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Sample records for isoniazid preventive therapy

  1. Effectiveness of rifabutin alone or in combination with isoniazid in preventive therapy of mouse tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jabès, D; Della Bruna, C; Rossi, R; Olliaro, P

    1994-01-01

    The ever-increasing incidence of tuberculosis calls for the implementation of control measures, including new efficient, short-term preventive therapies to replace 6 to 12 months of isoniazid therapy. The efficacies of 12-week regimens of rifabutin or isoniazid given daily and the combination of the two drugs administered intermittently were evaluated in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis after vaccination with the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) to imitate some features of the natural infection in humans with a low number of persisting bacteria. Rifabutin at 10 mg/kg of body weight per day was highly effective as early as the eighth week of treatment: all spleens were sterilized and the number of bacteria was drastically reduced in the lungs (mean +/- standard deviation log CFU, 0.2 +/- 0.3, compared with 5.9 +/- 0.6 for untreated controls). No bacilli were found in the spleens or lungs of any of the animals treated for 12 weeks. The combination of rifabutin at 10 mg/kg plus isoniazid at 25 mg/kg twice weekly was almost as effective as rifabutin daily: after 8 weeks of treatment only two of six mice harbored a small number of mycobacteria in their spleens and lungs; at week 12, all spleens were sterilized and a total of eight colonies were isolated from the lungs of two of six mice. Daily isoniazid and once-weekly rifabutin plus isoniazid therapies were less effective. Colonies randomly isolated from the spleens and lungs of mice from different experimental groups were also tested for their susceptibilities to the two drugs. The three surviving colonies from rifabutin-treated mice and all colonies from those administered rifabutin plus isoniazid remained fully susceptible to either drug. In contrast, 2 (18%) of the 11 colonies randomly selected from isoniazid-treated mice became resistant to isoniazid (MIC, > 2 micrograms/ml), although they were still susceptible to rifabutin. Three months of treatment with rifabutin, either daily alone or twice a week

  2. Barriers in the implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy for people living with HIV in Northern Ethiopia: a mixed quantitative and qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Teklay, Gebrehiwot; Teklu, Tsigemariam; Legesse, Befikadu; Tedla, Kiros; Klinkenberg, Eveline

    2016-08-19

    Isoniazid preventive therapy is a key public health intervention for the prevention of tuberculosis disease among people living with HIV. Despite the confirmed efficacy of isoniazid preventive therapy and global recommendations existing for decades, its implementation remains limited. In resource constrained settings, few have investigated why isoniazid preventive therapy is not implemented on full scale. This study was designed to investigate the level of isoniazid preventive therapy implementation and reasons for suboptimal implementation in Tigray region of Ethiopia. A review of patient records combined with a qualitative study using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions was conducted in 11 hospitals providing isoniazid preventive therapy in the Tigray Region. The study participants were health providers working in the HIV clinics of the 11 hospitals in the province. Health providers were interviewed about their experience of providing isoniazid preventive therapy and challenges faced during its implementation. All conversations were audio-recorded. Record review of 16,443 HIV patients registered for care in these hospitals between September 2011 and April 2014 was done to determine isoniazid preventive therapy utilization. Data were collected from April to August 2014. Fifty health providers participated in the study. Overall isoniazid preventive therapy coverage of the region was estimated to be 20 %. Isoniazid stock out, fear of creating isoniazid resistance, problems in patient acceptance, and lack of commitment of health managers to scale up the program were indicated by health providers as the main barriers hindering implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy. Implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy in Tigray region of Ethiopia had low coverage. Frequent interruption of isoniazid supplies raises the concern of interrupted therapy resulting in creation of isoniazid resistance. Health managers, drug suppliers and partners working in HIV

  3. Implications of the 2015 World Health Organization isoniazid preventive therapy recommendations on tuberculosis prevention efforts in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Oloo, Stella Anne

    2016-07-01

    The World Health Organization recently released guidelines recommending 36-month use of isoniazid preventive therapy in adults and adolescents living with HIV in resource-limited settings. Namibia continues to grapple with one of the highest incidences of tuberculosis (TB) worldwide. Implementation of these guidelines requires considerations of TB epidemiology, health infrastructure, programmatic priorities and patient adherence. This article explores the challenges Namibia currently faces in its fight against TB and the implications of the new guidelines on Namibian TB prevention efforts.

  4. Isoniazid preventive therapy for people living with HIV: public health challenges and implementation issues.

    PubMed

    Aït-Khaled, N; Alarcon, E; Bissell, K; Boillot, F; Caminero, J A; Chiang, C-Y; Clevenbergh, P; Dlodlo, R; Enarson, D A; Enarson, P; Ferroussier, O; Fujiwara, P I; Harries, A D; Heldal, E; Hinderaker, S G; Kim, S J; Lienhardt, C; Rieder, H L; Rusen, I D; Trébucq, A; Van Deun, A; Wilson, N

    2009-08-01

    Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is recognised as an important component of collaborative tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activities to reduce the burden of TB in people living with HIV (PLHIV). However, there has been little in the way of IPT implementation at country level. This failure has resulted in a recent call to arms under the banner title of the 'Three I's' (infection control to prevent nosocomial transmission of TB in health care settings, intensified TB case finding and IPT). In this paper, we review the background of IPT. We then discuss the important challenges of IPT in PLHIV, namely responsibility and accountability for the implementation, identification of latent TB infection, exclusion of active TB and prevention of isoniazid resistance, length of treatment and duration of protective efficacy. We also highlight several research questions that currently remain unanswered. We finally offer practical suggestions about how to scale up IPT in the field, including the need to integrate IPT into a package of care for PLHIV, the setting up of operational projects with the philosophy of 'learning while doing', the development of flow charts for eligibility for IPT, the development and implementation of care prior to antiretroviral treatment, and finally issues around procurement, distribution, monitoring and evaluation. We support the implementation of IPT, but only if it is done in a safe and structured way. There is a definite risk that 'sloppy' IPT will be inefficient and, worse, could lead to the development of multidrug-resistant TB, and this must be avoided at all costs.

  5. Implementation of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis and isoniazid preventive therapy for people living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Vitoria, Marco; Granich, Reuben; Banda, Mazuwa; Fox, Mayada Youssef; Gilks, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To measure progress in implementing co-trimoxazole prophylaxis (CTXp) (trimethoprim plus sulfamethoxazole) and isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) policy recommendations, identify barriers to the development of national policies and pinpoint challenges to implementation. Methods In 2007 we conducted by e-mail a cross-sectional survey of World Health Organization (WHO) HIV/AIDS programme officers in 69 selected countries having a high burden of infection with HIV or HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB). The specially-designed, self-administered questionnaire contained items covering national policies for CTXp and IPT in people living with HIV, current level of implementation and barriers to developing or implementing these policies. Findings The 41 (59%) respondent countries, representing all WHO regions, comprised 85% of the global burden of HIV-associated TB and 82% of the global burden of HIV infection. Thirty-eight countries (93%) had an established national policy for CTXp, but only 66% of them (25/38) had achieved nationwide implementation. For IPT, 21 of 41 countries (51%) had a national policy but only 28% of them (6/21) had achieved nationwide implementation. Despite significant progress in the development of CTXp policy, the limited availability of co-trimoxazole for this indication and inadequate systems to manage drug supply impeded nationwide implementation. Inadequate intensified tuberculosis case-finding and concerns regarding isoniazid resistance were challenges to the development and implementation of national IPT policies. Conclusion Despite progress in implementing WHO-recommended CTXp and IPT policies, these interventions remain underused. Urgent steps are required to facilitate the development and implementation of these policies. PMID:20431788

  6. Adverse effects of isoniazid preventative therapy for latent tuberculosis infection: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Denholm, Justin T; McBryde, Emma S; Eisen, Damon P; Penington, Jocelyn S; Chen, Caroline; Street, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    Isoniazid preventative therapy (IPT) is a widely used intervention for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), particularly in patients at high risk for reactivation. While treatment-limiting adverse effects have been well studied, few prospective studies have considered the range of adverse effects that patients may experience with IPT. All patients commencing treatment for LTBI were prospectively enrolled in an ongoing database of LTBI treatment outcomes particularly related to adverse effects, treatment adherence, and treatment completion. Data on the first 100 patients who were prescribed IPT are presented. Fifty-six patients reported at least one adverse effect at some stage during treatment, with six experiencing at least one World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 3-4 adverse effect. Increased age was significantly associated with risk of adverse effects (odds ratio [OR] =1.05 per year; confidence interval [CI] of 1.02-1.08=95%). Eighty-five patients had documented completion of therapy locally, with ten patients ceasing IPT due to adverse effects. This report highlights a variety of somatic adverse effects that occurred in a real-world cohort of patients receiving IPT. While adverse effects were frequently identified in this study, the considerable majority were low grade and transient. Despite frequent adverse effects of LTBI in our treatment cohort, the study demonstrated high levels of treatment adherence and completion.

  7. Improving tuberculosis screening and isoniazid preventive therapy in an HIV clinic in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Zaeh, S; Kempker, R; Stenehjem, E; Blumberg, H M; Temesgen, O; Ofotokun, I; Tenna, A

    2013-11-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends active tuberculosis (TB) case finding among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in resource-limited settings using a symptom-based algorithm; those without active TB disease should be offered isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT). To evaluate rates of adherence to WHO recommendations and the impact of a quality improvement intervention in an HIV clinic in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A prospective study design was utilized to compare TB symptom screening and IPT administration rates before and after a quality improvement intervention consisting of 1) educational sessions, 2) visual reminders, and 3) use of a screening checklist. A total of 751 HIV-infected patient visits were evaluated. The proportion of patients screened for TB symptoms increased from 22% at baseline to 94% following the intervention (P < 0.001). Screening rates improved from 51% to 81% (P < 0.001) for physicians and from 3% to 100% (P < 0.001) for nurses. Of the 281 patients with negative TB symptom screens and eligible for IPT, 4% were prescribed IPT before the intervention compared to 81% after (P < 0.001). We found that a quality improvement intervention significantly increased WHO-recommended TB screening rates and IPT administration. Utilizing nurses can help increase TB screening and IPT provision in resource-limited settings.

  8. Routine programmatic delivery of isoniazid preventive therapy to children in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Osman, M; Hesseling, A C; Beyers, N; Enarson, D A; Rusen, I D; Lombard, C; van Wyk, S S

    2013-09-21

    Fourteen primary health care facilities in Cape Town, South Africa. To determine the proportion and characteristics of infectious adult tuberculosis (TB) cases that identify children aged <5 years who qualify for isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), and to determine the proportion of children who initiate and complete IPT. A retrospective clinical record review conducted as a stratified cluster survey. Of 1179 records of infectious adult cases, 33.3% had no documentation of contacts. Of the remaining 786 records, 525 contacts aged <5 years were identified, representing 0.7 child contacts per infectious adult case. Older age, male, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive, smear-negative and retreatment TB cases were all associated with no documentation of contacts. Of the 525 child contacts identified, less than half were screened for TB, 141 initiated IPT and 19 completed it. Less than 67% of infectious TB case records had documentation of contacts. Younger, female, HIV-negative and new smear-positive TB cases were more likely to have had contacts identified. Less than 14% of children already initiated on IPT completed 6 months of treatment.

  9. Routine programmatic delivery of isoniazid preventive therapy to children in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hesseling, A. C.; Beyers, N.; Enarson, D. A.; Rusen, I. D.; Lombard, C.; van Wyk, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: Fourteen primary health care facilities in Cape Town, South Africa. Objective: To determine the proportion and characteristics of infectious adult tuberculosis (TB) cases that identify children aged <5 years who qualify for isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), and to determine the proportion of children who initiate and complete IPT. Design: A retrospective clinical record review conducted as a stratified cluster survey. Results: Of 1179 records of infectious adult cases, 33.3% had no documentation of contacts. Of the remaining 786 records, 525 contacts aged <5 years were identified, representing 0.7 child contacts per infectious adult case. Older age, male, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive, smear-negative and retreatment TB cases were all associated with no documentation of contacts. Of the 525 child contacts identified, less than half were screened for TB, 141 initiated IPT and 19 completed it. Conclusion: Less than 67% of infectious TB case records had documentation of contacts. Younger, female, HIV-negative and new smear-positive TB cases were more likely to have had contacts identified. Less than 14% of children already initiated on IPT completed 6 months of treatment. PMID:26393029

  10. Interventions to improve delivery of isoniazid preventive therapy: an overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Uptake of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) to prevent tuberculosis has been poor, particularly in the highest risk populations. Interventions to improve IPT delivery could promote implementation. The large number of existing systematic reviews on treatment adherence has made drawing conclusions a challenge. To provide decision makers with the evidence they need, we performed an overview of systematic reviews to compare different organizational interventions to improve IPT delivery as measured by treatment completion among those at highest risk for the development of TB disease, namely child contacts or HIV-infected individuals. Methods We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), and MEDLINE up to August 15, 2012. Two authors used a standardized data extraction form and the AMSTAR instrument to independently assess each review. Results Six reviews met inclusion criteria. Interventions included changes in the setting/site of IPT delivery, use of quality monitoring mechanisms (e.g., directly observed therapy), IPT delivery integration into other healthcare services, and use of lay health workers. Most reviews reported a combination of outcomes related to IPT adherence and treatment completion rate but without a baseline or comparison rate. Generally, we found limited evidence to demonstrate that the studied interventions improved treatment completion. Conclusions While most of the interventions were not shown to improve IPT completion, integration of tuberculosis and HIV services yielded high treatment completion rates in some settings. The lack of data from high burden TB settings limits applicability. Further research to assess different IPT delivery interventions, including those that address barriers to care in at-risk populations, is urgently needed to identify the most effective practices for IPT delivery and TB control in high TB burden settings. PMID:24886159

  11. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin and Isoniazid Preventive Therapy Protect Contacts of Patients with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Megan B.; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Galea, Jerome; Lecca, Leonid; Calderon, Roger; Yataco, Rosa; Contreras, Carmen; Zhang, Zibiao; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Cohen, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Individuals living with patients with tuberculosis (TB) are at elevated risk of infection and disease, with children at greatest risk. The World Health Organization recommends isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) for HIV-positive contacts and those younger than 5 years. Despite these recommendations, household-level IPT programs are rarely implemented in high TB burden settings. Evidence is scarce about the age-specific efficacy of interventions, such as IPT and bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination for preventing TB disease among exposed contacts. Objectives: We estimate the age-specific efficacy of IPT and BCG for preventing TB disease using data from a large observational prospective cohort study of household contacts of patients with TB in Lima, Peru. Methods: We identified all adults (>15 yr) with incident pulmonary TB (index cases) diagnosed at 106 public health centers in Lima from September 2009 to August 2012. Among 14,041 household contacts (of 3,446 index cases) assessed for infection and disease during the yearlong follow-up period, we identified 462 additional TB cases. We estimate risk ratios (RR) for pulmonary TB associated with BCG, IPT, and latent TB infection. Measurements and Main Results: BCG confers protection against coprevalent and incident TB among HIV-negative children younger than 10 years (RR, 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.19–0.66). IPT confers protection against incident TB among HIV-negative contacts younger than 30 years (RR, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.20–0.54). Risk of incident TB associated with latent TB infection is greatest for children younger than 5 years and decreases with age. Conclusions: These findings support the use of IPT in older children and young-adult household contacts, in addition to children younger than 5 years. PMID:24592878

  12. Tuberculosis control in South African gold mines: mathematical modeling of a trial of community-wide isoniazid preventive therapy.

    PubMed

    Vynnycky, Emilia; Sumner, Tom; Fielding, Katherine L; Lewis, James J; Cox, Andrew P; Hayes, Richard J; Corbett, Elizabeth L; Churchyard, Gavin J; Grant, Alison D; White, Richard G

    2015-04-15

    A recent major cluster randomized trial of screening, active disease treatment, and mass isoniazid preventive therapy for 9 months during 2006-2011 among South African gold miners showed reduced individual-level tuberculosis incidence but no detectable population-level impact. We fitted a dynamic mathematical model to trial data and explored 1) factors contributing to the lack of population-level impact, 2) the best-achievable impact if all implementation characteristics were increased to the highest level achieved during the trial ("optimized intervention"), and 3) how tuberculosis might be better controlled with additional interventions (improving diagnostics, reducing treatment delay, providing isoniazid preventive therapy continuously to human immunodeficiency virus-positive people, or scaling up antiretroviral treatment coverage) individually and in combination. We found the following: 1) The model suggests that a small proportion of latent infections among human immunodeficiency virus-positive people were cured, which could have been a key factor explaining the lack of detectable population-level impact. 2) The optimized implementation increased impact by only 10%. 3) Implementing additional interventions individually and in combination led to up to 30% and 75% reductions, respectively, in tuberculosis incidence after 10 years. Tuberculosis control requires a combination prevention approach, including health systems strengthening to minimize treatment delay, improving diagnostics, increased antiretroviral treatment coverage, and effective preventive treatment regimens.

  13. Tuberculosis Control in South African Gold Mines: Mathematical Modeling of a Trial of Community-Wide Isoniazid Preventive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vynnycky, Emilia; Sumner, Tom; Fielding, Katherine L.; Lewis, James J.; Cox, Andrew P.; Hayes, Richard J.; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Grant, Alison D.; White, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    A recent major cluster randomized trial of screening, active disease treatment, and mass isoniazid preventive therapy for 9 months during 2006–2011 among South African gold miners showed reduced individual-level tuberculosis incidence but no detectable population-level impact. We fitted a dynamic mathematical model to trial data and explored 1) factors contributing to the lack of population-level impact, 2) the best-achievable impact if all implementation characteristics were increased to the highest level achieved during the trial (“optimized intervention”), and 3) how tuberculosis might be better controlled with additional interventions (improving diagnostics, reducing treatment delay, providing isoniazid preventive therapy continuously to human immunodeficiency virus–positive people, or scaling up antiretroviral treatment coverage) individually and in combination. We found the following: 1) The model suggests that a small proportion of latent infections among human immunodeficiency virus–positive people were cured, which could have been a key factor explaining the lack of detectable population-level impact. 2) The optimized implementation increased impact by only 10%. 3) Implementing additional interventions individually and in combination led to up to 30% and 75% reductions, respectively, in tuberculosis incidence after 10 years. Tuberculosis control requires a combination prevention approach, including health systems strengthening to minimize treatment delay, improving diagnostics, increased antiretroviral treatment coverage, and effective preventive treatment regimens. PMID:25792607

  14. Anti-tuberculosis treatment outcomes in HIV-infected adults exposed to isoniazid preventive therapy in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Sibanda, T; Tedla, Z; Nyirenda, S; Agizew, T; Marape, M; Miranda, A G; Reuter, H; Johnson, J L; Samandari, T

    2013-02-01

    Eight public health clinics in Gaborone and Francistown, Botswana. To describe the characteristics and outcomes of incident tuberculosis (TB) cases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected adults exposed to isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) with access to antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis treatment. In 1995 HIV-infected adults, TB disease was excluded before commencing IPT. During and after receipt of 6 or 36 months of IPT, symptomatic participants were evaluated using chest radiographs, sputum microscopy, cultures and drug susceptibility testing (DST). Incident TB cases received ≥6 months of anti-tuberculosis treatment. Seventy-five incident TB cases were identified among 619 symptomatic participants. The median duration of IPT in these cases was 6 months (range 1-35), and the median time to initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment was 12 months after IPT cessation. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) was initiated before anti-tuberculosis treatment in 37 cases. Culture was positive in 43/58 (74%) TB cultures. DST was available for 38 cases, of which six (16%) were resistant to isoniazid (INH); 67/75 (89%) cases, including four with INH-monoresistant TB, completed anti-tuberculosis treatment or were cured. With prompt initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment and access to ART, excellent outcomes were achieved in a public health setting in HIV-infected adults who developed TB disease.

  15. Association of isoniazid preventive therapy with lower early mortality in individuals on antiretroviral therapy in a workplace programme.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Salome; Grant, Alison D; Innes, Craig; Hoffmann, Christopher J; Dowdeswell, Rob; Pienaar, Jan; Fielding, Katherine L; Churchyard, Gavin J

    2010-11-01

    To describe the association between isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) and mortality among individuals starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a workplace programme in South Africa where tuberculosis (TB) incidence is very high. ART-naive individuals starting ART from January 2004 to December 2007 were followed for up to 12 months. Deaths were ascertained from clinic and human resource data. The association between IPT and mortality was assessed using Cox regression. A total of 3270 individuals were included (median age 45; 93% men; median baseline CD4 cell count 155 cells/μl (interquartile range 87-221); and 45% with WHO stage 3/4]. Nine hundred twenty-two (28%) individuals started IPT either prior to or within 3 months of starting ART. Individuals who started IPT tended to have less advanced HIV disease at ART initiation. Two hundred fifty-nine (7.9%) deaths were observed with overall mortality rate 8.9 per 100 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.9-10.6]. The unadjusted mortality rate was lower among those who received IPT compared with those who did not [3.7/100 vs. 11.1/100 person-years, respectively, hazard ratio 0.34 (95% CI 0.24-0.49)]; this association remained after adjustment for age, baseline CD4 cell count, baseline WHO stage, year of ART start, and individual company (hazard ratio 0.51, 95% CI 0.32-0.80). In sensitivity analyses restricted to those with no previous history of TB (n = 3036) or with no TB symptoms at ART initiation (n = 2251), IPT remained associated with reduced mortality [adjusted hazard ratios 0.51 (95% CI 0.32-0.81) and 0.48 (95% CI 0.24-0.96), respectively]. Mortality was lower among individuals receiving IPT with or prior to ART start. These results support routine use of IPT in conjunction with ART.

  16. Implementation and evaluation of an isoniazid preventive therapy pilot program among HIV-infected patients in Vietnam, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Thuy T.; Han, Dien T.; Bloss, Emily; Le, Thai H.; Vu, Tung T.; Mai, Anh H.; Nguyen, Nhung V.; Nguyen, Long T.; Dinh, Sy N.; Whitehead, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background WHO recommends screening for TB and evaluation for isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) based on evidence that they reduce TB-related morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected persons. In Vietnam, an IPT pilot was implemented in two provinces; TB screening, treatment and outcomes were evaluated to inform the adoption and scale-up of IPT. Methods During April 2008 to March 2010, eligible HIV-infected persons aged >15 years, with no previous or current TB treatment, alcohol abuse or liver disease were screened for TB. If TB disease was ruled out based on symptoms, chest x-rays and sputum smears, isoniazid was administered for 9 months. Results Among 1281 HIV-infected persons who received initial eligibility screening, 520 were referred to and evaluated at district TB clinics for TB disease or IPT eligibility. Active TB was diagnosed in 17 patients and all were started on treatment. Of 520 patients evaluated, 416 (80.0%) initiated IPT: 382 (91.8%) completed IPT, 17 (4.1%) stopped treatment, 8 (1.9%) died, 3 (0.7%) developed TB during IPT and 6 (1.4%) had unknown outcomes. No severe adverse events were reported. Conclusions IPT treatment completion was high; no serious complications occurred. Improving and expanding intensified case-finding and IPT should be considered in Vietnam. PMID:26385936

  17. Uptake of Isoniazid Preventive Therapy among Under-Five Children: TB Contact Investigation as an Entry Point.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Yared; Gebre, Nigussie; Daba, Shallo; Gashu, Zewdu; Habte, Dereje; Hiruy, Nebiyu; Negash, Solomon; Melkieneh, Kassahun; Jerene, Degu; K Haile, Yared; Kassie, Yewulsew; Melese, Muluken; G Suarez, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    A child's risk of developing tuberculosis (TB) can be reduced by nearly 60% with administration of 6 months course of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT). However, uptake of IPT by national TB programs is low, and IPT delivery is a challenge in many resource-limited high TB-burden settings. Routinely collected program data was analyzed to determine the coverage and outcome of implementation of IPT for eligible under-five year old children in 28 health facilities in two regions of Ethiopia. A total of 504 index smear-positive pulmonary TB (SS+) cases were reported between October 2013 and June 2014 in the 28 health facilities. There were 282 under-five children registered as household contacts of these SS+ TB index cases, accounting for 17.9% of all household contacts. Of these, 237 (84%) were screened for TB symptoms, and presumptive TB was identified in 16 (6.8%) children. TB was confirmed in 5 children, producing an overall yield of 2.11% (95% confidence interval, 0.76-4.08%). Of 221 children eligible for IPT, 64.3% (142) received IPT, 80.3% (114) of whom successfully completed six months of therapy. No child developed active TB while on IPT. Contact screening is a good entry point for delivery of IPT to at risk children and should be routine practice as recommended by the WHO despite the implementation challenges.

  18. Uptake of Isoniazid Preventive Therapy among Under-Five Children: TB Contact Investigation as an Entry Point

    PubMed Central

    Gebre, Nigussie; Daba, Shallo; Gashu, Zewdu; Habte, Dereje; Hiruy, Nebiyu; Negash, Solomon; Melkieneh, Kassahun; Jerene, Degu; K. Haile, Yared; Kassie, Yewulsew; Melese, Muluken; G. Suarez, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    A child’s risk of developing tuberculosis (TB) can be reduced by nearly 60% with administration of 6 months course of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT). However, uptake of IPT by national TB programs is low, and IPT delivery is a challenge in many resource-limited high TB-burden settings. Routinely collected program data was analyzed to determine the coverage and outcome of implementation of IPT for eligible under-five year old children in 28 health facilities in two regions of Ethiopia. A total of 504 index smear-positive pulmonary TB (SS+) cases were reported between October 2013 and June 2014 in the 28 health facilities. There were 282 under-five children registered as household contacts of these SS+ TB index cases, accounting for 17.9% of all household contacts. Of these, 237 (84%) were screened for TB symptoms, and presumptive TB was identified in 16 (6.8%) children. TB was confirmed in 5 children, producing an overall yield of 2.11% (95% confidence interval, 0.76–4.08%). Of 221 children eligible for IPT, 64.3% (142) received IPT, 80.3% (114) of whom successfully completed six months of therapy. No child developed active TB while on IPT. Contact screening is a good entry point for delivery of IPT to at risk children and should be routine practice as recommended by the WHO despite the implementation challenges. PMID:27196627

  19. Assessment of isoniazid preventive therapy in the reduction of tuberculosis among ART patients in Arba Minch Hospital, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Abossie, Ashenafi; Yohanes, Tsegaye

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the most frequent life-threatening opportunistic disease among people living with HIV and remains a leading cause of mortality, even among persons receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis have been recommended for the benefit of HIV/AIDS-infected individuals to prevent opportunistic infections. The aim of this study was to assess IPT prophylaxis in the reduction of TB among ART patients. The study was a hospital-based retrospective study. A total of 271 study participants' available information such as demographic data, the type of prophylaxis used, and TB/HIV coinfection status as well as other variables were collected from clinical laboratory and HIV care/ART follow-up clinic. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0. TB-infected ART patients were higher among non-IPT group (37 [27.8%]) compared to IPT group (12 [8.7%]). The finding showed that IPT prophylaxis significantly reduces acquiring TB with the relative risk =0.31 (95% confidence interval =0.122, 0.49) in ART patients of this study site where the tuberculosis prevalence is prominent. ART had significant contribution for CD4(+) T-cell lymphocyte count improvement in both IPT and non-IPT groups (P<0.05) in this study. IPT had significant contributions to reduce the burden of TB in ART patients than non-IPT group. This result highlights the use of IPT for the prevention of TB, especially for all ART patients. Other longitudinal studies are needed to observe the benefits and side effects of IPT prophylaxis in tuberculin skin test-positive individuals.

  20. Assessment of isoniazid preventive therapy in the reduction of tuberculosis among ART patients in Arba Minch Hospital, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Abossie, Ashenafi; Yohanes, Tsegaye

    2017-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the most frequent life-threatening opportunistic disease among people living with HIV and remains a leading cause of mortality, even among persons receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis have been recommended for the benefit of HIV/AIDS-infected individuals to prevent opportunistic infections. The aim of this study was to assess IPT prophylaxis in the reduction of TB among ART patients. Methods The study was a hospital-based retrospective study. A total of 271 study participants’ available information such as demographic data, the type of prophylaxis used, and TB/HIV coinfection status as well as other variables were collected from clinical laboratory and HIV care/ART follow-up clinic. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0. Results TB-infected ART patients were higher among non-IPT group (37 [27.8%]) compared to IPT group (12 [8.7%]). The finding showed that IPT prophylaxis significantly reduces acquiring TB with the relative risk =0.31 (95% confidence interval =0.122, 0.49) in ART patients of this study site where the tuberculosis prevalence is prominent. ART had significant contribution for CD4+ T-cell lymphocyte count improvement in both IPT and non-IPT groups (P<0.05) in this study. Conclusion IPT had significant contributions to reduce the burden of TB in ART patients than non-IPT group. This result highlights the use of IPT for the prevention of TB, especially for all ART patients. Other longitudinal studies are needed to observe the benefits and side effects of IPT prophylaxis in tuberculin skin test-positive individuals. PMID:28392698

  1. Benefits of combined preventive therapy with co-trimoxazole and isoniazid in adults living with HIV: time to consider a fixed-dose, single tablet coformulation.

    PubMed

    Harries, Anthony D; Lawn, Stephen D; Suthar, Amitabh B; Granich, Reuben

    2015-12-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the main intervention needed to reduce morbidity and mortality and to prevent tuberculosis in adults living with HIV. However, in most resource-limited countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, ART is started too late to have an effect with substantial early morbidity and mortality, and in high tuberculosis burden settings ART does not reduce the tuberculosis risk to that reported in individuals not infected with HIV. Co-trimoxazole preventive therapy started before or with ART, irrespective of CD4 cell count, reduces morbidity and mortality with benefits that continue indefinitely. Isoniazid preventive therapy as an adjunct to ART prevents tuberculosis in high-exposure settings, with long-term treatment likely to be needed to sustain this benefit. Unfortunately, both preventive therapies are underused in low-income and high-burden settings. ART development has benefited from patient-centred simplification with several effective regimens now available as a one per day pill. We argue that co-trimoxazole and isoniazid should also be combined into a single fixed-dose pill, along with pyridoxine (vitamin B6), that would be taken once per day to help with individual uptake and national scale-up of therapies.

  2. Intensive Case Finding and Isoniazid Preventative Therapy in HIV Infected Individuals in Africa: Economic Model and Value of Information Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, Hendramoorthy; Barton, Pelham

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) accounts of much of the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV. We evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different strategies to actively screen for TB disease in HIV positive individuals, where isoniazid preventative therapy (IPT) is given to those screening negative, and use value of information analysis (VOI) to identify future research priorities. Methodology/ Principal Findings We built an individual sampling model to investigate the costs (2010 US Dollars) and consequences of screening for TB, and providing TB treatment or IPT in adults testing HIV positive in Sub-Saharan Africa. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to assess performance of the nine different TB screening strategies evaluated. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was conducted to incorporate decision uncertainty, and expected value of perfect information for the entire model and for groups of parameters was calculated. Screening all HIV infected individuals with sputum microscopy was the least costly strategy, with other strategies not cost-effective at WHO recommended thresholds. Screening those with TB symptoms with sputum microscopy and CXR would be cost-effective at a threshold ICER of $7,800 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), but associated with significant uncertainty. VOI analysis suggests further information would be of value. Conclusions/ Significance Resource-constrained countries in sub-Saharan Africa wishing to scale up TB preventative services in their HIV infected populations should consider expanding laboratory facilities to enable increased screening for TB with sputum microscopy, whilst improved estimates of the TB prevalence in the population to be screened are needed, as it may influence the optimal strategy. PMID:22291958

  3. Tuberculosis Contact Screening and Isoniazid Preventive Therapy in a South Indian District: Operational Issues for Programmatic Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Pothukuchi, Madhavi; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Kelamane, Santosha; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Shashidhar; Babu, Sai; Dewan, Puneet; Wares, Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Background Under India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP), all household contacts of sputum smear positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB) patients are screened for TB. In the absence of active TB disease, household contacts aged <6 years are eligible for Isoniazid Preventive Therapy (IPT) (5 milligrams/kilogram body weight/day) for 6 months. Objectives To estimate the number of household contacts aged <6 years, of sputum smear positive PTB patients registered for treatment under RNTCP from April to June'2008 in Krishna District, to assess the extent to which they are screened for TB disease and in its absence initiated on IPT. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted. Households of all smear positive PTB cases (n = 848) registered for treatment from April to June'2008 were included. Data on the number of household contacts aged <6 years, the extent to which they were screened for TB disease, and the status of initiation of IPT, was collected. Results Households of 825 (97%) patients were visited, and 172 household contacts aged <6 years were identified. Of them, 116 (67%) were evaluated for TB disease; none were found to be TB diseased and 97 (84%) contacts were initiated on IPT and 19 (16%) contacts were not initiated on IPT due to shortage of INH tablets in peripheral health centers. The reasons for non-evaluation of the remaining eligible children (n = 56, 33%) include no home visit by the health staff in 25 contacts, home visit done but not evaluated in 31 contacts. House-hold contacts in rural areas were less likely to be evaluated and initiated on IPT [risk ratio 6.65 (95% CI; 3.06–14.42)]. Conclusion Contact screening and IPT implementation under routine programmatic conditions is sub-optimal. There is an urgent need to sensitize all concerned programme staff on its importance and establishment of mechanisms for rigorous monitoring. PMID:21799875

  4. High Incidence of Tuberculosis in the Absence of Isoniazid and Cotrimoxazole Preventive Therapy in Children Living with HIV in Northern Ethiopia: A Retrospective Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Alemu, Yihun Mulugeta; Andargie, Gashaw; Gebeye, Ejigu

    2016-01-01

    To identify the incidence of and predictors for tuberculosis in children living with HIV in Northern Ethiopia. Observational, retrospective follow-up study. A total of 645 HIV-infected children were observed between September 2009 and September 2014. Cox regression analysis was used to identify predictors for developing TB. The incidence rate of tuberculosis was 4.2 per 100 child-years. Incidence of tuberculosis was higher for subjects who were not on cotrimoxazole preventive therapy, were not on isoniazid preventive therapy, had delayed motor development, had a CD4 cell count below the threshold, had hemoglobin level less than 10 mg/dl and were assessed as World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage III or IV. Incidence of TB in children living with HIV was high. This study reaffirmed that isoniazid preventive therapy is one of the best strategy to reduce incidence of TB in children living with HIV. All children living with HIV should be screened for TB but for children with delayed motor development, advanced WHO clinical stage, anemia or immune suppression, intensified screening is highly recommended.

  5. High Incidence of Tuberculosis in the Absence of Isoniazid and Cotrimoxazole Preventive Therapy in Children Living with HIV in Northern Ethiopia: A Retrospective Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Yihun Mulugeta; Andargie, Gashaw; Gebeye, Ejigu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the incidence of and predictors for tuberculosis in children living with HIV in Northern Ethiopia. Design Observational, retrospective follow-up study. Methods A total of 645 HIV-infected children were observed between September 2009 and September 2014. Cox regression analysis was used to identify predictors for developing TB. Results The incidence rate of tuberculosis was 4.2 per 100 child-years. Incidence of tuberculosis was higher for subjects who were not on cotrimoxazole preventive therapy, were not on isoniazid preventive therapy, had delayed motor development, had a CD4 cell count below the threshold, had hemoglobin level less than 10 mg/dl and were assessed as World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage III or IV. Conclusion Incidence of TB in children living with HIV was high. This study reaffirmed that isoniazid preventive therapy is one of the best strategy to reduce incidence of TB in children living with HIV. All children living with HIV should be screened for TB but for children with delayed motor development, advanced WHO clinical stage, anemia or immune suppression, intensified screening is highly recommended. PMID:27070435

  6. Tuberculin skin test reversion following isoniazid preventive therapy reflects diversity of immune response to primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Denise F; Malone, LaShaunda L; Zalwango, Sarah; Mukisa Oketcho, Joy; Chervenak, Keith A; Thiel, Bonnie; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Stein, Catherine M; Boom, W Henry; Lancioni, Christina L

    2014-01-01

    Healthy household contacts (HHC) of individuals with Tuberculosis (TB) with Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) conversions are considered to harbor latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), and at risk for TB. The immunologic, clinical, and public health implications of TST reversions that occur following Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) remain controversial. To measure frequency of TST reversion following IPT, and variation in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses to Mtb, in healthy Ugandan TB HHC with primary Mtb infection evidenced by TST conversion. Prospective cohort study of healthy, HIV-uninfected, TST-negative TB HHC with TST conversions. Repeat TST was performed 12 months following conversion (3 months following completion of 9 month IPT course) to assess for stable conversion vs. reversion. Whole blood IFN-γ responses to Mtb antigen 85B (MtbA85B) and whole Mtb bacilli (wMtb) were measured in a subset (n = 27 and n = 42, respectively) at enrollment and TST conversion, prior to initiation of IPT. Of 122 subjects, TST reversion was noted in 25 (20.5%). There were no significant differences in demographic, clinical, or exposure variables between reverters and stable converters. At conversion, reverters had significantly smaller TST compared to stable converters (13.7 mm vs 16.4 mm, respectively; p = 0.003). At enrollment, there were no significant differences in IFN-γ responses to MtbA85B or wMTB between groups. At conversion, stable converters demonstrated significant increases in IFN-γ responses to Ag85B and wMtb compared to enrollment (p = 0.001, p<0.001, respectively), while there were no significant changes among reverters. TST reversion following IPT is common following primary Mtb infection and associated with unique patterns of Mtb-induced IFN-γ production. We have demonstrated that immune responses to primary Mtb infection are heterogeneous, and submit that prospective longitudinal studies of cell mediated immune responses to Mtb infection

  7. Risk of Disease After Isoniazid Preventive Therapy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Exposure in Young HIV-uninfected Children

    PubMed Central

    Tameris, Michele D.; Geldenhuys, Hennie D.; Mulenga, Humphrey; Van Schalkwyk, Amaryl; Hughes, Elizabeth J.; Toefey, Asma; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hussey, Gregory; Mahomed, Hassan; McShane, Helen; Landry, Bernard; Hanekom, Willem A.; Hatherill, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background: The risk of developing tuberculosis (TB) disease in HIV-uninfected children after isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) for a positive QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk of TB disease after IPT in young HIV-uninfected children with a positive QFT-GIT result, or household TB contact. Methods: HIV-uninfected South African infants aged 4–6 months were screened for enrolment in a TB vaccine trial. Baseline household TB contact and positive QFT-GIT result were exclusion criteria, and these infants were referred for IPT. Outcome data are reported for 36 months after IPT referral. Results: Four thousand seven hundred forty-nine infants were screened. Household TB contact was reported in 131 (2.8%) infants; 279 (6.0%) were QFT-GIT positive, and 138 of these 410 infants (34.0%) started IPT. Forty-four cases of TB disease (11.0%) were recorded within 991 child years of observation. TB disease incidence was 4.8 versus 3.6 per 100 child years in household exposed versus QFT-GIT-positive children [incidence rate ratio: 1.35; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67–2.88] and 2.4 versus 5.5 per 100 child years in children who received versus did not receive IPT, respectively (incidence rate ratio: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.17–0.96). Adjusted hazard ratio (Cox regression) for TB disease was 0.48 (95% CI: 0.21–1.05) for those who received IPT. Conclusion: In young HIV-uninfected children, the effect of IPT on risk of TB disease is similar, whether TB exposure was defined by household contact history or by positive QFT-GIT result. International IPT guidelines for HIV-uninfected children with a positive QFT-GIT result should be updated. PMID:26252568

  8. Long-term Protection From Isoniazid Preventive Therapy for Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Patients in a Medium-Burden Tuberculosis Setting: The TB/HIV in Rio (THRio) Study

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Jonathan E.; Cohn, Silvia; Saraceni, Valeria; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Pacheco, Antonio G.; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Durovni, Betina; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The duration of protection against tuberculosis provided by isoniazid preventive therapy is not known for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals living in settings of medium tuberculosis incidence. Methods. We conducted an individual-level analysis of participants in a cluster-randomized, phased-implementation trial of isoniazid preventive therapy. HIV-infected patients who had positive tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) were followed until tuberculosis diagnosis, death, or administrative censoring. Nelson–Aalen cumulative hazard plots were generated and hazards were compared using the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to investigate factors associated with tuberculosis diagnosis. Results. Between 2003 and 2009, 1954 patients with a positive TST were studied. Among these, 1601 (82%) initiated isoniazid. Overall tuberculosis incidence was 1.39 per 100 person-years (PY); 0.53 per 100 PY in those who initiated isoniazid and 6.52 per 100 PY for those who did not (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], .11–.25). Receiving antiretroviral therapy at time of a positive TST was associated with a reduced risk of tuberculosis (aHR, 0.69; 95% CI, .48–1.00). Nelson–Aalen plots of tuberculosis incidence showed a constant risk, with no acceleration in 7 years of follow-up for those initiating isoniazid preventive therapy. Conclusions. Isoniazid preventive therapy significantly reduced tuberculosis risk among HIV-infected patients with a positive TST. In a medium-prevalence setting, 6 months of isoniazid in HIV-infected patients with positive TST reduces tuberculosis risk over 7 years of follow-up, in contrast to results of studies in higher-burden settings in Africa. PMID:25365974

  9. Preventing tuberculosis among HIV-infected pregnant women in Lesotho: the case for rolling out active case finding and isoniazid preventive therapy.

    PubMed

    Tiam, Appolinaire; Machekano, Rhoderick; Gounder, Celine R; Maama-Maime, Llang B M; Ntene-Sealiete, Keletso; Sahu, Maitreyi; Isavwa, Anthony; Oyebanji, Oyebola; Ahimbisibwe, Allan; Mokone, Majoalane; Barnes, Grace L; Chaisson, Richard E; Guay, Laura; Kassaye, Seble

    2014-09-01

    The Lesotho Ministry of Health issued guidelines on active case finding (ACF) for tuberculosis (TB) and isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) in April 2011. ACF has been recommended in maternal and child health (MCH) settings globally, however, the feasibility of implementing IPT within MCH in countries with high concurrent HIV and TB epidemics is unknown. The study evaluated the implementation of ACF and IPT guidelines in MCH settings in 2 health facilities in Lesotho. This descriptive prospective study analyzed data collected during routine services. Categorical data and continuous variables were summarized using descriptive statistics. The χ test or Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to ascertain significant associations between categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Data from 160 HIV-positive and 640 HIV-negative women were reviewed. Within this study population, 99.8% of women were screened for TB, and 11.4% HIV-positive women compared with 2.3% HIV-negative women were reported to have symptoms of TB (P < 0.001). IPT was initiated in 124/158 (78.5%) HIV-positive pregnant women, 64.5% women completed a 6-month IPT regimen, 2 (1.6%) died of causes unrelated to IPT/TB, and 31.5% were lost to follow-up. Predictors of IPT initiation among HIV-positive women included gestational age at the first antenatal visit (unadjusted odds ratio, -0.93; 95% confidence interval: -0.88 to 0.98), and receipt of antiretroviral therapy for treatment rather than for prevention of mother-to-child transmission prophylaxis only (odds ratio, 4.59; 95% confidence interval: 1.32 to 15.93). Implementation of ACF and IPT is feasible within the MCH setting. Uptake of IPT during pregnancy among HIV-positive women was high, but with a high rate of loss to follow-up.

  10. A Qualitative Evaluation of the Acceptability of an Interactive Voice Response System to Enhance Adherence to Isoniazid Preventive Therapy Among People Living with HIV in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Daftary, Amrita; Hirsch-Moverman, Yael; Kassie, Getnet M; Melaku, Zenebe; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Saito, Suzue; Howard, Andrea A

    2016-05-24

    Interactive voice response (IVR) is increasingly used to monitor and promote medication adherence. In 2014, we evaluated patient acceptability toward IVR as part of the ENRICH Study, aimed to enhance adherence to isoniazid preventive therapy for tuberculosis prevention among HIV-positive adults in Ethiopia. Qualitative interviews were completed with 30 participants exposed to 2867 IVR calls, of which 24 % were completely answered. Individualized IVR options, treatment education, and time and cost savings facilitated IVR utilization, whereas poor IVR instruction, network and power malfunctions, one-way communication with providers, and delayed clinic follow-up inhibited utilization. IVR acceptability was complicated by HIV confidentiality, mobile phone access and literacy, and patient-provider trust. Incomplete calls likely reminded patients to take medication but were less likely to capture adherence or side effect data. Simple, automated systems that deliver health messages and triage clinic visits appear to be acceptable in this resource-limited setting.

