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Sample records for isolated wetland implications

  1. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  2. Remarkable amphibian biomass and abundance in an isolated wetland: implications for wetland conservation.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, J Whitfield; Winne, Christopher T; Scott, David E; Willson, John D; Glaudas, Xavier; Andrews, Kimberly M; Todd, Brian D; Fedewa, Luke A; Wilkinson, Lucas; Tsaliagos, Ria N; Harper, Steven J; Greene, Judith L; Tuberville, Tracey D; Metts, Brian S; Dorcas, Michael E; Nestor, John P; Young, Cameron A; Akre, Tom; Reed, Robert N; Buhlmann, Kurt A; Norman, Jason; Croshaw, Dean A; Hagen, Cris; Rothermel, Betsie B

    2006-10-01

    Despite the continuing loss of wetland habitats and associated declines in amphibian populations, attempts to translate wetland losses into measurable losses to ecosystems have been lacking. We estimated the potential productivity from the amphibian community that would be compromised by the loss of a single isolated wetland that has been protected from most industrial, agricultural, and urban impacts for the past 54 years. We used a continuous drift fence at Ellenton Bay, a 10-ha freshwater wetland on the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina (U.S.A.), to sample all amphibians for 1 year following a prolonged drought. Despite intensive agricultural use of the land surrounding Ellenton Bay prior to 1951, we documented 24 species and remarkably high numbers and biomass of juvenile amphibians (>360,000 individuals; >1,400 kg) produced during one breeding season. Anurans (17 species) were more abundant than salamanders (7 species), comprising 96.4% of individual captures. Most (95.9%) of the amphibian biomass came from 232095 individuals of a single species of anuran (southern leopard frog[Rana sphenocephala]). Our results revealed the resilience of an amphibian community to natural stressors and historical habitat alteration and the potential magnitude of biomass and energy transfer from isolated wetlands to surrounding terrestrial habitat. We attributed the postdrought success of amphibians to a combination of adult longevity (often >5 years), a reduction in predator abundance, and an abundance of larval food resources. Likewise, the increase of forest cover around Ellenton Bay from <20% in 1951 to >60% in 2001 probably contributed to the long-term persistence of amphibians at this site. Our findings provide an optimistic counterpoint to the issue of the global decline of biological diversity by demonstrating that conservation efforts can mitigate historical habitat degradation.

  3. The hydrologic implications of alternative prioritizations of landscape-scale geographically isolated wetlands conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenson, G. R.; Golden, H. E.; Lane, C.; Mclaughlin, D. L.; D'Amico, E.

    2016-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), defined as upland embedded wetlands, provide an array of ecosystem goods and services. Wetland conservation efforts aim to protect GIWs in the face of continued threats from anthropogenic activities. Given limited conservation resources, there is a critical need for methods capable of evaluating the watershed-scale hydrologic implications of alternative approaches to GIW conservation. Further, there is a need for methods that quantify the watershed-scale aggregate effects of GIWs to determine their regulatory status within the United States. We applied the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a popular watershed-scale hydrologic model, to represent the 1,700 km2 Pipestem Creek watershed in North Dakota, USA. We modified the model to incorporate an improved representation of GIW hydrologic processes via hydrologic response unit (HRU) redefinition and modifications to the model source code. We then used the model to evaluate the hydrologic effects of alternative approaches to GIW conservation prioritization by simulating the destruction/removal of GIWs by sub-classes defined by their relative position within the simulated fill-spill GIW network and their surface area characteristics. We evaluated the alternative conservation approaches as impacting (1) simulated streamflow at the Pipestem Creek watershed outlet; (2) simulated water-levels within the GIWs; and (3) simulated hydrologic connections between the GIWs. Our approach to modifying SWAT and evaluating alternative GIW conservation strategies may be replicated in different watersheds and physiographic regions to aid the development of GIW conservation priorities.

  4. Benthic diatom composition in wet and dry isolated forested wetlands: implications for monitoring and assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of bioindicators for wetlands, especially ephemerally hydrated depressional and isolated wetlands, can be problematic because of seasonal changes in hydrology and target organism biology. To determine if benthic diatoms could be used as a year-round biological ind...

  5. Benthic diatom composition in isolated forested wetlands subject to drying: implications for monitoring and assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of bioindicators for wetlands, especially ephemerally hydrated depressional and isolated wetlands, can be problematic because of seasonal hydrology and target organism biology. To determine if benthic diatoms could be used as a year-round biological indicator of w...

  6. Benthic diatom composition in wet and dry isolated forested wetlands: implications for monitoring and assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of bioindicators for wetlands, especially ephemerally hydrated depressional and isolated wetlands, can be problematic because of seasonal changes in hydrology and target organism biology. To determine if benthic diatoms could be used as a year-round biological ind...

  7. Benthic diatom composition in isolated forested wetlands subject to drying: implications for monitoring and assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of bioindicators for wetlands, especially ephemerally hydrated depressional and isolated wetlands, can be problematic because of seasonal hydrology and target organism biology. To determine if benthic diatoms could be used as a year-round biological indicator of w...

  8. Geographically isolated wetlands: Rethinking a misnomer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mushet, David M.; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Alexander, Laurie C.; Cohen, Matthew J.; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie G.; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan W.; Rains, Mark C.; Walls, Susan

    2015-01-01

    We explore the category “geographically isolated wetlands” (GIWs; i.e., wetlands completely surrounded by uplands at the local scale) as used in the wetland sciences. As currently used, the GIW category (1) hampers scientific efforts by obscuring important hydrological and ecological differences among multiple wetland functional types, (2) aggregates wetlands in a manner not reflective of regulatory and management information needs, (3) implies wetlands so described are in some way “isolated,” an often incorrect implication, (4) is inconsistent with more broadly used and accepted concepts of “geographic isolation,” and (5) has injected unnecessary confusion into scientific investigations and discussions. Instead, we suggest other wetland classification systems offer more informative alternatives. For example, hydrogeomorphic (HGM) classes based on well-established scientific definitions account for wetland functional diversity thereby facilitating explorations into questions of connectivity without an a priori designation of “isolation.” Additionally, an HGM-type approach could be used in combination with terms reflective of current regulatory or policymaking needs. For those rare cases in which the condition of being surrounded by uplands is the relevant distinguishing characteristic, use of terminology that does not unnecessarily imply isolation (e.g., “upland embedded wetlands”) would help alleviate much confusion caused by the “geographically isolated wetlands” misnomer.

  9. Pore Water Circulation in Isolated Wetlands: Implications to Internal Nutrient Loading.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, J. H.; Perkins, D. B.; Jawitz, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    The potential of wetland soils to accumulate and release pollutants including nutrients has been the motivation for numerous studies related to measuring the concentration, fate, and transport mechanisms of these substances in soils. While external nutrient loading from anthropogenic sources such as agricultural and cattle areas can be addressed through the implementation of Best Management Practices (BMPs), and interception strategies such as construction of storm-water treatment areas (STAs) in Florida, internal loading through shallow sediments has prevented the rapid improvement of water quality in numerous watersheds in South Florida, including the Lake Okeechobee drainage basin. The internal release of nutrients can occur via two different yet equally important mechanisms: advection and diffusion. These processes may mix the pore water not only within the sediment but also with the overlying water column over short periods of time (e.g., days or weeks). This provides sufficient time for diagenesis to alter the reactive chemical components of nutrients that may ultimately increase the nutrient fluxes to the overlying water column. The objectives of this research are to present a plausible and testable technique to collect pore water samples from saturated wetland soils, and to evaluate the importance of pore water circulation as a mechanism for mobilizing nutrients into the water column from within shallow sediments in isolated wetlands. Pore water sampling can be a difficult task to perform in low permeable wetland soils using standard sampling devices such as pore water equilibrators (peepers) and mechanical vises (Rheeburg squeezers). However, our attempt at using Multisamplers, which is in fact a multi-level piezometer capable of collecting up to ten pore water samples to a depth of 110 cm below the soil-water interface in a single deployment, proved to be a success. The ability to collect samples from multiple depths from a single location is an important

  10. Mapping hydrologic connectivity of geographically isolated wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, Ali; Creed, Irena

    2016-04-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) are characterized as depressional landscape features completely surrounded by uplands. These small and typically circular landscape features represent a vast majority of wetlands in various landscapes in North America (98% of all wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region). Geographical isolation, however, does not imply the hydrological isolation. Although geospatial data (e.g., aerial photos) suggested that GIWs lack a persistent surface water connection, the groundwater connection between GIWs and navigable downstream waters can be substantial with large fluxes at the regional scales. The surface/subsurface connections among GIWs and between GIWs and navigable waters are difficult to map and quantify. This is intimately tied to the fact that an efficient incorporation of these small geometric features and characterization of the mechanisms behind these connectivities are challenging within grid-based simulators. We used a physically-based grid-free groundwater-surface water interaction and surface flow routing schemes to map and assess the watershed-scale GIWs connectivity within an extensively studied watershed at the Canadian prairie pothole region with high density of GIWs. The results showed that there is a persistent subsurface connectivity among GIWs and between GIWs and navigable waters. Surface connection was rare and only occurred during extreme events. The results of this paper have significant implications for developing scientifically grounded environmental policy for protection of GIWs within North American Prairie.

  11. Hydrologic considerations in defining isolated wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; LaBaugh, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Wetlands that are not connected by streams to other surface-water bodies are considered to be isolated. Although the definition is based on surface-water connections to other water bodies, isolated wetlands commonly are integral parts of extensive ground-water flow systems, and isolated wetlands can spill over their surface divides into adjacent surface-water bodies during periods of abundant precipitation and high water levels. Thus, characteristics of ground-water flow and atmospheric-water flow affect the isolation of wetlands. In general, the degree that isolated wetlands are connected through the ground-water system to other surface-water bodies depends to a large extent on the rate that ground water moves and the rate that hydrologic stresses can be transmitted through the ground-water system. Water that seeps from an isolated wetland into a gravel aquifer can travel many kilometers through the ground-water system in one year. In contrast, water that seeps from an isolated wetland into a clayey or silty substrate may travel less than one meter in one year. For wetlands that can spill over their surface watersheds during periods of wet climate conditions, their isolation is related to the height to a spill elevation above normal wetland water level and the recurrence interval of various magnitudes of precipitation. The concepts presented in this paper indicate that the entire hydrologic system needs to be considered in establishing a definition of hydrologic isolation.

  12. Integrating geographically isolated wetlands into land management decisions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands across the globe provide extensive ecosystem services. However, many wetlands – especially those surrounded by uplands, often referred to as geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) – remain poorly protected. Protection and restoration of wetlands frequently r...

  13. Flooding Frequency Alters Vegetation in Isolated Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.

    2006-01-01

    Many isolated wetlands in central Florida occur as small, shallow depressions scattered throughout the karst topography of the region. In these wetlands, the water table approaches land surface seasonally, and water levels and flooding frequency are largely determined by differences between precipitation and evapotranspiration. Because much of the region is flat with little topographic relief, small changes in wetland water levels can cause large changes in wetland surface area. Persistent changes in wetland flooding frequencies, as a result of changes in rainfall or human activity, can cause a substantial change in the vegetation of thousands of acres of land. Understanding the effect that flooding frequency has on wetland vegetation is important to assessing the overall ecological status of wetlands. Wetland bathymetric mapping, when combined with water-level data and vegetation assessments, can enable scientists to determine the frequency of flooding at different elevations in a wetland and describe the effects of flooding frequency on wetland vegetation at those elevations. Five cypress swamps and five marshes were studied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during 2000-2004, as part of an interdisciplinary study of isolated wetlands in central Florida (Haag and others, 2005). Partial results from two of these marshes are described in this report.

  14. Integrating geographically isolated wetlands into land ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Wetlands across the globe provide extensive ecosystem services. However, many wetlands – especially those surrounded by uplands, often referred to as geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) – remain poorly protected. Protection and restoration of wetlands frequently requires information on their hydrologic connectivity to other surface waters, and their cumulative watershed-scale effects. The integration of measurements and models can supply this information. However, the types of measurements and models that should be integrated are dependent on management questions and information compatibility. We summarize the importance of GIWs in watersheds and discuss what wetland connectivity means in both science and management contexts. We then describe the latest tools available to quantify GIW connectivity and explore crucial next steps to enhancing and integrating such tools. These advancements will ensure that appropriate tools are used in GIW decision making and maintaining the important ecosystem services that these wetlands support. In a nutshell: Wetlands in general receive insufficient protection and this is particularly true for geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), which are completely surrounded by upland areas GIWs have recently gained policy attention because they provide important ecosystem services, but like most wetlands, their loss and degradation continues Knowledge of the hydrologic connections of GIWs to downstream waters is necessary for th

  15. ISOLATED WETLANDS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS: AN ECOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent U.S. Supreme Court case of Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County v. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (SWANCC) has had profound implications on the legal status of isolated wetlands. As a result of this decision, policymakers need ecological information on the definit...

  16. ISOLATED WETLANDS: STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Supreme Court case of Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County v. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (SWANCC) has had profound implications on the legal status of isolated wetlands. As a result of this decision, policymakers and regulators need information on the ecological...

  17. A review of basin morphology and pool hydrology of isolated ponded wetlands: implications for seasonal forest pools of the northeastern United States

    Treesearch

    Robert T. Brooks; Robert T. Brooks

    2005-01-01

    Seasonal forest pools (SFPs) are geographically- and hydrologically- isolated ponded wetlands, in that they are topographically isolated from other surface waters. SFPs occur commonly throughout the temperate forests of the eastern United States and adjacent Canada. SFPs are ephemeral in occurrence, typically drying annually. The regular drying of SFPs excludes fish...

  18. Hydrologic Influence and Function of Naturally-occurring Isolated Wetlands in the Lake Okeechobee Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, D. B.; Jawitz, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    Wetland restoration has become an area of interest for reduction of watershed discharges of nutrients and other solutes, as well as reduction of hydrograph peak discharges. Nutrient loading from agricultural land uses in the Lake Okeechobee Basin has been implicated as a source of increased trophic levels of receiving rivers and Lake Okeechobee. Potential mitigation strategies for these water quality impacts include the management of naturally-occurring isolated wetlands (IWs), which cover an estimated 16% the basin landscape. Restoration of IWs within these pastures is hypothesized to promote water and nutrient retention and a reduction of nutrient loading to receiving water bodies. Four head-of-ditch isolated wetlands have been monitored for two years with emphases on wetland water and nutrient budgets. A water balance approach was used to estimate the size of the hydrologic capture zone for each wetland. Significant system characterization included water table elevation, ground surface slope, and rainfall. Results indicated that water entered the wetlands primarily via saturation excess overland flow and was subsequently discharged from the wetlands primarily via subsurface outflow. The wetlands were found to be recharging groundwater the vast majority of the time that the wetlands were saturated, resulting in a net yearly of 100 to 150 cm of wetland surface water. These results have important implications for how isolated wetlands are viewed within watershed-scale restoration schemes.

  19. Geographically Isolated Wetlands: Why We Should Keep the Term

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of the term "isolated wetlands" in the U.S. Supreme Court’s SWANCC decision created confusion, since it could imply functional isolation. In response, the term "geographically isolated wetlands" (GIWs) - wetlands surrounded by uplands - was introduced in 2003. A recent arti...

  20. Geographically Isolated Wetlands: Why We Should Keep the Term

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of the term "isolated wetlands" in the U.S. Supreme Court’s SWANCC decision created confusion, since it could imply functional isolation. In response, the term "geographically isolated wetlands" (GIWs) - wetlands surrounded by uplands - was introduced in 2003. A recent arti...

  1. Do geographically isolated wetlands influence landscape functions?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Matthew J.; Creed, Irena F.; Alexander, Laurie C.; Basu, Nandita; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Craft, Christopher; D’Amico, Ellen; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie; Golden, Heather E.; Jawitz, James W.; Kalla, Peter; Kirkman, L. Katherine; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan; Leibowitz, Scott G.; Lewis, David Bruce; Marton, John; McLaughlin, Daniel L.; Mushet, David M.; Raanan-Kiperwas, Hadas; Rains, Mark C.; Smith, Lora; Walls, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), those surrounded by uplands, exchange materials, energy, and organisms with other elements in hydrological and habitat networks, contributing to landscape functions, such as flow generation, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity support. GIWs constitute most of the wetlands in many North American landscapes, provide a disproportionately large fraction of wetland edges where many functions are enhanced, and form complexes with other water bodies to create spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the timing, flow paths, and magnitude of network connectivity. These attributes signal a critical role for GIWs in sustaining a portfolio of landscape functions, but legal protections remain weak despite preferential loss from many landscapes. GIWs lack persistent surface water connections, but this condition does not imply the absence of hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological exchanges with nearby and downstream waters. Although hydrological and biogeochemical connectivity is often episodic or slow (e.g., via groundwater), hydrologic continuity and limited evaporative solute enrichment suggest both flow generation and solute and sediment retention. Similarly, whereas biological connectivity usually requires overland dispersal, numerous organisms, including many rare or threatened species, use both GIWs and downstream waters at different times or life stages, suggesting that GIWs are critical elements of landscape habitat mosaics. Indeed, weaker hydrologic connectivity with downstream waters and constrained biological connectivity with other landscape elements are precisely what enhances some GIW functions and enables others. Based on analysis of wetland geography and synthesis of wetland functions, we argue that sustaining landscape functions requires conserving the entire continuum of wetland connectivity, including GIWs.

  2. Do geographically isolated wetlands influence landscape functions?

    PubMed

    Cohen, Matthew J; Creed, Irena F; Alexander, Laurie; Basu, Nandita B; Calhoun, Aram J K; Craft, Christopher; D'Amico, Ellen; DeKeyser, Edward; Fowler, Laurie; Golden, Heather E; Jawitz, James W; Kalla, Peter; Kirkman, L Katherine; Lane, Charles R; Lang, Megan; Leibowitz, Scott G; Lewis, David Bruce; Marton, John; McLaughlin, Daniel L; Mushet, David M; Raanan-Kiperwas, Hadas; Rains, Mark C; Smith, Lora; Walls, Susan C

    2016-02-23

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), those surrounded by uplands, exchange materials, energy, and organisms with other elements in hydrological and habitat networks, contributing to landscape functions, such as flow generation, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity support. GIWs constitute most of the wetlands in many North American landscapes, provide a disproportionately large fraction of wetland edges where many functions are enhanced, and form complexes with other water bodies to create spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the timing, flow paths, and magnitude of network connectivity. These attributes signal a critical role for GIWs in sustaining a portfolio of landscape functions, but legal protections remain weak despite preferential loss from many landscapes. GIWs lack persistent surface water connections, but this condition does not imply the absence of hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological exchanges with nearby and downstream waters. Although hydrological and biogeochemical connectivity is often episodic or slow (e.g., via groundwater), hydrologic continuity and limited evaporative solute enrichment suggest both flow generation and solute and sediment retention. Similarly, whereas biological connectivity usually requires overland dispersal, numerous organisms, including many rare or threatened species, use both GIWs and downstream waters at different times or life stages, suggesting that GIWs are critical elements of landscape habitat mosaics. Indeed, weaker hydrologic connectivity with downstream waters and constrained biological connectivity with other landscape elements are precisely what enhances some GIW functions and enables others. Based on analysis of wetland geography and synthesis of wetland functions, we argue that sustaining landscape functions requires conserving the entire continuum of wetland connectivity, including GIWs.

  3. Isolated wetlands of the southeastern United States: abundance and expected condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the wake of two U.S. Supreme Court decisions that severely curtailed federal protection for isolated wetlands in the U.S. (i.e., those completely surrounded by uplands), the true extent of the wetlands impacted, and thus, the implications of the decisions, is unknown. Best pro...

  4. SPATIAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ISOLATED WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA is conducting isolated wetland (IW) research at locations around the USA to better understand the ecological importance and ecosystem services provided by IW and to develop methods to monitor and assess their condition. The first research component explores the use of r...

  5. SPATIAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ISOLATED WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA is conducting isolated wetland (IW) research at locations around the USA to better understand the ecological importance and ecosystem services provided by IW and to develop methods to monitor and assess their condition. The first research component explores the use of r...

  6. Responses of Isolated Wetland Herpetofauna to Upland Forest Management

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.R.; Hanlin, H.G.; Wigley, T.B.; Guynn, D.C., Jr.

    2002-01-02

    Measurement of responses of herpetofauna at isolated wetlands in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina to disturbance of adjacent loblolly pine forest. Many species of isolated wetland herpetofauna in the Southeastern Coastal Plain may tolerate some disturbance in adjacent upland stands. Responses of isolated wetland herpetofauna to upland silviculture and the need for adjacent forested buffers likely depend on the specific landscape context in which the wetlands occur and composition of the resident herpetofaunal community.

  7. Geographically isolated wetlands: What we've learned since SWANCC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2001 SWANCC and 2006 Rapanos US Supreme Court decisions created a need for research on geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs). In 2003, a special issue on isolated wetlands was published in Wetlands. That issue contained fifteen papers that reviewed and summarized the lite...

  8. Geographically isolated wetlands: What we've learned since SWANCC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2001 SWANCC and 2006 Rapanos US Supreme Court decisions created a need for research on geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs). In 2003, a special issue on isolated wetlands was published in Wetlands. That issue contained fifteen papers that reviewed and summarized the lite...

  9. Do geographically isolated wetlands influence landscape functions?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew J.; Creed, Irena F.; Alexander, Laurie; Basu, Nandita B.; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Craft, Christopher; D’Amico, Ellen; DeKeyser, Edward; Fowler, Laurie; Golden, Heather E.; Jawitz, James W.; Kalla, Peter; Kirkman, L. Katherine; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan; Leibowitz, Scott G.; Lewis, David Bruce; Marton, John; McLaughlin, Daniel L.; Mushet, David M.; Raanan-Kiperwas, Hadas; Rains, Mark C.; Smith, Lora; Walls, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), those surrounded by uplands, exchange materials, energy, and organisms with other elements in hydrological and habitat networks, contributing to landscape functions, such as flow generation, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity support. GIWs constitute most of the wetlands in many North American landscapes, provide a disproportionately large fraction of wetland edges where many functions are enhanced, and form complexes with other water bodies to create spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the timing, flow paths, and magnitude of network connectivity. These attributes signal a critical role for GIWs in sustaining a portfolio of landscape functions, but legal protections remain weak despite preferential loss from many landscapes. GIWs lack persistent surface water connections, but this condition does not imply the absence of hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological exchanges with nearby and downstream waters. Although hydrological and biogeochemical connectivity is often episodic or slow (e.g., via groundwater), hydrologic continuity and limited evaporative solute enrichment suggest both flow generation and solute and sediment retention. Similarly, whereas biological connectivity usually requires overland dispersal, numerous organisms, including many rare or threatened species, use both GIWs and downstream waters at different times or life stages, suggesting that GIWs are critical elements of landscape habitat mosaics. Indeed, weaker hydrologic connectivity with downstream waters and constrained biological connectivity with other landscape elements are precisely what enhances some GIW functions and enables others. Based on analysis of wetland geography and synthesis of wetland functions, we argue that sustaining landscape functions requires conserving the entire continuum of wetland connectivity, including GIWs. PMID:26858425

  10. Strength in Numbers: Describing the Flooded Area of Isolated Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Terrie M.; Haag, Kim H.

    2006-01-01

    Thousands of isolated, freshwater wetlands are scattered across the karst1 landscape of central Florida. Most are small (less than 15 acres), shallow, marsh and cypress wetlands that flood and dry seasonally. Wetland health is threatened when wetland flooding patterns are altered either by human activities, such as land-use change and ground-water pumping, or by changes in climate. Yet the small sizes and vast numbers of isolated wetlands in Florida challenge our efforts to characterize them collectively as a statewide water resource. In the northern Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida alone, water levels are measured monthly in more than 400 wetlands by the Southwest Florida Water Management Distirct (SWFWMD). Many wetlands have over a decade of measurements. The usefulness of long-term monitoring of wetland water levels would greatly increase if it described not just the depth of water at a point in the wetland, but also the amount of the total wetland area that was flooded. Water levels can be used to estimate the flooded area of a wetland if the elevation contours of the wetland bottom are determined by bathymetric mapping. Despite the recognized importance of the flooded area to wetland vegetation, bathymetric maps are not available to describe the flooded areas of even a representative number of Florida's isolated wetlands. Information on the bathymetry of isolated wetlands is rare because it is labor intensive to collect the land-surface elevation data needed to create the maps. Five marshes and five cypress wetlands were studied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during 2000 to 2004 as part of a large interdisciplinary study of isolated wetlands in central Florida. The wetlands are located either in municipal well fields or on publicly owned lands (fig. 1). The 10 wetlands share similar geology and climate, but differ in their ground-water settings. All have historical water-level data and multiple vegetation surveys. A comprehensive report by Haag and

  11. Geographically isolated wetlands and watershed hydrology: A modified

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data for An improved representation of geographically isolated wetlands in a watershed-scale hydrologic modelThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Evenson, G., H. Golden, C. Lane, and E. D'Amico. An improved representation of geographically isolated wetlands in a watershed-scale hydrologic model. Hydrological Processes. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Indianapolis, IN, USA, online, (2016).

  12. Upland-wetland connectivity provides a significant nexus between isolated wetlands and downstream water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaughlin, D. L.; Kaplan, D. A.; Cohen, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent rulings by the U.S. Supreme Court have limited federal protection over isolated wetlands, requiring documentation of a 'significant nexus' to a navigable water body to ensure federal jurisdiction. Despite geographic isolation, isolated wetlands influence the surficial aquifer dynamics that regulate baseflow to surface water systems. Due to differences in specific yield (Sy) between upland soils and inundated wetlands, responses of the upland water table to atmospheric fluxes (precipitation, P, and evapotranspiration, ET) are amplified relative to wetland water levels, leading to reversals in the hydraulic gradient between the two systems. As such, wetlands act as a water sink during wet cycles (via wetland exfiltration) and a source (via infiltration) during drier times, regulating both the surficial aquifer and its baseflow to downstream systems. To explore the importance of this wetland function at the landscape scale, we integrated models of soil moisture, upland water table, and wetland stage to simulate the hydrology of a low-relief, depressional landscape. We quantified the hydrologic buffering effect of wetlands by calculating the relative change in the standard deviation (SD) of water table elevation between model runs with and without wetlands. Using this model we explored the effects wetland area and spatial distribution over a range of climatic drivers (P and ET) and soil types. Increasing wetland cumulative area and/or density reduced water table variability relative to landscapes without wetlands, supporting the idea that wetlands stabilize regional hydrologic variation, but also increased mean water table depth because of sustained high ET rates in wetlands during dry periods. Maintaining high cumulative wetland area, but with fewer wetlands, markedly reduced the effect of wetland area, highlighting the importance of small, distributed wetlands on water table regulation. Simulating a range of climate scenarios suggested that the capacity of

  13. The significant surface-water connectivity of "geographically isolated wetlands"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Mushet, David M.; Alexander, Laurie C.; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan W.; Rains, Mark C.; Richter, Stephen; Walls, Susan

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the current literature, coupled with our collective research expertise, on surface-water connectivity of wetlands considered to be “geographically isolated” (sensu Tiner Wetlands 23:494–516, 2003a) to critically assess the scientific foundation of grouping wetlands based on the singular condition of being surrounded by uplands. The most recent research on wetlands considered to be “geographically isolated” shows the difficulties in grouping an ecological resource that does not reliably indicate lack of surface water connectivity in order to meet legal, regulatory, or scientific needs. Additionally, the practice of identifying “geographically isolated wetlands” based on distance from a stream can result in gross overestimates of the number of wetlands lacking ecologically important surface-water connections. Our findings do not support use of the overly simplistic label of “geographically isolated wetlands”. Wetlands surrounded by uplands vary in function and surface-water connections based on wetland landscape setting, context, climate, and geographic region and should be evaluated as such. We found that the “geographically isolated” grouping does not reflect our understanding of the hydrologic variability of these wetlands and hence does not benefit conservation of the Nation’s diverse wetland resources. Therefore, we strongly discourage use of categorizations that provide overly simplistic views of surface-water connectivity of wetlands fully embedded in upland landscapes.

  14. USGS research on Florida's isolated freshwater wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres, Arturo E.; Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.; Metz, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has studied wetland hydrology and its effects on wetland health and ecology in Florida since the 1990s. USGS wetland studies in Florida and other parts of the Nation provide resource managers with tools to assess current conditions and regional trends in wetland resources. Wetland hydrologists in the USGS Florida Water Science Center (FLWSC) have completed a number of interdisciplinary studies assessing the hydrology, ecology, and water quality of wetlands. These studies have expanded the understanding of wetland hydrology, ecology, and related processes including: (1) the effects of cyclical changes in rainfall and the influence of evapotranspiration; (2) surface-water flow, infiltration, groundwater movement, and groundwater and surfacewater interactions; (3) the effects of water quality and soil type; (4) the unique biogeochemical components of wetlands required to maintain ecosystem functions; (5) the effects of land use and other human activities; (6) the influences of algae, plants, and invertebrates on environmental processes; and (7) the effects of seasonal variations in animal communities that inhabit or visit Florida wetlands and how wetland function responds to changes in the plant community.

  15. Putting Connectivity in Context: Overview on Geographically Isolated Wetland Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) affect and contribute to the integrity of other waters through biological, chemical, and hydrological (or physical) processes that vary in timing, duration, and magnitude of their impact. Research quantifying contributions and effects of so...

  16. Identification of Putative Geographically Isolated Wetlands of the Conterminous United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) are unique landscape features, defined as wetlands completely surrounded by uplands. Densely occurring in certain parts of the North America, GIWs include wetland types such as Prairie Potholes, Delmarva Ponds, West Coast or California Vern...

  17. Identification of Putative Geographically Isolated Wetlands of the Conterminous United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) are unique landscape features, defined as wetlands completely surrounded by uplands. Densely occurring in certain parts of the North America, GIWs include wetland types such as Prairie Potholes, Delmarva Ponds, West Coast or California Vern...

  18. A significant nexus: Geographically isolated wetlands influence landscape hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Daniel L.; Kaplan, David A.; Cohen, Matthew J.

    2014-09-01

    Recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings have limited federal protections for geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) except where a "significant nexus" to a navigable water body is demonstrated. Geographic isolation does not imply GIWs are hydrologically disconnected; indeed, wetland-groundwater interactions may yield important controls on regional hydrology. Differences in specific yield (Sy) between uplands and inundated GIWs drive differences in water level responses to precipitation and evapotranspiration, leading to frequent reversals in hydraulic gradients that cause GIWs to act as both groundwater sinks and sources. These reversals are predicted to buffer surficial aquifer dynamics and thus base flow delivery, a process we refer to as landscape hydrologic capacitance. To test this hypothesis, we connected models of soil moisture, upland water table, and wetland stage to simulate hydrology of a low-relief landscape with GIWs, and explored the influences of total wetland area, individual wetland size, climate, and soil texture on water table and base flow variation. Increasing total wetland area and decreasing individual wetland size substantially decreased water table and base flow variation (e.g., reducing base flow standard deviation by as much as 50%). GIWs also decreased the frequency of extremely high and low water tables and base flow deliveries. For the same total wetland area, landscapes with fewer (i.e., larger) wetlands exhibited markedly lower hydrologic capacitance than those with more (i.e., smaller) wetlands, highlighting the importance of small GIWs to regional hydrology. Our results suggest that GIWs buffer dynamics of the surficial aquifer and stream base flow, providing an indirect but significant nexus to the regional hydrologic system.

  19. Do Geographically Isolated Wetlands Influence Landscape Functions?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landscape functions such as flow generation, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity support depend on the exchange of solutes, particles, energy, and organisms between elements in hydrological and habitat networks. Wetlands are important network elements, providing hyd...

  20. Do Geographically Isolated Wetlands Influence Landscape Functions?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landscape functions such as flow generation, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity support depend on the exchange of solutes, particles, energy, and organisms between elements in hydrological and habitat networks. Wetlands are important network elements, providing hyd...

  1. Spatial modeling of potential hydrologic connectivity among isolated wetlands and jurisdictional surface waters for the Dougherty Plain in southwestern Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deemy, J. B.; Hepinstall-Cymerman, J.; Kirkman, L.; Rasmussen, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    monitoring wetlands to other hydrographic features. Nearly one fifth of the approximately 200 predicted wetlands on site were connected to other hydrographic features by potential drainages. Preliminary soil assessments within the potential drainages connecting wetlands to surface waters indicate the presence of redoximorphic characters and hydric soils in more than half of those sampled. Potential flow paths are further used to determine optimal hydrologic monitoring sites during high water events for temporal components of biological, chemical and hydrologic connectivity. These data may have important implications for quantifying ecosystem services provided by geographically isolated wetlands in southwestern Georgia.

  2. Phosphorus Retention and Storage by Isolated Wetlands in the Lake Ocheechobee Basin, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, M.; Jawitz, J.

    2003-04-01

    Wetlands are one of the most promising technologies for use in controlling nutrients from agricultural operations. Their effectiveness, however, depends on the retention capacity of the wetland, contaminant load and the desired effluent quality. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of isolated wetlands for attenuation of phosphorus (P) export from the basin. Small isolated wetlands comprise 16.6 % of the landscape in Lake Okeechobee basin, located in south-central Florida. The lake provides flood protection, water supply for agricultural and urban areas, and it is a critical habitat for wildlife. Excessive phosphorus loading causes algal blooms and detrimental changes in biological communities of Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades ecosystem. The land use in the Okeechobee basin is primarily dairy farms and cow-calf operations. Studies conducted within the past two decades have implicated these land uses as a prominent source of the P loading from manure, fertilizers and runoff. Due to poor retention by sandy soils, much of the P is ultimately exported downstream through the Taylor Creek-Nubbin Slough and Kissimmee River to Lake Okeechobee. Despite numerous efforts to reduce P loading from these watersheds, continued improvements are necessary to further reduce nutrients runoff. This research is a multi-year effort to optimize the P removal and assimilation capacity of on-farm treatment wetlands thorough hydrologic manipulation to describe long-term P retention by wetlands. Field data collection is ongoing at four ranch sites selected for this project. Initially, hypothetical case simulations will be evaluated using several modeling methodologies: one-dimensional mass balance based input-output analysis, two-dimensional variably saturated water flow and solute transport model, and three-dimensional analysis at the watershed scale.

  3. An improved representation of geographically isolated wetlands in a watershed-scale hydrologic model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), defined as wetlands surrounded by uplands, provide an array of ecosystem goods and services. Within the United States, federal regulatory protections for GIWs are contingent, in part, on the quantification of their singular or aggregate ef...

  4. Watershed-scale effects of isolated wetlands on downstream hydrology: modeling approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) are depressional features on an eroding landscape that are entirely surrounded by uplands. These wetlands are purported to provide an array of ecological and watershed values and functions, including increasing biodiversity, modifying water...

  5. Watershed-scale effects of isolated wetlands on downstream hydrology: modeling approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) are depressional features on an eroding landscape that are entirely surrounded by uplands. These wetlands are purported to provide an array of ecological and watershed values and functions, including increasing biodiversity, modifying water...

  6. Modeling the effects of isolated wetlands on downstream hydrology at the watershed scale

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically-isolated wetlands, wetlands completely surrounded by uplands (e.g., prairie potholes, vernal pools and cypress domes), are depressional landscape features. They provide numerous ecological functions including biogeochemical cycling and water storage and recharge an...

  7. Modeling the effects of isolated wetlands on downstream hydrology at the watershed scale

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically-isolated wetlands, wetlands completely surrounded by uplands (e.g., prairie potholes, vernal pools and cypress domes), are depressional landscape features. They provide numerous ecological functions including biogeochemical cycling and water storage and recharge an...

  8. An improved representation of geographically isolated wetlands in a watershed-scale hydrologic model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), defined as wetlands surrounded by uplands, provide an array of ecosystem goods and services. Within the United States, federal regulatory protections for GIWs are contingent, in part, on the quantification of their singular or aggregate ef...

  9. The extent and expected condition of isolated wetlands in the southeastern and mid-Atlantic states, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the wake of two United States (US) Supreme Court decisions in the past decade, federal protection for isolated wetlands (i.e., those completely surrounded by uplands) has been severely curtailed. However, the extent of the resource impacted and thus the implications for the c...

  10. The extent and expected condition of isolated wetlands in the southeastern and mid-Atlantic states, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the wake of two United States (US) Supreme Court decisions in the past decade, federal protection for isolated wetlands (i.e., those completely surrounded by uplands) has been severely curtailed. However, the extent of the resource impacted and thus the implications for the c...

  11. Mapping isolated wetlands in a Karst landscape: GIS and remote sensing methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated wetlands occur in many areas of the United States, and although they are relatively common, they are a resource not yet thoroughly understood by the scientific community. Isolated wetlands have received increased attention recently, due to the 2001 Solid Waste Agency of ...

  12. A LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING ECOLOGICAL VULNERABILITY IN GEOGRAPHICALLY ISOLATED WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA 's Office of Research and Development is using a landscape approach to assess the ecological/hydrologic functions of geographically isolated wetlands in the mid-western, southern, and western regions of the United States. Geographically isolated wetlands are considered t...

  13. A LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING ECOLOGICAL VULNERABILITY IN GEOGRAPHICALLY ISOLATED WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA 's Office of Research and Development is using a landscape approach to assess the ecological/hydrologic functions of geographically isolated wetlands in the mid-western, southern, and western regions of the United States. Geographically isolated wetlands are considered t...

  14. Mapping isolated wetlands in a Karst landscape: GIS and remote sensing methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated wetlands occur in many areas of the United States, and although they are relatively common, they are a resource not yet thoroughly understood by the scientific community. Isolated wetlands have received increased attention recently, due to the 2001 Solid Waste Agency of ...

  15. Roseomonas riguiloci sp. nov., isolated from wetland freshwater.

    PubMed

    Baik, Keun Sik; Park, Seong Chan; Choe, Han Na; Kim, Se Na; Moon, Jae-Hak; Seong, Chi Nam

    2012-12-01

    A non-motile, coccobacillus-shaped and pink pigmented bacterium, designated strain 03SU10-P(T), was isolated from wetland freshwater (Woopo wetland, Republic of Korea). Cells were Gram reaction-negative and catalase- and oxidase-positive. The major fatty acids (>10% of total) were C(18:1)ω7c and summed feature 3 (iso-C(15:0) 2-OH and/or C(16:1)ω7c). The predominant respiratory lipoquinone was Q-10. The DNA G+C content was 68 mol%. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine and an unknown aminolipid. Spermidine, putrescine and 1,3-diaminopropane were the major polyamines. A phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons showed that strain 03SU10-P(T) formed an evolutionary lineage within the radiation enclosing the members of the genus Roseomonas. The nearest neighbour to the novel strain was Roseomonas stagni HS-69(T) (96.3% gene sequence similarity). The evidence provided by the polyphasic taxonomic approach used in this study indicated that strain 03SU10-P(T) could not be assigned to any recognized species; therefore a novel species is proposed, Roseomonas riguiloci sp. nov., with 03SU10-P(T) ( = KCTC 23339(T) = JCM 17520(T)) as the type strain.

  16. New species of Eunotia from small isolated wetlands in Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diatom species composition of small wetlands is diverse and unique due to a plethora of spatial and temporal variables. Diatoms from small wetlands can contribute greatly to better understanding microbial biodiversity, distribution, dispersal and populations.

  17. New species of Eunotia from small isolated wetlands in Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diatom species composition of small wetlands is diverse and unique due to a plethora of spatial and temporal variables. Diatoms from small wetlands can contribute greatly to better understanding microbial biodiversity, distribution, dispersal and populations.

  18. EXTENT, PROPERTIES, AND LANDSCAPE SETTING OF GEOGRAPHICALLY ISOLATED WETLANDS IN URBAN SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed the extent and characteristics of geographically isolated wetlands (i.e., wetlands completely surrounded by upland) in a series of drainage basins in the urban northeast U.S. We employed a random sampling design that stratifies study sites according to their degree o...

  19. EXTENT, PROPERTIES, AND LANDSCAPE SETTING OF GEOGRAPHICALLY ISOLATED WETLANDS IN URBAN SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed the extent and characteristics of geographically isolated wetlands (i.e., wetlands completely surrounded by upland) in a series of drainage basins in the urban northeast U.S. We employed a random sampling design that stratifies study sites according to their degree o...

  20. Geographically Isolated Wetlands and Catchment Hydrology: A Modified Model Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenson, G.; Golden, H. E.; Lane, C.; D'Amico, E.

    2014-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), typically defined as depressional wetlands surrounded by uplands, support an array of hydrological and ecological processes. However, key research questions concerning the hydrological connectivity of GIWs and their impacts on downgradient surface waters remain unanswered. This is particularly important for regulation and management of these systems. For example, in the past decade United States Supreme Court decisions suggest that GIWs can be afforded protection if significant connectivity exists between these waters and traditional navigable waters. Here we developed a simulation procedure to quantify the effects of various spatial distributions of GIWs across the landscape on the downgradient hydrograph using a refined version of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a catchment-scale hydrological simulation model. We modified the SWAT FORTRAN source code and employed an alternative hydrologic response unit (HRU) definition to facilitate an improved representation of GIW hydrologic processes and connectivity relationships to other surface waters, and to quantify their downgradient hydrological effects. We applied the modified SWAT model to an ~ 202 km2 catchment in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, USA, exhibiting a substantial population of mapped GIWs. Results from our series of GIW distribution scenarios suggest that: (1) Our representation of GIWs within SWAT conforms to field-based characterizations of regional GIWs in most respects; (2) GIWs exhibit substantial seasonally-dependent effects upon downgradient base flow; (3) GIWs mitigate peak flows, particularly following high rainfall events; and (4) The presence of GIWs on the landscape impacts the catchment water balance (e.g., by increasing groundwater outflows). Our outcomes support the hypothesis that GIWs have an important catchment-scale effect on downgradient streamflow.

  1. Deefgea chitinilytica sp. nov., isolated from a wetland.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Chung, Yu-Ni; Chiu, Tzu-Fang; Cheng, Chih-Yu; Arun, A B; Sheu, Shih-Yi

    2010-06-01

    A bacterial strain, designated Nsw-4(T), was isolated from a water sample of Niao-Song Wetland Park in Taiwan and was characterized by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Strain Nsw-4(T) was Gram-negative, aerobic, ivory-coloured, rod-shaped and motile by means of a polar flagellum. Growth occurred at 15-37 degrees C, pH 6.0-8.0 and 0-2 % NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain belonged to the genus Deefgea and that its closest neighbour was Deefgea rivuli WB 3.4-79(T) (96.9 %). The results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed the clear phenotypic differentiation of this isolate from D. rivuli WB 3.4-79(T). The major fatty acids were C16 : 1omega7c and C16 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 53.7 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and the chemotaxonomic and physiological data, strain Nsw-4(T) should be classified as representing a novel species and the second member of the genus Deefgea, for which the name Deefgea chitinilytica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Nsw-4(T) (=BCRC 17934(T)=LMG 24817(T)).

  2. Evaluating the aggregate effect of geographical isolated wetlands and associated spatial and size distributions on downstream hydrologic flows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIW), defined as depressional wetlands completely surrounded by uplands, support an array of ecological processes. A solid scientific understanding of the hydrologic effects of GIWs upon downstream waterways is important for legal and policy-mak...

  3. Evaluating the aggregate effect of geographical isolated wetlands and associated spatial and size distributions on downstream hydrologic flows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIW), defined as depressional wetlands completely surrounded by uplands, support an array of ecological processes. A solid scientific understanding of the hydrologic effects of GIWs upon downstream waterways is important for legal and policy-mak...

  4. Regulatory Implications of Using Constructed Wetlands to Treat Selenium-Laden Wastewater

    Treesearch

    A. Dennis Lemly; Harry M. Ohlendorf

    2002-01-01

    The practice of using constructed wetlands to treat selenium-laden wastewater is gaining popularity in the linited States and elsewhere. However, proponents of treatment wetlands often overlook important ecological liabilities and regulatory implications when developing new methods and applications. Their research studies typically seek to answer a basic performance...

  5. After the deluge: Establishing rates of geographically isolated wetland loss within the prairie pothole region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serran, J.; Creed, I. F.

    2014-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) from the prairie pothole region of North America are particularly vulnerable to loss and increasing urban, agricultural, and natural resource development pressures continue to place these wetlands at risk. Although small in area and low in surface hydrologic connectivity, GIWs provide important functions such as flood control and water purification and their loss has been recognized as a contributing factor to the eutrophication of Lake Winnipeg. Within Canada, GIW loss can be attributed to the lack of high-resolution wetland inventories and the lack of information about historic wetland loss rates. In this study, we tested an approach to estimate GIW loss by improving their detection and delineation. To initialize our work, a high-resolution wetland inventory was created using a novel approach that fuses LiDAR data (probability of wetland) with aerial photographs (to distinguish open water and wet meadow) for the Beaverhill watershed, a major tributary of the North Saskatchewan watershed. Our wetland mapping results validated our ability to detect wetlands on the landscape. Secondly, we applied a power law area-frequency function to an aerial photograph time series spanning the watershed's natural climate variation range (1960 to present) to estimate historic wetland loss, with historic wetland loss determined via a break in slope in the power law function. Our analysis revealed ongoing loss of small GIWs in the watershed, despite the implementation of wetland policy measures to mitigate this loss. This ongoing GIW loss is particularly detrimental as it is concomitant with a loss in the important associated ecosystem functions of these GIWs, which has serious repercussions for downstream waters. Overall, our findings support a shift in wetland policies from area to function assessments that provide governments with tools to manage the potential consequences of wetland loss in terms of increased flooding and pollution of

  6. Abundance and Distribution of Geographically Isolated Wetlands across the Conterminous United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWS) are important landscape elements involved in hydrologic, biogeochemical, and biological functioning. Their influence, under certain circumstances, can significantly affect other waters of the Unites States. However, there have been no data-...

  7. Abundance and Distribution of Geographically Isolated Wetlands across the Conterminous United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWS) are important landscape elements involved in hydrologic, biogeochemical, and biological functioning. Their influence, under certain circumstances, can significantly affect other waters of the Unites States. However, there have been no data-...

  8. Geographically Isolated Wetlands are Part of the Hydrological Landscape

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recent report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that all wetlands located on floodplains and/or within riparian areas have significant chemical, physical, and/or biological connections with downgradient WOUS. The report concludes that other wetlands – includ...

  9. Geographically Isolated Wetlands are Part of the Hydrological Landscape

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recent report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that all wetlands located on floodplains and/or within riparian areas have significant chemical, physical, and/or biological connections with downgradient WOUS. The report concludes that other wetlands – includ...

  10. Sphingobacterium paludis sp. nov., isolated from wetland soil.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hao; Zeng, Yanhua; Huang, Yili

    2014-10-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative bacteria, designated S37(T), was isolated from soil of the Xixi wetland, Zhejiang province, China. Cells of strain S37(T) were aerobic, non-motile rods. Growth occurred at 10-37 °C (optimum, 25 °C), pH 5.0-9.7 (optimum, pH 7.5) and with 0-6% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0.5%). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain S37(T) was found to be a member of the genus Sphingobacterium and shared highest similarity with Sphingobacterium composti 4M24(T) (95.78%). The major fatty acids were summed feature 3 (iso-C15:0 2-OH and/or C16:1ω7c), iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0 3-OH, and the DNA G+C content was 43.8 mol%. The predominant respiratory quinone was MK-7. Based on its phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics and phylogenetic data, strain S37(T) represents a novel species of the genus Sphingobacterium, for which the name Sphingobacterium paludis sp. nov. (type strain S37(T) = CGMCC 1.12801(T) = NBRC 110386(T)) is proposed.

  11. Paludibacterium purpuratum sp. nov., isolated from wetland soil.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heeyoung; Kim, Haneul; Joung, Yochan; Kim, Kyu-Joong; Joh, Kiseong

    2016-04-26

    A novel bacterium, designated KJ031T, was isolated from a wetland soil sample taken from Jeju island, Republic of Korea. Cells were Gram-negative, curved rod shaped, oxidase- and catalase- positive, motile, and facultatively anaerobic. Growth was observed at pH 6.0-8.0 and at 20-37 °C on R2A agar. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain KJ031T is a member of the genus Paludibacterium, sharing highest sequence similarities with Paludibacterium paludis KBP-21T (96.2 %) and P. yongneupense 5YN8-15T (96.0 %). The major fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c and/or C16:1 ω6c), C16:0 and summed feature 8 (C18:1 ω7c and/or C18:1 ω6c). The predominant respiratory quinone was Q-8. The major polar lipids of strain KJ031T were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified aminophospholipid, two unidentified phospholipids and one unidentified polar lipid. The DNA G+C content was 59.2 mol%. On the basis of the evidence presented in this study, strain KJ031T represents a novel species of the genus Paludibacterium, for which the name Paludibacterium purpuratum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KJ031T (= KCTC 42852T = CECT 8976T).

  12. Water source to four U.S. wetlands: Implications for wetland management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Buso, D.C.; Merk, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Results of long-term field studies of wetlands in four different hydrogeologic and climatic settings in the United States indicate that each has considerably different sources of water, which affects their response to climate variability and land-use practices. A fen wetland in New Hampshire is supplied almost entirely by ground water that originates as seepage from Mirror Lake; therefore, stream discharge from the fen closely follows the pattern of Mirror Lake stage fluctuations. A fen wetland in northern Minnesota is supplied largely by discharge from a regional ground-water flow system that has its recharge area 1 to 2 km to the east. Because of the size of this wetland's ground-water watershed, stream discharge from the fen has little variability. A prairie-pothole wetland in North Dakota receives more than 90 percent of its water from precipitation and loses more than 90 percent of its water to evapotranspiration, resulting in highly variable seasonal and annual water levels. A wetland in the sandhills of Nebraska lies in a regional ground-water flow field that extends for tens of kilometers and that contains numerous lakes and wetlands. The wetland receives water that moves through the ground-water system from the upgradient lakes and from ground water in local flow systems that are recharged between the lakes. The difference in sources of water to these wetlands implies that they would require different techniques to protect their water supply and water quality.

  13. Flavobacterium palustre sp. nov., isolated from wetland soil.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hao; Zeng, Yanhua; Huang, Yili

    2015-03-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, non-motile, yellow-coloured, rod-shaped bacterium, designated S44(T), was isolated from bankside soil of Xixi wetland, located in Zhejiang province, China. Growth of strain S44(T) was observed at 6-37 °C (optimum, 28 °C) and at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum, 7.0). No growth occurred in the presence of >2 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain S44(T) represented a member of the genus Flavobacterium, showing the highest sequence similarities to the sequences from Flavobacterium succinicans DSM 4002(T) (96.9 %), Flavobacterium reichenbachii WB 3.2-61(T) (96.6 %) and Flavobacterium glycines NCBI 105008(T) (96.5 %). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 33.6 mol%. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), and the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone 6 (MK-6). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, two unknown aminolipids, two unknown aminophospholipids and four unknown polar lipids. On the basis of the phenotypic and genotypic data, it is proposed that the isolate S44(T) be classified as representing a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium palustre sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S44(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12811(T) = NBRC 110389(T)).

  14. How do wetland type and location affect their hydrological services? - A distributed hydrological modelling study of the contribution of isolated and riparian wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossey, Maxime; Rousseau, Alain N.; Savary, Stéphane; Royer, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Wetlands play a significant role on the hydrological cycle, reducing peak flows through water storage functions and sustaining low flows through slow release of water. However, their impacts on water resource availability and flood control are mainly driven by wetland types and locations within a watershed. So, despite the general agreement about these major hydrological functions, little is known about their spatial and typological influences. Consequently, assessing the quantitative impact of wetlands on hydrological regimes has become a relevant issue for both the scientific community and the decision-maker community. To investigate the hydrologic response at the watershed scale, mathematical modelling has been a well-accepted framework. Specific isolated and riparian wetland modules were implemented in the PHYSITEL/HYDROTEL distributed hydrological modelling platform to assess the impact of the spatial distribution of isolated and riparian wetlands on the stream flows of the Becancour River watershed, Quebec, Canada. More specifically, the focus was on assessing whether stream flow parameters, including peak flow and low flow, were related to: (i) geographic location of wetlands, (ii) typology of wetlands, and (iii) season of the year. Preliminary results suggest that isolated and riparian wetlands have individual space- and time-dependent impacts on the hydrologic response of the study watershed and provide relevant information for the design of wetland protection and restoration programs.

  15. A Hydraulic Nexus between Geographically Isolated Wetlands and Downstream Water Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaughlin, D. L.; Kaplan, D. A.; Cohen, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Geographic isolation does not imply hydrological isolation; indeed, local groundwater exchange between geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) and surrounding uplands may yield important controls on regional hydrology. Differences in specific yield (Sy) between aquifers and inundated GIWs drive differences in water level responses to atmospheric fluxes, leading to frequent reversals in hydraulic gradients that cause GIWs to act as both groundwater sinks and sources. When distributed across the landscape, these reversals in local groundwater fluxes are predicted to collectively buffer the surficial aquifer and its regulation of baseflow delivery, a process we refer to as landscape hydrologic capacitance. To test this hypothesis, we integrated models of daily soil moisture, upland water table, and wetland stage dynamics to simulate hydrology of a low-relief landscape with GIWs. Simulations explored the influences of cumulative wetland area, individual wetland size, climate, and soil texture on water table and baseflow variation. Increasing cumulative wetland area and decreasing individual wetland size reduced water table variation and the frequency of extremely shallow and deep water tables. This buffering effect extended to baseflow deliveries, decreasing the standard deviation of daily baseflow by as much as 50%. For the same total wetland area, landscapes with fewer (i.e., larger) wetlands exhibited markedly lower hydrologic capacitance than those with more (i.e., smaller) wetlands, highlighting the important role of small GIWs in regulating regional hydrology. Recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings have limited federal protections for GIWs except where a "significant nexus" to a navigable water body is demonstrated. Our results suggest that GIWs regulate downstream baseflow, even where water in GIWs may never physically reach downstream systems, providing a significant "hydraulic" nexus to distant water bodies.

  16. Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Patricia L.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests studying New York's wetlands, both in the classroom and in the field, to illustrate ecological concepts of diversity, succession, and adaptation and to learn about their importance in controlling flooding, erosion, and pollution. (NEC)

  17. Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Patricia L.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests studying New York's wetlands, both in the classroom and in the field, to illustrate ecological concepts of diversity, succession, and adaptation and to learn about their importance in controlling flooding, erosion, and pollution. (NEC)

  18. Bacillus rigui sp. nov., isolated from wetland fresh water.

    PubMed

    Baik, Keun Sik; Lim, Chae Hong; Park, Seong Chan; Kim, Eun Mi; Rhee, Moon Soo; Seong, Chi Nam

    2010-09-01

    Two Gram-stain-positive strains, WPCB074(T) and WPCB165, were isolated from fresh water collected from the Woopo wetland (Republic of Korea). Both strains were strictly aerobic, motile, endospore-forming rods. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strains WPCB074(T) and WPCB165 belonged to the genus Bacillus and that strain WPCB074(T) was most closely related to Bacillus solisalsi YC1(T) (98.4 % sequence similarity), B. barbaricus V2-BIII-A2(T) (97.7 %), B. macauensis ZFHKF-1(T) (96.9 %), B. arsenicus Con a/3(T) (96.4 %) and B. gelatini LMG 21880(T) (95.1 %). The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains WPCB074(T) and WPCB165 differed at one position (99.9 % similarity), suggesting that these two strains constitute a single species. DNA-DNA relatedness between strain WPCB074(T) and the type strains of B. solisalsi, B. barbaricus, B. macauensis, B. arsenicus and B. gelatini were 26, 17, 20, 14 and 7 %, respectively. Strain WPCB074(T) was characterized by having cell-wall peptidoglycan based on meso-diaminopimelic acid, MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone and iso-C(15 : 0) and anteiso-C(15 : 0) as the major fatty acids. The DNA G+C content of strain WPCB074(T) was 41.9 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic properties, phylogeny and genomic distinctiveness, strain WPCB074(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus for which the name Bacillus rigui sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WPCB074(T) (=KCTC 13278(T) =JCM 16348(T)).

  19. Parasediminibacterium paludis gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from wetland.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heeyoung; Kim, Haneul; Joung, Yochan; Joh, Kiseong

    2016-01-01

    A novel orange-pigmented bacterial strain, designated HME6815T, was isolated from wetland in Jeju Island, Republic of Korea. The cells were Gram stain-negative, non-motile, strictly aerobic and rod-shaped. Optimal growth occurred at 30 °C and pH 7.0 on R2A agar. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain HME6815T formed a distinct phyletic lineage within the family Chitinophagaceae and was most closely related to members of the genera Sediminibacterium, Vibrionimonas, Hydrobacter, Hydrotalea and Asinibacterium with 92.3-94.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and iso-C13 : 0. The only respiratory quinone was MK-7. Polar lipid analysis revealed the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine, four unidentified aminolipids, one unidentified aminophospholipid and three unidentified polar lipids. The DNA G+C content was 38.4 mol%. On the basis of the evidence presented in this study, strain HME6815T represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Chitinophagaceae, for which the name Parasediminibacterium paludis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is HME6815T ( = KCTC 23736T = CECT 8010T).

  20. Emticicia paludis sp. nov., isolated from wetland freshwater.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heeyoung; Kim, Haneul; Joung, Yochan; Joh, Kiseong

    2016-09-01

    A novel bacterium, designated HMF3850T, was isolated from freshwater collected from the Gyeong-an wetland, Republic of Korea. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, straight rods, non-motile, and oxidase- and catalase-positive. Growth was observed at pH 6.0-8.0 and at 10-30 °C on R2A agar. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain HMF3850T is a member of the genus Emticicia, sharing highest sequence similarities with Emticicia aquatica HMF2925T (96.7 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Emticicia sediminis JBR12T (95.0 %), Emticicia ginsengisoliGsoil 085T (94.9 %) and Emticicia oligotrophica DSM 17448T (94.7 %). The major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0. The predominant respiratory quinone was MK-7. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, one unidentified aminophospholipid, two unidentified aminolipids and eight unidentified polar lipids. The DNA G+C content was 38.5 mol %. On the basis of the evidence presented in this study, strain HMF3850T represents a novel species of the genus Emticicia, for which the name Emticicia paludis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HMF3850T (=KCTC 42851T=CECT 9087T).

  1. Agricultural Encroachment: Implications for Carbon Sequestration in Tropical African Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. B.; Saunders, M.; Kansiime, F.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical wetlands have been shown to exhibit high rates of net primary productivity and may therefore play an important role in global climate change mitigation through carbon assimilation and sequestration. Many permanently flooded areas of tropical East Africa are dominated by the highly productive C4 emergent macrophyte sedge, Cyperus papyrus L. (papyrus). However, increasing population densities around wetland margins in East Africa are reducing the extent of papyrus coverage due to the planting of subsistence crops such as Cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta). We have assessed the impact of this land use change on the carbon cycle in theis wetland environment. Eddy covariance techniques were used, on a campaign basis, to measure fluxes of carbon dioxide over both papyrus and cocoyam dominated wetlands located on the Ugandan shore of Lake Victoria. The integration of flux data over the annual cycle shows that papyrus wetlands have the potential to act as a sink for significant amounts of carbon, in the region of 10 t C ha-1 yr-1. The cocoyam vegetation was found to assimilate ~7 t C ha-1 yr-1 but when carbon exports from crop biomass removal were taken into account these wetlands represent a significant net loss of carbon of similar magnitude. The development of sustainable wetland management strategies are therefore required in order to promote the dual wetland function of crop production and the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions especially under future climate change scenarios.

