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Sample records for isolation phylogenetic analysis

  1. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of feline calicivirus isolates in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaxin; Deng, Mingliang; Peng, Zhong; Hu, Ruiming; Chen, Huanchun; Wu, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of Chinese feline calicivirus (FCV) isolates and their phylogenetic relationship with isolates from elsewhere in the world. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on the partial open reading frame (ORF) 2 sequences (regions B-F) of 21 Chinese FCV isolates and 30 global isolates. The Chinese isolates included 13 isolates from Wuhan, which were isolated in this study, and eight previously published isolates. Sixteen Chinese isolates and two Japanese isolates formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster. Phylogenetic analysis based on the sequences of the complete genome, ORF1, ORF2 and ORF3 of selected isolates supported the above findings. Genogroup analysis revealed that FCV genogroup II is present in China. These findings suggest that Chinese FCV isolates are closely related to Japanese FCV isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Isolates from Florida

    PubMed Central

    White, Gregory S.; Pickett, Brett E.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Johnson, Amelia G.; Ottendorfer, Christy; Stark, Lillian M.; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Florida has the highest degree of endemicity for eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) of any state in the United States and is the only state with year-round transmission of EEEV. To further understand the viral population dynamics in Florida, the genome sequence of six EEEV isolates from central Florida were determined. These data were used to identify the most polymorphic regions of the EEEV genome from viruses isolated in Florida. The sequence of these polymorphic regions was then determined for 18 additional Florida isolates collected in four geographically distinct regions over a 20-year period. Phylogenetic analyses of these data suggested a rough temporal association of the Florida isolates, but no clustering by region or by source of the isolate. Some clustering of northeastern isolates with Florida isolates was seen, providing support for the hypothesis that Florida serves as a reservoir for the periodic introduction of EEEV into the northeastern United States. PMID:21540379

  3. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis of Acanthamoeba isolates associated with keratitis.

    PubMed

    Risler, Arnaud; Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Pélandakis, Michel

    2013-11-01

    We examined a partial SSU-rDNA sequence from 20 Acanthamoeba isolates associated with keratitis infections. The phylogenetic tree inferred from this partial sequence allowed to assign isolates to genotypes. Among the 20 isolates examined, 16 were found to be of the T4 genotype, 2 were T3, 1 was a T5, and 1 was a T2, confirming the predominance of T4 in infections. However, the study highlighted other genotypes more rarely associated with infections, particularly the T2 genotype. Our study is the second one to detect that this genotype is associated with keratitis. Additionally, the phylogenetic analyses showed five main emerging clusters, T4/T3/T11, T2/T6, T10/T12/T14, T13/T16, and T7/T8/T9/T17, regularly obtained whichever method was used. A similar branching pattern was found when the full rDNA sequence was investigated.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of Wheat dwarf virus isolates from Iran.

    PubMed

    Parizipour, Mohamad Hamed Ghodoum; Schubert, Jörg; Behjatnia, Seyed Ali Akbar; Afsharifar, Alireza; Habekuß, Antje; Wu, Beilei

    2017-04-01

    Wheat dwarf virus (WDV) adversely affects cereal production in Asia, Europe, and North Africa. In this study, sequences of several WDV isolates from Iran which is located in the Fertile Crescent were analyzed. Analysis revealed a new geographic cluster for WDV-Wheat from Iran. Recombination analysis demonstrated the existence of several breakpoints in different regions of the viral genome. Data analysis demonstrated that WDV-Barley has an older history and lower diversity than WDV-Wheat. Sequence analysis identified a rare occasion of a co-infection of wheat with WDV-Wheat and WDV-Barley.

  5. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis of Pneumocystis jirovecii isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rashmi; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Guleria, Randeep; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Samantaray, Jyotish Chandra; Kumar, Lalit; Kabra, Sushil Kumar; Luthra, Kalpana; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla

    2010-08-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is the cause of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immuno-compromised individuals. The aim of this study was to describe the genotypes/haplotypes of P. jirovecii in immuno-compromised individuals with positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) result for PCP. The typing was based on sequence polymorphism at internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rRNA operon. Phylogenetic relationship between Indian and global haplotypes was also studied. Between January 2005 to October 2008, 43 patients were found to be positive for Pneumocystis using PCR targeting mitochondrial large subunit rRNA (mt LSU rRNA) and ITS region. Genotyping of all the positive samples was performed at the ITS locus by direct sequencing. Nine ITS1 alleles (all previously known) and 11 ITS2 alleles (nine previously defined and two new) were observed. A total of 19 ITS haplotypes, including five novel haplotypes (DEL1r, Edel2, Hr, Adel3 and SYD1a), were observed. The most prevalent type was SYD1g (16.3%), followed by types Ea (11.6%), Ec (9.3%), Eg (6.9%), DEL1r (6.9%), Ne (6.9%) and Ai (6.9%). To detect mixed infection, 30% of the positive isolates were cloned and 4-5 clones were sequenced from each specimen. Cloning and sequencing identified two more haplotypes in addition to the 19 types. Mixed infection was identified in 3 of the 13 cloned samples (23.1%). Upon construction of a haplotype network of 21 haplotypes, type Eg was identified as the most probable ancestral type. The present study is the first study that describes the haplotypes of P. jirovecii based on the ITS gene from India. The study suggests a high diversity of P. jirovecii haplotypes in the population.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of classical swine fever virus isolates from Peru.

    PubMed

    Araínga, M; Hisanaga, T; Hills, K; Handel, K; Rivera, H; Pasick, J

    2010-08-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is considered to be endemic in Peru with outbreaks reported to the World Organization for Animal Health as recently as 2008 and 2009. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the genetic subgroup(s) of CSF virus that are circulating in Peru or their relationship to recent CSF viruses that have been isolated from neighbouring South American countries or other parts of the world. In this study, we molecularly characterize CSF viruses that were isolated from domestic pigs from different regions of Peru from the middle of 2007 to early 2008. All virus isolates were found to belong to genetic subgroup 1.1, consistent with the subgroup of viruses that have been identified from other South American countries. Although the Peruvian isolates are most closely related to viruses from Colombia and Brazil, they form a monophyletic clade, which suggests they have a distinct evolutionary history.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of Mexican Babesia bovis isolates using msa and ssrRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Genis, Alma D; Mosqueda, Juan J; Borgonio, Verónica M; Falcón, Alfonso; Alvarez, Antonio; Camacho, Minerva; de Lourdes Muñoz, Maria; Figueroa, Julio V

    2008-12-01

    Variable merozoite surface antigens of Babesia bovis are exposed glycoproteins having a role in erythrocyte invasion. Members of this gene family include msa-1 and msa-2 (msa-2c, msa-2a(1), msa-2a(2), and msa-2b). Small subunit ribosomal (ssr)RNA gene is subject to evolutive pressure and has been used in phylogenetic studies. To determine the phylogenetic relationship among B. bovis Mexican isolates using different genetic markers, PCR amplicons, corresponding to msa-1, msa-2c, msa-2b, and ssrRNA genes, were cloned and plasmids carrying the corresponding inserts were sequenced. Comparative analysis of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences revealed distinct degrees of variability and identity among the coding gene sequences obtained from 12 geographically different B. bovis isolates and a reference strain. Overall sequence identities of 47.7%, 72.3%, 87.7%, and 94% were determined for msa-1, msa-2b, msa-2c, and ssrRNA, respectively. A robust phylogenetic tree was obtained with msa-2b sequences. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that Mexican B. bovis isolates group in clades not concordant with the Mexican geography. However, the Mexican isolates group together in an American clade separated from the Australian clade. Sequence heterogeneity in msa-1, msa-2b, and msa-2c coding regions of Mexican B. bovis isolates present in different geographical regions can be a result of either differential evolutive pressure or cattle movement from commercial trade.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Porphyromonas species isolated from the oral cavity of Australian marsupials.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Deirdre; Milinovich, Gabriel J; Burrell, Paul C; Huynh, Sharnan C; Pettett, Lyndall M; Blackall, Linda L; Trott, Darren J; Bird, Philip S

    2008-09-01

    Porphyromonas species are frequently isolated from the oral cavity and are associated with periodontal disease in both animals and humans. Black, pigmented Porphyromonas spp. isolated from the gingival margins of selected wild and captive Australian marsupials with varying degrees of periodontal disease (brushtail possums, koalas and macropods) were compared phylogenetically to Porphyromonas strains from non-marsupials (bear, wolf, coyote, cats and dogs) and Porphyromonas gingivalis strains from humans using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The results of the phylogenetic analysis identified three distinct groups of strains. A monophyletic P. gingivalis group (Group 1) contained only strains isolated from humans and a Porphyromonas gulae group (Group 2) was divided into three distinct subclades, each containing both marsupial and non-marsupial strains. Group 3, which contained only marsupial strains, including all six strains isolated from captive koalas, was genetically distinct from P. gulae and may constitute a new Porphyromonas species.

  9. Full-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of four neurovirulent Mexican isolates of porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Barrera, Ali A; Del Valle, Alberto; Montaño-Hirose, Juan A; Barrón, Blanca Lilia; Salinas-Trujano, Juana; Torres-Flores, Jesus

    2017-02-09

    We report the complete genome sequences of four neurovirulent isolates of porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) from 2015 and one historical PorPV isolate from 1984 obtained by next-generation sequencing. A phylogenetic tree constructed using the individual sequences of the complete HN genes of the 2015 isolates and other historical sequences deposited in the GenBank database revealed that several recent neurovirulent isolates of PorPV (2008-2015) cluster together in a separate clade. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome sequences revealed that the neurovirulent strains of PorPV that circulated in Mexico during 2015 are genetically different from the PorPV strains that circulated during the 1980s.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 isolated from Cuban individuals.

    PubMed

    Machado, Liuber Y; Díaz, Héctor M; Noa, Enrique; Martín, Dayamí; Blanco, Madeline; Díaz, Dervel F; Sánchez, Yordank R; Nibot, Carmen; Sánchez, Lourdes; Dubed, Marta

    2014-08-01

    The presence of infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) in Cuba has been previously documented. However, genetic information on the strains that circulate in the Cuban people is still unknown. The present work constitutes the first study concerning the phylogenetic relationship of HIV-2 Cuban isolates conducted on 13 Cuban patients who were diagnosed with HIV-2. The env sequences were analyzed for the construction of a phylogenetic tree with reference sequences of HIV-2. Phylogenetic analysis of the env gene showed that all the Cuban sequences clustered in group A of HIV-2. The analysis indicated several independent introductions of HIV-2 into Cuba. The results of the study will reinforce the program on the epidemiological surveillance of the infection in Cuba and make possible further molecular evolutionary studies.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis and antimicrobial activities of Streptomyces isolates from mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Satheeja, Santhi V; Jebakumar, Solomon R D

    2011-02-01

    The phylogeny of members of Streptomyces bacteria isolated from mangrove sediments in the Manakudi estuary near the Arabian Sea, India, was analyzed in the present study. Among the 35 different isolates, five organisms, JS-9, JS-11, JS-12, JS-13 and JS-20, exhibited potent antimicrobial effects against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (clinical isolate) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus MTCC 3160 and Salmonella typhi MTCC 733; all other isolates displayed intermediate antimicrobial effects. RFLP analysis of HaeIII and BstUI double-digested 16S rRNA gene fragments of the isolates were distinguished into 20 distinct RFLP types, with the genetic similarity coefficient varying from 0.57 to 0.97. On average, 17 RFLP markers were observed from approximately 50 to 350 bp size and all the RFLP types showed significant genetic polymorphism by clustering into three major clusters. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the 20-member Streptomyces isolates were divided into three major clusters and they shared 97.2-99.8% sequence identity to the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the Streptomyces taxons of marine origin. The distribution of the isolates revealed that the distinct Streptomyces groups were clustered in the phylogenetic tree and there was a good correlation between the diversity of the antimicrobial phenotype and that of the 16S rRNA gene.

  12. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolates in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Goga, Izedin; Berxholi, Kristaq; Hulaj, Beqe; Sylejmani, Driton; Yakobson, Boris; Stram, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    Three serum samples positive in Antigen ELISA BVDV have been tested to characterise genetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in Kosovo. Samples were obtained in 2011 from heifers and were amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, sequenced and analysed by computer-assisted phylogenetic analysis. Amplified products and nucleotide sequence showed that all 3 isolates belonged to BVDV 1 genotype and 1b sub genotype. These results enrich the extant knowledge of BVDV and represent the first documented data about Kosovo BVDV isolates.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of Newcastle disease viruses isolated from commercial poultry in Mozambique (2011-2016).

    PubMed

    Mapaco, Lourenço P; Monjane, Iolanda V A; Nhamusso, Antonieta E; Viljoen, Gerrit J; Dundon, William G; Achá, Sara J

    2016-10-01

    The complete sequence of the fusion (F) protein gene from 11 Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) isolated from commercial poultry in Mozambique between 2011 and 2016 has been generated. The F gene cleavage site motif for all 11 isolates was (112)RRRKRF(117) indicating that the viruses are virulent. A phylogenetic analysis using the full F gene sequence revealed that the viruses clustered within genotype VIIh and showed a higher similarity to NDVs from South Africa, China and Southeast Asia than to viruses previously described in Mozambique in 1994, 1995 and 2005. The identification of these new NDVs has important implications for Newcastle disease management and control in Mozambique.

  14. Molecular epidemiology and phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus type-1 and 2 isolated in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Muhd Hasyim; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur; Hussin, Salasawati

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Detection of different serotypes of dengue virus and provide information on origin, distribution and genotype of the virus. Methods: Dengue virus serotypes identified as DEN-1 and DEN-2 were amplified and sequenced with E gene. The consensus sequences were aligned with references E gene sequences of globally available GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-joining and Kimura 2-parameter model to construct phylogenetic tree. Results: A total of 53 dengue virus isolates were positive, of which 38 (71.7%) were DENV-1 and 15 (28.3%) were DENV-2. Phylogenetic tree of DENV-1 and DENV-2 showed that the isolates were clustered in genotype I and cosmopolitan genotype, respectively considered the predominant genotypes in Southeast Asian countries. The molecular epidemiology genotype I DENV-1 and cosmopolitan genotype DENV-2 have been co-circulating in Klang Valley areas, Malaysia without shifting of genotype. Conclusion: The study reveals that DENV-1 and DENV-2 have been circulating in Malaysia. The isolates are clustered in genotype 1 and cosmopolitian genotype, respectively. The study results would help in planning for prevention and control of dengue virus in Malaysia. PMID:26150855

  15. Genotyping and Phylogenetic Analysis of Giardia duodenalis Isolates from Turkish Children

    PubMed Central

    Tamer, Gulden Sonmez; Kasap, Murat; Er, Doganhan Kadir

    2015-01-01

    Background Giardiasis is caused by the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis (synonyms: G. lamblia, G. intestinalis), which is one of the most frequent parasites that infect Turkish children. However, molecular characterization of G. duodenalis in Turkey is relatively scarce. The present work aimed at genotyping G. duodenalis isolates from Turkey using molecular techniques. Material/Methods In the present study, 145 fecal samples from children were collected to search for the presence of Giardia by microscopy and PCR screening. PCR generated a 384 bp fragment for β-giardin. The PCR products were sequenced and the sequences were subjected to phylogenetic analysis by using PHYLIP. Results Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the sequences, assemblage A, B, and mixed subtypes were determined. Of 22 isolates, 11 were identified as assemblage A (50%), 7 were assemblage B (31.8%), and 4 were assemblage AB (18.2%). Association between G. duodenalis assemblages and the epidemiological data was analyzed. No correlation was found between symptoms and infection with specific assemblages (P>0.05), but we found statistically significant association between age and the assemblage AB (P=0.001). Conclusions The association between G. duodenalis and the epidemiologic data were analyzed. Since assemblage A is the more prevalent subgroup compared with assemblage B, this subgroup might be responsible for common Giardia infections in Turkey. This is the first study that included a detailed phylogenetic analysis of Giardia strains from Turkey. PMID:25689970

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of Newcastle disease virus isolates occurring in India during 1989-2013.

    PubMed

    Desingu, P A; Singh, S D; Dhama, K; Karthik, K; Vinodh Kumar, O R; Malik, Y S

    2016-06-01

    The study details characterization of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates recovered from commercial poultry flocks (chicken) and wild birds (crane) of India during the time period from 1989 to 2013. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the NDV isolates belongs to class II, genotype XIIIa and a chicken isolate (108/BAREILLY/AD-IVRI/91) was of genotype VI, where it showed diversity of 3 % from the other viruses belonging to same genotype. Another chicken isolate (75/RAMPUR/AD-IVRI/89) grouped in genotype III and showed 4 % diversity with viruses of genotype III. The crane origin NDV identified as of genotype II corresponding to the vaccine virus. This appears to be the first report about existence of genotype XIIIa and its ancestral viruses are circulating in India for the last two decades in different species of birds. Furthermore, genetically distinct viruses belonging to genotypes II, III and VI are also circulating in India.

  17. Identification, phylogenetic evolutionary analysis of GDQY orf virus isolated from Qingyuan City, Guangdong Province, southern China.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chaohui; Liao, Meiying; Wang, Han; Luo, Xiaohong; Shao, Jing; Xu, Ying; Li, Wei; Hao, Wenbo; Luo, Shuhong

    2015-01-25

    Infection with the orf virus (ORFV) leads to contagious ecthyma, also called contagious pustular dermatitis, which usually affects sheep, goats and other small ruminants. It has a great distribution throughout the world and has also been reported to infect humans. Though many strains have been isolated from differing parts of mainland China, rarely has any strain been reported from the southern provinces of China. We studied a case of orf virus infection that occurred at Qingyuan City, Guangdong Province in southern China. An orf virus strain, GDQY, was successfully isolated and identified through cell culture techniques and transmission electron microscopy. Complete genes of ORFV011, ORFV059, ORFV106 and ORFV107 were amplified for the sequence analysis based on their nucleotide or amino acid level. In order to discuss the genetic variation, precise sequences were used to compare to other reference strains isolated from different districts or countries. Phylogenetic trees based on those strains were built up and evolutionary distances were calculated based on the alignment of their complete sequences. The typical structure of the orf virus was observed in cell-culture suspensions inoculated with GDQY, and the full-length of four genes was amplified and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that GDQY is homologous to FJ-DS and CQ/WZ on ORFV011 nucleotides. ORFV059 may be more variable than ORFV011 based on the comparison between GDQY and other isolates. Genetic studies of ORFV106 and 107 are reported for the first time in the presented study.

  18. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Varicella-zoster virus strains isolated from Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Ho; Jeon, Jeong Seon; Kim, In Kyo; Park, Ji Seon; Park, Hosun; Shin, Ok Sarah; Lee, Chan Hee

    2017-08-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a causative agent of chickenpox in primary infection and shingles after its reactivation from latency. Complete or almost-complete genomic DNA sequences for various VZV strains have been reported. Recently, clinical VZV strains were isolated from Korean patients whose genome was sequenced using high-throughput sequencing technology. In this study, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of VZV strains to genetically characterize Korean clinical isolates. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that three Korean strains, YC01, YC02, and YC03, were linked to clade 2. Comprehensive SNP analysis identified 86 sites specific for the 5 VZV clades. VZV strains isolated from Korea did not form a phylogenetic cluster. Rather, YC02 and YC03 clustered strongly with Chinese strain 84-7 within clade 2, more specifically cluster 2a. Signature sequences for the cluster 2a were identified and found to play an important role in the separation of cluster 2a strains from other clade 2 strains, as shown in substitution studies. Further genetic analysis with additional strains isolated from Japan, China, and other Asian countries would provide a novel insight into the significance of two distinct subclades within clade 2.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of Indian rabies virus isolates targeting the complete glycoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Susan; Singh, Rajendra; Singh, K P; Manjunatha Reddy, G B; Anjaneya; Ravi Kumar, G V P P S; Sumithra, T G; Singh, R P

    2015-12-01

    Rabies a fatal viral zoonosis is endemic in India. There is no report on phylogenetic study of Indian rabies virus isolates based on the complete G gene. In the present study, a total of 25 rabies positive brain samples collected during 2001-2014 from North India (UP, MP, Delhi, Rajasthan), South India (Kerala and Karnataka) and Gujarat states belonging to six different host species were subjected to G gene amplification by RT-PCR as three overlapping fragments of 881 bp, 991 bp and 618 bp. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all Indian rabies virus isolates are genetically closely related with Arctic-like 1a lineage viruses. However, two distinct clusters were identified namely, India South and India North. All the Indian rabies isolates had 95.5-100% homology related to geography, but not to host species. Deduced amino acids on comparison revealed two amino acid changes, aa 356 in ECTO; N→K and aa 458; M→I, which were found to distinguish between the India South and India North isolates.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the NS5 gene of dengue viruses isolated in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Regato, Mary; Recarey, Ricardo; Moratorio, Gonzalo; de Mora, Domenica; Garcia-Aguirre, Laura; Gónzalez, Manuel; Mosquera, Carlos; Alava, Aracely; Fajardo, Alvaro; Alvarez, Macarena; D' Andrea, Lucia; Dubra, Ana; Martínez, Mariela; Khan, Baldip; Cristina, Juan

    2008-03-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae. DENV causes a wide range of diseases in humans, from the acute febrile illness dengue fever (DF) to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). There is not knowledge of the genetic relations among DENV circulating in Ecuador. Given the emerging behaviour of DENV, a single tube RT-PCR assay using a pair of consensus primers to target the NS5 coding region has been recently validated for rapid detection of flaviviruses. In order to gain insight into the degree of genetic variation of DENV strains isolated in Ecuador, DENV NS5 sequences from 23 patients were obtained by direct sequencing of PCR fragments using the mentioned one step RT-PCR assay. Phylogenetic analysis carried out using the 23 Ecuadorian DENV NS5 sequences, as well as 56 comparable sequences from DENV strains isolated elsewhere, revealed a close genetic relation among Ecuadorian strains and DENV isolates of Caribbean origin. The use of partial NS5 gene sequences may represent a useful alternative for a rapid phylogenetic analysis of DENV outbreaks.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of rabies virus isolated from canids in North and Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Débora Nunes; Carnieli, Pedro; Macedo, Carla Isabel; de Novaes Oliveira, Rafael; de Carvalho Ruthner Batista, Helena Beatriz; Rodrigues, Adriana Candido; Pereira, Patricia Mariano Cruz; Achkar, Samira Maria; Vieira, Luiz Fernando Pereira; Kawai, Juliana Galera Castilho

    2017-01-01

    Cases of canine rabies continue to occur in North and Northeast Brazil, and the number of notifications of rabies cases in wild canids has increased as a result of the expansion of urban areas at the expense of areas with native vegetation. In light of this, we performed molecular characterization of rabies virus isolates from dogs and Cerdocyon thous from various states in North and Northeast Brazil. In all, 102 samples from dogs (n = 56) and Cerdocyon thous (n = 46) collected between 2006 and 2012 were used. The nucleotide sequences obtained for the N gene of rabies virus were analyzed, and phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of two distinct genetic lineages, one associated with canids and one with bats, and, within the canid cluster, two distinct sublineages circulating among dogs and Cerdocyon thous. In addition, phylogenetic groups associated with geographic region and fourteen cases of interspecific infection were observed among the isolates from canids. Our findings show that analysis of rabies virus lineages isolated from reservoirs such as canids must be constantly evaluated because the mutation rate is high.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of Escherichia coli isolated from broilers with colibacillosis based on gyrA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Hamid; Mardani, Karim; Ownagh, Abdolghaffar

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates from chickens with colibacillosis were assigned to phylogenetic groups based on multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and antibacterial resistance of E. coli belonging to these groups was examined. Furthermore, the gyrA gene of isolates was sequenced and a phylogenetic tree was generated. A total of 84 E. coli isolates were grouped using multiplex PCR of TSPE4.C2, chuA, yjaA, and gadA molecular markers. Four phylogenetic groups were identified with strains divided as follows: 16 in group A (19.05%), 17 in group B1 (20.24%), 23 in group B2 (27.38%), and 28 in group D (33.33%). Escherichia coli isolates belonging to phylogenetic groups B2 and D were resistant to Soltrim and Flumequine unlike the majority of E. coli isolates that belonged to groups A and B1, and which were susceptible to these antibiotics. The phylogenetic results based on gyrA gene sequences from multiplex PCR revealed that E. coli phylogenetic grouping was in accordance with the clusters obtained in the phylogenetic tree. In conclusion, the comparative sequence analysis of gyrA sequences provides a firm framework for an accurate classification of E. coli and related taxa and may constitute a pertinent phylogenetic marker for E. coli.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of Gansu sheeppox virus isolates based on P32, GPCR, and RPO30 genes.

    PubMed

    Su, H L; Jia, H J; Yin, C; Jing, Z Z; Luo, X N; Chen, Y X

    2015-03-13

    Two outbreaks of sheeppox in sheep have occurred in Gansu Province, China. The P32, GPCR, and RPO30 genes were used as markers for differential diagnosis. We confirmed that the outbreaks were caused by sheeppox virus. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the P32, GPCR, and RPO30 genes revealed a close relationship between the 2 isolates and Chinese sheeppox viruses. Because ill sheep were imported from Jingyuan, another county of Gansu Province, our results strongly suggest the importance of veterinary surveillance prior to transportation.

  4. Whole genome sequence phylogenetic analysis of four Mexican rabies viruses isolated from cattle.

    PubMed

    Bárcenas-Reyes, I; Loza-Rubio, E; Cantó-Alarcón, G J; Luna-Cozar, J; Enríquez-Vázquez, A; Barrón-Rodríguez, R J; Milián-Suazo, F

    2017-08-04

    Phylogenetic analysis of the rabies virus in molecular epidemiology has been traditionally performed on partial sequences of the genome, such as the N, G, and P genes; however, that approach raises concerns about the discriminatory power compared to whole genome sequencing. In this study we characterized four strains of the rabies virus isolated from cattle in Querétaro, Mexico by comparing the whole genome sequence to that of strains from the American, European and Asian continents. Four cattle brain samples positive to rabies and characterized as AgV11, genotype 1, were used in the study. A cDNA sequence was generated by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) using oligo dT. cDNA samples were sequenced in an Illumina NextSeq 500 platform. The phylogenetic analysis was performed with MEGA 6.0. Minimum evolution phylogenetic trees were constructed with the Neighbor-Joining method and bootstrapped with 1000 replicates. Three large and seven small clusters were formed with the 26 sequences used. The largest cluster grouped strains from different species in South America: Brazil, and the French Guyana. The second cluster grouped five strains from Mexico. A Mexican strain reported in a different study was highly related to our four strains, suggesting common source of infection. The phylogenetic analysis shows that the type of host is different for the different regions in the American Continent; rabies is more related to bats. It was concluded that the rabies virus in central Mexico is genetically stable and that it is transmitted by the vampire bat Desmodus rotundus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a Cunninghamella bertholletiae isolate from a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Bragulat, M Rosa; Castellá, Gemma; Isidoro-Ayza, Marcos; Domingo, Mariano; Cabañes, F Javier

    2017-07-18

    Cunninghamella is a genus of the order Mucorales which includes saprophytic species, rarely causing mycoses. The most frequently reported in human mycoses is the thermophilic species Cunninghamella bertholletiae. However, this species does not appear to cause mucormycosis in animals, so there is scarce information about C. bertholletiae isolates from animals. In this paper we describe the phenotypic and genotypic characterization, and the phylogenetic analysis, of an isolate of C. bertholletiae involved in a central nervous system mucormycosis in a dolphin. The isolate studied in this publication was characterized using the current morphological and physiological identification system for Cunninghamella species. DNA sequencing and analysis of the D1/D2 regions of the 26S rRNA gene and the ITS-5.8S rRNA gene sequences were also performed. Colonies were fast-growing, white at first, although they became tannish-gray, covering the whole plate after 7 days of incubation at 30 and 40°C. Limited growth was observed after 7 days at 45°C. The micromorphology showed characteristic erect sporangiophores. The identification of the isolate was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the D1/D2 regions of the 26S and the ITS-5.8S (ITS) rRNA gene sequencing. In the phylogenetic study, the isolate clustered in the same clade as C. bertholletiae neotype strain although some differences were observed in the ITS sequences. In the cetacean cases, the possible sources of infection are unclear. The reasons why this pathogen has been found only in cetaceans and not in other domestic or wild animals are at the moment unknown and need further study. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Phylogenetic grouping, epidemiological typing, analysis of virulence genes, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy broilers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to investigate the possible etiology of avian colibacillosis by examining Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers. Findings Seventy-eight E. coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers in Japan were subjected to analysis of phylogenetic background, virulence-associated gene profiling, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), and antimicrobial resistance profiling. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 35 of the 78 isolates belonged to group A, 28 to group B1, one to group B2, and 14 to group D. Virulence-associated genes iutA, iss, cvaC, tsh, iroN, ompT, and hlyF were found in 23 isolates (29.5%), 16 isolates (20.5%), nine isolates (11.5%), five isolates (6.4%), 19 isolates (24.4%), 23 isolates (29.5%), and 22 isolates (28.2%) respectively. Although the genetic diversity of group D isolates was revealed by MLST, the group D isolates harbored iutA (10 isolates, 71.4%), iss (6 isolates, 42.9%), cvaC (5 isolates, 35.7%), tsh (3 isolates, 21.4%), hlyF (9 isolates, 64.3%), iroN (7 isolates, 50.0%), and ompT (9 isolates, 64.3%). Conclusions Our results indicated that E. coli isolates inhabiting the intestines of healthy broilers pose a potential risk of causing avian colibacillosis. PMID:25061511

  7. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of novel γ-gliadin genes in genus Dasypyrum.

    PubMed

    Li, G R; Liu, C; Yang, E N; Yang, Z J

    2013-03-13

    As the most ancient member of the wheat gluten family, the γ-gliadin genes are suitable for phylogenetic analysis among wheat and related species. Species in the grass genus Dasypyrum have been widely used for wheat cross breeding. However, the genomic relationships among Dasypyrum species have been little studied. We isolated 22 novel γ-gliadin gene sequences, among which 10 are putatively functional. The open reading frame lengths of these sequences range from 642 to 933 bp, and these putative proteins consist of five domains. Phylogenetic analyses showed that all Dasypyrum γ-gliadin gene sequences clustered in a large group; D. villosum and tetraploid D. breviaristatum γ-gliadin gene sequences clustered in a subgroup, while diploid D. breviaristatum γ-gliadin gene sequences clustered at the edge of the subgroup. All of the Dasypyrum γ-gliadin gene sequences were absent in three major T cell-stimulatory epitopes binding to HLA-DQ2/8 in celiac disease patients. Based on the phylogenetic analyses, we suggest that D. villosum and tetraploid D. breviaristatum evolved in parallel from a diploid ancestor D. breviaristatum.

  8. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of peste des petits ruminants virus isolated from outbreaks in Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Munir, M; Zohari, S; Saeed, A; Khan, Q M; Abubakar, M; LeBlanc, N; Berg, M

    2012-02-01

    Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) is an important viral disease of small ruminants and is endemic in Pakistan. In the following study, samples from two outbreaks of PPR in goats have been subjected to laboratory investigations. The Peste des Petits Ruminants virus (PPRV) genome was detected using both conventional and real-time PCR. Genetic characterization of the local PPRV field isolates was conducted by sequencing 322 bp of the fusion (F) gene and 255 bp of the nucleoprotein (N) gene. The phylogenetic tree based on the F gene clustered samples from both outbreaks into lineage 4 along with other Asian isolates, specifically into subcluster 1 along with isolates from Middle East. Analysis of N gene revealed a different pattern. In this case, the Pakistani samples clustered with Chinese, Tajikistani and Iranian isolates, which probably represents the true geographical pattern of virus circulation. This is the first report presenting the phylogenetic tree based on N gene as well as performing a parallel comparison of the trees of F and N gene together from Pakistani isolates. The results of this study shed light on the PPRV population in Pakistan and emphasize the importance of using molecular methods to understand the epidemiology. Such understanding is essential in any efforts to control the number and impact of outbreaks that are occurring in endemic countries such as Pakistan, especially in the current scenario where OIE and FAO are eager to control and subsequently eradicate PPR from the globe, as has been achieved for Rinderpest. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of canine distemper virus among domestic dogs in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    NGUYEN, Dung Van; SUZUKI, Junko; MINAMI, Shohei; YONEMITSU, Kenzo; NAGATA, Nao; KUWATA, Ryusei; SHIMODA, Hiroshi; VU, Chien Kim; TRUONG, Thuy Quoc; MAEDA, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is one of the most serious pathogens found in many species of carnivores, including domestic dogs. In this study, hemagglutinin (H) genes were detected in five domestic Vietnamese dogs with diarrhea, and two CDVs were successfully isolated from dogs positive for H genes. The complete genome of one isolate, CDV/dog/HCM/33/140816, was determined. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all Vietnamese CDVs belonged to the Asia-1 genotype. In addition, the H proteins of Vietnamese CDV strains were the most homologous to those of Chinese CDVs (98.4% to 99.3% identity). These results indicated that the Asia-1 genotype of CDV was the predominant genotype circulating among the domestic dog population in Vietnam and that transboundary transmission of CDV has occurred between Vietnam and China. PMID:27746406

  10. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of canine distemper virus among domestic dogs in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dung Van; Suzuki, Junko; Minami, Shohei; Yonemitsu, Kenzo; Nagata, Nao; Kuwata, Ryusei; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Vu, Chien Kim; Truong, Thuy Quoc; Maeda, Ken

    2017-01-20

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is one of the most serious pathogens found in many species of carnivores, including domestic dogs. In this study, hemagglutinin (H) genes were detected in five domestic Vietnamese dogs with diarrhea, and two CDVs were successfully isolated from dogs positive for H genes. The complete genome of one isolate, CDV/dog/HCM/33/140816, was determined. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all Vietnamese CDVs belonged to the Asia-1 genotype. In addition, the H proteins of Vietnamese CDV strains were the most homologous to those of Chinese CDVs (98.4% to 99.3% identity). These results indicated that the Asia-1 genotype of CDV was the predominant genotype circulating among the domestic dog population in Vietnam and that transboundary transmission of CDV has occurred between Vietnam and China.

  11. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the gp51 gene from Korean bovine leukemia virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Lee, EunJung; Kim, Eun-Ju; Joung, Ha-Kyung; Kim, Bo-Hye; Song, Jae-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2015-04-15

    Bovine Leukemia virus (BLV) infection of cattle has been reported in Korea for more than three decades. However, to date, there have been few studies regarding Korean BLV since 1980s. Thus, the purpose of this study is to perform a diagnosis and molecular characterization of BLV strains circulating in Korea and to estimate genetic diversity of different genotypes of BLV. To investigate the distribution of BLV variants in the world and assess the evolutionary history of Korean BLV isolates, a comprehensive molecular analysis of the BLV env gp51 gene was conducted using recent worldwide BLV isolates. The isolates included 50 samples obtained from two cattle farms in southeastern Korea in 2014. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of partial 444-nt fragment sequences and complete gp51 sequences of BLV revealed eight distinct genotypes of BLV showing geographic distribution of the world. Most Korean BLV isolates were found to belong to genotype 1 which is a major genotype prevailed throughout the world, and only four isolates from one farm were classified as genotype 3 related to the US and Japan isolates. Analysis of amino acids of Korean BLV isolates showed several sequence substitutions in the leader peptide, conformational epitope, and neutralizing domain regions. The observations suggest the possibility of affecting on viral infectivity and formation. Korean BLV isolates showed the close relationship to genotype 1 and 3. Further study to identify the diversity of BLV circulating in Korea is necessary with samples collected nationwide because this study is the first report of BLV genotype 3 being in circulation in Korea.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of 32 porcine circovirus type 2 isolates from Shandong, China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianli; Xu, Shaojian; Fu, Fang; Cong, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Xiaoyuan; Peng, Zhe; Wu, Jiaqiang; Sun, Wenbo; Du, Yijun; Li, Jun; Huang, Baohua; Wang, Jinbao

    2015-02-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), the essential causative agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), can be divided into distinct genotypes. Thirty-two PCV2 isolates obtained made from pigs in Shandong Province between 2005 and 2013. Complete genome sequences were obtained in three replicates for each virus isolate, and the sequences were submitted to the NCBI database. The ORF1-encoded amino acid sequences had 98.4 %-100 % identity among the 32 isolates, and there were no significant differences among the three potential glycosylation positions: aa 23-25 (NPS), aa 256-258 (NQT) and aa 286-288 (NAT). The amino acid sequences of ORF2 had 88 %-100 % identity among the 32 isolates and the potential glycosylation position in the cap protein, aa 143-145 (NYS), had no variation. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the PCV2b/1C genetic lineage was prevalent in swine populations in Shandong Province. It also suggested that selection pressure has made the PCV2 isolates more genetically distant from current vaccine strains.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus 1 isolated from South Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Drumond, Betania Paiva; da Silva Fagundes, Luiz Gustavo; Rocha, Raissa Prado; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Araki, Carlos Shigueru; Colombo, Tatiana Elisa; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda; Castilho, Thiago Elias; da Silveira, Nelson José Freitas; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients who experience secondary infection with a different serotype can progress to a more severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. The four Dengue virus serotypes (1–4) are antigenically and genetically distinct and each serotype is composed of multiple genotypes. In this study we isolated one Dengue virus 1 serotype, named BR/Alfenas/2012, from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Alfenas, South Minas Gerais, Brazil and molecular identification was performed based on the analysis of NS5 gene. Swiss mice were infected with this isolate to verify its potential to induce histopathological alterations characteristic of dengue. Liver histopathological analysis of infected animals showed the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, hepatic steatosis, as well as edema, hemorrhage and necrosis focal points. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses based on the envelope gene provided evidence that the isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 belongs to genotype V, lineage I and it is probably derived from isolates of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 showed two unique amino acids substitutions (SER222THRE and PHE306SER) when compared to other Brazilian isolates from the same genotype/lineage. Molecular models were generated for the envelope protein indicating that the amino acid alteration PHE 306 SER could contribute to a different folding in this region located within the domain III. Further genetic and animal model studies using BR/Alfenas/2012 and other isolates belonging to the same lineage/genotype could help determine the relation of these genetic alterations and dengue hemorrhagic fever in a susceptible population. PMID:26887252

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus 1 isolated from South Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Drumond, Betania Paiva; Fagundes, Luiz Gustavo da Silva; Rocha, Raissa Prado; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Araki, Carlos Shigueru; Colombo, Tatiana Elisa; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda; Castilho, Thiago Elias; da Silveira, Nelson José Freitas; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients who experience secondary infection with a different serotype can progress to a more severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. The four Dengue virus serotypes (1-4) are antigenically and genetically distinct and each serotype is composed of multiple genotypes. In this study we isolated one Dengue virus 1 serotype, named BR/Alfenas/2012, from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Alfenas, South Minas Gerais, Brazil and molecular identification was performed based on the analysis of NS5 gene. Swiss mice were infected with this isolate to verify its potential to induce histopathological alterations characteristic of dengue. Liver histopathological analysis of infected animals showed the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, hepatic steatosis, as well as edema, hemorrhage and necrosis focal points. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses based on the envelope gene provided evidence that the isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 belongs to genotype V, lineage I and it is probably derived from isolates of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 showed two unique amino acids substitutions (SER222THRE and PHE306SER) when compared to other Brazilian isolates from the same genotype/lineage. Molecular models were generated for the envelope protein indicating that the amino acid alteration PHE 306 SER could contribute to a different folding in this region located within the domain III. Further genetic and animal model studies using BR/Alfenas/2012 and other isolates belonging to the same lineage/genotype could help determine the relation of these genetic alterations and dengue hemorrhagic fever in a susceptible population.

  15. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the reticuloendotheliosis virus isolated from wild birds in Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lili; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Yulong; Hua, Yuping; Li, Kai; Deng, Xiaoyun; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Lizhou; Chai, Hongliang; Chen, Yuming; Yin, Chunhong; Gao, Honglei; Qin, Liting; Wang, Yongqiang; Qu, Yue; Chen, Qiang; Fan, Zhaobin; Wang, Xiaomei

    2013-09-27

    To analyze the status of reticuloendotheliosis (RE) infection of wild birds in China, 585 samples from wild birds collected in Liaoning, Jilin and Heilongjiang provinces China were investigated and analyzed. The sampled birds represent 3 orders and more than 40 species. Virus isolation and PCR amplification showed that some of the wild birds were infected with REV, and 10 REV strains were isolated. The gp90 gene from each of the 10 REV strains was amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Sequence analysis indicated that the gp90 genes of the 10 REV strains isolated in this study were more similar at the nucleotide level with the northeast Chinese strains HLJR0901 and HLJR0801 and some REV strains found in the US and Taiwan than with the early Chinese REV isolate HA9901. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis indicated that the gp90 genes of the 10 REV strains were more similar to the REV subtype III-representing strain (CSV) than to strains 170A (subtype I) or SNV (subtype II). This is the first study to investigate the status of wild birds infected with REV. The results of this paper will not only provide necessary information for further understanding the evolution of REV, but they also identify the potential role of wild birds in REV transmission and furthers our understanding of the ecology of REV in wild bird species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of isolates of Pasteurella pneumotropica from laboratory animals based on the gyrB gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Ueno, Masami; Takakura, Akira; Itoh, Toshio

    2006-10-01

    Phylogenetic analysis using the gyrB sequence was performed to investigate the genetic relevance among 49 isolates of P. pneumotropica. In the phylogeny, the isolates were clearly classified into three groups as follows: group A for the isolates of biotype Jawetz derived from mice, group B for the isolates of biotype Jawetz derived from rats, and group C for the isolates of biotype Heyl. These results suggest that the gyrB sequence of P. pneumotropica differs between the isolates of two biotypes, and also between the isolates derived from mice and rats in the biotype Jawetz.

  17. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of South Korean sacbrood virus isolates from infected honey bees (Apis cerana).

    PubMed

    Choe, Se-Eun; Nguyen, Thuy Thi-Dieu; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Noh, Jin-Hyeong; Lee, Hee-Soo; Lee, Chang-Hee; Kang, Seung-Won

    2012-05-25

    Sacbrood virus (SBV) is one of the most destructive honey bee viruses. The virus causes failure to pupate and death in both larvae and adult bees. Genetic analysis of SBV infected honey bees (Apis cerana) from five different provinces was carried out based on three nucleotide sequences; one partial structural protein coding sequence and two non-structural protein coding sequences. Sequences amplified by three specific primer pairs were aligned and compared with reference sequences deposited in the GenBank database. Sequence alignments revealed a low level of sequence variation among Korean isolates (≥ 98.6% nucleotide identity), regardless of the genome regions studied or the geographic origins of the strains. Multiple sequence comparisons indicated that Korean SBV isolates are genetically closely related to Chinese and other Asian strains. Interestingly, the Korean SBV isolates showed a number of unique nucleotides and amino acids that had not been observed in other published strains. Korean and other Asian isolates from the host A. cerana and the UK, European and Japanese strains from the host Apis mellifera showed differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid identities. This suggests that host-specificity exists among SBV strains isolated from different species. Phylogenetic relatedness between compared sequences was analyzed by MEGA 4.1 software using the neighbor-joining (NJ) method with a boot-strap value of 1000 replicates. Obtained topologies were in agreement with previous studies, in which a distinct group of SBV was formed by UK and European genotypes and another group was comprised of Asian genotypes including strains that originated from China, Japan (japonica), India and Nepal. However, phylogeny based on a partial protein structural coding sequence grouped all Korean SBV isolates identified in A. cerana as a separate cluster. Our findings suggest that further study, including Korean SBV isolated from A. mellifera, is needed.

  18. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of orf virus from the sheep herd outbreak in northeast China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Orf is a zoonotic and epitheliotrophic contagious disease that mainly affects sheep, goats, wild ruminants, and humans with a worldwide distribution. To date, there is little information on the characterization of ORFV strains that are endemic in Mainland China. In addition, the relationship between the severity of disease and the molecular profile of ORFV strains has not been fully elucidated. Results From the recent outbreak of a sheep herd in Nongan, northeast of China, the novel orf virus (ORFV) strain NA1/11 was successfully isolated. Western blot analysis indicated that the NA1/11 strain cross reacts with monoclonal antibody A3 and infected sheep ORFV antiserum. The purified virions revealed the typical ovoid shape when observed by atomic force microscopy. To determine the genetic characteristics of the NA1/11 strain, the sequences of ORFV011 (B2L), ORFV059 (F1L), ORFV109, ORFV110 and ORFv132 (VEGF) genes were amplified and compared with reference parapoxvirus strains. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) was performed to analyze the nucleotide similarities between different ORFV strains. Conclusions Phylogenetic analysis based on ORFV 011 nucleotide sequences showed that the NA1/11strain was closely related to Xinjiang and Gansu strains. ORFV110 and ORFV132 genes are highly variable. The results revealed that precise phylogenetic analysis might provide evidence for genetic variation and movement of circulating ORFV strains in Northeast China. In addition, nMDS analysis showed that geographic isolation and animal host are likely major factors resulting in genetic differences between ORFV strains. PMID:23174032

  19. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of three feline calicivirus strains from domestic cats in Jilin Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanli; Chen, Xiaoqing; Ying, Ying; Wang, Kai; Dong, Hongwei; Gao, Chao; Yang, Songtao; Hu, Guixue

    2017-05-06

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a highly prevalent pathogen that can cause infectious felid upper respiratory tract disease. The majority of complete genome sequences of FCV strains reported to date are from the USA. In this study, three FCV strains, CH-JL1, CH-JL2 and CH-JL3, were isolated from domestic cats in Jilin Province, China. Sequence analysis revealed that except for strains HRB-SS, WZ-1, XH, 12Q087-1 and 12Q087-5, the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of CH-JL2 and CH-JL3 are more than 20 nucleotides longer than those of all other reference isolates. The complete sequences of the three CH-JLs were compared with other reference strains, with nucleotide sequence identity values in the range of 76.2%-82.2%, 76.8%-96.4 and 76.8%-96.4%. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CH-JL1 forms a branch with FB-NJ-13, GD, 12Q087-1 and 12Q087-5. CH-JL2 was found to be most closely related to CH-JL3, forming another branch together with the other isolates. CH-JL1 shares a long nucleotide span with CH-JL2 and CH-JL3. It can be inferred that many FCV strains are co-circulating in Jilin Province. The availability of complete genome sequences will serve as a reference for future epidemiological studies of FCV.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of Bacillus cereus isolates from severe systemic infections using multilocus sequence typing scheme.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Maria; Torii, Keizo; Oshimoto, Megumi; Okamoto, Akira; Agata, Norio; Yamada, Keiko; Hasegawa, Tadao; Ohta, Michio

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus cereus strains from cases of severe or lethal systemic infections, including respiratory symptoms cases, were analyzed using multilocus sequence typing scheme of B. cereus MLST database. The isolates were evenly distributed between the two main clades, and 60% of them had allele profiles new to the database. Half of the collection's strains clustered in a lineage neighboring Bacillus anthracis phylogenetic origin. Strains from lethal cases with respiratory symptoms were allocated in both main clades. This is the first report of strains causing respiratory symptoms to be identified as genetically distant from B. anthracis. The phylogenetic location of the presented here strains was compared with all previously submitted to the database isolates from systemic infections, and were found to appear in the same clusters where clinical isolates from other studies had been assigned. It seems that the pathogenic strains are forming clusters on the phylogenetic tree.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of Croatian orf viruses isolated from sheep and goats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Orf virus (ORFV) is the prototype of the parapoxvirus genus and it primarily causes contagious ecthyma in goats, sheep, and other ruminants worldwide. In this paper, we described the sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the B2L gene of ORFV from two natural outbreaks: i) in autochthonous Croatian Cres-breed sheep and ii) on small family goat farm. Results Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the ORFV B2L gene showed that the Cro-Cres-12446/09 and Cro-Goat-11727/10 were not clustered together. Cro-Cres-12446/09 shared the highest similarity with ORFV NZ2 from New Zealand, and Ena from Japan; Cro-Goat-11727/10 was closest to the HuB from China and Taiping and Hoping from Taiwan. Conclusion Distinct ORFV strains are circulating in Croatia. Although ORFV infections are found ubiquitously wherever sheep and goats are farmed in Croatia, this is the first information on genetic relatedness of any Croatian ORFV with other isolates around the world. PMID:21073725

  2. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Rhizobium sullae isolated from Algerian Hedysarum flexuosum.

    PubMed

    Aliliche, Khadidja; Beghalem, Hamida; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Chriki, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Isolates from root nodules of Hedysarum flexuosum, sampled from north region of Algeria, were analyzed on the basis of their phenotypic and molecular characteristics. They were tested for their tolerance to NaCl, pH, temperatures, antibiotics and heavy metals resistance. Interestingly, the isolate Hf_04N appeared resistant to ZnCl2 (50 μg/mL) and grew at high saline concentration up to 9 %. The phylogenetic positions of five isolates were studied by comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA, recA, nifH and nodD genes. There were grouped close to the Rhizobium sullae type strain in relation to their 16S rRNA, recA and nifH genes-based phylogenies. By contrast, the tree of nodD gene was not congruent with ribosomal, housekeeping and nitrogen fixation genes. We suggest that our strains have a novel nodD gene. The detection of conserved domains of NodD protein and nitrogenase reductase enzyme, confirm their ability to nodulate and fix nitrogen.

  3. Phylogenetic and geographic analysis of fowl adenovirus field strains isolated from poultry in Poland.

    PubMed

    Niczyporuk, Jowita Samanta

    2016-01-01

    Fowl adenoviruses (FAdVs) are widely distributed in chickens in Poland and throughout the world. FAdV infections have been reported in the United States, Australia, Europe, and the Mediterranean basin. Detection of FAdVs strains is very important from the epidemiological point of view and for monitoring disease outbreaks and developing strategies for vaccine development. Several molecular epidemiology and phylogenetic studies have been performed, but the results obtained are still limited, because FAdV strains, even of the same serotype, have very diverse characteristics. Some strains are pathogenic and some are nonpathogenic. This report describes the successful isolation of 96 FAdV field strains from chickens in Poland. A PCR assay specific for the L1 loop region of the hexon gene was conducted, and the products were subjected to sequence analysis. The sequences were analysed using BLAST and Geneious 6.0 software and compared to adenovirus field and reference strain sequences from different parts of the world that are accessible in the NCBI GenBank database. The sequences of the adenovirus strains indicated that they belonged to five species, Fowl aviadenovirus A-E, represented by eight serotypes FAdV-1, FAdV-4, FAdV-5, FAdV-7, FAdV-8a, FAdV-8b, and FAdV-2/11 (FAdV-D). The relationships between FAdVs isolated in Poland and isolates from other regions of the world were determined.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of VP2 gene of canine parvovirus and comparison with Indian and world isolates.

    PubMed

    Kaur, G; Chandra, M; Dwivedi, P N

    2016-03-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) causes hemorrhagic enteritis, especially in young dogs, leading to high morbidity and mortality. It has four main antigenic types CPV-2, CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. Virus protein 2 (VP2) is the main capsid protein and mutations affecting VP2 gene are responsible for the evolution of various antigenic types of CPV. Full length VP2 gene from field isolates was amplified and cloned for sequence analysis. The sequences were submitted to the GenBank and were assigned Acc. Nos., viz. KP406928.1 for P12, KP406927.1 for P15, KP406930.1 for P32, KP406926.1 for Megavac-6 and KP406929.1 for NobivacDHPPi. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the samples were forming a separate clad with vaccine strains. When the samples were compared with the world and Indian isolates, it was observed that samples formed a separate node indicating regional genetic variation in CPV.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Pediococcus, including Pediococcus claussenii sp. nov., a novel lactic acid bacterium isolated from beer.

    PubMed

    Dobson, C Melissa; Deneer, Harry; Lee, Sun; Hemmingsen, Sean; Glaze, Sarah; Ziola, Barry

    2002-11-01

    Pediococci are found in foods and on plants and as beer-spoilage agents. The goal of the present study was to use the DNA sequences of the first three variable regions of the 165 rRNA gene, the 16S-23S rRNA internally transcribed spacer region sequence and approximately a third of the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene to elucidate phylogenetic groupings within the genus Pediococcus. Phylogenetic trees were created with sequence data from 31 Pediococcus and three Lactobacillus isolates. Complete 16S rRNA gene sequences from selected Pediococcus isolates were also examined. The results were interpreted in relation to the currently accepted Pediococcus species. We found that, where previously done, speciation of many Pediococcus isolates is inaccurate. Also, one grouping of seven isolates did not include any currently recognized Pediococcus species type isolate. Our phylogenetic analyses support the conclusion that these seven isolates, all of brewing spoilage origin, belong to a novel species, for which the name Pediococcus claussenii sp. nov. is proposed (type strain P06(T0 = ATCC BAA-344(T) = DSM 14800(T)). Phylogenetic analysis has therefore helped to resolve problems surrounding species identification of Pediococcus isolates.

  6. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of a novel parvovirus isolated from chickens in Guangxi, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; Xie, Zhixun; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Liji; Xie, Zhiqin; Huang, Li; Fan, Qin; Luo, Sisi; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Leyi

    2016-11-01

    A previously unidentified chicken parvovirus (ChPV) strain, associated with runting-stunting syndrome (RSS), is now endemic among chickens in China. To explore the genetic diversity of ChPV strains, we determined the first complete genome sequence of a novel ChPV isolate (GX-CH-PV-7) identified in chickens in Guang Xi, China, and showed moderate genome sequence similarity to reference strains. Analysis showed that the viral genome sequence is 86.4 %-93.9 % identical to those of other ChPVs. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses showed that this newly emergent GX-CH-PV-7 is closely related to Gallus gallus enteric parvovirus isolate ChPV 798 from the USA, indicating that they may share a common ancestor. The complete DNA sequence is 4612 bp long with an A+T content of 56.66 %. We determined the first complete genome sequence of a previously unidentified ChPV strain to elucidate its origin and evolutionary status.

  7. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Newcastle disease virus isolates from healthy wild birds.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Flavia; Berinstein, Analía; Pereda, Ariel; Taboga, Oscar; Carrillo, Elisa

    2005-12-01

    Wild waterfowl is considered a natural reservoir of potentially infectious agents and a source of pathogenic viruses like avian paramyxoviruses type 1 (APMV 1). In 1997, commercial poultry in Argentina had reached the status of being free from virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infections. Vaccination and biosecurity measures are actively performed to maintain this preferential sanitary condition. However, the risk of reintroduction of pathogenic viruses is always present. In this context, we conducted a study to describe the status of wild healthy birds in a geographic region relevant for the poultry industry. The presence of anti-NDV antibodies was determined in different species in all areas sampled suggesting previous contact with NDV. Seven ND viruses were isolated and characterized as apathogenic strains by biological and molecular methods. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the majority of the Argentinian isolates form a subgroup related to viruses of genotype II. The results presented here highlight the importance of maintaining strict biosecurity measures and vaccination programs in poultry industries in order to preserve the virulent NDV-free status for commercial flocks in the country.

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of Stenotrophomonas spp. Isolates Contributes to the Identification of Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cerezer, Vinicius Godoy; Pasternak, Jacyr; Franzolin, Marcia Regina; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas ssp. has a wide environmental distribution and is also found as an opportunistic pathogen, causing nosocomial or community-acquired infections. One species, S. maltophilia, presents multidrug resistance and has been associated with serious infections in pediatric and immunocompromised patients. Therefore, it is relevant to conduct resistance profile and phylogenetic studies in clinical isolates for identifying infection origins and isolates with augmented pathogenic potential. Here, multilocus sequence typing was performed for phylogenetic analysis of nosocomial isolates of Stenotrophomonas spp. and, environmental and clinical strains of S. maltophilia. Biochemical and multidrug resistance profiles of nosocomial and clinical strains were determined. The inferred phylogenetic profile showed high clonal variability, what correlates with the adaptability process of Stenotrophomonas to different habitats. Two clinical isolates subgroups of S. maltophilia sharing high phylogenetic homogeneity presented intergroup recombination, thus indicating the high permittivity to horizontal gene transfer, a mechanism involved in the acquisition of antibiotic resistance and expression of virulence factors. For most of the clinical strains, phylogenetic inference was made using only partial ppsA gene sequence. Therefore, the sequencing of just one specific fragment of this gene would allow, in many cases, determining whether the infection with S. maltophilia was nosocomial or community-acquired. PMID:24818127

  9. Molecular phylogenetic and positive selection analysis of Japanese encephalitis virus strains isolated from pigs in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Zhu, Ming; Pei, Jing-Jing; Dong, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Ming-Qiu; Wang, Jia-Ying; Gou, Hong-Chao; Luo, Yong-Wen; Chen, Jin-Ding

    2013-12-26

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is one of the most important virus which causes encephalitis. This disease is most prevalent in the south, southeast and the east region of Asia. In this study, two JEV strains, named JEV/SW/GD/01/2009 and JEV/SW/GZ/09/2004, were isolated from aborted fetuses and seminal fluid of pigs in China. To determine the characteristic of these virus isolates, the virulence of two newly JEV isolates was investigated, the result evidenced that the JEV/SW/GD/01/2009 did not kill mice, while the JEV/SW/GZ/09/2004 displayed neurovirulence with 0.925log10 p.f.u./LD50. Additionally, the full genome sequences of JEV were determined and compared with other known JEV strains. Results demonstrated that the genome of two JEV isolates was 10,976 nucleotides (nt) in length. As compared to the Chinese vaccine strain SA14-14-2, the JEV/SW/GD/01/2009 and the JEV/SW/GZ/09/2004 showed 99.7% and 97.5% identity at the nucleotide level, 99.6% and 96.7% identity at the amino acid level, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the full-length genome revealed that two JEV isolates were all clustered into genotype III compared to the reference strains. Furthermore, selection analyses revealed that dominant selective pressure acting on the JEV genome was purifying selection. Four sites under positive selection were identified: codon 521 (amino acid E-227), 2296 (amino acid NS4b-24), 3048 (amino acid NS5-521) and 3055 (amino acid NS5-528). Amino acid E-227 was proved to be related to neurovirulence. Taken together, the molecular epidemiology and functional of positively selected amino acid sites of two newly JEV isolates were fully understood, which might be helpful to predict possible changes in virulence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Isolation, phylogenetic analysis and developmental expression parttern of AmphiRab23b in amphioxus].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Wei; Lin, Yu-Shuang; Chen, Dong-Yan; Zhang, Hong-Wei

    2009-12-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays an important role during the embryonic development and is related to the progression of cancers. Rab23 is a crucial functional molecule in Hh pathway. However, there is no report about amphioxus Rab23 up to now except the annotations of two isoforms in the genome of Florida lancelet (Branchiostoma floridae). Here a 2062 bp full-length cDNA sequence of the Rab23, AmphiRab23b, was isolated from Chinese amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri), which included the UTRs and an open reading frame of 714 bp, encoding a protein of 237 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that AmphiRab23b falled outside the vertebrate clade. But sequence analysis indicated that this putative AmphiRab23b protein contained a specific Rab23_lke domain, which implied that Rab23 gene was functional conservative during evolution. And its developmental expression pattern showed that AmphiRab23b was expressed in the differentiating neural plate and alimentary canal, as the same as the expression pattern of the homologous vertebrate genes, which suggested that AmphiRab23b may function in the development of nervous system and alimentary canal.

  11. Development of a rapid identification method for Klebsiella pneumoniae phylogenetic groups and analysis of 420 clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Brisse, S; van Himbergen, T; Kusters, K; Verhoef, J

    2004-10-01

    A rapid method combining gyrA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, parC PCR and adonitol fermentation was developed to identify Klebsiella pneumoniae phylogenetic groups KpI, KpII and KpIII. Analysis of 420 clinical isolates from 26 hospitals showed that the three groups were widespread geographically. KpI comprised 80.3% of 305 isolates from blood and 82.2-97.2% of isolates from other clinical sources. KpIII was never found among isolates from urinary tract infections. KpI isolates from blood were generally less susceptible than KpIII isolates to the ten antimicrobial agents tested, with KpII being intermediate. The frequencies of ceftazidime resistance were 21.6% and 8.6% in KpI and KpIII isolates, respectively (p 0.01).

  12. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of host-range genes of Camelpox virus isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Bera, B C; Barua, S; Shanmugasundaram, K; Anand, T; Riyesh, T; Vaid, R K; Virmani, N; Kundu, S; Yadav, N K; Malik, P; Singh, R K

    2015-09-01

    Camelpox virus (CMLV), a close variant of variola virus (VARV) infects camels worldwide. The zoonotic infections reported from India signify the need to study the host-range genes-responsible for host tropism. We report sequence and phylogenetic analysis of five host-range genes: cytokine response modifier B (crmB), chemokine binding protein (ckbp), viral schlafen-like (v-slfn), myxomavirus T4-like (M-T4-like) and b5r of CMLVs isolated from outbreaks in India. Comparative analysis revealed that these genes are conserved among CMLVs and shared 94.5-100 % identity at both nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) levels. All genes showed identity (59.3-98.4 %) with cowpox virus (CPXV) while three genes-crmB, ckbp and b5r showed similarity (92-96.5 %) with VARVs at both nt and aa levels. Interestingly, three consecutive serine residue insertions were observed in CKBP protein of CMLV-Delhi09 isolate which was similar to CPXV-BR and VACVs, besides five point mutations (K53Q, N67I, F84S, A127T and E182G) were also similar to zoonotic OPXVs. Further, few inconsistent point mutation(s) were also observed in other gene(s) among Indian CMLVs. These indicate that different strains of CMLVs are circulating in India and these mutations could play an important role in adaptation of CMLVs in humans. The phylogeny revealed clustering of all CMLVs together except CMLV-Delhi09 which grouped separately due to the presence of specific point mutations. However, the topology of the concatenated phylogeny showed close evolutionary relationship of CMLV with VARV and TATV followed by CPXV-RatGer09/1 from Germany. The availability of this genetic information will be useful in unveiling new strategies to control emerging zoonotic poxvirus infections.

  13. Isolation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Mucambo Virus (Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Complex Subtype IIIA) in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Auguste, Albert J.; Volk, Sara M.; Arrigo, Nicole C.; Martinez, Raymond; Ramkissoon, Vernie; Adams, A. Paige; Thompson, Nadin N.; Adesiyun, Abiodun A.; Chadee, Dave D.; Foster, Jerome E.; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P.A.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Carrington, Christine V. F.

    2009-01-01

    In the 1950s and 1960s, alphaviruses in the Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) antigenic complex were the most frequently isolated arboviruses in Trinidad. Since then, there has been very little research performed with these viruses. Herein, we report on the isolation, sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses of Mucambo virus (MUCV; VEE complex subtype IIIA), including 6 recently isolated from Culex (Melanoconion) portesi mosquitoes and 11 previously isolated in Trinidad and Brazil. Results show that nucleotide and amino acid identities across the complete structural polyprotein for the MUCV isolates were 96.6 – 100% and 98.7 – 100%, respectively, and the phylogenetic tree inferred for MUCV was highly geographically- and temporally- structured. Bayesian analyses suggest the sampled MUCV lineages have a recent common ancestry of approximately 198 years (with a 95% highest posterior density (HPD) interval of 63 – 448 years) prior to 2007, and an overall rate of evolution of 1.28 × 10−4 substitutions/site/yr. PMID:19631956

  14. Clinical Fusobacterium mortiferum Isolates Cluster with Undifferentiated Clostridium rectum Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Phylogenetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The most commonly encountered clinical Fusobacterium species are F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum; other Fusobacteria, such as F. mortiferum and F. varium, have occasionally been isolated from human specimens. Clostridium rectum is a gram-positive species characterized as a straight bacillus with oval sub-terminal spores. The close 16S rRNA gene sequence relationship of C. rectum with the genus Fusobacterium is unexpected given their very different phenotypic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2015, a total of 19 Fusobacterium isolates were recovered from the colonic tissue of 10 patients at a university hospital. All isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The phylogenetic relationship among these isolates was estimated using the neighbor-joining method and the Molecular Evolutionary Genetic Analysis (MEGA) version 6. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the F. mortiferum isolates clustered into two groups - F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) and F. mortiferum ATCC 25557 (group II) - even though they are of the same species. Furthermore, the F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) showed a close phylogenetic relationship with C. rectum, even though C. rectum is classified as a gram-positive spore-producing bacillus. C. rectum is clearly unrelated to the genus Clostridium as it shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species from the genus Fusobacterium Therefore, additional methods such as Gram staining and other biochemical methods should be performed for Fusobacterium identification. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  15. Molecular Tracing of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Isolates in Iran: A NS5B Phylogenetic Analysis with Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hesamizadeh, Khashayar; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Najafi Tireh Shabankareh, Azar; Sharafi, Heidar

    2016-01-01

    Context Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity and classified into 7 genotypes and different subtypes. It heterogeneously distributed through various risk groups and geographical regions. A well-established phylogenetic relationship can simplify the tracing of HCV hierarchical strata into geographical regions. The current study aimed to find genetic phylogeny of subtypes 1a and 1b of HCV isolates based on NS5B nucleotide sequences in Iran and other members of Eastern Mediterranean regional office of world health organization, as well as other Middle Eastern countries, with a systematic review of available published and unpublished studies. Evidence Acquisition The phylogenetic analyses were performed based on the nucleotide sequences of NS5B gene of HCV genotype 1 (HCV-1), which were registered in the GenBank database. The literature review was performed in two steps: 1) searching studies evaluating the NS5B sequences of HCV-1, on PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science, and 2) Searching sequences of unpublished studies registered in the GenBank database. Results In this study, 442 sequences from HCV-1a and 232 from HCV-1b underwent phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of all sequences revealed different clusters in the phylogenetic trees. The results showed that the proportion of HCV-1a and -1b isolates from Iranian patients probably originated from domestic sources. Moreover, the HCV-1b isolates from Iranian patients may have similarities with the European ones. Conclusions In this study, phylogenetic reconstruction of HCV-1 sequences clearly indicated for molecular tracing and ancestral relationships of the HCV genotypes in Iran, and showed the likelihood of domestic origin for HCV-1a and various origin for HCV-1b. PMID:28123445

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of Nosema ceranae isolated from European and Asian honeybees in Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chaimanee, Veeranan; Chen, Yanping; Pettis, Jeffery S; Scott Cornman, R; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2011-07-01

    Nosema ceranae was found to infect four different host species including the European honeybee (A. mellifera) and the Asian honeybees (Apis florea, A. cerana and Apis dorsata) collected from apiaries and forests in Northern Thailand. Significant sequence variation in the polar tube protein (PTP1) gene of N. ceranae was observed with N. ceranae isolates from A. mellifera and A. cerana, they clustered into the same phylogenetic lineage. N. ceranae isolates from A. dorsata and A. florea were grouped into two other distinct clades. This study provides the first elucidation of a genetic relationship among N. ceranae strains isolated from different host species and demonstrates that the N. ceranae PTP gene was shown to be a suitable and reliable marker in revealing genetic relationships within species.

  17. Molecular characterization of glycoprotein genes and phylogenetic analysis of two swine paramyxoviruses isolated from United States.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dan; Janke, Bruce H; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2009-08-01

    Two swine paramyxoviruses (SPMV)-(81-19252 (Texas-81) and 92-7783 (ISU-92)-were isolated from encephalitic pigs in the United States in 1981 and 1992. Antigenic, morphologic, and biological characteristics of these two viruses were essentially similar to members of the family Paramyxoviridae. Antigenic analysis by indirect fluorescent antibody, immunoblot, and one-way cross-neutralization tests placed these viruses along with bovine parainfluenza 3 (BPIV3) viruses. Purified virions were 50-300 nm in size and morphologically indistinguishable from other paramyxoviruses. These two viruses hemagglutinated red blood cells and had neuraminidase activity. The gene junctions of fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HN) glycoprotein genes of these viruses contained highly conserved transcription start and stop signal sequences and trinucleotide intergenic regions similar to other Paramyxoviridae. The F gene of ISU-92 was longer than Texas-81 due to insertion of a 24-nucleotide "U"-rich 3' untranslated region. Structure-based sequence alignment of glycoproteins of these two SPMVs indicated that they are essentially similar in structure and function to parainfluenzaviruses. The Texas-81 strain was closely related to BPIV3 Shipping Fever (SF) strain at nucleotide and amino acid level, while the ISU-92 strain was more closely related to BPIV3 910N strain. The envelope glycoproteins of ISU-92 had only approximately 92 and approximately 96% identity at nucleotide and amino acid levels with BPIV3-SF strain, respectively. The high sequence identities to BPIV3 indicated cross-species infection in pigs. Phylogenetic analyses based on both F protein and HN protein suggested the classification of these viruses into the subfamily Paramyxovirinae, genus Respirovirus, and genotype A of BPIV3.

  18. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Milk and Milk Products in Kaduna, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, J.; Olonitola, O. S.; Radu, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Listeria (L.) monocytogenes isolated from milk and milk products in Kaduna, Nigeria, were subjected to a multiplex PCR assay to identify virulence-associated genes (such as prf A, inl A, hly A, act A, and iap). Of the 36 isolates, 9 (25%) were positive for one or two virulence-associated genes. Based on the sample type, 6 (16.9%) of the isolates that possessed virulence-associated genes were obtained from raw milk, 2 (3.2%) from “Manshanu,” and 1 (2.8%) from “Kindrimo.” Sequence and phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA revealed that Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, NGA 41A, and NGA 38A), when compared with reference L. monocytogenes, were grouped into two distinct clusters, A and B, with sequence (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, and NGA 41A) phylogenetically closer to J1776; N1-011A; R2-502; J1816; and J2-031, whereas L. monocytogenes isolate (NGA 38A) clustered with EDG; J1-220; J1926; J1817; and J2-1091. The separation of the Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates into linage A (responsible for epidemic listeriosis) and lineage B (responsible for sporadic cases of listeriosis) is of public health concern and that local isolates might have potentials for human food borne listeriosis based on the virulence factors so far identified. PMID:27597873

  19. Diversity structure of culturable bacteria isolated from the Fildes Peninsula (King George Island, Antarctica): A phylogenetic analysis perspective

    PubMed Central

    González-Rocha, Gerardo; Muñoz-Cartes, Gabriel; Canales-Aguirre, Cristian B.; Lima, Celia A.; Domínguez-Yévenes, Mariana; Bello-Toledo, Helia

    2017-01-01

    It has been proposed that Antarctic environments select microorganisms with unique biochemical adaptations, based on the tenet ‘Everything is everywhere, but, the environment selects’ by Baas-Becking. However, this is a hypothesis that has not been extensively evaluated. This study evaluated the fundamental prediction contained in this hypothesis—in the sense that species are structured in the landscape according to their local habitats-, using as study model the phylogenetic diversity of the culturable bacteria of Fildes Peninsula (King George Island, Antarctica). Eighty bacterial strains isolated from 10 different locations in the area, were recovered. Based on phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, the isolates were grouped into twenty-six phylotypes distributed in three main clades, of which only six are exclusive to Antarctica. Results showed that phylotypes do not group significantly by habitat type; however, local habitat types had phylogenetic signal, which support the phylogenetic niche conservatism hypothesis and not a selective role of the environment like the Baas-Becking hypothesis suggests. We propose that, more than habitat selection resulting in new local adaptations and diversity, local historical colonization and species sorting (i.e. differences in speciation and extinction rates that arise by interaction of species level traits with the environment) play a fundamental role on the culturable bacterial diversity in Antarctica. PMID:28632790

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of some Newcastle disease virus isolates from the Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Elmardi, N.A.; Bakheit, M.A.; Khalafalla, A.I.