  11. Correlates of isoniazid preventive therapy failure in child household contacts with infectious tuberculosis in high burden settings in Nairobi, Kenya - a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Okwara, Florence Nafula; Oyore, John Paul; Were, Fred Nabwire; Gwer, Samson

    2017-09-16

    Sub-Saharan Africa continues to document high pediatric tuberculosis (TB) burden, especially among the urban poor. One recommended preventive strategy involves tracking and isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) for children under 5 years in close contact with infectious TB. However, sub-optimal effectiveness has been documented in diverse settings. We conducted a study to elucidate correlates to IPT strategy failure in children below 5 years in high burden settings. A prospective longitudinal cohort study was done in informal settlings in Nairobi, where children under 5 years in household contact with recently diagnosed smear positive TB adults were enrolled. Consent was sought. Structured questionnaires administered sought information on index case treatment, socio-demographics and TB knowledge. Contacts underwent baseline clinical screening exclude TB and/or pre-existing chronic conditions. Contacts were then put on daily isoniazid for 6 months and monitored for new TB disease, compliance and side effects. Follow-up continued for another 6 months. At baseline, 428 contacts were screened, and 14(3.2%) had evidence of TB disease, hence excluded. Of 414 contacts put on IPT, 368 (88.8%) completed the 1 year follow-up. Operational challenges were reported by 258(70%) households, while 82(22%) reported side effects. Good compliance was documented in 89% (CI:80.2-96.2). By endpoint, 6(1.6%) contacts developed evidence of new TB disease and required definitive anti-tuberculosis therapy. The main factor associated with IPT failure was under-nutrition of contacts (p = 0.023). Under-nutrition was associated with IPT failure for child contacts below 5 years in high burden, resource limited settings. IPT effectiveness could be optimized through nutrition support of contacts.

  12. Implementation of Tuberculosis Intensive Case Finding, Isoniazid Preventive Therapy, and Infection Control ("Three I's") and HIV-Tuberculosis Service Integration in Lower Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Charles, M Katherine; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Wester, C William; Blevins, Meridith; Sterling, Timothy R; Dung, Nguyen Thi; Dusingize, Jean Claude; Avit-Edi, Divine; Durier, Nicolas; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Cortes, Claudia P; Ballif, Marie; Fenner, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    World Health Organization advocates for integration of HIV-tuberculosis (TB) services and recommends intensive case finding (ICF), isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), and infection control ("Three I's") for TB prevention and control among persons living with HIV. To assess the implementation of the "Three I's" of TB-control at HIV treatment sites in lower income countries. Survey conducted between March-July, 2012 at 47 sites in 26 countries: 6 (13%) Asia Pacific, 7 (15%), Caribbean, Central and South America, 5 (10%) Central Africa, 8 (17%) East Africa, 14 (30%) Southern Africa, and 7 (15%) West Africa. ICF using symptom-based screening was performed at 38% of sites; 45% of sites used symptom-screening plus additional diagnostics. IPT at enrollment or ART initiation was implemented in only 17% of sites, with 9% of sites providing IPT to tuberculin-skin-test positive patients. Infection control measures varied: 62% of sites separated smear-positive patients, and healthcare workers used masks at 57% of sites. Only 12 (26%) sites integrated HIV-TB services. Integration was not associated with implementation of TB prevention measures except for IPT provision at enrollment (42% integrated vs. 9% non-integrated; p = 0.03). Implementation of TB screening, IPT provision, and infection control measures was low and variable across regional HIV treatment sites, regardless of integration status.

  13. Isoniazid

    MedlinePlus

    Isoniazid is used with other drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB; a serious infection that affects the lungs and ... to treat people with latent (resting or nongrowing) TB including those in close contact with people who ...

  14. Pregnancy outcomes in HIV-infected women receiving long-term isoniazid prophylaxis for tuberculosis and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allan W; Mosimaneotsile, Barudi; Mathebula, Unami; Mathoma, Anikie; Moathlodi, Ritah; Theebetsile, Irene; Samandari, Taraz

    2013-01-01

    While 6- to 12-month courses of isoniazid for tuberculosis prevention are considered safe in pregnant women, the effects of longer-term isoniazid prophylaxis or isoniazid in combination with antiretroviral therapy (ART) are not established in human-immunodeficiency-virus-(HIV-) infected women who experience pregnancy during the course of therapy. Nested study of pregnancy outcomes among HIV-infected women participating in a placebo-controlled, TB-prevention trial using 36 months daily isoniazid. Pregnancy outcomes were collected by interview and record review. Among 196 pregnant women, 103 (52.6%) were exposed to isoniazid during pregnancy; all were exposed to antiretroviral drugs. Prior to pregnancy they had received a median of 341 days (range 1-1095) of isoniazid. We observed no isoniazid-associated hepatitis or other severe isoniazid-associated adverse events in the 103 women. Pregnancy outcomes were 132 term live births, 42 premature births, 11 stillbirths, 8 low birth weight, 6 spontaneous abortions, 4 neonatal deaths, and 1 congenital abnormality. In a multivariable model, neither isoniazid nor ART exposure during pregnancy was significantly associated with adverse pregnancy outcome (adjusted odds ratios 0.6, 95% CI: 0.3-1.1 and 1.8, 95% CI 0.9-3.6, resp.). Long-term isoniazid prophylaxis was not associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm delivery, even in the context of ART exposure.

  15. Pregnancy Outcomes in HIV-Infected Women Receiving Long-Term Isoniazid Prophylaxis for Tuberculosis and Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Allan W.; Mosimaneotsile, Barudi; Mathebula, Unami; Mathoma, Anikie; Moathlodi, Ritah; Theebetsile, Irene; Samandari, Taraz

    2013-01-01

    Objective. While 6- to 12-month courses of isoniazid for tuberculosis prevention are considered safe in pregnant women, the effects of longer-term isoniazid prophylaxis or isoniazid in combination with antiretroviral therapy (ART) are not established in human-immunodeficiency-virus-(HIV-) infected women who experience pregnancy during the course of therapy. Design. Nested study of pregnancy outcomes among HIV-infected women participating in a placebo-controlled, TB-prevention trial using 36 months daily isoniazid. Pregnancy outcomes were collected by interview and record review. Results. Among 196 pregnant women, 103 (52.6%) were exposed to isoniazid during pregnancy; all were exposed to antiretroviral drugs. Prior to pregnancy they had received a median of 341 days (range 1–1095) of isoniazid. We observed no isoniazid-associated hepatitis or other severe isoniazid-associated adverse events in the 103 women. Pregnancy outcomes were 132 term live births, 42 premature births, 11 stillbirths, 8 low birth weight, 6 spontaneous abortions, 4 neonatal deaths, and 1 congenital abnormality. In a multivariable model, neither isoniazid nor ART exposure during pregnancy was significantly associated with adverse pregnancy outcome (adjusted odds ratios 0.6, 95% CI: 0.3–1.1 and 1.8, 95% CI 0.9–3.6, resp.). Conclusions. Long-term isoniazid prophylaxis was not associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm delivery, even in the context of ART exposure. PMID:23533318

  16. Symptom-based screening tool in ruling out active tuberculosis among HIV-infected patients eligible for isoniazid preventive therapy in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Shayo, Grace A; Minja, Lilian T; Egwaga, Said; Bakari, Muhammad; Mugusi, Ferdinand M

    2014-06-01

    We assessed the usefulness of the National TB and Leprosy Control Program (NTLP) symptom-based tuberculosis (TB) screening tool in identifying HIV-infected patients eligible for isoniazid preventive therapy in Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam Tanzania. Descriptive cross-sectional study. Data collected included socio-demographic and clinical data. Chest X-ray, sputum for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) microscopy, mycobacterial culture, CD4 + count and complete blood count were performed. Patients were considered not having active TB if they presented with no symptom in the screening tool, which comprised these symptoms: cough, fever and excessive night sweats for ≥2 weeks; weight loss of ≥3 kg in 4 weeks and haemoptysis of any duration. The reference standard was a negative culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We enroled 373 patients, of whom 72.1% were females. Active pulmonary TB was found in 4.1% (14/338) of the participants as defined by a positive culture. The sensitivity and specificity of the NTLP screening tool were 71.4% (10/14) and 75.9% (246/324), respectively. False-negative rate was 28.6% (4/10). Cough, fever for ≥2 weeks and weight loss were independent predictors of NTLP-defined TB. Cough ≥2 weeks predicted TB when a positive culture was used to define TB. The screening tool had fairly good sensitivity and specificity for TB screening; however, there is a possibility that about 29% of the screened population will be given IPT while they are supposed to receive a full course of TB treatment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The effect of isoniazid preventive therapy on incidence of tuberculosis among HIV-infected clients under pre-ART care, Jimma, Ethiopia: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Assebe, Lelisa Fekadu; Reda, Hailemariam Lemma; Wubeneh, Alem Desta; Lerebo, Wondwossen Terefe; Lambert, Saba Maria

    2015-04-10

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem that accounts for almost half a million human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated deaths. Provision of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is one of the public health interventions for the prevention of TB in HIV infected individuals. However, in Ethiopia, the coverage and implementation of IPT is limited. The objective of this study is to compare the incidence rate of TB, TB-free survival time and identify factors associated with development TB among HIV-infected individuals on pre-ART follow up. A retrospective cohort study was conducted from January, 2008 to February 31, 2012 in Jimma hospital. Kaplan-Meier survival plots were used to calculate the crude effect in both groups on TB-free survival probabilities and compared using the log rank test. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to identify predictors of TB. A total of 588 patients on pre-ART care (294 IPT and 294 non-IPT group) were followed retrospectively for a median duration of 24.1 months. The median CD4 (+) cell count was 422 cells/μl (IQR 344-589). During the follow up period, 49 individuals were diagnosed with tuberculosis, giving an overall incidence of 3.78 cases per 100 person year (PY). The incidence rate of TB was 5.06 per 100 PY in non-IPT group and 2.22 per 100 PY in IPT user group. Predictors of higher TB risk were: being on clinical WHO stage III/IV (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR = 3.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.61, 5.81); non-IPT user (AHR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.04, 3.92); having CD4 (+) cell count less than 350 cells/μl (AHR = 3.16, 95% CI: 1.04, 3.92) and between 350-499 cells/μl, (AHR = 2.87; 95% CI: 1.37-6.03) and having episode of opportunistic infection (OI) in the past (AHR = 2.41, 95% CI: 1.33-4.34). IPT use was associated with fifty percent reduction in new cases of tuberculosis and probability of developing TB was higher in non-IPT group. Implementing the widespread use of IPT has the potential to

  18. Do clinical decision-support reminders for medical providers improve isoniazid preventative therapy prescription rates among HIV-positive adults? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Green, Eric P; Catalani, Caricia; Diero, Lameck; Carter, E Jane; Gardner, Adrian; Ndwiga, Charity; Keny, Aggrey; Owiti, Philip; Israelski, Dennis; Biondich, Paul

    2015-04-09

    This document describes a research protocol for a study designed to estimate the impact of implementing a reminder system for medical providers on the use of isoniazid preventative therapy (IPT) for adults living with HIV in western Kenya. People living with HIV have a 5% to 10% annual risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB) once infected with TB bacilli, compared to a 5% lifetime risk in HIV-negative people with latent TB infection. Moreover, people living with HIV have a 20-fold higher risk of dying from TB. A growing body of literature suggests that IPT reduces overall TB incidence and is therefore of considerable benefit to patients and the larger community. However, in 2009, of the estimated 33 million people living with HIV, only 1.7 million (5%) were screened for TB, and about 85,000 (0.2%) were offered IPT. This study will examine the use of clinical decision-support reminders to improve rates of initiation of preventative treatment in a TB/HIV co-morbid population living in a TB endemic area. This will be a pragmatic, parallel-group, cluster-randomized superiority trial with a 1:1 allocation to treatment ratio. For the trial, 20 public medical facilities that use clinical summary sheets generated from an electronic medical records system will participate as clusters. All HIV-positive adult patients who complete an initial encounter at a study cluster and at least one return encounter during the study period will be included in the study cohort. The primary endpoint will be IPT prescription at 3 months post the initial encounter. We will conduct both individual-level and cluster-level analyses. Due to the nature of the intervention, the trial will not be blinded. This study will contribute to the growing evidence base for the use of electronic health interventions in low-resource settings to promote high-quality clinical care, health system optimization and positive patient outcomes. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01934309, registered 29

  19. Prevention of TB using rifampicin plus isoniazid reduces nevirapine concentrations in HIV-exposed infants.

    PubMed

    McIlleron, Helen; Denti, Paolo; Cohn, Silvia; Mashabela, Fildah; Hoffmann, Jennifer D; Shembe, Saba; Msandiwa, Regina; Wiesner, Lubbe; Velaphi, Sithembiso; Lala, Sanjay G; Chaisson, Richard E; Martinson, Neil; Dooley, Kelly E

    2017-07-01

    Newborns of HIV-infected mothers are given daily doses of nevirapine to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Infants born to mothers with TB should also receive TB preventive therapy. TB preventive regimens include isoniazid for 6 months or rifampicin plus isoniazid for 3 months (RH preventive therapy). The effect of concomitant RH preventive therapy on nevirapine concentrations in infants is unknown. Tshepiso was a prospective case-control cohort study of pregnant HIV-infected women with and without TB whose newborn infants received standard doses of nevirapine for HIV prophylaxis. Infants born to mothers with TB also received RH preventive therapy. Infant plasma nevirapine concentrations were measured at 1 and 6 weeks. The effects of RH preventive therapy on nevirapine disposition were investigated in a population pharmacokinetic model. Of 164 infants undergoing pharmacokinetic sampling, 46 received RH preventive therapy. After adjusting for weight using allometric scaling, the model estimated a 33% reduction in nevirapine trough concentrations with RH preventive therapy compared with TB-unexposed infants not receiving concomitant rifampicin and a 30% decline in trough concentrations in a typical infant between day 7 and 35 post-partum. Rifampicin-based TB preventative treatment reduces nevirapine concentrations significantly in HIV-exposed infants. Although the nevirapine exposures required to prevent HIV acquisition in breastfeeding infants are undefined, given the potential risks associated with underdosing nevirapine in this setting, it is prudent to avoid rifampicin-based preventive therapy in HIV-exposed children receiving prophylactic nevirapine.

  20. Feasibility of using tuberculin skin test screening for initiation of 36-month isoniazid preventive therapy in HIV-infected patients in resource-constrained settings.

    PubMed

    Huerga, Helena; Mueller, Yolanda; Ferlazzo, Gabriella; Mpala, Qhubekani; Bevilacqua, Paolo; Vasquez, Béatrice; Mekiedje, Calorine Noël; Ouattara, Ali; Mchunu, Gugu; Weyenga, Herman O; Varaine, Francis; Bonnet, Maryline

    2015-11-11

    Tuberculin skin test (TST) can be used to identify HIV-infected people who would benefit most from long-term Isoniazid Preventive Therapy (IPT). However, in resource-constrained settings, implementation of TST can be challenging. The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of implementing TST for IPT initiation and to estimate the proportion of TST-positive among HIV-positive patients in two high TB- and HIV burden settings. Two prospective observational cohort studies were conducted under programmatic conditions in Mathare, an urban slum of Nairobi, Kenya, and in rural Shiselweni, Swaziland. HIV-positive adults with negative TB symptomatic screening underwent TST. Those testing positive were started on 36-month IPT. Of 897 and 1021 patients screened in Mathare and Shiselweni, 550 and 696, respectively, were included. Median age was 38 years, 67.7% were female and 86.8% were on ART. Among TST-eligible participants, 88.0% (491/558) and 81.8% (694/848) accepted TST and 74.2% (414/558) and 77.1% (654/858) returned for test reading in Mathare and Shiselweni, respectively. TST was positive in 49.8% (95%CI: 44.9-54.6) in Mathare and 33.2% (95%CI: 29.6-36.8) in Shiselweni. 36-month IPT was accepted by 96.1% (198/206) patients in Mathare and 99.5% (216/217) in Shiselweni. IPT implementation at the clinics was managed with no additional staff or extra space. Implementing TST for IPT initiation was feasible and acceptable in both urban and rural resource-constrained settings. This strategy allows patients who can benefit most to receive long-term IPT and avoids unnecessarily treating a significant number of patients who do not stand to benefit.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND), which permits downloading and sharing the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

  1. Empirical tuberculosis therapy versus isoniazid in adult outpatients with advanced HIV initiating antiretroviral therapy (REMEMBER): a multicountry open-label randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hosseinipour, Mina C; Bisson, Gregory P; Miyahara, Sachiko; Sun, Xin; Moses, Agnes; Riviere, Cynthia; Kirui, Fredrick K; Badal-Faesen, Sharlaa; Lagat, David; Nyirenda, Mulinda; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Hakim, James; Mugyenyi, Peter; Henostroza, German; Leger, Paul D; Lama, Javier R; Mohapi, Lerato; Alave, Jorge; Mave, Vidya; Veloso, Valdilea G; Pillay, Sandy; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Bao, Jing; Hogg, Evelyn; Jones, Lynne; Zolopa, Andrew; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Gupta, Amita

    2016-03-19

    Mortality within the first 6 months after initiating antiretroviral therapy is common in resource-limited settings and is often due to tuberculosis in patients with advanced HIV disease. Isoniazid preventive therapy is recommended in HIV-positive adults, but subclinical tuberculosis can be difficult to diagnose. We aimed to assess whether empirical tuberculosis treatment would reduce early mortality compared with isoniazid preventive therapy in high-burden settings. We did a multicountry open-label randomised clinical trial comparing empirical tuberculosis therapy with isoniazid preventive therapy in HIV-positive outpatients initiating antiretroviral therapy with CD4 cell counts of less than 50 cells per μL. Participants were recruited from 18 outpatient research clinics in ten countries (Malawi, South Africa, Haiti, Kenya, Zambia, India, Brazil, Zimbabwe, Peru, and Uganda). Individuals were screened for tuberculosis using a symptom screen, locally available diagnostics, and the GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay when available before inclusion. Study candidates with confirmed or suspected tuberculosis were excluded. Inclusion criteria were liver function tests 2·5 times the upper limit of normal or less, a creatinine clearance of at least 30 mL/min, and a Karnofsky score of at least 30. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to either the empirical group (antiretroviral therapy and empirical tuberculosis therapy) or the isoniazid preventive therapy group (antiretroviral therapy and isoniazid preventive therapy). The primary endpoint was survival (death or unknown status) at 24 weeks after randomisation assessed in the intention-to-treat population. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the primary endpoint across groups were compared by the z-test. All participants were included in the safety analysis of antiretroviral therapy and tuberculosis treatment. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01380080. Between Oct 31, 2011, and June 9, 2014, we enrolled 850

  2. Beneficial Effect of Isoniazid Preventive Therapy and Antiretroviral Therapy on the Incidence of Tuberculosis in People Living with HIV in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Yirdaw, Kesetebirhan Delele; Jerene, Degu; Gashu, Zewdu; Edginton, M. E.; Kumar, Ajay M. V.; Letamo, Yohannes; Feleke, Beniam; Teklu, Alula M.; Zewdu, Solomon; Weiss, Bill; Ruff, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background IPT with or without concomitant administration of ART is a proven intervention to prevent tuberculosis among PLHIV. However, there are few data on the routine implementation of this intervention and its effectiveness in settings with limited resources. Objectives To measure the level of uptake and effectiveness of IPT in reducing tuberculosis incidence in a cohort of PLHIV enrolled into HIV care between 2007 and 2010 in five hospitals in southern Ethiopia. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis of electronic patient database was done. The independent effects of no intervention, “IPT-only,” “IPT-before-ART,” “IPT-and-ART started simultaneously,” “ART-only,” and “IPT-after-ART” on TB incidence were measured. Cox-proportional hazards regression was used to assess association of treatment categories with TB incidence. Results Of 7,097 patients, 867 were excluded because they were transferred-in; a further 823 (12%) were excluded from the study because they were either identified to have TB through screening (292 patients) or were on TB treatment (531). Among the remaining 5,407 patients observed, IPT had been initiated for 39% of eligible patients. Children, male sex, advanced disease, and those in Pre-ART were less likely to be initiated on IPT. The overall TB incidence was 2.6 per 100 person-years. As compared to those with no intervention, use of “IPT-only” (aHR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.19–0.66) and “ART-only” (aHR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.24–0.43) were associated with significant reduction in TB incidence rate. Combining ART and IPT had a more profound effect. Starting IPT-before-ART (aHR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.08–0.42) or simultaneously with ART (aHR = 0.20, 95% CI = 0.10–0.42) provided further reduction of TB at ∼80%. Conclusions IPT was found to be effective in reducing TB incidence, independently and with concomitant ART, under programme conditions in resource-limited settings. The level of IPT

  3. Beneficial effect of isoniazid preventive therapy and antiretroviral therapy on the incidence of tuberculosis in people living with HIV in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Yirdaw, Kesetebirhan Delele; Jerene, Degu; Gashu, Zewdu; Edginton, M E; Kumar, Ajay M V; Letamo, Yohannes; Feleke, Beniam; Teklu, Alula M; Zewdu, Solomon; Weiss, Bill; Ruff, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    IPT with or without concomitant administration of ART is a proven intervention to prevent tuberculosis among PLHIV. However, there are few data on the routine implementation of this intervention and its effectiveness in settings with limited resources. To measure the level of uptake and effectiveness of IPT in reducing tuberculosis incidence in a cohort of PLHIV enrolled into HIV care between 2007 and 2010 in five hospitals in southern Ethiopia. A retrospective cohort analysis of electronic patient database was done. The independent effects of no intervention, "IPT-only," "IPT-before-ART," "IPT-and-ART started simultaneously," "ART-only," and "IPT-after-ART" on TB incidence were measured. Cox-proportional hazards regression was used to assess association of treatment categories with TB incidence. Of 7,097 patients, 867 were excluded because they were transferred-in; a further 823 (12%) were excluded from the study because they were either identified to have TB through screening (292 patients) or were on TB treatment (531). Among the remaining 5,407 patients observed, IPT had been initiated for 39% of eligible patients. Children, male sex, advanced disease, and those in Pre-ART were less likely to be initiated on IPT. The overall TB incidence was 2.6 per 100 person-years. As compared to those with no intervention, use of "IPT-only" (aHR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.19-0.66) and "ART-only" (aHR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.24-0.43) were associated with significant reduction in TB incidence rate. Combining ART and IPT had a more profound effect. Starting IPT-before-ART (aHR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.08-0.42) or simultaneously with ART (aHR = 0.20, 95% CI = 0.10-0.42) provided further reduction of TB at ∼ 80%. IPT was found to be effective in reducing TB incidence, independently and with concomitant ART, under programme conditions in resource-limited settings. The level of IPT provision and effectiveness in reducing TB was encouraging in the study setting. Scaling up and strengthening IPT

  4. Efavirenz Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Rifapentine and Isoniazid for Tuberculosis Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Podany, Anthony T.; Bao, Yajing; Swindells, Susan; Chaisson, Richard E.; Andersen, Janet W.; Mwelase, Thando; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Mohapi, Lerato; Gupta, Amita; Benson, Constance A.; Kim, Peter; Fletcher, Courtney V.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Concomitant use of rifamycins to treat or prevent tuberculosis can result in subtherapeutic concentrations of antiretroviral drugs. We studied the interaction of efavirenz with daily rifapentine and isoniazid in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individuals receiving a 4-week regimen to prevent tuberculosis. Methods. Participants receiving daily rifapentine and isoniazid with efavirenz had pharmacokinetic evaluations at baseline and weeks 2 and 4 of concomitant therapy. Efavirenz apparent oral clearance was estimated and the geometric mean ratio (GMR) of values before and during rifapentine and isoniazid was calculated. HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RNA was measured at baseline and week 8. Results. Eighty-seven participants were evaluable: 54% were female, and the median age was 35 years (interquartile range [IQR], 29–44 years). Numbers of participants with efavirenz concentrations ≥1 mg/L were 85 (98%) at week 0; 81 (93%) at week 2; 78 (90%) at week 4; and 75 (86%) at weeks 2 and 4. Median efavirenz apparent oral clearance was 9.3 L/hour (IQR, 6.42–13.22 L/hour) at baseline and 9.8 L/hour (IQR, 7.04–15.59 L/hour) during rifapentine/isoniazid treatment (GMR, 1.04 [90% confidence interval, .97–1.13]). Seventy-nine of 85 (93%) participants had undetectable HIV-1 RNA (<40 copies/mL) at entry; 71 of 75 (95%) participants had undetectable HIV-1 RNA at week 8. Two participants with undetectable HIV-1 RNA at study entry were detectable (43 and 47 copies/mL) at week 8. Conclusions. The proportion of participants with midinterval efavirenz concentrations ≥1 mg/L did not cross below the prespecified threshold of >80%, and virologic suppression was maintained. Four weeks of daily rifapentine plus isoniazid can be coadministered with efavirenz without clinically meaningful reductions in efavirenz mid-dosing concentrations or virologic suppression. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT 01404312. PMID:26082504

  5. The ENRICH Study to evaluate the effectiveness of a combination intervention package to improve isoniazid preventive therapy initiation, adherence and completion among people living with HIV in Ethiopia: rationale and design of a mixed methods cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Howard, Andrea A; Hirsch-Moverman, Yael; Saito, Suzue; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Daftary, Amrita; Melaku, Zenebe

    2017-06-01

    Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) prevents tuberculosis among HIV-positive individuals, however implementation is suboptimal. Implementation science studies are needed to identify interventions to address this evidence-to-program gap. The ENRICH Study is a mixed methods cluster randomized trial aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and acceptability of a combination intervention package (CIP) to improve IPT implementation in Ethiopia. Ten health centers were randomized to receive the CIP or standard of care. The CIP includes: nurse training and mentorship using a clinical algorithm, tool to identify IPT-eligible family members, and data review at multidisciplinary team meetings; patient transport reimbursement; and adherence support using peer educators and interactive voice response messages. Routine data were abstracted for all newly-enrolled IPT-eligible HIV-positive patients; anticipated sample size was 1400 individuals. A measurement cohort of patients initiating IPT was recruited; target enrollment was 500 individuals, to be followed for the duration of IPT (6-9 months). Inclusion criteria were: HIV-positive; initiated IPT; age ≥18; Amharic-, Oromiffa-, Harari-, or Somali-speaking; and capable of informed consent. Three groups were recruited from CIP health centers for in-depth interviews: IPT initiators; IPT non-initiators; and health care providers. Primary outcomes are: IPT initiation; and IPT completion. Secondary outcomes include: retention; adherence; change in CD4+ count; adverse events; and acceptability. Follow-up is complete. The ENRICH Study evaluates a CIP targeting barriers to IPT implementation. If the CIP is found effective and acceptable, this study has the potential to inform TB prevention strategies for HIV patients in resource-limited countries in sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. Effectiveness of isoniazid preventative therapy in reducing incidence of active tuberculosis among people living with HIV/AIDS in public health facilities of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a historical cohort study.

    PubMed

    Semu, Mahlet; Fenta, Teferi Gedif; Medhin, Girmay; Assefa, Dawit

    2017-01-03

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) pandemic has exacerbated tuberculosis disease especially in Sub-Saharan African countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) and Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) have recommended Isoniazid Preventive Therapy (IPT) for HIV infected patients to reduce the burden of tuberculosis (TB). Ethiopia has been implementing IPT since 2007. However, effectiveness of IPT in averting occurrence of active tuberculosis among HIV infected patients has not been assessed. Retrospective cohort study was employed using secondary data from public health institutions of Addis Ababa. Descriptive statistics and Generalized Linear Model based on Poisson regression was used for data analysis. From 2524 HIV infected patients who were followed for 4106 Person-Years, a total of 277 incident Tuberculosis (TB) cases occurred. TB Incidence Rate was 0.21/100 Person-Year, 0.86/100 Person-Year & 7.18/100 Person-Year among IPT completed, in-completed and non-exposed patients, respectively. The adjusted Incidence Rate Ratio (aIRR) among IPT completed vs. non-exposed patients was 0.037 (95% CI, 0.016-0.072). Gender, residence area, employment status, baseline WHO stage of the disease (AIDS) and level of CD4 counts were identified as risk factors for TB incidence. The aIRR among patients who took Highly Active Anti- Retroviral Therapy (HAART) with IPT compared to those who took HAART alone was 0.063 (95% CI 0.035-0.104). IPT significantly reduced occurrence of active TB for 3 years. IPT significantly reduced tuberculosis incidence by 96.3% compared to IPT non-exposed patients. Moreover concomitant use of HAART with IPT has shown a significant reduction in tuberculosis incidence by 93.7% than the use of HAART alone. Since IPT significantly protected occurrence of active TB for 3 years, its implementation should be further strengthened in the country.

  7. Implementation and Operational Research: Feasibility of Using Tuberculin Skin Test Screening for Initiation of 36-Month Isoniazid Preventive Therapy in HIV-Infected Patients in Resource-Constrained Settings.

    PubMed

    Huerga, Helena; Mueller, Yolanda; Ferlazzo, Gabriella; Mpala, Qhubekani; Bevilacqua, Paolo; Vasquez, Béatrice; Noël Mekiedje, Calorine; Ouattara, Ali; Mchunu, Gugu; Weyenga, Herman O; Varaine, Francis; Bonnet, Maryline

    2016-04-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) can be used to identify HIV-infected people who would benefit the most from long-term isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT). However, in resource-constrained settings, implementation of the TST can be challenging. The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of implementing the TST for IPT initiation and to estimate the proportion of TST-positive incidence among HIV-positive patients in 2 high tuberculosis and HIV burden settings. Two prospective observational cohort studies were conducted under programmatic conditions in Mathare, an urban slum of Nairobi, Kenya, and in rural Shiselweni, Swaziland. HIV-positive adults with negative tuberculosis symptomatic screening underwent the TST. Those testing positive were started on 36-month IPT. Of 897 and 1021 patients screened in Mathare and Shiselweni, 550 and 696, respectively, were included. Median age was 38 years, 67.7% were female, and 86.8% were on antiretroviral therapy. Among TST-eligible participants, 88.0% (491/558) and 81.8% (694/848) accepted TST and 74.2% (414/558) and 77.1% (654/858) returned for test reading in Mathare and Shiselweni, respectively. The TST was positive in 49.8% (95% confidence interval: 44.9 to 54.6) in Mathare and 33.2% (95% confidence interval: 29.6 to 36.8) in Shiselweni. The 36-month IPT was accepted by 96.1% (198/206) patients in Mathare and 99.5% (216/217) in Shiselweni. IPT implementation at the clinics was managed with no additional staff or extra space. Implementing the TST for IPT initiation was feasible and acceptable in both urban and rural resource-constrained settings. This strategy allows patients who can benefit the most to receive long-term IPT and avoids unnecessarily treating a significant number of patients who do not stand to benefit.

  8. Tuberculosis case finding and isoniazid preventive therapy among people living with HIV at public health facilities of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional facility based study.

    PubMed

    Denegetu, Amenu Wesen; Dolamo, Bethabile Lovely

    2014-01-18

    Activities to decrease the burden of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with HIV (PLHIV) include intensified TB case-finding (ICF), Isoniaizid (INH) preventive therapy (IPT) and infection control in health-care and congregate settings (IC). Information about the status of collaborative TB/HIV care services which decreases the burden of TB among PLHIV in Ethiopia is limited. The purpose of the study was to assess TB case finding and provision of IPT among PLHIV in Addis Ababa. A cross sectional, facility-based survey was conducted between June 2011 and August 2011. Data was collected by interviewing 849 PLHIV from ten health facilities in Addis Ababa. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze findings and the results are described in this report. The proportion of PLHIV who have been screened for TB during any one of their follow-up cares was 92.8%. Eighty eight (10.4%) of the study participants have been diagnosed for TB during their HIV follow-up cares. PLHIV who had never been diagnosed for TB before they knew their positive HIV status were nearly four times more likely to be diagnosed for TB during follow-up cares than those diagnosed before (AOR [95% CI]: 3.78 [1.69-8.43]). Nearly a third (28.7%) of all interviewed PLHIV self reported that they had been treated with IPT. It can be concluded that ICF for TB and IPT among PLHIV in Addis Ababa need boosting. Hence, it is recommended to put into practice the national and global guidelines to improve ICF and IPT among PLHIV in the city.

  9. Transfer of isoniazid from circulation to breast milk in lactating women on chronic therapy for tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neera; Golani, Anil; Patel, Zarine; Maitra, Anurupa

    2008-01-01

    Aim To determine milk to plasma (M : P) ratios and infant dose (absolute and relative) for isoniazid in lactating women on antituberculosis therapy. Methods Concentrations of isoniazid in plasma and milk were measured in exclusively breast feeding women taking 300 mg day−1 as treatment for tuberculosis. Results Peak plasma and milk concentrations of isoniazid were observed at 1 h. A mean M : PAUC value of 0.89 (95% CI 0.7, 1.1) was calculated for isoniazid from seven women over 24 h. The mean absolute infant dose was estimated to be 89.9 μg kg day−1 (95% CI 65.6, 114) and the relative infant dose was 1.2% of the weight adjusted maternal dose. Conclusions The mean relative dose of isoniazid (1.2%) transmitted to the infant via breast milk is below the 10% notional level of concern. These data suggest that isoniazid therapy is safe during breastfeeding. What is already known about this subject Isoniazid is the most widely used first line antituberculosis drug.It is considered safe during lactation, but limited data are available on the transfer of isoniazid from circulation to milk in lactating women, which can provide an assessment of extent of exposure to the nursling. What this study adds The study documents the transfer pattern and milk to plasma (M : P) ratio of isoniazid at a steady state.Peak plasma and milk concentrations of isoniazid were reached within 1 h and the projected exposure of the drug to the infant is much lower than the prophylactic dose, supporting its safety during breast feeding. PMID:18093257

  10. Selected pharmaceutical excipient prevent isoniazid and rifampicin induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shih, Tung-Yuan; Ho, Shan-Chu; Hsiong, Cheng-Huei; Huang, Tien-Yu; Hu, Oliver Yoa-Pu

    2013-07-01

    The incidence of isoniazid (INH)- and rifampicin (RIF)-induced abnormal liver enzyme activity is 27% but only 19% with INH alone. Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is thought to contribute to the synergistic effects of RIF and INH. Pharmaceutical excipients are inactive ingredients that are added to a pharmaceutical compound. The purpose of this study was to screen excipients for CYP2E1 inhibition and identify whether the screened excipients prevented INH/RIF-induced hepatotoxicity. Fifty-five known pharmaceutical excipients were screened for CYP2E1 inhibition. The hepatotoxic doses of INH and RIF were 50 and 100 mg/kg/day, respectively. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by the galactose single point (GSP) method (a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommended quantitative liver function test), liver histopathology, malondialdehyde (MDA) assay, and measurement of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity. We chose the CYP2E1-specific substrate chlorzoxazone to assess CYP2E1 activity in animal and human. Mannitol inhibited CYP2E1 activity by 54% in mice with INH/RIF-induced hepatotoxicity (p < 0.005). Serum AST, ALT and GSP levels were significantly increased 3.8- to 7.8-fold in these mice (p < 0.005), and these levels could be lowered by mannitol. Mannitol significantly alleviated the depletion of hepatic glutathione (GSH) and partially reversed the increase in MDA formation in mice treated with INH/RIF (p < 0.005). Mannitol also decreased CYP2E1 activity by 58% in humans (p < 0.005). Furthermore, an antituberculosis (TB) efficacy assay revealed that mannitol did not affect the anti-TB effects of INH/RIF. Mannitol, an FDA-approved excipient, was found to be a CYP2E1 inhibitor. Mannitol may be a useful adjuvant for drugs that induce hepatotoxicity through CYP2E1, such as INH and RIF.

  11. Intensified tuberculosis case finding, implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy and associated factors among people living with human immunodeficiency virus at public health facilities of Harari Region, Eastern Ethiopia: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Geleto, Ayele; Abate, Degu; Egata, Gudina

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Globally, the number of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) particularly in sub-Saharan Africa is growing. This has been resulted in increased number of tuberculosis (TB) new cases. To control burden of TB among PLHIV, a number of collaborative TB/HIV activities were recommended. However, data about collaborative TB/HIV services in the study area is scarce. The objective of this study is to assess intensified TB case finding, implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) and associated factors among PLHIV. Methods: A facility based cross-sectional study design was employed among 419 randomly selected PLHIV from public health facilities of Harari region. Systematic sampling method was used to obtain sample from each health facilities. Interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were entered into EpiData and analyzed by SPSS statistical software. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the presence of association between variables using odds ratio with 95% confidence interval and association was declared significant at P ≤ 0.05. Results: One hundred fifteen (75.2%) of the respondents reported that they offered screening for TB during their HIV chronic cares and 94 (29.8%) of them were found to be positive for active TB. Female sex [AOR 2.51; 95%CI (1.52, 6.14)], educated patients [AOR 0.52; 95%CI (0.21, 0.83)], CD4 count greater than 350 cells/dl3 [AOR 0.62; 95%CI(0.22,0.82)], Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) initiation [AOR 0.50; 95%CI (0.35, 0.88)] and missing dose of ART [AOR 2.57; 95%CI (1.21, 5.32)] were significantly associated with TB infection. Nearly four-fifth (78.7 %) of the study participants were provided IPT. Conclusions: Screening of TB among PLHIV and implementation of IPT in the region is lower when compared to the findings of other studies conducted in different parts of the country and needs to be improved through implementation of national and international

  12. Treatment for preventing tuberculosis in children and adolescents: a randomized clinical trial of a 3-month, 12-dose regimen of a combination of rifapentine and isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Villarino, M Elsa; Scott, Nigel A; Weis, Stephen E; Weiner, Marc; Conde, Marcus B; Jones, Brenda; Nachman, Sharon; Oliveira, Ricardo; Moro, Ruth N; Shang, Nong; Goldberg, Stefan V; Sterling, Timothy R

    2015-03-01

    group developed tuberculosis vs 3 of 434 (cumulative rate, 0.74%) in the isoniazid-only group, for a difference of -0.74% and an upper bound of the 95% CI of the difference of +0.32%, which met the noninferiority criterion. Treatment with the combination of rifapentine and isoniazid was as effective as isoniazid-only treatment for the prevention of tuberculosis in children aged 2 to 17 years. The combination-therapy group had a higher treatment completion rate than did the isoniazid-only group and was safe. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00023452.

  13. Two controlled studies of the efficacy of isoniazid alone in preventing relapse in patients with bacteriologically quiescent pulmonary tuberculosis at the end of one year of chemotherapy*

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, O.; Devadatta, S.; Fox, Wallace; Menon, N. K.; Radhakrishna, S.; Rajappa, D.; Ramakrishnan, C. V.; Somasundaram, P. R.; Stott, H.; Subbammal, S.; Velu, S.

    1971-01-01

    An earlier report showed that, in patients with bacteriologically quiescent pulmonary tuberculosis at the end of 1 year of chemotherapy, isoniazid alone in a single daily dose of 150-200 mg, given as maintenance therapy in the second year, did not markedly prevent relapse over a 4-year period of follow-up in patients who had had residual cavitation (the ”open-negative” syndrome) at 1 year, but was highly effective in patients who had not. As a result of these findings, two controlled studies, reported here, were undertaken. The first study was undertaken in patients with bacteriologically quiescent disease and residual cavitation at 1 year, and investigated the value of isoniazid in a higher daily dose (400 mg) throughout the second year; this is known to be the optimum therapeutic dose when isoniazid is prescribed alone for 1 year in the initial treatment of the disease. The second study was carried out in patients with bacteriologically quiescent disease and no residual cavitation at 1 year, and sought to determine the value of a shorter duration (6 months) of chemotherapy in the second year with a daily dose of 300 mg of isoniazid. Neither of the two isoniazid regimens was highly satisfactory, although both appeared to have had some effect in preventing relapse during the 4-year period of follow-up. PMID:4947494

  14. Short-course therapy with rifampin plus isoniazid, compared with standard therapy with isoniazid, for latent tuberculosis infection: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ena, Javier; Valls, Victoria

    2005-03-01

    A major difficulty associated with the use of standard therapy with isoniazid for latent tuberculosis infection is poor patient adherence to therapy because of the prolonged course required. Shorter courses of therapy involving > or =2 drugs have been proposed as an alternative to standard therapy, but they have not undergone enough testing. We performed a meta-analysis to determine the equivalence of daily short-course therapy with rifampin plus isoniazid for 3 months and standard therapy with isoniazid for 6-12 months. The end points that were evaluated were development of active tuberculosis, severe adverse drug reactions, and death. We searched published information in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and Embase databases, as well as unpublished information in the Cambridge Scientific Abstracts Internet database, Conference Papers Index, AIDS and Cancer Research Abstracts, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also scanned the reference lists of articles. We only included trials in which individuals were randomly allocated to receive treatment. Two reviewers independently applied the criteria for trial selection, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. Five trials comprising 1926 adults from Hong Kong, Spain, and Uganda were identified. The mean duration of follow-up varied from 13 to 37 months. Overall, development of active tuberculosis was equivalent in association with both regimens (pooled risk difference, 0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1% to 2%; percentage of total variation across the studies that is the result of heterogeneity rather than chance [I2], 0%; P=.86). Severe adverse effects were reported with a similar frequency for both regimens (pooled risk difference, -1%; 95% CI, -7% to 5%) but with statistically significant heterogeneity detected (I2, 78%; P=.001). However, a subanalysis of high-quality trials (including 74% of the sample size) suggested that both regimens were equally safe. In 3 trials (comprising 1390 patients) that provided data on

  15. Isoniazid toxicity and TB development during biological therapy of patients with psoriasis in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cataño, Juan; Morales, Milena

    2016-10-01

    Background The use of biological therapy has been linked with an increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation. Objective The aim of this study was to present the follow-up results for Isoniazid (INH) chemoprophylaxis in patients with psoriasis receiving different biological therapies. Methods In this prospective observational study, patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) were given INH chemoprophylaxis between two and nine months prior to the beginning of biological therapy. All patients were followed up monthly for any signs or symptoms of active TB or INH toxicity. Results A total of 101 patients, 44.5% females, with a mean age of 46.9 ± 11.5 years (20-73) were enrolled. LTBI was identified in 100 patients (99%), of whom 81.2% completed nine months of chemoprophylaxis. Three patients (2.9%) developed active TB and 17 patients (16.8%) developed intolerance or toxicity related to INH. Conclusions Chemoprophylaxis with INH seems to be effective and safe for the prevention of most TB reactivations in individuals with LTBI receiving biological therapy, but toxicity must be monitored during follow-up.

  16. Impact of tuberculosis screening and isoniazid preventive therapy on incidence of tuberculosis and death in patients with HIV infection receiving care in public clinics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: the Tuberculosis/HIV in Rio de Janeiro (THRio) study: a stepped wedge, cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Durovni, Betina; Saraceni, Valeria; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Pacheco, Antonio G.; Cavalcante, Solange C.; King, Bonnie S.; Cohn, Silvia; Efron, Anne; Chaisson, Richard E.; Golub, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Preventive therapy for tuberculosis among HIV-infected patients is effective but has not been widely implemented in moderate/high-burden settings. Objectives To determine the impact of widespread use of isoniazid preventive therapy on rates of tuberculosis and death in HIV-infected individuals in Brazil. Design Stepped wedge, cluster randomized trial Participants Patients actively enrolled in 29 HIV clinics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Control period Standard of care Intervention period Staff training in tuberculosis screening, performance of tuberculin skin tests and use of isoniazid preventive therapy. Randomization Clinics were randomly allocated a date to begin the intervention period with two clinics beginning the intervention every 2 months starting September 1 2005. Main outcome measures Tuberculosis incidence alone or combined with death in the control versus intervention periods through August 31 2009. Results Among 17,413 patients in the THRio cohort, 12,816 were eligible for the intervention. Overall, there were 475 tuberculosis cases and 838 deaths. The intervention increased the rate of patients receiving skin tests from 19/100 person-years to 59/100 person-years, and from 36/100 person-years to 144/100 person-years for those eligible for isoniazid preventive therapy. In the control period, 221 tuberculosis cases were diagnosed (1·31/100 person-years) compared to 254 (1·10/100 person-years) in the intervention (unadjusted hazard ratio (HR)=0·87;95%CI:0·69–1·10). Rates of tuberculosis incidence or death were 3·64 and 3·04/100 person-years, respectively (HR=0·76; 95%CI:0·66–0·87). When adjusted for age, sex, entry CD4 count and use of antiretroviral therapy, the HR for tuberculosis was 0·73 (95%CI:0·54–0·99) and for tuberculosis or death was 0·69 (95%CI:0·57–0·83). Among 12,196 patients remaining in care (secondary analyses, 399 tuberculosis cases and 656 deaths), the adjusted HR of tuberculosis alone and combined

  17. A novel metabolite of antituberculosis therapy demonstrates host activation of isoniazid and formation of the isoniazid-NAD+ adduct.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Woolhiser, Lisa K; Lenaerts, Anne J; Johnson, John L; Eisenach, Kathleen D; Joloba, Moses L; Boom, W Henry; Belisle, John T

    2012-01-01

    One of the most effective and widely used antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs is isoniazid (INH), a prodrug activated via oxidation that forms an adduct with NAD(+) to inhibit NADH-dependent targets of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, such as enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA). The metabolic by-products and potentially toxic intermediates resulting from INH therapy have been identified through a large body of work. However, an INH-NAD adduct or structures related to this adduct have not been identified in specimens from human TB patients or animal models of TB. Analyses by mass spectrometry of urine collected from TB patients in a study conducted by the NIAID-funded Tuberculosis Research Unit identified 4-isonicotinoylnicotinamide (C(12)H(9)N(3)O(2)) as a novel metabolite of INH therapy. This compound was formed by M. tuberculosis strains in a KatG-dependent manner but could also be produced by mice treated with INH independent of an M. tuberculosis infection. Thus, the 4-isonicotinoylnicotinamide observed in human urine samples is likely derived from the degradation of oxidized INH-NAD adducts and provides direct evidence of host INH activation.

