micromonospora, Rhodococcus and Tsukamurella. A total of 39 strains from G. inflate and 27 strains from G. glabra showed antimicrobial activity against at least one indicator organism. The range of the antimicrobial activity of the strains isolated from G. glabra and G. inflate was similar. A total of 34 strains from G. inflate and 29 strains from G. glabra carried at least one of the genes encoding polyketide synthases, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and FADH2-dependent halogenase. In the type II polyketide synthase KSα gene phylogenetic analysis, the strains were divided into two major clades: one included known spore pigment production-linked KSα sequences and other sequences were linked to the production of different types of aromatic polyketide antibiotics. Based on the antimicrobial range, the isolates that carried different KSα types were not separated from each other or from the isolates that did not carry KSα. The incongruent phylogenies of 16S rRNA and KSα genes indicated that the KSα genes were possibly horizontally transferred. In all, the liquorice plants were a rich source of biocontrol agents that may produce novel bioactive compounds.

  20. Characterization of a cryptic plasmid from a Greenland ice core Arthrobacter isolate and construction of a shuttle vector that replicates in psychrophilic high G+C Gram-positive recipients.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Vanya; Lantz, Sarah; Brenchley, Jean

    2008-05-01

    Over 60 Greenland glacial isolates were screened for plasmids and antibiotic resistance/sensitivity as the first step in establishing a genetic system. Sequence analysis of a small, cryptic, 1,950 bp plasmid, p54, from isolate GIC54, related to Arthrobacter agilis, showed a region similar to that found in theta replicating Rhodococcus plasmids. A 6,002 bp shuttle vector, pSVJ21, was constructed by ligating p54 and pUC18 and inserting a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) cassette conferring chloramphenicol resistance. Candidate Gram-positive recipients were chosen among glacial isolates based on phylogenetic relatedness, relatively short doubling times at low temperatures, sensitivity to antibiotics, and absence of indigenous plasmids. We developed an electroporation protocol and transformed seven isolates related to members of the Arthrobacter, Microbacterium, Curtobacterium, and Rhodoglobus genera with pSVJ21. Plasmid stability was demonstrated by successive transformation into Escherichia coli and four Gram-positive isolates, growth without antibiotic, and plasmid re-isolation. This shuttle vector and our transformation protocol provide the basis for genetic experiments with different high G+C Gram-positive hosts to study cold adaptation and expression of cold-active enzymes at low temperatures.

  1. Screening and isolation of PHB-producing bacteria in a polluted marine microbial mat.

    PubMed

    López-Cortés, Alejandro; Lanz-Landázuri, Alberto; García-Maldonado, José Q

    2008-07-01

    The characteristics of microbial mats within the waste stream from a seafood cannery were compared to a microbial community at a pristine site near a sandy beach at Puerto San Carlos, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Isolation of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB)-producing bacteria, recognition of brightly refractile cytoplasmatic inclusions, lipophilic stains with Sudan Black and Nile Red, and chemical extraction of PHB were used as a culture-dependent strategy for the detection of PHB-producing bacteria. The culture-independent approach included denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of phylotypes of 16S rRNA of microbial communities from environmental samples. Significant differences in community structure were found among the polluted and pristine sites. These differences were correlated with the physicochemical characteristics of the seawater column. At the polluted site, the seawater was rich in nutrients (ammonia, phosphates, and organic matter), compared to the pristine location. Partial sequencing of 16S rDNA of cultures of bacteria producing PHB included Bacillus and Staphylococcus at both sites; Paracoccus and Micrococcus were found only at the polluted site and Rhodococcus and Methylobacterium were found only at the pristine site. Bands of the sequences of 16S rDNA from both field samples in the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses affiliated closely only with bacterial sequences of cultures of Bacillus and Staphylococcus. High concentrations of organic and inorganic nutrients at the polluted site had a clear effect on the composition and diversity of the microbial community compared to the unpolluted site.

  2. Prospect, isolation, and characterization of microorganisms for potential use in cases of oil bioremediation along the coast of Trindade Island, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Edmo M; Kalks, Karlos H M; Tótola, Marcos R

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, acrylic coupons with a thin layer of oil on the surface were incubated in the coastal water of Trindade Island, Brazil, for 60 days. The microorganisms adhered to the coupons were isolated using enrichment medium with hexadecane and naphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. A total of 15 bacterial isolates were obtained, and the ability of these isolates to use different hydrocarbons as the source of carbon and energy was investigated. None of the isolates produced biosurfactants under our experimental conditions. Subsequently, identification methods such as partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and analysis of fatty acids (MIDI) profile were employed. Among the 15 isolates, representatives of Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria were detected. The isolates Rhodococcus rhodochrous TRN7 and Nocardia farcinica TRH1 were able to use all the hydrocarbons added to the culture medium (toluene, octane, xylene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, hexadecane, anthracene, eicosane, tetracosane, triacontane, and pentacontane). Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the DNA isolated by employing primers for catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, alkane dehydrogenase and the alpha subunit of hydroxylating dioxygenases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon rings genes demonstrated that various isolates capable of utilizing hydrocarbons do not exhibit genes of known routes of catabolism, suggesting the existence of unknown catabolic pathways in these microorganisms. Our findings suggest that the microbiota associated to the coast of tropical oceanic islands has the ability to assist in environmental regeneration in cases of accidents involving oil spills in its shore. Thus, it motivates studies to map bioremediation strategies using the autochthonous microbiota from these environments.

  3. Microbial Population Dynamics Associated with Crude-Oil Biodegradation in Diverse Soils

    PubMed Central

    Hamamura, Natsuko; Olson, Sarah H.; Ward, David M.; Inskeep, William P.

    2006-01-01

    Soil bacterial population dynamics were examined in several crude-oil-contaminated soils to identify those organisms associated with alkane degradation and to assess patterns in microbial response across disparate soils. Seven soil types obtained from six geographically distinct areas of the United States (Arizona, Oregon, Indiana, Virginia, Oklahoma, and Montana) were used in controlled contamination experiments containing 2% (wt/wt) crude oil spiked with [1-14C]hexadecane. Microbial populations present during hydrocarbon degradation were analyzed using both 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and by traditional methods for cultivating hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria. After a 50-day incubation, all seven soils showed comparable hydrocarbon depletion, where >80% of added crude oil was depleted and approximately 40 to 70% of added [14C]hexadecane was converted to 14CO2. However, the initial rates of hydrocarbon depletion differed up to 10-fold, and preferential utilization of shorter-chain-length n-alkanes relative to longer-chain-length n-alkanes was observed in some soils. Distinct microbial populations developed, concomitant with crude-oil depletion. Phylogenetically diverse bacterial populations were selected across different soils, many of which were identical to hydrocarbon-degrading isolates obtained from the same systems (e.g., Nocardioides albus, Collimonas sp., and Rhodococcus coprophilus). In several cases, soil type was shown to be an important determinant, defining specific microorganisms responding to hydrocarbon contamination. However, similar Rhodococcus erythropolis-like populations were observed in four of the seven soils and were the most common hydrocarbon-degrading organisms identified via cultivation. PMID:16957258

  4. Cryogenic Faraday isolator

    SciTech Connect

    Zheleznov, D S; Zelenogorskii, V V; Katin, E V; Mukhin, I B; Palashov, O V; Khazanov, Efim A

    2010-05-26

    A Faraday isolator is described in which thermal effects are suppressed by cooling down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The principal scheme, main characteristics and modifications of the isolator are presented. The isolation degree is studied experimentally for the subkilowatt average laser radiation power. It is shown that the isolator can be used at radiation powers up to tens of kilowatts. (quantum electronic devices)

  5. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Laura M; Cheng, Andrew T; Warner, Christopher J A; Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J; Bray, Walter M; Riener, Romina M; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Linington, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection.

  6. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C.; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J.; Bray, Walter M.; Riener, Romina M.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Linington, Roger G.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection. PMID:26992172

  7. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Laura M; Cheng, Andrew T; Warner, Christopher J A; Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J; Bray, Walter M; Riener, Romina M; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Linington, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection. PMID:26992172

  8. Psychopathology of social isolation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Sang-Bin

    2014-06-01

    The most important defining factor of being human is the use of symbolic language. Language or communication problem occurs during the growth, the child will have a higher risk of social isolation and then the survival will be threatened constantly. Today, adolescents and youths are familiar with computer and smart-phone devices, and communication with others by these devices is easy than face-to-face communication. As adolescents and youths live in the comfortable and familiar cyber-world rather than actively participating real society, so they make social isolation. Extreme form of this isolation in adolescents and youths is so-called Socially Withdrawn Youth. In this study, the psychopathological factors inducing social isolation were discussed. Development stages of social isolation in relation with types of social isolation, Ego-syntonic isolation and Ego-dystonic isolation, were also considered.

  9. Analog signal isolation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.

    1992-12-31

    This paper discusses several techniques for isolating analog signals in an accelerator environment. The techniques presented here encompass isolation amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters (VIFCs), transformers, optocouplers, discrete fiber optics, and commercial fiber optic links. Included within the presentation of each method are the design issues that must be considered when selecting the isolation method for a specific application.

  10. Analog signal isolation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses several techniques for isolating analog signals in an accelerator environment. The techniques presented here encompass isolation amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters (VIFCs), transformers, optocouplers, discrete fiber optics, and commercial fiber optic links. Included within the presentation of each method are the design issues that must be considered when selecting the isolation method for a specific application.

  11. Isolation and characterization of hexavalent chromium-reducing rhizospheric bacteria from a wetland.

    PubMed

    Mauricio Gutiérrez, Amparo; Peña Cabriales, Juan José; Maldonado Vega, María

    2010-01-01

    Scirpus americanus Pers. occurs naturally in "San Germán," a pond that serves as a receptor of industrial wastewater in Guanajuato, México. This plant accumulates metals mainly in the root: concentrations (mg/kg) of Cr, As, Cd and Se were 970, 49, 41, and 85 respectively. Analysis of rhizosphere samples indicated bacterial population of 10(8) cfu g(-1) in media with 0.2 mM Cr(VI) and 10 mM sodium gluconate. Thirteen isolates were obtained and phylogenetic analyses (16S rRNA) indicated they corresponded to genera of Agrobacterium, Arthrobacter, Microbacterium, Curtobacterium, Rhodococcus, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas. Cr(VI) reduction was evaluated using the diphenyl carbazide method. The isolates accomplished 5-40% (20 microM) of reduction in assays of resting cell and tolerated 0.5-5.0 mM Cr(VI). Eight strains used nitrate and thirteen used iron and chromium as electron acceptors to grow under anaerobic conditions. Cr(VI) reduction by five strains occurred at pH values (7-9) and NaCl concentrations (0.5-1.0 M) in basal medium. A mixed culture of strains (S17 and S28) reached a chromium removal of 100% at 0.2 mM Cr(VI) initial concentration. Aerobically, this consortium was capable of 93.8% Cr(VI) reduction of 81 microg L(-1) Cr(VI) of the industrial effluent, indicating their possible use in environmental cleanup. PMID:20734910

  12. Magnetic nanoparticle-mediated isolation of functional bacteria in a complex microbial community.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayi; Berry, James P; Zhu, Di; Wang, Yun; Chen, Yin; Jiang, Bo; Huang, Shi; Langford, Harry; Li, Guanghe; Davison, Paul A; Xu, Jian; Aries, Eric; Huang, Wei E

    2015-03-01

    Although uncultured microorganisms have important roles in ecosystems, their ecophysiology in situ remains elusive owing to the difficulty of obtaining live cells from their natural habitats. In this study, we employed a novel magnetic nanoparticle-mediated isolation (MMI) method to recover metabolically active cells of a group of previously uncultured phenol degraders, Burkholderiales spp., from coking plant wastewater biosludge; five other culturable phenol degraders-Rhodococcus sp., Chryseobacterium sp. and three different Pseudomonas spp.-were also isolated from the same biosludge using traditional methods. The kinetics of phenol degradation by MMI-recovered cells (MRCs) was similar to that of the original sludge. Stable isotope probing (SIP) and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA from the 'heavy' DNA ((13)C-DNA) fractions indicated that Burkholderiales spp. were the key phenol degraders in situ in the biosludge, consistent with the results of MRCs. Single-cell Raman micro-spectroscopy was applied to probe individual bacteria in the MRCs obtained from the SIP experiment and showed that 79% of them were fully (13)C-labelled. Biolog assays on the MRCs revealed the impact of various carbon and nitrogen substrates on the efficiency of phenol degradation in the wastewater treatment plant biosludge. Specifically, hydroxylamine, a metabolite of ammonia oxidisation, but not nitrite, nitrate or ammonia, inhibited phenol degradation in the biosludge. Our results provided a novel insight into the occasional abrupt failure events that occur in the wastewater treatment plant. This study demonstrated that MMI is a powerful tool to recover live and functional cells in situ from a complex microbial community to enable further characterisation of their physiology.