    2016-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to amplify 1412 bp of the fusion protein gene (F gene) of four Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates; two velogenic (TY-1/90 and DIK-90) and two lentogenic isolates (Dongla 88/1 and GD.S.1). Following sequencing, nucleotide sequences were annotated and 894 bp were compared phylogenetically with those from strains previously reported in the Sudan and the virus strains published on the GenBank. It could be demonstrated that TY-1/90 and DIK-90 strains belong to the genotype VI of NDV and are in close genetic relationship to sub- genotype VIb. TY-1/90 and DIK-90 strains were observed to be genetically unrelated to the earlier Sudanese isolates of 1970/80s and the late of 2000s suggesting a different origin. The close genetic relationship to the European and African pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1) suggests a common ancestor. Dongola, GD.S.1 strains were classified into genotype II that comprises non-pathogenic lentogenic NDV strains. The present genetic classification of NDV isolates of the Sudan provides valuable information on genotypes of NDV. Further molecular epidemiological investigations of the recent outbreaks of Newcastle disease in the Sudan are needed in order to improve the efficiency of control strategies and vaccine development. PMID:27419101

  1. Isolation, phylogenetic analysis and anti-infective activity screening of marine sponge-associated actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Pimentel-Elardo, Sheila M; Hanora, Amro; Radwan, Mona; Abou-El-Ela, Soad H; Ahmed, Safwat; Hentschel, Ute

    2010-02-26

    Terrestrial actinomycetes are noteworthy producers of a multitude of antibiotics, however the marine representatives are much less studied in this regard. In this study, 90 actinomycetes were isolated from 11 different species of marine sponges that had been collected from offshore Ras Mohamed (Egypt) and from Rovinj (Croatia). Phylogenetic characterization of the isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing supported their assignment to 18 different actinomycete genera representing seven different suborders. Fourteen putatively novel species were identified based on sequence similarity values below 98.2% to other strains in the NCBI database. A putative new genus related to Rubrobacter was isolated on M1 agar that had been amended with sponge extract, thus highlighting the need for innovative cultivation protocols. Testing for anti-infective activities was performed against clinically relevant, Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, fungi (Candida albicans) and human parasites (Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei). Bioactivities against these pathogens were documented for 10 actinomycete isolates. These results show a high diversity of actinomycetes associated with marine sponges as well as highlight their potential to produce anti-infective agents.

  2. Isolation, Phylogenetic Analysis and Anti-infective Activity Screening of Marine Sponge-Associated Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Pimentel-Elardo, Sheila M.; Hanora, Amro; Radwan, Mona; Abou-El-Ela, Soad H.; Ahmed, Safwat; Hentschel, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial actinomycetes are noteworthy producers of a multitude of antibiotics, however the marine representatives are much less studied in this regard. In this study, 90 actinomycetes were isolated from 11 different species of marine sponges that had been collected from offshore Ras Mohamed (Egypt) and from Rovinj (Croatia). Phylogenetic characterization of the isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing supported their assignment to 18 different actinomycete genera representing seven different suborders. Fourteen putatively novel species were identified based on sequence similarity values below 98.2% to other strains in the NCBI database. A putative new genus related to Rubrobacter was isolated on M1 agar that had been amended with sponge extract, thus highlighting the need for innovative cultivation protocols. Testing for anti-infective activities was performed against clinically relevant, Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, fungi (Candida albicans) and human parasites (Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei). Bioactivities against these pathogens were documented for 10 actinomycete isolates. These results show a high diversity of actinomycetes associated with marine sponges as well as highlight their potential to produce anti-infective agents. PMID:20411105

  3. Phylogenetic and recombination analysis of genomic sequences of PCV2 isolated in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Kwon; Luo, Yuzi; Moon, Hyung Joon; Park, Seong Jun; Keum, Hyun Ok; Rho, Semi; Park, Bong Kyun

    2009-12-01

    The complete genomic sequences of 13 PCV2 viruses obtained between 2005 and 2007 were analyzed in order to determine their phylogenetic relationship and identify possible recombination events between PCV2a and PCV2b. Twelve PCV2b viruses and one PCV2a virus were identified by phylogenetic analysis. Notably, two PCV2b viruses (PF163 and C7201-1) were shown to belong to the 1B subgroup of PCV2b, which had not been previously reported in Korea. Theses two viruses were also predicted to be possible recombinants between PCV2a (the minor parent) and PCV2b (the major parent) by the RDP program (P < 0.01). A recombination site was predicted to exist in ORF1 of both viruses. This additional evidence of PCV2 recombination in Korea further supports the important role of recombination in genetic evolution.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus polyhedrin and p10 genes in wild isolates from Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiang; Lu, Zhuan-Ling; Wei, Bing-Xing; Feng, Jian-Ling; Qu, Dacai; Luo, Ting Rong

    2013-02-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) is a severe pathogen that seriously impacts the sericulture industry. In this study, 45 wild BmNPV isolates were collected from different silkworm-raising regions in China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Two highly expressed very late genes from each isolate, polyhedrin and p10, were sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The polyhedrin gene was found to be highly conserved, while the p10 gene was more variable frequently harboring point mutations and displaying variations in codon use without obvious codon bias. The BmNPV isolates from Guangxi were separated into three main clades, I, II, and III, according to the p10 gene phylogenetic tree. The geographical distribution of clade I isolates in Guangxi showed a concentrated pattern and that of clade II isolates showed a connected pattern. Clade III isolates were irregularly scattered throughout Guangxi. Local transmission of this pathogen clearly occurred in the silkworm-raising regions in Guangxi. This study may provide some data on BmNPV transmission in the silkworm-raising regions and be helpful in devising strategies for the prevention and control of BmNPV disease.

  5. Isolation, molecular characterization, and phylogenetic analysis of encephalomyocarditis virus from South China tigers in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Yan, Qi; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Jing; Wang, Chengmin; Du, Yingchun; Yan, Jing; He, Hongxuan

    2013-10-01

    Although encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) can infect many host species and cause myocarditis and sudden death in many species, little is known about EMCV infection in tigers. A virus was isolated from organs of dead South China tigers with sudden death in southern China. The production of cytopathic effect on BHK cells, and the results of PCR, electron microscopy (EM), and whole genome sequencing indicated that the pathogen was EMCV, the strain was named FJ13. Other pathogenic agents were excluded as possible pathogenic agents. Phylogenetic analyses of the whole genome, ORF (open reading frame) and CCR (capsid coding region) using the neighbour-joining method revealed that EMCV isolates cluster into two groups (group 1 and 2) with two sub-clusters within group 1 (group 1a and 1b), and FJ13 belongs to group 1a. Animal experiment showed that the isolated strain FJ13 could cause clinical symptoms and pathological changes. The results of this study indicated that FJ13 caused myocarditis of tigers and provided new epidemiologic data on EMCV in China. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Phylogenetic Analysis of Polygalacturonase-Producing Bacillus and Pseudomonas Isolated From Plant Waste Material

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, Muhammad; Latif, Zakia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keeping in mind the commercial application of polygalacturonase (PG) in juice and beverages industry, bacterial strains were isolated from rotten fruits and vegetables to screen for competent producers of PG. Objectives: In this study, the plate method was used for preliminary screening of polygalacturonase-producing bacteria, while the Dinitrosalicylic Acid (DNS) method was used for quantifications of PG. Materials and Methods: Biochemically-identified polygalacturonase-producing Bacillus and Pseudomonas species were further characterized by molecular markers. The genetic diversity among these selected strains was analyzed by investigating microsatellite distribution in their genome. Out of 110 strains, 17 competent strains of Bacillus and eight strains of Pseudomonas were selected, identified and confirmed biochemically. Selected strains were characterized by 16S rRNA sequencing and data was submitted to the national center for biotechnology information (NCBI) website for accession numbers. Results: Among the Bacillus, Bacillus vallismortis (JQ990307) isolated from mango was the most competent producer of PG; producing up to 4.4 U/µL. Amongst Pseudomonas, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (JQ990314) isolated from oranges was the most competent PG producer equivalent to B. vallismortis (JQ990307). To determine genetic diversity of different strains of Pseudomonas and Bacillus varying in PG production, fingerprinting was done on the basis of Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) or microsatellites. The data was analyzed and a phylogenetic tree was constructed using the Minitab 3 software for comparison of bacterial isolates producing different concentrations of PG. Fingerprinting showed that presence or absence of certain microsatellites correlated with the ability of PG production. Conclusions: Bacteria from biological waste were competent producers of PG and must be used on an industrial scale to cope with the demand of PG in the food industry. PMID:27099686

  7. Descriptive distribution and phylogenetic analysis of feline infectious peritonitis virus isolates of Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Saeed; Arshad, Siti S; Hair-Bejo, Mohd; Omar, Abdul R; Zeenathul, Nazariah A; Fong, Lau S; Rahman, Nor-Alimah; Arshad, Habibah; Shamsudin, Shahirudin; Isa, Mohd-Kamarudin A

    2010-01-06

    The descriptive distribution and phylogeny of feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) were studied in cats suspected of having feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in Malaysia. Ascitic fluids and/or biopsy samples were subjected to a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeted for a conserved region of 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of the FCoV genome. Eighty nine percent of the sampled animals were positive for the presence of FCoV. Among the FCoV positive cats, 80% of cats were males and 64% were below 2 years of age. The FCoV positive cases included 56% domestic short hair (DSH), 40% Persian, and 4% Siamese cats. The nucleotide sequences of 10 selected amplified products from FIP cases were determined. The sequence comparison revealed that the field isolates had 96% homology with a few point mutations. The extent of homology decreased to 93% when compared with reference strains. The overall branching pattern of phylogenetic tree showed two distinct clusters, where all Malaysian isolates fall into one main genetic cluster. These findings provided the first genetic information of FCoV in Malaysia.

  8. Phylogenetic relationships among Ehrlichia ruminantium isolates.

    PubMed

    Allsopp, M T E P; Van Heerden, H; Steyn, H C; Allsopp, B A

    2003-06-01

    Ehrlichia ruminantium, the causative agent of heartwater, is a tick-borne pathogen infecting ruminants throughout sub-Saharan Africa and on some Caribbean islands. The most reliable test for E. ruminantium is PCR-based, but this gives positive results in some areas free of clinical heartwater and of the known Amblyomma spp. tick vectors. To investigate the molecular basis for this finding we have sequenced and carried out phylogenetic analysis of a range of genes from a number of E. ruminantium isolates. The genes include ribonuclease III and cytochrome c oxidase assembly protein genes (the pCS20 region), groESL, citrate synthase (gltA), and 16S ribosomal RNA. Relationships among major antigenic protein (map1) genes have been exhaustively investigated in a previous study that showed that the genes are variable in length, have non-synonymous mutations, and show no geographical specificity among isolates. The 16S sequences are highly conserved, except in the V1 loop region. The pCS20, groESL, and gltA genes show only single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) dispersed throughout the sequenced regions. Phylogenetic analysis using pCS20 data differentiates the western African isolates into a single clade, which also includes a southern African isolate. All other southern African isolates and a Caribbean isolate fall into a further clade, which is subdivided into two groups. Sequence variation within this clade is greater than that within the western African clade, suggesting that E. ruminantium originated in southern Africa.

  9. Genomic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Chinese sacbrood virus isolated from Loess Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Liu, T X; Wang, D

    2016-09-23

    The complete genomic RNA of the Chinese sacbrood virus (CSBV) strain, which infects the honeybees in the Loess plateau, was sequenced and analyzed. The CSBV-SX strain contains 8705 nucleotides, which includes a single large open reading frame (99-8681 nucleotides) encoding 2860 amino acids. A novel efficient identification method was used to investigate the samples infected by CSBV. The putative amino acid sequence alignment analysis showed that, except for some normal well characterized domains such as RNA helicase, RNA protease, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domains, a calicivirus coat protein domain was identified at amino acids 493-564. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CSBV-SX was closely related to CSBV-BJ, and this result was supported by nucleotide multiple sequence alignment and protein multiple sequence alignment analysis results. These differences in the CSBV-SX strain may be related to virus adaptation to the xerothermic, low relative humidity, and strong ultraviolet radiation conditions in the Loess Plateau.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of Classical swine fever virus from archival formalin fixed clinical tissues reveals vietnamese origin of the isolates.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinod Kumar; Rajak, Kaushal Kishore

    2017-03-01

    Detection of Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) nucleic acid in archival formalin fixed tissue samples and their use for phylogenetic analysis was investigated. Ten samples were examined for the presence of CSFV nucleic acid by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of 5'UTR and E2 gene. RT-PCR was found positive for 5'UTR fragment in eight samples while only one tissue samples showed amplification for E2 gene target fragment. For molecular epidemiology of the disease, 5'UTR PCR product of sample from Darbhanga (Bihar), was cloned and sequenced. The sequence was compared with the sequences available in database. The phylogenetic analysis reveals that the isolate belongs to subgroup 2.2 sharing 98.7% nucleotide identities with Vietnamese isolate (CaTh05-1, AB252170), indicating towards the possible origin of genogroup 2.2 CSFV isolates involved in the outbreak from Vietnam. From the study, it can be concluded that the tissue samples collected and stored in buffer formalin for years can be used to detect CSFV nucleic acid. Results are also suggestive of that the 5'UTR region of genome is more suitable target for RT-PCR based detection of CSFV in archival formalin fixed specimens. The study also indicates the potential of archival formalin fixed tissues for molecular epidemiology and genotyping of the CSF virus.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of the surface proteins of influenza A (H5N1) viruses isolated in Asian and African populations.

    PubMed

    Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Ciotti, Marco; Marcuccilli, Fabio; Balestra, Emanuela; Dimonte, Salvatore; Perno, Carlo Federico; Aquaro, Stefano

    2009-10-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 virus can infect a variety of animals and continually poses a threat to animal and human health. Here, phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes indicated that the hemagglutinin gene of all human isolates, although very similar to each other, fell within different clades corresponding to antigenically distinguishable variants. Likewise, the N1 neuraminidase gene forms a clade that is evolutionarily distinct from previously characterized N1 neuraminidases. So, although all H5N1 viruses were derived from ancestors circulating in south-east Asia more than ten years ago, since 2003 they have evolved into geographically distinct groups within each country.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of field isolates of feline calcivirus (FCV) in Japan by sequencing part of its capsid gene.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Ohe, K; Murakami, M; Fukuyama, M; Furuhata, K; Kishikawa, S; Suzuki, Y; Kiuchi, A; Hara, M; Ishikawa, Y; Taneno, A

    2002-04-01

    The molecular epidemiology of the infectious disease caused by feline calcivirus (FCV) in Japan was investigated by analysing the phylogenetic relationship among 21 Japanese field isolates, including the F4 strain, and 30 global isolates. Parts of the capsid gene (B-F) of the isolates were amplified by RT-PCR, and the amino acid sequences were compared with those from the global isolates. Thirty-seven and 14 out of a total of 51 isolates were clustered into two distinct genogroups, I and II respectively, by UPGMA and NJ analysis. Seven of the 21 Japanese isolates (33%) fell into group I together with 30 global isolates, while the other 14 Japanese isolates (67%) belonged to group II. The bootstrap repetition analysis of groups I and II formed by the NJ method gave a value of 99.00%. The 14 latter Japanese isolates were clearly separated from the isolates in group I, and they were different from any previously known FCV, forming a new genogroup, which implies that this lineage has been confined to Japan. Comparing the amino acid sequences shared by groups I and II, the amino acid at position 377 in B region was asparagine (Asn or Asp (NH2)) in group I, while it was lysine (Lys) in all the strains in group II. Similarly, the amino acid at position 539 in the F region was alanine (Ala) or proline (Pro) in group I, while it was valine (Val) in group II; glycine (Gly) at position 557 in group I was serine (Ser) in Group II; and phenylalanine (Phe) or leucine (Leu) at position 566 in genogroup I was tyrosine (Tyr) in group II.

  13. Phylogenetic reconstruction and polymorphism analysis of BK virus VP2 gene isolated from renal transplant recipients in China

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHANG-YANG; HONG, WEI-LONG; ZHU, ZHE-HUI; CHEN, YUN-HAO; YE, WEN-LE; CHU, GUANG-YU; LI, JIA-LIN; CHEN, BI-CHENG; XIA, PENG

    2015-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is important pathogen for kidney transplant recipients, as it is frequently re-activated, leading to nephropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the phylogenetic reconstruction and polymorphism of the VP2 gene in BKV isolated from Chinese kidney transplant recipients. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out in the VP2 region from 135 BKV-positive samples and 28 reference strains retrieved from GenBank. The unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) grouped all strains into subtypes, but failed to subdivide strains into subgroups. Among the plasma and urine samples, all plasma (23/23) and 82 urine samples (82/95) were identified to contain subtype I; the other 10 urine samples contained subtype IV. A 86-bp fragment was identified as a highly conserved sequence. Following alignment with 36 published BKV sequences from China, 92 sites of polymorphism were identified, including 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) prevalent in Chinese individuals and 30 SNPs that were specific to the two predominant subtypes I and IV. The limitations of the VP2 gene segment in subgrouping were confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. The conserved sequence and polymorphism identified in this study may be helpful in the detection and genotyping of BKV. PMID:26640547

  14. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of pseudorabies virus variants isolated from Guangdong province of southern China during 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jindai; Zeng, Xiduo; Zhang, Guanqun; Wu, Qiwen; Niu, Jianqiang; Sun, Baoli; Xie, Qingmei

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of pseudorabies (PR) have occurred in southern China since late 2011, resulting in significant economic impacts on the swine industry. To identify the cause of PR outbreaks, especially among vaccinated pigs, 11 pseudorabies virus (PRV) field strains were isolated from Guangdong province during 2013–2014. Their major viral genes (gE, TK, gI, PK, gD, 11K, and 28K) were analyzed in this study. Insertions or deletions were observed in gD, gE, gI and PK genes compared with other PRV isolates from all over the world. Furthermore, sequence alignment showed that insertions in gD and gE were unique molecular characteristics of the new prevalent PRV strains in China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that our isolates were clustered in an independent branch together with other strains isolated from China in recent years, and that they showed a closer genetic relationship with earlier isolates from Asia. Our results suggest that these isolates are novel PRV variants with unique molecular signatures. PMID:26726029

  15. Isolation, phylogenetic analysis and screening of marine mollusc-associated bacteria for antimicrobial, hemolytic and surface activities.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Uchino, Masataka; Kalinovskaya, Natalia I; Mikhailov, Valery V

    2008-01-01

    This study was undertaken to survey culturable heterotrophic bacteria associated with the marine ark shell Anadara broughtoni inhabiting in the Sea of Japan, and to test isolates for their antimicrobial, hemolytic and surface activities with an emphasis on low-molecular-weight metabolites search. A total of 149 strains were isolated and identified phenotypically. A total of 27 strains were selected to be investigated phylogenetically by 165 rRNA gene sequence analysis. The most bacteria were affiliated with members of the Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, and Less with Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB) group. The isolates capable of hemolysis were numerically abundant in the genera Pseudoalteromonas, Aeromonas and Bacillus. The six Gram-positive isolates belonging to the genera Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Saccharothrix and two Gram-negative strains related to Pseudomonas and Sphingomonas, possessed antimicrobial activity against indicator strains and to each other. Antimicrobial, hemolytic and surface activities were revealed in butanot extracts of cells or cell-free supernatant of six active strains. This points to availability of active low-molecular-weight metabolites. Substances with hemolytic and surface activities were isolated from strain Bacillus pumilus An 112 and characterized as cyclic depsipeptides with molecular masses 1021, 1035, 1049, 1063 and 1077 Da. The recovery of strains producing antimicrobial and surface-active substances suggests that microorganisms associated with the marine bivalve are potential source of bioactive metabolites.

  16. [Isolation, identification, phylogenetic analysis and related properties of a pathogen in Silurus meridionalis Chen].

    PubMed

    Cao, Hai-jun; Li, Yong-wen; Lei, Yu; Wu, Jiang; Xu, Heng

    2007-02-01

    In October 2005, a large number of adults of Silurus meridionalis Chen died in the mud fish farming of Sichuan province. Later, three predominate strains of bacteria were isolated from the body of moribund fish. By artificial infection tests, strain TWN3 was confirmed to be the pathogen of the disease. Based on the characteristics of morphology, physiology and biochemistry tests, TWN3 was initially identified as Proteus vulgaris, and its G + C content of DNA is 39.1% . After being amplified, the sequence of its 16S rDNA was analyzed in the database of NCBI and it showed that TWN3 had the highest similarity to P. vulgaris, with 99.52% identity. By constructing the molecular phylogenetic dendrogram with Minimum Evolution method in Mega3.1, it was revealed that TWN3 was in the same branch with P. vulgaris. Based on all the results above, TWN3 is identified as P. vulgaris. However, the result of one biochemistry test, growth in KCN, deviates from the description in Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. With reference to the Manual above, Proteus vulgaris is divided into two groups, P. vulgaris BG2 and 3. According to the specific biochemical properties, TWN3 is classified as a member of P. vulgaris BG3. Relevant tests of biological properties were also conducted, which showed that this strain has no haemolysis and is sensitive to four kinds of antibiotic such as gentamicin. Moreover, it can strongly cause diseases to mice. The research on the growth property of strain TWN3 indicated that its growth temperature ranges from 10 degrees C to 43 degrees C , optimum 37 degrees C ; growth pH ranges from 4 to 11, optimum 6. Its optimum salinity varies under different temperatures, and it grows best under 1.5 % salinity while 37 degrees C. The aim of these researches is to provide an evidence for the prevention and cure of TWN3. According to the appearance of the diseased Silurus meridionalis Chen and results of artificial infection test on crucian carps, it is considered

  17. Comparative genomic analysis of phylogenetically closely related Hydrogenobaculum sp. isolates from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Romano, Christine; D'Imperio, Seth; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Lasken, Roger; Shock, Everett L; McDermott, Timothy R

    2013-05-01

    We describe the complete genome sequences of four closely related Hydrogenobaculum sp. isolates (≥ 99.7% 16S rRNA gene identity) that were isolated from the outflow channel of Dragon Spring (DS), Norris Geyser Basin, in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY. The genomes range in size from 1,552,607 to 1,552,931 bp, contain 1,667 to 1,676 predicted genes, and are highly syntenic. There are subtle differences among the DS isolates, which as a group are different from Hydrogenobaculum sp. strain Y04AAS1 that was previously isolated from a geographically distinct YNP geothermal feature. Genes unique to the DS genomes encode arsenite [As(III)] oxidation, NADH-ubiquinone-plastoquinone (complex I), NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain, a DNA photolyase, and elements of a type II secretion system. Functions unique to strain Y04AAS1 include thiosulfate metabolism, nitrate respiration, and mercury resistance determinants. DS genomes contain seven CRISPR loci that are almost identical but are different from the single CRISPR locus in strain Y04AAS1. Other differences between the DS and Y04AAS1 genomes include average nucleotide identity (94.764%) and percentage conserved DNA (80.552%). Approximately half of the genes unique to Y04AAS1 are predicted to have been acquired via horizontal gene transfer. Fragment recruitment analysis and marker gene searches demonstrated that the DS metagenome was more similar to the DS genomes than to the Y04AAS1 genome, but that the DS community is likely comprised of a continuum of Hydrogenobaculum genotypes that span from the DS genomes described here to an Y04AAS1-like organism, which appears to represent a distinct ecotype relative to the DS genomes characterized.

  18. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Phylogenetically Closely Related Hydrogenobaculum sp. Isolates from Yellowstone National Park

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Christine; D'Imperio, Seth; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Lasken, Roger; Shock, Everett L.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the complete genome sequences of four closely related Hydrogenobaculum sp. isolates (≥99.7% 16S rRNA gene identity) that were isolated from the outflow channel of Dragon Spring (DS), Norris Geyser Basin, in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY. The genomes range in size from 1,552,607 to 1,552,931 bp, contain 1,667 to 1,676 predicted genes, and are highly syntenic. There are subtle differences among the DS isolates, which as a group are different from Hydrogenobaculum sp. strain Y04AAS1 that was previously isolated from a geographically distinct YNP geothermal feature. Genes unique to the DS genomes encode arsenite [As(III)] oxidation, NADH-ubiquinone-plastoquinone (complex I), NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain, a DNA photolyase, and elements of a type II secretion system. Functions unique to strain Y04AAS1 include thiosulfate metabolism, nitrate respiration, and mercury resistance determinants. DS genomes contain seven CRISPR loci that are almost identical but are different from the single CRISPR locus in strain Y04AAS1. Other differences between the DS and Y04AAS1 genomes include average nucleotide identity (94.764%) and percentage conserved DNA (80.552%). Approximately half of the genes unique to Y04AAS1 are predicted to have been acquired via horizontal gene transfer. Fragment recruitment analysis and marker gene searches demonstrated that the DS metagenome was more similar to the DS genomes than to the Y04AAS1 genome, but that the DS community is likely comprised of a continuum of Hydrogenobaculum genotypes that span from the DS genomes described here to an Y04AAS1-like organism, which appears to represent a distinct ecotype relative to the DS genomes characterized. PMID:23435891

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of endophytic bacterial isolates from leaves of the medicinal plant Trichilia elegans A. Juss. (Meliaceae).

    PubMed

    Rhoden, S A; Garcia, A; Santos e Silva, M C; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A

    2015-02-20

    Various organisms such as fungi and bacteria can live inside plants, inhabiting the aerial parts (primarily the leaves) without causing damage. These microorganisms, called endophytes, produce an extensive variety of compounds that can be useful for medical and agronomic purposes. Trichilia elegans A. Juss., belonging to the Meliaceae family, shows wide dispersion in South America, and phytochemical analyses from these plants and endophyte isolates have shown biological activity. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to verify the diversity of bacterial endophytes from T. elegans using partial sequencing of 16S rRNA, followed by phylogenetic analysis. Isolation was performed by cutting the leaves, after disinfection with 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), in 1-2-mm² fragments, which were equally placed on dishes containing TSA and fungicide BENLATE at 75 μg/mL. All dishes were incubated at 28°C in the biochemical oxygen demand system for 5 days and periodically checked. Afterwards, the colonization frequency (%) was determined: (number of fragments colonized by bacteria/total number of fragments) x 100. Three isolations between September 2011 and March 2012 were performed; the growth frequency ranged between 1.6 and 13.6%. Following sequencing of 16S rRNA and phylogenetic analysis, the genera identified were: Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Microbacterium, Pseudomonas, and Pantoea. These results will provide important knowledge on the diversity of endophytic bacteria inhabiting medicinal plants, and a better understanding of the microbiome of T. elegans would reinforce the necessity of endophyte studies with a focus on their future applications in biotechnological areas of agriculture, medicine, and the environment.

  20. Partial characterization of Maize rayado fino virus isolates from Ecuador: phylogenetic analysis supports a Central American origin of the virus.

    PubMed

    Chicas, Mauricio; Caviedes, Mario; Hammond, Rosemarie; Madriz, Kenneth; Albertazzi, Federico; Villalobos, Heydi; Ramírez, Pilar

    2007-06-01

    Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV) infects maize and appears to be restricted to, yet widespread in, the Americas. MRFV was previously unreported from Ecuador. Maize plants exhibiting symptoms of MRFV infection were collected at the Santa Catalina experiment station in Quito, Ecuador. RT-PCR reactions were performed on total RNA extracted from the symptomatic leaves using primers specific for the capsid protein (CP) gene and 3' non-translated region of MRFV and first strand cDNA as a template. Nucleotide sequence comparisons to previously sequenced MRFV isolates from other geographic regions revealed 88-91% sequence identity. Phylogenetic trees constructed using Maximum Likelihood, UPGMA, Minimal Evolution, Neighbor Joining, and Maximum Parsimony methods separated the MRFV isolates into four groups. These groups may represent geographic isolation generated by the mountainous chains of the American continent. Analysis of the sequences and the genetic distances among the different isolates suggests that MRFV may have originated in Mexico and/or Guatemala and from there it dispersed to the rest of the Americas.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of Newcastle disease viruses isolated from wild birds in the Poyang Lake region of China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shengtao; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Xiaolong; Ying, Ying; Li, Xue; Li, Yongcheng; Li, Yuanguo; Ma, Jinzhu; Sun, Heting; Chu, Dong; Xu, Yu; Yang, Songtao; Li, Qihan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-09-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) causes a highly contagious viral disease in poultry and wild birds, and it can cause significant economic loss worldwide. Eight viral strains were isolated by inoculating embryonated chicken eggs from the Poyang Lake region of China with swab samples. All eight of the NDV isolates were identified as class I genotype 3 strains, but they diverged notablely from class II viruses. Further analysis revealed that all eight NDV isolates were lentogenic strains containing the (112)ERQER↓L(117) motif at the F protein cleavage site. The strains were highly identical and were more species specific (chicken and waterfowl) than site specific (Nanchang and Duchang regions). The close phylogenetic proximity of these isolates indicates that viral transmission may happen between poultry and wild birds. Our study demonstrates that lentogenic class I NDVs exist in clinically healthy wild waterfowl and poultry within the Poyang Lake region. Active surveillance of these viruses to determine their evolution and origin is one of the most realistic strategies for preventing and controlling NDV outbreaks.

  2. Morphological and phylogenetic analysis of a microsporidium (Nosema sp.) isolated from rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Xing, Dongxu; Yang, Qiong; Liao, Sentai; Han, Lanzhi; Li, Qingrong; Zhao, Chaoyi; Xiao, Yang; Ye, Mingqiang

    2017-08-16

    A new microsporidium was isolated from Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), one of the most important rice pests in China. The morphology and molecular systematics of this novel microsporidium were described in this study. The spores were long oval and measured 3.17 × 1.64 μm on fresh smears. Ultrastructure of the spores was characteristic for the genus Nosema: a diplokaryon, 10-12 polar filament coils of the same type, and posterior vacuole. Small subunit rRNA gene sequence data and phylogenetic analysis further confirmed that the microsporidian species from C. suppressalis belong to the true Nosema sub-group of the genus Nosema. Besides, the microsporidium Nosema sp. CS could cause systemic infection of Bombyx mori and infect silkworms through vertical transmission. Therefore, mulberry field pest control should be carefully monitored, and sanitation of mulberry leaves is essential to control the pebrine disease in sericulture.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of methanogenic enrichment cultures obtained from Lonar Lake in India: isolation of Methanocalculus sp. and Methanoculleus sp.

    PubMed

    Surakasi, Venkata Prasad; Wani, Aijaz Ahmad; Shouche, Yogesh S; Ranade, Dilip R

    2007-11-01

    The diversity of methanogenic archaea in enrichment cultures established from the sediments of Lonar Lake (India), a soda lake having pH approximately 10, was investigated using 16S rDNA molecular phylogenetic approach. Methanogenic enrichment cultures were developed in a medium that simulated conditions of soda lake with three different substrates viz., H(2):CO(2), sodium acetate, and trimethylamine (TMA), at alkaline pH. Archaeal 16S rRNA clone libraries were generated from enrichment cultures and 13 RFLP groups were obtained. Representative sequence analysis of each RFLP group indicated that the majority of the 16S rRNA gene sequences were phylogenetically affiliated with uncultured Archaea. Some of the groups may belong to new archaeal genera or families. Three RFLP groups were related to Methanoculleus sp, while two related to Methanocalculus sp. 16S rRNA gene sequences found in Lonar Lake were different from sequences reported from other soda lakes and more similar to those of oil reservoirs, palm oil waste treatment digesters, and paddy fields. In culture-based studies, three isolates were obtained. Two of these were related to Methanoculleus sp. IIE1 and one to Methanocalculus sp. 01F97C. These results clearly show that the Lonar Lake ecosystem harbors unexplored methanogens.

  4. Biological activities of some Acacia spp. (Fabaceae) against new clinical isolates identified by ribosomal RNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud Fawzy; Alrumman, Sulaiman Abdullah; Hesham, Abd El-Latif

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays,most of the pathogenic bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. Therefore,the pharmaceutical properties of the natural plant extracts have become of interest to researchers as alternative antimicrobial agents. In this study,antibacterial activities of extract gained from Acacia etbaica, Acacia laeta, Acacia origena and Acacia pycnantha have been evaluated against isolated pathogenic bacteria (Strains MFM-01, MFM-10 and AH-09) using agar well diffusion methods.The bacterial strains were isolated from infected individuals,and their exact identification was detected on the basis of 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequence determination. Alignment results and the comparison of 16 SrRN A gene sequences of the isolates to 16 SrRN A gene sequences available in Gen Bank data base as well as the phylogenetic analysis confirmed the accurate position of the isolates as Klebsiella oxytoca strain MFM-01, Staphylococcus aureus strain MFM-10 and Klebsiella pneumoniae strain AH-09. Except for cold water, all tested solvents (Chloroform, petroleum ether, methanol, diethyl ether, and acetone) showed variation in their activity against studied bacteria. GC-MS analysis of ethanol extracts showed that four investigated Acacia species have different phyto components. Eight important pharmaceutical components were found in the legume of Acacia etbaica, seven in the legume of Acacia laeta, fifteen in the legume of Acacia origena and nine in the leaves of Acacia pycnantha. A dendrogram was constructed based on chemical composition, revealed that Acacia laeta is more closely related to Acacia etbaica forming on eclade, whereas Acacia origena less similar to other species. Our results demonstrated that, investigated plants and chemical compounds present could be used as promising antibacterial agents.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of environmental Legionella pneumophila isolates from an endemic area (Alcoy, Spain).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Olmos, María Piedad; Camaró, María Luisa; Adrián, Francisco; Calafat, Juan Miguel; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Environmental surveillance of Legionella pneumophila is a key component of the control measures established in urban settlements to ensure water safety and quality, with the aim of minimizing and limiting opportunistic infections in humans. In this work, we present results on the detection and genetic characterization of these bacteria in the outbreak-recurrent region of Alcoy (Comunidad Valenciana, Spain) using water and biofilm samples. We were particularly interested in studying the presence and distribution of L. pneumophila in the absence of outbreak or sporadic cases of legionellosis and in comparing the efficacy of culturing from water samples with a biofilm-based detection procedure using molecular amplification. To this end, water samples were taken from 120 sites distributed all around the city and its surroundings, as well as 60 biofilm swabs from half of the sampling sites. L. pneumophila could be isolated from water in just 4 of the locations. Touchdown PCR was applied to DNA extracted from water and also biofilm swabs, as a rapid method for both routine and outbreak investigations. L. pneumophila was detected by this method in 14 of the sites in which both water and biofilms were taken, although 13 of them tested positive using only the biofilm samples. These results show a ten-fold increase in the success rate of Legionella detection over water samples. The application of this method to study the presence of L. pneumophila in the water-supply system and risk facilities of Alcoy revealed different strains distributed in different areas of the city. Sequence Type ST578, endemic in the area and responsible for most clinical cases, was detected in one of the sampling sites. The number of positive samples correlated with water temperature but not with chlorine levels. The direct analysis of biofilm swabs improves the detection rate and genetic characterization of L. pneumophila and can complement analyses based on bacterial culture. Copyright © 2014

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of recent isolates of classical swine fever virus from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Sabogal, Zonia Yubyll; Mogollón, José Darío; Rincón, Maria Antonia; Clavijo, Alfonso

    2006-01-01

    The ability to discriminate between different classical Swine fever virus (CSFV) isolates is a prerequisite for identifying the possible origin of an outbreak. To determine the relatedness between Colombian isolates from different geographical regions, genetic sequences of the glycoprotein E2 and the 5'UTR of CSFV were amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared with reference strains of different genetic grouping. The viruses originated from classical swine fever (CSF) outbreaks in Colombia during 1998-2002. All viruses characterized belonged to genogroup 1 and were members of the subgroup 1.1. The results indicate that the outbreaks from the year 2002 are caused by a strain related to the virus CSF/Santander, isolated in 1980, suggesting that the current CSF outbreaks are the consequence of a single strain that continues to circulate in the field. For the first time, an association between isolates from outbreaks in Colombia in the 1990s was established with a virus isolate from Brazil, indicating a possible origin of the virus causing the outbreak.

  7. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of human influenza A viruses isolated in Iran during the 2014-2015 season.

    PubMed

    Moasser, Elham; Behzadian, Farida; Moattari, Afagh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Rahimi, Amir; Zaraket, Hassan; Hosseini, Seyed Younes

    2017-07-01

    Influenza A viruses are an important cause of severe infectious diseases in humans and are characterized by their fast evolution rate. Global monitoring of these viruses is critical to detect newly emerging variants during annual epidemics. Here, we sought to genetically characterize influenza A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 viruses collected in Iran during the 2014-2015 influenza season. A total of 200 nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from patients with influenza-like illnesses. Swabs were screened for influenza A and B using real-time PCR. Furthermore, positive specimens with high virus load underwent virus isolation and genetic characterization of their hemagglutinin (HA) and M genes. Of the 200 specimens, 80 were influenza A-positive, including 44 A/H1N1pdm09 and 36 A/H3N2, while 18 were influenza B-positive. Phylogenetic analysis of the HA genes of the A/H1N1pdm09 viruses revealed the circulation of clade 6C, characterized by amino acid substitutions D97N, V234I and K283E. Analysis of the A/H3N2 viruses showed a genetic drift from the vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 with 5 mutations (T128A, R142G, N145S, P198S and S219F) belonging to the antigenic sites A, B, and D of the HA protein. The A/H3N2 viruses belonged to phylogenetic clades 3C.2 and 3C.3. The M gene trees of the Iranian A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 mirrored the clustering patterns of their corresponding HA trees. Our results reveal co-circulation of several influenza A virus strains in Iran during the 2014-2015 influenza season.

  8. Phylogenetic and clonality analysis of Bacillus pumilus isolates uncovered a highly heterogeneous population of different closely related species and clones.

    PubMed

    Branquinho, Raquel; Meirinhos-Soares, Luís; Carriço, João A; Pintado, Manuela; Peixe, Luísa V

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus pumilus is a Gram-positive bacterium with a wide range of attributed applications, namely as a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), animal, and human probiotic. However, a rare putative role in human diseases has been reported, namely in food poisoning or as anthrax-like cutaneous infectious agent. This species is difficult to distinguish from its closely related species on the basis of phenotypic or biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequences. In this study, the phylogenetic analysis of gyrB and rpoB gene sequences of a collection of isolates previously identified as B. pumilus, assigned most of them (93%, 38 of 41 isolates) to B. safensis or to the new recently described B. invictae. Moreover, we extended the previously reported recognized habitats of these species and unveiled a human health or biotechnological relevance (e.g. as implicated in food poisoning or PGPR) for them. Additionally, we demonstrated that both B. safensis and B. invictae species encompass a clonally diverse population, which can justify their great adaptation ability to different niches, with evidence of clonal-host specificity. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. PHYLOGENETIC AFFILIATION OF WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM BACTERIAL ISOLATES USING 16S RDNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a previously described study, only 15% of the bacterial strains isolated from a water distribution system (WDS) grown on R2A agar were identifiable using fatty acid methyl esthers (FAME) profiling. The lack of success was attributed to the use of fatty acid databases of bacter...

  10. PHYLOGENETIC AFFILIATION OF WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM BACTERIAL ISOLATES USING 16S RDNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a previously described study, only 15% of the bacterial strains isolated from a water distribution system (WDS) grown on R2A agar were identifiable using fatty acid methyl esthers (FAME) profiling. The lack of success was attributed to the use of fatty acid databases of bacter...

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis of Phenotypically Characterized Cryptococcus laurentii Isolates Reveals High Frequency of Cryptic Species

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Ferreira, Thatiana Bragine; Andrade-Silva, Leonardo; Mora, Delio Jose; Springer, Deborah J.; Heitman, Joseph; Fonseca, Fernanda Machado; Matos, Dulcilena; Melhem, Márcia Souza Carvalho; Silva-Vergara, Mario León

    2014-01-01

    Background Although Cryptococcus laurentii has been considered saprophytic and its taxonomy is still being described, several cases of human infections have already reported. This study aimed to evaluate molecular aspects of C. laurentii isolates from Brazil, Botswana, Canada, and the United States. Methods In this study, 100 phenotypically identified C. laurentii isolates were evaluated by sequencing the 18S nuclear ribosomal small subunit rRNA gene (18S-SSU), D1/D2 region of 28S nuclear ribosomal large subunit rRNA gene (28S-LSU), and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal region. Results BLAST searches using 550-bp, 650-bp, and 550-bp sequenced amplicons obtained from the 18S-SSU, 28S-LSU, and the ITS region led to the identification of 75 C. laurentii strains that shared 99–100% identity with C. laurentii CBS 139. A total of nine isolates shared 99% identity with both Bullera sp. VY-68 and C. laurentii RY1. One isolate shared 99% identity with Cryptococcus rajasthanensis CBS 10406, and eight isolates shared 100% identity with Cryptococcus sp. APSS 862 according to the 28S-LSU and ITS regions and designated as Cryptococcus aspenensis sp. nov. (CBS 13867). While 16 isolates shared 99% identity with Cryptococcus flavescens CBS 942 according to the 18S-SSU sequence, only six were confirmed using the 28S-LSU and ITS region sequences. The remaining 10 shared 99% identity with Cryptococcus terrestris CBS 10810, which was recently described in Brazil. Through concatenated sequence analyses, seven sequence types in C. laurentii, three in C. flavescens, one in C. terrestris, and one in the C. aspenensis sp. nov. were identified. Conclusions Sequencing permitted the characterization of 75% of the environmental C. laurentii isolates from different geographical areas and the identification of seven haplotypes of this species. Among sequenced regions, the increased variability of the ITS region in comparison to the 18S-SSU and 28S-LSU regions reinforces its

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Novel Molecular Isolate of Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae from Northern Peru

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    ompA, and sca4) from two molecular isolates of Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae from two ticks ( Amblyomma maculatum and Ixodes boliviensis) col- lected...andeanae from two ticks ( Amblyomma maculatum and Ixodes boliviensis) collected from domestic horses liv- ing in two separate locations in Northern Peru...scribed previously.2 However, new primers were used for PCR and sequencing in this study (TABLE 1). The sequences (both forward and reverse) were

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided.

  14. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of neurotoxin gene from an environmental isolate of Clostridium sp.: comparison with other clostridial neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Aparna; Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Singh, Lokendra

    2006-07-01

    A Clostridium sp. isolated from intestine of decaying fish exhibited 99% sequence identity with C. tetani at 16S rRNA level. It produced a neurotoxin that was neutralized by botulinum antitoxin (A+B+E) as well as tetanus antitoxin. The gene fragments for light chain, C-terminal and N-terminal regions of the heavy chain of the toxin were amplified using three reported primer sets for tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT). The neurotoxin gene fragments were cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. The sequences obtained exhibited approximately 98, 99 and 98% sequence identity with reported gene sequences of TeNT/LC, TeNT/HC and TeNT/HN, respectively. The phylogenetic interrelationship between the neurotoxin gene of Clostridium sp. with previously reported gene sequences of Clostridium botulinum A to G and C. tetani was examined by analysis of differences in the nucleotide sequences. Six amino acids were substituted at four different positions in the light chain of neurotoxin from the isolate when compared with the reported closest sequence of TeNT. Of these, four were located in the beta15 motif at a solvent inaccessible, buried region of the protein molecule. One of these substitutions were on the solvent accessible surface residue of alpha1 motif, previously shown to have strong sequence conservation. A substitution of two amino acids observed in N-terminal region of heavy chain were buried residues, located in the beta21 and beta37 motifs showing variability in other related sequences. The C-terminal region responsible for binding to receptor was conserved, showing no changes in the amino acid sequence.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Hepatitis E virus strains isolated from slaughter-age pigs in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Forero, Jorge E; Gutiérrez-Vergara, Cristian; Parra Suescún, Jaime; Correa, Guillermo; Rodríguez, Berardo; Gutiérrez, Lina A; Díaz, Francisco J; López-Herrera, Albeiro

    2017-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a zoonotic virus that causes acute hepatitis in humans, and can be transmitted via the fecal-oral route. Pigs are considered to be a reservoir for this infection-mainly where the disease is not endemic. In a previous study conducted in Antioquia, which is a region in Colombia where the production and consumption of pork meat is higher than in the rest of the country, the presence of anti-HEV IgG-type antibodies was reported in slaughter-age pigs. Aiming to identify the HEV genotype circulating in swine, animal liver, and feces samples from five swine cattle slaughterhouses located in six different sub-regions of Antioquia were collected. A nested RT-PCR (nRT-PCR) was used in order to amplify the HEV ORF-1 (170bp) and ORF-2 (348, and 958bp). The amplicons yielded in this study were sequenced, and a molecular phylogeny analysis based on the maximum likelihood method, including HEV sequences reported in several countries, was performed. Phylogeny analysis revealed that HEV amplification fragments from Antioquia's pigs were grouped in three clades within the sub-genotype 3a without a specific geographical structure, and were also genetically related to Japanese and American HEV sequences. This analysis provides the first approach on the genetic diversity and circulation dynamics of HEV in Colombian herds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular identification and phylogenetic analysis of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from gut of honeybees (Apis mellifera) from West Azerbaijan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sharifpour, Mohammad Farouq; Mardani, Karim; Ownagh, Abdulghaffar

    2016-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and phylogenetic analysis were used for molecular identification of lactic acid bacteria (LABs) isolated from Apis mellifera. Eighteen honeybee workers were collected from three different apiaries in West Azerbaijan. LABs from the gut of honeybees were isolated and cultured using routine biochemical procedures. Genomic DNA was extracted from LABs and a fragment of 1540 bp in size of 16S rRNA gene was amplified. PCR products were digested using HinfI endonuclease and digested products with different RFLP patterns were subjected to nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The results revealed that Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria spp. are were the most abundant LABs in honeybee gut. Phylogenetic analysis showed that both Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium were closely clustered with high similarity percentage with the same bacteria isolated from honeybees’ gut elsewhere. It was concluded that LABs isolated from honeybees had low sequence divergence in comparison with LABs isolated from other sources such as dairy products. PMID:28144419

  17. Molecular identification and phylogenetic analysis of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from gut of honeybees (Apis mellifera) from West Azerbaijan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Sharifpour, Mohammad Farouq; Mardani, Karim; Ownagh, Abdulghaffar

    2016-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and phylogenetic analysis were used for molecular identification of lactic acid bacteria (LABs) isolated from Apis mellifera. Eighteen honeybee workers were collected from three different apiaries in West Azerbaijan. LABs from the gut of honeybees were isolated and cultured using routine biochemical procedures. Genomic DNA was extracted from LABs and a fragment of 1540 bp in size of 16S rRNA gene was amplified. PCR products were digested using HinfI endonuclease and digested products with different RFLP patterns were subjected to nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The results revealed that Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria spp. are were the most abundant LABs in honeybee gut. Phylogenetic analysis showed that both Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium were closely clustered with high similarity percentage with the same bacteria isolated from honeybees' gut elsewhere. It was concluded that LABs isolated from honeybees had low sequence divergence in comparison with LABs isolated from other sources such as dairy products.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of spring virema of carp virus reveals distinct subgroups with common origins for recent isolates in North America and the UK.

    PubMed

    Miller, O; Fuller, F J; Gebreyes, W A; Lewbart, G A; Shchelkunov, I S; Shivappa, R B; Joiner, C; Woolford, G; Stone, D M; Dixon, P F; Raley, M E; Levine, J F

    2007-07-16

    Genetic relationships between 35 spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) genogroup Ia isolates were determined based on the nucleotide sequences of the phosphoprotein (P) gene and glycoprotein (G) genes. Phylogenetic analysis based on P gene sequences revealed 2 distinct subgroups within SVCV genogroup Ia, designated SVCV Iai and Iaii, and suggests at least 2 independent introductions of the virus into the USA in 2002. Combined P- and G-sequence data support the emergence of SVCV in Illinois, USA, and in Lake Ontario, Canada, from the initial outbreak in Wisconsin, USA, and demonstrate a close genetic link to viruses isolated during routine import checks on fish brought into the UK from Asia. The data also showed a genetic link between SVCV isolations made in Missouri and Washington, USA, in 2004 and the earlier isolation made in North Carolina, USA, in 2002. However, based on the close relationship to a 2004 UK isolate, the data suggest than the Washington isolate represents a third introduction into the US from a common source, rather than a reemergence from the 2002 isolate. There was strong phylogenetic support for an Asian origin for 9 of 16 UK viruses isolated either from imported fish, or shown to have been in direct contact with fish imported from Asia. In one case, there was 100% nucleotide identity in the G-gene with a virus isolated in China.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis and pathogenicity of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets in China

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongrui; Shi, Ying; Ruan, Tao; Li, Xuesong; Teng, Qiaoyang; Chen, Hongjun; Yang, Jianmei; Liu, Qinfang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    H3 subtype influenza A virus is one of the main subtypes that threats both public and animal health. However, the evolution and pathogenicity of H3 avian influenza virus (AIV) circulating in domestic birds in China remain largely unclear. In this study, seven H3 AIVs (four H3N2 and three H3N8) were isolated from poultry in live poultry market (LPM) in China. Phylogenetic analyses of full genomes showed that all viruses were clustered into Eurasian lineage, except N8 genes of two H3N8 isolates fell into North American lineage. Intriguingly, the N8 gene of one H3N8 and PB2, PB1, NP and NS of two H3N2 isolates have close relationship with those of the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses circulating in Korea and United States, suggesting that the H3-like AIV may contribute internal genes to the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses. Phylogenetic tree of HA gene and antigenic cross-reactivity results indicated that two antigenically different H3 viruses are circulating in LPM in China. Most of the H3 viruses replicated in mice lung and nasal turbinate without prior adaptation, and the representative H3 viruses infected chickens without causing clinical signs. The reassortment of H3 subtype influenza viruses warrants continuous surveillance in LPM in China. PMID:27270298

  20. Culturable actinobacteria from the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve: isolation and phylogenetic diversity by 16S rRNA gene-RFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Zhang, Wei; Lee, Hong Kum

    2006-08-01

    A total of 106 actinobacteria associated with the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve collected from the Yellow Sea, China were isolated using eight different media. The number of species and genera of actinobacteria recovered from the different media varied significantly, underlining the importance of optimizing the isolation conditions. The phylogenetic diversity of the actinobacteria isolates was assessed using 16S rRNA gene amplification-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the 106 strains with different morphologies. The RFLP fingerprinting of selected strains by HhaI-digestion of the 16S rRNA genes resulted in 11 different patterns. The HhaI-RFLP analysis gave good resolution for the identification of the actinobacteria isolates at the genus level. A phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolates belonged to seven genera of culturable actinobacteria including Actinoalloteichus, Micromonospora, Nocardia, Nocardiopsis, Pseudonocardia, Rhodococcus, and Streptomyces. The dominant genus was Streptomyces, which represented 74% of the isolates. Three of the strains identified are candidates for new species.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of HSP70 and cyt b gene sequences for Chinese Leishmania isolates and ultrastructural characteristics of Chinese Leishmania sp.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongmei; Qin, Hanxiao; Zhang, Jianguo; Liao, Lin; Chen, Qiwei; Chen, Dali; Chen, Jianping

    2017-02-01

    Leishmaniasis is a worldwide epidemic disease caused by the genus Leishmania, which is still endemic in the west and northwest areas of China. Some viewpoints of the traditional taxonomy of Chinese Leishmania have been challenged by recent phylogenetic researches based on different molecular markers. However, the taxonomic positions and phylogenetic relationships of Chinese Leishmania isolates remain controversial, which need for more data and further analysis. In this study, the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene and cytochrome b (cyt b) gene were used for phylogenetic analysis of Chinese Leishmania isolates from patients, dogs, gerbils, and sand flies in different geographic origins. Besides, for the interesting Leishmania sp. in China, the ultrastructure of three Chinese Leishmania sp. strains (MHOM/CN/90/SC10H2, SD, GL) were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Bayesian trees from HSP70 and cyt b congruently indicated that the 14 Chinese Leishmania isolates belong to three Leishmania species including L. donovani complex, L. gerbilli, and L. (Sauroleishmania) sp. Their identity further confirmed that the undescribed Leishmania species causing visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) in China is closely related to L. tarentolae. The phylogenetic results from HSP70 also suggested the classification of subspecies within L. donovani complex: KXG-918, KXG-927, KXG-Liu, KXG-Xu, 9044, SC6, and KXG-65 belong to L. donovani; Cy, WenChuan, and 801 were proposed to be L. infantum. Through transmission electron microscopy, unexpectedly, the Golgi apparatus were not observed in SC10H2, SD, and GL, which was similar to previous reports of reptilian Leishmania. The statistical analysis of microtubule counts separated SC10H2, SD, and GL as one group from any other reference strain (L. donovani MHOM/IN/80/DD8; L. tropica MHOM/SU/74/K27; L. gerbilli MRHO/CN/60/GERBILLI). The ultrastructural characteristics of Leishmania sp. partly lend support to the phylogenetic inference that

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of Trichophyton mentagrophytes human and animal isolates based on MnSOD and ITS sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Fréalle, Emilie; Rodrigue, Marion; Gantois, Nausicaa; Aliouat, Cécile-Marie; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Camus, Daniel; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Kauffmann-Lacroix, Catherine; Guillot, Jacques; Delhaes, Laurence

    2007-10-01

    Dermatophytes are keratinophilic fungi able to infect keratinized tissues of human or animal origin. Among them, Trichophyton mentagrophytes is known to be a species complex composed of several species or variants, which occur in both human and animals. Since the T. mentagrophytes complex includes both anthropophilic and zoophilic pathogens, accurate molecular identification is a critical issue for comprehensive understanding of the clinical and epidemiological implications of the genetic heterogeneity of this complex. Here, 41 T. mentagrophytes isolates from either human patients (14 isolates) or animals (27 isolates) with dermatophytosis were prospectively isolated by culture and identified on morphological bases at the University Hospital Centres of Lille and Poitiers, and the Veterinary School of Alfort, respectively. The isolates were differentiated by DNA sequencing of the variable internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions flanking the 5.8S rDNA, and of the housekeeping gene encoding the manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), an enzyme which is involved in defence against oxidative stress and has previously provided interesting insight into both fungal taxonomy and phylogeny. ITS1-ITS2 regions and MnSOD sequences successfully differentiate between members of the T. mentagrophytes complex and the related species Trichophyton rubrum. Whatever the phylogenetic marker used, members of this complex were classified into two major clades exhibiting a similar topology, with a higher variability when the ITS marker was used. Relationships between ITS/MnSOD sequences and host origin, clinical pattern and phenotypic characteristics (macroscopic and microscopic morphologies) were analysed.

  3. Complete Genome Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Getah Virus Strain (Genus Alphavirus, Family Togaviridae) Isolated from Culex tritaeniorhynchus Mosquitoes in Nagasaki, Japan in 2012.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Isawa, Haruhiko; Ejiri, Hiroko; Sasaki, Toshinori; Sunahara, Toshihiko; Futami, Kyoko; Tsuda, Yoshio; Katayama, Yukie; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Minakawa, Noboru; Ohta, Nobuo; Sawabe, Kyoko

    2016-12-01

    Getah virus (GETV; genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae) is a mosquito-borne virus known to cause disease in horses and pigs. In 2014, for the first time in ∼30 years, a sudden GETV outbreak occurred among racehorses in Ibaraki, Japan. Two years before this outbreak, we obtained multiple GETV isolates from Culex tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes collected in Nagasaki, Japan and determined the whole genome sequence of GETV isolate 12IH26. Our phylogenetic analysis of GETV strains revealed that the isolate 12IH26 forms a robust clade with the epidemic strains 14-I-605-C1 and 14-I-605-C2 isolated from horses in the 2014 outbreak in Ibaraki. Furthermore, the complete genomic sequence of the isolate 12IH26 was 99.9% identical to those of the 2014 epidemic strains in Ibaraki. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that the recent Japanese GETV strains, including the isolate 12IH26, are closely related to the Chinese and South Korean strains rather than the previous Japanese strains, suggesting that GETV strains may be transported from overseas into Japan through long-distance migration of the infected mosquitoes or migratory birds.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of glycoprotein B gene sequences of bovine herpesvirus 1 isolates from India reveals the predominance of subtype 1.1

    PubMed Central

    Patil, S. S.; Prajapati, A.; Hemadri, D.; Suresh, K. P.; Desai, G. S.; Reddy, G. B. Manjunatha; Chandranaik, B. M.; Ranganatha, S.; Rahman, H.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted for the isolation and molecular characterization of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) isolated from the nasal and vaginal swabs collected from naturally infected cattle showing clinical symptoms of the respiratory disease. Materials and Methods: Isolation of BoHV-1 virus performed on clinical samples collected from 65 cattle from five states of India. The BoHV-1 isolates were further confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for glycoprotein B (gB) genomic region. PCR amplification was performed using previously published gB gene-specific primer pairs. gB PCR amplicons obtained from all isolates were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was performed using software. Results: A total of 12 samples were found positive in cell culture isolation. 11 isolates showed the visible cytopathic effect on Madin-Darby bovine kidney after 72 h. Partial sequence analysis of gB gene of all isolates revealed 99.0-100% homology between them. All isolates showed 99.2-99.8% homology with Cooper stain. Conclusion: BoHV-1.1 is the predominant circulating subtype of BoHV in India, and all isolates have homology with Cooper stain. PMID:28096606

  5. A phylogenetic analysis of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) isolates from six different regions of the UK and links to animal movement data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) is a pestivirus which infects cattle populations worldwide and is recognised as a significant source of economic loss through its impact on health and productivity. Studies investigating the molecular epidemiology of BVDV can give invaluable information about the diversity of viral strains present in a population and this, in turn, can inform control programs, drive vaccine development and determine likely infection sources. The current study investigated 104 viral isolates from forty farms across the UK. Through phylogenetic and nucleotide sequence analysis of the 5′UTR and Npro regions of the isolates investigated, it was determined that BVDV 1a was the predominant sub-genotype. However, BVDV 1b, 1e and 1i were also identified and, for the first time in the UK, BVDV 1d. Through analysis of animal movement data alongside the phylogenetic analysis of these BVD isolates, it was possible to link animal movements to the viral isolates present on several premises and, for the first time, begin to elucidate the routes of viral transmission. With further work, this type of analysis would enable accurate determination and quantification of the true biosecurity risk factors associated with BVDV transmission. PMID:23783173

  6. A phylogenetic analysis of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) isolates from six different regions of the UK and links to animal movement data.

    PubMed

    Booth, Richard E; Thomas, Carole J; El-Attar, Laila M R; Gunn, George; Brownlie, Joe

    2013-06-19

    Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) is a pestivirus which infects cattle populations worldwide and is recognised as a significant source of economic loss through its impact on health and productivity. Studies investigating the molecular epidemiology of BVDV can give invaluable information about the diversity of viral strains present in a population and this, in turn, can inform control programs, drive vaccine development and determine likely infection sources. The current study investigated 104 viral isolates from forty farms across the UK. Through phylogenetic and nucleotide sequence analysis of the 5'UTR and Npro regions of the isolates investigated, it was determined that BVDV 1a was the predominant sub-genotype. However, BVDV 1b, 1e and 1i were also identified and, for the first time in the UK, BVDV 1d. Through analysis of animal movement data alongside the phylogenetic analysis of these BVD isolates, it was possible to link animal movements to the viral isolates present on several premises and, for the first time, begin to elucidate the routes of viral transmission. With further work, this type of analysis would enable accurate determination and quantification of the true biosecurity risk factors associated with BVDV transmission.

  7. Phylogenetic and pathogenic analysis of a novel H6N2 avian influenza virus isolated from a green peafowl in a wildlife park.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhaobin; Ci, Yanpeng; Ma, Yixin; Liu, Liling; Ma, Jianzhang; Li, D Yanbing; Chen, Hualan

    2014-12-01

    H6 subtype avian influenza virus, which has been circulating among different species, causes considerable concern for both veterinary medicine and public health. We isolated a strain of H6N2 avian influenza virus from healthy green peafowl (Pavo muticus) in Qinghuangdao Wildlife Park in Hebei Province, China, in 2012. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the isolated H6N2 strain had the same gene constellation as southern China strains, which were predominantly isolated from waterfowl distributed in Shantou, Guangxi, and Hunan in 2001-2010. The isolate showed no and low pathogenicity in chickens and ducks, respectively. However, it replicated efficiently in the lungs and turbinate of infected mice, resulting in thickened alveolar septa and moderate interstitial pneumonia. This finding raises concerns that the H6N2 subtype maybe evolve into a novel endemic avian influenza virus. Therefore, periodical surveillance of avian influenza viruses must be undertaken to monitor the advent of novel viruses.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of a swine influenza A(H3N2) virus isolated in Korea in 2012.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Il; Lee, Ilseob; Park, Sehee; Lee, Sangmoo; Hwang, Min-Woong; Bae, Joon-Yong; Heo, Jun; Kim, Donghwan; Jang, Seok-Il; Kim, Kabsu; Park, Man-Seong

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) can infect avian and mammalian species, including humans. The genome nature of IAVs may contribute to viral adaptation in different animal hosts, resulting in gene reassortment and the reproduction of variants with optimal fitness. As seen again in the 2009 swine-origin influenza A H1N1 pandemic, pigs are known to be susceptible to swine, avian, and human IAVs and can serve as a 'mixing vessel' for the generation of novel IAV variants. To this end, the emergence of swine influenza viruses must be kept under close surveillance. Herein, we report the isolation and phylogenetic study of a swine IAV, A/swine/Korea/PL01/2012 (swPL01, H3N2 subtype). After screening nasopharyngeal samples from pigs in the Gyeongsangnam-do region of Korea from December 2011 to May 2012, we isolated the swPL01 virus and sequenced its all of 8 genome segments (polymerase basic 2, PB2; polymerase basic 1, PB1; polymerase acidic, PA; hemagglutinin, HA; nucleocapsid protein, NP; neuraminidase, NA; matrix protein, M; and nonstructural protein, NS). The phylogenetic study, analyzed with reference strains registered in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, indicated that the swPL01 virus was similar to the North American triple-reassortant swine strains and that the HA gene of the swPL01 virus was categorized into swine H3 cluster IV. The swPL01 virus had the M gene of the triple-reassortant swine H3N2 viruses, whereas that of other contemporary strains in Korea was transferred from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. These data suggest the possibility that various swine H3N2 viruses may co-circulate in Korea, which underlines the importance of a sustained surveillance system against swine IAVs.

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Swine Influenza A(H3N2) Virus Isolated in Korea in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sehee; Lee, Sangmoo; Hwang, Min-Woong; Bae, Joon-Yong; Heo, Jun; Kim, Donghwan; Jang, Seok-Il; Kim, Kabsu; Park, Man-Seong

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) can infect avian and mammalian species, including humans. The genome nature of IAVs may contribute to viral adaptation in different animal hosts, resulting in gene reassortment and the reproduction of variants with optimal fitness. As seen again in the 2009 swine-origin influenza A H1N1 pandemic, pigs are known to be susceptible to swine, avian, and human IAVs and can serve as a ‘mixing vessel’ for the generation of novel IAV variants. To this end, the emergence of swine influenza viruses must be kept under close surveillance. Herein, we report the isolation and phylogenetic study of a swine IAV, A/swine/Korea/PL01/2012 (swPL01, H3N2 subtype). After screening nasopharyngeal samples from pigs in the Gyeongsangnam-do region of Korea from December 2011 to May 2012, we isolated the swPL01 virus and sequenced its all of 8 genome segments (polymerase basic 2, PB2; polymerase basic 1, PB1; polymerase acidic, PA; hemagglutinin, HA; nucleocapsid protein, NP; neuraminidase, NA; matrix protein, M; and nonstructural protein, NS). The phylogenetic study, analyzed with reference strains registered in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, indicated that the swPL01 virus was similar to the North American triple-reassortant swine strains and that the HA gene of the swPL01 virus was categorized into swine H3 cluster IV. The swPL01 virus had the M gene of the triple-reassortant swine H3N2 viruses, whereas that of other contemporary strains in Korea was transferred from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. These data suggest the possibility that various swine H3N2 viruses may co-circulate in Korea, which underlines the importance of a sustained surveillance system against swine IAVs. PMID:24523938

  10. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of matrix gene of avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds and live bird markets in the USA.

    PubMed

    Chander, Yogesh; Jindal, Naresh; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Stallknecht, David E; Goyal, Sagar M

    2013-07-01

    Wild birds are the natural hosts for influenza A viruses (IAVs) and provide a niche for the maintenance of this virus. This study was undertaken to analyze nucleotide sequences of the matrix (M) gene of AIVs isolated from wild birds and live bird markets (LBMs) to index the changes occurring in this gene. M-gene of 229 avian influenza virus (AIV) isolates obtained from wild birds and LBMs was amplified and sequenced. Full-length sequences (∼900 nt.) thus obtained were analyzed to identify changes that may be associated with resistance to adamantanes. Phylogenetic analysis of all sequences was performed using clustalw, and evolutionary distances were calculated by maximum composite likelihood method using mega (ver. 5.0) software. Twenty-seven different viral subtypes were represented with H3N8 being the most dominant subtype in wild birds and H7N2 being the predominant subtype among isolates from LBMs. Phylogenetic analysis of the M-gene showed a high degree of nucleotide sequence identity with US isolates of AIVs but not with those of Asian or European lineages. While none of the isolates from wild birds had any antiviral resistance-associated mutations, 17 LBM isolates carried polymorphisms known to cause reduced susceptibility to antiviral drugs (adamantanes). Of these 17 isolates, 16 had S31N change and one isolate had V27A mutation. These results indicate independent evolution of M-gene in the absence of any antiviral drugs leading to mutations causing resistance indicating the need for continued active surveillance of AIVs. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of surface protein genes of emerging H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from poultry in two geographical regions of China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yu; Wang, Jing-Lan; Yan, Zhuan-Qiang; Li, Guang-Wei; Chen, Shun-Yan; Zhang, Xiang-Bin; Qin, Jian-Ping; Li, Hai-Yan; Chang, Shuang; Chen, Feng; Bee, Ying-Zuo; Xie, Qing-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Subtype H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulating in China have aroused increasing concerns for their impact on poultry and risk to public health. The present study was an attempt to elucidate the phylogenetic relationship of H9N2 AIVs in two geographically distinct regions of China where vaccination is routinely practiced. A total of 18 emerging H9N2 isolates were identified and genetically characterized. Phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes confirmed that the isolates belonged to the Y280 lineage. Based on the HA genes, the isolates were subdivided into two subgroups. The viruses from Zhejiang Province were clustered together in Group I, while the isolates from Guangdong Province were clustered together in Group II. Antigenic characterization showed that the tested viruses were antigenically different when compared to the current used vaccine strain. It was notable that 14 out of total 18 isolates had an amino acid exchange (Q→L) at position 216 (226 by H3 Numbering) in the receptor-binding site, which indicated that the virus had potential affinity of binding to human like receptor. These results suggest that the emerging viruses have potential risk to public health than previously thought. Therefore, continuous surveillance studies of H9N2 influenza virus are very important to the prognosis and control of future influenza pandemics.

  12. Concordance analysis in mitogenomic phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Weisrock, David W

    2012-10-01

    Here I advocate the utility of Bayesian concordance analysis as a mechanism for exploring the magnitude and source of phylogenetic signal in concatenated mitogenomic phylogenetic studies. While typically applied to the study of independently evolving gene trees, Bayesian concordance analysis can also be applied to linked, but individually analyzed, gene regions using a prior probability that reflects the expectation of similar phylogenetic reconstructions. For true branches in the mitogenomic tree, concordance factors should represent the number of gene regions that contain phylogenetic signal for a particular clade. As a demonstration of the application of Bayesian concordance analysis to empirical data, I analyzed two different salamander (Hynobiidae and Plethodontidae) mitogenomic data sets using a gene-based partitioning strategy. The results revealed many strongly supported clades in the concatenated trees that have high concordance factors, permitting the inference that these are robustly resolved through phylogenetic signal distributed across the mitogenome. In contrast, a number of strongly supported clades in the concatenated tree received low concordance factors, indicating that their reconstruction is either driven primarily by phylogenetic signal in a small number of gene regions, or that they are inconsistent reconstructions influenced by properties of the data that can produce inaccurate trees (e.g., compositional bias, selection, etc.). Exploration of the Bayesian joint posterior distribution of trees highlighted partitions that contribute phylogenetic information to similar clade reconstructions. This approach was particularly insightful in the hynobiid data, where different combinations of genes were identified that support alternative tree reconstructions. Concatenated analysis of these different subsets of genes highlighted through Bayesian concordance analysis produced strongly supported and contrasting trees, demonstrating the potential for

  13. Synthesis of 'cineole cassette' monoterpenes in Nicotiana section Alatae: gene isolation, expression, functional characterization and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Fähnrich, Anke; Brosemann, Anne; Teske, Laura; Neumann, Madeleine; Piechulla, Birgit

    2012-08-01

    The scent bouquets of flowers of Nicotiana species, particularly those of section Alatae, are rich in monoterpenes, including 1,8-cineole, limonene, β-myrcene, α- and β-pinene, sabinene, and α-terpineol. New terpene synthase genes were isolated from flowers of Nicotiana bonariensis, N. forgetiana, N. longiflora, and N. mutabilis. The recombinant enzymes synthesize simultaneously the characteristic 'cineole cassette' monoterpenes with 1,8-cineole as the dominant volatile product. Interestingly, amino acid sequence comparison and phylogenetic tree construction clustered the newly isolated cineole synthases (CIN) of section Alatae together with the catalytically similar CIN of N. suaveolens of section Suaveolentes, thus suggesting a common ancestor. These CIN genes of N. bonariensis, N. forgetiana, N. longiflora, and N. mutabilis are distinct from the terpineol synthases (TERs) of the taxonomically related N. alata and N. langsdorfii (both Alatae), thus indicating gene diversification of monoterpene synthases in section Alatae. Furthermore, the presence of CINs in species of the American section Alatae supports the hypothesis that one parent of the Australian section Suaveolentes was a member of the present section Alatae. Amino acid sequences of the Nicotiana CINs and TERs were compared to identify relevant amino acids of the cyclization reaction from α-terpineol to 1,8-cineole.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of partial S1 and N gene sequences of infectious bronchitis virus isolates from Italy revealed genetic diversity and recombination.