  18. Combined Streptomycin-Isoniazid-Rifampin Therapy in the Treatment of Johne's Disease in a Goat

    PubMed Central

    Slocombe, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    Johne's disease (paratuberculosis) is an insidious, invariably fatal, chronic disease of ruminants. An increasing role for the goat as a companion animal as well as its commercial use stimulated interest in attempting to treat Johne's disease in this species. The disease tends to differ both clinically and pathologically in goats compared to cattle because the former species often has less severe intestinal involvement. It was, therefore, speculated that response to therapy may differ between cattle and goats. In addition, the combination drug regime of isoniazid, rifampin and streptomycin, widely accepted for human mycobacterial infections, has not been previously employed for treatment of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. The clinical course and pathological findings of a case of naturally occurring Johne's disease subsequent to a combined drug regime of isoniazid, rifampin and streptomycin is discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3a.Figure 3b. PMID:17422141

  19. Isoniazid Therapy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in HIV Clinics, Los Angeles, California

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Chang, Alicia H.; Ghosh, Jo Kay C.; Dubé, Michael P.; Bolan, Robert; Yang, Otto O.; Kerndt, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Setting Publicly-funded HIV clinics in Los Angeles County, California, USA. Objective HIV-infected persons are a high priority group for targeted testing and treatment for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the United States. We describe rates of isoniazid initiation and completion among HIV-1 and M. tuberculosis co-infected persons in Los Angeles County. Design We conducted a cross-sectional study using routinely collected surveillance data from publicly-funded HIV clinics. We examined differences in isoniazid treatment initiation and completion between four clinic categories: the three largest clinics (Clinics A, B, and C) and “Other” clinics (pooled data for remaining 10 clinics). Results During 2010–2013, 802 (5.3%) of 15,029 HIV-1-infected persons tested positive for M. tuberculosis infection. Isoniazid was initiated in 581 (72.4%) persons, of whom 457 (78.7%) completed therapy. We found significant differences between clinics for treatment initiation (range: 59.1% – 93.4%) and completion (range: 58.8% – 82.3%). Overall, 57% (457/802) of HIV and M. tuberculosis co-infected persons completed the recommended treatment (range across clinics: 34.8% – 76.3%). Conclusion We identified significant gaps in treatment for M. tuberculosis infection among HIV-infected persons in Los Angeles County. Interventions are needed to improve initiation and completion of treatment for M. tuberculosis infection in this population. PMID:27287651

  20. [Fe(CN)5(isoniazid)](3-): an iron isoniazid complex with redox behavior implicated in tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Eduardo Henrique Silva; de Mesquita Vieira, Francisca Gilmara; Butler, Jennifer S; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santiago, Diógenes S; Diógenes, Izaura C N; Lopes, Luiz Gonzaga de França; Sadler, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    Tuberculosis has re-emerged as a worldwide threat, which has motivated the development of new drugs. The antituberculosis complex Na3[Fe(CN)5(isoniazid)] (IQG607) in particular is of interest on account of its ability to overcome resistance. IQG607 has the potential for redox-mediated-activation, in which an acylpyridine (isonicotinoyl) radical could be generated without assistance from the mycobacterial KatG enzyme. Here, we have investigated the reactivity of IQG607 toward hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, well-known intracellular oxidizing agents that could play a key role in the redox-mediated-activation of this compound. HPLC, NMR and electronic spectroscopy studies showed a very fast oxidation rate for bound isoniazid, over 460-fold faster than free isoniazid oxidation. A series of EPR spin traps were used for detection of isonicotinoyl and derived radicals bound to iron. This is the first report for an isonicotinoyl radical bound to a metal complex, supported by (14)N and (1)H hyperfine splittings for the POBN and PBN trapped radicals. POBN and PBN exhibited average hyperfine coupling constants of aN=15.6, aH=2.8 and aN=15.4, aH=4.7, respectively, which are in close agreement to the isonicotinoyl radical. Radical generation is thought to play a major role in the mechanism of action of isoniazid and this work provides strong evidence for its production within IQG607, which, along with biological and chemical oxidation data, support a redox-mediated activation mechanism. More generally the concept of redox activation of metallo prodrugs could be applied more widely for the design of therapeutic agents with novel mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adherence with isoniazid for prevention of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Szakacs, Tom A; Wilson, Douglas; Cameron, D William; Clark, Michael; Kocheleff, Paul; Muller, F James; McCarthy, Anne E

    2006-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV-infected adults in developing countries. Isoniazid (INH) is recommended for treatment of latent TB infection, however non-adherence is common. The purpose of this study was to apply in-house prepared isoniazid (INH) urine test strips in a clinical setting, and identify predictors of positive test results in an adherence questionnaire in HIV-infected adults taking INH for prevention of TB. Methods Cross-sectional study of adherence using a questionnaire and urine test strips for detection of INH metabolites at two hospitals in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Participants were aged at least 18 years, HIV positive, and receiving INH for prevention of tuberculosis disease. Univariate and multivariate analyses are used to identify factors relevant to adherence. Results 301 consecutive patients were recruited. 28% of participants had negative urine tests. 32 (37.2%, 95% CI25.4, 45.0) of the 86 patients who received INH from peripheral pharmacies said the pharmacy had run out of INH at some time, compared with central hospital pharmacies (p = 0.0001). In univariate analysis, a negative test was associated with self-reported missed INH doses (p = 0.043). Each 12-hour increment since last reported dose increased the likelihood of a negative test by 34% (p = 0.0007). Belief in INH safety was associated with a positive test (p = 0.021). In multivariate analysis, patients who believed INH is important for prevention of TB disease were more likely to be negative (p = 0.0086). Conclusion Adequate drug availability at peripheral pharmacies remains an important intervention for TB prevention. Key questions may identify potentially non-adherent patients. In-house prepared urine tests strips are an effective and cheap method of objectively assessing INH adherence, and could be used an important tool in TB control programs. PMID:16772037

  2. Three months of rifapentine and isoniazid for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Timothy R; Villarino, M Elsa; Borisov, Andrey S; Shang, Nong; Gordin, Fred; Bliven-Sizemore, Erin; Hackman, Judith; Hamilton, Carol Dukes; Menzies, Dick; Kerrigan, Amy; Weis, Stephen E; Weiner, Marc; Wing, Diane; Conde, Marcus B; Bozeman, Lorna; Horsburgh, C Robert; Chaisson, Richard E

    2011-12-08

    Treatment of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is an essential component of tuberculosis control and elimination. The current standard regimen of isoniazid for 9 months is efficacious but is limited by toxicity and low rates of treatment completion. We conducted an open-label, randomized noninferiority trial comparing 3 months of directly observed once-weekly therapy with rifapentine (900 mg) plus isoniazid (900 mg) (combination-therapy group) with 9 months of self-administered daily isoniazid (300 mg) (isoniazid-only group) in subjects at high risk for tuberculosis. Subjects were enrolled from the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Spain and followed for 33 months. The primary end point was confirmed tuberculosis, and the noninferiority margin was 0.75%. In the modified intention-to-treat analysis, tuberculosis developed in 7 of 3986 subjects in the combination-therapy group (cumulative rate, 0.19%) and in 15 of 3745 subjects in the isoniazid-only group (cumulative rate, 0.43%), for a difference of 0.24 percentage points. Rates of treatment completion were 82.1% in the combination-therapy group and 69.0% in the isoniazid-only group (P<0.001). Rates of permanent drug discontinuation owing to an adverse event were 4.9% in the combination-therapy group and 3.7% in the isoniazid-only group (P=0.009). Rates of investigator-assessed drug-related hepatotoxicity were 0.4% and 2.7%, respectively (P<0.001). The use of rifapentine plus isoniazid for 3 months was as effective as 9 months of isoniazid alone in preventing tuberculosis and had a higher treatment-completion rate. Long-term safety monitoring will be important. (Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; PREVENT TB ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00023452.).

  3. Isoniazid preventive treatment among child contacts of adults with smear-positive tuberculosis in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Sillah, A.; Togun, T.; Kandeh, S.; Cole, F.; Jallow, A.; Able-Thomas, A.; Hoelscher, M.; Heinrich, N.; Hill, P. C.; Kampmann, B.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Greater Banjul area of The Gambia. Objectives: To evaluate uptake, adherence and completion of treatment among tuberculosis (TB) exposed children in The Gambia when isoniazid preventive treatment (IPT) is delivered at home Design: Child (age <5 years) contacts of adults with smear-positive TB were prospectively enrolled. Following symptom screening, tuberculin skin testing and clinical evaluation where indicated, those without disease were placed on daily isoniazid, provided monthly at home. Adherence was assessed by pill counts and IsoScreen™ urine test. Results: Of 404 contacts aged <5 years, 368 (91.1%) were offered IPT. Of the 328 (89.4%) for whom consent was received and who commenced IPT, 18 (5.5%) dropped out and 310 (94.5%) remained on IPT to the end of the 6-month regimen. Altogether, 255/328 children (77.7%, 95%CI 73.2–82.2) completed all 6 months, with good adherence. The IsoScreen test was positive in 85.3% (435/510) of all tests among those defined as having good adherence by pill count and in 16% (8/50) of those defined as having poor adherence (P < 0.001). A cascade of care analysis showed an overall completion rate with good adherence of 61% for all child contacts. Conclusion: Home-delivered IPT among child contacts of adults with smear-positive TB in The Gambia achieved verifiable high uptake and adherence rates. System rather than patient factors are likely to determine the success of IPT at national level. PMID:28123958

  4. Isoniazid preventive treatment among child contacts of adults with smear-positive tuberculosis in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Egere, U; Sillah, A; Togun, T; Kandeh, S; Cole, F; Jallow, A; Able-Thomas, A; Hoelscher, M; Heinrich, N; Hill, P C; Kampmann, B

    2016-12-21

    Setting: Greater Banjul area of The Gambia. Objectives: To evaluate uptake, adherence and completion of treatment among tuberculosis (TB) exposed children in The Gambia when isoniazid preventive treatment (IPT) is delivered at home Design: Child (age <5 years) contacts of adults with smear-positive TB were prospectively enrolled. Following symptom screening, tuberculin skin testing and clinical evaluation where indicated, those without disease were placed on daily isoniazid, provided monthly at home. Adherence was assessed by pill counts and IsoScreen(™) urine test. Results: Of 404 contacts aged <5 years, 368 (91.1%) were offered IPT. Of the 328 (89.4%) for whom consent was received and who commenced IPT, 18 (5.5%) dropped out and 310 (94.5%) remained on IPT to the end of the 6-month regimen. Altogether, 255/328 children (77.7%, 95%CI 73.2-82.2) completed all 6 months, with good adherence. The IsoScreen test was positive in 85.3% (435/510) of all tests among those defined as having good adherence by pill count and in 16% (8/50) of those defined as having poor adherence (P < 0.001). A cascade of care analysis showed an overall completion rate with good adherence of 61% for all child contacts. Conclusion: Home-delivered IPT among child contacts of adults with smear-positive TB in The Gambia achieved verifiable high uptake and adherence rates. System rather than patient factors are likely to determine the success of IPT at national level.

  5. Empiric Tuberculosis Therapy versus Isoniazid in Advanced HIV-infected Adult Outpatients Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy: a Multi-Country Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Bisson, Gregory P.; Miyahara, Sachiko; Sun, Xin; Moses, Agnes; Riviere, Cynthia; Kirui, F.K.; Badal-Faesen, Sharla; Lagat, David; Nyirenda, Mulinda; Naidoo, K; Hakim, James; Mugyenyi, Peter; Henostroza, German; Leger, P.D; Lama, Javier.R; Mohapi, Lerato; Alave, Jorge; Mave, V; Veloso, Valdilea.G; Pillay, Sandy; Kumarasamy, N.; Bao, Jing; Hogg, Evelyn; Jones, Lynne; Zolopa, Andrew; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Gupta, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Mortality within the first 6 months after initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) is common in resource-limited settings and is often due to tuberculosis (TB) among patients with advanced HIV disease. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is recommended in HIV-infected adults, but sub-clinical TB can be difficult to diagnose. We hypothesized that empiric TB treatment would reduce early mortality compared to IPT in high-burden settings. Methods We conducted a multi-country randomized clinical trial comparing empiric TB therapy (Empiric) vs. isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) in HIV-infected outpatients initiating ART with CD4 counts <50 cells/mm3. Individuals were screened for TB using a symptom screen, locally available diagnostics, and the GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay when available. The primary endpoint was survival (death or unknown status) at 24 weeks post randomization. Kaplan Meier estimates of the endpoint rates across arms were compared by the z-test. Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01380080). Findings From October 31, 2011 until June 9, 2014, we randomized 850 participants (424 in Empiric arm and 426 in IPT arm); the median CD4 count at baseline was 18 cells/mm3 (IQR: 9, 32). At week 24, each arm had 22 primary endpoints, for rates of 5.2% in each arm (95% CI: 3.5% to 7.8% for Empiric and 3.4% to 7.8% for IPT; absolute risk difference of -0.06% (95% CI: −3.05% to 2.94%). Grade 3 or 4 signs or symptoms occurred in 50 (12%) in the Empiric arm and 46 (11%) in the IPT arm. Grade 3 or 4 laboratory abnormalities occurred in 99 (23%) in the Empiric arm and 97 (23%) in the IPT arm. Incident TB was more common in the Empiric arm (31 vs. 18 events, p=0.01). Interpretation Empiric TB therapy did not reduce mortality at 24 weeks in outpatient adults initiating ART with advanced HIV disease. The low mortality rate of the trial supports implementation of systematic TB screening and IPT in outpatients with advanced HIV disease. PMID:27025337

  6. Pure red cell hypoplasia secondary to isoniazid.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C. R.; Manoharan, A.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a 77 year old man who developed pure red cell aplasia while receiving antituberculous therapy including isoniazid. Prompt recovery occurred following cessation of isoniazid. In this paper we also review previously described case reports of isoniazid-induced pure red cell aplasia. PMID:3120168

  7. Analysis of Rifapentine for Preventive Therapy in the Cornell Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Eishi; Chaisson, Richard E.; Bishai, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Rifapentine is a long-acting rifamycin which may be useful for intermittent drug therapy against tuberculosis. In this study we measured the efficacies of rifapentine-containing intermittent drug regimens for preventive therapy using the Cornell mouse model of latent tuberculosis. We infected groups of mice intravenously with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and then treated them with isoniazid and pyrazinamide for 12 weeks according to the Cornell latency development protocol. After a 4-week interval of no treatment, experimental preventive therapy was administered by esophageal gavage for 12 or 18 weeks. After equilibration and dexamethasone amplification treatment, mouse organs were analyzed by quantitative colony counts to measure the effectiveness of therapy. Our results showed that once-weekly isoniazid plus rifapentine combination therapy for 18 weeks was an effective preventive regimen with sterilizing potency and bacillary load reduction comparable to those of daily isoniazid therapy for 18 weeks. Monotherapy with rifapentine weekly or fortnightly or with rifampin twice weekly for up to 18 weeks did not offer advantages in reducing bacillary load or in sterilizing organs compared to the effects of a placebo. These results with the Cornell mouse model indicate that once-weekly, short-course preventive therapy with isoniazid plus rifapentine is effective and may warrant investigation in humans with latent tuberculosis infection. PMID:10471552

  8. Implementation and Operational Research: Cost-Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy and Isoniazid Prophylaxis to Reduce Tuberculosis and Death in People Living With HIV in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tyler; Samandari, Taraz; Abimbola, Taiwo; Marston, Barbara; Sangrujee, Nalinee

    2015-11-01

    In Botswana, a 36-month course of isoniazid treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection [isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT)] was superior to 6-month IPT in reducing TB and death in persons living with HIV (PLHIV), having positive tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) but not in those with negative TST. We examined the cost-effectiveness of IPT in Botswana, where antiretroviral therapy (ART) is widely available. Using a decision-analytic model, we determined the incremental cost-effectiveness of strategies for reducing TB and death in 10,000 PLHIV over 36 months. IPT for 6 months and provision of ART if CD4 lymphocyte count <250 cells per microliter (2011 Botswana policy) was compared with 6 alternative strategies that varied the use of IPT, TST, and ART for CD4 count thresholds, including CD4 <350 and <500 cells per microliter. Botswana policy, 2011 was dominated by most other strategies. IPT of 36 months for TST-positive PLHIV with ART for CD4 <250 cells per microliter resulted in 120 fewer TB cases for an additional cost of $1612 per case averted and resulted in 80 fewer deaths for an additional $2418 per death averted compared with provision of 6-month IPT to TST-positive PLHIV who received ART for CD4 <250 cells per microliter, the next most effective strategy. Alternative strategies offered lower incremental effectiveness at higher cost. These findings remained consistent in sensitivity analyses. A strategy of treating PLHIV who have positive TST with 36-month IPT is more cost effective for reducing both TB and death compared with providing IPT without a TST, providing only 6-month IPT, or expanding ART eligibility without IPT.

  9. Different Risk of Tuberculosis and Efficacy of Isoniazid Prophylaxis in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients with Biologic Therapy: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ming; Chang, Chia-Li; Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Der-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates an increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients receiving biologic therapy, and the effectiveness of isoniazid prophylaxis (INHP) in TB prevention. We aimed to examine 1) the incidence rate (IR) and risk factors for TB among RA patients receiving different therapies; 2) INHP effectiveness for TB prevention; 3) mortality rates after TB diagnosis in patients receiving different therapies. This retrospective study was conducted using a nationwide database: 168,720 non-RA subjects and a total of 42,180 RA patients including 36,162 csDMARDs-exposed, 3,577 etanercept-exposed, 1,678 adalimumab-exposed and 763 rituximab-exposed patients. TB risk was 2.7-fold higher in RA cohort compared with non-RA group, with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 2.58. Advanced age, male, the use of corticosteroids≧5mg/day, and the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease were risk factors for developing TB. Using csDMARDs-exposed group as reference, aHR of TB was the highest with adalimumab treatment (1.52), followed by etanercept (1.16), and the lowest with rituximab (0.08). INHP could effectively reduce TB risk in biologics-exposed patients. Mortality rates after TB diagnosis were higher in RA patients, particularly the elderly and those with DM, with lower rates in adalimumab-exposed patients compared with csDMARDs-exposed patients. In conclusion, TB risk was increased in patients receiving TNF-α inhibitors, but the risk associated with rituximab therapy was relatively low. With the effectiveness of INHP shown in the prevention of biologics-associated TB, stricter implementation of INHP should be beneficial. The mortality from biologics–associated TB may be efficiently reduced through increased awareness. PMID:27064275

  10. Contribution of Efflux to the Emergence of Isoniazid and Multidrug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Perdigão, João; Rodrigues, Liliana; Portugal, Isabel; Baptista, Pedro; Veigas, Bruno; Amaral, Leonard; Viveiros, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most effective drugs used in tuberculosis therapy. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which resistance towards isoniazid develops and how overexpression of efflux pumps favors accumulation of mutations in isoniazid targets, thus establishing a MDR phenotype. The study was based on the in vitro induction of an isoniazid resistant phenotype by prolonged serial exposure of M. tuberculosis strains to the critical concentration of isoniazid employed for determination of drug susceptibility testing in clinical isolates. Results show that susceptible and rifampicin monoresistant strains exposed to this concentration become resistant to isoniazid after three weeks; and that resistance observed for the majority of these strains could be reduced by means of efflux pumps inhibitors. RT-qPCR assessment of efflux pump genes expression showed overexpression of all tested genes. Enhanced real-time efflux of ethidium bromide, a common efflux pump substrate, was also observed, showing a clear relation between overexpression of the genes and increased efflux pump function. Further exposure to isoniazid resulted in the selection and stabilization of spontaneous mutations and deletions in the katG gene along with sustained increased efflux activity. Together, results demonstrate the relevance of efflux pumps as one of the factors of isoniazid resistance in M. tuberculosis. These results support the hypothesis that activity of efflux pumps allows the maintenance of an isoniazid resistant population in a sub-optimally treated patient from which isoniazid genetically resistant mutants emerge. Therefore, the use of inhibitors of efflux should be considered in the development of new therapeutic strategies for preventing the emergence of MDR-TB during treatment. PMID:22493700

  11. Contribution of efflux to the emergence of isoniazid and multidrug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Perdigão, João; Rodrigues, Liliana; Portugal, Isabel; Baptista, Pedro; Veigas, Bruno; Amaral, Leonard; Viveiros, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most effective drugs used in tuberculosis therapy. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which resistance towards isoniazid develops and how overexpression of efflux pumps favors accumulation of mutations in isoniazid targets, thus establishing a MDR phenotype. The study was based on the in vitro induction of an isoniazid resistant phenotype by prolonged serial exposure of M. tuberculosis strains to the critical concentration of isoniazid employed for determination of drug susceptibility testing in clinical isolates. Results show that susceptible and rifampicin monoresistant strains exposed to this concentration become resistant to isoniazid after three weeks; and that resistance observed for the majority of these strains could be reduced by means of efflux pumps inhibitors. RT-qPCR assessment of efflux pump genes expression showed overexpression of all tested genes. Enhanced real-time efflux of ethidium bromide, a common efflux pump substrate, was also observed, showing a clear relation between overexpression of the genes and increased efflux pump function. Further exposure to isoniazid resulted in the selection and stabilization of spontaneous mutations and deletions in the katG gene along with sustained increased efflux activity. Together, results demonstrate the relevance of efflux pumps as one of the factors of isoniazid resistance in M. tuberculosis. These results support the hypothesis that activity of efflux pumps allows the maintenance of an isoniazid resistant population in a sub-optimally treated patient from which isoniazid genetically resistant mutants emerge. Therefore, the use of inhibitors of efflux should be considered in the development of new therapeutic strategies for preventing the emergence of MDR-TB during treatment.

  12. Weekly Rifapentine/Isoniazid or Daily Rifampin/Pyrazinamide for Latent Tuberculosis in Household Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Schechter, Mauro; Zajdenverg, Roberto; Falco, Gisely; Barnes, Grace Link; Faulhaber, José Cláudio; Coberly, Jacqueline S.; Moore, Richard D.; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: Treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection with weekly rifapentine and isoniazid is a potentially effective alternative to current therapies. Objectives: To compare the efficacy of weekly rifapentine/isoniazid to daily rifampin/pyrazinamide in preventing TB in household contacts of patients with pulmonary TB in Brazil. Methods: Contacts of patients with TB were randomized to rifapentine 900 mg/isoniazid 900 mg once weekly for 12 wk or rifampin 450–600 mg/pyrazinamide 750–1,500 mg daily for 8 wk and followed for at least 2 yr. Measurements: TB rates, adverse events, and adherence to therapy. Main Results: A total of 399 household contacts were enrolled, 206 in the rifapentine/isoniazid arm and 193 in the rifampin/pyrazinamide arm. The median age was 34 yr, median weight was 63 kg, 60% of participants were female, and only one patient was HIV infected. Rifapentine/isoniazid was well tolerated, but the trial was halted by the investigators before completion because of unanticipated hepatotoxicity in the rifampin/pyrazinamide arm. Twenty of 193 participants (10%) receiving rifampin/pyrazinamide experienced grade 3 or 4 hepatotoxicity, compared with 2 of 206 participants (1%) on rifapentine/isoniazid (p < 0.001). There were no hospitalizations or deaths due to hepatotoxicity, and all participants' liver enzyme levels returned to normal during follow-up. During follow-up, four cases of active TB developed, three in the rifapentine/isoniazid group and one in the rifampin/pyrazinamide group (1.46 vs. 0.52%; difference, 0.94%; 95% confidence interval, −1.6 to 3.7%). Conclusions: Rifapentine/isoniazid was better tolerated than rifampin/pyrazinamide and was associated with good protection against TB. Rifapentine/isoniazid weekly for 12 wk is likely a promising therapy for latent TB infection. PMID:16474028

  13. Isoniazid-induced pellagra.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Calka, Omer; Altun, Faruk

    2011-12-01

    Pellagra is characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death occurring as a result of niacin or its precursor tryptophan deficiency. Although pellagra is a well-known complication of isoniazid (INH) therapy, the clinical diagnosis may be missed or delayed that may cause life-threatening consequences. Due to the diversity of pellagra-related signs and symptoms, the diagnosis can be made with an appropriate index of suspicion. We report a 7-year-old boy presenting with INH-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of the niacin therapy.

  14. Reparation of Isoniazid and Rifampicin Combinatorial Therapy-Induced Hepatotoxic Effects by Bacopa monnieri.

    PubMed

    Evan Prince, Sabina; Udhaya, Lavinya B; Sunitha, Priyadharshini S; Arumugam, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a major challenge in treating tuberculosis with isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF). This study was aimed at evaluating the protective effects of Bacopamonnieri (Brahmi) against INH and RIF-induced hepatotoxicity in a rat model and also to study the patterns of interaction between pregnane X receptor (PXR) and chosen active compounds of B. monnieri. Hepatotoxicity was induced in the experimental animals by the oral administration of INH and RIF (50 mg/kg b.w. each/day) for 28 days. The effects of co-administration of B. monnieri (500 mg/kg b.w./day) in INH- and RIF-induced rats were studied by the estimation of biochemical analyses. The standard hepatoprotective drug silymarin (25 mg/kg b.w./day) was used for the purpose of comparison. In silico docking experiments were carried out using the PatchDock server and the results were analysed on the PyMol molecular viewer. There was significant reduction in the antioxidant status of INH and RIF-induced rats. Also, there was significant elevation in the levels of serum liver function markers in the INH- and RIF-induced rats. B. monnieri was able to normalise the tested parameters. In silico studies reveal significant interaction between PXR and bacopaside I. B. monnieri exerts significant protective effects against INH and RIF-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

  15. 3D-printed hierarchical scaffold for localized isoniazid/rifampin drug delivery and osteoarticular tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Li, Kun; Zhu, Yufang; Zhang, Jianhua; Ye, Xiaojian

    2015-04-01

    After surgical treatment of osteoarticular tuberculosis (TB), it is necessary to fill the surgical defect with an implant, which combines the merits of osseous regeneration and local multi-drug therapy so as to avoid drug resistance and side effects. In this study, a 3D-printed macro/meso-porous composite scaffold is fabricated. High dosages of isoniazid (INH)/rifampin (RFP) anti-TB drugs are loaded into chemically modified mesoporous bioactive ceramics in advance, which are then bound with poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) through a 3D printing procedure. The composite scaffolds show greatly prolonged drug release time compared to commercial calcium phosphate scaffolds either in vitro or in vivo. In addition, the drug concentrations on the periphery tissues of defect are maintained above INH/RFP minimal inhibitory concentrations even up to 12 weeks post-surgery, while they are extremely low in blood. Examinations of certain serum enzymes suggest no harm to hepatic or renal functions. Micro-CT evaluations and histology results also indicate partly degradation of the composite scaffolds and new bone growth in the cavity. These results suggest promising applications of our hierarchical composite scaffold in bone regeneration and local anti-TB therapy after osteoarticular TB debridement surgery.

  16. In vitro evaluation of inhalable isoniazid-loaded surfactant liposomes as an adjunct therapy in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chimote, G; Banerjee, R

    2010-07-01

    In this study, exogenous pulmonary surfactant was evaluated as an inhalable drug carrier for antitubercular drug isoniazid (INH). Isoniazid-entrapped liposomes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) (the most abundant lipid of lung surfactant and exogenous surfactant) were developed and evaluated for size, drug entrapment, release, in vitro alveolar deposition, biocompatibility, antimycobacterial activity, and pulmonary surfactant action. Isoniazid-entrapped DPPC liposomes were about 750 nm in diameter and had entrapment efficiency of 36.7% +/- 1.8%. Sustained release of INH from DPPC liposomes was observed over 24 h. In vitro alveolar deposition efficiency using the twin impinger exhibited approximately 25-27% INH deposition in the alveolar chamber upon one minute nebulization using a jet nebulizer. At 37 degrees C, the formulation had better pulmonary surfactant function with quicker reduction of surface tension on adsorption (36.7 +/- 0.4 mN/m) than DPPC liposomes (44.7 +/- 0.6 mN/m) and 87% airway patency was exhibited by the formulation in a capillary surfactometer. The formulation was biocompatible and had antimycobacterial activity. The isoniazid-entrapped DPPC liposomes could fulfill the dual purpose of pulmonary drug delivery and alveolar stabilization due to antiatelectatic effect of the surfactant action which can improve the reach of antitubercular drug INH to the alveoli.

  17. Flu-like and Other Systemic Drug Reactions Among Persons Receiving Weekly Rifapentine Plus Isoniazid or Daily Isoniazid for Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the PREVENT Tuberculosis Study

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Timothy R.; Moro, Ruth N.; Borisov, Andrey S.; Phillips, Elizabeth; Shepherd, Gillian; Adkinson, Newton Franklin; Weis, Stephen; Ho, Christine; Villarino, Margarita Elsa

    2015-01-01

    Background. Weekly rifapentine plus isoniazid for 3 months (3HP) is as effective as daily isoniazid for 9 months (9H) for latent tuberculosis infection in high-risk persons, but there have been reports of possible flu-like syndrome. Methods. We identified clinically significant systemic drug reactions (SDR) and evaluated risk factors in patients who did not complete treatment in the PREVENT Tuberculosis study. Results. Among 7552 persons who received ≥1 dose of study drug, 153 had a SDR: 138/3893 (3.5%) with 3HP vs 15/3659 (0.4%) with 9H (P < .001). In the 3HP arm, 87 (63%) had flu-like syndrome and 23 (17%) had cutaneous reactions; 13/3893 (0.3%) had severe reactions (6 were hypotensive) and 6 reported syncope. Symptoms occurred after a median of 3 doses, and 4 hours after the dose; median time to resolution was 24 hours. There were no deaths. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, factors independently associated with SDR included receipt of 3HP (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 9.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.5, 16.2), white non-Hispanic race/ethnicity (aOR 3.3; 95% CI, 2.3, 4.7), female sex (aOR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.4, 2.9), age ≥35 years (aOR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.4, 2.9), and lower body mass index (body mass index [BMI]; P = .009). In a separate multivariate analysis among persons who received 3HP, severe SDR were associated with white non-Hispanic race/ethnicity (aOR 5.4; 95% CI, 1.8, 16.3), and receipt of concomitant non-study medications (aOR 5.9; 95% CI, 1.3, 27.1). Conclusions. SDR were more common with 3HP, and mostly flu-like. Persons of white race, female sex, older age, and lower BMI were at increased risk. Severe reactions were rare and associated with 3HP, concomitant medication, and white race. The underlying mechanism is unclear. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00023452. PMID:25904367

  18. Acute isoniazid intoxication: an uncommon cause of convulsion, coma and acidosis.

    PubMed

    Uzman, Sinan; Uludağ Yanaral, Tümay; Toptaş, Mehmet; Koç, Alparslan; Taş, Aytül; Bican, Gülşen

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use, suicidal ingestion of isoniazid is a rare condition in Turkey. We reported a case of acute isoniazid intoxication associated with alcohol intake presenting with convulsion, coma and metabolic acidosis. The patient was treated successfully with intravenous pyridoxine administration. Early recognation and appropriate treatment in the intensive care unit is very important to prevent mortality in patients with acute isoniazid toxicity.

  19. Operational challenges in managing Isoniazid Preventive Therapy in child contacts: A high-burden setting perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The study was conducted at a high TB-HIV burden primary health community clinic in Cape Town, South Africa. We describe the management of children under five years of age in household contact with a smear and/or culture-positive adult TB case. Methods This study was a record review of routinely-collected programme data. Results A total of 1094 adult TB case folders were reviewed. From all identified contacts, 149 children should have received IPT based on local guidelines; in only 2/149 IPT was initiated. Management of child contacts of sputum smear and/or culture-positive compared to sputum-negative TB patients were similar. Conclusions IPT delivery to children remains an operational challenge, especially in high TB-HIV burden communities. A tool to improve IPT management and targeting sputum smear and/or culture-positive TB child contacts may overcome some of these challenges and should be developed and piloted in such settings. PMID:21740580

  20. Isoniazid and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Martyn, John W.; Campbell, H. Hoyle

    1963-01-01

    In non-tuberculous patients with lesions exhibiting a delayed healing process oral isoniazid in doses of 3 mg./kg. was found to be rapidly effective in stimulating the wounded area to produce healthy granulation tissue. The prompt healing of these defects was accomplished by the formation of scar tissue which resisted stress in a superior manner. A topical ointment of 2% isoniazid in eucerin had a similar beneficial effect in patients with indolent skin ulcers who had failed to respond to routine treatment. Epithelialization rapidly ensued once the granulating base was established. A further series of patients with delayed wound healing and failure to respond to antibiotics or isoniazid alone showed satisfactory response when both measures were used simultaneously. It is postulated that isoniazid provides a stimulus to the growth of normal granulation tissue, may promote greater tensile strength in scars, and may be of benefit in antibiotic-resistant infections because of its ability to boost the host's normal repair mechanisms. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:13933176

  1. The benefits of isoniazid chemoprophylaxis and risk factors for tuberculosis among Oglala Sioux Indians.

    PubMed

    Mori, M A; Leonardson, G; Welty, T K

    1992-03-01

    In a case-control study of 92 Indian patients, 46 with active tuberculosis (cases) and 46 tuberculin reactors without the disease (control subjects), significantly more control subjects than patients had prior adequate isoniazid chemoprophylaxis. While the Indian Health Service recommends treating all tuberculin reactors with isoniazid prophylaxis, most (75%) of our tuberculosis (TB) cases could have been prevented if the guidelines of the American Thoracic Society had been followed. Diabetes, alcohol abuse, and chronic renal failure were risk factors for active TB. Despite marked reductions in TB morbidity and mortality rates among American Indians and Alaska Natives over the past 30 years, their TB rates are still two to three times higher than overall United States and white rates. Enhanced TB control programs with an emphasis on preventive therapy for patients at risk for developing active disease, especially those with diabetes and chronic renal failure, could decrease the incidence and eventually eliminate TB among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

  2. Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a High School and School-Based Supervision of an Isoniazid-Rifapentine Regimen for Preventing Tuberculosis - Colorado, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-10-04

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is spread from person to person by the airborne route. It can be transmitted extensively in congregate settings, making investigating exposures and treating infected contacts challenging. In December 2011, a student at a Colorado high school with 1,381 students and school personnel received a diagnosis of pulmonary TB disease. One of five household contacts had TB disease, and the other four had latent M. tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Screening of 1,249 school contacts (90%) found one person with pulmonary TB disease, who was fully treated, and 162 with LTBI, of whom 159 started an LTBI treatment regimen for preventing progression to TB disease and 153 completed a regimen. Only the index patient required inpatient care for TB, and TB caused no deaths. Use of short-course treatment regimens, either 12-dose weekly isoniazid and rifapentine directly observed at school or 4 months of self-supervised rifampin daily, facilitated treatment completion. State and county incident command structures led by county TB control authorities guided a response team from multiple jurisdictions. News media reports brought public scrutiny, but meetings with the community addressed the concerns and enhanced public participation. Two contacts of the index patient outside of the school had TB disease diagnosed after the school investigation. As of July 2013, no additional TB disease associated with in-school exposure had been found. An emergency plan for focusing widespread resources, an integral public communications strategy, and new, efficient interventions should be considered in other large TB contact investigations.

  3. Effect of secondary preventive therapy on recurrence of tuberculosis in HIV-infected individuals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bruins, Wassilis Sc; van Leth, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals successfully treated for tuberculosis (TB) remain at risk of recurrence of the disease, especially in high TB incidence settings. We performed a systematic review, investigating whether secondary preventive therapy (sPT) with anti-TB drugs (preventive therapy in former TB patients with treatment success) is an effective strategy to prevent recurrence of TB in this patient group. We searched the databases PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords HIV-infections, HIV, human immunodeficiency virus, AIDS, isoniazid, isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), tuberculosis, TB, recurrence and recurrent disease, resulting in 253 potential publications. We identified eight publications for full text assessment, after which four articles qualified for inclusion in this systematic review. The quality of the included articles was rated using the GRADE system. All but one study were rated as having a high quality. In all included studies, sPT significantly decreased the incidence of recurrent TB in HIV-infected individuals to a substantial degree in comparison to non-treatment or placebo. Relative reductions varied from 55.0% to 82.1%. These data showed that the use of sPT to prevent recurrent TB in HIV-infected individuals was highly beneficial. These findings need to be confirmed in prospective studies with an adequate assessment of the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the occurrence of drug resistance.

  4. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Therapy and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Hubert E

    2005-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. The major etiologies and risk factors for the development of HCC are well defined and some of the multiple steps involved in hepatocarcinogenesis have been elucidated in recent years. Despite these scientific advances and the implementation of measures for the early detection of HCC in patients at risk, patient survival has not improved during the last three decades. This is due to the advanced stage of the disease at the time of clinical presentation and limited therapeutic options. The therapeutic options fall into five main categories: surgical interventions including tumor resection and liver transplantation, percutaneous interventions including ethanol injection and radiofrequency thermal ablation, transarterial interventions including embolization and chemoembolization, radiation therapy and drugs as well as gene and immune therapies. These therapeutic strategies have been evaluated in part in randomized controlled clinical trials that are the basis for therapeutic recommendations. Though surgery, percutaneous and transarterial interventions are effective in patients with limited disease (1-3 lesions, <5 cm in diameter) and compensated underlying liver disease (cirrhosis Child A), at the time of diagnosis more than 80% patients present with multicentric HCC and advanced liver disease or comorbidities that restrict the therapeutic measures to best supportive care. In order to reduce the morbidity and mortality of HCC, early diagnosis and the development of novel systemic therapies for advanced disease, including drugs, gene and immune therapies as well as primary HCC prevention are of paramount importance. Furthermore, secondary HCC prevention after successful therapeutic interventions needs to be improved in order to make an impact on the survival of patients with HCC. New technologies, including gene expression profiling and proteomic analyses, should allow to further

  5. NAT2 genotype guided regimen reduces isoniazid-induced liver injury and early treatment failure in the 6-month four-drug standard treatment of tuberculosis: a randomized controlled trial for pharmacogenetics-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junichi; Ohno, Masako; Kubota, Ryuji; Yokota, Soichiro; Nagai, Takayuki; Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Okuda, Yasuhisa; Takashima, Tetsuya; Kamimura, Sayaka; Fujio, Yasushi; Kawase, Ichiro

    2013-05-01

    This study is a pharmacogenetic clinical trial designed to clarify whether the N-acetyltransferase 2 gene (NAT2) genotype-guided dosing of isoniazid improves the tolerability and efficacy of the 6-month four-drug standard regimen for newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. In a multicenter, parallel, randomized, and controlled trial with a PROBE design, patients were assigned to either conventional standard treatment (STD-treatment: approx. 5 mg/kg of isoniazid for all) or NAT2 genotype-guided treatment (PGx-treatment: approx. 7.5 mg/kg for patients homozygous for NAT2 4: rapid acetylators; 5 mg/kg, patients heterozygous for NAT2 4: intermediate acetylators; 2.5 mg/kg, patients without NAT2 4: slow acetylators). The primary outcome included incidences of 1) isoniazid-related liver injury (INH-DILI) during the first 8 weeks of therapy, and 2) early treatment failure as indicated by a persistent positive culture or no improvement in chest radiographs at the 8th week. One hundred and seventy-two Japanese patients (slow acetylators, 9.3 %; rapid acetylators, 53.5 %) were enrolled in this trial. In the intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis, INH-DILI occurred in 78 % of the slow acetylators in the STD-treatment, while none of the slow acetylators in the PGx-treatment experienced either INH-DILI or early treatment failure. Among the rapid acetylators, early treatment failure was observed with a significantly lower incidence rate in the PGx-treatment than in the STD-treatment (15.0 % vs. 38 %). Thus, the NAT2 genotype-guided regimen resulted in much lower incidences of unfavorable events, INH-DILI or early treatment failure, than the conventional standard regimen. Our results clearly indicate a great potential of the NAT2 genotype-guided dosing stratification of isoniazid in chemotherapy for tuberculosis.

  6. Osteoporosis prevention, diagnosis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    The objective of this NIH Consensus Statement is to inform the biomedical research and clinical practice communities of the results of the NIH Consensus Development Conference on Osteoporosis Prevention, Diagnosis, and Therapy. The statement provides state-of-the-art information and presents the conclusions and recommendations of the consensus panel regarding these issues. In addition, the statement identifies those areas of study that deserve further investigation. The target audience of clinicians for this statement includes, but is not limited to, family practitioners, internists, gerontologists, orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, obstetricians and gynecologists, and preventive medicine specialisits. A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 13-member panel representing the fields of internal medicine, family and community medicine, endocrinology, epidemiology, orthopaedic surgery, gerontology, rheumatology, obstetrics and gynecology, preventive medicine, and cell biology. In addition, 32 experts from these same fields presented data to the panel and a conference audience of approximately 700. The literature was searched using MEDLINE and an extensive bibliography of references was provided to the panel. Experts prepared abstracts for their conference presentations with relevant citations from the literature. Scientific evidence was given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience. The panel, answering predefined questions, developed their conclusions based on the scientific evidence presented in open forum and the scientific literature. The panel composed a draft statement, which was read in its entirety and circulated to the experts and the audience for comment. Thereafter, the panel resolved conflicting recommendations and released a revised statement at the end of the conference. The panel finalized the revisions within a few weeks after the conference. The draft statement was made available on the World Wide Web immediately following its release at the conference

  7. CYP2E1-dependent elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids by isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2013-01-15

    Isoniazid is the first-line medication in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Isoniazid is known to have a biphasic effect on the inhibition-induction of CYP2E1 and is also considered to be involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the full extent and mechanism of involvement of CYP2E1 in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity remain to be thoroughly investigated. In the current study, isoniazid was administered to wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice to investigate the potential toxicity of isoniazid in vivo. The results revealed that isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice, but produced elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids in wild-type mice, as well as decreased abundance of free fatty acids in wild-type mice and not in Cyp2e1-null mice. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that production of isoniazid metabolites was elevated in wild-type mice along with a higher abundance of bile acids, bile acid metabolites, carnitine and carnitine derivatives; these were not observed in Cyp2e1-null mice. In addition, the enzymes responsible for bile acid synthesis were decreased and proteins involved in bile acid transport were significantly increased in wild-type mice. Lastly, treatment of targeted isoniazid metabolites to wild-type mice led to similar changes in cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids. These findings suggest that while CYP2E1 is not involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, while an isoniazid metabolite might play a role in isoniazid-induced cholestasis through enhancement of bile acid accumulation and mitochondria β-oxidation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Osteoporosis prevention, diagnosis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    2001-02-14

    assessing fracture risk, and in determining who should be treated. Adequate calcium and vitamin D intake is crucial to develop optimal peak bone mass and to preserve bone mass throughout life. Supplementation with these 2 nutrients may be necessary in persons not achieving recommended dietary intake. Gonadal steroids are important determinants of peak and lifetime bone mass in men, women, and children. Regular exercise, especially resistance and high-impact activities, contributes to development of high peak bone mass and may reduce risk of falls in older persons. Assessment of bone mass, identification of fracture risk, and determination of who should be treated are the optimal goals when evaluating patients for osteoporosis. Fracture prevention is the primary treatment goal for patients with osteoporosis. Several treatments have been shown to reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures, including those that enhance bone mass and reduce the risk or consequences of falls. Adults with vertebral, rib, hip, or distal forearm fractures should be evaluated for osteoporosis and given appropriate therapy.

  9. Preventive therapy in children exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Merrin E; Hill, Philip C; Triasih, Rina; Sinfield, Rebecca; van Crevel, Reinout; Graham, Stephen M

    2012-10-01

    Young children living with a tuberculosis patient are at high risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease. WHO guidelines promote active screening and isoniazid (INH) preventive therapy (PT) for such children under 5 years, yet this well-established intervention is seldom used in endemic countries. We review the literature regarding barriers to implementation of PT and find that they are multifactorial, including difficulties in screening, poor adherence, fear of increasing INH resistance and poor acceptability among primary caregivers and healthcare workers. These barriers are largely resolvable, and proposed solutions such as the adoption of symptom-based screening and shorter drug regimens are discussed. Integrated multicomponent and site-specific solutions need to be developed and evaluated within a public health framework to overcome the policy-practice gap and provide functional PT programmes for children in endemic settings.

  10. CYP2E1-dependent elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids by isoniazid

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2013-01-15

    Isoniazid is the first-line medication in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Isoniazid is known to have a biphasic effect on the inhibition–induction of CYP2E1 and is also considered to be involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the full extent and mechanism of involvement of CYP2E1 in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity remain to be thoroughly investigated. In the current study, isoniazid was administered to wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice to investigate the potential toxicity of isoniazid in vivo. The results revealed that isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice, but produced elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids in wild-type mice, as well as decreased abundance of free fatty acids in wild-type mice and not in Cyp2e1-null mice. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that production of isoniazid metabolites was elevated in wild-type mice along with a higher abundance of bile acids, bile acid metabolites, carnitine and carnitine derivatives; these were not observed in Cyp2e1-null mice. In addition, the enzymes responsible for bile acid synthesis were decreased and proteins involved in bile acid transport were significantly increased in wild-type mice. Lastly, treatment of targeted isoniazid metabolites to wild-type mice led to similar changes in cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids. These findings suggest that while CYP2E1 is not involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, while an isoniazid metabolite might play a role in isoniazid-induced cholestasis through enhancement of bile acid accumulation and mitochondria β-oxidation. -- Highlights: ► Isoniazid metabolites were elevated only in wild-type mice. ► Isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice. ► Isoniazid elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids. ► Bile acid transporters were significantly decreased in isoniazid-treated mice.