  2. Implications of agricultural encroachment on the carbon and greenhouse gas dynamics in tropical African wetlands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Matthew; Kansiime, Frank; Jones, Michael

    2015-04-01

    the production and emission of methane (CH4), and plant-facilitated emissions of up to 32 mg CH4 m-2 h-1 were measured from mature papyrus plants grown in a constructed wetland, suggesting that these wetlands may make a significant contribution to regional methane emissions. The conversion of the papyrus wetlands to agricultural land use has significant implications for the carbon budgets of these systems, as the decomposition of detrital material in addition to the carbon exported in the crop biomass resulted in a net loss of carbon of ~10 t C ha-1 yr-1. The development of sustainable wetland management strategies are therefore required to maintain and enhance the services provided by these ecosystems especially under increasing population pressures and future climatic scenarios.

  3. Hydraulic characteristics of a constructed wetland: Implications for pollutant removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachniew, P.; Czuprynski, P.; Maloszewski, P.; Ozimek, T.

    2003-04-01

    Constructed wetlands are built in order to treat wastewaters of various origin with some degree of control over purification processes. Treatment wetlands improve water quality through removal of suspended solids, organics, nitrogen, phosphorus, pathogens (bacteria, parasites, viruses) and metals. Transformation and removal of pollutants from wastewaters occur via numerous interrelated physical, chemical and biological processes. The efficiency of soluble pollutants removal is related to the degree of contact between wastewaters and the reactive surfaces. Therefore knowledge of hydraulic phenomena is crucial in studies of wetland functioning. A subsurface flow wetland in Nowa Slupia, Poland was studied in order to find out relationships between hydraulic phenomena and wetland performance. The wetland consists of three parallel gravel beds overgrown by common reed with a total surface area of 6400 sq m, total active volume of around 900 cubic m and the average loading of around 4 l/s. Three tracer tests with bromide and tritium accompanied by observations of water quality, plant distribution and biomass were performed in summer and winter conditions. Tracer breakthrough curves obtained from tracer tests were used to identify sub-systems within the wetland and to infer their hydraulic properties (water residence times, active volumes, dispersive characteristics). Three reed beds receive different wastewater loadings and show different water residence times and dispersive characteristics. Wastewater flow occurs partly via surface overflow with apparent stagnant zones and preferential flow pathways. These flow patterns are reflected in complex structure of breakthrough curves. Inhomogenous wastewater distribution within the wetland is due to operation practices and clogging of the gravel beds with refractory organic matter. Observations of effluent water quality, plant distribution and biomass reflect these apparent inhomogenities in wastewater flow patterns. This work

  4. Soil phosphorus forms in hydrologically isolated wetlands and surrounding pasture uplands.

    PubMed

    Cheesman, Alexander W; Dunne, Ed J; Turner, Benjamin L; Reddy, K Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Newly created and restored wetlands play an important role in sequestering excess nutrients at the landscape scale. In evaluating the long-term efficacy of nutrient management strategies to increase wetland capacity for sequestering P, information is needed on the forms of P found across the upland-wetland transition. To assess this, we studied soils (0-10 cm) from four wetlands within cow-calf pastures north of Lake Okeechobee, FL. Wetlands contained significantly (P < 0.05) greater concentrations of organic matter (219 g C kg(-1)), total P (371 mg P kg(-1)), and metals (Al, Fe) relative to surrounding pasture. When calculated on an aerial basis, wetland surface soils contained significantly greater amounts of total P (236 kg ha(-1)) compared with upland soils (114 kg ha(-1)), which was linked to the concomitant increase in organic matter with increasing hydroperiod. The concentration of P forms, determined by extraction with anion exchange membranes, 1 mol L(-1) HCl, and an alkaline extract (0.25 mol L(-1) NaOH and 50 mmol L(-1) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA]) showed significant differences between uplands and wetlands but did not alter as a proportion of total P. Speciation of NaOH-EDTA extracts by solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that organic P was dominated by phosphomonoesters in both wetland and pasture soils but that myo-inositol hexakisphosphate was not detected in any sample. The tight coupling of total C and P in the sandy soils of the region suggests that the successful management of historically isolated wetlands for P sequestration depends on the long-term accumulation and stabilization of soil organic matter.

  5. Spatial and functional characterization, identification and assessment of isolated wetlands in Alachua County, Florida, USA - GIS and remote sensing techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing mapping techniques were developed to identify the locations of isolated wetlands in Alachua County, FL, a 2510 sq km area in north-central Florida with diverse geology and numerous isolated wetlands. The resul...

  6. Importance of Small Isolated Wetlands for Herpetofaunal Diversity in Managed, Young Growth Forests in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.R.; Guynn, D.C., Jr.; Hanlin, H.G.

    2002-03-27

    Assessment and comparison of richness, abundance and difference of herpetofauna at five small isolated wetlands located within a commercial forest landscape in the South Carolina Coastal Plain. Data indicates small isolated wetlands are focal points of herpetofaunal richness and abundance in managed coastal plain forest and contribute more to regional biodiversity than is implied by their small size or ephemeral hydrology.

  7. Calculating the ecosystem service of water storage in isolated wetlands using LiDAR in north central Florida, USA (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used remotely-sensed Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to estimate potential water storage capacity of isolated wetlands in north central Florida. The data were used to calculate the water storage potential of >8500 polygons identified as isolated wetlands. We f...

  8. Calculating the ecosystem service of water storage in isolated wetlands using LIDAR in north central Florida, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used remotely-sensed Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to estimate potential water storage capacity of isolated wetlands in north central Florida. The data were used to calculate the water storage potential of >8500 polygons identified as isolated wetlands. We ...

  9. Calculating the ecosystem service of water storage in isolated wetlands using LiDAR in north central Florida, USA (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used remotely-sensed Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to estimate potential water storage capacity of isolated wetlands in north central Florida. The data were used to calculate the water storage potential of >8500 polygons identified as isolated wetlands. We f...

  10. Calculating the ecosystem service of water storage in isolated wetlands using LIDAR in north central Florida, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used remotely-sensed Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to estimate potential water storage capacity of isolated wetlands in north central Florida. The data were used to calculate the water storage potential of >8500 polygons identified as isolated wetlands. We ...

  11. Spatial and functional characterization, identification and assessment of isolated wetlands in Alachua County, Florida, USA - GIS and remote sensing techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing mapping techniques were developed to identify the locations of isolated wetlands in Alachua County, FL, a 2510 sq km area in north-central Florida with diverse geology and numerous isolated wetlands. The resul...

  12. Characterization of an H10N8 influenza virus isolated from Dongting lake wetland

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Wild birds, especially those in wetlands and aquatic environments, are considered to be natural reservoirs of avian influenza viruses. It is accepted that water is an important component in the transmission cycle of avian influenza virus. Monitoring the water at aggregation and breeding sites of migratory waterfowl, mainly wetland, is very important for early detection of avian influenza virus. The epidemiology investigation of avian influenza virus was performed in Dongting lake wetland which is an international important wetland. Results An H10N8 influenza virus was isolated from Dongting Lake wetland in 2007. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the virus was generated by multiple gene segment reassortment. The isolate was lowly pathogenic for chickens. However, it replicated efficiently in the mouse lung without prior adaptation, and the virulence to mice increased rapidly during adaptation in mouse lung. Sequence analysis of the genome of viruses from different passages showed that multiple amino acid changes were involved in the adaptation of the isolates to mice. Conclusions The water might be an important component in the transmission cycle of avian influenza virus, and other subtypes of avian influenza viruses (other than H5, H7 and H9) might evolve to pose a potential threat to mammals and even humans. PMID:21272297

  13. Implications of hydrologic variability on the succession of plants in Great Lakes wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2004-01-01

    Primary succession of plant communities directed toward a climax is not a typical occurrence in wetlands because these ecological systems are inherently dependent on hydrology, and temporal hydrologic variability often causes reversals or setbacks in succession. Wetlands of the Great Lakes provide good examples for demonstrating the implications of hydrology in driving successional processes and for illustrating potential misinterpretations of apparent successional sequences. Most Great Lakes coastal wetlands follow cyclic patterns in which emergent communities are reduced in area or eliminated by high lake levels and then regenerated from the seed bank during low lake levels. Thus, succession never proceeds for long. Wetlands also develop in ridge and swale terrains in many large embayments of the Great Lakes. These formations contain sequences of wetlands of similar origin but different age that can be several thousand years old, with older wetlands always further from the lake. Analyses of plant communities across a sequence of wetlands at the south end of Lake Michigan showed an apparent successional pattern from submersed to floating to emergent plants as water depth decreased with wetland age. However, paleoecological analyses showed that the observed vegetation changes were driven largely by disturbances associated with increased human settlement in the area. Climate-induced hydrologic changes were also shown to have greater effects on plant-community change than autogenic processes. Other terms, such as zonation, maturation, fluctuations, continuum concept, functional guilds, centrifugal organization, pulse stability, and hump-back models provide additional means of describing organization and changes in vegetation; some of them overlap with succession in describing vegetation processes in Great Lakes wetlands, but each must be used in the proper context with regard to short- and long-term hydrologic variability.

  14. Hydrologic connectivity between geographically isolated wetlands and surface water systems: A review of select modeling methods

    Treesearch

    Heather E. Golden; Charles R. Lane; Devendra M. Amatya; Karl W. Bandilla; Hadas Raanan Kiperwas Kiperwas; Christopher D. Knightes; Herbert. Ssegane

    2014-01-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIW), depressional landscape features entirely surrounded by upland areas, provide a wide range of ecological functions and ecosystem services for human well-being. Current and future ecosystem management and decision-making rely on a solid scientific understanding of how hydrologic processes affect these important GIW services and...

  15. DIATOMS AS INDICATORS OF ISOLATED HERBACEOUS WETLAND CONDITION IN FLORIDA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic, epiphytic, and phytoplanktonic diatoms, as well as soil and water physical-chemical parameters, were sampled from 70 small (~1 ha) isolated depressional herbaceous wetlands located along a gradient of human disturbance in peninsular Florida to: 1) compare assemblage str...

  16. Satellite remote sensing of isolated wetlands using object-oriented classification of LANDSAT-7 data

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing interest in characterizing and mapping isolated depressional wetlands due to a 2001 U.S. Supreme Court decision that effectively removed their protected status. Our objective was to determine the utility of satellite remote sensing to accurately map ...

  17. Hydrologic connectivity between geographically isolated wetlands and surface water systems: A review of select modeling methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rulings in 2001 and 2006 by the United States Supreme Court concerning the protection of Geographically Isolated Wetlands (GIWs) unveiled a critical area of research: quantifying the extent of potential hydrologic connectivity of GIWs to navigable waters and their effects at a va...

  18. Ambient ex-situ Denitrification in Isolated Wetlands of Ohio, North Carolina, and Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated wetlands are completely surrounded by uplands and typically do not warrant federal protection under the Clean Water Act. Nevertheless they can be found at high densities in certain parts of the US and Canada (e.g., Prairie Pothole Region, Southern and Middle Atlantic Co...

  19. Satellite remote sensing of isolated wetlands using object-oriented classification of LANDSAT-7 data

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing interest in characterizing and mapping isolated depressional wetlands due to a 2001 U.S. Supreme Court decision that effectively removed their protected status. Our objective was to determine the utility of satellite remote sensing to accurately map ...

  20. Hydrologic connectivity between geographically isolated wetlands and surface water systems: A review of select modeling methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rulings in 2001 and 2006 by the United States Supreme Court concerning the protection of Geographically Isolated Wetlands (GIWs) unveiled a critical area of research: quantifying the extent of potential hydrologic connectivity of GIWs to navigable waters and their effects at a va...

  1. Ambient ex-situ denitrification in isolated wetlands of Ohio, North Carolina and Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated wetlands are completely surrounded by uplands and typically do not warrant federal protection under the Clean Water Act. Nevertheless they can be found at high densities in certain parts of the US and Canada (e.g., Prairie Pothole Region, Southern and Middle Atlantic Coa...

  2. Ambient ex-situ denitrification in isolated wetlands of Ohio, North Carolina and Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated wetlands are completely surrounded by uplands and typically do not warrant federal protection under the Clean Water Act. Nevertheless they can be found at high densities in certain parts of the US and Canada (e.g., Prairie Pothole Region, Southern and Middle Atlantic Coa...

  3. Draft genome sequence of cyanobacteria Arthrospira sp. TJSD091 isolated from seaside wetland.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shirui; Chen, Jin; Wang, Suying; Wu, Yuemei; Hou, Hujing; Li, Mi; Yan, Chunyu

    2015-12-01

    The cyanobacteria TJSD091 strain, a member of the genus Arthrospira was isolated from seaside wetland in China, Bohai. The draft genome sequence of Arthrospira sp. TJSD091 with a genome size of approximately 6.3 Mbp and a G+C content of 44.75% is reported.

  4. Ambient ex-situ Denitrification in Isolated Wetlands of Ohio, North Carolina, and Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated wetlands are completely surrounded by uplands and typically do not warrant federal protection under the Clean Water Act. Nevertheless they can be found at high densities in certain parts of the US and Canada (e.g., Prairie Pothole Region, Southern and Middle Atlantic Co...

  5. DIATOMS AS INDICATORS OF ISOLATED HERBACEOUS WETLAND CONDITION IN FLORIDA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic, epiphytic, and phytoplanktonic diatoms, as well as soil and water physical-chemical parameters, were sampled from 70 small (~1 ha) isolated depressional herbaceous wetlands located along a gradient of human disturbance in peninsular Florida to: 1) compare assemblage str...

  6. Emission of greenhouse gases from geographically isolated wetlands of Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatskaya, E.; Dyukarev, E.; Veretennikova, E.

    2014-12-01

    Wetlands are integral components of landscapes with specific nutrient dynamics and carbon sequestration potentials, which frequently differ, based on hydroperiod and seasonal hydropattern, as well as the constituent concentration of inputs, site-specific storages and vegetation structures. Human modifications have the potential to significantly alter controls on carbon dynamics. This study focused on determining carbon emissions (CO2 and CH4) from geographically isolated peatlands within the Ob-Tom River Interfluve area of Western Siberia affected by water diversion for municipal use by the city of Tomsk, Russia. Two oligotrophic wetlands within the study area were selected for site-specific CO2 studies, the Timiryazevskoe (16 ha) and Kirsanovskoe wetlands (29 ha), both affected by the Tomsk water intake (177 water wells 250 000 m3 water daily). Measurements of СО2 and CH4 emissions from peat surfaces were carried out bi-monthly in growing periods from 2008-2013 in two dominate vegetation zones, pine- shrub-sphagnum phytocenosis (ryam) and sedge-sphagnum fens. СО2 emissions were measured using OPTOGAS-500.4 infrared gas analyzer and dark chamber. Methane emissions were measured using static chamber method. Air samples were collected by syringes and analyzed at gas chromatograph Shimadzu-GC14B. Observations were accompanied by measurement of air temperature and humidity, surface temperature, peat temperature at various depths and the water table level. CО2 emission over the vegetative growing period had clearly pronounced seasonal dynamics with maximum values in the middle of the growing season (mid-July) and minimum values in spring and autumn. The average total flux over the studied period is 123±55 gС/m2 at sedge-sphagnum fen of Kirsanovskoe wetland and 323±66 gС/m2 at fen of Timiryazevskoe wetland. Total СО2 flux for the snow-free period at ryam sites of Timiryazevskoe and Kirsanovskoe wetlands is 238±84 and 260±47 gС/m2 accordingly. Methane

  7. Wildlife health implications of sewage disposal in wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, M.; Godfrey, P.J.; Kaynor, E.R.; Pelczarski, S.

    1985-01-01

    Wildlife health concerns associated with disposal of sewage effluent in wetlands are of three primary types: (1) introduction of pathogens, (2) introduction of pollutants that adversely impact on host body defense mechanisms, and (3) changes in the physical and chemical properties of wetlands that favor the development and maintenance of disease problems. Unlike the situation with human health concerns, introduction of pathogens is not the major concern regarding wildlife health. Instead, the focus of attention needs to be directed at environmental changes likely to take place as a result of effluent discharges into different types of wetlands. Unless these changes are adequately addressed from a disease perspective, marshes utilized for sewage disposal could become disease incubators and wildlife death traps. This result would be unfortunate because the backlash would likely negate the potentially beneficial aspects of the use of sewage wastewater for the creation of new wetlands and have a severe impact on progress being made towards evaluation of the compatibility of wildlife and sewage effluents.

  8. Modeling the hydrologic response of groundwater dominated wetlands to transient boundary conditions: Implications for wetland restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, James S.; Olyphant, Greg A.

    2007-01-01

    SummaryA variably-saturated groundwater model, based on that of Freeze [Freeze, R.A., 1971. Three-dimensional, transient, saturated-unsaturated flow in a groundwater basin. Water Resources Research 7, 347-366.], was used to analyze the details of surface-groundwater interaction and resulting hydroperiods of a site undergoing wetland restoration (the Lake Station Wetland Restoration Site in Northwest Indiana, USA). The three-dimensional groundwater flow model couples the saturated and unsaturated zones through the use of van Genuchten's [van Genuchten, M.T., 1980. A closed-form equation for predicting the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils. Soil Science Society of America Journal 44, 892-898.] characteristic equations. Initial estimates of hydraulic parameters were refined through a calibration exercise aimed at minimizing the discrepancy between simulated and measured water levels in seven wells within the study. Numerical simulations using the calibrated model, and driven by annual time series of rainfall and potential evaporation, were used to generate hydroperiod maps of surface saturation and root-zone saturation over a three-year period of study. This allowed identification of regularly saturated areas that would support hydric plants, as well as more rarely saturated areas that would require more dry tolerant species or additional hydrological remediation. The simulations also revealed the critical roles that topography, rainfall history, and antecedent conditions play in the hydrology of degraded wetlands that have been targeted for restoration.

  9. Regulatory implications of using constructed wetlands to treat selenium-laden wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lemly, A Dennis; Ohlendorf, Harry M

    2002-05-01

    The practice of using constructed wetlands to treat selenium-laden wastewater is gaining popularity in the United States and elsewhere. However, proponents of treatment wetlands often overlook important ecological liabilities and regulatory implications when developing new methods and applications. Their research studies typically seek to answer a basic performance question--are treatment wetlands effective in improving water quality--rather than answering an implicit safety question-are they hazardous to wildlife. Nevertheless, wetland owners are responsible for both the operational performance of treatment wetlands and the health of animals that use them. This is true even if wetlands were not created with the intent of providing wildlife habitat; the owner is still legally responsible for toxic hazards. If poisoning of fish and wildlife occurs, the owner can be prosecuted under a variety of federal and state laws, for example, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the Endangered Species Act. In considering this type of treatment technology it is important to document the selenium content of the wastewater, understand how it cycles and accumulates in the environment, and evaluate the threat it may pose to fish and wildlife before deciding whether or not to proceed with construction. Many of the potential hazards may not be obvious to project planners, particularly if there is no expressed intention for the wetland to provide wildlife habitat. Ecological risk assessment provides an approach to characterizing proposed treatment wetlands with respect to wildlife use, selenium contamination, and possible biological impacts. Proper application of this approach can reveal potential problems and the associated liabilities, and form the basis for selection of an environmentally sound treatment option.

  10. Mapping of West Siberian taiga wetland complexes using Landsat imagery: Implications for methane emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentieva, Irina; Sabrekov, Alexander; Glagolev, Mikhail; Maksyutov, Shamil

    2017-04-01

    area. Depressed environments as different types of hollows contribute 96% to the methane regional flux, covering 50% of the wetland area in the region. Applying the new map resulted in total methane emissions of 4.62 TgCH4/yr, which is 72% higher than the earlier estimate based on the same emission dataset and the less detailed map by Peregon et al. (2009). The revision resulted from the changes in fractional coverages of methane emitting ecosystems due to the better spatial resolution of the new map. The new Landsat-based map of WSL wetlands provides a benchmark for validation of coarse-resolution global land cover products and wetland datasets in high latitudes. Terentieva, I.E., Glagolev, M.V., Lapshina, E.D., Sabrekov, A.F., Maksyutov, S. Mapping of West Siberian taiga wetland complexes using Landsat imagery: implications for methane emissions // Biogeosciences. 2016. V. 13. № 16. P. 4615-4626.

  11. Biotransformation of chlorpyrifos in riparian wetlands in agricultural watersheds: implications for wetland management.

    PubMed

    Karpuzcu, M Ekrem; Sedlak, David L; Stringfellow, William T

    2013-01-15

    Biodegradation of the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-yl) phosphorothioate) in sediments from wetlands and agricultural drains in San Joaquin Valley, CA was investigated. Sediments were collected monthly, spiked with chlorpyrifos, and rates of chlorpyrifos degradation were measured using a standardized aerobic biodegradation assay. Phosphoesterase enzyme activities were measured and phosphotriesterase activity was related to observed biodegradation kinetics. First-order biodegradation rates varied between 0.02 and 0.69 day(-1), after accounting for abiotic losses. The average rate of abiotic chlorpyrifos hydrolysis was 0.02 d(-1) at pH 7.2 and 30 °C. Sediments from the site exhibiting the highest chlorpyrifos degradation capacity were incubated under anaerobic conditions to assess the effect of redox conditions on degradation rates. Half-lives were 5 and 92 days under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. There was a consistent decrease in observed biodegradation rates at one site due to permanently flooded conditions prevailing during one sampling year. These results suggest that wetland management strategies such as allowing a wet-dry cycle could enhance degradation rates. There was significant correlation between phosphotriesterase (PTE) activity and the chlorpyrifos biotransformation rates, with this relationship varying among sites. PTE activities may be useful as an indicator of biodegradation potential with reference to the previously established site-specific correlations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Freshwater Wetland Habitat Loss and Fragmentation: Implications for Aquatic Biodiversity Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolaver, B. D.; Pierre, J. P.; Labay, B. J.; Ryberg, W. A.; Hibbits, T. J.; Prestridge, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic land use changes have caused widespread wetland loss and fragmentation. This trend has important implications for aquatic biota conservation, including the semi-aquatic Western Chicken Turtle (Deirochelys reticularia miaria). This species inhabits seasonally inundated, ephemeral water bodies and adjacent uplands in the southeastern U.S. However, wetland conversion to agriculture and urbanization is thought to cause the species' decline, particularly in Texas, which includes the westernmost part of its range. Because the species moves only a few kilometers between wetlands, it particularly sensitive to habitat loss and fragmentation. Thus, as part of the only state-funded species research program, this study provides the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) with scientific data to determine if the species warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). We use a species distribution model to map potentially suitable habitat for most of East Texas. We evaluate landscape-scale anthropogenic activities in this region which may be contributing to the species' decline. We identify areas of urbanization, agricultural expansion, forestry, and resulting wetland loss. We find that between 2001 and 2011 approximately 80 km2 of wetlands were lost in potentially suitable habitat, including the urbanizing Houston area. We use spatial geostatistics to quantify wetland habitat fragmentation. We also introduce the Habitat Alteration Index (HAI), which calculates total landscape alteration and mean probability of occurrence to identify high-quality habitat most at risk of recent anthropogenic alteration. Population surveys by biologists are targeting these areas and future management actions may focus on mitigating anthropogenic activities there. While this study focuses on D. r. miaria, this approach can evaluate wetland habitat of other aquatic organisms.

  13. Stimulating a Great Lakes coastal wetland seed bank using portable cofferdams: implications for habitat rehabilitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowalski, K.P.; Wilcox, D.A.; Wiley, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal wetland seed banks exposed by low lake levels or through management actions fuel the reestablishment of emergent plant assemblages (i.e., wetland habitat) critical to Great Lakes aquatic biota. This project explored the effectiveness of using portable, water-filled cofferdams as a management tool to promote the natural growth of emergent vegetation from the seed bank in a Lake Erie coastal wetland. A series of dams stretching approximately 450??m was installed temporarily to isolate hydrologically a 10-ha corner of the Crane Creek wetland complex from Lake Erie. The test area was dewatered in 2004 to mimic a low-water year, and vegetation sampling characterized the wetland seed bank response at low, middle, and high elevations in areas open to and protected from bird and mammal herbivory. The nearly two-month drawdown stimulated a rapid seed-bank-driven response by 45 plant taxa. Herbivory had little effect on plant species richness, regardless of the location along an elevation gradient. Inundation contributed to the replacement of immature emergent plant species with submersed aquatic species after the dams failed and were removed prematurely. This study revealed a number of important issues that must be considered for effective long-term implementation of portable cofferdam technology to stimulate wetland seed banks, including duration of dewatering, product size, source of clean water, replacement of damaged dams, and regular maintenance. This technology is a potentially important tool in the arsenal used by resource managers seeking to rehabilitate the functions and values of Great Lakes coastal wetland habitats.

  14. [Isolation, identification and diversity analysis of petroleum-degrading bacteria in Shengli Oil Field wetland soil].

    PubMed

    Han, Ping; Zheng, Li; Cui, Zhi-Song; Guo, Xiu-Chun; Tian, Li

    2009-05-01

    The petroleum-degrading bacteria in Shengli Oil Field wetland soil were isolated and identified by traditional experiment methods, and their diversity was analyzed by PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). A total of thirteen petroleum-degrading bacterial strains were isolated, among which, six strains were found to have the ability of degrading the majority of C12-C26 petroleum hydrocarbon, with a degradation rate of > 90%. These petroleum degraders were phylogeneticly identified as the members of Halomonas, Alcanivorax, and Marinobacter, which were all belonged to gamma-proteobacteria. The uncultured predominant bacteria in Shengli Oil Field wetland soil were of Sulfurovum, Gillisia and Arcobacter. Among the predominant bacteria, gamma-proteobacteria accounted for a larger proportion, followed by alpha-proteobactiria, epsilon-proteobactiria, Actinobacteria, and Flavobacteria.

  15. Enhancing the area-isolation paradigm: habitat heterogeneity and metapopulation dynamics of a rare wetland mammal.

    PubMed

    Schooley, Robert L; Branch, Lyn C

    2009-10-01

    Conservation of species in fragmented landscapes often is guided by spatially realistic metapopulation theory. However, convincing cases of metapopulation dynamics are uncommon, especially for vertebrates. Moreover, there is concern that the patch area and isolation paradigm for metapopulations is an oversimplification for heterogeneous landscapes. We tested predictions from metapopulation theory for a rare wetland mammal (round-tailed muskrat, Neofiber alleni) and asked whether it was necessary to use a habitat-informed version of the area-isolation paradigm that included patch quality and matrix heterogeneity. In each of two years, we surveyed 457 isolated wetlands in central Florida, USA, for presence-absence of Neofiber and evaluated logistic regression models of patch occupancy, extinction, and colonization. We documented metapopulation dynamics in which patch occupancy was constant between years (26% of patches occupied) due to balanced local extinctions (n = 45) and recolonizations (n = 46). Neofiber was both habitat and dispersal limited. Local extinctions were related negatively to patch area, patch quality (cover of maidencane grass, Panicum hemitomon), and distance to nearest roadside ditch. Patch colonization depended on patch area, patch quality, and spatial connectivity to potential source wetlands. Despite the importance of patch quality, Neofiber did not exhibit a habitat-tracking metapopulation on an annual time scale. Cost-distance modeling suggested effective distances that included high costs for moving through forested matrix habitats generally were better than Euclidean distances for predicting patch colonization and occupancy. Two dominant land uses were tied to turnover dynamics: cattle grazing decreased habitat quality of wetlands, and presence of pine (Pinus spp.) plantations decreased functional connectivity. The simple area-isolation paradigm was not adequate for characterizing spatial dynamics of the Neofiber metapopulation

  16. ISOLATED WETLANDS: STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County v. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (SWANCC), the U.S. Supreme Court held that isolated, intrastate, non-navigable waters could not be protected under the Clean Water Act based solely on their use by migratory birds. The SWANCC decision ...

  17. ISOLATED WETLANDS: STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County v. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (SWANCC), the U.S. Supreme Court held that isolated, intrastate, non-navigable waters could not be protected under the Clean Water Act based solely on their use by migratory birds. The SWANCC decision ...

  18. Bathymetry and vegetation in isolated marsh and cypress wetlands in the northern Tampa Bay Area, 2000-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.; Herndon, Donald C.

    2005-01-01

    Wetland bathymetry and vegetation mapping are two commonly used lines of evidence for assessing the hydrologic and ecologic status of expansive coastal and riverine wetlands. For small isolated freshwater wetlands, however, bathymetric data coupled with vegetation assessments are generally scarce, despite the prevalence of isolated wetlands in many regions of the United States and the recognized importance of topography as a control on inundation patterns and vegetation distribution. In the northern Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida, bathymetry was mapped and vegetation was assessed in five marsh and five cypress wetlands. These 10 isolated wetlands were grouped into three categories based on the effects of ground-water withdrawals from regional municipal well fields: natural (no effect), impaired (drier than natural), and augmented (wetlands with artificially augmented water levels). Delineation of the wetland perimeter was a critical component for estimating wetland-surface area and stored water volume. The wetland perimeter was delineated by the presence of Serenoa repens (the 'palmetto fringe') at 9 of the 10 sites. At the 10th site, where the palmetto fringe was absent, hydric-soils indicators were used to delineate the perimeter. Bathymetric data were collected using one or more techniques, depending on the physical characteristics of each wetland. Wetland stage was measured hourly using continuous stage recorders. Wetland vegetation was assessed semiannually for 2 1/2 years in fixed plots located at three distinct elevations. Vegetation assessments were used to determine the community composition and the relative abundance of obligate, facultative wet, and facultative species at each elevation. Bathymetry maps were generated, and stage-area and stage-volume relations were developed for all 10 wetlands. Bathymetric data sets containing a high density of data points collected at frequent and regular spatial intervals provided the most useful stage

  19. Spatiotemporal patterns of wetland occurrence in the prairie pothole region of eastern South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kahara, S.N.; Mockler, R.M.; Higgins, K.F.; Chipps, S.R.; Johnson, R.R.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated changes in wetland abundance, size, and classification between average (19791986) and above-average (19951999) precipitation periods for two physiographic regions in eastern South Dakota. Temporal shifts in wetland numbers, area, and class varied by topographic location. In high wetland density areas (> 8 wetlands/100 ha), our data suggests that larger, semipermanent wetlands expanded and absorbed nearby wetland basins into their margins, resulting in a net "loss" or disappearance of temporary and seasonal wetlands in above-average water condition years. "Losses" described here are not deemed permanent as in cases of draining or filling, and wetlands may re-form when water conditions return to normal. Nevertheless, temporary disappearance of smaller more isolated wetlands may have implications for breeding waterfowl and other fauna. Percent change of semipermanent basin numbers was positively correlated with wetland density, whereas the opposite was true for seasonal wetlands. Loss of temporary wetlands was correlated with wetland aggregation within the sample area. However, in low wetland density areas, the number and size of seasonal and temporary wetlands generally increased following above-average precipitation. We suggest that wetlands' spatial arrangement be considered along with traditional wetland quantification techniques to better account for shifts in wetland habitat in dry versus wet years. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  20. Effects of salinity on dynamics of soil carbon in degraded coastal wetlands: Implications on wetland restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qingqing; Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhang, Guangliang

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effects of salinity on dynamics of soil carbon contents and stocks, soil samples were collected at a depth of 30 cm at four sampling sites (Sites B, T, S and P) along a salinity gradient in a drained coastal wetland, the Yellow River Delta, China. The salinity of these four sites ranked in the order: B (8.68 ± 4.25 ms/cm) > T (5.89 ± 3.17 ms/cm) > S (3.19 ± 1.01 ms/cm) > P (2.26 ± 0.39 ms/cm). Soil total carbon (TC), soil organic carbon (SOC), and soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were measured. Based on these data, soil organic carbon density (SOCD) and soil microbial biomass carbon density (MBCD) were calculated at four sites. The results showed that the mean concentrations of TC and MBC showed a general deceasing tendency with increasing salinities in the top 30 cm of soils. The values of SOCD and MBCD exhibited similar tendency along the salinity gradient. As for profile distribution pattern, The C/N ratios ranged from 8.28 to 56.51. The microbial quotient values at four sampling sites were quite low, ranging from 0.06 to 0.19. Higher C/N ratios were found in samples with high salinity. Correlation analysis showed that the concentrations of TC and MBC at four sampling sites were significantly negatively correlated with salinity (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), indicating that salinity could inhibit soil carbon accumulation and microbial activities.

  1. Carbon Dynamics in Isolated Wetlands of the Northern Everglades Watershed is Revealed using Hydrogeophysical Methods and Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, M. D.; Job, M. J.; Comas, X.

    2016-12-01

    Peatlands play a critical role in the carbon (C) cycle by sequestering and storing a large fraction of the global soil C pool; and by producing and releasing significant amounts of greenhouse gasses (CO2, CH4) into the atmosphere. While most studies exploring these attributes have traditionally focused on boreal and subarctic biomes, wetlands in temperate and tropical climates (such as the Florida Everglades) have been understudied despite accounting for more than 20% of the global peatland C stock. We used a combination of indirect non-invasive geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar, GPR), aerial imagery, and direct measurements (gas traps) to estimate the contribution of subtropical isolated wetlands to the total C pool of the pine flatwoods landscape at the Disney Wilderness Preserve (DWP, Poinciana, FL). Measurements were collected within two types of isolated wetlands at the preserve, emergent and forested. Geophysical surveys were collected weekly to 1) define total peat thickness (i.e. from the surface to the mineral soil interface) and 2) estimate changes within the internal gas regime. Direct measurements of gas fluxes using gas traps and time-lapse cameras were used to estimate gas emissions (i.e. CH­4 and CO2). Aerial photographs were used to estimate surface area for each isolated wetland and develop a relationship between surface area and total wetland C production that is then applied to every isolated wetland in the preserve to estimate the total wetland C contribution. This work seeks to provide evidence that isolated wetlands within the central Florida landscape are key contributors of C to the atmosphere.

  2. Characterization of Pasteurella multocida isolates from wetland ecosystems during 1996 to 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Wilson, M.A.; Joly, D.O.; Lehr, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We cultured 126 Pasteurella multocida isolates, 92 from water and 34 from sediment samples collected from wetlands in the Pacific and Central flyways of the United States between 1996 and 1999. Most (121) of the isolates were P. multocida serotype 1, but serotypes 3, 3/4, 10, and 11 were also found. Many (82) of the isolates were further characterized by DNA fingerprinting procedures and tested in Pekin ducks for virulence. Almost all the serotype 1 isolates we tested caused mortality in Pekin ducks. Serotype 1 isolates varied in virulence, but the most consistent pattern was higher mortality in male ducks than in females. We found no evidence that isolates found in sediment vs. water, between Pacific and Central flyways, or during El Nino years had consistently different virulence. We also found a number of non-serotype 1 isolates that were avirulent in Pekin ducks. Isolates had DNA fingerprint profiles similar to those found in birds that died during avian cholera outbreaks.

  3. Characterization of Pasteurella multocida isolates from wetland ecosystems during 1996 to 1999.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Michael D; Shadduck, Daniel J; Goldberg, Diana R; Wilson, Mark A; Joly, Damien O; Lehr, Margaret A

    2003-10-01

    We cultured 126 Pasteurella multocida isolates, 92 from water and 34 from sediment samples collected from wetlands in the Pacific and Central flyways of the United States between 1996 and 1999. Most (121) of the isolates were P. multocida serotype 1, but serotypes 3, 3/4, 10, and 11 were also found. Many (82) of the isolates were further characterized by DNA fingerprinting procedures and tested in Pekin ducks for virulence. Almost all the serotype 1 isolates we tested caused mortality in Pekin ducks. Serotype 1 isolates varied in virulence, but the most consistent pattern was higher mortality in male ducks than in females. We found no evidence that isolates found in sediment vs. water, between Pacific and Central flyways, or during El Niño years had consistently different virulence. We also found a number of non-serotype 1 isolates that were avirulent in Pekin ducks. Isolates had DNA fingerprint profiles similar to those found in birds that died during avian cholera outbreaks.

  4. Stochastic Modeling of Isolated Wetland Hydrologic Variability: Effects of Hydro-climatic Forcing, Wetland Bathymetry, and Groundwater-Surface Water Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeryang; Botter, Gianluca; Jawitz, Jim; Rao, Suresh

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological regimes regulate many wetland eco-hydrological functions, such as aquatic habitat integrity and biogeochemical processes. We examined hydrologic temporal variability of geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), and derived analytical expressions for probability density functions (pdfs) of water storage volume, water stage, and water surface area. We conceptualize a GIW as a non-linear reservoir, subject to stochastic "shot-noise" (Poisson rainfall inputs) modulated by recession through evapotranspiration and drainage during inter-event periods. The derived analytical pdfs are defined by three dimensionless parameters: scaled aridity index; mean daily stage increment (during rainfall events); and wetland shape coefficient. These key parameters define the similarity or diversity of hydrologic regimes of different GIWs at a location, or at different sites by capturing the essential features of the wetlandscape: stochastic hydro-climatic forcing, bathymetry, and connectivity to groundwater and/or upland. Numerical simulation of hydrologic variability of groundwater-dependent GIWs allowed us to further examine the role of groundwater-surface water connectivity, and how an adjustment to the effective rate of water loss can be made to match the derived analytical pdf solutions. We also compared the analytical pdfs with observed data from an isolated wetland in Florida. This model framework has utility for managers seeking to achieve target eco-hydrological regimes of GIWs.

  5. Characterization of Thermotolerant Chitinases Encoded by a Brevibacillus laterosporus Strain Isolated from a Suburban Wetland.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pulin; Cheng, Deyong; Miao, Lihong

    2015-12-04

    To isolate and characterize chitinases that can be applied with practical advantages, 57 isolates of chitin-degrading bacteria were isolated from the soil of a suburban wetland. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that the majority of these strains belonged to two genera, Paenibacillus and Brevibacillus. Taking thermostability into account, the chitinases (ChiA and ChiC) of a B. laterosporus strain were studied further. Ni-NTA affinity-purified ChiA and ChiC were optimally active at pH 7.0 and 6.0, respectively, and showed high temperature stability up to 55 °C. Kinetic analysis revealed that ChiC has a lower affinity and stronger catalytic activity toward colloidal chitin than ChiA. With their stability in a broad temperature range, ChiA and ChiC can be utilized for the industrial bioconversion of chitin wastes into biologically active products.

  6. Characterization of Thermotolerant Chitinases Encoded by a Brevibacillus laterosporus Strain Isolated from a Suburban Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pulin; Cheng, Deyong; Miao, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    To isolate and characterize chitinases that can be applied with practical advantages, 57 isolates of chitin-degrading bacteria were isolated from the soil of a suburban wetland. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that the majority of these strains belonged to two genera, Paenibacillus and Brevibacillus. Taking thermostability into account, the chitinases (ChiA and ChiC) of a B. laterosporus strain were studied further. Ni-NTA affinity-purified ChiA and ChiC were optimally active at pH 7.0 and 6.0, respectively, and showed high temperature stability up to 55 °C. Kinetic analysis revealed that ChiC has a lower affinity and stronger catalytic activity toward colloidal chitin than ChiA. With their stability in a broad temperature range, ChiA and ChiC can be utilized for the industrial bioconversion of chitin wastes into biologically active products. PMID:26690223

  7. Terrestrial distribution of pond-breeding salamanders around an isolated wetland.

    PubMed

    Scott, David E; Komoroski, Mark J; Croshaw, Dean A; Dixon, Philip M

    2013-11-01

    Terrestrial habitats surrounding isolated wetlands are a critical resource for many pond-breeding amphibian species, yet few studies have examined the terrestrial distribution of post-metamorphic juveniles and adults. We used an encircling drift fence at a breeding pond in conjunction with partial fences at 90, 172, and 332 m from the wetland to estimate the terrestrial distribution of adult marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum; four breeding seasons) and mole salamanders (A. talpoideum; two seasons), as well as the dispersion of newly metamorphosed A. opacum (one summer). For newly metamorphosed A. opacum, 79% emigrated < 90 m from the wetland, and 8% moved beyond 172 m; movement distance was unrelated to body size. Distribution of adult A. opacum varied among years, with an average of 28% (range 23-31%) occurring beyond 172 m in all years. Averaged across two years, 51% of adult A. talpoideum occurred beyond 172 m. Lognormal models provided a good fit to both the juvenile and adult ambystomatid distributions, and parameters differed between age classes, sexes, species, and years within species. For adult A. opacum a buffer radius of 300 m or 340 m, depending on the year, is estimated to include 95% of adults; for A. talpoideum the estimate is 464 m or 501 m. A reanalysis of distribution data for seven ambystomatid species shows that a previous estimate of a 164-m radius to protect 95% of a population underestimates the needed buffer radius by 185 m. Because our study wetland requires a nearly 500 m wide radius to protect 95% of its ambystomatid adults, preservation of similar communities may require much more surrounding terrestrial habitat than previously thought.

  8. Enhanced detection of wetland-stream connectivity using lidar:Implications for improved wetland conservation and management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The importance of wetland–stream connectivity has been heightened due to the current dependence of wetland regulatory status on this connectivity, although the importance of wetland function to adjacent stream health has been and will continue to be substantial regardless of government policies and ...

  9. Implications of discontinuous elevation gradients on fragmentation and restoration in patterned wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zweig, Christa L.; Reichert, Brian E.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2011-01-01

    Large wetlands around the world face the possibility of degradation, not only from complete conversion, but also from subtle changes in their structure and function. While fragmentation and isolation of wetlands within heterogeneous landscapes has received much attention, the disruption of spatial patterns/processes within large wetland systems and the resulting fragmentation of community components are less well documented. A greater understanding of pattern/process relationships and landscape gradients, and what occurs when they are altered, could help avoid undesirable consequences of restoration actions. The objective of this study is to determine the amount of fragmentation of sawgrass ridges due to artificial impoundment of water and how that may be differentially affected by spatial position relative to north and south levees. We also introduce groundbreaking evidence of landscape-level discontinuous elevation gradients within WCA3AS by comparing generalized linear and generalized additive models. These relatively abrupt breaks in elevation may have non-linear effects on hydrology and vegetation communities and would be crucial in restoration considerations. Modeling suggests there are abrupt breaks in elevation as a function of northing (Y-coordinate). Fragmentation indices indicate that fragmentation is a function of elevation and easting (X-coordinate), and that fragmentation has increased from 1988-2002. When landscapes change and the changes are compounded by non-linear landscape variables that are described herein, the maintenance processes change with them, creating a degraded feedback loop that alters the system's response to structuring variables and diminishes our ability to predict the effects of restoration projects or climate change. Only when these landscape variables and linkages are clearly defined can we predict the response to potential perturbations and apply the knowledge to other landscape-level wetland systems in need of future

  10. Remote Sensing of Wetland Hydrology: Implications for Water Quality Management in Agricultural Landscapes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Due to the substantial effect of agriculture on the ability of wetlands to function, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) serves a key role in wetland conservation and restoration. In order for the USDA to allocate funds to best manage wetlands, a better understanding of wetland functioning is ...

  11. Multi-temporal sub-pixel landsat ETM+ classification of isolated wetlands in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to determine the utility of subpixel processing of multi-temporal Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data for the detection of isolated wetlands greater than 0.50 acres in Cuyahoga County, located in the Erie Drift Plains ecoregion of northe...

  12. Variance in water chemistry parameters in isolated wetlands of Florida, USA, and relationships with macroinvertebrate and diatom community structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eighty small isolated wetlands throughout Florida were sampled in 2005 to explore within-site variability of water chemistry parameters and relate water chemistry to macroinvertebrate and diatom community structure. Three samples or measures of water were collected within each si...

  13. Multi-temporal sub-pixel landsat ETM+ classification of isolated wetlands in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to determine the utility of subpixel processing of multi-temporal Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data for the detection of isolated wetlands greater than 0.50 acres in Cuyahoga County, located in the Erie Drift Plains ecoregion of northe...

  14. Variance in water chemistry parameters in isolated wetlands of Florida, USA, and relationships with macroinvertebrate and diatom community structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eighty small isolated wetlands throughout Florida were sampled in 2005 to explore within-site variability of water chemistry parameters and relate water chemistry to macroinvertebrate and diatom community structure. Three samples or measures of water were collected within each si...

  15. Isolation and characterization of methane utilizing bacteria from wetland paddy ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Jhala, Y K; Vyas, R V; Shelat, H N; Patel, H K; Patel, H K; Patel, K T

    2014-06-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria which are known to utilize C1 compounds including methane. Research during past few decades increased the interest in finding out novel genera of methane degrading bacteria to efficiently utilize methane to decrease global warming effect. Moreover, evaluation of certain known plant growth promoting strains for their methane degrading potential may open up a new direction for multiple utility of such cultures. In this study, efficient methylotrophic cultures were isolated from wetland paddy fields of Gujarat. From the overall morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization studies, the isolates were identified and designated as Bacillus aerius AAU M 8; Rhizobium sp. AAU M 10; B. subtilis AAU M 14; Paenibacillus illinoisensis AAU M 17 and B. megaterium AAU M 29. Gene specific PCR analysis of the isolates, P. illinoisensis, B. aerius, Rhizobium sp. and B. subtilis showed presence of pmoA gene encoding α subunit particulate methane monooxygenase cluster. B. megaterium, P. illinoisensis, Rhizobium sp. and Methylobacterium extrorquens showed presence of mmoX gene encoding α subunit of the hydroxylase component of the soluble methane monooxygenase cluster. P. illinoisensis and Rhizobium sp. showed presence mxaF gene encoding α subunit region of methanol dehydrogenase gene cluster showing that both isolates are efficient utilizers of methane. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time report showing presence of methane degradation enzymes and genes within the known PGPB group of organisms from wet land paddy agro-ecosystem, which is considered as one of the leading methane producer.

  16. Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from an artificially drained coastal wetland during a flood: Implications for wetland global warming potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatland, J. R.; Santos, I. R.; Maher, D. T.; Duncan, T. M.; Erler, D. V.

    2014-08-01

    Floods frequently produce deoxygenation and acidification in waters of artificially drained coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS) wetlands. These conditions are ideal for carbon dioxide and methane production. We investigated CO2 and CH4 dynamics and quantified carbon loss within an artificially drained CASS wetland during and after a flood. We separated the system into wetland soils (inundated soil during flood and exposed soil during post flood period), drain water, and creek water and performed measurements of free CO2 ([CO2*]), CH4, dissolved inorganic and organic carbon (DIC and DOC), stable carbon isotopes, and radon (222Rn: natural tracer for groundwater discharge) to determine aquatic carbon loss pathways. [CO2*] and CH4 values in the creek reached 721 and 81 μM, respectively, 2 weeks following a flood during a severe deoxygenation phase (dissolved oxygen ~ 0% saturation). CO2 and CH4 emissions from the floodplain to the atmosphere were 17-fold and 170-fold higher during the flooded period compared to the post-flood period, respectively. CO2 emissions accounted for about 90% of total floodplain mass carbon losses during both the flooded and post-flood periods. Assuming a 20 and 100 year global warming potential (GWP) for CH4 of 105 and 27 CO2-equivalents, CH4 emission contributed to 85% and 60% of total floodplain CO2-equivalent emissions, respectively. Stable carbon isotopes (δ13C in dissolved CO2 and CH4) and 222Rn indicated that carbon dynamics within the creek were more likely driven by drainage of surface floodwaters from the CASS wetland rather than groundwater seepage. This study demonstrated that >90% of CO2 and CH4 emissions from the wetland system occurred during the flood period and that the inundated wetland was responsible for ~95% of CO2-equivalent emissions over the floodplain.

  17. Assessment of the Impact of the Spatial Distribution of Isolated and Riparian Wetlands on Watershed Hydrology using a Mathematical Modelling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossey, M.; Rousseau, A. N.; Savary, S.; Royer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Wetlands play a significant role on the hydrological cycle, reducing peak flows through water storage functions and sustaining low flows through slow release of water. However, their impacts on water resource availability and flood control are mainly driven by wetland types and locations within a watershed. So, despite the general agreement about these major hydrological functions, little is known about their spatial and typological influences. Consequently, assessing the quantitative impact of wetlands on hydrological regimes has become a relevant issue for both the scientific community and the decision-maker community. To investigate the hydrologic response at the watershed scale, mathematical modelling has been a well-accepted framework. Specific isolated and riparian wetland modules were implemented in the PHYSITEL/HYDROTEL distributed hydrological modelling platform to assess the impact of the spatial distribution of isolated and riparian wetlands on the stream flows of the Becancour River watershed, Quebec, Canada. More specifically, the focus was on assessing whether stream flow parameters, including peak flow, low flow and flow volume, were related to: (i) the percentage and the distribution of wetlands in the watershed, (ii) geographic location of wetlands, and (iii) seasons. Preliminary results suggest that: (i) integration of specific wetland modules can slightly improve HYDROTEL's ability to replicate basic hydrograph characteristics; and (ii) isolated and riparian wetlands have individual space- and time-dependent impacts on the hydrologic response of the study watershed.

  18. Can isolated and riparian wetlands mitigate the impact of climate change on watershed hydrology? A case study approach.

    PubMed

    Fossey, M; Rousseau, A N

    2016-12-15

    The effects of wetlands on stream flows are well established, namely mitigating flow regimes through water storage and slow water release. However, their effectiveness in reducing flood peaks and sustaining low flows is mainly driven by climate conditions and wetland type with respect to their connectivity to the hydrographic network (i.e. isolated or riparian wetlands). While some studies have demonstrated these hydrological functions/services, few of them have focused on the benefits to the hydrological regimes and their evolution under climate change (CC) and, thus, some gaps persist. The objective of this study was to further advance our knowledge with that respect. The PHYSITEL/HYDROTEL modelling platform was used to assess current and future states of watershed hydrology of the Becancour and Yamaska watersheds, Quebec, Canada. Simulation results showed that CC will induce similar changes on mean seasonal flows, namely larger and earlier spring flows leading to decreases in summer and fall flows. These expected changes will have different effects on 20-year and 100-year peak flows with respect to the considered watershed. Nevertheless, conservation of current wetland states should: (i) for the Becancour watershed, mitigate the potential increase in 2-year, 20-year and 100-year peak flows; and (ii) for the Yamaska watershed, accentuate the potential decrease in the aforementioned indicators. However, any loss of existing wetlands would be detrimental for 7-day 2-year and 10-year as well as 30-day 5-year low flows.

  19. An application of baseflow isolation and passive wetland treatment to watershed restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, K.L.; Rightnour, T.A.; Zug, F.R. III

    1999-07-01

    The project site, located in West Virginia, is a reclaimed wood waste disposal area situated on Pennsylvanian coal strata. Following reclamation of the disposal area, flow in the adjacent stream was observed to have elevated iron and manganese concentrations. The source of the groundwater baseflow entering this portion of the stream appeared to be hydrologically related to the landfill by its close proximity. The source of the metals contamination was not determined, but may be related to percolation from the disposal area into the underlying coal strata. The observable contamination was typical of alkaline coal mine drainage and met the criteria for passive wetland treatment. However, the contaminated baseflow entered the stream along the sides and bottom of the channel at several locations over a 100-meter section and could not be collected for accurate characterization of pollutant loading. Treatment of the entire contaminated stream flow to comply with NPDES permit requirements would have been prohibitively expensive, and insufficient space was available for a treatment facility of adequate size within the narrow stream valley. Given these constraints, it was decided to isolate the contaminated baseflow from the surface flow by construction of a lined stream relocation on top of a gravity-drained collection zone in the existing stream channel. The collection zone consists of a bed of coarse aggregate with a central collection pipe discharging to a submerged outlet, which prevents air from entering the collection zone and minimizes the formation of iron precipitates. The relocated stream channel was formed in place on top of the collection zone with compacted earth, and lined with one layer of polypropylene geomembrane covered by two layers of geotextile. Gabion baskets were then placed on top of the liner for stream stabilization and shaping of the final channel. Accurate discharge characterization at the end of the collection pipe allowed the design of a

  20. Isolation of Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix strains from iron bacteria communities in Tierra del Fuego wetlands.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bertram; Sánchez, Leandro A; Fretschner, Till; Kreps, Gastón; Ferrero, Marcela A; Siñeriz, Faustino; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    Sheath-forming iron- and manganese-depositing bacteria belonging to the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group (SLG) are widespread in natural and artificial water systems. Known requirements for their growth include the presence of organic substrates and molecular oxygen. High concentrations of reduced iron or manganese, although not necessary for most species, make their growth a noticeable phenomenon. Such microbial communities have been studied mostly in the Northern Hemisphere. Here, we present descriptions of diverse ochre-depositing microbial communities in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, using a combined approach of microscopical examination, clone library construction and cultivation focused on SLG bacteria. To date, only few SLG type strains are available. The present work increases the number and diversity of cultivated SLG bacteria by obtaining isolates from biofilms and sediment samples of wetlands in Tierra del Fuego. Thirty isolates were selected based on morphological features such as sheath formation and iron/manganese deposition. Five operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were deduced. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that one OTU is identical to the Leptothrix mobilis Feox-1(T) -sequence while the four remaining OTUs show similarity values related to previously described type strains. Similarity values ranged from 96.5% to 98.8%, indicating possible new species and subspecies.

  1. Methanoculleus hydrogenitrophicus sp. nov., a methanogenic archaeon isolated from wetland soil.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianqing; Wang, Yanfen; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2010-09-01

    An obligately anaerobic, methanogenic archaeon, strain HC(T), was isolated from soil of the Zoige wetland on the Tibetan plateau, China. The strain was isolated through construction of an artificial butyrate-degrading consortium in co-culture with a syntrophic bacterium, 'Syntrophomonas erecta subsp. sporosyntropha' JCM 13344. Cells of strain HC(T) were irregular coccoids, 0.8-2 mum in diameter, that occurred singly and utilized only H(2)/CO(2) for growth and methane production. Growth occurred at 18-45 degrees C (optimum around 37 degrees C). The pH for growth was 5.0-8.5 (optimal growth around pH 6.6). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 60.2 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain HC(T) was affiliated to the genus Methanoculleus, with sequence similarities of 94.8-97.2 % to existing members. However, strain HC(T) was distinguished from described Methanoculleus species by not using formate for growth or methane formation and not requiring acetate as a growth factor. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic characteristics, the novel species Methanoculleus hydrogenitrophicus sp. nov. is proposed, with strain HC(T) (=CGMCC 1.5146(T) =JCM 16311(T)) as the type strain.

  2. Radar monitoring of wetland hydrology: Water quality implications for the Chesapeake Bay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wetlands are hydrologically dynamic ecosystems which have the potential to improve water quality. Unfortunately, many of the Chesapeake Bay’s wetlands, especially forested wetlands, have been lost or degraded due to human impacts primarily associated with agriculture and urban/suburban development. ...

  3. Effects of Upland Forest Management on Small Isolated Wetland Herptofauna in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.R.

    2000-08-01

    Forest management practices were compared in five isolated wetlands. These isolated wetlands support a large number of reptiles and amphibians in the forest landscape. However, the effect of adjacent conditions on juvenile and adult mortality was unknown. Several treatments were applied around each bay. The latter included harvesting, harvesting plus site preparation, and a control or intact forest cover. The richness of the communities were similar at the five sites; however, significant differences were observed and associated with upland conditions prior to harvest. No differences in the richness abundance or diversity were detected among treatments. Short term decreases in the abundance of turtles and snakes were noted, but not after 1.5 years.

  4. Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov., a halophilic member of the genus Pseudomonas isolated from a wetland.

    PubMed

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Shahinpei, Azadeh; Sepahy, Abbas Akhavan; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Seyedmahdi, Shima Sadat; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, non-pigmented, rod-shaped, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated GBPy5(T), was isolated from aquatic plants of the Gomishan wetland, Iran. Cells of strain GBPy5(T) were motile. Growth occurred with between 1 and 10% (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally with 3% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5-9.0 and a temperature range of 4-35 °C. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that strain GBPy5(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas forming a monophyletic branch. The novel strain exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 95.4% with type strains of Pseudomonas guariconensis PCAVU11(T) and Pseudomonas sabulinigri J64(T), respectively. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were C18:1ω7c (37.8%), C16:0 (14.9%), C16:1ω7c (12.9%), C12:0 3-OH (7.1%) and C12:0 (7.0%). The polar lipid pattern of strain GBPy5(T) comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and one phospholipid. Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the predominant lipoquinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain GBPy5(T) was 59.2 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain GBPY5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GBPy5(T) ( = IBRC-M 10762(T) = CECT 8338(T)).

  5. Quantifying groundwater discharge through fringing wetlands to estuaries: Seasonal variability, methods comparison, and implications for wetland-estuary exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tobias, C.R.; Harvey, J.W.; Anderson, I.C.

    2001-01-01

    Because groundwater discharge along coastal shorelines is often concentrated in zones inhabited by fringing wetlands, accurately estimating discharge is essential for understanding its effect on the function and maintenance of these ecosystems. Most previous estimates of groundwater discharge to coastal wetlands have been temporally limited and have used only a single approach to estimate discharge. Furthermore, groundwater input has not been considered as a major mechanism controlling pore-water flushing. We estimated seasonally varying groundwater discharge into a fringing estuarine wetland using three independent methods (Darcy's Law, salt balance, and Br- tracer). Seasonal patterns of discharge predicted by both Darcy's Law and the salt balance yielded similar seasonal patterns with discharge maxima and minima in spring and early fall, respectively. They differed, however, in the estimated magnitude of discharge by two- to fourfold in spring and by 10-fold in fall. Darcy estimates of mean discharge ranged between -8.0 and 80 L m-2 d-1, whereas the salt balance predicted groundwater discharge of 0.6 to 22 L m-2 d-1. Results from the Br- tracer experiment estimated discharge at 16 L m-2 d-t, or nearly equal to the salt balance estimate at that time. Based upon the tracer test, pore-water conductivity profiles, and error estimates for the Darcy and salt balance approaches, we concluded that the salt balance provided a more certain estimate of groundwater discharge at high flow (spring). In contrast, the Darcy method provided a more reliable estimate during low flow (fall). Groundwater flushing of pore water in the spring exported solutes to the estuary at rates similar to tidally driven surface exchange seen in previous studies. Based on pore-water turnover times, the groundwater-driven flux of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and NH4+ to the estuary was 11.9, 1.6, and 1.3 g C or g N m-2 wetland for the 90 d encompassing peak

  6. Mapping of West Siberian taiga wetland complexes using Landsat imagery: implications for methane emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evgenievna Terentieva, Irina; Vladimirovich Glagolev, Mikhail; Dmitrievna Lapshina, Elena; Faritovich Sabrekov, Alexandr; Maksyutov, Shamil

    2016-08-01

    High-latitude wetlands are important for understanding climate change risks because these environments sink carbon dioxide and emit methane. However, fine-scale heterogeneity of wetland landscapes poses a serious challenge when generating regional-scale estimates of greenhouse gas fluxes from point observations. In order to reduce uncertainties at the regional scale, we mapped wetlands and water bodies in the taiga zone of The West Siberia Lowland (WSL) on a scene-by-scene basis using a supervised classification of Landsat imagery. Training data consist of high-resolution images and extensive field data collected at 28 test areas. The classification scheme aims at supporting methane inventory applications and includes seven wetland ecosystem types comprising nine wetland complexes distinguishable at the Landsat resolution. To merge typologies, mean relative areas of wetland ecosystems within each wetland complex type were estimated using high-resolution images. Accuracy assessment based on 1082 validation polygons of 10 × 10 pixel size indicated an overall map accuracy of 79 %. The total area of the WSL wetlands and water bodies was estimated to be 52.4 Mha or 4-12 % of the global wetland area. Ridge-hollow complexes prevail in WSL's taiga zone accounting for 33 % of the total wetland area, followed by pine bogs or "ryams" (23 %), ridge-hollow-lake complexes (16 %), open fens (8 %), palsa complexes (7 %), open bogs (5 %), patterned fens (4 %), and swamps (4 %). Various oligotrophic environments are dominant among wetland ecosystems, while poor fens cover only 14 % of the area. Because of the significant change in the wetland ecosystem coverage in comparison to previous studies, a considerable reevaluation of the total CH4 emissions from the entire region is expected. A new Landsat-based map of WSL's taiga wetlands provides a benchmark for validation of coarse-resolution global land cover products and wetland data sets in high latitudes.