  13. Magnetic nanoparticle-mediated isolation of functional bacteria in a complex microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dayi; Berry, James P; Zhu, Di; Wang, Yun; Chen, Yin; Jiang, Bo; Huang, Shi; Langford, Harry; Li, Guanghe; Davison, Paul A; Xu, Jian; Aries, Eric; Huang, Wei E

    2015-01-01

    Although uncultured microorganisms have important roles in ecosystems, their ecophysiology in situ remains elusive owing to the difficulty of obtaining live cells from their natural habitats. In this study, we employed a novel magnetic nanoparticle-mediated isolation (MMI) method to recover metabolically active cells of a group of previously uncultured phenol degraders, Burkholderiales spp., from coking plant wastewater biosludge; five other culturable phenol degraders—Rhodococcus sp., Chryseobacterium sp. and three different Pseudomonas spp.—were also isolated from the same biosludge using traditional methods. The kinetics of phenol degradation by MMI-recovered cells (MRCs) was similar to that of the original sludge. Stable isotope probing (SIP) and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA from the ‘heavy' DNA (13C-DNA) fractions indicated that Burkholderiales spp. were the key phenol degraders in situ in the biosludge, consistent with the results of MRCs. Single-cell Raman micro-spectroscopy was applied to probe individual bacteria in the MRCs obtained from the SIP experiment and showed that 79% of them were fully 13C-labelled. Biolog assays on the MRCs revealed the impact of various carbon and nitrogen substrates on the efficiency of phenol degradation in the wastewater treatment plant biosludge. Specifically, hydroxylamine, a metabolite of ammonia oxidisation, but not nitrite, nitrate or ammonia, inhibited phenol degradation in the biosludge. Our results provided a novel insight into the occasional abrupt failure events that occur in the wastewater treatment plant. This study demonstrated that MMI is a powerful tool to recover live and functional cells in situ from a complex microbial community to enable further characterisation of their physiology. PMID:25191996

  14. Enrichment of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic acids by oil-degrading bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of plants growing in oil-contaminated soil from Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Mikolasch, Annett; Omirbekova, Anel; Schumann, Peter; Reinhard, Anne; Sheikhany, Halah; Berzhanova, Ramza; Mukasheva, Togzhan; Schauer, Frieder

    2015-05-01

    Three microbial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), grass mixture (Festuca rubra, 75 %; Lolium perenne, 20 %; Poa pratensis, 10 %), and rape (Brassica napus) on the basis of their high capacity to use crude oil as the sole carbon and energy source. These isolates used an unusually wide spectrum of hydrocarbons as substrates (more than 80), including n-alkanes with chain lengths ranging from C12 to C32, monomethyl- and monoethyl-substituted alkanes (C12-C23), n-alkylcyclo alkanes with alkyl chain lengths from 4 to 18 carbon atoms, as well as substituted monoaromatic and diaromatic hydrocarbons. These three strains were identified as Gordonia rubripertincta and Rhodococcus sp. SBUG 1968. During their transformation of this wide range of hydrocarbon substrates, a very large number of aliphatic, alicyclic, and aromatic acids was detected, 44 of them were identified by GC/MS analyses, and 4 of them are described as metabolites for the first time. Inoculation of plant seeds with these highly potent bacteria had a beneficial effect on shoot and root development of plants which were grown on oil-contaminated sand. PMID:25592733

  15. Enrichment of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic acids by oil-degrading bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of plants growing in oil-contaminated soil from Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Mikolasch, Annett; Omirbekova, Anel; Schumann, Peter; Reinhard, Anne; Sheikhany, Halah; Berzhanova, Ramza; Mukasheva, Togzhan; Schauer, Frieder

    2015-05-01

    Three microbial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), grass mixture (Festuca rubra, 75 %; Lolium perenne, 20 %; Poa pratensis, 10 %), and rape (Brassica napus) on the basis of their high capacity to use crude oil as the sole carbon and energy source. These isolates used an unusually wide spectrum of hydrocarbons as substrates (more than 80), including n-alkanes with chain lengths ranging from C12 to C32, monomethyl- and monoethyl-substituted alkanes (C12-C23), n-alkylcyclo alkanes with alkyl chain lengths from 4 to 18 carbon atoms, as well as substituted monoaromatic and diaromatic hydrocarbons. These three strains were identified as Gordonia rubripertincta and Rhodococcus sp. SBUG 1968. During their transformation of this wide range of hydrocarbon substrates, a very large number of aliphatic, alicyclic, and aromatic acids was detected, 44 of them were identified by GC/MS analyses, and 4 of them are described as metabolites for the first time. Inoculation of plant seeds with these highly potent bacteria had a beneficial effect on shoot and root development of plants which were grown on oil-contaminated sand.

  16. Mutation and premating isolation.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  17. Module isolation devices

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Cooke, John Albert; Buzinski, Michael David

    2010-04-27

    A gas flow isolation device includes a gas flow isolation valve movable from an opened condition to a closed condition. The module isolation valve in one embodiment includes a rupture disk in flow communication with a flow of gas when the module isolation valve is in an opened condition. The rupture disk ruptures when a predetermined pressure differential occurs across it causing the isolation valve to close. In one embodiment the valve is mechanically linked to the rupture disk to maintain the valve in an opened condition when the rupture disk is intact, and which permits the valve to move into a closed condition when the rupture disk ruptures. In another embodiment a crushable member maintains the valve in an open condition, and the flow of gas passed the valve upon rupturing of the rupture disk compresses the crushable member to close the isolation valve.

  18. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  19. Characterization of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria isolated from polluted soils and containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Belimov, A A; Safronova, V I; Sergeyeva, T A; Egorova, T N; Matveyeva, V A; Tsyganov, V E; Borisov, A Y; Tikhonovich, I A; Kluge, C; Preisfeld, A; Dietz, K J; Stepanok, V V

    2001-07-01

    Fifteen bacterial strains containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase were isolated from the rhizoplane of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) grown in different soils and a long-standing sewage sludge contaminated with heavy metals. The isolated strains were characterized and assigned to various genera and species, such as Pseudomonas brassicacearum, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas sp., Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Alcaligenes sp., Variovorax paradoxus, Bacillus pumilus, and Rhodococcus sp. by determination of 16S rRNA gene sequences. The root elongation of Indian mustard and rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera L.) germinating seedlings was stimulated by inoculation with 8 and 13 isolated strains, respectively. The bacteria were tolerant to cadmium toxicity and stimulated root elongation of rape seedlings in the presence of 300 microM CdCl2 in the nutrient solution. The effect of ACC-utilising bacteria on root elongation correlated with the impact of aminoethoxyvinylglycine and silver ions, chemical inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis. A significant improvement in the growth of rape caused by inoculation with certain selected strains was also observed in pot experiments, when the plants were cultivated in cadmium-supplemented soil. The biomass of pea cv. Sparkle and its ethylene sensitive mutant E2 (sym5), in particular, was increased through inoculation with certain strains of ACC-utilising bacteria in pot experiments in quartz sand culture. The beneficial effect of the bacteria on plant growth varied significantly depending on individual bacterial strains, plant genotype, and growth conditions. The results suggest that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase are present in various soils and offer promise as a bacterial inoculum for improvement of plant growth, particularly under unfavourable environmental conditions.

  20. Characterization of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria isolated from polluted soils and containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Belimov, A A; Safronova, V I; Sergeyeva, T A; Egorova, T N; Matveyeva, V A; Tsyganov, V E; Borisov, A Y; Tikhonovich, I A; Kluge, C; Preisfeld, A; Dietz, K J; Stepanok, V V

    2001-07-01

    Fifteen bacterial strains containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase were isolated from the rhizoplane of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) grown in different soils and a long-standing sewage sludge contaminated with heavy metals. The isolated strains were characterized and assigned to various genera and species, such as Pseudomonas brassicacearum, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas sp., Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Alcaligenes sp., Variovorax paradoxus, Bacillus pumilus, and Rhodococcus sp. by determination of 16S rRNA gene sequences. The root elongation of Indian mustard and rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera L.) germinating seedlings was stimulated by inoculation with 8 and 13 isolated strains, respectively. The bacteria were tolerant to cadmium toxicity and stimulated root elongation of rape seedlings in the presence of 300 microM CdCl2 in the nutrient solution. The effect of ACC-utilising bacteria on root elongation correlated with the impact of aminoethoxyvinylglycine and silver ions, chemical inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis. A significant improvement in the growth of rape caused by inoculation with certain selected strains was also observed in pot experiments, when the plants were cultivated in cadmium-supplemented soil. The biomass of pea cv. Sparkle and its ethylene sensitive mutant E2 (sym5), in particular, was increased through inoculation with certain strains of ACC-utilising bacteria in pot experiments in quartz sand culture. The beneficial effect of the bacteria on plant growth varied significantly depending on individual bacterial strains, plant genotype, and growth conditions. The results suggest that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase are present in various soils and offer promise as a bacterial inoculum for improvement of plant growth, particularly under unfavourable environmental conditions. PMID:11547884

  1. Physical and Metabolic Interactions of Pseudomonas sp. Strain JA5-B45 and Rhodococcus sp. Strain F9-D79 during Growth on Crude Oil and Effect of a Chemical Surfactant on Them

    PubMed Central

    Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Ward, Owen P.

    2001-01-01

    Methods to enhance crude oil biodegradation by mixed bacterial cultures, for example, (bio)surfactant addition, are complicated by the diversity of microbial populations within a given culture. The physical and metabolic interactions between Rhodococcus sp. strain F9-D79 and Pseudomonas sp. strain JA5-B45 were examined during growth on Bow River crude oil. The effects of a nonionic chemical surfactant, Igepal CO-630 (nonylphenol ethoxylate), also were evaluated. Strain F9-D79 grew attached to the oil-water interface and produced a mycolic acid-containing capsule. Crude oil emulsification and surface activity were associated with the cellular fraction. Strain JA5-B45 grew in the aqueous phase and was unable to emulsify oil, but cell-free supernatants mediated kerosene-water emulsion formation. In coculture, stable emulsions were formed and strain JA5-B45 had an affinity for the capsule produced by strain F9-D79. Igepal CO-630 inhibited F9-D79 cells from adhering to the interface, and cells grew dispersed in the aqueous phase as 0.5-μm cocci rather than 2.5-μm rods. The surfactant increased total petroleum hydrocarbon removal by strain JA5-B45 from 4 to 22% and included both saturated compounds and aromatics. In coculture, TPH removal increased from 13 to 40% following surfactant addition. The culture pH normally increased from 7.0 to between 7.5 and 8.5, although addition of Igepal CO-630 to F9-D79 cultures resulted in a drop to pH 5.5. We suggest a dual role for the nonylphenol ethoxylate surfactant in the coculture: (i) to improve hydrocarbon uptake by strain JA5-B45 through emulsification and (ii) to prevent strain F9-D79 from adhering to the oil-water interface, indirectly increasing hydrocarbon availability. These varied effects on hydrocarbon biodegradation could explain some of the known diversity of surfactant effects. PMID:11571196

  2. Positive isolation disconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosener, A. A.; Jonkoniec, T. G.

    1975-01-01

    A positive isolation disconnect was developed for component replacement in serviced liquid and gaseous spacecraft systems. Initially a survey of feasible concepts was made to determine the optimum method for fluid isolation, sealing techniques, coupling concepts, and foolproofing techniques. The top concepts were then further evaluated, including the fabrication of a semifunctional model. After all tradeoff analyses were made, a final configuration was designed and fabricated for development testing. This resulted in a 6.35 mm (1/4 inch) line and 12.7 mm (1/2 inch) line positive isolation disconnect, each unit consisting of two coupled disconnect halves, each capable of fluid isolation with essentially zero clearance between them for zero leakage upon disconnect half disengagement. An interlocking foolproofing technique was incorporated that prevents uncoupling of disconnect halves prior to fluid isolation.

  3. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein.

    PubMed

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98-99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample.

  4. Extremely Isolated Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Christopher R.; Marcum, P.; Fanelli, M.; Aars, C.