  11. Supervised preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infection in illegal immigrants in Italy.

    PubMed

    Matteelli, A; Casalini, C; Raviglione, M C; El-Hamad, I; Scolari, C; Bombana, E; Bugiani, M; Caputo, M; Scarcella, C; Carosi, G

    2000-11-01

    In a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label study of isoniazid-preventive therapy (IPT) for latent tuberculosis infection, illegal immigrants from countries where tuberculosis is highly endemic were enrolled at two clinical sites in Northern Italy. Of 208 eligible subjects, 82 received supervised IPT at a dose of 900 mg twice weekly for 6 mo (Regimen A), 73 received unsupervised IPT 900 mg twice weekly for 6 mo (Regimen B), and 53 received unsupervised IPT 300 mg daily for 6 mo (Regimen C). Supervised IPT was delivered at either one tuberculosis clinic or one migrant clinic. The probability of completing a 26-wk regimen was 7, 26, and 41% in Regimens A, B, and C, respectively (p < 0.005, Log- rank test calculated using Kaplan-Meier plots). The mean time to dropout was 3. 8, 6, and 6.2 wk in Regimens A, B, and C, respectively (p = 0.003 for regimen A versus either Regimens B or C). Treatment was stopped in five subjects (2.4%) because of adverse events. The rate of completion of preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infection among illegal immigrants was low. Supervised, clinic-based administration of IPT significantly reduced adherence. Alternative strategies to implement preventive therapy in illegal immigrants are clearly required.

  12. Emerging Therapies for Scar Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Block, Lisa; Gosain, Ankush; King, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: There are ∼12 million traumatic lacerations treated in the United States emergency rooms each year, 250 million surgical incisions created worldwide every year, and 11 million burns severe enough to warrant medical treatment worldwide. In the United States, over $20 billion dollars per year are spent on the treatment and management of scars. Recent Advances: Investigations into the management of scar therapies over the last decade have advanced our understanding related to the care of cutaneous scars. Scar treatment methods are presented including topical, intralesional, and mechanical therapies in addition to cryotherapy, radiotherapy, and laser therapy. Critical Issues: Current treatment options for scars have significant limitations. This review presents the current and emerging therapies available for scar management and the scientific evidence for scar management is discussed. Future Directions: Based upon our new understanding of scar formation, innovative scar therapies are being developed. Additional research on the basic science of scar formation will lead to additional advances and novel therapies for the treatment of cutaneous scars. PMID:26487979

  13. Prophylactic Antibiotic Therapy for Preventing Poststroke Infection.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Infections, in particular pneumonia, are common complications in patients with acute stroke and are associated with a less favorable neurologic and functional outcome. Patients with severe stroke and dysphagia are at highest risk of infection. Experimental and clinical data suggest stroke-induced immunodeficiency as a major factor contributing to the high incidence of infection after stroke. Preclinical studies support the potential benefit of preventive antibiotic therapy in acute stroke for lowering the incidence of infection and improving clinical outcome. Several smaller clinical trials on preventive antibiotic therapy in patients with stroke conducted during the last 10 years yielded inconclusive results. Recently, 2 large, open-label, controlled trials failed to demonstrate an improved clinical outcome after preventive antibiotic therapy in patients with acute stroke treated in specialized stroke units. In the "Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study", antibiotic therapy lowered the rate of infection but did not influence outcome. In the STROKE-INF study, performed in patients with dysphagia after stroke, antibiotic therapy did not lower the incidence of pneumonia and had no prognostic significance. At present, preventive antibiotic therapy cannot be recommended as a therapeutic option for acute stroke.

  14. Isoniazid mediates the CYP2B6*6 genotype-dependent interaction between efavirenz and antituberculosis drug therapy through mechanism-based inactivation of CYP2A6.

    PubMed

    Court, Michael H; Almutairi, Fawziah E; Greenblatt, David J; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Sheng, Hongyan; Klein, Kathrin; Zanger, Ulrich M; Bourgea, Joanne; Patten, Christopher J; Kwara, Awewura

    2014-07-01

    Efavirenz is commonly used to treat patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis. Previous clinical studies have observed paradoxically elevated efavirenz plasma concentrations in patients with the CYP2B6*6/*6 genotype (but not the CYP2B6*1/*1 genotype) during coadministration with the commonly used four-drug antituberculosis therapy. This study sought to elucidate the mechanism underlying this genotype-dependent drug-drug interaction. In vitro studies were conducted to determine whether one or more of the antituberculosis drugs (rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, or ethambutol) potently inhibit efavirenz 8-hydroxylation by CYP2B6 or efavirenz 7-hydroxylation by CYP2A6, the main mechanisms of efavirenz clearance. Time- and concentration-dependent kinetics of inhibition by the antituberculosis drugs were determined using genotyped human liver microsomes (HLMs) and recombinant CYP2A6, CYP2B6.1, and CYP2B6.6 enzymes. Although none of the antituberculosis drugs evaluated at up to 10 times clinical plasma concentrations were found to inhibit efavirenz 8-hydroxylation by HLMs, both rifampin (apparent inhibition constant [Ki] = 368 μM) and pyrazinamide (Ki = 637 μM) showed relatively weak inhibition of efavirenz 7-hydroxylation. Importantly, isoniazid demonstrated potent time-dependent inhibition of efavirenz 7-hydroxylation in both HLMs (inhibitor concentration required for half-maximal inactivation [KI] = 30 μM; maximal rate constant of inactivation [kinact] = 0.023 min(-1)) and recombinant CYP2A6 (KI = 15 μM; kinact = 0.024 min(-1)) and also formed a metabolite intermediate complex consistent with mechanism-based inhibition. Selective inhibition of the CYP2B6.6 allozyme could not be demonstrated for any of the antituberculosis drugs using either recombinant enzymes or CYP2B6*6 genotype HLMs. In conclusion, the results of this study identify isoniazid as the most likely perpetrator of this clinically important drug-drug interaction through

  15. Isoniazid Mediates the CYP2B6*6 Genotype-Dependent Interaction between Efavirenz and Antituberculosis Drug Therapy through Mechanism-Based Inactivation of CYP2A6

    PubMed Central

    Almutairi, Fawziah E.; Greenblatt, David J.; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Sheng, Hongyan; Klein, Kathrin; Zanger, Ulrich M.; Bourgea, Joanne; Patten, Christopher J.; Kwara, Awewura

    2014-01-01

    Efavirenz is commonly used to treat patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis. Previous clinical studies have observed paradoxically elevated efavirenz plasma concentrations in patients with the CYP2B6*6/*6 genotype (but not the CYP2B6*1/*1 genotype) during coadministration with the commonly used four-drug antituberculosis therapy. This study sought to elucidate the mechanism underlying this genotype-dependent drug-drug interaction. In vitro studies were conducted to determine whether one or more of the antituberculosis drugs (rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, or ethambutol) potently inhibit efavirenz 8-hydroxylation by CYP2B6 or efavirenz 7-hydroxylation by CYP2A6, the main mechanisms of efavirenz clearance. Time- and concentration-dependent kinetics of inhibition by the antituberculosis drugs were determined using genotyped human liver microsomes (HLMs) and recombinant CYP2A6, CYP2B6.1, and CYP2B6.6 enzymes. Although none of the antituberculosis drugs evaluated at up to 10 times clinical plasma concentrations were found to inhibit efavirenz 8-hydroxylation by HLMs, both rifampin (apparent inhibition constant [Ki] = 368 μM) and pyrazinamide (Ki = 637 μM) showed relatively weak inhibition of efavirenz 7-hydroxylation. Importantly, isoniazid demonstrated potent time-dependent inhibition of efavirenz 7-hydroxylation in both HLMs (inhibitor concentration required for half-maximal inactivation [KI] = 30 μM; maximal rate constant of inactivation [kinact] = 0.023 min−1) and recombinant CYP2A6 (KI = 15 μM; kinact = 0.024 min−1) and also formed a metabolite intermediate complex consistent with mechanism-based inhibition. Selective inhibition of the CYP2B6.6 allozyme could not be demonstrated for any of the antituberculosis drugs using either recombinant enzymes or CYP2B6*6 genotype HLMs. In conclusion, the results of this study identify isoniazid as the most likely perpetrator of this clinically important drug-drug interaction through

  16. Quantifying Isoniazid Levels in Small Hair Samples: A Novel Method for Assessing Adherence during the Treatment of Latent and Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gerona, Roy; Wen, Anita; Chin, Aaron T.; Koss, Catherine A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Metcalfe, John; Gandhi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death from an infectious pathogen worldwide and the most prevalent opportunistic infection in people living with HIV. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) reduces the incidence of active TB and reduces morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients independently of antiretroviral therapy. However, treatment of latent or active TB is lengthy and inter-patient variability in pharmacokinetics and adherence common. Current methods of assessing adherence to TB treatment using drug levels in plasma or urine assess short-term exposure and pose logistical challenges. Drug concentrations in hair assess long-term exposure and have demonstrated pharmacodynamic relevance in HIV. Methods A large hair sample from a patient with active TB was obtained for assay development. Methods to pulverize hair and extract isoniazid were optimized and then the drug detected by liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS). The method was validated for specificity, accuracy, precision, recovery, linearity and stability to establish the assay’s suitability for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Hair samples from patients on directly-observe isoniazid-based latent or active TB therapy from the San Francisco Department of Public Health TB clinic were then tested. Results Our LC/MS-MS-based assay detected isoniazid in quantities as low as 0.02ng/mg using 10–25 strands hair. Concentrations in spiked samples demonstrated linearity from 0.05–50ng/mg. Assay precision and accuracy for spiked quality-control samples were high, with an overall recovery rate of 79.5%. In 18 patients with latent or active TB on treatment, isoniazid was detected across a wide linear dynamic range. Conclusions An LC-MS/MS-based assay to quantify isoniazid levels in hair with performance characteristics suitable for TDM was developed and validated. Hair concentrations of isoniazid assess long-term exposure and may be useful for monitoring adherence to

  17. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Schmidt, Joachim; Kisters, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. It has been recognized as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, where it is crucial for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Magnesium is required for DNA and RNA synthesis, reproduction, and protein synthesis. Moreover, magnesium is essential for the regulation of muscular contraction, blood pressure, insulin metabolism, cardiac excitability, vasomotor tone, nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. Imbalances in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesemia as it is seen more common than hypermagnesemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Based on magnesium’s many functions within the human body, it plays an important role in prevention and treatment of many diseases. Low levels of magnesium have been associated with a number of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (e.g., stroke), migraine headaches, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PMID:26404370

  18. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gröber, Uwe; Schmidt, Joachim; Kisters, Klaus

    2015-09-23

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. It has been recognized as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, where it is crucial for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Magnesium is required for DNA and RNA synthesis, reproduction, and protein synthesis. Moreover, magnesium is essential for the regulation of muscular contraction, blood pressure, insulin metabolism, cardiac excitability, vasomotor tone, nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. Imbalances in magnesium status-primarily hypomagnesemia as it is seen more common than hypermagnesemia-might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Based on magnesium's many functions within the human body, it plays an important role in prevention and treatment of many diseases. Low levels of magnesium have been associated with a number of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (e.g., stroke), migraine headaches, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

  19. Dance as a therapy for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Gurbuz; Ogce, Filiz

    2005-01-01

    Even though the field of medicine has developed tremendously, the wide variety of cancer is still among chronic and life threatening disease today. Therefore, the specialists constantly research and try every possible way to find cure or preventive ways to stop its further development. For this reason, studies concerning the chronic disease such as cancer have been spread to many different fields. In this regard, many other alternative ways besides medicine, are used in prevention of cancer. Nutritional therapy, herbal therapy, sportive activities, art therapy, music therapy, dance therapy, imagery, yoga and acupuncture can be given as examples. Among these, dance/movement therapy which deals with individuals physical, emotional, cognitive as well as social integration is widely used as a popular form of physical activity. The physical benefits of dance therapy as exercise are well documented. Studies have shown that physical activity is known to increase special neurotransmitter substances in the brain (endorphins), which create a state of well-being. And total body movement such as dance enhances the functions of other body systems, such as circulatory, respiratory, skeletal, and muscular systems. Regarding its unique connection to the field of medicine, many researches have been undertaken on the effects of dance/movement therapy in special settings with physical problems such as amputations, traumatic brain injury, and stroke, chronic illnesses such as anorexia, bulimia, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, asthma, AIDS, and arthritis. Today dance/movement therapy is a well recognized form of complementary therapy used in hospitals as well as at the comprehensive clinical cancer centres.

  20. Isoniazid or Moxifloxacin in Rifapentine-based Regimens for Experimental Tuberculosis?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Ian M.; Zhang, Ming; Almeida, Deepak; Grosset, Jacques H.; Nuermberger, Eric L.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Recent studies have demonstrated that combined substitutions of rifapentine for rifampin and moxifloxacin for isoniazid in the standard, daily, short-course regimen of rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide produces stable cure in 12 weeks or less. This study was designed to more precisely evaluate the contribution of moxifloxacin and isoniazid to rifapentine-based regimens. Objectives: We compared bactericidal activity and treatment-shortening potential between regimens consisting of isoniazid or moxifloxacin plus rifapentine and pyrazinamide administered either thrice-weekly or daily. Methods: Using a mouse model of tuberculosis, we assessed bactericidal activity by performing quantitative cultures of lung homogenates over the first 12 weeks of treatment. Relapse rates were assessed after completing 8, 10, and 12 weeks of treatment to determine the duration of treatment necessary for stable cure. Measurements and Main Results: After 4 weeks of treatment, daily and thrice-weekly therapy with rifapentine, moxifloxacin, and pyrazinamide was significantly more active than treatment with rifapentine, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide. By 8 weeks of treatment, all mice receiving the moxifloxacin-containing regimens were lung culture negative, whereas those mice receiving the isoniazid-containing regimens continued to be lung culture positive. However, the duration of treatment necessary to achieve stable cure was 10 weeks for daily regimens and 12 weeks for thrice-weekly regimens, regardless of whether isoniazid or moxifloxacin was used. All mice receiving standard daily therapy with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide relapsed after 12 weeks of treatment. Conclusions: These results suggest that regimens consisting of isoniazid or moxifloxacin plus rifapentine and pyrazinamide may dramatically shorten the duration of treatment needed to cure human tuberculosis. PMID:18723432

  1. Psychological therapies for preventing seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Forneris, Catherine A; Nussbaumer, Barbara; Kaminski-Hartenthaler, Angela; Morgan, Laura C; Gaynes, Bradley N; Sonis, Jeffrey H; Greenblatt, Amy; Wipplinger, Jörg; Lux, Linda J; Winkler, Dietmar; Van Noord, Megan G; Hofmann, Julia; Gartlehner, Gerald

    2015-11-11

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a seasonal pattern of recurrent major depressive episodes that most commonly occurs during autumn or winter and remits in spring. The prevalence of SAD ranges from 1.5% to 9%, depending on latitude. The predictable seasonal aspect of SAD provides a promising opportunity for prevention. This is one of four reviews on the efficacy and safety of interventions to prevent SAD; we focus on psychological therapies as preventive interventions. To assess the efficacy and safety of psychological therapies (in comparison with no treatment, other types of psychological therapy, second-generation antidepressants (SGAs), light therapy, melatonin or agomelatine or lifestyle interventions) in preventing SAD and improving patient-centred outcomes among adults with a history of SAD. We conducted a search of the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Review Group Specialised Register (CCDANCTR) to 11 August 2015. The CCDANCTR contains reports of relevant randomised controlled trials from EMBASE (1974 to date), MEDLINE (1950 to date), PsycINFO (1967 to date) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Furthermore, we searched the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Web of Knowledge, The Cochrane Library and the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (to 26 May 2014). We conducted a grey literature search (e.g. in clinical trial registries) and handsearched the reference lists of all included studies and pertinent review articles. To examine efficacy, we planned to include randomised controlled trials on adults with a history of winter-type SAD who were free of symptoms at the beginning of the study. To examine adverse events, we intended to include non-randomised studies. We planned to include studies that compared psychological therapy versus any other type of psychological therapy, placebo, light therapy, SGAs, melatonin, agomelatine or lifestyle changes. We also intended to

  2. Light therapy for preventing seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Nussbaumer, Barbara; Kaminski-Hartenthaler, Angela; Forneris, Catherine A; Morgan, Laura C; Sonis, Jeffrey H; Gaynes, Bradley N; Greenblatt, Amy; Wipplinger, Jörg; Lux, Linda J; Winkler, Dietmar; Van Noord, Megan G; Hofmann, Julia; Gartlehner, Gerald

    2015-11-08

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a seasonal pattern of recurrent major depressive episodes that most commonly occurs during autumn or winter and remits in spring. The prevalence of SAD ranges from 1.5% to 9%, depending on latitude. The predictable seasonal aspect of SAD provides a promising opportunity for prevention. This review - one of four reviews on efficacy and safety of interventions to prevent SAD - focuses on light therapy as a preventive intervention. Light therapy is a non-pharmacological treatment that exposes people to artificial light. Mode of delivery (e.g. visors, light boxes) and form of light (e.g. bright white light) vary. To assess the efficacy and safety of light therapy (in comparison with no treatment, other types of light therapy, second-generation antidepressants, melatonin, agomelatine, psychological therapies, lifestyle interventions and negative ion generators) in preventing SAD and improving patient-centred outcomes among adults with a history of SAD. A search of the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neuorosis Review Group (CCDANCTR) included all years to 11 August 2015. The CCDANCTR contains reports of relevant randomised controlled trials derived from EMBASE (1974 to date), MEDLINE (1950 to date), PsycINFO (1967 to date) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trails (CENTRAL). Furthermore, we searched the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Web of Knowledge, The Cochrane Library and the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (to 26 May 2014). We also conducted a grey literature search and handsearched the reference lists of all included studies and pertinent review articles. For efficacy, we included randomised controlled trials on adults with a history of winter-type SAD who were free of symptoms at the beginning of the study. For adverse events, we also intended to include non-randomised studies. We intended to include studies that compared any type of

  3. Safety and Adherence for 12 Weekly Doses of Isoniazid and Rifapentine for Pediatric Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andrea T; Starke, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    Traditional treatment of tuberculosis infection (TBI) is efficacious, but adherence is low. Eighty children with TBI received a 12-dose once-weekly isoniazid/rifapentine regimen; 79 (99%) completed therapy, 94% reported no adverse events, 1 child had mildly elevated transaminases but 1 adolescent later developed pulmonary TB. Isoniazid/rifapentine is safe, is well tolerated and has much higher completion rates than traditional TBI regimens.

  4. Targeted Therapy for Breast Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    den Hollander, Petra; Savage, Michelle I.; Brown, Powel H.

    2013-01-01

    With a better understanding of the etiology of breast cancer, molecularly targeted drugs have been developed and are being testing for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Targeted drugs that inhibit the estrogen receptor (ER) or estrogen-activated pathways include the selective ER modulators (tamoxifen, raloxifene, and lasofoxifene) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) (anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane) have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies. Tamoxifen and raloxifene have been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer and promising results of AIs in breast cancer trials, suggest that AIs might be even more effective in the prevention of ER-positive breast cancer. However, these agents only prevent ER-positive breast cancer. Therefore, current research is focused on identifying preventive therapies for other forms of breast cancer such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, breast cancer that does express ER, progesterone receptor, or HER2). HER2-positive breast cancers are currently treated with anti-HER2 therapies including trastuzumab and lapatinib, and preclinical and clinical studies are now being conducted to test these drugs for the prevention of HER2-positive breast cancers. Several promising agents currently being tested in cancer prevention trials for the prevention of TNBC include poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, vitamin D, and rexinoids, both of which activate nuclear hormone receptors (the vitamin D and retinoid X receptors). This review discusses currently used breast cancer preventive drugs, and describes the progress of research striving to identify and develop more effective preventive agents for all forms of breast cancer. PMID:24069582

  5. Screening and preventive therapy for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J; Ayles, Helen; Graham, Stephen M; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) epidemic is well controlled in most developed countries and the focus in these areas has shifted to TB eradication. Transmission within nonendemic areas is limited and most cases of TB result from reactivation of distant (latent) infection. With adequate resources, wide-scale use of preventive therapy can assist to eliminate the pool of latent infection that is required for TB eradication. In contrast, TB control remains poor in many developing countries, especially those worst affected by poverty and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. In this review the authors critically assess the approach to TB preventive therapy in children and adults, focus on the underlying treatment rationale, discuss available data and identify issues of concern.

  6. Preventive therapies: weighing the pros and cons.

    PubMed Central

    Laupacis, A

    1996-01-01

    The author comments on three issues raised by Dr. Kenneth G. Marshall in his series on the benefits and harms of preventive therapies, which begins in this issue on page 1493. First, because the method by which the results of clinical trials are presented markedly affects the perception of those results some measure of absolute benefit and harm must be used when the results of clinical trials are presented. Second, there is increasing interest in decision aids as a means of helping patients to understand evidence and make therapeutic choices. It is important that these aids undergo rigorous testing before they are adopted for common use. Third, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are a welcome resource for busy clinicians. However, physicians and patients should bear in mind that interpretations of the available evidence can vary, leading to different conclusions about the appropriateness of preventive therapies. PMID:8625001

  7. Protective effects of thiopronin against isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jiang; Dong, Guicheng; He, Chunyan; Chen, Jie; Liu, Yinghui; Peng, Renxiu

    2009-10-29

    Isoniazid is a widely used drug for the treatment of tuberculosis, but hepatotoxicity is a major concern during treatment. Thiopronin contains an SH-group and is generally considered an antioxidant. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of thiopronin during liver injury and DNA damage induced by isoniazid. Rats were injected daily with isoniazid (100 mg/kg, i.p.) for 21 days with or without thiopronin co-administration (60 mg/kg, i.p.) from day 11 to day 21. The influence of thiopronin on isoniazid-induced DNA oxidative damage was analyzed in precision-cut rat liver slices by HPLC-MS/MS. Thiopronin prevented isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, indicated by both diagnostic indicators of liver damage (alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase) and histopathological analysis. In vivo, thiopronin significantly inhibited isoniazid-induced CYP2E1 activity as assessed by both chlorzoxazone hydroxylase and aniline hydroxylase (p<0.001). Thiopronin concentration-dependently inhibited CYP2E1-dependent aniline hydroxylation, and the Dixon plots suggest that thiopronin is a competitive inhibitor of CYP2E1. Thiopronin markedly attenuated isoniazid-induced inhibition of the detoxification system through cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), including mu GST and alpha GST. In precision-cut liver slices, the free radical scavenging activity of thiopronin reduced the generation of DNA adducts induced by isoniazid (p<0.05). Altogether, these results suggest that thiopronin exerts its hepatoprotective activity against isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibiting the production of free radicals in addition to its role as a scavenger. Thiopronin may reduce free radical generation via inhibition of hepatic CYP2E1 and increase the removal of free radicals directly or through the induction of cytosolic GSTs.

  8. Management of health care workers after inadvertent exposure to tuberculosis: a guide for the use of preventive therapy.

    PubMed

    Stead, W W

    1995-06-15

    To quantify the protection of previously infected persons from developing tuberculosis after intense exposure. 6 hospitals and 22 nursing homes in which heavy tuberculosis exposure had occurred. Results of tuberculin skin tests before and after exposure and the development of tuberculosis among known reactors, both converters and nonconverters. All converters were given preventive therapy with isoniazid as soon as they could be identified. Nonconverters and previously known reactors were not treated. In 6 hospital outbreaks, largely aborted by prompt preventive therapy, 98 of 336 nonreactors (29%) showed skin test conversion, and, before therapy could be started, 19 (19% [95% CI, 12% to 29%]) had developed tuberculosis. No tuberculosis developed among the 238 nonconverters (0% [CI, 0% to 1.5%]) or the 76 known reactors who were not treated (0% [CI, 0.5% to 2%]). Tuberculosis developed in 5 of 209 known reactors (2.4% [CI, 0.8% to 5.5%]) in 22 nursing homes with heavy exposure, little more than 10 of 921 known reactors (1.1% [CI, 0.5% to 2%]) in 76 homes where there was no exposure (P = 0.17). Healthy persons who remain nonreactive to tuberculin after heavy exposure have escaped infection and require no chemotherapy. However, if exposure is discovered immediately, it is wise to start preventive therapy in particularly heavily exposed non-reactors and discontinue it if the skin test result is still negative at 3 months. Persons who react after exposure fall into three groups: 1) converters, in whom the risk for tuberculosis warrants preventive chemotherapy, regardless of age; 2) reactors with no preexposure test results, who should be treated as converters; and 3) previously known reactors, in whom the risk for tuberculosis generally is too slight to warrant therapy. However, those who are younger than age 35 years, have human immunodeficiency virus infection, are receiving cancer chemotherapy or long-term corticosteroid therapy, or are otherwise immunocompromised

  9. [Preventive medical effects of nature therapy].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yoshifumi; Lee, Juyoung; Park, Bum-Jin; Tsunetsugu, Yuko; Matsunaga, Keiko

    2011-09-01

    Five million years has passed since a subset of primates recognizably became human. Because we have already spent more than 99.99% of our evolutionary history in natural environments, it is thought that we are essentially adaptive to nature. However, we live in a society characterized by urbanization and artificiality, despite our physiological functions still being adapted to nature. We conducted experiments involving 420 subjects at 35 different forests throughout Japan. As a result, these subjects sitting in natural surroundings showed decreases in the following physiological indices compared with the urban control group: 12.4% decrease in cortisol level, 7.0% decrease in sympathetic nervous activity, 1.4% decrease in systolic blood pressure, and 5.8% decrease in heart rate. This shows that stressful states can be relieved by forest therapy. It should also be noted that parasympathetic nerve activity increased by 55.0%, indicating a relaxed state. The results of walking experiments were also similar. Li et al. demonstrated that immune functions are enhanced by forest therapy. Middle-aged employees volunteered to participate in these experiments. NK (natural killer cells) activity, as an indicator of immune function, increased by 56% on the second day and returned to normal levels. A significant increase of 23% was maintained for 1 month even after these subjects returned to urban life, clearly illustrating the preventive medical effects of nature therapy. We expect nature therapy to play an increasingly important role in preventive medicine in the future.

  10. Hormone Therapy Not Advised for Preventing Disease After Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165628.html Hormone Therapy Not Advised for Preventing Disease After Menopause Benefits ... 2017 TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Using hormone therapy to prevent chronic health issues, such as heart ...

  11. Antithrombotic therapy for secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Mark J

    2011-12-01

    : Antithrombotic therapy is a key component of any strategy for the secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. A better understanding of the various therapeutic options will lead to improved stroke prevention, better medication adherence, and fewer complications. : Antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants are the two major classes of antithrombotic therapy used for stroke prevention. The etiology and mechanism of the stroke must be considered in order to make the best decision regarding which agent(s) to use for secondary stroke prevention. The recent Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) study showed that clopidogrel and aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole had similar event rates in terms of recurrent stroke, but clopidogrel was better tolerated, with fewer bleeding events. Several new anticoagulants are poised to replace warfarin for stroke prevention in the setting of atrial fibrillation. These include dabigatran (a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor) and possibly apixaban (a new oral factor Xa inhibitor). These new medications are much easier to use than warfarin and may be more effective and safer, with fewer drug and food interactions and no need for routine blood monitoring. Thus, these new medications may improve adherence as well as clinicians' inclination to treat with anticoagulation. : Because each antiplatelet agent or anticoagulant has certain advantages and disadvantages, clinicians must choose an agent that the patient can afford and tolerate in terms of side effects and adherence. The hope and expectation is that the proper use of these medications in accordance with current guidelines will reduce the risk of a recurrent stroke.

  12. Massage therapy for preventing pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinhong; Sun, Zhongren; Yue, Jinhuan

    2015-06-17

    Pressure ulcers affect approximately 10% of patients in hospitals and the elderly are at highest risk. Several studies have suggested that massage therapy may help to prevent the development of pressure ulcers, but these results are inconsistent. To assess the evidence for the effects of massage compared with placebo, standard care or other interventions for prevention of pressure ulcers in at-risk populations.The review sought to answer the following questions:Does massage reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers of any grade?Is massage safe in the short- and long-term? If not, what are the adverse events associated with massage? We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (8 January 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to 8 January 2015), Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process Other Non-Indexed Citations 8 January 2015), Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 8 January 2015), and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 8 January 2015). We did not apply date or language restrictions. We planned to include all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised controlled trials (Q-RCTs) that evaluated the effects of massage therapy for the prevention of pressure ulcers. Our primary outcome was the proportion of people developing a new pressure ulcer of any grade. Two review authors independently carried out trial selection. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. No studies (RCTs or Q-RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. Therefore, neither a meta-analysis nor a narrative description of studies was possible. There are currently no studies eligible for inclusion in this review. It is, therefore, unclear whether massage therapy can prevent pressure ulcers.

  13. Acute and Fatal Isoniazid-Induced Hepatotoxicity: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarkis, Aline T.; Saroufim, Paola G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a case of an acute and fatal isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity and provides a review of the literature. A 65-year-old female diagnosed with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection was receiving oral isoniazid 300 mg daily. She was admitted to the hospital for epigastric and right sided flank pain of one-week duration. Laboratory results and imaging confirmed hepatitis. After ruling out all other possible causes, she was diagnosed with isoniazid-induced acute hepatitis (probable association by the Naranjo scale). After discharge, the patient was readmitted and suffered from severe coagulopathy, metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, hepatic encephalopathy, and cardiorespiratory arrest necessitating two rounds of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Despite maximal hemodynamic support, the patient did not survive. A review of the literature, from several European countries and the United States of America, revealed a low incidence of mortality due to isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity when used as a single agent for latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. As for the management, the first step consists of withdrawing isoniazid and rechallenge is usually discouraged. Few treatment modalities have been proposed; however there is no robust evidence to support any of them. Routine monitoring for hepatotoxicity in patients receiving isoniazid is warranted to prevent morbidity and mortality. PMID:27648319

  14. Cytoprotective effects of taurine against toxicity induced by isoniazid and hydrazine in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Reza; Babaei, Hossein; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2013-06-01

    Isoniazid is one of the most commonly used drugs to treat tuberculosis. Its administration is associated with a high incidence of hepatotoxicity. The aim of this study was to establish the protective effects of taurine against cytotoxicity induced by isoniazid and its suspected toxic metabolite hydrazine in isolated rat hepatocytes by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial depolarisation, reduced glutathione (GSH), and oxidised glutathione (GSSG). Isoniazid caused no significant ROS formation in normal hepatocytes, but in glutathione-depleted cells it was considerable. Hydrazine caused ROS formation and lipid peroxidation in both intact and glutathione-depleted cells. Both isoniazid and hydrazine caused mitochondrial membrane depolarisation. Hydrazine lowered cellular GSH reserve and increased GSSG. Taurine (200 μmol L(-1)) and N-acetylcysteine (200 μmol L(-1)) effectively countered the toxic effects of isoniazid and/or hydrazine by decreasing ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial damage. Taurine prevented depletion of GSH and lowered GSSG levels in hydrazine-treated cells. This study suggests that the protective effects of taurine against isoniazid and its intermediary metabolite hydrazine cytotoxicity in rat hepatocytes could be attributed to antioxidative action.

  15. Completion Rate and Side-Effect Profile of Three-Month Isoniazid and Rifapentine Treatment for Latent Tuberculosis Infection in an Urban County Jail.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Reyes, Maria; Gallivan, Mark; Chyorny, Alexander; O'Keeffe, Linda; Shah, Neha S

    2016-01-01

    In an urban jail population, 3 months of isoniazid and rifapentine (3HP) was associated with an 85% latent tuberculosis infection treatment completion rate compared with 18% in a standard 9-month isoniazid treatment group. Among the 91 patients who started 3HP therapy, there were 2 treatment discontinuations from adverse drug reactions.

  16. Completion Rate and Side-Effect Profile of Three-Month Isoniazid and Rifapentine Treatment for Latent Tuberculosis Infection in an Urban County Jail

    PubMed Central

    Juarez-Reyes, Maria; Gallivan, Mark; Chyorny, Alexander; O'Keeffe, Linda; Shah, Neha S.

    2016-01-01

    In an urban jail population, 3 months of isoniazid and rifapentine (3HP) was associated with an 85% latent tuberculosis infection treatment completion rate compared with 18% in a standard 9-month isoniazid treatment group. Among the 91 patients who started 3HP therapy, there were 2 treatment discontinuations from adverse drug reactions. PMID:26885547

  17. Nanotechnology in dentistry: prevention, diagnosis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Bozec, Laurent; Perez, Roman A; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has rapidly expanded into all areas of science; it offers significant alternative ways to solve scientific and medical questions and problems. In dentistry, nanotechnology has been exploited in the development of restorative materials with some significant success. This review discusses nanointerfaces that could compromise the longevity of dental restorations, and how nanotechnolgy has been employed to modify them for providing long-term successful restorations. It also focuses on some challenging areas in dentistry, eg, oral biofilm and cancers, and how nanotechnology overcomes these challenges. The recent advances in nanodentistry and innovations in oral health-related diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic methods required to maintain and obtain perfect oral health, have been discussed. The recent advances in nanotechnology could hold promise in bringing a paradigm shift in dental field. Although there are numerous complex therapies being developed to treat many diseases, their clinical use requires careful consideration of the expense of synthesis and implementation.

  18. Nanotechnology in dentistry: prevention, diagnosis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Bozec, Laurent; Perez, Roman A; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has rapidly expanded into all areas of science; it offers significant alternative ways to solve scientific and medical questions and problems. In dentistry, nanotechnology has been exploited in the development of restorative materials with some significant success. This review discusses nanointerfaces that could compromise the longevity of dental restorations, and how nanotechnolgy has been employed to modify them for providing long-term successful restorations. It also focuses on some challenging areas in dentistry, eg, oral biofilm and cancers, and how nanotechnology overcomes these challenges. The recent advances in nanodentistry and innovations in oral health-related diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic methods required to maintain and obtain perfect oral health, have been discussed. The recent advances in nanotechnology could hold promise in bringing a paradigm shift in dental field. Although there are numerous complex therapies being developed to treat many diseases, their clinical use requires careful consideration of the expense of synthesis and implementation. PMID:26504385

  19. Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiation Therapy (Brachytherapy) Systemic Radiation Therapy Coping With Radiation Treatment Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is made ...

  20. Isoniazid Toxicity among an Older Veteran Population: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Vinnard, Christopher; Gopal, Anand; Linkin, Darren R.; Maslow, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Background: our objective was to determine the incidence of toxicity among veterans initiating isoniazid therapy for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and determine whether advancing age was a risk factor for toxicity. Methods: we performed a retrospective cohort study among all adults initiating isoniazid treatment for LTBI at a Veterans Medical Center from 1999 to 2005. We collected data on patient demographics, co-morbidities, site of initiation, and treatment outcome. Results: 219 patients initiated isoniazid therapy for LTBI during the period of observation, and the completion of therapy was confirmed in 100 patients (46%). Among 18/219 patients (8%) that discontinued therapy due to a documented suspected toxicity, the median time to onset was 3 months (IQR 1–5 months). In an adjusted Cox regression model, there was no association between discontinuation due to suspected toxicity and advancing age (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.99, 1.07). In contrast, hepatitis C infection was a significant predictor of cessation due to toxicity in the adjusted analysis (HR 3.03, 95% CI 1.08, 8.52). Conclusions: cessation of isoniazid therapy due to suspected toxicity was infrequently observed among a veteran population and was not associated with advancing age. Alternative LTBI treatment approaches should be further examined in the veteran population. PMID:23365735

  1. Isoniazid Toxicity among an Older Veteran Population: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vinnard, Christopher; Gopal, Anand; Linkin, Darren R; Maslow, Joel

    2013-01-01

    our objective was to determine the incidence of toxicity among veterans initiating isoniazid therapy for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and determine whether advancing age was a risk factor for toxicity. we performed a retrospective cohort study among all adults initiating isoniazid treatment for LTBI at a Veterans Medical Center from 1999 to 2005. We collected data on patient demographics, co-morbidities, site of initiation, and treatment outcome. 219 patients initiated isoniazid therapy for LTBI during the period of observation, and the completion of therapy was confirmed in 100 patients (46%). Among 18/219 patients (8%) that discontinued therapy due to a documented suspected toxicity, the median time to onset was 3 months (IQR 1-5 months). In an adjusted Cox regression model, there was no association between discontinuation due to suspected toxicity and advancing age (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.99, 1.07). In contrast, hepatitis C infection was a significant predictor of cessation due to toxicity in the adjusted analysis (HR 3.03, 95% CI 1.08, 8.52). cessation of isoniazid therapy due to suspected toxicity was infrequently observed among a veteran population and was not associated with advancing age. Alternative LTBI treatment approaches should be further examined in the veteran population.

  2. [EBOLA HEMORRHAGIC FEVER: DIAGNOSTICS, ETIOTROPIC AND PATHOGENETIC THERAPY, PREVENTION].

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, K V; Zakharenko, S M; Kovalenko, A N; Semenov, A V; Fisun, A Ya

    2015-01-01

    The data on diagnostics, etiotropic and pathogenetic therapy, prevention of Ebola hemorrhagic fever are presented including diagnostic algorithms for different clinical situations. Fundamentals of pathogenetic therapy are described. Various groups of medications used for antiviral therapy of conditions caused by Ebola virus are characterized. Experimental drugs at different stages of clinical studies are considered along with candidate vaccines being developed for the prevention of the disease.

  3. Role of hydrazine in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity in a hepatocyte inflammation model

    SciTech Connect

    Tafazoli, Shahrzad; Mashregi, Mariam; O'Brien, Peter J.

    2008-05-15

    Isoniazid is an anti-tuberculosis drug that can cause hepatotoxicity in 20% of patients that is usually associated with an inflammatory response. Hepatocytes when exposed to non-toxic levels of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, to simulate H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation by inflammatory cells, became twice as sensitive to isoniazid toxicity. Isoniazid cytotoxicity was prevented by 1-aminobenzotriazole, a non-selective P450 inhibitor or by bis-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (BNPP), an esterase inhibitor. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of hydrazine, the metabolite formed by amidase-catalyzed hydrolysis of isoniazid, was increased 16-fold by a non-toxic H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-generating system. The acetylhydrazine metabolite was found to be much less cytotoxic than hydrazine in this hepatocyte inflammation model. Hydrazine, therefore, seems to be the isoniazid reactive metabolite in this inflammation model. The molecular mechanism of hydrazine-induced cytotoxicity was attributed to oxidative stress as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and protein carbonyl formation occurred before the onset of hepatocyte toxicity. Hydrazine toxicity also involved significant production of endogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} which resulted in lysosomal membrane damage and leads to a collapse in mitochondrial membrane potential. These results implicated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, a cellular mediator of inflammation, as a potential risk factor for the manifestation of adverse drug reactions, particularly those caused by hydrazine containing drugs.

  4. Hepatoprotective Activity of Heptoplus on Isoniazid and Rifampicin Induced Liver Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, M.; Rajkumar, Johanna; Sridhar, Dorai

    2015-01-01

    The present study is designed to evaluate the efficacy of heptoplus a polyherbal formulation as an oral supplementary agent for isoniazid and rifampicin induced hepatotoxicity in rats. 50 and 100 mg/kg of heptoplus supplement were fed orally to the rats along with isoniazid and rifampicin and compared to rats treated with 100 mg/kg Liv 52 standard drug. Rats treated with isoniazid and rifampicin suffered from severe oxidative stress by the virtue of free radicals induced lipid per oxidation. As a result abnormal index of serum biochemical markers for liver function and increased liver lysosomal enzymes activity was observed. However rats nourished with 100 mg/kg of heptoplus and Liv 52 protected the liver from oxidative damage by maintaining normal antioxidant profile status and restored normal serum liver biochemical markers. Increased liver lysosomal enzymes activity is prevented in the rats supplemented with heptoplus and Liv 52. Histopathological analysis also revealed severe vascular changes and lobular necrosis in the treatment of isoniazid and rifampicin. Heptoplus (100 mg/kg) and Liv 52 supplemented rats liver apparently revealed normal architecture of liver. This study confirms that heptoplus has liver protective activity against Isoniazid and Rifampicin induced liver injury in rats, in par with Liv 52. PMID:26798170

  5. Cognitive stimulation and occupational therapy for delirium prevention

    PubMed Central

    Tobar, Eduardo; Alvarez, Evelyn; Garrido, Maricel

    2017-01-01

    Delirium is a relevant condition in critically ill patients with long-term impacts on mortality, cognitive and functional status and quality of life. Despite the progress in its diagnosis, prevention and management during the last years, its impact persists being relevant, so new preventive and therapeutic strategies need to be explored. Among non-pharmacologic preventive strategies, recent reports suggest a role for occupational therapy through a series of interventions that may impact the development of delirium. The aim of this review is to evaluate the studies evaluating the role of occupational therapy in the prevention of delirium in critically ill patient populations, and suggests perspectives to future research in this area.

  6. Substitution of moxifloxacin for isoniazid during intensive phase treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Susan E; Johnson, John L; Goldberg, Stefan; Muzanye, Grace; Padayatchi, Nesri; Bozeman, Lorna; Heilig, Charles M; Bernardo, John; Choudhri, Shurjeel; Grosset, Jacques H; Guy, Elizabeth; Guyadeen, Priya; Leus, Maria Corazon; Maltas, Gina; Menzies, Dick; Nuermberger, Eric L; Villarino, Margarita; Vernon, Andrew; Chaisson, Richard E

    2009-08-01

    Moxifloxacin has potent activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro and in a mouse model of antituberculosis (TB) chemotherapy, but data regarding its activity in humans are limited. Our objective was to compare the antimicrobial activity and safety of moxifloxacin versus isoniazid during the first 8 weeks of combination therapy for pulmonary TB. Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB were randomly assigned to receive either moxifloxacin 400 mg plus isoniazid placebo, or isoniazid 300 mg plus moxifloxacin placebo, administered 5 days/week for 8 weeks, in addition to rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. All doses were directly observed. Sputum was collected for culture every 2 weeks. The primary outcome was negative sputum culture at completion of 8 weeks of treatment. Of 433 participants enrolled, 328 were eligible for the primary efficacy analysis. Of these, 35 (11%) were HIV positive, 248 (76%) had cavitation on baseline chest radiograph, and 213 (65%) were enrolled at African sites. Negative cultures at Week 8 were observed in 90/164 (54.9%) participants in the isoniazid arm, and 99/164 (60.4%) in the moxifloxacin arm (P = 0.37). In multivariate analysis, cavitation and enrollment at an African site were associated with lower likelihood of Week-8 culture negativity. The proportion of participants who discontinued assigned treatment was 31/214 (14.5%) for the moxifloxacin group versus 22/205 (10.7%) for the isoniazid group (RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 0.81, 2.25). Substitution of moxifloxacin for isoniazid resulted in a small but statistically nonsignificant increase in Week-8 culture negativity.

  7. Using Rational-Emotive Therapy to Prevent Classroom Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Jo; Coleman, Maggie

    1988-01-01

    Teachers are encouraged to utilize rational-emotive therapy to prevent and deal with classroom behavior problems. Rational-emotive therapy is defined, the ABC model of rational thinking briefly explained, types of irrational thinking identified, and suggestions for becoming a rational thinker are offered. Classroom examples are given. (DB)

  8. Using Rational-Emotive Therapy to Prevent Classroom Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Jo; Coleman, Maggie

    1988-01-01

    Teachers are encouraged to utilize rational-emotive therapy to prevent and deal with classroom behavior problems. Rational-emotive therapy is defined, the ABC model of rational thinking briefly explained, types of irrational thinking identified, and suggestions for becoming a rational thinker are offered. Classroom examples are given. (DB)

  9. Hirschsprung-Associated Enterocolitis: Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Frykman, Philip K.; Short, Scott S.