  7. Surface elevation change and vegetation distribution dynamics in a subtropical coastal wetland: Implications for coastal wetland response to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kerrylee; Saintilan, Neil; Woodroffe, Colin D.

    2014-08-01

    The response of coastal wetlands to sea-level rise is receiving global attention and observed changes in the distribution of mangrove and salt marsh are increasingly associated with global climate change, particularly sea-level and temperature rise, and potentially elevated carbon dioxide. Processes operating over smaller-spatial scales, such as rainfall variability and nutrient enrichment are also proposed as possible short-term drivers of changes in the distribution of mangrove and salt marsh. We consider the response of mangrove and salt marsh in a subtropical estuary to changes in environmental variables over a 12 year period by comparing rates of surface elevation change and vegetation distribution dynamics to hydrological and climatic variables, specifically water level and rainfall. This period of analysis captured inter-annual variability in sea level and rainfall associated with different phases of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). We found that the mangrove and salt marsh trend of increasing elevation was primarily controlled by position within the tidal prism, in this case defined by inundation depth and distance to the tidal channel. Rainfall was not a primary driver of elevation trends in mangrove and salt marsh, but rainfall and water level variability did influence variability in elevation over the study period, though cross-correlation of these factors confounds identification of a single process driving this variability. These results highlight the scale-dependence of coastal wetland vegetation distribution dynamics; the longer-term trend of surface elevation increase and mangrove encroachment of salt marsh correlated with global sea-level trends, while short-term variability in surface elevation was related to local variability in water level and rainfall. Rates of surface elevation increase were found to lag behind rates of water level change within the Tweed River, which may facilitate further expansion of mangrove into salt marsh. This

  8. Historical wetlands in Oregon's Willamette Valley: Implications for restoration of winter waterbird habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taft, Oriane W.; Haig, Susan M.

    2003-01-01

    Before agricultural expansion in the 19th century, river valleys of North America supported expanses of wetland habitat. In restoring these landscapes, it is important to understand their historical condition and biological function. Synthesizing historical primary accounts (from explorers, travelers, settlers, and farmers) with contemporary knowledge of these wetland systems, we developed a profile of the wetlands and their use by nonbreeding waterbirds (e.g., waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds) within the Willamette Valley, Oregon, ca. 1840. We found evidence for three types of wetlands used by non-breeding waterbirds in fall, winter, and spring: emergent wetlands, riverine wetlands, and wetland prairie. The most extensive wetland type was wetland prairie, which functioned as fall/winter habitat for waterbirds, but only while native Kalapuyans managed the region with fire. Since the mid-1800s, four species, in particular, have decreased their use of the Willamette Valley: trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator), snow goose (Chen caerulescens), sandhill crane (Grus canadensis), and long-billed curlew (Numenius americanus). Information suggests that ca. 1840, waterbirds and their habitats were more abundant in the Willamette Valley than today. Restoration of the Willamette Valley landscape is warranted, and today's agricultural wetlandsa??former wetland prairiea??hold highest restoration potential.

  9. Agromyces binzhouensis sp. nov., an actinobacterium isolated from a coastal wetland of the Yellow River Delta.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhirong; Guan, Yingying; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Jing

    2016-06-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, heterotrophic, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped strain, designated OAct353T, belonging to the genus Agromyces was isolated from a soil sample collected from a coastal wetland of the Yellow River delta, PR China. The strain was identified using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The strain grew in the presence of 0-10 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 2-3 %), at pH 5.0-8.0 (optimum pH 7.0) and 12-36 °C (optimum 28 °C). The isolate contained 2,4-diaminobutyric acid, glutamic acid and glycine in its peptidoglycan. The acyl type of the cell-wall muramic acid was N-acetyl. The whole-cell sugars of this novel strain were glucose, xylose and rhamnose. The predominant menaquinones were MK-12 (74 %) and MK-11 (21 %). The major phospholipids were phosphatidylglycerol, one unknown phospholipid, three unknown glycolipids and three unknown polar lipids. The major fatty acids were iso-C16:0, anteiso-C15:0 and anteiso-C17:0. The DNA G+C content was 69.6 mol %. DNA-DNA relatedness clearly separated strain OAct353T from its closest relatives. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic data, a novel species, Agromyces binzhouensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is OAct353T (=CGMCC4.7180T=DSM 28305T=NRRL B-59115T).

  10. Cyclobacterium halophilum sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from a coastal-marine wetland.

    PubMed

    Shahinpei, Azadeh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Sepahy, Abbas Akhavan; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated strain GASx41(T), was isolated from soil of the coastal-marine wetland Gomishan in Iran. Cells of strain GASx41(T) were curved, ring-like or horseshoe-shaped rods and non-motile. Strain GASx41(T) was strictly aerobic, and catalase- and oxidase-positive. The strain was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 1-10% (w/v), with optimum growth occurring at 2.5-3% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 25-30 °C and pH 7.5-8.0. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain GASx41(T) was shown to belong to the genus Cyclobacterium within the phylum Bacteroidetes and showed closest phylogenetic similarity to 'Cyclobacterium jeungdonense' HMD3055 (98.0%). The DNA G+C content of strain GASx41(T) was 48.1 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain GASx41(T) were iso-C15 : 0, summed feature 4 (iso-C15 : 0 2-OH and/or C16 : 1ω7c), anteiso-C15 : 0 2-OH, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, and its polar lipid pattern consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine and 12 unknown lipids. The only quinone present was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). All these features confirmed the placement of isolate GASx41(T) within the genus Cyclobacterium. On the basis of evidence from this study, a novel species of the genus Cyclobacterium, Cyclobacterium halophilum sp. nov., is proposed, with strain GASx41(T) ( = IBRC-M 10761(T) = CECT 8341(T)) as the type strain.

  11. Assessment of environmental DNA for detecting presence of imperiled aquatic amphibian species in isolated wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Anna; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Barichivich, William J.; Spear, Stephen F.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Glenn, Travis C

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is an emerging tool that allows low-impact sampling for aquatic species by isolating DNA from water samples and screening for DNA sequences specific to species of interest. However, researchers have not tested this method in naturally acidic wetlands that provide breeding habitat for a number of imperiled species, including the frosted salamander (Ambystoma cingulatum), reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi), striped newt (Notophthalmus perstriatus), and gopher frog (Lithobates capito). Our objectives for this study were to develop and optimize eDNA survey protocols and assays to complement and enhance capture-based survey methods for these amphibian species. We collected three or more water samples, dipnetted or trapped larval and adult amphibians, and conducted visual encounter surveys for egg masses for target species at 40 sites on 12 different longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) tracts. We used quantitative PCRs to screen eDNA from each site for target species presence. We detected flatwoods salamanders at three sites with eDNA but did not detect them during physical surveys. Based on the sample location we assumed these eDNA detections to indicate the presence of frosted flatwoods salamanders. We did not detect reticulated flatwoods salamanders. We detected striped newts with physical and eDNA surveys at two wetlands. We detected gopher frogs at 12 sites total, three with eDNA alone, two with physical surveys alone, and seven with physical and eDNA surveys. We detected our target species with eDNA at 9 of 11 sites where they were present as indicated from traditional surveys and at six sites where they were not detected with traditional surveys. It was, however, critical to use at least three water samples per site for eDNA. Our results demonstrate eDNA surveys can be a useful complement to traditional survey methods for detecting imperiled pond-breeding amphibians. Environmental DNA may be particularly useful in situations

  12. Social Isolation of Youth at Risk: Conceptualizations and Practical Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazler, Richard J.; Denham, Sharon A.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses social isolation as a major factor in determining how youth are increasingly put at risk for both immediate and lifelong difficulties and examines three at-risk situations that counselors face to better understand the origins and implications affecting assessment and interventions. Presents practical implications for how school and…

  13. The role of protected area wetlands in waterfowl habitat conservation: implications for protected area network design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beatty, William S.; Kesler, Dylan C.; Webb, Elisabeth B.; Raedeke, Andrew H.; Naylor, Luke W.; Humburg, Dale D.

    2014-01-01

    The principal goal of protected area networks is biodiversity preservation, but efficacy of such networks is directly linked to animal movement within and outside area boundaries. We examined wetland selection patterns of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) during non-breeding periods from 2010 to 2012 to evaluate the utility of protected areas to migratory waterfowl in North America. We tracked 33 adult females using global positioning system (GPS) satellite transmitters and implemented a use-availability resource selection design to examine mallard use of wetlands under varying degrees of protection. Specifically, we examined effects of proximities to National Wildlife Refuges, private land, state wildlife management areas, Wetland Reserve Program easements (WRP), and waterfowl sanctuaries on mallard wetland selection. In addition, we included landscape-level variables that measured areas of sanctuary and WRP within the surrounding landscape of each used and available wetland. We developed 8 wetland selection models according to season (autumn migration, winter, spring migration), hunting season (present, absent), and time period (diurnal, nocturnal). Model averaged parameter estimates indicated wetland selection patterns varied across seasons and time periods, but ducks consistently selected wetlands with greater areas of sanctuary and WRP in the surrounding landscape. Consequently, WRP has the potential to supplement protected area networks in the midcontinent region. Additionally, seasonal variation in wetland selection patterns indicated considering the effects of habitat management and anthropogenic disturbances on migratory waterfowl during the non-breeding period is essential in designing protected area networks.

  14. Management of hydro-biogeochemical connectivity of geographically isolated wetlands to reduce the risk of eutrophication of Lake Winnipeg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creed, Irena F.; Ameli, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Lake Winnipeg - a transboundary water resource that is the 10th largest freshwater lake in the world - was recently listed as the most threatened lake in the world due to eutrophication. Its watershed has experienced amongst the highest geographically isolated wetland (GIW) drainage rates in the world, leading to increased nutrient loads to remaining wetlands and downstream streams and lakes. GIWs are surrounded by uplands - and thus collect and store water from the surrounding landscape during snowmelt or storm events, and filter nutrients before slowly returning water to the water cycle. When drained, GIWs become connected to downstream flows and nutrients move unimpeded from and through them to downstream waters. Therefore, effective GIW management strategies can reduce nutrient loads to regional surface water bodies in the Lake Winnipeg watershed. But, how do we prioritize wetland protection and restoration efforts? We know that hydrologic connections to GIWs vary in length and timing, and hypothesize that long and slow hydrologic connections to a GIW have higher potential for P retention, while short and fast hydrologic connections to a GIW have lower potential for P retention along the flow path, leading to higher P concentrations within the GIW. We test these hypotheses in a watershed that drains into the North Saskatchewan River and ultimately to Lake Winnipeg. Using a novel model that quantifies the continuum of time and length variations of subsurface-surface hydrological connections to each GIW, we explore the relationship between length and time and time of hydrologic connection to a GIW and nutrients in the GIW. We found that GIWs are not always "isolated" islands - rather, they are connected to other surface waters in diverse ways. GIWs with no modeled surface or subsurface hydrological connections had the lowest nutrient concentrations and algal biomass. Recharge GIWs have lower concentrations of nutrients than discharge wetlands. Discharge GIWs with

  15. Simplified Volume-Area-Depth Method for Estimating Water Storage of Isolated Prairie Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minke, A. G.; Westbrook, C. J.; van der Kamp, G.

    2009-05-01

    There are millions of wetlands in shallow depressions on the North American prairies but the quantity of water stored in these depressions remains poorly understood. Hayashi and van der Kamp (2000) used the relationship between volume (V), area (A) and depth (h) to develop an equation for estimating wetland storage. We tested the robustness of their full and simplified V-A-h methods to accurately estimate volume for the range of wetland shapes occurring across the Prairie Pothole Region. These results were contrasted with two commonly implemented V-A regression equations to determine which method estimates volume most accurately. We used detailed topographic data for 27 wetlands in Smith Creek and St. Denis watersheds, Saskatchewan that ranged in surface area and basin shape. The full V-A-h method was found to accurately estimate storage (errors <3%) across wetlands of various shapes, and is therefore suitable for calculating water storage in the variety of wetland surface shapes found in the prairies. Both V-A equations performed poorly, with volume underestimated by an average of 15% and 50% Analysis of the simplified V-A-h method showed that volume errors of <10% can be achieved if the basin and shape coefficients are derived properly. This would involve measuring depth and area twice, with sufficient time between measurements that the natural fluctuations in water storage are reflected. Practically, wetland area and depth should be measured in spring, following snowmelt when water levels are near the peak, and also in late summer prior to water depths dropping below 10 cm. These guidelines for applying the simplified V-A-h method will allow for accurate volume estimations when detailed topographic data are not available. Since the V-A equations were outperformed by the full and simplified V-A-h methods, we conclude that wetland depth and basin morphology should be considered when estimating volume. This will improve storage estimations of natural and human

  16. Epilithonimonas xixisoli sp. nov., isolated from wetland bank-side soil.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hao; Zeng, Yanhua; Huang, Yili

    2014-12-01

    A novel Gram-staining-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterial strain containing flexirubin-type pigments, designated S31(T), was isolated from bank-side soil of the Xixi wetland in Zhejiang province, China. Growth occurred at 10-37 °C (optimum, 32 °C), pH 6-8 (optimum, pH 7) and with 0-2 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 1 %). Strain S31(T) shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Epilithonimonas lactis H1(T) (96.2 %) and Chryseobacterium molle DW3(T) (96.4 %). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that strain S31(T) was a member of the genus Epilithonimonas. The dominant respiratory quinone was MK-6 and the DNA G+C content was 33.3 mol%. The major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, summed feature 3 (iso-C15 : 0 2-OH and/or C16 : 1ω7c) and anteiso-C15 : 0. The major polar lipids of strain S31(T) were phosphatidylethanolamine, three unidentified aminolipids and four unidentified polar lipids. Based on its phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics and phylogenetic data, strain S31(T) represents a novel species of the genus Epilithonimonas, for which the name Epilithonimonas xixisoli sp. nov. (type strain S31(T) = CGMCC 1.12802(T) = NBRC 110387(T)) is proposed.

  17. Flavobacterium dongtanense sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of a wetland reed.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yi-Ping; Hui, Wei; Lee, Jung-Sook; Lee, Keun Chul; Quan, Zhe-Xue

    2011-02-01

    Two strains of Gram-reaction-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, non-motile, aerobic bacteria, designated LW30(T) and LW29, were isolated from the rhizosphere of a wetland reed in Dongtan, Chongming Island, China. The strains formed pale-yellow colonies on R2A plates. Growth occurred at 4-37 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 6-9 (optimum pH 7-8) and in the presence of 0-3 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0-1 %). Oxidase and catalase activities and flexirubin-type pigments were absent. MK-6 was the major respiratory quinone. The major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0), C(15 : 0), iso-C(15 : 1) G and iso-C(17 : 1)ω9c. Strains LW30(T) and LW29 could be differentiated from related species by several phenotypic characteristics. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strains LW30(T) and LW29 in the genus Flavobacterium with high sequence similarity to Flavobacterium cheniae NJ-26(T) (94.0 %) and Flavobacterium indicium GPTSA 100-9(T) (93.9 %). Together with F. indicium GPTSA 100-9(T), strains LW30(T) and LW29 formed a distinct group in the phylogenetic tree. The DNA G+C content was 30 mol%. On the basis of the phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, strains LW30(T) and LW29 represent a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium dongtanense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LW30(T) (=KCTC 22671(T) =CCTCC AB 209201(T)).

  18. The removal of pathogens in surface-flow constructed wetlands and its implications for water reuse.

    PubMed

    Ghermandi, A; Bixio, D; Traverso, P; Cersosimo, I; Thoeye, C

    2007-01-01

    Microbiological quality represents the biggest concern to the reuse of treated wastewater. This paper reports and discusses the results of an international survey on the removal of indicators of microbiological contamination in surface-flow constructed wetlands. Constructed wetlands consistently provide a reduction of 90-99% (1-2 log-removal) in the concentration of indicators such as coliform bacteria and faecal streptococci. This removal is found in wetlands treating water from different types of pretreatment (primary sedimentation, activated sludge, trickling filter, maturation ponds). On the other hand, when the influent is of high microbiological quality, wetlands act as sources of pathogenic contamination. The final water quality, however, is still compatible with medium to no-contact recreational activities and other final water uses. High variability in the effluent quality and seasonality might limit the opportunities for reuse. The role of constructed wetlands in different treatment schemes and the remaining open questions concerning removal mechanisms and reference pathogens are discussed.

  19. Multiple antibiotic resistance patterns of rhizospheric bacteria isolated from Phragmites australis growing in constructed wetland for distillery effluent treatment.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Sonal; Chandra, Ram; Rai, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Susceptibility patterns of 12 different antibiotics were investigated against rhizospheric bacteria isolated from Phragmites australis from three different zones i.e. upper (0-5 cm), middle (5-10 cm), lower (10-15 cm) in constructed wetland system with and without distillery effluent. The major pollutants of distillery effluent were phenols, sulphide, heavy metals, and higher levels of biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD) etc. The antibiotic resistance properties of bacteria were correlated with the heavy metal tolerance (one of distillery pollutant). Twenty-two species from contaminated and seventeen species from non-contaminated site were tested by agar disc-diffusion method. The results revealed that more than 63% of total isolates were resistance towards one or more antibiotics tested from all the three different zones of contaminated sites. The multiple-drug resistance property was shown by total 8 isolates from effluent contaminated region out of which 3 isolates were from upper zone, 3 isolates from middle zone and 2 isolates were from lower zone. Results indicated that isolates from contaminated rhizosphere were found more resistant to antibiotics than isolates from non-contaminated rhizosphere. Further this study produces evidence suggesting that tolerance to antibiotics was acquired by isolates for the adaptation and detoxification of all the pollutants present in the effluent at contaminated site. This consequently facilitated the phytoremediation of effluent, which emerges the tolerance and increases resistance to antibiotics.

  20. Isolation and identification of culturable halophilic bacteria with producing hydrolytic enzyme from Incheh Broun hypersaline wetland in Iran.

    PubMed

    Zarparvar, P; Amoozegar, M A; Babavalian, H; Reza Fallahian, M; Tebyanian, H; Shakeri, F

    2016-10-31

    Incheh Broun hypersaline wetland is located near the border of Turkmenistan in thenorth of Iran. This wetland is notable because of salinity (280g/l) and alteration in pH range (2.8 to 6.8). Eastern part of wetland is affected by wastewater of iodine extraction factory.  Samples were taken from soil, water and salt. Totally, 400 bacterial strains were isolated of which 194 strains were Gram-positive bacilli, 184 strains were Gram-negative rod and 22 strains were Gram-positive cocci. According to phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA, selected strains were placed in three taxonomic phyla including Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Optimum growth was evaluated for salt and 22 strains were found to be moderate halophile and 33 strains were halotolerant. Production of lipase, amylase, gelatinase and protease was examined. Gram-positive bacilli were the main producers of hydrolytic enzymes. Gelatinase and protease were the most frequent enzymes. Gram-positive cocci were the main producers of lipase but they didn't produce amylase.

  1. Efficiency of phenol biodegradation by planktonic Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes (a constructed wetland isolate) vs. root and gravel biofilm.

    PubMed

    Kurzbaum, Eyal; Kirzhner, Felix; Sela, Shlomo; Zimmels, Yoram; Armon, Robert

    2010-09-01

    In the last two decades, constructed wetland systems gained increasing interest in wastewater treatment and as such have been intensively studied around the world. While most of the studies showed excellent removal of various pollutants, the exact contribution, in kinetic terms, of its particular components (such as: root, gravel and water) combined with bacteria is almost nonexistent. In the present study, a phenol degrader bacterium identified as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes was isolated from a constructed wetland, and used in an experimental set-up containing: plants and gravel. Phenol removal rate by planktonic and biofilm bacteria (on sterile Zea mays roots and gravel surfaces) was studied. Specific phenol removal rates revealed significant advantage of planktonic cells (1.04 × 10(-9) mg phenol/CFU/h) compared to root and gravel biofilms: 4.59 × 10(-11)-2.04 × 10(-10) and 8.04 × 10(-11)-4.39 × 10(-10) (mg phenol/CFU/h), respectively. In batch cultures, phenol biodegradation kinetic parameters were determined by biomass growth rates and phenol removal as a function of time. Based on Haldane equation, kinetic constants such as μ(max) = 1.15/h, K(s) = 35.4 mg/L and K(i) = 198.6 mg/L fit well phenol removal by P. pseudoalcaligenes. Although P. pseudoalcaligenes planktonic cells showed the highest phenol removal rate, in constructed wetland systems and especially in those with sub-surface flow, it is expected that surface associated microorganisms (biofilms) will provide a much higher contribution in phenol and other organics removal, due to greater bacterial biomass. Factors affecting the performance of planktonic vs. biofilm bacteria in sub-surface flow constructed wetlands are further discussed.

  2. Diffusion of Nutrients in an Isolated Wetland Resulting From Shallow Pore Water Gradients Affected by Antecedent Soil Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, J. H.; Jawitz, J. W.; Dunne, E. J.; Perkins, D. B.

    2007-05-01

    Historically sequestered nutrients in wetland soils may be gradually released to the water column through the process commonly referred to as internal loading. The watershed for Lake Okeechobee, FL (USA) is heavily agricultural and excess nutrients in this area are drained to the Lake by ditches and canals. Formerly isolated, wetlands in this area have also been extensively ditched and drained. In this study, diffusive fluxes of nutrients were calculated using Fick's First Law from shallow pore water gradients, and later compared to fluxes measured by an incubated laboratory experiment on 10-cm intact soil cores from the same sites. Three intact soil cores from a wetland located on an operational beef farm were used to measure total phosphorus (TP), along with soil properties such as porosity, bulk density, and pH. Simultaneously, pore water concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) were also measured at the same three sites for a period of twelve months, and compared to surface water concentrations during flooded periods. A strong correlation between concentration gradients in pore water SRP and those observed in soil TP, suggests that shallow pore water concentrations reflect antecedent soil conditions. If this is true, then fluxes associated with diffusion and advection could greatly affect the total ground water fluxes across the soil-water interface. Fickian diffusive fluxes, estimated six times over a twelve month sampling period, were found to vary between 7-38 mg.m-2.d-1 for TOC, 1-18 mg.m-2.d-1 for TKN, and 0.04-0.86 mg.m-2.d-1 for SRP. While factors such as wetland stage and hydroperiod may have affected the fluxes, it is ultimately the concentration gradients across the soil-water interface that drives diffusive fluxes.

  3. [Book review] Wetland birds: Habitat resources and conservation implications, by Milton W. Weller

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Milton Weller's love of wetlands and their inhabitants comes through in this book, and he continues a leadership role in a world of field ecologists where fewer and fewer are really experiencing the wet and wild.

  4. Patterns in Habitat and Fish Assemblages within Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands and Implications for Sampling Design

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discerning fish - habitat associations at a variety of spatial scales is relevant to evaluating stressor responses and assessment protocols in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. NMDS ordination of electrofishing catch-per-effort data identified an overriding influence of geography an...

  5. Patterns in Habitat and Fish Assemblages within Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands and Implications for Sampling Design

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discerning fish - habitat associations at a variety of spatial scales is relevant to evaluating stressor responses and assessment protocols in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. NMDS ordination of electrofishing catch-per-effort data identified an overriding influence of geography an...

  6. Biotic wetland connectivity—supporting a new approach for wetland policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amezaga, J. M.; Santamaría, L.; Green, A. J.

    2002-06-01

    Wetlands are key habitats connected physically and socially with processes occurring over a much wider territory. The biotic connection through dispersal mechanisms among wetlands is of primary importance to wetland management and policies. However, traditional wetland conservation approaches are based on the preservation of isolated sites considered to be of special importance (typically owing to their importance for concentrations of migratory waterbirds). Research linking local species richness and bird migration suggests that the effect of wetland loss on regional diversity might be much larger than what would be expected from direct habitat loss. Since the biotic connection among wetlands serviced by waterbirds appears to be more efficient within a limited range, the distribution of wetlands in space is a key aspect determining wetland connectedness even in the absence of direct hydrologic links. Protected areas should thus be defined with regard to waterfowl movements and waterbird migration as functional processes contributing to aquatic species migration and local species richness. This calls for a regional approach to wetland management within a continental context. This paper aims at defining an operational view of the dispersion function of wetlands and its implication for conservation policies. For this purpose, we examined the conservation policies of the Ramsar Convention (the international treaty that protects wetlands) and the European Union (as an example of relevant continental level policy-making) from the viewpoint of bird-mediated dispersal of aquatic organisms. We propose nine specific avenues for the inclusion of bird-mediated dispersal in the policy documents examined. Non-governmental organisations and other organisations working in waterbird conservation should also recognise the importance of their policies for aquatic biodiversity at broader levels and avoid compartmentalising their conservation activities.

  7. Geographically Isolated Wetlands and Hydrologic Connectivity: Quantifying Seasonal and Annual Downstream Effects using a Hybrid Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, H. E.; Sander, H. A.; Lane, C.; Zhao, C.; Price, K.; D'Amico, E.; Christensen, J.

    2014-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) are distinguishable as depressional landscape features that are entirely surrounded by uplands. This nomenclature does not necessarily imply functional isolation because these systems may exhibit a gradient of hydrologic, biological, or chemical connections to other surface waters. In this study, we examine the influence of GIWs on streamflow, a potential indicator of GIW hydrologic connectivity with surface waters. Our method involves the Spatial Stream Network (SSN) model, which considers spatial autocorrelation of model covariates explicitly, and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which predicts streamflow across a network of 579 subbasins in the lower Neuse River Basin, North Carolina, USA. Our study results suggest that GIWs influence streamflow, though the effect is limited. The farther GIWs are from a stream, the greater their capacity to increase streamflow due to the physiographic setting and hypothesized connectivity, transit times and sequencing of watershed hydrologic connectivity in the study area across seasonal and annual scales. However, as the combined extent of GIWs and non-GIWs increases in subbasins, seasonal and annual streamflow decreases. Results also suggest that other landscape indicators of watershed-scale hydrology, when coupled with wetland features on the landscape, explain variations in seasonal and annual simulated streamflow. Our study findings begin to elucidate the aggregate influence of GIWs on streamflow, providing insights for future decision-making on GIW protection and management.

  8. Potential pathogens, antimicrobial patterns and genotypic diversity of Escherichia coli isolates in constructed wetlands treating swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, A M; Murinda, Shelton E; DebRoy, Chitrita; Reddy, Gudigopura B

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli populations originating from swine houses through constructed wetlands were analyzed for potential pathogens, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, and genotypic diversity. Escherichia coli isolates (n = 493) were screened for the presence of the following virulence genes: stx1, stx2 and eae (Shiga toxin-producing E. coli [STEC]), heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) genes and heat stable toxin STa and STb (enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), cytotoxin necrotizing factors 1 and 2 (cnf1 and cnf2 [necrotoxigenic E. coli- NTEC]), as well as O and H antigens, and the presence of the antibiotic resistance genes blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCMY-2, tet A, tet B, tet C, mph(A), aadA, StrA/B, sul1, sul2 and sul3. The commensal strains were further screened for 16 antimicrobials and characterized by BOX AIR-1 PCR for unique genotypes. The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was for tetracycline, followed by erythromycin, ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole and kanamycin. Our data showed that most of the isolates had high distribution of single or multidrug-resistant (MDR) genotypes. Therefore, the occurrence of MDR E. coli in the wetland is a matter of great concern due to possible transfer of resistance genes from nonpathogenic to pathogenic strains or vice versa in the environment.

  9. Reprint of Ecological health status of the Lagos wetland ecosystems: Implications for coastal risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agboola, Julius I.; Ndimele, Prince E.; Odunuga, Shakirudeen; Akanni, Adeniran; Kosemani, Bosede; Ahove, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    Lagos, a major urban agglomeration in the world is characterized by wetlands and basin for upstream rivers such as Ogun, Oshun and Yewa Rivers. Ongoing environmental pressures exerted by large-scale land reclamation for residential quarters, refuse and sewage dumping, and other uses, however, are suspected to have had a substantial impact on ecological health of the Lagos wetland ecosystems over the last few decades. To determine the impact of these pressures, we examined spatial changes in three wetlands areas- Badore/Langbasa (BL), Festac/Iba/Ijegun (FI) and Ologe/Otto-Awori (OO) through field sample collection and analyses of surface water, sediments, air-water interface gas fluxes and vegetations. Surface water conductivity, total suspended solids (TSS), alkalinity, chloride, biological oxygen demand (BOD), nitrate, phosphate and heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Fe, Na, Mn, Pb, Cd, K and Ni) exhibited relative spatial stability while other water quality parameters varied significantly (P < 0.05) across the wetland areas. Also, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) contributed to most of the total dissolved solids (TDS) since only DIC correlated significantly with TDS (r = 0.889; P = 0.05, n = 12) and TS (r = 0.891; P = 0.05, n = 12), suggesting a strong capacity for carbon sequestration and carbon sink across the wetland areas. None of the encountered vegetation species are in the vulnerable category of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). There are indications of steady rise in greenhouse gas levels in Lagos since air CO2 value at BL have reached global threshold of 400 ppm with OO and FI closely approaching. We conclude that the Lagos wetland ecosystems, especially OO and FI still have some semblance of natural habitat. However, further destruction and unwise use of the resources could cause damage to physical, chemical, geological and biological processes in nature, which could result to grave socio-economic and cultural consequences to the local

  10. Ecological health status of the Lagos wetland ecosystems: Implications for coastal risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agboola, Julius I.; Ndimele, Prince E.; Odunuga, Shakirudeen; Akanni, Adeniran; Kosemani, Bosede; Ahove, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    Lagos, a major urban agglomeration in the world is characterized by wetlands and basin for upstream rivers such as Ogun, Oshun and Yewa Rivers. Ongoing environmental pressures exerted by large-scale land reclamation for residential quarters, refuse and sewage dumping, and other uses, however, are suspected to have had a substantial impact on ecological health of the Lagos wetland ecosystems over the last few decades. To determine the impact of these pressures, we examined spatial changes in three wetlands areas- Badore/Langbasa (BL), Festac/Iba/Ijegun (FI) and Ologe/Otto-Awori (OO) through field sample collection and analyses of surface water, sediments, air-water interface gas fluxes and vegetations. Surface water conductivity, total suspended solids (TSS), alkalinity, chloride, biological oxygen demand (BOD), nitrate, phosphate and heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Fe, Na, Mn, Pb, Cd, K and Ni) exhibited relative spatial stability while other water quality parameters varied significantly (P < 0.05) across the wetland areas. Also, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) contributed to most of the total dissolved solids (TDS) since only DIC correlated significantly with TDS (r = 0.889; P = 0.05, n = 12) and TS (r = 0.891; P = 0.05, n = 12), suggesting a strong capacity for carbon sequestration and carbon sink across the wetland areas. None of the encountered vegetation species are in the vulnerable category of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). There are indications of steady rise in greenhouse gas levels in Lagos since air CO2 value at BL have reached global threshold of 400 ppm with OO and FI closely approaching. We conclude that the Lagos wetland ecosystems, especially OO and FI still have some semblance of natural habitat. However, further destruction and unwise use of the resources could cause damage to physical, chemical, geological and biological processes in nature, which could result to grave socio-economic and cultural consequences to the local

  11. Dry down impacts on apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) demography: Implications for wetland water management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darby, P.C.; Bennetts, R.E.; Percival, H.F.

    2008-01-01

    Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa Say) are prey for several wetland-dependent predators, most notably for the endangered Florida snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis Vieillot). Management concerns for kites have been raised regarding the impacts of wetland dry downs on snails, but little data exists to validate these concerns. We simulated drying events in experimental tanks, where we observed that snail survival patterns, regardless of hydrology, were driven by a post-reproductive die off. In contrast to earlier reports of little to no dry down tolerance, we found that 70% of pre-reproductive adult-sized snails survived a 12-week dry down. Smaller size classes of snails exhibited significantly lower survival rates (< 50% after eight weeks dry). Field surveys showed that 77% of egg production occurs in April-June. Our hydrologic analyses of six peninsular Florida wetlands showed that most dry downs overlapped a portion of the peak snail breeding season, and 70% of dry downs were ??? 12 weeks in duration. Dry down timing can affect recruitment by truncating annual egg production and stranding juveniles. Dry down survival rates and seasonal patterns of egg cluster production helped define a range of hydrologic conditions that support robust apple snail populations, and illustrate why multiple characteristics of dry down events should be considered in developing target hydrologic regimes for wetland fauna. ?? 2008, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  12. Changes in wetland sediment elevation following major storms: implications for estimating trends in relative sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    Hurricanes can be important agents of geomorphic change in coastal marshes and mangrove forests. Hurricanes can cause large-scale redistribution of sediments within the coastal environment resulting in sedimentation, erosion, disruption of vegetated substrates, or some combination of these processes in coastal wetlands. It has been proposed that such sediment pulsing events are important at maintaining wetland sediment elevations in sediment-poor settings with high rates of relative sea-level rise, such as the Mississippi River Delta. But do these pulsing events result in a net gain in sediment elevation even when substantial amounts of sediment are deposited? Clearly sediment erosion and scour would result in a loss of elevation. But will a substantial sediment deposit on poorly consolidated sediments always result in a net gain in elevation? If the wetland vegetation is killed by wind, tidal surge, or the introduction of saline water, will there be a collapse of sediment elevation in the absence of root production and ongoing decomposition of root matter? During the past decade several wetlands where my colleagues and I have monitored sedimentation and elevation change have been struck by one to several hurricanes. This paper describes the range of sediment elevation responses to hurricane strikes, the suggested mechanisms driving those responses, the implications for estimating long-term trends in relative sea-level rise, and future research needs for improving our understanding of the role that major storms play in wetland sediment elevation dynamics. For many wetlands the change in sediment elevation was directly proportional to the amount of sediment deposited by the storm. But surprisingly, there was a loss of elevation in some wetlands with substantial sediment deposits. In these wetlands, the impact of the storm was either direct (sedimentation and compaction) or indirect (vegetation death), and the effect on sediment elevation was either permanent or

  13. River and Wetland Food Webs in Australia's Wet-Dry Tropics: General Principles and Implications for Management.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, M. M.; Bunn, S. E.; Davies, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    The tropical rivers of northern Australia are internationally recognised for their high ecological and cultural values. They have largely unmodified flow regimes and are comparatively free of the impacts associated with intensive land use. However, there is growing demand for agricultural development and existing pressures, such as weeds and feral animals, threaten their ecological integrity. Using the international literature to provide a conceptual framework and drawing on limited published and unpublished data on rivers in northern Australia, we have derived five general principles about food webs and related ecosystem processes that both characterise tropical rivers of northern Australia and have important implications for their management. These are: (1) Seasonal hydrology is a strong driver of ecosystem processes and food web structure; (2) Hydrological connectivity is largely intact and underpins important terrestrial-aquatic food web subsidies; (3) River and wetland food webs are strongly dependent on algal production; (4) A few common macroconsumers species have a strong influence on benthic food webs; (5) Omnivory is widespread and food chains are short. These principles have implications for the management and protection of tropical rivers and wetlands of northern Australia and provide a framework for the formation of testable hypotheses in future research programs.

  14. Degradation of bacterial quorum sensing signaling molecules by the microscopic yeast Trichosporon loubieri isolated from tropical wetland waters.

    PubMed

    Wong, Cheng-Siang; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Chen, Jian Woon; Chong, Yee Meng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-09-25

    Proteobacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactones as signaling molecules, which will bind to their cognate receptor and activate quorum sensing-mediated phenotypes in a population-dependent manner. Although quorum sensing signaling molecules can be degraded by bacteria or fungi, there is no reported work on the degradation of such molecules by basidiomycetous yeast. By using a minimal growth medium containing N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine lactone as the sole source of carbon, a wetland water sample from Malaysia was enriched for microbial strains that can degrade N-acylhomoserine lactones, and consequently, a basidiomycetous yeast strain WW1C was isolated. Morphological phenotype and molecular analyses confirmed that WW1C was a strain of Trichosporon loubieri. We showed that WW1C degraded AHLs with N-acyl side chains ranging from 4 to 10 carbons in length, with or without oxo group substitutions at the C3 position. Re-lactonisation bioassays revealed that WW1C degraded AHLs via a lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of degradation of N-acyl-homoserine lactones and utilization of N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine as carbon and nitrogen source for growth by basidiomycetous yeast from tropical wetland water; and the degradation of bacterial quorum sensing molecules by an eukaryotic yeast.

  15. Degradation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing Signaling Molecules by the Microscopic Yeast Trichosporon loubieri Isolated from Tropical Wetland Waters

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Cheng-Siang; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Chen, Jian Woon; Chong, Yee Meng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Proteobacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactones as signaling molecules, which will bind to their cognate receptor and activate quorum sensing-mediated phenotypes in a population-dependent manner. Although quorum sensing signaling molecules can be degraded by bacteria or fungi, there is no reported work on the degradation of such molecules by basidiomycetous yeast. By using a minimal growth medium containing N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine lactone as the sole source of carbon, a wetland water sample from Malaysia was enriched for microbial strains that can degrade N-acylhomoserine lactones, and consequently, a basidiomycetous yeast strain WW1C was isolated. Morphological phenotype and molecular analyses confirmed that WW1C was a strain of Trichosporon loubieri. We showed that WW1C degraded AHLs with N-acyl side chains ranging from 4 to 10 carbons in length, with or without oxo group substitutions at the C3 position. Re-lactonisation bioassays revealed that WW1C degraded AHLs via a lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of degradation of N-acyl-homoserine lactones and utilization of N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine as carbon and nitrogen source for growth by basidiomycetous yeast from tropical wetland water; and the degradation of bacterial quorum sensing molecules by an eukaryotic yeast. PMID:24072030

  16. Spatiotemporal dynamics of prairie wetland networks: power-law scaling and implications for conservation planning.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christopher K

    2010-07-01

    Although habitat networks show promise for conservation planning at regional scales, their spatiotemporal dynamics have not been well studied, especially in climate-sensitive landscapes. Here I use satellite remote sensing to compile wetland habitat networks from the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America. An ensemble of networks assembled across a hydrologic gradient from deluge to drought and a range of representative dispersal distances exhibits power-law scaling of important topological parameters. Prairie wetland networks are "meso-worlds" with mean topological distance increasing faster with network size than small-world networks, but slower than a regular lattice (or "large world"). This scaling implies rapid dispersal through wetland networks without some of the risks associated with "small worlds" (e.g., extremely rapid propagation of disease or disturbance). Retrospective analysis of wetland networks establishes a climatic envelope for landscape connectivity in the PPR, where I show that a changing climate might severely impact metapopulation viability and restrict long-distance dispersal and range shifts. More generally, this study demonstrates an efficient approach to conservation planning at a level of abstraction addressing key drivers of the global biodiversity crisis: habitat fragmentation and climatic change.

  17. Hydrogen isotope variability in prairie wetland systems: implications for studies of migratory connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Lauren E; Clark, Robert G; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes (delta2H) are often used to infer the origins of migratory animals based on the strong correlation between deuterium content of tissues and long-term patterns of precipitation. However, the extreme flood and drought dynamics of surface waters in prairie wetland systems could mask these expected correlations. We investigated H isotopic variability in an aquatic food web associated with Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) that rely heavily on wetland-derived aerial insects for food. We evaluated isotopic turnover and incorporation of environmental water into tissue, processes that could affect H isotopic composition. Wetland water and aquatic invertebrates showed intra- and interannual H isotopic variation mainly related to evaporation and the amount and timing of precipitation. Snails showed rapid turnover of tissue deuterium and a large contribution of environmental water to their tissues. Swallow feather deuterium (delta2Hf) was variable but did not clearly follow changes in any of the food web compartments measured. Instead, isotopic variability may have been driven by shifts in the type or relative amounts of grey consumed and types of wetlands used. Nevertheless, despite relatively high variance in delta2Hf, the majority of birds fell within the predicted range of delta2Hf for the study area, revealing that significant trophic averaging occurred. However, both (presumed) diet shifts and variable hydrological conditions have the potential to greatly increase variance that must be considered when assigning origins of migratory animals based on delta2H.

  18. Fish assemblages, connectivity, and habitat rehabilitation in a diked Great Lakes coastal wetland complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowalski, Kurt P.; Wiley, Michael J.; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Fish and plant assemblages in the highly modified Crane Creek coastal wetland complex of Lake Erie were sampled to characterize their spatial and seasonal patterns and to examine the implications of the hydrologic connection of diked wetland units to Lake Erie. Fyke netting captured 52 species and an abundance of fish in the Lake Erie–connected wetlands, but fewer than half of those species and much lower numbers and total masses of fish were captured in diked wetland units. Although all wetland units were immediately adjacent to Lake Erie, there were also pronounced differences in water quality and wetland vegetation between the hydrologically isolated and lake-connected wetlands. Large seasonal variations in fish assemblage composition and biomass were observed in connected wetland units but not in disconnected units. Reestablishment of hydrologic connectivity in diked wetland units would allow coastal Lake Erie fish to use these vegetated habitats seasonally, although connectivity does appear to pose some risks, such as the expansion of invasive plants and localized reductions in water quality. Periodic isolation and drawdown of the diked units could still be used to mimic intermediate levels of disturbance and manage invasive wetland vegetation.

  19. Hydrogeochemistry of groundwater in coastal wetlands: implications for coastal conservation in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, R; Soulsby, C

    2001-01-29

    Groundwater in a shallow coastal aquifer in north east Scotland was monitored over the hydrological year October 1996-September 1997. Groundwater flow from inland areas sustained freshwater conditions in a dune-wetland complex of conservation importance. In particular, seasonal flooding of the coastal wetlands due to water table rise provided important roosting and breeding habitats for waterfowl. Hydrogeochemical analysis revealed that groundwater in the shallow sand aquifer was circum-neutral, and non-saline, despite being within 50 m of the sea and only 1 m above the mean high water mark. Calcium and HCO3 were the dominant cation and anion respectively, reflecting weathering processes in the aquifer. Use of the geochemical code NETPATH indicated that calcite weathering in shell fragments within the sand was the primary source of Ca and alkalinity generation. The concentrations of Na and Cl were also important, though these can be explained primarily by atmospheric inputs from precipitation. In detail, the spatial and temporal variation in groundwater chemistry was remarkably complex for what intuitively appeared a simple aquifer system. Temporal variations in groundwater chemistry mainly related to the seasonal event of groundwater recharge. Thus, the main period of rising groundwater levels resulted in a marked dilution of solutes in the aquifer, implying that water storage greatly increased in a relatively short period. A period of several weeks appeared to be required for dissolution processes to proceed to equilibrium. Spatial variation in groundwater chemistry appears to relate to the spatial distribution of geochemical processes in different hydrogeological units. Sulphate reduction, alkalinity generation and Fe precipitation appear to be locally important processes. The chemistry of groundwater maintains the wetland habitat by providing freshwater conditions that allow populations of various plant species to flourish. The potentially large recharge

  20. Rapid changes in small fish mercury concentrations in estuarine wetlands: Implications for wildlife risk and monitoring programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagles-Smith, C. A.; Ackerman, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    Small fish are commonly used to assess mercury (Hg) risk to wildlife and monitor Hg in wetlands. However, limited research has evaluated short-term Hg variability in small fish, which can have important implications for monitoring programs and risk assessment. We conducted a time-series study of Hg concentrations in two small fish species representing benthic (longjaw mudsuckers [Gillichthys mirabilis]) and pelagic (threespine sticklebacks [Gasterosteus aculeatus]) food-webs within three wetland habitats in San Francisco Bay Estuary. We simultaneously monitored prey deliveries, nest initiation, and chick hatching dates of breeding Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri), the most abundant nesting piscivore in the region. Mudsuckers and sticklebacks were the predominant prey fish, comprising 36% and 25% of tern diet, and Hg concentrations averaged (geometric mean ?? SE, ??g/g dw) 0.44 ?? 0.01 and 0.68 ?? 0.03, respectively. Fish Hg concentrations varied substantially over time following a quadratic form in both species, increasing 40% between March and May then decreasing 40% between May and July. Importantly, Forster's terns initiated 68% of nests and 31% of chicks hatched during the period of peak Hg concentrations in prey fish. These results illustrate the importance of short-term temporal variation in small fish Hg concentrations for both Hg monitoring programs and assessing wildlife risk.

  1. A new ranavirus isolated from Pseudacris clarkii tadpoles in playa wetlands in the southern High Plains, Texas.

    PubMed

    Torrence, Shannon M; Green, D Earl; Benson, Catherine J; Ip, Hon S; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T

    2010-06-01

    Mass die-offs of amphibian populations pose a challenging problem for conservation biologists. Ranaviruses often cause systemic infections in amphibians and, in North America, are especially virulent and lethal to larvae and metamorphs. In this paper we describe a novel ranavirus isolate as well as the first recorded occurrence of ranavirus in the southern High Plains of Texas and in associated populations of the spotted chorus frog Pseudacris clarkii. The breeding sites were playas, that is, wetlands that fill via isolated thunderstorms that can occur infrequently; thus, not every playa has water or breeding amphibians annually. We did not detect ranavirus in sympatric anurans, but other reports document ranaviruses in Pseudacris spp. elsewhere. The occurrence of multiple isolates of ranavirus in a number of Pseudacris species suggests that this genus of frogs is highly susceptible to ranaviruses and may experience exceptionally high mortality rates from infection. Thus, the virus may contribute to substantial seasonal population declines and low seasonal recruitment, with negative impacts on populations of breeding adults in successive years.

  2. Isotopic composition of methane released from wetlands: Implications for the increase in atmospheric methane

    SciTech Connect

    Quay, P.D.; King, S.L.; Lansdown, J.M.; Wilbur, D.O. )

    1988-12-01

    Measurements of the delta-C{sup 13} of methane released from tropical, temperate, and arctic wetland sites are reported. The mean delta C{sup 13} values (relative to PDB carbonate standard) for peat bogs and Alaskan tundra are {minus}53 + or{minus}8, {minus}66 + or{minus}5 and {minus}64 + or{minus}5{per thousand}, respectively. These measurements combined with methane flux estimates yield a flux-weighted global average delta-C{sup 13} value of {minus}59 + or{minus}6{per thousand} for methane released from wetlands, a major natural methane source. The agreement between the measured delta-C{sup 13} for methane emitted from wetlands and the calculated steady state value of approximately {minus}6{per thousand} for the delta-C{sup 13} of preindustrial methane sources suggests that methane was predominantly produced biogenically in the preindustrial era. The industrial era time rate of change of the delta-C{sup 13} of the global methane flux is calculated from estimates of the growth rate of the major anthropogenically derived methane sources and the C{sup 13} composition of these sources, and compared to the measured change in the delta-C{sup 13} of methane during the last 300 years. Based on these results, it is estimated that 13 + or{minus}8% of the current global methane flux is derived abiogenically from natural gas and biomass burning, whereas the remainder is derived biogenically primarily from wetlands, rice paddies, and livestock. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Postbreeding movements of American Avocets and implications for wetland connectivity in the western Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plissner, Jonathan H.; Haig, Susan M.; Oring, L.W.

    2000-01-01

    Wetlands in the western Great Basin of the United States are patchily distributed and undergo extensive seasonal and annual variation in water levels. The American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana) is one of many shorebird species that use these wetlands as breeding and migratory stopover sites and must adjust to variable conditions. We used radio telemetry to determine postbreeding, premigratory movement patterns of avocets throughout the region. In 1996 and 1997, 185 breeding adults were captured and fitted with radio transmitters at five breeding areas in Oregon, California, and Nevada. Regular aerial and ground surveys were conducted at the five main study areas from June through September, or until all avocets had left a site. Other wetlands in the western Great Basin also were surveyed by aircraft for the presence of radio-marked birds. Fifty-six percent of radio-marked avocets were still detected in the region at least eight weeks after capture. Each of these individuals was detected at an average of 2.1 lakes (range 0 to 6), with 74% found at more than one lake system. Forty radio-marked individuals moved at least 200 km between wetlands prior to migration, most of which dispersed northward. Male and female patterns did not differ significantly. Overall, movements may be associated with a prebasic molt, exploitation of a superabundant food source in northern lakes, and reconnaissance for future breeding efforts or staging sites. These results also demonstrate wide-ranging patterns of dispersal in this species and suggest a need for the consideration of large-scale habitat connectivity issues in establishing conservation strategies for shorebirds in the western Great Basin.

  4. Mechanical resistance properties of gravel used in subsurface flow constructed wetlands: implications for clogging.

    PubMed

    Pedescoll, Anna; Passos, Fabiana; Alba, Elisenda; García, Joan; Puigagut, Jaume

    2011-01-01

    Gravel constitutes the filter medium in subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF CWs) and its porosity and hydraulic conductivity decrease over time (clogging), limiting the lifespan of the systems. Using gravel of poor quality accelerates clogging in wetlands. In this study, gravel samples from six different wetland systems were compared with regards to their mineral composition and mechanical resistance properties. Results showed that both mineralogy and texture are related to mechanical resistance. Accordingly, gravel with high content of quartz (> 80%) showed a lower percentage of broken particles (0.18-1.03%) than those with lower content of quartz (2.42-4.56% media broken). Although granite is formed by high durability minerals, its non-uniform texture results in a lower resistance to abrasion (ca. 10% less resistance than calcareous gravel). Therefore, it is recommended to use gravels composed mainly of quartz or, when it is not available, limestone gravels (rounded and uniform) are recommended instead. The resistance to abrasion (LAA test) seems to be a good indicator to determine the mechanical properties of gravels used in CWs. It is recommended to use gravels with LAA below 30% in order to avoid a rapid clogging due to gravel crumbling and subsequent mineral solids accumulation.

  5. Implications of climate change for wetland-dependent birds in the Prairie Pothole Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steen, Valerie; Skagen, Susan; Melcher, Cynthia P.

    2016-01-01

    The habitats and food resources required to support breeding and migrant birds dependent on North American prairie wetlands are threatened by impending climate change. The North American Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) hosts nearly 120 species of wetland-dependent birds representing 21 families. Strategic management requires knowledge of avian habitat requirements and assessment of species most vulnerable to future threats. We applied bioclimatic species distribution models (SDMs) to project range changes of 29 wetland-dependent bird species using ensemble modeling techniques, a large number of General Circulation Models (GCMs), and hydrological climate covariates. For the U.S. PPR, mean projected range change, expressed as a proportion of currently occupied range, was −0.31 (± 0.22 SD; range − 0.75 to 0.16), and all but two species were projected to lose habitat. Species associated with deeper water were expected to experience smaller negative impacts of climate change. The magnitude of climate change impacts was somewhat lower in this study than earlier efforts most likely due to use of different focal species, varying methodologies, different modeling decisions, or alternative GCMs. Quantification of the projected species-specific impacts of climate change using species distribution modeling offers valuable information for vulnerability assessments within the conservation planning process.

  6. Iron and manganese removal in wetland treatment systems: rates, processes and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Batty, Lesley; Lesley, Batty; Hooley, Daniel; Daniel, Hooley; Younger, Paul; Paul, Younger

    2008-05-01

    Mine water drainage is a significant environmental problem throughout the world and constructed wetlands are being increasingly used to treat such contaminating discharges. Iron and manganese removal within a wetland treatment system at Whittle Colliery, UK which receives alkaline waters, was monitored to determine rates and processes within the different components of the system. In addition hourly samples were taken for a period of 24 h to determine the effect of photosynthetic organisms on metal removal. Significant iron removal occurred, with removal rates of 98% at Whittle. Oxidation of iron to form iron hydroxide precipitates was the dominant removal process in the proximal sections of the treatment system (i.e. oxidation ponds and initial reaches of the wetland), whereas biotic removal processes appeared to become more important in distal parts of the systems, where iron concentrations were much lower. Significant manganese removal was also observed, although this did not become substantial until iron concentrations had fallen below 5 mg/L. The process by which manganese was removed is not clear, but bacterially-mediated oxidation may be involved. Further elucidation of the relative importance of abiotic and biotic removal processes within treatment systems is important in the design and long-term management of constructed systems.

  7. Mangrove expansion in the Gulf of Mexico with climate change: Implications for wetland health and resistance to rising sea levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comeaux, Rebecca S.; Allison, Mead A.; Bianchi, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    Black mangroves ( Avicennia spp.) are hypothesized to expand their latitudinal range with global climate change in the 21st century, induced by a reduction in the frequency and severity of coastal freezes, which are known to limit mangrove colony extent and individual tree size. The Gulf of Mexico is a prime candidate for population expansion to occur because it is located at the northward limit of black mangrove habitat. This may come at the expense of existing coastal saline wetlands that are dominantly Spartina spp. marsh grasses. The present study was conducted to focus on the implications of a marsh to mangrove transition in Gulf wetlands, specifically: (1) wetland resistance to accelerating eustatic sea level rise (ESLR) rates; (2) resistance to wave attack in large storms (increased cyclonic storm frequency/intensity is predicted with future climate warming); and (3) organic carbon sequestration and wetland soil geochemistry. Field sites of adjacent and inter-grown Avicennia germinans mangrove and Spartina marsh populations in similar geomorphological setting were selected in back-barrier areas near Port Aransas and Galveston, TX. Elevation surveys in the more mature Port Aransas site indicate mangrove vegetated areas are 4 cm higher in elevation than surrounding marsh on an average regional scale, and 1-2 cm higher at the individual mangrove scale. 210Pb and 137Cs accumulation rates and loss on ignition data indicate that mineral trapping is 4.1 times higher and sediment organics are 1.7 times lower in mangroves at Port Aransas. This additional mineral trapping does not differ in grain size character from marsh accumulation. Elevation change may also be effected by soil displacement of higher root volumes in mangrove cores. Port Aransas porosities are lower in mangrove rooted horizons, with a corresponding increase in sediment strength, suggesting mangrove intervals are more resistant to wave-induced erosion during storm events. Port Aransas mangroves

  8. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for the endangered wetland plant Adenophora palustris (Campanulaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Otake, Kuniaki; Kondo, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Sonoko; Masumoto, Ikuko; Iwahori, Katsumi; Isagi, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Adenophora palustris (Campanulaceae) is an endangered wetland plant species in Japan. Although it is widely distributed in East Asia, only six extant populations are known in Japan, with fewer than 1000 individuals in total. We developed 15 microsatellite markers for this species and confirmed their utility for the closely related species A. triphylla var. japonica. Methods and Results: Ten polymorphic loci were characterized for genetic variation within three populations of A. palustris. The number of alleles per locus ranged from four to 15, with an average of 9.3; the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.48 to 0.89, with an average of 0.74. Nine loci were successfully amplified in A. triphylla var. japonica, and three of these loci showed polymorphism. Conclusions: These markers are useful for investigating genetic diversity and gene flow within and among remnant populations of A. palustris in Japan, and the results will provide crucial information for conservation. PMID:27672523

  9. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Production and Consumption after the Rewetting of Soils in Isolated Wetlands and Surrounding Pasture Upland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Inglett, K.; Inglett, P.; Clark, M.; Reddy, R.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the most potent greenhouse gases and the highest N2O emissions from pasture lands are always found after the rewetting of soils which is caused by events, such as rainfall and irrigation. The N2O emission peaks are attributed to denitrification because of the anaerobic condition in the soil created by rewetting and the accumulated substrates (nitrate and labile organic carbon) during the drying period. Therefore, the N2O emissions after rewetting represent the difference between N2O production and N2O consumption by denitrification. Isolated wetlands, which have no surface water connectivity with nearby water bodies, are common feature in many pasture ecosystems. They act as water and nutrient storage systems at landscape scale and have distinct biogeochemical features with the surrounding pasture uplands. An isolated wetland located in cow-grazing pasture was selected as our study site. Study area has been stratified into three zones according to the vegetative communities and basin morphology: wetland center zone (Center), transient edge zone (Edge) and pasture upland zone (Upland). Six transects extended from the center of wetland to surrounding pasture upland have been set up, in which 3 transects have been fenced aiming for excluding the cow and calf grazing. Soil samples (0-10 cm) were collected in each zone along each transects. Soil biogeochemical properties were characterized on soil subsamples. A laboratory incubation study was performed to quantify N2O production and consumption rates of the rewetted soils. Our results indicated that the N2O production process normally had a biphasic pattern, with a low production rates in 6 h after rewetting, followed by a faster production rate between 6 h to the time when accumulated N2O began to be consumed. In the first 6 h after rewetting, soils from Edge had the highest production rates because of the relative higher nitrate content. Nitrous oxide production rates were significantly

  10. Bacterial Survival under Extreme UV Radiation: A Comparative Proteomics Study of Rhodobacter sp., Isolated from High Altitude Wetlands in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Vilma; Hengst, Martha; Kurte, Lenka; Dorador, Cristina; Jeffrey, Wade H.; Wattiez, Ruddy; Molina, Veronica; Matallana-Surget, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Salar de Huasco, defined as a polyextreme environment, is a high altitude saline wetland in the Chilean Altiplano (3800 m.a.s.l.), permanently exposed to the highest solar radiation doses registered in the world. We present here the first comparative proteomics study of a photoheterotrophic bacterium, Rhodobacter sp., isolated from this remote and hostile habitat. We developed an innovative experimental approach using different sources of radiation (in situ sunlight and UVB lamps), cut-off filters (Mylar, Lee filters) and a high-throughput, label-free quantitative proteomics method to comprehensively analyze the effect of seven spectral bands on protein regulation. A hierarchical cluster analysis of 40 common proteins revealed that all conditions containing the most damaging UVB radiation induced similar pattern of protein regulation compared with UVA and visible light spectral bands. Moreover, it appeared that the cellular adaptation of Rhodobacter sp. to osmotic stress encountered in the hypersaline environment from which it was originally isolated, might further a higher resistance to damaging UV radiation. Indeed, proteins involved in the synthesis and transport of key osmoprotectants, such as glycine betaine and inositol, were found in very high abundance under UV radiation compared to the dark control, suggesting the function of osmolytes as efficient reactive oxygen scavengers. Our study also revealed a RecA-independent response and a tightly regulated network of protein quality control involving proteases and chaperones to selectively degrade misfolded and/or damaged proteins. PMID:28694800

  11. Application of fish index of biological integrity (FIBI) in the Sanmenxia Wetland with water quality implications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Shan, Baoqing; Ao, Liang

    2014-08-01

    Long-term changes of fish biotic integrity in the Sanmenxia Wetland, North China, since the 1950s were assessed using the fish index of biological integrity (FIBI). The water and sediment quality was evaluated by the water quality index (WQI) and sediment pollution index (SPI). The results showed that FIBI continuously decreased from 46 to 20 during the past 5 decades, which indicated that the fish community state shifted from fair to very poor conditions, and damming by itself did not affect the fish biotic integrity. At the same time, WQI fell from 83 to 44.1, and SPI increased from 0.99 to 2.14 since the 1960s, resulting from fast regional socio-economic development and insufficient wastewater treatment. Correlation analysis suggested that water quality significantly affected biotic integrity (r=0.867, p<0.05) through direct effects on the fish community. As a representative example of many wetlands in North China, our study clearly demonstrated that the biological integrity was degraded, induced both by water quality deterioration and sediment pollution, further driven by the contradiction between rapid development of regional economy and lagging development of sewage treatment facilities, which were thought to be the main factor responsible for the degradation of biological integrity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Prey preferences of aquatic insects: potential implications for the regulation of wetland mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Saha, N; Aditya, G; Saha, G K

    2014-03-01

    Wetlands are potential sites for mosquito breeding and are thus important in the context of public health. The use of chemical and microbial controls is constrained in wetlands in view of their potential impact on the diverse biota. Biological control using generalist aquatic insects can be effective, provided a preference for mosquito larvae is exhibited. The mosquito prey preferences of water bugs and larvae of odonate species were evaluated using chironomid larvae, fish fingerlings and tadpoles as alternative prey. Manly's selectivity (αi ) values with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated to judge prey preference patterns. Multivariate analysis of variance (manova) and standardized canonical coefficients were used to test the effects of density on prey selectivity. The αi values indicated a significant preference (P < 0.05) in all of the insect predators tested for mosquito larvae over the alternative prey as a density-dependent function. On a comparative scale, chironomid larvae had the highest impact as alternative prey. In a multiple-prey experiment, predators showed a similar pattern of preference for mosquito larvae over alternative prey, reflecting a significant (P < 0.05) niche overlap. The results suggest that, in a laboratory setting, these insect predators can effectively reduce mosquito density in the presence of multiple alternative prey.