    2006-06-01

    Isolated galaxies provide a means of assessing the evolution of galactic systems. Extremely isolated galaxies define a zero-interaction baseline for comparative studies of galaxy evolution. We present results of a search for isolated elliptical galaxies (IEGs). We utilize the optical imaging data produced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to identify candidate galaxies from Release 1-4 of the SDSS. Candidate IEGs meet strict isolation criteria: Any IEG must be separated by at least 2.5 Mpc from any neighboring non-dwarf galaxy having a MV fainter than -16.5 mag. The candidate isolated systems have no non-dwarf neighbors within a distance such that we can insure that the IEGs have never interacted with another existing galaxy since formation.In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, we have used the SDSS images in the u,g,r filters to create combined sets of images for each IEG. The stacked images permit a more robust determination of the morphology of the candidate galaxies. Verification that these are spheroidal systems is achieved through a bulge/disk decomposition technique using standard surface photometry. Our preliminary sample of 51 isolated systems defines a complete volume-limited population of extremely isolated early-type galaxies within a distance of 72Mpc

  5. Isolated perianal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Akgun, E; Tekin, F; Ersin, S; Osmanoglu, H

    2005-03-01

    Perianal tuberculosis, without the presence of any previous or active pulmonary infection, is extremely rare. A case of isolated perianal tuberculosis without gastrointestinal or pulmonary spread will be discussed here with an evaluation of the clinical features. PMID:15813425

  6. Base isolation: Fresh insight

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, V.

    1993-07-15

    The objective of the research is a further development of the engineering concept of seismic isolation. Neglecting the transient stage of seismic loading results in a widespread misjudgement: The force of resistance associated with velocity is mostly conceived as a source of damping vibrations, though it is an active force at the same time, during an earthquake type excitation. For very pliant systems such as base isolated structures with relatively low bearing stiffness and with artificially added heavy damping mechanism, the so called `damping`` force may occur even the main pushing force at an earthquake. Thus, one of the two basic pillars of the common seismic isolation philosophy, namely, the doctrine of usefulness and necessity of a strong damping mechanism, is turning out to be a self-deception, sometimes even jeopardizing the safety of structures and discrediting the very idea of seismic isolation. There is a way out: breaking with damping dependancy.

  7. Isolation and growth kinetics of a novel phenol-degrading bacterium Microbacterium oxydans from the sediment of Taihu Lake (China).

    PubMed

    Wang, Linqiong; Li, Yi; Niu, Lihua; Dai, Yu; Wu, Yue; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Seven phylogenetically diverse phenol-degrading bacterial strains designated as P1 to P7 were isolated from the industry-effluent dump sites of an industrial area near Taihu Lake, China. Through the 16S rDNA sequence analysis, these strains were widely distributed among five different genera: Rhodococcus (P1), Pseudomonas (P2-P4), Acinetobacter (P5), Alcaligenes (P6), and Microbacterium (P7). All seven isolates were capable of growing with phenol as the sole carbon source. Strain P7 was found to be a novel phenol-degrading strain by detailed morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristic analysis as well as the 16S rDNA sequence analyses, and was named Microbacterium oxydans LY1 (M. oxydans LY1 in its short form). Degradation experiments of phenol at various initial concentrations (20-1,000 mg/L) revealed that phenol is an inhibitory substrate to M. oxydans LY1. In a batch culture experiment, more than 95% of the phenol (500 mg/L) was degraded by M. oxydans LY1 at 30°C, pH 7.0 and 120 rpm within 88 h. Phenol concentration higher than 200 mg/L was found to inhibit the bacterial growth. The growth kinetics correlated well with the Haldane model with μmax (maximum specific cell growth rate) = 0.243 h(-1), Ks (saturation constant) = 25.7 mg/L, and Ki (self-inhibition constant) = 156.3 mg/L. This is the first report of the ability of M. oxydans to degrade phenol, and the results could provide important information for bioremediation of phenol-contaminated environments.

  8. Isolation and growth kinetics of a novel phenol-degrading bacterium Microbacterium oxydans from the sediment of Taihu Lake (China).

    PubMed

    Wang, Linqiong; Li, Yi; Niu, Lihua; Dai, Yu; Wu, Yue; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Seven phylogenetically diverse phenol-degrading bacterial strains designated as P1 to P7 were isolated from the industry-effluent dump sites of an industrial area near Taihu Lake, China. Through the 16S rDNA sequence analysis, these strains were widely distributed among five different genera: Rhodococcus (P1), Pseudomonas (P2-P4), Acinetobacter (P5), Alcaligenes (P6), and Microbacterium (P7). All seven isolates were capable of growing with phenol as the sole carbon source. Strain P7 was found to be a novel phenol-degrading strain by detailed morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristic analysis as well as the 16S rDNA sequence analyses, and was named Microbacterium oxydans LY1 (M. oxydans LY1 in its short form). Degradation experiments of phenol at various initial concentrations (20-1,000 mg/L) revealed that phenol is an inhibitory substrate to M. oxydans LY1. In a batch culture experiment, more than 95% of the phenol (500 mg/L) was degraded by M. oxydans LY1 at 30°C, pH 7.0 and 120 rpm within 88 h. Phenol concentration higher than 200 mg/L was found to inhibit the bacterial growth. The growth kinetics correlated well with the Haldane model with μmax (maximum specific cell growth rate) = 0.243 h(-1), Ks (saturation constant) = 25.7 mg/L, and Ki (self-inhibition constant) = 156.3 mg/L. This is the first report of the ability of M. oxydans to degrade phenol, and the results could provide important information for bioremediation of phenol-contaminated environments. PMID:27120643

  9. Low-loss, high-isolation, fiber-optic isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, George F. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A low-loss, high-isolation, fiber-optic isolator for use in single-mode fiber systems utilizes a Faraday rotator and two polarizers, one at each end angularly oriented from each other at the angle of rotation for isolation, and two aspheric lens connectors to couple optical fibers to the Faraday isolator to reduce forward loss to about 2.5 dB and improve isolation to greater than 70 dB.

  10. Nucleic acid isolation process

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lewis, Annette K.; Hildebrand, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for isolating DNA from eukaryotic cell and flow sorted chromosomes. When DNA is removed from chromosome and cell structure, detergent and proteolytic digestion products remain with the DNA. These products can be removed with organic extraction, but the process steps associated with organic extraction reduce the size of DNA fragments available for experimental use. The present process removes the waste products by dialyzing a solution containing the DNA against a solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). The waste products dialyze into the PEG leaving isolated DNA. The remaining DNA has been prepared with fragments containing more than 160 kb. The isolated DNA has been used in conventional protocols without affect on the protocol.

  11. Nucleic acid isolation

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, J.L.; Lewis, A.K.; Hildebrand, C.E.

    1988-01-21

    A method is provided for isolating DNA from eukaryotic cell and flow sorted chromosomes. When DNA is removed from chromosome and cell structure, detergent and proteolytic digestion products remain with the DNA. These products can be removed with organic extraction, but the process steps associated with organic extraction reduces the size of DNA fragments available for experimental use. The present process removes the waste products by dialyzing a solution containing the DNA against a solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). The waste products dialyze into the PEG leaving isolated DNA. The remaining DNA has been prepared with fragments containing more than 160 kb. The isolated DNA has been used in conventional protocols without effect on the protocol.

  12. Clinical Islet Isolation.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Wayne J; Williams, Lindy; Chew, Yi Vee

    2016-01-01

    The overarching success of islet transplantation relies on the success in the laboratory to isolate the islets. This chapter focuses on the processes of human islet cell isolation and the ways to optimally provide islet cells for transplantation. The major improvements in regards to the choice of enzyme type, way the digested pancreas tissue is handled to best separate islets from the acinar and surrounding tissues, the various methods of purification of the islets, their subsequent culture and quality assurance to improve outcomes to culminate in safe and effective islet transplantation will be discussed. After decades of improvements, islet cell isolation and transplantation now clearly offer a safe, effective and feasible therapeutic treatment option for an increasing number of patients suffering from type 1 diabetes specifically for those with severe hypoglycaemic unawareness. PMID:27586424

  13. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. [Rhodococcus

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.; Fry, I.; Wyza, R.E.; Palmer, D.T.; Zupancic, T.J.; Conkle, H.N.

    1990-03-15

    The objective of this project is to produce one or more microorganisms capable of removing the organic and inorganic sulfur in coal. The original specific technical objectives of the project were to: Clone and characterize the genes encoding the enzymes of the 4S'' pathway (sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate) for release of organic sulfur from coal; Return multiple copies of genes to the original host to enhance the biodesulfurization activity of that organism; Transfer this pathway into a fast-growing chemolithotrophic bacterium; Conduct a batch-mode optimization/analysis of scale-up variables.

  14. Biotransformations catalyzed by the genus rhodococcus

    SciTech Connect

    Warhurst, A.M.; Fewson, C.A. . Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococci display a diverse range of metabolic capabilities and they are a ubiquitous feature of many environments. They are able to degrade short-chain, long-chain, and halogenated hydrocarbons, and numerous aromatic compounds, including halogenated and other substituted aromatics, heteroaromatics, hydroaromatics, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. They possess a wide variety of pathways for degrading and modifying aromatic compounds, including dioxygenase and monooxygenase ring attack, and cleavage of catechol by both ortho- and meta-routes, and some strains posses a modified 3-oxoadipate pathway. Biotransformations catalyzed by rhodococci include steroid modification, enantioselective synthesis, and the transformation of nitriles to amides and acids. Tolerance of rhodococci to starvation, their frequent lack of catabolite repression, and their environmental persistence make them excellent candidates for bioremediation treatments. Some strains can produce poly(3-hydroxyalkanoate)s, others can accumulate cesium, and still others are the source of useful enzymes such as phenylalanine dehydrogenase and endoglycosidases. Other actual or potential applications of rhodococci include desulfurization of coal, bioleaching, use of their surfactants in enhancement of oil recovery and as industrial dispersants, and the construction of biosensors.

  15. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Tabbara, Khalid F.; Tabbarah, Zuhair

    2015-01-01

    We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation. PMID:26483675

  16. Positive isolation disconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V.

    1980-01-01

    Positive-isolation-disconnect (PID) device with two mating halves prevents leakage or spillover when two fluid lines are disconnected. Each half has shutoff poppet to stop fluid flow. When flow is shut, poppets are flush against each other, leaving no space for fluid to remain it.

  17. Biological Isolation Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A spinoff of astronaut's biological garment will allow hospital patients who are highly vulnerable to infection to leave their sterile habitats for several hours, carrying their germ free environment with them. Garments can be used in any of some 200 hospitals where isolation rooms are installed to treat leukemia.

  18. Biological isolation garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spross, F. R.

    1968-01-01

    Biological Isolation Garment /BIG/ is a one-piece loose fitting garment fabricated from a tightly woven, permeable, 100 percent-cotton fabric. Its headpiece, incorporates an integral oronsal respirator with 0.3-micron-particle filters, and a full width visor. All fabrication seams are sealed on the inside of the garment.

  19. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  20. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  1. Pump isolation valve

    DOEpatents

    Kinney, Calvin L.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-08-02

    The pump isolation valve provides a means by which the pump may be selectively isolated from the remainder of the coolant system while being compatible with the internal hydraulic arrangement of the pump during normal operation of the pump. The valve comprises a valve cylinder disposed around the pump and adjacent to the last pump diffuser with a turning vane attached to the lower end of the valve cylinder in a manner so as to hydraulically match with the discharge diffuser. The valve cylinder is connected to a drive means for sliding the valve cylinder relative to the diffuser support cylinder so as to block flow in either direction through the discharge diffuser when the valve is in the closed position and to aid in the flow of the coolant from the discharge diffuser by means of the turning vane when the valve is in the open position.

  2. Ultrasonic thermometer isolation standoffs

    DOEpatents

    Arave, Alvin E.

    1977-01-01

    A method is provided for minimizing sticking of the transmission line to the protective sheath and preventing noise echoes from interfering with signal echoes in an improved high temperature ultrasonic thermometer which includes an ultrasonic transmission line surrounded by a protective sheath. Small isolation standoffs are mounted on the transmission line to minimize points of contact between the transmission line and the protective sheath, the isolation standoffs serving as discontinuities mounted on the transmission line at locations where a signal echo is desired or where an echo can be tolerated. Consequently any noise echo generated by the sticking of the standoff to the protective sheath only adds to the amplitude of the echo generated at the standoff and does not interfere with the other signal echoes.