    PubMed

    Bochkov, Yury A; Tosi, Giovanni; Massi, Paola; Drygin, Vladimir V

    2007-08-01

    A total of ten infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) isolates collected from commercial chickens in Italy in 1999 were characterized by RT-PCR and sequencing of the S1 and N genes. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial S1 gene sequences showed that five field viruses clustered together with 793/B-type strains, having 91.3-98.5% nucleotide identity within the group, and one isolate had very close sequence relationship (94.6% identity) with 624/I strain. These two IBV types have been identified in Italy previously. The other three variant isolates formed novel genotype detected recently in many countries of Western Europe. For one of these variant viruses, Italy-02, which afterwards became the prototype strain, the entire S1 gene was sequenced to confirm its originality. In contrast, phylogenetic analysis of more conserved partial N gene sequences, comprising 1-300 nucleotides, revealed different clustering. Thus, three variant IBVs of novel Italy-02 genotype, which had 96.7-99.2% S1 gene nucleotide identity with each other, belonged to three separate subgroups based on N gene sequences. 624/I-type isolate Italy-06 together with Italy-03, which was undetectable using S1 gene primers, shared 97.7% and 99.3% identity, respectively, in N gene region with vaccine strain H120. Only one of the 793/B-type isolates, Italy-10, clustered with the 793/B strain sharing 99.3% partial N gene identity, whereas the other four isolates were genetically distant from them (only 87.7-89.7% identity) and formed separate homogenous subgroup. The results demonstrated that both mutations and recombination events could contribute to the genetic diversity of the Italian isolates.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Ara+ and Ara- Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates and development of a multiplex PCR procedure for rapid discrimination between the two biotypes.

    PubMed

    Dharakul, T; Tassaneetrithep, B; Trakulsomboon, S; Songsivilai, S

    1999-06-01

    A Burkholderia pseudomallei-like organism has recently been identified among some soil isolates of B. pseudomallei in an area with endemic melioidosis. This organism is almost identical to B. pseudomallei in terms of morphological and biochemical profiles, except that it differs in ability to assimilate L-arabinose. These Ara+ isolates are also less virulent than the Ara- isolates in animal models. In addition, clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei available to date are almost exclusively Ara-. These features suggested that these two organisms may belong to distinctive species. In this study, the 16S rRNA-encoding genes from five clinical (four Ara- and one Ara+) and nine soil isolates (five Ara- and four Ara+) of B. pseudomallei were sequenced. The nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the 16S rRNA-encoding gene of the Ara+ biotype was similar to but distinctively different from that of the Ara- soil isolates, which were identical to the classical clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei. The nucleotide sequence differences in the 16S rRNA-encoding gene appeared to be specific for the Ara+ or Ara- biotypes. The differences were, however, not sufficient for classification into a new species within the genus Burkholderia. A simple and rapid multiplex PCR procedure was developed to discriminate between Ara- and Ara+ B. pseudomallei isolates. This new method could also be incorporated into our previously reported nested PCR system for detecting B. pseudomallei in clinical specimens.

  16. [HIV-1 subtype distribution determined by phylogenetic analysis of pol gene sequences and automated subtyping tools among HIV-1 isolates from the Aegian Region of Turkey].

    PubMed

    Uluer Biçeroğlu, Servet; Altuğlu, Imre; Nazli Zeka, Arzu; Gökengin, Deniz; Yazan Sertöz, Rüçhan

    2014-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exhibiting remarkable genetic variability, includes two genotypes namely HIV-1 (group M, N, O and P) and HIV-2 (group A-H). HIV-1 group M, which is mainly the cause of the AIDS pandemic, is divided into nine pure subtypes, more than 45 circulating recombinant forms (CRF) and numerous unique recombinant forms (URF). According to the documents of Turkish Government of Health, among a total of 6802 HIV-positive cases, 1096 of them were defined as AIDS as of June 2013 in Turkey. Although subtype B is the predominant subtype, recent studies indicate higher proportion of CRFs similar to their increasing role in the HIV pandemic. The aim of this study was to determine the subtype distribution of HIV-1 strains isolated from 70 patients (61 male, 9 female; age range: 16-73 yrs, mean age: 39.6 yrs) who presented to our institution between April 2008-June 2013. HIV-1 strains were subtyped by phylogenetic analysis of the pol gene region and commonly used automated subtyping tools namely, Stanford HIV db v6.2.0 and Rega v3.0. Pol sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos database and from GeneBank, were trimmed from full-length genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of the 1302 base pair of the pol gene region was performed using Mega v5.2 software. The sequences were aligned using Muscle and phylogenetic distances between sequences were estimated by using Kimura two-parameter model (transition/transversion ratio: 2.0). Tree topology was obtained using neighbour-joining method and bootstrap value was set at 1000. Sixty-one (87.1%) patients were antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naive and nine were on different ART regimens. The subtypes of the isolates according to phylogenetic analysis were found as follows; 31 (44.2%) subtype B, 24 (34.2%) CRF42_BF, 6 (8.5%) B/CRF02_AG recombinants, 5 (7.1%) sub-subtype A1, 1 (1.4%) sub-subtype F1, 1 (%1.4) CRF 25_cpx, 1 (1.4%) CRF02_AG and 1 (1.4%) CRF01_AE. Rega v3.0 subtyping tool produced five discrepant results (4 B

  17. Genome Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of 39 Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 1 Strains Isolated from 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Bose, Michael E.; Fan, Jiang; Kumar, Swati; Henrickson, Kelly J.

    2012-01-01

    Thirty-nine human parainfluenza type 1 (HPIV-1) genomes were sequenced from samples collected in Milwaukee, Wisconsin from 1997–2010. Following sequencing, phylogenetic analyses of these sequences plus any publicly available HPIV-1 sequences (from GenBank) were performed. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genomes, as well as individual genes, revealed that the current HPIV-1 viruses group into three different clades. Previous evolutionary studies of HPIV-1 in Milwaukee revealed that there were two genotypes of HPIV-1 co-circulating in 1991 (previously described as HPIV-1 genotypes C and D). The current study reveals that there are still two different HPIV-1 viruses co-circulating in Milwaukee; however, both groups of HPIV-1 viruses are derived from genotype C indicating that genotype D may no longer be in circulation in Milwaukee. Analyses of genetic diversity indicate that while most of the genome is under purifying selection some regions of the genome are more tolerant of mutation. In the 40 HPIV-1 genomes sequenced in this study, the nucleotide sequence of the L gene is the most conserved while the sequence of the P gene is the most variable. Over the entire protein coding region of the genome, 81 variable amino acid residues were observed and as with nucleotide diversity, the P protein seemed to be the most tolerant of mutation (and contains the greatest proportion of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions) while the M protein appears to be the least tolerant of amino acid substitution. PMID:23029382

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of a novel H6N6 avian influenza virus isolated from a green peafowl in China and its pathogenic potential in mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhaobin; Ci, Yanpeng; Ma, Yixin; Liu, Liling; Wang, Deli; Ma, Jianzhang; Li, Yanbing; Chen, Hualan

    2014-12-01

    To explore the ecology of the H6 subtype avian influenza viruses in Hebei Province, China, a long-term surveillance was conducted in 2012 among domestic poultry and birds in a wildlife park. In this study, we report the characterization of a novel H6N6 avian influenza virus isolated from a healthy green peafowl in Qinghuangdao Wildlife Park in 2012. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the isolated H6N6 strain has the same gene constellation as the ST3367-like strains, which are mainly distributed in southern and eastern China. A mouse experiment showed that the isolate replicated efficiently in the lungs and turbinates of infected mice without previous adaptation, resulting in locally thickened alveolar septa and interstitial pneumonia. Further studies of the H6 subtype viruses are required to clarify their evolutionary pattern in north China, which will benefit disease control and pandemic preparedness for novel viruses.

  19. Analysis of kinetoplast cytochrome b gene of 16 Leishmania isolates from different foci of China: different species of Leishmania in China and their phylogenetic inference

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Leishmania species belong to the family Trypanosomatidae and cause leishmaniasis, a geographically widespread disease that infects humans and other vertebrates. This disease remains endemic in China. Due to the large geographic area and complex ecological environment, the taxonomic position and phylogenetic relationship of Chinese Leishmania isolates remain uncertain. A recent internal transcribed spacer 1 and cytochrome oxidase II phylogeny of Chinese Leishmania isolates has challenged some aspects of their traditional taxonomy as well as cladistics hypotheses of their phylogeny. The current study was designed to provide further disease background and sequence analysis. Methods We systematically analyzed 50 cytochrome b (cyt b) gene sequences of 19 isolates (16 from China, 3 from other countries) sequenced after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a special primer for cyt b as well as 31 sequences downloaded from GenBank. After alignment, the data were analyzed using the maximum parsimony, Bayesian and netwok methods. Results Sequences of six haplotypes representing 10 Chinese isolates formed a monophyletic group and clustered with Leishmania tarentolae. The isolates GS1, GS7, XJ771 of this study from China clustered with other isolates of Leishmania donovani complex. The isolate JS1 was a sister to Leishmania tropica, which represented an L. tropica complex instead of clustering with L. donovani complex or with the other 10 Chinese isolates. The isolates KXG-2 and GS-GER20 formed a monophyletic group with Leishmania turanica from central Asia. In the different phylogenetic trees, all of the Chinese isolates occurred in at least four groups regardless of geographic distribution. Conclusions The undescribed Leishmania species of China, which are clearly causative agents of canine leishmaniasis and human visceral leishmaniasis and are related to Sauroleishmania, may have evolved from a common ancestral parasite that came from the Americas and may have

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E; Weisburg, W G; Tordoff, L A; Fraser, G J; Hespell, R B; Stanton, T B; Zablen, L; Mandelco, L; Woese, C R

    1991-10-01

    The 16S rRNA sequences were determined for species of Spirochaeta, Treponema, Borrelia, Leptospira, Leptonema, and Serpula, using a modified Sanger method of direct RNA sequencing. Analysis of aligned 16S rRNA sequences indicated that the spirochetes form a coherent taxon composed of six major clusters or groups. The first group, termed the treponemes, was divided into two subgroups. The first treponeme subgroup consisted of Treponema pallidum, Treponema phagedenis, Treponema denticola, a thermophilic spirochete strain, and two species of Spirochaeta, Spirochaeta zuelzerae and Spirochaeta stenostrepta, with an average interspecies similarity of 89.9%. The second treponeme subgroup contained Treponema bryantii, Treponema pectinovorum, Treponema saccharophilum, Treponema succinifaciens, and rumen strain CA, with an average interspecies similarity of 86.2%. The average interspecies similarity between the two treponeme subgroups was 84.2%. The division of the treponemes into two subgroups was verified by single-base signature analysis. The second spirochete group contained Spirochaeta aurantia, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirochaeta litoralis, and Spirochaeta isovalerica, with an average similarity of 87.4%. The Spirochaeta group was related to the treponeme group, with an average similarity of 81.9%. The third spirochete group contained borrelias, including Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia anserina, Borrelia hermsii, and a rabbit tick strain. The borrelias formed a tight phylogenetic cluster, with average similarity of 97%. THe borrelia group shared a common branch with the Spirochaeta group and was closer to this group than to the treponemes. A single spirochete strain isolated fromt the shew constituted the fourth group. The fifth group was composed of strains of Serpula (Treponema) hyodysenteriae and Serpula (Treponema) innocens. The two species of this group were closely related, with a similarity of greater than 99%. Leptonema illini

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of H9N2 viruses isolated from migratory ducks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Hua; Okazaki, Katsunori; Shi, Wei-Min; Kida, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    Genetic analysis indicated that the pandemic influenza strains derived from wild aquatic birds harbor viruses of 15 hemagglutinin (HA) and 9 neuraminidase (NA) antigenic subtypes. Surveillance studies have shown that H9N2 subtype viruses are worldwide in domestic poultry and could infect mammalian species, including humans. Here, we genetically analyzed the HA and NA genes of five H9N2 viruses isolated from the migratory ducks in Hokkaido, Japan, the flyway of migration from Siberia during 1997-2000. The results showed that HA and NA genes of these viruses belong to the same lineages, respectively. Compared with those of A/quail/Hong Kong/G1/97-like and A/duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97-like viruses, HA and NA of the migratory duck isolates had a close relationship with those of H9N2 viruses isolated from the chicken in Korea, indicating that the Korea H9N2 viruses might be derived from the migratory ducks. The NA genes of the five isolates were located in the same cluster as those of N2 viruses, which had caused a human pandemic in 1968, indicating that the NA genes of the previous pandemic strains are still circulating in waterfowl reservoirs. The present results further emphasize the importance of carrying out molecular epidemiological surveillance of H9N2 viruses in wild ducks to obtain more information for the future human influenza pandemics preparedness.

  2. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates from Pakistan during 2009–2013 reveals circulation of new sub genotype

    SciTech Connect

    Siddique, Naila; Naeem, Khalid; Abbas, Muhammad Athar; Ali Malik, Akbar; Rashid, Farooq; Rafique, Saba; Ghafar, Abdul; Rehman, Abdul

    2013-09-15

    Despite observing the standard bio-security measures at commercial poultry farms and extensive use of Newcastle disease vaccines, a new genotype VII-f of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) got introduced in Pakistan during 2011. In this regard 300 ND outbreaks recorded so far have resulted into huge losses of approximately USD 200 million during 2011–2013. A total of 33 NDV isolates recovered during 2009–2013 throughout Pakistan were characterized biologically and phylogenetically. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a new velogenic sub genotype VII-f circulating in commercial and domestic poultry along with the earlier reported sub genotype VII-b. Partial sequencing of Fusion gene revealed two types of cleavage site motifs; lentogenic {sup 112}GRQGRL{sup 117} and velogenic {sup 112}RRQKRF{sup 117} along with some point mutations indicative of genetic diversity. We report here a new sub genotype of virulent NDV circulating in commercial and backyard poultry in Pakistan and provide evidence for the possible genetic diversity which may be causing new NDV out breaks. - Highlights: • The first report of isolation of new genotype VII-f of virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in Pakistan. • We report the partial Fusion gene sequences of new genotype VII-f of virulent NDV from Pakistan. • We report the phylogenetic relationship of new NDV strains with reported NDV strains. • Provide outbreak history of new virulent NDV strain in commercial and backyard poultry in Pakistan. • We provide possible evidence for the role of backyard poultry in NDV outbreaks.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of 626 hepatitis E virus (HEV) isolates from humans and animals in China (1986-2011) showing genotype diversity and zoonotic transmission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Li, Lingjun; Wang, Ling; Bu, Qiuning; Fu, Hongwei; Han, Jian; Zhu, Yonghong; Lu, Fengmin; Zhuang, Hui

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis E is considered as a public health problem in China. To determine the overall molecular epidemiology of hepatitis E virus (HEV) and analyze the situation of cross-species transmission between humans and swine in China over the last 25 years (1986-2011), 626 HEV complete and partial sequences (89 isolates identified by our group) isolated from humans and animals in China were retrieved from GenBank and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. There were three genotypes and 11 sub-genotypes of HEV prevailing in China. Furthermore, rabbit HEVs, of which the genotype is controversial, are also widespread in China. Genotype 1 was the most isolated genotype prior to 2000 and mainly detected in Xinjiang, Beijing and East China. However, genotype 4, which was identified in most regions of China during the last 10 years, has overtaken genotype 1 in frequency of isolation nationwide. Genotype 3 HEV strains have been found only in eastern China and were thought to be imported from Japan. Both genotypes 3 and 4 were found in humans and swine and cross-species transmission from pigs to humans of the two genotypes may have occurred in Northeast, Northwest, North, East and South China. These results indicate that HEV strains with considerable genetic diversity are widespread and the zoonotic transmission between swine and humans appears ubiquitous in China.

  4. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis to characterize Candida clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Angeletti, Silvia; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Crea, Francesca; Palazzotti, Bernardetta; Dedej, Etleva; Ciccozzi, Massimo; De Florio, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    Clinical Candida isolates from two different hospitals in Rome were identified and clustered by MALDI-TOF MS system and their origin and evolution estimated by Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. The different species of Candida were correctly identified and clustered separately, confirming the ability of these techniques to discriminate between different Candida species. Focusing MALDI-TOF analysis on a single Candida species, Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis strains clustered differently for hospital setting as well as for period of isolation than Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis isolates. The evolutionary rates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (1.93×10(-2) and 1.17×10(-2)substitutions/site/year, respectively) were in agreement with a higher rate of mutation of these species, even in a narrow period, than what was observed in C. glabrata and C. tropicalis strains (6.99×10(-4) and 7.52×10(-3)substitutions/site/year, respectively). C. albicans resulted as the species with the highest between and within clades genetic distance values in agreement with the temporal-related clustering found by MALDI-TOF and the high evolutionary rate 1.93×10(-2)substitutions/site/year. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) field isolates from outbreaks in South and Central America.

    PubMed

    Pereda, A J; Greiser-Wilke, I; Schmitt, B; Rincon, M A; Mogollon, J D; Sabogal, Z Y; Lora, A M; Sanguinetti, H; Piccone, M E

    2005-06-01

    To date, there is little information concerning the epidemiological situation of classical swine fever (CSF) in the Americas. Besides summarizing the available data, genotyping of isolates from outbreaks in domestic pigs in several countries of South and Central America was performed. For this, a 190 base fragment of the E2 envelope glycoprotein gene was used. European strains and isolates, and historical isolates from the United States (US) were included for comparison. In contrast to the situation in most parts of Europe, where group 2 isolates predominate, it was found that all the isolates from the American continent analyzed belonged to group 1 and were further resolved into three subgroups. The Cuban isolates clustered in subgroup 1.2, whereas the isolates from Honduras and Guatemala clustered in subgroup 1.3. The remaining isolates from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico generated four poorly resolved clusters in subgroup 1.1, together with the vaccine strains, with historical European and US isolates, and with a recent Russian isolate. While the vaccine strains and the historical European isolates formed a relatively distinct cluster, one of the US isolates clustered together with the Mexican, and another one with Colombian isolates. Historically, CSF (hog cholera) was observed almost simultaneously in the US and in Europe in the first half of the 19th century, and its origin remains a matter of discussion. Our results showed that the US isolates are closely related to isolates from South America, while appearance of isolates in Cuba on one hand and in Honduras and Guatemala on the other hand, seems to have been due to unrelated events. This allows to speculate that at least in the American continent, CSF virus may have appeared independently in several regions, and spreading may have been a secondary effect.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of the non-structural (NS) gene of influenza A viruses isolated from mallards in Northern Europe in 2005

    PubMed Central

    Zohari, Siamak; Gyarmati, Péter; Ejdersund, Anneli; Berglöf, Ulla; Thorén, Peter; Ehrenberg, Maria; Czifra, György; Belák, Sándor; Waldenström, Jonas; Olsen, Björn; Berg, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background Although the important role of the non-structural 1 (NS) gene of influenza A in virulence of the virus is well established, our knowledge about the extent of variation in the NS gene pool of influenza A viruses in their natural reservoirs in Europe is incomplete. In this study we determined the subtypes and prevalence of influenza A viruses present in mallards in Northern Europe and further analysed the NS gene of these isolates in order to obtain a more detailed knowledge about the genetic variation of NS gene of influenza A virus in their natural hosts. Results A total number of 45 influenza A viruses of different subtypes were studied. Eleven haemagglutinin- and nine neuraminidase subtypes in twelve combinations were found among the isolated viruses. Each NS gene reported here consisted of 890 nucleotides; there were no deletions or insertions. Phylogenetic analysis clearly shows that two distinct gene pools, corresponding to both NS allele A and B, were present at the same time in the same geographic location in the mallard populations in Northern Europe. A comparison of nucleotide sequences of isolated viruses revealed a substantial number of silent mutations, which results in high degree of homology in amino acid sequences. The degree of variation within the alleles is very low. In our study allele A viruses displays a maximum of 5% amino acid divergence while allele B viruses display only 2% amino acid divergence. All the viruses isolated from mallards in Northern Europe possessed the typical avian ESEV amino acid sequence at the C-terminal end of the NS1 protein. Conclusion Our finding indicates the existence of a large reservoir of different influenza A viruses in mallards population in Northern Europe. Although our phylogenetic analysis clearly shows that two distinct gene pools, corresponding to both NS allele A and B, were present in the mallards populations in Northern Europe, allele B viruses appear to be less common in natural host species

  7. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates from Pakistan during 2009-2013 reveals circulation of new sub genotype.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Naila; Naeem, Khalid; Abbas, Muhammad Athar; Ali Malik, Akbar; Rashid, Farooq; Rafique, Saba; Ghafar, Abdul; Rehman, Abdul

    2013-09-01

    Despite observing the standard bio-security measures at commercial poultry farms and extensive use of Newcastle disease vaccines, a new genotype VII-f of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) got introduced in Pakistan during 2011. In this regard 300 ND outbreaks recorded so far have resulted into huge losses of approximately USD 200 million during 2011-2013. A total of 33 NDV isolates recovered during 2009-2013 throughout Pakistan were characterized biologically and phylogenetically. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a new velogenic sub genotype VII-f circulating in commercial and domestic poultry along with the earlier reported sub genotype VII-b. Partial sequencing of Fusion gene revealed two types of cleavage site motifs; lentogenic (112)GRQGRL(117) and velogenic (112)RRQKRF(117) along with some point mutations indicative of genetic diversity. We report here a new sub genotype of virulent NDV circulating in commercial and backyard poultry in Pakistan and provide evidence for the possible genetic diversity which may be causing new NDV out breaks.

  8. Isolation and phylogenetic footprinting analysis of the 5'-regulatory region of the floral homeotic gene OrcPI from Orchis italica (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Aceto, Serena; Cantone, Carmela; Chiaiese, Pasquale; Ruotolo, Gianluca; Sica, Maria; Gaudio, Luciano

    2010-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of regulatory elements from homologous genes can be strongly divergent. Phylogenetic footprinting, a comparative analysis of noncoding regions, can detect putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) shared among the regulatory regions of 2 or more homologous genes. These conserved motifs have the potential to serve the same regulatory function in distantly related taxa. We isolated the 5'-noncoding region of the OrcPI gene, a MADS-box transcription factor involved in flower development in Orchis italica, using the thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction technique. This region (comprising 1352 bp) induced transient beta-glucuronidase expression in the petal tissue of white Rosa hybrida flowers and represents the 5'-regulatory sequence of the OrcPI gene. Phylogenetic footprinting analysis detected conserved regions within the 5'-regulatory sequence of OrcPI and the homologous regions of Oryza sativa, Lilium regale, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Some of these sequences are known TFBSs described in databases of plant regulatory elements. Nucleotide sequence data reported are available in the DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank databases under the following accession numbers: AF198055 promoter region of the PISTILLATA (PI) gene of A. thaliana; AB094985 cDNA of OrcPI (PI/GLOBOSA [PI/GLO] homologue) of O. italica; AB378089 5'-regulatory region of the OrcPI gene of O. italica; AP008211 putative promoter region of OSMADS2 (PI/GLO homologue) of O. sativa; AP008207 putative promoter region of OSMADS4 (PI/GLO homologue) of O. sativa; and AB158292 putative promoter region of the PI/GLO homologue of L. regale.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis and comparison of eight strains of pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1) isolated in China between 2010 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongbo; Liu, Xiaoli; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Chen, Jinding; Zhao, Shasha; Kong, Xiangang; Liu, Shengwang

    2013-06-01

    Eight strains of pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1) were isolated and identified in this study, from diseased pigeon flocks suspected to be infected with PPMV-1 in China between 2010 and 2012. These PPMV-1 isolates were purified using specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chicken embryo cells before full-length genomic sequencing. The complete genome of these isolates contained 15,192 nucleotides, similar to those of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains in genotypes V-XI, with the gene order 3'-NP-P-M-F-HN-L-5'. A six-nucleotide insertion was found to be located in the 5' non-coding region of the nucleoprotein gene in our eight PPMV-1 strains when compared with those of genotypes I, II, III, IV and V. The cleavage site of the fusion protein was (112)RRQKRF(117), a feature generally associated with virulent NDV strains. The structural proteins were in accordance with those of other PPMV-1 strains, with the exception of the W protein of pigeon/CHINA/LJL/100605. The length of the W protein was 227 amino acids, in common with PPMV-1 strains, whereas that of pigeon/CHINA/LJL/100605 was only 181 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the genomic sequences and sequences of the fusion gene, revealed that our eight isolates should be classified as class II genotype VIb NDVs. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that the strain pigeon/CHINA/LLN/110713 is similar to strains isolated abroad, but it was isolated in China, which implies that it may have been introduced to China from overseas. Differences between the Chinese and foreign strains were identified in three regions (nucleotide positions 1632-2229, 3023-3310 and 6103-6439). In addition, the values of ICPI and MDT demonstrated that PPMV-1 isolates were mesogenic or lentogenic, and virulence studies showed that these PPMV-1 strains were non-pathogenic in chickens, but they induced the generation of antibodies in vivo.

  10. Antimicrobial Activity and Phylogenetic Analysis of Streptomyces Parvulus Dosmb-D105 Isolated from the Mangrove Sediments of Andaman Islands.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, R; Mohan, P M; Sivakumar, K; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-03-01

    Actinomycetes, especially species of Streptomyces are prolific producers of pharmacologically significant compounds accounting for about 70% of the naturally derived antibiotics that are presently in clinical use. In this study, we used five solvents to extract the secondary metabolites from marine Streptomyces parvulus DOSMB-D105, which was isolated from the mangrove sediments of the South Andaman Islands. Among them, ethyl acetate crude extract showed maximum activity against 11 pathogenic bacteria and six fungi. Presence of bioactive compounds in the ethyl acetate extract was determined using GC-MS and the compounds detected in the ethyl acetate extract were matched with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) library. Totally eight compounds were identified and the prevalent compounds were 2 steroids, 2 alkaloids, 2 plasticizers, 1 phenolic and 1 alkane. Present study revealed that S. parvulus DOSMB-D105 is a promising species for the isolation of valuable bioactive compounds to combat pathogenic microbes.

  11. Isolation and cultivation of endosymbiotic algae from green hydra and phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Kovacević, Goran; Franjević, Damjan; Jelencić, Biserka; Kalafatić, Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Symbiotic associations are of wide significance in evolution and biodiversity. The green hydra is a typical example of endosymbiosis. In its gastrodermal myoepithelial cells it harbors the individuals of a unicellular green algae. Endosymbiotic algae from green hydra have been successfully isolated and permanently maintained in a stable clean lab culture for the first time. We reconstructed the phylogeny of isolated endosymbiotic algae using the 18S rRNA gene to clarify its current status and to validate the traditional inclusion of these endosymbiotic algae within the Chlorella genus. Molecular analyses established that different genera and species of unicellular green algae could be present as symbionts in green hydra, depending on the natural habitat of a particular strain of green hydra.

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis and Polyphasic Characterization of Clavibacter michiganensis Strains Isolated from Tomato Seeds Reveal that Nonpathogenic Strains Are Distinct from C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Karine; Orgeur, Geoffrey; Balidas, Samuel; Fricot, Céline; Bonneau, Sophie; Quillévéré, Anne; Audusseau, Corinne; Olivier, Valérie; Grimault, Valérie; Mathis, René

    2012-01-01

    The genus Clavibacter comprises one species and five subspecies of plant-pathogenic bacteria, four of which are classified as quarantine organisms due to the high economic threat they pose. Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is one of the most important pathogens of tomato, but the recommended diagnostic tools are not satisfactory due to false-negative and/or -positive results. To provide a robust analysis of the genetic relatedness among a worldwide collection of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains, relatives (strains from the four other C. michiganensis subspecies), and nonpathogenic Clavibacter-like strains isolated from tomato, we performed multilocus sequence-based analysis and typing (MLSA and MLST) based on six housekeeping genes (atpD, dnaK, gyrB, ppK, recA, and rpoB). We compared this “framework” with phenotypic and genotypic characteristics such as pathogenicity on tomato, reaction to two antisera by immunofluorescence and to five PCR identification tests, and the presence of four genes encoding the main C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis pathogenicity determinants. We showed that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is monophyletic and is distinct from its closest taxonomic neighbors. The nonpathogenic Clavibacter-like strains were identified as C. michiganensis using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These strains, while cross-reacting with C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis identification tools, are phylogenetically distinct from the pathogenic strains but belong to the C. michiganensis clade. C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis clonal complexes linked strains from highly diverse geographical origins and also strains isolated over long periods of time in the same location. This illustrates the importance of seed transmission in the worldwide dispersion of this pathogen and its survival and adaptation abilities in a new environment once introduced. PMID:23001675

  13. Phylogenetic analysis and polyphasic characterization of Clavibacter michiganensis strains isolated from tomato seeds reveal that nonpathogenic strains are distinct from C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Durand, Karine; Orgeur, Geoffrey; Balidas, Samuel; Fricot, Céline; Bonneau, Sophie; Quillévéré, Anne; Audusseau, Corinne; Olivier, Valérie; Grimault, Valérie; Mathis, René

    2012-12-01

    The genus Clavibacter comprises one species and five subspecies of plant-pathogenic bacteria, four of which are classified as quarantine organisms due to the high economic threat they pose. Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is one of the most important pathogens of tomato, but the recommended diagnostic tools are not satisfactory due to false-negative and/or -positive results. To provide a robust analysis of the genetic relatedness among a worldwide collection of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains, relatives (strains from the four other C. michiganensis subspecies), and nonpathogenic Clavibacter-like strains isolated from tomato, we performed multilocus sequence-based analysis and typing (MLSA and MLST) based on six housekeeping genes (atpD, dnaK, gyrB, ppK, recA, and rpoB). We compared this "framework" with phenotypic and genotypic characteristics such as pathogenicity on tomato, reaction to two antisera by immunofluorescence and to five PCR identification tests, and the presence of four genes encoding the main C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis pathogenicity determinants. We showed that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is monophyletic and is distinct from its closest taxonomic neighbors. The nonpathogenic Clavibacter-like strains were identified as C. michiganensis using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These strains, while cross-reacting with C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis identification tools, are phylogenetically distinct from the pathogenic strains but belong to the C. michiganensis clade. C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis clonal complexes linked strains from highly diverse geographical origins and also strains isolated over long periods of time in the same location. This illustrates the importance of seed transmission in the worldwide dispersion of this pathogen and its survival and adaptation abilities in a new environment once introduced.

  14. Detection, molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of full-length equine infectious anemia (EIAV) gag genes isolated from Shackleford Banks wild horses.

    PubMed

    Capomaccio, S; Willand, Z A; Cook, S J; Issel, C J; Santos, E M; Reis, J K P; Cook, R F

    2012-06-15

    The genetically distinct wild horse herds inhabiting Shackleford Banks, North Carolina are probably the direct descendents of Spanish stock abandoned after failed attempts to settle mid-Atlantic coastal regions of North America in the Sixteenth Century. In a 1996 island survey, 41% of the gathered horses were discovered seropositive for Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) with additional cases identified in 1997 and 1998. As a result of their unique genetic heritage, EIAV seropositive individuals identified in the two latter surveys were transferred to a quarantine facility on the mainland. In September 2008 two of the horses SB1 and SB2 after 10 and 11 years in quarantine respectively, developed clinical signs of EIA. In the case of SB2 these were so severe that the only humane option was euthanasia. Although SB1, survived it experienced a second clinical episode one month later. In May 2009, a third horse in quarantine, SB3, developed extremely severe clinical EIA and was euthanized. This demonstrates naturally infected long-term inapparent carriers can experience recrudescence of very severe disease many years after initial exposure to EIAV. Phylogenetic analysis of complete EIAV gag gene sequences obtained from each of three Shackleford horses demonstrated they were infected with very closely related viruses. Although these were distinguishable from all other strains examined, they belong to a monophyletic group comprising almost exclusively of New World isolates that is distinct from a number of recently characterized Central European EIAV strains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Implementation of a National Measles Elimination Program in Iran: Phylogenetic Analysis of Measles Virus Strains Isolated during 2010–2012 Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Vahid; Abbasi, Simin; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Fatemi-Nasab, Ghazal; Adjaminezhad-Fard, Fatemeh; Shadab, Azadeh; Ghavami, Nastaran; Zareh-Khoshchehre, Raziyeh; Soltanshahi, Rambod; Bont, Louis; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat

    2014-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) causes small and large outbreaks in Iran. Molecular assays allow identifying and the sources of measles imported from neighboring countries. We carried out a phylogenetic analysis of measles virus circulating in Iran over the period 2010–2012. Specimens from suspected cases of measles were collected from different regions of Iran. Virus isolation was performed on urine and throat swabs. Partial nucleoprotein gene segments of MV were amplified by RT-PCR. PCR products of 173 samples were sequenced and analyzed. The median age of confirmed cases was 2 years. Among all confirmed cases, 32% had unknown vaccination status, 20% had been vaccinated, and 48% had not been vaccinated. Genotypes B3 and D8 (for the first time), H1 and D4 were detected mainly in unvaccinated toddlers and young children. Genotype B3 became predominant in 2012 and was closely related to African strains. H1 strains were also found in small and large outbreaks during 2012 but were not identical to Iranian H1-2009 strains. A majority of the Iranian D4 strains during 2010–2012 outbreaks were linked to the D4 strain identified in the Pakistan in 2007. We identified a single case in 2010 belonging to D8 genotype with 99.7% identity to Indian isolates. Although the vaccination program is currently good enough to prevent nationwide epidemics and successfully decreased measles incidence in Iran, the fraction of protected individuals in the population was not high enough to prevent continuous introduction of cases from abroad. Due to increasing number of susceptible individuals in some areas, sustained transmission of the newly introduced viral genotype remains possible. PMID:24736720

  16. Genetic Studies of Vibrio cholerae in South West Cameroon—A Phylogenetic Analysis of Isolates from the 2010-2011 Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Moise C.; Masalla, Thomas; Esemu, Seraphine; Fumoloh, Foche Francis; Kracalik, Ian; Cella, Eleonora; Alam, Meer Taifur; Akoachere, Jane-Francis; Liang, Song; Salemi, Marco; Morris, J. Glenn; Ali, Afsar; Ndip, Lucy M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: During the cholera outbreak from 2010 to 2011 in Cameroon, 33,192 cases with 1,440 deaths (case fatality ratio 4.34%) were reported to the World Health Organization. Of these, the South West Region reported 3,120 clinical cases. This region is in the Equatorial Monsoon climatic subzone of Cameroon, close to the coast, raising questions as to whether cases were linked with development of environmental reservoirs. Methods: In an investigation conducted by the Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Buea, toxigenic V. cholerae O1 were isolated from diarrheal stool samples from 18 patients, with ages ranging from <3 to 70 years. Coordinates for clinical centers at which cases were identified were obtained using a handheld GPS, and were mapped using ArcGIS. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby ‘Bauer agar disc diffusion method. The full genomes of these strains were sequenced with the Illumina MiSeq platform. De novo assembly of cholera genomes and multiple sequence alignment were carried out using the bioinformatics pipeline developed in the Emerging Pathogens Institute laboratory at the University of Florida. Results/Discussion: Genetic comparisons showed that isolates were closely related, with pairwise p-distances ranging from 2.25 to 14.52 10-5 nt substitutions per site, and no statistically significant correlation between the pairwise genetic distances and the geographic distances among sampling locations. Indeed, the phylogeny of the Cameroonian strains displays the typical star-like topology and intermixing of strains from different locations that are characteristic of an exponential outbreak localized around a relatively restricted area with occasional spillover to other parts of the country, likely mediated by direct human contact and human movement. Findings highlight the utility of whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis in understanding transmission patterns at the local level. PMID

  17. Phylogenetic and Recombination Analysis of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jisuk; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) severely damages and reduces the yield of many economically important plants worldwide. In this study, we determined the whole-genome sequences of 10 TSWV isolates recently identified from various regions and hosts in Korea. Phylogenetic analysis of these 10 isolates as well as the three previously sequenced isolates indicated that the 13 Korean TSWV isolates could be divided into two groups reflecting either two different origins or divergences of Korean TSWV isolates. In addition, the complete nucleotide sequences for the 13 Korean TSWV isolates along with previously sequenced TSWV RNA segments from Korea and other countries were subjected to phylogenetic and recombination analysis. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that both the RNA L and RNA M segments of most Korean isolates might have originated in Western Europe and North America but that the RNA S segments for all Korean isolates might have originated in China and Japan. Recombination analysis identified a total of 12 recombination events among all isolates and segments and five recombination events among the 13 Korea isolates; among the five recombinants from Korea, three contained the whole RNA L segment, suggesting reassortment rather than recombination. Our analyses provide evidence that both recombination and reassortment have contributed to the molecular diversity of TSWV. PMID:23696821

  18. Phylogenetic and recombination analysis of tomato spotted wilt virus.

    PubMed

    Lian, Sen; Lee, Jong-Seung; Cho, Won Kyong; Yu, Jisuk; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) severely damages and reduces the yield of many economically important plants worldwide. In this study, we determined the whole-genome sequences of 10 TSWV isolates recently identified from various regions and hosts in Korea. Phylogenetic analysis of these 10 isolates as well as the three previously sequenced isolates indicated that the 13 Korean TSWV isolates could be divided into two groups reflecting either two different origins or divergences of Korean TSWV isolates. In addition, the complete nucleotide sequences for the 13 Korean TSWV isolates along with previously sequenced TSWV RNA segments from Korea and other countries were subjected to phylogenetic and recombination analysis. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that both the RNA L and RNA M segments of most Korean isolates might have originated in Western Europe and North America but that the RNA S segments for all Korean isolates might have originated in China and Japan. Recombination analysis identified a total of 12 recombination events among all isolates and segments and five recombination events among the 13 Korea isolates; among the five recombinants from Korea, three contained the whole RNA L segment, suggesting reassortment rather than recombination. Our analyses provide evidence that both recombination and reassortment have contributed to the molecular diversity of TSWV.

  19. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    PubMed Central

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  20. Relationships among North American and Japanese Laetiporus isolates inferred from molecular phylogenetics and single-spore incompatibility reactions

    Treesearch

    Mark T. Banik; Daniel L. Lindner; Yuko Ota; Tsutomu. Hattori

    2010-01-01

    Relationships were investigated among North American and Japanese isolates of Laetiporus using phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequences and single-spore isolate incompatibility. Single-spore isolate pairings revealed no significant compatibility between North American and Japanese isolates. ITS analysis revealed 12 clades within the core ...

  1. [Phylogenetic analysis of bacteria of extreme ecosystems].

    PubMed

    Romanovskaia, V A; Parfenova, V V; Bel'kova, N L; Sukhanova, E V; Gladka, G V; Tashireva, A A

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria of the two extreme regions (Dead Sea and West Antarctic) was performed on the basis of the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA gene. Thermotolerant and halotolerant spore-forming bacteria 7t1 and 7t3 of terrestrial ecosystems Dead Sea identified as Bacillus licheniformis and B. subtilis subsp. subtilis, respectively. Taking into account remote location of thermotolerant strain 6t1 from closely related strains in the cluster Staphylococcus, 6t1 strain can be regarded as Staphylococcus sp. In terrestrial ecosystems, Galindez Island (Antarctic) detected taxonomically diverse psychrotolerant bacteria. From ornithogenic soil were isolated Micrococcus luteus O-1 and Microbacterium trichothecenolyticum O-3. Strains 4r5, 5r5 and 40r5, isolated from grass and lichens, can be referred to the genus Frondihabitans. These strains are taxonomically and ecologically isolated and on the tree diagram form the joint cluster with three isolates Frondihabitans sp., isolated from the lichen Austrian Alps, and psychrotolerant associated with plants F. cladoniiphilus CafT13(T). Isolates from black lichen in the different stationary observation points on the south side of a vertical cliff identified as: Rhodococcus fascians 181n3, Sporosarcina aquimarina O-7, Staphylococcus sp. 0-10. From orange biofilm of fouling on top of the vertical cliff isolated Arthrobacter sp. 28r5g1, from the moss-- Serratia sp. 6r1g. According to the results, Frondihabitans strains most frequently encountered among chemoorganotrophic aerobic bacteria in the Antarctic phytocenoses.

  2. EcoR phylogenetic analysis and virulence genotyping of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and Escherichia coli isolates from commercial chicken carcasses in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Renata K T; Aquino, Ivani; Ferreira, Ana Lívia da S; Vidotto, Marilda C

    2011-05-01

    Escherichia coli strains designated as avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) are responsible for avian colibacillosis, an acute and largely systemic disease that promotes significant economic losses in poultry industry worldwide because of mortality increase, medication costs, and condemnation of carcasses. APEC is a subgroup of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli pathotype, which includes uropathogenic E. coli, neonatal meningitis E. coli, and septicemic E. coli. We isolated E. coli from commercial chicken carcasses in a Brazilian community and compared by polymerase chain reaction-defined phylogenetic group (A, B1, B2, or D) with APEC strains isolated from sick chickens from different poultry farms. A substantial number of strains assigned to phylogenetic E. coli reference collection group B2, which is known to harbor potent extraintestinal human and animal E. coli pathogens, were identified as APEC (26.0%) in both commercial chicken carcasses and retail poultry meat (retail poultry E. coli [RPEC]) (21.25%). The majority of RPEC were classified as group A (35%), whereas the majority of APEC were groups B1 (30.8) and A (27.6%). APEC and RPEC presented the genes pentaplex, iutA, hly, iron, ompT, and iss, but with different virulence profiles. The similarity between APEC and RPEC indicates RPEC as potentially pathogenic strains and supports a possible zoonotic risk for humans.

  3. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence profiles, and phylogenetic groups of fecal Escherichia coli isolates: a comparative analysis between dogs and their owners in Japan.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Okada, Erika; Shimizu, Takae; Kataoka, Yasushi; Sawada, Takuo; Takahashi, Toshio

    2012-03-01

    In this study, fecal Escherichia coli isolates (n=188) from 34 dog-owner pairs and 26 healthy control humans (2 isolates per individual) were tested for susceptibility to 6 antimicrobials and screened for virulence genes. Genetic diversity between canine and owner isolates was evaluated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Canine isolates exhibited significantly different rates of resistance to four and two antimicrobials, compared to control and owner isolates, respectively. Of the genes examined, the prevalence of sfa, hly, and cnf genes in canine isolates were higher than in control isolates, but not than in owner isolates. These results suggest that characteristics of owner isolates are somewhat similar to canine isolates, compared to isolates from non-dog owners. In addition, PFGE analysis revealed that transfer of E. coli between owners and their dogs had occurred within 3/34 (8.8%) households. Considering the effects of dog ownership on the population of E. coli isolates from owners, further epidemiological studies are required.

  4. A Deliberate Practice Approach to Teaching Phylogenetic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, F. Collin; Johnson, Daniel J.; Kearns, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    One goal of postsecondary education is to assist students in developing expert-level understanding. Previous attempts to encourage expert-level understanding of phylogenetic analysis in college science classrooms have largely focused on isolated, or "one-shot," in-class activities. Using a deliberate practice instructional approach, we…

  5. A Deliberate Practice Approach to Teaching Phylogenetic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, F. Collin; Johnson, Daniel J.; Kearns, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    One goal of postsecondary education is to assist students in developing expert-level understanding. Previous attempts to encourage expert-level understanding of phylogenetic analysis in college science classrooms have largely focused on isolated, or "one-shot," in-class activities. Using a deliberate practice instructional approach, we…

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of H6 influenza viruses isolated from rosy-billed pochards (Netta peposaca) in Argentina reveals the presence of different HA gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Rimondi, Agustina; Xu, Kemin; Craig, Maria Isabel; Shao, Hongxia; Ferreyra, Hebe; Rago, Maria Virginia; Romano, Marcelo; Uhart, Marcela; Sutton, Troy; Ferrero, Andrea; Perez, Daniel R; Pereda, Ariel

    2011-12-01

    Until recently, influenza A viruses from wild waterfowl in South America were rarely isolated and/or characterized. To explore the ecology of influenza A viruses in this region, a long-term surveillance program was established in 2006 for resident and migratory water birds in Argentina. We report the characterization of 5 avian influenza viruses of the H6 hemagglutinin (HA) subtype isolated from rosy-billed pochards (Netta peposaca). Three of these viruses were paired to an N2 NA subtype, while the other two were of the N8 subtype. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the internal gene segments revealed a close relationship with influenza viruses from South America, forming a unique clade and supporting the notion of independent evolution from influenza A viruses in other latitudes. The presence of NS alleles A and B was also identified. The HA and NA genes formed unique clades separate from North American and Eurasian viruses, with the exception of the HA gene of one isolate, which was more closely related to the North American lineage, suggesting possible interactions between viruses of North American and South American lineages. Animal studies suggested that these Argentine H6 viruses could replicate and transmit inefficiently in chickens, indicating limited adaptation to poultry. Our results highlight the importance of continued influenza virus surveillance in wild birds of South America, especially considering the unique evolution of these viruses.

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis of H6 Influenza Viruses Isolated from Rosy-Billed Pochards (Netta peposaca) in Argentina Reveals the Presence of Different HA Gene Clusters ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rimondi, Agustina; Xu, Kemin; Craig, Maria Isabel; Shao, Hongxia; Ferreyra, Hebe; Rago, Maria Virginia; Romano, Marcelo; Uhart, Marcela; Sutton, Troy; Ferrero, Andrea; Perez, Daniel R.; Pereda, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, influenza A viruses from wild waterfowl in South America were rarely isolated and/or characterized. To explore the ecology of influenza A viruses in this region, a long-term surveillance program was established in 2006 for resident and migratory water birds in Argentina. We report the characterization of 5 avian influenza viruses of the H6 hemagglutinin (HA) subtype isolated from rosy-billed pochards (Netta peposaca). Three of these viruses were paired to an N2 NA subtype, while the other two were of the N8 subtype. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the internal gene segments revealed a close relationship with influenza viruses from South America, forming a unique clade and supporting the notion of independent evolution from influenza A viruses in other latitudes. The presence of NS alleles A and B was also identified. The HA and NA genes formed unique clades separate from North American and Eurasian viruses, with the exception of the HA gene of one isolate, which was more closely related to the North American lineage, suggesting possible interactions between viruses of North American and South American lineages. Animal studies suggested that these Argentine H6 viruses could replicate and transmit inefficiently in chickens, indicating limited adaptation to poultry. Our results highlight the importance of continued influenza virus surveillance in wild birds of South America, especially considering the unique evolution of these viruses. PMID:21976652

  8. Phylogenetic reconstruction of endophytic fungal isolates using internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region.

    PubMed

    GokulRaj, Kathamuthu; Sundaresan, Natesan; Ganeshan, Enthai Jagan; Rajapriya, Pandi; Muthumary, Johnpaul; Sridhar, Jayavel; Pandi, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Endophytic fungi are inhabitants of plants, living most part of their lifecycle asymptomatically which mainly confer protection and ecological advantages to the host plant. In this present study, 48 endophytic fungi were isolated from the leaves of three medicinal plants and characterized based on ITS2 sequence - secondary structure analysis. ITS2 secondary structures were elucidated with minimum free energy method (MFOLD version 3.1) and consensus structure of each genus was generated by 4SALE. ProfDistS was used to generate ITS2 sequence structure based phylogenetic tree respectively. Our elucidated isolates were belonging to Ascomycetes family, representing 5 orders and 6 genera. Colletotrichum/Glomerella spp., Diaporthae/Phomopsis spp., and Alternaria spp., were predominantly observed while Cochliobolus sp., Cladosporium sp., and Emericella sp., were represented by singletons. The constructed phylogenetic tree has well resolved monophyletic groups with >50% bootstrap value support. Secondary structures based fungal systematics improves not only the stability; it also increases the precision of phylogenetic inference. Above ITS2 based phylogenetic analysis was performed for our 48 isolates along with sequences of known ex-types taken from GenBank which confirms the efficiency of the proposed method. Further, we propose it as superlative marker for reconstructing phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels due to their lesser length.

  9. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin gene of H9N2 influenza viruses from chickens in South China from 2012 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Qin; Yan, Zhuan-Qiang; Zeng, Fan-Gui; Liao, Chang-Tao; Zhou, Qing-Feng; Qin, Jian-Ping; Xie, Qing-Mei; Bi, Ying-Zuo; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    As part of our ongoing influenza surveillance program in South China, 19 field strains of H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from dead or diseased chicken flocks in Guangdong province, South China, between 2012 and 2013. Hemagglutinin (HA) genes of these strains were sequenced and analyzed and phylogenic analysis showed that 12 of the 19 isolates belonged to the lineage h9.4.2.5, while the other seven belonged to h9.4.2.6. Specifically, we found that all of the viruses isolated in 2013 belonged to lineage h9.4.2.5. The lineage h9.4.2.5 viruses contained a PSRSSR↓GLF motif at HA cleavage site, while the lineage h9.4.2.6 viruses contained a PARSSR↓GLF at the same position. Most of the isolates in lineage h9.4.2.5 lost one potential glycosylation site at residues 200-202, and had an additional one at residues 295-297 in HA1. Notably, 19 isolates had an amino acid exchange (Q226L) in the receptor binding site, which indicated that the viruses had potential affinity of binding to human like receptor. The present study shows the importance of continuing surveillance of new H9N2 strains to better prepare for the next epidemic or pandemic outbreak of H9N2 AIV infections in chicken flocks.

  10. [Analysis phylogenetic relationship of Gynostemma (Cucurbitaceae)].

    PubMed

    Qin, Shuang-shuang; Li, Hai-tao; Wang, Zhou-yong; Cui, Zhan-hu; Yu, Li-ying

    2015-05-01

    The sequences of ITS, matK, rbcL and psbA-trnH of 9 Gynostemma species or variety including 38 samples were compared and analyzed by molecular phylogeny method. Hemsleya macrosperma was designated as outgroup. The MP and NJ phylogenetic tree of Gynostemma was built based on ITS sequence, the results of PAUP phylogenetic analysis showed the following results: (1) The eight individuals of G. pentaphyllum var. pentaphyllum were not supported as monophyletic in the strict consensus trees and NJ trees. (2) It is suspected whether G. longipes and G. laxum should be classified as the independent species. (3)The classification of subgenus units of Gynostemma plants is supported.

  11. A Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis of Deadenylases

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Balatsos, Nikolaos A.A.; Kossida, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    Deadenylases catalyze the shortening of the poly(A) tail at the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) 3′-end in eukaryotes. Therefore, these enzymes influence mRNA decay, and constitute a major emerging group of promising anti-cancer pharmacological targets. Herein, we conducted full phylogenetic analyses of the deadenylase homologs in all available genomes in an effort to investigate evolutionary relationships between the deadenylase families and to identify invariant residues, which probably play key roles in the function of deadenylation across species. Our study includes both major Asp-Glu-Asp-Asp (DEDD) and exonuclease-endonuclease-phospatase (EEP) deadenylase superfamilies. The phylogenetic analysis has provided us with important information regarding conserved and invariant deadenylase amino acids across species. Knowledge of the phylogenetic properties and evolution of the domain of deadenylases provides the foundation for the targeted drug design in the pharmaceutical industry and modern exonuclease anti-cancer scientific research. PMID:24348009

  12. Phylogenetic diversity and biological activity of culturable Actinobacteria isolated from freshwater fish gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Jami, Mansooreh; Ghanbari, Mahdi; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Domig, Konrad J

    2015-06-01

    The diversity of Actinobacteria isolated from the gut microbiota of two freshwater fish species namely Schizothorax zarudnyi and Schizocypris altidorsalis was investigated employing classical cultivation techniques, repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), partial and full 16S rDNA sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis. A total of 277 isolates were cultured by applying three different agar media. Based on rep-PCR profile analysis a subset of 33 strains was selected for further phylogenetic investigations, antimicrobial activity testing and diversity analysis of secondary-metabolite biosynthetic genes. The identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the isolates belong to eight genera distributed among six families. At the family level, 72% of the 277 isolates belong to the family Streptomycetaceae. Among the non-streptomycetes group, the most dominant group could be allocated to the family of Pseudonocardiaceae followed by the members of Micromonosporaceae. Phylogenetic analysis clearly showed that many of the isolates in the genera Streptomyces, Saccharomonospora, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium and Agromyces formed a single and distinct cluster with the type strains. Notably, there is no report so far about the occurrence of these Actinobacteria in the microbiota of freshwater fish. Of the 33 isolates, all the strains exhibited antibacterial activity against a set of tested human and fish pathogenic bacteria. Then, to study their associated potential capacity to synthesize diverse bioactive natural products, diversity of genes associated with secondary-metabolite biosynthesis including PKS I, PKS II, NRPS, the enzyme PhzE of the phenazine pathways, the enzyme dTGD of 6-deoxyhexoses glycosylation pathway, the enzyme Halo of halogenation pathway and the enzyme CYP in polyene polyketide biosynthesis were investigated among the isolates. All the strains possess at least two types of the investigated

  13. Whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of Bluetongue virus serotype 2 strains isolated in the Americas including a novel strain from the western United States.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Natasha N; Mayo, Christie E; Jasperson, Dane C; Crossley, Beate M; Breitmeyer, Richard E; Johnson, Donna J; Ostlund, Eileen N; MacLachlan, N James; Wilson, William C

    2014-07-01

    Bluetongue is a potentially fatal arboviral disease of domestic and wild ruminants that is characterized by widespread edema and tissue necrosis. Bluetongue virus (BTV) serotypes 10, 11, 13, and 17 occur throughout much of the United States, whereas serotype 2 (BTV-2) was previously only detected in the southeastern United States. Since 1998, 10 other BTV serotypes have also been isolated from ruminants in the southeastern United States. In 2010, BTV-2 was identified in California for the first time, and preliminary sequence analysis indicated that the virus isolate was closely related to BTV strains circulating in the southeastern United States. In the current study, the whole genome sequence of the California strain of BTV-2 was compared with those of other BTV-2 strains in the Americas. The results of the analysis suggest co-circulation of genetically distinct viruses in the southeastern United States, and further suggest that the 2010 western isolate is closely related to southeastern strains of BTV. Although it remains uncertain as to how this novel virus was translocated to California, the findings of the current study underscore the need for ongoing surveillance of this economically important livestock disease.

  14. Comparison and phylogenetic analysis of the ISS gene in two predominant avian pathogenic E. coli serogroups isolated from avian colibacillosis in Iran.

    PubMed

    Zahraei Salehi, Taghi; Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Tadjbakhsh, Hasan; Karimi, Vahid

    2013-02-01

    The ISS (increased serum survival) gene and its protein product (ISS) of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are important characteristics of resistance to the complement system. The aims of this study were to clone, sequence and characterize sequence diversity of the ISS gene between two predominant serogroups in Iran and among those previously deposited in Genbank. The ISS gene of 309 bp from the APEC χ1390 strain was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced using pTZ57R/T vector. The ISS gene from the χ1390 strain has 100% identity among different serogroups of APEC in different geographical regions throughout the world. Phylogenetic analysis shows two different phylogenic groups among the different strains. Strong association of nucleotide sequences among different E. coli strains suggests that it may be a conserved gene and could be a suitable antigen to control and detect avian pathogenic E. coli, at least in our region. Currently, our group is working on the ISS protein as candidate vaccine in SPF poultry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Patterns of Reproductive Isolation in Eucalyptus-A Phylogenetic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, Matthew J; Holland, Barbara; Steane, Dorothy A; Jones, Rebecca C; Nicolle, Dean; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M

    2015-07-01

    We assess phylogenetic patterns of hybridization in the speciose, ecologically and economically important genus Eucalyptus, in order to better understand the evolution of reproductive isolation. Eucalyptus globulus pollen was applied to 99 eucalypt species, mainly from the large commercially important subgenus, Symphyomyrtus. In the 64 species that produce seeds, hybrid compatibility was assessed at two stages, hybrid-production (at approximately 1 month) and hybrid-survival (at 9 months), and compared with phylogenies based on 8,350 genome-wide DArT (diversity arrays technology) markers. Model fitting was used to assess the relationship between compatibility and genetic distance, and whether or not the strength of incompatibility "snowballs" with divergence. There was a decline in compatibility with increasing genetic distance between species. Hybridization was common within two closely related clades (one including E. globulus), but rare between E. globulus and species in two phylogenetically distant clades. Of three alternative models tested (linear, slowdown, and snowball), we found consistent support for a snowball model, indicating that the strength of incompatibility accelerates relative to genetic distance. Although we can only speculate about the genetic basis of this pattern, it is consistent with a Dobzhansky-Muller-model prediction that incompatibilities should snowball with divergence due to negative epistasis. Different rates of compatibility decline in the hybrid-production and hybrid-survival measures suggest that early-acting postmating barriers developed first and are stronger than later-acting barriers. We estimated that complete reproductive isolation can take up to 21-31 My in Eucalyptus. Practical implications for hybrid eucalypt breeding and genetic risk assessment in Australia are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For

  16. Complete genome sequences and phylogenetic analysis of two West Nile virus strains isolated from equines in Argentina in 2006 could indicate an early introduction of the virus in the Southern Cone.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Cintia M; García, Jorge B; Morales, María Alejandra; Enría, Delia A; Levis, Silvana; Lanciotti, Robert S

    2014-11-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of two West Nile virus (WNV) strains isolated in Argentina were determined. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from the aligned nucleic acid sequences of these two strains along with other previously published complete WNV genome sequences. Phylogenetic data showed that both strains belonged to clade 1a of lineage 1 and clustered in a subclade with American strains isolated during 1999-2002. These results suggest two independent routes of introduction of WNV in Argentina and that the virus could have been circulating in Argentina for some time before being isolated.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical samples in Mashhad, Iran.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Farzad; Ghanbari, Fahimeh; Mellmann, Alexander; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J; Khaledi, Azad

    2016-01-01

    The spa gene occurs in all strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), can function as a genetic marker and might be used distinguish strains at the species level. Hence, due to these advantages, we used spa typing and the Based Upon Repeat Pattern (BURP) to assign the clonal and phylogenetic relationships of S. aureus strains. The sensitivity of S. aureus strains to methicillin was determined using agar disk diffusion. The extracted DNA from 56 isolates of S. aureus was subjected to PCR to detect the spa gene with specific primers. The spa typing method was performed for each of the isolates, and then, BURP was used to cluster spa types (spa-CCs). Finally, using relevant software, the phylogenic tree was drawn. The results of this study showed that 25 out of 56 (44.6%) isolates were resistant to methicillin. The typing of S. aureus isolates revealed 24 different spa types among 56 isolates, and BURP analysis clustered the 24 spa types into 5 spa clonal complexes (CCs) and 12 singletons. The process of spa typing, in combination with BURP analysis, provides an efficient method for investigating phylogenetic and clonal relationships among clinical isolates and can be useful for monitoring bacterial spread between hospitals and communities as well as between and within hospitals.

  18. On the analysis of phylogenetically paired designs

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Jennifer L; Rakovski, Cyril S; Macpherson, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    As phylogenetically controlled experimental designs become increasingly common in ecology, the need arises for a standardized statistical treatment of these datasets. Phylogenetically paired designs circumvent the need for resolved phylogenies and have been used to compare species groups, particularly in the areas of invasion biology and adaptation. Despite the widespread use of this approach, the statistical analysis of paired designs has not been critically evaluated. We propose a mixed model approach that includes random effects for pair and species. These random effects introduce a “two-layer” compound symmetry variance structure that captures both the correlations between observations on related species within a pair as well as the correlations between the repeated measurements within species. We conducted a simulation study to assess the effect of model misspecification on Type I and II error rates. We also provide an illustrative example with data containing taxonomically similar species and several outcome variables of interest. We found that a mixed model with species and pair as random effects performed better in these phylogenetically explicit simulations than two commonly used reference models (no or single random effect) by optimizing Type I error rates and power. The proposed mixed model produces acceptable Type I and II error rates despite the absence of a phylogenetic tree. This design can be generalized to a variety of datasets to analyze repeated measurements in clusters of related subjects/species. PMID:25750719

  19. A phylogenetic analysis of the family Dermatophilaceae.

    PubMed

    Stackebrandt, E; Kroppenstedt, R M; Fowler, V J

    1983-06-01

    The comparative analysis of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) of Geodermatophilus obscurus DSM 43060 and Dermatophilus congolensis DSM 43037 revealed that these members of the family Dermatophilaceae were only remotely related. While G. obscurus represented an individual and separate line of descent within the phylogenetically defined order Actinomycetales, D. congolensis was closely related to representatives of Arthrobacter, Micrococcus, Cellulomonas, Brevibacterium, Promicromonospora and Microbacterium.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated in 2015 in Germany indicates significant genetic divergence from vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ahmed; Abdelwhab, El-Sayed M; Slanina, Heiko; Hussein, Mohamed A; Kuznetsova, Irina; Schüttler, Christian G; Ziebuhr, John; Pleschka, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Infections by H3N2-type influenza A viruses (IAV) resulted in significant numbers of hospitalization in several countries in 2014-2015, causing disease also in vaccinated individuals and, in some cases, fatal outcomes. In this study, sequence analysis of H3N2 viruses isolated in Germany from 1998 to 2015, including eleven H3N2 isolates collected early in 2015, was performed. Compared to the vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (H3N2), the 2015 strains from Germany showed up to 4.5 % sequence diversity in their HA1 protein, indicating substantial genetic drift. The data further suggest that two distinct phylogroups, 3C.2 and 3C.3, with 1.6-2.3 % and 0.3-2.4 % HA1 nucleotide and amino acid sequence diversity, respectively, co-circulated in Germany in the 2014/2015 season. Distinct glycosylation patterns and amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins were identified, possibly contributing to the unusually high number of H3N2 infections in this season and providing important information for developing vaccines that are effective against both genotypes.

  1. Phylogenetic and physiological diversity of microorganisms isolated from a deep greenland glacier ice core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miteva, V. I.; Sheridan, P. P.; Brenchley, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    We studied a sample from the GISP 2 (Greenland Ice Sheet Project) ice core to determine the diversity and survival of microorganisms trapped in the ice at least 120,000 years ago. Previously, we examined the phylogenetic relationships among 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences in a clone library obtained by PCR amplification from genomic DNA extracted from anaerobic enrichments. Here we report the isolation of nearly 800 aerobic organisms that were grouped by morphology and amplified rDNA restriction analysis patterns to select isolates for further study. The phylogenetic analyses of 56 representative rDNA sequences showed that the isolates belonged to four major phylogenetic groups: the high-G+C gram-positives, low-G+C gram-positives, Proteobacteria, and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group. The most abundant and diverse isolates were within the high-G+C gram-positive cluster that had not been represented in the clone library. The Jukes-Cantor evolutionary distance matrix results suggested that at least 7 isolates represent new species within characterized genera and that 49 are different strains of known species. The isolates were further categorized based on the isolation conditions, temperature range for growth, enzyme activity, antibiotic resistance, presence of plasmids, and strain-specific genomic variations. A significant observation with implications for the development of novel and more effective cultivation methods was that preliminary incubation in anaerobic and aerobic liquid prior to plating on agar media greatly increased the recovery of CFU from the ice core sample.

  2. Phylogenetic and physiological diversity of microorganisms isolated from a deep greenland glacier ice core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miteva, V. I.; Sheridan, P. P.; Brenchley, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    We studied a sample from the GISP 2 (Greenland Ice Sheet Project) ice core to determine the diversity and survival of microorganisms trapped in the ice at least 120,000 years ago. Previously, we examined the phylogenetic relationships among 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences in a clone library obtained by PCR amplification from genomic DNA extracted from anaerobic enrichments. Here we report the isolation of nearly 800 aerobic organisms that were grouped by morphology and amplified rDNA restriction analysis patterns to select isolates for further study. The phylogenetic analyses of 56 representative rDNA sequences showed that the isolates belonged to four major phylogenetic groups: the high-G+C gram-positives, low-G+C gram-positives, Proteobacteria, and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group. The most abundant and diverse isolates were within the high-G+C gram-positive cluster that had not been represented in the clone library. The Jukes-Cantor evolutionary distance matrix results suggested that at least 7 isolates represent new species within characterized genera and that 49 are different strains of known species. The isolates were further categorized based on the isolation conditions, temperature range for growth, enzyme activity, antibiotic resistance, presence of plasmids, and strain-specific genomic variations. A significant observation with implications for the development of novel and more effective cultivation methods was that preliminary incubation in anaerobic and aerobic liquid prior to plating on agar media greatly increased the recovery of CFU from the ice core sample.

  3. Phylogenetic and physiological diversity of microorganisms isolated from a deep greenland glacier ice core.

    PubMed

    Miteva, V I; Sheridan, P P; Brenchley, J E

    2004-01-01

    We studied a sample from the GISP 2 (Greenland Ice Sheet Project) ice core to determine the diversity and survival of microorganisms trapped in the ice at least 120,000 years ago. Previously, we examined the phylogenetic relationships among 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences in a clone library obtained by PCR amplification from genomic DNA extracted from anaerobic enrichments. Here we report the isolation of nearly 800 aerobic organisms that were grouped by morphology and amplified rDNA restriction analysis patterns to select isolates for further study. The phylogenetic analyses of 56 representative rDNA sequences showed that the isolates belonged to four major phylogenetic groups: the high-G+C gram-positives, low-G+C gram-positives, Proteobacteria, and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group. The most abundant and diverse isolates were within the high-G+C gram-positive cluster that had not been represented in the clone library. The Jukes-Cantor evolutionary distance matrix results suggested that at least 7 isolates represent new species within characterized genera and that 49 are different strains of known species. The isolates were further categorized based on the isolation conditions, temperature range for growth, enzyme activity, antibiotic resistance, presence of plasmids, and strain-specific genomic variations. A significant observation with implications for the development of novel and more effective cultivation methods was that preliminary incubation in anaerobic and aerobic liquid prior to plating on agar media greatly increased the recovery of CFU from the ice core sample.

  4. A Deliberate Practice Approach to Teaching Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, F. Collin; Johnson, Daniel J.; Kearns, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    One goal of postsecondary education is to assist students in developing expert-level understanding. Previous attempts to encourage expert-level understanding of phylogenetic analysis in college science classrooms have largely focused on isolated, or “one-shot,” in-class activities. Using a deliberate practice instructional approach, we designed a set of five assignments for a 300-level plant systematics course that incrementally introduces the concepts and skills used in phylogenetic analysis. In our assignments, students learned the process of constructing phylogenetic trees through a series of increasingly difficult tasks; thus, skill development served as a framework for building content knowledge. We present results from 5 yr of final exam scores, pre- and postconcept assessments, and student surveys to assess the impact of our new pedagogical materials on student performance related to constructing and interpreting phylogenetic trees. Students improved in their ability to interpret relationships within trees and improved in several aspects related to between-tree comparisons and tree construction skills. Student feedback indicated that most students believed our approach prepared them to engage in tree construction and gave them confidence in their abilities. Overall, our data confirm that instructional approaches implementing deliberate practice address student misconceptions, improve student experiences, and foster deeper understanding of difficult scientific concepts. PMID:24297294

  5. A deliberate practice approach to teaching phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, F Collin; Johnson, Daniel J; Kearns, Katherine D

    2013-01-01

    One goal of postsecondary education is to assist students in developing expert-level understanding. Previous attempts to encourage expert-level understanding of phylogenetic analysis in college science classrooms have largely focused on isolated, or "one-shot," in-class activities. Using a deliberate practice instructional approach, we designed a set of five assignments for a 300-level plant systematics course that incrementally introduces the concepts and skills used in phylogenetic analysis. In our assignments, students learned the process of constructing phylogenetic trees through a series of increasingly difficult tasks; thus, skill development served as a framework for building content knowledge. We present results from 5 yr of final exam scores, pre- and postconcept assessments, and student surveys to assess the impact of our new pedagogical materials on student performance related to constructing and interpreting phylogenetic trees. Students improved in their ability to interpret relationships within trees and improved in several aspects related to between-tree comparisons and tree construction skills. Student feedback indicated that most students believed our approach prepared them to engage in tree construction and gave them confidence in their abilities. Overall, our data confirm that instructional approaches implementing deliberate practice address student misconceptions, improve student experiences, and foster deeper understanding of difficult scientific concepts.

  6. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic inferences of Dermanyssus gallinae isolates in Italy within an European framework.

    PubMed

    Marangi, M; Cantacessi, C; Sparagano, O A E; Camarda, A; Giangaspero, A

    2014-12-01

    In order to investigate the genetic relationships between Dermanyssus gallinae (Metastigmata: Dermanyssidae) (de Geer) isolates from poultry farms in Italy and other European countries, phylogenetic analysis was performed using a portion of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of the mitochondrial DNA and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1+5.8S+ITS2) of the ribosomal DNA. A total of 360 cox1 sequences and 360 ITS+ sequences were obtained from mites collected on 24 different poultry farms in 10 different regions of Northern and Southern Italy. Phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 sequences resulted in the clustering of two groups (A and B), whereas phylogenetic analysis of the ITS+ resulted in largely unresolved clusters. Knowledge of the genetic make-up of mite populations within countries, together with comparative analyses of D. gallinae isolates from different countries, will provide better understanding of the population dynamics of D. gallinae. This will also allow the identification of genetic markers of emerging acaricide resistance and the development of alternative strategies for the prevention and treatment of infestations.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of cubilin (CUBN) gene

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Abjal Pasha; Alsaeed, Abbas H; Kiranmayee, S; Bammidi, VK; Sultana, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Cubilin, (CUBN; also known as intrinsic factor-cobalamin receptor [Homo sapiens Entrez Pubmed ref NM_001081.3; NG_008967.1; GI: 119606627]), located in the epithelium of intestine and kidney acts as a receptor for intrinsic factor – vitamin B12 complexes. Mutations in CUBN may play a role in autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia. The current study investigated the possible role of CUBN in evolution using phylogenetic testing. A total of 588 BLAST hits were found for the cubilin query sequence and these hits showed putative conserved domain, CUB superfamily (as on 27th Nov 2012). A first-pass phylogenetic tree was constructed to identify the taxa which most often contained the CUBN sequences. Following this, we narrowed down the search by manually deleting sequences which were not CUBN. A repeat phylogenetic analysis of 25 taxa was performed using PhyML, RAxML and TreeDyn softwares to confirm that CUBN is a conserved protein emphasizing its importance as an extracellular domain and being present in proteins mostly known to be involved in development in many chordate taxa but not found in prokaryotes, plants and yeast.. No horizontal gene transfers have been found between different taxa. PMID:23390341

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of cubilin (CUBN) gene.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Abjal Pasha; Alsaeed, Abbas H; Kiranmayee, S; Bammidi, Vk; Sultana, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Cubilin, (CUBN; also known as intrinsic factor-cobalamin receptor [Homo sapiens Entrez Pubmed ref NM_001081.3; NG_008967.1; GI: 119606627]), located in the epithelium of intestine and kidney acts as a receptor for intrinsic factor - vitamin B12 complexes. Mutations in CUBN may play a role in autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia. The current study investigated the possible role of CUBN in evolution using phylogenetic testing. A total of 588 BLAST hits were found for the cubilin query sequence and these hits showed putative conserved domain, CUB superfamily (as on 27(th) Nov 2012). A first-pass phylogenetic tree was constructed to identify the taxa which most often contained the CUBN sequences. Following this, we narrowed down the search by manually deleting sequences which were not CUBN. A repeat phylogenetic analysis of 25 taxa was performed using PhyML, RAxML and TreeDyn softwares to confirm that CUBN is a conserved protein emphasizing its importance as an extracellular domain and being present in proteins mostly known to be involved in development in many chordate taxa but not found in prokaryotes, plants and yeast.. No horizontal gene transfers have been found between different taxa.