  13. The utility of state parks as a conservation tool for isolated and ephemeral wetlands: A case study from the southern Blue Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. H.; Baldwin, R.; Pitt, A. L.; Baldwin, E. D.

    2013-12-01

    were deeper on average than park pools. We found significant differences in total taxonomic richness, invertebrate tolerance values and wetland depth between park and non-park wetlands. We relied heavily on local ecological knowledge (LEK) for identification and information on wetlands within parks. Furthermore, state parks played a vital role in the development of this project and our study was enriched as a result of utilizing state park personnel and their LEK. We were also able to interact with the public during our site visits and this two-way dialogue between scientists and the general public was useful for educating citizens about the importance of isolated/ephemeral wetlands and helped us better understand public perceptions of wetlands. State parks provided a number of study sites, various personnel who were knowledgeable about the locations and dynamics of wetlands and an a priori framework for conservation at the local scale which can help bolster conservation efforts at larger scales. We posit that state parks are an under-utilized but extremely important resource for filling the gaps in conservation.

  14. A Conceptual Model for Evaluating Hydrologic Connectivity in Geographically Isolated Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge about hydrologic connectivity between aquatic resources is critical to understanding and managing watershed hydrology and to the legal status of those resources. In particular, information is needed on the hydrologic connectivity and effects of geographically isolated ...

  15. A Conceptual Model for Evaluating Hydrologic Connectivity in Geographically Isolated Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge about hydrologic connectivity between aquatic resources is critical to understanding and managing watershed hydrology and to the legal status of those resources. In particular, information is needed on the hydrologic connectivity and effects of geographically isolated ...

  16. Seed germination of cirsium arvense and Lepidium latifolium: Implications for management of montane wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, M.K.; Shaffer, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    Cirsium arvense and Lepidium latifolium are species that can aggressively invade wetland margins and potentially reduce biodiversity and alter ecosystem function. Although expansion of these species primarily occurs via rhizomatous growth, seeds are thought to be important in initial establishment. We conducted this study to investigate differences in seed germination of C. arvense and L. latifolium in montane wetlands of Colorado and Wyoming, USA. We used germination chambers to simulate environmental conditions (photoperiod, day/night temperature) during three periods of the growing season at each site and evaluated seed germination in relation to three soil moisture levels and two soil depths. A combination of shallow (<1 cm) seed burial and wet conditions resulted in the greatest germination probability of C. arvense (x = 63.0%), 95% CI = 41.2-80.5%), whereas deep (2-3 cm) seed burial and saturated moisture conditions resulted in almost no germination (x?? = 0.3%, 95% CI = 0.1-1.3%). The maximum germination probability of 44.0% (CI = 28.1-61.4%) for L. latifolium also occurred in the shallow burial and wet treatment; however, only effects of seed burial were significant (P < 0.05). The estimated mean germination probability of deeply buried seeds was <1.0% (CI = 0.3-1.4%) compared to 32% (CI = 19.7-47.9%) for shallowly buried seeds. Our results suggest that each species has the ability to germinate at similar rates throughout the growing season and across a large portion of the moisture gradient. This suggests that management actions, including water-level manipulations, at any time during the growing season may stimulate germination. Although burial of seed to depths of 2-3 cm reduced the germination potential of both species, the use of mechanical implements may be problematic in established stands because new plants of both species easily sprout from root buds. Further, disturbance resulting from such actions diminishes the density and vigor of other plants

  17. Occurrence of resistance to antibiotics, UV-B, and arsenic in bacteria isolated from extreme environments in high-altitude (above 4400 m) Andean wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dib, Julián; Motok, Jessica; Zenoff, Verónica Fernández; Ordoñez, Omar; Farías, María Eugenia

    2008-05-01

    High-altitude Andean wetlands are pristine environments with extreme conditions such as high UV radiation, high heavy metal content (mainly arsenic), high salinity, and oligotrophy. In this paper, the UV-B resistance and tolerance to arsenic of phylogenetically characterized bacteria (Actinobacteria [six isolates], Firmicutes [four isolates], and gamma-Proteobacteria [three isolates]) isolated from Laguna Vilama (4400-m altitude) and Laguna Azul (4560 m) were determined. In addition, given that multiple antibiotic resistances were also determined, a relationship between antibiotic resistances as a consequence of mutagenic ability or in relation to metal resistance is proposed. High UV-B resistances were found, since after 30 min (0.7 KJ m(-2)) and 60 min (1.4 KJ m(-2)) of irradiation, most of the studied bacteria did not show a decreased survival; what is more, many of them had an improved survival with the increased doses. Augmentations in mutagenesis rates were observed after UV-B irradiation in only 4 of the 13 tested isolates. Arsenite tolerance was also established in 8 of the 13 tested strains: Staphylococcus saprophyticus A3 and Micrococcus sp. A7, which were able to grow in media containing up to 10 mM As(III). Finally, predominance of antibiotic resistances (azithromycin, erythromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, gentamycin, kanamycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin) was found, in all the isolated strains from both wetlands, with unexpectedly high minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs; >2 mg mL(-1)) for macrolides. These results demonstrate that in extreme environments like high-altitude wetlands there is a correlation of multiresistances to UV-B radiation and arsenic, and that antibiotic resistances are also widespread in these pristine environments, where antibiotic selective pressure is supposed to be absent.

  18. Constructed Wetlands

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    these systems can improve water quality, engineers and scientists construct systems that replicate the functions of natural wetlands. Constructed wetlands are treatment systems that use natural processes

  19. Radar monitoring of hydrology in Maryland's forested coastal plain wetlands: Implications for predicted climate change and improved mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner Lang, Megan

    Wetlands provide important services to society but Mid-Atlantic wetlands are at high risk for loss, with forested wetlands being especially vulnerable. Hydrology (flooding and soil moisture) controls wetland function and extent but it may be altered due to changes in climate and anthropogenic influence. Wetland hydrology must better understood in order to predict and mitigate the impact of these changes. Broad-scale forested wetland hydrology is difficult to monitor using ground-based and traditional remote sensing methods. C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data could improve the capability to monitor forested wetland hydrology but the abilities and limitations of these data need further investigation. This study examined: (1) the link between climate and wetland hydrology; (2) the ability of ENVISAT SAR (C-HH and C-VV) data to monitor inundation and soil moisture in forested wetlands; (3) limitations inherent to C-band data (incidence angle, polarization, and phenology) when monitoring forested wetland hydrology; and (4) the accuracy of forested wetland maps produced using SAR data. The study was primarily conducted near the Patuxent River in Maryland but the influence of incidence angle was considered along the Roanoke River in North Carolina. This study showed: (1) climate was highly correlated with wetland inundation; (2) significant differences in C-VV and C-HH backscatter existed between forested areas of varying hydrology (uplands and wetlands) throughout the year; (3) C-HH backscatter was better correlated to hydrology than C-VV backscatter; (4) correlations were stronger during the leaf-off season; (5) the difference in backscatter between flooded and non-flooded areas did not sharply decline with incidence angle, as predicted; and (6) maps produced using SAR data had relatively high accuracy levels. Based on these findings, I concluded that hydrology is influenced by climate at the study site, and C-HH data should be able to monitor changes in

  20. Environmental impacts and regulatory policy implications of spray disposal of dredged material in Louisiana wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Cowan, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The capabilities of a new wetland dredging technology were assessed along with associated newly developed state and federal regulatory policies to determine if policy expectations realistically match the technological achievement. Current regulatory practices require amelioration of spoil bank impacts upon abandonment of an oil/gas well, but this may not occur for many years or decades, if at all. Recently, a dreding method (high-pressure spray spoil disposal) was developed that does not create a spoil bank in the traditional sense. Its potential for reducing environmental impacts was recognized immediately by regulatory agencies for whom minimizing spoil bank impacts is a major concern. The use of high-pressure spray disposal as a suitable alternative to traditional dreding technology has been adopted as policy even though its value as a management tool has never been tested or verified. A qualitative evaluation at two spoil disposal sites in saline marsh indicates that high-pressure spray disposal may indeed have great potential to minimize impacts, but most of this potential remains unverified. Also, some aspects of current regulatory policy may be based on unrealistic expectations as to the ability of this new technology to minimize or eliminate spoil bank impacts.

  1. Variations in tidal level in the Gulf of Mexico and implications for tidal wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, R.P.; Haines, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Tidal wetland environments have an ecological zonation that corresponds with tide levels, in particular with mean high water. However, mean sea level (MSL), which has shown a persistent rise in the Gulf of Mexico during this century, is the most common reference for water level change. We examine here the relationship between mean sea level and mean high water in describing water level changes in the Gulf of Mexico. The records of monthly mean water level for four stations, Galveston, Pensacola, Cedar Key and Key West, are partitioned into the annual cycle, the long-term trend, and a low-frequency (> 10 year period) fluctuation. The trend is the same for MSL and mean higher high water (MHHW) for all stations investigated except Cedar Key, Florida, where MHHW has increased more rapidly than MSL. The low-frequency fluctuations are similar between the stations and the tidal datums. MSL can predict MHHW with discrepancies of up to 5 cm owing to the lunar nodal cycle and an annual tidal signal. Low-frequency climatic fluctuations produce greater variations than the nodal cycle, but the difference in frequency can lead to interference between the two in MHHW. The combination of the two can produce sea-level rises in excess of 1 cm year-1 over several year periods, even in areas having long-term trends of 0.2 cm year-1 or less.

  2. Accumulation of impact markers in desert wetlands and implications for the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Latorre, Claudio; Rech, Jason A.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Martinez, Katherine E.; Budahn, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis contends that an extraterrestrial object exploded over North America at 12.9 ka, initiating the Younger Dryas cold event, the extinction of many North American megafauna, and the demise of the Clovis archeological culture. Although the exact nature and location of the proposed impact or explosion remain unclear, alleged evidence for the fallout comes from multiple sites across North America and a site in Belgium. At 6 of the 10 original sites (excluding the Carolina Bays), elevated concentrations of various "impact markers" were found in association with black mats that date to the onset of the Younger Dryas. Black mats are common features in paleowetland deposits and typically represent shallow marsh environments. In this study, we investigated black mats ranging in age from approximately 6 to more than 40 ka in the southwestern United States and the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. At 10 of 13 sites, we found elevated concentrations of iridium in bulk and magnetic sediments, magnetic spherules, and/or titanomagnetite grains within or at the base of black mats, regardless of their age or location, suggesting that elevated concentrations of these markers arise from processes common to wetland systems, and not a catastrophic extraterrestrial impact event.

  3. Keep wetlands wet: the myth of sustainable development of tropical peatlands - implications for policies and management.

    PubMed

    Evers, Stephanie; Yule, Catherine M; Padfield, Rory; O'Reilly, Patrick; Varkkey, Helena

    2017-02-01

    Pristine tropical peat swamp forests (PSFs) represent a unique wetland ecosystem of distinctive hydrology which support unique biodiversity and globally significant stores of soil carbon. Yet in Indonesia and Malaysia, home to 56% of the world's tropical peatland, they are subject to considerable developmental pressures, including widespread drainage to support agricultural needs. In this article, we review the ecology behind the functioning and ecosystem services provided by PSFs, with a particular focus on hydrological processes as well as the role of the forest itself in maintaining those services. Drawing on this, we review the suitability of current policy frameworks and consider the efficacy of their implementation. We suggest that policies in Malaysia and Indonesia are often based around the narrative of oil palm and other major monocrops as drivers of prosperity and development. However, we also argue that this narrative is also being supported by a priori claims concerning the possibility of sustainability of peat swamp exploitation via drainage-based agriculture through the adherence to best management practices. We discuss how this limits their efficacy, uptake and the political will towards enforcement. Further, we consider how both narratives (prosperity and sustainability) clearly exclude important considerations concerning the ecosystem value of tropical PSFs which are dependent on their unimpacted hydrology. Current research clearly shows that the actual debate should be focused not on how to develop drainage-based plantations sustainably, but on whether the sustainable conversion to drainage-based systems is possible at all.

  4. Accumulation of impact markers in desert wetlands and implications for the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pigati, Jeffrey S; Latorre, Claudio; Rech, Jason A; Betancourt, Julio L; Martínez, Katherine E; Budahn, James R

    2012-05-08

    The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis contends that an extraterrestrial object exploded over North America at 12.9 ka, initiating the Younger Dryas cold event, the extinction of many North American megafauna, and the demise of the Clovis archeological culture. Although the exact nature and location of the proposed impact or explosion remain unclear, alleged evidence for the fallout comes from multiple sites across North America and a site in Belgium. At 6 of the 10 original sites (excluding the Carolina Bays), elevated concentrations of various "impact markers" were found in association with black mats that date to the onset of the Younger Dryas. Black mats are common features in paleowetland deposits and typically represent shallow marsh environments. In this study, we investigated black mats ranging in age from approximately 6 to more than 40 ka in the southwestern United States and the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. At 10 of 13 sites, we found elevated concentrations of iridium in bulk and magnetic sediments, magnetic spherules, and/or titanomagnetite grains within or at the base of black mats, regardless of their age or location, suggesting that elevated concentrations of these markers arise from processes common to wetland systems, and not a catastrophic extraterrestrial impact event.

  5. Accumulation of impact markers in desert wetlands and implications for the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Latorre, Claudio; Rech, Jason A.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Martínez, Katherine E.; Budahn, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis contends that an extraterrestrial object exploded over North America at 12.9 ka, initiating the Younger Dryas cold event, the extinction of many North American megafauna, and the demise of the Clovis archeological culture. Although the exact nature and location of the proposed impact or explosion remain unclear, alleged evidence for the fallout comes from multiple sites across North America and a site in Belgium. At 6 of the 10 original sites (excluding the Carolina Bays), elevated concentrations of various “impact markers” were found in association with black mats that date to the onset of the Younger Dryas. Black mats are common features in paleowetland deposits and typically represent shallow marsh environments. In this study, we investigated black mats ranging in age from approximately 6 to more than 40 ka in the southwestern United States and the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. At 10 of 13 sites, we found elevated concentrations of iridium in bulk and magnetic sediments, magnetic spherules, and/or titanomagnetite grains within or at the base of black mats, regardless of their age or location, suggesting that elevated concentrations of these markers arise from processes common to wetland systems, and not a catastrophic extraterrestrial impact event. PMID:22529347

  6. Ear Infection in Isolated Cleft Lip: Etiological Implications.

    PubMed

    Ruegg, Teresa A; Cooper, Margaret E; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Ford, Matthew D; Wehby, George L; Deleyiannis, Frederic W B; Czeizel, Andrew E; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2017-03-01

      Chronic ear infections are a common occurrence in children with orofacial clefts involving the secondary palate. Less is known about the middle ear status of individuals with isolated clefts of the lip, although several studies have reported elevated rates of ear infection in this group. The purpose of this retrospective study was to test the hypothesis that chronic ear infections occur more frequently in isolated cleft lip cases (n = 94) compared with controls (n = 183).   A questionnaire was used to obtain information on history of chronic ear infection. The association between ear infection status (present/absent) and cleft lip status (cleft lip case/control) was tested using both chi-square and logistic regression.   The reported occurrence of chronic ear infection was significantly greater in cleft lip cases (31%) compared with unaffected controls (11%). After adjusting for age and sex, having a cleft lip increased the odds of being positive for ear infection by a factor greater than 3 (odds ratio = 3.698; 95% confidence interval = 1.91 to 7.14). Within cleft lip cases, there was no difference in the occurrence of ear infection by defect laterality or by the type of clefting present in the family history. Although velopharyngeal insufficiency was present in 18.4% of our cleft lip sample, there was no statistical association between ear infection and abnormal speech patterns. These results may have potential implications both for the clinical management of isolated cleft lip cases and for understanding the etiology of orofacial clefting.

  7. Two science communities and coastal wetlands policy

    SciTech Connect

    LeVine, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    This study compares the attitudes of academic and government wetlands scientists about wetlands science and policy. Analysis of one thousand seven hundred responses to Delphi-type questions posed to twenty California scientists on a wide range of issues about California coastal wetlands found significant differences between academic and government scientists about wetlands definitions, threats to wetlands, wetlands policies, wetlands health, and wetlands mitigation strategies. These differences were consistent with descriptive models of political sociology developed by D. Price and C.P. Snow and with normative models of the philosophy of science developed in the renaissance by F. Bacon and R. Descartes. Characteristics, preferences, and personality attributes consistent with group functions and roles have been described in these models. These findings have serious implications for policy. When academic and government wetlands scientists act as advisors to the major parties in land use conflicts, basic differences in perspective have contributed to costly contention over the future use of wetlands.

  8. Plant growth under salinity and inundation stress: implications for sea-level rise on tidal wetland function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change and sea-level rise (SLR) may increase salinity or inundation duration for tidal wetland organisms. To test the effects of these stressors on wetland productivity, we transplanted seedlings of seven common plant species to polyhaline, mesohaline and oligohaline tida...

  9. Plant growth under salinity and inundation stress: implications for sea-level rise on tidal wetland function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change and sea-level rise (SLR) may increase salinity or inundation duration for tidal wetland organisms. To test the effects of these stressors on wetland productivity, we transplanted seedlings of seven common plant species to polyhaline, mesohaline and oligohaline tida...

  10. Wetlands postcard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Lianne C.

    2016-05-25

    Research conducted by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey provides reliable scientific information for the management of wetlands ranging from small freshwater alpine lakes in the Western United States to coastal wetlands of the Great Lakes and salt marshes along the Southeastern coast. Learn more about USGS wetlands research at: http://www.usgs.gov/ecosystems/environments/wetlands.html.

  11. Isolation and characterization of hexavalent chromium-reducing rhizospheric bacteria from a wetland.

    PubMed

    Mauricio Gutiérrez, Amparo; Peña Cabriales, Juan José; Maldonado Vega, María

    2010-01-01

    Scirpus americanus Pers. occurs naturally in "San Germán," a pond that serves as a receptor of industrial wastewater in Guanajuato, México. This plant accumulates metals mainly in the root: concentrations (mg/kg) of Cr, As, Cd and Se were 970, 49, 41, and 85 respectively. Analysis of rhizosphere samples indicated bacterial population of 10(8) cfu g(-1) in media with 0.2 mM Cr(VI) and 10 mM sodium gluconate. Thirteen isolates were obtained and phylogenetic analyses (16S rRNA) indicated they corresponded to genera of Agrobacterium, Arthrobacter, Microbacterium, Curtobacterium, Rhodococcus, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas. Cr(VI) reduction was evaluated using the diphenyl carbazide method. The isolates accomplished 5-40% (20 microM) of reduction in assays of resting cell and tolerated 0.5-5.0 mM Cr(VI). Eight strains used nitrate and thirteen used iron and chromium as electron acceptors to grow under anaerobic conditions. Cr(VI) reduction by five strains occurred at pH values (7-9) and NaCl concentrations (0.5-1.0 M) in basal medium. A mixed culture of strains (S17 and S28) reached a chromium removal of 100% at 0.2 mM Cr(VI) initial concentration. Aerobically, this consortium was capable of 93.8% Cr(VI) reduction of 81 microg L(-1) Cr(VI) of the industrial effluent, indicating their possible use in environmental cleanup.

  12. Arsenic detoxification potential of aox genes in arsenite-oxidizing bacteria isolated from natural and constructed wetlands in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin-Soo; Yoon, In-Ho; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Ki-Rak; An, Jeongyi; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2010-04-01

    Arsenic is subject to microbial interactions, which support a wide range of biogeochemical transformations of elements in natural environments such as wetlands. The arsenic detoxification potential of the bacterial strains was investigated with the arsenite oxidation gene, aox genotype, which were isolated from the natural and constructed wetlands. The isolates were able to grow in the presence of 10 mM of sodium arsenite (As(III) as NaAsO(2)) and 1 mM of D: +glucose. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that these isolated strains resembled members of the genus that have arsenic-resistant systems (Acinetobacter sp., Aeromonas sp., Agrobacterium sp., Comamonas sp., Enterobacter sp., Pantoea sp., and Pseudomonas sp.) with sequence similarities of 81-98%. One bacterial isolate identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri strain GIST-BDan2 (EF429003) showed the activity of arsenite oxidation and existence of aoxB and aoxR gene, which could play an important role in arsenite oxidation to arsenate. This reaction may be considered as arsenic detoxification process. The results of a batch test showed that P. stutzeri GIST-BDan2 (EF429003) completely oxidized in 1 mM of As(III) to As(V) within 25-30 h. In this study, microbial activity was evaluated to provide a better understanding of arsenic biogeochemical cycle in both natural and constructed wetlands, where ecological niches for microorganisms could be different, with a specific focus on arsenic oxidation/reduction and detoxification.

  13. Alloactinosynnema iranicum sp. nov., a rare actinomycete isolated from a hypersaline wetland, and emended description of the genus Alloactinosynnema.

    PubMed

    Nikou, Mahdi Moshtaghi; Ramezani, Mohaddaseh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    A Gram-staining-positive actinobacterial strain, Chem10(T), was isolated from soil around Inche-Broun hypersaline wetland in the north of Iran. Strain Chem10(T) was strictly aerobic, and catalase- and oxidase-positive. The isolate grew with 0-3 % NaCl, at 20-40 °C and at pH 6.0-8.0. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 30 °C and pH 7.0, respectively. The cell wall of strain Chem10(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as diamino acid and galactose, ribose and arabinose as whole-cell sugars. The polar lipid pattern contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. Strain Chem10(T) synthesized cellular fatty acids of the straight-chain saturated and mono-unsaturated, and iso- and anteiso-branched types C14 : 0, C16 : 0, iso-C16 : 1, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, iso-C14 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0, and the major respiratory quinone was MK-9(H4). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 70.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Chem10(T) belonged to the family Pseudonocardiaceae and showed the closest phylogenetic similarity to Alloactinosynnema album KCTC 19294(T) (98.3 %) and Actinokineospora cibodasensis DSM 45658(T) (97.9 %). DNA-DNA relatedness values between the novel strain and strains Alloactinosynnema album KCTC 19294(T) and Actinokineospora cibodasensis DSM 45658(T) were only 52 % and 23 %, respectively. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, phenotypic characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization data, a novel species of the genus Alloactinosynnema is proposed, Alloactinosynnema iranicum sp. nov. The type strain is Chem10(T) ( = IBRC-M 10403(T) = CECT 8209(T)). In addition, an emended description of the genus Alloactinosynnema is proposed.

  14. A multi-year comparison of IPCI scores for prairie pothole wetlands: implications of temporal and spatial variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euliss, Ned H.; Mushet, David M.

    2011-01-01

    In the prairie pothole region of North America, development of Indices of Biotic Integrity (IBIs) to detect anthropogenic impacts on wetlands has been hampered by naturally dynamic inter-annual climate fluctuations. Of multiple efforts to develop IBIs for prairie pothole wetlands, only one, the Index of Plant Community Integrity (IPCI), has reported success. We evaluated the IPCI and its ability to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic variation using plant community data collected from 16 wetlands over a 4-year-period. We found that under constant anthropogenic influence, IPCI metric scores and condition ratings varied annually in response to environmental variation driven primarily by natural climate variation. Artificially forcing wetlands that occur along continuous hydrologic gradients into a limited number of discrete classes (e.g., temporary, seasonal, and semipermanent) further confounded the utility of IPCI metrics. Because IPCI scores vary significantly due to natural climate dynamics as well as human impacts, methodology must be developed that adequately partitions natural and anthropogenically induced variation along continuous hydrologic gradients. Until such methodology is developed, the use of the IPCI to evaluate prairie pothole wetlands creates potential formisdirected corrective or regulatory actions, impairment of natural wetland functional processes, and erosion of public confidence in the wetland sciences.

  15. A multi-year comparison of IPCI scores for prairie pothole wetlands: implications of temporal and spatial variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euliss, Ned H.; Mushet, David M.

    2011-01-01

    In the prairie pothole region of North America, development of Indices of Biotic Integrity (IBIs) to detect anthropogenic impacts on wetlands has been hampered by naturally dynamic inter-annual climate fluctuations. Of multiple efforts to develop IBIs for prairie pothole wetlands, only one, the Index of Plant Community Integrity (IPCI), has reported success. We evaluated the IPCI and its ability to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic variation using plant community data collected from 16 wetlands over a 4-year-period. We found that under constant anthropogenic influence, IPCI metric scores and condition ratings varied annually in response to environmental variation driven primarily by natural climate variation. Artificially forcing wetlands that occur along continuous hydrologic gradients into a limited number of discrete classes (e.g., temporary, seasonal, and semi-permanent) further confounded the utility of IPCI metrics. Because IPCI scores vary significantly due to natural climate dynamics as well as human impacts, methodology must be developed that adequately partitions natural and anthropogenically induced variation along continuous hydrologic gradients. Until such methodology is developed, the use of the IPCI to evaluate prairie pothole wetlands creates potential for misdirected corrective or regulatory actions, impairment of natural wetland functional processes, and erosion of public confidence in the wetland sciences.

  16. Reconstructing Mississippi River Deltaic Wetland Hydrostratigraphy Using Compositional Kriging Method - Implications for Groundwater, Groundwater-River Water Interaction, Subsidence and Deltaic Wetland Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.; Tsai, F. T. C.; White, C.; Wang, J.; Bentley, S. J.; Xu, K.

    2016-12-01

    River deltaic wetlands are formed along coastal area where sediment-laden river water reaches ocean. A river deltaic wetland is a complex system that mainly consists of groundwater, soil and vegetation components. Groundwater makes up a large portion of the system. The wetlands are important to human being and wild life. This research focuses on hydrostratigraphic architecture of the Mississippi River deltaic wetland. Research area includes lower Barataria Bay and lower Breton Sound that located on the Mississippi River Delta in southern Louisiana. In this study, a three dimensional hydrostratigraphy model is constructed using coring survey grain size data and geostatistics approach. A three-dimensional grid system is firstly constructed to cover the whole research domain. Each cell of the grid has a dimension of 100 meters by 100 meters by 1 centimeter (length by width by depth). Then Compositional Kriging and Gaussian Sequential Simulation methods are adopted to estimate soil composition (sand, silt and clay fractions) for each cell. A result has been generated to reveal spatial hydro facies variation by cutting cross sections and extracting soil texture maps at different locations. In the result, bay silt makes a large portion of the sediments body and sandy sediments are shown at different depths in both sides of the river. In Barataria Bay, sand bodies are lenticular, relatively thick and vertical continuous, however, in Breton Sound, sand bodies are sheet-like, relatively thin and vertical non-continuous. It is likely that the sandy sediments in Barataria Bay and Breton Sound are deposited in distal distributary and overbank flow respectively. Larger sandy bodies are prone to form in the distal distributary than in the overbank flow. Sandy units formed in the distal distributary can provide better interconnection between river water and groundwater than that formed in the overbank flow. Larger sandy bodies also provides more space to store groundwater. More

  17. Hindcasting Historical Breeding Conditions for an Endangered Salamander in Ephemeral Wetlands of the Southeastern USA: Implications of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Houston C.; Rypel, Andrew L.; Jiao, Yan; Haas, Carola A.; Gorman, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    The hydroperiod of ephemeral wetlands is often the most important characteristic determining amphibian breeding success, especially for species with long development times. In mesic and wet pine flatwoods of the southeastern United States, ephemeral wetlands were a common landscape feature. Reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi), a federally endangered species, depend exclusively on ephemeral wetlands and require at least 11 weeks to successfully metamorphose into terrestrial adults. We empirically modeled hydroperiod of 17 A. bishopi breeding wetlands by combining downscaled historical climate-model data with a recent 9-year record (2006–2014) of observed water levels. Empirical models were subsequently used to reconstruct wetland hydrologic conditions from 1896–2014 using the downscaled historical climate datasets. Reconstructed hydroperiods for the 17 wetlands were highly variable through time but were frequently unfavorable for A. bishopi reproduction (e.g., only 61% of years, using a conservative estimate of development time [12 weeks], were conducive to larval development and metamorphosis). Using change-point analysis, we identified significant shifts in average hydroperiod over the last century in all 17 wetlands. Mean hydroperiods were shorter in recent years than at any other point since 1896, and thus less suitable for A. bishopi reproduction. We suggest that climate change will continue to impact the reproductive success of flatwoods salamanders and other ephemeral wetland breeders by reducing the number of years these wetlands have suitable hydroperiods. Consequently, we emphasize the importance of conservation and management for mitigating other forms of habitat degradation, especially maintenance of high quality breeding sites where reproduction can occur during appropriate environmental conditions. PMID:26910245

  18. Hindcasting Historical Breeding Conditions for an Endangered Salamander in Ephemeral Wetlands of the Southeastern USA: Implications of Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Houston C; Rypel, Andrew L; Jiao, Yan; Haas, Carola A; Gorman, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    The hydroperiod of ephemeral wetlands is often the most important characteristic determining amphibian breeding success, especially for species with long development times. In mesic and wet pine flatwoods of the southeastern United States, ephemeral wetlands were a common landscape feature. Reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi), a federally endangered species, depend exclusively on ephemeral wetlands and require at least 11 weeks to successfully metamorphose into terrestrial adults. We empirically modeled hydroperiod of 17 A. bishopi breeding wetlands by combining downscaled historical climate-model data with a recent 9-year record (2006-2014) of observed water levels. Empirical models were subsequently used to reconstruct wetland hydrologic conditions from 1896-2014 using the downscaled historical climate datasets. Reconstructed hydroperiods for the 17 wetlands were highly variable through time but were frequently unfavorable for A. bishopi reproduction (e.g., only 61% of years, using a conservative estimate of development time [12 weeks], were conducive to larval development and metamorphosis). Using change-point analysis, we identified significant shifts in average hydroperiod over the last century in all 17 wetlands. Mean hydroperiods were shorter in recent years than at any other point since 1896, and thus less suitable for A. bishopi reproduction. We suggest that climate change will continue to impact the reproductive success of flatwoods salamanders and other ephemeral wetland breeders by reducing the number of years these wetlands have suitable hydroperiods. Consequently, we emphasize the importance of conservation and management for mitigating other forms of habitat degradation, especially maintenance of high quality breeding sites where reproduction can occur during appropriate environmental conditions.

  19. Temperature effects in treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Kadlec, R H; Reddy, K R

    2001-01-01

    Several biogeochemical processes that regulate the removal of nutrients in wetlands are affected by temperature, thus influencing the overall treatment efficiency. In this paper, the effects of temperature on carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling processes in treatment wetlands and their implications to water quality are discussed. Many environmental factors display annual cycles that mediate whole system performance. Water temperature is one of the important cyclic stimuli, but inlet flow rates and concentrations, and several features of the annual biogeochemical cycle, also can contribute to the observed patterns of nutrient and pollutant removal. Atmospheric influences, including rain, evapotranspiration, and water reaeration, also follow seasonal patterns. Processes regulating storages in wetlands are active throughout the year and can act as seasonal reservoirs of nutrients, carbon, and pollutants. Many individual wetland processes, such as microbially mediated reactions, are affected by temperature. Response was much greater to changes at the lower end of the temperature scale (< 15 degrees C) than at the optimal range (20 to 35 degrees C). Processes regulating organic matter decomposition are affected by temperature. Similarly, all nitrogen cycling reactions (mineralization, nitrification, and denitrification) are affected by temperature. The temperature coefficient (theta) varied from 1.05 to 1.37 for carbon and nitrogen cycling processes during isolated conditions. Phosphorus sorption reactions are least affected by temperature, with theta values of 1.03 to 1.12. Physical processes involved in the removal of particulate carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus are not affected much by temperature. In contrast, observed wetland removals may have different temperature dependence. Design models are oversimplified because of limitations of data for calibration. The result of complex system behavior and the simple model is the need to interpret whole ecosystem data

  20. AMPHIBIAN OCCURRENCE AND AQUATIC INVADERS IN A CHANGING LANDSCAPE: IMPLICATIONS FOR WETLAND MITIGATION IN THE WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite concern about the conservation status of amphibians in western North America, few field studies have documented occurrence patterns of amphibians relative to potential stressors. We surveyed wetland fauna in Oregon Willamette Valley and used an information theoretic appro...

  1. AMPHIBIAN OCCURRENCE AND AQUATIC INVADERS IN A CHANGING LANDSCAPE: IMPLICATIONS FOR WETLAND MITIGATION IN THE WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite concern about the conservation status of amphibians in western North America, few field studies have documented occurrence patterns of amphibians relative to potential stressors. We surveyed wetland fauna in Oregon Willamette Valley and used an information theoretic appro...

  2. Wetlands stewardship

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    Wetlands have important ecological values and functions. It is estimated that 80 percent of the Nation's coastal fisheries are dependent on wetlands for spawning, nursery areas, and food sources. Both coastal and inland wetlands provide essential breeding, nesting, feeding, and predator escape habitats for millions of waterfowl, other birds, mammals, and reptiles. Well over one-third of the 564 plant and animal species listed as threatened or endangered in the United States utilize wetland habitats during some portion of their life cycle. Wetlands Stewardship is intended as a resource for everyone interested in wetlands protection.

  3. Colonization of a newly constructed urban wetland by mosquitoes in England: implications for nuisance and vector species.

    PubMed

    Medlock, Jolyon M; Vaux, Alexander G C

    2014-12-01

    Urban wetlands are being created in the UK as part of sustainable urban drainage strategies, to create wetland habitats lost during development, to provide a habitat for protected species, and to increase the public's access to 'blue-space' for the improvement of health and well-being. Sewage treatment reedbeds are also being incorporated into newly constructed wetlands to offer an alternative approach to dealing with sewage. This field study aims to provide the first UK evidence of how such newly constructed aquatic habitats are colonized by mosquitoes. A number of new aquatic habitats were surveyed for immature mosquitoes every fortnight over the first two years following wetland construction. The majority of mosquitoes collected were Culex sp. and were significantly associated with the sewage treatment reedbed system, particularly following storm events and sewage inflow. Other more natural aquatic habitats that were subject to cycles of drying and re-wetting contributed the majority of the remaining mosquitoes colonizing. Colonization of permanent habitats was slow, particularly where fluctuations in water levels inhibited emergent vegetation growth. It is recommended that during the planning process for newly constructed wetlands consideration is given on a case-by-case basis to the impact of mosquitoes, either as a cause of nuisance or as potential vectors. Although ornithophagic Culex dominated in this wetland, their potential role as enzootic West Nile virus vectors should not be overlooked.

  4. The concentrations of five heavy metals in components of an economically important urban coastal wetland in Ghana: public health and phytoremediation implications.

    PubMed

    Gbogbo, Francis; Otoo, Samuel D

    2015-10-01

    Sakumo II is an urban wetland and a receptacle for domestic and industrial wastes from two cities in Ghana. It however supports viable populations of fish and crabs, is cultivated for food crops and grazed by farm animals. Components of the wetland can therefore accumulate pollutants, but the public health and phytoremediation implications of this are yet to be evaluated. We analysed Cd, As, Hg, Cu and Pb in the lagoon water, sediment, green algae, eight species of aquatic macrophytes, seven species of arthropods and one species of fish. The concentrations of Pb were generally below detection limit whilst Cu was detected only in the lagoon water and Pheropsophus vertialis. Cadmium ranged from 21 ± 4 ppb in algae to 69 ± 12 ppb in Typha domingensis and was generally higher than As and Hg. The highest concentration of As was 11.7 ± 2.1 ppb in Pistia stratiotes whilst Hg was highest in lagoon water (4 ± 2 ppb). The Cd concentrations generally, and Hg concentrations in macrophytes, were higher than US EPA guidelines indicating the wetland's resources were unsafe for regular consumption. Among the emergent aquatic macrophytes, T. domingensis, Ludwigia sp. and Paspalum vaginatum, respectively, had the highest accumulation capacity for Cd, As and Hg, but the floating aquatic plant P. stratiotes appeared to be a better accumulator of Cd and As.

  5. Zambia Wetland

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... article title:  Floodwaters Renew Zambia's Kafue Wetland     View Larger Image ... roundish shape of the Lukanga Swamp, another important wetland. The images along the left are natural color views from MISR's ...

  6. Sedimentary Features of the Coastal Wetlands of Breton Sound and Barataria Bay in the Mississippi River Delta and their Implications for Sediment Transport and Coastal Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C.; Chen, Q. J.; Karimpour, A.; Bentley, S. J.; White, C.; Xu, K.; Wang, J.; Fanguy, M.

    2016-02-01

    Louisiana is experiencing some of the highest land loss rates in the world. The majority of this occurs in its coastal wetlands and is partly attributed to exacerbated conditions which influence erosive mechanisms, e.g. increased fetch, reduced sediment delivery, ecosystem stress. Wetland soils and their underlying substrates are an integral component of these systems' morphological response to erosional forcing, but one that is notoriously difficult to characterize. To this end, a multi-disciplinary field campaign was undertaken to capture essential soil mechanical and geological data over a wide expanse of coastal wetlands in both Barataria Bay and Breton Sound in Louisiana. Here we present the results of our data collection and a synthesis focused on elucidating the study area's subsurface geotechnical features with reference to the Mississippi's deltaic depositional environment. A total of 100 data collection sites were subjected to vibracore sampling and in-situ tests to determine bulk density, organic content, water content, grain size, undrained shear strength, and erosive critical shear stress at discrete subsurface intervals up to a maximum depth of 6 meters. The sites in total encompassed approximately 500 km2 and are distributed on the eastern side of Barataria Bay, LA and the western portion of Breton Sound, LA. Two general landscape features, i.e. bay bottom and vegetated marsh edge, were sampled. In general, this controlled the vertical distribution of our data and influenced the observed stratigraphic sequence. Typically, the muddy bay bottom cores exhibited less variability, displayed interbedded sand layers less frequently, and lacked the upper organic layer seen in the marsh edge cores. This confirms the conversion of marsh to open water model proposed by Wilson et al. (2008) for eroding coastal wetlands. This study has implications for the sediment diversions planned in the region. It is likely that the increased hydrodynamic forcing and sediment

  7. Influence of drought on salamander occupancy of isolated wetlands on the southeastern Coastal Plain of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walls, Susan C.; Barichivich, William J.; Brown, Mary E.; Scott, David E.; Hossack, Blake R.

    2013-01-01

    In the southeastern U.S., changes in temperature and precipitation over the last three decades have been the most dramatic in winter and spring seasons. Continuation of these trends could negatively impact pond-breeding amphibians, especially those that rely on winter and spring rains to fill seasonal wetlands, trigger breeding, and ensure reproductive success. From 2009 to 2012, we monitored Spring and Fall presence of aquatic stages (larval and paedomorphic, gilled adult) of a winter-breeding amphibian (the mole salamander, Ambystoma talpoideum) and used multi-season models to estimate occupancy, local colonization and extinction. Seasonal estimates of occupancy, corrected for imperfect detection, declined from 22.3 % of ponds in Spring 2009 to 9.9 % in Fall 2012. Our best supported model suggested that changes in occupancy were driven by increased rates of extinction that corresponded with drought-related drying of ponds. Based on uncertainty in climate change projections for the Southeast, we present a conceptual model of predicted changes in wetland hydroperiods across a landscape with projected decreases and increases in future precipitation. Such precipitation changes could alter wetland hydroperiods, facilitate extinctions of species adapted to short, intermediate or long hydroperiod environments and, ultimately, modify the composition of amphibian communities within freshwater wetland ecosystems.

  8. Potential pathogens, antimicrobial patterns, and genotypic diversity of Escherichia coli isolates in constructed wetlands treating swine wastewater

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The treatment and removal of contaminants such as nutrients, salts, microbes, and pharmaceutically active compounds from swine waste by constructed wetlands involves complex biological processes. However, little is known about the population structure and antibiotic resistant patterns of E. coli em...

  9. Functional and phylogenetic relatedness in temporary wetland invertebrates: current macroecological patterns and implications for future climatic change scenarios.

    PubMed

    Ruhí, Albert; Boix, Dani; Gascón, Stéphanie; Sala, Jordi; Batzer, Darold P

    2013-01-01

    In freshwater ecosystems, species compositions are known to be determined hierarchically by large to small‑scale environmental factors, based on the biological traits of the organisms. However, in ephemeral habitats this heuristic framework remains largely untested. Although temporary wetland faunas are constrained by a local filter (i.e., desiccation), we propose its magnitude may still depend on large-scale climate characteristics. If this is true, climate should be related to the degree of functional and taxonomic relatedness of invertebrate communities inhabiting seasonal wetlands. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. First, based on 52 biological traits for invertebrates, we conducted a case study to explore functional trends among temperate seasonal wetlands differing in the harshness (i.e., dryness) of their dry season. After finding evidence of trait filtering, we addressed whether it could be generalized across a broader climatic scale. To this end, a meta-analysis (225 seasonal wetlands spread across broad climatic categories: Arid, Temperate, and Cold) allowed us to identify whether an equivalent climate-dependent pattern of trait richness was consistent between the Nearctic and the Western Palearctic. Functional overlap of invertebrates increased from mild (i.e., Temperate) to harsher climates (i.e., Arid and Cold), and phylogenetic clustering (using taxonomy as a surrogate) was highest in Arid and lowest in Temperate wetlands. We show that, (i) as has been described in streams, higher relatedness than would be expected by chance is generally observed in seasonal wetland invertebrate communities; and (ii) this relatedness is not constant but climate-dependent, with the climate under which a given seasonal wetland is located determining the functional overlap and the phylogenetic clustering of the community. Finally, using a space-for-time substitution approach we suggest our results may anticipate how the invertebrate biodiversity embedded in these

  10. Functional and Phylogenetic Relatedness in Temporary Wetland Invertebrates: Current Macroecological Patterns and Implications for Future Climatic Change Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Ruhí, Albert; Boix, Dani; Gascón, Stéphanie; Sala, Jordi; Batzer, Darold P.

    2013-01-01

    In freshwater ecosystems, species compositions are known to be determined hierarchically by large to small‑scale environmental factors, based on the biological traits of the organisms. However, in ephemeral habitats this heuristic framework remains largely untested. Although temporary wetland faunas are constrained by a local filter (i.e., desiccation), we propose its magnitude may still depend on large-scale climate characteristics. If this is true, climate should be related to the degree of functional and taxonomic relatedness of invertebrate communities inhabiting seasonal wetlands. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. First, based on 52 biological traits for invertebrates, we conducted a case study to explore functional trends among temperate seasonal wetlands differing in the harshness (i.e., dryness) of their dry season. After finding evidence of trait filtering, we addressed whether it could be generalized across a broader climatic scale. To this end, a meta-analysis (225 seasonal wetlands spread across broad climatic categories: Arid, Temperate, and Cold) allowed us to identify whether an equivalent climate-dependent pattern of trait richness was consistent between the Nearctic and the Western Palearctic. Functional overlap of invertebrates increased from mild (i.e., Temperate) to harsher climates (i.e., Arid and Cold), and phylogenetic clustering (using taxonomy as a surrogate) was highest in Arid and lowest in Temperate wetlands. We show that, (i) as has been described in streams, higher relatedness than would be expected by chance is generally observed in seasonal wetland invertebrate communities; and (ii) this relatedness is not constant but climate-dependent, with the climate under which a given seasonal wetland is located determining the functional overlap and the phylogenetic clustering of the community. Finally, using a space-for-time substitution approach we suggest our results may anticipate how the invertebrate biodiversity embedded in these

  11. Late Quaternary dynamics of a South African floodplain wetland and the implications for assessing recent human impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooth, S.; Rodnight, H.; McCarthy, T. S.; Duller, G. A. T.; Grundling, A. T.

    2009-05-01

    Knowledge of the long-term geomorphological dynamics of wetlands is limited, so currently there is an inadequate scientific basis for assessing anthropogenically induced changes and for developing conservation, remediation, and/or sustainable management guidelines for these fragile ecosystems. Along the upper Klip River, eastern South Africa, geomorphological and sedimentological investigations, geochronology, and remote sensing have been used to establish the late Quaternary dynamics of some internationally important floodplain wetlands, thus providing a reference condition against which to assess the extent of recent human impacts. Optically stimulated luminescence dating reveals that the wetlands have developed over at least the last 30 ky as a result of slow meander migration (< 0.2 m y - 1 ), irregular cutoff events, and infrequent avulsions (approximately one every 3-6 ky) that have occurred autogenically as a natural part of meander-belt development. Following European settlement in the Klip valley (late nineteenth century), however, modifications to local flora and fauna, as well as the initiation of local wetland drainage schemes, have had major impacts. In particular, proliferation of exotic willows and associated debris jams, and the artificial excavation of a 1.2-km-long channel section across the wetlands have initiated an ongoing avulsion that is characterised by failure (gradual abandonment) of the main channel and rapid incision of a headcutting channel. Compared to the pre-settlement condition, little change in lateral migration activity has occurred, but this avulsion provides a clear example of anthropogenically accelerated change, occurring only ~ 1 ky after the last natural avulsion and in a part of the wetlands where avulsions have not occurred previously. Subsequent human interventions have included installing weirs in an attempt to control the resulting erosion and promote reflooding, but ongoing maintenance has been required. In areas that

  12. Amphibian occurrence and aquatic invaders in a changing landscape: Implications for wetland mitigation in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; Adams, Michael J.; Leuthold, N.; Bury, R. Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Despite concern about the conservation status of amphibians in western North America, few field studies have documented occurrence patterns of amphibians relative to potential stressors. We surveyed wetland fauna in Oregon's Willamette Valley and used an information theoretic approach (AIC) to rank the associations between native amphibian breeding occurrence and wetland characteristics, non-native aquatic predators, and landscape characteristics in a mixed urban-agricultural landscape. Best predictors varied among the five native amphibians and were generally consistent with life history differences. Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) and long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) occurrence was best predicted by the absence of non-native fish. Northern red-legged frog (Rana a. aurora) and northwestern salamander (Ambystoma gracile) were most strongly related to wetland vegetative characteristics. The occurrence of rough-skinned newts (Taricha granulosa), a migratory species that makes extensive use of terrestrial habitats, was best predicted by greater forest cover within 1 km. The absence of non-native fish was a strong predictor of occurrence for four of the five native species. In contrast, amphibians were not strongly related to native fish presence. We found little evidence supporting negative effects of the presence of breeding populations of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) on any native species. Only the two Ambystoma salamanders were associated with wetland permanence. Northwestern salamanders (which usually have a multi-year larval stage) were associated with permanent waters, while long-toed salamanders were associated with temporary wetlands. Although all the species make some use of upland habitats, only one (rough-skinned newt) was strongly associated with surrounding landscape conditions. Instead, our analysis suggests that within-wetland characteristics best predict amphibian occurrence in this region. We recommend that wetland preservation and

  13. Response of an invasive native wetland plant to environmental flows: implications for managing regulated floodplain ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Vivian, Lyndsey M; Marshall, David J; Godfree, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    The natural flow regimes of rivers underpin the health and function of floodplain ecosystems. However, infrastructure development and the over-extraction of water has led to the alteration of natural flow regimes, resulting in the degradation of river and floodplain habitats globally. In many catchments, including Australia's Murray-Darling Basin, environmental flows are seen as a potentially useful tool to restore natural flow regimes and manage the degradation of rivers and their associated floodplains. In this paper, we investigated whether environmental flows can assist in controlling an invasive native floodplain plant in Barmah Forest, south-eastern Australia. We experimentally quantified the effects of different environmental flow scenarios, including a shallow (20 cm) and deeper (50 cm) flood of different durations (12 and 20 weeks), as well as drought and soil-saturated conditions, on the growth and survival of seedlings of Juncus ingens, a native emergent macrophyte that has become invasive in some areas of Barmah Forest following river regulation and alteration of natural flow regimes. Three height classes of J. ingens (33 cm, 17 cm and 12 cm) were included in the experiment to explicitly test for relationships between treatments, plant survival and growth, and plant height. We found that seedling mortality occurred in the drought treatment and in the 20-week flood treatments of both depths; however, mortality rates in the flood treatments depended on initial plant height, with medium and short plants (initial heights of ≤17 cm) exhibiting the highest mortality rates. Both the 20 cm and 50 cm flood treatments of only 12 weeks duration were insufficient to cause mortality in any of the height classes; indeed, shoots of plants in the 20 cm flood treatment were able to elongate through the water surface at rapid rates. Our findings have important implications for management of Barmah Forest and floodplain ecosystems elsewhere, as it demonstrates

  14. Social isolation among Latino workers in rural North Carolina: exposure and health implications.

    PubMed

    Mora, Dana C; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Anderson, Andrea M; Chen, Haiying; Arcury, Thomas A; Marín, Antonio J; Quandt, Sara A

    2014-10-01

    Immigrant Latinos frequently experience social isolation in their receiving communities. This paper investigates the prevalence of social isolation among immigrant workers in a new settlement area and delineates the association between social isolation and physical and mental health outcomes. Interviews were conducted in Spanish with immigrant Latino manual workers (N = 743) in western North Carolina. The CES-D and the SF-12 questionnaires assessed health outcomes. A social isolation scale was used to assess degree of social isolation. Nearly 1 in 5 workers (19.5 %) reported the highest level of social isolation. Social isolation was associated with higher depressive symptoms and poorer physical and mental health, related to quality of life. Social isolation is a common experience among immigrant Latinos that may have negative implications for physical and mental health. Community outreach efforts to minimize experiences of isolation may be useful in protecting immigrant physical and mental health.

  15. Isolated Spring Wetlands in the Great Basin and Mojave Deserts, USA: Potential Response of Vegetation to Groundwater Withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, Duncan T.; Rouse, Leigh; Stromberg, Juliet C.

    2008-03-01

    Desert springs, often the sole sources of water for wildlife and cattle, support wetland and wetland/upland transition ecosystems including rare and endemic species. In the basin and range province in Nevada, USA, springs in the Great Basin and Mojave deserts are sustained by interconnected deep carbonate and shallow basin-fill aquifers which are threatened by proposed groundwater withdrawal to sustain rapidly expanding urban areas, a common problem in arid regions worldwide. This paper draws on historic groundwater data, groundwater modeling, and studies of environmental controls of spring ecosystems to speculate on the potential effects of groundwater withdrawal and water table decline on spring-supported vegetation. The focus is on springs in the Great Basin and Mojave deserts representative of those that may be affected by future, planned groundwater withdrawal. Groundwater withdrawal is expected to reduce spring discharge directly through reduced flows from the shallow basin-fill aquifer or through reduction of the hydraulic head of the deep carbonate aquifer. This flow reduction will truncate the outflow stream, reducing the areal cover of wetland and wetland/upland transition vegetation. Lowering the local water table may also reduce the amount of upland phreatophytic vegetation by causing water levels to drop below plant rooting depths. Percolation of salts to surface soils may be reduced, eventually altering desert shrub cover from halophytes to nonhalophytes. The extent of these effects will vary among springs, based on their distance from extraction sites and location relative to regional groundwater flow paths. On-site monitoring of biotic variables (including cover of selected hygrophytes and phreatophytes) should be a necessary complement to the planned monitoring of local hydrologic conditions.

  16. Rapid Stable Isotope Turnover of Larval Fish in a Lake Superior Coastal Wetland: Implications for Diet and Life History Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trophic linkages of larval fish in Lake Superior coastal wetlands, rivers and embayments can be identified using naturally occurring differences in the stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (15N:14N, ?15N) and carbon (13C:12C, ?13C). We sampled pelagic fish larvae weekly during sprin...

  17. Rapid Stable Isotope Turnover of Larval Fish in a Lake Superior Coastal Wetland: Implications for Diet and Life History Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trophic linkages of larval fish in Lake Superior coastal wetlands, rivers and embayments can be identified using naturally occurring differences in the stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (15N:14N, ?15N) and carbon (13C:12C, ?13C). We sampled pelagic fish larvae weekly during sprin...

  18. Variation of energy and carbon fluxes from a restored temperate freshwater wetland and implications for carbon market verification protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Frank E.; Bergamaschi, Brian; Sturtevant, Cove; Knox, Sara; Hastings, Lauren; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Detto, Matteo; Hestir, Erin L.; Drexler, Judith; Miller, Robin L.; Matthes, Jaclyn Hatala; Verfaillie, Joseph; Baldocchi, Dennis; Snyder, Richard L.; Fujii, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Temperate freshwater wetlands are among the most productive terrestrial ecosystems, stimulating interest in using restored wetlands as biological carbon sequestration projects for greenhouse gas reduction programs. In this study, we used the eddy covariance technique to measure surface energy carbon fluxes from a constructed, impounded freshwater wetland during two annual periods that were 8 years apart: 2002-2003 and 2010-2011. During 2010-2011, we measured methane (CH4) fluxes to quantify the annual atmospheric carbon mass balance and its concomitant influence on global warming potential (GWP). Peak growing season fluxes of latent heat and carbon dioxide (CO2) were greater in 2002-2003 compared to 2010-2011. In 2002, the daily net ecosystem exchange reached as low as -10.6 g C m-2 d-1, which was greater than 3 times the magnitude observed in 2010 (-2.9 g C m-2 d-1). CH4 fluxes during 2010-2011 were positive throughout the year and followed a strong seasonal pattern, ranging from 38.1 mg C m-2 d-1 in the winter to 375.9 mg C m-2 d-1 during the summer. The results of this study suggest that the wetland had reduced gross ecosystem productivity in 2010-2011, likely due to the increase in dead plant biomass (standing litter) that inhibited the generation of new vegetation growth. In 2010-2011, there was a net positive GWP (675.3 g C m-2 yr-1), and when these values are evaluated as a sustained flux, the wetland will not reach radiative balance even after 500 years.

  19. Variation of energy and carbon fluxes from a restored temperate freshwater wetland and implications for carbon market verification protocols

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Frank; Bergamaschi, Brian; Sturtevant, Cove; Knox, Sarah; Hastings, Lauren; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Detto, Matteo; Hestir, Erin L.; Drexler, Judith; Miller, Robin L.; Matthes, Jaclyn; Verfaillie, Joseph; Baldocchi, Dennis; Snyder, Richard L.; Fujii, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Temperate freshwater wetlands are among the most productive terrestrial ecosystems, stimulating interest in using restored wetlands as biological carbon sequestration projects for greenhouse gas reduction programs. In this study, we used the eddy covariance technique to measure surface energy carbon fluxes from a constructed, impounded freshwater wetland during two annual periods that were 8 years apart: 2002–2003 and 2010–2011. During 2010–2011, we measured methane (CH4) fluxes to quantify the annual atmospheric carbon mass balance and its concomitant influence on global warming potential (GWP). Peak growing season fluxes of latent heat and carbon dioxide (CO2) were greater in 2002–2003 compared to 2010–2011. In 2002, the daily net ecosystem exchange reached as low as −10.6 g C m−2 d−1, which was greater than 3 times the magnitude observed in 2010 (−2.9 g C m−2 d−1). CH4 fluxes during 2010–2011 were positive throughout the year and followed a strong seasonal pattern, ranging from 38.1 mg C m−2 d−1 in the winter to 375.9 mg C m−2 d−1 during the summer. The results of this study suggest that the wetland had reduced gross ecosystem productivity in 2010–2011, likely due to the increase in dead plant biomass (standing litter) that inhibited the generation of new vegetation growth. In 2010–2011, there was a net positive GWP (675.3 g C m−2 yr−1), and when these values are evaluated as a sustained flux, the wetland will not reach radiative balance even after 500 years.

  20. Characterisation of an isolated galaxy sample: Astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argudo Fernandez, Maria del Carmen

    2013-11-01

    In order to understand the evolution of galaxies, it is necessary to have a reference sample where the effects of the environment are minimised and quantified. Recent advances in large redshift galaxy surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR9), allow to reach a 3-dimensional picture of the environment. In the first two parts of the thesis, we present, in the framework of the AMIGA project (Analysis of the interstellar Medium of Isolated GAlaxies), a revision of the isolation degree and a study of the 3-dimensional environment for galaxies in the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies (CIG, Karachentseva 1973). Using the 3-dimensional information, new catalogues of isolated galaxies, isolated pairs, and isolated triplets are assembled in the third part of the thesis. The main aims of this thesis are: * to refine the photographic-based CIG and to provide an improvement of the quantification of the isolation degree with respect to previous works, using both photometry and spectroscopy; * to identify and quantify the effects of the physical satellite distribution around galaxies in the CIG, as well as the effects of the Large Scale Structure (LSS); * to construct a catalogue of galaxies isolated in 3-dimension, and build catalogues of physically associated isolated pairs and isolated triplets. We develop an automatic method to search for neighbours around each CIG galaxy in the SDSS, within a projected area up to 3 Mpc. To recover the physically bound neighbour galaxies we focus on the satellites which are within the escape speed of each CIG galaxy. The local number density, at the 5 th nearest neighbour, and the tidal strength affecting the CIG galaxy are estimated to quantify the local and LSS isolation degrees. For the first time, the environment and the isolation degree of CIG galaxies are quantified using digital data. Besides, the availability of the spectroscopic data allows us to check the validity of the CIG isolation criterion, and shows that it is not

  1. Wetlands: Tidal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conner, William H.; Krauss, Ken W.; Baldwin, Andrew H.; Hutchinson, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Tidal wetlands are some of the most dynamic areas of the Earth and are found at the interface between the land and sea. Salinity, regular tidal flooding, and infrequent catastrophic flooding due to storm events result in complex interactions among biotic and abiotic factors. The complexity of these interactions, along with the uncertainty of where one draws the line between tidal and nontidal, makes characterizing tidal wetlands a difficult task. The three primary types of tidal wetlands are tidal marshes, mangroves, and freshwater forested wetlands. Tidal marshes are dominated by herbaceous plants and are generally found at middle to high latitudes of both hemispheres. Mangrove forests dominate tropical coastlines around the world while tidal freshwater forests are global in distribution. All three wetland types are highly productive ecosystems, supporting abundant and diverse faunal communities. Unfortunately, these wetlands are subject to alteration and loss from both natural and anthropogenic causes.

  2. Coastal wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, H.H.; d'Itri, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents an overview of coastal wetlands, mainly focusing on the Great Lakes ecosystem. Topics covered include the following: the effects of water level fluctuations on Great Lakes coastal marshes; environmental influences on the distribution and composition of wetlands in the Great Lakes Basin; vegetation dynamics, buried seeds, and water level fluctuations on the shorelines of the Great Lakes; preliminary observations on the flux of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous in a Great Lakes coastal marsh; nutrient cycling by wetlands and possible effects of water levels; and Avain wetland habitat functions affected by water level fluctuations.