  3. Bacillus odysseyi isolate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri (Inventor); La Duc, Myron Thomas (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to discovery and isolation of a biologically pure culture of a Bacillus odysseyi isolate with high adherence and sterilization resistant properties. B. odysseyi is a round spore forming Bacillus species that produces an exosporium. This novel species has been characterized on the basis of phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. According to the results of these analyses, this strain belongs to the genus Bacillus and the type strain is 34hs-1.sup.T (=ATCC PTA-4993.sup.T=NRRL B-30641.sup.T=NBRC 100172.sup.T). The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence of strain 34hs-1.sup.T is AF526913.

  4. Isolated lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    Isolated lung perfusion (ILP) has been historically used as a method to study basic lung physiologic concepts using animal models. More recently, ILP has been applied in lung transplantation and thoracic oncology. In lung transplantation, ILP has been used to assess physiological integrity of donor lungs after the organ is removed from the donor. This procedure is called Ex vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP), and it has also been proposed as a method for active treatment and repair of injured unsuitable donor organs ex vivo. In oncology, ILP is an attractive method to deliver high dose chemotherapy to treat pulmonary metastatic disease. Since the lung vasculature is isolated in vivo, this technique is called in vivo lung perfusion (IVLP). This review will focus on the rationale, technical aspects, experimental and clinical experience of EVLP and IVLP. A perspective on the future use of these techniques is described. PMID:22202033

  5. Isolated glucocorticoid insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Werder, E A; Haller, R; Vetter, W; Zachmann, M; Siebenmann, R

    1975-07-01

    Two cases of isolated glucocorticoid insufficiency or congenital adrenocortical unresponsiveness to ACTH-a variant of adrenocortical failure without mineralocorticoid insufficiency-are presented. Familial incidence was present only in case 1 since two of the siblings died after convulsions, possible related to hypoglycemia. The pathology specimens of one sibling were available for review showing complete lack of the fascicular zone and degenerative changes in the adrenals and evidence of increased ACTH secretion in the pituitary. In the patients who were given substitution therapy with hydrocortisone, studies of plasma renin and aldosterone revealed impairment of plasma aldosterone response to salt restriction, orthostatism and furosemide-induced diuresis combined with postural change. We conclude that in some cases of isolated glucocorticoid insufficiency, impairment of mineralocorticoid function may gradually develop, which is in contrast to the assumption of a congenital defect in the action of ACTH.

  6. High voltage isolation transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Ruitberg, A. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage isolation transformer is provided with primary and secondary coils separated by discrete electrostatic shields from the surfaces of insulating spools on which the coils are wound. The electrostatic shields are formed by coatings of a compound with a low electrical conductivity which completely encase the coils and adhere to the surfaces of the insulating spools adjacent to the coils. Coatings of the compound also line axial bores of the spools, thereby forming electrostatic shields separating the spools from legs of a ferromagnetic core extending through the bores. The transformer is able to isolate a high constant potential applied to one of its coils, without the occurrence of sparking or corona, by coupling the coatings, lining the axial bores to the ferromagnetic core and by coupling one terminal of each coil to the respective coating encasing the coil.

  7. Isolation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, K; Swiggard, W J; Steinman, R M; Romani, N; Schuler, G

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents two methods for preparing dendritic cells (DCs), a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell (APC). The first method involves the isolation of DCs from mouse spleen, resulting in a cell population that is highly enriched in accessory cell and APC function. A support protocol for collagenase digestion of splenocyte suspensions is described to increase the yield of dendritic cells. The second method involves generating large numbers of DCs from mouse bone marrow progenitor cells. In that technique, bone marrow cells are cultured in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to yield 5-10 10(6) cells, 60% of which express DC surface markers (e.g., B-7-2/CD86). Additional techniques for isolating DCs from mouse spleens or other mouse tissues, as well as from human tissues, are also discussed.

  8. Isolation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kayo; Swiggard, William J; Steinman, Ralph M; Romani, Nikolaus; Schuler, Gerold; Brinster, Carine

    2009-08-01

    This unit presents two methods for preparing dendritic cells (DCs), a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell (APC). The first method involves the isolation of DCs from mouse spleen, resulting in a cell population that is highly enriched in accessory cell and APC function. A support protocol for collagenase digestion of splenocyte suspensions is described to increase the yield of dendritic cells. The second method involves generating large numbers of DCs from mouse bone marrow progenitor cells. In that technique, bone marrow cells are cultured in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to yield 5-10 x 10(6) cells, 60% of which express DC surface markers (e.g., B-7-2/CD86). Additional techniques for isolating DCs from mouse spleens or other mouse tissues, as well as from human tissues, are also discussed.

  9. Cycle isolation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C.

    2009-07-15

    There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

  10. Genetics of population isolates.

    PubMed

    Arcos-Burgos, M; Muenke, M

    2002-04-01

    Genetic isolates, as shown empirically by the Finnish, Old Order Amish, Hutterites, Sardinian and Jewish communities among others, represent a most important and powerful tool in genetically mapping inherited disorders. The main features associated with that genetic power are the existence of multigenerational pedigrees which are mostly descended from a small number of founders a short number of generations ago, environmental and phenotypic homogeneity, restricted geographical distribution, the presence of exhaustive and detailed records correlating individuals in very well ascertained pedigrees, and inbreeding as a norm. On the other hand, the presence of a multifounder effect or admixture among divergent populations in the founder time (e.g. the Finnish and the Paisa community from Colombia) will theoretically result in increased linkage disequilibrium among adjacent loci. The present review evaluates the historical context and features of some genetic isolates with emphasis on the basic population genetic concepts of inbreeding and genetic drift, and also the state-of-the-art in mapping traits, both Mendelian and complex, on genetic isolates. PMID:12030885

  11. Isolated persistent hypermethioninemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, S H; Levy, H L; Tangerman, A; Boujet, C; Buist, N; Davidson-Mundt, A; Hudgins, L; Oyanagi, K; Nagao, M; Wilson, W G

    1995-01-01

    New information has been obtained on 30 patients with isolated persistent hypermethioninemia, most of them previously unreported. Biopsies to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of partially deficient activity of ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT; E.C.2.5.1.6) in liver were not performed on most of these patients. However, none showed the clinical findings or the extreme elevations of serum folate previously described in other patients with isolated hypermethioninemia considered not to have hepatic MAT deficiency. Patients ascertained on biochemical grounds had no neurological abnormalities, and 27/30 had IQs or Bayley development-index scores within normal limits or were judged to have normal mental development. Methionine transamination metabolites accumulated abnormally only when plasma methionine concentrations exceeded 300-350 microM and did so more markedly after 0.9 years of age. Data were obtained on urinary organic acids as well as plasma creatinine concentrations. Patterns of inheritance of isolated hypermethioninemia were variable. Considerations as to the optimal management of this group of patients are discussed. PMID:7573050

  12. Isolation of neuromelanin granules.

    PubMed

    Tribl, Florian

    2008-12-01

    Neuromelanin granules are pigmented organelles in the human midbrain that give name to a brain area, substantia nigra pars compacta, which macroscopically appears as a dark brown region in the midbrain due to the insoluble pigment neuromelanin. The substantia nigra pars compacta massively degenerates in Parkinson's disease and gives rise to severely disabling movement symptoms. It has been suggested that neuromelanin granules play an important role in the neurodegenerative events in Parkinson's disease: redox-active iron is bound to neuromelanin and thereby retained within this compartment, but in Parkinson's disease it is thought to be increasingly released into the cytosol, promoting oxidative stress. This unit includes a methodological workflow for the isolation of neuromelanin granules from the human midbrain. This top-down approach (describes an approach that reduces the complexity of the sample stepwise from the level of tissue to cell, and from cell to organelle) encompasses the organelle isolation by sequential density gradient centrifugation and the assessment of the isolation efficacy by western blotting. PMID:19085988

  13. Analysis of bacterial community structure in sulfurous-oil-containing soils and detection of species carrying dibenzothiophene desulfurization (dsz) genes.

    PubMed

    Duarte, G F; Rosado, A S; Seldin, L; de Araujo, W; van Elsas, J D

    2001-03-01

    . PCR-DGGE applied to sequential enrichment cultures in DBT-containing sulfur-free basal salts medium prepared from the A and treated FSL soils revealed the selection of up to 10 distinct bands. Sequencing a subset of these bands provided evidence for the presence of organisms related to Pseudomonas putida, a Pseudomonas sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Rhodococcus erythropolis. Several of 52 colonies obtained from the A and FSL soils on agar plates with DBT as the sole sulfur source produced bands that matched the migration of bands selected in the enrichment cultures. Evidence for the presence of dszB in 12 strains was obtained, whereas dszA and dszC genes were found in only 7 and 6 strains, respectively. Most of the strains carrying dszA or dszC were classified as R. erythropolis related, and all revealed the capacity to desulfurize DBT. A comparison of 37 dszA sequences, obtained via PCR from the A and FSL soils, from enrichments of these soils, and from isolates, revealed the great similarity of all sequences to the canonical (R. erythropolis strain IGTS8) dszA sequence and a large degree of internal conservation. The 37 sequences recovered were grouped in three clusters. One group, consisting of 30 sequences, was minimally 98% related to the IGTS8 sequence, a second group of 2 sequences was slightly different, and a third group of 5 sequences was 95% similar. The first two groups contained sequences obtained from both soil types and enrichment cultures (including isolates), but the last consisted of sequences obtained directly from the polluted A soil.

  14. How isolated is Antarctica?

    PubMed

    Clarke, Andrew; Barnes, David K A; Hodgson, Dominic A

    2005-01-01

    The traditional view of Antarctica and the surrounding Southern Ocean as an isolated system is now being challenged by the recent discovery at the Antarctic Peninsula of adult spider crabs Hyas areneus from the North Atlantic and of larvae of subpolar marine invertebrates. These observations question whether the well described biogeographical similarities between the benthic fauna of the Antarctic Peninsula and the Magellan region of South America result from history (the two regions were once contiguous), or from a previously unrecognized low level of faunal exchange. Such exchange might be influenced by regional climate change, and also exacerbated by changes in human impact. PMID:16701330

  15. Investigation of mercury thruster isolators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Mercury ion thruster isolator lifetime tests were performed using different isolator materials and geometries. Tests were performed with and without the flow of mercury through the isolators in an oil diffusion pumped vacuum facility and cryogenically pumped bell jar. The onset of leakage current in isolators occurred in time intervals ranging from a few hours to many hundreds of hours. In all cases, surface contamination was responsible for the onset of leakage current and subsequent isolator failure. Rate of increase of leakage current and the leakage current level increased approximately exponentially with isolator temperature. Careful attention to shielding techniques and the elimination of sources of metal oxides appear to have eliminated isolator failures as a thruster life limiting mechanism.

  16. Purification, characterization, and directed evolution study of a vitamin D{sub 3} hydroxylase from Pseudonocardia autotrophica

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yoshikazu; Kabumoto, Hiroki; Nishimura, Kenji; Fujii, Tadashi; Yanai, Satoshi; Takeda, Koji; Tamura, Noriko; Arisawa, Akira; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2009-07-24

    Vitamin D{sub 3} (VD{sub 3}) is a fat-soluble prohormone that plays a crucial role in bone metabolism, immunity, and control of cell proliferation and cell differentiation in mammals. The actinomycete Pseudonocardia autotrophica is capable of bioconversion of VD{sub 3} into its physiologically active forms, namely, 25(OH)VD{sub 3} or 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}VD{sub 3}. In this study, we isolated and characterized Vdh (vitamin D{sub 3} hydroxylase), which hydroxylates VD{sub 3} from P. autotrophica NBRC 12743. The vdh gene encodes a protein containing 403 amino acids with a molecular weight of 44,368 Da. This hydroxylase was found to be homologous with the P450 belonging to CYP107 family. Vdh had the same ratio of the V{sub max} values for VD{sub 3} 25-hydroxylation and 25(OH)VD{sub 3} 1{alpha}-hydroxylation, while other enzymes showed preferential regio-specific hydroxylation on VD{sub 3}. We characterized a collection of Vdh mutants obtained by random mutagenesis and obtained a Vdh-K1 mutant by the combination of four amino acid substitutions. Vdh-K1 showed one-order higher VD{sub 3} 25-hydroxylase activity than the wild-type enzyme. Biotransformation of VD{sub 3} into 25(OH)VD{sub 3} was successfully accomplished with a Vdh-expressed recombinant strain of actinobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis. Vdh may be a useful enzyme for the production of physiologically active forms of VD{sub 3} by a single cytochrome P450.