  9. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of a Geographically and Temporally Matched Set of Candida albicans Isolates from Humans and Nonmigratory Wildlife in Central Illinois ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Lauren; Whittington, Julia K.; Pujol, Claude; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Ruiz, Marilyn O.; Pfaller, Michael A.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Soll, David R.; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored whether wildlife species serve as the reservoir for human Candida albicans strains in a given geographic area. C. albicans isolates were collected from nonmigratory wildlife admitted to the University of Illinois Wildlife Medical Clinic. A geographically and temporally matched set of C. albicans oral isolates was collected from healthy human volunteers. Multilocus sequence typing was used to assign strains to genetic clades. Clade 1 isolates, particularly diploid sequence type 69 (DST 69), were most common in humans. Clade 1 strains were less frequently recovered from wildlife, while clade 8 strains, particularly DST 90, were overrepresented in the wildlife collection. All instances where a wildlife and human isolate shared the same DST occurred within clade 1. Clade distributions between human and wildlife isolates were significantly different, demonstrating population isolation between the groups. These differences may indicate limited strain transfer between groups or differential selection of C. albicans isolates in humans and wildlife. Wildlife strains had an amphotericin B MIC significantly lower than that of human isolates; strains with increased susceptibility were from several clades. C. albicans isolates were collected from domestic animals to provide comparisons with human and wildlife data sets. C. albicans isolation from canine and feline oral and anal swabs was infrequent; companion animal isolates were closely related to clade 1 human isolates. Collectively, the data suggest a greater likelihood of C. albicans transfer from humans to animals than from animals to humans. The nontransient human population may maintain the connection between geography and the C. albicans genetic groups recovered from humans. PMID:18621922

  10. Molecular identification and phylogenetic analysis of baculoviruses from Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Jehle, Johannes A; Lange, Martin; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Yongjie; Hauschild, Rüdiger

    2006-03-01

    PCR amplification of the highly conserved baculovirus genes late expression factor 8 (lef-8), late expression factor 9 (lef-9) and polyhedrin/granulin (polh/gran) combined with molecular phylogenetic analyses provide a powerful tool to identify lepidopteran-specific baculoviruses and to study their diversity. In the present investigation, we have improved the degenerate oligonucleotides and corroborated the approach that was recently described by Lange et al. (Lange, M., Wang, H., Zhihong, H., Jehle, J.A., 2004. Towards a molecular identification and classification system of lepidopteran-specific baculoviruses. Virology 325, 36-47.). Baculovirus DNA was isolated from 71 uncharacterized historic baculovirus samples, and partial gene sequences were amplified by using gene-specific degenerate PCR primers. The obtained PCR products were directly sequenced, and the deduced amino acid sequences were compiled and aligned with published sequences of these target genes. A phylogenetic tree of 117 baculoviruses was inferred using maximum parsimony and distance methods. Based on the comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the partial lef-8, lef-9 and polh/gran genes, we propose a phylogenetic species criterion for lepidopteran-specific baculoviruses that uses the genetic distances of these genes for species demarcation.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of honey bee behavioral evolution.

    PubMed

    Raffiudin, Rika; Crozier, Ross H

    2007-05-01

    DNA sequences from three mitochondrial (rrnL, cox2, nad2) and one nuclear gene (itpr) from all 9 known honey bee species (Apis), a 10th possible species, Apis dorsata binghami, and three outgroup species (Bombus terrestris, Melipona bicolor and Trigona fimbriata) were used to infer Apis phylogenetic relationships using Bayesian analysis. The dwarf honey bees were confirmed as basal, and the giant and cavity-nesting species to be monophyletic. All nodes were strongly supported except that grouping Apis cerana with A. nigrocincta. Two thousand post-burnin trees from the phylogenetic analysis were used in a Bayesian comparative analysis to explore the evolution of dance type, nest structure, comb structure and dance sound within Apis. The ancestral honey bee species was inferred with high support to have nested in the open, and to have more likely than not had a silent vertical waggle dance and a single comb. The common ancestor of the giant and cavity-dwelling bees is strongly inferred to have had a buzzing vertical directional dance. All pairwise combinations of characters showed strong association, but the multiple comparisons problem reduces the ability to infer associations between states between characters. Nevertheless, a buzzing dance is significantly associated with cavity-nesting, several vertical combs, and dancing vertically, a horizontal dance is significantly associated with a nest with a single comb wrapped around the support, and open nesting with a single pendant comb and a silent waggle dance.

  12. Virulence determinants, phylogenetic groups and fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from cystitis and pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ferjani, S; Saidani, M; Ennigrou, S; Hsairi, M; Ben Redjeb, S

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the relation between virulence genotype, phylogenetic group and susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and the urinary tract infection type including pyelonephritis and cystitis due to Escherichia coli. Between 2006 and 2007, 129 non-duplicate E. coli isolates from pyelonephritis (n=56) and cystitis (n=73) were prospectively collected. The antibiotic susceptibility was done by disk diffusion method. The phylogenetic groups, A, B1, B2 and D and 18 virulence genes were determined by multiplex PCR. Statistical analysis was done with the Pearson χ2 test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis test and stepwise multivariable logistic regression analysis, P values below 0.05 were considered statistically significant. For the pyelonephritis group, sex ratio was 0.3, the median age for women was 30 years and for men it was 54 years. For the cystitis group, sex ratio was 0.4, the median age for women was 41.5 years and for men it was 67.8 years. Significant statistical correlations were found between pyelonephritis isolates and susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (P=4 10(-5)), papG allele II (P=2 10(-6)), hlyA (P=10(-03)), iroN (P=0.04), iha (P=0.03) and ompT (P=0.03) virulence genes, high virulence score (P=0.008) and B2 phylogenetic group (P=0.03). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, papG II as predictor of pyelonephritis, no correlation could be established for the cystitis group. Our findings argue for a direct link between pyelonephritis, virulence factors, susceptibility to fluroquinolones and B2 phylogenetic group among uropthogenic E. coli. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Uncommonly isolated clinical Pseudomonas: identification and phylogenetic assignation.

    PubMed

    Mulet, M; Gomila, M; Ramírez, A; Cardew, S; Moore, E R B; Lalucat, J; García-Valdés, E

    2017-02-01

    Fifty-two Pseudomonas strains that were difficult to identify at the species level in the phenotypic routine characterizations employed by clinical microbiology laboratories were selected for genotypic-based analysis. Species level identifications were done initially by partial sequencing of the DNA dependent RNA polymerase sub-unit D gene (rpoD). Two other gene sequences, for the small sub-unit ribosonal RNA (16S rRNA) and for DNA gyrase sub-unit B (gyrB) were added in a multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) study to confirm the species identifications. These sequences were analyzed with a collection of reference sequences from the type strains of 161 Pseudomonas species within an in-house multi-locus sequence analysis database. Whole-cell matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analyses of these strains complemented the DNA sequenced-based phylogenetic analyses and were observed to be in accordance with the results of the sequence data. Twenty-three out of 52 strains were assigned to 12 recognized species not commonly detected in clinical specimens and 29 (56 %) were considered representatives of at least ten putative new species. Most strains were distributed within the P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa lineages. The value of rpoD sequences in species-level identifications for Pseudomonas is emphasized. The correct species identifications of clinical strains is essential for establishing the intrinsic antibiotic resistance patterns and improved treatment plans.

  14. Complete genome of a European hepatitis C virus subtype 1g isolate: phylogenetic and genetic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Bracho, Maria A; Saludes, Verónica; Martró, Elisa; Bargalló, Ana; González-Candelas, Fernando; Ausina, Vicent

    2008-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus isolates have been classified into six main genotypes and a variable number of subtypes within each genotype, mainly based on phylogenetic analysis. Analyses of the genetic relationship among genotypes and subtypes are more reliable when complete genome sequences (or at least the full coding region) are used; however, so far 31 of 80 confirmed or proposed subtypes have at least one complete genome available. Of these, 20 correspond to confirmed subtypes of epidemic interest. Results We present and analyse the first complete genome sequence of a HCV subtype 1g isolate. Phylogenetic and genetic distance analyses reveal that HCV-1g is the most divergent subtype among the HCV-1 confirmed subtypes. Potential genomic recombination events between genotypes or subtype 1 genomes were ruled out. We demonstrate phylogenetic congruence of previously deposited partial sequences of HCV-1g with respect to our sequence. Conclusion In light of this, we propose changing the current status of its subtype-specific designation from provisional to confirmed. PMID:18533988

  15. Computational methods to detect conserved non-genic elements in phylogenetically isolated genomes: application to zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Michael; Agarwal, Saatvik; Notwell, James H.; Parikh, Ravi; Guturu, Harendra; Wenger, Aaron M.; Bejerano, Gill

    2013-01-01

    Many important model organisms for biomedical and evolutionary research have sequenced genomes, but occupy a phylogenetically isolated position, evolutionarily distant from other sequenced genomes. This phylogenetic isolation is exemplified for zebrafish, a vertebrate model for cis-regulation, development and human disease, whose evolutionary distance to all other currently sequenced fish exceeds the distance between human and chicken. Such large distances make it difficult to align genomes and use them for comparative analysis beyond gene-focused questions. In particular, detecting conserved non-genic elements (CNEs) as promising cis-regulatory elements with biological importance is challenging. Here, we develop a general comparative genomics framework to align isolated genomes and to comprehensively detect CNEs. Our approach integrates highly sensitive and quality-controlled local alignments and uses alignment transitivity and ancestral reconstruction to bridge large evolutionary distances. We apply our framework to zebrafish and demonstrate substantially improved CNE detection and quality compared with previous sets. Our zebrafish CNE set comprises 54 533 CNEs, of which 11 792 (22%) are conserved to human or mouse. Our zebrafish CNEs (http://zebrafish.stanford.edu) are highly enriched in known enhancers and extend existing experimental (ChIP-Seq) sets. The same framework can now be applied to the isolated genomes of frog, amphioxus, Caenorhabditis elegans and many others. PMID:23814184

  16. Phylogenetic correlation of Greek and Italian orf virus isolates based on VIR gene.

    PubMed

    Kottaridi, Christine; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Teodori, Liana; Savini, Giovanni; Lelli, Rossella; Markoulatos, Panayotis; Mangana, Olga

    2006-09-10

    Thirteen orf virus isolates obtained during the time period between 1995 and 2004 from crusted scab lesions of nine sheep and four goats from different geographical areas of Greece and Italy with suspected contagious ecthyma infection were analyzed. DNA of all isolates was successfully amplified by PCR with the primers 045F-045R and identified them as parapox virus. Partial DNA sequence of orf virus interferon resistant (VIR) gene, phylogenetic analysis of the available isolates and amino acid comparison of the interferon resistance protein encoded by this genomic region was carried out. According to the results of the present report a precise characterisation of the genomic region studied might provide evidence for the genetic variation and movement of the circulating orf virus strains.

  17. A comparative study on the phylogenetic diversity of culturable actinobacteria isolated from five marine sponge species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Yan; Jin, Meifang; Yu, Xingju

    2008-03-01

    A cultivation-based approach was employed to compare the culturable actinobacterial diversity associated with five marine sponge species (Craniella australiensis, Halichondria rugosa, Reniochalina sp., Sponge sp., and Stelletta tenuis). The phylogenetic affiliation of the actinobacterial isolates was assessed by 16S rDNA-RFLP analysis. A total of 181 actinobacterial strains were isolated using five different culture media (denoted as M1-M5). The type of medium exhibited significant effects on the number of actinobacteria recovered, with the highest number of isolates on M3 (63 isolates) and the lowest on M1 (12 isolates). The genera isolated were also different, with the recovery of three genera on M2 and M3, and only a single genus on M1. The number of actinobacteria isolated from the five sponge species was significantly different, with a count of 83, 36, 30, 17, and 15 isolates from S. tenuis, H. rugosa, Sponge sp., Reniochalina sp., and C. australiensis, respectively. M3 was the best isolation medium for recovery of actinobacteria from S. tenuis, H. rugosa, and Sponge sp., while no specific medium preference was observed for the recovery of actinobacteria from Reniochalina sp., and C. australiensis. The RFLP fingerprinting of 16S rDNA genes digested with HhaI revealed six different patterns, in which 16 representative 16S rDNAs were fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 12 strains belong to the group Streptomyces, three strains belong to Pseudonocardia, and one strain belongs to Nocardia. Two strains C14 (from C. australiensis) and N13 (from Sponge sp.) have only 96.26% and 96.27% similarity to earlier published sequences, and are therefore potential candidates for new species. The highest diversity of three actinobacteria genera was obtained from Sponge sp., though the number of isolates was low. Two genera of actinobacteria, Streptomyces, and Pseudonocardia, were isolated from both S. tenuis and C. australiensis. Only the genus of Streptomyces

  18. Taxonomic review and phylogenetic analysis of Enchodontoidei.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hilda M A; Gallo, Valéria

    2011-06-01

    Enchodontoidei are extinct marine teleost fishes with a long temporal range and a wide geographic distribution. As there has been no comprehensive phylogenetic study of this taxon, we performed a parsimony analysis using a data matrix with 87 characters, 31 terminal taxa for ingroup, and three taxa for outgroup. The analysis produced 93 equally parsimonious trees (L = 437 steps; CI = 0. 24; RI = 0. 49). The topology of the majority rule consensus tree was: (Sardinioides + Hemisaurida + (Nardorex + (Atolvorator + (Protostomias + Yabrudichthys ) + (Apateopholis + (Serrilepis + (Halec + Phylactocephalus ) + (Cimolichthys + (Prionolepis + ( (Eurypholis + Saurorhamphus ) + (Enchodus + (Paleolycus + Parenchodus ))))))) + ( (Ichthyotringa + Apateodus ) + (Rharbichthys + (Trachinocephalus + ( (Apuliadercetis + Brazilodercetis ) + (Benthesikyme + (Cyranichthys + Robertichthys ) + (Dercetis + Ophidercetis )) + (Caudadercetis + (Pelargorhynchus + (Nardodercetis + (Rhynchodercetis + (Dercetoides + Hastichthys )))))). The group Enchodontoidei is not monophyletic. Dercetidae form a clade supported by the presence of very reduced neural spines and possess a new composition. Enchodontidae are monophyletic by the presence of middorsal scutes, and Rharbichthys was excluded. Halecidae possess a new composition, with the exclusion of Hemisaurida. This taxon and Nardorex are Aulopiformes incertae sedis.

  19. Exoribonuclease superfamilies: structural analysis and phylogenetic distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yuhong; Deutscher, Murray P.

    2001-01-01

    Exoribonucleases play an important role in all aspects of RNA metabolism. Biochemical and genetic analyses in recent years have identified many new RNases and it is now clear that a single cell can contain multiple enzymes of this class. Here, we analyze the structure and phylogenetic distribution of the known exoribonucleases. Based on extensive sequence analysis and on their catalytic properties, all of the exoribonucleases and their homologs have been grouped into six superfamilies and various subfamilies. We identify common motifs that can be used to characterize newly-discovered exoribonucleases, and based on these motifs we correct some previously misassigned proteins. This analysis may serve as a useful first step for developing a nomenclature for this group of enzymes. PMID:11222749

  20. A Distance Measure for Genome Phylogenetic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Minh Duc; Allison, Lloyd; Dix, Trevor

    Phylogenetic analyses of species based on single genes or parts of the genomes are often inconsistent because of factors such as variable rates of evolution and horizontal gene transfer. The availability of more and more sequenced genomes allows phylogeny construction from complete genomes that is less sensitive to such inconsistency. For such long sequences, construction methods like maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood are often not possible due to their intensive computational requirement. Another class of tree construction methods, namely distance-based methods, require a measure of distances between any two genomes. Some measures such as evolutionary edit distance of gene order and gene content are computational expensive or do not perform well when the gene content of the organisms are similar. This study presents an information theoretic measure of genetic distances between genomes based on the biological compression algorithm expert model. We demonstrate that our distance measure can be applied to reconstruct the consensus phylogenetic tree of a number of Plasmodium parasites from their genomes, the statistical bias of which would mislead conventional analysis methods. Our approach is also used to successfully construct a plausible evolutionary tree for the γ-Proteobacteria group whose genomes are known to contain many horizontally transferred genes.

  1. Phylogenetic relationships of Brazilian isolates of Pythium insidiosum based on ITS rDNA and cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, M I; Botton, S A; Pereira, D I B; Robe, L J; Jesus, F P K; Mahl, C D; Costa, M M; Alves, S H; Santurio, J M

    2012-09-14

    Pythium insidiosum is an aquatic oomycete that is the causative agent of pythiosis. Advances in molecular methods have enabled increased accuracy in the diagnosis of pythiosis, and in studies of the phylogenetic relationships of this oomycete. To evaluate the phylogenetic relationships among isolates of P. insidiosum from different regions of Brazil, and also regarding to other American and Thai isolates, in this study a total of thirty isolates of P. insidiosum from different regions of Brazil was used and had their ITS1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2 rDNA (ITS) region and the partial sequence of cytochrome oxidase II (COX II) gene sequenced and analyzed. The outgroup consisted of six isolates of other Pythium species and one of Lagenidium giganteum. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS and COX II genes were conducted, both individually and in combination, using four different methods: Maximum parsimony (MP); Neighbor-joining (NJ); Maximum likelihood (ML); and Bayesian analysis (BA). Our data supported P. insidiosum as monophyletic in relation to the other Pythium species, and COX II showed that P. insidiosum appears to be subdivided into three major polytomous groups, whose arrangement provides the Thai isolates as paraphyletic in relation to the Brazilian ones. The molecular analyses performed in this study suggest an evolutionary proximity among all American isolates, including the Brazilian and the Central and North America isolates, which were grouped together in a single entirely polytomous clade. The COX II network results presented signals of a recent expansion for the American isolates, probably originated from an Asian invasion source. Here, COX II showed higher levels bias, although it was the source of higher levels of phylogenetic information when compared to ITS. Nevertheless, the two markers chosen for this study proved to be entirely congruent, at least with respect to phylogenetic relationships between different isolates of P. insidiosum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  2. Close phylogenetic relationship between Angolan and Romanian HIV-1 subtype F1 isolates

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Monick L; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Otsuki, Koko; da Silva, Rosa Ferreira FC; Francisco, Moises; da Silva, Filomena Gomes; Serrano, Ducelina; Morgado, Mariza G; Bello, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    Background Here, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships of the HIV-1 subtype F1 circulating in Angola with subtype F1 strains sampled worldwide and reconstructed the evolutionary history of this subtype in Central Africa. Methods Forty-six HIV-1-positive samples were collected in Angola in 2006 and subtyped at the env-gp41 region. Partial env-gp120 and pol-RT sequences and near full-length genomes from those env-gp41 subtype F1 samples were further generated. Phylogenetic analyses of partial and full-length subtype F1 strains isolated worldwide were carried out. The onset date of the subtype F1 epidemic in Central Africa was estimated using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. Results Nine Angolan samples were classified as subtype F1 based on the analysis of the env-gp41 region. All nine Angolan sequences were also classified as subtype F1 in both env-gp120 and pol-RT genomic regions, and near full-length genome analysis of four of these samples confirmed their classification as "pure" subtype F1. Phylogenetic analyses of subtype F1 strains isolated worldwide revealed that isolates from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) were the earliest branching lineages within the subtype F1 phylogeny. Most strains from Angola segregated in a monophyletic group together with Romanian sequences; whereas South American F1 sequences emerged as an independent cluster. The origin of the subtype F1 epidemic in Central African was estimated at 1958 (1934–1971). Conclusion "Pure" subtype F1 strains are common in Angola and seem to be the result of a single founder event. Subtype F1 sequences from Angola are closely related to those described in Romania, and only distantly related to the subtype F1 lineage circulating in South America. Original diversification of subtype F1 probably occurred within the DRC around the late 1950s. PMID:19386115

  3. A phylogenetic analysis of the mycoplasmas: basis for their classification.

    PubMed Central

    Weisburg, W G; Tully, J G; Rose, D L; Petzel, J P; Oyaizu, H; Yang, D; Mandelco, L; Sechrest, J; Lawrence, T G; Van Etten, J

    1989-01-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were determined for almost 50 species of mycoplasmas and their walled relatives, providing the basis for a phylogenetic systematic analysis of these organisms. Five groups of mycoplasmas per se were recognized (provisional names are given): the hominis group (which included species such as Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma lipophilum, Mycoplasma pulmonis, and Mycoplasma neurolyticum), the pneumoniae group (which included species such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Mycoplasma muris), the spiroplasma group (which included species such as Mycoplasma mycoides, Spiroplasma citri, and Spiroplasma apis), the anaeroplasma group (which encompassed the anaeroplasmas and acholeplasmas), and a group known to contain only the isolated species Asteroleplasma anaerobium. In addition to these five mycoplasma groups, a sixth group of variously named gram-positive, walled organisms (which included lactobacilli, clostridia, and other organisms) was also included in the overall phylogenetic unit. In each of these six primary groups, subgroups were readily recognized and defined. Although the phylogenetic units identified by rRNA comparisons are difficult to recognize on the basis of mutually exclusive phenotypic characters alone, phenotypic justification can be given a posteriori for a number of them. PMID:2592342

  4. A minute virus of canines (MVC: canine bocavirus) isolated from an elderly dog with severe gastroenteritis, and phylogenetic analysis of MVC strains.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, T; Kawakami, K; Abe, T; Mochizuki, M

    2010-10-26

    Two of the three adult dogs kept in a family developed severe gastroenteritis. From the feces of one of the affected dogs a minute virus of canines (MVC) was detected by PCR and virus isolation. That this virus had recently infected the dogs was indicated by high anti-MVC antibody titers of their sera. No other virus commonly associated with canine gastrointestinal disease was implicated. As no previous association of MVC infection and disease in aged dogs had been described, further characterization of the isolated virus was performed to determine if it had unique pathogenic or genetic properties. Experimental infection of adult dogs did not result in clinical disease and comparison of the viral genome with other MVCs did not reveal any novel elements. The American, Japanese and Korean MVC strains studied were closely related to bocaviruses of bovine and human origin, and appeared to have evolved uniquely in the dog population after dividing from the common ancestor of bocaviruses. Further detailed clinical and virological studies are warranted to define the role of MVCs in disease in adult dogs.

  5. Antifungal Drug Susceptibility and Phylogenetic Diversity among Cryptococcus Isolates from Dogs and Cats in North America

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Lisa M.; Meyer, Wieland; Firacative, Carolina; Thompson, George R.; Samitz, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Molecular types of the Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex that infect dogs and cats differ regionally and with host species. Antifungal drug susceptibility can vary with molecular type, but the susceptibility of Cryptococcus isolates from dogs and cats is largely unknown. Cryptococcus isolates from 15 dogs and 27 cats were typed using URA5 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP), PCR fingerprinting, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Susceptibility was determined using a microdilution assay (Sensititre YeastOne; Trek Diagnostic Systems). MICs were compared among groups. The 42 isolates studied comprised molecular types VGI (7%), VGIIa (7%), VGIIb (5%), VGIIc (5%), VGIII (38%), VGIV (2%), VNI (33%), and VNII (2%), as determined by URA5 RFLP. The VGIV isolate was more closely related to VGIII according to MLST. All VGIII isolates were from cats. All sequence types identified from veterinary isolates clustered with isolates from humans. VGIII isolates showed considerable genetic diversity compared with other Cryptococcus molecular types and could be divided into two major subgroups. Compared with C. neoformans MICs, C. gattii MICs were lower for flucytosine, and VGIII MICs were lower for flucytosine and itraconazole. For all drugs except itraconazole, C. gattii isolates exhibited a wider range of MICs than C. neoformans. MICs varied with Cryptococcus species and molecular type in dogs and cats, and MICs of VGIII isolates were most variable and may reflect phylogenetic diversity in this group. Because sequence types of dogs and cats reflect those infecting humans, these observations may also have implications for treatment of human cryptococcosis. PMID:24696030

  6. Genetic diversity, distant phylogenetic relationships and the occurrence of recombination events among cucumber mosaic virus isolates from zucchini in Poland.

    PubMed

    Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Chrzanowski, Mateusz; Budzyńska, Daria; Rymelska, Natalia; Borodynko-Filas, Natasza

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, the occurrence of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been noted in zucchini crops in Poland. Beside characteristic isolates, which displayed mosaics and chlorosis on infected plants, new necrotic isolates have also been identified. Here, we analysed the molecular variability of 27 isolates of CMV collected from zucchini in various regions of the country. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis based on the genes encoding the coat (CP) and movement (MP) proteins revealed that the Polish isolates belong to two subgroups: IA and II, with the prevalence of subgroup II. New recombinant variants with an IA-MP/II-CP pattern for RNA3 were also detected.

  7. Epidemiological Survey and Phylogenetic Characterization of Cysticercus tenuicollis Isolated from Tibetan Pigs in Tibet, China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Houqiang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Kun; Rehman, Mujeeb Ur; Mehmood, Khalid; Lan, Yanfang; Huang, Shucheng

    2017-01-01

    Cysticercus tenuicollis, commonly known as “water bell,” is a larva of Taenia hydatigena, which is the most significant parasite of pigs. However, until now very few information is available regarding the prevalence and genetic characterization of the Cysticercus tenuicollis in Tibetan pigs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and phylogenetic analysis of Cysticercus tenuicollis in Tibetan pigs. For this purpose, the COX2 gene of Cysticercus tenuicollis was amplified and sequenced for the first time in Tibetan pigs. The overall prevalence of Cysticercus tenuicollis was 43.93% in Tibetan pigs, with further distribution of 42.86% in 2014 and 45.35% in 2015. In Tibetan male and female pigs, the prevalence of Cysticercus tenuicollis was 43.39% and 44.56%, respectively. The prevalence of Cysticercus tenuicollis in different growing stages (juveniles, subadults, and adults) varied from 30.20% to 63.79%. The phylogenetic analysis of the Cysticercus tenuicollis isolates showed very close resemblance to 16 reference strains, isolates from Gansu, Hunan, and Sichuan provinces of China. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the prevalence and genetic characterization of Cysticercus tenuicollis derived from Tibetan pigs. The data of present study provides baseline information for controlling cysticerci infections in pigs in Tibetan Plateau, China. PMID:28607936

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Andriy; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2010-03-16

    The superfamily of ABC proteins is among the largest known in nature. Its members are mainly, but not exclusively, involved in the transport of a broad range of substrates across biological membranes. Many contribute to multidrug resistance in microbial pathogens and cancer cells. The diversity of ABC proteins in fungi is comparable with those in multicellular animals, but so far fungal ABC proteins have barely been studied. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of the ABC proteins extracted from the genomes of 27 fungal species from 18 orders representing 5 fungal phyla thereby covering the most important groups. Our analysis demonstrated that some of the subfamilies of ABC proteins remained highly conserved in fungi, while others have undergone a remarkable group-specific diversification. Members of the various fungal phyla also differed significantly in the number of ABC proteins found in their genomes, which is especially reduced in the yeast S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Data obtained during our analysis should contribute to a better understanding of the diversity of the fungal ABC proteins and provide important clues about their possible biological functions.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The superfamily of ABC proteins is among the largest known in nature. Its members are mainly, but not exclusively, involved in the transport of a broad range of substrates across biological membranes. Many contribute to multidrug resistance in microbial pathogens and cancer cells. The diversity of ABC proteins in fungi is comparable with those in multicellular animals, but so far fungal ABC proteins have barely been studied. Results We performed a phylogenetic analysis of the ABC proteins extracted from the genomes of 27 fungal species from 18 orders representing 5 fungal phyla thereby covering the most important groups. Our analysis demonstrated that some of the subfamilies of ABC proteins remained highly conserved in fungi, while others have undergone a remarkable group-specific diversification. Members of the various fungal phyla also differed significantly in the number of ABC proteins found in their genomes, which is especially reduced in the yeast S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Conclusions Data obtained during our analysis should contribute to a better understanding of the diversity of the fungal ABC proteins and provide important clues about their possible biological functions. PMID:20233411

  10. Complete genome sequences of three tomato spotted wilt virus isolates from tomato and pepper plants in Korea and their phylogenetic relationship to other TSWV isolates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Seung; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2011-04-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infects numerous host plants and has three genome segments, called L, M and S. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three Korean TSWV isolates (TSWV-1 to -3) infecting tomato and pepper plants. Although the nucleotide sequence of TSWV-1 genome isolated from tomato is very different from those of TSWV-2 and TSWV-3 isolated from pepper, the deduced amino acid sequences of the five TSWV genes are highly conserved among all three TSWV isolates. In phylogenetic analysis, deduced RdRp protein sequences of TSWV-2 and TSWV-3 were clustered together with two previously reported isolates from Japan and Korea, while TSWV-1 grouped together with a Hawaiian isolate. A phylogenetic tree based on N protein sequences, however, revealed four distinct groups of TSWV isolates, and all three Korean isolates belonged to group II, together with many other isolates, mostly from Europe and Asia. Interestingly, most American isolates grouped together as group I. Together, these results suggested that these newly identified TSWV isolates might have originated from an Asian ancestor and undergone divergence upon infecting different host plants.

  11. Diagnosis and phylogenetic analysis of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keshan; Kong, Hanjin; Liu, Yongjie; Shang, Youjun; Wu, Bin; Liu, Xiangtao

    2014-02-01

    Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is a lung tumor of sheep caused by jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). OPA is common in sheep, and it is most commonly observed in China. Without preventative vaccines and serological diagnostic tools for assay of OPA, identification of JSRV based on reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is very important for prevention and control measures for OPA in practice management. In this study, the diagnosis of OPA was made from analysis of clinical signs, pathological observations, JSRV-like particle discovery, and RT-PCR of the target env gene. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the China Shandong (SD) strain studied in this article belonged to exogenous JSRV, and it was very similar to 92k3, which was isolated from sheep in the Kenya (Y18305). The current study reported a severe outbreak of OPA in Shandong Province, China. The observations could offer a comparative view of the env gene of JSRV.

  12. Phylogenetic position of Leishmania isolates from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nazma Habib; Messenger, Louisa A; Wahid, Sobia; Sutherland, Colin J

    2016-08-01

    Several species of the genus Leishmania are causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Pakistan. This study aimed to determine phylogenetic placement of Leishmania species causing cutaneous leishmaniasis in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan (34 Leishmania tropica, 3 Leishmania infantum), in-relation to species from other geographical areas using gene sequences encoding cytochrome b (cytb) and internal transcribed spacer 2 (its2). Based on cytochrome b sequence analysis, L. tropica strains from Pakistan and other geographical regions were differentiated into two genotype groups, A and B. Within the province, five distinct L. tropica genotypes were recognized; two in group A, three in group B. Two L. infantum isolates from the province were closely associated with both Afro-Eurasian and American species of the Leishmania donovani complex, including Leishmania chagasi, L. infantum and L. donovani from Sudan and Ethiopia; while a third L. infantum isolate could not be differentiated from visceralizing Kenyan and Indian L. donovani. We observed apposite phylogenetic placement of CL-causing L. tropica and L. infantum from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Affinities ascribed to Leishmania spp. From the region are valuable in tracing potential importation of leishmaniasis.

  13. Phylogenetic study on the 5'-untranslated region of bovine viral diarrhoea virus isolates from Iran.

    PubMed

    Esmaelizad, Majid; Kargar-Moakhar, Rohani

    2014-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus is a pathogen of bovids associated with reproduction system, causing in infected animals a range of ailments, from abortion to congenital defects. In this article, the nucleotide structure of the 5'-untranslated region (5-UTR) from 7 Iranian bovine diarrhoea virus (BVDV) isolates was characterized and subjected to comparative analysis against a panel of BVDV isolates from different sources. To this end, a 288 bp-long stretch of the internal ribosome entry site was amplified by RT-PCR. The PCR products subsequently cloned into PTZ57T vector and sequenced using T7 promoter primers. This resulted in detection of 3 new point mutations G → A and G → T in 2 isolates. When these findings were phylogenetically assessed, all the examined Iranian isolates were deemed to belong to the type1 of BVDV. Besides, 2 subtypes were identified among these isolates. In group A, a high level of similarity (99.2%) between Iranian isolates with a cytopathic Australian strain of BVDV-1c was detected; while in group B, the 4 Iranian isolates proved to be very similar to NADL-like BVDV-1a strains. We believe that the surprisingly high level of similarity between group A Iranian isolates and their corresponding Australian strain is likely to be an indication of a shared common ancestor. If correct, the most likely explanation of this observation is the introduction of such strains from Australia to Iran, possibly through exportation of infected live animals or animal productions (e.g. semen and meat) at some points in the past. Nevertheless, this hypothesis remains to be proved as further epidemiological work at genomic level is required to understand population of BVDV in Iran.

  14. Molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of bovine astrovirus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Candido, Marcelo; Alencar, Anna Luiza Farias; Almeida-Queiroz, Sabrina R; Buzinaro, Maria da Glória; Munin, Flavia Simone; de Godoy, Silvia Helena Seraphin; Livonesi, Marcia Cristina; Fernandes, Andrezza Maria; de Sousa, Ricardo Luiz Moro

    2015-06-01

    Bovine astrovirus (BoAstV) is associated with gastroenterical disorders such as diarrhea, particularly in neonates and immunocompromised animals. Its prevalence is >60 % in the first five weeks of the animal's life. The aim of this study was to detect and perform a phylogenetic analysis of BoAstV in Brazilian cattle. A prevalence of 14.3 % of BoAstV in fecal samples from 272 head of cattle from different Brazilian states was detected, and 11 samples were analyzed by nucleotide sequencing. The majority of positive samples were obtained from diarrheic animals (p < 0.01). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Brazilian samples were grouped in clades along with other BoAstV isolates. There was 74.3 %-96.5 % amino acid sequence similarity between the samples in this study and >74.8 % when compared with reference samples for enteric BoAstV. Our results indicate, for the first time, the occurrence of BoAstV circulation in cattle from different regions of Brazil, prevalently in diarrheic calves.

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis and Pathogenicity Assessment of Two Strains of Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Migratory Birds: High Homology of Internal Genes with Human H10N8 Virus.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ge; Liang, Chai Hong; Hua, Deng Guo; Song, Lei Yong; Xiang, Yang Guo; Guang, Chen; Lan, Chen Hua; Ping, Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Two human-infecting avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H7N9 and H10N8, have emerged in China, which further indicate that the H9N2 subtype of AIVs, as an internal gene donor, may have an important role in the generation of new viruses with cross-species transmissibility and pathogenicity. H9N2 viruses that contain such internal genes widely exist in poultry but are rarely reported in migratory birds. In this study, two strains of the H9N2 virus were isolated from fecal samples of migratory birds in 2014: one strain from Caizi Lake in Anhui Province and one from Chen Lake in Hubei Province of China. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed high homology of all six internal genes of these two strains with the internal genes of the human H10N8 virus in Jiangxi Province, as well as with the human H7N9 virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a possible origin of these two strains from poultry in South China. Both of the two viruses tested could replicated in respiratory organs of infective mice without adaption, by both strains of the H9N2 AIVs from wild birds, suggesting their potential capacity for directly infecting mammals. Our findings indicate the existence of H9N2 viruses that contain internal genes highly homologous with human H10N8 or H7N9 viruses. Wild birds can contribute to the spread of the H9N2 virus that contains the "harmful" internal gene complex, leading to gene rearrangement with other influenza viruses and to the generation of new pathogenic viruses. Therefore, strengthening AIV surveillance in wild birds can promote an understanding of the presence and prevalence of viruses and provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of AIVs and human-infecting AIVs.

  16. Phylogenetic Analysis and Pathogenicity Assessment of Two Strains of Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Migratory Birds: High Homology of Internal Genes with Human H10N8 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ge; Liang, Chai Hong; Hua, Deng Guo; Song, Lei Yong; Xiang, Yang Guo; Guang, Chen; Lan, Chen Hua; Ping, Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Two human-infecting avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H7N9 and H10N8, have emerged in China, which further indicate that the H9N2 subtype of AIVs, as an internal gene donor, may have an important role in the generation of new viruses with cross-species transmissibility and pathogenicity. H9N2 viruses that contain such internal genes widely exist in poultry but are rarely reported in migratory birds. In this study, two strains of the H9N2 virus were isolated from fecal samples of migratory birds in 2014: one strain from Caizi Lake in Anhui Province and one from Chen Lake in Hubei Province of China. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed high homology of all six internal genes of these two strains with the internal genes of the human H10N8 virus in Jiangxi Province, as well as with the human H7N9 virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a possible origin of these two strains from poultry in South China. Both of the two viruses tested could replicated in respiratory organs of infective mice without adaption, by both strains of the H9N2 AIVs from wild birds, suggesting their potential capacity for directly infecting mammals. Our findings indicate the existence of H9N2 viruses that contain internal genes highly homologous with human H10N8 or H7N9 viruses. Wild birds can contribute to the spread of the H9N2 virus that contains the “harmful” internal gene complex, leading to gene rearrangement with other influenza viruses and to the generation of new pathogenic viruses. Therefore, strengthening AIV surveillance in wild birds can promote an understanding of the presence and prevalence of viruses and provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of AIVs and human-infecting AIVs. PMID:26973600

  17. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of host-range (E3L, K3L, and C7L) and structural protein (B5R) genes of buffalopox virus isolates from buffalo, cattle, and human in India.

    PubMed

    Bera, Bidhan Ch; Shanmugasundaram, K; Barua, Sanjay; Anand, Taruna; Riyesh, T; Vaid, Rajesh K; Virmani, Nitin; Bansal, Manish; Shukla, Brihaspati N; Malik, Praveen; Singh, Raj K

    2012-12-01

    Buffalopox virus (BPXV), a close variant of vaccinia virus (VACV) has emerged as a zoonotic pathogen. The host tropism of poxviruses is governed by host-range genes. Among the host-range genes: E3L, K3L, and C7L are essential for virus replication by preventing interferon resistance, whereas B5R is essential for spread of the virus and evasion from the host's immune response as in VACV. We report sequence analysis of host-range genes: E3L, K3L, C7L, and membrane protein gene (B5R) of BPXVs from buffalo, cattle, and human from recent outbreaks in India-their phylogenetic relationship with reference strain (BP4) and other Orthopoxviruses. BPXVs revealed a sequence homology with VACVs including zoonotic Brazilian VACV-like viruses. The aa sequences of E3L and K3L genes were 100 % similar in buffalo, cattle, and human isolates. However, four significant point mutations (I11K; N12K and S36F in C7L gene and D249G in B5R gene) were observed specific to buffalo isolate only. This signifies that different strains of BPXV were circulated during the outbreak. The mutations in C7L and B5R could play an important role in adaptation of BPXV in human and cattle which needs further functional studies. The strain of BPXV isolated from buffalo may not be adopted in human and cow. Various point mutations were observed in the host-range genes of reference strain (BPXV-BP4) which may be due to several passages of virus in cell culture. The phylogeny constructed based on concatenated gene sequences revealed that BPXVs are not as closely related to vaccine strain (Lister and Lister-derived strain-LC16m8), as hypothesized earlier, rather they are more closely related to reference strain (BPXV-BP4) and other vaccinia and vaccinia-like viruses such as Passatempo and Aracatuba viruses. The availability of information regarding host tropism determinants would allow us to understand molecular mechanism of species tropism of poxviruses which would be useful in unveiling new strategies to

  18. Virological and phylogenetic characterization of attenuated small ruminant lentivirus isolates eluding efficient serological detection.

    PubMed

    Cardinaux, Laure; Zahno, Marie-Luise; Deubelbeiss, Martina; Zanoni, Reto; Vogt, Hans-Rudolf; Bertoni, Giuseppe

    2013-03-23

    Three field isolates of small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs) were derived from a mixed flock of goats and sheep certified for many years as free of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV). The phylogenetic analysis of pol sequences permitted to classify these isolates as A4 subtype. None of the animals showed clinical signs of SRLV infection, confirming previous observations which had suggested that this particular subtype is highly attenuated, at least for goats. A quantitative real time PCR strategy based on primers and probes derived from a highly variable env region permitted us to classify the animals as uninfected, singly or doubly infected. The performance of different serological tools based on this classification revealed their profound inadequacy in monitoring animals infected with this particular SRLV subtype. In vitro, the isolates showed differences in their cytopathicity and a tendency to replicate more efficiently in goat than sheep cells, especially in goat macrophages. By contrast, in vivo, these viruses reached significantly higher viral loads in sheep than in goats. Both env subtypes infected goats and sheep with equal efficiency. One of these, however, reached significantly higher viral loads in both species. In conclusion, we characterized three isolates of the SRLV subtype A4 that efficiently circulate in a mixed herd of goats and sheep in spite of their apparent attenuation and a strict physical separation between goats and sheep. The poor performance of the serological tools applied indicates that, to support an SRLV eradication campaign, it is imperative to develop novel, subtype specific tools.

  19. Characterization of mycobacterial isolates phylogenetically related to, but different from Mycobacterium simiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, E; Piersimoni, C; Kirschner, P; Bartoloni, A; Burrini, C; Lacchini, C; Mantella, A; Muzzi, G; Tosi, C P; Penati, V; Scarparo, C; Simonetti, M T; Böttger, E C

    1997-01-01

    The use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed four previously unreported profiles within a group of mycobacteria consisting of 14 clinical isolates. These mycobacteria, whose identification by conventional tests appeared problematic, mostly resembled Mycobacterium avium complex or Mycobacterium simiae. Genetic analysis revealed, within this group, six different nucleic acid sequences in a hypervariable 16S rRNA segment, but all the isolates appeared to be phylogenetically related to M. simiae. Six isolates representing the largest of groups defined by means of genetic sequencing turned out to belong to the newly described species Mycobacterium lentiflavum. Furthermore, three such clusters precisely coincided with three of those defined by HPLC, while the three remaining clusters shared almost identical HPLC profiles. All but one strain (which, although clearly not belonging to the M. avium complex, hybridized with specific commercial DNA probes) showed high-grade resistance to the majority of antimycobacterial drugs. Three of the isolates were clinically significant according to stringent criteria. Sophisticated techniques, like genetic sequencing or HPLC, by now seem indispensable for differentiating unusual and new mycobacteria from well-established ones. PMID:9041415

  20. Open Reading Frame Phylogenetic Analysis on the Cloud

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has become essential in researching the evolutionary relationships between viruses. These relationships are depicted on phylogenetic trees, in which viruses are grouped based on sequence similarity. Viral evolutionary relationships are identified from open reading frames rather than from complete sequences. Recently, cloud computing has become popular for developing internet-based bioinformatics tools. Biocloud is an efficient, scalable, and robust bioinformatics computing service. In this paper, we propose a cloud-based open reading frame phylogenetic analysis service. The proposed service integrates the Hadoop framework, virtualization technology, and phylogenetic analysis methods to provide a high-availability, large-scale bioservice. In a case study, we analyze the phylogenetic relationships among Norovirus. Evolutionary relationships are elucidated by aligning different open reading frame sequences. The proposed platform correctly identifies the evolutionary relationships between members of Norovirus. PMID:23671843

  1. Phylogenetic characterization of canine distemper virus isolates from naturally infected dogs and a marten in Korea.

    PubMed

    An, Dong-Jun; Yoon, Sook-Hee; Park, Jee-Yong; No, In-Sun; Park, Bong-Kyun

    2008-12-10

    We sequenced the hemagglutinin (H) genes from four canine distemper virus (CDV) isolates obtained from three dogs and a marten in Korea. These sequences were included in subsequent H gene-focused phylogenetic tree analysis of 89 CDV strains. This analysis revealed eight clades designated as EU1, EU2, EU3, NA1, NA2, Asia 1, Asia 2 and Vaccine. Three of the Korean isolates (97Jindo, 98Marten and 07D111) occurred in the Asia 2 group that also contains many Japanese CDV strains isolated in 1998. The remaining Korean strain (07Q72) fell into the Asia 1 group. The 21 H protein sequences of 25 Asia 1 strains are generally predicted to bear nine potential N-linked glycosylation sites. In contrast, the 9 H protein sequences of 12 Asia 2 strains had eight potential N-linked glycosylation sites. The remaining strains had six (98Marten and 07D111) and seven (97Jindo) potential N-linked glycosylation sites.

  2. Phylogenetic relationships among Linguatula serrata isolates from Iran based on 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Tavassoli, Mousa; Peters, Andrew; Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Hajipour, Naser

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among seven Linguatula serrata (L. serrata) isolates collected from cattle, goats, sheep, dogs and camels in different geographical locations of Iran were investigated using partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences. The nucleotide sequences were analysed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationships between the isolates. Higher sequence diversity and intraspecies variation was observed in the cox1 gene compared to 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 gene placed all L. serrata isolates in a sister clade to L. arctica. The Mantel regression analysis revealed no association between genetic variations and host species or geographical location, perhaps due to the small sample size. However, genetic variations between L. serrata isolates in Iran and those isolated in other parts of the world may exist and could reveal possible evolutionary relationships.

  3. Listeria seeligeri Isolates from Food Processing Environments Form Two Phylogenetic Lineages▿

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Andrea A.; Schmid, Michael W.; Meyer, Ortwin; Meussdoerffer, Franz G.

    2010-01-01

    Seven different actA subtypes forming two phylogenetic lineages could be distinguished by sequencing the actA gene of Listeria seeligeri isolates from different habitats. Isolates of the two lineages differ in hemolytic as well as phospholipase activities and in the arrangement of the virulence gene cluster. The presence of a serine protease gene resembling orf2110 of L. monocytogenes in some isolates further supports the hypothesis that L. seeligeri is subject to ongoing adaptation to changing environments. PMID:20228097

  4. Phylogenetic groups among Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from Brazil: relationship with antimicrobial resistance and origin.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Maíra Espíndola Silva; Cabral, Adriane Borges; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira; da Silveira, Vera Magalhães; de Souza Lopes, Ana Catarina

    2011-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution of phylogenetic groups among Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from Recife, Brazil and to assess the relationship between the groups and the isolation sites and resistance profile. Ninety four isolates of K. pneumoniae from hospital or community infections and from normal microbiota were analyzed by gyrA PCR-RFLP, antibiotic susceptibility, and adonitol fermentation. The results revealed the distinction of three phylogenetic groups, as it has also been reported in Europe, showing that these clusters are highly conserved within K. pneumoniae. Group KpI was dominantly represented by hospital and community isolates while groups KpII and KpIII displayed mainly normal microbiota isolates. The resistance to third generation cephalosporins, aztreonam, imipenem, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and streptomycin was only observed in KpI. The percentage of resistance was higher in KpI, followed by KpII and KpIII. The differences in the distribution of K. pneumoniae phylogenetic groups observed in this study suggest distinctive clinical and epidemiological characteristics among the three groups, which is important to understand the epidemiology of infections caused by this organism. This is the first study in Brazil on K. pneumoniae isolates from normal microbiota and community infections regarding the distribution of phylogenetic groups based on the gyrA gene.

  5. Phylogenetic assignment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing clinical isolates in Japan by maximum a posteriori estimation.

    PubMed

    Seto, Junji; Wada, Takayuki; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Tamaru, Aki; Maeda, Shinji; Yamamoto, Kaori; Hase, Atsushi; Murakami, Koichi; Maeda, Eriko; Oishi, Akira; Migita, Yuji; Yamamoto, Taro; Ahiko, Tadayuki

    2015-10-01

    Intra-species phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been regarded as a clue to estimate its potential risk to develop drug-resistance and various epidemiological tendencies. Genotypic characterization of variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), a standard tool to ascertain transmission routes, has been improving as a public health effort, but determining phylogenetic information from those efforts alone is difficult. We present a platform based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation to estimate phylogenetic information for M. tuberculosis clinical isolates from individual profiles of VNTR types. This study used 1245 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates obtained throughout Japan for construction of an MAP estimation formula. Two MAP estimation formulae, classification of Beijing family and other lineages, and classification of five Beijing sublineages (ST11/26, STK, ST3, and ST25/19 belonging to the ancient Beijing subfamily and modern Beijing subfamily), were created based on 24 loci VNTR (24Beijing-VNTR) profiles and phylogenetic information of the isolates. Recursive estimation based on the formulae showed high concordance with their authentic phylogeny by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) of the isolates. The formulae might further support phylogenetic estimation of the Beijing lineage M. tuberculosis from the VNTR genotype with various geographic backgrounds. These results suggest that MAP estimation can function as a reliable probabilistic process to append phylogenetic information to VNTR genotypes of M. tuberculosis independently, which might improve the usage of genotyping data for control, understanding, prevention, and treatment of TB.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis based on 28S rRNA of Babesia spp. in ruminants in China.

    PubMed

    Gou, Huitian; Guan, Guiquan; Ma, Miling; Liu, Aihong; Liu, Zhijie; Ren, Qiaoyun; Li, Youquan; Yang, Jifei; Chen, Ze; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jianxun

    2013-04-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analyses are mainly based on the small ribosomal RNA subunit (18S rRNA), internal transcribed spacer regions, and other molecular markers. We compared the phylogenetic relationships of Babesia spp. using large subunit ribosomal RNA, i.e., 28S rRNA, and the united 28S + 18S rRNA sequence fragments from 11 isolates of Babesia spp. collected in China. Due to sequence length and variability, the 28S rRNA gene contained more information than the 18S rRNA gene and could be used to elucidate the phlyogenetic relationships of B. motasi, B. major, and B. bovis. Thus, 28S rRNA is another candidate marker that can be used for the phylogenetic analysis of Babesia spp. However, the united fragment (28S + 18S) analysis provided better supported phylogenetic relationships than single genes for Babesia spp. in China.

  7. Phylogenetic Comparison of Influenza Virus Isolates from Three Medical Centers in Tehran with the Vaccine Strains during 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Fahime; Kheiri, Masoumeh Tavassoti; Hosseini, Seyed Masoud; Taghizadeh, Mojgan; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Heydarchi, Behnaz; Bashar, Rouzbeh; Gomari, Hosna

    2011-09-01

    Influenza virus is a major infectious pathogen of the respiratory system causing a high degree of morbidity and mortality annually. The worldwide vaccines are decided and produced annually by World Health Organization and licensed companies based on the samples collected from all over the world. The aim of this study was to determine phylogenecity and heterogenecity of the circulating influenza isolates during 2008-2009 outbreaks in Tehran, compare them with the vaccine strains that were recommended by WHO for the same period. Nasopharyngeal swabs (n=142) were collected from patients with influenza and influenza-like illness. Typing and subtyping of the isolates were performed using multiplex RT-PCR and phylogenetic analysis was carried out for hemagglutinin genes of the isolates. Fifty out of 142 samples were positive for influenza A virus, and no influenza B virus was detected. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the A/H1N1 isolates were related closely to A/Brisbane/59/2007, and the A/H3N2 isolates were close to A/Brisbane/10/2007 vaccine strains. The findings of the present study demonstrate that the A/H1N1 was the predominant subtype of human influenza virus among the patients studied in Tehran during 2008-2009 winter seasons. In addition, some amino acid variation was found in Tehran/2008/H1N1 isolates from the 2008-2009 vaccine strain, but the H3N2 isolates showed higher genetic resemblance to the vaccine strain.

  8. Phylogenetic and pathogenic analyses of two virulent Newcastle disease viruses isolated from Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon) in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Hao, Huafang; Liu, Qingtian; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Xinglong; Du, Enqi; Yang, Zengqi

    2013-06-01

    The crested ibis is one of the most endangered birds in the world, found only in Shaanxi Province in Central China, and it has been reintroduced in Sadogashima in Japan. Two Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates were collected from sick crested ibises, and their pathogenic and phylogenetic characteristics were investigated. The results showed that they are virulent, with intracerebral pathogenicity indices of 1.46-1.83 and a mean time of death of 54.4-84.4 h. They shared the same virulent motif (112)-R-R-Q-K-R-F-(117) at the F protein cleavage site. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that both isolates were clustered with class II NDVs, with one in genotype VIId and another in a novel genotype (provisionally designated as VIi). The two isolates shared high homology with the strains isolated from poultry flocks in the same region from 2006 to 2010. We first isolated and characterised the NDV isolates from crested ibises, one of which showed new genetic characteristics and formed a new subgenotype with isolates from pigeons and ostriches in the same area. These data are useful for further epidemiological studies on NDV and the protection of crested ibises.

  9. A phylogenetic analysis of the phylum Fibrobacteres.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Kelsea A; Scott, Jarrod J; Adams, Sandra M; Suen, Garret

    2013-09-01

    Members of the phylum Fibrobacteres are highly efficient cellulolytic bacteria, best known for their role in rumen function and as potential sources of novel enzymes for bioenergy applications. Despite being key members of ruminants and other digestive microbial communities, our knowledge of this phylum remains incomplete, as much of our understanding is focused on two recognized species, Fibrobacter succinogenes and F. intestinalis. As a result, we lack insights regarding the environmental niche, host range, and phylogenetic organization of this phylum. Here, we analyzed over 1000 16S rRNA Fibrobacteres sequences available from public databases to establish a phylogenetic framework for this phylum. We identify both species- and genus-level clades that are suggestive of previously unknown taxonomic relationships between Fibrobacteres in addition to their putative lifestyles as host-associated or free-living. Our results shed light on this poorly understood phylum and will be useful for elucidating the function, distribution, and diversity of these bacteria in their niches.

  10. TREEFINDER: a powerful graphical analysis environment for molecular phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Jobb, Gangolf; von Haeseler, Arndt; Strimmer, Korbinian

    2004-01-01

    Background Most analysis programs for inferring molecular phylogenies are difficult to use, in particular for researchers with little programming experience. Results TREEFINDER is an easy-to-use integrative platform-independent analysis environment for molecular phylogenetics. In this paper the main features of TREEFINDER (version of April 2004) are described. TREEFINDER is written in ANSI C and Java and implements powerful statistical approaches for inferring gene tree and related analyzes. In addition, it provides a user-friendly graphical interface and a phylogenetic programming language. Conclusions TREEFINDER is a versatile framework for analyzing phylogenetic data across different platforms that is suited both for exploratory as well as advanced studies. PMID:15222900

  11. A phylogenetic analysis of Aquifex pyrophilus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Olsen, G. J.; Stetter, K. O.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The 16S rRNA of the bacterion Aquifex pyrophilus, a microaerophilic, oxygen-reducing hyperthermophile, has been sequenced directly from the the PCR amplified gene. Phylogenetic analyses show the Aq. pyrophilus lineage to be probably the deepest (earliest) in the (eu)bacterial tree. The addition of this deep branching to the bacterial tree further supports the argument that the Bacteria are of thermophilic ancestry.

  12. A phylogenetic analysis of Aquifex pyrophilus.

    PubMed

    Burggraf, S; Olsen, G J; Stetter, K O; Woese, C R

    1992-08-01

    The 16S rRNA of the bacterion Aquifex pyrophilus, a microaerophilic, oxygen-reducing hyperthermophile, has been sequenced directly from the the PCR amplified gene. Phylogenetic analyses show the Aq. pyrophilus lineage to be probably the deepest (earliest) in the (eu)bacterial tree. The addition of this deep branching to the bacterial tree further supports the argument that the Bacteria are of thermophilic ancestry.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lonergan, D.J.; Jenter, H.L.; Coates, J.D.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Schmidt, T.M.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships among strictly anaerobic dissimilatory Fe(III)- reducing bacteria obtained from a diversity of sedimentary environments were examined by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Members of the genera Geobacter, Desulfuromonas, Pelobacter, and Desulfuromusa formed a monophyletic group within the delta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. On the basis of their common ancestry and the shared ability to reduce Fe(III) and/or S0, we propose that this group be considered a single family, Geobacteraceae. Bootstrap analysis, characteristic nucleotides, and higher- order secondary structures support the division of Geobacteraceae into two subgroups, designated the Geobacter and Desulfuromonas clusters. The genus Desulfuromusa and Pelobacter acidigallici make up a distinct branch with the Desulfuromonas cluster. Several members of the family Geobacteraceae, none of which reduce sulfate, were found to contain the target sequences of probes that have been previously used to define the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacterium-like microorganisms. The recent isolations of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms distributed throughout the domain Bacteria suggest that development of 16S rRNA probes that would specifically target all Fe(III) reducers may not be feasible. However, all of the evidence suggests that if a 16S rRNA sequence falls within the family Geobacteraceae, then the organism has the capacity for Fe(III) reduction. The suggestion, based on geological evidence, that Fe(III) reduction was the first globally significant process for oxidizing organic matter back to carbon dioxide is consistent with the finding that acetate-oxidizing Fe(III) reducers are phylogenetically diverse.

  14. The first outbreak of eastern equine encephalitis in Vermont: outbreak description and phylogenetic relationships of the virus isolate.

    PubMed

    Saxton-Shaw, Kali D; Ledermann, Jeremy P; Kenney, Joan L; Berl, Erica; Graham, Alan C; Russo, Joel M; Powers, Ann M; Mutebi, John-Paul

    2015-01-01

    The first known outbreak of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) in Vermont occurred on an emu farm in Rutland County in 2011. The first isolation of EEE virus (EEEV) in Vermont (VT11) was during this outbreak. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that VT11 was most closely related to FL01, a strain from Florida isolated in 2001, which is both geographically and temporally distinct from VT11. EEEV RNA was not detected in any of the 3,905 mosquito specimens tested, and the specific vectors associated with this outbreak are undetermined.

  15. The First Outbreak of Eastern Equine Encephalitis in Vermont: Outbreak Description and Phylogenetic Relationships of the Virus Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Saxton-Shaw, Kali D.; Ledermann, Jeremy P.; Kenney, Joan L.; Berl, Erica; Graham, Alan C.; Russo, Joel M.; Powers, Ann M.; Mutebi, John-Paul

    2015-01-01

    The first known outbreak of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) in Vermont occurred on an emu farm in Rutland County in 2011. The first isolation of EEE virus (EEEV) in Vermont (VT11) was during this outbreak. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that VT11 was most closely related to FL01, a strain from Florida isolated in 2001, which is both geographically and temporally distinct from VT11. EEEV RNA was not detected in any of the 3,905 mosquito specimens tested, and the specific vectors associated with this outbreak are undetermined. PMID:26043136

  16. Isolation and phylogenetic relationships of bat trypanosomes from different biomes in Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marcili, Arlei; da Costa, Andrea P; Soares, Herbert S; Acosta, Igor da C L; de Lima, Julia T R; Minervino, Antonio H H; Melo, Andréia T L; Aguiar, Daniel M; Pacheco, Richard C; Gennari, Solange M

    2013-12-01

    In the order Chiroptera, more than 30 trypanosome species belonging to the subgenera Herpetosoma, Schizotrypanum, Megatrypanum, and Trypanozoon have been described. The species Trypanosoma cruzi , Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, and Trypanosoma dionisii are the most common in bats and belong to the Schizotrypanum subgenus. Bats from 2 different biomes, Pantanal and Amazonia/Cerrado in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, were evaluated according to the presence of trypanosome parasites by means of hemoculture and PCR in primary samples (blood samples). A total of 211 bats from 20 different species were caught and the trypanosome prevalence, evaluated through hemoculture, was 9.0% (19), 15.5% (13), and 4.8% (6) in the municipalities of Confresa (Amazonia/Cerrado biome) and Poconé (Pantanal biome). Among the 123 primary samples obtained from the bats, only 3 (2.4%) were positive. Phylogenetic analysis using trypanosomatid barcoding (V7V8 region of SSU rDNA) identified all the isolates and primary samples as T. c. marinkellei. The sequences of the isolates were segregated according to the bat host genus or species and suggest that co-evolutionary patterns exist between hosts and parasites. Further studies in different Brazilian regions and biomes need to be conducted in order to gain real understanding of the diversity of trypanosomes in bats.

  17. Phylogenetic diversity of endophytic leaf fungus isolates from the medicinal tree Trichilia elegans (Meliaceae).

    PubMed

    Rhoden, S A; Garcia, A; Rubin Filho, C J; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A

    2012-08-16

    Various types of organisms, mainly fungi and bacteria, live within vegetal organs and tissues, without causing damage to the plant. These microorganisms, which are called endophytes, can be useful for biological control and plant growth promotion; bioactive compounds from these organisms may have medical and pharmaceutical applications. Trichilia elegans (Meliaceae) is a native tree that grows abundantly in several regions of Brazil. Preparations using the leaves, seeds, bark, and roots of many species of the Meliaceae family have been widely used in traditional medicine, and some members of the Trichilia genus are used in Brazilian popular medicine. We assessed the diversity of endophytic fungi from two wild specimens of T. elegans, collected from a forest remnant, by sequencing ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 of rDNA of the isolates. The fungi were isolated and purified; 97 endophytic fungi were found; they were separated into 17 morpho-groups. Of the 97 endophytic fungi, four genera (Phomopsis, Diaporthe, Dothideomycete, and Cordyceps) with 11 morpho-groups were identified. Phomopsis was the most frequent genus among the identified endophytes. Phylogenetic analysis showed two major clades: Sordariomycetes, which includes three genera, Phomopsis, Diaporthe, and Cordyceps, and the clade Dothideomycetes, which was represented by the order Pleosporales.

  18. PhyloPat: phylogenetic pattern analysis of eukaryotic genes

    PubMed Central

    Hulsen, Tim; de Vlieg, Jacob; Groenen, Peter MA

    2006-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic patterns show the presence or absence of certain genes or proteins in a set of species. They can also be used to determine sets of genes or proteins that occur only in certain evolutionary branches. Phylogenetic patterns analysis has routinely been applied to protein databases such as COG and OrthoMCL, but not upon gene databases. Here we present a tool named PhyloPat which allows the complete Ensembl gene database to be queried using phylogenetic patterns. Description PhyloPat is an easy-to-use webserver, which can be used to query the orthologies of all complete genomes within the EnsMart database using phylogenetic patterns. This enables the determination of sets of genes that occur only in certain evolutionary branches or even single species. We found in total 446,825 genes and 3,164,088 orthologous relationships within the EnsMart v40 database. We used a single linkage clustering algorithm to create 147,922 phylogenetic lineages, using every one of the orthologies provided by Ensembl. PhyloPat provides the possibility of querying with either binary phylogenetic patterns (created by checkboxes) or regular expressions. Specific branches of a phylogenetic tree of the 21 included species can be selected to create a branch-specific phylogenetic pattern. Users can also input a list of Ensembl or EMBL IDs to check which phylogenetic lineage any gene belongs to. The output can be saved in HTML, Excel or plain text format for further analysis. A link to the FatiGO web interface has been incorporated in the HTML output, creating easy access to functional information. Finally, lists of omnipresent, polypresent and oligopresent genes have been included. Conclusion PhyloPat is the first tool to combine complete genome information with phylogenetic pattern querying. Since we used the orthologies generated by the accurate pipeline of Ensembl, the obtained phylogenetic lineages are reliable. The completeness and reliability of these phylogenetic

  19. Phylogenetic distribution of phenotypic traits in Bacillus thuringiensis determined by multilocus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Michael B; Martin, Phyllis A W; Kuhar, Daniel; Farrar, Robert R; Gundersen-Rindal, Dawn E

    2013-01-01

    Diverse isolates from a world-wide collection of Bacillus thuringiensis were classified based on phenotypic profiles resulting from six biochemical tests; production of amylase (T), lecithinase (L), urease (U), acid from sucrose (S) and salicin (A), and the hydrolysis of esculin (E). Eighty two isolates representing the 15 most common phenotypic profiles were subjected to phylogenetic analysis by multilocus sequence typing; these were found to be distributed among 19 sequence types, 8 of which were novel. Approximately 70% of the isolates belonged to sequence types corresponding to the classical B. thuringiensis varieties kurstaki (20 isolates), finitimus (15 isolates), morrisoni (11 isolates) and israelensis (11 isolates). Generally, there was little apparent correlation between phenotypic traits and phylogenetic position, and phenotypic variation was often substantial within a sequence type. Isolates of the sequence type corresponding to kurstaki displayed the greatest apparent phenotypic variation with 6 of the 15 phenotypic profiles represented. Despite the phenotypic variation often observed within a given sequence type, certain phenotypes appeared highly correlated with particular sequence types. Isolates with the phenotypic profiles TLUAE and LSAE were found to be exclusively associated with sequence types associated with varieties kurstaki and finitimus, respectively, and 7 of 8 TS isolates were found to be associated with the morrisoni sequence type. Our results suggest that the B. thuringiensis varieties israelensis and kurstaki represent the most abundant varieties of Bt in soil.

  20. Exploration of phylogenetic data using a global sequence analysis method

    PubMed Central

    Chapus, Charles; Dufraigne, Christine; Edwards, Scott; Giron, Alain; Fertil, Bernard; Deschavanne, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Background Molecular phylogenetic methods are based on alignments of nucleic or peptidic sequences. The tremendous increase in molecular data permits phylogenetic analyses of very long sequences and of many species, but also requires methods to help manage large datasets. Results Here we explore the phylogenetic signal present in molecular data by genomic signatures, defined as the set of frequencies of short oligonucleotides present in DNA sequences. Although violating many of the standard assumptions of traditional phylogenetic analyses – in particular explicit statements of homology inherent in character matrices – the use of the signature does permit the analysis of very long sequences, even those that are unalignable, and is therefore most useful in cases where alignment is questionable. We compare the results obtained by traditional phylogenetic methods to those inferred by the signature method for two genes: RAG1, which is easily alignable, and 18S RNA, where alignments are often ambiguous for some regions. We also apply this method to a multigene data set of 33 genes for 9 bacteria and one archea species as well as to the whole genome of a set of 16 γ-proteobacteria. In addition to delivering phylogenetic results comparable to traditional methods, the comparison of signatures for the sequences involved in the bacterial example identified putative candidates for horizontal gene transfers. Conclusion The signature method is therefore a fast tool for exploring phylogenetic data, providing not only a pretreatment for discovering new sequence relationships, but also for identifying cases of sequence evolution that could confound traditional phylogenetic analysis. PMID:16280081

  1. Phylogenetic appraisal of antagonistic, slow growing actinomycetes isolated from hypersaline inland solar salterns at Sambhar salt Lake, India

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Polpass Arul; Jebakumar, Solomon Robinson David

    2013-01-01

    Inland solar salterns established in the vicinity of Sambhar Lake are extreme saline environments with high salinity and alkalinity. In view of the fact that microbes inhabiting such extreme saline environments flourish the contemporary bioprospecting, it was aimed to selectively isolate slow growing and rare actinomycetes from the unexplored solar salterns. A total of 14 slow growing actinomycetes were selectively isolated from three composite soil samples of inland solar salterns. Among the isolates, four groups were formed according to similarity of the banding patterns obtained by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). A subset of representative isolates for each ARDRA group was identified using 16S rDNA sequence based phylogenetic analysis and subsequently the entire isolates were assigned under three different genera; Streptomyces, Pseudonocardia, and Actinoalloteichus. The genus Streptomyces was found to be the dominant among the isolates. Furthermore, rare actinomycete genus Actinoalloteichus was isolated for the first time from solar saltern. Determination of salt-tolerance revealed that certain level of salt-tolerance and moderate halophilism occurs among the actinomycetes isolated from the inland salterns. In addition, all the acinomycetes were screened in two levels to unravel their ability to produce antimicrobial compounds. Significant antimicrobial activity was found among the actinomycetes against a range of bacteria and fungi to worth further characterization of these persuasive actinomycetes and their antimicrobial secondary metabolites. In a nutshell, this study offered a first interesting insight on occurrence of antagonistic rare actinomycetes and streptomycetes in inland solar salterns associated with Sambhar salt Lake. PMID:23847611

  2. Phylogenetically Diverse Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria Isolated from Epilithic Biofilms in Tama River, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Setsuko; Matsuura, Katsumi; Haruta, Shin

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria in freshwater environments, particularly in rivers, has not been examined in as much detail as in ocean environments. In the present study, we investigated the phylogenetic and physiological diversities of AAP bacteria in biofilms that developed on submerged stones in a freshwater river using culture methods. The biofilms collected were homogenized and inoculated on solid media and incubated aerobically in the dark. Sixty-eight red-, pink-, yellow-, orange-, or brown-colored colonies were isolated, and, of these, 28 isolates contained the photosynthetic pigment, bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates were classified into 14 groups in 8 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and distributed in the orders Rhodospirillales, Rhodobacterales, and Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria and in Betaproteobacteria. Physiological analyses confirmed that none of the representative isolates from any of the groups grew under anaerobic phototrophic conditions. Seven isolates in 4 OTUs showed a 16S rRNA gene sequence identity of 98.0% or less with any established species, suggesting the presence of previously undescribed species of AAP bacteria. Six isolates in 2 other OTUs had the closest relatives, which have not been reported to be AAP bacteria. Physiological comparisons among the isolates revealed differences in preferences for nutrient concentrations, BChl contents, and light-harvesting proteins. These results suggest that diverse and previously unknown AAP bacteria inhabit river biofilms. PMID:27453124

  3. Phylogenetic characterization and virulence of two Newcastle disease viruses isolated from wild birds in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haijin; Zhang, Peng; Wu, Pengpeng; Chen, Shengli; Mu, Guohui; Duan, Xuji; Hao, Huafang; Du, Enqi; Wang, Xinglong; Yang, Zengqi

    2013-12-01

    Wild birds are considered as a natural reservoir of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). However, there is no information about genotype IX NDV from wild birds, especially from Columbiformes. In this study, two genotype IX NDV viruses were isolated from wild birds. One was from Eurasian Blackbird, while the other was from Spotted-necked dove. After purification by plaque technique, complete genomes of both viruses were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of partial fusion (F) gene and complete genome indicated both strains belonged to genotype IX. Based on intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI), the virus from Eurasian Blackbird was velogenic virus, while the strain from Spotted-necked dove was lentogenic virus. However, both strains showed one of velogenic cleavage sites. In addition, the strain from Eurasian Blackbird showed greater replication ability and generated larger fusion foci in vitro than that of strain from Spotted-necked dove. Comparing all the corresponding protein sequences of both strains, there were only 9 different amino acid residues between them. Furthermore, after analysis of these differences, the information about lentogenic NDV with multi-basic cleavage site was presented.