  3. Diversity and distribution of aquatic insects in Southern Brazil wetlands: implications for biodiversity conservation in a Neotropical region.

    PubMed

    Maltchik, Leonardo; Dalzochio, Marina Schmidt; Stenert, Cristina; Rolon, Ana Silvia

    2012-03-01

    The selection of priority areas is an enormous challenge for biodiversity conservation. Some biogeographic methods have been used to identify the priority areas to conservation, and panbiogeography is one of them. This study aimed at the utilization of panbiogeographic tools, to identify the distribution patterns of aquatic insect genera, in wetland systems of an extensive area in the Neotropical region (approximately 280 000km2), and to compare the distribution of the biogeographic units identified by the aquatic insects, with the conservation units of Southern Brazil. We analyzed the distribution pattern of 82 genera distributed in four orders of aquatic insects (Diptera, Odonata, Ephemeroptera and Trichoptera) in Southern Brazil wetlands. Therefore, 32 biogeographic nodes corresponded to the priority areas for conservation of the aquatic insect diversity. Among this total, 13 were located in the Atlantic Rainforest, 16 in the Pampa and three amongst both biomes. The distribution of nodes showed that only 15% of the dispersion centers of insects were inserted in conservation units. The four priority areas pointed by node cluster criterion must be considered in further inclusions of areas for biodiversity conservation in Southern Brazil wetlands, since such areas present species from different ancestral biota. The inclusion of such areas into the conservation units would be a strong way to conserve the aquatic biodiversity in this region.

  4. Are wetlands the reservoir for avian cholera?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands have long been suspected to be an important reservoir for Pasteurella multocida and therefore the likely source of avian cholera outbreaks. During the fall of 1995a??98 we collected sediment and water samples from 44 wetlands where avian cholera epizootics occurred the previous winter or spring. We attempted to isolate P. multocida in sediment and surface water samples from 10 locations distributed throughout each wetland. We were not able to isolate P. multocida from any of the 440 water and 440 sediment samples collected from these wetlands. In contrast, during other investigations of avian cholera we isolated P. multocida from 20 of 44 wetlands, including 7% of the water and 4.5% of the sediment samples collected during or shortly following epizootic events. Our results indicate that wetlands are an unlikely reservoir for the bacteria that causes avian cholera.

  5. Wetland Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Marilyn

    1994-01-01

    Examines what wetland conservation means to different groups of Louisiana's coastal residents. Describes coastal resources, reasons for their deterioration, conservation efforts, and the impact of a public perception that conservation of wetlands is closely tied to conservation of the existing lifestyle. (LZ)

  6. Exploring Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Elizabeth; Harrison, Gordon

    1996-01-01

    Presents a wetlands education model for secondary education students. Students monitor a wetland, participate in decision-making, and take actions to protect it. In a series of six steps, the model guides students through the process of defining a problem; envisioning solutions; evaluating appropriate solutions based on environmental, economic and…

  7. Freshwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  8. Wetland Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Marilyn

    1994-01-01

    Examines what wetland conservation means to different groups of Louisiana's coastal residents. Describes coastal resources, reasons for their deterioration, conservation efforts, and the impact of a public perception that conservation of wetlands is closely tied to conservation of the existing lifestyle. (LZ)

  9. Exploring Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Elizabeth; Harrison, Gordon

    1996-01-01

    Presents a wetlands education model for secondary education students. Students monitor a wetland, participate in decision-making, and take actions to protect it. In a series of six steps, the model guides students through the process of defining a problem; envisioning solutions; evaluating appropriate solutions based on environmental, economic and…

  10. Freshwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  11. Wetland Hydrology

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter discusses the state of the science in wetland hydrology by touching upon the major hydraulic and hydrologic processes in these complex ecosystems, their measurement/estimation techniques, and modeling methods. It starts with the definition of wetlands, their benefit...

  12. Train-borne Measurements of Enhanced Wet Season Methane Emissions in Northern Australia - Implications for Australian Tropical Wetland Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutscher, N. M.; Griffith, D. W.; Paton-Walsh, C.

    2008-12-01

    We present the first transect measurements of CH4, CO2, CO and N2O taken on the Ghan railway travelling on a N-S transect of the Australian continent between Adelaide (34.9°S, 138.6°E) and Darwin (12.5°S, 130.9°E). The Ghan crosses Australia from the mainly agricultural mid-latitude south through the arid interior to the wet-dry tropical savannah south of and around Darwin. In the 2008 wet season (February) we observed a significant latitudinal gradient of CH4 increasing towards the north. The same pattern was observed in the late 2008 wet season (March-April), with a smaller latitudinal gradient. These will be compared with a dry season transect, to be undertaken in September/October 2008. The Air Pollution Model (TAPM), a regional scale prognostic meteorological model, is used to estimate the surface methane source strength required to explain the observed latitudinal gradient in CH4 in the wet season, and investigate the source type. Fluxes from cattle and termites together contribute up to 25% of the enhancements seen, leaving wetlands as the major source of wet season methane in the Australian tropics. Wetlands are the largest natural source of methane to the atmosphere, and tropical wetlands are responsible for the majority of the interannual variation in methane source strength. We attempt to quantify the annual methane flux contributed by anaerobic organic breakdown due to wet- season flooding in tropical Northern Territory.

  13. Three Decades of Landsat-derived Spring Surface Water Dynamics in an Agricultural Wetland Mosaic; Implications for Migratory Shorebirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer-Smith, D.; Swenson, J. J.; Barbaree, B. A.; Reiter, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    To balance human demand for limited freshwater with biodiversity and other ecosystem values, it is critical that we develop a more thorough understanding of the spatial and temporal extent of surface water resources. Satellite measurements of surface water dynamics offer promise for understanding wetland habitat availability and quality at broad spatial scales. We used an innovative approach combining random forest models and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to systematically identify a mid-infrared (1.5-1.7 µm) threshold for classification of water and non-water areas at an important stopover site for shorebirds during spring migration. We analyzed water extent dynamics for a 1983-2015 Landsat time series, using a customized data interpolation to fill missing data gaps in classifications of SLC-off Landsat 7 imagery. Combined with a simple masking procedure, our approach identifies inundation in wetlands and agricultural fields in the Sacramento Valley of California at 30-m resolution with an average of 92% accuracy across the time series, which is comparable to other approaches that require more intensive user input. We found substantial variability in interannual and within-season water extent. Flood-irrigated agriculture provided the greatest potential habitat area for shorebirds; however, herbaceous wetlands on federal state and private lands provided the most reliable habitat. Spring water extent has been most limited during the peak of shorebird migration; on average we detected open water on 26,000 ha ( 3% of the study area) in early April, which is only 18% of the average extent in late May. Furthermore, the water extent on the landscape in late March, leading into peak migration, has significantly declined over time. Our findings provide important information that can be used directly in water and wildlife management under climate change. The unique classification and interpolation methods that we developed for this study could be adapted

  14. Responses of Biogeochemical Characteristics and Enzyme Activities in Sediment to Climate Warming under a Simulation Experiment in Geographically Isolated Wetlands of the Hulunbuir Grassland, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Liliang; Su, Derong; Lv, Shihai; Luo, Yan; Li, Xingfu; Jiao, Jian; Diao, Zhaoyan; Bu, He

    2017-08-27

    Climate warming generates a tremendous threat to the stability of geographically-isolated wetland (GIW) ecosystems and changes the type of evaporation and atmospheric precipitation in a region. The intrinsic balance of biogeochemical processes and enzyme activity in GIWs may be altered as well. In this paper, we sampled three types of GIWs exhibiting different kinds of flooding periods. With the participation of real-time temperature regulation measures, we assembled a computer-mediated wetland warming micro-system in June 2016 to simulate climate situation of ambient temperature (control group) and two experimental temperature differences (+2.5 °C and +5.0 °C) following a scientific climate change circumstance based on daily and monthly temperature monitoring at a two-minutes scale. Our results demonstrate that the contents of the total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) in the warmed showed, roughly, a balance or a slight decrease than the control treatment. Warming obstructed the natural subsidence of sediment, but reinforced the character of the ecological source, and reduced the activity of urease (URE), but promoted the activity of alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and sucrase (SUC). Redundancy analysis showed that sucrase, urease, available phosphorus (AP), and pH were the major correlating factors under warming conditions in our research scope. Total organic carbon, total nitrogen, sucrase, catalase (CAT), and alkaline phosphatase were the principal reference factors to reflect the ambient temperature variations. Nutrient compositions and enzyme activities in GIW ecosystems could be reconstructed under the warming influence.

  15. Identification and genotyping of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. isolates in aquatic birds in the Salburua wetlands, Álava, Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Cano, Lourdes; de Lucio, Aida; Bailo, Begoña; Cardona, Guillermo A; Muadica, Aly Salimo Omar; Lobo, Luis; Carmena, David

    2016-05-15

    Aquatic birds are known to be suitable hosts for a number of avian-specific species and genotypes of the enteric protozoan parasites Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Waterbirds have also been reported as sporadic carriers of species of both pathogens from human or domestic animal origin via environmental contamination. Because aquatic birds can shed substantial amounts of infective Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts to the environment including surface waters intended for human consumption, this situation may pose a potential risk of waterborne zoonotic disease. A total of 265 waterbird faecal samples were collected from May 2014 to June 2015 at Salburua (Álava), one of the most valued continental wetlands in northern Spain. The detection of Giardia oocyst and Cryptosporidium oocysts was carried out by direct fluorescence microscopy and molecular (PCR and sequence analysis) methods targeting the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of the parasites. Typing of Giardia duodenalis isolates at the sub-assemblage level was based on the specific amplification and sequencing of a partial fragment of the glutamate dehydrogenase gene. Overall, Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 22 (8.3%) and 6 (2.3%), respectively, of the 265 faecal samples analysed. The two only Giardia isolates characterized (one novel, one known) were assigned to the sub-assemblage BIV of G. duodenalis, none of them previously reported in Spanish human isolates. This finding raises doubts about the actual origin of the infection and whether waterbirds may serve as potential source of infective Giardia cysts to humans via waterborne transmission or through direct contact. The six Cryptosporidium isolates obtained were characterized as avian genotype III (n=4), duck genotype b (n=1), and goose genotype Id (n=1), all considered avian-specific and therefore of negligible risk of zoonotic infection.

  16. Implication of Mitochondrial Cytoprotection in Human Islet Isolation and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Mendoza-Elias, Joshua E.; Qi, Meirigeng; Harvat, Tricia A.; Ahn, Sang Joon; Lee, Dongyoung; Gutierrez, Diana; Jeon, Hyojin; Paushter, Daniel; Oberholzer, José

    2012-01-01

    Islet transplantation is a promising therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus; however, success rates in achieving both short- and long-term insulin independence are not consistent, due in part to inconsistent islet quality and quantity caused by the complex nature and multistep process of islet isolation and transplantation. Since the introduction of the Edmonton Protocol in 2000, more attention has been placed on preserving mitochondrial function as increasing evidences suggest that impaired mitochondrial integrity can adversely affect clinical outcomes. Some recent studies have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve islet cytoprotection by maintaining mitochondrial function and subsequently to improve islet transplantation outcomes. However, the benefits of mitoprotection in many cases are controversial and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This article summarizes the recent progress associated with mitochondrial cytoprotection in each step of the islet isolation and transplantation process, as well as islet potency and viability assays based on the measurement of mitochondrial integrity. In addition, we briefly discuss immunosuppression side effects on islet graft function and how transplant site selection affects islet engraftment and clinical outcomes. PMID:22611495

  17. Borrelidin B: isolation, biological activity, and implications for nitrile biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Christopher J; Bray, Walter M; Loganzo, Frank; Lam, My-Hanh; Szal, Teresa; Villalobos, Anabella; Koehn, Frank E; Linington, Roger G

    2014-11-26

    Borrelidin (1) is a nitrile-containing bacterially derived polyketide that is a potent inhibitor of bacterial and eukaryotic threonyl-tRNA synthetases. We now report the discovery of borrelidin B (2), a tetrahydro-borrelidin derivative containing an aminomethyl group in place of the nitrile functionality in borrelidin. The discovery of this new metabolite has implications for both the biosynthesis of the nitrile group and the bioactivity of the borrelidin compound class. Screening in the SToPS assay for tRNA synthetase inhibition revealed that the nitrile moiety is essential for activity, while profiling using our in-house image-based cytological profiling assay demonstrated that 2 retains biological activity by causing a mitotic stall, even in the absence of the nitrile motif.

  18. Rapid wetland expansion during European settlement and its implication for marsh survival under modern sediment delivery rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirwan, Matthew L.; Murray, A. Brad; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Corbett, D. Reide

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations in sea-level rise rates are thought to dominate the formation and evolution of coastal wetlands. Here we demonstrate a contrasting scenario in which land-use-related changes in sediment delivery rates drive the formation of expansive marshland, and vegetation feedbacks maintain their morphology despite recent sediment supply reduction. Stratigraphic analysis and radiocarbon dating in the Plum Island Estuary (Massachusetts, United States) suggest that salt marshes expanded rapidly during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries due to increased rates of sediment delivery following deforestation associated with European settlement. Numerical modeling coupled with the stratigraphic observations suggests that existing marshland could survive, but not form under the low suspended sediment concentrations observed in the estuary today. These results suggest that many of the expansive marshes that characterize the modern North American coast are metastable relicts of high nineteenth century sediment delivery rates, and that recent observations of degradation may represent a slow return to pre-settlement marsh extent. In contrast to ecosystem management practices in which restoring pre-anthropogenic conditions is seen as a way to increase ecosystem services, our results suggest that widespread efforts to restore valuable coastal wetlands actually prevent some systems from returning to a natural state.

  19. Aquatic adventitious roots of the wetland plant Meionectes brownii can photosynthesize: implications for root function during flooding.

    PubMed

    Rich, Sarah Meghan; Ludwig, Martha; Pedersen, Ole; Colmer, Timothy David

    2011-04-01

    • Many wetland plants produce aquatic adventitious roots from submerged stems. Aquatic roots can form chloroplasts, potentially producing endogenous carbon and oxygen. Here, aquatic root photosynthesis was evaluated in the wetland plant Meionectes brownii, which grows extensive stem-borne aquatic roots during submergence. • Underwater photosynthetic light and CO(2) response curves were determined for aquatic-adapted leaves, stems and aquatic roots of M. brownii. Oxygen microelectrode and (14)CO(2)-uptake experiments determined shoot inputs of O(2) and photosynthate into aquatic roots. • Aquatic adventitious roots contain a complete photosynthetic pathway. Underwater photosynthetic rates are similar to those of stems, with a maximum net photosynthetic rate (P(max)) of 0.38 μmol O(2) m(-2) s(-1); however, this is c. 30-fold lower than that of aquatic-adapted leaves. Under saturating light with 300 mmol m(-3) dissolved CO(2), aquatic roots fix carbon at 0.016 μmol CO(2) g(-1) DM s(-1). Illuminated aquatic roots do not rely on exogenous inputs of O(2). • The photosynthetic ability of aquatic roots presumably offers an advantage to submerged M. brownii as aquatic roots, unlike sediment roots, need little O(2) and carbohydrate inputs from the shoot when illuminated. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Intracrystalline diffusion in clinoptilolite: Implications for radionuclide isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.K.; Viani, B.E.; Phinney, D.

    1995-11-16

    Experiments have been performed to measure the rate of exchange diffusion in the zeolite clinoptilolite (CL) for elements important to radionuclide isolation at Yucca Mountain, NV. Clinoptilolite is one of the major sorptive minerals in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain, and occurs both as a major component in zeolitized units (Calico Hills), and in fractures in non-zeolitized tuffs (Topopah Spring). Field evidence and numerical modeling suggests that the movement of fluids through the tuff rocks adjacent to the potential repository may occur via episodic flow through fractures. Under conditions of rapid fracture flow the effective sorptive capacity of fracture-lining clinoptilolite may be controlled by exchange diffusion rather than exchange equilibrium.

  1. [Sedimentological Implications of the change in the coverage of mangrove forest in Boca Zacate, Térraba-Sierpa National Wetlands, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Silva Benavides, Ana Margarita; Picado Barboza, Jorge; Mora Rodríguez, Fernando; González Gairaud, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    In the last sixty years many geomorphological changes have occurred in Costa Rica's Térraba-Sierpe National Wetlands. Changes in coastal geomorphology are generally associated with erosion or accretion of sediment, which has led to the removal of sections of mangrove forests or sediment banks colonized by mangroves. The aim of this study was to analyze sedimentation as a leading process in the dynamics of coastal morphology and its implications for mangrove forest cover in the Boca Zacate area of Térraba-Sierpe wetlands. The study was conducted in the sectors of Bocón, Brujo and Coco Island in Boca Zacate, from 2008 to 2013. The research was based on a multi-temporal analysis of coastal morphology using aerial photographs from the years 1948, 1960, 1974, 1978, 1984, 1992 and 2011. The following measurements were also performed: monthly sedimentation rate (g/cm2/day), and granulometric composition and content of chemical elements in the sediments of the study area. These last two measurements were performed once each in the dry and rainy seasons during the years of study. The results indicated that over the past 60 years, Boca Zacate has witnessed a process of sustained erosion; from 1948 through 2001, losing 10.6 % of its land and approximately 8.9 % of its forest cover. It has also experienced accretion in the area of Coco Island. The Brujo sector showed the highest sedimentation rate and the Camibar estuary, the lowest. The dominant type of sediment in all study sites was sand, followed by clay and silt. The most widespread chemical elements (mg/L) included magnesium, calcium and potassium; others, such as manganese, iron, aluminum, phosphorus, zinc and copper, were measured in smaller amounts. Transport, composition and quantity of sediment in Boca Zacate are crucial to the changes that have occurred on the coastal area of La Boca, where the presence of dead trees was evident. This geomorphological analysis holds great importance for future guidelines and

  2. Isolation and characterization of Magnetospirillum sp. strain 15-1 as a representative anaerobic toluene-degrader from a constructed wetland model.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Cifuentes, Ingrid; Martinez-Lavanchy, Paula M; Marin-Cevada, Vianey; Böhnke, Stefanie; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Jochen A; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2017-01-01

    Previously, Planted Fixed-Bed Reactors (PFRs) have been used to investigate microbial toluene removal in the rhizosphere of constructed wetlands. Aerobic toluene degradation was predominant in these model systems although bulk redox conditions were hypoxic to anoxic. However, culture-independent approaches indicated also that microbes capable of anaerobic toluene degradation were abundant. Therefore, we aimed at isolating anaerobic-toluene degraders from one of these PFRs. From the obtained colonies which consisted of spirilli-shaped bacteria, a strain designated 15-1 was selected for further investigations. Analysis of its 16S rRNA gene revealed greatest similarity (99%) with toluene-degrading Magnetospirillum sp. TS-6. Isolate 15-1 grew with up to 0.5 mM of toluene under nitrate-reducing conditions. Cells reacted to higher concentrations of toluene by an increase in the degree of saturation of their membrane fatty acids. Strain 15-1 contained key genes for the anaerobic degradation of toluene via benzylsuccinate and subsequently the benzoyl-CoA pathway, namely bssA, encoding for the alpha subunit of benzylsuccinate synthase, bcrC for subunit C of benzoyl-CoA reductase and bamA for 6-oxocyclohex-1-ene-1-carbonyl-CoA hydrolase. Finally, most members of a clone library of bssA generated from the PFR had highest similarity to bssA from strain 15-1. Our study provides insights about the physiological capacities of a strain of Magnetospirillum isolated from a planted system where active rhizoremediation of toluene is taking place.

  3. Isolation and characterization of Magnetospirillum sp. strain 15-1 as a representative anaerobic toluene-degrader from a constructed wetland model

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Cifuentes, Ingrid; Martinez-Lavanchy, Paula M.; Marin-Cevada, Vianey; Böhnke, Stefanie; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Jochen A.

    2017-01-01

    Previously, Planted Fixed-Bed Reactors (PFRs) have been used to investigate microbial toluene removal in the rhizosphere of constructed wetlands. Aerobic toluene degradation was predominant in these model systems although bulk redox conditions were hypoxic to anoxic. However, culture-independent approaches indicated also that microbes capable of anaerobic toluene degradation were abundant. Therefore, we aimed at isolating anaerobic-toluene degraders from one of these PFRs. From the obtained colonies which consisted of spirilli-shaped bacteria, a strain designated 15–1 was selected for further investigations. Analysis of its 16S rRNA gene revealed greatest similarity (99%) with toluene-degrading Magnetospirillum sp. TS-6. Isolate 15–1 grew with up to 0.5 mM of toluene under nitrate-reducing conditions. Cells reacted to higher concentrations of toluene by an increase in the degree of saturation of their membrane fatty acids. Strain 15–1 contained key genes for the anaerobic degradation of toluene via benzylsuccinate and subsequently the benzoyl-CoA pathway, namely bssA, encoding for the alpha subunit of benzylsuccinate synthase, bcrC for subunit C of benzoyl-CoA reductase and bamA for 6-oxocyclohex-1-ene-1-carbonyl-CoA hydrolase. Finally, most members of a clone library of bssA generated from the PFR had highest similarity to bssA from strain 15–1. Our study provides insights about the physiological capacities of a strain of Magnetospirillum isolated from a planted system where active rhizoremediation of toluene is taking place. PMID:28369150

  4. What Makes a Wetland a Wetland?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions of and activities about various kinds of wetlands. Contains seven learning activities ranging from creating wetland scenes with picture cutouts to actually exploring a wetland. Includes reproducible handouts and worksheets for several of the activities. (TW)

  5. What Makes a Wetland a Wetland?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions of and activities about various kinds of wetlands. Contains seven learning activities ranging from creating wetland scenes with picture cutouts to actually exploring a wetland. Includes reproducible handouts and worksheets for several of the activities. (TW)

  6. Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

  7. Detection and Antimicrobial Resistance of Vibrio Isolates in Aquaculture Environments: Implications for Public Health.

    PubMed

    Igbinosa, Etinosa O

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of Vibrio isolates recovered from four different fish pond facilities in Benin City, Nigeria, determine their antibiogram profiles, and evaluate the public health implications of these findings. Fish pond water samples were collected from four sampling sites between March and September 2014. A total of 56 samples were collected and screened for the isolation of Vibrio species using standard culture-based methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to confirm the identities of the Vibrio species using the genus-specific and species-specific primers. Vibrio species were detected at all the study sites at a concentration on the order of 10(3) and 10(6) CFU/100 ml. A total of 550 presumptive Vibrio isolates were subjected to PCR confirmation. Of these isolates, 334 isolates tested positive, giving an overall Vibrio prevalence rate of 60.7%. The speciation of the 334 Vibrio isolates from fish ponds yielded 32.63% Vibrio fluvialis, 20.65% Vibrio parahaemolyticus, 18.26% Vibrio vulnificus, and 28.44% other Vibrio species. In all, 167 confirmed Vibrio isolates were selected from a pool of 334 confirmed Vibrio isolates for antibiogram profiling. The susceptibility profiles of 20 antimicrobial agents on the isolates revealed a high level of resistance for AMP(R), ERY(R), NAL(R), SUL(R), TMP(R), SXT(R), TET(R), OTC(R), and CHL(R). The percentage of multiple drug resistance Vibrio isolates was 67.6%. The multiple antibiotic resistance index mean value of 0.365 for the Vibrio isolates found in this study indicated that the Vibrio isolates were exposed to high-risk sources of contamination when antibiotics were frequently used. The resistant Vibrio strains could be transmitted through the food chain to humans and therefore constitutes a risk to public health.

  8. Isolated Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava: A Case Report and its Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bisoyi, Samarjit; Jagannathan, Usha; Dash, Anjan Kumar; Tripathy, Sabyasachi; Mohapatra, Raghunath; Pattnaik, Naba Kumar; Sahu, Satyajit; Nayak, Debashish

    2017-01-01

    The venous anomaly of a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) affects 0.3%–0.5% of the general population. PLSVC with absent right superior vena cava, also termed as “isolated PLSVC,” is an extremely rare venous anomaly. Almost half of the patients with isolated PLSVC have cardiac anomalies in the form of atrial septal defect, endocardial cushion defects, or tetralogy of Fallot. Isolated PLSVC is usually innocuous. Its discovery, however, has important clinical implications. It can pose clinical difficulties with central venous access, cardiothoracic surgeries, and pacemaker implantation. When it drains to the left atrium, it may create a right to left shunt. In this case report, we present the incidental finding of isolated PLSVC in a patient who underwent aortic valve replacement. Awareness about this condition and its variations is important to avoid complications. PMID:28074807

  9. Wetland restoration, flood pulsing, and disturbance dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    1999-01-01

    While it is generally accepted that flood pulsing and disturbance dynamics are critical to wetland viability, there is as yet no consensus among those responsible for wetland restoration about how best to plan for those phenomena or even whether it is really necessary to do so at all. In this groundbreaking book, Dr. Beth Middleton draws upon the latest research from around the world to build a strong case for making flood pulsing and disturbance dynamics integral to the wetland restoration planning process.While the initial chapters of the book are devoted to laying the conceptual foundations, most of the coverage is concerned with demonstrating the practical implications for wetland restoration and management of the latest ecological theory and research. It includes a fascinating case history section in which Dr. Middleton explores the restoration models used in five major North American, European, Australian, African, and Asian wetland projects, and analyzes their relative success from the perspective of flood pulsing and disturbance dynamics planning.Wetland Restoration also features a wealth of practical information useful to all those involved in wetland restoration and management, including: * A compendium of water level tolerances, seed germination, seedling recruitment, adult survival rates, and other key traits of wetland plant species * A bibliography of 1,200 articles and monographs covering all aspects of wetland restoration * A comprehensive directory of wetland restoration ftp sites worldwide * An extensive glossary of essential terms

  10. Intraspecific variation in growth of marsh macrophytes in response to salinity and soil type: Implications for wetland restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic diversity within plant populations can influence plant community structure along environmental gradients. In wetland habitats, salinity and soil type are factors that can vary along gradients and therefore affect plant growth. To test for intraspecific growth variation in response to these factors, a greenhouse study was conducted using common plants that occur in northern Gulf of Mexico brackish and salt marshes. Individual plants of Distichlis spicata, Phragmites australis, Schoenoplectus californicus, and Schoenoplectus robustus were collected from several locations along the coast in Louisiana, USA. Plant identity, based on collection location, was used as a measure of intraspecific variability. Prepared soil mixtures were organic, silt, or clay, and salinity treatments were 0 or 18 psu. Significant intraspecific variation in stem number, total stem height, or biomass was found in all species. Within species, response to soil type varied, but increased salinity significantly decreased growth in all individuals. Findings indicate that inclusion of multiple genets within species is an important consideration for marsh restoration projects that include vegetation plantings. This strategy will facilitate establishment of plant communities that have the flexibility to adapt to changing environmental conditions and, therefore, are capable of persisting over time. ?? Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation 2009.

  11. Community structure of fishes inhabiting aquatic refuges in a threatened Karst wetland and its implications for ecosystem management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kobza, Robert M.; Trexler, J.C.; Loftus, W.F.; Perry, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    We illustrate the importance of subsurface refuges for conservation of aquatic fauna with our studies of karstic wetlands in Everglades National Park, Florida, USA. Managers have proposed that water levels there should not fall more than 46 cm below ground level for more than 90 days annually. In four areas, 84% of solution holes were less than 46 cm deep and holes deeper than lm were rare (<3 km-2). Null-model analysis indicated no "structure" in the solution-hole fish communities early in the dry season, but that structure emerged as drying progressed. Native cyprinodontiforms were abundant in shallow solution holes that dry annually under current management, while predatory species (often non-native) tended to dominate deeper holes. Water quality was correlated with hole volume and with composition of late dry-season fish communities. Tremendous losses of fish biomass occurred when water levels fell below 46 cm from ground surface. Most native taxa were unlikely to survive in the deep refuges that held predatory non-native taxa. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence and implications of the background phosphorus concentration of submerged aquatic vegetation wetlands in Stormwater Treatment Areas for Everglades restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juston, John M.; Debusk, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The limits of phosphorus (P) removal from the 18,120 ha Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) for Everglades restoration depend largely on the performance of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) wetlands, as SAV treatment cells now provide final stage treatment for 85% of the STA project. A long-term internal P profile in STA-2 cell 3 (STA2C3), one of the longest-running and best performing SAV cells, demonstrated no further net removal in the back quarter of the cell once total P (TP) levels approached 15 μg L-1. Inflow-outflow performance data from STA2C3 were analyzed at monthly and annual scales and were pooled with data from an additional eight STA SAV treatment cells. The pooled data allowed inference of background TP concentrations in SAV treatment cells using existing Bayesian methods. Results showed a central tendency of 16 μg L-1 (13-17, 90% bounds), insensitivity to P loads less than ˜1.7 g m-2 yr-1, and interannual variability outside these bounds. Internal data from the STA2C3 profile provided validation. Background P concentrations of 7 and 6 μg L-1 were identified for dissolved organic and particulate P fractions in the data pool, respectively, again similar to values in the STA2C3 gradient. Existing simulation modeling approaches for STA evaluations were identified as ineffective at or near background TP concentrations. Instead, we use an empirical and probabilistic approach based on full-scale data from STAs that produces annual risk of exceedance statistics and is easy to update. The current analysis suggests tangible risks for exceeding proposed annual discharge criteria from the STAs in the range of 16-20 μg L-1.

  13. A landscape-scale assessment of above- and belowground primary production in coastal wetlands: Implications for climate change-induced community shifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stagg, Camille L.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Piazza, Sarai C.; Snedden, Gregg; Steyer, Gregory D.; Fischenich, Craig J; McComas, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Above- and belowground production in coastal wetlands are important contributors to carbon accumulation and ecosystem sustainability. As sea level rises, we can expect shifts to more salt-tolerant communities, which may alter these ecosystem functions and services. Although the direct influence of salinity on species-level primary production has been documented, we lack an understanding of the landscape-level response of coastal wetlands to increasing salinity. What are the indirect effects of sea-level rise, i.e., how does primary production vary across a landscape gradient of increasing salinity that incorporates changes in wetland type? This is the first study to measure both above- and belowground production in four wetland types that span an entire coastal gradient from fresh to saline wetlands. We hypothesized that increasing salinity would limit rates of primary production, and saline marshes would have lower rates of above- and belowground production than fresher marshes. However, along the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coast in Louisiana, USA, we found that aboveground production was highest in brackish marshes, compared with fresh, intermediate, and saline marshes, and belowground production was similar among all wetland types along the salinity gradient. Multiple regression analysis indicated that salinity was the only significant predictor of production, and its influence was dependent upon wetland type. We concluded that (1) salinity had a negative effect on production within wetland type, and this relationship was strongest in the fresh marsh (0–2 PSU) and (2) along the overall landscape gradient, production was maintained by mechanisms at the scale of wetland type, which were likely related to plant energetics. Regardless of wetland type, we found that belowground production was significantly greater than aboveground production. Additionally, inter-annual variation, associated with severe drought conditions, was observed exclusively for belowground

  14. Saltwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides information about saltwater wetlands. Contains seven learning activities which deal with "making" a mud snail, plants and animals of mangroves, and the effects of tides on salt marshes. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for several of the activities. (TW)

  15. Coastal Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Area Cooperative Educational Services, New Haven, CT. Environmental Education Center.

    This material includes student guide sheets, reference materials, and tape script for the audio-tutorial unit on Inland Wetlands. A set of 35mm slides and an audio tape are used with the materials. The material is designed for use with Connecticut schools, but it can be adapted to other localities. The unit materials emphasize the structure,…

  16. Saltwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides information about saltwater wetlands. Contains seven learning activities which deal with "making" a mud snail, plants and animals of mangroves, and the effects of tides on salt marshes. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for several of the activities. (TW)

  17. Inland Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Area Cooperative Educational Services, New Haven, CT. Environmental Education Center.

    This material includes student guide sheets, reference materials, and tape script for the audio-tutorial unit on Inland Wetlands. A set of 35mm slides and an audio tape are used with the material. The material is designed for use with Connecticut schools, but it can be adapted to other localities. The materials emphasize characteristics of inland…

  18. Characterization of Pb(2+) biosorption by psychrotrophic strain Pseudomonas sp. I3 isolated from permafrost soil of Mohe wetland in Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Xu, Xingjian; Yu, Hongwen; Han, Xuerong

    2017-03-08

    Due to the long and severe winter in Northeast China, wastewater containing lead (Pb) is treated inefficiently, resulting in irregular disposal. In order to solve this problem, a Pb-resistant psychrotrophic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. I3, was isolated from permafrost soil of Mohe wetland and served as biosorbent for Pb(2+) removal under 15 °C. The minimum inhibitory concentration of strain I3 for Pb(2+) was 7.5 mM, which was higher than that of Escherichia coli DH5α (1.5 mM). However, acid digestion results showed that these two bacteria had a comparable biosorption capacity for Pb(2+), suggesting no direct relationship between biosorption ability of bacteria and their metal-resistance. Acid digestion results also proved that intracellular Pb accumulation was mainly contributed to the distinct performance between living and non-living biosorbents, which was further confirmed by the analyses of TEM-EDS. Results of FTIR revealed that functional groups including CH2, CO, CN, NH, COO and SO3 were participated in the biosorption process of the tested biosorbents no matter bacteria were living or not. The effects of environmental factors including pH, temperature, biomass dose, operation time and initial Pb(2+) concentration were investigated through a batch of biosorption experiments. The equilibrium data for living and non-living biosorbent were well fitted to Langmuir model with their maximum Pb(2+) biosorption capacities of 49.48 and 42.37 mg/g, respectively. The kinetic data for each biosorbent were well described by pseudo-second order kinetic model. Overall, Pseudomonas sp. I3 seemed to be an effective biosorbent for cleansing Pb(2+) from contaminated wastewater at low temperature.

  19. Isolating wetland CH4 emissions using the additional constraints of δ13CH4, and C2H6 in a inverse modeling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillermo Nuñez Ramirez, Tonatiuh; Marshall, Julia; Houweling, Sander; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Worthy, Douglas E. J.; Vaughn, Bruce; Simpson, Isobel; White, James; Brand, Willi A.; Sasakawa, Motoki; Nichol, Silvia; Ramonet, Michel; Tyler, Stanley C.; Hueber, Jacques; Helmig, Detlev; Read, Katie; Punjabi, Schalini; Vanni Gatti, Luciana; Krummel, Paul; Heimann, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Wetlands are the largest single source of atmospheric methane (CH_4). However, estimates of their relative contribution to the atmospheric CH4 budget are highly uncertain. Models of CH4 fluxes from wetlands, which reflect our understanding of the processes driving these fluxes, disagree strongly in their estimates of the total contribution of wetlands to the CH4 budget and in the variability of the fluxes in space and time. Atmospheric CH4 observations can provide a top-down constraint on wetland CH4 flux estimates. Results from atmospheric inverse modeling studies highlight the importance of tropical wetlands in driving interannual variability of atmospheric CH_4. Nevertheless, atmospheric observations in the tropics are scarce, with large areas of strong emissions not covered by the atmospheric observation network. Furthermore, the Bayesian framework, often used in atmospheric inverse modeling, preferentially projects signals onto spatiotemporal regions with large a-priori uncertainty, which is the case of tropical wetlands. Since a large lack of knowledge exists as well for other non-wetland sources of atmospheric CH_4, signals from these could be wrongly allocated to tropical wetlands. The CH4 stable carbon isotope signal (δ13CH_4) and co-emitted species such as ethane (C_2H_6) can provide additional constraints which may be use to discriminate wetland from non-wetland CH4 emissions. We describe the set-up of an inverse modeling framework based on the Jena Inversion System and the TM3 transport model that optimizes CH4 fluxes to fit the observed atmospheric CH_4, δ13CH_4, and C_2H6 signals. The fluxes are optimized with the constraint that each source process was assigned a characteristic range of δ13CH4 signals and methane-to-ethane ratios (MERs). An additional characteristic of our set-up is that no seasonal or interannual variability was included in the wetland a-priori estimate to ensure that all variability is derived exclusively from observations. A

  20. Salininema proteolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic rare actinomycete isolated from wetland soil, and emended description of the family Glycomycetaceae.

    PubMed

    Nikou, Mahdi Moshtaghi; Ramezani, Mohaddaseh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Rasouli, Mehrnoush; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Schumann, Peter; de la Haba, Rafael R; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    A Gram-stain-positive actinobacterial strain, Miq-4T, was isolated from soil around Meighan wetland in the centre of Iran. Strain Miq-4T was strictly aerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive. The isolate grew in the presence of 3–15 % (w/v) NaCl, at 20–40 °C and pH 6.0–11.0. The optimum NaCl, temperature and pH for growth were 7.0 %, 30 °C and 7.0–8.5, respectively. The cell wall of strain Miq-4T contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diamino acid and glucose and ribose as the whole-cell sugars. The polar lipid pattern consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannoside. Strain Miq-4T synthesized cellular fatty acids of anteiso- and iso-branched types, including anteiso-C17 : 0, anteiso- C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0, and the major respiratory quinone was MK-9(H4). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 68.2 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and characteristic patterns of 16S rRNA gene signature nucleotides revealed that strain Miq-4T belongs to the family Glycomycetaceae and showed the closest phylogenetic similarity with Haloglycomyces albus YIM 92370T (94.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain Miq-4T represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Glycomycetaceae, for which the name Salininema proteoliyticum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is Miq-4T ( = IBRC-M 10908T = LMG 28391T). An emended description of the family Glycomycetaceae is also proposed in order to include features of the new genus.

  1. Marinobacter lacisalsi sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from the saline-wetland wildfowl reserve Fuente de Piedra in southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Margarita; Jiménez-Pranteda, Maria L; Kharroub, Karima; González-Paredes, Ana; Durban, Juan J; Russell, Nick J; Ramos-Cormenzana, Alberto; Monteoliva-Sánchez, Mercedes

    2009-07-01

    A Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, motile, moderately halophilic, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain FP2.5(T), was isolated from the inland hypersaline lake Fuente de Piedra, a saline-wetland wildfowl reserve located in the province of Málaga in southern Spain. Strain FP2.5(T) was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. It produced colonies with a light-yellow pigment. Strain FP2.5(T) grew at salinities of 3-15 % (w/v) and at temperatures of 20-40 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 5-9. Strain FP2.5(T) was able to utilize various organic acids as sole carbon and energy source. Its major fatty acids were C(16 : 0), C(18 : 1)omega9c and C(16 : 1)omega9c. The DNA G+C content was 58.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain FP2.5(T) appeared to be a member of the genus Marinobacter and clustered closely with the type strains of Marinobacter segnicrescens, Marinobacter bryozoorum and Marinobacter gudaonensis (levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 98.1, 97.4 and 97.2 %, respectively). However, DNA-DNA relatedness between the new isolate and the type strains of its closest related Marinobacter species was low; levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain FP2.5(T) and M. segnicrescens LMG 23928(T), M. bryozoorum DSM 15401(T) and M. gudaonensis DSM 18066(T) were 36.3, 32.1 and 24.9 %, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data, strain FP2.5(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Marinobacter, for which the name Marinobacter lacisalsi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FP2.5(T) (=CECT 7297(T)=LMG 24237(T)).

  2. Now You See Them, Now You Don't: Temporal Change in the Mode and Extent of Connected and Disconnected Boreal Wetlands and Implications for Streamflow Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, C.; Stadnyk, T. A.; Smith, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    In northern Boreal catchments the presence of a multitude of connected and disconnected wetland complexes is commonly believed to play a controlling role on the source and timing of streamflow, effective simulation of which is critical to flow forecasting in changing climates. A key factor in this control is the mode of connectivity between wetlands and downstream rivers, and temporal distribution thereof. The local Lower Nelson River basin, Manitoba, Canada, has an area of approximately 90,000 km2, of which 25% is estimated to be covered by wetlands. Assessment of a decade of aerial imagery indicates variation in the spatial extent of wetlands of up to 50% of the surface area of individual headwater basins on both an inter- and intra-annual basis. Aerial and ground reconnaissance of selected areas indicates that using generalised aerial-based reflectance imagery for land cover classification is hampered by the presence of a number of types of wetlands (treed, shrubby, grassed, open) and shallow groundwater in this flat landscape. The large, remote, catchment area renders detailed ground-truthing impractical. As an alternative, five headwater basins and the main stem of the river are gauged and monitored for stable isotopes of water. In this study linear regression is used to assess linkages between isotopic and wetland extent variation and dominant environmental variables. Mass balance modelling is used to assess the relative merits of a detailed re-analysis of wetland delineation using refined reflectance analysis, soil and isotopic data, and simply assigning wetland extent as a calibration variable. Results indicate that aerial imagery provides a useful tool to assess surface connectivity, but that explicit identification and representation of temporal variation in surface and subsurface connectivity is necessary to adequately estimate timing of streamflow in this flat, wetland-dominated catchment.

  3. Our Valuable Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    1988-01-01

    Defines wetlands and lists several types of wetland habitat. Describes explorations that can be done with secondary school students including the baby boom, a food pyramid, and microenvironments. Includes a classroom poster with text on the variety of wetlands. (CW)

  4. Our Valuable Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    1988-01-01

    Defines wetlands and lists several types of wetland habitat. Describes explorations that can be done with secondary school students including the baby boom, a food pyramid, and microenvironments. Includes a classroom poster with text on the variety of wetlands. (CW)

  5. Riparian Wetlands: Mapping

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian wetlands are critical systems that perform functions and provide services disproportionate to their extent in the landscape. Mapping wetlands allows for better planning, management, and modeling, but riparian wetlands present several challenges to effective mapping due t...

  6. Riparian Wetlands: Mapping

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian wetlands are critical systems that perform functions and provide services disproportionate to their extent in the landscape. Mapping wetlands allows for better planning, management, and modeling, but riparian wetlands present several challenges to effective mapping due t...

  7. Genetic Evidence for Contrasting Wetland and Savannah Habitat Specializations in Different Populations of Lions (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Moore, Andy E; Cotterill, Fenton P D Woody; Winterbach, Christiaan W; Winterbach, Hanlie E K; Antunes, Agostinho; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    South-central Africa is characterized by an archipelago of wetlands, which has evolved in time and space since at least the Miocene, providing refugia for animal species during Pleistocene arid episodes. Their importance for biodiversity in the region is reflected in the evolution of a variety of specialist mammal and bird species, adapted to exploit these wetland habitats. Populations of lions (Panthera leo) across south-central and east Africa have contrasting signatures of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and biparental nuclear DNA in wetland and savannah habitats, respectively, pointing to the evolution of distinct habitat preferences. This explains the absence of genetic admixture of populations from the Kalahari savannah of southwest Botswana and the Okavango wetland of northern Botswana, despite separation by only 500 km. We postulate that ancestral lions were wetland specialists and that the savannah lions evolved from populations that were isolated during arid Pleistocene episodes. Expansion of grasslands and the resultant increase in herbivore populations during mesic Pleistocene climatic episodes provided the stimulus for the rapid population expansion and diversification of the highly successful savannah lion specialists. Our model has important implications for lion conservation. © The American Genetic Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Flooded area and plant zonation in isolated wetlands in well fields in the Northern Tampa Bay Region, Florida, following reductions in groundwater-withdrawal rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haag, Kim H.; Pfeiffer, William R.

    2012-01-01

    WAP scores and weighted average scores for wetland vegetation were generally consistent with the results of the flooded area analysis. The WAP scores and weighted average scores were higher overall and did not decline with time at four wetlands in well fields (W-33, W-56, Starkey N, and Starkey 108) during the years following reductions in groundwater-withdrawal rates. These four wetlands also had increases in the extent and duration of the flooded area during the post-reduction period. Scores for trees were more consistent than scores for shrubs and groundcover. WAP scores remained relatively low or generally declined at five well-field wetlands (Q-1, W-17, W-41, Starkey D, and Starkey E) during the years following reductions in groundwater-withdrawal rates, and weighted average scores either declined over time or remained low. These five wetlands either did not have an increase in the extent and duration of the flooded area, or if there was an increase, it was small.

  9. Integrating wetland connectivity into models for watershed-scale analyses: Current and future approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIW), or wetlands embedded in uplands, exist along a spatial and temporal hydrologic connectivity continuum to downstream waters. Via these connections and disconnections, GIWs provide numerous hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological functio...

  10. Integrating wetland connectivity into models for watershed-scale analyses: Current and future approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIW), or wetlands embedded in uplands, exist along a spatial and temporal hydrologic connectivity continuum to downstream waters. Via these connections and disconnections, GIWs provide numerous hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological functio...

  11. Wetlands as Habitat in Urbanizing Landscapes: Patterns of Bird Abundance and Occupancy

    EPA Science Inventory

    As natural habitats become fewer in number and more fragmented through urbanization, functions and services provided by small isolated wetlands may become increasingly important in maintaining ecosystem processes. For example, wildlife habitat provided by wetlands in urban lands...

  12. Wetlands as Habitat in Urbanizing Landscapes: Patterns of Bird Abundance and Occupancy

    EPA Science Inventory

    As natural habitats become fewer in number and more fragmented through urbanization, functions and services provided by small isolated wetlands may become increasingly important in maintaining ecosystem processes. For example, wildlife habitat provided by wetlands in urban lands...

  13. Arcicella rigui sp. nov., isolated from water of a wetland, and emended descriptions of the genus Arcicella, Arcicella aquatica, Arcicella rosea and Arcicella aurantiaca.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Yang, Shwu-Harn; Young, Chiu-Chung; Sheu, Shih-Yi

    2013-01-01

    A bacterial strain, designated NSW-5(T), was isolated from a water sample taken from Niao-Song Wetland Park in Taiwan and characterized using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Cells of strain NSW-5(T) were strictly aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-motile and polymorphic, being straight, vibrioid, curved and spiral-shaped rods surrounded by a thick capsule and forming light pink-coloured colonies. Some rings consisting of several cells were present. Growth occurred at 10-40 °C (optimum, 25 °C), with 0-3.0 % NaCl (optimum, 0 %) and at pH 6.0-8.0 (optimum, pH 7.0). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain NSW-5(T) belonged to the genus Arcicella with sequence similarities of 98.6, 98.0 and 97.3 % with Arcicella aquatica NO-502(T), Arcicella rosea TW5(T) and Arcicella aurantiaca TNR-18(T), respectively. The predominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)ω7c and/or C(16 : 1)ω6c; 20.8 %), C(16 : 0) (14.6 %), iso-C(15 : 0) (13.8 %), C(16 : 1)ω5c (12.5 %) and C(18 : 0) (11.4 %), and the only respiratory quinone was MK-7. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine and several uncharacterized glycolipids, aminolipids, phospholipids and aminophospholipids. The DNA G+C content of strain NSW-5(T) was 44.1 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain NSW-5(T) with respect to recognized species of the genus Arcicella was less than 70 %. On the basis of phylogenetic inference and phenotypic data, strain NSW-5(T) should be classified as a representative of a novel species, for which the name Arcicella rigui sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NSW-5(T) (= KCTC 23307(T) = BCRC 80260(T)). Emended descriptions of the genus Arcicella and of Arcicella aquatica, Arcicella rosea and Arcicella aurantiaca are also proposed.

  14. Biogeochemical Characterization of Constructed Wetland Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, B. J.; Parker, G. R.; Filley, T. R.

    2001-12-01

    Agricultural productions areas of the Midwestern United States are recognized as significant contributors of nonpoint source pollution and influence many aspects of water quality at both local and regional scales. In addition, ambitious land "improvement" programs stemming back to the mid-1800s have resulted in widespread loss of wetlands throughout the U.S., including heavy losses in agricultural production areas of the Mississippi River Basin. The combination of these two factors has been directly implicated as a contributing factor to high-profile environmental problems such as exacerbation of the zone of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. Constructed wetlands are recognized for their potential to help mitigate the effects of agricultural nonpoint source pollution and previous loss of wetlands. The vast majority of previous studies of constructed wetlands have focused on the bulk movement of water quality constituents such as nitrogen, phosphorus, total carbon and sediment. While insightful, these studies do not address more detailed aspects of wetland function as it pertains to carbon flux and storage. In this study, we present results from biogeochemical analyses of influent and effluent of an experimental wetland constructed near row crop and animal production facilities in North-central Indiana. Cross flow utrafiltration and chemolytic techniques were used to collect and characterize organic components of wetland influent and effluent. Biomarker molecules were used to describe functions of the constructed wetland.

  15. Assessing the cumulative effect of the weather variability on wetlands and the hydrological connection between wetlands and downstream waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I. Y.; Lang, M. W.; Lee, S.; Mccarty, G.; Peng, Y.; Huang, C.

    2014-12-01

    Wetlands are crucial ecosystem features that provide important ecological benefits to improve water quality and reduce the climate change impact. This ecosystem functioning of wetlands is largely dependent upon their hydrological characteristics and linkage to the downstream waters. However, the cumulative impacts of the climate on wetlands and the hydrological connection between wetlands and downstream waters have been rarely quantified at the landscape scale. This study reports findings from time series satellite observation that can illustrate the changes in extent of wetland inundation at a high spatial resolution (30-m) over the period 1985-2010. This remote sensing based observation provides crucial information to gain insights onto inter-annual variability of inundation dynamics, and we analyze this product with the drought indices, streamflows, the USFS NWI-hydrologic modifier. This study focuses on natural palustrine wetlands, densely distributed in the coastal plain of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW). We observe inundation patterns change in response to the weather variability, and it is proportionally related to the downstream flow discharge. While those wetlands with a longer hydro-period (i.e., permanently ponded wetlands during the growing season) show the strongest relationship with stream discharge (including baseflow, contributed from the shallow groundwater), inundation patterns of headwater/isolated wetlands are also strongly related to stream discharge. It shows the strong relationship between wetlands and downstream water regardless of geographic isolation and their mutual reliance on groundwater. The study provides the support for the conservation of wetlands through section 404 of the Clean Water Act.

  16. Ecosystem level methane fluxes from tidal freshwater and brackish marshes of the Mississippi River Delta: Implications for coastal wetland carbon projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Krauss, Ken W.; Johnson, Darren J.; Raynie, Richard C.; Killebrew, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate from seawater inhibits methane production in tidal wetlands, and by extension, salinity has been used as a general predictor of methane emissions. With the need to reduce methane flux uncertainties from tidal wetlands, eddy covariance (EC) techniques provide an integrated methane budget. The goals of this study were to: 1) establish methane emissions from natural, freshwater and brackish wetlands in Louisiana based on EC; and 2) determine if EC estimates conform to a methane-salinity relationship derived from temperate tidal wetlands with chamber sampling. Annual estimates of methane emissions from this study were 62.3 g CH4/m2/yr and 13.8 g CH4/m2/yr for the freshwater and brackish (8–10 psu) sites, respectively. If it is assumed that long-term, annual soil carbon sequestration rates of natural marshes are ~200 g C/m2/yr (7.3 tCO2e/ha/yr), healthy brackish marshes could be expected to act as a net radiative sink, equivalent to less than one-half the soil carbon accumulation rate after subtracting methane emissions (4.1 tCO2e/ha/yr). Carbon sequestration rates would need case-by-case assessment, but the EC methane emissions estimates in this study conformed well to an existing salinity-methane model that should serve as a basis for establishing emission factors for wetland carbon offset projects.

  17. Isolation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus from pet dogs and cats: a public health implication.

    PubMed

    Abdel-moein, Khaled A; Samir, Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a globally distributed bacterium causing wide variety of illnesses in humans, which attributed to its ability to produce wide array of virulence factors, including enterotoxins that are responsible for staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks. The current study was carried out to investigate the prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus among pet dogs and cats and its public health implication. For this purpose, nasal, oral, and wound swabs were collected from 70 dogs and 47 cats, whereas nasal swabs were collected from 26 human contacts. All samples were examined for the presence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus by isolation of S. aureus in culture media and then tested by specific ELISA kits to detect the produced toxins in bacterial cultures. The prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus was 10% and 2.1% for pet dogs and cats, respectively, whereas the nasal carriage rate in human contacts was 7.7%. The majority of animal isolates were obtained from mouth of the apparently healthy animals. All types of staphylococcal enterotoxins were detected in both animal and human isolates. High prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus among pet dogs highlights the possibility of zoonotic transmission to human contacts leading to nasal and/or hand carriage of such strains; thus, pet animals may be incriminated in the epidemiology of household staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks.

  18. The distribution of organochlorine pesticides in sediments from iSimangaliso Wetland Park: Ecological risks and implications for conservation in a biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Buah-Kwofie, Archibold; Humphries, Marc S

    2017-10-01

    The iSimangaliso Wetland Park World Heritage site, located on the east coast of South Africa, spans ∼3300 km(2) and constitutes the largest protected estuarine environment for hippopotami, crocodiles and aquatic birds in Africa. Given the ecological importance of this site and continued use of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the region, this study focused on the nature, distribution and potential sources of organochlorine contamination within iSimangaliso Wetland Park. OCPs were widely distributed in surface sediment samples obtained from the four main Ramsar wetland systems within the park (Lake St Lucia, Mkhuze, Lake Sibaya and Kosi Bay). ∑HCH and ∑DDT were the dominant contaminants detected with concentrations in the range of 26.29-282.5 ng/g and 34.49-262.4 ng/g, respectively. ∑DDT concentrations revealed a distinctive gradient, with significantly higher concentrations at Kosi Bay and Lake Sibaya attributed to the application of DDT for malaria control. p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD were the dominant isomers detected, but the detection of p,p'-DDT in a number of samples reflects recent inputs of technical DDT. Highest concentrations of HCH, endosulfan and heptachlor were detected in sediments from Mkhuze and reflect the substantial residue load these wetlands receive from agricultural activities within the catchment area. Isomeric compositions indicate that endosulfan and heptachlor residues are derived mainly from historical application, while inputs of HCH, aldrin and endrin could be attributed to more recent usage at several sites. OCP sediment concentrations from iSimangaliso represent the highest yet recorded in South Africa and some of the highest reported globally this century. Sediments found within the lakes and wetlands of iSimangaliso represent large reservoirs of contaminants that pose ecotoxicological threats to this globally important biodiversity hotspot. Detailed investigation into the bioaccumulation and toxicological risks of OCPs within

  19. Ohio Uses Wetlands Program Development Grants to Protect Wetlands

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The wetland water quality standards require the use of ORAM score to determine wetland quality. OEPA has also used these tools to evaluate wetland mitigation projects, develop performance standards for wetland mitigation banks and In Lieu Fee programs an.

  20. Wonderful Wetlands: An Environmental Education Curriculum Guide for Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King County Parks Div., Redmond, WA.

    This curriculum guide was designed to give teachers, students, and society a better understanding of wetlands in the hope that they learn why wetlands should be valued and preserved. It explores what is meant by wetlands, functions and values of wetlands, wetland activities, and wetland offerings which benefit animal and plant life, recreation,…

  1. Sap flow of black ash in wetland forests of northern Minnesota, USA: Hydrologic implications of tree mortality due to emerald ash borer

    Treesearch

    Andrew C. Telander; Robert A. Slesak; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Kenneth N. Brooks; Christian F. Lenhart

    2015-01-01

    Black ash (Fraxinus nigra) mortality caused by the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) is of concern to land managers in the upper Great Lakes region, given the large areas of ash-dominated forest and potential alteration of wetland hydrology following loss of this foundation tree species. The importance of changes in evapotranspiration (ET) following...

  2. HYDROLOGY OF COASTAL WETLANDS OF LAKE SUPERIOR: LAKE AND TRIBUTARY ROLES IN MIXING REGIME AND TURNOVER TIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our work on coastal wetlands of western Lake Superior indicates that hydrological linkages to the lake and watershed are highly dynamic, with potentially significant implications for wetland ecosystem structure and function. Time series data on tributary discharges and seiche amp...

  3. Spatio-temporal dynamics of evapotranspiration from forested, ephemeral wetlands and its implication for hydrologic connectivity in the Western Boreal Plain in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Alexander; Kettridge, Nicholas; Devito, Kevin; Hokanson, Kelly; Leonard, Rhoswen; Krause, Stefan; Waddington, James Michael

    2017-04-01

    In catchments where hydrologic connectivity is predominantly controlled by storage-threshold dynamics, landscape units promoting water transmission can be crucial for overall ecohydrological functioning. In Canada's Western Boreal Plain, ephemeral wetlands surrounded by upland forests on deep and coarse, glacial deposits are examples of such units. In the sub-humid climate, their importance is exacerbated due to regional, multi-year water deficits, resulting from high evapotranspirative (ET) demand coinciding with most of the annual precipitation and its variability between years. Yet, these ephemeral wetlands frequently saturate during small rain events; hence, they likely play a key role in supplying water to adjacent and downstream systems in both dry and wet periods. We assess factors controlling water losses from these wetlands to the atmosphere (via the soil surface and vegetation), how they change over time (i.e. throughout the growing season), and the extent to which they vary in space. Our goal is to generate process-based understanding of ET dynamics and to determine potential feedbacks that reduce ET losses, maximizing the magnitude and period over which these landscape units may act as water sources. We hypothesize that the following mechanisms enhance the ascribed water transmitting function: (1) external and internal shading reduces incident radiation and therefore available energy to drive ET; this effect increases with leaf area, but is counter-acted by interception. (2) Vegetation structure reduces turbulent exchange with air masses above the canopy, thereby decreasing humidity gradients driving ET. (3) High, near-surface soil tensions during periods of drying limit rates of evaporation. We applied a combined measurement approach to assess spatial and temporal dynamics of ET in the 2016 growing season (May - August) and gathered additional data to assess abiotic and biotic controls on ET rates. We continuously measured ET from the wetland's surface

  4. Hydrogeomorphic Classification of Wetlands on Mt. Desert Island, Maine, Including Hydrologic Susceptibility Factors for Wetlands in Acadia National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Martha G.

    2006-01-01

    Depressional (Open, Semiclosed, and Closed), 231 were Riverine (Upper Perennial and Nonperennial), 210 were Soil Flat (Mineral and Organic), 68 were Lacustrine Fringe, 51 were Tidal Fringe, 22 were Hilltop/Upper Hillslope, and another 35 were small open water bodies. Most small, isolated wetlands classified on the island are Slope wetlands. The least common, Hilltop/Upper Hillslope wetlands, only occur on a few hilltops and shoulders of hills and mountains. Large wetland complexes generally consist of groups of Depressional wetlands and Mineral Soil Flat or Organic Soil Flat wetlands, often with fringing Slope wetlands at their edges and Riverine wetlands near streams flowing through them. The two analyses of wetland hydrologic susceptibility on Mt. Desert Island were applied to 186 wetlands located partially or entirely within ANP. These analyses were conducted using individually mapped catchments for each wetland. The 186 wetlands were aggregated from the original 1,202 mapped wetland polygons on the basis of their HGM classes. Landscape-level hydrologic, geomorphic, and soil variables were defined for the catchments of the wetlands, and transformed into scaled scores from 0 to 10 for each variable. The variables included area of the wetland, area of the catchment, area of the wetland divided by the area of the catchment, the average topographic slope of the catchment, the amount of the catchment where bedrock crops out with no soil cover or excessively thin soil cover, the amount of storage (in lakes and wetlands) in the catchment, the topographic relief of the catchment, the amount of clay-rich soil in the catchment, the amount of manmade impervious surface, whether the wetland had a stream inflow, and whether the wetland had a hydraulic connection to a lake or estuary. These data were determined using a GIS and data layers mapped at a scale of 1:24,000 or larger. These landscape variables were combined in different ways for the two hydrologic susceptibility fact

  5. Species composition, distribution and habitat types of Odonata in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and the associated conservation implications.