  17. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  18. Recombinant baculovirus isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2007-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac or BaculoDirect, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Additionally, many systems require a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay. Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  19. Biodegradation of sulfamethoxazole by individual and mixed bacteria.

    PubMed

    Larcher, Simone; Yargeau, Viviane

    2011-07-01

    Antibiotic compounds, like sulfamethoxazole (SMX), have become a concern in the aquatic environment due to the potential development of antibacterial resistances. Due to excretion and disposal, SMX has been frequently detected in wastewaters and surface waters. SMX removal in conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) ranges from 0% to 90%, and there are opposing results regarding its biodegradability at lab scale. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of pure cultures of individual and mixed consortia of bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Rhodococcus equi, Rhodococcus erythropolis, Rhodococcus rhodocrous, and Rhodococcus zopfii) known to exist in WWTP activated sludge to remove SMX. Results showed that R. equi alone had the greatest ability to remove SMX leading to 29% removal (with glucose) and the formation of a metabolite. Degradation pathways and metabolite structures have been proposed based on the potential enzymes produced by R. equi. When R. equi was mixed with other microorganisms, a positive synergistic effect was not observed and the maximum SMX removal achieved was 5%. This indicates that pure culture results cannot be extrapolated to mixed culture conditions, and the methodology developed here to study the biodegradability of compounds under controlled mixed culture conditions offers an alternative to conventional studies using pure bacterial cultures or inocula from activated sludge sources consisting of unknown and variable microbial populations. PMID:21499763

  20. Isolated resonator gyroscope with isolation trimming using a secondary element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention discloses a resonator gyroscope including an isolated resonator. One or more flexures support the isolated resonator and a baseplate is affixed to the resonator by the flexures. Drive and sense elements are affixed to the baseplate and used to excite the resonator and sense movement of the gyroscope. In addition, at least one secondary element (e.g., another electrode) is affixed to the baseplate and used for trimming isolation of the resonator. The resonator operates such that it transfers substantially no net momentum to the baseplate when the resonator is excited. Typically, the isolated resonator comprises a proof mass and a counterbalancing plate.

  1. Characterization and performance of a toluene-degrading biofilm developed on pumice stones.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Alessandra; Varcamonti, Mario; Parascandola, Palma; Vignola, Rodolfo; Bernardi, Adriano; Sacceddu, Pasquale; Sisto, Raffaello; de Alteriis, Elisabetta

    2005-01-17

    BACKGROUND: Hydrocarbon-degrading biofilms in the treatment of contaminated groundwaters have received increasing attention due to the role played in the so-called "biobarriers". These are bioremediation systems in which a microbial consortium adherent to a solid support is placed across the flow of a contaminated plume, thus promoting biodegradation of the pollutant. RESULTS: A microbial consortium adherent to pumice granules (biofilm) developed from a toluene-enriched microflora in a mini-scale system, following continuous supply of a mineral medium containing toluene, over a 12-month period. Observation by scanning electron microscopy, together with quantification of the biomass attached to pumice, evidenced the presence of abundant exopolymeric material surrounding the cells in the biofilm. Toluene removal monitored during 12-month operation, reached 99%. Identification of the species, based on comparative 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis, revealed that Rhodococcus erythropolis and Pseudomonas marginalis were the predominant bacterial species in the microbial consortium. CONCLUSION: A structurally complex toluene-degrading biofilm, mainly formed by Rhodococcus erythropolis and Pseudomonas marginalis, developed on pumice granules, in a mini-scale apparatus continuously fed with toluene.

  2. Material isolation enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Martell, Calvin J.; Dahlby, Joel W.; Gallimore, Bradford F.; Comer, Bob E.; Stone, Water A.; Carlson, David O.

    1993-01-01

    An enclosure similar to a glovebox for isolating materials from the atmosphere, yet allowing a technician to manipulate the materials and also apparatus which is located inside the enclosure. A portion of a wall of the enclosure is comprised of at least one flexible curtain. An opening defined by a frame is provided for the technician to insert his hands and forearms into the enclosure. The frame is movable in one plane, so that the technician has access to substantially all of the working interior of the enclosure. As the frame is moved by the technician, while he accomplishes work inside the enclosure, the curtain moves such that the only opening through the enclosure wall is the frame. In a preferred embodiment, where a negative pressure is maintained inside the enclosure, the frame is comprised of airfoils so that turbulence is reduced, thereby enhancing material retention within the box.

  3. Material isolation enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Martell, C.J.; Dahlby, J.W.; Gallimore, B.F.; Comer, B.E.; Stone, W.A.; Carlson, D.O.

    1993-04-27

    An enclosure is described, similar to a glove box, for isolating materials from the atmosphere, yet allowing a technician to manipulate the materials and also apparatus which is located inside the enclosure. A portion of a wall of the enclosure is comprised of at least one flexible curtain. An opening defined by a frame is provided for the technician to insert his hands and forearms into the enclosure. The frame is movable in one plane, so that the technician has access to substantially all of the working interior of the enclosure. As the frame is moved by the technician, while he accomplishes work inside the enclosure, the curtain moves such that the only opening through the enclosure wall is the frame. In a preferred embodiment, where a negative pressure is maintained inside the enclosure, the frame is comprised of airfoils so that turbulence is reduced, thereby enhancing material retention within the box.

  4. Magnetically coupled signal isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Jr., William C. (Inventor); Hermann, Theodore M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A current determiner having an output at which representations of input currents are provided having an input conductor for the input current and a current sensor supported on a substrate electrically isolated from one another but with the sensor positioned in the magnetic fields arising about the input conductor due to any input currents. The sensor extends along the substrate in a direction primarily perpendicular to the extent of the input conductor and is formed of at least a pair of thin-film ferromagnetic layers separated by a non-magnetic conductive layer. The sensor can be electrically connected to electronic circuitry formed in the substrate including a nonlinearity adaptation circuit to provide representations of the input currents of increased accuracy despite nonlinearities in the current sensor, and can include further current sensors in bridge circuits.

  5. Positive isolation disconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A disconnect composed basically of two halves each consisting of a poppet valve operable to isolate fluid with essentially zero fluid loss is presented. The two halves are coupled together by a quickly releasable coupling which may be either a coupling ring tightened or loosened by a twisting motion, or a clamp operated by a pivoted to prevent disconnecting the two halves until both valves are in closed condition. The positive feature of the device is one requiring a valve closing step before a disconnect step, and takes structural form in an accentric lobe mounted on the valve operating stem. If some obstruction prevents the poppet from moving to its seat, the eccentric lobe cannot be rotated to the closed position, and the interlock prevents a disconnect.

  6. The neuroendocrinology of social isolation.

    PubMed

    Cacioppo, John T; Cacioppo, Stephanie; Capitanio, John P; Cole, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    Social isolation has been recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in humans for more than a quarter of a century. Although the focus of research has been on objective social roles and health behavior, the brain is the key organ for forming, monitoring, maintaining, repairing, and replacing salutary connections with others. Accordingly, population-based longitudinal research indicates that perceived social isolation (loneliness) is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality independent of objective social isolation and health behavior. Human and animal investigations of neuroendocrine stress mechanisms that may be involved suggest that (a) chronic social isolation increases the activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical axis, and (b) these effects are more dependent on the disruption of a social bond between a significant pair than objective isolation per se. The relational factors and neuroendocrine, neurobiological, and genetic mechanisms that may contribute to the association between perceived isolation and mortality are reviewed.

  7. Aerobic biotransformation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) by bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Robrock, Kristin R; Coelhan, Mehmet; Sedlak, David L; Alvarez-Cohent, Lisa

    2009-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that have been used in consumer products and furniture for three decades. Currently, very little is known about their fate in the environment and specifically about their susceptibility to aerobic biotransformation. Here, we investigated the ability of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrading bacteria Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 to transform mono- through hexa-BDEs at ppb levels. We also tested the PBDE transforming abilities of the related strain Rhodococcus sp. RR1 and the ether-degrading Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190. The two PCB-degrading strains transformed all of the mono- through penta-BDEs and strain LB400 transformed one of the hexa-BDEs. The extent of transformation was inversely proportional to the degree of bromination. Strains RR1 and CB1190 were only able to transform the less brominated mono- and di-BDE congeners. RHA1 released stoichiometric quantities of bromide while transforming mono- and tetra-BDE congeners. LB400 instead converted most of a mono-BDE to a hydroxylated mono-BDE. This is the first report of aerobic transformation of tetra-, penta,- and hexa-BDEs as well as the first report of stoichiometric release of bromide during PBDE transformation.

  8. Aerobic biotransformation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) by bacterial isolates

    PubMed Central

    Robrock, Kristin R.; Coelhan, Mehmet; Sedlak, David; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that have been used in consumer products and furniture for three decades. Currently, very little is known about their fate in the environment and specifically about their susceptibility to aerobic biotransformation. Here, we investigated the ability of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrading bacteria Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 to transform mono- through hexa-BDEs at ppb levels. We also tested the PBDE transforming abilities of related strain Rhodococcus sp. RR1 and the ether-degrading Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190. The two PCB-degrading strains transformed all of the mono- through penta-BDEs and strain LB400 transformed one of the hexa-BDEs. The extent of transformation was inversely proportional to the degree of bromination. Strains RR1 and CB1190 were only able to transform the less brominated mono- and di- BDE congeners. RHA1 released stoichiometric quantities of bromide while transforming mono- and tetra-BDE congeners. LB400 instead converted most of a mono-BDE to a hydroxylated mono-BDE. This is the first report of aerobic transformation of tetra-, penta- and hexa-BDEs as well as the first report of stoichiometric release of bromide during PBDE transformation. PMID:19731666

  9. Genomics of isolation in hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Gompert, Zachariah; Parchman, Thomas L.; Buerkle, C. Alex

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid zones are common in nature and can offer critical insights into the dynamics and components of reproductive isolation. Hybrids between diverged lineages are particularly informative about the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation, because introgression in an admixed population is a direct measure of isolation. In this paper, we combine simulations and a new statistical model to determine the extent to which different genetic architectures of isolation leave different signatures on genome-level patterns of introgression. We found that reproductive isolation caused by one or several loci of large effect caused greater heterogeneity in patterns of introgression than architectures involving many loci with small fitness effects, particularly when isolating factors were closely linked. The same conditions that led to heterogeneous introgression often resulted in a reasonable correspondence between outlier loci and the genetic loci that contributed to isolation. However, demographic conditions affected both of these results, highlighting potential limitations to the study of the speciation genomics. Further progress in understanding the genomics of speciation will require large-scale empirical studies of introgression in hybrid zones and model-based analyses, as well as more comprehensive modelling of the expected levels of isolation with different demographies and genetic architectures of isolation. PMID:22201173

  10. New Ventilated Isolation Cage

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Reginald O.

    1968-01-01

    A multifunction lid has been developed for a commercially available transparent animal cage which permits feeding, watering, viewing, long-term holding, and local transport of laboratory rodents on experiment while isolating the surrounding environment. The cage is airtight except for its inlet and exhaust high-efficiency particulate air filters, and it is completely steam-sterilizable. Opening of the cage's feed and water ports causes an inrush of high velocity air which prevents back-migration of aerosols and permits feeding and watering while eliminating need for chemical vapor decontamination. Ventilation system design permits the holding in adjacent cages of animals infected with different organisms without danger of cross-contamination; leaves the animal room odor-free; reduces required bedding changes to twice a month or less, and provides investigators with capability to control precisely individual cage ventilation rates. Forty-eight cages can be conveniently placed on a standard NIH “shoebox” cage rack (60 inches wide × 28 inches deep × 74 inches high) fitted with a simple manifold exhaust system. The entire system is mobile, requiring only an electrical power outlet. Principal application of the caging system is in the area of preventing exposure of animal caretakers to pathogenic substances associated with the animal host, and in reducing handling of animals and their exposure to extraneous contamination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 9 PMID:5659368

  11. Transverse Magnetic Field Propellant Isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2000-01-01

    An alternative high voltage isolator for electric propulsion and ground-based ion source applications has been designed and tested. This design employs a transverse magnetic field that increases the breakdown voltage. The design can greatly enhance the operating range of laboratory isolators used for high voltage applications.

  12. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  13. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Franklin E.