    2012-01-01

    Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis (HAEC) remains the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in children with Hirschsprung disease. This chapter details the various approaches used to treat and prevent this disease process. This includes prevention of complications such as stricture formation, prophylaxis with rectal washouts and identification of high risk individuals. The chapter also details approaches to diagnose HAEC as well as to exclude other etiologies. PMID:22985838

  10. Gene-therapy for malaria prevention.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Soares, Irene S

    2014-11-01

    The limited number of tools for malaria prevention and the inability to eradicate the disease have required large investments in vaccine development, as vaccines have been the only foreseeable type of immunoprophylaxis against malaria. An alternative strategy named vectored immunoprophylaxis (VIP) now would allow genetically transduced host cells to assemble and secrete antibodies that neutralize the infectivity of the malaria parasite and prevent disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Global and Regional Burden of Isoniazid-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Courtney M.; Jenkins, Helen E.; Rodriguez, Carly A.; Keshavjee, Salmaan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Isoniazid has been the backbone of tuberculosis chemotherapy for 6 decades. Resistance to isoniazid threatens the efficacy of treatment of tuberculosis disease and infection. To inform policies around treatment of tuberculosis disease and infection in children, we sought to estimate both the proportion of child tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance and the number of incident isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis cases in children, by region. METHODS: We determined the relationship between rates of isoniazid resistance among child cases and among treatment-naive adult cases through a systematic literature review. We applied this relationship to regional isoniazid resistance estimates to estimate proportions of childhood tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance. We applied these proportions to childhood tuberculosis incidence estimates to estimate numbers of children with isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis. RESULTS: We estimated 12.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.8% to 14.8%) of all children with tuberculosis had isoniazid-resistant disease, representing 120 872 (95% CI 96 628 to 149 059) incident cases of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis in children in 2010. The majority of these occurred in the Western Pacific and Southeast Asia regions; the European region had the highest proportion of child tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance, 26.1% (95% CI: 20.0% to 33.6%). CONCLUSIONS: The burden of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis in children is substantial, and risk varies considerably by setting. The large number of child cases signals extensive ongoing transmission from adults with isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis. The risk of isoniazid resistance must be considered when evaluating treatment options for children with disease or latent infection to avoid inadequate treatment and consequent poor outcomes. PMID:26034243

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin and Isoniazid in Tuberculosis-HIV-Coinfected Patients Receiving Nevirapine- or Efavirenz-Based Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, N. B.; Barau, C.; Amin, A.; Baudin, E.; Meggi, B.; Silva, C.; Furlan, V.; Grinsztejn, B.; Barrail-Tran, A.; Bonnet, M.

    2014-01-01

    This is a substudy of the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le Sida et les Hépatites Virales (ANRS) Comparison of Nevirapine and Efavirenz for the Treatment of HIV-TB Co-infected Patients (ANRS 12146-CARINEMO) trial, which assessed the pharmacokinetics of rifampin or isoniazid with or without the coadministration of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based HIV antiretroviral therapy in HIV-tuberculosis-coinfected patients in Mozambique. Thirty-eight patients on antituberculosis therapy based on rifampin and isoniazid participated in the substudy (57.9% males; median age, 33 years; median weight, 51.9 kg; median CD4+ T cell count, 104 cells/μl; median HIV-1 RNA load, 5.5 log copies/ml). The daily doses of rifampin and isoniazid were 10 and 5 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. Twenty-one patients received 200 mg of nevirapine twice a day (b.i.d.), and 17 patients received 600 mg of efavirenz once a day (q.d.) in combination with lamivudine and stavudine from day 1 until the end of the study. Blood samples were collected at regular time-dosing intervals after morning administration of a fixed-dose combination of rifampin and isoniazid. When rifampin was administered alone, the median maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) at steady state were 6.59 mg/liter (range, 2.70 to 14.07 mg/liter) and 27.69 mg · h/liter (range, 11.41 to 109.75 mg · h/liter), respectively. Concentrations remained unchanged when rifampin was coadministered with nevirapine or efavirenz. When isoniazid was administered alone, the median isoniazid Cmax and AUC at steady state were 5.08 mg/liter (range, 1.26 to 11.51 mg/liter) and 20.92 mg · h/liter (range, 7.73 to 56.95 mg · h/liter), respectively. Concentrations remained unchanged when isoniazid was coadministered with nevirapine; however, a 29% decrease in the isoniazid AUC was observed when isoniazid was combined with efavirenz. The pharmacokinetic parameters of

  13. Pharmacokinetics of rifampin and isoniazid in tuberculosis-HIV-coinfected patients receiving nevirapine- or efavirenz-based antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, N B; Barau, C; Amin, A; Baudin, E; Meggi, B; Silva, C; Furlan, V; Grinsztejn, B; Barrail-Tran, A; Bonnet, M; Taburet, A M

    2014-06-01

    This is a substudy of the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le Sida et les Hépatites Virales (ANRS) Comparison of Nevirapine and Efavirenz for the Treatment of HIV-TB Co-infected Patients (ANRS 12146-CARINEMO) trial, which assessed the pharmacokinetics of rifampin or isoniazid with or without the coadministration of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based HIV antiretroviral therapy in HIV-tuberculosis-coinfected patients in Mozambique. Thirty-eight patients on antituberculosis therapy based on rifampin and isoniazid participated in the substudy (57.9% males; median age, 33 years; median weight, 51.9 kg; median CD4(+) T cell count, 104 cells/μl; median HIV-1 RNA load, 5.5 log copies/ml). The daily doses of rifampin and isoniazid were 10 and 5 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. Twenty-one patients received 200 mg of nevirapine twice a day (b.i.d.), and 17 patients received 600 mg of efavirenz once a day (q.d.) in combination with lamivudine and stavudine from day 1 until the end of the study. Blood samples were collected at regular time-dosing intervals after morning administration of a fixed-dose combination of rifampin and isoniazid. When rifampin was administered alone, the median maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) at steady state were 6.59 mg/liter (range, 2.70 to 14.07 mg/liter) and 27.69 mg · h/liter (range, 11.41 to 109.75 mg · h/liter), respectively. Concentrations remained unchanged when rifampin was coadministered with nevirapine or efavirenz. When isoniazid was administered alone, the median isoniazid Cmax and AUC at steady state were 5.08 mg/liter (range, 1.26 to 11.51 mg/liter) and 20.92 mg · h/liter (range, 7.73 to 56.95 mg · h/liter), respectively. Concentrations remained unchanged when isoniazid was coadministered with nevirapine; however, a 29% decrease in the isoniazid AUC was observed when isoniazid was combined with efavirenz. The pharmacokinetic parameters of

  14. The effects of isoniazid on hippocampal NMDA receptors: protective role of erdosteine.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Ekrem; Sutcu, Recep; Gokalp, Osman; Yilmaz, H Ramazan; Ozer, M Kaya; Uz, Efkan; Ozcelik, Nurten; Delibas, Namik

    2005-09-01

    Isoniazid (INH) has neurotoxic effects such as seizure, poor concentration, subtle reduction in memory, anxiety, depression and psychosis. INH-induced toxic effects are thought to be through increased oxidative stress, and these effects have been shown to be prevented by antioxidant therapies in various organs. Increased oxidative stress may be playing a role in these neurotoxic effects. N-methyl D-aspartat receptors (NMDA) are a member of the ionotropic group of glutamate receptors. These receptors are involved in a wide variety of processes in the central nervous system including synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, memory and learning. Erdosteine is a potent antioxidant and mucolytic agent. We aimed to investigate adverse effects of INH on rat hippocampal NMDAR receptors, and to elucidate whether erdosteine prevents possible adverse effects of INH. In the present study, compared to control group, NMDAR2A (NR2A) receptors were significantly decreased and malondialdehyde (MDA), end product of lipid peroxidation, production was significantly increased in INH-treated group. On the other hand, administration of erdosteine to INH-treated group significantly increased NR2A receptors and decreased MDA production. In conclusion, decreasing NR2A receptors in hippocampus and increasing lipid peroxidation correlates with the degree of oxidative effects of INH and erdosteine protects above effect of INH on NR2A receptors and membrane damage due to lipid peroxidation by its antioxidant properties.

  15. Cilostazol may prevent cardioembolic stroke in patients undergoing antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Horie, Nobutaka; Kaminogo, Makio; Izumo, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Kentaro; Tsujino, Akira; Nagata, Izumi

    2015-07-01

    Randomised trials have shown the efficacy of antiplatelet therapy with cilostazol to prevent secondary ischaemic stroke. Recently, cilostazol has been reported to prevent the development and/or recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF), which can potentially prevent cardioembolic stroke in patients undergoing antiplatelet therapy. Herein, we examined the impact of prior antiplatelet therapy with cilostazol on the incidence of cardioembolic stroke, which had not been fully investigated. Using the multicenter retrospective study of stroke risk in antithrombotic therapy (RESTATE) database, we analysed consecutive patients with primary or secondary stroke under single antiplatelet therapy. We evaluated the characteristics of ischaemic stroke based on the type of antiplatelet agent used: aspirin, ticlopidine/clopidogrel or cilostazol. Of 1069 consecutive patients with primary or secondary stroke during antithrombotic therapy from January to December 2012, 615 patients received single antiplatelet therapy (293 and 322 cases of primary and secondary strokes, respectively). Interestingly, the percentage of cardioembolic infarction was significantly lower in patients taking cilostazol compared with other agents. Multivariate regression analysis found that age (OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.06, P = 0.0029), serum creatinine (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.03-1.34, P = 0.0198), aspirin (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.00-3.22, P = 0.0486), cilostazol (OR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.03-0.73, P = 0.0125), and smoking (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.16-2.94, P = 0.0102) were independently associated with cardioembolic stroke. Cilostazol may prevent cardioembolic stroke in patients undergoing antiplatelet therapy. This could be a novel strategy for cardioembolic stroke prevention potentially by affecting cardiac remodelling, in contrast to secondary anticoagulant therapy.

  16. [Spasticity. Physical therapy, preventive measures and treatment].

    PubMed

    Gay, S; Egon, G

    2005-06-01

    Spasticity is one of the most common motor and tonus disorders during the initial phase with traumatic brain injured patients. The evaluation of spasticity is mainly clinical but it is very important to prevent complications such as limitation of range of motion, pain, decubitus ulcers. The therapeutic options consist in classical indications such as baclofen, dantrolene, tizanidine, benzodiazepine, associated with physiotherapy. Other additive therapeutic options could be discussed: use of toxin botulinum in focal spasticity and intrathecal baclofen infusion in case of severe spasticity (often associated with dysautonomic disorders.).

  17. Feline Cardiogenic Arterial Thromboembolism: Prevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Daniel F

    2017-09-01

    Feline cardiogenic arterial thromboembolism (CATE) is a devastating disease whereby 33% of cats survive their initial event, although approximately 50% of mortality is from euthanasia. Short-term management focuses on inducing a hypocoagulable state, improving blood flow, and providing supportive care. Ideally, all cats should be given 72 hours of treatment to determine the acute clinical course. Preventive protocols include antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant drugs, with the only prospective clinical trial demonstrating that clopidogrel is superior to aspirin with a lower CATE recurrence rate and longer time to recurrent CATE. Newer anticoagulant drugs hold great promise in the future of managing this disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Protective effects of resveratrol on hepatotoxicity induced by isoniazid and rifampicin via SIRT1 modulation.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Natália F; Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês; Santos, André A; Leite, Carlos E; Dias, Ana C O; Batista, Eraldo L; Basso, Luiz A; Campos, Maria M; Santos, Diógenes S; Souto, André A

    2014-10-24

    Acute liver injury was induced in male BALB/c mice by coadministering isoniazid and rifampicin. In this work, the effects of resveratrol (1) were investigated in the hepatotoxicity caused by isoniazid-rifampicin in mice. Compound 1 was administered 30 min prior to isoniazid-rifampicin. Serum biochemical tests, liver histopathological examination, oxidative stress, myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-12p70, and IL-10), and mRNA expression of SIRT1-7 and PPAR-γ/PGC1-α were evaluated. The administration of 1 significantly decreased aspartate transaminase and alanine aminotransferase levels, myeloperoxidase activity, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, 1 reverted the decrease of catalase and glutathione activities and ameliorated the histopathological alterations associated with antituberculosis drugs. Modulation of SIRT1 and PPAR-γ/PGC1-α expression is likely involved in the protective effects of 1. The results presented herein show that 1 was able to largely prevent the hepatotoxicity induced by isoniazid and rifampicin in mice, mainly by modulating SIRT1 mRNA expression.

  19. Dance movement therapy and falls prevention.

    PubMed

    Veronese, Nicola; Maggi, Stefania; Schofield, Patricia; Stubbs, Brendon

    2017-08-01

    Falls are a leading cause of morbidity, healthcare use and mortality. Dance is a popular form of physical activity among older people and previous research has suggested that it may improve various health outcomes in this population, including balance, gait and muscle performance. A systematic review of the potential benefits of dance on falls and fear of falling is lacking. Thus, we conducted a systematic review considering all randomized controls trials (RCTs) investigating if dance can reduce falls and improve fear of falling in older adults. Major databases were searched from inception until 1 March 2017 and a total of 10 RCTs were identified, which included a total of 680 people (n=356 dance, n=324 control). Overall, the mean age of the samples was 69.4 years, and 75.2% were female. Across four RCTs, dance therapy reduced falls versus usual care in only one study. Dance therapy improved fear of falling in two out of three included RCTs. There were no serious adverse events reported in the RCTs. In summary, we found a paucity of studies investigating the effect of dance on falls and fear of falling and the evidence base is preliminary and equivocal. Given the heterogeneity of the included samples and interventions, in addition to the short-term follow-up, no firm conclusions can be drawn. However, dance appears to be safe and, given its popularity and demonstrated benefits on other health/wellbeing outcomes in older adults, it is important that future research considers its potential benefits on falls/fear of falling in older age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Spectrophotometric determination of isoniazid in presence of its hydrazones.

    PubMed

    Devani, M B; Shishoo, C J; Patel, M A; Bhalara, D D

    1978-05-01

    A spectrophotometric determination of isoniazid in the presence of its hydrazones was developed. The method involves the reaction between isoniazid and 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone in the presence of ammonia in an ethanolic medium. The colored product has an absorbance maxium at 640 nm. The Lambert-Beer law is obeyed in the 1--14-microgram/ml range. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of isoniazid tablets. In commercial tablets, hydrazone formation due to the reaction between isoniazid and lactose was detected by TLC. The analysis of lactose-containing isoniazid tablets showed 10--22% lower recovery than that obtained by the official method. Hydrazone formation in tablets probably interferes with isoniazid bioavailability.

  1. Comparison of three composite compliance indices in a trial of self-administered preventive therapy for tuberculosis in HIV-infected Ugandan adults. Uganda-Case Western Reserve University Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Pekovic, V; Mayanja, H; Vjecha, M; Johnson, J; Okwera, A; Nsubuga, P; Mugerwa, R; Ellner, J; Whalen, C

    1998-07-01

    Compliance with tuberculosis preventive therapy in a randomized placebo-controlled trial in 2736 HIV-infected Ugandans was measured using urinary isoniazid metabolite testing, clinic attendance, and self-report. Overall, 77% of urine tests were positive, subjects kept 85% of their scheduled visits while on therapy, and 69% reportedly never forgot to take their medication. Different strategies were used for constructing three composite compliance indices in active arms: (1) an unweighted index of the summed scores on scaled compliance measures; (2) a weighted index using weights obtained from a survey of experts on tuberculosis; and (3) a statistically weighted index using principal components analysis. Composite indices were evaluated for reliability, validity, and practical utility. Understanding of the regimen, study arm, subsequent follow-up, tuberculosis status, and urine spot-check result were associated with composite compliance scores. The unweighted index in this study performed as well as the weighted indices.

  2. Medical and dietary therapy for kidney stone prevention.

    PubMed

    Gul, Zeynep; Monga, Manoj

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of kidney stone disease is increasing, and newer research is finding that stones are associated with several serious morbidities. These facts suggest that emphasis needs to be placed not only on stone treatment but also stone prevention. However, there is a relative dearth of information on dietary and medical therapies to treat and avoid nephrolithiasis. In addition, studies have shown that there are many misconceptions among both the general community and physicians about how stones should be managed. This article is meant to serve as a review of the current literature on dietary and drug therapies for stone prevention.

  3. Non-drug therapy in prevention and control of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sainani, G S

    2003-10-01

    Non-drug therapy is a very vital aspect in prevention and treatment of hypertension. The successive reports of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of Hypertension, WHO scientific report on primary prevention of essential hypertension and national High Blood Pressure Education Program's working groups report on primary prevention of hypertension have stressed on the non-drug therapy. Today a busy family physician does not spend enough time to explain to the patient various dietary and lifestyle modifications but straightaway prescribes the drugs. Every patient of hypertension from the stage of pre-hypertension to grade 2 hypertension should follow non-drug therapy. If non-drug therapy is strictly adhered, one can prevent cases of pre-hypertension from progressing to hypertension stage and one can reduce or stop the medications in Grade I (mild) hypertension. We have discussed the role of low salt, high potassium diet, role of caffeine intake, calcium and magnesium supplements, fish oil intake, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, role of physical exercise, stress reduction and bio-feedback, yoga, meditation and acupuncture. These recommendations regarding diet and lifestyle modifications should be targeted to population at large through public health authorities, non-government organisations and news media.

  4. Prevention and Therapy of Pediatric Emergence Delirium: A National Survey.

    PubMed

    Huett, Christopher; Baehner, Torsten; Erdfelder, Felix; Hoehne, Claudia; Bode, Christian; Hoeft, Andreas; Ellerkmann, Richard K

    2017-04-01

    Although pediatric emergence delirium (ED) is common, preventive and therapeutic pharmacological treatment is the matter of an international controversial discussion and evidence on different options is partially vague. We therefore examined clinical routine in prevention strategies and postoperative therapy of ED with respect to clinical experience in pediatric anesthesia. A web-based survey was developed investigating routine management (prevention and treatment) of ED, facility structure, and patient population. The link was sent to all enlisted members of the German Society of Anesthesiology. We analyzed 1229 questionnaires. Overall, 88% reported ED as a relevant clinical problem; however, only 5% applied assessment scores to define ED. Oral midazolam was reported as standard premedication by 84% of respondents, the second largest group was 'no premedication' (5%). The first choice prevention strategy was to perform total intravenous (propofol) anesthesia (63%). The first choice therapeutic pharmacological treatment depended on clinical experience. Therapeutic propofol was preferentially chosen by more experienced anesthesiologists (5 to >20 patients per week, n = 538), while lesser experienced colleagues (<5 patients per week, n = 676) preferentially applied opioids. Dexmedetomidine (1%) and non-pharmacological (2%) therapy were rarely stated. The highest satisfaction levels for pharmacological therapy of ED were attributed to propofol. Propofol is the preferred choice for pharmacological prevention and treatment of ED among German anesthesiologists. Further therapy options as well as alternatives to a midazolam-centered premedication procedure are underrepresented.

  5. Novel approaches in melanoma prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Antonio M; Cassidy, Pamela B; Leachmann, Sancy; Ascierto, Paolo A

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of cutaneous melanoma has risen at a rate significantly higher than that for other malignancies. This increase persists despite efforts to educate the public about the dangers of excess exposure to UV radiation from both the sun and tanning beds. Melanoma affects a relatively younger population and is notorious for its propensity to metastasize and for its poor response to current therapeutic regimens. These factors make prevention an integral component to the goal of decreasing melanoma-related mortality. Transformation of melanocytes into malignant melanoma involves the interplay between genetic factors, UV exposure, and the tumor microenvironment. The roles of UV radiation in the etiology of melanoma are mediated by both direct damage of DNA through formation of photoproducts and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Many of the promising antioxidant agents under development for the prevention of melanoma are derived from foodstuffs. B-Raf is a member of the Raf kinase family of serine/threonine-specific protein kinases that plays a role in regulating the MAP kinase/ERKs signaling pathway. About 50 % of melanomas harbor activating BRAF mutations. BRAF mutations are found in 59 % of the melanomas arising in skin with intermittent sun exposure, such as trunk and arms, as compared with only 23 % of the acral melanomas, 11 % of mucosal melanomas, and 0 % of uveal melanomas. Two new agents, ipilimumab and vemurafenib, have been shown to improve outcome of advanced melanoma as presented at the plenary session of the 2011 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Vemurafenib is the first personalized compound which demonstrated an improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in metastatic melanoma harboring the BRAFV600 mutation and represents the first drug of a class that exerts its anti-proliferative activity through inhibition of a highly specific molecular target. GSK2118436 (dabrafenib), the

  6. Isoniazid-Resistant Tuberculosis in Children: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Courtney M.; Tolman, Arielle W.; Cohen, Ted; Parr, Jonathan B.; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Isoniazid resistance is an obstacle to the treatment of tuberculosis disease and latent tuberculosis infection in children. We aim to summarize the literature describing the risk of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis among children with tuberculosis disease. Methods We did a systematic review of published reports of children with tuberculosis disease who had isolates tested for susceptibility to isoniazid. We searched PubMed, Embase and LILACS online databasesuptoJanuary 12, 2012. Results Our search identified 3,403 citations, of which 95 studies met inclusion criteria. These studies evaluated 8,351 children with tuberculosis disease for resistance to isoniazid. The median proportion of children found to have isoniazid-resistant strains was 8%; the distribution was right-skewed (25th percentile: 0% and 75th percentile: 18%). Conclusions High proportions of isoniazid resistance among pediatric tuberculosis patients have been reported in many settings suggesting that diagnostics detecting only rifampin resistance are insufficient to guide appropriate treatment in this population. Many children are likely receiving sub-standard tuberculosis treatment with empirical isoniazid-based regimens, and treating latent tuberculosis infection with isoniazid may not be effective in large numbers of children. Work is needed urgently to identify effective regimens for the treatment of children sick with or exposed to isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis and to better understand the scope of this problem. PMID:23348808

  7. A rare case of isoniazid-induced erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Garg, Yashika; Gore, Rajeshwari; Jain, Sourabh; Kumar, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a common infectious disease in developing countries. Isoniazid is established the first-line antitubercular drug and an essential component of all antitubercular regimens. Erythroderma caused by isoniazid is an uncommon but serious adverse drug reaction. We report here a case of a 63-year-old female patient who presented with generalized redness and scaling with itching after 8 weeks of antitubercular treatment (ATT). ATT was stopped immediately, and antihistaminics were started. The patient improved over a period of 2 weeks. On sequential rechallenge, she developed similar lesions all over the body with isoniazid, hence confirming the diagnosis of isoniazid-induced erythroderma.

  8. Homocysteine-lowering therapy: a role in stroke prevention?

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2007-09-01

    On the basis of the results of several recent clinical trials, many researchers have concluded that vitamin therapy designed to lower total homocysteine concentrations is not effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. However, whereas almost all myocardial infarctions are due to plaque rupture, stroke has many more pathophysiological mechanisms, and thrombosis-which is increased by raised total homocysteine concentrations-has an important role in many of these processes. Thus, stroke and myocardial infarction could respond differently to vitamin therapy. A detailed assessment of the results of the recent HOPE-2 trial and a reanalysis of the VISP trial restricted to patients capable of responding to vitamin therapy suggest that higher doses of vitamin B12 and perhaps new approaches to lowering total homocysteine besides routine vitamin therapy with folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 could reduce the risk of stroke. Thus, therapy to lower homocysteine could still help to prevent stroke, if not other vascular outcomes.

  9. [How to prevent drug therapy risk].

    PubMed

    Bouvenot, G

    2001-12-01

    Therapeutic risk is largely foreseeable and can also largely be avoided. The art of prescription consists of favoring the beneficial effect of the medicament while taking all useful precautions to minimize undesirable effects. The appropriate method is correct use of the medicament at the collective and individual level. This is based on respect of reference systems and firstly on the particulars of the marketing license and the summary of the characteristics of the product, which provide validated knowledge concerning the medication. However, these may also be gray areas, insufficient updating, and insufficiently clear and concrete information on the expected therapeutic benefit as opposed to the pernicious effects feared. It is also based on opposing medical references, which attract attention to dangerous prescription practices. Moreover, for an individualized prescription it is necessary to take into account the actual patient, here and now, and not only the standard patient of clinical trials. Prescription priority must also be organized to favor indispensable medications only. In some cases drug monitoring based on personalized pharmacokinetics should be performed. Monitoring and informing of the patient must be strict for maximum safety; however, this is never complete. In this connection, lack of hindsight, premature enthusiasm, and falsely reassuring surveillance should be taken into account, particularly where undesirable effects not dependent on dosage are concerned. Health education for the public, improved training of health staff as concerns iatrogenic effects and, shortly, computerized risk prevention with suitable software and data banks, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of therapeutic safety will help provide the patient with improved protection. This constitutes a major scientific, economic and ethical challenge for our societies.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, solubility and stability studies of hydrate cocrystal of antitubercular Isoniazid with antioxidant and anti-bacterial Protocatechuic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhadi, Syed Muddassir Ali; Yunus, Uzma; Bhatti, Moazzam Hussain; Ahmed, Imtiaz; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2016-08-01

    Isoniazid is an important component used in "triple therapy" to combat tuberculosis. It has reduced Tabletting formulations stability. Anti-oxidants are obligatory to counter oxidative stress, pulmonary inflammation, and free radical burst from macrophages caused in tuberculosis and other diseases. In the present study a hydrate cocrystal of Isoniazid with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial Protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) in 1:1 is reported. This Cocrystal may have improved tabletting stability and anti-oxidant properties. Cocrystal structure analysis confirmed the existence of pyridine-carboxylic acid synthon in the Cocrystal. Other synthons of different graph sets involving Nsbnd H···O and Osbnd H···N bonds are formed between hydrazide group of isoniazid and coformer. Solubility studies revealed that cocrystal is less soluble as compared to isoniazid in buffer at pH 7.4 at 22 °C while stability studies at 80 °C for 24 h period disclosed the fact that cocrystal has higher stability than that of isoniazid.

  11. Improving access to tuberculosis preventive therapy and treatment for children.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J

    2017-03-01

    Children suffer a huge burden of disease in tuberculosis (TB) endemic countries. This disease burden was largely invisible when TB control programmes focused exclusively on adults with sputum smear-positive disease. High-level advocacy and better data have improved visibility, but the establishment of functional paediatric TB programmes remains challenging. The key issues that limit children's access to TB preventive therapy and treatment in endemic areas are briefly discussed. Barriers to preventive therapy include (1) the perceived inability to rule out active disease, (2) fear of creating drug resistance, (3) non-implementation of existing guidelines in the absence of adequate monitoring, and (4) poor adherence with long preventive therapy courses. Barriers to TB treatment include (1) perceived diagnostic difficulties, (2) non-availability of chest radiography, (3) young children presenting to unprepared maternal and child health (MCH) services, and (4) the absence of child-friendly formulations. With drug-resistant disease there is currently no guidance on the use of preventive therapy and treatment is usually restricted to cases with bacteriologically confirmed disease, which excludes most young children from care, even if their likely source case has documented drug-resistant TB. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene therapy for the prevention of vein graft disease

    PubMed Central

    Southerland, Kevin W.; Frazier, Sarah B.; Bowles, Dawn E.; Milano, Carmelo A.; Kontos, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Despite advances in the medical management of atherosclerosis over the past several decades, many patients require arterial revascularization to reduce mortality and alleviate ischemic symptoms. Technological advancements have led to dramatic increases in the use of percutaneous and endovascular approaches, yet surgical revascularization (bypass surgery) with autologous vein grafts remains a mainstay of therapy for both coronary and peripheral artery disease. Although bypass surgery is highly efficacious in the short-term, long-term outcomes are limited by relatively high failure rates as a result of intimal hyperplasia, which is a common feature of vein graft disease. The supply of native veins is limited, and many individuals require multiple grafts and repeat procedures. The need to prevent vein graft failure has led to great interest in gene therapy approaches to this problem. Bypass grafting presents an ideal opportunity for gene therapy, as surgically harvested vein grafts can be treated with gene delivery vectors ex vivo, thereby maximizing gene delivery while minimizing the potential for systemic toxicity and targeting the pathogenesis of vein graft disease at its onset. Here we will review the pathogenesis of vein graft disease and discuss vector delivery strategies and potential molecular targets for its prevention. We will summarize the preclinical and clinical literature on gene therapy in vein grafting and discuss additional considerations for future therapies to prevent vein graft disease. PMID:23274305

  13. Influence of endothelium in dose-dependent inhibition and potentiation by isoniazid of isosorbide dinitrate relaxation of rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; Fernández, G

    2001-05-01

    The influence of in vivo administration of isoniazid on the relaxant effect of isosorbide dinitrate was determined by pretreating rats with various doses of isoniazid and obtaining concentration-response curves to isosorbide dinitrate in aortic rings from these animals. In rings with endothelium, isoniazid potentiated responses to isosorbide dinitrate at doses of 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg; 3 and 300 mg/kg were without effect. In endothelium-denuded preparations, potentiation was present only at 10 mg/kg; 3 and 300 mg/kg inhibited relaxation. Other experiments indicated that isoniazid potentiation was prevented by pyridoxine, was reproduced with theophylline, and did not occur with 3-morpholinosydnonimine or papaverine. These results were deemed compatible with the hypothesis that isoniazid inhibits transsulfuration of homocysteine and causes its accumulation in vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, where it functions as a thiol intermediate and leads to enhanced bioactivation of isosorbide dinitrate. Potentiation appeared to occur only with moderate increases of homocysteine.

  14. NF-κB in Carcinoma Therapy and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew; Cohen, Jonah; Arun, Pattatheyil; Chen, Zhong; Van Waes, Carter

    2008-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) includes a family of signal-activated transcription factors which normally regulate responses to injury and infection, but which are aberrantly activated in many carcinomas. Objective To review the activation and role of NF-κB in pathogenesis and as a target for treatment and prevention in carcinoma. Methods Evidence from experimental, epidemiologic, pre-clinical studies and clinical trials cited in the literature are reviewed. Results/conclusion Cumulative evidence implicates NF-κB in cell survival, inflammation, angiogenesis, spread and therapeutic resistance during tumor development, progression and metastasis of carcinomas. Non-specific natural and synthetic agents that inhibit NF-κB have demonstrated activity and safety in prevention or therapy. NF-κB activating kinases and the proteasome are under investigation for targeted prevention and therapy of carcinoma. PMID:18694378

  15. Barriers to and Motivations for the Implementation of a Treatment Programme for Latent Tuberculosis Infection using Isoniazid for People Living with HIV, in Upper Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Moolphate, Saiyud; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Pungrassami, Petchawan; Sanguanwongse, Natpatou; Yamada, Norio; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Isoniazid Preventive Therapy (IPT) has been recommended by WHO/UNAIDS for people living with HIV (PLWH) since 1993; however the uptake of IPT implementation has been very low globally. This study aims to assess the barriers to and motivations for the implementation of IPT for PLWH in upper northern Thailand, an area with a high tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) burden. Methods: A survey was carried out via self-administered questionnaires mailed to healthcare workers (HCW) in all 95 public hospitals in the upper northern region of Thailand. A reminding phone call, one month after sending the mail, was made. Results: The response rate from the hospitals was 94% and from the HCW's, 70%. IPT programme was being implemented at only 18 (20%) out of the 89 public hospitals. The main barriers as reported by 144 HCWs working in hospitals without IPT programme, were: (1) unclear direction of national policy (60%), (2) fear of emerging Isoniazid resistant tuberculosis (52%), and (3) fear of poor adherence (30%). The 38 HCWs from hospitals implementing IPT programme, were motivated by (1) knowledge that IPT can prevent TB (63%), (2) the following of national guideline (34%), (3) concern for TB prevention even after the expansion of access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) (32%). Conclusion and Recommendation: To implement an IPT programme for PLWH, giving a clear national policy and straightforward direction are necessary. Furthermore, provision of public health information and updated evidences may enhance HCW's comprehension of benefits and risks of IPT, thus it may increase the IPT programme implementation. PMID:23777722

  16. Update on Antithrombotic Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Opinion statement Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the elderly, affecting 1 in 20 adults over the age of 70 years. Stroke is a major yet highly preventable complication of AF, and the strokes related to AF often are disabling and fatal. Warfarin is the treatment of choice in high-risk patients with AF, and its superior efficacy over aspirin for preventing stroke in these patients is widely recognized. However, several eligible patients with AF are not being treated with warfarin or are being treated inadequately, largely because of concerns regarding the attendant strict monitoring, drug interactions, and risk of major bleeding. As such, alternative antithrombotic therapies that can rival or exceed the efficacy of warfarin, yet compare favorably with its administration and side effect profile, are being sought. One such strategy, the use of a combination antiplatelet regimen, for stroke prevention in high-risk patients with nonvalvular AF was investigated recently in two clinical trials. This article reviews the role of combination antiplatelet regimens in stroke prevention for patients with AF. Other therapies discussed include oral anticoagulation, single antiplatelet therapies, oral anticoagulation plus antiplatelet treatment, direct thrombin inhibitors, and factor Xa inhibitors. PMID:20461116

  17. Extended therapy for primary and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Conway, Susan E; Marcy, Todd R

    2010-08-01

    Clinical practice guidelines currently suggest extended anticoagulation therapy for primary and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The optimal duration of anticoagulation has been an active area of clinical investigation for patients undergoing orthopedic surgeries and those diagnosed with a first episode of unprovoked VTE. Practice guidelines, VTE incidence, clinical predictors/mediators, and clinical trial evidence is reviewed to help pharmacists and other health care providers make an informed, patient-specific decision on the optimal duration of anticoagulation therapy. Extended anticoagulation up to 5 weeks following orthopedic surgery for primary VTE prevention and indefinitely following a first episode of unprovoked VTE for secondary VTE prevention should be considered only if the risk of bleeding is not high and the cost and burden of anticoagulation is acceptable to the patient. The optimal duration of anticoagulation therapy for primary or secondary prevention of VTE should include the health care provider and patient making a decision based on evaluation of individual benefits, risks, and preferences.

  18. Therapy of Chagas Disease: Implications for Levels of Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Colantonio, Lisandro; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the evidence supporting the use of etiological treatment for Chagas disease that has changed the standard of care for patients with Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the last decades. Implications of this evidence on different levels of prevention as well as gaps in current knowledge are also discussed. In this regard, etiological treatment has shown to be beneficial as an intervention for secondary prevention to successfully cure the infection or to delay, reduce, or prevent the progression to disease, and as primary disease prevention by breaking the chain of transmission. Timely diagnosis during initial stages would allow for the prescription of appropriate therapies mainly in the primary health care system thus improving chances for a better quality of life. Based on current evidence, etiological treatment has to be considered as an essential public health strategy useful to reduce disease burden and to eliminate Chagas disease altogether. PMID:22523499

  19. Antiplatelet therapy in prevention of cardio- and venous thromboembolic events.

    PubMed

    Steinhubl, Steven R; Eikelboom, John W; Hylek, Elaine M; Dauerman, Harold L; Smyth, Susan S; Becker, Richard C

    2014-04-01

    The contribution of platelets in the pathophysiology of low-shear thrombosis-specifically, in atrial fibrillation (AF) and venous thromboembolic events (VTE)-remains less clear than for arterial thrombosis. AF itself appears to lead to platelet activation, offering a potential target for aspirin and other antiplatelet agents. Randomized trial results suggest a small benefit of aspirin over placebo, and of dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin plus clopidogrel) over aspirin alone, for prevention of cardioembolic events in AF. Antiplatelet therapy thus can represent an option for patients with AF who are unsuitable for therapy with warfarin or novel oral anticoagulant agents. For VTE, the rationale for antiplatelet therapy reflects the venous response to disrupted blood flow-interactions among monocytes, neutrophil extracellular traps, and platelets. Early randomized trials generally showed poorer performance of aspirin relative to heparins and danaparoid sodium in prevention of VTE. However, results from large placebo- and dalteparin-controlled randomized trials have spurred changes in the most recent practice guidelines-aspirin is now recommended after major orthopedic surgery for patients who cannot receive other antithrombotic therapies.

  20. [Costs of caries therapy and prevention in a school].

    PubMed

    Marci, F; Antenucci, F; Giannoni, M

    1989-01-01

    The prevalence of dental caries in the school children population in Rieti is very high, according to low levels of fluoride content in drinkable water, similar to those detected in other areas of Italy and Europe. The aim of our research is to propose a combined prevention protocol, utilizing fluoride tablets and dental therapy through structures already existing in the public health national organization. The application of this combined (profilaxis-therapy) protocol is expected to decrease the prevalence of dental caries to 50% in a five years period, at a very accettable cost. This protocol should find early application, possibly starting from maternal schools.

  1. Tissue distribution of isoniazid and its metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaneo, Y; Kubo, H; Tabata, T; Matsuyama, K; Noda, A; Iguchi, S

    1981-08-01

    Distribution of isoniazid and its metabolites was observed in the liver, kidney, lung and plasma after the subcutaneous administration of isoniazid to rats. The tissue levels of isoniazid, acetylisoniazid, acetylhydrazine, 1,2-diacetylhydrazine and hydrazine were determined by mass fragmentography using a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer equipped with a multiple ion detector-peak matcher. Using the compounds labeled with a stable isotope as an internal standard, namely the isotope dilution method, made it possible to estimate trace amounts of these metabolites in the tissues. The amount of hydrazine was much less than the other hydrazines, but the metabolite which is well known as a mutagen, could be successfully detected in the tissues and plasma. The greater part of free hydrazine is formed through a direct hydrolysis of isoniazid. The isoniazid-hydrolyzing activity was found to be significantly higher in the liver homogenate. This suggested that hydrazine formation is mainly caused by hepatic hydrolysis.

  2. Effect of isoniazid on antigen-specific interferon-γ secretion in latent tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Martha; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Guio, Heinner; Carranza, Claudia; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Canizales, Sergio; Molina, Susana; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Téllez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Mongua-Rodriguez, Norma; Sifuentes-Osornio, Jose; Ponce-de Leon, Alfredo; Sada, Eduardo; Young, Douglas B.; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of persons with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection at greatest risk of reactivation is an important component of TB control and elimination strategies. Biomarkers evaluating the effectiveness of treatment of latent TB infection have not yet been identified. This information would enhance control efforts and assist the evaluation of new treatment regimes. We designed a two-group, two-arm, randomised clinical study of tuberculin skin test-positive participants: 26 with documented contact with TB patients and 34 with non-documented contact. Participants in each group were randomly assigned to the immediate- or deferred-isoniazid treatment arms. Assays of in vitro interferon (IFN)-γ secretion in response to recombinant Rv1737 and overlapping synthetic peptide pools from various groups of immunodominant proteins were performed. During isoniazid therapy, a significant increase from baseline in the proportion of IFN-γ responders to the 10-kDa culture filtrate protein, Rv2031, Rv0849, Rv1986, Rv2659c, Rv2693c and the recombinant Rv1737 protein was observed (p⩽0.05). The peptide pool of Rv0849 and Rv1737 recombinant proteins induced the highest percentage of IFN-γ responders after isoniazid therapy. The in vitro IFN-γ responses to these proteins might represent useful markers to evaluate changes associated with treatment of latent TB infection. PMID:25359354

  3. Isoniazid vs. Rifampin for Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Jail Inmates: Toxicity and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    White, Mary C.; Tulsky, Jacqueline P.; Lee, Ju Ruey-Jiuan; Chen, Lisa; Goldenson, Joe; Spetz, Joanne; Kawamura, L. Masae

    2012-01-01

    This open-label randomized trial compared isoniazid (9 months) to rifampin (4 months) on toxicity and completion in a jailed population with latent tuberculosis infection. Rifampin resulted in fewer elevated liver function tests (risk ratio [RR] 0.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.18, 0.86]) and less toxicity requiring medication withdrawal (RR 0.51, 95% CI [0.13, 2.01]), although one participant receiving rifampin experienced an allergic reaction. Completion was achieved for 33% receiving rifampin compared to 26% receiving isoniazid (p = .10). With careful monitoring rifampin is a safe and less toxic regimen and appears to be a reasonable alternative because of its shorter duration, allowing more people to complete treatment behind bars. Therapy completion in released inmates is unacceptably low and ensuring follow-up after discharge must be part of a decision to treat. PMID:22419641

  4. Prevention of peritoneal adhesions: A promising role for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Hussein M

    2011-01-01

    Adhesions are the most frequent complication of abdominopelvic surgery, yet the extent of the problem, and its serious consequences, has not been adequately recognized. Adhesions evolved as a life-saving mechanism to limit the spread of intraperitoneal inflammatory conditions. Three different pathophysiological mechanisms can independently trigger adhesion formation. Mesothelial cell injury and loss during operations, tissue hypoxia and inflammation each promotes adhesion formation separately, and potentiate the effect of each other. Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that interruption of a single pathway does not completely prevent adhesion formation. This review summarizes the pathogenesis of adhesion formation and the results of single gene therapy interventions. It explores the promising role of combinatorial gene therapy and vector modifications for the prevention of adhesion formation in order to stimulate new ideas and encourage rapid advancements in this field. PMID:22171139

  5. ICD Therapy for Primary Prevention in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common and heterogeneous disorder that increases an individual’s risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). This review article discusses the relevant factors that are involved in the challenge of preventing SCD in patients with HCM. The epidemiology of SCD in patients is reviewed as well as the structural and genetic basis behind ventricular arrhythmias in HCM. The primary prevention of SCD with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy is the cornerstone of modern treatment for individuals at high risk of SCD. The focus here is on the current and emerging predictors of SCD as well as risk stratification recommendations from both North American and European guidelines. Issues related to ICD implantation, such as programming, complications and inappropriate therapies, are discussed. The emerging role of the fully subcutaneous ICD and the data regarding its implantation are reviewed. PMID:28116084

  6. Laser therapy for prevention and treatment of pathologic excessive scars.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rui; Huang, Xiaolu; Li, Hua; Yuan, Yuwen; Li, Bin; Cheng, Chen; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-12-01

    The management of hypertrophic scars and keloids remains a therapeutic challenge. Treatment regimens are currently based on clinical experience rather than substantiated evidence. Laser therapy is an emerging minimally invasive treatment that has recently gained attention. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of various laser therapies. The pooled response rate, pooled standardized mean difference of Vancouver Scar Scale scores, scar height, erythema, and pliability were reported. Twenty-eight well-designed clinical trials with 919 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The overall response rate for laser therapy was 71 percent for scar prevention, 68 percent for hypertrophic scar treatment, and 72 percent for keloid treatment. The 585/595-nm pulsed-dye laser and 532-nm laser subgroups yielded the best responses among all laser systems. The pooled estimates of hypertrophic scar studies also showed that laser therapy reduced total Vancouver Scar Scale scores, scar height, and scar erythema of hypertrophic scars. Regression analyses of pulsed-dye laser therapy suggested that the optimal treatment interval is 5 to 6 weeks. In addition, the therapeutic effect of pulsed-dye laser therapy is better on patients with lower Fitzpatrick skin type scores. This study presents the first meta-analysis to confirm the efficacy and safety of laser therapy in hypertrophic scar management. The level of evidence for laser therapy as a keloid treatment is low. Further research is required to determine the mechanism of action for different laser systems and to examine the efficacy in quantifiable parameters, such as scar erythema, scar texture, degrees of symptom relief, recurrence rates, and adverse effects.

  7. Cognitive Therapy to Prevent Depressive Relapse in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence, frequent relapse, and recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) increase its personal and societal costs. Cognitive therapy (CT) aims to decrease depressive symptoms and prevent relapse/recurrence. We review prevention evidence for acute, continuation, and maintenance CTs for patients whose depression is active, remitted, and recovered, respectively. Evidence suggests that patients relapse less often after discontinuing acute phase CT versus discontinuing pharmacotherapy. Continuation CT further decreases relapse relative to inactive controls and similarly to active pharmacotherapy. Maintenance CT may decrease recurrence but needs rigorous evaluation. Post-acute CT’s preventive effects appear greater for higher-risk patients (e.g., with residual depressive symptoms, unstable acute-phase treatment response, childhood trauma, more prior depressive episodes), although risks may vary by specific CTs. PMID:25729758

  8. Antibiotic therapy of aortic graft infection: treatment and prevention recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hodgkiss-Harlow, Kelley D; Bandyk, Dennis F

    2011-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after aortic intervention, an uncommon but serious vascular condition, requires patient-specific antibiotic therapy. Effective treatment and prevention requires the vascular surgeon to be cognizant of changing SSI microbiology, advances in antibiotic delivery, and patient characteristics. The majority of aortic graft infections are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus now the prevalent pathogen. Nasal carriage of methicillin-sensitive or methicillin-resistant S aureus strains, diabetes mellitus, recent hospitalization, a failed arterial reconstruction, and the presence of a groin incision are important SSI risk factors. Overall, the aortic SSI rate is higher than predicted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk category system; ranging from 5% after open or endovascular aortic interventions to as high as 10% to 15% after aortofemoral bypass or uni-aortoiliac grafting with femorofemoral bypass. Perioperative measures to reduce S aureus nares and skin colonization, administration of antibiotic prophylaxis, meticulous wound closure/care, and therapy directed to optimize patient host defense regulation mechanisms (eg, temperature, oxygenation, blood sugar) can minimize SSI occurrence. Antibiotic therapy for aortic graft infection should utilize bactericidal drugs that penetrate bacteria biofilms and can be delivered to the surgical site both parenterally and locally in the form of antibiotic-impregnated beads or prosthetic grafts.