  4. A phylogenetic analysis of the megadiverse Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera) are extremely diverse with an estimated 500,000 species. We present the first phylogenetic analysis of the superfamily based on a cladistic analysis of both morphological and molecular data. A total of 233 morphological characters were scored for 300 taxa and 265 genera, a...

  5. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  6. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  7. Genetic and resistance phenotypic subtyping of Salmonella Saintpaul isolates from various food sources and humans: Phylogenetic concordance in combinatory analyses.

    PubMed

    Hayford, Alice E; Brown, Eric W; Zhao, Shaohua; Mammel, Mark K; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Abbott, Jason W; Friedman, Sharon L; Ayers, Sherry L; Lewis, Jada L; Lacher, David W; McDermott, Patrick; Elkins, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial pathogen subtyping for public health traceback of foodborne outbreaks has increasingly produced a number of disparate molecular techniques of varying resolution. Here, we bridge the molecular divide across three methodologies, transform data types for cross-comparison, and test phylogenetic concordance. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery was combined with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for identifying and differentiating 183 strains of closely related Salmonella enterica serovar Saintpaul isolates from retail meats, produce-associated outbreaks, and clinical sources. Fifty-six SNPs across 30 different genes were identified by comparative genomic analysis. These SNPs stratified general, monophyletic S. Saintpaul serovar specific signatures down to informative strain-specific markers. This SNP panel resulted in 17 distinct genotypes that, in concert with standard PFGE profiling, generated additional discriminatory power among clonal swarms of isolates when the data were transformed into a cross-comparable binary format. In a limited number of cases, antimicrobial susceptibility profiles (ASP) provided additional attributes for some strains when combined similarly. However, as expected from presumably acquired elements, resistant and susceptible populations produced some conflicting signals in most clonal complexes but they remained largely undisruptive to the general concordance. Taken in concert together, the three datasets (SNPs, PFGE,ASP) yielded a matrix of 156 independent phylogenetic characters that were statistically evaluated and found to be largely congruent, resulting in a consistently structured, non-homoplastic, phylogenetic signal and tree topology. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of full-genome HBV subgenotype D3 sequences from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Stanojević, Boban; Osiowy, Carla; Schaefer, Stephan; Bojović, Ksenija; Blagojević, Jelena; Nešić, Milica; Yamashita, Shunichi; Stamenković, Gorana

    2011-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is classified into 8 genotypes with distinct geographical distribution. Genotype D (HBV/D) has the widest distribution area and is comprised of 7 subgenotypes. Subgenotypes D1, D2 and D3 appear worldwide, while D4-D7 have a more restricted distribution. Within the Mediterranean area, HBV/D and subgenotype D3 are the most prevalent. The purpose of this study was to characterize the full genome of Serbian HBV/D3 isolates by comparison and phylogenetic analysis with HBV/D3 sequences (66 samples) found in GeneBank/DDBJ databases from different parts of the world. Isolates were obtained from three patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B (HBsAg+). All three isolates have two very rare nucleotide substitutions, A929T and T150A, which indicate the same ancestor. Phylogenetic analysis of HBV/D3 genome sequences throughout the world follows an ethno-geographical origin of isolates with rare exceptions, which could be explained by human travelling and migration. The geographically close but ethnically different Serbian and Italian isolates clustered in the same subnode, and on a common branch with strains from Northern Canada. To test the apparently close HBV phylogenetic relationship between completely separated patients from Serbia and Northern Canada we analyzed in depth a 440 bp region of the HBsAg from Canadian (n=73) and Serbian (n=70) isolates. The constructed parsimony tree revealed that strains from Serbia and Northern Canada fell along the same branch which indicates independent evolution within regions of each country. Considering that HBsAg sequence has limited variability for phylogenetic analyses, our hypothesis needs further confirmation with more HBV complete genome sequences.

  9. [New isolation methods and phylogenetic diversity of actinobacteria from hypersaline beach in Aksu].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Xia, Zhanfeng; Cao, Xinbo; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lili

    2013-08-04

    We explored 4 new methods to improve the isolation of actinobacterial resources from high salt areas. Optimized media based on 4 new strategies were used for isolating actinobacteria from hypersaline beaches. Glycerin-arginine, trehalose-creatine, glycerol-asparticacid, mannitol-casein, casein-mannitol, mannitol-alanine, chitosan-asparagineand GAUZE' No. 1 were used as basic media. New isolation strategy includes 4 methods: ten-fold dilution culture, simulation of the original environment, actinobacterial culture guided by uncultured molecular technology detected, and reference of actinobacterial media for brackish marine environment. The 16S rRNA genes of the isolates were amplified with bacterial universal primers. The results of 16S rRNA gene sequences were compared with sequences obtained from GenBank databases. We constructed phylogenetic tree with the neighbor-joining method. No actinobacterial strains were isolated by 8 media of control group, while 403 strains were isolated by new strategies. The isolates by new methods were members of 14 genera (Streptomyces, Streptomonospora, Saccharomonospora, Plantactinospora, Nocardia, Amycolatopsis, Glycomyces, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Isoptericola, Nonomuraea, Thermobifida, Actinopolyspora, Actinomadura) of 10 families in 8 suborders. The most abundant and diverse isolates were the two suborders of Streptomycineae (69.96%) and Streptosporangineaesuborder (9.68%) within the phylum Actinobacteria, including 9 potential novel species. New isolation methods significantly improved the actinobacterial culturability of hypersaline areas, and obtained many potential novel species, which provided a new and more effective way to isolate actinobacteria resources in hypersaline environments.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Han, Yingpeng; Wu, Junjiang; Lv, Huiying; Qiu, Lijuan; Chang, Ruzhen; Jin, Limei; Wang, Jinsheng; Yu, Anliang; Chen, Chen; Nan, Haiyang; Xu, Xiuhong; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Dayong; Zhang, Shuzhen; Li, Wenbin; Chen, Weiyuan

    2007-02-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S rDNA) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) was amplified via the PCR method in seventeen different isolates of Phytophthora sojae using the common primers of the ITS of fungi. Around 800 bp-1,000 bp fragments were obtained based on the DL2000 marker and the sequences of the PCR products were tested. Taking isolate USA as outgroup, the phylogenetic tree was constructed by means of maximum parsimony analysis, and the genetic evolution among isolates was analyzed. The results showed that there is a great difference between the base constitution of ITS1 and ITS2 among various isolates. The seventeen isolates are classified into three groups, and the isolates from the same region belong to the same group, which shows the variation in geography.

  11. Production of hemolysin BL by Bacillus cereus group isolates of dairy origin is associated with whole-genome phylogenetic clade.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Jasna; Miller, Rachel A; Carroll, Laura M; Kent, David J; Jian, Jiahui; Beno, Sarah M; Wiedmann, Martin

    2016-08-09

    Bacillus cereus group isolates that produce diarrheal or emetic toxins are frequently isolated from raw milk and, in spore form, can survive pasteurization. Several species within the B. cereus group are closely related and cannot be reliably differentiated by established taxonomical criteria. While B. cereus is traditionally recognized as the principal causative agent of foodborne disease in this group, there is a need to better understand the distribution and expression of different toxin and virulence genes among B. cereus group food isolates to facilitate reliable characterization that allows for assessment of the likelihood of a given isolate to cause a foodborne disease. We performed whole genome sequencing of 22 B. cereus group dairy isolates, which represented considerable genetic diversity not covered by other isolates characterized to date. Maximum likelihood analysis of these genomes along with 47 reference genomes representing eight validly published species revealed nine phylogenetic clades. Three of these clades were represented by a single species (B. toyonensis -clade V, B. weihenstephanensis - clade VI, B. cytotoxicus - VII), one by two dairy-associated isolates (clade II; representing a putative new species), one by two species (B. mycoides, B. pseudomycoides - clade I) and four by three species (B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. anthracis - clades III-a, b, c and IV). Homologues of genes encoding a principal diarrheal enterotoxin (hemolysin BL) were distributed across all, except the B. cytotoxicus clade. Using a lateral flow immunoassay, hemolysin BL was detected in 13 out of 18 isolates that carried hblACD genes. Isolates from clade III-c (which included B. cereus and B. thuringiensis) consistently did not carry hblACD and did not produce hemolysin BL. Isolates from clade IV (B. cereus, B. thuringiensis) consistently carried hblACD and produced hemolysin BL. Compared to others, clade IV was significantly (p = 0.0001) more likely to produce

  12. Phylogenetic Comparison of Influenza Virus Isolates from Three Medical Centers in Tehran with the Vaccine Strains during 2008-2009

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Fahime; Kheiri, Masoumeh Tavassoti; Hosseini, Seyed Masoud; Taghizadeh, Mojgan; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Heydarchi, Behnaz; Bashar, Rouzbeh; Gomari, Hosna

    2011-01-01

    Background: Influenza virus is a major infectious pathogen of the respiratory system causing a high degree of morbidity and mortality annually. The worldwide vaccines are decided and produced annually by World Health Organization and licensed companies based on the samples collected from all over the world. The aim of this study was to determine phylogenecity and heterogenecity of the circulating influenza isolates during 2008-2009 outbreaks in Tehran, compare them with the vaccine strains that were recommended by WHO for the same period. Methods: Nasopharyngeal swabs (n=142) were collected from patients with influenza and influenza-like illness. Typing and subtyping of the isolates were performed using multiplex RT-PCR and phylogenetic analysis was carried out for hemagglutinin genes of the isolates. Results: Fifty out of 142 samples were positive for influenza A virus, and no influenza B virus was detected. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the A/H1N1 isolates were related closely to A/Brisbane/59/2007, and the A/H3N2 isolates were close to A/Brisbane/10/2007 vaccine strains. Conclusion: The findings of the present study demonstrate that the A/H1N1 was the predominant subtype of human influenza virus among the patients studied in Tehran during 2008-2009 winter seasons. In addition, some amino acid variation was found in Tehran/2008/H1N1 isolates from the 2008-2009 vaccine strain, but the H3N2 isolates showed higher genetic resemblance to the vaccine strain. PMID:23359291

  13. Molecular Phylogenetic Diversity of Dermatologic and Other Human Pathogenic Fusarial Isolates from Hospitals in Northern and Central Italy▿

    PubMed Central

    Migheli, Quirico; Balmas, Virgilio; Harak, Henry; Sanna, Silvana; Scherm, Barbara; Aoki, Takayuki; O'Donnell, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    Fifty-eight fusaria isolated from 50 Italian patients between 2004 and 2007 were subject to multilocus DNA sequence typing to characterize the spectrum of species and circulating sequence types (STs) associated with dermatological infections, especially onychomycoses and paronychia, and other fusarioses in northern and central Italy. Sequence typing revealed that the isolates were nearly evenly divided among the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC; n = 18), the F. oxysporum species complex (FOSC; n = 20), and the Gibberella (Fusarium) fujikuroi species complex (GFSC; n = 20). The three-locus typing scheme used for members of the FSSC identified 18 novel STs distributed among six phylogenetically distinct species, yielding an index of discrimination of 1.0. Phylogenetic analysis of the FOSC two-locus data set identified nine STs, including four which were novel, and nine isolates of ST 33, the previously described widespread clonal lineage. With the inclusion of eight epidemiologically unrelated ST 33 isolates, the FOSC typing scheme scored a discrimination index of 0.787. The two-locus GFSC typing scheme, which was primarily designed to identify species, received the lowest discrimination index, with a score of 0.492. The GFSC scheme, however, was used to successfully identify 17 isolates as F. verticillioides, 2 as F. sacchari, and 1 as F. guttiforme. This is the first report that F. guttiforme causes a human mycotic infection, which was supported by detailed morphological analysis. In addition, the results of a pathogenicity experiment revealed that the human isolate of F. guttiforme was able to induce fusariosis of pineapple, heretofore its only known host. PMID:20107100

  14. Avian Influenza Virus Isolated in Wild Waterfowl in Argentina: Evidence of a potentially unique phylogenetic lineage in South America

    PubMed Central

    Pereda, Ariel J.; Uhart, Marcela; Perez, Alberto A.; Zaccagnini, Maria E.; La Sala, Luciano; Decarre, Julieta; Goijman, Andrea; Solari, Laura; Suarez, Romina; Craig, Maria I.; Vagnozzi, Ariel; Rimondi, Agustina; König, Guido; Terrera, Maria V.; Kaloghlian, Analia; Song, Haichen; Sorrell, Erin M.; Perez, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Avian Influenza (AI) viruses have been sporadically isolated in South America. The most recent reports are from an outbreak in commercial poultry in Chile in 2002 and its putative ancestor from a wild bird in Bolivia in 2001. Extensive surveillance in wild birds was carried out in Argentina during 2006-2007. Using RRT-PCR, 12 AI positive detections were made from cloacal swabs. One of those positive samples yielded an AI virus isolated from a wild kelp gull (Larus dominicanus) captured in the South Atlantic coastline of Argentina. Further characterization by nucleotide sequencing reveals that it belongs to the H13N9 subtype. Phylogenetic analysis of the 8 viral genes suggests that the 6 internal genes are related to the isolates from Chile and Bolivia. The analysis also indicates that a cluster of phylogenetically related AI viruses from South America may have evolved independently, with minimal gene exchange, from influenza viruses in other latitudes. The data produced from our investigations are valuable contributions to the study of AI viruses in South America. PMID:18632129

  15. Phylogenetic and molecular analysis of HTLV-1 isolates from a medium sized town in northern of Brazil: tracing a common origin of the virus from the most endemic city in the country.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Themístocles; Mota-Miranda, Aline Cristina; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Junior; Olavarria, Viviana; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Rios-Grassi, Maria Fernanda

    2008-11-01

    Salvador-Bahia has the highest prevalence of HTLV-1 infection in Brazil; about 2% of the population is infected. In this city, the prevalence of HTLV in pregnant women is 1%. There is no data of the HTLV-1 prevalence in others cities of the Bahia's Recôncavo, where the population has similar social and demography characteristics to those from Salvador. Our aim was to evaluate the seroprevalence of HTLV in pregnant women in Cruz das Almas-Bahia, a medium-sized city from the Bahia's Recôncavo. All individuals were tested for HTLV (ELISA) and the positive samples were confirmed by Western Blot. Phylogenetic analyses of the total LTR region were performed in all positive samples. We tested 408 samples (45.4% of the estimate pregnant women population) between June 1st and October 31, 2005. The prevalence of HTLV-1 infection was 0.98%. In addition, all isolated virus were grouped in the subtype HTLV-1a, in the Latin American group. Our results suggest that the introduction of HTLV-1 occurred after the slave trade into Salvador. In addition, HTLV-1-infection should be screened during the pregnancy in women originating from HTLV-1 endemic areas.

  16. A preliminary report of phylogenetic diversity of bacterial strains isolated from marine creatures.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Midori; Yokota, Akira

    2002-10-01

    Bacterial diversity among marine creatures, especially molluscs, as a source for searching out novel lineages of bacteria, was studied. Marine creatures were collected at the coasts of the Kanto area in Japan. A total of 116 strains of bacteria were isolated from the intestines of 19 species of marine creatures includings molluscs, pisces and protochordata. Partial sequencing of 16S rDNA revealed that most of the isolates belonged to the gamma subclass of the Proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group. The BLAST searches revealed that the complete 16S rDNA sequence of 17 strains out of 116 isolates showed less than 94% similarity with 16S rDNA sequences deposited in the database. Four strains out of the 17 isolates belonged to the Rhodobacter group, 8 strains to the Alteromonas group, and the remaining 5 strains to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group. Phylogenetic positions of 6 strains belonging to the Alteromonas group, which were isolated from different marine creatures, were close to each other, and represented a novel 16S rDNA lineage within the gamma subclass of Proteobacteria. Therefore, it may be inferred that these 6 strains belong to a new genus of Proteobacteria. Phylogenetic positions of the other strains are also independent from neighboring taxa, and they were suggested to respectively form a novel lineage. From these results, it is clear that the biodiversity of bacteria in marine creatures is much wider than was previously thought, and unknown microbiological resources are buried in these organisms.

  17. Evaluating Methods for Isolating Total RNA and Predicting the Success of Sequencing Phylogenetically Diverse Plant Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Bruskiewich, Richard; Burris, Jason N.; Carrigan, Charlotte T.; Chase, Mark W.; Clarke, Neil D.; Covshoff, Sarah; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Edger, Patrick P.; Goh, Falicia; Graham, Sean; Greiner, Stephan; Hibberd, Julian M.; Jordon-Thaden, Ingrid; Kutchan, Toni M.; Leebens-Mack, James; Melkonian, Michael; Miles, Nicholas; Myburg, Henrietta; Patterson, Jordan; Pires, J. Chris; Ralph, Paula; Rolf, Megan; Sage, Rowan F.; Soltis, Douglas; Soltis, Pamela; Stevenson, Dennis; Stewart, C. Neal; Surek, Barbara; Thomsen, Christina J. M.; Villarreal, Juan Carlos; Wu, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yong; Deyholos, Michael K.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing plays a central role in the characterization and quantification of transcriptomes. Although numerous metrics are purported to quantify the quality of RNA, there have been no large-scale empirical evaluations of the major determinants of sequencing success. We used a combination of existing and newly developed methods to isolate total RNA from 1115 samples from 695 plant species in 324 families, which represents >900 million years of phylogenetic diversity from green algae through flowering plants, including many plants of economic importance. We then sequenced 629 of these samples on Illumina GAIIx and HiSeq platforms and performed a large comparative analysis to identify predictors of RNA quality and the diversity of putative genes (scaffolds) expressed within samples. Tissue types (e.g., leaf vs. flower) varied in RNA quality, sequencing depth and the number of scaffolds. Tissue age also influenced RNA quality but not the number of scaffolds ≥1000 bp. Overall, 36% of the variation in the number of scaffolds was explained by metrics of RNA integrity (RIN score), RNA purity (OD 260/230), sequencing platform (GAIIx vs HiSeq) and the amount of total RNA used for sequencing. However, our results show that the most commonly used measures of RNA quality (e.g., RIN) are weak predictors of the number of scaffolds because Illumina sequencing is robust to variation in RNA quality. These results provide novel insight into the methods that are most important in isolating high quality RNA for sequencing and assembling plant transcriptomes. The methods and recommendations provided here could increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of RNA sequencing for individual labs and genome centers. PMID:23185583

  18. Phylogenetic analysis on the bacteria producing non-volatile fungistatic substances.

    PubMed

    Li, ZhiFang; Zou, ChangSong; He, YueQiu; Mo, MingHe; Zhang, KeQin

    2008-06-01

    This study characterized the soil bacteria producing non-volatile fungistatic substances. Among the 2,100 colonies of soil bacteria randomly isolated from seven agricultural soil samples, 518 isolates (24.67% of total) showed fungistatic activity toward nematophagous fungi Paecilomyces lilacinus and Trichoderma viride by producing non-volatile substances. A phylogenetic analysis based on amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and 16S rDNA sequence placed the 518 bacteria in three groups of the domain Bacteria: Actinomycetales, Bacillales, and Gammaproteobacteria. Three genera, Arthrobacter, Bacillus, and Pseudomonas, were the most frequently encountered groups.

  19. Phylogenetic and recombination analysis of rice black-streaked dwarf virus segment 9 in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Weng, Jian-Feng; Chen, Yan-Ping; Liu, Chang-Lin; Han, Xiao-Hua; Hao, Zhuan-Fang; Li, Ming-Shun; Yong, Hong-Jun; Zhang, De-Gui; Zhang, Shi-Huang; Li, Xin-Hai

    2015-04-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) is an economically important virus that causes maize rough dwarf disease and rice black-streaked dwarf disease in East Asia. To study RBSDV variation and recombination, we examined the segment 9 (S9) sequences of 49 RBSDV isolates from maize and rice in China. Three S9 recombinants were detected in Baoding, Jinan, and Jining, China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Chinese RBSDV isolates could be classified into two groups based on their S9 sequences, regardless of host or geographical origin. Further analysis suggested that S9 has undergone negative and purifying selection.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis on the soil bacteria distributed in karst forest

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, JunPei; Huang, Ying; Mo, MingHe

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic composition of bacterial community in soil of a karst forest was analyzed by culture-independent molecular approach. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified directly from soil DNA and cloned to generate a library. After screening the clone library by RFLP, 16S rRNA genes of representative clones were sequenced and the bacterial community was analyzed phylogenetically. The 16S rRNA gene inserts of 190 clones randomly selected were analyzed by RFLP and generated 126 different RFLP types. After sequencing, 126 non-chimeric sequences were obtained, generating 113 phylotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the bacteria distributed in soil of the karst forest included the members assigning into Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi (Green nonsulfur bacteria), Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, Nitrospirae, Actinobacteria (High G+C Gram-positive bacteria), Firmicutes (Low G+C Gram-positive bacteria) and candidate divisions (including the SPAM and GN08). PMID:24031430

  1. Phylogenetic Identification of Fungi Isolated from the Marine Sponge Tethya aurantium and Identification of Their Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Jutta; Ohlendorf, Birgit; Blümel, Martina; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2011-01-01

    Fungi associated with the marine sponge Tethya aurantium were isolated and identified by morphological criteria and phylogenetic analyses based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. They were evaluated with regard to their secondary metabolite profiles. Among the 81 isolates which were characterized, members of 21 genera were identified. Some genera like Acremonium, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Phoma, and Trichoderma are quite common, but we also isolated strains belonging to genera like Botryosphaeria, Epicoccum, Parasphaeosphaeria, and Tritirachium which have rarely been reported from sponges. Members affiliated to the genera Bartalinia and Volutella as well as to a presumably new Phoma species were first isolated from a sponge in this study. On the basis of their classification, strains were selected for analysis of their ability to produce natural products. In addition to a number of known compounds, several new natural products were identified. The scopularides and sorbifuranones have been described elsewhere. We have isolated four additional substances which have not been described so far. The new metabolite cillifuranone (1) was isolated from Penicillium chrysogenum strain LF066. The structure of cillifuranone (1) was elucidated based on 1D and 2D NMR analysis and turned out to be a previously postulated intermediate in sorbifuranone biosynthesis. Only minor antibiotic bioactivities of this compound were found so far. PMID:21731550

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of Cryptosporidium Parasites Based on the Small-Subunit rRNA Gene Locus

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Escalante, Lillian; Yang, Chunfu; Sulaiman, Irshad; Escalante, Anannias A.; Montali, Richard J.; Fayer, Ronald; Lal, Altaf A.

    1999-01-01

    Biological data support the hypothesis that there are multiple species in the genus Cryptosporidium, but a recent analysis of the available genetic data suggested that there is insufficient evidence for species differentiation. In order to resolve the controversy in the taxonomy of this parasite genus, we characterized the small-subunit rRNA genes of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium baileyi, Cryptosporidium muris, and Cryptosporidium serpentis and performed a phylogenetic analysis of the genus Cryptosporidium. Our study revealed that the genus Cryptosporidium contains the phylogenetically distinct species C. parvum, C. muris, C. baileyi, and C. serpentis, which is consistent with the biological characteristics and host specificity data. The Cryptosporidium species formed two clades, with C. parvum and C. baileyi belonging to one clade and C. muris and C. serpentis belonging to the other clade. Within C. parvum, human genotype isolates and guinea pig isolates (known as Cryptosporidium wrairi) each differed from bovine genotype isolates by the nucleotide sequence in four regions. A C. muris isolate from cattle was also different from parasites isolated from a rock hyrax and a Bactrian camel. Minor differences were also detected between C. serpentis isolates from snakes and lizards. Based on the genetic information, a species- and strain-specific PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism diagnostic tool was developed. PMID:10103253

  3. Character analysis in morphological phylogenetics: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Wiens, J J

    2001-01-01

    Many aspects of morphological phylogenetics are controversial in the theoretical systematics literature and yet are often poorly explained and justified in empirical studies. In this paper, I argue that most morphological characters describe variation that is fundamentally quantitative, regardless of whether they are coded qualitatively or quantitatively by systematists. Given this view, three fundamental problems in morphological character analysis (definition, delimitation, and ordering of character states) may have a common solution: coding morphological characters as continuous quantitative traits. A new parsimony method (step-matrix gap-weighting, a modification of Thiele's approach) is proposed that allows quantitative traits to be analyzed as continuous variables. The problem of scaling or weighting quantitative characters relative to qualitative characters (and to each other) is reviewed, and three possible solutions are described. The new coding method is applied to data from hoplocercid lizards, and the results show the sensitivity of phylogenetic conclusions to different scaling methods. Although some authors reject the use of continuous, overlapping, quantitative characters in phylogenetic analysis, quantitative data from hoplocercid lizards that are coded using the new approach contain significant phylogenetic structure and exhibit levels of homoplasy similar to those seen in data that are coded qualitatively.

  4. Determining the Position of Storks on the Phylogenetic Tree of Waterbirds by Retroposon Insertion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Tae; Nishihara, Hidenori; Watanabe, Maiko; Okada, Norihiro

    2015-11-01

    Despite many studies on avian phylogenetics in recent decades that used morphology, mitochondrial genomes, and/or nuclear genes, the phylogenetic positions of several birds (e.g., storks) remain unsettled. In addition to the aforementioned approaches, analysis of retroposon insertions, which are nearly homoplasy-free phylogenetic markers, has also been used in avian phylogenetics. However, the first step in the analysis of retroposon insertions, that is, isolation of retroposons from genomic libraries, is a costly and time-consuming procedure. Therefore, we developed a high-throughput and cost-effective protocol to collect retroposon insertion information based on next-generation sequencing technology, which we call here the STRONG (Screening of Transposons Obtained by Next Generation Sequencing) method, and applied it to 3 waterbird species, for which we identified 35,470 loci containing chicken repeat 1 retroposons (CR1). Our analysis of the presence/absence of 30 CR1 insertions demonstrated the intra- and interordinal phylogenetic relationships in the waterbird assemblage, namely 1) Loons diverged first among the waterbirds, 2) penguins (Sphenisciformes) and petrels (Procellariiformes) diverged next, and 3) among the remaining families of waterbirds traditionally classified in Ciconiiformes/Pelecaniformes, storks (Ciconiidae) diverged first. Furthermore, our genome-scale, in silico retroposon analysis based on published genome data uncovered a complex divergence history among pelican, heron, and ibis lineages, presumably involving ancient interspecies hybridization between the heron and ibis lineages. Thus, our retroposon-based waterbird phylogeny and the established phylogenetic position of storks will help to understand the evolutionary processes of aquatic adaptation and related morphological convergent evolution. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Determining the Position of Storks on the Phylogenetic Tree of Waterbirds by Retroposon Insertion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuramoto, Tae; Nishihara, Hidenori; Watanabe, Maiko; Okada, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Despite many studies on avian phylogenetics in recent decades that used morphology, mitochondrial genomes, and/or nuclear genes, the phylogenetic positions of several birds (e.g., storks) remain unsettled. In addition to the aforementioned approaches, analysis of retroposon insertions, which are nearly homoplasy-free phylogenetic markers, has also been used in avian phylogenetics. However, the first step in the analysis of retroposon insertions, that is, isolation of retroposons from genomic libraries, is a costly and time-consuming procedure. Therefore, we developed a high-throughput and cost-effective protocol to collect retroposon insertion information based on next-generation sequencing technology, which we call here the STRONG (Screening of Transposons Obtained by Next Generation Sequencing) method, and applied it to 3 waterbird species, for which we identified 35,470 loci containing chicken repeat 1 retroposons (CR1). Our analysis of the presence/absence of 30 CR1 insertions demonstrated the intra- and interordinal phylogenetic relationships in the waterbird assemblage, namely 1) Loons diverged first among the waterbirds, 2) penguins (Sphenisciformes) and petrels (Procellariiformes) diverged next, and 3) among the remaining families of waterbirds traditionally classified in Ciconiiformes/Pelecaniformes, storks (Ciconiidae) diverged first. Furthermore, our genome-scale, in silico retroposon analysis based on published genome data uncovered a complex divergence history among pelican, heron, and ibis lineages, presumably involving ancient interspecies hybridization between the heron and ibis lineages. Thus, our retroposon-based waterbird phylogeny and the established phylogenetic position of storks will help to understand the evolutionary processes of aquatic adaptation and related morphological convergent evolution. PMID:26527652

  6. Isolation of phylogenetically diverse nonylphenol ethoxylate-degrading bacteria and characterization of their corresponding biotransformation pathways.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xin; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Min; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Kamagata, Yoichi; Li, Dong

    2010-06-01

    Most nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPEO)-degrading isolates have been assigned to gamma-Proteobacteria, which is different from the results acquired by using molecular ecological techniques. To better understand the environmental fate of NPEOs, bacterial isolation strategy characterized by the use of gellan gum as a gelling reagent and a low concentration of target carbon source were used to isolate phylogenetically diverse NPEO-degrading bacteria from activated sludge, and the biotransformation pathways of the isolates were investigated. Eight NPEO-degrading isolates with high diversity were acquired, which were distributed among seven different genera: Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Sphingobium, Cupriavidus, Ralstonia, Achromobacter and Staphylococcus. The latter five genera have never been reported to be able to degrade NPEOs. Three biotransformation pathways of NPEOs were observed in the eight stains. Six strains belonging to alpha, beta and gamma classes of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes phylum degraded NPEOs by initially shortening the EO chain and then oxidizing the terminal alcohol of the shortened NPEOs to the corresponding nonylphenoxy carboxylates (NPECs), which could explain most of the reported observations for the degradation of NPEOs in environment. An isolate (NP42a) belonging to the genus Sphingomonas degraded NPEOs through a non-oxidative pathway, with nonylphenol monoethoxylate (NP(1)EO) as the dominant product. Another isolate (NP47a) belonging to the genus Ralstonia degraded NPEOs by oxidizing the EO chain directly without the formation of short chain products. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of Elymus (Poaceae) in western China.

    PubMed

    Song, H; Nan, Z B; Tian, P

    2015-10-09

    Elymus L. is often planted in temperate and subtropical regions as forage. Species in the genus have 5 allopolyploid genomes that are found in the grass tribe Triticeae. To determine the phylogenetic relationships in Elymus species from western China, we estimated phylogenetic trees using sequences from the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer and non-coding chloroplast DNA sequences from 56 accessions (871 samples) of 9 polyploid Elymus species and 42 accessions from GenBank. Tetraploid and hexaploid Elymus species from western China had independent origins, and Elymus species from the same area or neighboring geographic regions were the most closely related. Based on the phylogenetic tree topology, the St- and Y-genomes were not derived from the same donor and Y-genome likely originated from the H-genome of Hordeum species, or they shared the same origin or underwent introgression. The maternal genome of tetraploid and hexaploid Elymus species originated from species of Hordeum or Pseudoroegneria. Additionally, Elymus species in western China began diverging 17-8.5 million years ago, during a period of increased aridification as a consequence of the Messinian salinity crisis. Elymus species adapted to drought and high salinity may have developed based on the environmental conditions during this period. Elymus evolution in western China may have been affected by the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (5 million years ago), when Elymus seeds were dispersed by gravity or wind into a newly heterogeneous habitat, resulting in isolation.

  8. Phylogenetic Diversity of Marine Cyanophage Isolates and Natural Virus Communities as Revealed by Sequences of Viral Capsid Assembly Protein Gene g20†

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yan; Chen, Feng; Wilhelm, Steven W.; Poorvin, Leo; Hodson, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    In order to characterize the genetic diversity and phylogenetic affiliations of marine cyanophage isolates and natural cyanophage assemblages, oligonucleotide primers CPS1 and CPS8 were designed to specifically amplify ca. 592-bp fragments of the gene for viral capsid assembly protein g20. Phylogenetic analysis of isolated cyanophages revealed that the marine cyanophages were highly diverse yet more closely related to each other than to enteric coliphage T4. Genetically related marine cyanophage isolates were widely distributed without significant geographic segregation (i.e., no correlation between genetic variation and geographic distance). Cloning and sequencing analysis of six natural virus concentrates from estuarine and oligotrophic offshore environments revealed nine phylogenetic groups in a total of 114 different g20 homologs, with up to six clusters and 29 genotypes encountered in a single sample. The composition and structure of natural cyanophage communities in the estuary and open-ocean samples were different from each other, with unique phylogenetic clusters found for each environment. Changes in clonal diversity were also observed from the surface waters to the deep chlorophyll maximum layer in the open ocean. Only three clusters contained known cyanophage isolates, while the identities of the other six clusters remain unknown. Whether or not these unidentified groups are composed of bacteriophages that infect different Synechococcus groups or other closely related cyanobacteria remains to be determined. The high genetic diversity of marine cyanophage assemblages revealed by the g20 sequences suggests that marine viruses can potentially play important roles in regulating microbial genetic diversity. PMID:11916671

  9. Structure-Based Phylogenetic Analysis of the Lipocalin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Balasubramanian; Mishra, Madhulika; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalins constitute a superfamily of extracellular proteins that are found in all three kingdoms of life. Although very divergent in their sequences and functions, they show remarkable similarity in 3-D structures. Lipocalins bind and transport small hydrophobic molecules. Earlier sequence-based phylogenetic studies of lipocalins highlighted that they have a long evolutionary history. However the molecular and structural basis of their functional diversity is not completely understood. The main objective of the present study is to understand functional diversity of the lipocalins using a structure-based phylogenetic approach. The present study with 39 protein domains from the lipocalin superfamily suggests that the clusters of lipocalins obtained by structure-based phylogeny correspond well with the functional diversity. The detailed analysis on each of the clusters and sub-clusters reveals that the 39 lipocalin domains cluster based on their mode of ligand binding though the clustering was performed on the basis of gross domain structure. The outliers in the phylogenetic tree are often from single member families. Also structure-based phylogenetic approach has provided pointers to assign putative function for the domains of unknown function in lipocalin family. The approach employed in the present study can be used in the future for the functional identification of new lipocalin proteins and may be extended to other protein families where members show poor sequence similarity but high structural similarity. PMID:26263546

  10. Butyrate production in phylogenetically diverse Firmicutes isolated from the chicken caecum

    PubMed Central

    Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska; De Baere, Siegrid; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Louis, Petra; Vandamme, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Sixteen butyrate‐producing bacteria were isolated from the caecal content of chickens and analysed phylogenetically. They did not represent a coherent phylogenetic group, but were allied to four different lineages in the Firmicutes phylum. Fourteen strains appeared to represent novel species, based on a level of ≤ 98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity towards their nearest validly named neighbours. The highest butyrate concentrations were produced by the strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, clusters which are predominant in the chicken caecal microbiota. In only one of the 16 strains tested, the butyrate kinase operon could be amplified, while the butyryl‐CoA : acetate CoA‐transferase gene was detected in eight strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV, XIVa and XIVb. None of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates carried this gene based on degenerate PCR analyses. However, another CoA‐transferase gene more similar to propionate CoA‐transferase was detected in the majority of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates. Since this gene is located directly downstream of the remaining butyrate pathway genes in several human cluster XVI bacteria, it may be involved in butyrate formation in these bacteria. The present study indicates that butyrate producers related to cluster XVI may play a more important role in the chicken gut than in the human gut. PMID:21375722

  11. Butyrate production in phylogenetically diverse Firmicutes isolated from the chicken caecum.

    PubMed

    Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska; De Baere, Siegrid; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Louis, Petra; Vandamme, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Sixteen butyrate-producing bacteria were isolated from the caecal content of chickens and analysed phylogenetically. They did not represent a coherent phylogenetic group, but were allied to four different lineages in the Firmicutes phylum. Fourteen strains appeared to represent novel species, based on a level of ≤ 98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity towards their nearest validly named neighbours. The highest butyrate concentrations were produced by the strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, clusters which are predominant in the chicken caecal microbiota. In only one of the 16 strains tested, the butyrate kinase operon could be amplified, while the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene was detected in eight strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV, XIVa and XIVb. None of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates carried this gene based on degenerate PCR analyses. However, another CoA-transferase gene more similar to propionate CoA-transferase was detected in the majority of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates. Since this gene is located directly downstream of the remaining butyrate pathway genes in several human cluster XVI bacteria, it may be involved in butyrate formation in these bacteria. The present study indicates that butyrate producers related to cluster XVI may play a more important role in the chicken gut than in the human gut.

  12. Phylogenetic and chemical diversity of fungal endophytes isolated from Silybum marianum (L) Gaertn. (milk thistle)

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Huzefa A.; Kaur, Amninder; El-Elimat, Tamam; Figueroa, Mario; Kumar, Rahul; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh; Faeth, Stanley H.; Cech, Nadja B.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2015-01-01

    Use of the herb milk thistle (Silybum marianum) is widespread, and its chemistry has been studied for over 50 years. However, milk thistle endophytes have not been studied previously for their fungal and chemical diversity. We examined the fungal endophytes inhabiting this medicinal herb to determine: (1) species composition and phylogenetic diversity of fungal endophytes; (2) chemical diversity of secondary metabolites produced by these organisms; and (3) cytotoxicity of the pure compounds against the human prostate carcinoma (PC-3) cell line. Forty-one fungal isolates were identified from milk thistle comprising 25 operational taxonomic units based on BLAST search via GenBank using published authentic sequences from nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer sequence data. Maximum likelihood analyses of partial 28S rRNA gene showed that these endophytes had phylogenetic affinities to four major classes of Ascomycota, the Dothideomycetes, Sordariomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, and Leotiomycetes. Chemical studies of solid–substrate fermentation cultures led to the isolation of four new natural products. In addition, 58 known secondary metabolites, representing diverse biosynthetic classes, were isolated and characterized using a suite of nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry techniques. Selected pure compounds were tested against the PC-3 cell line, where six compounds displayed cytotoxicity. PMID:26000195

  13. Five gonadotrophin-releasing hormone receptors in a teleost fish: isolation, tissue distribution and phylogenetic relationships.

    PubMed

    Moncaut, Natalia; Somoza, Gustavo; Power, Deborah M; Canário, Adelino V M

    2005-06-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the main neurohormone controlling gonadotrophin release in all vertebrates, and in teleost fish also of growth hormone and possibly of other adenohypophyseal hormones. Over 20 GnRHs have been identified in vertebrates and protochoordates and shown to bind cognate G-protein couple receptors (GnRHR). We have searched the puffer fish, Fugu rubripes, genome sequencing database, identified five GnRHR genes and proceeded to isolate the corresponding complementary DNAs in European sea bass, Dicentrachus labrax. Phylogenetic analysis clusters the European sea bass, puffer fish and all other vertebrate receptors into two main lineages corresponding to the mammalian type I and II receptors. The fish receptors could be subdivided in two GnRHR1 (A and B) and three GnRHR2 (A, B and C) subtypes. Amino acid sequence identity within receptor subtypes varies between 70 and 90% but only 50-55% among the two main lineages in fish. All European sea bass receptor mRNAs are expressed in the anterior and mid brain, and all but one are expressed in the pituitary gland. There is differential expression of the receptors in peripheral tissues related to reproduction (gonads), chemical senses (eye and olfactory epithelium) and osmoregulation (kidney and gill). This is the first report showing five GnRH receptors in a vertebrate species and the gene expression patterns support the concept that GnRH and GnRHRs play highly diverse functional roles in the regulation of cellular functions, besides the "classical" role of pituitary function regulation.

  14. Phylogenetic characterization of virulent Newcastle disease viruses isolated during outbreaks in northwestern Iran in 2010.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Elham; Pourbakhsh, Seyed Ali; Ahmadi, Malahat; Mardani, Karim; Talebi, Alireza

    2016-11-01

    The northwest of Iran shares long borders with three neighboring countries; therefore, it is considered one of the main entry portals of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) into the country. Ten virulent NDVs were recovered from 19 poultry farms of various prefectures in northwestern Iran during Newcastle disease outbreaks in 2010. The isolates were genotypically analyzed using an F-gene-specific reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. The amplified F gene (nucleotides 189-1666) sequences of the NDV isolates were compared phylogenetically with those of previously published strains in GenBank. All of the NDV isolates belonged to genotype VIIb and were closely related to some isolates from Iran, Russia, and Sweden. Therefore, it can be postulated that these isolates evolved from previously reported strains. The velogenic viruses carried the motif (112)R-R-Q-K-R/F(117) at the F0 cleavage site and a unique substitution of (190)L→F which had never been reported in any NDV genotype VIIb isolate. They shared high sequence similarity with each other but were distinct from current NDV vaccines and NDV strains reported from other countries. This information is fundamental for improving the efficacy of controlling strategies and vaccine development for NDV.

  15. Pathogenesis and phylogenetic analyses of canine distemper virus strain 007Lm, a new isolate in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lan, N T; Yamaguchi, R; Furuya, Y; Inomata, A; Ngamkala, S; Naganobu, K; Kai, K; Mochizuki, M; Kobayashi, Y; Uchida, K; Tateyama, S

    2005-10-31

    The pathogenesis of a new isolate of canine distemper virus (CDV), strain 007Lm, was investigated from lymph node tissue by using Vero cells that express canine signalling lymphocyte activation molecules with a tag (Vero-DST) in dogs. Two CDV sero-negative Beagle dogs were inoculated intranasally and intraconjunctively with a virus suspension. Both infected dogs showed clinical signs of severe bloody diarrhea, conjunctivitis, ocular discharge, nasal discharge and coughing, lymphopenia, fever and weight loss. Titers of CDV-IgM and CDV-IgG in the blood were measured. CDV was detected by using reverse transcriptase-PCR and was recovered in swabs from one dog from 9 days and from the other dogs from 10 days after inoculation. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of H and P genes showed that nucleotide and amino acid sequences of these genes of strain 007Lm after isolation in Vero-DST cells are identical to those of the original virus from fresh tissue and that strain 007Lm joins to the Asia 2 group cluster of CDV strains that is distinct from other clusters. These results indicate that (1) CDV strain 007Lm isolated in Vero-DST cells is virulent, (2) nucleotide and amino acid sequences of H and P genes of strain 007Lm do not change after isolation in Vero-DST cells compared with the original virus from fresh tissue and (3) strain 007Lm isolated from a vaccinated dog belongs to a cluster far from the vaccine strains in the phylogenetic trees of H and P genes.

  16. Mesoamerican tree squirrels evolution (Rodentia: Sciuridae): a molecular phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Federico; Gutierrez-Espeleta, Gustavo

    2014-06-01

    The tribe Sciurini comprehends the genera Sciurus, Syntheosiurus, Microsciurus, Tamiasciurus and Rheinthrosciurus. The phylogenetic relationships within Sciurus have been only partially done, and the relationship between Mesoamerican species remains unsolved. The phylogenetic relationships of the Mesoamerican tree squirrels were examined using molecular data. Sequence data publicly available (12S, 16S, CYTB mitochondrial genes and IRBP nuclear gene) and cytochrome B gene sequences of four previously not sampled Mesoamerican Sciurus species were analyzed under a Bayesian multispecies coalescence model. Phylogenetic analysis of the multilocus data set showed the neotropical tree squirrels as a monophyletic clade. The genus Sciurus was paraphyletic due to the inclusion of Microsciurus species (M. alfari and M. flaviventer). The South American species S. aestuans and S. stramineus showed a sister taxa relationship. Single locus analysis based on the most compact and complete data set (i.e. CYTB gene sequences), supported the monophyly of the South American species and recovered a Mesoamerican clade including S. aureogaster, S. granatensis and S. variegatoides. These results corroborated previous findings based on cladistic analysis of cranial and post-cranial characters. Our data support a close relationship between Mesoamerican Sciurus species and a sister relationship with South American species, and corroborates previous findings in relation to the polyphyly of Microsciurus and Syntheosciurus paraphyly.

  17. Identification and phylogenetic analysis of hepatitis C virus in forensic blood samples obtained from injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Kato, H; Maeno, Y; Seko-Nakamura, Y; Monma-Ohtaki, J; Sugiura, S; Takahashi, K; Zhe, L X; Matsumoto, T; Kurvanov, F; Mizokami, M; Nagao, M

    2007-05-03

    Injecting drug users (IDUs) are a high-risk group for contracting hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. In Japan, data on the prevalence of those blood-borne viruses among IDUs are very limited. Blood samples were obtained from 12 cadavers of IDUs sent to Nagoya City University for the purpose of judicious autopsy and two alive IDUs with hepatitis C referred to a local hospital at the same period. The viruses were detected by polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis was performed. Two (16.6%) of the 12 autopsy cases were positive for HCV, but no case was positive for either HBV or HIV. Phylogenetic analysis of the two HCV isolates revealed that one was classified into genotype 1b and another was genotype 2b. Furthermore, nucleotide sequences of two isolates recovered from IDUs with hepatitis C were identical, that indicated the transmission of HCV between them, and those HCV were phylogenetically classified into genotype 2a. The prevalence of HCV infection among IDUs in Japan, despite the case of judicious autopsy, seems to be high, but HIV infection seems to be rare. The transmission of HCV between IDUs was demonstrated, and this indicates that phylogenetic analysis would applicable to also forensic analysis. HCV isolates identified in this study did not phylogenetically segregate, thus multiple transmission route of HCV among IDUs seems be exist in Japan.

  18. Fusarium culmorum is a single phylogenetic species based on multilocus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Obanor, Friday; Erginbas-Orakci, G; Tunali, B; Nicol, J M; Chakraborty, S

    2010-09-01

    Fusarium culmorum is a major pathogen of wheat and barley causing head blight and crown rot in cooler temperate climates of Australia, Europe, West Asia and North Africa. To better understand its evolutionary history we partially sequenced single copy nuclear genes encoding translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF), reductase (RED) and phosphate permease (PHO) in 100 F. culmorum isolates with 11 isolates of Fusarium crookwellense, Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium pseudograminearum. Phylogenetic analysis of multilocus sequence (MLS) data using Bayesian inference and maximum parsimony analysis showed that F. culmorum from wheat is a single phylogenetic species with no significant linkage disequilibrium and little or no lineage development along geographic origin. Both MLS and TEF and RED gene sequence analysis separated the four Fusarium species used and delineated three to four groups within the F. culmorum clade. But the PHO gene could not completely resolve isolates into their respective species. Fixation index and gene flow suggest significant genetic exchange between the isolates from distant geographic regions. A lack of strong lineage structure despite the geographic separation of the three collections indicates a frequently recombining species and/or widespread distribution of genotypes due to international trade, tourism and long-range dispersal of macroconidia. Moreover, the two mating type genes were present in equal proportion among the F. culmorum collection used in this study, leaving open the possibility of sexual reproduction. Copyright © 2010 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Phylogenetic diversity and biological activity of actinobacteria isolated from the Chukchi Shelf marine sediments in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meng; Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; Dong, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-03-06

    Marine environments are a rich source of Actinobacteria and have the potential to produce a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we used four selective isolation media to culture Actinobacteria from the sediments collected from the Chukchi Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. A total of 73 actinobacterial strains were isolated. Based on repetitive DNA fingerprinting analysis, we selected 30 representatives for partial characterization according to their phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial activities and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis genes. Results from the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the 30 strains could be sorted into 18 phylotypes belonging to 14 different genera: Agrococcus, Arsenicicoccus, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Citricoccus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinibacterium and Streptomyces. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report on the isolation of Microlunatus genus members from marine habitats. Of the 30 isolates, 11 strains exhibited antibacterial and/or antifungal activity, seven of which have activities against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. All 30 strains have at least two biosynthetic genes, one-third of which possess more than four biosynthetic genes. This study demonstrates the significant diversity of Actinobacteria in the Chukchi Shelf sediment and their potential for producing biologically active compounds and novel material for genetic manipulation or combinatorial biosynthesis.

  20. Phylogenetic Diversity and Biological Activity of Actinobacteria Isolated from the Chukchi Shelf Marine Sediments in the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Meng; Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; Dong, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Marine environments are a rich source of Actinobacteria and have the potential to produce a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we used four selective isolation media to culture Actinobacteria from the sediments collected from the Chukchi Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. A total of 73 actinobacterial strains were isolated. Based on repetitive DNA fingerprinting analysis, we selected 30 representatives for partial characterization according to their phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial activities and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis genes. Results from the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the 30 strains could be sorted into 18 phylotypes belonging to 14 different genera: Agrococcus, Arsenicicoccus, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Citricoccus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinibacterium and Streptomyces. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report on the isolation of Microlunatus genus members from marine habitats. Of the 30 isolates, 11 strains exhibited antibacterial and/or antifungal activity, seven of which have activities against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. All 30 strains have at least two biosynthetic genes, one-third of which possess more than four biosynthetic genes. This study demonstrates the significant diversity of Actinobacteria in the Chukchi Shelf sediment and their potential for producing biologically active compounds and novel material for genetic manipulation or combinatorial biosynthesis. PMID:24663116

  1. Phylogenetic relationships of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from Peruvian children

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, C. A.; Ruiz, J.; Lacher, D. W.; Rivera, F. P.; Saenz, Y.; Chea-Woo, E.; Zavaleta, N.; Gil, A. I.; Lanata, C. F.; Huicho, L.; Maves, R. C.; Torres, C.; DebRoy, C.; Cleary, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, virulence factors (stx, eae, ehxA and astA) and phylogenetic relationships [PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST)] of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains isolated from four previous cohort studies in 2212 Peruvian children aged <36 months. STEC prevalence was 0.4 % (14/3219) in diarrhoeal and 0.6 % (15/2695) in control samples. None of the infected children developed haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) or other complications of STEC. stx1 was present in 83 % of strains, stx2 in 17 %, eae in 72 %, ehxA in 59 % and astA in 14 %. The most common serotype was O26 : H11 (14 %) and the most common seropathotype was B (45 %). The strains belonged mainly to phylogenetic group B1 (52 %). The distinct combinations of alleles across the seven MLST loci were used to define 13 sequence types among 19 STEC strains. PFGE typing of 20 STEC strains resulted in 19 pulsed-field patterns. Comparison of the patterns revealed 11 clusters (I–XI), each usually including strains belonging to different serotypes; one exception was cluster VI, which gathered exclusively seven strains of seropathotype B, clonal group enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) 2 and phylogenetic group B1. In summary, STEC prevalence was low in Peruvian children with diarrhoea in the community setting. The strains were phylogenetically diverse and associated with mild infections. However, additional studies are needed in children with bloody diarrhoea and HUS. PMID:21292859

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of Canine Parvovirus VP2 Gene in China.

    PubMed

    Yi, L; Tong, M; Cheng, Y; Song, W; Cheng, S

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a total of 37 samples (58.0%) were found through PCR assay to be positive for canine parvovirus (CPV) of 66 suspected faecal samples of dogs collected from various cities throughout China. Eight CPV isolates could be obtained in the CRFK cell line. The sequencing of the VP2 gene of CPV identified the predominant CPV strain as CPV-2a (Ser297Ala), with two CPV-2b (Ser297Ala). Sequence comparison revealed homologies of 99.3-99.9%, 99.9% and 99.3-99.7% within the CPV 2a isolates, within the CPV 2b isolates and between the CPV 2a and 2b isolates, respectively. In addition, several non-synonymous and synonymous mutations were also recorded. The phylogenetic tree revealed that most of the CPV strains from different areas in China were located in the formation of a large branch, which were grouped together along with the KU143-09 strain from Thailand and followed the same evolution. In this study, we provide an updated molecular characterization of CPV 2 circulation in China.

  3. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses isolated from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Counihan, Katrina L; Skerratt, Lee F; Franson, J Christian; Hollmén, Tuula E

    2015-11-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections.

  4. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of Human Campylobacter jejuni Isolates and Association with Phylogenetic Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Wonhee; Mosci, Rebekah; Wengert, Samantha L.; Singh, Pallavi; Newton, Duane W.; Salimnia, Hossein; Lephart, Paul; Khalife, Walid; Mansfield, Linda S.; Rudrik, James T.; Manning, Shannon D.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a zoonotic pathogen and the most common bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. With the increase of antibiotic resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides, the drugs of choice for treatment, C. jejuni was recently classified as a serious antimicrobial resistant threat. Here, we characterized 94 C. jejuni isolates collected from patients at four Michigan hospitals in 2011 and 2012 to determine the frequency of resistance and association with phylogenetic lineages. The prevalence of resistance to fluoroquinolones (19.1%) and macrolides (2.1%) in this subset of C. jejuni isolates from Michigan was similar to national reports. High frequencies of fluoroquinolone-resistant C. jejuni isolates, however, were recovered from patients with a history of foreign travel. A high proportion of these resistant isolates were classified as multilocus sequence type (ST)-464, a fluoroquinolone-resistant lineage that recently emerged in Europe. A significantly higher prevalence of tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni was also found in Michigan and resistant isolates were more likely to represent ST-982, which has been previously recovered from ruminants and the environment in the U.S. Notably, patients with tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni infections were more likely to have contact with cattle. These outcomes prompt the need to monitor the dissemination and diversification of imported fluoroquinolone-resistant C. jejuni strains and to investigate the molecular epidemiology of C. jejuni recovered from cattle and farm environments to guide mitigation strategies. PMID:27199922

  5. Analysis of diversification: combining phylogenetic and taxonomic data.

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    The estimation of diversification rates using phylogenetic data has attracted a lot of attention in the past decade. In this context, the analysis of incomplete phylogenies (e.g. phylogenies resolved at the family level but unresolved at the species level) has remained difficult. I present here a likelihood-based method to combine partly resolved phylogenies with taxonomic (species-richness) data to estimate speciation and extinction rates. This method is based on fitting a birth-and-death model to both phylogenetic and taxonomic data. Some examples of the method are presented with data on birds and on mammals. The method is compared with existing approaches that deal with incomplete phylogenies. Some applications and generalizations of the approach introduced in this paper are further discussed. PMID:14667342

  6. [A phylogenetic analysis of plant communities of Teberda Biosphere Reserve].

    PubMed

    Shulakov, A A; Egorov, A V; Onipchenko, V G

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of communities is based on the comparison of distances on the phylogenetic tree between species of a community under study and those distances in random samples taken out of local flora. It makes it possible to determine to what extent a community composition is formed by more closely related species (i.e., "clustered") or, on the opposite, it is more even and includes species that are less related with each other. The first case is usually interpreted as a result of strong influence caused by abiotic factors, due to which species with similar ecology, a priori more closely related, would remain: In the second case, biotic factors, such as competition, may come to the fore and lead to forming a community out of distant clades due to divergence of their ecological niches: The aim of this' study Was Ad explore the phylogenetic structure in communities of the northwestern Caucasus at two spatial scales - the scale of area from 4 to 100 m2 and the smaller scale within a community. The list of local flora of the alpine belt has been composed using the database of geobotanic descriptions carried out in Teberda Biosphere Reserve at true altitudes exceeding.1800 m. It includes 585 species of flowering plants belonging to 57 families. Basal groups of flowering plants are.not represented in the list. At the scale of communities of three classes, namely Thlaspietea rotundifolii - commumties formed on screes and pebbles, Calluno-Ulicetea - alpine meadow, and Mulgedio-Aconitetea subalpine meadows, have not demonstrated significant distinction of phylogenetic structure. At intra level, for alpine meadows the larger share of closely related species. (clustered community) is detected. Significantly clustered happen to be those communities developing on rocks (class Asplenietea trichomanis) and alpine (class Juncetea trifidi). At the same time, alpine lichen proved to have even phylogenetic structure at the small scale. Alpine (class Salicetea herbaceae) that

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) gene.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Abjal Pasha; Alsaeed, Abbas H; Sultana, Asma

    2012-01-01

    The uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) enzyme (also known as hydroxymethylbilane hydrolyase) catalyzes the cyclization of hydroxymethylbilane to uroporphyrinogen III during heme biosynthesis. A deficiency of this enzyme is associated with the very rare Gunther's disease or congenital erythropoietic porphyria, an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism. The current study investigated the possible role of UROS (Homo sapiens [EC: 4.2.1.75; 265 aa; 1371 bp mRNA; Entrez Pubmed ref NP_000366.1, NM_000375.2]) in evolution by studying the phylogenetic relationship and divergence of this gene using computational methods. The UROS protein sequences from various taxa were retrieved from GenBank database and were compared using Clustal-W (multiple sequence alignment) with defaults and a first-pass phylogenetic tree was built using neighbor-joining method as in DELTA BLAST 2.2.27+ version. A total of 163 BLAST hits were found for the uroporphyrinogen III synthase query sequence and these hits showed putative conserved domain, HemD superfamily (as on 14(th) Nov 2012). We then narrowed down the search by manually deleting the proteins which were not UROS sequences and sequences belonging to phyla other than Chordata were deleted. A repeat phylogenetic analysis of 39 taxa was performed using PhyML and TreeDyn software to confirm that UROS is a highly conserved protein with approximately 85% conserved sequences in almost all chordate taxons emphasizing its importance in heme synthesis.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Maverick/Polinton giant transposons across organisms.

    PubMed

    Haapa-Paananen, Saija; Wahlberg, Niklas; Savilahti, Harri

    2014-09-01

    Polintons are a recently discovered group of large transposable elements (<40Kb in size) encoding up to 10 different proteins. The increasing number of genome sequencing projects has led to the discovery of these elements in genomes of protists, fungi, and animals, but not in plants. The RepBase database of eukaryotic repetitive elements currently contains consensus sequences and information of 70 Polinton elements from 28 organisms. Previous phylogenetic analyses have shown the relationship of Polintons to linear plasmids, bacteriophages, and retroviruses. However, a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of all known Polintons has been lacking. We retrieved the Polinton consensus sequences from the most recent version of RepBase, and compiled amino acid sequences for the two most common Polinton-specific genes, the DNA polymerase-B and retroviral-like integrase. Open reading frame predictions and homology comparisons revealed partial or full sequences for 54 polymerases and 55 Polinton integrases. Multiple sequence alignments portrayed conservation in several functional motifs of these proteins. Phylogenetic analyses based on Bayesian inference using single- and combined-gene datasets revealed seven distinct lineages of Polintons that broadly follow the tree of life. Two of the seven lineages are found within the same species, indicating that ancient divergences have been retained to this day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a scattered distribution of autumn colours

    PubMed Central

    Archetti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf colour in autumn is rarely considered informative for taxonomy, but there is now growing interest in the evolution of autumn colours and different hypotheses are debated. Research efforts are hindered by the lack of basic information: the phylogenetic distribution of autumn colours. It is not known when and how autumn colours evolved. Methods Data are reported on the autumn colours of 2368 tree species belonging to 400 genera of the temperate regions of the world, and an analysis is made of their phylogenetic relationships in order to reconstruct the evolutionary origin of red and yellow in autumn leaves. Key Results Red autumn colours are present in at least 290 species (70 genera), and evolved independently at least 25 times. Yellow is present independently from red in at least 378 species (97 genera) and evolved at least 28 times. Conclusions The phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that autumn colours have been acquired and lost many times during evolution. This scattered distribution could be explained by hypotheses involving some kind of coevolutionary interaction or by hypotheses that rely on the need for photoprotection. PMID:19126636

  10. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of bacteriophage WO in spiders (Araneae).

    PubMed

    Yan, Qian; Qiao, Huping; Gao, Jin; Yun, Yueli; Liu, Fengxiang; Peng, Yu

    2015-11-01

    Phage WO is a bacteriophage found in Wolbachia. Herein, we represent the first phylogenetic study of WOs that infect spiders (Araneae). Seven species of spiders (Araneus alternidens, Nephila clavata, Hylyphantes graminicola, Prosoponoides sinensis, Pholcus crypticolens, Coleosoma octomaculatum, and Nurscia albofasciata) from six families were infected by Wolbachia and WO, followed by comprehensive sequence analysis. Interestingly, WO could be only detected Wolbachia-infected spiders. The relative infection rates of those seven species of spiders were 75, 100, 88.9, 100, 62.5, 72.7, and 100 %, respectively. Our results indicated that both Wolbachia and WO were found in three different body parts of N. clavata, and WO could be passed to the next generation of H. graminicola by vertical transmission. There were three different sequences for WO infected in A. alternidens and two different WO sequences from C. octomaculatum. Only one sequence of WO was found for the other five species of spiders. The discovered sequence of WO ranged from 239 to 311 bp. Phylogenetic tree was generated using maximum likelihood (ML) based on the orf7 gene sequences. According to the phylogenetic tree, WOs in N. clavata and H. graminicola were clustered in the same group. WOs from A. alternidens (WAlt1) and C. octomaculatum (WOct2) were closely related to another clade, whereas WO in P. sinensis was classified as a sole cluster.

  11. Penicillium astrolabium and Penicillium neocrassum, two new species isolated from grapes and their phylogenetic placement in the P. olsonii and P. brevicompactum clade.

    PubMed

    Serra, Rita; Peterson, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    We describe two new terverticillate Penicillium species isolated from grapes on the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic differences from known species. The strains were isolated in the course of a study to establish the mycobiota of grapes in Portugal. Penicillium astrolabium is phenotypically similar to P. olsonii but differs from it by two cultural characters, growth rates and the colony reverse color. P. neocrassum is similar to P. brevicompactum but is readily distinguished by sclerotia production. Phylogenetically P. astrolabium and P. neocrassum are placed respectively in the P. olsonii and P. brevicompactum clade. Multilocus analysis confirmed the genetic distinctiveness of both species. The parsimony trees obtained for ITS-lsu rDNA region and two protein coding genes, calmodulin and beta-tubulin, show congruence for all the species in the Olsonii series: P. brevicompactum, P. bialowiezense, P. olsonii, P. astrolabium and P. neocrassum, indicating that these taxa are genetically well isolated.

  12. Isoenzyme patterns and phylogenetic relationships in Acanthamoeba spp. isolated from contact lens containers in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Myung-Soo; Kim, Han-Jip; Im, Kyung-Il

    1999-01-01

    In order to refer to the basic information regarding the identification of isolates obtained from a contact lens container in Korea, the isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the isoenzyme band patterns among Acanthamoeba spp. including eight isolates and the simple pairwise dissimilarity analysis was carried out. For an alkaline phosphate development, isolate 7 and Acanthamoeba polyphaga showed homologous band patterns, and isolates 1, 2, and 3 showed the same patterns. For lactate dehydrogenase, similar patterns were observed in isolates 2 and 3. Isolates 3 and 5 showed homologous band patterns for malate dehydrogenase and glucose phosphate isomerase. For hexokinase, isolates 4, 7, and A. hatchetti showed the same band patterns. In others, a considerable number of interstrain polymorphisms was observed in nine isoenzyme band patterns. In Acanthamoeba group II, genetic distances among isolates 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 ranged from 0.104 to 0.200. In comparison to A. castellanii, A. hatchetti, and A. polyphaga, genetic distances of isolates 7 and 8 were 0.254 and 0.219, respectively. In Acanthamoeba group III, including A. culbertsoni, A. healyi, and A. royreba, isolate 6 had genetic distances which ranged from 0.314 to 0.336. Finally, when comparing to the six reference Acanthamoeba, it was possible to classify isolates 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, as genetically close-related species and as independent species group. Furthermore, isolates 6, 7 and 8 were identified as independent species as well. PMID:10634038

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of anaerobic psychrophilic enrichment cultures obtained from a greenland glacier ice core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Peter P.; Miteva, Vanya I.; Brenchley, Jean E.

    2003-01-01

    The examination of microorganisms in glacial ice cores allows the phylogenetic relationships of organisms frozen for thousands of years to be compared with those of current isolates. We developed a method for aseptically sampling a sediment-containing portion of a Greenland ice core that had remained at -9 degrees C for over 100,000 years. Epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry results showed that the ice sample contained over 6 x 10(7) cells/ml. Anaerobic enrichment cultures inoculated with melted ice were grown and maintained at -2 degrees C. Genomic DNA extracted from these enrichments was used for the PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with bacterial and archaeal primers and the preparation of clone libraries. Approximately 60 bacterial inserts were screened by restriction endonuclease analysis and grouped into 27 unique restriction fragment length polymorphism types, and 24 representative sequences were compared phylogenetically. Diverse sequences representing major phylogenetic groups including alpha, beta, and gamma Proteobacteria as well as relatives of the Thermus, Bacteroides, Eubacterium, and Clostridium groups were found. Sixteen clone sequences were closely related to those from known organisms, with four possibly representing new species. Seven sequences may reflect new genera and were most closely related to sequences obtained only by PCR amplification. One sequence was over 12% distant from its closest relative and may represent a novel order or family. These results show that phylogenetically diverse microorganisms have remained viable within the Greenland ice core for at least 100,000 years.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of anaerobic psychrophilic enrichment cultures obtained from a greenland glacier ice core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Peter P.; Miteva, Vanya I.; Brenchley, Jean E.

    2003-01-01

    The examination of microorganisms in glacial ice cores allows the phylogenetic relationships of organisms frozen for thousands of years to be compared with those of current isolates. We developed a method for aseptically sampling a sediment-containing portion of a Greenland ice core that had remained at -9 degrees C for over 100,000 years. Epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry results showed that the ice sample contained over 6 x 10(7) cells/ml. Anaerobic enrichment cultures inoculated with melted ice were grown and maintained at -2 degrees C. Genomic DNA extracted from these enrichments was used for the PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with bacterial and archaeal primers and the preparation of clone libraries. Approximately 60 bacterial inserts were screened by restriction endonuclease analysis and grouped into 27 unique restriction fragment length polymorphism types, and 24 representative sequences were compared phylogenetically. Diverse sequences representing major phylogenetic groups including alpha, beta, and gamma Proteobacteria as well as relatives of the Thermus, Bacteroides, Eubacterium, and Clostridium groups were found. Sixteen clone sequences were closely related to those from known organisms, with four possibly representing new species. Seven sequences may reflect new genera and were most closely related to sequences obtained only by PCR amplification. One sequence was over 12% distant from its closest relative and may represent a novel order or family. These results show that phylogenetically diverse microorganisms have remained viable within the Greenland ice core for at least 100,000 years.

  15. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of anaerobic psychrophilic enrichment cultures obtained from a greenland glacier ice core.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Peter P; Miteva, Vanya I; Brenchley, Jean E

    2003-04-01

    The examination of microorganisms in glacial ice cores allows the phylogenetic relationships of organisms frozen for thousands of years to be compared with those of current isolates. We developed a method for aseptically sampling a sediment-containing portion of a Greenland ice core that had remained at -9 degrees C for over 100,000 years. Epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry results showed that the ice sample contained over 6 x 10(7) cells/ml. Anaerobic enrichment cultures inoculated with melted ice were grown and maintained at -2 degrees C. Genomic DNA extracted from these enrichments was used for the PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with bacterial and archaeal primers and the preparation of clone libraries. Approximately 60 bacterial inserts were screened by restriction endonuclease analysis and grouped into 27 unique restriction fragment length polymorphism types, and 24 representative sequences were compared phylogenetically. Diverse sequences representing major phylogenetic groups including alpha, beta, and gamma Proteobacteria as well as relatives of the Thermus, Bacteroides, Eubacterium, and Clostridium groups were found. Sixteen clone sequences were closely related to those from known organisms, with four possibly representing new species. Seven sequences may reflect new genera and were most closely related to sequences obtained only by PCR amplification. One sequence was over 12% distant from its closest relative and may represent a novel order or family. These results show that phylogenetically diverse microorganisms have remained viable within the Greenland ice core for at least 100,000 years.

  17. Phylogenetic Analysis of Anaerobic Psychrophilic Enrichment Cultures Obtained from a Greenland Glacier Ice Core

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Peter P.; Miteva, Vanya I.; Brenchley, Jean E.