    1992-01-01

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  14. High performance rotational vibration isolator.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Andrew; Blair, David G; Ju, Li; Golden, Howard; Torres, Francis; Chen, Xu; Lockwood, Ray; Wolfgram, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We present a new rotational vibration isolator with an extremely low resonant frequency of 0.055 ± 0.002 Hz. The isolator consists of two concentric spheres separated by a layer of water and joined by very soft silicone springs. The isolator reduces rotation noise at all frequencies above its resonance which is very important for airborne mineral detection. We show that more than 40 dB of isolation is achieved in a helicopter survey for rotations at frequencies between 2 Hz and 20 Hz. Issues affecting performance such as translation to rotation coupling and temperature are discussed. The isolator contains almost no metal, making it particularly suitable for electromagnetic sensors.

  15. GOES-R Dual Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freesland, Doug; Carter, Delano; Chapel, Jim; Clapp, Brian; Howat, John; Krimchansky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) is the first of the next generation geostationary weather satellites, scheduled for delivery in late 2015. GOES-R represents a quantum increase in Earth and solar weather observation capabilities, with 4 times the resolution, 5 times the observation rate, and 3 times the number of spectral bands for Earth observations. With the improved resolution, comes the instrument suite's increased sensitive to disturbances over a broad spectrum 0-512 Hz. Sources of disturbance include reaction wheels, thruster firings for station keeping and momentum management, gimbal motion, and internal instrument disturbances. To minimize the impact of these disturbances, the baseline design includes an Earth Pointed Platform (EPP), a stiff optical bench to which the two nadir pointed instruments are collocated together with the Guidance Navigation & Control (GN&C) star trackers and Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). The EPP is passively isolated from the spacecraft bus with Honeywell D-Strut isolators providing attenuation for frequencies above approximately 5 Hz in all six degrees-of-freedom. A change in Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA) vendors occurred very late in the program. To reduce the risk of RWA disturbances impacting performance, a secondary passive isolation system manufactured by Moog CSA Engineering was incorporated under each of the six 160 Nms RWAs, tuned to provide attenuation at frequencies above approximately 50 Hz. Integrated wheel and isolator testing was performed on a Kistler table at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. High fidelity simulations were conducted to evaluate jitter performance for four topologies: 1) hard mounted no isolation, 2) EPP isolation only, 2) RWA isolation only, and 4) dual isolation. Simulation results demonstrate excellent performance relative to the pointing stability requirements, with dual isolated Line of Sight (LOS) jitter less than 1 micron rad.

  16. Isolated vastus lateralis tendon avulsion.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jonathan M; Riedel, Matthew D; McCormick, Frank M; Nho, Shane J

    2013-10-01

    Isolated avulsion of the vastus lateralis tendon is a very rare injury. To our knowledge, only 1 case has been reported in the literature. This tendon is crucial to knee stability and proper patellofemoral tracking. As isolated avulsion of the tendon tends to occur in young, active males, early surgical repair is recommended to allow them to maintain a high level of functional ability. We present the case of a 49-year-old man who sustained an isolated vastus lateralis tendon avulsion injury. The injury was successfully treated with suture anchor repair.

  17. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 isolate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to discovery and isolation of a biologically pure culture of a Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 isolate with UV sterilization resistant properties. This novel strain has been characterized on the basis of phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. According to the results of these analyses, this strain belongs to the genus Bacillus. The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence of the Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 isolate is AY167879.

  18. Helicopter gearbox isolation using periodically layered fluidic isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szefi, Joseph Thomas

    2003-07-01

    In rotorcraft transmissions, vibration generation by meshing gear pairs is a significant source of vibration and cabin noise. This high-frequency gearbox noise is primarily transmitted to the fuselage through rigid connections, which do not appreciably attenuate vibratory energy. The high-frequency vibrations typically include discrete gear-meshing frequencies in the range of 500--2000 Hz, and are often considered irritating and can reduce pilot effectiveness and passenger comfort. Periodically-layered isolators were identified as potential passive attenuators of these high frequency vibrations. Layered isolators exhibit transmissibility "stop bands," or frequency ranges in which there is very low transmissibility. An axisymmetric model was developed to accurately predict the location of these stop bands for isolators in compression. A Ritz approximation method was used to model the axisymmetric elastic behavior of layered cylindrical isolators. This model of layered isolators was validated with experiments. The physical design constraints of the proposed helicopter gearbox isolators were then estimated. Namely, constraints associated with isolator mass, axial stiffness, geometry, and elastomeric fatigue were determined. The passive performance limits of layered isolators were then determined using a design optimization methodology employing a simulated annealing algorithm. The results suggest that layered isolators cannot always meet frequency targets given a certain set of design constraints. Many passive and active design enhancements were considered to address this problem, and the use of embedded inertial amplifiers was found to exhibit a combination of advantageous effects. The first benefit was a lowering of the beginning stop band frequency, and thus a widening of the original stop band. The second was a tuned absorber effect, where the elastomer layer stiffness and the amplified tuned mass combined to act as a vibration absorber within the stop band. The

  19. Isolation of methylglyoxal from liver.

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, G; Mujumdar, R; Szent-Gyorgyi, A

    1978-01-01

    Acetaldehyde and methylglyoxal were shown to be present in liver bound to protein. They were isolated in the form of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones and osazones, respectively. The NMR spectrum of pure methylglyoxal was recorded. PMID:279916

  20. Flight representative positive isolation disconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosener, A. A.; Jonkoniec, T. G.

    1977-01-01

    Resolutions were developed for each problem encountered and a tradeoff analysis was performed to select a final configuration for a flight representative PID (Positive Isolation Disconnect) that is reduced in size and comparable in weight and pressure drop to the developmental PID. A 6.35 mm (1/4-inch) line size PID was fabricated and tested. The flight representative PID consists of two coupled disconnect halves, each capable of fluid isolation with essentially zero clearance between them for zero leakage upon disconnect half disengagement. An interlocking foolproofing technique prevents uncoupling of disconnect halves prior to fluid isolation. Future development efforts for the Space Shuttle subsystems that would benefit from the use of the positive isolation disconnect are also recommended. Customary units were utilized for principal measurements and calculations with conversion factors being inserted in equations to convert the results to the international system of units.

  1. Isolation of rat adrenocortical mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, Paola; Fujioka, Hisashi; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for isolation of adrenocortical mitochondria from the adrenal gland of rats is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purified isolated mitochondria show excellent morphological integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of oxidative phosphorylation are excellent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method increases the opportunity of direct analysis of adrenal mitochondria from small animals. -- Abstract: This report describes a relatively simple and reliable method for isolating adrenocortical mitochondria from rats in good, reasonably pure yield. These organelles, which heretofore have been unobtainable in isolated form from small laboratory animals, are now readily accessible. A high degree of mitochondrial purity is shown by the electron micrographs, as well as the structural integrity of each mitochondrion. That these organelles have retained their functional integrity is shown by their high respiratory control ratios. In general, the biochemical performance of these adrenal cortical mitochondria closely mirrors that of typical hepatic or cardiac mitochondria.

  2. Isolation Effect in Immediate and Delayed Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellezza, Francis S.; Cheney, Terry L.

    1973-01-01

    If the hypothesis of selective rehearsal is used to account for the isolation effect, then the recall of isolated items will depend both on the serial position of the isolated item and on whether recall is immediate or delayed. (Author)

  3. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions isolated growth hormone deficiency isolated growth hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a condition caused by a severe ...

  4. Pneumothorax complicating isolated clavicle fracture.

    PubMed

    Hani, Redouane; Ennaciri, Badr; Jeddi, Idriss; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Isolated clavicle fractures are among the commonest of traumatic fractures in the emergency department. Complications of isolated clavicle fractures are rare. Pneumothorax has been described as a complication of a fractured clavicle only rarely in English literature. In all the reported cases, the pneumothorax was treated by a thoracostomy and the clavicle fracture was treated conservatively. In our case, the pneumothorax required a chest drain insertion and the clavicle fracture was treated surgically with good result.

  5. Market study: Biological isolation garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The biological isolation garment was originally designed for Apollo astronauts to wear upon their return to earth from the moon to avoid the possibility of their contaminating the environment. The concept has been adapted for medical use to protect certain patients from environmental contamination and the risk of infection. The nature and size of the anticipated market are examined with certain findings and conclusions relative to clinical acceptability and potential commercial viability of the biological isolation garment.

  6. Catalogues of isolated galaxies, isolated pairs, and isolated triplets in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argudo-Fernández, M.; Verley, S.; Bergond, G.; Duarte Puertas, S.; Ramos Carmona, E.; Sabater, J.; Fernández Lorenzo, M.; Espada, D.; Sulentic, J.; Ruiz, J. E.; Leon, S.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The construction of catalogues of galaxies and the a posteriori study of galaxy properties in relation to their environment have been hampered by scarce redshift information. The new 3-dimensional (3D) surveys permit small, faint, physically bound satellites to be distinguished from a background-projected galaxy population, giving a more comprehensive 3D picture of the surroundings. Aims: We aim to provide representative samples of isolated galaxies, isolated pairs, and isolated triplets for testing galaxy evolution and secular processes in low density regions of the local Universe, as well as to characterise their local and large-scale environments. Methods: We used spectroscopic data from the tenth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR10) to automatically and homogeneously compile catalogues of 3702 isolated galaxies, 1240 isolated pairs, and 315 isolated triplets in the local Universe (z ≤ 0.080). To quantify the effects of their local and large-scale environments, we computed the projected density and the tidal strength for the brightest galaxy in each sample. Results: We find evidence of isolated pairs and isolated triplets that are physically bound at projected separations up to d ≤ 450 kpc with radial velocity difference Δν ≤ 160 km s-1, where the effect of the companion typically accounts for more than 98% of the total tidal strength affecting the central galaxy. For galaxies in the catalogues, we provide their positions, redshifts, and degrees of relation with their physical and large-scale environments. The catalogues are publicly available to the scientific community. Conclusions: For isolated galaxies, isolated pairs, and isolated triplets, there is no difference in their degree of interaction with the large-scale structure (up to 5 Mpc), which may suggest that they have a common origin in their formation and evolution. We find that most of them belong to the outer parts of filaments, walls, and clusters, and generally

  7. [Isolation of heterotrophic nitrifiers which can tolerate high concentration of ammonia-nitrogen and the optimization of their nitrogen removal efficiency in wastewater].

    PubMed

    Si, Wen-Gong; Lü, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Chao

    2011-11-01

    The removal capabilities and tolerance of high concentration of ammonia-nitrogen of heterotrophic nitrifiers were studied. Methods included multi-point sampling, domestication, gradient dilution of domestication liquid, color indicator as rapid nitrification detection and isolation from streaking plate were conducted to screen heterotrophic nitrifiers. The strains were identified according to the sequence analysis of 16S rDNA. After inoculating the strains into ammonia-nitrogen wastewater, changes of nitrogen compounds were measured in order to understand their denitrification characteristics. The denitrification efficiency was optimized by improving the C/N ratio, changing the compatibility of the strains and mixing the compatible strains with the domesticated bacterial suspension. Finally 8 high-efficiency heterotrohic nitrifiers were obtained, and named as N1-N8 respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 8 strains belonged to Comamonas genus, Rhodococcus genus, Pseudomonos genus, Arthrobacter genus and Paracoccus genus, respectively. When the initial concentration of ammonia nitrogen was 256.9 mg x L(-1) and the C/N was 5.5 of the artificial wastewater, the removal rates of ammonia nitrogen by the strains were about 65%-80%, and the stain N4 was the best. When the C/N ratio of the wastewater increased to 8.0, the ammonia nitrogen removal rates of the strains correspondingly increased to about 80% -90%. As the strains compatibility, the denitrification rate of N4 + N5 + N6 was 88.2% in the artificial wastewater with initial ammonia nitrogen concentration was 261.1 mg x L(-1) and initial C/N ratio was 5.5, which was higher than that of any single strain. The ammonia nitrogen removal rate could reach to 99.8% when N4 + N5 + N6 were combined with the domesticated bacterial suspension. In the artificial wastewater, when the initial ammonia nitrogen increased to 446.9 mg x L(-1) and the C/N ratio decreased to 3.2, the ammonia nitrogen removal rate of the mixed

  8. Molecular biological enhancement of coal desulfurization: Cloning and expression of the sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate genes in Pseudomonads and Thiobacillae. Eleventh quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, S.

    1992-08-01

    Research continues on desulfurization of coal using microorganisms. Topics reported on this quarter include: desulfurization with N1-36 (presumptively identified as Rhodochrous erythropolis), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA`s of Thiobacillus spp., and fresh isolates with the presumptive capacity to desulfurize dibenzothiophenes.