  9. Targeted therapies for the prevention of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Schachter, E Neil; Neuman, Tzvi

    2007-12-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries and potentially one of the most preventable cancers. The major cause of this neoplasm, cigarette smoking, has been well established since the 1950s. Legislative, regulatory and educational efforts have resulted in significant reductions in the number of smokers, decreasing the percentage of individuals who initiate the smoking habit and increasing the number of persons who quit. Nevertheless, there is wide recognition of the need to address the issue of lung cancer prevention for those who are addicted to cigarettes or who are exposed to lung carcinogens in other ways. Strategies for smoking cessation now include nicotine replacement, and modulation of central nervous system addictive mechanisms through neuropharmacology. For those who have experienced prolonged carcinogen exposure a growing number of novel strategies based on epidemiologic observations as well as oncologic principles are under investigation. Many promising avenues have been proposed and while no agent is yet approved as chemopreventive for lung cancer a growing number of these agents are being tested as primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies. Proposed primary prevention strategies include cigarette abstinence and treatment of cigarette addiction, using appropriate cancer screening methods, decreasing environmental exposure, and possibly vaccination. Proposed secondary prevention strategies include methods for smoking cessation, lifestyle and diet modification, and modulation of molecular pathways that lead to lung cancer. Proposed tertiary prevention strategies include individually tailored therapies against certain molecular pathways as well as treatments to minimize disease metastasis and its sequelae. Currently, treatment for nicotine addiction includes nicotine replacement and medications such as bupropion and the recently approved varenicline. Attempts to modify the development of lung cancer

  10. Emerging Therapies for the Prevention of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ruthman, Carl A.; Festic, Emir

    2015-01-01

    The development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) carries significant risk of morbidity and mortality. To date, pharmacologic therapy has been largely ineffective for patients with ARDS. We present our personal review aimed at outlining current and future directions for the pharmacologic prevention of ARDS. Several available risk-stratification or prediction scores strategies for identification of patients at risk of ARDS have been reported. Although not ready for the clinical everyday use, they are and will be instrumental in the ongoing and future trials of pharmacoprevention of ARDS. Several systemic medications established the potential role in ARDS prevention based on the preclinical studies and observational data. Due to potential for systemic adverse effects to neutralize any pharmacologic benefits of systemic therapy, inhaled medications appear particularly attractive candidates for ARDS prevention. This is because of their direct delivery to the site of the proposed action (lungs), while pulmonary epithelial surface is still functional. We postulate that overall morbidity and mortality rates from ARDS in the future will be contingent upon decreasing the overall incidence of ARDS through effective identification of those at risk and early application of proven supportive care and pharmacologic interventions. PMID:26002528

  11. Ozone therapy in the management and prevention of caries.

    PubMed

    Almaz, Merve Erkmen; Sönmez, Işıl Şaroğlu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to assess the effectiveness of ozone therapy in the management and prevention of caries, reviewing clinical and in vitro studies. Ozone has proven to be effective against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, viruses, and fungi. In dentistry, most of the published articles are based on ozone's antimicrobial effects and the treatment of caries. Most of the clinical studies reported ozone to be a promising alternative to conventional methods for caries management. However, a few studies have shown ozone to be insufficient for preventing caries and reducing microorganisms in open occlusal carious lesions. Ozone might be a useful tool to reduce and control oral infectious microorganisms in dental plaque and dental cavity. However, the results of in vitro studies are controversial; while some researchers reported that ozone therapy had a minimal or no effect on the viability of microorganisms, others suggested ozone to be highly effective in killing both gram-positive and gram-negative oral microorganisms. Therefore, more evidence is required before ozone can be accepted as an alternative to present methods for the management and prevention of caries.

  12. Prescription drug therapies for prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Mary Beth

    2006-07-01

    To characterize the changes in bone mass with age in women and men, explain the physiology and pathophysiology of the bone remodeling process, identify the targets for prescription osteoporosis drugs in this process, and provide details about the uses, efficacy, safety, and economics of prescription drug therapies for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Preventing accelerated bone loss and decreasing age-related decreases in bone density are the primary goals of prescription drug therapy for osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates are the drugs of choice for preventing and treating postmenopausal osteoporosis. Alternatives for patients who cannot take bisphosphonates include raloxifene and calcitonin salmon. Menopause is accompanied by a rapid loss in bone mass that is followed by annual losses due to aging in women, which are similar to age-related bone mass decreases in men. Most prescription drug therapies for osteoporosis prevention or treatment reduce bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast activation and activity, with only one medication class able to increase bone formation by stimulating osteoblasts. Denosumab, an investigational monoclonal antibody that inhibits nuclear factor kB ligand, would be a new class of anti-resorptive medications. Bisphosphonates currently are the drugs of choice for preventing and treating osteoporosis, with 7- and 10-year safety data available for risedronate and alendronate, respectively. Weekly and monthly regimens of bisphosphonates improve patient acceptance. Recently, an injectable form of ibandronate received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for once every 3 months administration. Raloxifene and calcitonin salmon are alternatives for patients who cannot take bisphosphonates because of contraindications or adverse effects. Teriparatide, a recombinant parathyroid hormone fragment, not only increases bone mineral density but also increases bone connectivity. Osteoporosis medications are usually safe, especially if used

  13. Recommendations for use of an isoniazid-rifapentine regimen with direct observation to treat latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    2011-12-09

    Preventing tuberculosis (TB) by treating latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a cornerstone of the U.S. strategy for TB elimination. Three randomized controlled trials have shown that a new combination regimen of isoniazid (INH) and rifapentine (RPT) administered weekly for 12 weeks as directly observed therapy (DOT) is as effective for preventing TB as other regimens and is more likely to be completed than the U.S. standard regimen of 9 months of INH daily without DOT. This report provides CDC recommendations for using the INH-RPT regimen. The new regimen is recommended as an equal alternative to the 9-month INH regimen for otherwise healthy patients aged≥12 years who have LTBI and factors that are predictive of TB developing (e.g., recent exposure to contagious TB). The new regimen also can be considered for other categories of patients when it offers practical advantages. Although the INH-RPT regimen was well tolerated in treatment trials, monitoring for adverse effects is recommended. Severe adverse effects should be reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and CDC.

  14. Hepatoprotective activity of Ficus religiosa leaves against isoniazid+rifampicin and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Parameswari, Sundaramoorthi Angala; Chetty, Challa Madhusudhana; Chandrasekhar, Kothapalli Bannoth

    2013-01-01

    Background: The present study was designed to investigate the hepato protective effect of methanolic extract of Ficus religisoa L., Moraceae, on isoniazid-rifampicin and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar albino rats were divided into six groups; group 1 served as a control received vehicle (Distilled water), group 2 served as a toxic control, received isoniazid-rifampicin (100 mg/ kg, i.p.) or paracetamol 200mg/kg, p.o in sterile water, groups 3, 4 and 5 received 100, 200 and 300mg/kg bw, p.o. methanolic extract of F. religisoa along with INH+RIF or paracetamol and group 6 received Liv 52 as reference standard. All the treatment protocols followed 21 days for INH+RIF model and seven days for paracetamol model, after treatment rats were sacrificed and blood was used for biochemical and liver was used for histological studies. Results: Administration of INH+RIF and paracetamol caused a significant elevation in the levels of liver marker enzymes (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (P < 0.001) in experimental rats. Administration of methanolic extracts of F. religisoa significantly prevented isoniazid-rifampicin and paracetamol induced elevation in the levels of serum diagnostic liver marker enzymes and TBARS level in experimental groups of rats. Moreover, total protein and reduced glutathione levels were significantly (P < 0.001) increased in treatment group. The effect of extract was compared with a standard drug, Liv 52. The changes in biochemical parameters were supported by histological profile. Conclusion: The methanolic extract of F. religisoa protects against isoniazid- rifampicin and paracetamol induced oxidative liver injury in rats. PMID:24174821

  15. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management: Overview of current therapies.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Al-Bulushi, Taimoor

    2016-02-01

    Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management.

  16. Hormone replacement therapy and the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Gambacciani, Marco; Levancini, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Fracture prevention is one of the public health priorities worldwide. Estrogen deficiency is the major factor in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the most common metabolic bone disease. Different effective treatments for osteoporosis are available. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) at different doses rapidly normalizes turnover, preserves bone mineral density (BMD) at all skeletal sites, leading to a significant, reduction in vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Tibolone, a selective tissue estrogenic activity regulator (STEAR), is effective in the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, vaginal atrophy and prevention/treatment of osteoporosis with a clinical efficacy similar to that of conventional HRT. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) such as raloxifene and bazedoxifene reduce turnover and maintain or increase vertebral and femoral BMD and reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures. The combination of bazedoxifene and conjugated estrogens, defined as tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC), is able to reduce climacteric symptoms, reduce bone turnover and preserve BMD. In conclusion, osteoporosis prevention can actually be considered as a major additional benefit in climacteric women who use HRT for treatment of climacteric symptoms. The use of a standard dose of HRT for osteoporosis prevention is based on biology, epidemiology, animal and preclinical data, observational studies and randomized, clinical trials. The antifracture effect of a lower dose HRT or TSEC is supported by the data on BMD and turnover, with compelling scientific evidence.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, James G; Marseille, Elliot A; Bennett, Rod; Williams, Brian G; Granich, Reuben

    2011-01-01

    Recent empirical studies and analyses have heightened interest in the use of expanded antiretroviral therapy (ART) for prevention of HIV transmission. However, ART is expensive, approximately $600 per person per year, raising issues of the cost and cost-effectiveness of ambitious ART expansion. The goal of this review is to equip the reader with the conceptual tools and substantive background needed to understand and evaluate the policy and programmatic implications of cost-effectiveness assessments of ART for prevention. We provide this review in six sections. We start by introducing and explaining basic concepts of health economics as they relate to this issue, including resources, costs, health metrics (such as Disability-Adjusted Life Years), and different types of economic analysis. We then review research on the cost and cost-effectiveness of ART as treatment, and on the cost-effectiveness of traditional HIV prevention. We describe critical issues in the epidemic impact of ART, such as suppression of transmission and the role of the acute phase of infection. We then present a conceptual model for conducting and interpreting cost-effectiveness analyses of ART as prevention, and review the existing preliminary estimates in this area. We end with a discussion of future directions for programmatic demonstrations and evaluation. PMID:21999776

  18. Protective effects of Asparagus racemosus on oxidative damage in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxic rats: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, N; Manian, S

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the hepatoprotective activity of Asparagus racemosus against isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity in male albino rats. Rats (n = 6 per group)were divided into four groups: saline-treated control, saline-treated control with A. racemosus extract (50 mg/kg), isoniazid treatment alone (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]), and isoniazid-A. racemosus extract (50 mg/kg)administered orally as cotreatment. Animals were treated for 21 days and euthanized 1 h after the last drug administration. Evaluated body weight, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, g-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, hepatic malondialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase, catalase, cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1)activity and glutathione (GSH). A. racemosus extract prevented isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, indicated by both diagnostic indicators of liver damage, liver functional profile, significantly (p < 0.05)inhibited CYP2E1 activity, markedly attenuated oxidative stress by improved enzymatic, non-enzymatic antioxidants levels and mitigate malondialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxide significantly (p < 0.05). These results suggest that A. racemosus extract exerts its hepatoprotective activity by inhibiting the production of free radicals and acts as a scavenger, reducing the free radical generation via inhibition of hepatic CYP2E1 activity, increasing the removal of free radicals through the induction of antioxidant enzymes and improving non-enzymatic thiol antioxidant GSH.

  19. Molecular Targeted Approaches to Cancer Therapy and Prevention Using Chalcones

    PubMed Central

    Jandial, Danielle D.; Blair, Christopher A.; Zhang, Saiyang; Krill, Lauren S.; Zhang, Yan-Bing; Zi, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging paradigm shift in oncology that seeks to emphasize molecularly targeted approaches for cancer prevention and therapy. Chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones), naturally-occurring compounds with widespread distribution in spices, tea, beer, fruits and vegetables, consist of open-chain flavonoids in which the two aromatic rings are joined by a three-carbon α, β-unsaturated carbonyl system. Due to their structural diversity, relative ease of chemical manipulation and reaction of α, β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety with cysteine residues in proteins, some lead chalcones from both natural products and synthesis have been identified in a variety of screening assays for modulating important pathways or molecular targets in cancers. These pathways and targets that are affected by chalcones include MDM2/p53, tubulin, proteasome, NF-kappa B, TRIAL/death receptors and mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathways, cell cycle, STAT3, AP-1, NRF2, AR, ER, PPAR-γ and β-catenin/Wnt. Compared to current cancer targeted therapeutic drugs, chalcones have the advantages of being inexpensive, easily available and less toxic; the ease of synthesis of chalcones from substituted benzaldehydes and acetophenones also makes them an attractive drug scaffold. Therefore, this review is focused on molecular targets of chalcones and their potential implications in cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:24467530

  20. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Dressman, J B; Amidon, G L; Junginger, H E; Kopp, S; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Barends, D M

    2007-03-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing isoniazid as the only active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are reviewed. Isoniazid's solubility and permeability characteristics according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), as well as its therapeutic use and therapeutic index, its pharmacokinetic properties, data related to the possibility of excipient interactions and reported BE/bioavailability (BA) problems were taken into consideration. Isoniazid is "highly soluble" but data on its oral absorption and permeability are inconclusive, suggesting this API to be on the borderline of BCS Class I and III. For a number of excipients, an interaction with the permeability is extreme unlikely, but lactose and other deoxidizing saccharides can form condensation products with isoniazid, which may be less permeable than the free API. A biowaiver is recommended for IR solid oral drug products containing isoniazid as the sole API, provided that the test product meets the WHO requirements for "very rapidly dissolving" and contains only the excipients commonly used in isoniazid products, as listed in this article. Lactose and/or other deoxidizing saccharides containing formulations should be subjected to an in vivo BE study.

  1. Antiretroviral Therapy for the Prevention of HIV-1 Transmission.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Myron S; Chen, Ying Q; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James G; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Pilotto, Jose H S; Godbole, Sheela V; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Santos, Breno R; Mayer, Kenneth H; Hoffman, Irving F; Eshleman, Susan H; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Cottle, Leslie; Zhang, Xinyi C; Makhema, Joseph; Mills, Lisa A; Panchia, Ravindre; Faesen, Sharlaa; Eron, Joseph; Gallant, Joel; Havlir, Diane; Swindells, Susan; Elharrar, Vanessa; Burns, David; Taha, Taha E; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Celentano, David D; Essex, Max; Hudelson, Sarah E; Redd, Andrew D; Fleming, Thomas R

    2016-09-01

    An interim analysis of data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 trial showed that antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevented more than 96% of genetically linked infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serodiscordant couples. ART was then offered to all patients with HIV-1 infection (index participants). The study included more than 5 years of follow-up to assess the durability of such therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. We randomly assigned 1763 index participants to receive either early or delayed ART. In the early-ART group, 886 participants started therapy at enrollment (CD4+ count, 350 to 550 cells per cubic millimeter). In the delayed-ART group, 877 participants started therapy after two consecutive CD4+ counts fell below 250 cells per cubic millimeter or if an illness indicative of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (i.e., an AIDS-defining illness) developed. The primary study end point was the diagnosis of genetically linked HIV-1 infection in the previously HIV-1-negative partner in an intention-to-treat analysis. Index participants were followed for 10,031 person-years; partners were followed for 8509 person-years. Among partners, 78 HIV-1 infections were observed during the trial (annual incidence, 0.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 1.1). Viral-linkage status was determined for 72 (92%) of the partner infections. Of these infections, 46 were linked (3 in the early-ART group and 43 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.7) and 26 were unlinked (14 in the early-ART group and 12 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.3%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). Early ART was associated with a 93% lower risk of linked partner infection than was delayed ART (hazard ratio, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.22). No linked infections were observed when HIV-1 infection was stably suppressed by ART in the index participant. The early initiation of ART led to a sustained decrease in genetically linked HIV-1

  2. Antiretroviral Therapy for the Prevention of HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Myron S.; Chen, Ying Q.; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James G.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Pilotto, Jose H.S.; Godbole, Sheela V.; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Santos, Breno R.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Hoffman, Irving F.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Cottle, Leslie; Zhang, Xinyi C.; Makhema, Joseph; Mills, Lisa A.; Panchia, Ravindre; Faesen, Sharlaa; Eron, Joseph; Gallant, Joel; Havlir, Diane; Swindells, Susan; Elharrar, Vanessa; Burns, David; Taha, Taha E.; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Celentano, David D.; Essex, Max; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Redd, Andrew D.; Fleming, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND An interim analysis of data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 trial showed that antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevented more than 96% of genetically linked infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serodiscordant couples. ART was then offered to all patients with HIV-1 infection (index participants). The study included more than 5 years of follow-up to assess the durability of such therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. METHODS We randomly assigned 1763 index participants to receive either early or delayed ART. In the early-ART group, 886 participants started therapy at enrollment (CD4+ count, 350 to 550 cells per cubic millimeter). In the delayed-ART group, 877 participants started therapy after two consecutive CD4+ counts fell below 250 cells per cubic millimeter or if an illness indicative of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (i.e., an AIDS-defining illness) developed. The primary study end point was the diagnosis of genetically linked HIV-1 infection in the previously HIV-1– negative partner in an intention-to-treat analysis. RESULTS Index participants were followed for 10,031 person-years; partners were followed for 8509 person-years. Among partners, 78 HIV-1 infections were observed during the trial (annual incidence, 0.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 1.1). Viral-linkage status was determined for 72 (92%) of the partner infections. Of these infections, 46 were linked (3 in the early-ART group and 43 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.7) and 26 were unlinked (14 in the early-ART group and 12 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.3%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). Early ART was associated with a 93% lower risk of linked partner infection than was delayed ART (hazard ratio, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.22). No linked infections were observed when HIV-1 infection was stably suppressed by ART in the index participant. CONCLUSIONS The early initiation of ART led to a sustained

  3. Dexamethasone Pretreatment Alleviates Isoniazid/Lipopolysaccharide Hepatotoxicity: Inhibition of Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hozeifa M.; Guo, Hongli; Yousef, Bashir A.; Ping-Ping, Ding; Zhang, Luyong; Jiang, Zhenzhou

    2017-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH) remains a cornerstone key constitute of the current tuberculosis management strategy, but its hepatotoxic potentiality remains a significant clinical problem. Our previous findings succeed to establish a rat model of INH hepatotoxicity employing the inflammatory stress theory in which non-injurious doses of inflammatory-mediating agent bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) augmented the toxicity of INH that assist to uncover the mechanisms behind INH hepatotoxicity. Following LPS exposure, several inflammatory cells are activated and it is likely that the consequences of this activation rather than direct hepatocellular effects of LPS underlie the ability of LPS to augment toxic responses. In this study, we investigated the potential protective role of the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone (DEX), a potent synthetic glucocorticoid, in INH/LPS hepatotoxic rat model. DEX pre-treatment successfully eliminates the components of the inflammatory stress as shown through analysis of blood biochemistry and liver histopathology. DEX potentiated hepatic anti-oxidant mechanisms while serum and hepatic lipid profiles were reduced. However, DEX administration was not able to revoke the principal effects of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) in INH/LPS-induced liver damage. In conclusion, this study illustrated the DEX-preventive capabilities on INH/LPS-induced hepatotoxicity model through DEX-induced potent anti-inflammatory activity whereas the partial toxicity seen in the model could be attributed to the expression of hepatic CYP2E1. These findings potentiate the clinical applications of DEX co-administration with INH therapy in order to reduce the potential incidences of hepatotoxicity. PMID:28360859

  4. Dexamethasone Pretreatment Alleviates Isoniazid/Lipopolysaccharide Hepatotoxicity: Inhibition of Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hozeifa M; Guo, Hongli; Yousef, Bashir A; Ping-Ping, Ding; Zhang, Luyong; Jiang, Zhenzhou

    2017-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH) remains a cornerstone key constitute of the current tuberculosis management strategy, but its hepatotoxic potentiality remains a significant clinical problem. Our previous findings succeed to establish a rat model of INH hepatotoxicity employing the inflammatory stress theory in which non-injurious doses of inflammatory-mediating agent bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) augmented the toxicity of INH that assist to uncover the mechanisms behind INH hepatotoxicity. Following LPS exposure, several inflammatory cells are activated and it is likely that the consequences of this activation rather than direct hepatocellular effects of LPS underlie the ability of LPS to augment toxic responses. In this study, we investigated the potential protective role of the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone (DEX), a potent synthetic glucocorticoid, in INH/LPS hepatotoxic rat model. DEX pre-treatment successfully eliminates the components of the inflammatory stress as shown through analysis of blood biochemistry and liver histopathology. DEX potentiated hepatic anti-oxidant mechanisms while serum and hepatic lipid profiles were reduced. However, DEX administration was not able to revoke the principal effects of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) in INH/LPS-induced liver damage. In conclusion, this study illustrated the DEX-preventive capabilities on INH/LPS-induced hepatotoxicity model through DEX-induced potent anti-inflammatory activity whereas the partial toxicity seen in the model could be attributed to the expression of hepatic CYP2E1. These findings potentiate the clinical applications of DEX co-administration with INH therapy in order to reduce the potential incidences of hepatotoxicity.

  5. Contribution of efflux activity to isoniazid resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Liliana; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Amaral, Leonard; Viveiros, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Resistance to isoniazid (INH), one of the main drugs used in tuberculosis (TB) therapy, is mostly due to chromosomal mutations in target genes. However, approximately 20-30% of INH resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates do not have mutations in any of the genes associated with INH resistance. This suggests that other mechanism(s) may be involved, namely efflux pump systems capable of extruding the drug to the exterior of the cell. In a previous work, we have induced clinical INH susceptible M. tuberculosis isolates and the H37Rv reference strain to high-level resistance to INH, by gradual exposure to increasing concentrations of this drug. In the present study, we have characterized these strains and Mycobacterium bovis BCG induced to INH resistance with respect to their efflux activity and its contribution to INH resistance using the following approach: determination of the susceptibility to INH in the presence and absence of the efflux inhibitors (EIs) chlorpromazine, thioridazine and verapamil; evaluation of efflux activity by a semi-automated fluorometric method; and quantification of the expression level of genes coding for efflux pumps by real-time RT-qPCR. The EIs decreased INH resistance in the INH induced strains, in particular verapamil promoted a reversal of resistance in some of the strains tested. The induced strains presented an increased efflux activity that was inhibited by the EIs and showed overexpression of the efflux pump genes efpA, mmpL7, mmr, p55 and the Tap-like gene Rv1258c. Altogether, these results correlate efflux activity with INH resistance and demonstrate that efflux pumps play an important role in acquired INH resistance in M. tuberculosis complex. The development of EIs that can restore the antimicrobial activity of the antibiotic subject to efflux is an approach that can be useful in order to prevent the emergence of this resistance and guide the development of new effective anti-TB therapeutical approaches.

  6. [Relapse prevention group therapy for paedophiles: French adaptation].

    PubMed

    Smith, J; Petibon, C

    2005-01-01

    Psychotherapy for sex offenders has only very recently started to develop in France. The French law on compulsory treatment for sex offenders was voted in 1998, and many mental health practitioners are not trained to treat such patients yet. In our ambulatory forensic consultation, sex offenders have been treated since 1992 and group psychotherapy has been offered to them since 1994. Our first therapeutic models were the North-American behavioural-cognitive therapy and Pithers' relapse prevention model. Behavioural-cognitive theory describes paedophilia as an acquired sexual preference maintained by positive reinforcement. Pithers (1990) considered that relapse only occurs in high-risk situations, and that high-risk situations always come after offence precursors. In North America, relapse prevention consists in helping paedophiles spot their high-risk situations and offence precursors, and enhance their skills to cope with such situations or to prevent them. Therapy programs were developed according to these models, aiming to help offenders develop such skills, ie empathy, social skills, cognitive restructuring, self-esteem, etc. Trying to apply these therapy programs in France, our team quickly realised that we would have to adapt them to French culture. On the one hand, behavioural-cognitive theory did not seem satisfactory enough in explaining paedophilic behaviour and paedophilic preference. On the other hand, behavioural-cognitive therapy made patients into children too much and increased resistance. Therapy based on programs seemed too rigid for French patients and therapists, and we often felt we were working on an issue that would have been much more accurate to work on a few sessions earlier, when this issue was spontaneously brought up by a patient. We believe change occurs all the more as issues are worked on at the right moment for the patient. Moreover, on a cultural point of view, we also realised the use of programs in psychotherapy was difficult to

  7. Protective effect of methanolic extract of Annona squamosa Linn in isoniazid-rifampicin induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Thattakudian Sheik Uduman, Mohamed Saleem; Sundarapandian, Ramkanth; Muthumanikkam, Azagusundharam; Kalimuthu, Gnanaprakash; Parameswari S, Angala; Vasanthi Srinivas, Thiruvengada Rajan; Karunakaran, Gauthaman

    2011-04-01

    The present study was made to investigate the protective effect of methanolic extract of Annona squamosa on isoniazid-rifampicin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Rats were divided into five different groups (n=6), group 1 served as a control, Group 2 received isoniazid (100 mg/kg, i.p.) and co-administered with rifampicin (100 mg/kg, i.p.), in sterile water, group 3 and 4 served as extract treatment groups and received 250 & 500 mg/kg bw, p.o methanolic extract of Annona squamosa and group 5 served as standard group and received silymarin 2.5 mg/kg bw, p.o. All the treatment protocols followed 21 days and after rats were sacrificed blood and liver were used for biochemical and histological studies, respectively. Administration of isoniazid and rifampicin caused a significant elevation in the levels of liver marker enzymes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, oxidative stress markers) in experimental rats. Administration of methanolic extracts of Annona squamosa significantly prevented isoniazid-rifampicin-induced elevation in the levels of serum diagnostic liver marker enzymes (alanine amino transferase (ALT), aspartate amino transferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma glutamate transpeptidase (γ-GT)), serum bilirubin, and TBARS level in experimental groups of rats. Moreover, total protein and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly increased in treatment group. The effect of extract was compared with a standard drug, silymarin. The changes in biochemical parameters were supported by histological profile. It is to be concluded that the methanolic extract of Annona squamosa protects against isoniazid and rifampicin-induced oxidative liver injury in rats.

  8. The role of Fc Receptors in HIV Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Austin W.; Brown, Eric; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, a wealth of experimental evidence has accumulated supporting the importance of Fc receptor (FcR) ligation in antibody-mediated pathology and protection in many disease states. Here we present the diverse evidence base that has accumulated as to the importance of antibody effector functions in the setting of HIV prevention and therapy, including clinical correlates, genetic associations, viral evasion strategies, and a rapidly growing number of compelling animal model experiments. Collectively, this work identifies antibody interactions with FcR as important to both therapeutic and prophylactic strategies involving both passive and active immunity. These findings mirror those in other fields as investigators continue to work toward identifying the right antibodies and the right effectors to be present at the right sites at the right time. PMID:26497529

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy for the prevention of restenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Delfaus, M.L.

    1997-12-01

    The potential application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the prevention of restenosis following angioplasty is under investigation at Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications. The process of Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty involves the insertion of a balloon dilation catheter into the occluded artery. The balloon is then inflated for several minutes to dilate the artery. The blockage is decreased, and blood flow through the artery is improved. This procedure is, initially, very successful. However, 30 to 60% of patients treated also show restenosis within 6 months. Although many physiological processes may contribute to restenosis, the primary mechanism is thought to be abnormal proliferation of the smooth muscle cells in the treated artery.

  10. Isoniazid hepatotoxicity with clinical and histopathology correlate.

    PubMed

    Gourishankar, Anand; Navarro, Fernando; Debroy, Ashish N; Smith, Kim C

    2014-01-01

    A fifteen-year-old girl was treated with isoniazid (INH) for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and subsequently developed epigastric pain, vomiting, and jaundice after three months of treatment. Acute fulminant hepatic failure was diagnosed. INH was stopped, and she received N-acetyl cysteine and Vitamin K. Liver biopsy showed moderate to severe lymphocytic and plasmacytic portal and lobular inflammation, prominent ductal proliferation, moderate cholestasis (predominantly hepatocellular and canalicular), hepatocellular damage, and stage 3 bridging fibrosis. She was treated with steroids and azathioprine for probable autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). She received six months of rifampicin treatment for LTBI. Liver biopsy two years later showed mild portal inflammation, predominantly lymphocytitic, mild portal fibrosis without bridging, irregular bile ducts without cholestasis, and no significant hepatocellular damage; overall the later biopsy demonstrated significant improvement. This case illustrates overlapping morphologic presentation in INH hepatotoxicity with hepatocellular injury and plasma cell infiltrate (due to probable AIH), as well as cholestatic features. Although her follow-up liver biopsy indicated lymphocytic inflammation, she is now asymptomatic with normal hepatic transaminases.

  11. Compliance with isoniazid prophylaxis in jail.

    PubMed

    Alcabes, P; Vossenas, P; Cohen, R; Braslow, C; Michaels, D; Zoloth, S

    1989-11-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis in New York City has risen dramatically in the last decade, an increase that has also been seen in the incarcerated population on Rikers Island, New York City's principal jail. We have investigated the establishment and maintenance of compliance with isoniazid prophylaxis in this population. Factors affecting compliance were studied in a sample of young men who were found to be tubercullin-reactive at the time of their incarceration. Compliance was quantified by determining the number of doses taken divided by the total number of available doses. Mean compliance for the 74 subjects was 37.5%. Two factors were important determinants of compliance: (1) the building where the inmate was incarcerated and (2) his knowledge of tuberculoses and the isoniazed regimen. The influence of the housing unit on compliance suggests that administrative responses to prison overcrowding, an increasingly prevalent condition in the nation's jails and prisons, may have an unintended and detrimental effect on medical care and public health.

  12. Zidovudine and isoniazid induced liver toxicity and oxidative stress: Evaluation of mitigating properties of silibinin.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ramanathan; Karthikeyan, Sivanesan

    2016-09-01

    HIV/AIDS patients are more prone for opportunistic TB infections and they are administered the combined regimen of anti-retroviral drug zidovudine (AZT) and isoniazid (INH) for therapy. However, AZT+INH treatment has been documented to induce injury and remedial measures to prevent this adversity are not clearly defined. Silibinin (SBN) is a natural hepatoprotective principle isolated from medicinal plant Silybum marianum and is currently used for therapy of various liver diseases. This study investigate the hepatotoxic potentials of AZT alone, INH alone and AZT+INH treatments and the mitigating potentials of SBN against these drugs induced toxic insults of liver in rats. Separate groups of rats (n=6 in each group) were administered AZT alone (50mg/kg b.w.), INH alone (25mg/kg, b.w.), AZT+INH (50mg/kg, b.w. and 25mg/kg, b.w.), SBN alone (100mg/kg, b.w.) and SBN+AZT+INH daily for sub-chronic period of 45days orally. The control rats received saline/propylene glycol. INH alone and AZT+INH-induced parenchymal cell injury and cholestasis of liver was evidenced by highly significant increase in the activities of marker enzymes (aspartate and alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, argino succinic acid lyase), bilirubin, protein, oxidative stress parameters (lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione, vitamins C and E) and membrane bound ATPases were evaluated in serum/liver tissue homogenates. Histopathological studies show ballooning degradation, inflammatory lesions, lipid deposition and hydropic changes in the liver tissue. All the above biochemical and pathological changes induced by AZT+INH treatments were mitigated in rats receiving SBN simultaneously with these hepatotoxins, indicating its hepatoprotective and antioxidant potentials against AZT+INH-induced hepatotoxicity. The moderate hepatoprotective and oxidant potentials of SBN could be due to its low bioavailability and this deficiency could be prevented by supplementation of

  13. Food allergy prevalence: new possibilities for therapy and prevention.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan

    2012-12-01

    Food allergy is an important clinical problem of increasing prevalence worldwide. Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic responses are the most widely recognized form of food allergy. The prevalence of food allergy is influenced by country, age, culture, and dietary habits. Strategies for the prevention of food allergy have been extensively studied. There is currently no standard treatment for food allergy and allergen-specific immunotherapy has been hindered by severe side effects in the past. A mutated recombinant major apple allergen is clinically hypoallergenic, which paves the way toward safer immunotherapy for the treatment of food-allergic patients.Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is one of the oldest medical practices in the world. A Chinese Food Allergy Herbal Formula-2 (FAHF-2) has been used as a therapy for food allergy patients. FAHF-2 was shown to be remarkably effective against food anaphylaxis in an animal model and in human clinical trial with the potential to be a long-lasting therapy.

  14. Interferon-gamma-release assay prevents unnecessary tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Schichter-Konfino, Vered; Halasz, Katalin; Grushko, Galia; Snir, Ayelet; Haj, Tharwat; Vadasz, Zahava; Kessel, Aharon; Potasman, Israel; Toubi, Elias

    2015-04-01

    The mass influx of immigrants from tuberculosis-endemic countries into Israel was followed by a considerable increase in the incidence of tuberculosis (TB). All contacts of active TB patients are obliged to be screened by tuberculin skin tests (TST) and, if found positive, prophylactic treatment is considered. To assess the utility of interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-release assay with a prolonged follow-up in preventing unnecessary anti-TB therapy in individuals with suspected false positive results. Between 2008 and 2012 the QuantiFERON TB gold-in-tube test (QFT-G) was performed in 278 sequential individuals who were mostly TST-positive and/or were in contact with an active TB patient. In all, whole blood was examined by the IFNγ-release assay. We correlated the TST diameter with the QFT-G assay and followed those patients with a negative assay. The QFT-G test was positive in only 72 (42%) of all 171 TST-positive individuals. There was no correlation between the diameter of TST and QFT-G positivity. Follow-up over 5 years was available in 128 (62%) of all QFT-G-negative individuals. All remained well and none developed active TB. A negative QFT-G test may obviate the need for anti-TB therapy in more than half of those with a positive TST.

  15. Photodynamic therapy for the prevention of restenosis after angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahara, Takayuki; Usui, Mikio; Amemiya, Takashi; Oike, Yasuhisa; Shiraishi, Hiromori; Miyagi, Manabu; Nakajima, Hitoshi; Kato, Tomitsugu; Naito, Yuichi; Ibukiyama, Chiharu

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether photodynamic therapy (PDT) can destroy the proliferating smooth muscle cells and therefore suppress the occurrence of restenosis after angioplasty. PDT following administration of hematoporphyrin derivatives (HpD) 24 hours before irradiation was performed on 30 rabbits immediately (0D), 3 days (3D), 1 week (1W) and 2 weeks (2W) after balloon injury. HpD accumulation of each group was investigated simultaneously. Irradiation of 27 J/10 mm2 from an Hg-Xe flash lamp light transmitted through an 800 micrometers quartz fiber with a diffusing tip was used. All rabbits were sacrificed 4 weeks after balloon injury. The results were expressed in terms of intima:media thickness ratio at the site of fiber contact (I/M) and intima:media area ratio of the cross section (IA/MA). Inhibition of intimal thickening evaluated on the basis of the I/M ratio was recognized in the 3D-, 1W-, and 2W-PDT group. The most effective photoradiation was at the 1W-PDT (I/M equals 0.78 +/- 0.67), but in 2W-PDT intimal necrosis resulting in a small amount of thickness was observed with less media necrosis. ThreeD and 0D PDT effects reduced with media necrosis. We conclude that PDT after angioplasty would be an ideal preventional therapy of restenosis.

  16. Reagent Precoated Targets for Rapid In-Tissue Derivatization of the Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Isoniazid Followed by MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manier, M. Lisa; Reyzer, Michelle L.; Goh, Anne; Dartois, Veronique; Via, Laura E.; Barry, Clifton E.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-08-01

    Isoniazid (INH) is an important component of front-line anti-tuberculosis therapy with good serum pharmacokinetics but unknown ability to penetrate tuberculous lesions. However, endogenous background interferences hinder our ability to directly analyze INH in tissues. Chemical derivatization has been successfully used to measure isoniazid directly from tissue samples using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). MALDI targets were pretreated with trans-cinnamaldehyde (CA) prior to mounting tissue slices. Isoniazid present in the tissues was efficiently derivatized and the INH-CA product measured by MS/MS. Precoating of MALDI targets allows the tissues to be directly thaw-mounted and derivatized, thus simplifying the preparation. A time-course series of tissues from tuberculosis infected/INH dosed animals were assayed and the MALDI MS/MS response correlates well with the amount of INH determined to be in the tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS/MS.

  17. Liver regeneration microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinoma for prevention and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanmin; Zhang, Lisheng

    2017-01-01

    Research on liver cancer prevention and treatment has mainly focused on the liver cancer cells themselves. Currently, liver cancers are no longer viewed as only collections of genetically altered cells but as aberrant organs with a plastic stroma, matrix, and vasculature. Improving the microenvironment of the liver to promote liver regeneration and repair by affecting immune function, inflammation and vasculature can regulate the dynamic imbalance between normal liver regeneration and repair and abnormal liver regeneration, thus improving the microenvironment of liver regeneration for the prevention and treatment of liver cancer. This review addresses the basic theory of the liver regeneration microenvironment, including the latest findings on immunity, inflammation and vasculature. Attention is given to the potential design of molecular targets in the microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In an effort to improve the liver regeneration microenvironment of HCC, researchers have extensively utilized the enhancement of immunity, anti-inflammation and the vasculature niche, which are discussed in detail in this review. In addition, the authors summarize the latest pro-fibrotic transition characteristics of the vascular niche and review potential cell therapies for liver disease. PMID:27655683

  18. Therapies for Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia associated with a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, with a prevalence of 44 million people throughout the world in 2015, and this figure is estimated to double by 2050. This disease is characterized by blood-brain barrier disruption, oxidative stress, mitochondrial impairment, neuroinflammation, and hypometabolism; it is related to amyloid-β peptide accumulation and tau hyperphosphorylation as well as a decrease in acetylcholine levels and a reduction of cerebral blood flow. Obesity is a major risk factor for AD, because it induces adipokine dysregulation, which consists of the release of the proinflammatory adipokines and decreased anti-inflammatory adipokines, among other processes. The pharmacological treatments for AD can be divided into two categories: symptomatic treatments such as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and etiology-based treatments such as secretase inhibitors, amyloid binders, and tau therapies. Strategies for prevention of AD through nonpharmacological treatments are associated with lifestyle interventions such as exercise, mental challenges, and socialization as well as caloric restriction and a healthy diet. AD is an important health issue on which all people should be informed so that prevention strategies that minimize the risk of its development may be implemented. PMID:27547756

  19. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for preventing Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Larry D; Avens, Faith E; Walf, Alicia A

    2017-09-15

    This review provides the rationale for implementing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There are known risk factors associated with the development of AD, some of which may be ameliorated with CBT. We posit that treating the risk factors of inactivity, poor diet, hyposmia and anosmia, sleep disorders and lack of regularly engaged challenging cognitive activity will modify the physiology of the brain sufficiently to avoid the accumulation of excess proteins, including amyloid beta, causal events in the development of AD. Further, the successful treatment of the listed risk factors is well within our technology to do so and, even further, it is cost effective. Also, there is considerable scientific literature to support the proposition that, if implemented by well-established practices, CBT will be effective and will be engaged by those of retirement age. That is, we present a biologically informed CBT for the prevention of the development of AD, i.e., an aspect of applied behavioral neuroscience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Preventing restenosis in atherosclerotic miniswine with photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiang, York N.; Crespo, M. T.; To, Eleanor C.; Sobeh, Mohammed S.; Greenwald, Stephen E.; Bower, Robert D.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the addition of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) using the photosensitizer Photofrin* (P*) following balloon angioplasty (BA) could prevent restenosis in an atherosclerotic animal model. Bilateral iliac atherosclerosis was created in 21 Yucatan miniswine. Six weeks later, P* 2.5 mg/kg was given IV 24 hours prior to BA (4 mm X 20 mm, 1 inflation). Following BA, swine were randomly allocated to receive PDT via a fiberoptic probe with laser energy or the same probe without laser energy. The fiberoptic probe had a 1 cm cylindrical diffusing tip and was passed co-axially through a custom catheter to ensure central location of the probe. A continuous wave argon ion-pumped dye laser tuned to 630 nm was used to provide a fluence of 100 J/cm2. Four weeks later, swine were sacrificed and vessels perfusion-fixed in-situ with glutaraldehyde and analyzed by ocular micrometry. Five occlusions occurred, all in the PDT + BA group. Percentage intimal thickness (mean +/- SD) was 51.0 +/- 29.5 in the BA group and 71.2 +/- 35.2 in the BA + PDT group (p equals 0.21). These results suggest that the addition of PDT following BA does not prevent restenosis.

  1. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: New Prospects for Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Elizabeth C.; Schleiss, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common congenital viral infection in the developed world, with an overall birth prevalence of approximately 0.6%. Approximately 10% of congenitally infected infants have signs and symptoms of disease at birth, and these symptomatic infants have a high risk for demonstration of subsequent neurologic sequelae, including sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), mental retardation, microcephaly, development delay, seizure disorders, and cerebral palsy. Antiviral therapy of children with symptomatic central nervous system (CNS) congenital CMV infection is effective at reducing the risk of long-term disabilities and should be offered to families with affected newborns. An effective pre-conceptual vaccine against CMV could, by preventing congenital infection, protect against long-term neurological sequelae and other disabilities. A variety of active and passive immunization strategies are in clinical trials and are likely to be licensed in the next few years. Until a vaccine is licensed, preventive strategies aimed at reducing transmission should be emphasized and public awareness increased, particularly among women of child-bearing age. PMID:23481104

  2. [Animal welfare in prevention and therapy of laminitis].

    PubMed

    Winkelsett, S; Vervuert, I

    2008-03-01

    Laminitis is a systemic disease which is manifested as a non infectious condition in the foot. The management of feeding and housing conditions is necessary to treat the endocrinological and metabolic disturbances of laminitic horses. The Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) is predisposing for developing laminitis, and it is characterised by obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. A genetical predisposition is supposed and EMS is accompanied by a lack of exercise and inadequate energy intake. Laboratory examinations are of great importance for diagnosis. Analyses of insulin, glucose and ACTH are of interest. Several approaches to treat laminitis are available, including pharmacological and orthopaedic strategies as well as the management of the feeding and housing conditions. However, the prophylaxis to prevent laminitis has to be emphasised. Predisposed horses should be detected and adequately treated; especially weight reduction in obese horses is in the focus of interest. Horses in the acute stage of laminitis have to be stabled. Furthermore redistributing weight from the most stressed wall is necessary to prevent pain and to minimise laminar damage and displacement of the distal phalanx. In cases of displacement of the distal phalanx a close communication between the veterinarian and the authorised farrier is necessary, in these cases treatment should be supported by x-ray diagnosis. Horses have to be treated with NSAISs to ensure a proper therapy to consider animal welfare. Horses have to be fed with hay and supplemented with minerals and vitamins. Feeding exclusively straw and feed restriction has to be avoided.

  3. Porcine Neonatal Coccidiosis: Evaluation of Monensin as Preventive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Doré, Monique; Morin, Michel

    1987-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of monensin as a preventive therapy for porcine neonatal coccidiosis. Fifteen three-day-old piglets were given 50,000 sporulated oocysts of Isospora suis and eight of them received 15 mg/kg of monensin orally every other day. Seven piglets served as normal controls. Fecal samples were collected and checked for oocyst shedding. At 18 days of age, piglets were euthanized and necropsied. The onset of clinical signs was delayed in the treated group, but all inoculated piglets displayed anorexia, soft stool, or diarrheic feces. Treated piglets shed large numbers of oocysts in their feces (up to 201,200 oocysts per gram of feces). All infected piglets had lesions of villous atrophy in the jejunum and most of them were in the late atrophic or villous regrowth stages. The results of this study suggest that monensin does not prevent clinical signs, oocyst shedding, and intestinal lesions caused by I. suis in neonatal piglets. PMID:17422909

  4. Isoniazid cocrystals with anti-oxidant hydroxy benzoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhadi, Syed Muddassir Ali; Yunus, Uzma; Bhatti, Moazzam Hussain; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2014-11-01

    Isoniazid is the primary constituent of “triple therapy” used to effectively treat tuberculosis. In tuberculosis and other diseases, tissue inflammation and free radical burst from macrophages results in oxidative stress. These free radicals cause pulmonary inflammation if not countered by anti-oxidants. Therefore, in the present study cocrystals of isoniazid with four anti-oxidant hydroxy benzoic acids have been reported. Gallic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid resulted in the formation of cocrystals when reacted with isoniazid. Cocrystal structure analysis confirmed the existence of pyridine-carboxylic acid synthon in the cocrystals of isoniazid with Gallic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid. While cocrystal of 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid formed the pyridine-hydroxy group synthon. Other synthons of different graph sets are formed between hydrazide group of isoniazid and coformers involving Nsbnd H⋯O and Osbnd H⋯N bonds. All the cocrystals were in 1:1 stoichiometric ratio.