    2003-01-01

    The examination of microorganisms in glacial ice cores allows the phylogenetic relationships of organisms frozen for thousands of years to be compared with those of current isolates. We developed a method for aseptically sampling a sediment-containing portion of a Greenland ice core that had remained at −9°C for over 100,000 years. Epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry results showed that the ice sample contained over 6 × 107 cells/ml. Anaerobic enrichment cultures inoculated with melted ice were grown and maintained at −2°C. Genomic DNA extracted from these enrichments was used for the PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with bacterial and archaeal primers and the preparation of clone libraries. Approximately 60 bacterial inserts were screened by restriction endonuclease analysis and grouped into 27 unique restriction fragment length polymorphism types, and 24 representative sequences were compared phylogenetically. Diverse sequences representing major phylogenetic groups including alpha, beta, and gamma Proteobacteria as well as relatives of the Thermus, Bacteroides, Eubacterium, and Clostridium groups were found. Sixteen clone sequences were closely related to those from known organisms, with four possibly representing new species. Seven sequences may reflect new genera and were most closely related to sequences obtained only by PCR amplification. One sequence was over 12% distant from its closest relative and may represent a novel order or family. These results show that phylogenetically diverse microorganisms have remained viable within the Greenland ice core for at least 100,000 years. PMID:12676695

  18. Phylogenetic relationship of dengue virus type 3 isolated in Brazil and Paraguay and global evolutionary divergence dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Dengue virus comprises four antigenically related viruses named dengue virus type 1 to 4 (DENV1-4). DENV-3 was re-introduced into the Americas in 1994 causing outbreaks in Nicaragua and Panama. DENV-3 was introduced in Brazil in 2000 and then spread to most of the Brazilian States, reaching the neighboring country, Paraguay in 2002. In this study, we have analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of DENV-3 isolated in Brazil and Paraguay with viruses isolated worldwide. We have also analyzed the evolutionary divergence dynamics of DENV-3 viruses. Results The entire open reading frame (ORF) of thirteen DENV-3 isolated in Brazil (n = 9) and Paraguay (n = 4) were sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. DENV-3 grouped into three main genotypes (I, II and III). Several internal clades were found within each genotype that we called lineage and sub-lineage. Viruses included in this study belong to genotype III and grouped together with viruses isolated in the Americas within the lineage III. The Brazilian viruses were further segregated into two different sub-lineage, A and B, and the Paraguayan into the sub-lineage B. All three genotypes showed internal grouping. The nucleotide divergence was in average 6.7% for genotypes, 2.7% for lineages and 1.5% for sub-lineages. Phylogenetic trees constructed with any of the protein gene sequences showed the same segregation of the DENV-3 in three genotypes. Conclusion Our results showed that two groups of DENV-3 genotypes III circulated in Brazil during 2002–2009, suggesting different events of introduction of the virus through different regions of the country. In Paraguay, only one group DENV-3 genotype III is circulating that is very closely related to the Brazilian viruses of sub-lineage B. Different degree of grouping can be observed for DENV-3 and each group showed a characteristic evolutionary divergence. Finally, we have observed that any

  19. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of Orf virus from sheep in Brazil: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Abrahão, Jônatas S; Campos, Rafael K; Trindade, Giliane S; Guedes, Maria IM; Lobato, Zélia IP; Mazur, Carlos; Ferreira, Paulo CP; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Kroon, Erna G

    2009-01-01

    Background Orf virus (ORFV), the prototype of the genus Parapoxvirus (PPV), is the etiological agent of contagious ecthyma, a severe exanthematic dermatitis that afflicts domestic and wild small ruminants. Although South American ORFV outbreaks have occurred and diagnosed there are no South American PPV major membrane glycoprotein B2L gene nucleotide sequences available. Case presentation an outbreak of ovine contagious ecthyma in Midwest Brazil was investigated. The diagnosis was based on clinical examinations and molecular biology techniques. The molecular characterization of the virus was done using PCR amplification, cloning and DNA sequencing of the B2L gene. The phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a high degree of identity with ORFV strains, and the isolate was closest to the ORFV-India 82/04 isolate. Another Brazilian ORFV isolate, NE1, was sequenced for comparative analysis and also showed a high degree of identity with an Asian ORFV strain. Conclusion Distinct ORFV strains are circulating in Brazil. This is the first report on the phylogenetic analysis of an ORFV in South America. PMID:19413907

  20. Phylogenetic diversity and genotypic complexity of H1N1 subtype swine influenza viruses isolated in Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background After the occurrence of 2009 pandemic H1N1, close attention has been paid to the H1N1 subtype swine influenza viruses (H1N1 SIV) by scientific communities in many countries. A large-scale sequence analysis of the NCBI Influenza Virus Resource Database on H1N1 SIVs submitted primarily by scientists in China during 1992 to 2011 was performed. The aims of this study were to elucidate the genetic and evolutionary characteristics of H1N1 SIVs, to identify and unify the lineages and genetic characteristics of the H1N1 SIVs isolated in mainland China. Results Most of the strains were isolated during the period of 2008 to 2010 from Guangdong and Shandong provinces, China. Based on the phylogenetic and genotypic analyses, all of the H1N1 SIV strains can be classified into 8 lineages and 10 genotypes. All strains were of the characteristics of low pathogenic influenza viruses. The viruses of different lineage are characterized with different amino acid residues at the receptor-binding sites. Viruses containing PB2 genes of the classical swine, early seasonal human and recent seasonal human lineage might be more infectious to human. Some genotypes were directly related with human influenza viruses, which include strains that harbored genes derived from human influenza viruses. Conclusions Phylogenetic diversity and complexity existed in H1N1 SIVs isolated in mainland China. These H1N1 SIV strains were closely related to other subtype influenza viruses, especially to human influenza viruses. Moreover, it was shown that, novel lineages and genotypes of H1N1 SIVs emerged recently in mainland China. These findings provided new and essential information for further understanding of the genetic and evolutionary characteristics and monitoring the H1N1 SIVs in mainland China. PMID:23181491

  1. Phylogenetic Analysis and Epidemic History of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 2 in Tunisia, North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Rajhi, Mouna; Ghedira, Kais; Chouikha, Anissa; Djebbi, Ahlem; Cheikh, Imed; Ben Yahia, Ahlem; Sadraoui, Amel; Hammami, Walid; Azouz, Msaddek; Ben Mami, Nabil; Triki, Henda

    2016-01-01

    HCV genotype 2 (HCV-2) has a worldwide distribution with prevalence rates that vary from country to country. High genetic diversity and long-term endemicity were suggested in West African countries. A global dispersal of HCV-2 would have occurred during the 20th century, especially in European countries. In Tunisia, genotype 2 was the second prevalent genotype after genotype 1 and most isolates belong to subtypes 2c and 2k. In this study, phylogenetic analyses based on the NS5B genomic sequences of 113 Tunisian HCV isolates from subtypes 2c and 2k were carried out. A Bayesian coalescent-based framework was used to estimate the origin and the spread of these subtypes circulating in Tunisia. Phylogenetic analyses of HCV-2c sequences suggest the absence of country-specific or time-specific variants. In contrast, the phylogenetic grouping of HCV-2k sequences shows the existence of two major genetic clusters that may represent two distinct circulating variants. Coalescent analysis indicated a most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of Tunisian HCV-2c around 1886 (1869–1902) before the introduction of HCV-2k in 1901 (1867–1931). Our findings suggest that the introduction of HCV-2c in Tunisia is possibly a result of population movements between Tunisia and European population following the French colonization. PMID:27100294

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis and Epidemic History of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 2 in Tunisia, North Africa.

    PubMed

    Rajhi, Mouna; Ghedira, Kais; Chouikha, Anissa; Djebbi, Ahlem; Cheikh, Imed; Ben Yahia, Ahlem; Sadraoui, Amel; Hammami, Walid; Azouz, Msaddek; Ben Mami, Nabil; Triki, Henda

    2016-01-01

    HCV genotype 2 (HCV-2) has a worldwide distribution with prevalence rates that vary from country to country. High genetic diversity and long-term endemicity were suggested in West African countries. A global dispersal of HCV-2 would have occurred during the 20th century, especially in European countries. In Tunisia, genotype 2 was the second prevalent genotype after genotype 1 and most isolates belong to subtypes 2c and 2k. In this study, phylogenetic analyses based on the NS5B genomic sequences of 113 Tunisian HCV isolates from subtypes 2c and 2k were carried out. A Bayesian coalescent-based framework was used to estimate the origin and the spread of these subtypes circulating in Tunisia. Phylogenetic analyses of HCV-2c sequences suggest the absence of country-specific or time-specific variants. In contrast, the phylogenetic grouping of HCV-2k sequences shows the existence of two major genetic clusters that may represent two distinct circulating variants. Coalescent analysis indicated a most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of Tunisian HCV-2c around 1886 (1869-1902) before the introduction of HCV-2k in 1901 (1867-1931). Our findings suggest that the introduction of HCV-2c in Tunisia is possibly a result of population movements between Tunisia and European population following the French colonization.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of a transfusion-transmitted hepatitis A outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hettmann, Andrea; Juhász, Gabriella; Dencs, Ágnes; Tresó, Bálint; Rusvai, Erzsébet; Barabás, Éva; Takács, Mária

    2017-02-01

    A transfusion-associated hepatitis A outbreak was found in the first time in Hungary. The outbreak involved five cases. Parenteral transmission of hepatitis A is rare, but may occur during viraemia. Direct sequencing of nested PCR products was performed, and all the examined samples were identical in the VP1/2A region of the hepatitis A virus genome. HAV sequences found in recent years were compared and phylogenetic analysis showed that the strain which caused these cases is the same as that had spread in Hungary recently causing several hepatitis A outbreaks throughout the country.

  4. Phylogenetic identification of marine bacteria isolated from deep-sea sediments of the eastern South Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcus Adonai Castro; Cavalett, Angélica; Spinner, Ananda; Rosa, Daniele Cristina; Jasper, Regina Beltrame; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Bonatelli, Maria Letícia; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline; Corção, Gertrudes; Lima, André Oliveira de Souza

    2013-12-01

    The deep-sea environments of the South Atlantic Ocean are less studied in comparison to the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. With the aim of identifying the deep-sea bacteria in this less known ocean, 70 strains were isolated from eight sediment samples (depth range between 1905 to 5560 m) collected in the eastern part of the South Atlantic, from the equatorial region to the Cape Abyssal Plain, using three different culture media. The strains were classified into three phylogenetic groups, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, by the analysis of 16s rRNA gene sequences. Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes were the most frequently identified groups, with Halomonas the most frequent genus among the strains. Microorganisms belonging to Firmicutes were the only ones observed in all samples. Sixteen of the 41 identified operational taxonomic units probably represent new species. The presence of potentially new species reinforces the need for new studies in the deep-sea environments of the South Atlantic.

  5. Epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis of institutional mouse parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Joh, Joongho; Proctor, Mary L; Ditslear, Janice L; King, William W; Sundberg, John P; Jenson, A Bennett; Ghim, Shin-Je

    2013-08-01

    Mouse parvoviruses (MPVs) are small, single-stranded, 5 kb DNA viruses that are subclinical and endemic in many laboratory mouse colonies. MPVs cause more distinctive deleterious effects in immune-compromised or genetically-engineered mice than immuno-competent mice. At the University of Louisville (U of L), there was an unexpected increase of MPV sero-positivity for MPV infections in mouse colonies between January 2006 and February 2007, resulting in strategic husbandry changes aimed at controlling MPV spread throughout the animal facility. To investigate these MPVs, VP2 genes of seven MPVs were cloned and sequenced from eight documented incidences by PCR technology. The mutations in these VP2 genes were compared to those found at the Genbank database (NCBI; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and an intra-institutional phylogenetic tree for MPV infections at U of L was constructed. We discovered that the seven MPV isolates were different from those in Genbank and were not identical to each other. These MPVs were designated MPV-UL1 to 7; none of them were minute virus of mice (MVMs). Four isolates could be classified as MPV1, one was classified as MPV2, and two were defined as novel types with less than 96% and 94% homology with existing MPV types. Considering that all seven isolates had mutations in their VP2 genes and no mutations were observed in VP2 genes of MPV during a four-month time period of incubation, we concluded that all seven MPVs isolated at U of L between 2006 and 2007 probably originated from different sources. Serological survey for MPV infections verified that each MPV outbreak was controlled without further contamination within the institution. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Detecting Network Communities: An Application to Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Roberto F. S.; Rocha-Neto, Ivan C.; Santos, Leonardo B. L.; de Santana, Charles N.; Diniz, Marcelo V. C.; Lobão, Thierry Petit; Goés-Neto, Aristóteles; Pinho, Suani T. R.; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to identify communities in generally weighted complex networks and apply it to phylogenetic analysis. In this case, weights correspond to the similarity indexes among protein sequences, which can be used for network construction so that the network structure can be analyzed to recover phylogenetically useful information from its properties. The analyses discussed here are mainly based on the modular character of protein similarity networks, explored through the Newman-Girvan algorithm, with the help of the neighborhood matrix . The most relevant networks are found when the network topology changes abruptly revealing distinct modules related to the sets of organisms to which the proteins belong. Sound biological information can be retrieved by the computational routines used in the network approach, without using biological assumptions other than those incorporated by BLAST. Usually, all the main bacterial phyla and, in some cases, also some bacterial classes corresponded totally (100%) or to a great extent (>70%) to the modules. We checked for internal consistency in the obtained results, and we scored close to 84% of matches for community pertinence when comparisons between the results were performed. To illustrate how to use the network-based method, we employed data for enzymes involved in the chitin metabolic pathway that are present in more than 100 organisms from an original data set containing 1,695 organisms, downloaded from GenBank on May 19, 2007. A preliminary comparison between the outcomes of the network-based method and the results of methods based on Bayesian, distance, likelihood, and parsimony criteria suggests that the former is as reliable as these commonly used methods. We conclude that the network-based method can be used as a powerful tool for retrieving modularity information from weighted networks, which is useful for phylogenetic analysis. PMID:21573202

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of diprotodontian marsupials based on complete mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Munemasa, Maruo; Nikaido, Masato; Donnellan, Stephen; Austin, Christopher C; Okada, Norihiro; Hasegawa, Masami

    2006-06-01

    Australidelphia is the cohort, originally named by Szalay, of all Australian marsupials and the South American Dromiciops. A lot of mitochondria and nuclear genome studies support the hypothesis of a monophyly of Australidelphia, but some familial relationships in Australidelphia are still unclear. In particular, the familial relationships among the order Diprotodontia (koala, wombat, kangaroos and possums) are ambiguous. These Diprotodontian families are largely grouped into two suborders, Vombatiformes, which contains Phascolarctidae (koala) and Vombatidae (wombat), and Phalangerida, which contains Macropodidae, Potoroidae, Phalangeridae, Petauridae, Pseudocheiridae, Acrobatidae, Tarsipedidae and Burramyidae. Morphological evidence and some molecular analyses strongly support monophyly of the two families in Vombatiformes. The monophyly of Phalangerida as well as the phylogenetic relationships of families in Phalangerida remains uncertain, however, despite searches for morphological synapomorphy and mitochondrial DNA sequence analyses. Moreover, phylogenetic relationships among possum families (Phalangeridae, Petauridae, Pseudocheiridae, Acrobatidae, Tarsipedidae and Burramyidae) as well as a sister group of Macropodoidea (Macropodidae and Potoroidae) remain unclear. To evaluate familial relationships among Dromiciops and Australian marsupials as well as the familial relationships in Diprotodontia, we determined the complete mitochondrial sequence of six Diprotodontian species. We used Maximum Likelihood analyses with concatenated amino acid and codon sequences of 12 mitochondrial protein genomes. Our analysis of mitochondria amino acid sequence supports monophyly of Australian marsupials+Dromiciops and monophyly of Phalangerida. The close relatedness between Macropodidae and Phalangeridae is also weakly supported by our analysis.

  8. The worldwide distribution of genetically and phylogenetically diverse Bacillus cereus isolates harbouring Bacillus anthracis-like plasmids.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, Paulina Sylwia; Yernazarova, Aliya; Drewnowska, Justyna Malgorzata; Zambrowski, Grzegorz; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2015-10-01

    Bacillus cereus is a close relative of B. anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax whose pathogenic determinants are located on pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids. Bacillus anthracis-like plasmids have been also noted among B. cereus, however, genetic features of B. cereus harbouring these elements remain largely undescribed, especially from the global perspective. Herein, we present the genetic polymorphism, population structure and phylogeny of B. cereus with pXO1-/pXO2-like plasmids originating from Argentina, Kazakhstan, Kenya and Poland. The plasmids were found in about 17% of the isolates, but their frequencies and expression of replicons differed within and between populations. In the multi-locus sequence typing, the bacteria exhibited high genetic polymorphism reflected by 116 sequencing types, including 84 singletons and 10 clonal complexes, which mainly consisted of isolates of the same origin. The phylogenetic analysis of pXO1-/pXO2-like positive B. cereus isolates revealed six independent clades; in certain clades individual populations predominated. Generally, B. cereus with pXO1-/pXO2-like plasmids did not indicate the genetic relationship with B. anthracis, and cannot be classified into an evolutionary independent anthrax line within the B. cereus group. Our report is of a crucial importance for discovering the genetic specificity and evolution of B. cereus bacilli. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Molecular Taxonomic Evidence for Two Distinct Genotypes of Mycobacterium yongonense via Genome-Based Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Bo-Ram; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Ga-Na; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we introduced a distinct Mycobacterium intracellulare INT-5 genotype, distantly related to other genotypes of M. intracellulare (INT-1 to -4). The aim of this study is to determine the exact taxonomic status of the M. intracellulare INT-5 genotype via genome-based phylogenetic analysis. To this end, genome sequences of the two INT-5 strains, MOTT-H4Y and MOTT-36Y were compared with M. intracellulare ATCC 13950T and Mycobacterium yongonense DSM 45126T. Our phylogenetic analysis based on complete genome sequences, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) of 35 target genes, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis indicated that the two INT-5 strains were more closely related to M. yongonense DSM 45126T than the M. intracellulare strains. These results suggest their taxonomic transfer from M. intracellulare into M. yongonense. Finally, we selected 5 target genes (argH, dnaA, deaD, hsp65, and recF) and used SNPs for the identification of M. yongonese strains from other M. avium complex (MAC) strains. The application of the SNP analysis to 14 MAC clinical isolates enabled the selective identification of 4 M. yongonense clinical isolates from the other MACs. In conclusion, our genome-based phylogenetic analysis showed that the taxonomic status of two INT-5 strains, MOTT-H4Y and MOTT-36Y should be revised into M. yongonense. Our results also suggest that M. yongonense could be divided into 2 distinct genotypes (the Type I genotype with the M. parascrofulaceum rpoB gene and the Type II genotype with the M. intracellulare rpoB gene) depending on the presence of the lateral gene transfer of rpoB from M. parascrofulaceum. PMID:27031100

  10. Phylogenetic diversity of the Bacillus pumilus group and the marine ecotype revealed by multilocus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lai, Qiliang; Dong, Chunming; Sun, Fengqin; Wang, Liping; Li, Guangyu; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria closely related to Bacillus pumilus cannot be distinguished from such other species as B. safensis, B. stratosphericus, B. altitudinis and B. aerophilus simply by 16S rRNA gene sequence. In this report, 76 marine strains were subjected to phylogenetic analysis based on 7 housekeeping genes to understand the phylogeny and biogeography in comparison with other origins. A phylogenetic tree based on the 7 housekeeping genes concatenated in the order of gyrB-rpoB-pycA-pyrE-mutL-aroE-trpB was constructed and compared with trees based on the single genes. All these trees exhibited a similar topology structure with small variations. Our 79 strains were divided into 6 groups from A to F; Group A was the largest and contained 49 strains close to B. altitudinis. Additional two large groups were presented by B. safensis and B. pumilus respectively. Among the housekeeping genes, gyrB and pyrE showed comparatively better resolution power and may serve as molecular markers to distinguish these closely related strains. Furthermore, a recombinant phylogenetic tree based on the gyrB gene and containing 73 terrestrial and our isolates was constructed to detect the relationship between marine and other sources. The tree clearly showed that the bacteria of marine origin were clustered together in all the large groups. In contrast, the cluster belonging to B. safensis was mainly composed of bacteria of terrestrial origin. Interestingly, nearly all the marine isolates were at the top of the tree, indicating the possibility of the recent divergence of this bacterial group in marine environments. We conclude that B. altitudinis bacteria are the most widely spread of the B. pumilus group in marine environments. In summary, this report provides the first evidence regarding the systematic evolution of this bacterial group, and knowledge of their phylogenetic diversity will help in the understanding of their ecological role and distribution in marine environments.

  11. Phylogenetic Diversity of the Bacillus pumilus Group and the Marine Ecotype Revealed by Multilocus Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chunming; Sun, Fengqin; Wang, Liping; Li, Guangyu; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria closely related to Bacillus pumilus cannot be distinguished from such other species as B. safensis, B. stratosphericus, B. altitudinis and B. aerophilus simply by 16S rRNA gene sequence. In this report, 76 marine strains were subjected to phylogenetic analysis based on 7 housekeeping genes to understand the phylogeny and biogeography in comparison with other origins. A phylogenetic tree based on the 7 housekeeping genes concatenated in the order of gyrB-rpoB-pycA-pyrE-mutL-aroE-trpB was constructed and compared with trees based on the single genes. All these trees exhibited a similar topology structure with small variations. Our 79 strains were divided into 6 groups from A to F; Group A was the largest and contained 49 strains close to B. altitudinis. Additional two large groups were presented by B. safensis and B. pumilus respectively. Among the housekeeping genes, gyrB and pyrE showed comparatively better resolution power and may serve as molecular markers to distinguish these closely related strains. Furthermore, a recombinant phylogenetic tree based on the gyrB gene and containing 73 terrestrial and our isolates was constructed to detect the relationship between marine and other sources. The tree clearly showed that the bacteria of marine origin were clustered together in all the large groups. In contrast, the cluster belonging to B. safensis was mainly composed of bacteria of terrestrial origin. Interestingly, nearly all the marine isolates were at the top of the tree, indicating the possibility of the recent divergence of this bacterial group in marine environments. We conclude that B. altitudinis bacteria are the most widely spread of the B. pumilus group in marine environments. In summary, this report provides the first evidence regarding the systematic evolution of this bacterial group, and knowledge of their phylogenetic diversity will help in the understanding of their ecological role and distribution in marine environments. PMID:24244618

  12. [Biological characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of a denitrifying photosynthetic bacterium].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zhang, Demin; Wang, Longgang; Pan, Zhichong

    2011-02-01

    Nitrite accumulation in aquaculture water is toxic to reared animals. One of the solutions to this problem is to apply denitrifying bacteria. This paper is intended to get a strain of phototrophic bacteria for efficient removal of nitrite from aquaculture water. We used soft agar to isolate and purify phototrophic bacteria. We investigated biological characteristics of the isolate by means of light and electronic observations, physical and chemical tests. We analyzed its phylogenetical position based on the sequences of 16S rDNA and the gene that codes for photosynthetic reaction center subunit M (pufM). A photosynthetic bacterial strain, named wps, showing high removal efficiency of nitrite, was isolated from the freshwater ponds. Cells were Gram-negative, rod-shaped, slightly curved, 0.4 - 0.6 x 1.5 - 4.0 microm, motile by means of polar multiple flagella. Intracellular membranes were of the lamellar type. It grew under facultative anaerobic conditions in the light with bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoid of sppirilloxanthin series as photosynthetic pigment. The optimum growth was obtained at pH 5.5 - 8.5, in a range of 0 - 2% salinity and at 25 - 38 degrees C. The similarity of 16S rDNA between strain wps and Rhodopseudomonas palustris was 98.9% and 94.9% for pufM gene. However, there are significant differences between them in the morphological and physiological characteristics, i. e. grew at pH 5.5; no growth photoautotrophicaly with sodium hydrogen carbonate; could not utilize citrate or formate as only carbon source; required thiamine hydrochloride and calcium pantothenate as growth factors. Strain wps may represent a novel species in genus Rhodopseudomonas and possibly find its application in the bioremediation of polluted aquaculture water.

  13. Pathogenesis and Phylogenetic Analyses of Two Avian Influenza H7N1 Viruses Isolated from Wild Birds.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongmei; Wang, Deli; Sun, Jing; Cui, Yanfang; Chen, Guang; Zhang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Jiajie; Li, Xiang; Chai, Hongliang; Gao, Yuwei; Li, Yanbing; Hua, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of human infections with a novel H7N9 influenza strain has raised global concerns about a potential human pandemic. To further understand the character of other influenza viruses of the H7 subtype, we selected two H7N1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) isolated from wild birds during routine surveillance in China: A/Baer's Pochard/Hunan/414/2010 (BP/HuN/414/10) (H7N1) and A/Common Pochard/Xianghai/420/2010 (CP/XH/420/10) (H7N1). To better understand the molecular characteristics of these two isolated H7N1 viruses, we sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed their entire genomes. The results showed that the two H7N1 strains belonged to a Eurasian branch, originating from a common ancestor. Phylogenetic analysis of their hemagglutinin (HA) genes showed that BP/HuN/414/10 and CP/XH/420/10 have a more distant genetic relationship with A/Shanghai/13/2013 (H7N9), with similarities of 91.6 and 91.4%, respectively. To assess the replication and pathogenicity of these viruses in different hosts, they were inoculated in chickens, ducks and mice. Although, both CP/XH/420/10 and BP/HuN/414/10 can infect chickens, ducks and mice, they exhibited different replication capacities in these animals. The results of this study demonstrated that two low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H7N1 viruses of the Eurasian branch could infect mammals and may even have the potential to infect humans. Therefore, it is important to monitor H7 viruses in both domestic and wild birds.

  14. Pathogenesis and Phylogenetic Analyses of Two Avian Influenza H7N1 Viruses Isolated from Wild Birds

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongmei; Wang, Deli; Sun, Jing; Cui, Yanfang; Chen, Guang; Zhang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Jiajie; Li, Xiang; Chai, Hongliang; Gao, Yuwei; Li, Yanbing; Hua, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of human infections with a novel H7N9 influenza strain has raised global concerns about a potential human pandemic. To further understand the character of other influenza viruses of the H7 subtype, we selected two H7N1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) isolated from wild birds during routine surveillance in China: A/Baer's Pochard/Hunan/414/2010 (BP/HuN/414/10) (H7N1) and A/Common Pochard/Xianghai/420/2010 (CP/XH/420/10) (H7N1). To better understand the molecular characteristics of these two isolated H7N1 viruses, we sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed their entire genomes. The results showed that the two H7N1 strains belonged to a Eurasian branch, originating from a common ancestor. Phylogenetic analysis of their hemagglutinin (HA) genes showed that BP/HuN/414/10 and CP/XH/420/10 have a more distant genetic relationship with A/Shanghai/13/2013 (H7N9), with similarities of 91.6 and 91.4%, respectively. To assess the replication and pathogenicity of these viruses in different hosts, they were inoculated in chickens, ducks and mice. Although, both CP/XH/420/10 and BP/HuN/414/10 can infect chickens, ducks and mice, they exhibited different replication capacities in these animals. The results of this study demonstrated that two low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H7N1 viruses of the Eurasian branch could infect mammals and may even have the potential to infect humans. Therefore, it is important to monitor H7 viruses in both domestic and wild birds. PMID:27458455

  15. Phylogenetic analysis and characterization of Korean bovine viral diarrhea viruses.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Cha, Sang-Ho; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Park, Choi-Kyu; Joo, Yi-Seok

    2009-11-18

    Thirty-six bovine viral disease viruses (BVDVs) were identified in bovine feces (n=16), brains (n=2), and aborted fetuses (n=18) in Korea. To reveal the genetic diversity and characteristics of these Korean strains, the sequences of their 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTRs) were determined and then compared with published reference sequences. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the Korean viruses were of the BVDV subtypes 1a (n=17) or 2a (n=17). The remaining strains were of subtypes 1b (n=1) and 1n (n=1). This analysis indicates that the 1a and 2a BVDV subtypes are predominant and widespread in Korea. In addition, the prevalence of BVDV-2 was markedly higher in aborted fetuses than in other samples and was more often associated with reproductive problems and significant mortality in cattle.

  16. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of equine piroplasms in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Min-Goo; Yun, Sun-Hee; Choi, Seong-Kyoon; Cho, Gil-Jae; Park, Yong-Soo; Cho, Kwang-Hyun; Kwon, Oh-Deog; Kwak, Dongmi

    2013-06-01

    This study was conducted to screen out horses infected with piroplasms using PCR and to assess the phylogenetic variations of the piroplasm isolates. From 2007 to 2010, a total of 224 blood samples of horses were collected from three provinces of Korea and analyzed by PCR using primers specific to the 18S rRNA of piroplasms. Out of 224 samples analyzed, only two (0.9%) horses were found positive for Theileria equi. Sequencing of the complete 18S rRNA of T. equi from the two horses (GG-7 and GG-14) whose information was submitted to the GenBank (accession nos. HM229407 and HM229408, respectively) showed 100% identity. Alignment of the complete sequences of T. equi 18S rRNA with the GenBank databases of T. equi showed a high degree of homology (98.6-99.8%). The phylogenetic analysis showed T. equi GG-7 and GG-14 clustered together with T. equi isolates from Spain, Sudan, Jordan and South Africa, indicating the possibility of a close epidemiological link among these isolates.

  17. A phylogenetic transform enhances analysis of compositional microbiota data.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Justin D; Washburne, Alex D; Mukherjee, Sayan; David, Lawrence A

    2017-02-15

    Surveys of microbial communities (microbiota), typically measured as relative abundance of species, have illustrated the importance of these communities in human health and disease. Yet, statistical artifacts commonly plague the analysis of relative abundance data. Here, we introduce the PhILR transform, which incorporates microbial evolutionary models with the isometric log-ratio transform to allow off-the-shelf statistical tools to be safely applied to microbiota surveys. We demonstrate that analyses of community-level structure can be applied to PhILR transformed data with performance on benchmarks rivaling or surpassing standard tools. Additionally, by decomposing distance in the PhILR transformed space, we identified neighboring clades that may have adapted to distinct human body sites. Decomposing variance revealed that covariation of bacterial clades within human body sites increases with phylogenetic relatedness. Together, these findings illustrate how the PhILR transform combines statistical and phylogenetic models to overcome compositional data challenges and enable evolutionary insights relevant to microbial communities.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of cichlid fishes using nuclear DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Sültmann, H; Mayer, W E; Figueroa, F; Tichy, H; Klein, J

    1995-11-01

    The recent explosive adaptive radiation of cichlids in the great lakes of Africa has attracted the attention of both morphologists and molecular biologists. To decipher the phylogenetic relationships among the various taxa within the family Cichlidae is a prerequisite for answering some fundamental questions about the nature of the speciation process. In the present study, we used the random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique to obtain sequence differences between selected cichlid species. We then designed specific primers based on these sequences and used them to amplify template DNA from a large number of species by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We sequenced the amplified products and searched the sequences for indels and shared substitutions. We identified a number of such characters at three loci--DXTU1, DXTU2, and DXTU3--and used them for phylogenetic and cladistic analysis of the relationships among the various cichlid groups. Our studies assign an outgroup position to Neotropical cichlids in relation to African cichlids, provide evidence for a sister-group relationship of tilapiines to the haplochromines, group Cyphotilapia frontosa with the lamprologines of Lake Tanganyika, place Astatoreochromis alluaudi to an outgroup position with respect to other haplochromines of Lakes Victoria and Malawi, and provide additional support for the monophyly of the remaining Lake Victoria haplochromines and the Lake Malawi haplochromines. The described approach holds great promise for further resolution of cichlid phylogeny.

  19. Networks in phylogenetic analysis: new tools for population biology.

    PubMed

    Morrison, David A

    2005-04-30

    Phylogenetic analysis has changed greatly in the past decade, including the more widespread appreciation of the idea that evolutionary histories are not always tree-like, and may, thus, be best represented as reticulated networks rather than as strictly dichotomous trees. Reconstructing such histories in the absence of a bifurcating speciation process is even more difficult than the usual procedure, and a range of alternative strategies have been developed. There seem to be two basic uses for a network model of evolution: the display of real but unobservable evolutionary events (i.e. a hypothesis of the true phylogenetic history), and the display of character conflict within the data itself (i.e. a summary of the data). These two general approaches are briefly reviewed here, and the strengths and weaknesses of the different implementations are compared and contrasted. Each network methodology seems to have limitations in terms of how it responds to increasing complexity (e.g. conflict) in the data, and therefore each is likely to be more appropriate for one of the two uses than for the other. Several examples using parasitological data sets illustrate the uses of networks within the context of population biology.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the Argonaute protein family in platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yadong

    2013-03-01

    Argonaute proteins (AGOs) are mediators of gene silencing via recruitment of small regulatory RNAs to induce translational regression or degradation of targeted molecules. Platyhelminths have been reported to express microRNAs but the diversity of AGOs in the phylum has not been explored. Phylogenetic relationships of members of this protein family were studied using data from six platyhelminth genomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all cestode and trematode AGOs, along with some triclad planarian AGOs, were grouped into the Ago subfamily and its novel sister clade, here referred to as Cluster 1. These were very distant from Piwi and Class 3 subfamilies. By contrast, a number of planarian Piwi-like AGOs formed a novel sister clade to the Piwi subfamily. Extensive sequence searching revealed the presence of an additional locus for AGO2 in the cestode Echinococcus granulosus and exon expansion in this species and E. multilocularis. The current study suggests the absence of the Piwi subfamily and Class 3 AGOs in cestodes and trematodes and the Piwi-like AGO expansion in a free-living triclad planarian and the occurrence of exon expansion prior to or during the evolution of the most-recent common ancestor of the Echinococcus species studied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A phylogenetic transform enhances analysis of compositional microbiota data

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Justin D; Washburne, Alex D; Mukherjee, Sayan; David, Lawrence A

    2017-01-01

    Surveys of microbial communities (microbiota), typically measured as relative abundance of species, have illustrated the importance of these communities in human health and disease. Yet, statistical artifacts commonly plague the analysis of relative abundance data. Here, we introduce the PhILR transform, which incorporates microbial evolutionary models with the isometric log-ratio transform to allow off-the-shelf statistical tools to be safely applied to microbiota surveys. We demonstrate that analyses of community-level structure can be applied to PhILR transformed data with performance on benchmarks rivaling or surpassing standard tools. Additionally, by decomposing distance in the PhILR transformed space, we identified neighboring clades that may have adapted to distinct human body sites. Decomposing variance revealed that covariation of bacterial clades within human body sites increases with phylogenetic relatedness. Together, these findings illustrate how the PhILR transform combines statistical and phylogenetic models to overcome compositional data challenges and enable evolutionary insights relevant to microbial communities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21887.001 PMID:28198697

  2. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in Chile.

    PubMed

    Tapia, D; Eissler, Y; Torres, P; Jorquera, E; Espinoza, J C; Kuznar, J

    2015-10-27

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is the etiological agent of a highly contagious disease that is endemic to salmon farming in Chile and causes great economic losses to the industry. Here we compared different diagnostic methods to detect IPNV in field samples, including 3 real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assays, cell culture isolation, and indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Additionally, we performed a phylogenetic analysis to investigate the genogroups prevailing in Chile, as well as their geographic distribution and virulence. The 3 qRT-PCR assays used primers that targeted regions of the VP2 and VP1 genes of the virus and were tested in 46 samples, presenting a fair agreement within their results. All samples were positive for at least 2 of the qRT-PCR assays, 29 were positive for cell culture, and 23 for IFAT, showing less sensitivity for these latter 2 methods. For the phylogenetic analysis, portions of 1180 and 523 bp of the VP2 region of segment A were amplified by RT-PCR, sequenced and compared with sequences from reference strains and from isolates reported by previous studies carried out in Chile. Most of the sequenced isolates belonged to genogroup 5 (European origin), and 5 were classified within genogroup 1 (American origin). Chilean isolates formed clusters within each of the genogroups found, evidencing a clear differentiation from the reference strains. To our knowledge, this is the most extensive study completed for IPNV in Chile, covering isolates from sea- and freshwater salmon farms and showing a high prevalence of this virus in the country.

  3. Assortative mating between two sympatric closely-related specialists: inferred from molecular phylogenetic analysis and behavioral data.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huai-Jun; Li, Wen-Zhu; Yang, Xing-Ke

    2014-06-25

    Host plant shifting of phytophagous insects can lead to the formation of host associated differentiation and ultimately speciation. In some cases, host plant specificity alone acts as a nearly complete pre-mating isolating barrier among insect populations. We here test whether effective pre-mating isolation and host-independent behavioral isolation have evolved under the condition of extreme host specilization using two sympatric flea beetles with incomplete post-mating isolation under laboratory conditions. Phylogenetic analysis and coalescent simulation results showed that there is a limited interspecific gene flow, indicating effctive isolation between these species. Three types of mating tests in the absence of host plant cues showed that strong host-independent behavioral isolation has evolved between them. We conclude that almost perfect assortative mating between these two extreme host specialists results from a combination of reduced encounter rates due to differential host preference and strong sexual isolation.

  4. Assortative mating between two sympatric closely-related specialists: inferred from molecular phylogenetic analysis and behavioral data

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Huai-Jun; Li, Wen-Zhu; Yang, Xing-Ke

    2014-01-01

    Host plant shifting of phytophagous insects can lead to the formation of host associated differentiation and ultimately speciation. In some cases, host plant specificity alone acts as a nearly complete pre-mating isolating barrier among insect populations. We here test whether effective pre-mating isolation and host-independent behavioral isolation have evolved under the condition of extreme host specilization using two sympatric flea beetles with incomplete post-mating isolation under laboratory conditions. Phylogenetic analysis and coalescent simulation results showed that there is a limited interspecific gene flow, indicating effctive isolation between these species. Three types of mating tests in the absence of host plant cues showed that strong host-independent behavioral isolation has evolved between them. We conclude that almost perfect assortative mating between these two extreme host specialists results from a combination of reduced encounter rates due to differential host preference and strong sexual isolation. PMID:24961567

  5. RFLP analysis of mtDNA from six platyrrhine genera: phylogenetic inferences.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-García, M; Alvarez, D

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the phylogenetic relationships of 10 species of platyrrhine primates using RFLP analysis of mtDNA. Three restriction enzymes were used to determine the restriction site haplotypes for a total of 276 individuals. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum parsimony was employed to construct phylogenetic trees. We found close phylogenetic relationships between Alouatta, Lagothrix and Ateles. We also found a close relationship between Cebus and Aotus, with Saimiri clustering with the atelines. Haplotype diversity was found in four of the species studied, in Cebus albifrons, Saimiri sciureus, Lagothrix lagotricha and Ateles fusciceps. These data provide additional information concerning the phylogenetic relationships between these platyrrhine genera and species.

  6. [Phylogenetic and Bioinformatics Analysis of Replicase Gene Sequence of Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus].

    PubMed

    Liang, Chaoqiong; Meng, Yan; Luo, Laixin; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Jianqiang

    2015-11-01

    kD proteins of tested CGMMV isolates. The current results that there was no significant difference between the replicase gene sequences, it was stable and conservative for intra-species and clearly difference for inter-species. CGMMV-No. 1, CGMMV-No. 3, CGMMV-No. 4 and CGMMV-No. 5 had. a close genetic relationship with Shandong and Liangning isolates (Accession No. KJ754195 and EF611826), they are potentially originate from the same source. CGMMV-No. 2 was closer with Korea isolate. High sequence similarity of tested samples were gathered for a class in phylogenetic tree. It didn't show regularity of the bioinformatics analysis results of 129 kD and 57 kD proteins of tested CGMMV isolates. There was no corresponding relationship among the molecular phylogeny and the bioinformatics analysis of the tested CGMMV isolates.

  7. Phylogenetic characterization of a microsporidium (Nosema sp. MPr) isolated from the Pieris rapae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Darui; Shen, Zhongyuan; Zhu, Feng; Guan, Rui; Hou, Jiange; Zhang, Jiao; Xu, Xiaofang; Tang, Xudong; Xu, Li

    2012-07-01

    Cabbage butterfly (Pieris rapae), included in the Lepidoptera genus, Pieris family, is the main pest that damages Cruciferae. In this paper, we reported a microsporidian isolate of Nosema species which was isolated from P. rapae in Zhenjiang City, Jiangsu Province, China. The mature spore of this microsporidium is long oval in shape and 3.8 ± 0.3 × 2.0 ± 0.2 μm in size. Research results showed that the novel microsporidium cannot infect the BmN cell in vitro and silkworm larvae. The organization of rRNA gene was 5'-SSU rRNA-ITS-LSU rRNA-3'. Phylogenetic trees based on SSU rRNA and LSU rRNA gene sequences were constructed by MEGA 4.0 software. The topology showed that this microsporidium was on the same second branch of Nosema clade, and had close relationships to other Nosema species. Consequently, this microsporidium was confirmed to be a member of Nosema genus, and named as Nosema sp. MPr.

  8. Phylogenetic group distributions, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance properties of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients with urinary tract infections in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Subhadra, B; Son, Y-J; Kim, D H; Park, H S; Kim, J M; Koo, S H; Oh, M H; Kim, H-J; Choi, C H

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common diseases by which humans seek medical help and are caused mainly by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Studying the virulence and antibiotic resistance of UPEC with respect to various phylogenetic groups is of utmost importance in developing new therapeutic agents. Thus, in this study, we analysed the virulence factors, antibiotic resistance and phylogenetic groups among various UPEC isolates from children with UTIs. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that majority of the strains responsible for UTIs belonged to the phylogenetic groups B2 and D. Of the 58 E. coli isolates, 79·31% belonged to group B2, 15·51% to group D, 3·44% to group A and 1·72% to B1. Simultaneously, the number of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance exhibited were also significantly high in groups B2 and D compared to other groups. Among the isolates, 44·8% were multidrug resistant and of that 73% belonged to the phylogenetic group B2, indicating the compatibility of antibiotic resistance and certain strains carrying virulence factor genes. The antibiotic resistance profiling of UPEC strains elucidates that the antimicrobial agents such as chloramphenicol, cefoxitin, cefepime, ceftazidime might still be used in the therapy for treating UTIs. As the antibiotic resistance pattern of uropathogenic Escherichia coli varies depending on different geographical regions, the antibiotic resistance pattern from this study will help the physicians to effectively administer antibiotic therapy for urinary tract infections. In addition, the frequency of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes among various phylogenic groups could be effectively used to draw new targets for uropathogenic Escherichia coli antibiotic-independent therapies. The study emphasizes need of public awareness on multidrug resistance and for more prudent use of antimicrobials. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of the N8 neuraminidase gene of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Kawaoka, Y; Webster, R G

    1993-04-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the N8 neuraminidase (NA) genes from 18 influenza A viruses, representing equine and avian hosts in different geographic locations, revealed three major lineages: (i) currently circulating equine 2 viruses; (ii) avian viruses isolated in the Eurasian region, including A/Equine/Jilin/1/89, a recent avian-like N8 isolate found in horses in China; and (iii) avian viruses isolated in North America. Comparison of mutation rates indicated that avian N8 genes have evolved more slowly than their equine counterparts. That is, in both avian lineages, 72% of the nucleotide changes were silent in the terminal branches of the phylogenetic tree, whereas in equine 2 viruses, 59% of the nucleotide changes were silent. This suggests greater selective pressure on the NA gene from the mammalian immune system, leading to progressive evolution. Alternatively, the slower mutation rate for avian N8 genes could reflect a selective advantage gained from a longer, continuous span of evolution. The shape of the phylogenetic tree, the evolutionary rate, and the calculated date of origin for the N8 equine 2 virus lineage were comparable to findings for the equine 2 virus hemagglutinin (HA) gene (Bean et al., J. Virol. 66, 1129-1138, 1992). This suggests that both viral membrane glycoproteins of equine 2 viruses have evolved together and have been subjected to similar levels of selective pressure. Several amino acid residues were found to differ among the three host-specific lineages, but they may not be involved in host restriction of the NA, as they are shared by EQ/Jilin/1/89 and viruses of avian origin. The present findings complement detailed structural information on the N2 and N9 subtypes and should prove valuable in understanding future X-ray diffraction studies of N8 crystals.

  10. Genetic Variability and Phylogenetic Relationships within Trypanosoma cruzi I Isolated in Colombia Based on Miniexon Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Claudia; Guhl, Felipe; Falla, Alejandra; Fajardo, Anabella; Montilla, Marleny; Adolfo Vallejo, Gustavo; Bargues, M. Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic studies of Trypanosoma cruzi have identified the existence of two groups: T. cruzi I and T. cruzi II. There are aspects that still remain unknown about the genetic variability within the T. cruzi I group. Given its epidemiological importance, it is necessary to have a better understanding of T. cruzi transmission cycles. Our purpose was to corroborate the existence of haplotypes within the T. cruzi I group and to describe the genetic variability and phylogenetic relationships, based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the miniexon gene intergenic region, for the isolates from different hosts and epidemiological transmission cycles in Colombian regions. 31 T. cruzi isolates were molecularly characterized. Phylogenetic relationships within T. cruzi I isolates showed four haplotype groups (Ia–Id), associated with their transmission cycle. In previous studies, we reported that haplotype Ia is mainly associated with the domestic cycle and domiciliated Rhodnius prolixus. Haplotype Ib is associated with the domestic cycle and peridomestic cycle, haplotype Ic is closely related with the peridomestic cycle, and haplotype Id is strongly associated with the sylvatic cycle. The phylogenetic methodologies applied in this study are tools that bolster the associations among isolates and thus shed light on Chagas disease epidemiology. PMID:20798881

  11. Phylogenetic analysis and rapid identification of Candida dubliniensis based on analysis of ACT1 intron and exon sequences.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, S M; Sullivan, D J; Shanley, D B; Coleman, D C

    1999-08-01

    The phylogenetic position of Candida dubliniensis has previously been established on the basis of the sequence of rRNA genes. In order to confirm the relationship between C. dubliniensis and other yeast species, particularly Candida albicans, using non-rRNA gene sequences the ACT1 gene was chosen for analysis. Three overlapping fragments that together span the entire C. dubliniensis ACT1 gene (CdACT1) were amplified from a recombinant phage isolated from a genomic DNA lambda library using PCR. These were cloned and used to determine the contiguous sequence of the gene. Analysis of the sequence data revealed the presence of a 1131 bp ORF interrupted by a single 632 bp intron at the 5' extremity of the gene. Comparison of the CdACT1 sequence with the C. albicans homologue (CaACT1) revealed that although the exons are 97.9% identical the introns are only 83.4% identical. Phylogenetic trees generated using ACT1 exon and intron sequences from a range of yeast species unequivocally confirmed the phylogenetic position of C. dubliniensis as a unique taxon within the genus Candida. Analysis of the ACT1-associated intron sequences from 10 epidemiologically unrelated C. dubliniensis isolates from disparate geographical locations showed a very low level of intraspecies sequence variation. In order to develop an accurate and rapid method to identify C. dubliniensis from primary isolation plates the significant divergence between the C. dubliniensis and C. albicans ACT1 intron sequences was exploited by designing C. dubliniensis-specific PCR primers. Using a rapid boiling method to produce template DNA directly from colonies from primary isolation plates in 10 min, these primers were used in a blind test with 122 isolates of C. dubliniensis, 53 isolates of C. albicans, 10 isolates of C. stellatoidea and representative isolates of other clinically relevant Candida and other yeast species. Only the C. dubliniensis isolates yielded the C. dubliniensis-specific 288 bp amplimer. Use

  12. Lack of premating isolation at the base of a phylogenetic tree.

    PubMed

    Grant, B Rosemary; Grant, Peter R

    2002-07-01

    Darwin's finches in the Galápagos archipelago are an unusual example of adaptive radiation in that the basal split separates two lineages of warbler finches (Certhidea olivacea and Certhidea fusca) believed until recently to be only one species. The large genetic difference between them contrasts with their similarity in plumage, size, shape, and courtship behavior. They differ in song, which is a key factor in premating isolation of other sympatric Darwin's finches. We conducted playback experiments to see whether members of the population of C. olivacea on Santa Cruz Island would respond to songs of C. fusca from two islands, Genovesa and Pinta, and songs of C. olivacea from another island (Isabela). Another set of experiments was performed, using the same playback tapes, with C. fusca on Genovesa. Some members of both populations responded to all playbacks; therefore, the hypothesis of complete premating isolation on the basis of song is rejected. Discrimination between songs of the two lineages was inconsistent. We conclude that premating barriers to interbreeding among the tested populations have not arisen in the 1.5-2.0 m.yr. of their geographical isolation on different islands. This contrasts with strong premating barriers between more recently derived sympatric species. Early learning of song associated with morphology is later used in mate recognition. This explains why sympatric species that are vocally and morphologically distinct yet genetically less differentiated than Certhidea do not interbreed, whereas the Certhidea lineages that are genetically well differentiated but vocally and morphologically similar have no apparent premating barrier. We discuss this unusual situation in terms of the forces that have produced similarities and differences in song, morphology, and ecology and their relevance to phylogenetic and biological species concepts. Neither principles nor details are unique to Darwin's finches, and we conclude by pointing out strong

  13. Halotia gen. nov., a phylogenetically and physiologically coherent cyanobacterial genus isolated from marine coastal environments.

    PubMed

    Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Vaz, Marcelo Gomes Marçal Vieira; Hentschke, Guilherme Scotta; Sant'Anna, Célia Leite; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2015-02-01

    Nostoc is a common and well-studied genus of cyanobacteria and, according to molecular phylogeny, is a polyphyletic group. Therefore, revisions of this genus are urged in an attempt to clarify its taxonomy. Novel strains isolated from underexplored environments and assigned morphologically to the genus Nostoc are not genetically related to the 'true Nostoc' group. In this study, four strains isolated from biofilms collected in Antarctica and five strains originated from Brazilian mangroves were evaluated. Despite their morphological similarities to other morphotypes of Nostoc, these nine strains differed from other morphotypes in ecological, physiological and genetic aspects. Based on the phylogeny of the 16S rRNA gene, the Antarctic sequences were grouped together with the sequences of the Brazilian mangrove isolates and Nostoc sp. Mollenhauer 1 : 1-067 in a well-supported cluster (74 % bootstrap value, maximum-likelihood). This novel cluster was separated phylogenetically from the 'true Nostoc' clade and from the clades of the morphologically similar genera Mojavia and Desmonostoc. The 16S rRNA gene sequences generated in this study exhibited 96 % similarity to sequences from the nostocacean genera mentioned above. Physiologically, these nine strains showed the capacity to grow in a salinity range of 1-10 % NaCl, indicating their tolerance of saline conditions. These results provide support for the description of a new genus, named Halotia gen. nov., which is related morphologically to the genera Nostoc, Mojavia and Desmonostoc. Within this new genus, three novel species were recognized and described based on morphology and internal transcribed spacer secondary structures: Halotia branconii sp. nov., Halotia longispora sp. nov. and Halotia wernerae sp. nov., under the provisions of the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants.

  14. [Cloning, expression and phylogenetic analysis of Schistosoma japonicum calcyphosine gene].

    PubMed

    Ju, Chuan; Peng, Jian-xin; Xu, Bin; Wang, Wei; Feng, Zheng; Hu, Wei

    2006-10-01

    To clone and express Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) calcyphosine gene, and purify the expressed protein. The encoding sequence selected from Sj cDNA library was amplified by PCR. After subcloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a, the expressed protein was purified with His -Tag affinity chromatography. Western blotting was used to detect the immunogenicity. The structure and functions of the protein were analyzed by bioinformatics method, and the phylogenetic tree of the protein was drawn. The recombinant protein was specifically recognized by the Sj infected rabbit serum. The bioinformatics analysis showed 4 EF-hand domains. Besides, it was predicted that Sj calcyphosine contains two phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C, eight phosphorylation sites for casein kinase II and one N-myristoylation site. The Sj calcyphosine belonged to type-II calcyphosine. The calcyphosine gene is a calcium-binding protein and might be a potential candidate for diagnosis, vaccine or drug target.

  15. Phylogenetic and Structural Analysis of Polyketide Synthases in Aspergilli

    PubMed Central

    Bhetariya, Preetida J.; Prajapati, Madhvi; Bhaduri, Asani; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Varma, Anupam; Madan, Taruna; Singh, Yogendra; Sarma, P. Usha

    2016-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) of Aspergillus species are multidomain and multifunctional megaenzymes that play an important role in the synthesis of diverse polyketide compounds. Putative PKS protein sequences from Aspergillus species representing medically, agriculturally, and industrially important Aspergillus species were chosen and screened for in silico studies. Six candidate Aspergillus species, Aspergillus fumigatus Af293, Aspergillus flavus NRRL3357, Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88, Aspergillus terreus NIH2624, Aspergillus oryzae RIB40, and Aspergillus clavatus NRRL1, were selected to study the PKS phylogeny. Full-length PKS proteins and only ketosynthase (KS) domain sequence were retrieved for independent phylogenetic analysis from the aforementioned species, and phylogenetic analysis was performed with characterized fungal PKS. This resulted into grouping of Aspergilli PKSs into nonreducing (NR), partially reducing (PR), and highly reducing (HR) PKS enzymes. Eight distinct clades with unique domain arrangements were classified based on homology with functionally characterized PKS enzymes. Conserved motif signatures corresponding to each type of PKS were observed. Three proteins from Protein Data Bank corresponding to NR, PR, and HR type of PKS (XP_002384329.1, XP_753141.2, and XP_001402408.2, respectively) were selected for mapping of conserved motifs on three-dimensional structures of KS domain. Structural variations were found at the active sites on modeled NR, PR, and HR enzymes of Aspergillus. It was observed that the number of iteration cycles was dependent on the size of the cavity in the active site of the PKS enzyme correlating with a type with reducing or NR products, such as pigment, 6MSA, and lovastatin. The current study reports the grouping and classification of PKS proteins of Aspergilli for possible exploration of novel polyketides based on sequence homology; this information can be useful for selection of PKS for polyketide exploration and

  16. Distribution and Phylogenetic Analysis of Family 19 Chitinases in Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Tomokazu; Saito, Akihiro; Sato, Toshiya; Kanai, Ryo; Fujii, Takeshi; Nikaidou, Naoki; Miyashita, Kiyotaka; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    In organisms other than higher plants, family 19 chitinase was first discovered in Streptomyces griseus HUT6037, and later, the general occurrence of this enzyme in Streptomyces species was demonstrated. In the present study, the distribution of family 19 chitinases in the class Actinobacteria and the phylogenetic relationship of Actinobacteria family 19 chitinases with family 19 chitinases of other organisms were investigated. Forty-nine strains were chosen to cover almost all the suborders of the class Actinobacteria, and chitinase production was examined. Of the 49 strains, 22 formed cleared zones on agar plates containing colloidal chitin and thus appeared to produce chitinases. These 22 chitinase-positive strains were subjected to Southern hybridization analysis by using a labeled DNA fragment corresponding to the catalytic domain of ChiC, and the presence of genes similar to chiC of S. griseus HUT6037 in at least 13 strains was suggested by the results. PCR amplification and sequencing of the DNA fragments corresponding to the major part of the catalytic domains of the family 19 chitinase genes confirmed the presence of family 19 chitinase genes in these 13 strains. The strains possessing family 19 chitinase genes belong to 6 of the 10 suborders in the order Actinomycetales, which account for the greatest part of the Actinobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that there is a close evolutionary relationship between family 19 chitinases found in Actinobacteria and plant class IV chitinases. The general occurrence of family 19 chitinase genes in Streptomycineae and the high sequence similarity among the genes found in Actinobacteria suggest that the family 19 chitinase gene was first acquired by an ancestor of the Streptomycineae and spread among the Actinobacteria through horizontal gene transfer. PMID:14766598

  17. Biodegradation of geosmin by a novel Gram-negative bacterium; isolation, phylogenetic characterisation and degradation rate determination.

    PubMed

    Hoefel, Daniel; Ho, Lionel; Monis, Paul T; Newcombe, Gayle; Saint, Christopher P

    2009-06-01

    Biologically active sand filters within water treatment plants (WTPs) are now recognised as an effective barrier for the removal of geosmin. However, little is known regarding the actual microbiological processes occurring or the bacteria capable of degrading geosmin. This study reports the enrichment and isolation of a Gram-negative bacterium, Geo48, from the biofilm of a WTP sand filter where the isolate was shown to effectively degrade geosmin individually. Experiments revealed that Geo48 degraded geosmin in a planktonic state by a pseudo-first-order mechanism. Initial geosmin concentrations ranging from 100 to 1000ng/l were shown to directly influence geosmin degradation in reservoir water by Geo48, with rate constants increasing from 0.010h(-1) (R(2)=0.93) to 0.029h(-1) (R(2)=0.97) respectively. Water temperature also influenced degradation of geosmin by Geo48 where temperatures of 11, 22 and 30 degrees C resulted in rate constants of 0.017h(-1) (R(2)=0.98), 0.023h(-1) (R(2)=0.91) and 0.019h(-1) (R(2)=0.85) respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using the 16S rRNA gene of Geo48 revealed it was a member of the Alphaproteobacteria and clustered with 99% bootstrap support with an isolate designated Geo24, a Sphingopyxis sp. previously described as degrading geosmin but only as a member of a bacterial consortium. Of the previously described bacteria, Geo48 was most similar to Sphingopyxis alaskensis (97.2% sequence similarity to a 1454bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene). To date, this is the only study to report the isolation and characterisation of a Gram-negative bacterium from a biologically active sand filter capable of the sole degradation of geosmin.

  18. Phylogenetic relationships and pathogenicity variation of two Newcastle disease viruses isolated from domestic ducks in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yinfeng; Li, Yanling; Yuan, Runyu; Li, Xianwei; Sun, Minhua; Wang, Zhaoxiong; Feng, Minsha; Jiao, Peirong; Ren, Tao

    2014-08-12

    Newcastle disease (ND) is an OIE listed disease caused by virulent avian paramyxovirus type 1 (APMV-1) strains, which is enzootic and causes large economic losses in the poultry sector. Genotype VII and genotype IX NDV viruses were the predominant circulating genotype in China, which may possibly be responsible for disease outbreaks in chicken flocks in recent years. While ducks and geese usually have exhibited inapparent infections. In the present study, we investigate the complete genome sequence, the clinicopathological characterization and transmission of two virulent Newcastle disease viruses, SS-10 and NH-10, isolated from domestic ducks in Southern China in 2010. F, and the complete gene sequences based on phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that SS-10 (genotype VII) and NH-10 (genotype IX) belongs to class II. The deduced amino acid sequence was (112)R-R-Q-K/R-R-F(117) at the fusion protein cleavage site. Animal experiment results showed that the SS-10 virus isolated from ducks was highly pathogenic for chickens and geese, but low pathogenic for ducks. It could be detected from spleen, lung, kidney, trachea, small intestine, bursa of fabricius, thymus, pancreas and cecal tonsils, oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs, and could transmit to the naive contact birds. Moreover, it could transmit to chickens, ducks and geese by naive contact. However, the NH-10 virus isolated from ducks could infect some chickens, ducks and geese, but only caused chickens to die. Additionally, it could transmit to the naive contact chickens, ducks, and geese. The two NDV isolates exhibited different biological properties with respect to pathogenicity and transmission in chickens, ducks and geese. Therefore, no species-preference exists for chicken, duck or goose viruses and more attention should be paid to the trans-species transmission of VII NDVs between ducks, geese and chickens for the control and eradication of ND.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis, homology modelling, molecular dynamics and docking studies of caffeoyl-CoA-O- methyl transferase (CCoAOMT 1 and 2) isoforms isolated from subabul (Leucaena leucocephala).

    PubMed

    Sekhar Pagadala, Nataraj; Arha, Manish; Reddy, P S; Kumar, Ranadheer; Sirisha, V L; Prashant, S; Janardhan Reddy, K; Khan, Bashir; Rawal, S K; Kavi Kishor, P B

    2009-02-01

    Caffeoyl coenzyme A O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) is an important enzyme that participates in lignin biosynthesis especially in the formation of cell wall ferulic esters of plants. It plays a pivotal role in the methylation of the 3-hydroxyl group of caffeoyl CoA. Two cDNA clones that code CCoAOMT were isolated earlier from subabul and in the present study; 3D models of CCoAOMT1 and CCoAOMT2 enzymes were built using the MODELLER7v7 software to find out the substrate binding sites. These two proteins differed only in two amino acids and may have little or no functional redundancy. Refined models of the proteins were obtained after energy minimization and molecular dynamics in a solvated water layer. The models were further assessed by PROCHECK, WHATCHECK, Verify_3D and ERRAT programs and the results indicated that these models are reliable for further active site and docking analysis. The refined models showed that the two proteins have 9 and 10 alpha-helices, 6 and 7 beta-sheets respectively. The models were used for docking the substrates CoA, SAM, SAH, caffeoyl CoA, feruloyl CoA, 5-hydroxy feruloyl CoA and sinapyl CoA which showed that CoA and caffeoyl CoA are binding with high affinity with the enzymes in the presence and absence of SAM. It appears therefore that caffeoyl CoA is the substrate for both the isoenzymes. The results also indicated that CoA and caffeoyl CoA are binding with higher affinity to CCoAOMT2 than CCoAOMT1. Therefore, CCoAOMT2 conformation is thought to be the active form that exists in subabul. Docking studies indicated that conserved active site residues Met58, Thr60, Val63, Glu82, Gly84, Ser90, Asp160, Asp162, Thr169, Asn191 and Arg203 in CCoAOMT1 and CCoAOMT2 enzymes create the positive charge to balance the negatively charged caffeoyl CoA and play an important role in maintaining a functional conformation and are directly involved in donor-substrate binding.

  20. Phylogenetic typing and detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases in Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Ramezan Ali; Motamedi, Hossein; Maleki, Elham; Ghanbarpour, Reza; Mayahi, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to reveal the phylogenetic background, to detect the genes encoding TEM, SHV and CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL), and to analyze their distribution in phylo-groups of 150 Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens in Ahvaz (Southwest of Iran). Seventy- five cloacal swabs from healthy birds (fecal isolates), and 75 heart blood samples from birds with colibacillosis (septicemic isolates) were obtained. All isolates were phylotyped and screened for ESBL genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The fecal isolates belonged to four main phylo-groups, including 41 isolates (54.67%) to A, 9 (12.00%) to B1, 5 (6.67%) to B2, and 20 (26.67%) to D. Of septicemic isolates, 37 isolates (49.33%) were classified as phylotype A, 5 (6.67%) as B1, 10 (13.33%) as B2, and 23 (30.67%) as D. In molecular analysis, a total of 72 isolates (35 fecal and 37 septicemic) were identified to harbor ESBL genes, which were distributed in phylo-groups A, B1, B2, and D. Regardless of the type of isolate, blaCTX-M-15 gene was the most common genotype, followed by blaTEM and blaSHV genes. This study suggests that broiler chickens in Iran are infected to ESBL genes- harboring Escherichia coli strains which may be spread to the food chain through fecal contamination of carcasses during slaughtering. PMID:27872719

  1. Phylogenetic Relationships of Xylella fastidiosa Strains Isolated from Landscape Ornamentals in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Martinez, Rufina; de la Cerda, Karla A; Costa, Heather S; Cooksey, Donald A; Wong, Francis P

    2007-07-01

    ABSTRACT Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne, xylem-limited pathogenic bacterium that has been associated with a rise in incidence of diseased landscape ornamentals in southern California. The objective of this study was to genetically characterize strains isolated from ornamental hosts to understand their distribution and identity. Strains of X. fastidiosa isolated from ornamentals were characterized using a multiprimer polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR, and sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (ISR). Based on RAPD-PCR and 16S-23S rDNA ISR, strains isolated from daylily, jacaranda, and magnolia clustered with members of X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi and caused oleander leaf scorch but not Pierce's disease symptoms in glasshouse assays on oleander and grape, respectively. This demonstrated both that our groupings based on genetic characterization were valid and that strains of X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi are present in hosts other than oleander. Strains isolated from Spanish broom, cherry, and one strain isolated from western redbud clustered with X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa members. Strains isolated from purple-leafed plum, olive, peach, plum, sweetgum, maidenhair tree, crape myrtle, and another western redbud strain clustered with members of X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex. All strains isolated from mulberry and one from heavenly bamboo formed a separate cluster that has not yet been defined as a subspecies.

  2. Analysis of Iranian Potato virus S isolates.

    PubMed

    Salari, Khadijeh; Massumi, Hossein; Heydarnejad, Jahangir; Hosseini Pour, Akbar; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-10-01

    Two hundred forty potato samples with one or more symptoms of leaf mosaic, distortion, mottling and yellowing were collected between 2005 and 2008 from seven Iranian provinces. Forty-four of these samples tested positive with double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (DAS-ELISA) using a Potato virus S (PVS) polyclonal antibody. Of these 12 isolates of PVS were selected based on the geographical location for biological and molecular characterization. The full coat protein (CP) and 11K genes from 12 PVS isolates were PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced. All 12 PVS isolates showed mosaic symptoms on Nicotiana debneyii and N. tabacum cv. Whiteburly and local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor, C. quinoa and C. album. The Iranian isolates share between 93 and 100% pairwise nucleotide identity with other PVS(O) isolates. Based on maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis coupled with pairwise identity analysis, we propose 15 genotypes for the PVS(O) strain and 3 genotypes for the PVS(A) strain.

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of Fusarium solani Associated with the Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis

    PubMed Central

    Geib, Scott M.; Scully, Erin D.; Jimenez-Gasco, Maria del Mar; Carlson, John E.; Tien, Ming; Hoover, Kelli

    2012-01-01

    Culture-independent analysis of the gut of a wood-boring insect, Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), revealed a consistent association between members of the fungal Fusarium solani species complex and the larval stage of both colony-derived and wild A. glabripennis populations. Using the translation elongation factor 1-alpha region for culture-independent phylogenetic and operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses, only two OTUs were detected, suggesting that genetic variance at this locus was low among A. glabripennis-associated isolates. To better survey the genetic variation of F. solani associated with A. glabripennis, and establish its phylogenetic relationship with other members of the F. solani species complex, single spore isolates were created from different populations and multi-locus phylogenetic analysis was performed using a combination of the translation elongation factor alpha-1, internal transcribed spacer, and large subunit rDNA regions. These analyses revealed that colony-derived larvae reared in three different tree species or on artificial diet, as well as larvae from wild populations collected from three additional tree species in New York City and from a single tree species in Worcester, MA, consistently harbored F. solani within their guts. While there is some genetic variation in the F. solani carried between populations, within-population variation is low. We speculate that F. solani is able to fill a broad niche in the A. glabripennis gut, providing it with fungal lignocellulases to allow the larvae to grow and develop on woody tissue. However, it is likely that many F. solani genotypes could potentially fill this niche, so the relationship may not be limited to a single member of the F. solani species complex. While little is known about the role of filamentous fungi and their symbiotic associations with insects, this report suggests that larval A. glabripennis has developed an intimate relationship with F. solani

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis of Fusarium solani Associated with the Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis.

    PubMed

    Geib, Scott M; Scully, Erin D; Jimenez-Gasco, Maria Del Mar; Carlson, John E; Tien, Ming; Hoover, Kelli

    2012-02-10

    Culture-independent analysis of the gut of a wood-boring insect, Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), revealed a consistent association between members of the fungal Fusarium solani species complex and the larval stage of both colony-derived and wild A. glabripennis populations. Using the translation elongation factor 1-alpha region for culture-independent phylogenetic and operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses, only two OTUs were detected, suggesting that genetic variance at this locus was low among A. glabripennis-associated isolates. To better survey the genetic variation of F. solani associated with A. glabripennis, and establish its phylogenetic relationship with other members of the F. solani species complex, single spore isolates were created from different populations and multi-locus phylogenetic analysis was performed using a combination of the translation elongation factor alpha-1, internal transcribed spacer, and large subunit rDNA regions. These analyses revealed that colony-derived larvae reared in three different tree species or on artificial diet, as well as larvae from wild populations collected from three additional tree species in New York City and from a single tree species in Worcester, MA, consistently harbored F. solani within their guts. While there is some genetic variation in the F. solani carried between populations, within-population variation is low. We speculate that F. solani is able to fill a broad niche in the A. glabripennis gut, providing it with fungal lignocellulases to allow the larvae to grow and develop on woody tissue. However, it is likely that many F. solani genotypes could potentially fill this niche, so the relationship may not be limited to a single member of the F. solani species complex. While little is known about the role of filamentous fungi and their symbiotic associations with insects, this report suggests that larval A. glabripennis has developed an intimate relationship with F. solani

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane β-Barrel Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Jąkalski, Marcin; Pieńkowska, Joanna R.; Stobienia, Olgierd; Karachitos, Andonis; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Weiner, January; Kmita, Hanna; Makałowski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Transport of molecules across mitochondrial outer membrane is pivotal for a proper function of mitochondria. The transport pathways across the membrane are formed by ion channels that participate in metabolite exchange between mitochondria and cytoplasm (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel, VDAC) as well as in import of proteins encoded by nuclear genes (Tom40 and Sam50/Tob55). VDAC, Tom40, and Sam50/Tob55 are present in all eukaryotic organisms, encoded in the nuclear genome, and have β-barrel topology. We have compiled data sets of these protein sequences and studied their phylogenetic relationships with a special focus on the position of Amoebozoa. Additionally, we identified these protein-coding genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii and Dictyostelium discoideum to complement our data set and verify the phylogenetic position of these model organisms. Our analysis show that mitochondrial β-barrel channels from Archaeplastida (plants) and Opisthokonta (animals and fungi) experienced many duplication events that resulted in multiple paralogous isoforms and form well-defined monophyletic clades that match the current model of eukaryotic evolution. However, in representatives of Amoebozoa, Chromalveolata, and Excavata (former Protista), they do not form clearly distinguishable clades, although they locate basally to the plant and algae branches. In most cases, they do not posses paralogs and their sequences appear to have evolved quickly or degenerated. Consequently, the obtained phylogenies of mitochondrial outer membrane β-channels do not entirely reflect the recent eukaryotic classification system involving the six supergroups: Chromalveolata, Excavata, Archaeplastida, Rhizaria, Amoebozoa, and Opisthokonta. PMID:22155732

  6. [Study on virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and phylogenetic groupings in Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients with cystitis].

    PubMed

    Tiba, Monique Ribeiro; Nogueira, Gustavo Prado; Leite, Domingos da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli samples isolated from female patients with cystitis were characterized with regard to the presence of virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and phylogenetic groupings. Polymerase chain reaction results demonstrated that all the samples were positive for the gene fimH (type 1 fimbriae), 91 for fliC (flagellins), 50 for papC (P fimbriae), 44 for kpsMTII (capsules) and 36 for flu (antigen 43). The results from assays to quantify the biofilm formation demonstrated that 44 samples produced biofilm on polystyrene microplates and 56 samples produced weak or no biofilm. We also confirmed that Escherichia coli samples were present in phylogenetic groups B2 and D.

  7. Virulence Profiles, Phylogenetic Background, and Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Isolated from Turkeys with Airsacculitis

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; de Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Xavier; de Oliveira, Mirela Caroline Vilela; da Silva, Ketrin Cristina; Gomes, Cleise Ribeiro; Moreno, Andrea Micke; Knöbl, Terezinha

    2014-01-01

    Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) has been studied for decades because of its economic impact on the poultry industry. Recently, the zoonotic potential of APEC and multidrug-resistant strains have emerged. The aim of this study was to characterize 225 APEC isolated from turkeys presenting airsacculitis. The results showed that 92% of strains presented a multidrug-resistance (MDR), and the highest levels of resistance were to sulfamethazine (94%) and tetracycline (83%). Half of these strains were classified in phylogenetic group B2, followed by B1 (28.6%), A (17.1%), and D (4.8%). The prevalence of virulence genes was as follows: salmochelin (iroN, 95%), increased serum survival (iss, 93%), colicin V (cvi/cva, 67%), aerobactin (iucD, 67%), temperature-sensitive haemagglutinin (tsh, 56%), iron-repressible protein (irp2, 51%), invasion brain endothelium (ibeA, 31%), vacuolating autotransporter toxin (vat, 24%), K1 antigen (neuS, 19%), enteroaggregative heat-stable cytotoxin (astA, 17%), and pilus associated with pyelonephritis (papC, 15%). These results demonstrate that the majority of the investigated strains belonged to group B2 and were MDR. These data suggest that turkeys may serve as a reservoir of pathogenic and multidrug-resistance strains, reinforcing the idea that poultry plays a role in the epidemiological chain of ExPEC. PMID:25105155

  8. Phylogenetic history of Phytophthora cryptogea and P. drechsleri isolates from floriculture crops in North Carolina greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Olson, H A; Carbone, I; Benson, D M

    2011-11-01

    The evolutionary history of Phytophthora cryptogea and P. drechsleri isolates previously collected from floriculture crops in North Carolina commercial greenhouses was explored with coalescent- and parsimony-based analyses. Initially, 68 isolates representing 13 location-host groups were sequenced at multiple loci. Sequences of all isolates within a group were identical. A subset of isolates were selected, cloned to resolve heterozygous sites, and analyzed with SNAP Workbench. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA and cytochrome oxidase II gene genealogies were congruent and indicated that P. cryptogea and P. drechsleri are sister species diverged from a common ancestor with no evidence of gene flow. In contrast, genealogies inferred from β-tubulin (β-tub) and translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) genes were in conflict with these loci. Coalescent analysis based on a nonrecombining partition in β-tub and EF-1α showed an initial (older) split between P. cryptogea and P. drechsleri, with a later (recent) event separating the remaining P. cryptogea haplotypes from P. drechsleri. A parsimony-based minimal ancestral recombination graph inferred recombination between P. cryptogea and P. drechsleri isolates in the ITS region and β-tub, suggesting genetic exchange between species. Also, putative recombination between A1 and A2 mating types of P. cryptogea suggests that sexual reproduction has occurred in the history of these P. cryptogea isolates.

  9. BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYLOGENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF TWO NOVEL DEEP-SEA THERMOCOCCUS ISOLATES WITH POTENTIALLY BIOTECHNOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The partial 16S rDNA gene sequences of two thermophilic archaeal strains, TY and TYS, previously isolated from the Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent site were determined. Lipid analyses and a comparative analysis performed with 16S rDNA sequences of similar thermophilic species sho...