  9. Active nematocyst isolation via nudibranchs.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Ami; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Loya, Yossi

    2009-01-01

    Cnidarian venoms are potentially valuable tools for biomedical research and drug development. They are contained within nematocysts, the stinging organelles of cnidarians. Several methods exist for the isolation of nematocysts from cnidarian tissues; most are tedious and target nematocysts from specific tissues. We have discovered that the isolated active nematocyst complement (cnidome) of several sea anemone (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) species is readily accessible. These nematocysts are isolated, concentrated, and released to the aqueous environment as a by-product of aeolid nudibranch Spurilla neapolitana cultures. S. neapolitana feed on venomous sea anemones laden with stinging nematocysts. The ingested stinging organelles of several sea anemone species are effectively excreted in the nudibranch feces. We succeeded in purifying the active organelles and inducing their discharge. Thus, our current study presents the attractive possibility of using nudibranchs to produce nematocysts for the investigation of novel marine compounds. PMID:19184220

  10. Entropy of isolated horizons revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Rudranil; Kaul, Romesh K.; Majumdar, Parthasarathi

    2010-07-15

    The decade-old formulation of the isolated horizon classically and within loop quantum gravity, and the extraction of the microcanonical entropy of such a horizon from this formulation, is reviewed, in view of recent renewed interest. There are two main approaches to this problem: one employs an SU(2) Chern-Simons theory describing the isolated horizon degrees of freedom, while the other uses a reduced U(1) Chern-Simons theory obtained from the SU(2) theory, with appropriate constraints imposed on the spectrum of boundary states ''living'' on the horizon. It is shown that both these ways lead to the same infinite series asymptotic in the horizon area for the microcanonical entropy of an isolated horizon. The leading area term is followed by an unambiguous correction term logarithmic in area with a coefficient -(3/2), with subleading corrections dropping off as inverse powers of the area.

  11. Space Suit (Mobil Biological Isolation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A Houston five-year-old known as David is getting a "space suit," a vitally important gift that will give him mobility he has never known. David suffers from a rare malady called severe combined immune deficiency, which means that be was born without natural body defenses against disease; germs that would have little or no effect on most people could cause his death. As a result, he has spent his entire life in germ-free isolation rooms, one at Houston's Texas Children's hospital, another at his home. The "space suit" David is getting will allow him to spend four hours ata a time in a mobile sterile environment outside his isolation rooms. Built by NASA's Johnson Space Center, it is a specially-designed by product of Space Suit technology known as the mobile biological isolation system.

  12. Isolation of marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Houssen, Wael E; Jaspars, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    Marine macro- and micro-biota offer a wealth of chemically diverse compounds that have been evolutionary preselected to modulate biochemical pathways. Many industrial and academic groups are accessing this source using advanced technology platforms. The previous edition of this chapter offered some practical guidance in the process of extraction and isolation of marine natural products with more emphasis on the procedures adapted to the physical and chemical characteristics of the isolated compounds. Automation and direct integration of the isolation technology into high-throughput screening (HTS) systems were also reported. In this edition, we refer to some new topics which are heavily represented in the literature. These include methods for sampling the deep ocean and the procedures for culturing high-pressure-adapted (piezophilic) marine microorganisms to be amenable to laboratory investigation. A brief discussion on genomic-guided approaches to detect the presence of biosynthetic loci even those that are silent or cryptic is also included.

  13. Perceived social isolation and cognition.

    PubMed

    Cacioppo, John T; Hawkley, Louise C

    2009-10-01

    Social species, from Drosophila melanogaster to Homo sapiens, fare poorly when isolated. Homo sapiens, an irrepressibly meaning-making species, are, in normal circumstances, dramatically affected by perceived social isolation. Research indicates that perceived social isolation (i.e. loneliness) is a risk factor for, and may contribute to, poorer overall cognitive performance, faster cognitive decline, poorer executive functioning, increased negativity and depressive cognition, heightened sensitivity to social threats, a confirmatory bias in social cognition that is self-protective and paradoxically self-defeating, heightened anthropomorphism and contagion that threatens social cohesion. These differences in attention and cognition impact on emotions, decisions, behaviors and interpersonal interactions that can contribute to the association between loneliness and cognitive decline and between loneliness and morbidity more generally. PMID:19726219

  14. Fusarochromanone production by Fusarium isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, W D; Nelson, P E; Cook, M E; Smalley, E B

    1990-01-01

    Sixty two Fusarium isolates representing nine species from many parts of the world were screened for fusarochromanone production. A simplified method for the detection of fusarochromanone in culture filtrates or grain cultures was used. Under UV irradiation (364 nm) the chloroform phase from fusarochromanone-positive culture extracts fluoresced a characteristic bright blue color. Results were confirmed by thin-layer-chromatography comparison with pure fusarochromanone standards. Detection was possible in cultures as young as 1 week old. Biosynthesis of fusarochromanone was rare in Fusarium spp. and was only detected in three isolates of Fusarium equiseti, namely R-4482 (barley [Federal Republic of Germany]), R-6137 (barley [Alaska]), and R-8508 (potato [Denmark]), among all the isolates tested from various geographic sources. Images PMID:2285312

  15. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  16. QUANTUM ELECTRONIC DEVICES: Cryogenic Faraday isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleznov, D. S.; Zelenogorskii, V. V.; Katin, E. V.; Mukhin, I. B.; Palashov, O. V.; Khazanov, Efim A.

    2010-05-01

    A Faraday isolator is described in which thermal effects are suppressed by cooling down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The principal scheme, main characteristics and modifications of the isolator are presented. The isolation degree is studied experimentally for the subkilowatt average laser radiation power. It is shown that the isolator can be used at radiation powers up to tens of kilowatts.

  17. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  18. Completely Isolated? Health Information Seeking among Social Isolates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askelson, Natoshia M.; Campo, Shelly; Carter, Knute D.

    2011-01-01

    To better target messages it is important to determine where people seek their health information. Interpersonal networks are a common way most people gather health information, but some people have limited networks. Using data from the 2004 General Social Survey (N = 984), we compared social isolates and nonisolates in their health…

  19. Incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Kısaoğlu, Abdullah; Özoğul, Bünyami; Atamanalp, Sabri Selçuk; Pirimoğlu, Berhan; Aydınlı, Bülent; Korkut, Ercan

    2015-03-01

    Isolated pancreatic hydatid cysts are a rare parasitic disease even in endemic areas. It is difficult to discriminate primary pancreatic hydatid cysts from other cystic and solid lesions of the pancreas. This is a case report of an incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst. A heterogeneous cystic lesion in the body of the pancreas was identified on magnetic resonance imaging of a patient previously diagnosed patient with cholelithiasis, and because of the malignant possibility of the lesion, splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy and cholecystectomy was performed. The histopathologic diagnosis was reported as a hydatid cyst. Pancreatic hydatid cysts should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic malignancies.

  20. Mechanics of rotating isolated horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Beetle, Christopher; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2001-08-15

    Black hole mechanics was recently extended by replacing the more commonly used event horizons in stationary space-times with isolated horizons in more general space-times (which may admit radiation arbitrarily close to black holes). However, so far the detailed analysis has been restricted to nonrotating black holes (although it incorporated arbitrary distortion, as well as electromagnetic, Yang-Mills, and dilatonic charges). We now fill this gap by first introducing the notion of isolated horizon angular momentum and then extending the first law to the rotating case.

  1. Isolation of ribosomes and polysomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-03-01

    Here we describe a preparative differential centrifugation protocol for the isolation of ribosomes from a crude cell homogenate. The subcellular fraction obtained is enriched in ribosome monomers and polysomes. The protocol has been optimized for the homogenization and collection of the ribosomal fraction from prokaryotic cells, mammalian and plant tissues, reticulocytes, and chloroplasts. The quality of the ribosomal preparation is enhanced by the removal of the remaining cellular components and adsorbed proteins by pelleting through a sucrose cushion with a high concentration of monovalent salts, NH4Cl or KCl. The different components of the ribosomal fraction isolated using this protocol can be further purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation.

  2. [Isolated giant hydatid in kidney].

    PubMed

    Ozgör, Faruk; Erbin, Akif; Berberoğlu, Ahmet Yalçın; Binbay, Murat; Sarılar, Omer; Müslümanoğlu, Ahmet Yaser

    2014-06-01

    Cyst hydatid of the kidney is parasitic condition caused by Echinococcus granulosus and identified in many countries, especially associated with sheep farming. Echinococcal larvae enter the bloodstream using the digestive system and invade any organs in the human body. The urinary system is the third most common area affected by parasitic infection after liver and lungs, but isolated renal involvement is a very rare situation, even in endemic areas. İn our case, we aimed to report a 57-year-old female patient with an 18-centimeter isolated renal cyst hydatid treated by retroperitoneal nephrectomy. The diagnosis was based on imaging findings and confirmed by histopathologically.

  3. Metabolomics of the bio-degradation process of aflatoxin B1 by actinomycetes at an initial pH of 6.0.

    PubMed

    Eshelli, Manal; Harvey, Linda; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; McNeil, Brian

    2015-02-04

    Contamination of food and feed by Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a cause of serious economic and health problems. Different processes have been used to degrade AFB1. In this study, biological degradation of AFB1 was carried out using three Actinomycete species, Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277, Streptomyces lividans TK 24, and S. aureofaciens ATCC 10762, in liquid cultures. Biodegradation of AFB1 was optimised under a range of temperatures from 25 to 40 °C and pH values of 4.0 to 8.0. An initial concentration of 20 µg/mL of AFB1 was used in this study. The amount of AFB1 remaining was measured against time by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled with UV and mass spectrometry (LC-MS). All species were able to degrade the AFB1, and no significant difference was found between them. AFB1 remained in the liquid culture for R. erythropolis, S. lividans and S. aureofaciens were 0.81 µg/mL, 2.41 µg/mL and 2.78 µg/mL respectively, at the end of the first 24 h. Degradation occurred at all incubation temperatures and the pH with the optimal conditions for R. erythropolis was achieved at 30 °C and pH 6, whereas for S. lividans and S. aureofaciens the optimum conditions for degradation were 30 °C and pH 5. Analysis of the degradative route indicated that each microorganism has a different way of degrading AFB1. The metabolites produced by R. erythropolis were significantly different from the other two microorganisms. Products of degradation were identified through metabolomic studies by utilizing high-resolution mass spectral data. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the degradation of AFB1 was associated with the appearance of a range of lower molecular weight compounds. The pathway of degradation or chemical alteration of AFB1 was followed by means of high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry (HR-FTMS) analysis as well as through the MS2 fragmentation to unravel the degradative pathway for AFB1. AFB1 bio

  4. Metabolomics of the Bio-Degradation Process of Aflatoxin B1 by Actinomycetes at an Initial pH of 6.0

    PubMed Central

    Eshelli, Manal; Harvey, Linda; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; McNeil, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of food and feed by Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a cause of serious economic and health problems. Different processes have been used to degrade AFB1. In this study, biological degradation of AFB1 was carried out using three Actinomycete species, Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277, Streptomyces lividans TK 24, and S. aureofaciens ATCC 10762, in liquid cultures. Biodegradation of AFB1 was optimised under a range of temperatures from 25 to 40 °C and pH values of 4.0 to 8.0. An initial concentration of 20 µg/mL of AFB1 was used in this study. The amount of AFB1 remaining was measured against time by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled with UV and mass spectrometry (LC-MS). All species were able to degrade the AFB1, and no significant difference was found between them. AFB1 remained in the liquid culture for R. erythropolis, S. lividans and S. aureofaciens were 0.81 µg/mL, 2.41 µg/mL and 2.78 µg/mL respectively, at the end of the first 24 h. Degradation occurred at all incubation temperatures and the pH with the optimal conditions for R. erythropolis was achieved at 30 °C and pH 6, whereas for S. lividans and S. aureofaciens the optimum conditions for degradation were 30 °C and pH 5. Analysis of the degradative route indicated that each microorganism has a different way of degrading AFB1. The metabolites produced by R. erythropolis were significantly different from the other two microorganisms. Products of degradation were identified through metabolomic studies by utilizing high-resolution mass spectral data. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the degradation of AFB1 was associated with the appearance of a range of lower molecular weight compounds. The pathway of degradation or chemical alteration of AFB1 was followed by means of high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry (HR-FTMS) analysis as well as through the MS2 fragmentation to unravel the degradative pathway for AFB1. AFB1 bio

  5. Resisting an Isolated Learning Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanggaard, Lene

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to suggest that researchers on workplace learning avoid an isolated learning discourse. The point at issue is that being a learner is just one aspect of people's sometimes complicated lives in the workplace, and that people may sometimes--for good reasons--resist a learning discourse if it is linked…

  6. Isolating Lysosomes from Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    This protocol describes the generation of a fraction enriched in lysosomes from rat liver. The lysosomes are rapidly isolated using density-gradient centrifugation with gradient media that retain the osmolarity of the lysosomes such that they are functional and can be used in in vitro assays.