    PubMed

    Hart, Lorinda A; Bowker, Meyrick B; Tarboton, Warwick; Downs, Colleen T

    2014-01-01

    Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany, South Africa has been identified as a biodiversity hotspot and centre for endemism. Odonata make good indicators of freshwater ecosystem health. Consequently we compiled a list of Odonata species recorded to date in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. We then detailed important species in terms of endemism, conservation status, and potential as indicator species. Finally, we compared Odonata assemblages of different sites sampled within the park to illustrate habitat importance. Species identified during two formal surveys and incidental observations made during the study period were combined with an existing database to compile an accurate and up to date species list for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. Data from this study were then analyzed to determine which water bodies had the most similar species composition. The Dragonfly Biotic Index (DBI) value of each study area was also determined. We recorded 68 odonate species in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, adding 13 species to the Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife database for the area. This brings the total number of Odonata species for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park to 86. Eight species are red-listed, 12 are restricted in South Africa to the coastal plains of northern KwaZulu-Natal, and the remainder occurs widely across the southern African savanna. Analyses indicate that species odonate assemblages were most similar in water bodies with comparable habitats. iSimangaliso Wetland Park is identified as an important area for Odonata diversity and endemism, a trend also reflected by the DBI values. Shifts in the existing species assemblages would indicate changes within the ecosystem and thus this species account provides necessary baseline data for the area. Species Conservation efforts should thus target water bodies of varying habitat types to protect greater species diversity.

  6. Species Composition, Distribution and Habitat Types of Odonata in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and the Associated Conservation Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Lorinda A.; Bowker, Meyrick B.; Tarboton, Warwick; Downs, Colleen T.

    2014-01-01

    Maputaland–Pondoland–Albany, South Africa has been identified as a biodiversity hotspot and centre for endemism. Odonata make good indicators of freshwater ecosystem health. Consequently we compiled a list of Odonata species recorded to date in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. We then detailed important species in terms of endemism, conservation status, and potential as indicator species. Finally, we compared Odonata assemblages of different sites sampled within the park to illustrate habitat importance. Species identified during two formal surveys and incidental observations made during the study period were combined with an existing database to compile an accurate and up to date species list for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park. Data from this study were then analyzed to determine which water bodies had the most similar species composition. The Dragonfly Biotic Index (DBI) value of each study area was also determined. We recorded 68 odonate species in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, adding 13 species to the Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife database for the area. This brings the total number of Odonata species for the iSimangaliso Wetland Park to 86. Eight species are red-listed, 12 are restricted in South Africa to the coastal plains of northern KwaZulu-Natal, and the remainder occurs widely across the southern African savanna. Analyses indicate that species odonate assemblages were most similar in water bodies with comparable habitats. iSimangaliso Wetland Park is identified as an important area for Odonata diversity and endemism, a trend also reflected by the DBI values. Shifts in the existing species assemblages would indicate changes within the ecosystem and thus this species account provides necessary baseline data for the area. Species Conservation efforts should thus target water bodies of varying habitat types to protect greater species diversity. PMID:24662948

  7. Hydrogeology of wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; Llamas, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    A collection of 10 papers presented at the Hydrogeology of Wetlands Symposium, 28th International Geological Congress in Washington, DC, in July 1989. The purpose of the symposium was to assemble papers describing hydrogeologic studies of wetlands representative of different geographic regions, wetland types, and study approaches. The papers presented at the Symposium ranged geographically from wetlands in the Arctic to the Subtropics. Different wetland types included coastal, riverine, depressional glacial terrane, and dunal depressions. Different study approaches included regional syntheses, analyses of groundwater flow systems, wetland-river interaction, and geomorphology-vegetation interaction. -from Editors

  8. Replacing natural wetlands with stormwater management facilities: Biophysical and perceived social values.

    PubMed

    Rooney, R C; Foote, L; Krogman, N; Pattison, J K; Wilson, M J; Bayley, S E

    2015-04-15

    Urban expansion replaces wetlands of natural origin with artificial stormwater management facilities. The literature suggests that efforts to mimic natural wetlands in the design of stormwater facilities can expand the provision of ecosystem services. Policy developments seek to capitalize on these improvements, encouraging developers to build stormwater wetlands in place of stormwater ponds; however, few have compared the biophysical values and social perceptions of these created wetlands to those of the natural wetlands they are replacing. We compared four types of wetlands: natural references sites, natural wetlands impacted by agriculture, created stormwater wetlands, and created stormwater ponds. We anticipated that they would exhibit a gradient in biodiversity, ecological integrity, chemical and hydrologic stress. We further anticipated that perceived values would mirror measured biophysical values. We found higher biophysical values associated with wetlands of natural origin (both reference and agriculturally impacted). The biophysical values of stormwater wetlands and stormwater ponds were lower and indistinguishable from one another. The perceived wetland values assessed by the public differed from the observed biophysical values. This has important policy implications, as the public are not likely to perceive the loss of values associated with the replacement of natural wetlands with created stormwater management facilities. We conclude that 1) agriculturally impacted wetlands provide biophysical values equivalent to those of natural wetlands, meaning that land use alone is not a great predictor of wetland value; 2) stormwater wetlands are not a substantive improvement over stormwater ponds, relative to wetlands of natural origin; 3) stormwater wetlands are poor mimics of natural wetlands, likely due to fundamental distinctions in terms of basin morphology, temporal variation in hydrology, ground water connectivity, and landscape position; 4) these

  9. Characterizing wetland change at landscape scale in Jiangsu Province, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chi; Sheng, Sheng; Zhou, Wen; Cui, Lijuan; Liu, Maosong

    2011-08-01

    Human activities produced great impacts on wetlands worldwide. Taking Jiangsu Province, China, as a representative wetland region subject to extensive human activities, the aim of this study is to understand the conversion trajectory and spatial differentiation in wetland change from a multi-scale perspective. Based on multi-temporal Landsat images, it was found that the natural wetlands decreased by 11.2% from 1990 to 2006 in Jiangsu Province. Transition matrices showed that the conversion of natural wetlands to human-made wetlands (mostly aquaculture ponds) was the major form of natural wetland reduction, accounting for over 60% of the reduction. Percentage reduction and area reduc tion of natural wetlands were respectively quantified within different wetland cover zones using a moving window analysis. Average percentage reduction showed a decreasing tendency with increasing wetland cover. The high-cover and mid-cover zone presented the largest area reduction at the scales of 1-2 km and 4-8 km, respectively. Local hotspots of natural wetland reduction were mapped using the equal-interval and quantile classification schemes. The hotspots were mostly concentrated in the Lixiahe marshes and the coastal wetland areas. For the area reduction hotspots, the quantile classification presented larger area and more patches than the equal-interval classification; while an opposite result was shown for the percentage reduction hotspots. With respect to the discontinuous distribution of the natural wetlands, area reduction could be more appropriate to represent reduction hotspots than percentage reduction in the study area. These findings could have useful implications to wetland conservation.

  10. WETLAND INVENTORY USING REMOTELY SENSED LANDSAT DATA AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands perform many functions on the landscape related to water quality and quantity, and provide habitat for myriad organisms. The identification of wetlands can be problematic, especially in areas with numerous isolated wetlands, in mixed landuse areas, or over large geograp...

  11. WETLAND INVENTORY USING REMOTELY SENSED LANDSAT DATA AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands perform many functions on the landscape related to water quality and quantity, and provide habitat for myriad organisms. The identification of wetlands can be problematic, especially in areas with numerous isolated wetlands, in mixed landuse areas, or over large geograp...

  12. Modeling the Hydrologic Processes of a Depressional Forested Wetland in South Carolina, U.S.A.

    Treesearch

    Ge Sun; Timothy Callahan; Jennifer E. Pyzoha; Carl C. Trettin; Devendra M. Amatya

    2004-01-01

    Depressional forested wetlands or geographically isolated wetlands such as cypress swamps and Carolina bays are common land features in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern US. Those wetlands play important roles in providing wildlife habitats, water quality improvement, and carbon sequestration. Great stresses have been imposed on those important ecosystems...

  13. Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    D. J. Hansen

    1997-05-01

    This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

  14. Wetland Characteristics and Denitrification

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation serves as an initial summary of our wetland field work's watershed characteristics hydrologic characteristics, water quality measurements, and denitrification assays. We present our measurement results in the context of wetland type (Estuarine, Freshwater Mars...

  15. Why are wetlands important?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, comparable to rain forests and coral reefs. An immense variety of species of microbes, plants, insects, amphibians, reptiles, birds, fish, and mammals can be part of a wetland ecosystem.

  16. Diversity of Endophytic Fungi Associated with the Roots of Four Aquatic Plants Inhabiting Two Wetlands in Korea.

    PubMed

    You, Young-Hyun; Park, Jong Myong; Park, Jong-Han; Kim, Jong-Guk

    2015-09-01

    A total of 4 aquatic plants, Eleocharis kuroguwai Ohwi, Hydrocharis dubia Backer, Salvinia natans All., and Zizania latifolia Turcz., were sampled from representative two wetlands of South Korea. A total of 38 endophytic fungal strains were isolated from aquatic plants native to the Daepyeong wetland, and 27 strains were isolated from the Jilnal wetland. The internal transcribed spacer regions of fungal isolates were sequenced and a phylogenetic analysis was performed. In addition, endophytic fungal diversity from each wetland and host plant species was deduced. A total of 25 fungal genera were purely isolated, and 16 fungal genera were isolated from each of the two wetlands. Commonly isolated genera from both wetlands were Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Clonostachys, Fusarium, Leptosphaeria, Penicillium, and Talaromyces. This study revealed that fungal diversity varied with environmental conditions and by host plant in representative two wetlands.

  17. Diversity of Endophytic Fungi Associated with the Roots of Four Aquatic Plants Inhabiting Two Wetlands in Korea

    PubMed Central

    You, Young-Hyun; Park, Jong Myong; Park, Jong-Han

    2015-01-01

    A total of 4 aquatic plants, Eleocharis kuroguwai Ohwi, Hydrocharis dubia Backer, Salvinia natans All., and Zizania latifolia Turcz., were sampled from representative two wetlands of South Korea. A total of 38 endophytic fungal strains were isolated from aquatic plants native to the Daepyeong wetland, and 27 strains were isolated from the Jilnal wetland. The internal transcribed spacer regions of fungal isolates were sequenced and a phylogenetic analysis was performed. In addition, endophytic fungal diversity from each wetland and host plant species was deduced. A total of 25 fungal genera were purely isolated, and 16 fungal genera were isolated from each of the two wetlands. Commonly isolated genera from both wetlands were Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Clonostachys, Fusarium, Leptosphaeria, Penicillium, and Talaromyces. This study revealed that fungal diversity varied with environmental conditions and by host plant in representative two wetlands. PMID:26539039

  18. Nitrogen removal capacity of wetlands: sediment versus epiphytic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bourgues, S; Hart, B T H

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands are important sinks for nutrients and constructed wetlands are current practice for stormwater treatment. For nitrogen, the main removal process is denitrification (microbial reduction of nitrate to nitrogen gas). The bacteria responsible for this process are mostly found in the sediments and in epiphytic biofilms growing on wetland macrophytes. This paper reports on a project which aimed at measuring denitrification potential in sediments and epiphyton in urban wetlands. This study showed that wetland sediments could support high rates of denitrification. Interestingly, the most polluted of the wetlands studied had the highest denitrification potential. The management implication from this result is that indicators of pollution, such as hydrocarbon levels, will not necessarily reflect the ability of a wetland to denitrify. Two of the wetlands were studied in more detail. Here the denitrification potential of the epiphyton on dominant macrophytes and sediments were measured. The results indicated that the potential denitrification activity of the epiphyton was comparable to those measured in the sediments. Hence, biofilms could play a significant part in removing nitrogen loads. This work contributes to a better knowledge of the functioning of wetlands. This will lead to improved design and management of wetlands used for treating stormwater.

  19. Sedimentation of prairie wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleason, Robert A.; Euliss, Ned H.

    1998-01-01

    Many wetlands in the prairie pothole region are embedded within an agricultural landscape where they are subject to varying degrees of siltation. Cultivation of wetland catchment areas has exacerbated soil erosion; wetlands in agricultural fields receive more sediment from upland areas than wetlands in grassland landscapes and hence are subject to premature filling (i.e., they have shorter topographic lives). Associated impacts from increased turbidity, sediment deposition, and increased surface water input likely have impaired natural wetland functions. Although trapping of sediments by wetlands is often cited as a water quality benefit, sediment input from agricultural fields has potential to completely fill wetlands and shorten their effective life-span. Thus, the value placed on wetlands to trap sediments is in conflict with maximizing the effective topographic life of wetlands. Herein, we provide an overview of sedimentation, identify associated impacts on wetlands, and suggest remedial management strategies. We also highlight the need to evaluate the impact of agricultural practices on wetland functions from an interdisciplinary approach to facilitate development of best management practices that benefit both wetland and agricultural interests.

  20. Wetlands: An Interdisciplinary Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerniak, Charlene M.

    2004-01-01

    The topic of wetlands provides a rich context for curriculum integration. This unit contains seven activities that integrate environmental science with math, technology, social studies, language arts, and other disciplines. In this series, students will identify plants and animals found in wetlands, understand the function of wetlands through the…

  1. Gulf Coast Wetlands

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Wetlands of the Gulf Coast     ... web of estuarine channels and extensive coastal wetlands that provide important habitat for fisheries. The city of New Orleans ... or below sea level. The city is protected by levees, but the wetlands which also function as a buffer from storm surges have been ...

  2. Wetlands, Wildlife, and People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the problems created when wetlands are drained or altered by humans. Provides a brief case study of the Everglades as an example of the effects of human intervention. Presents four learning activities (along with reproducible worksheets) that deal with the benefits of wetlands, and some debated issues over wetlands. (TW)

  3. Wetlands, Wildlife, and People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the problems created when wetlands are drained or altered by humans. Provides a brief case study of the Everglades as an example of the effects of human intervention. Presents four learning activities (along with reproducible worksheets) that deal with the benefits of wetlands, and some debated issues over wetlands. (TW)

  4. Wetlands: An Interdisciplinary Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerniak, Charlene M.

    2004-01-01

    The topic of wetlands provides a rich context for curriculum integration. This unit contains seven activities that integrate environmental science with math, technology, social studies, language arts, and other disciplines. In this series, students will identify plants and animals found in wetlands, understand the function of wetlands through the…

  5. The land value impacts of wetland restoration.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Nikhil; BenDor, Todd K

    2013-09-30

    U.S. regulations require offsets for aquatic ecosystems damaged during land development, often through restoration of alternative resources. What effect does large-scale wetland and stream restoration have on surrounding land values? Restoration effects on real estate values have substantial implications for protecting resources, increasing tax base, and improving environmental policies. Our analysis focuses on the three-county Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina region, which has experienced rapid development and extensive aquatic ecological restoration (through the state's Ecosystem Enhancement Program [EEP]). Since restoration sites are not randomly distributed across space, we used a genetic algorithm to match parcels near restoration sites with comparable control parcels. Similar to propensity score analysis, this technique facilitates statistical comparison and isolates the effects of restoration sites on surrounding real estate values. Compared to parcels not proximate to any aquatic resources, we find that, 1) natural aquatic systems steadily and significantly increase parcel values up to 0.75 mi away, and 2) parcels <0.5 mi from EEP restoration sites have significantly lower sale prices, while 3) parcels >0.5 mi from EEP sites gain substantial amenity value. When we control for intervening water bodies (e.g. un-restored streams and wetlands), we find a similar inflection point whereby parcels <0.5 mi from EEP sites exhibit lower values, and sites 0.5-0.75 mi away exhibit increased values. Our work points to the need for higher public visibility of aquatic ecosystem restoration programs and increased public information about their value.

  6. Understanding the Groundwater Hydrology of a Geographically-Isolated Prairie Fen: Implications for Conservation.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Prasanna Venkatesh; Liao, Hua-Sheng; Curtis, Zachary Kristopher; Doran, Patrick J; Herbert, Matthew E; May, Christopher A; Li, Shu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    The sources of water and corresponding delivery mechanisms to groundwater-fed fens are not well understood due to the multi-scale geo-morphologic variability of the glacial landscape in which they occur. This lack of understanding limits the ability to effectively conserve these systems and the ecosystem services they provide, including biodiversity and water provisioning. While fens tend to occur in clusters around regional groundwater mounds, Ives Road Fen in southern Michigan is an example of a geographically-isolated fen. In this paper, we apply a multi-scale groundwater modeling approach to understand the groundwater sources for Ives Road fen. We apply Transition Probability geo-statistics on more than 3000 well logs from a state-wide water well database to characterize the complex geology using conditional simulations. We subsequently implement a 3-dimensional reverse particle tracking to delineate groundwater contribution areas to the fen. The fen receives water from multiple sources: local recharge, regional recharge from an extensive till plain, a regional groundwater mound, and a nearby pond. The regional sources deliver water through a tortuous, 3-dimensional "pipeline" consisting of a confined aquifer lying beneath an extensive clay layer. Water in this pipeline reaches the fen by upwelling through openings in the clay layer. The pipeline connects the geographically-isolated fen to the same regional mound that provides water to other fen clusters in southern Michigan. The major implication of these findings is that fen conservation efforts must be expanded from focusing on individual fens and their immediate surroundings, to studying the much larger and inter-connected hydrologic network that sustains multiple fens.

  7. DETECTION OF MOLECULAR GAS IN VOID GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR STAR FORMATION IN ISOLATED ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Das, M.; Honey, M.; Saito, T.; Iono, D.; Ramya, S.

    2015-12-10

    We present the detection of molecular gas from galaxies located in nearby voids using the CO(1–0) line emission as a tracer. The observations were performed using the 45 m single dish radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. Void galaxies lie in the most underdense parts of our universe and a significant fraction of them are gas rich, late-type spiral galaxies. Although isolated, they have ongoing star formation but appear to be slowly evolving compared to galaxies in denser environments. Not much is known about their star formation properties or cold gas content. In this study, we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively high IRAS fluxes or Hα line luminosities, both of which signify ongoing star formation. All five galaxies appear to be isolated and two lie within the Bootes void. We detected CO(1–0) emission from four of the five galaxies in our sample and their molecular gas masses lie between 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. We conducted follow-up Hα imaging observations of three detected galaxies using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope and determined their star formation rates (SFRs) from their Hα fluxes. The SFR varies from 0.2 to 1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; which is similar to that observed in local galaxies. Our study indicates that although void galaxies reside in underdense regions, their disks contain molecular gas and have SFRs similar to galaxies in denser environments. We discuss the implications of our results.

  8. Understanding the Groundwater Hydrology of a Geographically-Isolated Prairie Fen: Implications for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Prasanna Venkatesh; Liao, Hua-Sheng; Curtis, Zachary Kristopher; Doran, Patrick J.; Herbert, Matthew E.; May, Christopher A.; Li, Shu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    The sources of water and corresponding delivery mechanisms to groundwater-fed fens are not well understood due to the multi-scale geo-morphologic variability of the glacial landscape in which they occur. This lack of understanding limits the ability to effectively conserve these systems and the ecosystem services they provide, including biodiversity and water provisioning. While fens tend to occur in clusters around regional groundwater mounds, Ives Road Fen in southern Michigan is an example of a geographically-isolated fen. In this paper, we apply a multi-scale groundwater modeling approach to understand the groundwater sources for Ives Road fen. We apply Transition Probability geo-statistics on more than 3000 well logs from a state-wide water well database to characterize the complex geology using conditional simulations. We subsequently implement a 3-dimensional reverse particle tracking to delineate groundwater contribution areas to the fen. The fen receives water from multiple sources: local recharge, regional recharge from an extensive till plain, a regional groundwater mound, and a nearby pond. The regional sources deliver water through a tortuous, 3-dimensional “pipeline” consisting of a confined aquifer lying beneath an extensive clay layer. Water in this pipeline reaches the fen by upwelling through openings in the clay layer. The pipeline connects the geographically-isolated fen to the same regional mound that provides water to other fen clusters in southern Michigan. The major implication of these findings is that fen conservation efforts must be expanded from focusing on individual fens and their immediate surroundings, to studying the much larger and inter-connected hydrologic network that sustains multiple fens. PMID:26452279

  9. Regional and National Use of Semi-Natural and Natural Depressional Wetlands in Green Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, C.; D'Amico, E.

    2016-12-01

    Depressional wetlands are frequently amongst the first aquatic systems to be exposed to pollutants from terrestrial source areas. Wetland functions include the finite ability to process nutrients and other pollutants. Through assimilation or sequestration of pollutants, depressional wetlands can affect other waters. While the functions of wetlands are well known, the abundance of depressional wetlands throughout the United States is not well known. Recent estimates conclude that approximately 16% of the freshwater wetlands of the conterminous United States may be depressional wetlands, or putative "geographically isolated wetlands" (Lane and D'Amico JAWRA 2016 52(3):705-722). However, there remains uncertainty in the impact or effects of depressional wetlands on other waters. We present geographic information system analyses showing the abundance and types of depressional wetlands effectively serving as green infrastructure throughout the conterminous U.S. We furthermore analyze the landscape position of depressional wetlands intersecting potentially pollutant-laden surficial flow paths from specific land uses (e.g., depressional wetlands embedded in agricultural landscapes). We discuss how similarities and differences in types and abundances of depressional wetlands between and among ecoregions of the conterminous US provide an opportunity for wise management at broad geographic scales. These data may suggest utility in including wetland depressions in large-scale coupled hydrological and nutrient modeling.

  10. National Wetlands Inventory products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    control. These predominantly wet areas, or wetlands as they are commonly called, now represent only about 5 percent of the land surface of the lower 48 States. Out of 221 million acres of wetlands that once existed in the conterminous United States, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) estimates that only about 103.3 million acres remain. Each year, development, drainage, and agriculture eliminate another 290,000 acres-an area a little less than half the size of Rhode Island. From the 1950's to the 1970's, conversion of wetlands to farmland caused 87 percent of all wetland losses. The FWS has long recognized the importance of America's wetlands because they form breeding and wintering grounds for great numbers of migratory birds. In 1977, the FWS began the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI), a systematic effort to classify and map America's remaining wetlands.

  11. Rodentborne fungal pathogens in wetland agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Manuel; Abraham Samuel, K; Kurian, Punnen

    2012-01-01

    The past few decades have witnessed an overwhelming increase in the incidence of fungal infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. Consequently, zoonotic diseases, especially through rodents constitute a prominent group among the emerging diseases. Rodents are commensal to man and related health risks are common. Water rats (Rattus norvegicus) are typical to Vembanadu-Kol wetland agroecosystems, where they can act as a good carrier nexus for pathogens. The present study evaluates the carrier status of water rats with respect to fungal pathogens. A total of fifty two fungi covering eighteen families were isolated. Among the isolates, eight were dermaptophytes and Chrysosporium sp. (89.18%) was the frequent isolate. The source-wise analyses showed an increased isolation from ventral hair (67 isolates). Water rats of Vembanadu-Kol wetland agroecosystem are potent carrier of dermaptophytes and other opportunistic fungi, and strong carrier paths are existing too.

  12. Rodentborne fungal pathogens in wetland agroecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Manuel; Abraham Samuel, K.; Kurian, Punnen

    2012-01-01

    The past few decades have witnessed an overwhelming increase in the incidence of fungal infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. Consequently, zoonotic diseases, especially through rodents constitute a prominent group among the emerging diseases. Rodents are commensal to man and related health risks are common. Water rats (Rattus norvegicus) are typical to Vembanadu-Kol wetland agroecosystems, where they can act as a good carrier nexus for pathogens. The present study evaluates the carrier status of water rats with respect to fungal pathogens. A total of fifty two fungi covering eighteen families were isolated. Among the isolates, eight were dermaptophytes and Chrysosporium sp. (89.18%) was the frequent isolate. The source-wise analyses showed an increased isolation from ventral hair (67 isolates). Water rats of Vembanadu-Kol wetland agroecosystem are potent carrier of dermaptophytes and other opportunistic fungi, and strong carrier paths are existing too. PMID:24031825

  13. Phosphorus transformations during decomposition of wetland macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Cheesman, Alexander W; Turner, Benjamin L; Inglett, Patrick W; Reddy, K Ramesh

    2010-12-15

    The microbially mediated transformation of detrital P entering wetlands has important implications for the cycling and long-term sequestration of P in wetland soils. We investigated changes in P forms in sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense Crantz) and cattail (Typha domingensis Pers.) leaf litter during 15 months of decomposition at two sites of markedly different nutrient status within a hard-water subtropical wetland (Water Conservation Area 2A, Florida). Leaf litter decomposition at the nutrient enriched site resulted in net sequestration of P from the environment in forms characteristic of microbial cells (i.e., phosphodiesters and pyrophosphate). In contrast, low P concentrations at the unenriched site resulted in little or no net sequestration of P, with changes in P forms limited to the loss of compounds present in the initial leaf litter. We conclude that under nutrient-rich conditions, P sequestration occurs through the accumulation of microbially derived compounds and the presumed concentration of endogenous macrophyte P. Under nutrient-poor conditions, standing P pools within wetland soils appear to be independent of the heterotrophic decomposition of macrophyte leaf litter. These conclusions have important implications for our ability to predict the nature, stability, and rates of P sequestration in wetlands in response to changes in nutrient loading.

  14. Factors influencing stable isotope ratios in CH4 and CO2 within subenvironments of freshwater wetlands: implications for delta-signatures of emissions.

    PubMed

    Hornibrook, E R; Longstaffe, F J; Fyfe, W S

    2000-01-01

    Much uncertainty still exists regarding spatial and temporal variability of stable isotope ratios (13C/12C and D/H) in different CH4-emission sources. Such variability is especially prevalent in freshwater wetlands where a range of processes can influence stable isotope compositions, resulting in variations of up to approximately 50% for delta13C-CH4 and approximately 50% for deltaD-CH4 values. Within a temperate-zone bog and marsh situated in southwestern Ontario, Canada, gas bubbles in pond sediments exhibit only minor seasonal and spatial variation in delta13C-CH4, deltaD-CH4 and delta13C-CO2 values. In pond sediments, CO2 appears to be the main source of carbon during methanogenesis either directly via CO2 reduction or indirectly through dissimilation of autotrophic acetate. In contrast, CH4 production occurs primarily via acetate fermentation at shallow depths in peat soils adjacent to ponds at each wetland. At greater depths within soils, sigmaCO2 and H2O increasingly exert an influence on delta13C- and deltaD-CH4 values. Secondary alteration processes (e.g., methanotrophy or diffusive transport) are unlikely to be responsible for depth-related changes in stable isotope values of CH4. Recent models that attempt to predict deltaD-CH4 values in freshwater environments from D/H ratios in local precipitation do not adequately account for such changes with depth. Subenvironments (i.e., soil-forming and open water areas) in wetlands should be considered separately with respect to stable isotope signatures in CH4 emission models.

  15. Freshwater Wetlands: A Citizen's Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catskill Center for Conservation and Development, Inc., Hobart, NY.

    The purpose of this "primer" for the general public is to describe the general characteristics of wetlands and how wetland alteration adversely affects the well-being of humans. Particular emphasis is placed on wetlands in New York State and the northeast. Topics discussed include wetland values, destruction of wetlands, the costs of…

  16. Freshwater Wetlands: A Citizen's Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catskill Center for Conservation and Development, Inc., Hobart, NY.

    The purpose of this "primer" for the general public is to describe the general characteristics of wetlands and how wetland alteration adversely affects the well-being of humans. Particular emphasis is placed on wetlands in New York State and the northeast. Topics discussed include wetland values, destruction of wetlands, the costs of…

  17. Carbon storage in US wetlands | Science Inventory | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Nature Communications article is a product of legacy work that contributes to Safe and Sustainable Water Resources research on technical support and research on the enhancement of Office of Water’s National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) (SSWR 3.01A). The research is also potentially relevant to SHC and ACE research program questions. The research was conducted under USEPA cooperative agreement number 83422601 with Michigan State University in association with Kenyon College. USEPA 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment data used for this research are publically available from https://www.epa.gov/national-aquatic-resource-surveys/data-national-aquatic-resource-surveys. ***This is article is clearing for completion ONLY*** The research and conclusions in this article highlight the role of wetland soils in storing carbon and the implications of disturbance to wetlands for climate change. Specifically, we provide unbiased estimates of soil carbon stocks for wetlands at regional and national scales using field data from the 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA). This research also describes how soil carbon stocks vary by wetland type and soil depth, and by anthropogenic disturbance to the wetland. We find that wetlands in the conterminous US store a total of 11.52 PgC – roughly equivalent to four years of annual carbon emissions by the US. Freshwater inland wetlands, in part due to their substantial areal extent, hold nearly ten-fol

  18. Carbon storage in US wetlands | Science Inventory | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Nature Communications article is a product of legacy work that contributes to Safe and Sustainable Water Resources research on technical support and research on the enhancement of Office of Water’s National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) (SSWR 3.01A). The research is also potentially relevant to SHC and ACE research program questions. The research was conducted under USEPA cooperative agreement number 83422601 with Michigan State University in association with Kenyon College. USEPA 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment data used for this research are publically available from https://www.epa.gov/national-aquatic-resource-surveys/data-national-aquatic-resource-surveys. ***This is article is clearing for completion ONLY*** The research and conclusions in this article highlight the role of wetland soils in storing carbon and the implications of disturbance to wetlands for climate change. Specifically, we provide unbiased estimates of soil carbon stocks for wetlands at regional and national scales using field data from the 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA). This research also describes how soil carbon stocks vary by wetland type and soil depth, and by anthropogenic disturbance to the wetland. We find that wetlands in the conterminous US store a total of 11.52 PgC – roughly equivalent to four years of annual carbon emissions by the US. Freshwater inland wetlands, in part due to their substantial areal extent, hold nearly ten-fol

  19. Genetic Variants in Isolated Ebstein Anomaly Implicated in Myocardial Development Pathways.

    PubMed

    Sicko, Robert J; Browne, Marilyn L; Rigler, Shannon L; Druschel, Charlotte M; Liu, Gang; Fan, Ruzong; Romitti, Paul A; Caggana, Michele; Kay, Denise M; Brody, Lawrence C; Mills, James L

    2016-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare heart defect in which the tricuspid valve is malformed and displaced. The tricuspid valve abnormalities can lead to backflow of blood from the right ventricle to the right atrium, preventing proper circulation of blood to the lungs. Although the etiology of EA is largely unresolved, increased prevalence of EA in those with a family history of congenital heart disease suggests EA has a genetic component. Copy number variants (CNVs) are a major source of genetic variation and have been implicated in a range of congenital heart defect phenotypes. We performed a systematic, genome-wide search for CNVs in 47 isolated EA cases using genotyping microarrays. In addition, we used a custom HaloPlex panel to sequence three known EA genes and 47 candidate EA genes. We identified 35 candidate CNVs in 24 (51%) EA cases. Rare sequence variants in genes associated with cardiomyopathy were identified in 11 (23%) EA cases. Two CNVs near the transcriptional repressor HEY1, a member of the NOTCH signaling pathway, were identified in three unrelated cases. All other candidate CNVs were each identified in a single case. At least 11 of 35 candidate CNVs include genes involved in myocardial development or function, including multiple genes in the BMP signaling pathway. We identified enrichment of gene sets involved in histone modification and cardiomyocyte differentiation, supporting the involvement of the developing myocardium in the etiology of EA. Gene set enrichment analysis also identified ribosomal RNA processing, a potentially novel pathway of altered cardiac development in EA. Our results suggest an altered myocardial program may contribute to abnormal tricuspid valve development in EA. Future studies should investigate abnormal differentiation of cardiomyocytes as a potential etiological factor in EA.

  20. Genetic testing in familial isolated hyperparathyroidism: unexpected results and their implications

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J; Epstein, M; Sweet, A; Singh, D; Burgess, J; Stranks, S; Hill, P; Perry-Keene, D; Learoyd, D; Robinson, B; Birdsey, P; Mackenzie, E; Teh, B; Prins, J; Cardinal, J

    2004-01-01

    Familial hyperparathyroidism is not uncommon in clinical endocrine practice. It encompasses a spectrum of disorders including multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 (MEN1) and 2A, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome (HPT-JT), familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH), and familial isolated hyperparathyroidism (FIHP). Distinguishing among the five syndromes is often difficult but has profound implications for the management of patient and family. The availability of specific genetic testing for four of the syndromes has improved diagnostic accuracy and simplified family monitoring in many cases but its current cost and limited accessibility require rationalisation of its use. No gene has yet been associated exclusively with FIHP. FIHP phenotypes have been associated with mutant MEN1 and calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) genotypes and, very recently, with mutation in the newly identified HRPT2 gene. The relative proportions of these are not yet clear. We report results of MEN1, CASR, and HRPT2 genotyping of 22 unrelated subjects with FIHP phenotypes. We found 5 (23%) with MEN1 mutations, four (18%) with CASR mutations, and none with an HRPT2 mutation. All those with mutations had multiglandular hyperparathyroidism. Of the subjects with CASR mutations, none were of the typical FHH phenotype. These findings strongly favour a recommendation for MEN1 and CASR genotyping of patients with multiglandular FIHP, irrespective of urinary calcium excretion. However, it appears that HRPT2 genotyping should be reserved for cases in which other features of the HPT-JT phenotype have occurred in the kindred. Also apparent is the need for further investigation to identify additional genes associated with FIHP. PMID:14985373

  1. Genetic Variants in Isolated Ebstein Anomaly Implicated in Myocardial Development Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Druschel, Charlotte M.; Fan, Ruzong; Caggana, Michele; Brody, Lawrence C.; Mills, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare heart defect in which the tricuspid valve is malformed and displaced. The tricuspid valve abnormalities can lead to backflow of blood from the right ventricle to the right atrium, preventing proper circulation of blood to the lungs. Although the etiology of EA is largely unresolved, increased prevalence of EA in those with a family history of congenital heart disease suggests EA has a genetic component. Copy number variants (CNVs) are a major source of genetic variation and have been implicated in a range of congenital heart defect phenotypes. We performed a systematic, genome-wide search for CNVs in 47 isolated EA cases using genotyping microarrays. In addition, we used a custom HaloPlex panel to sequence three known EA genes and 47 candidate EA genes. We identified 35 candidate CNVs in 24 (51%) EA cases. Rare sequence variants in genes associated with cardiomyopathy were identified in 11 (23%) EA cases. Two CNVs near the transcriptional repressor HEY1, a member of the NOTCH signaling pathway, were identified in three unrelated cases. All other candidate CNVs were each identified in a single case. At least 11 of 35 candidate CNVs include genes involved in myocardial development or function, including multiple genes in the BMP signaling pathway. We identified enrichment of gene sets involved in histone modification and cardiomyocyte differentiation, supporting the involvement of the developing myocardium in the etiology of EA. Gene set enrichment analysis also identified ribosomal RNA processing, a potentially novel pathway of altered cardiac development in EA. Our results suggest an altered myocardial program may contribute to abnormal tricuspid valve development in EA. Future studies should investigate abnormal differentiation of cardiomyocytes as a potential etiological factor in EA. PMID:27788187

  2. Detailed study of irrigation drainage in and near wildlife management areas, west-central Nevada, 1987-90; Part B, Effect on biota in Stillwater and Fernley Wildlife Management Areas and other nearby wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hallock, Robert J.; Hallock, Linda L.

    1993-01-01

    A water-quality reconnaissance study during 1986-87 found high concentrations of several potentially toxic elements in water, bottom sediment, and biota in and near Stillwater Wildlife Management Area (WMA). This study prompted the U.S. Department of the Interior to initiate a more detailed study to determine the hydrogeochemical processes that control water quality in the Stillwater WMA, and other nearby wetlands, and the resulting effects on biota, especially migratory birds. Present wetland size is about 10% of historical size; the dissolved- solids load in the water in these now-isolated wetlands has increased only moderately, but the dissolved-solids concentration has increased more than seven-fold. Wetland vegetation has diminished and species composition in flow water has shifted to predominant salt-tolerant species in many areas. Decreased vegetative cover for nesting is implicated in declining waterfowl production. Decreases in numbers or virtual absence of several wildlife species are attributed to degraded water quality. Results of toxicity tests indicate that water in some drains and wetland areas is acutely toxic to some fish and invertebrates. Toxicity is attributed to the combined presence of arsenic, boron, lithium, and molybdenum. Biological pathways are involved in the transport of mercury and selenium from agricultural drains to wetlands. Hatch success of both artificially incubated and field-reared duck eggs was greater than/= 90 percent; no teratogenesis was observed. Mercury in muscle tissue of waterfowl harvested from Carson Lake in October 1987 exceeded the human health criterion six-fold.

  3. Pipeline corridors through wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. ); Isaacson, H.R. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

  4. Pipeline corridors through wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L.; Isaacson, H.R.

    1992-12-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

  5. Draft Wetlands Rule Released

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released on 28 March a draft of a new rule to guide compensatory mitigation for when wetlands are unavoidably lost due to development. However, whether the rule is successful in preventing a net loss in wetlands will depend largely on its implementation, according to two wetlands scientists who evaluated the issue for the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) in 2001. Under the federal Clean Water Act, developers who seek to build on wetlands must compensate for any wetlands loss if they are unable to avoid or minimize the loss. Such compensation is covered under the newly proposed compensatory mitigation rule. Benjamin Grumbles, EPA assistant administrator for water, called the rule an ``innovative new standard that will accelerate the pace of wetlands conservation and restoration.''

  6. [Fragmentation process of wetland landscape in watersheds of Sanjiang Plain, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyu; Lü, Xianguo; Zhang, Shikui; Yang, Qing

    2005-02-01

    The Sanjiang Plain is the largest fresh water wetland distribution area in China and the center of waterfowls breeding and habitat area in Asia, but over the past 50 years, more than 73% of its wetland had lost because of agricultural development, and as a result, the wetland biodiversity declines dramatically, and the remnant wetlands are in a very fragment state. Based on historical maps, remote sensing data and GIS techniques, this paper selected two watersheds to analyze their wetland landscape fragmentation process during 1950-2000. It was indicated that land reclamation resulted in a decrease of 98% wetland corridors in Qixing River, 90% in Naoli River, 87% in the middle reach of Bielahong River, and 94% in the lower reach of Bielahong River; The amount of isolated wetlands in watershed increased dramatically; The maximum patch areas of wetland decreased by 92.6% in Naoli River watershed and 74.6% in Bielahong River watershed, and the mean wetland patch area in the two watersheds decreased by 99%. Before 1983, the wetland landscape was in an extensive area distribution state (the index of patch density was < 0.1), but after 1983, it fragmented dramatically, with the index of patch density larger than 1.5. The shape fragmentation indices of wetland decreased from 1950 to 2000, indicating a very big change in wetland patch shapes in the watersheds. The area fragmentation indices of wetland also increased from 1950 to 2000, especially after 1983, showing that the wetlands were in a serious fragmentation state. The wetland landscape fragmentation changed from a landmass and island model to a satellite model, and finally to a completely isolated model, which indicated the great changes in spatial structure of wetland in the Sanjiang Plain.

  7. Modeling the climatic and subsurface stratigraphy controls on the hydrology of a Carolina Bay wetland in South Carolina, USA

    Treesearch

    Ge Sun; Timothy J. Callahan; Jennifer E. Pyzoha; Carl C. Trettin

    2006-01-01

    Restoring depressional wetlands or geographically isolated wetlands such as cypress swamps and Carolina bays on the Atlantic Coastal Plains requires a clear understanding of the hydrologic processes and water balances. The objectives of this paper are to (1) test a distributed forest hydrology model, FLATWOODS, for a Carolina bay wetland system using seven years of...

  8. Modeling the climatic and subsurface stratigraphy controls on the hydrology of a Carolina bay wetland in South Carolina, USA

    Treesearch

    Ge Sun; Timothy J. Callahan; Jennifer E. Pyzoha; Carl C. Trettin

    2006-01-01

    Restoring depressional wetlands or geographically isolated wetlands such as cypress swamps and Carolina bays on the Atlantic Coastal Plains requires a clear understanding of the hydrologic processes and water balances. The objectives of this paper are to (1) test a distributed forest hydrology model, FLATWOODS, for a Carolina bay wetland system using seven years of...

  9. Wetlands and Paleolakes in the Hyperarid Atacama Desert During the Late Quaternary and Their Implications for Early Human Occupation of South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, M.; Latorre Hidalgo, C.; Santoro, C.; Gayo, E.; McRostie, V.; Finstad, K. M.; Amundson, R.

    2016-12-01

    The hyperarid Atacama Desert has long been considered a natural barrier to human dispersal. However, several archaeological sites dating from the late Pleistocene have been recently reported on, and other as yet unpublished evidence is rapidly accumulating. It has been established that these occupations were facilitated by increased fluvial activity and biologically productive riparian ecosystems along the western slope of the Andes, and that the presence of humans disappeared with declines in this water flow. The considerable evidence for regional stream flow suggests that basins and lowlands should have contained lakes or wetlands contemporaneous with the ages of the fluvial activity, but there has been no published data on late Quaternary lakes in the region. Here, we report on our observations that possibly many present day salars (salt covered basins) were fresh water lakes and marshlands during the Central Andean Pluvial Event (CAPE) that occurred during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene. We performed radiocarbon analysis of described stratigraphic profiles on paleo-shorelines or in paleo-lake basins that lie within the Pampa del Tamarugal (PDT) basin. We additionally described gastropods, plant remnants, phytoliths and diatomea, which provide a reliable source for paleoenvironmental facies interpretation. These data indicate that a paleolake existed at the location of the present-day Salar de Bellavista, and that wetlands (and possibly lakes) were present at the Salar de Llamara and Pintados. These past aquatic systems are coeval with the activation of the riparian systems of the PDT reported by previous studies. Furthermore, they would have contributed to a starkly different set of resource constraints for early inhabitants than the inhospitable conditions existing today. Additionally, the presence of these water sources provides guidance in the search for additional evidence of human occupation in the region, and for understanding the geographical

  10. Comparative Hydrology, Water Quality, and Ecology of Selected Natural and Augmented Freshwater Wetlands in West-Central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, T.M.; Haag, K.H.; Metz, P.A.; Sacks, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Comparing altered wetlands to natural wetlands in the same region improves the ability to interpret the gradual and cumulative effects of human development on freshwater wetlands. Hydrologic differences require explicit attention because they affect nearly all wetland functions and are an overriding influence on other comparisons involving wetland water quality and ecology. This study adopts several new approaches to quantify wetland hydrologic characteristics and then describes and compares the hydrology, water quality, and ecology of 10 isolated freshwater marsh and cypress wetlands in the mantled karst landscape of central Florida. Four of the wetlands are natural, and the other six have water levels indirectly lowered by ground-water withdrawals on municipally owned well fields. For several decades, the water levels in four of these altered wetlands have been raised by adding ground water in a mitigation process called augmentation. The two wetlands left unaugmented were impaired because their water levels were lowered. Multifaceted comparisons between the altered and natural wetlands are used to examine differences between marshes and cypress wetlands and to describe the effects of augmentation practices on the wetland ecosystems. In the karstic geologic setting, both natural and altered wetlands predominantly lost water to the surficial aquifer. Water leaking out of the wetlands created water-table mounds below the wetlands. The smallest mounds radiated only slightly beyond the vegetated area of the wetlands. The largest and steepest mounds occurred below two of the augmented wetlands. There, rapid leakage rates regenerated a largely absent surficial aquifer and mounds encompassed areas 7-8 times as large as the wetlands. Wetland leakage rates, estimated using a daily water-budget analysis applied over multiple years and normalized as inches per day, varied thirtyfold from the slowest leaking natural wetland to the fastest leaking augmented wetland. Leakage

  11. A FRAMEWORK FOR DEVELOPING A RAPID ASSESSMENT PROTCOL FOR SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND SEASONALLY FLOODED POOLS TO ASSIST STATEWIDE WETLAND MONITORING PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small isolated wetlands that are seasonally-flooded provide important hydrological, biological, and ecosystem functions that increasingly are being impacted by human development. In southern New England, these wetlands provide specialized breeding habitat for several invertebrat...

  12. Characterizing the Connectivity and Cumulative Effects of Wetlands on Downstream Hydrology: A Modeling Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) are depressional landscape features entirely surrounded by uplands. While “GIW” may imply functional isolation from other surface waters, these systems exhibit a gradient of hydrologic, biological, and/or chemical connectivity. ...

  13. Characterizing the Connectivity and Cumulative Effects of Wetlands on Downstream Hydrology: A Modeling Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) are depressional landscape features entirely surrounded by uplands. While “GIW” may imply functional isolation from other surface waters, these systems exhibit a gradient of hydrologic, biological, and/or chemical connectivity. ...

  14. Removal processes for arsenic in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lizama A, Katherine; Fletcher, Tim D; Sun, Guangzhi

    2011-08-01

    Arsenic pollution in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its toxicity and chronic effects on human health. This concern has generated increasing interest in the use of different treatment technologies to remove arsenic from contaminated water. Constructed wetlands are a cost-effective natural system successfully used for removing various pollutants, and they have shown capability for removing arsenic. This paper reviews current understanding of the removal processes for arsenic, discusses implications for treatment wetlands, and identifies critical knowledge gaps and areas worthy of future research. The reactivity of arsenic means that different arsenic species may be found in wetlands, influenced by vegetation, supporting medium and microorganisms. Despite the fact that sorption, precipitation and coprecipitation are the principal processes responsible for the removal of arsenic, bacteria can mediate these processes and can play a significant role under favourable environmental conditions. The most important factors affecting the speciation of arsenic are pH, alkalinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, the presence of other chemical species--iron, sulphur, phosphate--,a source of carbon, and the wetland substrate. Studies of the microbial communities and the speciation of arsenic in the solid phase using advanced techniques could provide further insights on the removal of arsenic. Limited data and understanding of the interaction of the different processes involved in the removal of arsenic explain the rudimentary guidelines available for the design of wetlands systems.

  15. Redox Transformations of Mercury in Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amyot, M.

    2007-12-01

    Wetlands are valued for their high biodiversity and for their ecosystem services. However, we still have a poor understanding of their role in the redox transformation of contaminants such as mercury. We first propose a brief overview of past studies conducted on wetlands from different latitudes. In most instances, photochemical processes are determinant in the upper portion of the water column. At the sediment/water interface, evidence is currently supporting a significant contribution of bacterial communities, as promoters of Hg(II) reduction, particularly in the presence of anoxia. A multi-year study was recently conducted on Hg redox cycling in a fluvial wetland of the St. Lawrence River, where wetland restoration could have unintended consequences. In addition to photochemistry and bacterial reduction, Hg redox cycling was affected by epiphytes living on macrophytes, through adsorption/absorption processes. Redox studies such as this one have been historically seen as having implication for water/air flux studies, since Hg(0) is volatile. We here also discuss the potential bioavailability of Hg(0) towards bacteria. An emerging axis of our wetland research effort deals with beaver dams, which are in expansion and shown to produce high levels of methylHg

  16. Gas Research Institute wetland research program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E. ); Isaacson, H.R. )

    1992-01-01

    As part of three ongoing research projects, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) is studying the natural gas industry's impacts on wetlands and how to manage operations so that impacts can be minimized or eliminated. The objective of the first project is to gain a better understanding of the causes and processes of wetland loss in the Louisiana deltaic plain and what role gas pipeline canals play in wetland loss. On the basis of information gathered from the first projects, management and mitigation implications for pipeline construction and maintenance will be evaluated. The objective of the second project is to assess the floral and faunal communities on existing rights-of-way (ROWs) that pass through numerous types of wetlands across the United States. The emphasis of the project is on pipelines that were installed within the past five years. The objective of the third project is to evaluate the administrative, jurisdictional, technical, and economic issues of wetland mitigation banking. This paper discusses these projects, their backgrounds, some of the results to date, and the deliverables.

  17. Gas Research Institute wetland research program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Isaacson, H.R.

    1992-12-01

    As part of three ongoing research projects, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) is studying the natural gas industry`s impacts on wetlands and how to manage operations so that impacts can be minimized or eliminated. The objective of the first project is to gain a better understanding of the causes and processes of wetland loss in the Louisiana deltaic plain and what role gas pipeline canals play in wetland loss. On the basis of information gathered from the first projects, management and mitigation implications for pipeline construction and maintenance will be evaluated. The objective of the second project is to assess the floral and faunal communities on existing rights-of-way (ROWs) that pass through numerous types of wetlands across the United States. The emphasis of the project is on pipelines that were installed within the past five years. The objective of the third project is to evaluate the administrative, jurisdictional, technical, and economic issues of wetland mitigation banking. This paper discusses these projects, their backgrounds, some of the results to date, and the deliverables.

  18. Hydrology and Ecology of Freshwater Wetlands in Central Florida - A Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater wetlands are an integral part of central Florida, where thousands are distributed across the landscape. However, their relatively small size and vast numbers challenge efforts to characterize them collectively as a statewide water resource. Wetlands are a dominant landscape feature in Florida; in 1996, an estimated 11.4 million acres of wetlands occupied 29 percent of the area of the State. Wetlands represent a greater percentage of the land surface in Florida than in any other state in the conterminous United States. Statewide, 90 percent of the total wetland area is freshwater wetlands and 10 percent is coastal wetlands. About 55 percent of the freshwater wetlands in Florida are forested, 25 percent are marshes and emergent wetlands, 18 percent are scrub-shrub wetlands, and the remaining 2 percent are freshwater ponds. Freshwater wetlands are distributed differently in central Florida than in other parts of the State. In the panhandle and in northern Florida, there are fewer isolated wetlands than in the central and southern parts of the State, and few of those wetlands are affected by activities such as groundwater withdrawals. In southern Florida, the vast wetlands of the Everglades and the Big Cypress Swamp blanket the landscape and form contiguous shallow expanses of water, which often exhibit slow but continuous flow toward the southwestern coast. In contrast, the wetlands of central Florida are relatively small, numerous, mostly isolated, and widely distributed. In many places, wetlands are flanked by uplands, generating a mosaic of contrasting environments-unique wildlife habitat often adjacent to dense human development. As the population of central Florida increases, the number of residents living near wetlands also increases. Living in close proximity to wetlands provides many Floridians with an increased awareness of nature and an opportunity to examine the relationship between people and wetlands. Specifically, these residents can observe

  19. Wetlands: Earth's Kidneys

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands are unique, diverse, and productive habitats that emerge at the fringe of aquatic and upland land systems. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines wetlands as "areas that are regularly inundated by surface water or groundwater and characterized by a preva...

  20. Percent Wetland Cover

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Wetlands act as filters, removing or diminishing the amount of pollutants that enter surface water. Higher values for percent of wetland cover (WETLNDSPCT) may be indicate cleaner surface water. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  1. Wetlands and Web Pages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisone-Bartels, Dede

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the preservation of areas like the Shoreline Park (California) wetlands depends on educating students about the value of natural resources. Describes the creation of a Web page on the wetlands for third-grade students by seventh-grade art and ecology students. Outlines the technical process of developing a Web page. (DSK)

  2. Wetlands: Earth's Kidneys

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands are unique, diverse, and productive habitats that emerge at the fringe of aquatic and upland land systems. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines wetlands as "areas that are regularly inundated by surface water or groundwater and characterized by a preva...

  3. Wetlands and Web Pages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisone-Bartels, Dede

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the preservation of areas like the Shoreline Park (California) wetlands depends on educating students about the value of natural resources. Describes the creation of a Web page on the wetlands for third-grade students by seventh-grade art and ecology students. Outlines the technical process of developing a Web page. (DSK)

  4. Remote sensing of wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roller, N. E. G.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of using remote sensing to inventory wetlands and the related topics of proper inventory design and data collection are discussed. The material presented shows that aerial photography is the form of remote sensing from which the greatest amount of wetlands information can be derived. For extensive, general-purpose wetlands inventories, however, the use of LANDSAT data may be more cost-effective. Airborne multispectral scanners and radar are, in the main, too expensive to use - unless the information that these sensors alone can gather remotely is absolutely required. Multistage sampling employing space and high altitude remote sensing data in the initial stages appears to be an efficient survey strategy for gathering non-point specific wetlands inventory data over large areas. The operational role of remote sensing insupplying inventory data for application to several typical wetlands management problems is illustrated by summary descriptions of past ERIM projects.

  5. Forested wetland habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duberstein, Jamie A.; Krauss, Ken W.; Kennish, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    A forested wetland (swamp) is a forest where soils are saturated or flooded for at least a portion of the growing season, and vegetation, dominated by trees, is adapted to tolerate flooded conditions. A tidal freshwater forested wetland is a forested wetland that experiences frequent but short-term surface flooding via tidal action, with average salinity of soil porewater less than 0.5 g/l. It is known locally as tidal várzea in the Amazon delta, Brazil. A tidal saltwater forested wetland (mangrove forest) is a forested wetland that experiences frequent but short-term surface flooding via tidal action, with average salinity often exceeding 3 g/l and reaching levels that can exceed seawater. Mangrove ecosystems are composed of facultative halophytes that generally experience better growth at moderate salinity concentrations.

  6. Effects of Environmental Conditions on an Urban Wetland's Methane Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naor Azrieli, L.; Morin, T. H.; Bohrer, G.; Schafer, K. V.; Brooker, M.; Mitsch, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    Methane emissions from wetlands are the largest natural source of uncertainty in the global methane (CH4) budget. Wetlands are highly productive ecosystems with a large carbon sequestration potential. While wetlands are a net sink for carbon dioxide, they also release methane, a potent greenhouse gas. To effectively develop wetland management techniques, it is important to properly calculate the carbon budget of wetlands by understand the driving factors of methane fluxes. We constructed an eddy flux covariance system in the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, a series of created and restored wetland in Columbus Ohio. Through the use of high frequency open path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) sensors, we have continuously monitored the methane fluxes associated with the wetland since May 2011. To account for the heterogeneous landscape surrounding the tower, a footprint analysis was used to isolate data originating from within the wetland. Continuous measurements of the meteorological and environmental conditions at the wetlands coinciding with the flux measurements allow the interactions between methane fluxes and the climate and ecological forcing to be studied. The wintertime daily cycle of methane peaks around midday indicating a typical diurnal pattern in cold months. In the summer, the peak shifts to earlier in the day and also includes a daily peak occurring at approximately 10 AM. We believe this peak is associated with the onset of photosynthesis in Typha latifolia flushing methane from the plant's air filled tissue. Correlations with methane fluxes include latent heat flux, soil temperature, and incoming radiation. The connection to radiation may be further evidence of plant activity as a driver of methane fluxes. Higher methane fluxes corresponding with higher soil temperature indicates that warmer days stimulate the methanogenic consortium. Further analysis will focus on separating the methane fluxes into emissions from different terrain types within

  7. Use of seasonal freshwater wetlands by fishes in a temperate river floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henning, Julie A.; Gresswell, Robert E.; Fleming, Ian A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the use of freshwater wetland restoration and enhancement projects (i.e. non-estuarine wetlands subject to seasonal drying) by fish populations. To quantify fish use of freshwater emergent wetlands and assess the effect of wetland enhancement (i.e. addition of water control structures), two enhanced and two unenhanced emergent wetlands were compared, as well as two oxbow habitats within the Chehalis River floodplain. Eighteen fish species were captured using fyke nets and emigrant traps from January to the beginning of June, with the most abundant being three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus and Olympic mudminnow Novumbra hubbsi. Coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch was the dominant salmonid at all sites. Enhanced wetlands, with their extended hydroperiods, had significantly higher abundances of yearling coho salmon than unenhanced wetlands. Both enhanced and unenhanced emergent wetlands yielded higher abundances of non-game native fishes than oxbow habitats. Oxbow habitats, however, were dominated by coho salmon. Fish survival in the wetland habitats was dependent on emigration to the river before dissolved oxygen concentrations decreased and wetlands became isolated and stranding occurred. This study suggests that wetland enhancement projects with an outlet to the river channel appear to provide fishes with important temporary habitats if they have the opportunity to leave the wetland as dissolved oxygen levels deteriorate.

  8. Wetland Detection Using Digital Elevation Model and Remote Sensing in Jimunai Desert, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ting; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Liping; Xian, Cuiling; Lin, Peirong

    2017-04-01

    Wetlands play a vital role in the environment, especially in some desert, which has most vulnerable ecosystem. A method is introduced to identify wetlands in the desert with the aim to protect them better in this study. It takes advantage of the depressions calculated by the eight flow direction matrix (D8) approach, a conventional approach to derive drainage networks and catchment boundaries, and makes the most of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) computed from remote sensing images. It was hypothesized that those depressions calculated by the D8 approach are potential wetlands. To test this hypothesis, the proposed method was used to derive wetlands automatically by combining DEM and NDVI. Potential surface depressions are derived by mathematic algorithms from D8 approach and verified using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The depressions can be identified as wetlands. Determining the sub-watershed of each wetland using the D8 approach and considering the correlation between the two of characteristic of a wetland and its sub-watershed. Besides, arranging those wetlands in the descending or ascending order of danger, helping the local government understand and manage wetlands more efficiently, with the presumption that more watershed area a wetland or depression has, safer it is. The proposed method has been tested at Jimunai Desert in Jimunai County, Xinjiang province, China. The result shows wetlands features can be isolated effectively and its performance appears to be consistent with the wetlands data collected by government well.

  9. HISTORIC WETLANDS OF PRUDENCE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten wetland sites around Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island have been selected for a multidisciplinary study. These wetland sites are being studied to develop indicators of "wetland health." The study includes assessing the ecological conditions of the wetlands in the past, and the c...

  10. HISTORIC WETLANDS OF PRUDENCE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten wetland sites around Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island have been selected for a multidisciplinary study. These wetland sites are being studied to develop indicators of "wetland health." The study includes assessing the ecological conditions of the wetlands in the past, and the c...

  11. Conceptual hierarchical modeling to describe wetland plant community organization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Little, A.M.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Allen, T.F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Using multivariate analysis, we created a hierarchical modeling process that describes how differently-scaled environmental factors interact to affect wetland-scale plant community organization in a system of small, isolated wetlands on Mount Desert Island, Maine. We followed the procedure: 1) delineate wetland groups using cluster analysis, 2) identify differently scaled environmental gradients using non-metric multidimensional scaling, 3) order gradient hierarchical levels according to spatiotem-poral scale of fluctuation, and 4) assemble hierarchical model using group relationships with ordination axes and post-hoc tests of environmental differences. Using this process, we determined 1) large wetland size and poor surface water chemistry led to the development of shrub fen wetland vegetation, 2) Sphagnum and water chemistry differences affected fen vs. marsh / sedge meadows status within small wetlands, and 3) small-scale hydrologic differences explained transitions between forested vs. non-forested and marsh vs. sedge meadow vegetation. This hierarchical modeling process can help explain how upper level contextual processes constrain biotic community response to lower-level environmental changes. It creates models with more nuanced spatiotemporal complexity than classification and regression tree procedures. Using this process, wetland scientists will be able to generate more generalizable theories of plant community organization, and useful management models. ?? Society of Wetland Scientists 2009.

  12. Phenotypic variation amongst genotypically homogeneous Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates: implications for the investigation of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, T. G.; Saunders, N. A.; Haththotuwa, A.; Hallas, G.; Birtles, R. J.; Taylor, A. G.

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, obtained from a site associated with an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, were examined by monoclonal antibody subgrouping, restriction fragment length polymorphism typing, restriction endonuclease analysis and plasmid content. Nine distinct phenotypes were detected but at the genotypic level all strains were closely related. The data presented indicate that phenotypic variation of a single parent strain can occur within an environmental site. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the investigation of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1969803

  13. American Bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) Resist Infection by Multiple Isolates of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Including One Implicated in Wild Mass Mortality.