  10. BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYLOGENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF TWO NOVEL DEEP-SEA THERMOCOCCUS ISOLATES WITH POTENTIALLY BIOTECHNOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The partial 16S rDNA gene sequences of two thermophilic archaeal strains, TY and TYS, previously isolated from the Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent site were determined. Lipid analyses and a comparative analysis performed with 16S rDNA sequences of similar thermophilic species sho...

  11. Fungistatic intensity of agricultural soil against fungal agents and phylogenetic analysis on the actinobacteria involved.

    PubMed

    Fang, Li Zhi; Kun, Xu Chuan; Song, Zou Chang; Qin, Xi Jia; Qiu, He Yue; Qun, Duan Chang; He, Mo Ming

    2011-04-01

    A total of 287 agricultural soil samples collected from 26 provinces or autonomous regions of China were tested on their ability to suppress the conidial germination of nine biocontrol fungal agents. These soil samples showed great differences in the degree to inhibit the germination of conidia (22.8% < mean inhibition rate < 97.5%), but all exhibited fungistatic activities above the moderate levels (mean inhibition rate > 50%) to most of tested fungi. Ten soil samples that have stronger fungistatic intensity (germination inhibition rate > 68.3%) to the target fungi, Trichoderma viride and Paecilomyces lilacinus, were selected to evaluate their soil actinobacteria involved fungistasis in soil. Of the 1,000 isolates from those soil samples, 345 actinobacteria exhibited fungistatic activity to conidial germination of T. viride and P. lilacinus with germination inhibition rates higher than 10%. Sequences encoding 16S rRNA gene of the 345 actinobacteria were analyzed by ARDRA and resulted 44 different ARDRA types. Fifty-six isolates, at least one from each unique ARDRA type, were selected for 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Results indicated that the actinobacteria involved in the soil fungistasis had close phylogenetic relationship with the members of Sterptomycetaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Micrococcaceae, and Nocardiacea.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of actinobacterial populations associated with Antarctic Dry Valley mineral soils.

    PubMed

    Babalola, Olubukola O; Kirby, Bronwyn M; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Cook, Andrew E; Cary, S Craig; Burton, Stephanie G; Cowan, Don A

    2009-03-01

    Despite the apparent severity of the environmental conditions in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Eastern Antarctica, recent phylogenetic studies conducted on mineral soil samples have revealed the presence of a wide diversity of microorganisms, with actinobacteria representing one of the largest phylotypic groups. Previous metagenomic studies have shown that the majority of Antarctic actinobacterial populations are classified as 'uncultured'. In this study, we assessed the diversity of actinobacteria in Antarctic cold desert soils by complementing traditional culture-based techniques with a metagenomic study. Phylogenetic analysis of clones generated with actinobacterium- and streptomycete-specific PCR primers revealed that the majority of the phylotypes were most closely related to uncultured Pseudonocardia and Nocardioides species. Phylotypes most closely related to a number of rarer actinobacteria genera, including Geodermatophilus, Modestobacter and Sporichthya, were also identified. While complementary culture-dependent studies isolated a number of Nocardia and Pseudonocardia species, the majority of the cultured isolates (> 80%) were Streptomyces species--although phylotypes affiliated to the genus Streptomyces were detected at a low frequency in the metagenomic study. This study confirms that Antarctic Dry Valley desert soil harbours highly diverse actinobacterial communities and suggests that many of the phylotypes identified may represent novel, uncultured species.

  13. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis of Bovine Non-aureus Staphylococci Species Based on Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Naushad, Sohail; Barkema, Herman W.; Luby, Christopher; Condas, Larissa A. Z.; Nobrega, Diego B.; Carson, Domonique A.; De Buck, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Non-aureus staphylococci (NAS), a heterogeneous group of a large number of species and subspecies, are the most frequently isolated pathogens from intramammary infections in dairy cattle. Phylogenetic relationships among bovine NAS species are controversial and have mostly been determined based on single-gene trees. Herein, we analyzed phylogeny of bovine NAS species using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 441 distinct isolates. In addition, evolutionary relationships among bovine NAS were estimated from multilocus data of 16S rRNA, hsp60, rpoB, sodA, and tuf genes and sequences from these and numerous other single genes/proteins. All phylogenies were created with FastTree, Maximum-Likelihood, Maximum-Parsimony, and Neighbor-Joining methods. Regardless of methodology, WGS-trees clearly separated bovine NAS species into five monophyletic coherent clades. Furthermore, there were consistent interspecies relationships within clades in all WGS phylogenetic reconstructions. Except for the Maximum-Parsimony tree, multilocus data analysis similarly produced five clades. There were large variations in determining clades and interspecies relationships in single gene/protein trees, under different methods of tree constructions, highlighting limitations of using single genes for determining bovine NAS phylogeny. However, based on WGS data, we established a robust phylogeny of bovine NAS species, unaffected by method or model of evolutionary reconstructions. Therefore, it is now possible to determine associations between phylogeny and many biological traits, such as virulence, antimicrobial resistance, environmental niche, geographical distribution, and host specificity. PMID:28066335

  14. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis of Bovine Non-aureus Staphylococci Species Based on Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Sohail; Barkema, Herman W; Luby, Christopher; Condas, Larissa A Z; Nobrega, Diego B; Carson, Domonique A; De Buck, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Non-aureus staphylococci (NAS), a heterogeneous group of a large number of species and subspecies, are the most frequently isolated pathogens from intramammary infections in dairy cattle. Phylogenetic relationships among bovine NAS species are controversial and have mostly been determined based on single-gene trees. Herein, we analyzed phylogeny of bovine NAS species using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 441 distinct isolates. In addition, evolutionary relationships among bovine NAS were estimated from multilocus data of 16S rRNA, hsp60, rpoB, sodA, and tuf genes and sequences from these and numerous other single genes/proteins. All phylogenies were created with FastTree, Maximum-Likelihood, Maximum-Parsimony, and Neighbor-Joining methods. Regardless of methodology, WGS-trees clearly separated bovine NAS species into five monophyletic coherent clades. Furthermore, there were consistent interspecies relationships within clades in all WGS phylogenetic reconstructions. Except for the Maximum-Parsimony tree, multilocus data analysis similarly produced five clades. There were large variations in determining clades and interspecies relationships in single gene/protein trees, under different methods of tree constructions, highlighting limitations of using single genes for determining bovine NAS phylogeny. However, based on WGS data, we established a robust phylogeny of bovine NAS species, unaffected by method or model of evolutionary reconstructions. Therefore, it is now possible to determine associations between phylogeny and many biological traits, such as virulence, antimicrobial resistance, environmental niche, geographical distribution, and host specificity.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis Tarp and correlation with clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Erika I; Bonner, Christine; Holland, Martin J; Suchland, Robert J; Stamm, Walter E; Jewett, Travis J; McClarty, Grant; Hackstadt, Ted

    2010-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of infectious blindness worldwide and is the most commonly reported pathogen causing sexually transmitted infections. Tarp (translocated actin recruiting phosphoprotein), a type III secreted effector that mediates actin nucleation, is central to C. trachomatis infection. The phylogenetic analysis of tarP from reference strains as well as ocular, genital, and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) clinical isolates demonstrated an evolutionary relationship with disease phenotype, with LGV and ocular isolates branched into clades that were separate from the urogenital isolates. The sequence analysis of Tarp indicated a high degree of variability and identified trends within clinical groupings. Tarps from LGV strains contained the highest number of tyrosine-rich repeat regions (up to nine) and the fewest (two) predicted actin binding domains. The converse was noted for Tarp proteins from ocular isolates that contained up to four actin binding domains and as few as one tyrosine-rich repeat region. The results suggest that Tarp is among the few known genes to play a role in C. trachomatis adaptations to specific niches within the host.

  16. Identification and phylogenetic analysis of contagious ecthyma virus from camels (Camelus dromedarius) in Iran.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Mosadeghhesari, Mahboobe; Zibaee, Saeed; Mohammadi, Ali

    2017-03-24

    Contagious ecthyma is a highly contagious disease affecting domestic and wild ruminants such as sheep, goats and camels. The identification and characterisation of a parapoxvirus (PPV) infecting camels is described here. The virus was detected in dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) from Kerman and Shiraz in Iran. PPV-specific amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) further confirmed that the disease was associated with PPV infection. Phylogenetic analysis of ORF011 (B2L) gene sequences showed 99.79% and 82.13% similarity of the PPV identified in this study with the Jodhpur isolate and the bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) isolates (CE41), respectively. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of the ORF045 gene indicated that the Shiraz sample was in all probability closely related to VR634 and to F00.120R and PCPV776. In conclusion, the results suggest that camel PPV (CPPV) is a likely cause of contagious ecthyma in dromedary camels in Iran.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of Demodex caprae based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Hu, Li; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2013-11-01

    Demodex caprae infests the hair follicles and sebaceous glands of goats worldwide, which not only seriously impairs goat farming, but also causes a big economic loss. However, there are few reports on the DNA level of D. caprae. To reveal the taxonomic position of D. caprae within the genus Demodex, the present study conducted phylogenetic analysis of D. caprae based on mt16S rDNA sequence data. D. caprae adults and eggs were obtained from a skin nodule of the goat suffering demodicidosis. The mt16S rDNA sequences of individual mite were amplified using specific primers, and then cloned, sequenced, and aligned. The sequence divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversion rate were computed, and the phylogenetic trees in Demodex were reconstructed. Results revealed the 339-bp partial sequences of six D. caprae isolates were obtained, and the sequence identity was 100% among isolates. The pairwise divergences between D. caprae and Demodex canis or Demodex folliculorum or Demodex brevis were 22.2-24.0%, 24.0-24.9%, and 22.9-23.2%, respectively. The corresponding average genetic distances were 2.840, 2.926, and 2.665, and the average transition/transversion rates were 0.70, 0.55, and 0.54, respectively. The divergences, genetic distances, and transition/transversion rates of D. caprae versus the other three species all reached interspecies level. The five phylogenetic trees all presented that D. caprae clustered with D. brevis first, and then with D. canis, D. folliculorum, and Demodex injai in sequence. In conclusion, D. caprae is an independent species, and it is closer to D. brevis than to D. canis, D. folliculorum, or D. injai.

  18. Phylogenetic Studies of the Three RNA Silencing Suppressor Genes of South American CTV Isolates Reveal the Circulation of a Novel Genetic Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Benítez-Galeano, María José; Rubio, Leticia; Bertalmío, Ana; Maeso, Diego; Rivas, Fernando; Colina, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) is the most economically important virus of citrus worldwide. Genetic diversity and population structure of CTV isolates from all citrus growing areas from Uruguay were analyzed by RT-PCR and cloning of the three RNA silencing suppressor genes (p25, p20 and p23). Bayesian phylogenetic analysis revealed the circulation of three known genotypes (VT, T3, T36) in the country, and the presence of a new genetic lineage composed by isolates from around the world, mainly from South America. Nucleotide and amino acid identity values for this new genetic lineage were both higher than 97% for the three analyzed regions. Due to incongruent phylogenetic relationships, recombination analysis was performed using Genetic Algorithms for Recombination Detection (GARD) and SimPlot software. Recombination events between previously described CTV isolates were detected. High intra-sample variation was found, confirming the co-existence of different genotypes into the same plant. This is the first report describing: (1) the genetic diversity of Uruguayan CTV isolates circulating in the country and (2) the circulation of a novel CTV genetic lineage, highly present in the South American region. This information may provide assistance to develop an effective cross-protection program. PMID:26205407

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of simian Plasmodium spp. infecting Anopheles balabacensis Baisas in Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chua, Tock H; Manin, Benny O; Daim, Sylvia; Vythilingam, Indra; Drakeley, Chris

    2017-10-02

    Anopheles balabacensis of the Leucospyrus group has been confirmed as the primary knowlesi malaria vector in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo for some time now. Presently, knowlesi malaria is the only zoonotic simian malaria in Malaysia with a high prevalence recorded in the states of Sabah and Sarawak. Anopheles spp. were sampled using human landing catch (HLC) method at Paradason village in Kudat district of Sabah. The collected Anopheles were identified morphologically and then subjected to total DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect Plasmodium parasites in the mosquitoes. Identification of Plasmodium spp. was confirmed by sequencing the SSU rRNA gene with species specific primers. MEGA4 software was then used to analyse the SSU rRNA sequences and bulid the phylogenetic tree for inferring the relationship between simian malaria parasites in Sabah. PCR results showed that only 1.61% (23/1,425) of the screened An. balabacensis were infected with one or two of the five simian Plasmodispp. found in Sabah, vi Plasmodium coatneyi, P. inui, P. fieldi, P. cynomolgi and P. knowlesi. Sequence analysis of SSU rRNA of Plasmodium isolates showed high percentage of identity within the same Plasmodium sp. group. The phylogenetic tree based on the consensus sequences of P. knowlesi showed 99.7%-100.0% nucleotide identity among the isolates from An. balabacensis, human patients and a long-tailed macaque from the same locality. This is the first study showing high molecular identity between the P. knowlesi isolates from An. balabacensis, human patients and a long-tailed macaque in Sabah. The other common simian Plasmodium spp. found in long-tailed macaques and also detected in An. balabacensis were P. coatneyi, P. inui, P. fieldi and P. cynomolgi. The high percentage identity of nucleotide sequences between the P. knowlesi isolates from the long-tailed macaque, An. balabacensis and human patients suggests a close genetic relationship between the parasites from these

  20. Phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis of Iberian lynx populations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W E; Godoy, J A; Palomares, F; Delibes, M; Fernandes, M; Revilla, E; O'Brien, S J

    2004-01-01

    The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus), one of the world's most endangered cat species, is vulnerable due to habitat loss, increased fragmentation of populations, and precipitous demographic reductions. An understanding of Iberian lynx evolutionary history is necessary to develop rational management plans for the species. Our objectives were to assess Iberian lynx genetic diversity at three evolutionary timescales. First we analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation to position the Iberian lynx relative to other species of the genus LYNX: We then assessed the pattern of mtDNA variation of isolated populations across the Iberian Peninsula. Finally we estimated levels of gene flow between two of the most important remaining lynx populations (Doñana National Park and the Sierra Morena Mountains) and characterized the extent of microsatellite locus variation in these populations. Phylogenetic analyses of 1613 bp of mtDNA sequence variation supports the hypothesis that the Iberian lynx, Eurasian lynx, and Canadian lynx diverged within a short time period around 1.53-1.68 million years ago, and that the Iberian lynx and Eurasian lynx are sister taxa. Relative to most other felid species, genetic variation in mtDNA genes and nuclear microsatellites were reduced in Iberian lynx, suggesting that they experienced a fairly severe demographic bottleneck. In addition, the effects of more recent reductions in gene flow and population size are being manifested in local patterns of molecular genetic variation. These data, combined with recent studies modeling the viability of Iberian lynx populations, should provide greater urgency for the development and implementation of rational in situ and ex situ conservation plans.

  1. Phylogenetic Analysis of Low Pathogenicity H5N1 and H7N3 Influenza A Virus Isolates Recovered from Sentinel, Free Flying, Wild Mallards at One Study Site During 2006

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Vivien G.; Dunham, Eleca J.; Jin, Guozhong; Sheng, Zong-Mei; Kaser, Emilee; Nolting, Jacqueline M.; Alexander, H. Lloyd; Slemons, Richard D.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2011-01-01

    From August 2-October 11, 2006, clusters of low pathogenicity (LP) North American lineage H5N1 and H7N3 avian influenza A viruses (AIV), and other subtypes, were recovered from free-flying, resident, wild mallards used as sentinels at one site. The antigenic subtypes, pathogenicity potential, and Sanger sequencing of the isolates determined the H5N1 and H7N3 isolates were only recovered from samples collected on 8/2/2006 and 9/8/2006, respectively. However, subsequent efforts using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and additional Sanger sequencing found partial H7 segments in other HA-NA virus combinations on 8/2/2006, 9/8/2006 and 10/11/2006. It is well established that over larger geographic areas and years AIVs form transient genomic constellations; this sequential sampling data revealed that over a short period of time the dynamics of AIVs can be active and newer sequencing platforms increase recognition of mixed infections. Both findings provide further insight into the natural history of AIVs in natural reservoirs. PMID:21658737

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of the evolution of lactose digestion in adults.

    PubMed

    Holden, C; Mace, R

    1997-10-01

    In most of the world's population the ability to digest lactose declines sharply after infancy. High lactose digestion capacity in adults is common only in populations of European and circum-Mediterranean origin and is thought to be an evolutionary adaptation to millennia of drinking milk from domestic livestock. Milk can also be consumed in a processed form, such as cheese or soured milk, which has a reduced lactose content. Two other selective pressures for drinking fresh milk with a high lactose content have been proposed: promotion of calcium uptake in high-latitude populations prone to vitamin-D deficiency and maintainance of water and electrolytes in the body in highly and environments. These three hypotheses are all supported by the geographic distribution of high lactose digestion capacity in adults. However, the relationships between environmental variables and adult lactose digestion capacity are highly confounded by the shared ancestry of many populations whose lactose digestion capacity has been tested. The three hypotheses for the evolution of high adult lactose digestion capacity are tested here using a comparative method of analysis that takes the problem of phylogenetic confounding into account. This analysis supports the hypothesis that high adult lactose digestion capacity is an adaptation to dairying but does not support the hypotheses that lactose digestion capacity is additionally selected for either at high latitudes or in highly arid environments. Furthermore, methods using maximum likelihood are used to show that the evolution of milking preceded the evolution of high lactose digestion.

  3. Kinetic and phylogenetic analysis of plant polyamine uptake transporters.

    PubMed

    Mulangi, Vaishali; Chibucos, Marcus C; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Morris, Paul F

    2012-10-01

    The rice gene Polyamine Uptake Transporter1 (PUT1) was originally identified based on its homology to the polyamine uptake transporters LmPOT1 and TcPAT12 in Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi, respectively. Here we show that five additional transporters from rice and Arabidopsis that cluster in the same clade as PUT1 all function as high affinity spermidine uptake transporters. Yeast expression assays of these genes confirmed that uptake of spermidine was minimally affected by 166 fold or greater concentrations of amino acids. Characterized polyamine transporters from both Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa along with the two polyamine transporters from L. major and T. cruzi were aligned and used to generate a hidden Markov model. This model was used to identify significant matches to proteins in other angiosperms, bryophytes, chlorophyta, discicristates, excavates, stramenopiles and amoebozoa. No significant matches were identified in fungal or metazoan genomes. Phylogenic analysis showed that some sequences from the haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi, as well as sequences from oomycetes and diatoms clustered closer to sequences from plant genomes than from a homologous sequence in the red algal genome Galdieria sulphuraria, consistent with the hypothesis that these polyamine transporters were acquired by horizontal transfer from green algae. Leishmania and Trypansosoma formed a separate cluster with genes from other Discicristates and two Entamoeba species. We surmise that the genes in Entamoeba species were acquired by phagotrophy of Discicristates. In summary, phylogenetic and functional analysis has identified two clades of genes that are predictive of polyamine transport activity.

  4. Molecular analysis and phylogenetic characterization of HIV in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sarrami-Forooshani, Ramin; Das, Suman Ranjan; Sabahi, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Esmaeili, Rezvan; Wahren, Britta; Mohraz, Minoo; Haji-Abdolbaghi, Mahboubeh; Rasoolinejad, Mehrnaz; Jameel, Shahid; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2006-07-01

    The rate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in Iran has increased dramatically in the last few years. While the earliest cases were found in hemophiliacs, intravenous drug users are now fueling the outbreak. In this study, both the 122 clones of HIV-1 gag p17 and the 131 clones of env V1-V5 region were obtained from 61 HIV-1 seropositives belonging to these two groups in Iran. HIV-1 subtyping and phylogenetic analysis was done by heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA) and multiple clone sequencing. The result indicated all hemophiliacs are infected with HIV-1 subtype B and all intravenous drug users are infected with HIV-1 subtype A. Since intravenous drug abuse is the major transmission route in Iran, HIV-1 subtype A is likely to be the dominant viral subtype circulating in the country. The analysis of genetic distances showed subtype B viruses in Iran to be twice as heterogeneous as the subtype A viruses. In conclusion, this first molecular study of HIV-1 genotypes in Iran suggests two parallel outbreaks in distinct high-risk populations and may offer clues to the origin and spread of infection in Iran.

  5. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of influenza A H7N9 virus.

    PubMed

    Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Dimonte, Slavatore; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Perno, Carlo Federico; Ciotti, Marco; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2014-07-01

    Recently, human infections with the novel avian-origin influenza A H7N9 virus have been reported from various provinces in China. Human infections with avian influenza A viruses are rare and may cause a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms. This is the first time that human infection with a low pathogenic avian influenza A virus has been associated with a fatal outcome. Here, a phylogenetic and positive selective pressure analysis of haemagglutin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), and matrix protein (MP) genes of the novel reassortant H7N9 virus was carried out. The analysis showed that both structural genes of this reassortant virus likely originated from Euro-Asiatic birds, while NA was more likely to have originated from South Korean birds. The Bayesian phylogenetic tree of the MP showed a main clade and an outside cluster including four sequences from China. The United States and Guatemala classical H7N9-isolates appeared homogeneous and clustered together, although they are distinct from other classical Euro-Asiatic and novel H7N9 viruses. Selective pressure analysis did not reveal any site under statistically significant positive selective pressure in any of the three genes analyzed. Unknown certain intermediate hosts involved might be implicated, so extensive global surveillance and bird-to-person transmission should be closely considered in the future.

  6. [Phylogenetic diversity of the culturable rare actinomycetes in marine sponge Hymeniacidon perlevis by improved isolation media].

    PubMed

    Xin, Yanjuan; Wu, Peichun; Deng, Maicun; Zhang, Wei

    2009-07-01

    Based on the molecular diversity information, seven actinomycete-selective culture media and isolation conditions were modified to isolate and cultivate diverse rare actinomycetes from Hymeniacidon perlevis. Modified, selective cultivation and enrichment media were used, with the addition of an elemental solution of simulating the elemental composition of marine sponge H. perlevis. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of 16S rDNA sequence was used to reveal the diversity of culturable rare actinomycetes. A total of 59 actinomycete strains were isolated from the marine sponge H. perlevis. A total of 27 representative actinomycetes were selected according to their morphological feature, color and pigments. They gave 15 different RFLP patterns after digesting their PCR products of 16s rDNA with Hha I. The results showed that these isolates belonged to 10 genera: Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Micromonospora, Cellulosimicrobium, Gordonia, Nocardia, Prauseria, Pseudonocardia , Saccharomonospora and Microbacterium. The modified isolation media and selective cultivation procedures are highly effective in the recovery of culturable actinomycetes from the marine sponge H. perlevis, resulting in the highest diversity of culturable rare actinomycetes from any sponges.

  7. Erosion of phylogenetic signal in tunicate mitochondrial genomes on different levels of analysis.

    PubMed

    Stach, Thomas; Braband, Anke; Podsiadlowski, Lars

    2010-06-01

    The molecular phylogenetic position of Tunicata and internal interrelationship of higher tunicate taxa is controversial. High substitution rates and extreme gene order variability hamper phylogenetic analyses. We describe the sequence and organization of the mitochondrial genome of the aplousobranch ascidian Clavelina lepadiformis and use mitochondrial genomes to investigate phylogenetic information content on different molecular levels of comparison. Despite agreement in phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences, split analyses revealed little phylogenetic signal. Split analyses on molecular data sets deemed increasingly conservative, demonstrated that the lack of signal pervades all levels and that it is Tunicata the taxon of interest that introduces noise in the data sets. The strongest signal present in our molecular data sets as revealed by split analyses is not present in the optimal cladograms and supports a sister group relationship between cephalochordates and craniates. Phylogenetic analysis of gene order using common interval algorithms shows that phylogenetic signal is also eroded in respect of gene positions. Even functional constraints, such as partial gene overlap as exemplified in the case of the commonly observed adjacency between cox2 and cytb are subjected to homoplasy. However, rare phylogenetic events like this hold some promise to retain phylogenetic information even in such cases of extreme variability. We therefore caution to rely on sequence analysis alone and recommend investigation into the signal content of molecular data sets in order to assess the strength of phylogenetic signal.

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157, Germany, 1987–2008

    PubMed Central

    Jenke, Christian; Harmsen, Dag; Weniger, Thomas; Rothgänger, Jörg; Hyytiä-Trees, Eija; Bielaszewska, Martina; Karch, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is a subtyping technique for characterizing human pathogenic bacteria such as enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157. We determined the phylogeny of 202 epidemiologically unrelated EHEC O157:H7/H– clinical isolates through 8 MLVA loci obtained in Germany during 1987–2008. Biodiversity in the loci ranged from 0.66 to 0.90. Four of 8 loci showed null alleles and a frequency <44.1%. These loci were distributed among 48.5% of all strains. Overall, 141 MLVA profiles were identified. Phylogenetic analysis assigned 67.3% of the strains to 19 MLVA clusters. Specific MLVA profiles with an evolutionary persistence were identified, particularly within sorbitol-fermenting EHEC O157:H–.These pathogens belonged to the same MLVA cluster. Our findings indicate successful persistence of this clone. PMID:20350374

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacillus subtilis Strains Applicable to Natto (Fermented Soybean) Production ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Yuji; Rooney, Alejandro P.; Tsukakoshi, Yoshiki; Nakagawa, Rikio; Hasegawa, Hiromasa; Kimura, Keitarou

    2011-01-01

    Spore-forming Bacillus strains that produce extracellular poly-γ-glutamic acid were screened for their application to natto (fermented soybean food) fermentation. Among the 424 strains, including Bacillus subtilis and B. amyloliquefaciens, which we isolated from rice straw, 59 were capable of fermenting natto. Biotin auxotrophism was tightly linked to natto fermentation. A multilocus nucleotide sequence of six genes (rpoB, purH, gyrA, groEL, polC, and 16S rRNA) was used for phylogenetic analysis, and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was also conducted on the natto-fermenting strains. The ability to ferment natto was inferred from the two principal components of the AFLP banding pattern, and natto-fermenting strains formed a tight cluster within the B. subtilis subsp. subtilis group. PMID:21764950

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of Bacillus subtilis strains applicable to natto (fermented soybean) production.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yuji; Rooney, Alejandro P; Tsukakoshi, Yoshiki; Nakagawa, Rikio; Hasegawa, Hiromasa; Kimura, Keitarou

    2011-09-01

    Spore-forming Bacillus strains that produce extracellular poly-γ-glutamic acid were screened for their application to natto (fermented soybean food) fermentation. Among the 424 strains, including Bacillus subtilis and B. amyloliquefaciens, which we isolated from rice straw, 59 were capable of fermenting natto. Biotin auxotrophism was tightly linked to natto fermentation. A multilocus nucleotide sequence of six genes (rpoB, purH, gyrA, groEL, polC, and 16S rRNA) was used for phylogenetic analysis, and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was also conducted on the natto-fermenting strains. The ability to ferment natto was inferred from the two principal components of the AFLP banding pattern, and natto-fermenting strains formed a tight cluster within the B. subtilis subsp. subtilis group.

  11. Molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of the Egyptian foot-and-mouth disease virus SAT2.

    PubMed

    El-Shehawy, Laila I; Abu-Elnaga, Hany I; Rizk, Sonia A; Abd El-Kreem, Ahmed S; Mohamed, A A; Fawzy, Hossam G

    2014-03-01

    In February 2012, a massive new foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreak struck Egypt. In this work, one-step RT-PCR assays were used for in-house detection and differentiation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in Egypt in this year using pan-serotypic and serotype-targeting sequence primers. FMDV SAT2 was the dominant virus in the examined isolates from the epidemic. The complete VP1 coding regions of two isolates were sequenced. The two isolates had 99.2 % sequence identity to most contemporary Egyptian SAT2 reference viruses, whereas they had 89.7-90.1 % identity to the SAT2/EGY/2/2012 isolate, which was collected from Alexandria, Egypt, and previously sequenced by WRLFMD. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Egypt had one topotype and two lineage of FMDV SAT2 in 2012. The Egyptian and the Palestinian 2012 strains were associated mainly with topotype VII, lineage SAT2/VII/Ghb-12, while the virus isolated from Alexandria Governorate belonged to the SAT2/VII/Alx-12 lineage. Topotype VII also comprised lineages that included strains isolated from Libya in 2012 and 2003. Furthermore, within the same topotype, the Egyptian SAT2/2012 isolates were related to strains from Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Eritrea, Cameroon and Nigeria. Nevertheless, more epidemiological work with neighboring countries is needed to prevent cross-border spread of disease and to reach a precise conclusion about the origin of the 2012 FMDV SAT2 emergency in the Middle East.

  12. PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS AND AUTECOLOGY OF SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA FROM HYPERSALINE ENVIRONMENTS.

    PubMed

    Gladka, G V; Romanovskaya, V A; Tashyreva, H O; Tashyrev, O B

    2015-01-01

    Multi-resistant to extreme factors spore-forming bacteria of Bacillus genus are isolated from hypersaline environments of the Crimea (Ukraine) and the Dead Sea (Israel). Phylogenetic analysis showed distinction of dominating extremophilic culturable species in studied regions. In Crimean environments they are B. mojavensis and B. simplex, in the Dead Sea ecosystem--B. subtilis subsp. spizizenii, B. subtilis subsp. subtilis, B. licheniformis and B. simplex. Isolates are simultaneously halotolerant and resistant to UV radiation. Strains isolated from the Dead Sea and the Crimea environments were resistant to UV: LD90 and LD99.99 made 100-170 J/m2 and 750-1500 J/m2 respectively. Spores showed higher UV-resistance (LD99.99-2500 J/m2) than the vegetative cells. However the number of spores made 0.02-0.007% of the whole cell population, and should not significantly affect the UV LD99.99 value. Isolates of both environments were halotolerant in the range of 0.1-10% NaCl and thermotolerant in the range of 20-50 °C, and didn't grow at 15 °C. Survival strategy of spore-forming bacteria from hypersaline environments under high UV radiation level can be performed by spore formation which minimize cell damage as well as efficient DNA-repair systems that remove damages.

  13. [Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Paecilomyces hepiali and Cordyceps sinensis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Ling; Xiao, Wei; He, Hui-Xia; Zhu, Hui-Xin; Wang, Shu-Fang; Cheng, Ke-Di; Zhu, Ping

    2008-04-01

    Phylogenetic relationship between Paecilomyces hepiali and Cordyceps sinensis was studied by analyzing the sequence of rDNA-ITS. The samples of C. sinensis were collected from Hualong County in Qinghai Province and Kangding County in Sichuan Province in May and June, respectively. The rDNA-ITS fragments were obtained by PCR amplification with the template genomic DNA of the fresh stroma or caterpillar body of the collected samples and the cultured mycelium of P. hepiali, with the universal fungal primers ITS1/ITS4. The amplified fragments were cloned into pMD18-T Vector and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis was performed with these sequences and those from GenBank. The result showed that all of the 46 clones randomly chosen from the amplification of C. sinensis shared identical or almost identical rDNA-ITS regions and had over 99% identity with some rDNA-ITS sequences of Hirsutella sinensis and C. sinensis registered in GenBank, but all of them had only about 72% identity with that of P. hepiali. Two pairs of specific primers were designed based on the rDNA-ITS sequence of P. hepiali, then PCR and Nest-PCR were performed with the template genomic DNA of the stroma or caterpillar body of C. sinensis samples mentioned above. The apparent bands amplified by Nest-PCR were obtained from all of the samples, and the sequences showed 100% identity with the rDNA-ITS sequence of P. hepiali. In addition, another pair of specific primers were designed based on the rDNA-ITS sequence registered in GenBank as the marker of C. sinensis (accession no. AB067740) but the latter only shared 87.3% identity with that of H. sinensis (accession no. AJ309353). This pair of primers was used to amplify the C. sinensis samples by PCR, and the amplified sequence showed 100% identity with that of AB067740. The result indicated that H. sinensis is the main body of C. sinensis, while some other endoparasitic fungi such as P. hepiali commonly exist in the natural C. sinensis.

  14. Pathogenicity, sequence and phylogenetic analysis of Malaysian Chicken anaemia virus obtained after low and high passages in MSB-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S M Z H; Omar, A R; Aini, I; Hair-Bejo, M; Jamaluddin, A A; Md-Zain, B M; Kono, Y

    2003-12-01

    Specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens inoculated with low passage Chicken anaemia virus (CAV), SMSC-1 and 3-1 isolates produced lesions suggestive of CAV infection. Repeated passages of the isolates in cell culture until passage 60 (P60) and passage 123 produced viruses that showed a significantly reduced level of pathogenicity in SPF chickens compared to the low passage isolates. Sequence comparison indicated that nucleotide changes in only the coding region of the P60 passage isolates were thought to contribute to virus attenuation. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that SMSC-1 and 3-1 were highly divergent, but their P60 passage derivatives shared significant homology to a Japanese isolate A2.

  15. Fluoroquinolone-resistance mechanisms and phylogenetic background of clinical Escherichia coli strains isolated in south-east Poland.

    PubMed

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Skrzypek, Kinga; Siwiec, Radosław; Wrobel, Andrzej; Malm, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Fluorochinolones are a class of broad-spectrum antimicrobials in the treatment of several infections, including those caused by Escherichia coli. Due to the increasing resistance of bacteria to antimicrobials, an understanding of fluoroquinolone resistance is important for infection control. The aim of this study was to determine susceptibility of clinical E. coli strains to fluoroquinolones and characterize their mechanisms of quinolone resistance. Totally, 79 non-duplicate clinical E. coli isolates included in this study were mainly from skin lesion -36 (45.6%) isolates; 54 (68.4%) isolates were assigned to phylogenetic B2 group. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was found in 20 isolates. In the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) region of gyrA and parC, 4 types of point mutations were detected. Mutations in parC gene were found in all strains with gyrA mutations. Predominance of double mutation in codon 83 and 87 of gyrA (90%) and in codon 80 of parC (90%) was found. Moreover, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMRQ) determinants (qnrA or qnrB and/or aac(6')-Ib-cr) were present in 5 (25%) out of 20 fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. Resistance to fluoroquinolones in all of the tested clinical E. coli isolates correlated with point mutations in both gyrA and parC. The majority of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains belonged to D and B2 phylogenetic groups.

  16. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of mango mealybug, Drosicha mangiferae from Punjab.

    PubMed

    Banta, Geetika; Jindal, Vikas; Mohindru, Bharathi; Sharma, Sachin; Kaur, Jaimeet; Gupta, V K

    2016-01-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) are major pests of a wide range of crops and ornamental plants worldwide. Their high degree of morphological similarity makes them difficult to identify and limits their study and management. In the present study, four Indian populations of mango mealybug (mango, litchi, guava from Gurdaspur and mango from Jalandhar) were analyzed. The mtCOI region was amplified, cloned, the nucleotide sequences were determined and analysed. All the four species were found to be D. mangiferae. The population from Litchi and Mango from Gurdaspur showed 100% homologus sequence. The population of Guava-Gurdaspur and Mango-Jalandhar showed a single mutation of 'C' instead of 'T' at 18th and 196th position, respectively. Indian populations were compared with populations from Pakistan (21) and Japan (1). The phylogenetic tree resulted in two main clusters. Cluster1 represent all the 4 populations of Punjab, India, 20 of Pakistan (Punjab, Sind, Lahore, Multan, Faisalabad and Karak districts) with homologous sequences. The two population collected from Faisalabad district of Pakistan and Japan made a separate cluster 2 because the gene sequence used in analysis was from the COI-3p region. However, all the other sequence of D. mangiferae samples under study showed a low nucleotide divergence. The homologus mtCO1 sequence of Indian and Pakistan population concluded that the genetic diversity in mealybug population was quite less over a large geographical area.

  17. Inventory and phylogenetic analysis of meiotic genes in monogonont rotifers.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sara J; Schurko, Andrew M; Hecox-Lea, Bette; Welch, David B Mark; Stelzer, Claus-Peter; Logsdon, John M

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing question in evolutionary biology is how sexual reproduction has persisted in eukaryotic lineages. As cyclical parthenogens, monogonont rotifers are a powerful model for examining this question, yet the molecular nature of sexual reproduction in this lineage is currently understudied. To examine genes involved in meiosis, we generated partial genome assemblies for 2 distantly related monogonont species, Brachionus calyciflorus and B. manjavacas. Here we present an inventory of 89 meiotic genes, of which 80 homologs were identified and annotated from these assemblies. Using phylogenetic analysis, we show that several meiotic genes have undergone relatively recent duplication events that appear to be specific to the monogonont lineage. Further, we compare the expression of "meiosis-specific" genes involved in recombination and all annotated copies of the cell cycle regulatory gene CDC20 between obligate parthenogenetic (OP) and cyclical parthenogenetic (CP) strains of B. calyciflorus. We show that "meiosis-specific" genes are expressed in both CP and OP strains, whereas the expression of one of the CDC20 genes is specific to cyclical parthenogenesis. The data presented here provide insights into mechanisms of cyclical parthenogenesis and establish expectations for studies of obligate asexual relatives of monogononts, the bdelloid rotifer lineage.

  18. Inventory and Phylogenetic Analysis of Meiotic Genes in Monogonont Rotifers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing question in evolutionary biology is how sexual reproduction has persisted in eukaryotic lineages. As cyclical parthenogens, monogonont rotifers are a powerful model for examining this question, yet the molecular nature of sexual reproduction in this lineage is currently understudied. To examine genes involved in meiosis, we generated partial genome assemblies for 2 distantly related monogonont species, Brachionus calyciflorus and B. manjavacas. Here we present an inventory of 89 meiotic genes, of which 80 homologs were identified and annotated from these assemblies. Using phylogenetic analysis, we show that several meiotic genes have undergone relatively recent duplication events that appear to be specific to the monogonont lineage. Further, we compare the expression of “meiosis-specific” genes involved in recombination and all annotated copies of the cell cycle regulatory gene CDC20 between obligate parthenogenetic (OP) and cyclical parthenogenetic (CP) strains of B. calyciflorus. We show that “meiosis-specific” genes are expressed in both CP and OP strains, whereas the expression of one of the CDC20 genes is specific to cyclical parthenogenesis. The data presented here provide insights into mechanisms of cyclical parthenogenesis and establish expectations for studies of obligate asexual relatives of monogononts, the bdelloid rotifer lineage. PMID:23487324

  19. Genetic characterization of Echinostoma revolutum and Echinoparyphium recurvatum (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) in Thailand and phylogenetic relationships with other isolates inferred by ITS1 sequence.

    PubMed

    Saijuntha, Weerachai; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Andrews, Ross H; Petney, Trevor N

    2011-03-01

    Echinostomatidae are common, widely distributed intestinal parasites causing significant disease in both animals and humans worldwide. In spite of their importance, the taxonomy of these echinostomes is still controversial. The taxonomic status of two species, Echinostoma revolutum and Echinoparyphium recurvatum, which commonly infect poultry and other birds, as well as human, is problematical. Previous phylogenetic analyses of Southeast Asian strains indicate that these species cluster as sister taxa. In the present study, the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) sequence was used for genetic characterization and to examine the phylogenetic relationships between an isolate from Thailand with other isolates available from GenBank database. Interspecies differences in ITS1 sequence between E. revolutum and E. recurvatum were detected at 6 (3%) of the 203 alignment positions. Of these, nucleotide deletion at positions 25, 26, and 27, pyrimidine transition at 50, 189, and pyrimidine transversion at 118 were observed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that E. recurvatum from Thailand clustered as a sister taxa with E. revolutum and not with other members of the genus Echinoparyphium. Interestingly, this result confirms a previous report based on allozyme electrophoresis and mitochondrial DNA that E. revolutum and E. recurvatum in Southeast Asia are sister species. Hence, the taxonomic status of E. recurvatum in Thailand, as well as in Southeast Asian countries needs to be confirmed and revised using more comprehensive analyses based on morphology and other molecular techniques.

  20. First epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis of Hepatitis B virus infection in migrants from Mali.

    PubMed

    Cella, Eleonora; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Vita, Serena; Lai, Alessia; Presti, Alessandra Lo; Blasi, Aletheia; Palco, Maurizio Lo; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Angeletti, Silvia; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    The armed conflict in Mali caused a migration crisis since 2012. Most Malian refugees were in Italy. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the seroprevalence of anti-HBV antibodies is particularly high. Genotype E is the most prevalent throughout a crescent covering area from Angola to Senegal, including Mali. We report 16 HBV positive individual from 136 Malian asylum seekers in order to investigate the genetic diversity of HBV in this population. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis has been used. The HBV genotype E isolates from Mali did not cluster together but were intermixed, with the other African sequences. Only three supported clade were evidenced and closely related to sequences from Burkina Faso. The estimated evolutionary rate was 9.29 × 10(4) . The root of the tree dated back to February 2008 in (95% HPD: 2006-2011). From this ancestor six main statistically supported clusters (pp > 0.80) were identified. The most recent Clade dated back to May 2015. The BSP showed that the effective number of infections softly increased from 2011 to the 2015. Phylogenetic analysis helped in understanding how two on sixteen individuals, have been infected in Italy, and give an important improvement in prevention campaigns and monitoring of the viral infection in migrants. J. Med. Virol. 89:639-646, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Confirmation of a novel siadenovirus species detected in raptors: partial sequence and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Endre R; Benko, Mária

    2009-03-01

    Partial genome characterisation of a novel adenovirus, found recently in organ samples of multiple species of dead birds of prey, was carried out by sequence analysis of PCR-amplified DNA fragments. The virus, named as raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), has originally been detected by a nested PCR method with consensus primers targeting the adenoviral DNA polymerase gene. Phylogenetic analysis with the deduced amino acid sequence of the small PCR product has implied a new siadenovirus type present in the samples. Since virus isolation attempts remained unsuccessful, further characterisation of this putative novel siadenovirus was carried out with the use of PCR on the infected organ samples. The DNA sequence of the central genome part of RAdV-1, encompassing nine full (pTP, 52K, pIIIa, III, pVII, pX, pVI, hexon, protease) and two partial (DNA polymerase and DBP) genes and exceeding 12 kb pairs in size, was determined. Phylogenetic tree reconstructions, based on several genes, unambiguously confirmed the preliminary classification of RAdV-1 as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Further study of RAdV-1 is of interest since it represents a rare adenovirus genus of yet undetermined host origin.

  2. Cystoisospora spp. from dogs in China and phylogenetic analysis of its 18S and ITS1 gene.

    PubMed

    He, Pengfei; Li, Jianhua; Gong, Pengtao; Huang, Jingui; Zhang, Xichen

    2012-11-23

    Cystoisospora spp. oocysts isolated from dog feces in Changchun, China were morphologically similar to those of Cystoisospora ohioensis and Cystoisospora sp. 1-MM recently isolated from dogs in Japanese. Sequencing results of the 18S subunit RNA gene from isolates in the present study were compared to other Cystoisospora spp. and the results suggested that Cystoisospora spp. from dogs in Changchun was homologous to C. ohioensis and Cystoisospora sp. 1-MM. Phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rRNA sequences showed that the Cystoisospora sp. ChangChun 1 and Cystoisospora sp. ChangChun 2 were nested in a clade with other Cystoisospora spp., including C. ohioensis, Cystoisospora belli, Cystoisospora suis, Isospora sp. Harbin/01/08 and C. orlovi,. Cystoisospora sp. ChangChun 2 was confirmed as C. ohioensis, and the other isolate was in a separate clade but the genetic relationship was relatively close to C. suis after analysis of the ITS-1gene.

  3. Isolation of Coronavirus NL63 from Blood from Children in Rural Haiti: Phylogenetic Similarities with Recent Isolates from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Beau De Rochars, Valery Madsen; Lednicky, John; White, Sarah; Loeb, Julia; Elbadry, Maha A; Telisma, Taina; Chavannes, Sonese; Anilis, Marie Gina; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Okech, Bernard A; Salemi, Marco; Morris, J Glenn

    2017-01-11

    Human coronavirus (HCoV) NL63 is recognized as a common cause of upper respiratory infections and influenza-like illness. In screening children with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in a school cohort in rural Haiti, we identified HCoV-NL63 in blood samples from four children. Cases clustered over an 11-day period; children did not have respiratory symptoms, but two had gastrointestinal complaints. On phylogenetic analysis, the Haitian HCoV-NL63 strains cluster together in a highly supported monophyletic clade linked most closely with recently reported strains from Malaysia; two respiratory HCoV-NL63 strains identified in north Florida in the same general period form a separate clade, albeit again with close linkages with the Malaysian strains. Our data highlight the variety of presentations that may be seen with HCoV-NL63, and underscore the apparent ease with which CoV strains move among countries, with our data consistent with recurrent introduction of strains into the Caribbean (Haiti and Florida) from Asia.

  4. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the gp200 protein of Ehrlichia canis from dogs in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Chia; Hsieh, Yu-Chen; Tsang, Chau-Loong; Chung, Yang-Tsung

    2010-12-01

    Ehrlichia (E.) canis is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium responsible for canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Currently, the genetic diversity of E. canis strains worldwide is poorly defined. In the present study, sequence analysis of the nearly full-length 16S rDNA (1,620 bp) and the complete coding region (4,269 bp) of the gp200 gene, which encodes the largest major immunoreactive protein in E. canis, from 17 Taiwanese samples was conducted. The resultant 16S rDNA sequences were found to be identical to each other and have very high homology (99.4~100%) with previously reported E. canis sequences. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis of gp200 demonstrated that the E. canis Taiwanese genotype was genetically distinct from other reported isolates obtained from the United States, Brazil, and Israel, and that it formed a separate clade. Remarkable variations unique to the Taiwanese genotype were found throughout the deduced amino acid sequence of gp200, including 15 substitutions occurring in two of five known species-specific epitopes. The gp200 amino acid sequences of the Taiwanese genotype bore 94.4~94.6 identities with those of the isolates from the United States and Brazil, and 93.7% homology with that of the Israeli isolate. Taken together, these results suggest that the Taiwanese genotype represents a novel strain of E. canis that has not yet been characterized.

  5. Phylogenetic relationships in the family Streptomycetaceae using multi-locus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Labeda, David P; Dunlap, Christopher A; Rong, Xiaoying; Huang, Ying; Doroghazi, James R; Ju, Kou-San; Metcalf, William W

    2017-04-01

    The family Streptomycetaceae, notably species in the genus Streptomyces, have long been the subject of investigation due to their well-known ability to produce secondary metabolites. The emergence of drug resistant pathogens and the relative ease of producing genome sequences has renewed the importance of Streptomyces as producers of new natural products and resulted in revived efforts in isolating and describing strains from novel environments. A previous large study of the phylogeny in the Streptomycetaceae based on 16S rRNA gene sequences provided a useful framework for the relationships among species, but did not always have sufficient resolution to provide definitive identification. Multi-locus sequence analysis of 5 house-keeping genes has been shown to provide improved taxonomic resolution of Streptomyces species in a number of previous reports so a comprehensive study was undertaken to evaluate evolutionary relationships among species within the family Streptomycetaceae where type strains are available in the ARS Culture Collection or genome sequences are available in GenBank. The results of the analysis supported the distinctiveness of Kitasatospora and Streptacidiphilus as validly named genera since they cluster outside of the phylogenetic radiation of the genus Streptomyces. There is also support for the transfer of a number of Streptomyces species to the genus Kitasatospora as well for reducing at least 31 species clusters to a single taxon. The multi-locus sequence database resulting from the study is a useful tool for identification of new isolates and the phylogenetic analysis presented also provides a road map for planning future genome sequencing efforts in the Streptomycetaceae.

  6. Functional and phylogenetic analysis of ureD in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Steyert, Susan R; Rasko, David A; Kaper, James B

    2011-02-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a food-borne pathogen that can cause severe health complications and utilizes a much lower infectious dose than other E. coli pathotypes. Despite having an intact ure locus, ureDABCEFG, the majority of EHEC strains are phenotypically urease negative under tested conditions. Urease activity potentially assists with survival fitness by enhancing acid tolerance during passage through the stomach or by aiding with colonization in either human or animal reservoirs. Previously, in the EHEC O157:H7 Sakai strain, a point mutation in ureD, encoding a urease chaperone protein, was identified, resulting in a substitution of an amber stop codon for glutamine. This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is observed in the majority of EHEC O157:H7 isolates and correlates with a negative urease phenotype in vitro. We demonstrate that the lack of urease activity in vitro is not solely due to the amber codon in ureD. Our analysis has identified two additional SNPs in ureD affecting amino acid positions 38 and 205, in both cases determining whether the encoded amino acid is leucine or proline. Phylogenetic analysis based on Ure protein sequences from a variety of urease-encoding bacteria demonstrates that the proline at position 38 is highly conserved among Gram-negative bacteria. Experiments reveal that the L38P substitution enhances urease enzyme activity; however, the L205P substitution does not. Multilocus sequence typing analysis for a variety of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli isolates combined with the ureD sequence reveals that except for a subset of the O157:H7 strains, neither the in vitro urease-positive phenotype nor the ureD sequence is phylogenetically restricted.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships of rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, isolated from different geographical regions revealed widespread multiple lineages.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Harunari, Tsunehito; Tanikawa, Tsutomu; Komatsu, Noriyuki; Koizumi, Nobuo; Tung, Kwong-Chung; Suzuki, Jun; Kadosaka, Teruki; Takada, Nobuhiro; Kumagai, Takashi; Akao, Nobuaki; Ohta, Nobuo

    2012-09-01

    We conducted a pilot survey of genetic variation of A. cantonensis using small subunit (SSU) ribosomal (r) RNA and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (coxI) gene sequences. Two distinct SSU genotypes (G1 and G2) were identified among 17 individual A. cantonensis worms from 17 different geographical localities in Japan, Mainland China, Taiwan, and Thailand. The partial coxI sequences were determined for 83 worms from 18 different geographical localities from Japan, Mainland China, Taiwan, and Thailand. Phylogenetic analysis showed eight distinct coxI haplotypes (ac1 to ac8). In 16 out of 18 localities, only a single coxI haplotype was found. However, in two localities, two coxI haplotypes coexisted. The common haplotypes found were: haplotype ac1 (Tokyo, Chiba, Kanagawa, Amamioshima Island, and Taichung), haplotype ac2 (Ishikawa, Shenzhen, and Lianjiang), haplotype ac5 (the Okinawa and the Ogasawara Islands), and haplotype ac7 (Miyagi, Aichi, and Kanagawa). Each of these regions is separated from the others by high mountain ranges or oceans. In addition, the lower genetic variation and particular geographical distribution of A. cantonensis in each location could indicate a founder effect, which may have resulted from multiple independent origins, and suggests that haplotypes migrated from endemic areas via human-related transportation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis and characterization of Korean orf virus from dairy goats: case report.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Roh, In-Soon; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Jean, Young-Hwa; Lee, O-Soo

    2009-10-16

    An outbreak of orf virus infection in dairy goats in Korea was investigated. Suspected samples of the skin and lip of affected goats were sent to the laboratory for more exact diagnosis. Orf virus was detected by electron microscopy and viral DNA was identified by PCR. To reveal the genetic characteristics of the Korean strain (ORF/09/Korea), the sequences of the major envelope protein (B2L) and orf virus interferon resistance (VIR) genes were determined and then compared with published reference sequences. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the ORF/09/Korea strain was closest to the isolates (Taiping) from Taiwan. This is believed to be the first report on the molecular characterization of orf virus in Korea.

  9. Enteroviral infection outbreak in the Republic of Belarus: principal characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of etiological agents.

    PubMed

    Amvrosieva, Tamara V; Paklonskaya, Natallia V; Biazruchka, Aliaksei A; Kazinetz, Olga N; Bohush, Zoya F; Fisenko, Elena G

    2006-06-01

    For the last decade enterovirus outbreaks were registered in all of six districts of Belarus. Two of them, reported in 1997 (in Gomel) and in 2003 (in Minsk), were the most extensive and involved 461 and 1,351 patients respectively. Virus ECHO 30 was identified as the dominant etiologic agent of the outbreak in 1997 whereas co-circulation of ECHO 30, ECHO 6 and Coxsackievirus B5 took place in 2003. Analysis of clinical manifestations during the Minsk outbreak revealed unusually high rate of severe clinical forms of infection including aseptic meningitis, encephalitis and myocardial disorders. Epidemiologic observation was ordinary for enterovirus epidemics in temperate climates: the peak of the outbreak was recorded during summer-autumn period of 2003, and 0-14 years old children predominated. Data from the case-control study indicated that illness was associated with drinking water from community water system. Also the laboratory examination demonstrated contamination of different water samples with the epidemic virus serotypes and sequence analysis showed high level of genetic similarity between waterborne and clinical isolates. For these reasons the outbreak should be classified as a waterborne one. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that all Belarusian ECHO 30 isolates belong to the major genotype of ECHO 30 which has been circulating for last 15 years in Europe and North America. Viral agents of 2003 were very similar and substantially differed from isolates of 1997. Comparison of nucleotide sequences of isolates from myocarditis patients revealed their considerable genetic similarity with ECHO 30 isolates from patients with aseptic meningitis and from water. The results of the study draw attention to the importance of virological control of tap and bottled water as a relevant measure aimed at reduction of epidemiological risks.

  10. Evidence of Increased Antibiotic Resistance in Phylogenetically-Diverse Aeromonas Isolates from Semi-Intensive Fish Ponds Treated with Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Hemant J.; Benet-Perelberg, Ayana; Naor, Alon; Smirnov, Margarita; Ofek, Tamir; Nasser, Ahmed; Minz, Dror; Cytryn, Eddie

    2016-01-01

    The genus Aeromonas is ubiquitous in aquatic environments encompassing a broad range of fish and human pathogens. Aeromonas strains are known for their enhanced capacity to acquire and exchange antibiotic resistance genes and therefore, are frequently targeted as indicator bacteria for monitoring antimicrobial resistance in aquatic environments. This study evaluated temporal trends in Aeromonas diversity and antibiotic resistance in two adjacent semi-intensive aquaculture facilities to ascertain the effects of antibiotic treatment on antimicrobial resistance. In the first facility, sulfadiazine-trimethoprim was added prophylactically to fingerling stocks and water column-associated Aeromonas were monitored periodically over an 11-month fish fattening cycle to assess temporal dynamics in taxonomy and antibiotic resistance. In the second facility, Aeromonas were isolated from fish skin ulcers sampled over a 3-year period and from pond water samples to assess associations between pathogenic strains to those in the water column. A total of 1200 Aeromonas isolates were initially screened for sulfadiazine resistance and further screened against five additional antimicrobials. In both facilities, strong correlations were observed between sulfadiazine resistance and trimethoprim and tetracycline resistances, whereas correlations between sulfadiazine resistance and ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol resistances were low. Multidrug resistant strains as well as sul1, tetA, and intI1 gene-harboring strains were significantly higher in profiles sampled during the fish cycle than those isolated prior to stocking and these genes were extremely abundant in the pathogenic strains. Five phylogenetically distinct Aeromonas clusters were identified using partial rpoD gene sequence analysis. Interestingly, prior to fingerling stocking the diversity of water column strains was high, and representatives from all five clusters were identified, including an A. salmonicida cluster

  11. Characterization of virulence factors and phylogenetic group determination of Escherichia coli isolated from diarrheic and non-diarrheic calves from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; de Araújo Diniz, Soraia; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to detect virulence factors, pathovars, and phylogenetic groups of Escherichia coli strains obtained from feces of calves with and without diarrhea up to 70 days old and to determine the association between occurrence of diarrhea, phylogenetic groups, and pathovars. Phylo-typing analysis of the 336 E. coli strains isolated from calves with Clermont method showed that 21 (6.25 %) belong to phylogroup A, 228 (67.85 %) to phylogroup B1, 2 (0.6 %) to phylogroup B2, 5 (1.49 %) to phylogroup C, 57 (16.96 %) to phylogroup E, and 3 (0.9 %) to phylogroup F. Phylogroup D was not identified and 20 strains (5.95 %) were assigned as "unknown." The distribution of phylogenetic groups among pathovars showed that NTEC belong to phylogroups B1 (17) and C (4); EPEC to phylogroups B1 (6) and E (8); STEC to phylogroups A (5), B1 (56), B2 (2), C (1), and E (15); EHEC to phylogroups B1 (95) and E (5); and ETEC to phylogroups A (3), B1 (7), and E (10). The EAST-1 strains were phylogroups A (13), B1 (47), E (19), and F (3); E. coli strains of "unknown" phylogroups belonged to pathovars EPEC (1), EHEC (2), STEC (7), and EAST-1 strains (6). ETEC was associated with diarrhea (P = 0.002). Our study did not find association between the phylogenetic background and occurrence of diarrhea (P = 0.164) but did find some relationship in phylogenetic group and pathovar. The study showed that EHEC and STEC are classified as phylogroup B1, EAST-1 phylogroup A, ETEC, and EPEC phylogroup E.

  12. PhyloOncology: Understanding cancer through phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Somarelli, Jason A; Ware, Kathryn E; Kostadinov, Rumen; Robinson, Jeffrey M; Amri, Hakima; Abu-Asab, Mones; Fourie, Nicolaas; Diogo, Rui; Swofford, David; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2017-04-01

    Despite decades of research and an enormity of resultant data, cancer remains a significant public health problem. New tools and fresh perspectives are needed to obtain fundamental insights, to develop better prognostic and predictive tools, and to identify improved therapeutic interventions. With increasingly common genome-scale data, one suite of algorithms and concepts with potential to shed light on cancer biology is phylogenetics, a scientific discipline used in diverse fields. From grouping subsets of cancer samples to tracing subclonal evolution during cancer progression and metastasis, the use of phylogenetics is a powerful systems biology approach. Well-developed phylogenetic applications provide fast, robust approaches to analyze high-dimensional, heterogeneous cancer data sets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Evolutionary principles - heterogeneity in cancer?, edited by Dr. Robert A. Gatenby. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Phylogenetic Analysis of Genome Rearrangements among Five Mammalian Orders

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Haiwei; Arndt, William; Zhang, Yiwei; Shi, Guanqun; Alekseyev, Max; Tang, Jijun; Hughes, Austin L.; Friedman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships among placental mammalian orders have been controversial. Whole genome sequencing and new computational methods offer opportunities to resolve the relationships among 10 genomes belonging to the mammalian orders Primates, Rodentia, Carnivora, Perissodactyla and Artiodactyla. By application of the double cut and join distance metric, where gene order is the phylogenetic character, we computed genomic distances among the sampled mammalian genomes. With a marsupial outgroup, the gene order tree supported a topology in which Rodentia fell outside the cluster of Primates, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, and Artiodactyla. Results of breakpoint reuse rate and synteny block length analyses were consistent with the prediction of random breakage model, which provided a diagnostic test to support use of gene order as an appropriate phylogenetic character in this study. We the influence of rate differences among lineages and other factors that may contribute to different resolutions of mammalian ordinal relationships by different methods of phylogenetic reconstruction. PMID:22929217

  14. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of squid myosin-V: a vesicle motor in nerve cells.

    PubMed

    Molyneaux, B J; Mulcahey, M K; Stafford, P; Langford, G M

    2000-06-01

    We have shown that vesicles in the axoplasm of the squid giant axon move on actin filaments and that movement is inhibited by myosin V-specific antibodies [Tabb et al., 1998]. In the study reported in this article, experiments were performed to clone and sequence the cDNA for squid brain myosin V. Five proteolytic fragments of purified squid brain myosin V were analyzed by direct protein sequencing [Tabb et al., 1998]. Based on this sequence information, degenerate primers were constructed and used to isolate cDNA clones by PCR. Five clones, representing overlapping segments of the gene, were sequenced. The sequence data and the previous biochemical characterization of the molecule support the classification of this vesicle-associated myosin as a member of the class V myosins. Motif analysis of the head, neck, and tail domains revealed that squid MyoV has consensus sequences for all the motifs found in vertebrate members of the myosin V family of motor proteins. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from a sequence alignment by the neighbor-joining method, using Megalign (DNAStar, Madison, WI); the resulting phylogenetic tree showed that squid MyoV is more closely related to vertebrate MyoV (mouse dilute, chicken dilute, rat myr6, and human myo5a) than Drosophila and yeast (myo2, and myo4) myosins V. These new data on the phylogenetic relationships of squid myosin V to vertebrate myosin V strengthens the argument that myosin V functions as a vesicle motor in vertebrate neurons. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Evolutionary Analysis of Estrogen Receptors from Phylogenetically Ancient Fish

    PubMed Central

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Kohno, Satomi; Hyodo, Susumu; Ijiri, Shigeho; Adachi, Shinji; Hara, Akihiko; Guillette, Louis J.; Iguchi, Taisen

    2008-01-01

    Estrogens are necessary for ovarian differentiation during a critical developmental stage in many vertebrates, and they promote the growth and differentiation of the adult female reproductive system. To understand the evolution of vertebrate estrogen receptors (ESRs) and to evaluate estrogen receptor-ligand interactions in phylogenetically ancient fish, we used PCR techniques to isolate the cDNA encoding ESRs from lungfish, sturgeon, and gar. Sequence analyses indicate that these fishes have two ESRs, ESR1 (ERα) and ESR2 (ERβ), as previously reported for other vertebrate species, but a second type of ESR2 (ERβ2) was not found as has been reported in a number of teleost fishes. Phylogenetic analysis of the ESR sequences indicated that the lungfish ESRs are classified to the tetrapod ESR group, not with the teleost fish ESRs as are the ESRs from gar and sturgeon. Using transient transfection assays of mammalian cells, ESR proteins from these three ancient fishes displayed estrogen-dependent activation of transcription from an estrogen-responsive-element containing promoter. We also examined the estrogenic potential of o,p′-dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (o,p′-DDT) and p,p′-DDT as well as one of its common metabolites, p,p′-dichloro-diphenyl-ethylene (p,p′-DDE) on the ESRs from these fishes. Lungfish ESR1 was less sensitive to DDT/DDE than the ESR1 from the other two fishes. The response of lungfish ESR1 to these pesticides is similar to the pattern obtained from salamander ESR1. These data provide a basic tool allowing future studies examining the receptor-ligand interactions and endocrine-disrupting mechanisms in three species of phylogenetically ancient fish and also expands our knowledge of ESR evolution. PMID:18635653

  16. Pathotyping and Phylogenetic Characterization of Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated in Peru: Defining Two Novel Subgenotypes Within Genotype XII.

    PubMed

    Chumbe, Ana; Izquierdo-Lara, Ray; Tataje, Luis; Gonzalez, Rosa; Cribillero, Giovana; González, Armando E; Fernández-Díaz, Manolo; Icochea, Eliana

    2017-03-01

    Infections of poultry with virulent strains of avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1), also known as Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs), cause Newcastle disease (ND). This highly contagious disease affects poultry and many other species of birds worldwide. In countries where the disease is prevalent, constant monitoring and characterization of isolates causing outbreaks are necessary. In this study, we report the results of pathogenicity testing and phylogenetic analyses of seven NDVs isolated from several regions of Peru between 2004 and 2015. Six viruses had intracerebral pathogenicity indices (ICPIs) of between 1.75 and 1.88, corresponding to a velogenic pathotype. The remaining virus had an ICPI of 0.00, corresponding to a lentogenic pathotype. These results were consistent with amino acid sequences at the fusion protein (F) cleavage site. All velogenic isolates had the polybasic amino acid sequence (112)RRQKR↓F(117) at the F cleavage site. Phylogenetic analyses of complete F gene sequences showed that all isolates are classified in class II of APMV-1. The velogenic viruses are classified in genotype XII, while the lentogenic virus is classified in genotype II, closely related to the LaSota vaccine strain. Moreover, tree topology, bootstrap values, and genetic distances observed within genotype XII resulted in the identification of novel subgenotypes XIIa (in South America) and XIIb (in China) and possibly two clades within genotype XIIa. All velogenic Peruvian viruses belonged to subgenotype XIIa. Overall, our results confirm the presence of genotype XII in Peru and suggest that it is the prevalent genotype currently circulating in our country. The phylogenetic characterization of these isolates helps to characterize the evolution of NDV and may help with the development of vaccines specific to our regional necessities.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of nasal avian schistosomes (Trichobilharzia) from aquatic birds in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran.

    PubMed

    Fakhar, Mahdi; Ghobaditara, Maryam; Brant, Sara V; Karamian, Mehdi; Gohardehi, Shaban; Bastani, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Nasal schistosomes are trematodes in the family Schistosomatidae, many members of which are causative agents of human cercarial dermatitis (HCD). Little is known about the species diversity and distribution of nasal dwelling schistosomes of water birds, particularly in countries outside of Europe; even less is known in countries like Iran. Nasal schistosomes are of particular interest since these species migrate via the central nervous system to the nasal cavity once they penetrate their host. Thus, there must be efforts to determine the incidence of HCD due to nasal schistosomes. HCD outbreaks are reported seasonally in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran, an area well known for rice cultivation leading to increased person contact with water and infected snails. Such places include favorable habitat for both domestic ducks year round, and wild migratory ducks in the winter through spring. Recent reports have detected the presence of both nasal and visceral schistosomes in ducks in this area but with little species characterization. In this study, we examine a diversity of aquatic birds to determine the distribution, prevalence and bird host use of nasal schistosomes. We apply for the first time a molecular identification and phylogenetic analysis of these schistosomes. From 2012 to 2014, the nasal cavity of 508 aquatic birds from Mazandaran Province were examined that included species in Anseriformes, Gruiformes, Charadriiformes and Phoenicopteriformes. Nasal schistosomes were found in 45 (8.9%) birds belonging to Anseriformes (Anas platyrhynchos and Anas clypeata). Phylogenetic analysis of the nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 rDNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase1 gene of isolated eggs revealed that all samples grouped in a sister clade to the European Trichobilharzia regenti. However, Trichobilharzia from this study were more similar to a unique haplotype of Trichobilharzia, isolated from the nasals of an A. clypeata in France. The genetic and

  18. A cDNA clone for cyclophilin from Griffithsia japonica and phylogenetic analysis of cyclophilins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Kyung; Hong, Choo Bong; Suh, Youngbae; Lee, In Kyu

    2002-02-28

    A cDNA clone, designated as Griffithsia japonica cyclophilin-1 (GjCyp-1), was isolated by differential screening of a cDNA library for a red alga, G. japonica. The transcript that corresponded to GjCyp-1 was abundant in vegetative, male, and tetrasporangial thalli, but only the basal level of the transcript was detected in female gametophytes. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of GjCyp-1 identified an open reading frame (ORF), which shared high homologies with cyclophilins that were previously reported in other organisms. Currently available amino acid sequences of eukaryotic cyclophilins were compared in order to examine their phylogenetic relationship to GjCyp-1. A phylogenetic analysis, based on the aligned sequences, showed two major clades - cytosolic cyclophilins (CypA) and ER cyclophilins (CypB). The clade of CypA was divided into six groups - plant, nematode, mammal, euglenozoa, fungi, and platyhelminthes CypA. GjCyp-1 appeared to be closely allied with the euglenozoan CypAs, but constituted an independent lineage. GjCyp-1 showed little relationship with other algal Cyps. A green alga, Chlamydomonas (Chl a + b group), was located in a green plant clade, but a brown alga, Fucus (Chl a + c group), formed an independent clade with a fungus Uromyces (Basidiomycota).

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of avian poxviruses among free-ranging birds of Virginia.

    PubMed

    Adams, Cary J; Feldman, Sanford H; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2005-12-01

    Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify a portion of the avian poxvirus core 4b gene of infected free-ranging birds that presented at the Wildlife Center of Virginia during the 2003 and early 2004 years. The species of bird infected were a great blue heron (Ardea herodias), two American crows (Corvus brachyrhyncos), two American robins (Turdus migratorius), two mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), a blue-gray gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea), a northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos), a house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus), and a northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis). Phylogenetic analysis was performed using the consensus sequences determined for each avian case in Virginia in combination with avian poxvirus core 4b gene sequence from isolates previously described in Europe and that of vaccinia virus. Alignment of DNA sequences identified areas of point mutations and, in the case of a single mourning dove, the incorporation of a triplet of nucleotides. Maximum-likelihood analysis grouped the 2003-2004 Virginia avian poxviruses into a clade distinct from those reported in European free-ranging birds, with the exception of a single case in a mourning dove that clustered within one European clade. The cladogram that resulted from our analysis of the European isolates is in agreement with those previously published. This study identified a distinct clade of avian poxvirus unique from four clades previously described and associated with epornitics in free-ranging birds, where the core 4b gene DNA sequence has been the basis of comparison.

  20. A Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Weltevreden, an Emerging Agent of Diarrheal Disease in Tropical Regions

    PubMed Central

    Makendi, Carine; Page, Andrew J.; Wren, Brendan W.; Le Thi Phuong, Tu; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Klemm, Elizabeth J.; Pickard, Derek; Okoro, Chinyere; Hunt, Martin; Thompson, Corinne N.; Phu Huong Lan, Nguyen; Tran Do Hoang, Nhu; Thwaites, Guy E.; Le Hello, Simon; Brisabois, Anne; Weill, François-Xavier; Baker, Stephen; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden (S. Weltevreden) is an emerging cause of diarrheal and invasive disease in humans residing in tropical regions. Despite the regional and international emergence of this Salmonella serovar, relatively little is known about its genetic diversity, genomics or virulence potential in model systems. Here we used whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses to define the phylogenetic structure of a diverse global selection of S. Weltevreden. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 100 isolates demonstrated that the population of S. Weltevreden can be segregated into two main phylogenetic clusters, one associated predominantly with continental Southeast Asia and the other more internationally dispersed. Subcluster analysis suggested the local evolution of S. Weltevreden within specific geographical regions. Four of the isolates were sequenced using long read sequencing to produce high quality reference genomes. Phenotypic analysis in Hep-2 cells and in a murine infection model indicated that S. Weltevreden were significantly attenuated in these models compared to the classical S. Typhimurium reference strain SL1344. Our work outlines novel insights into this important emerging pathogen and provides a baseline understanding for future research studies. PMID:26867150

  1. A Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Weltevreden, an Emerging Agent of Diarrheal Disease in Tropical Regions.