  5. New Regimens to Prevent Tuberculosis in Adults with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Neil A.; Barnes, Grace L.; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Msandiwa, Reginah; Hausler, Harry; Ram, Malathi; McIntyre, James A.; Gray, Glenda E.; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Treatment of latent tuberculosis in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is efficacious, but few patients around the world receive such treatment. We evaluated three new regimens for latent tuberculosis that may be more potent and durable than standard isoniazid treatment. METHODS We randomly assigned South African adults with HIV infection and a positive tuberculin skin test who were not taking antiretroviral therapy to receive rifapentine (900 mg) plus isoniazid (900 mg) weekly for 12 weeks, rifampin (600 mg) plus isoniazid (900 mg) twice weekly for 12 weeks, isoniazid (300 mg) daily for up to 6 years (continuous isoniazid), or isoniazid (300 mg) daily for 6 months (control group). The primary end point was tuberculosis-free survival. RESULTS The 1148 patients had a median age of 30 years and a median CD4 cell count of 484 per cubic millimeter. Incidence rates of active tuberculosis or death were 3.1 per 100 person-years in the rifapentine–isoniazid group, 2.9 per 100 person-years in the rifampin–isoniazid group, and 2.7 per 100 person-years in the continuous-isoniazid group, as compared with 3.6 per 100 person-years in the control group (P>0.05 for all comparisons). Serious adverse reactions were more common in the continuous-isoniazid group (18.4 per 100 person-years) than in the other treatment groups (8.7 to 15.4 per 100 person-years). Two of 58 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3.4%) were found to have multidrug resistance. CONCLUSIONS On the basis of the expected rates of tuberculosis in this population of HIV-infected adults, all secondary prophylactic regimens were effective. Neither a 3-month course of intermittent rifapentine or rifampin with isoniazid nor continuous isoniazid was superior to 6 months of isoniazid. PMID:21732833

  6. Population Genetics Study of Isoniazid Resistance Mutations and Evolution of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis†

    PubMed Central

    Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Brimacombe, Michael; Bobadilla del Valle, Miriam; Cavatore, Magali; Guerrero, Marta Inírida; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Billman-Jacobe, Helen; Lavender, Caroline; Fyfe, Janet; García-García, Lourdes; León, Clara Inés; Bose, Mridula; Chaves, Fernando; Murray, Megan; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Cave, M. Donald; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Alland, David

    2006-01-01

    The molecular basis for isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is complex. Putative isoniazid resistance mutations have been identified in katG, ahpC, inhA, kasA, and ndh. However, small sample sizes and related potential biases in sample selection have precluded the development of statistically valid and significant population genetic analyses of clinical isoniazid resistance. We present the first large-scale analysis of 240 alleles previously associated with isoniazid resistance in a diverse set of 608 isoniazid-susceptible and 403 isoniazid-resistant clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. We detected 12 mutant alleles in isoniazid-susceptible isolates, suggesting that these alleles are not involved in isoniazid resistance. However, mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were strongly associated with isoniazid resistance, while kasA mutations were associated with isoniazid susceptibility. Remarkably, the distribution of isoniazid resistance-associated mutations was different in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates from that in multidrug-resistant isolates, with significantly fewer isoniazid resistance mutations in the isoniazid-monoresistant group. Mutations in katG315 were significantly more common in the multidrug-resistant isolates. Conversely, mutations in the inhA promoter were significantly more common in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates. We tested for interactions among mutations and resistance to different drugs. Mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were associated with rifampin resistance, but only katG315 mutations were associated with ethambutol resistance. There was also a significant inverse association between katG315 mutations and mutations in ahpC or inhA and between mutations in kasA and mutations in ahpC. Our results suggest that isoniazid resistance and the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains are complex dynamic processes that may be influenced by interactions between genes and drug-resistant phenotypes. PMID:16870753

  7. Isoniazid interaction with phosphatidylcholine-based membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Amanda Vicente; Marengo Trindade, Paulo; Marques, Sheylla; Brum, Tainá; Harte, Etienne; Rodrigues, Marieli Oliveira; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; da Silva, Pedro Almeida; Pohlmann, Adriana R.; Alves, Isabel Dantas; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues

    2013-11-01

    Interaction between the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid (INH) and phosphatidylcholine membranes was investigated in terms of: (i) drug affinity to a lipid bilayer and (ii) drug-induced changes in the dynamic properties of liposomes, such as membrane hydration state, polar head and non-polar acyl chain order and lipid phase transition behavior. These parameters were studied by plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy (PWR), UV-visible, horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. PWR measurements showed an INH membrane dissociation constant value of 0.031 μM to phosphatidylcholine bilayers. INH induced higher membrane perturbation in the plane which is perpendicular to the membrane plane. The INH saturation concentration in phosphatidylcholine liposomes was 170 μM. At this concentration, HATR-FTIR and NMR findings showed that INH may interact with the lipid polar head, increasing the number of hydrogen bonds in the phosphate region and enhancing the choline motional freedom. DSC measurements showed that, at 115 μM, INH was responsible for a decrease in lipid phase transition temperature of approximately 2 °C and had no influence in the lipid enthalpy variation (ΔH). However, at 170 μM, INH induced the reduction of the ΔH by approximately 52%, suggesting that the drug may increase the distance among lipid molecules and enhance the freedom of the lipid acyl chains methylene groups. This paper provides information on the effects of INH on membrane dynamics which is important to understand liposome targeting of the drug and for the development of anti-TB pharmacologic systems that not only are less susceptible to resistance but also have low toxicity.

  8. Thermodynamics of inclusion complexes between cyclodextrins and isoniazid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhova, I. V.; Kumeev, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    Complex formation of α- and β-cyclodextrins with isoniazid, a antituberculous pharmaceutical, is studied using such methods as calorimetry and 1H NMR at 298.15 K. On the basis of the obtained experimental data, it is shown that α- and β-cyclodextrins form 1 : 1 inclusion complexes with isoniazid, which are characterized by low stability in aqueous solution. Along with this, deeper penetration of isoniazid into the cavity of β-cyclodextrin, accompanied by more intensive dehydration of the reagents, is observed. The results are interpreted in terms of influence of structure of reagents and their state in solution on the binding mode, driving forces, and thermodynamic parameters of the complex formation.

  9. Prevention of hospital-acquired hyponatraemia: individualised fluid therapy.

    PubMed

    Lunøe, M; Overgaard-Steensen, C

    2015-09-01

    Large amounts of fluids are daily prescribed to hospitalised patients across different medical specialities. Unfortunately, inappropriate fluid administration commonly causes iatrogenic hyponatraemia with associated increase in morbidity and mortality. Fundamental for prevention of hospital-acquired hyponatraemia is an understanding of what determines plasma sodium concentration (P-[Na(+) ]) in the individual patient. P-[Na(+) ] is determined by balances of water and cations according to Edelman. This paper discusses the mechanisms influencing water and cation balances. In the hospitalised patient, non-osmotic antidiuretic hormone secretion is frequent and results in a reduced renal electrolyte-free water clearance (EFWC). This condition puts the patient at risk of hyponatraemia upon infusion of fluids that are hypotonic such as 5% glucose, Darrow-glucose, NaKglucose and 0.45% NaCl in 5% glucose. It is suggested that individualised fluid therapy includes the following: Firstly, bolus therapy with Ringer-acetate/Ringer-lactate/0.9% NaCl in the hypovolaemic patient to minimise the risk of fluid under-/overload. Secondly, P-[Na(+) ] should be monitored together with the balances influencing P-[Na(+) ]. This may include EFWC in patients at additional risk of hyponatraemia. In patients with potentially reduced intracranial compliance (e.g. meningitis, intracranial bleeding, cerebral contusion and brain oedema), even a small decrease in P-[Na(+) ] induced by slightly hypotonic fluids like Ringer-acetate/Ringer-lactate can increase the intracranial pressure dramatically. Consequently, 0.9 % NaCl is recommended as first-line fluid for such patients. The occurrence of hospital-acquired hyponatraemia may be reduced by prescribing fluids, type and amount, with the same dedication as shown for other drugs. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Treatment outcome of patients with isoniazid mono-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chien, J-Y; Chen, Y-T; Wu, S-G; Lee, J-J; Wang, J-Y; Yu, C-J

    2015-01-01

    Isoniazid mono-resistance is the most common first-line drug resistance in tuberculosis (TB), but its treatment outcome remains unclear. From January 2004 to October 2011, 425 (5.1%) of 8414 patients with culture-confirmed pulmonary TB from four hospitals in Taiwan were identified as having isoniazid mono-resistant TB. Among them, 395 (92.9%) were included and followed up for 2 years after complete treatment. Although 328 (83.0%) patients were successfully treated, 67 (17.0%) had unfavourable outcomes, including death in 56 (14.2%) and treatment failure in 11 (2.8%). The treatment success rate was similar in patients with high-level and low-level isoniazid-resistant TB (82.2% versus 83.4%, p 0.785) and among those taking anti-TB treatment with and without isoniazid (83.1% versus 83.0%, p 1.000). Patients without rifampicin interruption had lower risk of unfavourable outcome (14.3% versus 37.0%, p <0.001), especially those with low-level isoniazid resistance (11.5% versus 56.5%, p <0.001). Supplementation with a new-generation fluoroquinolone improved treatment success (60.0% versus 12.5%, p 0.003). The presence of cavitary lesions was significantly associated with a higher relapse rate (4.1% versus 0.0%, p 0.006) and extended treatment of 7-9, 10-12 and >12 months had less relapse than 6-month treatment (3.2%, 0%, 3.7% and 25.0%, respectively, p 0.037). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that co-morbidity with cancer (hazard ratio, 2.43) and rifampicin interruption (hazard ratio 1.91) were independent factors associated with unfavourable outcomes. Treatment throughout with rifampicin and extended treatment for cavitary disease are crucial for improving outcomes in patients with isoniazid mono-resistant TB.

  11. [Repetitive strain injury (RSI): occurrence, etiology, therapy and prevention].

    PubMed

    Bongers, P M; de Vet, H C W; Blatter, B M

    2002-10-19

    In the Netherlands, work related upper-limb disorders are called Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSI). RSI is not a diagnosis but a catch-all term for symptoms and signs located in the neck, upper back, shoulder, arm, elbow, hand, wrist and fingers. These symptoms may include pain, stiffness, tingling, clumsiness, loss of co-ordination, loss of strength, skin discoloration and temperature differences. Each year, 8% of working Dutch citizens take time off work due to RSI symptoms. Although the number of people claiming disability benefit due to RSI is limited, this figure has risen consecutively over the last three years. There is consensus that repetitive work at a high frequency and possibly accompanied by exertion of force is accompanied by RSI symptoms. There are indications of a relation between visual display unit use and these symptoms. However, these relations have not been established in a longitudinal study of adequate quality. High perceived job stress and a high workload are thought to be related to RSI, and women report more symptoms than men. There is insufficient information available on the role of different coping styles, perfectionism and dealing with symptoms. There is little information on the underlying mechanisms in the development of RSI, the diagnostics, therapy and prevention. In view of the lack of clear diagnostic criteria, suggestions have been made for a standardised description of the symptoms involved in the syndrome. A multidisciplinary treatment is likely to have the most effect. In terms of prevention, an integrated approach aimed at improving the working posture, reduction of static load and job stress and at individual factors is assumed to be the most effective.

  12. Inactivation of isoniazid by Canadian Eskimos and Indians

    PubMed Central

    Jeanes, C. W. L.; Schaefer, O.; Eidus, L.

    1972-01-01

    Phenotyping for isoniazid inactivation in Canadian Eskimos and Indians showed that the former are all fast acetylators, while only 63.4% of the Indians examined belonged to the same group. Further studies are suggested to confirm this initial finding. During the investigation metabolic studies were carried out to devise a reliable urine test for phenotyping of isoniazid inactivators, to replace the fall-off technique which required venipunctures. The simplicity of the new urine test makes it suitable for mass examinations. PMID:5061127

  13. Isoniazid Induced Lupus Presenting as Oral Mucosal Ulcers with Pancytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ankale, Padmaraj; Sinha, Kanishk; Iyer, Aparna; Jayalakshmi, T.K

    2016-01-01

    Drug Induced Lupus Erythematous (DILE) is a rare adverse reaction to a large variety of drugs including Isoniazid (INH), with features resembling idiopathic Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Diagnosis require identification of a temporal relationship between drug administered and symptom. It is an idiosyncratic reaction, with no pre-existing lupus. Our case highlights a rare presentation of isoniazid induced lupus with profound pancytopenia and mucosal ulcers, thus posing a diagnostic challenge. The patient was on multidrug treatment for pulmonary and knee joint tuberculosis. DILE was diagnosed on basis of strongly positive Anti Nuclear Antibodies (ANA), anti ds DNA and antihistone antibodies with clinical response to cessation of INH. PMID:27891378

  14. Role of medication therapy management in preexposure prophylaxis therapy for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Kelli W; Woodard, Laresa M; Woodard, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Patient medication adherence is a long-standing problem and is one that raises serious issues for patient health, public health, and health care quality. Medication nonadherence costs the US economy an estimated US$290 billion in avoidable medical spending every year. One of the most costly health conditions is HIV disease, which continues to be a serious health issue for parts of the world. About 34 million people are living with HIV around the world. With the emerging preventative treatment against HIV, known as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), come concerns surrounding the potential impact of nonadherence to this newly approved medication therapy. Nonadherence to antiretroviral treatments are commonly the root cause for patients not reaching their treatment goals, putting them at risk of progression and worsening of their disease and complications, such as increased risk of opportunistic infections. Therefore, it is essential to improve antiretroviral medication adherence. By identifying members who are nonadherent to their prescribed antiretroviral medications and working collaboratively with patients, physicians, and pharmacists, Medication Therapy Management (MTM) can potentially increase medication adherence by helping patients identify, resolve, and prevent issues that may affect their decision not to take a medication as intended.

  15. The Immune System in Cancer Prevention, Development and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Candeias, Serge M; Gaipl, Udo S

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the integrity of an organism. Besides the protection against pathogens, it is strongly involved in cancer prevention, development and defense. This review focuses on how the immune system protects against infections and trauma and on its role in cancer development and disease. Focus is set on the interactions of the innate and adaptive immune system and tumors. The role of IFN-γ as a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a very important role at the interface of innate and adaptive immune systems in tumor development and induction of anti-tumor immune responses is outlined. Further, immune cells as prognostic and predictive markers of cancer will be discussed. Data are provided that even the brain as immune privileged organ is subjected to immune surveillance and consequently also brain tumors. Immune therapeutic approaches for glioblastoma multiforme, the most frequent and malignant brain tumor, based on vaccination with dendritic cells are outlined and application of hyperthermia in form of magnetic nanoparticles is discussed. We conclude that the immune system and developing tumors are intimately intertwined. Anti-tumor immune responses can be prominently boosted by multimodal therapies aiming on the one hand to induce immunogenic tumor cell death forms and on the other hand to actively counteract the immune suppressive microenvironment based on the tumor itself.

  16. Nursing aspects of pressure sore prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Culley, F

    Pressure sores remain a significant problem in hospitals and domestic settings, affecting people of all ages, social class and race. Associated complications may be life threatening, e.g. sepsis and osteomyelitis. Other less dangerous, but nevertheless compromising outcomes such as pain, discomfort and low self-esteem and body image can cause personal suffering, and may add extra demand for limited resources. The exact state of pressure sore occurrence remains difficult to determine, particularly in the community. Recent trends in pressure area management present a multidisciplinary approach, eroding traditional perceptions of pressure sores as a solely nursing problem. Written from nursing perspective, this article summarizes principles of good practice relating to pressure sore prevention and therapy, emphasizing the importance of documenting observed events, rather than assumptions or opinions, and the need for healthcare professionals to approach problems and needs from a collaborative stance. Pressure sore risk assessment and classification are discussed, and an overview of nutrition, moving a handling, selecting support surfaces, principles of wound management, and skin care are considered.

  17. [Gender aspects of malnutrition and associated sequelae. Prevention and therapy].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, M; Hoppichler, F

    2013-08-01

    Malnutrition is related to a range of secondary complications. The prevalence of many of these sequelae is higher in elderly women than in men, thus resulting in a higher level of impairment and reduced quality of life. Multiple factors lead to the development of malnutrition and socioeconomic causes, such as poverty among the elderly and isolation, are more common in elderly women. The age-associated loss of muscle mass is more pronounced in women than in men and the risk of developing sarcopenia and frailty is increased. The prevalence of sarcopenic obesity is higher in women than in men. Malnutrition increases the risk of osteoporosis and about 80 % of all osteoporosis patients are women. Furthermore, low serum levels of vitamin D correlate more closely to a poorer cognitive outcome in elderly women than they do in men. The prevention, early diagnosis and therapy of malnutrition is of great clinical importance, particularly to preserve physical functional capacity and thus quality of life in elderly women.

  18. Alternative Therapies for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gan, Tong J.; Joseph, Nicholas; Uribe, Alberto; Pandya, Jyoti; Dalal, Rohan; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a complication affecting between 20 and 40% of all surgery patients, with high-risk patients experiencing rates of up to 80%. Recent studies and publications have shed light on the uses of alternative treatment for PONV through their modulation of endogenous opioid neuropeptides and neurokinin ligands. In addition to reducing PONV, hypnosis was reported to be useful in attenuating postoperative pain and anxiety, and contributing to hemodynamic stability. Music therapy has been utilized to deepen the sedation level and decrease patient anxiety, antiemetic and analgesic requirements, hospital length of stay, and fatigue. Isopropyl alcohol and peppermint oil aromatherapy have both been used to reduce postoperative nausea. With correct training in traditional Chinese healing techniques, acupuncture (APu) at the P6 acupoint has also been shown to be useful in preventing early PONV, postdischarge nausea and vomiting, and alleviating of pain. Electro-acupuncture (EAPu), as with APu, provided analgesic and antiemetic effects through release and modulation of opioid neuropeptides. These non-pharmacological modalities of treatment contribute to an overall patient wellbeing, assisting in physical and emotional healing. PMID:26734609

  19. Mitosis-targeting natural products for cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chinthalapally V; Kurkjian, Carla D; Yamada, Hiroshi Y

    2012-12-01

    Mitosis is a complex process resulting in division of a cell into two daughter cells, and its failure often results in the death of the daughter cells (via apoptotic, necrotic, or proliferative/senescent death). Many chemicals that inhibit the mitotic process (anti-mitotic drugs) have proven effective for killing cancer cells in vitro and in clinical settings. Among the most studied anti-mitotic drugs are plant-origin natural products including taxanes (e.g. paclitaxel, docetaxel) and vinca alkaloids (e.g. vincristine, vinblastine), whose validated target is the spindle microtubules. With the success of these agents, efforts have been made to develop other spindle poisons as well as to improve efficacy of existing spindle poisons with structural modifications. Novel drugs and natural products that inhibit other proteins involved in mitosis (nonmicrotubule targets) have been sought in hopes of expanding available cancer-directed therapies. Recently, significant advances have been made in the understanding of mitotic mechanisms in tumor cells as well as in normal epithelial cells. These advances help us to identify and develop potential natural agents for the prevention and treatment of cancer. This review will focus on natural products that target mitotic process and/or proteins involved in mitotic progression.

  20. Alternative Therapies for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting.

    PubMed

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gan, Tong J; Joseph, Nicholas; Uribe, Alberto; Pandya, Jyoti; Dalal, Rohan; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a complication affecting between 20 and 40% of all surgery patients, with high-risk patients experiencing rates of up to 80%. Recent studies and publications have shed light on the uses of alternative treatment for PONV through their modulation of endogenous opioid neuropeptides and neurokinin ligands. In addition to reducing PONV, hypnosis was reported to be useful in attenuating postoperative pain and anxiety, and contributing to hemodynamic stability. Music therapy has been utilized to deepen the sedation level and decrease patient anxiety, antiemetic and analgesic requirements, hospital length of stay, and fatigue. Isopropyl alcohol and peppermint oil aromatherapy have both been used to reduce postoperative nausea. With correct training in traditional Chinese healing techniques, acupuncture (APu) at the P6 acupoint has also been shown to be useful in preventing early PONV, postdischarge nausea and vomiting, and alleviating of pain. Electro-acupuncture (EAPu), as with APu, provided analgesic and antiemetic effects through release and modulation of opioid neuropeptides. These non-pharmacological modalities of treatment contribute to an overall patient wellbeing, assisting in physical and emotional healing.

  1. Hepatoprotective activity of chitosan against isoniazid and rifampicin-induced toxicity in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sethumadhavan; Sini, Theruvathil K; Anandan, Rangasamy; Mathew, Paruthapara T

    2007-10-15

    Tuberculosis is a dangerous disease and its death toll is increasing year by year. Intake of isoniazid and rifampicin, the most common antitubercular drugs, lead to fatal hepatotoxic condition. We have studied the protective effect of chitosan supplementation against the hepatotoxicity induced by antitubercular drugs with respect to the changes in the levels of protein, albumin-globulin ratio, urea and bilirubin in the serum and diagnostic marker enzymes (alanine amino transferase, aspartate amino transferase, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase), protein, glycoprotein conjugates (hexose, hexosamine and sialic acid), lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione in the liver tissue of normal and experimental groups of rats. Co-administration of chitosan was found to significantly prevent the antitubercular drugs-induced alterations in the levels of diagnostic marker enzymes, bilirubin and albumin/globulin ratio in experimental groups of rats. Isoniazid and rifampicin-induced lipid peroxidation was also found to be prevented by the administration of chitosan. Further, chitosan administration increased the levels of urea and protein (in serum and liver) in experimental groups compared to hepatotoxicity-induced group of rats. Levels of glycoconjugates were also maintained to near normal level by chitosan co-administration. From the results obtained, it can be concluded that chitosan is beneficial against antitubercualr drugs-induced hepatoxicity.

  2. Menopausal hormone therapy for the primary prevention of chronic conditions: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-01-01

    Update of the 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on hormone therapy for the prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women. The USPSTF commissioned a review of the literature to update evidence about the benefits and harms of using menopausal hormone therapy to prevent chronic conditions, as well as whether the benefits and harms of hormone therapy differ by population subgroups defined by age; the presence of comorbid medical conditions; and the type, dose, and method of hormonal delivery. This recommendation applies to postmenopausal women who are considering hormone therapy for the primary prevention of chronic medical conditions. It does not apply to women who are considering hormone therapy for the management of menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes or vaginal dryness. It also does not apply to women younger than 50 years who have had surgical menopause. The USPSTF recommends against the use of combined estrogen and progestin for the prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women. (Grade D recommendation).The USPSTF recommends against the use of estrogen for the prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women who have had a hysterectomy. (Grade D recommendation).

  3. Isoniazid Hair Concentrations in Children with Tuberculosis: A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Mave, Vidya; Chandanwale, Ajay; Kinikar, Aarti; Khadse, Sandhya; Kagal, Anju; Gupte, Nikhil; Suryavanshi, Nishi; Nimkar, Smita; Koli, Hari; Khwaja, Sultanat; Bharadwaj, Renu; Joshi, Samir; Horng, Howard; Benet, Leslie Z.; Ramachandran, Geetha; Dooley, Kelly E.; Gupta, Amita; Gandhi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Assessing treatment adherence and quantifying tuberculosis drug exposure among children is challenging. We undertook a “proof of concept” study to assess the drug concentrations of isoniazid in hair as a therapeutic drug monitoring tool. Children <12 years of age initiated on thrice-weekly treatment including isoniazid (10 mg/kg) for newly diagnosed tuberculosis were enrolled. Isoniazid concentrations in hair were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry at 1, 2, 4 and 6 months after tuberculosis treatment initiation. We found that isoniazid hair concentrations in all children on thrice weekly isoniazid were detectable and displayed variability across a dynamic range. PMID:27155191

  4. A programmed release multi-drug implant fabricated by three-dimensional printing technology for bone tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weigang; Zheng, Qixin; Guo, Xiaodong; Sun, Jianhua; Liu, Yudong

    2009-12-01

    In the world, bone tuberculosis is still very difficult to treat and presents a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we utilized 3D printing technology to fabricate a programmed release multi-drug implant for bone tuberculosis therapy. The construction of the drug implant was a multi-layered concentric cylinder divided into four layers from the center to the periphery. Isoniazid and rifampicin were distributed individually into the different layers in a specific sequence of isoniazid-rifampicin-isoniazid-rifampicin. The drug release assays in vitro and in vivo showed that isoniazid and rifampicin were released orderly from the outside to the center to form the multi-drug therapeutic alliance, and the peak concentrations of drugs were detected in sequence at 8 to 12 day intervals. In addition, no negative effect on the proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was detected during the cytocompatibility assay. Due to its ideal pharmacologic action and cytocompatibility, the programmed release multi-drug implant with a complex construction fabricated by 3D printing technology could be of interest in prevention and treatment of bone tuberculosis.

  5. Prevention of transmitted infections in a pet therapy program: An exemplar.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Pam; Brown, Janice; Wright, Mary Ellen

    2016-07-01

    The focus of the patient experience in health care delivery has afforded the opportunity to integrate pet therapy as a part of patient care. The purpose of this article is to present the implementation of a pet therapy program that includes guidelines for the prevention of transmitted infections. Consideration of infection prevention strategies has resulted in a 16-year program with no documented incidences of transmitted infections, averaging 20,000 pet therapy interactions per year.

  6. DNA Methyltransferases: A Novel Target for Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Thombre, Ravi; Dhar, Animesh; Anant, Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in US. Despite the emergence of new, targeted agents, and the use of various therapeutic combinations, none of the available treatment options are curative in patients with advanced cancer. Epigenetic alterations are increasingly recognized as valuable targets for the development of cancer therapies. DNA methylation at the 5-position of cytosine, catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), is the predominant epigenetic modification in mammals. DNMT1, the major enzyme responsible for maintenance of the DNA methylation pattern is located at the replication fork and methylates newly biosynthesized DNA. DNMT2 or TRDMT1, the smallest mammalian DNMT is believed to participate in the recognition of DNA damage, DNA recombination, and mutation repair. It is composed solely of the C-terminal domain, and does not possess the regulatory N-terminal region. The levels of DNMTs, especially those of DNMT3B, DNMT3A, and DNMT3L, are often increased in various cancer tissues and cell lines, which may partially account for the hypermethylation of promoter CpG-rich regions of tumor suppressor genes in a variety of malignancies. Moreover, it has been shown to function in self-renewal and maintenance of colon cancer stem cells and need to be studied in several cancers. Inhibition of DNMTs has demonstrated reduction in tumor formation in part through the increased expression of tumor suppressor genes. Hence, DNMTs can potentially be used as anti-cancer targets. Dietary phytochemicals also inhibit DNMTs and cancer stem cells; this represents a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of many cancers. PMID:24822169

  7. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Suicide Prevention (CBT-SP): Treatment Model, Feasibility, and Acceptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Barbara; Brown, Gregory; Brent, David A.; Wells, Karen; Poling, Kim; Curry, John; Kennard, Betsy D.; Wagner, Ann; Cwik, Mary F.; Klomek, Anat Brunstein; Goldstein, Tina; Vitiello, Benedetto; Barnett, Shannon; Daniel, Stephanie; Hughes, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the elements of a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP) and to report its feasibility in preventing the recurrence of suicidal behavior in adolescents who have recently attempted suicide. Method: The CBT-SP was developed using a risk reduction and relapse prevention approach and…

  8. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Suicide Prevention (CBT-SP): Treatment Model, Feasibility, and Acceptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Barbara; Brown, Gregory; Brent, David A.; Wells, Karen; Poling, Kim; Curry, John; Kennard, Betsy D.; Wagner, Ann; Cwik, Mary F.; Klomek, Anat Brunstein; Goldstein, Tina; Vitiello, Benedetto; Barnett, Shannon; Daniel, Stephanie; Hughes, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the elements of a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP) and to report its feasibility in preventing the recurrence of suicidal behavior in adolescents who have recently attempted suicide. Method: The CBT-SP was developed using a risk reduction and relapse prevention approach and…

  9. Broad targeting of angiogenesis for cancer prevention and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zongwei; Dabrosin, Charlotta; Yin, Xin; Fuster, Mark M.; Arreola, Alexandra; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Generali, Daniele; Nagaraju, Ganji P.; El-Rayes, Bassel; Ribatti, Domenico; Chen, Yi Charlie; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Nowsheen, Somaira; Amedei, Amedeo; Niccolai, Elena; Amin, Amr; Ashraf, S. Salman; Helferich, Bill; Yang, Xujuan; Guha, Gunjan; Bhakta, Dipita; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Aquilano, Katia; Chen, Sophie; Halicka, Dorota; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Azmi, Asfar S.; Bilsland, Alan; Keith, W. Nicol; Jensen, Lasse D.

    2015-01-01

    angiogenesis and the pathological tumor vasculature which would be well suited as targets for anti-angiogenic therapy: (1) endothelial cell migration/tip cell formation, (2) structural abnormalities of tumor vessels, (3) hypoxia, (4) lymphangiogenesis, (5) elevated interstitial fluid pressure, (6) poor perfusion, (7) disrupted circadian rhythms, (8) tumor promoting inflammation, (9) tumor promoting fibroblasts and (10) tumor cell metabolism/acidosis. Following this analysis, we scrutinized the available literature on broadly acting anti-angiogenic natural products, with a focus on finding qualitative information on phytochemicals which could inhibit these targets and came up with 10 prototypical phytochemical compounds: (1) oleanolic acid, (2) tripterine, (3) silibinin, (4) curcumin, (5) epigallocatechin-gallate, (6) kaempferol, (7) melatonin, (8) enterolactone, (9) withaferin A and (10) resveratrol. We suggest that these plant-derived compounds could be combined to constitute a broader acting and more effective inhibitory cocktail at doses that would not be likely to cause excessive toxicity. All the targets and phytochemical approaches were further cross-validated against their effects on other essential tumorigenic pathways (based on the “hallmarks” of cancer) in order to discover possible synergies or potentially harmful interactions, and were found to generally also have positive involvement in/effects on these other aspects of tumor biology. The aim is that this discussion could lead to the selection of combinations of such anti-angiogenic compounds which could be used in potent anti-tumor cocktails, for enhanced therapeutic efficacy, reduced toxicity and circumvention of single-agent anti-angiogenic resistance, as well as for possible use in primary or secondary cancer prevention strategies. PMID:25600295

  10. Broad targeting of angiogenesis for cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zongwei; Dabrosin, Charlotta; Yin, Xin; Fuster, Mark M; Arreola, Alexandra; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Generali, Daniele; Nagaraju, Ganji P; El-Rayes, Bassel; Ribatti, Domenico; Chen, Yi Charlie; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Nowsheen, Somaira; Amedei, Amedeo; Niccolai, Elena; Amin, Amr; Ashraf, S Salman; Helferich, Bill; Yang, Xujuan; Guha, Gunjan; Bhakta, Dipita; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Aquilano, Katia; Chen, Sophie; Halicka, Dorota; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Bilsland, Alan; Keith, W Nicol; Jensen, Lasse D

    2015-12-01

    pathological tumor vasculature which would be well suited as targets for anti-angiogenic therapy: (1) endothelial cell migration/tip cell formation, (2) structural abnormalities of tumor vessels, (3) hypoxia, (4) lymphangiogenesis, (5) elevated interstitial fluid pressure, (6) poor perfusion, (7) disrupted circadian rhythms, (8) tumor promoting inflammation, (9) tumor promoting fibroblasts and (10) tumor cell metabolism/acidosis. Following this analysis, we scrutinized the available literature on broadly acting anti-angiogenic natural products, with a focus on finding qualitative information on phytochemicals which could inhibit these targets and came up with 10 prototypical phytochemical compounds: (1) oleanolic acid, (2) tripterine, (3) silibinin, (4) curcumin, (5) epigallocatechin-gallate, (6) kaempferol, (7) melatonin, (8) enterolactone, (9) withaferin A and (10) resveratrol. We suggest that these plant-derived compounds could be combined to constitute a broader acting and more effective inhibitory cocktail at doses that would not be likely to cause excessive toxicity. All the targets and phytochemical approaches were further cross-validated against their effects on other essential tumorigenic pathways (based on the "hallmarks" of cancer) in order to discover possible synergies or potentially harmful interactions, and were found to generally also have positive involvement in/effects on these other aspects of tumor biology. The aim is that this discussion could lead to the selection of combinations of such anti-angiogenic compounds which could be used in potent anti-tumor cocktails, for enhanced therapeutic efficacy, reduced toxicity and circumvention of single-agent anti-angiogenic resistance, as well as for possible use in primary or secondary cancer prevention strategies. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Validation of microscopic observation drug susceptibility testing for rapid, direct rifampicin and isoniazid drug susceptibility testing in patients receiving tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Coronel, J; Roper, M H; Herrera, C; Bonilla, C; Jave, O; Gianella, C; Sabogal, I; Huancaré, V; Leo, E; Tyas, A; Mendoza-Ticona, A; Caviedes, L; Moore, D A J; Drancourt, M

    2014-01-01

    Drug susceptibility testing (DST) is often needed in patients clinically failing tuberculosis (TB) therapy. Most studies of phenotypic direct drug susceptibility tests, such as microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) tests, have been performed in patients not receiving TB treatment. The effect of ongoing TB treatment on the performance of MODS direct DST has not been previously explored, but patients failing such therapy constitute an important target group. The aim of this study was to determine the performance of MODS direct rifampicin and isoniazid DST in patients clinically failing first-line TB treatment, and to compare MODS direct DST with indirect proportion method DST. Sputa from 264 TB patients were cultured in parallel in Lowenstein–Jensen (LJ) and MODS assays; strains were tested for rifampicin and isoniazid susceptibility by the proportion method at the national reference laboratory. Ninety-three samples were culture-positive by LJ and MODS (concordance of 96%; kappa 0.92). With conventional MODS plate DST reading (performed on the same day as the sample is classified as culture-positive), the isoniazid DST concordance was 96.8% (kappa 0.89), and the concordance for rifampicin susceptibility testing was 92.6% (kappa 0.80). Reading of MODS DST plates 1 week after cultures had been determined to be culture-positive improved overall performance marginally—the isoniazid DST concordance was 95.7% (kappa 0.85); and the rifampicin DST concordance was 96.8% (kappa 0.91). Sensitivity for detection of multidrug-resistant TB was 95.8%. MODS testing provided reliable rifampicin and isoniazid DST results for samples obtained from patients receiving TB therapy. A modified DST reading schedule for such samples, with a final reading 1 week after a MODS culture turns positive, marginally improves the concordance with reference DST. PMID:24107197

  12. Validation of microscopic observation drug susceptibility testing for rapid, direct rifampicin and isoniazid drug susceptibility testing in patients receiving tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Coronel, J; Roper, M H; Herrera, C; Bonilla, C; Jave, O; Gianella, C; Sabogal, I; Huancaré, V; Leo, E; Tyas, A; Mendoza-Ticona, A; Caviedes, L; Moore, D A J

    2014-06-01

    Drug susceptibility testing (DST) is often needed in patients clinically failing tuberculosis (TB) therapy. Most studies of phenotypic direct drug susceptibility tests, such as microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) tests, have been performed in patients not receiving TB treatment. The effect of ongoing TB treatment on the performance of MODS direct DST has not been previously explored, but patients failing such therapy constitute an important target group. The aim of this study was to determine the performance of MODS direct rifampicin and isoniazid DST in patients clinically failing first-line TB treatment, and to compare MODS direct DST with indirect proportion method DST. Sputa from 264 TB patients were cultured in parallel in Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) and MODS assays; strains were tested for rifampicin and isoniazid susceptibility by the proportion method at the national reference laboratory. Ninety-three samples were culture-positive by LJ and MODS (concordance of 96%; kappa 0.92). With conventional MODS plate DST reading (performed on the same day as the sample is classified as culture-positive), the isoniazid DST concordance was 96.8% (kappa 0.89), and the concordance for rifampicin susceptibility testing was 92.6% (kappa 0.80). Reading of MODS DST plates 1 week after cultures had been determined to be culture-positive improved overall performance marginally-the isoniazid DST concordance was 95.7% (kappa 0.85); and the rifampicin DST concordance was 96.8% (kappa 0.91). Sensitivity for detection of multidrug-resistant TB was 95.8%. MODS testing provided reliable rifampicin and isoniazid DST results for samples obtained from patients receiving TB therapy. A modified DST reading schedule for such samples, with a final reading 1 week after a MODS culture turns positive, marginally improves the concordance with reference DST.

  13. Mechanisms of heteroresistance to isoniazid and rifampin of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Tashkent, Uzbekistan.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Thiel, S; van Ingen, J; Feldmann, K; Turaev, L; Uzakova, G T; Murmusaeva, G; van Soolingen, D; Hoffmann, H

    2009-02-01

    Heteroresistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is defined as the coexistence of susceptible and resistant organisms to anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs in the same patient. Heteroresistance of MTB is considered a preliminary stage to full resistance. To date, no mechanism causing heteroresistance of MTB has been proven. Clinical specimens and cultures from 35 TB patients from Tashkent, Uzbekistan, were analysed using the Genotype MTBDR assay (Hain Lifescience, Nehren, Germany), which is designed to detect genetic mutations associated with resistance to rifampin and isoniazid. Cases of heteroresistance were further subjected to genotyping using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat typing, spoligotyping and IS6110 fingerprinting. Heteroresistance to rifampin and/or isoniazid was found in seven cases (20%). In five of them, heteroresistance was caused by two different strains and in two by a single strain of the Beijing genotype. The latter cases had a history of relapse of their TB. For the first time, two different mechanisms of heteroresistance in tuberculosis have been proven using a stepwise molecular-biological approach: 1) superinfection with two different strains, which is of interest for clinical infection control practitioners; and 2) splitting of a single strain into susceptible and resistant organisms. The latter mechanism is most likely to be related to poor treatment quality and could serve as a quality marker for tuberculosis therapy programmes in the future.

  14. Differentiated thyroid cancer-personalized therapies to prevent overtreatment.

    PubMed

    Luster, Markus; Weber, Theresia; Verburg, Frederik A

    2014-09-01

    The concept of individualized therapy is rapidly gaining recognition in the management of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). This Review provides an overview of the most important elements of this paradigm shift in DTC management and discusses the implications for clinical practice. In the majority of patients with DTC who have an inherently good prognosis, the extent of surgery, the dosage of (131)I therapy and the use of levothyroxine therapy are all aspects suitable for individualization, on the basis of both the stage of disease and the response to treatment. In individuals with advanced disease, newer imaging techniques, advances in (131)I therapy and the use of targeted molecular therapies (such as multitargeted kinase inhibitors) have provided new options for the personalized care of patients, for whom until recently no effective therapies were available. Individualized therapies could reduce adverse effects, including the sometimes debilitating hypothyroidism that used to be required before initiation of (131)I treatment, and major salivary gland damage, a common and unpleasant side effect of (131)I therapy. Highly individualized interdisciplinary treatment of patients with DTC might lead to improved outcomes with reduced severity and frequency of complications and adverse effects. However, in spite of ongoing research, personalized therapies remain in their infancy.

  15. Treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasumasa; Sato, Yoshinori; Ozawa, Sun-ichiro; Ishigooka, Shinya; Yamashita, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the standard of care for the secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic stroke, especially after coronary intervention. However, this therapy is associated with bleeding complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding, which is one of the most common life-threatening complications. Early endoscopy is recommended for most patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. After successful endoscopic hemostasis, immediate resumption of antiplatelet therapy with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) is recommended to prevent further ischemic events. PPI prophylaxis during antiplatelet therapy reduces the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The potential negative metabolic interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel is still unclear. PMID:25685721

  16. Comparative effectiveness of preventative therapy for venous thromboembolism after coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Alexander; Rassen, Jeremy A; Myers, Jessica; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Gagne, Joshua; Polinski, Jennifer M; Liu, Jun; Fischer, Michael A; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2012-08-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal preventative therapy for venous thromboembolism (VTE) after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. We sought to compare the effectiveness and safety of the most commonly used regimens. We assembled a cohort of 92 699 patients who underwent CABG between 2004 and 2008, using the Premier database. Patients were categorized by method of VTE prevention initiated within 48 hours of surgery, including no preventative therapy (n=55 400), mechanical preventative therapy (n=21 162), subcutaneous unfractio--nated or low-molecular-weight heparin (n=10 718), subcutaneous fondaparinux (n=88), and concurrent mechanical-chemical therapy (n=5331). The incidence of VTE and major bleeding events within 6 weeks of CABG were compared, using multivariable and propensity score adjustment. The overall incidence of VTE for the entire cohort was 0.74%, and the incidence of major bleeding was 1.43%. VTE and bleeding events occurred with similar incidence in each of the patient categories (VTE: 0.70%, 0.79%, 0.81%, 1.14%, and 0.73%; major bleeding: 1.36%, 1.45%, 1.69%, 3.41%, 1.50%; no prevention, mechanical prevention, subcutaneous heparin, subcutaneous fondaparinux, concurrent mechanical-chemical prevention, respectively). Compared with receiving no prevention, the use of mechanical prevention or subcutaneous heparin did not significantly reduce the risk of VTE or change the risk of major bleeding (P=NS). Venous thromboembolism occurs infrequently after CABG. Compared with the use of no prevention, the administration of chemical or mechanical preventative therapies to CABG patients does not appreciably lower the risk of VTE. These data provide support for the common practice of administering no VTE preventative therapy after CABG, used for nearly 60% of patients within this cohort.

  17. Antiretroviral Therapy as HIV Prevention: Status and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Kartik K.

    2010-01-01

    As antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection has become increasingly accessible, attention has focused on whether these drugs can used for prevention because of increased tolerability of newer medications, decreased cost, and the limitations of other approaches. We review the status of antiretroviral HIV prevention, including chemoprophylaxis, as well as the effects of treatment of infected individuals on prevention. It is possible that the life-saving agents that have transformed the natural history of AIDS can be a critical component of HIV prevention efforts, but their ultimate role in affecting HIV transmission dynamics remains to be defined. PMID:20724682

  18. Predicting and preventing the cardiotoxicity of cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brent; Sawyer, Douglas B

    2008-08-01

    For the past 40 years, cardiovascular disease and malignant neoplasms have been the leading causes of death in the USA. As treatments for cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other chronic illnesses improve, we are seeing more complicated patients in our clinics. Cancer therapies such as anthracyclines and radiation therapy continue to pose a risk for delayed-onset cardiovascular disease, in spite of decades of research. It has been reported that the risk of congestive heart failure is the second most common, late, long-term disabling health condition among cancer survivors. Improved understanding of an individual's risk for cardiovascular complications of these therapies and earlier intervention for selected patients may help to improve the overall outcome for patients requiring these therapies. New therapies targeting oncogenes and the process of angiogenesis have 'off-target' effects regarding the cardiovascular system that remain poorly understood. Our knowledge and experience in the cardiovascular care of patients with cancer must continue to grow if we are to assure the best possible outcome for these people. The aim of this review is to highlight the risk of chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity among several of the most commonly used cancer therapies, various ways to screen for patients at highest risk of cardiotoxicity and management of cardiac complications of cancer therapy. We spend a disproportionate amount of space and time on the subject of anthracycline toxicity due to its often devastating nature, and its persistence as a clinical problem despite decades of use and research.

  19. Antibody Therapy Could Be an Effective Method for HIV-1 Prevention, Treatment | FNLCR

    Cancer.gov

    Four recent studies have given the scientific community a better understanding of how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) establishes and maintains itself in an infected individual and how antibody therapy may help prevent or fight the disease. Curren

  20. Antibody Therapy Could Be an Effective Method for HIV-1 Prevention, Treatment | FNLCR Staging

    Cancer.gov

    Four recent studies have given the scientific community a better understanding of how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) establishes and maintains itself in an infected individual and how antibody therapy may help prevent or fight the disease. Curren

  1. The efficacy of sucralfate suspension in the prevention of oral mucositis due to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; Wong, F.L.W. )

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of sucralfate suspension in prevention of oral mucositis and for reduction of oral pain in patients who develop mucositis during radiation therapy. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized prospective trial of a sucralfate suspension in the prevention and management of oral mucositis during radiation therapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using a quantitative scale and symptoms were assessed using visual analogue scales. The statistical model was developed to detect a 40% reduction in mucositis. No statistically significant reduction in mucositis was seen. Early during radiation therapy less oral pain was reported in the sucralfate group, but as treatment progressed all patients experienced pain. Patients in the sucralfate group were prescribed topical and systemic analgesics later in the course of radiation therapy. Prophylactic oral rinsing with sucralfate did not prevent oral ulcerative mucositis. Sucralfate may reduce the experience of pain during radiation therapy. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. [The role of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the prevention and adjuvant therapy of certain infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Halmy, C; Halmy, L

    1998-09-27

    Authors call attention to the role of lactic acid bacteria in the prevention and adjuvant therapy of certain infective diseases. It has special importance in the prevention and adjuvant therapy of new-born and childhood enteritis, different urogenital inflammations and antibiotic associated diarrhoea. Administration of lactic acid bacteria create eubiosis between the human organism and the world of bacteria, that is, eubacteriosis is developed instead of a pathogen flora, assuring normal physiologic functions for the well-being of the organism.