  7. Pediatric isolated bilateral iliac aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chithra, R; Sundar, R Ajai; Velladuraichi, B; Sritharan, N; Amalorpavanathan, J; Vidyasagaran, T

    2013-07-01

    Aneurysms are rare in children. Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are very rare, especially bilateral aneurysms. Pediatric aneurysms are usually secondary to connective tissue disorders, arteritis, or mycotic causes. We present a case of a 3-year-old child with bilateral idiopathic common iliac aneurysms that were successfully repaired with autogenous vein grafts.

  8. Emotional isolation in BBC Forum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sienkiewicz, J.; Chmiel, A.

    2014-03-01

    We analyze emotionally annotated massive data from BBC Forum and examine properties of the isolation phenomenon of negative and positive users. Our results show the existence of a percolation threshold dependent on the average emotional value in the network of negatively charged nodes.

  9. BIOSYNTHESIS IN ISOLATED ACETABULARIA CHLOROPLASTS

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, David C.; Levin, Wendy B.

    1972-01-01

    The ability of chloroplasts isolated from Acetabulana mediterranea to synthesize the protein amino acids has been investigated. When this chloroplast isolate was presented with 14CO2 for periods of 6–8 hr, tracer was found in essentially all amino acid species of their hydrolyzed protein Phenylalanine labeling was not detected, probably due to technical problems, and hydroxyproline labeling was not tested for The incorporation of 14CO2 into the amino acids is driven by light and, as indicated by the amount of radioactivity lost during ninhydrin decarboxylation on the chromatograms, the amino acids appear to be uniformly labeled. The amino acid labeling pattern of the isolate is similar to that found in plastids labeled with 14CO2 in vivo. The chloroplast isolate did not utilize detectable amounts of externally supplied amino acids in light or, with added adenosine triphosphate (ATP), in darkness. It is concluded that these chloroplasts are a tight cytoplasmic compartment that is independent in supplying the amino acids used for its own protein synthesis. These results are discussed in terms of the role of contaminants in the observed synthesis, the "normalcy" of Acetabularia chloroplasts, the synthetic pathways for amino acids in plastids, and the implications of these observations for cell compartmentation and chloroplast autonomy. PMID:4557310

  10. Isolation and identification among cockle isolates of Vibrio vulnificus isolated from Selangor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurdi Al-Dulaimi, Mohammed M.; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd.; Ghani, Ma`aruf Abd.

    2014-09-01

    Vibrio vulnificus infections are worldwide public health problems associated with illnesses resulting from consumption of raw or partially cooked seafood. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and identification of V. vulnificus in cockles from local wet (40) and supermarkets (38) from Selangor, Malaysia from July 2013 to February 2014. A total of 78(n=78) cockle were examined for the presence of V. vulnificus and at about 32% (25/78) cockle samples were positive to this bacterium. Colonies morphological observation and biochemical characterization for those isolates showed 60% (15/78) of isolates were classified as biotype 1 and 40% (10/78) belong to biotype 2.

  11. Acinetobacter seifertii Isolated from China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunxing; Wang, Jianfeng; Fu, Ying; Ruan, Zhi; Yu, Yunsong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinical infections caused by Acinetobacter spp. have increasing public health concerns because of their global occurrence and ability to acquire multidrug resistance. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus–Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex encompasses A. calcoaceticus, A. baumannii, A. pittii (formerly genomic species 3), and A nosocomial (formerly genomic species 13TU), which are predominantly responsible for clinical pathogenesis in the Acinetobacter genus. In our previous study, a putative novel species isolated from 385 non-A. baumannii spp. strains based on the rpoB gene phylogenetic tree was reported. Here, the putative novel species was identified as A. seifertii based on the whole-genome phylogenetic tree. A. seifertii was recognized as a novel member of the ACB complex and close to A. baumannii and A. nosocomials. Furthermore, we studied the characteristics of 10 A. seifertii isolates, which were distributed widely in 6 provinces in China and mainly caused infections in the elderly or children. To define the taxonomic status and characteristics, the biochemical reactions, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and whole-genome sequence analysis were performed. The phenotypic characteristics failed to distinguish A. serfertii from other species in the ACB complex. Most of the A. seifertii isolates were susceptible to antibiotics commonly used for nosocomial Acinetobacter spp. infections, but one isolate (strain A362) was resistant to ampicillin/sulbactam, ceftazidime and amikacin. The different patterns of MLST and PFGE suggested that the 10 isolates were not identical and lacked clonal relatedness. Our study reported for the first time the molecular epidemiological and genomic features of widely disseminated A. seifertii in China. These observations could enrich the knowledge of infections caused by non-A. baumannii and may provide a scientific basis for future clinical

  12. Vapor-barrier Vacuum Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor); Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system includes a collimated beam source within a vacuum chamber, a condensable barrier gas, cooling material, a pump, and isolation chambers cooled by the cooling material to condense the barrier gas. Pressure levels of each isolation chamber are substantially greater than in the vacuum chamber. Coaxially-aligned orifices connect a working chamber, the isolation chambers, and the vacuum chamber. The pump evacuates uncondensed barrier gas. The barrier gas blocks entry of atmospheric vapor from the working chamber into the isolation chambers, and undergoes supersonic flow expansion upon entering each isolation chamber. A method includes connecting the isolation chambers to the vacuum chamber, directing vapor to a boundary with the working chamber, and supersonically expanding the vapor as it enters the isolation chambers via the orifices. The vapor condenses in each isolation chamber using the cooling material, and uncondensed vapor is pumped out of the isolation chambers via the pump.

  13. Degradation of various alkyl ethers by alkyl ether-degrading Actinobacteria isolated from activated sludge of a mixed wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hak; Cha, Chang-Jun; Engesser, Karl-Heinrich; Kim, Sang-Jong

    2008-11-01

    Various substrate specificity groups of alkyl ether (AE)-degrading Actinobacteria coexisted in activated sewage sludge of a mixed wastewater treatment. There were substrate niche overlaps including diethyl ether between linear AE- and cyclic AE-degrading strains and phenetole between monoalkoxybenzene- and linear AE-degrading strains. Representatives of each group showed different substrate specificities and degradation pathways for the preferred substrates. Determining the rates of initial reactions and the initial metabolite(s) from whole cell biotransformation helped us to get information about the degradation pathways. Rhodococcus sp. strain DEE5311 and Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain 117 both were able to degrade anisole and phenetole through aromatic 2-monooxygenation to form 2-alkoxyphenols. In contrast, diethyl ether-oxidizing strain DEE5311 capable of degrading a broad range of linear AE, dibenzyl ether and monoalkoxybenzenes initially transformed anisole and phenetole to phenol via direct O-dealkylation. Compared to this, cyclic AE-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain THF100 preferred tetrahydrofuran (265 ± 35 nmol min(-1)mg(-1) protein) to diethyl ether (<30), but it cannot oxidize bulkier AE than diethyl ether. Otherwise, 1,4-diethoxybenzene-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain DEOB100 and Gordonia sp. strain DEOB200 transformed 1,3-/1,4-dialkoxybenzenes to 3-/4-alkoxyphenols by similar manners in the order of rates (nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein): 1,4-diethoxybenzene (11.1 vs. 3.9)>1,4-dimethoxybenzene (1.6 vs. 2.6)>1,3-dimethoxybenzene (0.6 vs. 0.6). This study suggests that the AE-degrading Actinobacteria can orchestrate various substrate specificity responses to the degradation of various categories of AE pollutants in activated sludge communities.

  14. Liver isolation in abdominal MRI.

    PubMed

    Rajasvaran, Logeswaran; Haw, Tan Wooi; Sarker, Shakowat Zaman

    2008-08-01

    This work presents a method for liver isolation in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abdomen images. It is based on a priori statistical information about the shape of the liver obtained from a training set using the segmentation approach. Morphological watershed algorithm is used as a key technique as it is a simple and intuitive method, producing a complete division of the image in separated regions even if the contrast is poor, and it is fast, with possibility for parallel implementation. To overcome the over-segmentation problem of the watershed process, image preprocessing and postprocessing are applied. Morphological smoothing, Gaussian smoothing, intensity thresholding, gradient computation and gradient thresholding are proposed for preprocessing with morphological and graph based region adjacent list constructed for region merging. A new integrated region similarity function is also defined for region merging control. The proposed method produces good isolation of liver in axial MRI images of the abdomen, as is shown in this paper.

  15. Heterogeneity of koala retrovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Shojima, Takayuki; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus which may induce immune suppression, leukemia and lymphoma in koalas. Currently three KoRV subgroups (A, B, and J) have been reported. Our phylogenetic analysis suggests that KoRV-B and KoRV-J should be classified as the same subgroup. In long terminal repeat (LTR), a KoRV-B isolate has four 17 bp tandem repeats named direct repeat (DR)-1, while a KoRV-J isolate (strain OJ-4) has three 37 bp tandem repeats named DR-2. We also found that the promoter activity of the KoRV-J strain OJ-4 is stronger than that of original KoRV-A, suggesting that KoRV-J may replicate more efficiently than KoRV-A.

  16. Sleuthing the Isolated Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. J.

    2004-08-01

    In the early 1990's, isolated thermally-emitting neutron stars accreting from the interstellar medium were predicted to show up in their thousands in the ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey. The glut of sources would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the equation of state of ultra-dense matter. Only seven objects have been firmly identified to date. The reasons for this discrepency are discussed and recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of these objects are described. Spectra of the brightest of the isolated neutron star candidates, RX J1856.5-3754, continue to present interpretational difficulties for current neutron star model atmospheres and alternative models are briefly discussed. RX J1856.5-3754 remains a valid quark star candidate.

  17. Isolation of nuclei from yeast.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, M M; Halvorson, H O

    1971-05-01

    A method for isolation of nuclei from Saccharomyces cervisiae in high yield is described. The DNA/protein ratio of the isolated nuclei is 10 times higher than that of whole cells. Examination of these nuclei in phase and electron microscopes has shown them to be round bodies having a double membrane, microtubules, and a dark crescent at one end. The optimum conditions for extraction and resolution of histones of these nuclei on acrylamide gels have been investigated. The nuclei have an active RNA polymerase (E.C. 2.7.7.6) and are able to synthesize RNA in vitro. They are also readily stainable with Giemsa's, Feulgen's, and acridine orange methods. PMID:19866769

  18. An isolated compact galaxy triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuai; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Shen, Shi-Yin; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I.; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Fang-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of an isolated compact galaxy triplet SDSS J084843.45+164417.3, which is first detected by the LAMOST spectral survey and then confirmed by a spectroscopic observation of the BFOSC mounted on the 2.16 meter telescope located at Xinglong Station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It is found that this triplet is an isolated and extremely compact system, which has an aligned configuration and very small radial velocity dispersion. The member galaxies have similar colors and show marginal star formation activities. These results support the opinion that the compact triplets are well-evolved systems rather than hierarchically forming structures. This serendipitous discovery reveals the limitations of fiber spectral redshift surveys in studying such a compact system, and demonstrates the necessity of additional observations to complete the current redshift sample.

  19. Isolated tuberculosis of the coccyx.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Varshney, M K; Trikha, V; Khan, S A

    2006-10-01

    Vertebral disease constitutes approximately 50% of all skeletal tuberculosis. We describe a patient who developed a discharging sinus at the tip of the coccyx. Extensive examination revealed isolated tuberculosis of the coccyx. Although rare, the condition should be suspected in patients presenting with a chronic sinus in the sacrococcygeal area and a lytic lesion in the coccyx on CT or MRI, particularly in the developing world.

  20. Transformerless dc-Isolated Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1987-01-01

    Efficient voltage converter employs capacitive instead of transformer coupling to provide dc isolation. Offers buck/boost operation, minimal filtering, and low parts count, with possible application in photovoltaic power inverters, power supplies and battery charges. In photovoltaic inverter circuit with transformerless converter, Q2, Q3, Q4, and Q5 form line-commutated inverter. Switching losses and stresses nil because switching performed when current is zero.