    PubMed

    Makendi, Carine; Page, Andrew J; Wren, Brendan W; Le Thi Phuong, Tu; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Klemm, Elizabeth J; Pickard, Derek; Okoro, Chinyere; Hunt, Martin; Thompson, Corinne N; Phu Huong Lan, Nguyen; Tran Do Hoang, Nhu; Thwaites, Guy E; Le Hello, Simon; Brisabois, Anne; Weill, François-Xavier; Baker, Stephen; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden (S. Weltevreden) is an emerging cause of diarrheal and invasive disease in humans residing in tropical regions. Despite the regional and international emergence of this Salmonella serovar, relatively little is known about its genetic diversity, genomics or virulence potential in model systems. Here we used whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses to define the phylogenetic structure of a diverse global selection of S. Weltevreden. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 100 isolates demonstrated that the population of S. Weltevreden can be segregated into two main phylogenetic clusters, one associated predominantly with continental Southeast Asia and the other more internationally dispersed. Subcluster analysis suggested the local evolution of S. Weltevreden within specific geographical regions. Four of the isolates were sequenced using long read sequencing to produce high quality reference genomes. Phenotypic analysis in Hep-2 cells and in a murine infection model indicated that S. Weltevreden were significantly attenuated in these models compared to the classical S. Typhimurium reference strain SL1344. Our work outlines novel insights into this important emerging pathogen and provides a baseline understanding for future research studies.

  2. Exoelectrogenic bacterium phylogenetically related to Citrobacter freundii, isolated from anodic biofilm of a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianjian; Zhu, Nengwu; Cao, Yanlan; Peng, Yue; Wu, Pingxiao; Dong, Wenhao

    2015-02-01

    An electrogenic bacterium, named Citrobacter freundii Z7, was isolated from the anodic biofilm of microbial fuel cell (MFC) inoculated with aerobic sewage sludge. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) analysis exhibited that the strain Z7 had relatively high electrochemical activity. When the strain Z7 was inoculated into MFC, the maximum power density can reach 204.5 mW/m(2) using citrate as electron donor. Series of substrates including glucose, glycerol, lactose, sucrose, and rhammose could be utilized to generate power. CV tests and the addition of anode solution as well as AQDS experiments indicated that the strain Z7 might transfer electrons indirectly via secreted mediators.

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Bifidobacterium Genus Using Glycolysis Enzyme Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Katelyn; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are important members of the human gastrointestinal tract that promote the establishment of a healthy microbial consortium in the gut of infants. Recent studies have established that the Bifidobacterium genus is a polymorphic phylogenetic clade, which encompasses a diversity of species and subspecies that encode a broad range of proteins implicated in complex and non-digestible carbohydrate uptake and catabolism, ranging from human breast milk oligosaccharides, to plant fibers. Recent genomic studies have created a need to properly place Bifidobacterium species in a phylogenetic tree. Current approaches, based on core-genome analyses come at the cost of intensive sequencing and demanding analytical processes. Here, we propose a typing method based on sequences of glycolysis genes and the proteins they encode, to provide insights into diversity, typing, and phylogeny in this complex and broad genus. We show that glycolysis genes occur broadly in these genomes, to encode the machinery necessary for the biochemical spine of the cell, and provide a robust phylogenetic marker. Furthermore, glycolytic sequences-based trees are congruent with both the classical 16S rRNA phylogeny, and core genome-based strain clustering. Furthermore, these glycolysis markers can also be used to provide insights into the adaptive evolution of this genus, especially with regards to trends toward a high GC content. This streamlined method may open new avenues for phylogenetic studies on a broad scale, given the widespread occurrence of the glycolysis pathway in bacteria, and the diversity of the sequences they encode. PMID:27242688

  4. Serologic and hexon phylogenetic analysis of ruminant adenoviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objectives of this study were to determine the antigenic relationship among ruminant adenoviruses and determine their phylogenetic relationship based on the deduced hexon gene amino acid sequence. Results of reciprocal cross-neutralization tests demonstrated antigenic relationships in either on...

  5. Phylogenetic Relationships in Actinidia as Revealed by RAPD Analysis

    Treesearch

    Hongwen Huang; Zuozhou Li; Jianqiang Li; Thomas L. Kubiisiak; Desmond R. Lavne

    2002-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within the Actinidia were investigated using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. DNAs from 10 taxa, including31 species encompassing all four sections and four series of the traditional subdivisions within the genus, were amplified using 22 preselected 10-mer oligonucieotide primers. A total 204 DNA bands...

  6. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of iron-sulfur-oxidizing heterotrophic bacteria indigenous to nickel laterite ores of Sulawesi, Indonesia: Implications for biohydrometallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaerun, Siti Khodijah; Hung, Sutina; Mubarok, Mohammad Zaki; Sanwani, Edy

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to isolate and phylogenetically identify the indigenous iron-sulfur-oxidizing heterotrophic bacteria capable of bioleaching nickel from laterite mineral ores. The bacteria were isolated from a nickel laterite mine area in South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. Seven bacterial strains were successfully isolated from laterite mineral ores (strains SKC/S-1 to SKC/S-7) and they were capable of bioleaching of nickel from saprolite and limonite ores. Using EzTaxon-e database, the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the seven bacterial strains were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, resulting in a complete hierarchical classification system, and they were identified as Pseudomonas taiwanensis BCRC 17751 (98.59% similarity), Bacillus subtilis subsp. inaquosorum BGSC 3A28 (99.14% and 99.32% similarities), Paenibacillus pasadenensis SAFN-007 (98.95% and 99.33% similarities), Bacillus methylotrophicus CBMB 205 (99.37% similarity), and Bacillus altitudinis 41KF2b (99.37% similarity). It is noteworthy that members of the phylum Firmicutes (in particular the genus Bacillus) predominated in this study, therefore making them to have the high potential to be candidates for the bioleaching of nickel from laterite mineral ores. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the predominance of the phylum Firmicutes in the Sulawesi laterite mineral ores.

  7. The Effect of Host-Plant Phylogenetic Isolation on Species Richness, Composition and Specialization of Insect Herbivores: A Comparison between Native and Exotic Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Grandez-Rios, Julio Miguel; Lima Bergamini, Leonardo; Santos de Araújo, Walter; Villalobos, Fabricio; Almeida-Neto, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of plant-insect interactions is still a key issue in terrestrial ecology. Here, we used 30 well-defined plant-herbivore assemblages to assess the effects of host plant phylogenetic isolation and origin (native vs. exotic) on the species richness, composition and specialization of the insect herbivore fauna on co-occurring plant species. We also tested for differences in such effects between assemblages composed exclusively of exophagous and endophagous herbivores. We found a consistent negative effect of the phylogenetic isolation of host plants on the richness, similarity and specialization of their insect herbivore faunas. Notably, except for Jaccard dissimilarity, the effect of phylogenetic isolation on the insect herbivore faunas did not vary between native and exotic plants. Our findings show that the phylogenetic isolation of host plants is a key factor that influences the richness, composition and specialization of their local herbivore faunas, regardless of the host plant origin. PMID:26379159

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of Culturable Dimethyl Sulfide-Producing Bacteria from a Spartina-Dominated Salt Marsh and Estuarine Water

    PubMed Central

    Ansede, John H.; Friedman, Robert; Yoch, Duane C.

    2001-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), an abundant osmoprotectant found in marine algae and salt marsh cordgrass, can be metabolized to dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and acrylate by microbes having the enzyme DMSP lyase. A suite of DMS-producing bacteria isolated from a salt marsh and adjacent estuarine water on DMSP agar plates differed markedly from the pelagic strains currently in culture. While many of the salt marsh and estuarine isolates produced DMS and methanethiol from methionine and dimethyl sulfoxide, none appeared to be capable of producing both methanethiol and DMS from DMSP. DMSP, and its degradation products acrylate and β-hydroxypropionate but not methyl-3-mecaptopropionate or 3-mercaptopropionate, served as a carbon source for the growth of all the α- and β- but only some of the γ-proteobacterium isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all of the isolates were in the group Proteobacteria, with most of them belonging to the α and γ subclasses. Only one isolate was identified as a β-proteobacterium, and it had >98% 16S rRNA sequence homology with a terrestrial species of Alcaligenes faecalis. Although bacterial population analysis based on culturability has its limitations, bacteria from the α and γ subclasses of the Proteobacteria were the dominant DMS producers isolated from salt marsh sediments and estuaries, with the γ subclass representing 80% of the isolates. The α-proteobacterium isolates were all in the Roseobacter subgroup, while many of the γ-proteobacteria were closely related to the pseudomonads; others were phylogenetically related to Marinomonas, Psychrobacter, or Vibrio species. These data suggest that DMSP cleavage to DMS and acrylate is a characteristic widely distributed among different phylotypes in the salt marsh-estuarine ecosystem. PMID:11229912

  9. Landscape Patterns in Rainforest Phylogenetic Signal: Isolated Islands of Refugia or Structured Continental Distributions?

    PubMed Central

    Kooyman, Robert M.; Rossetto, Maurizio; Sauquet, Hervé; Laffan, Shawn W.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Identify patterns of change in species distributions, diversity, concentrations of evolutionary history, and assembly of Australian rainforests. Methods We used the distribution records of all known rainforest woody species in Australia across their full continental extent. These were analysed using measures of species richness, phylogenetic diversity (PD), phylogenetic endemism (PE) and phylogenetic structure (net relatedness index; NRI). Phylogenetic structure was assessed using both continental and regional species pools. To test the influence of growth-form, freestanding and climbing plants were analysed independently, and in combination. Results Species richness decreased along two generally orthogonal continental axes, corresponding with wet to seasonally dry and tropical to temperate habitats. The PE analyses identified four main areas of substantially restricted phylogenetic diversity, including parts of Cape York, Wet Tropics, Border Ranges, and Tasmania. The continental pool NRI results showed evenness (species less related than expected by chance) in groups of grid cells in coastally aligned areas of species rich tropical and sub-tropical rainforest, and in low diversity moist forest areas in the south-east of the Great Dividing Range and in Tasmania. Monsoon and drier vine forests, and moist forests inland from upland refugia showed phylogenetic clustering, reflecting lower diversity and more relatedness. Signals for evenness in Tasmania and clustering in northern monsoon forests weakened in analyses using regional species pools. For climbing plants, values for NRI by grid cell showed strong spatial structuring, with high diversity and PE concentrated in moist tropical and subtropical regions. Conclusions/Significance Concentrations of rainforest evolutionary history (phylo-diversity) were patchily distributed within a continuum of species distributions. Contrasting with previous concepts of rainforest community distribution, our findings of

  10. Ultrametric networks: a new tool for phylogenetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The large majority of optimization problems related to the inference of distance‐based trees used in phylogenetic analysis and classification is known to be intractable. One noted exception is found within the realm of ultrametric distances. The introduction of ultrametric trees in phylogeny was inspired by a model of evolution driven by the postulate of a molecular clock, now dismissed, whereby phylogeny could be represented by a weighted tree in which the sum of the weights of the edges separating any given leaf from the root is the same for all leaves. Both, molecular clocks and rooted ultrametric trees, fell out of fashion as credible representations of evolutionary change. At the same time, ultrametric dendrograms have shown good potential for purposes of classification in so far as they have proven to provide good approximations for additive trees. Most of these approximations are still intractable, but the problem of finding the nearest ultrametric distance matrix to a given distance matrix with respect to the L∞ distance has been long known to be solvable in polynomial time, the solution being incarnated in any minimum spanning tree for the weighted graph subtending to the matrix. Results This paper expands this subdominant ultrametric perspective by studying ultrametric networks, consisting of the collection of all edges involved in some minimum spanning tree. It is shown that, for a graph with n vertices, the construction of such a network can be carried out by a simple algorithm in optimal time O(n2) which is faster by a factor of n than the direct adaptation of the classical O(n3) paradigm by Warshall for computing the transitive closure of a graph. This algorithm, called UltraNet, will be shown to be easily adapted to compute relaxed networks and to support the introduction of artificial points to reduce the maximum distance between vertices in a pair. Finally, a few experiments will be discussed to demonstrate the applicability of

  11. Development of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for phylogenetic analysis of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hasanpour, Mojtaba; Najafi, Akram

    2017-03-28

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is among major pathogens causing 80-90% of all episodes of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Recently, E. coli strains are divided into eight main phylogenetic groups including A, B1, B2, C, D, E, F, and clade I. This study was aimed to develop a rapid, sensitive, and specific multiplex real time PCR method capable of detecting phylogenetic groups of E. coli strains. This study was carried out on E. coli strains (isolated from the patient with UTI) in which the presence of all seven target genes had been confirmed in our previous phylogenetic study. An EvaGreen-based singleplex and multiplex real-time PCR with melting curve analysis was designed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of these genes. The primers were selected mainly based on the production of amplicons with melting temperatures (Tm) ranging from 82°C to 93°C and temperature difference of more than 1.5°C between each peak.The multiplex real-time PCR assays that have been developed in the present study were successful in detecting the eight main phylogenetic groups. Seven distinct melting peaks were discriminated, with Tm value of 93±0.8 for arpA, 89.2±0.1for chuA, 86.5±0.1 for yjaA, 82.3±0.2 for TspE4C2, 87.8±0.1for trpAgpC, 85.4±0.6 for arpAgpE genes, and 91±0.5 for the internal control. To our knowledge, this study is the first melting curve-based real-time PCR assay developed for simultaneous and discrete detection of these seven target genes. Our findings showed that this assay has the potential to be a rapid, reliable and cost-effective alternative for routine phylotyping of E. coli strains.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of mammalian maximal oxygen consumption during exercise.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Chappell, Mark A; Meek, Thomas H; Szafranska, Paulina A; Zub, Karol; Konarzewski, Marek; Jones, James H; Bicudo, J Eduardo P W; Nespolo, Roberto F; Careau, Vincent; Garland, Theodore

    2013-12-15

    We compiled published values of mammalian maximum oxygen consumption during exercise ( ) and supplemented these data with new measurements of for the largest rodent (capybara), 20 species of smaller-bodied rodents, two species of weasels and one small marsupial. Many of the new data were obtained with running-wheel respirometers instead of the treadmill systems used in most previous measurements of mammalian . We used both conventional and phylogenetically informed allometric regression models to analyze of 77 'species' (including subspecies or separate populations within species) in relation to body size, phylogeny, diet and measurement method. Both body mass and allometrically mass-corrected showed highly significant phylogenetic signals (i.e. related species tended to resemble each other). The Akaike information criterion corrected for sample size was used to compare 27 candidate models predicting (all of which included body mass). In addition to mass, the two best-fitting models (cumulative Akaike weight=0.93) included dummy variables coding for three species previously shown to have high (pronghorn, horse and a bat), and incorporated a transformation of the phylogenetic branch lengths under an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model of residual variation (thus indicating phylogenetic signal in the residuals). We found no statistical difference between wheel- and treadmill-elicited values, and diet had no predictive ability for . Averaged across all models, the allometric scaling exponent was 0.839, with 95% confidence limits of 0.795 and 0.883, which does not provide support for a scaling exponent of 0.67, 0.75 or unity.

  13. Phylogenetic network analysis as a parsimony optimization problem.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Ward C

    2015-09-17

    Many problems in comparative biology are, or are thought to be, best expressed as phylogenetic "networks" as opposed to trees. In trees, vertices may have only a single parent (ancestor), while networks allow for multiple parent vertices. There are two main interpretive types of networks, "softwired" and "hardwired." The parsimony cost of hardwired networks is based on all changes over all edges, hence must be greater than or equal to the best tree cost contained ("displayed") by the network. This is in contrast to softwired, where each character follows the lowest parsimony cost tree displayed by the network, resulting in costs which are less than or equal to the best display tree. Neither situation is ideal since hard-wired networks are not generally biologically attractive (since individual heritable characters can have more than one parent) and softwired networks can be trivially optimized (containing the best tree for each character). Furthermore, given the alternate cost scenarios of trees and these two flavors of networks, hypothesis testing among these explanatory scenarios is impossible. A network cost adjustment (penalty) is proposed to allow phylogenetic trees and soft-wired phylogenetic networks to compete equally on a parsimony optimality basis. This cost is demonstrated for several real and simulated datasets. In each case, the favored graph representation (tree or network) matched expectation or simulation scenario. The softwired network cost regime proposed here presents a quantitative criterion for an optimality-based search procedure where trees and networks can participate in hypothesis testing simultaneously.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of the GST family in Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) darlingi.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Júnior, Gilson Martins de; Guimarães-Marques, Giselle Moura; Cegatti Bridi, Leticia; Christine Ohse, Ketlen; Vicentini, Renato; Tadei, Wanderli; Rafael, Míriam Silva

    2014-08-01

    Anopheles darlingi Root, 1926 and Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) are the most important human malaria vectors in South America and Africa, respectively. The two species are estimated to have diverged 100 million years ago. Studies on the phylogenetics and evolution of gene sequences, such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) in disease-transmitting mosquitoes are scarce. The sigma class GST (KC890767) from the transcriptome of An. darlingi captured in the Brazilian Amazon was studied by in silico hybridization, and mapped to chromosome 3 of An. gambiae. The sigma class GST of An. darlingi was used for phylogenetic analyses to understand the GST base composition of the most recent common ancestor between An. darlingi, Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. The GST (KC890767) of An. darlingi was studied to generate the main divergence branches using a Neighbor-Joining and bootstrapping approaches to confirm confidence levels on the tree nodes that separate the An. darlingi and other mosquito species. The results showed divergence between An. gambiae, Ae. Aegypti, Cx. quinquefasciatus, and Phlebotomus papatasi as outgroup, and the homology relationship between sigma class GST of An. darlingi and GSTS1_1 gene of An. gambiae was valuable for phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Phylogenetic relationship of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae isolated in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Zain, Zaini; Kamsani, Nurul H; Ahmad, Norazah; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-12-01

    The epidemiology of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) remains poorly understood. We therefore sought to determine the genetic relationship of 25 NTHi isolated from various states in Malaysia using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The majority of isolates were obtained from sputum. There were 24 novel sequence types (STs). Eight isolates were single-locus variants, the remainder being singletons. Clustering was not based on clinical site of isolation or geographical origin. Despite the limited number of isolates examined in this study, we demonstrate that NTHi isolates in Malaysia are diverse and warrant further investigation.

  16. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of capsid protein gene in feline calicivirus isolates from Rio Grande do Sul in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Henzel, A; Sá e Silva, M; Luo, S; Lovato, L T; Weiblen, R

    2012-02-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is an important pathogen that affects domestic cats, inducing acute oral and upper respiratory tract clinical signs. The aim of this study was to analyze the variability of the capsid protein in different FCV isolates from southern Brazil. The sequencing analyses of thirteen Brazilian FCV samples, phylogenetic analyses and assessments of ten previously published sequences were conducted by examining the open reading frame 2 (ORF2, regions B-F). Comparisons of the predicted amino acid sequences of the ORF2 in Brazilian FCV isolates with those of the FCV-F9 strain indicated that the main differences are located within the regions C and hypervariable E (HVR_E). Epitopes that were mapped to the regions D, 5'HVR_E and conserved E also presented with some variability when compared to the strain F9. This is the first study describing sequence analyses and the phylogenetic relationships among FCV isolates from Brazil. The results presented here may expand upon current knowledge regarding aspects of FCV biology, epidemiology and genetic diversity and provide insights into improving the efficacies of current FCV vaccines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular and phylogenetic characterization of multidrug resistant extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli isolated from poultry and cattle in Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Kar, Debasish; Bandyopadhyay, Samiran; Bhattacharyya, Debaraj; Samanta, Indranil; Mahanti, Achintya; Nanda, Pramod K; Mondal, Bimalendu; Dandapat, Premanshu; Das, Arun K; Dutta, Tapan K; Bandyopadhyay, Subhasish; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the occurrence and characterization of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli isolated from cattle and poultry in Odisha, India. Of 316 E. coli isolated from 305 samples (170 fecal samples from poultry and 135 milk samples from cattle), a total of 18 E. coli isolates were confirmed as ESBL producers by combination disc method and ESBL E-test. The isolates were resistant to oxyimino cephalosporins and monobactam as revealed by disc diffusion assay and determination of minimum inhibitory concentration. Resistance against other antibiotics was frequently noted as well. Further, beta-lactamase genes viz., blaSHV, blaCTXM, blaTEM and blaampC were detected in 17, 13, 9 and 2 isolates, respectively in PCR. Of the 18 ESBL strains, 16 were positive for class I integron (int1), nine of them carried sulphonamide resistance gene (sul1) and one harbored quinolone resistance gene (qnrB). Virulence markers for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli like astA, tsh and iucD were also present in 4, 3 and 3 isolates, respectively. All the PCR amplified products were cloned and subjected to sequencing for homology analysis and data were submitted to gene bank. Sequence analysis of the amplified variable regions of class 1 integron of four representative isolates revealed the presence of aadA2 and dfrA12 gene cassettes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim, respectively. Most of the ESBL producing strains emerged as single lineage through phylogenetic analysis by RAPD and ERIC PCR. This is the first ever systemic study on multidrug resistant ESBL producing E. coli in food producing animals from India.

  18. Electrochemical Characterization of a Novel Exoelectrogenic Bacterium Strain SCS5, Isolated from a Mediator-Less Microbial Fuel Cell and Phylogenetically Related to Aeromonas jandaei

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Subed Chandra Dev; Feng, Cuijie; Li, Jiangwei; Hu, Anyi; Wang, Han; Qin, Dan; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    A facultative anaerobic bacterium, designated as strain SCS5, was isolated from the anodic biofilm of a mediator-less microbial fuel cell using acetate as the electron donor and α-FeOOH as the electron acceptor. The isolate was Gram-negative, motile, and shaped as short rods (0.9–1.3 μm in length and 0.4–0.5 μm in width). A phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA, gyrB, and rpoD genes suggested that strain SCS5 belonged to the Aeromonas genus in the Aeromonadaceae family and exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (99.45%) with Aeromonas jandaei ATCC 49568. However, phenotypic, cellular fatty acid profile, and DNA G+C content analyses revealed that there were some distinctions between strain SCS5 and the type strain A. jandaei ATCC 49568. The optimum growth temperature, pH, and NaCl (%) for strain SCS5 were 35°C, 7.0, and 0.5% respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain SCS5 was 59.18%. The isolate SCS5 was capable of reducing insoluble iron oxide (α-FeOOH) and transferring electrons to extracellular material (the carbon electrode). The electrochemical activity of strain SCS5 was corroborated by cyclic voltammetry and a Raman spectroscopic analysis. The cyclic voltammogram of strain SCS5 revealed two pairs of oxidation-reduction peaks under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. In contrast, no redox pair was observed for A. jandaei ATCC 49568. Thus, isolated strain SCS5 is a novel exoelectrogenic bacterium phylogenetically related to A. jandaei, but shows distinct electrochemical activity from its close relative A. jandaei ATCC 49568. PMID:27396922

  19. Pathogenesis and phylogenetic analyses of canine distemper virus strain ZJ7 isolate from domestic dogs in China.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bin; Wen, Yong-Jun; Wang, Feng-Xue; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Wang, Xiu-Dong; Hu, Jia-Xin; Shi, Xin-Chuan; Yang, Bo-Chao; Chen, Li-Zhi; Cheng, Shi-Peng; Wu, Hua

    2011-11-16

    A new isolate of canine distemper virus (CDV), named ZJ7, was isolated from lung tissues of a dog suspected with CDV infection using MDCK cells. The ZJ7 isolate induced cytopathogenic effects of syncytia in MDCK cell after six passages. In order to evaluate pathogenesis of ZJ7 strain, three CDV sero-negative dogs were intranasally inoculated with its virus suspension. All infected dogs developed clinical signs of severe bloody diarrhea, conjunctivitis, ocular discharge, nasal discharge and coughing, fever and weight loss at 21 dpi, whereas the mock group infected with DMEM were normal. The results demonstrated that CDV-ZJ7 strain isolated by MDCK cell was virulent, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of strain ZJ7 had no change after isolation by MDCK cell when compared with the original virus from the fresh tissues. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses for the nucleocapsid (N), phosphoprotein (P) and receptor binding haemagglutinin (H) gene of the ZJ7 isolate clearly showed it is joins to the Asia 1 group cluster of CDV strains, the predominant genotype in China.

  20. Prevalence and Phylogenetic Analysis of Orientia tsutsugamushi in Small Mammals in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kozue; Pham, Hang T T; Hoang, Huong T; Trang, Tu C; Vu, Thuy N; Ung, Trang T H; Shimizu, Kenta; Arikawa, Jiro; Yamada, Akio; Nguyen, Hoa T; Nguyen, Hang L K; Le, Mai T Q; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2016-02-01

    Rodents are important reservoirs of many human pathogens transmitted via arthropod vectors. Arthropod-borne bacteria belonging to the family Rickettsiaceae cause acute febrile diseases in humans worldwide, but the real burdens of rickettsial diseases appear to be underestimated in Hanoi, Vietnam, because differential diagnosis on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms is confounded by the presence of other tropical infectious diseases with similar signs and symptoms. To know the prevalence of bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae among small mammals in Hanoi, 519 animals thriving in the public places were captured and examined for the presence of bacterial sequences using duplex PCR. Nucleotide sequences specific for Orientia tsutsugamushi were detected in seven samples (1.3%). Out of seven animals, two were captured in a market, whereas five were in hospitals. None of the captured small mammals tested positive for the genus Rickettsia. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the genes encoding the 47-kDa high-temperature requirement A (47-kDa HtrA) and 56-kDa type-specific antigen (TSA) showed that these seven isolates were indistinguishable from each other. O. tsutsugamushi isolated in this study was closely related phylogenetically to the Gilliam strain, which was originally isolated at the border of Assam and Burma, rather than to those isolated in the central to southern part of Vietnam. It should be emphasized that Vietnamese hospitals were heavily infested by small rodents and some of them harbored O. tsutsugamushi. Strict hygienic control should be implemented to mitigate the potential risk posed by O. tsutsugamushi in hospital settings.

  1. Phylogenetic and genetic characterization of a 2017 clinical isolate of H7N9 virus in Guangzhou, China during the fifth epidemic wave.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongqiang; Li, Chunlin; Han, Jianfeng; Wen, Yingfen; Wang, Jian; Hong, Wenxing; Li, Xiaofeng; Liu, Zhongyu; Ye, Qing; Li, Jing; Zhou, Changshuai; Yu, Lei; Qin, Chengfeng; Zhang, Fuchun; Jiang, Tao

    2017-10-09

    Pathogenic H7N9 influenza viruses continue to pose a public health concern. The H7N9 virus has caused five outbreak waves of human infections in China since 2013. In the present study, a novel H7N9 strain (A/Guangdong/8H324/2017) was isolated from a female patient with severe respiratory illness during the fifth wave of the 2017 H7N9 epidemic. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the H7N9 viruses collected during the fifth wave belong to two different lineages: the Pearl River Delta lineage and the Yangtze River Delta lineage. The novel isolate is closely related to the Pearl River Delta H7N9 viruses, which were isolated from patients in Guangdong Province. The novel H7N9 isolate has an insertion of three basic amino acids in the cleavage site of hemagglutinin (HA), which may enhance virulence in poultry. The 2017 isolate also possesses an R292K substitution in the neuraminidase (NA) protein, which confers oseltamivir resistance. This study highlights the pandemic potential of the novel H7N9 virus in mammals; thus, future characterization and surveillance is warranted.

  2. Cloning and phylogenetic analysis of the chitinase gene from the facultative pathogen Paecilomyces lilacinus.

    PubMed

    Dong, L Q; Yang, J K; Zhang, K Q

    2007-12-01

    To PCR-amplify the full-length genomic-encoding sequence for one chitinase from the facultative fungal pathogen Paecilomyces lilacinus, analyse the DNA and deduced amino acid sequences and compare the amino acid sequence with chitinases reported from mycopathogens, entomopathogens and nematopathogens. The encoding gene (designated as PLC) was isolated using the degenerate PCR primers and the DNA-Walking method. The gene is 1458 bp in length and contains three putative introns. A number of sequence motifs that might play a role in its regulation and function had also been found. Alignment of the translation product (designated as Plc, molecular mass of 45.783 kDa and pI of 5.65) with homologous sequences from other species showed that Plc belongs to Class V chitinase within the glycosyl hydrolase family 18. The phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analysis using mega (Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis) indicated that these chitinases from mycopathogens, entomopathogens and nematopathogens, the majority of which belong to glycosyl hydrolase family 18, were clustered into two well-supported subgroups corresponding to ascomycetes fungal and nonfungal chitinases (bacteria, baculoviruses). Our study showed that chitinases from mycoparasitic, entomopathogenic and nematophagous fungi are closely related to each other and reaffirmed the hypothesis that baculovirus chitinase is most likely to be of a bacterial origin - acquired by gene transfer. Bacterial and baculoviral chitinases in our study are potential pathogenicity factors; however, we still cannot ascribe any specific function to those chitinases from the fungi. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the chitinase gene and its translation product from Paecilomyces lilacinus, which constitutes the largest number of formulated biological nematicides reported so far, this is also the first study to analyse and resolve the phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary relationships among the chitinases

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of cercospora and mycosphaerella based on the internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, S B; Dunkle, L D; Zismann, V L

    2001-07-01

    ABSTRACT Most of the 3,000 named species in the genus Cercospora have no known sexual stage, although a Mycosphaerella teleomorph has been identified for a few. Mycosphaerella is an extremely large and important genus of plant pathogens, with more than 1,800 named species and at least 43 associated anamorph genera. The goal of this research was to perform a large-scale phylogenetic analysis to test hypotheses about the past evolutionary history of Cercospora and Mycosphaerella. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence data (ITS1, 5.8S rRNA gene, ITS2), the genus Mycosphaerella is monophyletic. In contrast, many anamorph genera within Mycosphaerella were polyphyletic and were not useful for grouping species. One exception was Cercospora, which formed a highly supported monophyletic group. Most Cercospora species from cereal crops formed a subgroup within the main Cercospora cluster. Only species within the Cercospora cluster produced the toxin cercosporin, suggesting that the ability to produce this compound had a single evolutionary origin. Intraspecific variation for 25 taxa in the Mycosphaerella clade averaged 1.7 nucleotides (nts) in the ITS region. Thus, isolates with ITS sequences that differ by two or more nucleotides may be distinct species. ITS sequences of groups I and II of the gray leaf spot pathogen Cercospora zeae-maydis differed by 7 nts and clearly represent different species. There were 6.5 nt differences on average between the ITS sequences of the sorghum pathogen Cercospora sorghi and the maize pathogen Cercospora sorghi var. maydis, indicating that the latter is a separate species and not simply a variety of Cercospora sorghi. The large monophyletic Mycosphaerella cluster contained a number of anamorph genera with no known teleomorph associations. Therefore, the number of anamorph genera related to Mycosphaerella may be much larger than suspected previously.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that Japanese encephalitis virus genotype III is still prevalent in swine herds in Sichuan province in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Qiao; Liu, Hongming; Chai, Chunxia; He, Bo; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Wen, Xintian; Yan, Qiguai; Ma, Xiaoping; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-06-01

    The genome of JEV strain SC201301, which was isolated from an aborted fetal piglet in 2013 in Sichuan province in China, was completely sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Sequence alignments showed that the SC201301 strain shared 97-100% sequence identity with other genotype III strains but showed less similarity to genotype I representative JEVs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the SC201301 strain belonged to genotype III and was most closely related to representative strains such as SA14-14-2, HW and SH0601. Our findings suggest that JEV genotype III is still prevalent in swine herds in Sichuan province in China, and thus, there is an urgent need to monitor the infection status of JEV among swine herds in China.

  5. Horizontal transmission and phylogenetic analysis of bovine leukemia virus in two districts of Miyazaki, Japan.

    PubMed

    Mekata, Hirohisa; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Konnai, Satoru; Kirino, Yumi; Horii, Yoichiro; Norimine, Junzo

    2015-09-01

    Horizontal transmission is recognized as a major infection route for bovine leukemia virus (BLV), and cattle with high viral loads are considered to be a major infectious source in a herd. However, a correlation between viral loads and the risk of infection has been insufficient to use as a foundation for BLV control strategies. In this report, we examined the epidemiology of BLV infection and the infectious source in a local area. In 2013-2014, BLV infection was investigated in 1,823 cattle from 117 farms in two adjacent districts, Miyazaki, Japan. Seropositive samples for BLV were detected with 88 cattle and in 14 farms. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 94% of the isolates clustered into genotype I and the remaining isolate into genotype III. Among genotype I, genetically distinct strains were spread at each farm, and cattle infected with less than 3 copies/100 cells did not transmit BLV to other cattle for more than thirty months. This is the first report of concrete data of viral load in relation to viral horizontal transmission under the field condition. The data facilitate farmers and veterinarians understanding the status of BLV infected cattle. This research contributes to BLV infection control and the development of effective BLV eradication programs.

  6. Horizontal transmission and phylogenetic analysis of bovine leukemia virus in two districts of Miyazaki, Japan

    PubMed Central

    MEKATA, Hirohisa; SEKIGUCHI, Satoshi; KONNAI, Satoru; KIRINO, Yumi; HORII, Yoichiro; NORIMINE, Junzo

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal transmission is recognized as a major infection route for bovine leukemia virus (BLV), and cattle with high viral loads are considered to be a major infectious source in a herd. However, a correlation between viral loads and the risk of infection has been insufficient to use as a foundation for BLV control strategies. In this report, we examined the epidemiology of BLV infection and the infectious source in a local area. In 2013–2014, BLV infection was investigated in 1,823 cattle from 117 farms in two adjacent districts, Miyazaki, Japan. Seropositive samples for BLV were detected with 88 cattle and in 14 farms. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 94% of the isolates clustered into genotype I and the remaining isolate into genotype III. Among genotype I, genetically distinct strains were spread at each farm, and cattle infected with less than 3 copies/100 cells did not transmit BLV to other cattle for more than thirty months. This is the first report of concrete data of viral load in relation to viral horizontal transmission under the field condition. The data facilitate farmers and veterinarians understanding the status of BLV infected cattle. This research contributes to BLV infection control and the development of effective BLV eradication programs. PMID:25892699

  7. Séance: reference-based phylogenetic analysis for 18S rRNA studies.

    PubMed

    Medlar, Alan; Aivelo, Tuomas; Löytynoja, Ari

    2014-11-30

    Marker gene studies often use short amplicons spanning one or more hypervariable regions from an rRNA gene to interrogate the community structure of uncultured environmental samples. Target regions are chosen for their discriminatory power, but the limited phylogenetic signal of short high-throughput sequencing reads precludes accurate phylogenetic analysis. This is particularly unfortunate in the study of microscopic eukaryotes where horizontal gene flow is limited and the rRNA gene is expected to accurately reflect the species phylogeny. A promising alternative to full phylogenetic analysis is phylogenetic placement, where a reference phylogeny is inferred using the complete marker gene and iteratively extended with the short sequences from a metagenetic sample under study. Based on the phylogenetic placement approach we built Séance, a community analysis pipeline focused on the analysis of 18S marker gene data. Séance combines the alignment extension and phylogenetic placement capabilities of the Pagan multiple sequence alignment program with a suite of tools to preprocess, cluster and visualise datasets composed of many samples. We showcase Séance by analysing 454 data from a longitudinal study of intestinal parasite communities in wild rufous mouse lemurs (Microcebus rufus) as well as in simulation. We demonstrate both improved OTU picking at higher levels of sequence similarity for 454 data and show the accuracy of phylogenetic placement to be comparable to maximum likelihood methods for lower numbers of taxa. Séance is an open source community analysis pipeline that provides reference-based phylogenetic analysis for rRNA marker gene studies. Whilst in this article we focus on studying nematodes using the 18S marker gene, the concepts are generic and reference data for alternative marker genes can be easily created. Séance can be downloaded from http://wasabiapp.org/software/seance/ .

  8. Detection of feline calicivirus (FCV) from vaccinated cats and phylogenetic analysis of its capsid genes.

    PubMed

    Ohe, K; Sakai, S; Sunaga, F; Murakami, M; Kiuchi, A; Fukuyama, M; Furuhata, K; Hara, M; Soma, T; Ishikawa, Y; Taneno, A

    2006-04-01

    We analysed genogroups of four feline calcivirus (FCV) isolates (FCV-S, H10, Ao198-1 and ML89) obtained from cats that experienced FCV infection after having been vaccinated against FCV. New PCR primer sets (8F/8R, Ao-S/Ao-A, cp-S/cp-A) were also designed, since the conventional Seal primer failed to amplify the target sequences in two samples. The genogroups of the four isolates as well as eight global and 17 domestic strains were determined by phylogenetic analysis of their amino acid sequences. One out of the four strains (25%) isolated in this study, H10, was grouped into genogroup I, along with the vaccine strains F9 and FCV-255. The other three isolates (75%) belonged to genogroup II. Thus, there were more isolates in genogroup II than in genogroup I. However, the antibody values of the four isolates against cat anti-F9 antisera were significantly decreased. There may be no relationship between the neutralizing antibody titre and genogroup. Amino acid sequence alignment of the four isolates showed that only a single amino acid in region C, which is involved in neutralization epitopes, was different in ML89 strain from that of F9. The other three strains, H10, Ao198-1 and FCV-B, shared the same amino acid sequence with F9. Alignment of amino acids for linear epitopes in the F9 strain, which are located at regions D and E, showed variations in 5' hypervariable region (HVR) of E, whereas D and conE had only synonymous substitutions i.e. no change in the amino acid sequence. This mutation in 5' HVR of region E suggested a vaccine breakdown, as the region is known to be essential for antigenicity. The genogroup II FCV is likely to be the cause of the FCV infection in this study, while the vaccine strains belong to genogroup I. Thus, the existing vaccine may need reevaluation for its effectiveness.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of bovine astrovirus in Korean cattle.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; An, Dong-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Bovine astrovirus (BAstV) belongs to a genetically divergent lineage within the genus Mamastrovirus. The present study showed that BAstV was associated with the gastroenteric tracts of cattle in nine positive fecal samples from 115 cattle, whereas no positive samples were found in the brain tissues of 14 downer cattle. Interestingly, the positive diarrheal samples were obtained mainly from calves aged 14 days-3 months. Bayesian inference tree analysis of the partial ORF1ab and capsid (ORF2) gene sequences of BAstVs identified four divergent groups. Eleven BAstVs, four porcine astroviruses, and two deer astroviruses (DAstVs; CcAstV-1 and -2) belonged to group 1; group 2 contained two BAstVs (BAstK08-51 and BAstK10-96) with another two in group 3 (BAstK08-2 and BAstK08-53); and group 4 comprised the BAstV-NeuroS1 strain derived from a cattle brain tissue sample and an ovine astrovirus. The same divergent groups were obtained when the pairwise alignments were produced using both amino acid and nucleotide sequences. The Korean BAstVs isolated from infected cattle had a nationwide distribution and they belonged to groups 1, 2, and 3.

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of an Anaerobic, Trichlorobenzene-Transforming Microbial Consortium

    PubMed Central

    von Wintzingerode, Friedrich; Selent, Burkhard; Hegemann, Werner; Göbel, Ulf B.

    1999-01-01

    A culture-independent phylogenetic survey for an anaerobic trichlorobenzene-transforming microbial community was carried out. Small-subunit rRNA genes were PCR amplified from community DNA by using primers specific for Bacteria or Euryarchaeota and were subsequently cloned. Application of a new hybridization-based screening approach revealed 51 bacterial clone families, one of which was closely related to dechlorinating Dehalobacter species. Several clone sequences clustered to rDNA sequences obtained from a molecular study of an anaerobic aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents (Dojka et al., Appl. Env. Microbiol. 64:3869–3877, 1998). PMID:9872791

  11. Evaluation of a Method Using Three Genomic Guided Escherichia coli Markers for Phylogenetic Typing of E. coli Isolates of Various Genetic Backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Hamamoto, Kouta; Ueda, Shuhei; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping and characterization of bacterial isolates are essential steps in the identification and control of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. Recently, one novel genotyping method using three genomic guided Escherichia coli markers (GIG-EM), dinG, tonB, and dipeptide permease (DPP), was reported. Because GIG-EM has not been fully evaluated using clinical isolates, we assessed this typing method with 72 E. coli collection of reference (ECOR) environmental E. coli reference strains and 63 E. coli isolates of various genetic backgrounds. In this study, we designated 768 bp of dinG, 745 bp of tonB, and 655 bp of DPP target sequences for use in the typing method. Concatenations of the processed marker sequences were used to draw GIG-EM phylogenetic trees. E. coli isolates with identical sequence types as identified by the conventional multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method were localized to the same branch of the GIG-EM phylogenetic tree. Sixteen clinical E. coli isolates were utilized as test isolates without prior characterization by conventional MLST and phylogenetic grouping before GIG-EM typing. Of these, 14 clinical isolates were assigned to a branch including only isolates of a pandemic clone, E. coli B2-ST131-O25b, and these results were confirmed by conventional typing methods. Our results suggested that the GIG-EM typing method and its application to phylogenetic trees might be useful tools for the molecular characterization and determination of the genetic relationships among E. coli isolates. PMID:25809972

  12. Phylogenetic Diversity Analysis of Subterranean Hot Springs in Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Marteinsson, Viggó Thór; Hauksdóttir, Sigurbjörg; Hobel, Cédric F. V.; Kristmannsdóttir, Hrefna; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur Oli; Kristjánsson, Jakob K.

    2001-01-01

    Geothermal energy has been harnessed and used for domestic heating in Iceland. In wells that are typically drilled to a depth of 1,500 to 2,000 m, the temperature of the source water is 50 to 130°C. The bottoms of the boreholes can therefore be regarded as subterranean hot springs and provide a unique opportunity to study the subterranean biosphere. Large volumes of geothermal fluid from five wells and a mixture of geothermal water from 50 geothermal wells (hot tap water) were sampled and concentrated through a 0.2-μm-pore-size filter. Cells were observed in wells RG-39 (91.4°C) and MG-18 (71.8°C) and in hot tap water (76°C), but no cells were detected in wells SN-4, SN-5 (95 to 117°C), and RV-5 (130°C). Archaea and Bacteria were detected by whole-cell fluorescent in situ hybridization. DNAs were extracted from the biomass, and small-subunit rRNA genes (16S rDNAs) were amplified by PCR using primers specific for the Archaea and Bacteria domains. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis showed 11 new operational taxonomic units (OTUs) out of 14, 3 of which were affiliated with known surface OTUs. Samples from RG-39 and hot tap water were inoculated into enrichment media and incubated at 65 and 85°C. Growth was observed only in media based on geothermal water. 16S rDNA analysis showed enrichments dominated with Desulfurococcales relatives. Two strains belonging to Desulfurococcus mobilis and to the Thermus/Deinococcus group were isolated from borehole RG-39. The results indicate that subsurface volcanic zones are an environment that provides a rich subsurface for novel thermophiles. PMID:11526029

  13. Clostridium guangxiense sp. nov. and Clostridium neuense sp. nov., two phylogenetically closely related hydrogen-producing species isolated from lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Li, Danyang; Xu, Shuhong; Guo, Zhanghao; Zhang, Yan; Man, Lin; Jiang, Binhui; Hu, Xiaomin

    2017-03-01

    Two novel anaerobic, mesophilic, biohydrogen-producing bacteria, designated strains ZGM211T and G1T, were isolated from lake sediment. 16S rRNA and ATP synthase beta subunit (atpD) gene sequences and phylogenetic analysis of strains ZGM211T and G1T revealed an affiliation to the genus Clostridium sensu stricto (cluster I of the clostridia), with Clostridium acetobutylicum as the closest characterized species, showing the same sequence similarity of 96.4 % to the type strain (98.9 % between the two isolates). Cells of the two strains were rod shaped. Growth occurred at 20-45 °C, pH 4.0-8.0 and NaCl concentrations up to 2 % (w/v). Grown on glucose, the main fermentation products were H2, CO2, acetate and butyrate. The major fatty acids were C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. The DNA G+C contents of strains ZGM211T and G1T were 40.7 and 41.5 mol%, respectively. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic differences, strains ZGM211T (=CICC 24070T=BCRC 80950T) and G1T (=CICC 24069T=BCRC 80949T) are proposed as the type strains of novel species of the genus Clostridium with the names Clostridium guangxiense sp. nov. and Clostridium neuense sp. nov., respectively.

  14. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and blakpc gene phylogenetic analysis of an outbreak of carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae strains.

    PubMed

    Angeletti, Silvia; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Crea, Francesca; Avola, Alessandra; Vitali, Massimiliano Andrea; Fagioni, Marco; De Florio, Lucia

    2015-10-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates are an important cause of nosocomial infections. This study evaluated a rapid cost-saving method based on MALDI-TOF technology, was and compared it with phenotypic, genotypic and epidemiological data for characterization of KPC-Kp strains consecutively isolated during a supposed outbreak. Twenty-five consecutive KPC Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were identified and clustered by the MALDI Biotyper (Bruker, Daltonics). To display and rank the variance within a data set, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed. ClinProTools models were generated to investigate the highest sum of recognition capability and cross-validation. A Class dendrogram of isolates was constructed using ClinproTool. MLST was performed sequencing gapA, infB, mdh, pgi, rpoB, phoE and tonB genes. blakpc and cps genes were typed. Phylogenetic analysis and genetic distance of the KPC gene were performed using the MEGA6 software. PCA analysis defined two clusters, I and II, which were identified in a dendrogram by both temporal split and different antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. These clusters were composed mostly of strains of the same sequence type (ST512), the most prevalent ST in Italy, and the same cps (type 2). In cluster II, blakpc genotype resulted more variable than in cluster I. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the genetic diversity in both clusters supported by the epidemiological data. Our study confirms that MALDI-TOF can be a rapid and cost-saving method for epidemiological clustering of KPC K. pneumoniae isolates and its association with blakpc genotyping represents a reliable method to recognize possible clonal strains in nosocomial settings.

  15. Variability of P1 protein of zucchini yellow mosaic virus for strain differentiation and phylogenetic analysis with other potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Lee, K C; Wong, S M

    1998-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a Singapore isolate of zucchini yellow mosaic potyvirus (ZYMV-S) was determined from viral cDNA clones. The complete genome is 9603 nucleotides in length excluding the poly (A) tail. Computer analysis of the sequence revealed a single large open reading frame (ORF) that presumably encodes a polyprotein of 3082 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 350 kDa. Analysis of the helper component (HC) protein showed that the highly conserved motif K-I-T-C which is involved in aphid transmission appeared as K-L-S-C. There is also a change of D-A-G to G-A-G triplet near the N-terminal of the coat protein (CP). Amino acid sequence identity comparison of ZYMV-S gene products with the California and Reunion Island isolates of ZYMV revealed a minimum range of 65-75% to a maximum range of 95-98%. Comparison with other distinct potyviruses showed a low degree of identity from 19-74%. The 5' untranslated region (UTR) of ZYMV-S showed 67% and 72% identity when compared with the California and Reunion Island isolates, respectively. The sequence variability in the 5' UTR of ZYMV can be exploited for strain differentiation and phylogenetic analysis. ZYMV-S shared 94% and 82% identity in the 3' UTR as compared to the California and Reunion Island isolates, respectively. The P1 protein of ZYMV-S shared moderate sequence variability among ZYMV isolates but high sequence variability among all potyviruses. In addition, phylogenetic analysis using the P1 protein indicated that highly variable proteins in the viral genome could also be employed in the study of potyvirus taxonomy and used for strain differentiation.

  16. Pythium recalcitrans sp. nov. revealed by multigene phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Moralejo, Eduardo; Clemente, Antonio; Descals, Enrique; Belbahri, Lassaad; Calmin, Gautier; Lefort, François; Spies, Chris F J; McLeod, Adele

    2008-01-01

    A new species of Pythium collected from grapevine roots (Vitis vinifera) in South Africa and roots of common beet (Beta vulgaris) in Majorca, Spain, is described. The phylogenetic position of the new species was investigated by multigene sequence analyses of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) of the rDNA region, as well as three other nuclear and three mitochondrial coding genes. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses based on ITS rDNA and concatenated beta-tubulin and cytrochrome c oxidase II alignment place Pythium recalcitrans together with P. sylvaticum and P. intermedium. Pythium recalcitrans sp. nov. is morphologically almost indistinguishable from other Pythium species that only form hyphal swellings in culture. However its species status is justified by the distinctiveness of the DNA sequences in all the genes examined. In culture P. recalcitrans exhibits fast radial growth, abundant spherical to subglobose hyphal swellings but produces no zoosporangia. Sexual structures are not seen in agar media but form in autoclaved grass blades floated on water. Multiple antheridia (1-7) are encountered with most of them diclinous and crook-necked. Oospores are thin-walled and either aplerotic or plerotic. P. recalcitrans was pathogenic to seedlings of Beta vulgaris and Solanum lycopersicum.

  17. Evolution of climatic niche specialization: a phylogenetic analysis in amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Bonetti, Maria Fernanda; Wiens, John J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of climatic niche specialization has important implications for many topics in ecology, evolution and conservation. The climatic niche reflects the set of temperature and precipitation conditions where a species can occur. Thus, specialization to a limited set of climatic conditions can be important for understanding patterns of biogeography, species richness, community structure, allopatric speciation, spread of invasive species and responses to climate change. Nevertheless, the factors that determine climatic niche width (level of specialization) remain poorly explored. Here, we test whether species that occur in more extreme climates are more highly specialized for those conditions, and whether there are trade-offs between niche widths on different climatic niche axes (e.g. do species that tolerate a broad range of temperatures tolerate only a limited range of precipitation regimes?). We test these hypotheses in amphibians, using phylogenetic comparative methods and global-scale datasets, including 2712 species with both climatic and phylogenetic data. Our results do not support either hypothesis. Rather than finding narrower niches in more extreme environments, niches tend to be narrower on one end of a climatic gradient but wider on the other. We also find that temperature and precipitation niche breadths are positively related, rather than showing trade-offs. Finally, our results suggest that most amphibian species occur in relatively warm and dry environments and have relatively narrow climatic niche widths on both of these axes. Thus, they may be especially imperilled by anthropogenic climate change. PMID:25274369

  18. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis supports an agricultural origin of Japonic languages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sean; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2011-12-22

    Languages, like genes, evolve by a process of descent with modification. This striking similarity between biological and linguistic evolution allows us to apply phylogenetic methods to explore how languages, as well as the people who speak them, are related to one another through evolutionary history. Language phylogenies constructed with lexical data have so far revealed population expansions of Austronesian, Indo-European and Bantu speakers. However, how robustly a phylogenetic approach can chart the history of language evolution and what language phylogenies reveal about human prehistory must be investigated more thoroughly on a global scale. Here we report a phylogeny of 59 Japonic languages and dialects. We used this phylogeny to estimate time depth of its root and compared it with the time suggested by an agricultural expansion scenario for Japanese origin. In agreement with the scenario, our results indicate that Japonic languages descended from a common ancestor approximately 2182 years ago. Together with archaeological and biological evidence, our results suggest that the first farmers of Japan had a profound impact on the origins of both people and languages. On a broader level, our results are consistent with a theory that agricultural expansion is the principal factor for shaping global linguistic diversity.

  19. Distribution of Integrons and Phylogenetic Groups among Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolates from Children <5 Years of Age in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Taru; Das, Shukla; Ramachandran, V. G.; Wani, Sayim; Shah, Dheeraj; Maroof, Khan A.; Sharma, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    Integrons by means of horizontal gene transfer carry multidrug resistance genes (MDR) among bacteria, including E. coli. The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic resistance profiles and the genes associated with them, to gain insights in the distribution of phylogroups, prevalence, and characterization of class 1, 2 and 3 integrons among Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) isolates, from children upto 5 years of age from Delhi and National Capital Region (NCR), India. A total of 120 E. coli isolates, including 80 from diarrheagenic E. coli (cases) and 40 from healthy isolates (controls) were recruited in this study. After isolation of E. coli, screening for EPEC was done by conventional multiplex PCR. Antibiotic suseptibility test was performed using disk diffusion method and further confirmed by minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) by E-test. The presence and characterization of integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes were performed by PCR and DNA sequencing. Phylogeny determination was carried out by quadruplex PCR. EPEC strains were found in 64 of the 80 diarrheagenic cases, out of which 38 were MDR. In the 40 healthy controls, 23 were found to be EPEC strain, out of which only 2 were MDR. Amongst 80 diarrheagenic cases, class 1 integron were observed in 43 isolates, class 2 integron in 12 isolates and 9 isolates were found with co-existence of both. Similarly, in healthy controls; class 1 integron in 9 and class 2 integron in 7 isolates were observed with co-existence in 3 isolates. None of the isolates included class 3 integron. The dfr was the most commonly identified gene cassette within the integron-positive isolates. Phylogenetic studies showed considerable representation of phylogroup B2 in both diarrheagenic cases and healthy controls. This study reiterates the importance of class 1 integron predominantly for acquisition of antibiotic resistance genes among EPEC isolates. Furthermore, it also ascertains the possible association between

  20. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that habitat filtering is structuring marine bacterial communities across the globe.

    PubMed

    Pontarp, Mikael; Canbäck, Björn; Tunlid, Anders; Lundberg, Per

    2012-07-01

    The phylogenetic structure and community composition were analysed in an existing data set of marine bacterioplankton communities to elucidate the evolutionary and ecological processes dictating the assembly. The communities were sampled from coastal waters at nine locations distributed worldwide and were examined through the use of comprehensive clone libraries of 16S ribosomal RNA genes. The analyses show that the local communities are phylogenetically different from each other and that a majority of them are phylogenetically clustered, i.e. the species (operational taxonomic units) were more related to each other than expected by chance. Accordingly, the local communities were assembled non-randomly from the global pool of available bacterioplankton. Further, the phylogenetic structures of the communities were related to the water temperature at the locations. In agreement with similar studies, including both macroorganisms and bacteria, these results suggest that marine bacterial communities are structured by “habitat filtering”, i.e. through non-random colonization and invasion determined by environmental characteristics. Different bacterial types seem to have different ecological niches that dictate their survival in different habitats. Other eco-evolutionary processes that may contribute to the observed phylogenetic patterns are discussed. The results also imply a mapping between phenotype and phylogenetic relatedness which facilitates the use of community phylogenetic structure analysis to infer ecological and evolutionary assembly processes.

  1. Molecular detection of the oyster parasite Mikrocytos mackini, and a preliminary phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Carnegie, Ryan B; Meyer, Gary R; Blackbourn, Janice; Cochennec-Laureau, Nathalie; Berthe, Franck C J; Bower, Susan M

    2003-04-24

    The protistan parasite Mikrocytos mackini, the causative agent of Denman Island disease in the oyster Crassostrea gigas in British Columbia, Canada, is of wide concern because it can infect other oyster species and because its life cycle, mode of transmission, and origins are unknown. PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assays were developed for M. mackini, the PCR assay was validated against standard histopathological diagnosis, and a preliminary phylogenetic analysis of the M. mackini small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rDNA) was undertaken. A PCR designed specifically not to amplify host DNA generated a 544 bp SSU rDNA fragment from M. mackini-infected oysters and enriched M. mackini cell isolates, but not from uninfected control oysters. This fragment was confirmed by FISH to be M. mackini SSU rDNA. A M. mackini-specific PCR was then designed which detected 3 to 4x more M. mackini infections in 1056 wild oysters from Denman Island, British Columbia, than standard histopathology. Mikrocytos mackini prevalence estimates based on both PCR and histopathology increased (PCR from 4.4 to 7.4%, histopathology from 1.2 to 2.1%) when gross lesions were processed in addition to standard samples (i.e. transverse sections for histopathology, left outer palp DNA for PCR). The use of histopathology and tissue imprints plus PCR, and standard samples plus observed gross lesions, represented a 'total evidence' approach that provided the most realistic estimates of the true prevalence of M. mackini. Maximum parsimony and evolutionary distance phylogenetic analyses suggested that M. mackini may be a basal eukaryote, although it is not closely related to other known protistan taxa.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of Monascus and new species from honey, pollen and nests of stingless bees.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, R N; Leong, S L; Vinnere-Pettersson, O; Chen, A J; Souza-Motta, C M; Frisvad, J C; Samson, R A; Oliveira, N T; Houbraken, J

    2017-03-01

    The genus Monascus was described by van Tieghem (1884) to accommodate M. ruber and M. mucoroides, two species with non-ostiolate ascomata. Species delimitation in the genus is still mainly based on phenotypic characters, and taxonomic studies that include sequence data are limited. The genus is of economic importance. Species are used in fermented Asian foods as food colourants (e.g. 'red rice' (ang-kak, angka)) and found as spoilage organisms, and recently Monascus was found to be essential in the lifecycle of stingless bees. In this study, a polyphasic approach was applied combining morphological characters, ITS, LSU, β-tubulin, calmodulin and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit sequences and extrolite data, to delimit species and to study phylogenetic relationships in Monascus. Furthermore, 30 Monascus isolates from honey, pollen and nests of stingless bees in Brazil were included. Based on this polyphasic approach, the genus Monascus is resolved in nine species, including three new species associated with stingless bees (M. flavipigmentosus sp. nov., M. mellicola sp. nov., M. recifensis sp. nov., M. argentinensis, M. floridanus, M. lunisporas, M. pallens, M. purpureus, M. ruber), and split in two new sections (section Floridani sect. nov., section Rubri sect. nov.). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the xerophile Monascus eremophilus does not belong in Monascus and monophyly in Monascus is restored with the transfer of M. eremophilus to Penicillium (P. eremophilum comb. nov.). A list of accepted and excluded Monascus and Basipetospora species is given, together with information on (ex-)types cultures and barcode sequence data.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of beta-papillomaviruses as inferred from nucleotide and amino acid sequence data.

    PubMed

    Gottschling, Marc; Köhler, Anja; Stockfleth, Eggert; Nindl, Ingo

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) of the beta-group seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancer. Papillomaviruses are host specific and are considered closely co-evolving with their hosts. Evolutionary incongruence between early genes and late genes has been reported among oncogenic genital alpha-papillomaviruses and considerably challenge phylogenetic reconstructions. We investigated the relationships of 29 beta-HPV (25 types plus four putative new types, subtypes, or variants) as inferred from codon aligned and amino acid sequence data of the genes E1, E2, E6, E7, L1, and L2 using likelihood, distance, and parsimony approaches. An analysis of a L1 fragment included additional nucleotide and amino acid sequences from seven non-human beta-papillomaviruses. Early genes and late genes evolution did not conflict significantly in beta-papillomaviruses based on partition homogeneity tests (p > or = 0.001). As inferred from the complete genome analyses, beta-papillomaviruses were monophyletic and segregated into four highly supported monophyletic assemblages corresponding to the species 1, 2, 3, and fused 4/5. They basically split into the species 1 and the remainder of beta-papillomaviruses, whose species 3, 4, and 5 constituted the sistergroup of species 2. beta-Papillomaviruses have been isolated from humans, apes, and monkeys, and phylogenetic analyses of the L1 fragment showed non-human papillomaviruses highly polyphyletic nesting within the HPV species. Thus, host and virus phylogenies were not congruent in beta-papillomaviruses, and multiple invasions across species borders may contribute (additionally to host-linked evolution) to their diversification.

  4. Sensitivity and correlation of hypervariable regions in 16S rRNA genes in phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2016-03-22

    Prokaryotic 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences are widely used in environmental microbiology and molecular evolution as reliable markers for the taxonomic classification and phylogenetic analysis of microbes. Restricted by current sequencing techniques, the massive sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons encompassing the full length of genes is not yet feasible. Thus, the selection of the most efficient hypervariable regions for phylogenetic analysis and taxonomic classification is still debated. In the present study, several bioinformatics tools were integrated to build an in silico pipeline to evaluate the phylogenetic sensitivity of the hypervariable regions compared with the corresponding full-length sequences. The correlation of seven sub-regions was inferred from the geodesic distance, a parameter that is applied to quantitatively compare the topology of different phylogenetic trees constructed using the sequences from different sub-regions. The relationship between different sub-regions based on the geodesic distance indicated that V4-V6 were the most reliable regions for representing the full-length 16S rRNA sequences in the phylogenetic analysis of most bacterial phyla, while V2 and V8 were the least reliable regions. Our results suggest that V4-V6 might be optimal sub-regions for the design of universal primers with superior phylogenetic resolution for bacterial phyla. A potential relationship between function and the evolution of 16S rRNA is also discussed.

  5. Increased phylogenetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 isolates in England and Wales since 2001.

    PubMed

    Strong, R; Errington, J; Cook, R; Ross-Smith, N; Wakeley, P; Steinbach, F

    2013-03-23

    Currently, there are two recognised genotypes of Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), type 1 and type 2. These genotypes are divided into subtypes based on phylogenetic analysis, namely a-p for BVDV-1 and a-c for BVDV-2. Within this study, the genetic heterogeneity of BVDV-1 in England and Wales was investigated and compared to the situation in 1996/1997. Viral RNA was extracted from 316 blood samples collected between 2004 and 2009 that were previously identified as BVDV-1 positive. A region of the 5' untranslated region (UTR) was amplified by RT-PCR and the PCR products were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the 5'UTR demonstrated the existence of five subtypes of BVDV-1 circulating in England and Wales, namely BVDV-1a (244 samples), BVDV-1b (50), BVDV-1e (3), BVDV-1f (1) and BVDV-1i (18). Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence for the N(pro) region of the viral genome supported the classification obtained with the 5'UTR. Given the fact that only three subtypes were detected in 1999 this report supports the notion that the restocking of cattle from continental Europe, after the mass culling during the Foot-and-Mouth outbreak in 2001 and slaughter of cattle due to bovine tuberculosis infection, has increased the genetic diversity of BVDV-1 subtypes in England and Wales in the past 10 years.

  6. Assigning protein functions by comparative genome analysis protein phylogenetic profiles

    DOEpatents

    Pellegrini, Matteo; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Eisenberg, David; Grothe, Robert; Yeates, Todd O.

    2003-05-13

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  7. Evolutionary ecology of specialization: insights from phylogenetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vamosi, Jana C.; Armbruster, W. Scott; Renner, Susanne S.

    2014-01-01

    In this Special feature, we assemble studies that illustrate phylogenetic approaches to studying salient questions regarding the effect of specialization on lineage diversification. The studies use an array of techniques involving a wide-ranging collection of biological systems (plants, butterflies, fish and amphibians are all represented). Their results reveal that macroevolutionary examination of specialization provides insight into the patterns of trade-offs in specialized systems; in particular, the genetic mechanisms of trade-offs appear to extend to very different aspects of life history in different groups. In turn, because a species may be a specialist from one perspective and a generalist in others, these trade-offs influence whether we perceive specialization to have effects on the evolutionary success of a lineage when we examine specialization only along a single axis. Finally, how geographical range influences speciation and extinction of specialist lineages remains a question offering much potential for further insight. PMID:25274367

  8. Ulocladium cantlous sp. nov. isolated from Northwest China: morphology and molecular phylogenetic position

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species of Ulocladium was isolated from diseased leaves from two Cucumis spp. growing in Sinkiang and Gansu Provinces of China. Conidia were isolated from diseased leaf areas, grown in single-spore pure culture, and conidia harvested 1, 3, and 7 days after incubation for morphological comparis...

  9. Phylogenetic relationship of ribosomal ITS2 and mitochondrial COI among diploid and triploid Paragonimus westermani isolates

    PubMed Central

    Im, Kyung-Il; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2003-01-01

    We compared patterns of intraspecific polymorphism of two markers with contrasting modes of evolution, nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), in the lung fluke, diploid and triploid Paragonimus westermani from three geographical regions of Korea. The genetic distances between three populations of Korean diploid and triploid P. westermani showed no significant difference in the nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) and ribosomaal second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) genes. A highly resolved strict-consensus tree was obtained that illustrated phylogenetically useful information of the ITS2 and mtCOI sequences from diploid and triploid P. westermani. PMID:12666730

  10. wolfPAC: building a high-performance distributed computing network for phylogenetic analysis using 'obsolete' computational resources.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Patrick A; Friedman, Philip H; Richards, Christopher M

    2005-01-01

    wolfPAC is an AppleScript-based software package that facilitates the use of numerous, remotely located Macintosh computers to perform computationally-intensive phylogenetic analyses using the popular application PAUP* (Phylogenetic Analysis Using Parsimony). It has been designed to utilise readily available, inexpensive processors and to encourage sharing of computational resources within the worldwide phylogenetics community.

  11. Evolution of climatic niche specialization: a phylogenetic analysis in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Maria Fernanda; Wiens, John J

    2014-11-22

    The evolution of climatic niche specialization has important implications for many topics in ecology, evolution and conservation. The climatic niche reflects the set of temperature and precipitation conditions where a species can occur. Thus, specialization to a limited set of climatic conditions can be important for understanding patterns of biogeography, species richness, community structure, allopatric speciation, spread of invasive species and responses to climate change. Nevertheless, the factors that determine climatic niche width (level of specialization) remain poorly explored. Here, we test whether species that occur in more extreme climates are more highly specialized for those conditions, and whether there are trade-offs between niche widths on different climatic niche axes (e.g. do species that tolerate a broad range of temperatures tolerate only a limited range of precipitation regimes?). We test these hypotheses in amphibians, using phylogenetic comparative methods and global-scale datasets, including 2712 species with both climatic and phylogenetic data. Our results do not support either hypothesis. Rather than finding narrower niches in more extreme environments, niches tend to be narrower on one end of a climatic gradient but wider on the other. We also find that temperature and precipitation niche breadths are positively related, rather than showing trade-offs. Finally, our results suggest that most amphibian species occur in relatively warm and dry environments and have relatively narrow climatic niche widths on both of these axes. Thus, they may be especially imperilled by anthropogenic climate change. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis and development of probes for differentiating methylotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, G A; Bulygina, E S; Hanson, R S

    1994-01-01

    Fifteen small-subunit rRNAs from methylotrophic bacteria have been sequenced. Comparisons of these sequences with 22 previously published sequences further defined the phylogenetic relationships among these bacteria and illustrated the agreement between phylogeny and physiological characteristics of the bacteria. Phylogenetic trees were constructed with 16S rRNA sequences from methylotrophic bacteria and representative organisms from subdivisions within the class Proteobacteria on the basis of sequence similarities by using a weighted least-mean-square difference method. The methylotrophs have been separated into coherent clusters in which bacteria shared physiological characteristics. The clusters distinguished bacteria which used either the ribulose monophosphate or serine pathway for carbon assimilation. In addition, methanotrophs and methylotrophs which do not utilize methane were found to form distinct clusters within these groups. Five new deoxyoligonucleotide probes were designed, synthesized, labelled with digoxigenin-11-ddUTP, and tested for the ability to hybridize to RNA extracted from the bacteria represented in the unique clusters and for the ability to detect RNAs purified from soils enriched for methanotrophs by exposure to a methane-air atmosphere for one month. The 16S rRNA purified from soil hybridized to the probe which was complementary to sequences present in 16S rRNA from serine pathway methanotrophs and hybridized to a lesser extent with a probe complementary to sequences in 16S rRNAs of ribulose monophosphate pathway methanotrophs. The nonradioactive detection system used performed reliably at amounts of RNA from pure cultures as small as 10 ng. Images PMID:7510941

  13. Phenotypic Microdiversity and Phylogenetic Signal Analysis of Traits Related to Social Interaction in Bacillus spp. from Sediment Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Torres, María Dolores; Islas-Robles, África; Gómez-Lunar, Zulema; Delaye, Luis; Hernández-González, Ismael; Souza, Valeria; Travisano, Michael; Olmedo-Álvarez, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between phylogeny and predicted traits is important to uncover the dimension of the predictive power of a microbial composition approach. Numerous works have addressed the taxonomic composition of bacteria in communities, but little is known about trait heterogeneity in closely related bacteria that co-occur in communities. We evaluated a sample of 467 isolates from the Churince water system of the Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB), enriched for Bacillus spp. The 16S rRNA gene revealed a random distribution of taxonomic groups within this genus among 11 sampling sites. A subsample of 141 Bacillus spp. isolates from sediment, with seven well-represented species was chosen to evaluate the heterogeneity and the phylogenetic signal of phenotypic traits that are known to diverge within small clades, such as substrate utilization, and traits that are conserved deep in the lineage, such as prototrophy, swarming and biofilm formation. We were especially interested in evaluating social traits, such as swarming and biofilm formation, for which cooperation is needed to accomplish a multicellular behavior and for which there is little information from natural communities. The phylogenetic distribution of traits, evaluated by the Purvis and Fritz’s D statistics approached a Brownian model of evolution. Analysis of the phylogenetic relatedness of the clusters of members sharing the trait using consenTRAIT algorithm, revealed more clustering and deeper phylogenetic signal for prototrophy, biofilm and swimming compared to the data obtained for substrate utilization. The explanation to the observed Brownian evolution of social traits could be either loss due to complete dispensability or to compensated trait loss due to the availability of public goods. Since many of the evaluated traits can be considered to be collective action traits, such as swarming, motility and biofilm formation, the observed microdiversity within taxonomic groups might be explained

  14. Phenotypic Microdiversity and Phylogenetic Signal Analysis of Traits Related to Social Interaction in Bacillus spp. from Sediment Communities.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Torres, María Dolores; Islas-Robles, África; Gómez-Lunar, Zulema; Delaye, Luis; Hernández-González, Ismael; Souza, Valeria; Travisano, Michael; Olmedo-Álvarez, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between phylogeny and predicted traits is important to uncover the dimension of the predictive power of a microbial composition approach. Numerous works have addressed the taxonomic composition of bacteria in communities, but little is known about trait heterogeneity in closely related bacteria that co-occur in communities. We evaluated a sample of 467 isolates from the Churince water system of the Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB), enriched for Bacillus spp. The 16S rRNA gene revealed a random distribution of taxonomic groups within this genus among 11 sampling sites. A subsample of 141 Bacillus spp. isolates from sediment, with seven well-represented species was chosen to evaluate the heterogeneity and the phylogenetic signal of phenotypic traits that are known to diverge within small clades, such as substrate utilization, and traits that are conserved deep in the lineage, such as prototrophy, swarming and biofilm formation. We were especially interested in evaluating social traits, such as swarming and biofilm formation, for which cooperation is needed to accomplish a multicellular behavior and for which there is little information from natural communities. The phylogenetic distribution of traits, evaluated by the Purvis and Fritz's D statistics approached a Brownian model of evolution. Analysis of the phylogenetic relatedness of the clusters of members sharing the trait using consenTRAIT algorithm, revealed more clustering and deeper phylogenetic signal for prototrophy, biofilm and swimming compared to the data obtained for substrate utilization. The explanation to the observed Brownian evolution of social traits could be either loss due to complete dispensability or to compensated trait loss due to the availability of public goods. Since many of the evaluated traits can be considered to be collective action traits, such as swarming, motility and biofilm formation, the observed microdiversity within taxonomic groups might be explained

  15. Whole Genome Sequence and Phylogenetic Analysis Show Helicobacter pylori Strains from Latin America Have Followed a Unique Evolution Pathway.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Ramírez, Zilia Y; Mendez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Kato, Ikuko; Bravo, Maria M; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Thorell, Kaisa; Torres, Roberto; Aviles-Jimenez, Francisco; Camorlinga, Margarita; Canzian, Federico; Torres, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) genetics may determine its clinical outcomes. Despite high prevalence of HP infection in Latin America (LA), there have bee