    PubMed

    Eskew, Evan A; Worth, S Joy; Foley, Janet E; Todd, Brian D

    2015-09-01

    The emerging amphibian disease chytridiomycosis varies in severity depending on host species. Within species, disease susceptibility can also be influenced by pathogen variation and environmental factors. Here, we report on experimental exposures of American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) to three different isolates of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), including one implicated in causing mass mortality of wild American bullfrogs. Exposed frogs showed low infection prevalence, relatively low infection load, and lack of clinical disease. Our results suggest that environmental cofactors are likely important contributors to Bd-associated American bullfrog mortality and that this species both resists and tolerates Bd infection.

  14. Simulated storm surge effects on freshwater coastal wetland soil porewater salinity and extractable ammonium levels: Implications for marsh recovery after storm surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, M.; White, J. R.; Putnam-Duhon, L. A.

    2016-11-01

    Coastal wetland systems experience both short-term changes in salinity, such as those caused by wind-driven tides and storm surge, and long-term shifts caused by sea level rise. Salinity increases associated with storm surge are known to have significant effects on soil porewater chemistry, but there is little research on the effect of flooding length on salt penetration depth into coastal marsh soils. A simulated storm surge was imposed on intact soil columns collected from a non-vegetated mudflat and a vegetated marsh site in the Wax Lake Delta, LA. Triplicate intact cores were continuously exposed to a 35 salinity water column (practical salinity scale) for 1, 2, and 4 weeks and destructively sampled in order to measure porewater salinity and extractable NH4sbnd N at two cm depth intervals. Salinity was significantly higher in the top 8 cm for both the marsh and mudflat cores after one week of flooding. After four weeks of flooding, salinity was significantly higher in marsh and mudflat cores compared to the control (no salinity) cores throughout the profile for both sites. Extractable ammonium levels increased significantly in the marsh cores throughout the experiment, but there was only a marginally (p < 0.1) significant increase seen in the mudflat cores. Results indicate that porewater salinity levels can become significantly elevated within a coastal marsh soil in just one week. This vertical intrusion of salt can potentially negatively impact macrophytes and associated microbial communities for significantly longer term post-storm surge.

  15. 77 FR 63326 - Huron Wetland Management District, Madison Wetland Management District, and Sand Lake Wetland...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... Sand Lake Wetland Management District, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding of No... assessment (EA) involving Huron, Madison, and Sand Lake Wetland Management Districts (Districts). In this..., Madison Wetland Management District, Sand Lake Wetland Management District final CCP'' in the subject...

  16. Wetland Hydrological Connectivity: A Classification Approach ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Connectivity has become a major focus of hydrological and ecological studies. Connectivity influences fluxes between landscape elements, while isolation reduces flows between elements. Thus connectivity can be an important characteristic controlling ecosystem services. Hydrologic connectivity is particularly significant, since movement of chemical constituents and biota flows are often associated with water flow. While wetlands have many important on-site functions, the degree to which they are connected to other ecosystems is a controlling influence on the effect these waters have on the larger landscape. Specifically, wetlands with high connectivity can serve as sources (e.g., net exporters of dissolved carbon), while those with low connectivity can function as sinks (e.g., net importers of suspended sediments). Here we focus on so-called “geographically isolated wetlands” (GIWs), or wetlands that are completely surrounded by uplands. While these wetlands normally lack surface water connections, they can be hydrologically connected to downstream waters through intermittent surface flow or groundwater. To help quantify connectivity of GIWs with downstream waters, we developed a system to classify GIWs based on type, magnitude, and frequency of hydrologic connectivity. We determine type (overland, shallow groundwater, or deep groundwater connectivity) by considering soil and bedrock permeability. For magnitude, we developed indices to repre

  17. Integrating wetland connectivity into models for watershed ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIW), or wetlands embedded in uplands, exist along a spatial and temporal hydrologic connectivity continuum to downstream waters. Via these connections and disconnections, GIWs provide numerous hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological functions linked to human health and watershed-scale ecosystem services. Often, a clear demonstration of these functions and the individual and cumulative effects of GIWs on downstream waters is required for their protection or restoration. Measurements alone are typically too resource intensive to do this. In this presentation, we discuss the use of various modeling approaches to quantify the hydrologic connectivity of GIWs and their associated watershed-scale cumulative effects. Our goal is to improve the science behind understanding the functions and connectivity of GIWs via models that are complemented with various types of novel data. We synthesize what is meant by GIW connectivity and its broad significance to science and decision-making. We further discuss case studies that provide insights to diverse modeling approaches, with varying levels of complexity, for how to estimate GIW connectivity and associated watershed-scale impacts to hydrology. We finally provide insights to the key opportunities and priorities for integrating GIW connectivity into the next generation of models. Geographically isolated wetlands (GIW), or wetlands embedded in uplands, exist along a spatial and temporal h

  18. National Wetlands Inventory products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Marshes, swamps, ponds, and bogs are teeming biological nurseries for migratory birds, fish, and aquatic plants. They also provide natural flood and erosion control. These predominantly wet areas, or wetlands as they are commonly called, now represent only about 5 percent of the land surface of the lower 48 States. Out of 221 million acres of wetlands that once existed in the conterminous United States, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) estimates that only about 103.3 million acres remain. Each year, development, drainage, and agriculture eliminate another 290,000 acres - an area a little less than half the size of Rhode Island. From the 1950's to the 1970's, conversion of wetlands to farmland caused 87 percent of all wetland losses. The FWS has long recognized the importance of America's wetlands because they form breeding and wintering grounds for great numbers of migratory birds. In 1977, the FWS began the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI), a systematic effort to classify and map America's remaining wetlands.

  19. Neotropical coastal wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Karen L.; Batzer, Darold P.; Baldwin, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    The Neotropical region, which includes the tropical Americas, is one of the world's eight biogeographic zones. It contains some of the most diverse and unique wetlands in the world, some of which are still relatively undisturbed by humans. This chapter focuses on the northern segment of the Neotropics (south Florida, the Caribbean islands, Mexico, and Central America), an area that spans a latitudinal gradient from about 7 N to 29 N and 60 W to 112 W. Examples of coastal wetlands in this realm include the Everglades (Florida, USA), Ten Thousand Islands (Florida, USA), Laguna de Terminos (Mexico), Twin Cays (Belize), and Zapata Swamp (Cuba). Coastal wetlands are dominated by mangroves, which will be emphasized here, but also include freshwater swamps and marshes, saline marshes, and seagrass beds. The aim of this chapter is to provide a broad overview of Neotropical coastal wetlands of the North American continent, with an emphasis on mangroves, since this is the dominant vegetation type and because in-depth coverage of all wetland types is impossible here. Instead, the goal is to describe the environmental settings, plant and animal communities, key ecological controls, and some conservation concerns, with specific examples. Because this book deals with wetlands of North America, this chapter excludes coastal wetlands of South America. However, much of the information is applicable to mangrove, marsh, and seagrass communities of other tropicaI regions.

  20. Sediment record of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Liaohe River Delta wetland, Northeast China: Implications for regional population migration and economic development.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuanliang; Lin, Tian; Ye, Siyuan; Ding, Xigui; Li, Yuanyuan; Guo, Zhigang

    2017-03-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of a (210)Pb-dated sediment core extracted from the Liaohe River Delta wetland were measured to reconstruct the sediment record of PAHs and its response to human activity for the past 300 years in Northeast China. The concentrations of the 16 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency priority PAHs (∑16PAHs) ranged from 46 to 1167 ng g(-1) in this sediment core. The concentrations of the 16 PAHs (especially 4- and 5+6-ring PAHs) after the 1980s (surface sediments 0-6 cm) were one or two orders of magnitudes higher than those of the down-core samples. The exponential growth of 4-ring and 5+6-ring PAH concentrations after the 1980s responded well to the increased energy consumption and number of civil vehicles resulting from the rapid economic development in China. Prior to 1950, relatively low levels of the 16 PAHs and a high proportion of 2+3-ring PAHs was indicative of biomass burning as the main source of the PAHs. A significant increase in the 2 + 3 ring PAH concentration from the 1860s-1920s was observed and could be attributed to a constant influx of population migration into Northeast China. It was suggested that the link between historical trend of PAHs and population or energy use involves two different economic stages. Typically, in an agricultural economy, the greater the population size, the greater the emission of PAHs from biomass burning, while in an industrial economy, the increase in sedimentary PAH concentrations is closely related to increasing energy consumption of fossil fuels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Linking soil O2, CO2, and CH4 concentrations in a Wetland soil: implications for CO2 and CH4 fluxes.

    PubMed

    Elberling, Bo; Askaer, Louise; Jørgensen, Christian J; Joensen, Hans P; Kühl, Michael; Glud, Ronnie N; Lauritsen, Frants R

    2011-04-15

    Oxygen (O(2)) availability and diffusivity in wetlands are controlling factors for the production and consumption of both carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and methane (CH(4)) in the subsoil and thereby potential emission of these greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. To examine the linkage between high-resolution spatiotemporal trends in O(2) availability and CH(4)/CO(2) dynamics in situ, we compare high-resolution subsurface O(2) concentrations, weekly measurements of subsurface CH(4)/CO(2) concentrations and near continuous flux measurements of CO(2) and CH(4). Detailed 2-D distributions of O(2) concentrations and depth-profiles of CO(2) and CH(4) were measured in the laboratory during flooding of soil columns using a combination of planar O(2) optodes and membrane inlet mass spectrometry. Microsensors were used to assess apparent diffusivity under both field and laboratory conditions. Gas concentration profiles were analyzed with a diffusion-reaction model for quantifying production/consumption profiles of O(2), CO(2), and CH(4). In drained conditions, O(2) consumption exceeded CO(2) production, indicating CO(2) dissolution in the remaining water-filled pockets. CH(4) emissions were negligible when the oxic zone was >40 cm and CH(4) was presumably consumed below the depth of detectable O(2). In flooded conditions, O(2) was transported by other mechanisms than simple diffusion in the aqueous phase. This work demonstrates the importance of changes in near-surface apparent diffusivity, microscale O(2) dynamics, as well as gas transport via aerenchymous plants tissue on soil gas dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions following marked changes in water level.

  2. Persistence of Pasteurella multocida in wetlands following avian cholera outbreaks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Samuel, M.D.; Goldberg, D.R.; Shadduck, D.J.; Lehr, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Avian cholera, caused by Pasteurella multocida, affects waterbirds across North America and occurs worldwide among various avian species. Once an epizootic begins, contamination of the wetland environment likely facilitates the transmission of P. multocida to susceptible birds. To evaluate the ability of P. multocida serotype-1, the most common serotype associated with avian cholera in waterfowl in western and central North America, to persist in wetlands and to identify environmental factors associated with its persistence, we collected water and sediment samples from 23 wetlands during winters and springs of 1996a??99. These samples were collected during avian cholera outbreaks and for up to 13 wk following initial sampling. We recovered P. multocida from six wetlands that were sampled following the initial outbreaks, but no P. multocida was isolated later than 7 wk after the initial outbreak sampling. We found no significant relationship between the probability of recovery of P. multocida during resampling and the abundance of the bacterium recovered during initial sampling, the substrate from which isolates were collected, isolate virulence, or water quality conditions previously suggested to be related to the abundance or survival of P. multocida. Our results indicate that wetlands are unlikely to serve as a long-term reservoir for P. multocida because the bacterium does not persist in wetlands for long time periods following avian cholera outbreaks.

  3. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling of meropenem against VIM-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Tsala, Marilena; Vourli, Sophia; Kotsakis, Stathis; Daikos, George L; Tzouvelekis, Leonidas; Zerva, Loukia; Miriagou, Vivi; Meletiadis, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    VIM-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates are usually associated with high MICs to carbapenems. Preclinical studies investigating the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) characteristics of carbapenems against these isolates are lacking. The in vitro antibacterial activity of meropenem against one WT and three VIM-producing K. pneumoniae clinical isolates (median MICs 0.031, 8, 16 and 128 mg l- 1) was studied in a dialysis-diffusion PK-PD model and verified in a thigh infection neutropenic animal model by testing selected strains and exposures. The in vitro PK-PD target associated with bactericidal activity was estimated and the target attainment for different dosing regimens was calculated with Monte Carlo analysis. The in vitro model was correlated with the in vivo data, with log10CFU/ml reduction of < 1 for the VIM-producing (MIC 16 mg l- 1) and >2 for the WT (MIC 0.031 mg l- 1) isolates, with %f T >MIC 25 and 100%, respectively. The in vitro bactericidal activity for all isolates was associated with 40 % f T>MIC and attained in >90% of cases with the standard 1 g q8 0.5 h infusion dosing regimen only for isolates with MICs up to 1 mg l- 1. For isolates with MICs of 2-8 mg l- 1, prolonged infusion regimens (4 h infusion q8 or 2 h infusion q4) of standard (1 g) and higher (2 g) doses or continuous infusion regimens (3-6 g) are required. For isolates with a MIC of 16 mg l- 1 the unconventional dosing regimen of 2 g as 2 h infusion q4 or 12 g continuous infusion will be required. Prolonged and continuous infusion regimens of meropenem may increase efficacy against VIM-producing K. pneumoniae isolates.

  4. Dental morphology and variation in theropod dinosaurs: implications for the taxonomic identification of isolated teeth.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua B; Vann, David R; Dodson, Peter

    2005-08-01

    Isolated theropod teeth are common Mesozoic fossils and would be an important data source for paleoecology biogeography if they could be reliably identified as having come from particular taxa. However, obtaining identifications is confounded by a paucity of easily identifiable characters. Here we discuss a quantitative methodology designed to provide defensible identifications of isolated teeth using Tyrannosaurus as a comparison taxon. We created a standard data set based as much as possible on teeth of known taxonomic affinity against which to compare isolated crowns. Tooth morphology was described using measured variables describing crown length, base length and width, and derived variables related to basal shape, squatness, mesial curve shape, apex location with respect to base, and denticle size. Crown curves were described by fitting the power function Y = a + bX(0.5) to coordinate data collected from lateral-view images of mesial curve profiles. The b value from these analyses provides a measure of curvature. Discriminant analyses compared isolated teeth of various taxonomic affinities against the standard. The analyses classified known Tyrannosaurus teeth with Tyrannosaurus and separated most teeth known not to be Tyrannosaurus from Tyrannosaurus. They had trouble correctly classifying teeth that were very similar to Tyrannosaurus and for which there were few data in the standard. However, the results indicate that expanding the standard should facilitate the identification of numerous types of isolated theropod teeth.

  5. Implications of between-isolate variation for climate change impact modelling of Haemonchus contortus populations.

    PubMed

    Rose Vineer, H; Steiner, J; Knapp-Lawitzke, F; Bull, K; von Son-de Fernex, E; Bosco, A; Hertzberg, H; Demeler, J; Rinaldi, L; Morrison, A A; Skuce, P; Bartley, D J; Morgan, E R

    2016-10-15

    The impact of climate change on parasites and parasitic diseases is a growing concern and numerous empirical and mechanistic models have been developed to predict climate-driven spatial and temporal changes in the distribution of parasites and disease risk. Variation in parasite phenotype and life-history traits between isolates could undermine the application of such models at broad spatial scales. Seasonal variation in the transmission of the haematophagous gastrointestinal nematode Haemonchus contortus, one of the most pathogenic helminth species infecting sheep and goats worldwide, is primarily determined by the impact of environmental conditions on the free-living stages. To evaluate variability in the development success and mortality of the free-living stages of H. contortus and the impact of this variability on future climate impact modelling, three isolates of diverse origin were cultured at a range of temperatures between 15°C and 37°C to determine their development success compared with simulations using the GLOWORM-FL H. contortus model. No significant difference was observed in the developmental success of the three isolates of H. contortus tested, nor between isolates and model simulations. However, development success of all isolates at 37°C was lower than predicted by the model, suggesting the potential for overestimation of transmission risk at higher temperatures, such as those predicted under some scenarios of climate change. Recommendations are made for future climate impact modelling of gastrointestinal nematodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Wetland functional health assessment using remote sensing and other techniques: Literature search and overview. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Patience, N.; Klemas, V.

    1993-03-01

    Contents: introduction; remote sensing of wetland biomass and other wetland condition indicators; conceptual approaches in wetland assessment; wetland extent and type; landscape and wetland patterns; wetland biomass and productivity; wetland vegetation; wetland habitat quality; wetland hydrology; and conclusions and recommendations.

  7. New serovars of Leptospira isolated from patients in Costa Rica: implications for public health.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Ma de los A; Goris, M G A; González, V; Anchia, M E; Díaz, P; Ahmed, A; Hartskeerl, R A

    2013-09-01

    Leptospira strains JICH 05 and INCIENSA 04 were isolated from hospitalized leptospirosis patients in the province of Puntarenas, Costa Rica. The isolates produced agglutination titres notably against members of serogroups Pyrogenes and Tarassovi, respectively, but appeared serologically unique in the cross agglutinin absorption test (CAAT). Therefore, JICH 05 and INCIENSA 04 were considered to represent two new serovars, designated Corredores and Costa Rica of the serogroups Pyrogenes and Tarassovi, respectively. Multilocus sequence genotyping revealed that both strain INCIENSA 04 and strain JICH 05 belong to Leptospira santarosai. These two new serovars are in addition to various other recently identified highly virulent serovars, including the new L. santarosai, serovar Arenal. Considering the fact that isolation and typing of leptospires from patients has only recently been introduced in Costa Rica, these findings suggest that various known and unknown virulent serovars of Leptospira are circulating in this country and probably beyond, thus posing a severe threat to public and probably veterinary health in the region.

  8. Models of care for socially isolated older rural carers: barriers and implications.

    PubMed

    Winterton, R; Warburton, J

    2011-01-01

    In response to population ageing, the numbers of older carers residing in rural areas are increasing. However, rural older carers are at risk of social isolation due to the decreased social networks associated with ageing and caring responsibilities, and the geographical isolation associated with rurality. This broad, systematic review of the literature was undertaken to: (1) identify barriers to social participation for rural older carers; and (2) summarise features of interventions that were effective in reducing social isolation for rural and/or older carers. Literature was obtained through systematic searches of selected electronic databases; selected Australian and international government and research based websites and Google Scholar. Searches were limited to material published from 1999 to 2009, and literature was included which either identified barriers to social participation, or outlined interventions that were effective in reducing social isolation and increasing social support in rural and/or older carers. 67 articles, book chapters and reports identified which addressed the review objectives. Findings indicate that rural older carers experience considerable barriers to socialisation, and six dimensions are identified that are effective in reducing barriers, decreasing social isolation and increasing social participation. Interventions must address individual needs; incorporate a dual carer-care recipient focus and/or an educational component; facilitate informal social interaction; utilise existing networks and experienced personnel; and be both sustainable and long term. Reducing social isolation in rural older carers is a two-stage process. First, barriers to attendance, both logistical and perceived, must be addressed, and the focus of the intervention must be relevant to the carer. Second, opportunities for informal social interaction must be maximised within the intervention. However, a secondary focus may be necessary to ensure attendance, and

  9. Heterogeneity of Mycolactones Produced by Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium ulcerans: Implications for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Mve-Obiang, Armand; Lee, Richard E.; Portaels, Françoise; Small, P. L. C.

    2003-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, a severe necrotizing skin disease endemic in tropical countries. Clinical evidence suggests that M. ulcerans isolates from Asia, Mexico, and Australia may be less virulent than isolates from Africa. In vivo studies suggest that mycolactone, a polyketide-derived macrolide toxin, plays a major role in the tissue destruction and immune suppression which occur in cases of Buruli ulcer. Mycolactones were extracted from 34 isolates of M. ulcerans representing strains from Africa, Malaysia, Asia, Australia, and Mexico. Thin-layer chromatography, mass spectroscopic analysis, and cytopathic assays of partially purified mycolactones from these isolates revealed that M. ulcerans produces a heterogeneous mixture of mycolactone variants. Mycolactone A/B, the most biologically active mycolactone species, was identified by mass spectroscopy as [M+Na]+ at m/z 765.5 in all cytotoxic isolates except for those from Mexico. Mycolactone C [M+Na]+ at m/z 726.3 was the dominant mycolactone species in eight Australian isolates, and mycolactone D [M+Na]+ m/z 781.2 was characteristic of two Asian strains. Mycolactone species are conserved within specific geographic areas, suggesting that there may be a correlation between mycolactone profile and virulence. In addition, the core lactone, [M+Na]+ m/z 447.4, was identified as a minor species, supporting the hypothesis that mycolactones are synthesized by two polyketide synthases. A cytopathic assay of the core lactone showed that this molecule is sufficient for cytotoxicity, although it is much less potent than the complete mycolactone. PMID:12540557

  10. Avian utilization of subsidence wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrot, J.R.; Conley, P.S.; Smout, C.L.

    1995-09-01

    Diverse and productive wetlands have resulted from coal mining in the midwest. The trend from surface to underground mining has increased the potential for subsidence. Planned subsidence of longwall mining areas provides increased opportunities for wetland habitat establishment. Planned subsidence over a 180 meter (590 foot) deep longwall mine in southern Illinois during 1984 to 1986 produced three subsidence wetlands totaling 15 hectares (38 acres). The resulting palustrine emergent wetlands enhanced habitat diversity within the surrounding palustrine forested unsubsided area. Habitat assessments and evaluations of avian utilization of the subsidence wetlands were conducted during February 1990 through October 1991. Avian utilization was greatest within the subsided wetlands. Fifty-three bird species representing seven foraging guilds utilized the subsidence wetlands. Wading/fishing, dabbling waterfowl, and insectivorous avian guilds dominated the subsidence wetlands. The subsidence wetlands represented ideal habitat for wood ducks and great blue herons which utilized snags adjacent to and within the wetlands for nesting (19 great blue heron nests produced 25 young). Dense cover and a rich supply of macroinvertebrates provide excellent brood habitat for wood ducks, while herpetofauna and ichthyofauna provided abundant forage in shallow water zones for great blue herons and other wetland wading birds. The diversity of game and non-game avifauna utilizing the subsidence areas demonstrated the unique value of these wetlands. Preplanned subsidence wetlands can help mitigate loss of wetland habitats in the midwest.

  11. Filtering fens: mechanisms explaining phosphorus-limited hotspots of biodiversity in wetlands adjacent to heavily fertilized areas.

    PubMed

    Cusell, Casper; Kooijman, Annemieke; Fernandez, Filippo; van Wirdum, Geert; Geurts, Jeroen J M; van Loon, E Emiel; Kalbitz, Karsten; Lamers, Leon P M

    2014-05-15

    The conservation of biodiverse wetland vegetation, including that of rich fens, has a high priority at a global scale. Although P-eutrophication may strongly decrease biodiversity in rich fens, some well-developed habitats do still survive in highly fertilized regions due to nutrient filtering services of large wetlands. The occurrence of such nutrient gradients is well-known, but the biogeochemical mechanisms that determine these patterns are often unclear. We therefore analyzed chemical speciation and binding of relevant nutrients and minerals in surface waters, soils and plants along such gradients in the large Ramsar nature reserve Weerribben-Wieden in the Netherlands. P-availability was lowest in relatively isolated floating rich fens, where plant N:P ratios indicated P-limitation. P-limitation can persist here despite high P-concentrations in surface waters near the peripheral entry locations, because only a small part of the P-input reaches the more isolated waters and fens. This pattern in P-availability appears to be primarily due to precipitation of Fe-phosphates, which mainly occurs close to entry locations as indicated by decreasing concentrations of Fe- and Al-bound P in the sub-aquatic sediments along this gradient. A further decrease of P-availability is caused by biological sequestration, which occurs throughout the wetland as indicated by equal concentrations of organic P in all sub-aquatic sediments. Our results clearly show that the periphery of large wetlands does indeed act as an efficient P-filter, sustaining the necessary P-limitation in more isolated parts. However, this filtering function does harm the ecological quality of the peripheral parts of the reserve. The filtering mechanisms, such as precipitation of Fe-phosphates and biological uptake of P, are crucial for the conservation and restoration of biodiverse rich fens in wetlands that receive eutrophic water from their surroundings. This seems to implicate that biodiverse wetland

  12. Principles of Wetland Restoration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    the return of a degraded ecosystem to a close approximation of its remaining natural potential - is experiencing a groundswell of support across the United States. The number of stream, river, lake, wetland and estuary restoration projects grows yearly

  13. Excellence in Wetland Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    States and tribes play important roles in protecting and restoring wetlands and other water resources by adopting practices within our Core Elements Framework (CEF) to complete various projects. restoration and protection, monitoring and assessment

  14. National Wetland Condition Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NWCA is a collaborative, statistical survey of the nation's wetlands. It is one of four national surveys that EPA and its partners conduct to assess the condition and health of the nation's water resources.

  15. Effect of metals on a siderophore producing bacterial isolate and its implications on microbial assisted bioremediation of metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Gaonkar, Teja; Bhosle, Saroj

    2013-11-01

    A bacterial isolate producing siderophore under iron limiting conditions, was isolated from mangroves of Goa. Based on morphological, biochemical, chemotaxonomical and 16S rDNA studies, the isolate was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NAR38.1. Preliminary characterization of the siderophore indicated it to be catecholate type with dihydroxy benzoate as the core component. Optimum siderophore production was observed at pH 7 in mineral salts medium (MSM) without any added iron with glucose as the carbon source. Addition of NaCl in the growth medium showed considerable decrease in siderophore production above 2% NaCl. Fe(+2) and Fe(+3) below 2 μM and 40 μM concentrations respectively, induced siderophore production, above which the production was repressed. Binding studies of the siderophore with Fe(+2) and Fe(+3) indicated its high affinity towards Fe(+3). The siderophore concentration in the extracellular medium was enhanced when MSM was amended with essential metals Zn, Co, Mo and Mn, however, decreased with Cu, while the concentration was reduced with abiotic metals As, Pb, Al and Cd. Significant increase in extracellular siderophore production was observed with Pb and Al at concentrations of 50 μM and above. The effect of metals on siderophore production was completely mitigated in presence of Fe. The results implicate effect of metals on the efficiency of siderophore production by bacteria for potential application in bioremediation of metal contaminated iron deficient soils especially in the microbial assisted phytoremediation processes.

  16. Wetlands for Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Jiang, Yi; Lee, Gordon; Kokabian, Bahareh; Fast, Sara; Truax, Dennis D; Martin, James L; Magbanua, Benjamin S; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides a review of the treatment technologies, which utilize natural processes or passive components in wastewater treatment. In particular, this paper primarily focuses on wetland systems and their applications in wastewater treatment (as an advanced treatment unit or decentralized system), nutrient and pollutant removal (single and multiple pollutants, and metals), and emerging pollutant removal (pharmaceuticals). A summary of studies involving the plant (vegetation) effects, wetland design and modeling, hybrid and innovative systems, storm water treatment and pathogen removal is also included.

  17. Genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolates in irrigation water and associated sediments: implications for source tracking.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lingeng; Hume, Michael E; Sternes, Keith L; Pillai, Suresh D

    2004-11-01

    Identifying the sources of fecal contaminants in surface water bodies such as rivers and lakes is of significant importance for environmental quality, food safety and regulatory purposes. Current DNA library-based source tracking approaches rely on the comparison of the genetic relatedness among the fecal contaminants. The objective of this study was to determine the genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli isolated from irrigation water and associated sediments using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and to evaluate the genetic stability of the E. coli PFGE patterns. The isolates were obtained over a 4-month period from specific locations within irrigation canals and sediments associated with the Rio Grande River along the Texas-Mexico border. Fifty E. coli isolates were genotyped using PFGE. Different E. coli genotypes were identified among samples collected in 11 different locations. Some isolates obtained over successive months showed similar genotypic patterns. In the laboratory experiment, the PFGE pattern of one E. coli strain changed during survival in irrigation water. The genetic relatedness of this strain changed from >95% to <83% over 8-week survival. These results imply that PFGE is of such extreme resolution that it may be a challenging task to rely solely on a PFGE-based source tracking DNA fingerprint library for large watersheds.

  18. Wetlands in changed landscapes: the influence of habitat transformation on the physico-chemistry of temporary depression wetlands.

    PubMed

    Bird, Matthew S; Day, Jenny A

    2014-01-01

    Temporary wetlands dominate the wet season landscape of temperate, semi-arid and arid regions, yet, other than their direct loss to development and agriculture, little information exists on how remaining wetlands have been altered by anthropogenic conversion of surrounding landscapes. This study investigates relationships between the extent and type of habitat transformation around temporary wetlands and their water column physico-chemical characteristics. A set of 90 isolated depression wetlands (seasonally inundated) occurring on coastal plains of the south-western Cape mediterranean-climate region of South Africa was sampled during the winter/spring wet season of 2007. Wetlands were sampled across habitat transformation gradients according to the areal cover of agriculture, urban development and alien invasive vegetation within 100 and 500 m radii of each wetland edge. We hypothesized that the principal drivers of physico-chemical conditions in these wetlands (e.g. soil properties, basin morphology) are altered by habitat transformation. Multivariate multiple regression analyses (distance-based Redundancy Analysis) indicated significant associations between wetland physico-chemistry and habitat transformation (overall transformation within 100 and 500 m, alien vegetation cover within 100 and 500 m, urban cover within 100 m); although for significant regressions the amount of variation explained was very low (range: ∼2 to ∼5.5%), relative to that explained by purely spatio-temporal factors (range: ∼35.5 to ∼43%). The nature of the relationships between each type of transformation in the landscape and individual physico-chemical variables in wetlands were further explored with univariate multiple regressions. Results suggest that conservation of relatively narrow (∼100 m) buffer strips around temporary wetlands is likely to be effective in the maintenance of natural conditions in terms of physico-chemical water quality.

  19. Wetlands in Changed Landscapes: The Influence of Habitat Transformation on the Physico-Chemistry of Temporary Depression Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Matthew S.; Day, Jenny A.

    2014-01-01

    Temporary wetlands dominate the wet season landscape of temperate, semi-arid and arid regions, yet, other than their direct loss to development and agriculture, little information exists on how remaining wetlands have been altered by anthropogenic conversion of surrounding landscapes. This study investigates relationships between the extent and type of habitat transformation around temporary wetlands and their water column physico-chemical characteristics. A set of 90 isolated depression wetlands (seasonally inundated) occurring on coastal plains of the south-western Cape mediterranean-climate region of South Africa was sampled during the winter/spring wet season of 2007. Wetlands were sampled across habitat transformation gradients according to the areal cover of agriculture, urban development and alien invasive vegetation within 100 and 500 m radii of each wetland edge. We hypothesized that the principal drivers of physico-chemical conditions in these wetlands (e.g. soil properties, basin morphology) are altered by habitat transformation. Multivariate multiple regression analyses (distance-based Redundancy Analysis) indicated significant associations between wetland physico-chemistry and habitat transformation (overall transformation within 100 and 500 m, alien vegetation cover within 100 and 500 m, urban cover within 100 m); although for significant regressions the amount of variation explained was very low (range: ∼2 to ∼5.5%), relative to that explained by purely spatio-temporal factors (range: ∼35.5 to ∼43%). The nature of the relationships between each type of transformation in the landscape and individual physico-chemical variables in wetlands were further explored with univariate multiple regressions. Results suggest that conservation of relatively narrow (∼100 m) buffer strips around temporary wetlands is likely to be effective in the maintenance of natural conditions in terms of physico-chemical water quality. PMID:24533161

  20. Global wetlands: Potential distribution, wetland loss, and status.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengjie; Niu, Zhenguo; Chen, Yanfen; Li, Lifeng; Zhang, Haiying

    2017-05-15

    Even though researchers have paid a great deal of attention to wetland loss and status, the actual extent of wetland loss on a global scale, especially the loss caused directly by human activities, and the actual extent of currently surviving wetlands remains uncertain. This paper simulated the potential distribution of global wetlands by employing a new Precipitation Topographic Wetness Index (PTWI) and global remote sensing training samples. The results show earth would have approximately 29.83millionkm(2) of wetlands, if humans did not interfere with wetland ecosystems. By combining datasets related to global wetlands, we found that at least 33% of global wetlands had been lost as of 2009, including 4.58millionkm(2) of non-water wetlands and 2.64millionkm(2) of open water. The areal extent of wetland loss has been greatest in Asia, but Europe has experienced the most serious losses. Wetland-related datasets suffer from major inconsistencies, and estimates of the areal extent of the remaining global wetlands ranged from 1.53 to 14.86millionkm(2). Therefore, although it is challenging, thematic mapping of global wetlands is necessary and urgently needed.

  1. Human Enteroviruses isolated during acute flaccid paralysis surveillance in Ghana: implications for the post eradication era

    PubMed Central

    Odoom, John Kofi; Obodai, Evangeline; Barnor, Jacob Samson; Ashun, Miriam; Arthur-Quarm, Jacob; Osei-Kwasi, Mubarak

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Surveillance of acute flaccid surveillance (AFP) has been used world-wide to monitor the control and eradication of circulating wild polioviruses. The Polio Laboratory since its accreditation in 1996 has supported the Disease Surveillance Department for AFP surveillance. This study aims to isolate and characterize human enteroviruses from patients with AFP in Ghana. Method Stool suspension was prepared from 308 samples received in 2009 from the surveillance activities throughout the country and inoculated on both RD and L20B cell lines. Isolates that showed growth on L20B were selected for real-time RT-PCR using degenerate and non-degenerate primers and probes. RD isolates were however characterized by microneutralisation technique with antisera pools from RIVM, The Netherlands and viruses that were untypable subjected to neutralization assay using antibodies specific for E71. Results Of the 308 samples processed, 17 (5.5%) grew on both L20B and RD cells while 32 (10.4%) grew on RD only. All 28 isolates from L20B were characterized by rRT-PCR as Sabin-like polioviruses. No wild poliovirus or VDPV was found. However from the microneutralisation assay, six different enteroviruses were characterized. Among these, Coxsackie B viruses were most predominant followed by Echovirus. Three children from whom non-polio enteroviruses were isolated had residual paralysis while one child with VAPP found. The non-polio enteroviruses circulated throughout the country with the majority (20.7%) from Ashanti region. Conclusion This study showed the absence of wild or vaccine-derived poliovirus circulation in the country. However, the detection of three non-polio enteroviruses and one Sabin-like poliovirus with residual paralysis call for continuous surveillance even in the post polio eradication era. PMID:23077695

  2. Human Enteroviruses isolated during acute flaccid paralysis surveillance in Ghana: implications for the post eradication era.

    PubMed

    Odoom, John Kofi; Obodai, Evangeline; Barnor, Jacob Samson; Ashun, Miriam; Arthur-Quarm, Jacob; Osei-Kwasi, Mubarak

    2012-01-01

    Surveillance of acute flaccid surveillance (AFP) has been used world-wide to monitor the control and eradication of circulating wild polioviruses. The Polio Laboratory since its accreditation in 1996 has supported the Disease Surveillance Department for AFP surveillance. This study aims to isolate and characterize human enteroviruses from patients with AFP in Ghana. Stool suspension was prepared from 308 samples received in 2009 from the surveillance activities throughout the country and inoculated on both RD and L20B cell lines. Isolates that showed growth on L20B were selected for real-time RT-PCR using degenerate and non-degenerate primers and probes. RD isolates were however characterized by microneutralisation technique with antisera pools from RIVM, The Netherlands and viruses that were untypable subjected to neutralization assay using antibodies specific for E71. Of the 308 samples processed, 17 (5.5%) grew on both L20B and RD cells while 32 (10.4%) grew on RD only. All 28 isolates from L20B were characterized by rRT-PCR as Sabin-like polioviruses. No wild poliovirus or VDPV was found. However from the microneutralisation assay, six different enteroviruses were characterized. Among these, Coxsackie B viruses were most predominant followed by Echovirus. Three children from whom non-polio enteroviruses were isolated had residual paralysis while one child with VAPP found. The non-polio enteroviruses circulated throughout the country with the majority (20.7%) from Ashanti region. This study showed the absence of wild or vaccine-derived poliovirus circulation in the country. However, the detection of three non-polio enteroviruses and one Sabin-like poliovirus with residual paralysis call for continuous surveillance even in the post polio eradication era.

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of Oceanimonas sp. GK1 Isolated from Gavkhouni Wetland (Iran) Demonstrates Presence of Genes for Virulence and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Azarbaijani, Reza; Mousavi, Hossein; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Amoozgar, Mohammad Ali; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Objective The bacterium Oceanimonas sp. (O. sp.) GK1 is a member of the Aeromonadaceae family and its genome represents several virulence genes involved in fish and human pathogenicity. In this original research study we aimed to identify and characterize the putative virulence factors and pathogenicity of this halotolerant marine bacterium using genome wide analysis. Materials and Methods The genome data of O. sp. GK1 was obtained from NCBI. Comparative genomic study was done using MetaCyc database. Results Whole genome data analysis of the O. sp. GK1 revealed that the bacterium possesses some important virulence genes (e.g. ZOT, RTX toxin, thermostable hemolysin, lateral flagella and type IV pili) which have been implicated in adhesion and biofilm formation and infection in some other pathogenic bacteria. Conclusion This is the first report of the putative pathogenicity of O. sp.GK1. The genome wide analysis of the bacterium demonstrates the presence of virulence genes causing infectious diseases in many warmand cold-blooded animals. PMID:26464816

  4. Coastal wetlands of Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, Andrew H.; Kangas, Patrick J.; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Perry, Matthew C.; Whigham, Dennis F.; Batzer, Darold P.; Batzer, Darold P.; Baldwin, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    Wetlands are prominent landscapes throughout North America. The general characteristics of wetlands are controversial, thus there has not been a systematic assessment of different types of wetlands in different parts of North America, or a compendium of the threats to their conservation. Wetland Habitats of North America adopts a geographic and habitat approach, in which experts familiar with wetlands from across North America provide analyses and syntheses of their particular region of study. Addressing a broad audience of students, scientists, engineers, environmental managers, and policy makers, this book reviews recent, scientifically rigorous literature directly relevant to understanding, managing, protecting, and restoring wetland ecosystems of North America.

  5. [Research progress on wetland ecotourism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Long; Lu, Lin

    2009-06-01

    Wetland is rich in biodiversity and cultural diversity, possessing higher tourism value and environmental education and community participation functions. Wetland ecotourism reflects the sustainable development of tourism economy and wetland protection, having received great concern from governments and scholars at home and abroad. This paper summarized the related theories and practices, discussed the research advances in wetland ecotourism from the aspects of significance, progress, contents, methods and results, and pointed out the important research fields in the future, aimed to accelerate the development of wetland ecotourism research and to provide reference about the resources exploitation, environment protection, and scientific administration of wetland and related scenic areas.

  6. Trapping carbon in small ponds and wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinton, J. N.; Ockenden, M. C.; Deasy, C.; Favaretto, N.

    2012-04-01

    There is no doubt that carbon (C) is on the move. Recent estimates have suggested that the global sediment flux in agricultural landscapes due to water and tillage erosion is 35±10 Pg C y-1. Some of this C is oxidised and lost to the atmosphere, other material may be deposited and burried in colluvium and some may be delivered through both surface and subsurface flow paths to surface waters. In many agricultural landscapes these surface waters may take the form of small ponds and wetlands (field wetlands). In this paper we explore the potential of field wetlands to trap particulate C and influence the fate of dissolved organic carbon within the context of a small agricultural catchments in England. Since 2008 the mitigation options for phosphorus and sediment project (MOPS) has established ten monitored field wetlands across three catchments in the UK at Crake Trees, Cumbria (silt soils, rainfall 1500 mm y-1), Whinton Hill Cumbria (sandy soils, rainfall 1200 mm y-1), Newton Rigg, Cumbria (Silt soils, rainfall c1200 mm y-1) and Loddington, Leicestershire (Clay soils, rainfall 650 mm y-1). Although originally designed to capture sediment and phosphorus, their potential for influencing catchment scale C dynamics is becoming apparent. The C contents of sediments from the three catchments are typically in the range of 1.8 - 3.0% at Crake Trees Catchment, 2.5 to 9% at Whinton Hill and 2.0 to 3.1 % at Crake Trees. At the high rainfall sites the wetlands trap upwards of 20 t y-1 of sediment equating to several hundred kilograms of C. There is also some evidence that the ponds and wetlands may influence DOC, with DOC concentrations falling from approximately 35 mg l-1 to 15 mg l-1 at the Whinton Hill site as water passes through a series of field wetlands. In this paper we will present data from the last two years of monitoring and consider the wider implications for C sequestration by ponds and wetlands in agricultural landscapes.

  7. Do created wetlands replace the wetlands that are destroyed?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Randall J.

    1997-01-01

    Wetlands, once perceived as worthless land, are now recognized as a necessary component of a vital landscape. However, due to draining and filling we have lost many of our wetlands. The loss of wetlands can have undesirable effects on the landscape, such as erosion, flooding, habitat loss and deterioration of water quality. While natural wetland systems are being destroyed nationwide, the wetlands restored or created to compensate for these losses are commonly not evaluated or contain large percentages of non-wetland acreage. At the present time we do not have established methodology that can uniformly evaluate a wetland's function, or that is useful for providing guidelines that enhance wetland restoration/creation success.

  8. Wetland InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  9. Salinifilum gen. nov., with description of Salinifilum proteinilyticum sp. nov., an extremely halophilic actinomycete isolated from Meighan wetland, Iran, and reclassification of Saccharopolyspora aidingensis as Salinifilum aidingensis comb. nov. and Saccharopolyspora ghardaiensis as Salinifilum ghardaiensis comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Moshtaghi Nikou, Mahdi; Ramezani, Mohaddaseh; Harirchi, Sharareh; Makzoom, Somayyeh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2017-09-18

    A Gram-positive, halophilic actinobacterial strain Miq-12T was isolated from Meighan wetland in Iran. Strain Miq-12T was strictly aerobic, catalase positive and oxidase negative. The isolate grew at 12-25 % NaCl, at 30-50 °C and pH 5.5-10.5. The optimum NaCl, temperature and pH for growth were 15-20 %, 40 °C and 7.0-8.0, respectively. The cell wall of strain Miq-12T contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as diagnostic diamino acid and arabinose as whole-cell sugar. The polar lipid pattern consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. It synthesized cellular fatty acids of anteiso and iso-branched types, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C17:0, iso-C15:0, iso-C16 : 0. The major respiratory quinone was MK-9(H4). The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 72.1 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison revealed that strain Miq-12T belongs to the family Pseudonocardiaceae, constituted a separate clade, and showed the closest phylogenetic similarity to Saccharopolyspora aidingensis TRM 46074T (96.99 %) and Saccharopolyspora ghardaiensis CCUG 63370T (96.92 %). On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, a novel genus and species of the family Pseudonocardiaceae, Salinifilum proteinilyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., are proposed. The type strain is Miq-12T (=IBRCM 11033T=LMG 28390T). We also propose that S. aidingensis and S. ghardaiensis should be transferred to this new genus and be named Salinifilum aidingensis comb. nov. and Salinifilum ghardaiensis comb. nov., respectively. The type strain of Salinifilum aidingensis comb. nov. is TRM 46074T (=CCTCCAA 2012014T=JCM 30185T) and the type strain of Salinifilum ghardaiensis comb. nov. is CCUG 63370T (=DSM 45606T=CECT 8304T).

  10. Unprecedented Silver Resistance in Clinically Isolated Enterobacteriaceae: Major Implications for Burn and Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Rhy; Austin, Cindy; Mitchell, Amber; Zank, Sara; Durham, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Increased utilization of inorganic silver as an adjunctive to many medical devices has raised concerns of emergent silver resistance in clinical bacteria. Although the molecular basis for silver resistance has been previously characterized, to date, significant phenotypic expression of these genes in clinical settings is yet to be observed. Here, we identified the first strains of clinical bacteria expressing silver resistance at a level that could significantly impact wound care and the use of silver-based dressings. Screening of 859 clinical isolates confirmed 31 harbored at least 1 silver resistance gene. Despite the presence of these genes, MIC testing revealed most of the bacteria displayed little or no increase in resistance to ionic silver (200 to 300 μM Ag+). However, 2 isolates (Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter cloacae) were capable of robust growth at exceedingly high silver concentrations, with MIC values reaching 5,500 μM Ag+. DNA sequencing of these two strains revealed the presence of genes homologous to known genetic determinants of heavy metal resistance. Darkening of the bacteria's pigment was observed after exposure to high silver concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy images showed the presence of silver nanoparticles embedded in the extracellular polymeric substance of both isolates. This finding suggested that the isolates may neutralize ionic silver via reduction to elemental silver. Antimicrobial testing revealed both organisms to be completely resistant to many commercially available silver-impregnated burn and wound dressings. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence of clinical bacteria capable of expressing silver resistance at levels that could significantly impact wound management. PMID:26014954

  11. Temporal and spatial differentiation in microhabitat use: Implications for reproductive isolation and ecological niche specification.

    PubMed

    Borzée, Amaël; Kim, Jun Young; DA Cunha, Marina Andrade Martins; Lee, Donggeun; Sin, Eunchong; Oh, Sunmin; Yi, Yoonjung; Jang, Yikweon

    2016-09-01

    Niche differentiation enables ecologically similar species to coexist by lessening competition over food and/or shelters and may be critical for reproductive isolation between closely related species in close proximity. Because no extra traits need to evolve, spatial and temporal differentiation may readily take place to complement other isolating mechanisms. Two closely related treefrog species occur together in Korea: the endangered Hyla suweonensis and the widespread Hyla japonica. Advertisement calls are differentiated, but it is unclear whether call difference is sufficient for reproductive isolation. We tracked individuals of both species to study fine-scale differentiation in microhabitat use in the diel cycle of the breeding season using a harmonic direction finder. tracking male movement patterns of both species revealed spatial and temporal differentiation in microhabitat use for calling and resting during the breeding season. Males of both H. suweonensis and H. japonica occurred in all 5 microhabitats identified in this study: rice paddy, ground, buried, grass and bush. Both treefrog species showed general similarities in calling from rice paddies and resting in grass and bush. However, H. suweonensis moved into rice paddies and produced advertisement calls 3 h earlier than H. japonica. These differences likely minimize contact between the species and provide an additional isolating mechanism. In addition, the activity of H. suweonensis may be contributing to the decline of this species, as resting in grass would increase dangers from predatory birds and habitat disturbance. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. O-antigen seroepidemiology of Klebsiella clinical isolates and implications for immunoprophylaxis of Klebsiella infections.

    PubMed Central

    Trautmann, M; Ruhnke, M; Rukavina, T; Held, T K; Cross, A S; Marre, R; Whitfield, C

    1997-01-01

    To provide a database for the development of an O-antigen-polysaccharide-containing vaccine against Klebsiella spp., we examined the O-antigen seroepidemiology of 378 Klebsiella clinical isolates collected prospectively in two university centers. Strains were typed by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with rabbit antisera specific for serogroups O1 to O12 and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for serogroups O1, O2ab, O2ac, and the genus-specific core antigen. The numbers of isolates (percentages) of individual O serogroups were as follows: 148 (39.2) for serogroup O1, 40 (10.6) for serogroup O2ab, 4 (1.1) for serogroup O2ac, 89 (23.6) for serogroup O3, 2 (0.5) for serogroup O4, 32 (8.5) for serogroup O5, none for serogroups O7, O9, and O12, and 21 (5.6) for serogroup O11. Forty-two (11.1) of the strains were non-O-typeable. O-serogroup distributions were virtually identical between isolates from invasive infections and those from noninvasive infections or colonizations. A vaccine containing the O-specific polysaccharides of serogroups O1, O2ab, O3, and O5 would cover 82% of clinically occurring O-antigen specificities. Three hundred thirty-eight of 378 isolates (89.4%) reacted with the genus-specific MAb V/9-5, which recognizes an epitope of the outer core region of Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide. Antibodies directed against this epitope may represent a further alternative for O-antigen-targeted immunoprophylaxis of Klebsiella infections. These data support further experimental investigations on the protective potential of O-antigen-based vaccines and/or hyperimmune globulins in Klebsiella infection. PMID:9302204

  13. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus stability in environmental and clinical substrates: implications for virus detection and isolation.

    PubMed

    Dornas, Fábio P; Silva, Lorena C F; de Almeida, Gabriel M; Campos, Rafael K; Boratto, Paulo V M; Franco-Luiz, Ana P M; La Scola, Bernard; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Abrahão, Jônatas S

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are extremely diverse and abundant and are present in countless environments. Giant viruses of the Megavirales order have emerged as a fascinating research topic for virologists around the world. As evidence of their ubiquity and ecological impact, mimiviruses have been found in multiple environmental samples. However, isolation of these viruses from environmental samples is inefficient, mainly due to methodological limitations and lack of information regarding the interactions between viruses and substrates. In this work, we demonstrate the long-lasting stability of mimivirus in environmental (freshwater and saline water) and hospital (ventilator plastic device tube) substrates, showing the detection of infectious particles after more than 9 months. In addition, an enrichment protocol was implemented that remarkably increased mimivirus detection from all tested substrates, including field tests. Moreover, biological, morphological and genetic tests revealed that the enrichment protocol maintained mimivirus particle integrity. In conclusion, our work demonstrated the stability of APMV in samples of environmental and health interest and proposed a reliable and easy protocol to improve giant virus isolation. The data presented here can guide future giant virus detection and isolation studies.

  14. Pig Pancreas Anatomy: Implications for Pancreas Procurement, Preservation, and Islet Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Joana; Scott, William E; Weegman, Bradley P; Suszynski, Thomas M; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2009-01-01

    Background Islet transplantation is emerging as a treatment option for selected patients with type 1 diabetes. The limited human islet supply from cadavers and poor islet yield and quality remain substantial impediments to progress in the field. Use of porcine islets holds great promise for large-scale application of islet transplantation. Consistent isolation of porcine islets is dependent on advances in pancreas procurement and preservation, and islet isolation requiring detailed knowledge of the porcine pancreatic anatomy. The primary aim of this study was to describe the vascular and ductal anatomy of the porcine pancreas in order to guide and improve organ preservation and enzyme perfusion. Methods Pancreata were removed by en bloc viscerectomy from 65 female Landrace pigs. Results 15% of organs exhibited inconsistent vascular branching from the celiac trunk. All organs had uniform patterns of branching at the superior mesenteric artery. The superior and inferior mesenteric veins (IMV) merged to become the portal vein in all but one case in which the IMV drained into the splenic vein. 97% of pancreata had three lobes: duodenal (DL), connecting (CL), and splenic (SL); 39% demonstrated ductal communication between the CL and the other two lobes; 50% had ductal communication only between the CL and DL; and 11% presented other types of ductal delineation. Conclusions Accounting for the variations in vascular and ductal anatomy, as detailed in this study, will facilitate development of protocols for preservation, optimal enzyme administration, and pancreas distention and digestion, and ultimately lead to substantial improvements in isolation outcomes. PMID:19077881

  15. Heterogeneity and clonality among isolates of Mycobacterium kansasii: implications for epidemiological and pathogenicity studies.

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, F; Richter, I; Bernasconi, C; Springer, B; Hagenau, C; Schulze-Röbbecke, R; Tortoli, E; Martín, R; Böttger, E C; Telenti, A

    1997-01-01

    The reservoir and transmission route of Mycobacterium kansasii are largely unknown. In addition, culturing of M. kansasii from human sources is not proof of disease because it may represent colonization rather than infection. Unfortunately, investigation of the epidemiology and pathogenicity of M. kansasii is complicated by evidence of heterogeneity within the species. A comprehensive study by detailed genotypic analysis of a large collection of M. kansasii isolates (n = 276) from various geographical sources within Europe was conducted. Five defined subtypes of M. kansasii were identified; of these subtypes, type I represents the most common isolate from humans. Although phylogenetic analysis confirmed its relationship to the other M. kansasii types, significant sequence divergence was found at the 16S-23S intergenic spacer. Analysis of the chromosomal polymorphism of type I demonstrated a marked clonal structure for this particular organism. Because M. kansasii is becoming a significant pathogen among immunodeficient hosts, future epidemiological and pathogenicity studies should take into consideration both the heterogeneity within the species and the apparent clonality of the most prevalent M. kansasii isolates infecting humans. PMID:9230363

  16. Conservation implications of drastic reductions in the smallest and most isolated populations of giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lifeng; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Shanning; Meng, Tao; Bruford, Michael W; Wei, Fuwen

    2010-10-01

    In conservation biology, understanding the causes of endangerment is a key step to devising effective conservation strategies. We used molecular evidence (coalescent simulations of population changes from microsatellite data) and historical information (habitat and human population changes) to investigate how the most-isolated populations of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in the Xiaoxiangling Mountains became highly endangered. These populations experienced a strong, recent demographic reduction (60-fold), starting approximately 250 years BP. Explosion of the human population and use of non-native crop species at the peak of the Qing Empire resulted in land-use changes, deforestation, and habitat fragmentation, which are likely to have led to the drastic reduction of the most-isolated populations of giant pandas. We predict that demographic, genetic, and environmental factors will lead to extinction of giant pandas in the Xiaoxiangling Mountains in the future if the population remains isolated. Therefore, a targeted conservation action--translocation--has been proposed and is being implemented by the Chinese government.

  17. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus Stability in Environmental and Clinical Substrates: Implications for Virus Detection and Isolation

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Gabriel M.; Campos, Rafael K.; Boratto, Paulo V. M.; Franco-Luiz, Ana P. M.; La Scola, Bernard; Ferreira, Paulo C. P.; Kroon, Erna G.; Abrahão, Jônatas S.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are extremely diverse and abundant and are present in countless environments. Giant viruses of the Megavirales order have emerged as a fascinating research topic for virologists around the world. As evidence of their ubiquity and ecological impact, mimiviruses have been found in multiple environmental samples. However, isolation of these viruses from environmental samples is inefficient, mainly due to methodological limitations and lack of information regarding the interactions between viruses and substrates. In this work, we demonstrate the long-lasting stability of mimivirus in environmental (freshwater and saline water) and hospital (ventilator plastic device tube) substrates, showing the detection of infectious particles after more than 9 months. In addition, an enrichment protocol was implemented that remarkably increased mimivirus detection from all tested substrates, including field tests. Moreover, biological, morphological and genetic tests revealed that the enrichment protocol maintained mimivirus particle integrity. In conclusion, our work demonstrated the stability of APMV in samples of environmental and health interest and proposed a reliable and easy protocol to improve giant virus isolation. The data presented here can guide future giant virus detection and isolation studies. PMID:24498379

  18. The Carolina Bay Restoration Project: Implementation and Management of a Wetland Mitigation Bank.

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Christopher; DeSteven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca; Kilgo, John; Imm, Donald; Kolka, Randy; Blake, John, I.

    2003-01-01

    A wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses associated with future authorized construction and environmental restoration projects in SRS wetlands. The Bank was intended not only to hasten mitigation efforts with respect to regulatory requirements and implementation, but also to provide onsite and fully functional compensation of impacted wetland acreage prior to any impact. Restoration and enhancement of small isolated wetlands, as well as major bottomland wetland systems scattered throughout the nonindustrialized area of SRS were designated for inclusion in the Bank. Based on information and techniques gained from previous research efforts involving Carolina bay wetlands (DOE 1997), a project to restore degraded Carolina bays on SRS has been undertaken to serve as the initial ''deposit'' in The Bank. There are over 300 Carolina bays or bay-like depression wetlands on the SRS, of which an estimated two-thirds were ditched or disturbed prior to federal occupation of the Site (Kirkman et al., 1996). These isolated wetlands range from small ephemeral depressions to large permanent ponds of 10-50 hectares in size. They provide habitat to support a wide range of rare plant species, and many vertebrates (birds, amphibians, bats). Historical impacts to the Carolina bays at SRS were primarily associated with agricultural activities. Bays were often drained tilled and planted to crops. The consequence was a loss in the wetland hydrologic cycle, the native wetland vegetation, and associated wildlife. The purpose of this mitigation and research project is to restore the functions and vegetation typical of intact depression wetlands and, in doing so, to enhance habitat for wetland dependent wildlife on SRS.

  19. Association between wetland disturbance and biological attributes in floodplain wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, S.R.; Hubbard, D.E.; Werlin, K.B.; Haugerud, N.J.; Powell, K.A.; Thompson, John; Johnson, T.

    2006-01-01

    We quantified the influence of agricultural activities on environmental and biological conditions of floodplain wetlands in the upper Missouri River basin. Seasonally-flooded wetlands were characterized as low impact (non-disturbed) or high impact (disturbed) based on local land use. Biological data collected from these wetlands were used to develop a wetland condition index (WCI). Fourteen additional wetlands were sampled to evaluate the general condition of seasonally-flooded floodplain wetlands. Structural and functional attributes of macrophyte, algae, and macroinvertebrate communities were tested as candidate metrics for assessing biotic responses. The WCI we developed used six biological metrics to discriminate between disturbed and non-disturbed wetlands: 1) biomass of Culicidae larvae, 2) abundance of Chironomidae larvae, 3) macroinvertebrate diversity, 4) total number of plant species, 5) the proportion of exotic plant species, and 6) total number of sensitive diatom species. Disturbed wetlands had less taxa richness and species diversity and more exotic and nuisance (e.g., mosquitoes) species. Environmental differences between low and high impact wetlands included measures of total potassium, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, alkalinity, conductance, and sediment phosphorus concentration. Canonical analyses showed that WCI scores were weakly correlated (P = 0.057) with environmental variables in randomly selected wetlands. In addition, mean WCI score for random wetlands was higher than that for high impact wetlands, implying that floodplain wetlands were less impacted by the types of agricultural activities affecting high impact sites. Inter-year sampling of some wetlands revealed that WCI metrics were correlated in 2000 and 2001, implying that biological metrics provided useful indicators of disturbance in floodplain wetlands. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  20. Soil-Gas Identification of Environmental Factors Affecting CO2 Concentrations Beneath a Playa Wetland: Implications for Soil-Gas Monitoring at Carbon Storage Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanak, K.; Bennett, P.

    2009-12-01

    Strategies for identifying and interpreting the effects of environmental factors on near-surface CO2 concentrations are essential to developing accurate monitoring protocols at carbon storage sites. Based on the results of a three-year study of a natural analogue we present, 1) a method for using soil-gas to identify near-surface CO2 cycling, and 2) a framework for developing monitoring protocols and site evaluation for near-surface monitoring. Near-surface CO2 production, consumption, and re-distribution was observed in the vadose-zone of a highly CO2-reactive playa wetland in the Texas High Plains. Atmospheric conditions, organic and inorganic soil carbon, subsurface pressure, water flux, and surface and groundwater chemistry were compared to real-time background measurements of CO2, CH4, O2+Ar, and N2 from depths up to 45 feet. Carbon isotopes and spatially and temporally variable concentrations of CO2 ≤ 17%, CH4 ≤ 2%, and O2 from 21-0% indicate CO2 and CH4 are produced by microbes. Molar gas ratios of O2 and CO2 distinguish between oxidation of organic matter (CH2O + O2 → CO2 + H2O), CH4 oxidation (CH4 + 2O2 → CO2 + 2H2O), and potentially acetate fermentation (CH3COOH → CH4 + CO2). O2 consumption and distribution is regulated by water flux that supplies dissolved organics to microbes at depth and regulates oxygen supply by blocking vertical permeability and atmospheric gas exchange. A surface flux experiment indicates that when playa floors are dry, subsurface wetting fronts from rain events or previous ponding periods block vertical permeability resulting in surface flux measurements that do not represent subsurface conditions. Samples with CO2+O2 < 21% and N2 > 78% identify dissolution of CO2 and carbonate minerals into recharging groundwater resulting in loss of pore pressure and chemically-induced advection of atmosphere into pores. Inverse geochemical reaction modeling (PHREEQC) of playa surface water and perched groundwater in high PCO2 zones

  1. North Atlantic Coastal Tidal Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book chapter provides college instructors, researchers, graduate and advanced undergraduate students, and environmental consultants interested in wetlands with foundation information on the ecology and conservation concerns of North Atlantic coastal wetlands. The book c...

  2. Hydrologic functions of prairie wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaBaugh, J.W.; Winter, T.C.; Rosenberry, D.O.

    1998-01-01

    Wetlands in the prairie known as potholes or sloughs represent an ever-changing mosaic of surface waters interacting with the atmosphere, groundwater, and each other in a variety of ways. Studies of groups of adjacent wetlands in different parts of the glaciated North American prairie have enabled some connections to be made between hydrologic processes, biological communities, and use of these wetlands by wetland-dependent wildlife. Understanding controls on variability in water levels, water volume, and salinity in these wetlands sets the stage for understanding controls on biological communities utilizing these wetlands. The role that natural variability in water and salinity plays in making these wetlands an important resource for waterfowl will provide an important context for those who are responsible for artificially altering the variability of water and salinity in prairie wetlands.

  3. National Wetlands Mitigation Action Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On December 26, 2002, EPA and the Corps of Engineers announced the release of a comprehensive, interagency National Wetlands Mitigation Action Plan to further achievement of the goal of no net loss of wetlands.

  4. North Atlantic Coastal Tidal Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book chapter provides college instructors, researchers, graduate and advanced undergraduate students, and environmental consultants interested in wetlands with foundation information on the ecology and conservation concerns of North Atlantic coastal wetlands. The book c...

  5. Wetlands Restoration Definitions and Distinctions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecological restoration is a valuable endeavor that has proven very difficult to define. The term indicates that degraded and destroyed natural wetland systems will be reestablished to sites where they once existed. But, what wetland ecosystems are we talki

  6. Uptake of heavy metals by Typha capensis from wetland sites polluted by effluent from mineral processing plants: implications of metal-metal interactions.

    PubMed

    Zaranyika, M F; Nyati, W

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to demonstrate the existence of metal-metal interactions in plants and their implications for the absorption of toxic elements like Cr. Typha capensis, a good accumulator of heavy metals, was chosen for the study. Levels of Fe, Cr, Ni, Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn were determined in the soil and roots, rhizomes, stems and leaves of T. capensis from three Sites A, B and C polluted by effluent from a chrome ore processing plant, a gold ore processing plant, and a nickel ore processing plant, respectively. The levels of Cr were extremely high at Site A at 5415 and 786-16,047 μg g(-1) dry weight in the soil and the plant, respectively, while the levels of Ni were high at Site C at 176 and 24-891 μg g(-1) in the soil and the plant, respectively. The levels of Fe were high at all three sites at 2502-7500 and 906-13,833 μg g(-1) in the soil and plant, respectively. For the rest of the metals, levels were modest at 8.5-148 and 2-264 μg g(-1) in the soil and plant, respectively. Pearson's correlation analysis confirmed mutual synergistic metal-metal interactions in the uptake of Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Fe, and Cr, which are attributed to the similarity in the radii and coordination geometry of the cations of these elements. The implications of such metal-metal interactions (or effects of one metal on the behaviour of another) on the uptake of Cr, a toxic element, and possible Cr detoxification mechanism within the plant, are discussed.

  7. Isolation, and virulence profiles, of Aeromonas hydrophila implicated in an outbreak of food poisoning in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Krovacek, K; Dumontet, S; Eriksson, E; Baloda, S B

    1995-01-01

    A case of food poisoning outbreak involving Aeromonas hydrophila is reported in this study. A group of 27 people consumed a typical Swedish food "landgång" which is a type of smörgåsbord containing shrimps with mayonnaise, liver paté, ham, sausage, and legume salad which was purchased from a food store. Twenty-two of the 27 persons became ill within 20-34 hr of consumption of the food and reported the symptoms ranging from severe acute diarrhea, abdominal pain, headache, fever and vomiting. One person also fainted. The symptoms lasted for a couple of days. Of the remaining 5 healthy persons who consumed the left-over food the next day, 2 became ill with similar symptoms. The bacteriological examination of left-over food samples resulted in the isolation of A. hydrophila from shrimps with mayonnaise, smoked sausage, liver paté and boiled ham. The total number of A. hydrophila in these foods were log 10(6) to log > 10(7) organisms per gram of food sample. A. hydrophila was however, not isolated from legume/mayonnaise salad samples. All the food samples tested showed low numbers of other expected food contaminating organisms such as coliforms at 37 C and 44 C, fecal streptococci, Staphylococcus aureus, fungi and yeast etc., while Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens and Salmonella spp. were not detected in the food samples. Investigations of the virulence profiles of the A. hydrophila isolates showed their capacity to produce beta-hemolysin, cytotoxins, cytotonic toxins, enterotoxins, and adhesion to and invasion of human intestinal (Henle 407) cells in culture.

  8. Taxonomic implications of Rhodotorula rubra isolates from polluted sea water in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hagler, A N; Mendonça-Hagler, L C

    1979-04-01

    Sixty two strains of Rhodotorula rubra which were all isolated from marine and estuarine waters of Rio de Janeiro were found variable for 19 to 32 carbon assimilation tests used in yeast taxonomy. Two R. rubra strains which had latent assimilation of maltose and melizitose appeared to be intermediate with R. pilimanae. Strains of R. glutinis var dairenensis which differed from R. rubra only by weak assimilation of nitrate appeared to be intermediated between these two species. Our physiological tests suggested that R. rubra, R. pilimanae, and part of R. glutinis should be combined and this was supported by DNA base composition and coezyme Q data existing in the literature.

  9. Reducing sedimentation of depressional wetlands in agricultural landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, S.K.; Melcher, Cynthia; Haukos, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Depressional wetlands in agricultural landscapes are easily degraded by sediments and contaminants accumulated from their watersheds. Several best management practices can reduce transport of sediments into wetlands, including the establishment of vegetative buffers. We summarize the sources, transport dynamics, and effect of sediments, nutrients, and contaminants that threaten wetlands and the current knowledge of design and usefulness of grass buffers for protecting isolated wetlands. Buffer effectiveness is dependent on several factors, including vegetation structure, buffer width, attributes of the surrounding watershed (i.e., area, vegetative cover, slope and topography, soil type and structure, soil moisture, amount of herbicides and pesticides applied), and intensity and duration of rain events. To reduce dissolved contaminants from runoff, the water must infiltrate the soil where microbes or other processes can break down or sequester contaminants. But increasing infiltration also diminishes total water volume entering a wetland, which presents threats to wetland hydrology in semi-arid regions. Buffer effectiveness may be enhanced significantly by implementing other best management practices (e.g., conservation tillage, balancing input with nutrient requirements for livestock and crops, precision application of chemicals) in the surrounding watershed to diminish soil erosion and associated contaminant runoff. Buffers require regular maintenance to remove sediment build-up and replace damaged or over-mature vegetation. Further research is needed to establish guidelines for effective buffer width and structure, and such efforts should entail a coordinated, regional, multi-scale, multidisciplinary approach to evaluate buffer effectiveness and impacts. Direct measures in "real-world" systems and field validations of buffer-effectiveness models are crucial next steps in evaluating how grass buffers will impact the abiotic and biotic variables attributes that

  10. Wetlands: water, wildlife, plants, & people

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandas, Stephen; Farrar, Frank

    1996-01-01

    Wetlands are part of all our lives. They can generally be described as transitional areas between land and deepwater habitats. There are many different kinds of wetlands, and they can be found in many different habitat types, from forests to deserts; some are maintained by saltwater, others by freshwater. This poster shows general types of diverse wetlands and demonstrates how people and wetlands can benefit by living together. The diversity of plants and animals is shown in cartooned pictures. As with plants and animals, there are many different common names for the various wetland types. The common names used on this poster were used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the publication "Wetlands-Status and Trends in the Conterminous United States, Mid-1970's to Mid-1980's." Estuarine wetland types--salt marshes and mangrove swamps--are labeled in red letters. The estuary is where ocean saltwater and river freshwater mix. The estuary is labeled in orange letters. The inland wetland types-inland marshes and wet meadows, forested wetlands, and shrub wetlands-are labeled in yellow. Other wetlands are present in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. The water bodies associated with these wetlands are labeled in black. The poster is folded into 8.5" x 11" panels; front and back panels can easily be photocopied.

  11. Developing a New Wetland Habitat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Rosalie

    2006-01-01

    This article features a project at Ohio's Miami Valley Career Technology Center (MVCTC) which has made a real difference in the wetland environment on campus. The goals of the wetland project were to replace a poorly functioning tile system and develop two wetland areas for local and migratory wildlife. The environmental/natural resources students…

  12. Developing a New Wetland Habitat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Rosalie

    2006-01-01

    This article features a project at Ohio's Miami Valley Career Technology Center (MVCTC) which has made a real difference in the wetland environment on campus. The goals of the wetland project were to replace a poorly functioning tile system and develop two wetland areas for local and migratory wildlife. The environmental/natural resources students…

  13. Wetland soils, hydrology and geomorphology

    Treesearch

    C. Rhett Jackson; James A. Thompson; Randall K. Kolka

    2014-01-01

    The hydrology, soils, and watershed processes of a wetland all interact with vegetation and animals over time to create the dynamic physical template upon which a wetland's ecosystem is based (Fig. 2.1). With respect to many ecosystem processes, the physical factors defining a wetland environment at any particular time are often treated as independent variables,...

  14. Implications of isolation and low genetic diversity in peripheral populations of an amphi-Atlantic coral.

    PubMed

    Nunes, F; Norris, R D; Knowlton, N

    2009-10-01

    Limited dispersal and connectivity in marine organisms can have negative fitness effects in populations that are small and isolated, but reduced genetic exchange may also promote the potential for local adaptation. Here, we compare the levels of genetic diversity and connectivity in the coral Montastraea cavernosa among both central and peripheral populations throughout its range in the Atlantic. Genetic data from one mitochondrial and two nuclear loci in 191 individuals show that M. cavernosa is subdivided into three genetically distinct regions in the Atlantic: Caribbean-North Atlantic, Western South Atlantic (Brazil) and Eastern Tropical Atlantic (West Africa). Within each region, populations have similar allele frequencies and levels of genetic diversity; indeed, no significant differentiation was found between populations separated by as much as 3000 km, suggesting that this coral species has the ability to disperse over large distances. Gene flow within regions does not, however, translate into connectivity across the entire Atlantic. Instead, substantial differences in allele frequencies across regions suggest that genetic exchange is infrequent between the Caribbean, Brazil and West Africa. Furthermore, markedly lower levels of genetic diversity are observed in the Brazilian and West African populations. Genetic diversity and connectivity may contribute to the resilience of a coral population to disturbance. Isolated peripheral populations may be more vulnerable to human impacts, disease or climate change relative to those in the genetically diverse Caribbean-North Atlantic region.

  15. Implications of macroalgal isolation by distance for networks of marine protected areas.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Halley M S; Burridge, Christopher P; Kelaher, Brendan P; Barrett, Neville S; Edgar, Graham J; Coleman, Melinda A

    2014-04-01

    The global extent of macroalgal forests is declining, greatly affecting marine biodiversity at broad scales through the effects macroalgae have on ecosystem processes, habitat provision, and food web support. Networks of marine protected areas comprise one potential tool that may safeguard gene flow among macroalgal populations in the face of increasing population fragmentation caused by pollution, habitat modification, climate change, algal harvesting, trophic cascades, and other anthropogenic stressors. Optimal design of protected area networks requires knowledge of effective dispersal distances for a range of macroalgae. We conducted a global meta-analysis based on data in the published literature to determine the generality of relation between genetic differentiation and geographic distance among macroalgal populations. We also examined whether spatial genetic variation differed significantly with respect to higher taxon, life history, and habitat characteristics. We found clear evidence of population isolation by distance across a multitude of macroalgal species. Genetic and geographic distance were positively correlated across 49 studies; a modal distance of 50-100 km maintained F(ST) < 0.2. This relation was consistent for all algal divisions, life cycles, habitats, and molecular marker classes investigated. Incorporating knowledge of the spatial scales of gene flow into the design of marine protected area networks will help moderate anthropogenic increases in population isolation and inbreeding and contribute to the resilience of macroalgal forests. ©2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. Streptokinase variants from Streptococcus pyogenes isolates display altered plasminogen activation characteristics - implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cook, Simon M; Skora, Amanda; Gillen, Christine M; Walker, Mark J; McArthur, Jason D

    2012-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) secretes streptokinase, a potent plasminogen activating protein. Among GAS isolates, streptokinase gene sequences (ska) are polymorphic and can be grouped into two distinct sequence clusters (termed cluster type-1 and cluster type-2) with cluster type-2 being further divided into sub-clusters type-2a and type-2b. In this study, far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that purified streptokinase variants of each type displayed similar secondary structure. Type-2b streptokinase variants could not generate an active site in Glu-plasminogen through non-proteolytic mechanisms while all other variants had this capability. Furthermore, when compared with other streptokinase variants, type-2b variants displayed a 29- to 35-fold reduction in affinity for Glu-plasminogen. All SK variants could activate Glu-plasminogen when an activator complex was preformed with plasmin; however, type-2b and type-1 complexes were inhibited by α(2) -antiplasmin. Exchanging ska(type-2a) in the M1T1 GAS strain 5448 with ska(type-2b) caused a reduction in virulence while exchanging ska(type-2a) with ska(type-1) into 5448 produced an increase in virulence when using a mouse model of invasive disease. These findings suggest that streptokinase variants produced by GAS isolates utilize distinct plasminogen activation pathways, which directly affects the pathogenesis of this organism.

  17. Cytotoxic triterpenoids isolated from sweet chestnut heartwood (Castanea sativa) and their health benefits implication.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Andy J; Pecio, Łukasz; Kowalczyk, Mariusz; Kontek, Renata; Gajek, Gabriela; Stopinsek, Lidija; Mirt, Ivan; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wiesław

    2017-03-28

    For centuries wood containers have been used in aging of wines and spirits, due to the pleasant flavors they give to the beverages. Together with oak, sweet chestnut wood (Castanea sativa) have been often used for such purpose. The maturation process involves the transfer of secondary metabolites, mainly phenolics, from the wood to the liquid. At the same time, other metabolites, such as triterpenoids and their glycosides, can also be released. Searching for the extractable triterpenoids from sweet chestnut heartwood (C. sativa), two new ursane-type triterpenoid saponins named chestnoside A (1) and chestnoside B (2), together with two known oleanen-type analogs (3 and 4) were isolated and characterized. The cytotoxicity of isolated compounds was tested against two cancer cell lines (PC3 and MCF-7), and normal lymphocytes. Breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were more affected by tested compounds than prostate cancer cells (PC3). Chestnoside B (2) exhibited the strongest cytotoxicity with an IC50 of 12.3 μM against MCF-7 cells, lower than those of positive controls, while it was moderately active against normal lymphocytes (IC50 = 67.2 μM). These results highlight the occurrence of triterpenoid saponins in sweet chestnut heartwood and their potential for the chemoprevention of breast cancer.

  18. Effects of isolation and confinement on humans-implications for manned space explorations.

    PubMed

    Pagel, J I; Choukèr, A

    2016-06-15

    Human psychology and physiology are significantly altered by isolation and confinement. In light of planned exploration class interplanetary missions, the related adverse effects on the human body need to be explored and defined as they have a large impact on a mission's success. Terrestrial space analogs offer an excellent controlled environment to study some of these stressors during a space mission in isolation without the complex environment of the International Space Station. Participants subjected to these space analog conditions can encounter typical symptoms ranging from neurocognitive changes, fatigue, misaligned circadian rhythm, sleep disorders, altered stress hormone levels, and immune modulatory changes. This review focuses on both the psychological and the physiological responses observed in participants of long-duration spaceflight analog studies, such as Mars500 or Antarctic winter-over. They provide important insight into similarities and differences encountered in each simulated setting. The identification of adverse effects from confinement allows not only the crew to better prepare for but also to design feasible countermeasures that will help support space travelers during exploration class missions in the future. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. α-Synuclein-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in isolated preparation and intact cells: implications in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bir, Aritri; Sen, Oishimaya; Anand, Shruti; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Cappai, Roberto; Sahoo, Arghyadip; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2014-12-01

    This study has shown that purified recombinant human α-synuclein (20 μM) causes membrane depolarization and loss of phosphorylation capacity of isolated purified rat brain mitochondria by activating permeability transition pore complex. In intact SHSY5Y (human neuroblastoma cell line) cells, lactacystin (5 μM), a proteasomal inhibitor, causes an accumulation of α-synuclein with concomitant mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. The effects of lactacystin on intact SHSY5Y cells are, however, prevented by knocking down α-synuclein expression by specific siRNA. Furthermore, in wild-type (non-transfected) SHSY5Y cells, the effects of lactacystin on mitochondrial function and cell viability are also prevented by cyclosporin A (1 μM) which blocks the activity of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Likewise, in wild-type SHSY5Y cells, typical mitochondrial poison like antimycin A (50 nM) produces loss of cell viability comparable to that of lactacystin (5 μM). These data, in combination with those from isolated brain mitochondria, strongly suggest that intracellularly accumulated α-synuclein can interact with mitochondria in intact SHSY5Y cells causing dysfunction of the organelle which drives the cell death under our experimental conditions. The results have clear implications in the pathogenesis of sporadic Parkinson's disease. α-Synuclein is shown to cause mitochondrial impairment through interaction with permeability transition pore complex in isolated preparations. Intracellular accumulation of α-synuclein in SHSY5Y cells following proteasomal inhibition leads to mitochondrial impairment and cell death which could be prevented by knocking down α-synuclein gene. The results link mitochondrial dysfunction and α-synuclein accumulation, two key pathogenic mechanisms of Parkinson's disease, in a common damage pathway.

  20. Exploring Wetland Connectivity at the Catchment Scale: a Coupled Hydro-Chemical Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorslund, J.; Cohen, M. J.; Jarsjo, J.; Jawitz, J. W.; Rains, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The hydrological and geochemical connections between geographically isolated wetland complexes and downstream waters can vary depending on multiple factors, such as landscape position, land-use, wetland size, and catchment and geological attributes. Understanding these connections are relevant to determining how best to conserve landscape scale water quality and storage functions that these wetlands provide. Since groundwater provides a physical and geochemical link between the wetland and the surrounding landscape, a basic unanswered question is how wetlands interact with adjacent (ground) waters. By understanding this interaction, and enumerating the relative role of the various controlling factors, we seek to upscale findings from individual wetlands to better assess interactions within and between wetland complexes and drainage features at the catchment scale. Such a perspective is relevant for understanding cumulative effects on downstream waters. We used a large scale distributed hydrological model to quantify groundwater-wetland interactions. Model results are compared to observation data of solute concentrations from wetland systems in North America and Canada, testing hypotheses regarding hydrological connectivity and local to regional trends in wetland geochemistry.

  1. Factors that influence the hydrologic recovery of wetlands in the Northern Tampa Bay area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Although of less importance than the other three factors, a low-lying topographical position benefited the hydrologic condition of several of the study wetlands (S-68 Cypress and W-12 Cypress) both before and after the reductions in groundwater withdrawals. Compared to wetlands in a higher topographical position, those in a lower position had longer hydroperiods because of their greater ability to receive more runoff from higher elevation wetlands and to establish surface-water connections to other isolated wetlands and surface-water bodies through low-lying surface-water channels during wet conditions. In addition, wetlands in low-lying areas benefited from groundwater inflow when groundwater levels were higher than wetland water levels.

  2. America's disappearing wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R.

    1983-08-19

    Environmentalists oppose changes in wetlands protection policies and in the way the Corps of Engineers is issuing permits to dredge and fill under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. The administration argues that relaxed regulation streamlines the permit process and saves money. A key provision in legislation proposed by Interior Secretary Watt eliminates federal subsidies for draining wetlands, but environmentalists point out that Watt exempts agriculture activities that account for most drainage. Realtors are opposed because the bill also eliminates subsidies for flood insurance, sewer grants, and construction loans. Wetlands protection is a recent government activity because the ecological importance was not recognized. The courts will decide whether the protection continues or is allowed to erode. 18 references, 6 figures. (DCK)

  3. Isolated Placental Inflammation and Vasculopathy: Clinical Implications in the Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rita P; Zhao, Yuan; Niwas, Ram; Kaplan, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The predictive values of placental histopathologies are compromised by a non-segregation of common anomalies. The effects of isolated pure placental inflammation (PI) and vasculopathy-coagulopathy (PV) were compared with normal (NL) placentas in extremely premature infants (ELBW, birth weight < 1000 g). PI infants required lower peak inspiratory pressure on day 3. More infants in PV were oxygen dependence on day 28. PV had an increased risk of intraventricular-periventricular hemorrhage (IVH, OR 4.9, 95% CI 1-24.7, p = 0.05). NL infants were unexposed to PPROM or maternal hypertension, had highest requirement for surfactant, did not develop IVH and periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and none of them were Caucasian.

  4. First isolation of tandemly repeated DNA sequences in New World vultures and phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Keyser, C; Montagnon, D; Schlee, M; Ludes, B; Pfitzinger, H; Mangin, P

    1996-02-01

    A highly repeated DNA sequence composed of closely related subunits that ranged from 171 to 176 base pairs has been cloned and characterized in the king vulture (Sarcoramphus papa). Related sequences were also isolated in the black vulture (Coragyps atratus). This new family of avian repetitive DNA elements is here termed the "HaeIII family." Genomic DNAs from a number of avian species were probed with one of the king vulture restriction fragments. In the cathartids, the hybridization patterns showed no individual or sexual variations. A strong HaeIII ladder was present in the two aforementioned species as well as in the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus), but in the black vulture the bands of the ladder alternated in intensity. Weaker hybridization signals were obtained in two ciconids, the jabiru stork (Jabiru mycteria) and the white stork (Ciconia ciconia). The HaeIII repeat was not detected in accipitrid birds of prey, a Polyborinae falconid, pelecanids, and psittacids.

  5. Pre-Holocene Origin for the Coronopus navasii Disjunction: Conservation Implications from Its Long Isolation.

    PubMed

    Martín-Hernanz, Sara; G Fernández de Castro, Alejandro; Moreno-Saiz, Juan Carlos; Valcárcel, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Integration of unexpected discoveries about charismatic species can disrupt their well-established recovery plans, particularly when this requires coordinate actions among the different governments responsible. The Critically Endangered Coronopus navasii (Brassicaceae) was considered a restricted endemism to a few Mediterranean temporary ponds in a high mountain range of Southeast Spain, until a new group of populations were discovered 500 km North in 2006. Ten years after this finding, its management has not been accommodated due to limited information of the new populations and administrative inertia. In this study, DNA sequences and species distribution models are used to analyse the origin of the C. navasii disjunction as a preliminary step to reassess its recovery plan. Molecular results placed the disjunction during Miocene-Pleistocene (6.30-0.49 Mya, plastid DNA; 1.45-0.03 Mya, ribosomal DNA), which discards a putative human-mediated origin. In fact, the haplotype network and the low gene flow estimated between disjunct areas suggest long-term isolation. Dispersal is the most likely explanation for the disjunction as interpreted from the highly fragmented distribution projected to the past. Particularly, a northward dispersal from Southeast is proposed since C. navasii haplotype network is connected to the sister-group through the southern haplotype. Although the reassessment of C. navasii conservation status is more optimistic under the new extent of occurrence, its long-term survival may be compromised due to the: (1) natural fragmentation and rarity of the species habitat, (2) genetic isolation between the two disjunct areas, and (3) northward shift of suitable areas under future climate change scenarios. Several ex-situ and in-situ conservation measures are proposed for integrating Central East Spanish populations into the on-going recovery plan, which still only contemplates Southeast populations and therefore does not preserve the genetic structure and

  6. Pre-Holocene Origin for the Coronopus navasii Disjunction: Conservation Implications from Its Long Isolation

    PubMed Central

    G. Fernández de Castro, Alejandro; Moreno-Saiz, Juan Carlos; Valcárcel, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Integration of unexpected discoveries about charismatic species can disrupt their well-established recovery plans, particularly when this requires coordinate actions among the different governments responsible. The Critically Endangered Coronopus navasii (Brassicaceae) was considered a restricted endemism to a few Mediterranean temporary ponds in a high mountain range of Southeast Spain, until a new group of populations were discovered 500 km North in 2006. Ten years after this finding, its management has not been accommodated due to limited information of the new populations and administrative inertia. In this study, DNA sequences and species distribution models are used to analyse the origin of the C. navasii disjunction as a preliminary step to reassess its recovery plan. Molecular results placed the disjunction during Miocene-Pleistocene (6.30–0.49 Mya, plastid DNA; 1.45–0.03 Mya, ribosomal DNA), which discards a putative human-mediated origin. In fact, the haplotype network and the low gene flow estimated between disjunct areas suggest long-term isolation. Dispersal is the most likely explanation for the disjunction as interpreted from the highly fragmented distribution projected to the past. Particularly, a northward dispersal from Southeast is proposed since C. navasii haplotype network is connected to the sister-group through the southern haplotype. Although the reassessment of C. navasii conservation status is more optimistic under the new extent of occurrence, its long-term survival may be compromised due to the: (1) natural fragmentation and rarity of the species habitat, (2) genetic isolation between the two disjunct areas, and (3) northward shift of suitable areas under future climate change scenarios. Several ex-situ and in-situ conservation measures are proposed for integrating Central East Spanish populations into the on-going recovery plan, which still only contemplates Southeast populations and therefore does not preserve the genetic structure

  7. Wetland and water supply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, John Augustus

    1960-01-01

    The Geological Survey has received numerous inquiries about the effects of proposed changes in the wetland environment. The nature of the inquiries suggests a general confusion in the public mind as to wetland values and an increasing concern by the public with the need for facts as a basis for sound decisions when public action is required. Perhaps the largest gap in our knowledge is in regard to the role played by the wetland in the natural water scheme. Specialists in such fields as agriculture and conservation have studied the wetland in relation to its special uses and values for farming and as a habitat for fish and wildlife. However, except as studied incidentally by these specialists, the role of the wetland with respect to water has been largely neglected. This facet of the wetland problem is of direct concern to the Geological Survey. We commonly speak of water in terms of its place in the hydrologic environment---as, for example, surface water or ground water. These terms imply that water can be neatly pigeonholed. With respect to the wetland environment nothing can be further from the truth. In fact, one objective of this discussion is to demonstrate that for the wetland environment surface water, ground water, and soil water cannot be separated realistically, but are closely interrelated and must be studied together. It should be noted that this statement holds true for the hydrologic environment in general, and that the wetland environment is by no means unique in this respect. Our second and principal objective is to identify some of the problems that must be studied in order to clarify the role of the wetland in relation to water supply. We have chosen to approach these objectives by briefly describing one area for which we have some information, and by using this example to point out some of the problems that need study. First, however, let us define what we, as geohydrologists, mean by wetland and briefly consider wetland classifications. For our

  8. Wetlands for Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gnaneswar Gude, Veera; Magbanua, Benjamin; Truax, Dennis D; Martin, James L

    2016-10-01

    An update on the current research and development of the treatment technologies, which utilize natural processes or passive components in wastewater treatment, is provided in this paper. The main focus is on wetland systems and their applications in wastewater treatment (as an advanced treatment unit or decentralized system), nutrient and pollutant removal (metals, industrial and emerging pollutants including pharmaceutical compounds). A summary of studies involving the effects of vegetation, wetland design and modeling, hybrid and innovative systems, storm water treatment and pathogen removal is also included.

  9. FGD liner experiments with wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsch, W.J.; Ahn, C.; Wolfe, W.E.

    1999-07-01

    The construction of artificial wetlands for wastewater treatment often requires impermeable liners not only to protect groundwater resources but also to ensure that there is adequate water in the wetland to support appropriate aquatic life, particularly wetland vegetation. Liners or relatively impervious site soils are very important to the success of constructed treatment wetlands in areas where ground water levels are typically close to the ground surface. This study, carried out at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, investigated the use of FGD material from sulfur scrubbers as a possible liner material for constructed wetlands. While several studies have investigated the use of FGD material to line ponds, no studies have investigated the use of this material as a liner for constructed wetlands. They used experimental mesocosms to see the effect of FGD liner materials in constructed wetlands on water quality and on wetland plant growth. This paper presents the results of nutrient analyses and physicochemical investigation of leachate and surface outflow water samples collected from the mesocosms. Plant growth and biomass of wetland vegetation are also included in this paper. First two year results are reported by Ahn et al. (1998, 1999). The overall goal of this study is the identification of advantages and disadvantages of using FGD by-product as an artificial liner in constructed wetlands.

  10. Carbon storage in US wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Nahlik, A. M.; Fennessy, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Wetland soils contain some of the highest stores of soil carbon in the biosphere. However, there is little understanding of the quantity and distribution of carbon stored in our remaining wetlands or of the potential effects of human disturbance on these stocks. Here we use field data from the 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment to provide unbiased estimates of soil carbon stocks for wetlands at regional and national scales. We find that wetlands in the conterminous United States store a total of 11.52 PgC, much of which is within soils deeper than 30 cm. Freshwater inland wetlands, in part due to their substantial areal extent, hold nearly ten-fold more carbon than tidal saltwater sites—indicating their importance in regional carbon storage. Our data suggest a possible relationship between carbon stocks and anthropogenic disturbance. These data highlight the need to protect wetlands to mitigate the risk of avoidable contributions to climate change. PMID:27958272

  11. Carbon storage in US wetlands.

    PubMed

    Nahlik, A M; Fennessy, M S

    2016-12-13

    Wetland soils contain some of the highest stores of soil carbon in the biosphere. However, there is little understanding of the quantity and distribution of carbon stored in our remaining wetlands or of the potential effects of human disturbance on these stocks. Here we use field data from the 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment to provide unbiased estimates of soil carbon stocks for wetlands at regional and national scales. We find that wetlands in the conterminous United States store a total of 11.52 PgC, much of which is within soils deeper than 30 cm. Freshwater inland wetlands, in part due to their substantial areal extent, hold nearly ten-fold more carbon than tidal saltwater sites-indicating their importance in regional carbon storage. Our data suggest a possible relationship between carbon stocks and anthropogenic disturbance. These data highlight the need to protect wetlands to mitigate the risk of avoidable contributions to climate change.

  12. Carbon storage in US wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahlik, A. M.; Fennessy, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Wetland soils contain some of the highest stores of soil carbon in the biosphere. However, there is little understanding of the quantity and distribution of carbon stored in our remaining wetlands or of the potential effects of human disturbance on these stocks. Here we use field data from the 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment to provide unbiased estimates of soil carbon stocks for wetlands at regional and national scales. We find that wetlands in the conterminous United States store a total of 11.52 PgC, much of which is within soils deeper than 30 cm. Freshwater inland wetlands, in part due to their substantial areal extent, hold nearly ten-fold more carbon than tidal saltwater sites--indicating their importance in regional carbon storage. Our data suggest a possible relationship between carbon stocks and anthropogenic disturbance. These data highlight the need to protect wetlands to mitigate the risk of avoidable contributions to climate change.

  13. Ensuring Disaster Risk Reduction via Sustainable Wetland Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, S. W.; Lindborg, R.; Nyström, S.; Silengo, M.; Tumbo, M.; Koutsouris, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems around the world are increasingly being targeted as land use development 'hotspots' under growing concerns of climate variability and food security. Anthropogenic encroachment on natural wetland ecosystems can have direct consequences locally through loss of biodiversity and regionally through increased disaster risks associated with, for example, flooding. We consider two regionally-relevant wetland ecosystems in eastern Africa, namely Zambia's Lukanga Swamps and Tanzania's Kilombero Valley, experiencing varying trajectories of development under climatic variations. These regions have been targeted for inclusive, multi-stakeholder initiatives that aim at developing agricultural potential through combinations of large and small scale irrigation schemes. Through our data-driven analysis we highlight the potential for shifts in hydrologic regime of each wetland ecosystem which can have significant regional impacts on disaster risks. In the case of the Lukanga Swamps, wetlands maintain water table fluctuations that help mitigate water cycling with implications for the downstream flooding impact of annual rains. With regards to Kilombero Valley, understanding seasonal changes in hydrological processes and storages provides the cornerstone for managing future water resource impacts/feedbacks under different scenarios of land management. This work emphasizes the need to tailor strategies towards sustainable uses of wetlands that reduce disaster risks regionally while contributing to improved community health and wellbeing. It remains an open (and fundamental) question of how to best define management recommendations and activities that not only achieve climate resiliency but also are acceptable for stakeholders without compromising the balance between ecosystem service supply and biodiversity conservation.

  14. Highlights and overview of the 2011 National Wetland ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation is for a webinar sponsored by the Society of Wetland Scientists. It is tailored to a technical audience with research interests in wetland ecology and management. The talk will introduce the National Aquatic Resource Surveys and then transition to a discussion of the methods, results, and applications of the National Wetland Condition Assessment. It is tailored The first National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA) was completed in 2011 and the results will be released to the public in 2016. A team of scientists from ORD played a major role in designing the survey, analyzing the data, and reporting on the results of the assessment in cooperation with the Office of Water. The analysis team also developed quantitative national and regional definitions of reference in terms of least disturbed condition. This presentation provides a summary of the major results, examples of their utility to resource management and implications to wetland policy. About 50% of the wetland area nationally was found to be in good biological condition while about 30% was in poor condition. The stressors with the greatest areal extent nationally were vegetation removal, hardening (e.g., roads, paths, extreme soil compaction), and ditching. A relative risk analysis indicated a strong relationship between high levels of nearly all the stressors measured (i.e., vegetation removal, hardening, ditching, damming, filling/erosion, and vegetation replacement) and poor bi

  15. Hurricane storm surge and amphibian communities in coastal wetlands of northwestern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gunzburger, M.S.; Hughes, W.B.; Barichivich, W.J.; Staiger, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Isolated wetlands in the Southeastern United States are dynamic habitats subject to fluctuating environmental conditions. Wetlands located near marine environments are subject to alterations in water chemistry due to storm surge during hurricanes. The objective of our study was to evaluate the effect of storm surge overwash on wetland amphibian communities. Thirty-two wetlands in northwestern Florida were sampled over a 45-month period to assess amphibian species richness and water chemistry. During this study, seven wetlands were overwashed by storm surge from Hurricane Dennis which made landfall 10 July 2005 in the Florida panhandle. This event allowed us to evaluate the effect of storm surge overwash on water chemistry and amphibian communities of the wetlands. Specific conductance across all wetlands was low pre-storm (<100 ??S/cm), but increased post-storm at the overwashed wetlands (x?? = 7,613 ??S/cm). Increased specific conductance was strongly correlated with increases in chloride concentrations. Amphibian species richness showed no correlation with specific conductance. One month post-storm we observed slightly fewer species in overwashed compared with non-overwashed wetlands, but this trend did not continue in 2006. More species were detected across all wetlands pre-storm, but there was no difference between overwashed and non-overwashed wetlands when considering all amphibian species or adult anurans and larval anurans separately. Amphibian species richness did not appear to be correlated with pH or presence of fish although the amphibian community composition differed between wetlands with and without fish. Our results suggest that amphibian communities in wetlands in the southeastern United States adjacent to marine habitats are resistant to the effects of storm surge overwash. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  16. Effects of Energy Dissipation Rate on Islets of Langerhans: Implications for Isolation and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shenkman, Rustin M.; Godoy-Silva, Ruben; Papas, Klearchos K.; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Acute physical stresses can occur in the procurement and isolation process and potentially can contribute to islet death or malfunction upon transplantation. A contractional flow device, previously used to subject suspended cells to well-defined hydrodynamic forces, has been modified and used to assess the vulnerability of porcine islets of Langerhans to hydrodynamic forces. The flow profiles and velocity gradients in this modified device were modeled using commercial CFD software and characterized, as in previous studies, with the scalar parameter, energy dissipation rate (EDR). Porcine islets were stressed in a single pass at various stress levels (i.e., values of EDR). Membrane integrity, oxygen uptake rate, caspase 3/7 activity, and insulin release were not affected by the levels of fluid stress tested up to an EDR of 2 × 103 W/m3. Visual observation of the stressed islets suggested that cells at the islet exterior were peeled away at EDR greater than 10,000 W/m3, however, this observation could not be confirmed using image analysis software, which determined the ratio of surface perimeter to total area. The result of this study suggests an upper limit in fluid stress to which islets can be subjected. Such upper limits assist in the design and operation of future islet processing equipment and processes. PMID:19191351

  17. Isolated scintigraphic abnormality of diffuse slow washout of myocardial thallium-201: Clinical and prognostic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, T.; Maddahi, J.; Garcia, E.; Raymond, M.; Nielsen, J.; Berman, D.

    1985-05-01

    The presence of a diffuse slow washout pattern (DSWP) of T1-201 without perfusion defects (PD) during stress-redistribution (ST-RD) imaging has been demonstrated to occur in some pts with extensive myocardial hypoperfusion that is relatively balanced in severity. Because PD analysis alone could misclassify such pts, the authors studied the clinical and prognostic implications of this unique T1 pattern. Of 3080 consecutive pts who had quantitative ST-RD T1 studies, 36 (1.2%) demonstrated DSWP (delayed clearance from anterior, posterior and inferior myocardium) without any PD. Of 19 patients with coronary angiography (angio), 15 (79%) had CAD and 22 (58%) had 3-vessel (TV) or left-main (LM) disease (D). During followup of 17 +- 12 month, 13/36pts (36%) had 15 major cardiac events: death (2), myocardial infarct (4), coronary bypass (9). In 24 pts exercising to <75% of predicted HR, specificity for CAD and extensive CAD remained high (67% and 50%), and 6/14 (43%) had cardiac events. Patients were compared as to the presence (Grp A-25 pts) or absence (Grp B-11 pts) of at least one other indicator of myocardial ischemia (chest pain, ST depression, hypotension, increased lung uptake of T1) during exercise. Angio in 25 Grp A pts revealed CAD in 14 (93%) and TVD or LMD in 10 (67%). After 16 +- 13 months, 12 of these 25 (48%) had a cardiac event. Three Grp B pts had angio (2 normal, 1 with TVD) and after 20 +- 9 months, 3 (27%) had cardiac events (2 deaths, 1 infarct). The authors conclude that DSWP with a PD is strongly associated with extensive CAD and major cardiac events, especially when accompanied by other markers of ischemia. Importantly, even when exercise is submaximal and does not result in other signs of mycocardial hypoperfusion, this pattern carries an ominous prognosis.

  18. Wetland biogeochemistry and ecological risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Junhong; Huang, Laibin; Gao, Haifeng; Zhang, Guangliang

    2017-02-01

    Wetlands are an important ecotone between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and can provide great ecological service functions. Soils/sediments are one of the important components of wetland ecosystems, which support wetland plants and microorganisms and influence wetland productivity. Moreover, wetland soils/sediments serve as sources, sinks and transfers of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and chemical contaminants such as heavy metals. In natural wetland ecosystems, wetland soils/sediments play a great role in improving water quality as these chemical elements can be retained in wetland soils/sediments for a long time. Moreover, the biogeochemical processes of the abovementioned elements in wetland soils/sediments can drive wetland evolution and development, and their changes will considerably affect wetland ecosystem health. Therefore, a better understanding of wetland soil biogeochemistry will contribute to improving wetland ecological service functions.

  19. Wetlands Mitigation Banking Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    the financial risk associated with are normally established in advance, mitigation permitted activities. banks eliminate the lag time between loss and...management natural state or to an enhanced condition and techniques. None of the traditional wetlands begin to amass bankable credits has also been management

  20. Wetlands, Chapter 17

    Treesearch

    T.L. Greaver; L. Liu; R. Bobbink

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Clean Water Act defines wetlands as "those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances do support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions".

  1. Wading into Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Wading into Wetlands." Contents are organized into the following…

  2. Wading into Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Wading into Wetlands." Contents are organized into the following…

  3. Inland wetland mineral soils

    Treesearch

    Kimberly P. Wickland; Alex V. Krusche; Randall K. Kolka; Ayaka W. Kishimoto-Mo; Rodney A. Chimner; Stephen Ogle; Nalin. Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides supplementary guidance for estimating and reporting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and removals from managed lands with Inland Wetland Mineral Soils (IWMS) for all land-use categories (see Chapter 1 and decision tree in Chapter 1 in this supplement for what is specifically covered in this chapter in relationship to other chapters in this...

  4. 7 CFR 12.33 - Use of wetland and converted wetland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of wetland and converted wetland. 12.33 Section 12.33 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Wetland Conservation § 12.33 Use of wetland and converted wetland. (a) The provisions of § 12.32(b)(2)...

  5. 7 CFR 12.33 - Use of wetland and converted wetland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of wetland and converted wetland. 12.33 Section 12.33 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Wetland Conservation § 12.33 Use of wetland and converted wetland. (a) The provisions of § 12.32(b)(2)...

  6. 7 CFR 12.33 - Use of wetland and converted wetland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of wetland and converted wetland. 12.33 Section 12.33 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Wetland Conservation § 12.33 Use of wetland and converted wetland. (a) The provisions of § 12.32(b)(2)...

  7. 7 CFR 12.33 - Use of wetland and converted wetland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of wetland and converted wetland. 12.33 Section 12.33 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Wetland Conservation § 12.33 Use of wetland and converted wetland. (a) The provisions of § 12.32(b)(2)...

  8. Geographically Isolated Wetlands Research Workshop Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the week of November 18–21, 2013, a team of research scientists from federal, academic, and non-profit research institutions across North America met at the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center in Newton, Georgia to articulate the state of the science, identify...

  9. Geographically Isolated Wetlands Research Workshop Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the week of November 18–21, 2013, a team of research scientists from federal, academic, and non-profit research institutions across North America met at the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center in Newton, Georgia to articulate the state of the science, identify...

  10. A Wetland Camp for Upland Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soniat, Lyle; Duggan, Suzanne

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a workshop to provide an opportunity for north Louisiana teachers to learn firsthand about Louisiana's coastal wetlands. The multidisciplinary sessions focused on coastal wetland ecosystems, covering wetland productivity, the functions and value of wetlands, current wetland issues, water quality, botany, geology, fisheries management,…

  11. A Wetland Camp for Upland Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soniat, Lyle; Duggan, Suzanne

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a workshop to provide an opportunity for north Louisiana teachers to learn firsthand about Louisiana's coastal wetlands. The multidisciplinary sessions focused on coastal wetland ecosystems, covering wetland productivity, the functions and value of wetlands, current wetland issues, water quality, botany, geology, fisheries management,…

  12. Phosphorus Dynamic in Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, H. K.

    2010-12-01

    The projected greater warming at higher/northern latitudes in the coming decades due to global climatic changes can mineralize substantial amount of the organic matter and supply massive amount of phosphorus (P) to the water column, and cause the collapse of freshwater wetlands. Thus, the rates and duration of organic matter accumulations/decompositions under rising global temperatures are critical determinants of how a freshwater wetland functions as an ecological unit within a landscape. Phosphorus is a limiting nutrient and a primary controller of eutrophication. Once the external P loads are curtailed, internal P regeneration, resulting from decompositions of detritus and soil/sediment organic matter determine the productivity, as well as the water quality of a wetland. Thus, global rise in temperature not only causes hydro-climatic fluctuations but can also change the composition of aquatic/semi-aquatic communities, in turn, could lead to adverse effect on human food chain to collapse of the ecosystem. While P enrichment may lead to immediate algal blooms in wetlands/aquatic systems, decreased in P input from external sources may not be able to stop the blooms for a considerable period of time depending on the P loading from within. The extent of P mineralization under changing conditions, enzymatic hydrolysis, and estimation of different P pools using 31P NMR in sediments and the water columns showed that the stability and bioavailability of P can greatly be influenced by rise in temperature and fluctuations in water level, thus, are crucial in determining the fate of the freshwater wetlands.

  13. Providing low-budget estimations of carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in agricultural wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Colin R.; Rebelo, Lisa-Maria; Finlayson, C. Max

    2013-03-01

    The conversion of wetlands to agriculture through drainage and flooding, and the burning of wetland areas for agriculture have important implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) production and changing carbon stocks. However, the estimation of net GHG changes from mitigation practices in agricultural wetlands is complex compared to dryland crops. Agricultural wetlands have more complicated carbon and nitrogen cycles with both above- and below-ground processes and export of carbon via vertical and horizontal movement of water through the wetland. This letter reviews current research methodologies in estimating greenhouse gas production and provides guidance on the provision of robust estimates of carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in agricultural wetlands through the use of low cost reliable and sustainable measurement, modelling and remote sensing applications. The guidance is highly applicable to, and aimed at, wetlands such as those in the tropics and sub-tropics, where complex research infrastructure may not exist, or agricultural wetlands located in remote regions, where frequent visits by monitoring scientists prove difficult. In conclusion, the proposed measurement-modelling approach provides guidance on an affordable solution for mitigation and for investigating the consequences of wetland agricultural practice on GHG production, ecological resilience and possible changes to agricultural yields, variety choice and farming practice.

  14. 2011 Summary: Coastal wetland restoration research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowalski, Kurt P.; Wiley, Michael J.; Wilcox, Douglas A.; Carlson Mazur, Martha L.; Czayka, Alex; Dominguez, Andrea; Doty, Susan; Eggleston, Mike; Green, Sean; Sweetman, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    waters, and maintains productive habitats for birds and other biota.  It will be important to continue to monitor the status of the reconnected wetland to determine the effect of long-term connection to Crane Creek and Lake Erie.  If conditions degrade, periodic management actions involving hydrologic isolation of the rehabilitated coastal wetland could be used to mimic intermediate levels of disturbance and maintain wetland vegetation.

  15. Isolation on the West Florida Shelf with implications for red tides and pollutant dispersal in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Olascoaga, M J

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of year-long drifter trajectories and records of simulated surface Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) have suggested the presence of a resilient Cross-Shelf Transport Barrier (CSTB) on the West Florida Shelf (WFS). The CSTB was conjectured to provide a large degree of isolation, which is consequential for the fueling of red tides on the southern WFS by nutrients possibly released by rivers and canals directly on the region. Here this conjecture is thoroughly tested by identifying LCSs as well as performing tracer advection calculations based on seven-year-long records of surface and subsurface currents produced by a HYbrid-Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) simulation of the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The identified LCSs suggest that the CSTB extends downward in the water column. The tracer calculations suggest that, while the majority of the nutrients possibly released by rivers and canals directly on the southern WFS are retained within the region for long times, only a small fraction of the nutrients possibly released by rivers outside the WFS reach the southern WFS, mainly accompanying shoreward excursions of the CSTB. These results add importance to the role played by the CSTB in controlling red tide development on the WFS. Implications of the results for the dispersal of pollutants, such as oil, in the GoM are discussed.

  16. Isolation on the West Florida Shelf with implications for red tides and pollutant dispersal in the Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Olascoaga, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of year-long drifter trajectories and records of simulated surface Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) have suggested the presence of a resilient Cross-Shelf Transport Barrier (CSTB) on the West Florida Shelf (WFS). The CSTB was conjectured to provide a large degree of isolation, which is consequential for the fueling of red tides on the southern WFS by nutrients possibly released by rivers and canals directly on the region. Here this conjecture is thoroughly tested by identifying LCSs as well as performing tracer advection calculations based on seven-year-long records of surface and subsurface currents produced by a HYbrid-Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) simulation of the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The identified LCSs suggest that the CSTB extends downward in the water column. The tracer calculations suggest that, while the majority of the nutrients possibly released by rivers and canals directly on the southern WFS are retained within the region for long times, only a small fraction of the nutrients possibly released by rivers outside the WFS reach the southern WFS, mainly accompanying shoreward excursions of the CSTB. These results add importance to the role played by the CSTB in controlling red tide development on the WFS. Implications of the results for the dispersal of pollutants, such as oil, in the GoM are discussed. PMID:22287830

  17. Isolation on the West Florida Shelf with implications for red tides and pollutant dispersal in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olascoaga, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of year-long drifter trajectories and records of simulated surface Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) have suggested the presence of a resilient Cross-Shelf Transport Barrier (CSTB) on the West Florida Shelf (WFS). The CSTB was conjectured to provide a large degree of isolation, which is consequential for the fueling of red tides on the southern WFS by nutrients possibly released by rivers and canals directly on the region. Here this conjecture is thoroughly tested by identifying LCSs as well as performing tracer advection calculations based on seven-year-long records of surface and subsurface currents produced by a HYbrid-Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) simulation of the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The identified LCSs suggest that the CSTB extends downward in the water column. The tracer calculations suggest that, while the majority of the nutrients possibly released by rivers and canals directly on the southern WFS are retained within the region for long times, only a small fraction of the nutrients possibly released by rivers outside the WFS reach the southern WFS, mainly accompanying shoreward excursions of the CSTB. These results add importance to the role played by the CSTB in controlling red tide development on the WFS. Implications of the results for the dispersal of pollutants, such as oil, in the GoM are discussed.

  18. Hydrological management for improving nutrient assimilative capacity in plant-dominated wetlands: A modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihao; Yang, Zhifeng; Yin, Xinan; Cai, Yanpeng; Sun, Tao

    2016-07-15

    Wetland eutrophication is a global environmental problem. Besides reducing pollutant emissions, improving nutrient assimilative capacity in wetlands is also significant for preventing eutrophication. Hydrological management can improve nutrient assimilative capacity in wetlands through physical effects on the dilution capacity of water body and ecological effects on wetland nutrient cycles. The ecological effects are significant while were rarely considered in previous research. This study focused on the ecological effects of hydrological management on two crucial nutrient removal processes, plant uptake and biological denitrification, in plant-dominated wetlands. A dual-objective optimization model for hydrological management was developed to improve wetland nitrogen and phosphorus assimilative capacities, using upstream reservoir release as water regulating measure. The model considered the interactions between ecological processes and hydrological cycles in wetlands, and their joint effects on nutrient assimilative capacity. Baiyangdian Wetland, the largest freshwater wetland in northern China, was chosen as a case study. The results found that the annual total assimilative capacity of nitrogen (phosphorus) was 4754 (493) t under the optimal scheme for upstream reservoir operation. The capacity of nutrient removal during the summer season accounted for over 80% of the annual total removal capacity. It was interesting to find that the relationship between water inflow and nutrient assimilative capacity in a plant-dominated wetland satisfied a dose-response relationship commonly describing the response of an organism to an external stressor in the medical field. It illustrates that a plant-dominated wetland shows similar characteristics to an organism. This study offers a useful tool and some fresh implications for future management of wetland eutrophication prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gas exchange in wetlands: Controls and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    This project was directed toward the quantification of fluxes of gaseous biogenic sulfur compounds from freshwater wetlands. These compounds (primarily hydrogen sulfide (H2S), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS)) have been implicated in the regulation of planetary albedo by the formation of microscopic atmospheric aerosols when they oxidize, and the further role of these aerosols as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The role of continental sources and sinks for these compounds is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to quantify the source and sink strength of high latitude wetlands, and to delineate factors that regulate this flux.

  20. Assessing and measuring wetland hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; Hayashi, Masaki; Anderson, James T.; Davis, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Virtually all ecological processes that occur in wetlands are influenced by the water that flows to, from, and within these wetlands. This chapter provides the “how-to” information for quantifying the various source and loss terms associated with wetland hydrology. The chapter is organized from a water-budget perspective, with sections associated with each of the water-budget components that are common in most wetland settings. Methods for quantifying the water contained within the wetland are presented first, followed by discussion of each separate component. Measurement accuracy and sources of error are discussed for each of the methods presented, and a separate section discusses the cumulative error associated with determining a water budget for a wetland. Exercises and field activities will provide hands-on experience that will facilitate greater understanding of these processes.

  1. Mitigation bank promotes research on restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands (South Carolina).

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Christopher D.; DeSteven, Diane; Kilgo, John C.

    2004-12-31

    Barton, Christopher, D., Diane DeSteven and John C. Kilgo. 2004. Mitigation bank promotes research on restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands (South Carolina). Ecol. Rest. 22(4):291-292. Abstract: Carolina bays and smaller depression wetlands support diverse plant communities and provide critical habitat for semi-aquatic fauna throughout the Coastal Plain region of the southeastern United States. Historically, many depression wetlands were altered or destroyed by surface ditching, drainage, and agricultural or silviculture uses. These important habitats are now at further risk of alteration and loss following a U.S. Supreme Court decision in 2001 restricting federal regulation of isolated wetlands. Thus, there is increased attention towards protecting intact sites and developing methods to restore others. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) 312-mi2 (800-km2) Savannah River Site (SRS) in west-central South Carolina includes about 350 Carolina bays and bay-like wetland depressions, of which about two-thirds were degraded or destroyed prior to federal acquisition of the land. Although some of the altered wetlands have recovered naturally, others still have active active drainage ditches and contain successional forests typical of drained sites. In 1997, DOE established a wetland mitigation bank to compensate for unavoidable wetland impacts on the SRS. This effort provided an opportunity fir a systematic research program to investigate wetland restoration techniques and ecological responses. Consequently, research and management staffs from the USDA Forest Service, Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation, the Savannah River Technology Center, the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) and several universities developed a collaborative project to restore degraded depression wetlands on the SRS. The mitigation project seeks cost-effective methods to restore the hydrology and vegetation typical of natural depression wetlands, and so enhance habitats for wetland

  2. Ebullitive methane emissions from oxygenated wetland streams.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John T; Stanley, Emily H; Spawn, Seth A; Finlay, Jacques C; Loken, Luke C; Striegl, Robert G

    2014-11-01

    Stream and river carbon dioxide emissions are an important component of the global carbon cycle. Methane emissions from streams could also contribute to regional or global greenhouse gas cycling, but there are relatively few data regarding stream and river methane emissions. Furthermore, the available data do not typically include the ebullitive (bubble-mediated) pathway, instead focusing on emission of dissolved methane by diffusion or convection. Here, we show the importance of ebullitive methane emissions from small streams in the regional greenhouse gas balance of a lake and wetland-dominated landscape in temperate North America and identify the origin of the methane emitted from these well-oxygenated streams. Stream methane flux densities from this landscape tended to exceed those of nearby wetland diffusive fluxes as well as average global wetland ebullitive fluxes. Total stream ebullitive methane flux at the regional scale (103 Mg C yr(-1) ; over 6400 km(2) ) was of the same magnitude as diffusive methane flux previously documented at the same scale. Organic-rich stream sediments had the highest rates of bubble release and higher enrichment of methane in bubbles, but glacial sand sediments also exhibited high bubble emissions relative to other studied environments. Our results from a database of groundwater chemistry support the hypothesis that methane in bubbles is produced in anoxic near-stream sediment porewaters, and not in deeper, oxygenated groundwaters. Methane interacts with other key elemental cycles such as nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur, which has implications for ecosystem changes such as drought and increased nutrient loading. Our results support the contention that streams, particularly those draining wetland landscapes of the northern hemisphere, are an important component of the global methane cycle.

  3. Ebullitive methane emissions from oxygenated wetland streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, John T.; Stanley, Emily H.; Spawn, Seth A.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Stream and river carbon dioxide emissions are an important component of the global carbon cycle. Methane emissions from streams could also contribute to regional or global greenhouse gas cycling, but there are relatively few data regarding stream and river methane emissions. Furthermore, the available data do not typically include the ebullitive (bubble-mediated) pathway, instead focusing on emission of dissolved methane by diffusion or convection. Here, we show the importance of ebullitive methane emissions from small streams in the regional greenhouse gas balance of a lake and wetland-dominated landscape in temperate North America and identify the origin of the methane emitted from these well-oxygenated streams. Stream methane flux densities from this landscape tended to exceed those of nearby wetland diffusive fluxes as well as average global wetland ebullitive fluxes. Total stream ebullitive methane flux at the regional scale (103 Mg C yr−1; over 6400 km2) was of the same magnitude as diffusive methane flux previously documented at the same scale. Organic-rich stream sediments had the highest rates of bubble release and higher enrichment of methane in bubbles, but glacial sand sediments also exhibited high bubble emissions relative to other studied environments. Our results from a database of groundwater chemistry support the hypothesis that methane in bubbles is produced in anoxic near-stream sediment porewaters, and not in deeper, oxygenated groundwaters. Methane interacts with other key elemental cycles such as nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur, which has implications for ecosystem changes such as drought and increased nutrient loading. Our results support the contention that streams, particularly those draining wetland landscapes of the northern hemisphere, are an important component of the global methane cycle.

  4. USDA Forest Service wetlands research

    SciTech Connect

    Bartuska, A.M. )

    1993-05-01

    Wetland and riparian systems play a major role in flood control, water quality, and food chain support. Timber production, fisheries, and recreation vie economically as primary uses of forested wetlands. This article reviews current Forest Service research in the Intermountain Region, North Central Region, Northeast Region, Pacific Northwest Region, Rocky Mountain Region, and Southern Region. Future research areas are discussed: ecosystem processes, restoration and rehabilitation, management of the wetland resource, socioeconomic values, and landscape-scale links. 8 refs.

  5. Importance of Macrophyte Quality in Determining Life-History Traits of the Apple Snails Pomacea canaliculata: Implications for Bottom-Up Management of an Invasive Herbivorous Pest in Constructed Wetlands.

    PubMed

    Yam, Rita S W; Fan, Yen-Tzu; Wang, Tzu-Ting

    2016-02-24

    Pomacea canaliculata (Ampullariidae) has extensively invaded most Asian constructed wetlands and its massive herbivory of macrophytes has become a major cause of ecosystem dysfunctioning of these restored habitats. We conducted non-choice laboratory feeding experiments of P. canaliculata using five common macrophyte species in constructed wetlands including Ipomoea aquatica, Commelina communis, Nymphoides coreana, Acorus calamus and Phragmites australis. Effects of macrophytes on snail feeding, growth and fecundity responses were evaluated. Results indicated that P. canaliculata reared on Ipomoea had the highest feeding and growth rates with highest reproductive output, but all individuals fed with Phragmites showed lowest feeding rates and little growth with poorest reproductive output. Plant N and P contents were important for enhancing palatability, supporting growth and offspring quantity of P. canaliculata, whilst toughness, cellulose and phenolics had critically deterrent effects on various life-history traits. Although snail offspring quality was generally consistent regardless of maternal feeding conditions, the reduced growth and offspring quantity of the poorly-fed snails in constructed wetlands dominated by the less-palatable macrophytes could limit the invasive success of P. canaliculata. Effective bottom-up control of P. canaliculata in constructed wetlands should involve selective planting strategy using macrophytes with low nutrient and high toughness, cellulose and phenolic contents.

  6. Importance of Macrophyte Quality in Determining Life-History Traits of the Apple Snails Pomacea canaliculata: Implications for Bottom-Up Management of an Invasive Herbivorous Pest in Constructed Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Rita S. W.; Fan, Yen-Tzu; Wang, Tzu-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Pomacea canaliculata (Ampullariidae) has extensively invaded most Asian constructed wetlands and its massive herbivory of macrophytes has become a major cause of ecosystem dysfunctioning of these restored habitats. We conducted non-choice laboratory feeding experiments of P. canaliculata using five common macrophyte species in constructed wetlands including Ipomoea aquatica, Commelina communis, Nymphoides coreana, Acorus calamus and Phragmites australis. Effects of macrophytes on snail feeding, growth and fecundity responses were evaluated. Results indicated that P. canaliculata reared on Ipomoea had the highest feeding and growth rates with highest reproductive output, but all individuals fed with Phragmites showed lowest feeding rates and little growth with poorest reproductive output. Plant N and P contents were important for enhancing palatability, supporting growth and offspring quantity of P. canaliculata, whilst toughness, cellulose and phenolics had critically deterrent effects on various life-history traits. Although snail offspring quality was generally consistent regardless of maternal feeding conditions, the reduced