  3. Benefits and Risks of Antiretroviral Therapy for Perinatal HIV Prevention.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Mary G; Qin, Min; Fiscus, Susan A; Currier, Judith S; Flynn, Patricia M; Chipato, Tsungai; McIntyre, James; Gnanashanmugam, Devasena; Siberry, George K; Coletti, Anne S; Taha, Taha E; Klingman, Karin L; Martinson, Francis E; Owor, Maxensia; Violari, Avy; Moodley, Dhayendre; Theron, Gerhard B; Bhosale, Ramesh; Bobat, Raziya; Chi, Benjamin H; Strehlau, Renate; Mlay, Pendo; Loftis, Amy J; Browning, Renee; Fenton, Terence; Purdue, Lynette; Basar, Michael; Shapiro, David E; Mofenson, Lynne M

    2016-11-03

    Background Randomized-trial data on the risks and benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) as compared with zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine to prevent transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in HIV-infected pregnant women with high CD4 counts are lacking. Methods We randomly assigned HIV-infected women at 14 or more weeks of gestation with CD4 counts of at least 350 cells per cubic millimeter to zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine plus a 1-to-2-week postpartum "tail" of tenofovir and emtricitabine (zidovudine alone); zidovudine, lamivudine, and lopinavir-ritonavir (zidovudine-based ART); or tenofovir, emtricitabine, and lopinavir-ritonavir (tenofovir-based ART). The primary outcomes were HIV transmission at 1 week of age in the infant and maternal and infant safety. Results The median CD4 count was 530 cells per cubic millimeter among 3490 primarily black African HIV-infected women enrolled at a median of 26 weeks of gestation (interquartile range, 21 to 30). The rate of transmission was significantly lower with ART than with zidovudine alone (0.5% in the combined ART groups vs. 1.8%; difference, -1.3 percentage points; repeated confidence interval, -2.1 to -0.4). However, the rate of maternal grade 2 to 4 adverse events was significantly higher with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (21.1% vs. 17.3%, P=0.008), and the rate of grade 2 to 4 abnormal blood chemical values was higher with tenofovir-based ART than with zidovudine alone (2.9% vs. 0.8%, P=0.03). Adverse events did not differ significantly between the ART groups (P>0.99). A birth weight of less than 2500 g was more frequent with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (23.0% vs. 12.0%, P<0.001) and was more frequent with tenofovir-based ART than with zidovudine alone (16.9% vs. 8.9%, P=0.004); preterm delivery before 37 weeks was more frequent with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (20.5% vs. 13.1%, P<0.001). Tenofovir-based ART was associated

  4. Benefits and Risks of Antiretroviral Therapy for Perinatal HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, M.G.; Qin, M.; Fiscus, S.A.; Currier, J.S.; Flynn, P.M.; Chipato, T.; McIntyre, J.; Gnanashanmugam, D.; Siberry, G.K.; Coletti, A.S.; Taha, T.E.; Klingman, K.L.; Martinson, F.E.; Owor, M.; Violari, A.; Moodley, D.; Theron, G.B.; Bhosale, R.; Bobat, R.; Chi, B.H.; Strehlau, R.; Mlay, P.; Loftis, A.J.; Browning, R.; Fenton, T.; Purdue, L.; Basar, M.; Shapiro, D.E.; Mofenson, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Randomized-trial data on the risks and benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) as compared with zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine to prevent transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in HIV-infected pregnant women with high CD4 counts are lacking. METHODS We randomly assigned HIV-infected women at 14 or more weeks of gestation with CD4 counts of at least 350 cells per cubic millimeter to zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine plus a 1-to-2-week postpartum “tail” of tenofovir and emtricitabine (zidovudine alone); zidovudine, lamivudine, and lopinavir–ritonavir (zidovudine-based ART); or tenofovir, emtricitabine, and lopinavir–ritonavir (tenofovir-based ART). The primary outcomes were HIV transmission at 1 week of age in the infant and maternal and infant safety. RESULTS The median CD4 count was 530 cells per cubic millimeter among 3490 primarily black African HIV-infected women enrolled at a median of 26 weeks of gestation (interquartile range, 21 to 30). The rate of transmission was significantly lower with ART than with zidovudine alone (0.5% in the combined ART groups vs. 1.8%; difference, −1.3 percentage points; repeated confidence interval, −2.1 to −0.4). However, the rate of maternal grade 2 to 4 adverse events was significantly higher with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (21.1% vs. 17.3%, P=0.008), and the rate of grade 2 to 4 abnormal blood chemical values was higher with tenofovir-based ART than with zidovudine alone (2.9% vs. 0.8%, P=0.03). Adverse events did not differ significantly between the ART groups (P>0.99). A birth weight of less than 2500 g was more frequent with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (23.0% vs. 12.0%, P<0.001) and was more frequent with tenofovir-based ART than with zidovudine alone (16.9% vs. 8.9%, P=0.004); preterm delivery before 37 weeks was more frequent with zidovudine-based ART than with zidovudine alone (20.5% vs. 13.1%, P<0.001). Tenofovir-based ART was

  5. Liver disorders in patients receiving chlorpromazine or isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Derby, L E; Gutthann, S P; Jick, H; Dean, A D

    1993-01-01

    Based on information derived from computers and clinical records obtained from general practitioners in the United Kingdom, we estimated the frequency of liver toxicity associated with two known hepatotoxins, chlorpromazine and isoniazid. Among the cohort of 10,502 users of chlorpromazine, 14 had illnesses compatible with drug-induced liver disease, a frequency of 1.3/1000 users (95% Cl 0.8, 2.2). Four presumed cases of the disorder occurred among 921 users of isoniazid, for a frequency of 4/1000 users (95% Cl 1.7, 11.1). This study provides population-based quantification of the frequency of liver disorders associated with the use of these two agents.

  6. Understanding and Prevention of “Therapy-” Induced Dyskinesias

    PubMed Central

    Aviles-Olmos, Iciar; Kefalopoulou, Zinovia; Foltynie, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    L-dopa is the most effective, currently available treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), but it leads to the development of involuntary movements known as L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in the majority of patients after long-term use. Both gene and cell therapy approaches are the subject of multiple ongoing studies as potential ways of relieving symptoms of PD without the complication of dyskinesia. However, the spectre of dyskinesia in the absence of L-dopa, the so-called “off-phase” or graft-induced dyskinesia (GID), remains a major obstacle particularly in the further development of cell therapy in PD, but it is also a concern for proponents of gene therapy approaches. LID results from nonphysiological dopamine release, supersensitivity of dopamine receptors, and consequent abnormal signalling through mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Restoration of physiological circuitry within the basal ganglia loops is ultimately the aim of all cell and gene therapy approaches but each using distinctive strategies and accompanied by risks of exacerbation of LID or development of “off-phase”/GID. In this paper we discuss the details of what is understood regarding the development of dyskinesias with relevance to cell and gene therapy and potential strategies to minimize their occurrence. PMID:22685687

  7. HIV-1 Coinfection Does Not Reduce Exposure to Rifampin, Isoniazid, and Pyrazinamide in South African Tuberculosis Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Meintjes, Graeme; Chirehwa, Maxwell; Wiesner, Lubbe; McIlleron, Helen; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    There are contrasting data in the literature about antituberculosis plasma drug concentrations in HIV-1-coinfected patients. We report the pharmacokinetics of rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide in a cohort of patients being treated for active tuberculosis, the majority of whom were coinfected with HIV-1 and had commenced antiretroviral therapy within 2 months of starting antituberculosis treatment. We also examined the association between antituberculosis drug concentrations and reported drug side effects at the 2-month clinical review. One hundred patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (65% coinfected with HIV-1) were intensively sampled to determine rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide plasma concentrations after 7 to 8 weeks of a daily quadruple-therapy regimen dosed according to World Health Organization (WHO) weight bands. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for each patient by using nonlinear mixed-effects models. HIV-1-coinfected patients had lower clearance rates for rifampin (21% decrease) and isoniazid (23% decrease) than HIV-1-uninfected patients, with resulting higher areas under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24) and maximum concentrations of drug in serum (Cmax). Antiretroviral therapy (ART) that included double-standard-dose lopinavir/ritonavir further lowered rifampin clearance, by 46%, and increased the AUC0–24. The current uniform dosing (per kilogram of body weight) across WHO weight bands was associated with a trend of decreased pharmacokinetic exposures for the lowest weight band. Use of fat-free mass as opposed to total body weight for allometric scaling of clearance significantly improved the model. Ambulant HIV-1-coinfected patients, the majority of whom were coprescribed ART, did not have reduced antituberculosis drug concentrations compared to HIV-1-uninfected patients. PMID:27480859

  8. Time dependence of risks and benefits in pediatric primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, Elizabeth S; Triedman, John K; Cecchin, Frank; Mah, Doug Y; Abrams, Dominic J; Walsh, Edward P; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Alexander, Mark E

    2014-12-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) used to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in children not only provide appropriate therapy in 25% of patients but also result in a significant incidence of inappropriate shocks and other device complications. ICDs placed for secondary prevention have higher rates of appropriate therapy than those placed for primary prevention. Pediatric patients with primary prevention ICDs were studied to determine time-dependent incidence of appropriate use and adverse events. A total of 140 patients aged <21 years (median age, 15 years) at first ICD implantation at Boston Children's Hospital (2000-2009) in whom devices were placed for primary prevention were retrospectively identified. Demographics and times to first appropriate shock; adverse events (including inappropriate shock, lead failure, reintervention, and complication); generator replacement and follow-up were noted. During mean follow-up of 4 years, appropriate shock occurred in 19% patients and first adverse event (excluding death/transplant) occurred in 36%. Risk of death or transplant was ≈1% per year and was not related to receiving appropriate therapy. Conditional survival analysis showed rates of appropriate therapy and adverse events decrease soon after implantation, but adverse events are more frequent than appropriate therapy throughout follow-up. Primary prevention ICDs were associated with appropriate therapy in 19% and adverse event in 36% in this cohort. The incidence of both first appropriate therapy and device-related adverse events decreased during longer periods of follow-up after implantation. This suggests that indications for continued device therapy in pediatric primary prevention ICD patients might be reconsidered after a period of nonuse. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Relapse in Pediatric Responders to Pharmacotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jones, Jessica M.; Tao, Rongrong; Stewart, Sunita M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2008-01-01

    The outcome of a sequential treatment strategy that included cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the prevention of major depressive disorder relapse among 46 youths is examined. Results show that youths under the antidepressant medication management plus relapse prevention CBT treatment was at lower risk for relapse than those under the…

  10. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Relapse in Pediatric Responders to Pharmacotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jones, Jessica M.; Tao, Rongrong; Stewart, Sunita M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2008-01-01

    The outcome of a sequential treatment strategy that included cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the prevention of major depressive disorder relapse among 46 youths is examined. Results show that youths under the antidepressant medication management plus relapse prevention CBT treatment was at lower risk for relapse than those under the…

  11. Lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid presenting as exfoliative dermatitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thakur, B K; Verma, S; Mishra, J

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients are at increased risk of drug reactions because of immune dysregulation and multiple drug intake. Lichenoid drug reactions to isoniazid have been reported previously in the literature. However, for lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid to be so extensive to present as exfoliative dermatitis is rare. We report here a rare case of lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid presenting as exfoliative dermatitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

  12. In vitro postantibiotic effects of rifapentine, isoniazid, and moxifloxacin against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chiu-Yeung; Au-Yeang, Carrie; Yew, Wing-Wai; Leung, Chi-Chiu; Cheng, Augustine F B

    2004-01-01

    Postantibiotic effects (PAEs) of rifapentine, isoniazid, and moxifloxacin against Mycobacterium tuberculosis ATCC 27294 were studied using a radiometric culture system. Rifapentine at 20 mg/liter gave the longest PAE (104 h) among the drugs used alone. The combinations of rifapentine plus isoniazid, rifapentine plus moxifloxacin, and isoniazid plus moxifloxacin gave PAEs of 136.5, 59.0, and 8.3 h, respectively.

  13. In Vitro Postantibiotic Effects of Rifapentine, Isoniazid, and Moxifloxacin against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chiu-Yeung; Au-Yeang, Carrie; Yew, Wing-Wai; Leung, Chi-Chiu; Cheng, Augustine F. B.

    2004-01-01

    Postantibiotic effects (PAEs) of rifapentine, isoniazid, and moxifloxacin against Mycobacterium tuberculosis ATCC 27294 were studied using a radiometric culture system. Rifapentine at 20 mg/liter gave the longest PAE (104 h) among the drugs used alone. The combinations of rifapentine plus isoniazid, rifapentine plus moxifloxacin, and isoniazid plus moxifloxacin gave PAEs of 136.5, 59.0, and 8.3 h, respectively. PMID:14693563

  14. Ultrastructural characteristics of type A epithelioid cells during BCG-granulomatosis and treatment with lysosomotropic isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Shkurupii, V A; Kozyaev, M A; Nadeev, A P

    2006-04-01

    We studied BCG-granulomas, their cellular composition, and ultrastructure of type A epithelioid cells in the liver of male BALB/c mice with spontaneous granulomatous inflammation. The animals received free isoniazid or isoniazid conjugated with lysosomotropic intracellularly prolonged matrix (dialdehyde dextran, molecular weight 65-75 kDa). Lysosomotropic isoniazid was accumulated in the vacuolar apparatus of epithelioid cells and produced a stimulatory effect on plastic processes in these cells.

  15. Coresistance to Isoniazid and Ethionamide Maps to Mycothiol Biosynthetic Genes in Mycobacterium bovis▿

    PubMed Central

    Vilchèze, Catherine; Av-Gay, Yossef; Barnes, S. Whitney; Larsen, Michelle H.; Walker, John R.; Glynne, Richard J.; Jacobs, William R.

    2011-01-01

    A search to identify new mechanisms of isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium bovis led to the isolation of mutants defective in mycothiol biosynthesis due to mutations in genes coding for the glycosyltransferase (mshA) or the cysteine ligase (mshC). These mutants showed low-level resistance to isoniazid but were highly resistant to ethionamide. This study further illustrates that mutations in mycothiol biosynthesis genes may contribute to isoniazid or ethionamide resistance across mycobacterial species. PMID:21709101

  16. Determination of hydrazine metabolites of isoniazid in human urine by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Timbrell, J A; Wright, J M; Smith, C M

    1977-08-01

    A method is described for the determination of isoniazid, acetylisoniazid, acetylhydrazine, diacetylhydrazine and hydrazine in urine. Isoniazid, acetylhydrazine and hydrazine are reacted in aqueous solution with p-chlorobenzaldehyde to form hydrazones. Following the addition of appropriate internal standards, these hydrazones are then extracted into an organic solvent and determined by gas chromatography using a nitrogen-sensitive detector. Acetylisoniazid and diacetylhydrazine are determined similarly after hydrolysis to isoniazid and acetylhydrazine, respectively.

  17. The Wilderness Therapy Prevention Program: A Prevention Model for At-Risk Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Meghan

    2008-01-01

    Wilderness Therapy Programs have recently become a formal alternative treatment for adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders (Hinkle, 1999; Russell & Hendee, 1999; Russell, Hendee, & Phillips-Miller, 2000; Russell, 2003a, 2003b). Adolescent populations are unique in that traditional forms of psychotherapy, including "talk-therapies,"…

  18. The Wilderness Therapy Prevention Program: A Prevention Model for At-Risk Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Meghan

    2008-01-01

    Wilderness Therapy Programs have recently become a formal alternative treatment for adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders (Hinkle, 1999; Russell & Hendee, 1999; Russell, Hendee, & Phillips-Miller, 2000; Russell, 2003a, 2003b). Adolescent populations are unique in that traditional forms of psychotherapy, including "talk-therapies,"…

  19. Developing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Depressive Relapse in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jarrett, Robin B.; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    Relapse rates for children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) range from 30% to 40% within 1 to 2 years after acute treatment. Although relapse rates are high, there have been relatively few studies on the prevention of relapse in youth. While acute phase pharmacotherapy has been shown to reduce symptoms rapidly in depressed…

  20. Developing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Depressive Relapse in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jarrett, Robin B.; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    Relapse rates for children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) range from 30% to 40% within 1 to 2 years after acute treatment. Although relapse rates are high, there have been relatively few studies on the prevention of relapse in youth. While acute phase pharmacotherapy has been shown to reduce symptoms rapidly in depressed…

  1. Molecular detection of rifampin and isoniazid resistance to guide chronic TB patient management in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Paolo; Saleri, Nuccia; Dembelé, Mathurin; Ouedraogo, Martial; Badoum, Gisèle; Pinsi, Gabriele; Migliori, Giovanni B; Matteelli, Alberto; Cirillo, Daniela M

    2009-08-28

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is considered a real threat to the achievement of TB control. Testing of mycobacterial culture and testing of drug susceptibility (DST) capacity are limited in resource-poor countries, therefore inadequate treatment may occur, favouring resistance development. We evaluated the molecular assay GenoType MTBDRplus (Hain Lifescience, Germany) in order to detect DR-TB directly in clinical specimens as a means of providing a more accurate management of chronic TB patients in Burkina Faso, a country with a high TB-HIV co-infection prevalence. Samples were collected in Burkina Faso where culture and DST are not currently available, and where chronic cases are therefore classified and treated based on clinical evaluation and sputum-smear microscopy results. One hundred and eight chronic TB patients (sputum smear-positive, after completing a re-treatment regimen for pulmonary TB under directly observed therapy) were enrolled in the study from December 2006 to October 2008. Two early morning sputum samples were collected from each patient, immediately frozen, and shipped to Italy in dry ice. Samples were decontaminated, processed for smear microscopy and DNA extraction. Culture was attempted on MGIT960 (Becton Dickinson, Cockeysville, USA) and decontaminated specimens were analyzed for the presence of mutations conferring resistance to rifampin and isoniazid by the molecular assay GenoType MTBDRplus. We obtained a valid molecular test result in 60/61 smear-positive and 47/47 smear-negative patients. Among 108 chronic TB cases we identified patients who (i) harboured rifampin- and isoniazid-susceptible strains (n 24), (ii) were negative for MTB complex DNA (n 24), and (iii) had non-tuberculous mycobacteria infections (n 13). The most represented mutation conferring rifampin-resistance was the D516V substitution in the hotspot region of the rpoB gene (43.8% of cases). Other mutations recognized were the H526D (15.6%), the H526Y (15.6%), and

  2. [Antiretroviral therapy: useful from prevention to HIV treatment].

    PubMed

    Tshikung, Olivier Nawej; Calmy, Alexandra

    2016-01-13

    In 2015, the publication of important studies allowed the development of new guidelines, notably by WHO and the European AIDS ClinicalSociety (EACS), for HIV preventive treatment (pre-exposure prophylaxis), as well as for the start of antiretroviral treatment. The START and TEMPRANO studies have extended the treatment to all HIV-infected patients, irrespective of the level of immunosuppression and therefore the CD4 count. In addition, innovative screening methods, such as self-tests, are now available in all French pharmacies since 15 September 2015. The latest developments in 2015 concerning the prevention, screening, and treatment of HIV are discussed in this article and will certainly have an impact on the care of patients in Switzerland.

  3. [Non-withdrawal-related delirium : Evidence on prevention and therapy].

    PubMed

    Haussmann, R; Bauer, M; Donix, M

    2016-05-01

    Delirium is a severe and common yet under-diagnosed disorder in the clinical routine. Multiple factors may contribute to the development of delirium, which is associated with increased mortality and high healthcare costs. Treatment of delirium is often provided with delay and limited to pharmacological interventions. This article summarizes the key symptoms for delirium as well as risk factors and highlights the pharmacological and non-pharmacological options for treatment and prevention.

  4. Green Tea in Prevention and Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Epidemiological studies, though inconclusive suggest that drinking green tea may lower the risk of prostate cancer (CaP) in humans. Here we report...that polyphenols present in green tea especially its major constituent (-) epigallocatechin- 3-gallate (EGCG) possesses both cancer preventive and...polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea at a human achievable dose (equivalent to six cups of green tea per day) significantly inhibited CaP

  5. Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Comparison of Preventative Therapies.

    PubMed

    Honicker, Theresa; Holt, Karyn

    2016-01-01

    Contrast medium is used daily for diagnostic and interventional procdures as a means to visualize blood vessels. The administration of contrast dye, however, can lead to an acute reduction in kidney function. This complication can impact length of hospital stay, risk of dialysis, and increased hospital mortality. Common preventative measures include N-acetylcysteine and intravenous hydration. The evidence reviewed revealed hydration to be the more effective treatment to reduce the risk of acute kidney injury.

  6. Isoniazid metal complex reactivity and insights for a novel anti-tuberculosis drug design.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Eduardo Henrique Silva; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes S; Diógenes, Izaura Cirino Nogueira; Longhinotti, Elisane; Lopes, Luiz Gonzaga de França; Moreira, Icaro de Sousa

    2012-02-01

    For over a decade, tuberculosis (TB) has been the leading cause of death among infectious diseases. Since the 1950s, isoniazid has been used as a front-line drug in the treatment of TB; however, resistant TB strains have limited its use. The major route of isoniazid resistance relies on KatG enzyme disruption, which does not promote an electron transfer reaction. Here, we investigated the reactivity of isoniazid metal complexes as prototypes for novel self-activating metallodrugs against TB with the aim to overcome resistance. Reactivity studies were conducted with hydrogen peroxide, hexacyanoferrate(III), and aquopentacyanoferrate(III). The latter species showed a preference for the inner-sphere electron transfer reaction pathway. Additionally, electron transfer reaction performed with either free isoniazid or (isoniazid)pentacyanoferrate(II) complex resulted in similar oxidized isoniazid derivatives as observed when the KatG enzyme was used. However, upon metal coordination, a significant enhancement in the formation of isonicotinic acid was observed compared with that of isonicotinamide. These results suggest that the pathway of a carbonyl-centered radical might be favored upon coordination to the Fe(II) owing to the π-back-bonding effect promoted by this metal center; therefore, the isoniazid metal complex could serve as a potential metallodrug. Enzymatic inhibition assays conducted with InhA showed that the cyanoferrate moiety is not the major player involved in this inhibition but the presence of isoniazid is required in this process. Other isoniazid metal complexes, [Ru(CN)(5)(izd)](3-) and [Ru(NH(3))(5)(izd)](2+) (where izd is isoniazid), were also unable to inhibit InhA, supporting our proposed self-activating mechanism of action. We propose that isoniazid reactivity can be rationally modulated by metal coordination chemistry, leading to the development of novel anti-TB metallodrugs.

  7. Antiemetic Therapy With or Without Olanzapine in Preventing Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients With Cancer Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies antiemetic therapy with olanzapine to see how well they work compared to antiemetic therapy alone in preventing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with cancer receiving highly emetogenic (causes vomiting) chemotherapy. Antiemetic drugs, such as palonosetron hydrochloride, ondansetron, and granisetron hydrochloride, may help lessen or prevent nausea and vomiting in patients treated with chemotherapy. |

  8. Antioxidants and coronary artery disease: from pathophysiology to preventive therapy.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Jane A

    2015-03-01

    Oxidant stress in the cardiovascular system may occur when antioxidant capacity is insufficient to reduce reactive oxygen species and other free radicals. Oxidant stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and incident coronary artery disease. As a result of this connection, early observational studies focused on dietary antioxidants, such as β-carotene, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between intake of these antioxidants and major adverse cardiovascular events. These findings supported a number of randomized trials on the use of selected antioxidants as primary or secondary prevention strategies to decrease cardiac risk; however, many of these studies reported disappointing results with little or no observed risk reduction in antioxidant-treated patients. Several plausible explanations for these findings have been suggested, including incorrect antioxidant choice or dose, synthetic versus dietary antioxidants as the intervention, and patient selection, all of which will be important to consider when designing future clinical trials. This review will focus on the contemporary evidence that is the basis for our current understanding of the role of antioxidants in cardiovascular disease prevention.

  9. [Drama therapy for the prevention of workplace violence].

    PubMed

    Hermoso Lloret, Diana; Cervantes Ortega, Genís; Blanch, Josep Maria; Ochoa Pacheco, Paola

    2012-01-01

    To achieve, through a training and preventive intervention, a significant change in the emotional experience of a group of health care professionals at risk of exposure to workplace violence. 143 Catalonian health professionals participated in a training course on occupational risk prevention that incorporated theatrical staging techniques and psychotherapeutic strategies, focused on the interpretation of emotional experiences associated with violence in the workplace. They participated voluntarily in the program and were selectedaccording to type of healthcare delivered and professional diversity. A pre- and post-course questionnaire was administered. Ninety-two percent of respondents claimed to have witnessed, and 85% had personally experienced, a violent episode in the previous five years. The comparison of mean scores before and after the training intervention revealed anincrease in the positive assessment of the effectiveness of one's own performance and communication skills (p< 0.001), and induced emotional experiences in line with a greater peace of mind (p< 0.005) and less anxiety (p< 0.005) with respect to the violent incident. Staging experiential stressful situations can be a useful learning tool for managing emotions, which increases the perceived degree of one's ability to manage communication, teamwork and professional stress itself. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Seguretat i Medicina del Treball.

  10. Antioxidants and Coronary Artery Disease: From Pathophysiology to Preventive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidant stress in the cardiovascular system may occur when antioxidant capacity is insufficient to reduce reactive oxygen species and other free radicals. Oxidant stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and incident coronary artery disease. As a result of this connection, early observational studies focused on dietary antioxidants, such as β-carotene, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between intake of these antioxidants and major adverse cardiovascular events. These findings supported a number of randomized trials of selected antioxidants as primary and secondary prevention to decrease cardiac risk; however, many of these studies reported disappointing results with little or no observed risk reduction in antioxidant treated patients. Several plausible explanations for these findings have been suggested, including incorrect antioxidant choice or dose, synthetic versus dietary antioxidant as the intervention, and patient selection, all of which will be important to consider when designing future clinical trials. This review will focus on the contemporary evidence that is the basis for our current understanding of the role of antioxidants in cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:25369999

  11. BRCA1 as target for breast cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Romagnolo, Alberto P G; Romagnolo, Donato F; Selmin, Ornella I

    2015-01-01

    The Breast Cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) is a tumor suppressor involved in basic cellular functions necessary for cell replication and DNA synthesis, but reduced expression of BRCA1, due to mutations or epigenetic inactivation, leads to impaired mammary gland differentiation and increased risk of breast cancer development. Although BRCA1 acts as a tumor suppressor and is present in all cells, where it is essential for the maintenance of the genome integrity, it is still not clear why mutations in the BRCA1 gene predispose to breast and ovarian, but not to other types of cancer. In the first part of this review, we briefly discuss the function and regulation of the BRCA1 protein, including its role associated with familial and sporadic breast cancer. The second part is an overview of the therapeutic compounds used for breast cancer treatment targeting BRCA1, and the natural food components that hold potential preventive effect against those types of breast cancer in which BRCA1 expression is either reduced or lacking. Further studies elucidating the interactions between dietary compounds and cellular pathways, involved in regulation of BRCA1expression, are necessary for the development of strategies that may successfully prevent or treat breast cancer.

  12. Barriers to preventive therapy for breast and other major cancers and strategies to improve uptake

    PubMed Central

    DeCensi, Andrea; Thorat, Mangesh A; Bonanni, Bernardo; Smith, Samuel G; Cuzick, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The global cancer burden continues to rise and the war on cancer can only be won if improvements in treatment go hand in hand with therapeutic cancer prevention. Despite the availability of several efficacious agents, utilisation of preventive therapy has been poor due to various barriers, such as the lack of physician and patient awareness, fear of side effects, and licensing and indemnity issues. In this review, we discuss these barriers in detail and propose strategies to overcome them. These strategies include improving physician awareness and countering prejudices by highlighting the important differences between preventive therapy and cancer treatment. The importance of the agent–biomarker–cohort (ABC) paradigm to improve effectiveness of preventive therapy cannot be overemphasised. Future research to improve therapeutic cancer prevention needs to include improvements in the prediction of benefits and harms, and improvements in the safety profile of existing agents by experimentation with dose. We also highlight the role of drug repurposing for providing new agents as well as to address the current imbalance between therapeutic and preventive research. In order to move the field of therapeutic cancer prevention forwards, engagement with policymakers to correct research imbalance as well as to remove practical obstacles to implementation is also urgently needed. PMID:26635899

  13. Anithrombotic prevention in vascular disease: bases for a new strategy in antithrombotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Raul

    2007-01-01

    A tendency toward bleeding often undercuts the beneficial preventive effect of higher doses of a single antithrombotic drug or combined antithrombotic therapy. Although high doses of antithrombotic drugs may be necessary for optimal prevention, such therapy can also elicit more frequent bleeding. Although major bleeding could be a reversible event is likely to lead clinicians to discontinue antithrombotic therapy which in turn could increase the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death. Thus, to prevent thrombotic events without frequent bleeding complications, the preferred approach might be to use anti-inflammatory drugs in addition to the first-line antithrombotic drugs to reduce inflammation and thrombin formation in atheroma. Although some preliminary data have been already published, to confirm the potential benefit of anti-inflammatory drugs in acute coronary syndromes large prospective double-bind randomized trials are necessary. PMID:17727726

  14. Late-onset sepsis in preterm infants: update on strategies for therapy and prevention.

    PubMed

    Pammi, Mohan; Weisman, Leonard E

    2015-04-01

    Late-onset sepsis occurs in 15-25% of very low birth weight neonates. Early diagnosis and therapy optimize patient outcomes. Despite these efforts, mortality remains high (18-36%) and survivors suffer significant neurological and pulmonary morbidity. Although rapid diagnostics are improving, more are needed. Current therapy remains antibiotics and supportive care. Adjunctive therapies have either limited data (e.g., pentoxifylline) or have been found ineffective (e.g., granulocyte transfusions, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor/granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and intravenous immunoglobulin). Preventive strategies that have proven beneficial include infection control measures (e.g., hand hygiene and universal precautions), early enteral feeds with human milk, early removal of central lines, catheter infection prevention bundles, antibiotic stewardship and focused quality improvement measures. Promising strategies to prevent late-onset sepsis include oral lactoferrin, and pathogen-specific monoclonal antibodies but more evidence is required to make practice recommendations.

  15. A virtual simulator designed for collision prevention in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hyunuk; Kum, Oyeon; Han, Youngyih Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Jin Sung; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, collisions between the patient and nozzle potentially occur because of the large nozzle structure and efforts to minimize the air gap. Thus, software was developed to predict such collisions between the nozzle and patient using treatment virtual simulation. Methods: Three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a gantry inner-floor, nozzle, and robotic-couch was performed using SolidWorks based on the manufacturer’s machine data. To obtain patient body information, a 3D-scanner was utilized right before CT scanning. Using the acquired images, a 3D-image of the patient’s body contour was reconstructed. The accuracy of the image was confirmed against the CT image of a humanoid phantom. The machine components and the virtual patient were combined on the treatment-room coordinate system, resulting in a virtual simulator. The simulator simulated the motion of its components such as rotation and translation of the gantry, nozzle, and couch in real scale. A collision, if any, was examined both in static and dynamic modes. The static mode assessed collisions only at fixed positions of the machine’s components, while the dynamic mode operated any time a component was in motion. A collision was identified if any voxels of two components, e.g., the nozzle and the patient or couch, overlapped when calculating volume locations. The event and collision point were visualized, and collision volumes were reported. Results: All components were successfully assembled, and the motions were accurately controlled. The 3D-shape of the phantom agreed with CT images within a deviation of 2 mm. Collision situations were simulated within minutes, and the results were displayed and reported. Conclusions: The developed software will be useful in improving patient safety and clinical efficiency of proton therapy.

  16. A virtual simulator designed for collision prevention in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyunuk; Kum, Oyeon; Han, Youngyih; Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Jin Sung; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-10-01

    In proton therapy, collisions between the patient and nozzle potentially occur because of the large nozzle structure and efforts to minimize the air gap. Thus, software was developed to predict such collisions between the nozzle and patient using treatment virtual simulation. Three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a gantry inner-floor, nozzle, and robotic-couch was performed using SolidWorks based on the manufacturer's machine data. To obtain patient body information, a 3D-scanner was utilized right before CT scanning. Using the acquired images, a 3D-image of the patient's body contour was reconstructed. The accuracy of the image was confirmed against the CT image of a humanoid phantom. The machine components and the virtual patient were combined on the treatment-room coordinate system, resulting in a virtual simulator. The simulator simulated the motion of its components such as rotation and translation of the gantry, nozzle, and couch in real scale. A collision, if any, was examined both in static and dynamic modes. The static mode assessed collisions only at fixed positions of the machine's components, while the dynamic mode operated any time a component was in motion. A collision was identified if any voxels of two components, e.g., the nozzle and the patient or couch, overlapped when calculating volume locations. The event and collision point were visualized, and collision volumes were reported. All components were successfully assembled, and the motions were accurately controlled. The 3D-shape of the phantom agreed with CT images within a deviation of 2 mm. Collision situations were simulated within minutes, and the results were displayed and reported. The developed software will be useful in improving patient safety and clinical efficiency of proton therapy.

  17. FEMALE SEX AND DISCONTINUATION OF ISONIAZID DUE TO ADVERSE EFFECTS DURING THE TREATMENT OF LATENT TUBERCULOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, April C.; Bethel, James; Hirsch-Moverman, Yael; Colson, Paul W.; Sterling, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives To determine the rate of and risk factors for discontinuation of isoniazid due to adverse effects during the treatment of latent tuberculosis infection in a large, multi-site study. Methods The Tuberculosis Epidemiologic Studies Consortium (TBESC) conducted a prospective study from March 2007–September 2008 among adults initiating isoniazid for treatment of LTBI at 12 sites in the US and Canada. The relative risk for isoniazid discontinuation due to adverse effects was determined using negative binomial regression. Adjusted models were constructed using forward stepwise regression. Results Of 1,306 persons initiating isoniazid, 617 (47.2%, 95% CI 44.5–50.0%) completed treatment and 196 (15.0%, 95% CI 13.1–17.1%) discontinued due to adverse effects. In multivariable analysis, female sex (RR 1.67, 95% CI 1.32–2.10, p<0.001) and current alcohol use (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.13–1.77, p=0.003) were independently associated with isoniazid discontinuation due to adverse effects. Conclusions The rate of discontinuation of isoniazid due to adverse effects was substantially higher than reported earlier. Women were at increased risk of discontinuing isoniazid due to adverse effects; close monitoring of women for adverse effects may be warranted. Current alcohol use was also associated with isoniazid discontinuation; counseling patients to abstain from alcohol could decrease discontinuation due to adverse effects. PMID:23845828

  18. Isoniazid-induced seizures with secondary rhabdomyolysis and associated acute renal failure in a dog.

    PubMed

    Haburjak, J J; Spangler, W L

    2002-04-01

    Isoniazid-induced seizures resulted in rhabdomyolysis and associated acute renal tubular necrosis in a dog. Rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuric renal failure, although recognised in the dog, are reported infrequently as a consequence of seizures. The clinical presentation of isoniazid toxicity in a dog is described.

  19. Chlorhexidine, fluoride varnish, and xylitol chewing gum: underutilized preventive therapies?

    PubMed

    Anusavice, K J

    1998-01-01

    The successful implementation of a preventive dentistry program depends, to a large extent, on the compliance of the patient. The scheduled program would include: recall appointments, all instructions relative to oral hygiene, use of nightly fluoride rinses, and control of diet. To ensure that high-risk patients who have cariogenic bacteria are adequately treated, chlorhexidine rinses may be required on a periodic basis. The patient's level of risk must determine all treatment decisions. For low-risk patients, the times between recall appointments can be extended when evidence of caries arrest and remineralization can be documented. High-risk patients should be recalled at least every three months, until evidence of lesion arrest and/or remineralization has been documented. For patients with extremely low saliva flow rates, the combined chlorhexidine and fluoride method may be required. If the caries risk is still judged to be high according to bacteria counts and/or evidence of further lesion development or progression, more frequent applications of chlorhexidine may be required. Because fluoride varnish is generally more effective on smooth surfaces than on fissure sites, moderate caries-risk patients should receive fluoride varnish on smooth surfaces, and sealants, when indicated, on fissure sites. As the caries risk of the patient is reduced to a low-risk level, less frequent use of fluoride-containing or fluoride releasing products is indicated, and there can be longer periods between recall examinations. Three applications of fluoride varnish, applied to a single week, appear to provide greater caries protection than two applications per year. Attempts should be made to ensure that the varnish is applied immediately after cleaning the teeth and protected as long as possible after the varnish has been applied (preferably at least 10 hours). Fluoride varnish appears to be as effective as topical fluoride gel and may be safer. Thus, a greater frequently of

  20. Metformin: On Ongoing Journey across Diabetes, Cancer Therapy and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pulito, Claudio; Sanli, Toran; Rana, Punam; Muti, Paola; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metabolism is the focus of intense research, which witnesses its key role in human tumors. Diabetic patients treated with metformin exhibit a reduced incidence of cancer and cancer-related mortality. This highlights the possibility that the tackling of metabolic alterations might also hold promising value for treating cancer patients. Here, we review the emerging role of metformin as a paradigmatic example of an old drug used worldwide to treat patients with type II diabetes which to date is gaining strong in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities to be included in clinical trials. Metformin is also becoming the focus of intense basic and clinical research on chemoprevention, thus suggesting that metabolic alteration is an early lesion along cancer transformation. Metabolic reprogramming might be a very efficient prevention strategy with a profound impact on public health worldwide. PMID:24958265

  1. Antiplatelet therapies for secondary stroke prevention: an update on clinical and cost–effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Rothlisberger, Julia M; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Stroke exacts a huge toll physically, mentally and economically. Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of secondary stroke prevention, and proven drugs available to successfully realize this therapeutic strategy for the long term include aspirin, dipyridamole plus aspirin and clopidogrel. However, government agencies, corporations, health plans and patients desire more information about the clinical- and cost–effectiveness of these established therapies in real-world settings. This paper provides an update on evidence-based secondary stroke prevention with antiplatelet medications, discusses cost-related issues and offers perspective about the future. PMID:26274799

  2. Antiplatelet therapies for secondary stroke prevention: an update on clinical and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Rothlisberger, Julia M; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-08-01

    Stroke exacts a huge toll physically, mentally and economically. Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of secondary stroke prevention, and proven drugs available to successfully realize this therapeutic strategy for the long term include aspirin, dipyridamole plus aspirin and clopidogrel. However, government agencies, corporations, health plans and patients desire more information about the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of these established therapies in real-world settings. This paper provides an update on evidence-based secondary stroke prevention with antiplatelet medications, discusses cost-related issues and offers perspective about the future.

  3. Aspirin therapy and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Younis, Naveed; Williams, Steve; Soran, Handrean

    2009-11-01

    The benefits of aspirin therapy in reducing the subsequent risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and death is well documented in individuals with cardiovascular disease including those with diabetes mellitus (DM). The evidence for aspirin use in primary prevention of cardiovascular events in DM is debatable and meta-analyses do not suggest a proven benefit. Despite the lack of evidence, low-dose aspirin therapy has been recommended by many current diabetes guidelines. This article reviews the results of two recently published large randomized clinical trials that have looked at primary prevention of cardiovascular events using aspirin in patients with DM.

  4. The convergence of cancer prevention and therapy in early-phase clinical drug development.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzese, James L; Lippman, Scott M

    2004-10-01

    After decades of separate but not equal drug development, prevention and therapy are beginning to converge at the level of early-phase clinical testing. This highly beneficial convergence is due to spectacular molecular advances in our understanding of neoplasia (both cancer and precancer), cancer risk and prognosis, and the mechanisms by which novel drugs with less toxicity and more cytostatic activity profiles target specific molecular events to suppress malignant and premalignant cells. The future full convergence of prevention-therapy drug development (aided by technological advances, such as in molecular imaging) promises to hasten the progress of oncology in reducing the public health impact of the major cancers.

  5. Experimental and theoretical NMR determination of isoniazid and sodium p-sulfonatocalix[n]arenes inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    de Assis, João V; Teixeira, Milena G; Soares, Cássia G P; Lopes, Juliana F; Carvalho, Guilherme S L; Lourenço, Maria C S; de Almeida, Mauro V; de Almeida, Wagner B; Fernandes, Sergio A

    2012-10-09

    In this work the inclusion complex formation of isoniazid with sodium p-sulfonatocalix[n]arenes is reported aiming to improve the physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties of isoniazid a first line antibuberculosis drug. The architectures of the complexes were proposed according to NMR data Job plot indicating details on the insertion of the isoniazid in the calix[n]arenes cavities. DFT theoretical NMR calculations were also performed for sodium p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene complex with isoniazid, with various modes of complexation being considered, to provide support for the experimental proposal. A comparison between experimental and theoretical ¹H NMR chemical shifts profiles allowed for the inclusion complex characterization confirming the isoniazid inclusion mode which is preferentially through the hydrazide moiety. The remarkable agreement between experimental and theoretical NMR profiles adds support to their use in the structural characterization of inclusion compounds. Antibacterial activity was evaluated and the results indicated the inclusion complexes as a potential strategy for tuberculosis treatment.

  6. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy effectively prevented diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ling; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Yin, Tsung-Cheng; Huang, Tien-Hung; Yuen, Chun-Man; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Tong, Meng-Shen; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Lin, Kun-Chen; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2015-01-01

    Background: We tested the hypothesis that extracorporeal shock wave (ECSW) therapy can effectively protect sciatic nerve (SN) from diabetes mellitus (DM)-induced neuropathy in leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice. Methods and results: Eighteen-week C57BL/6 mice (n=8) served as age-matched controls (group 1) and ob/ob mice (n=16) were categorized into DM (group 2) and DM + ECSW (0.12 mJ/mm2 for 4 times of 200 impulses at 3-week intervals) (group 3). The animals were sacrificed two weeks post-ECSW. In vitro results showed that the protein expressions of oxidative stress (NOX-1, NOX-2, oxidized protein), inflammation (MMP-9, TNF-α, iNOS), apoptosis (Bax, cleaved caspase-3, & PARP), and DNA-damage marker (γ-H2AX) were significantly higher in RT4-D6P2T (schwannoma cell line) treated by menadione (25 µM) compared with control group and were significantly reversed after ECSW (0.12 mJ/mm2, 200 impulses) (all p<0.001). mRNA expressions of inflammation (MMP-9, TNF-α, iNOS), oxidative stress (NOX-1, NOX-2) and apoptosis (Bax, caspase-3) in SN were significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1 and were significantly reversed in group 3, whereas the mRNA expressions of anti-oxidants (HO-1, NQO1) progressively increased from group 1 to group 3 (all p<0.001). Cellular expressions of F4/80+, CD14+, γ-H2AX+ cells, and number of vacuolar formation in SN showed a pattern identical to that of inflammation markers among all groups (all p<0.001). Microscopic findings of Schwann cells and myelin-sheath scores, and number of eNOS+ cells in SN showed a reversed pattern compared to that of inflammation among all groups (all p<0.001). Conclusions: ECSW therapy protected SN against DM-induced neuropathy. PMID:26885256

  7. Incretin-Based Therapy for Prevention of Diabetic Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic vascular complications are the most common cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with numbers of affected individuals steadily increasing. Diabetic vascular complications can be divided into two categories: macrovascular andmicrovascular complications. Macrovascular complications include coronary artery diseaseand cerebrovascular disease, while microvascular complications include retinopathy and chronic kidney disease. These complications result from metabolic abnormalities, including hyperglycemia, elevated levels of free fatty acids, and insulin resistance. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to mediate the adverse effects of these metabolic disorders on vascular tissues, including stimulation of protein kinase C signaling and activation of the polyol pathway by oxidative stress and inflammation. Additionally, the loss of tissue-specific insulin signaling induced by hyperglycemia and toxic metabolites can induce cellular dysfunction and both macro- and microvascular complications characteristic of diabetes. Despite these insights, few therapeutic methods are available for the management of diabetic complications. Recently, incretin-based therapeutic agents, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, have been reported to elicit vasotropic actions, suggesting a potential for effecting an actual reduction in diabetic vascular complications. The present review will summarize the relationship between multiple adverse biological mechanisms in diabetes and putative incretin-based therapeutic interventions intended to prevent diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26881236

  8. Prevention is the Best Therapy: The Geneticist's Approach.

    PubMed

    Altarescu, Gheona

    2016-06-01

    Abstract During the last two decades prenatal genetic screening and diagnosis has become the cornerstone of medical care for family planning to prevent genetic disease. Carrier screening programs for genetic disorders that are prevalent in various populations identify couples and pregnancies at risk of having an affected child. These couples can proceed with a choice of invasive prenatal diagnosis tests of the fetus (chorionic villous sampling and amniocentesis), or non-invasive prenatal testing of free fetal DNA circulation in the maternal blood which has emerged within the last few years and is currently available for fetal sexing for X Linked disorders. Despite the advances in prenatal diagnosis, couples found to have a fetus affected with a genetic disorder may need to face the dilemma of pregnancy termination. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an alternative to preempt risk of having a child affected with a life-altering genetic disorder. This technique allows biopsy and genetic diagnosis of embryos obtained from in vitro fertilization by analysis of the genetic material from one or a few embryonic cells. Only unaffected embryos are returned to the mother to establish the pregnancy. We present our experience using PGD for four Lysosomal storage disorders: Tay Sachs, Gaucher type 1, Hunter and Fabry disease with some of the couples being carriers of more than one genetic disorder. PGD is applicable to most disorders for which the gene and the familial mutation are known and should be presented to couples as an alternative to invasive prenatal testing.

  9. Luteolin, a flavonoid with potentials for cancer prevention and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yong; Shi, Ranxin; Wang, Xia; Shen, Han-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Luteolin, 3′,4′,5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone, is a common flavonoid that exists in many types of plants including fruits, vegetables, and medicinal herbs. Plants rich in luteolin have been used in Chinese traditional medicine for treating various diseases such as hypertension, inflammatory disorders, and cancer. Having multiple biological effects such as anti-inflammation, anti-allergy and anticancer, luteolin functions as either an antioxidant or a pro-oxidant biochemically. The biological effects of luteolin could be functionally related to each other. For instance, the anti-inflammatory activity may be linked to its anticancer property. Luteolin's anticancer property is associated with the induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of cell proliferation, metastasis and angiogenesis. Furthermore, luteolin sensitizes cancer cells to therapeutic-induced cytotoxicity through suppressing cell survival pathways such as phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), and stimulating apoptosis pathways including those that induce the tumor suppressor p53. These observations suggest that luteolin could be an anticancer agent for various cancers. Furthermore, recent epidemiological studies have attributed a cancer prevention property to luteolin. In this review, we summarize the progress of recent research on luteolin, with a particular focus on its anticancer role and molecular mechanisms underlying this property of luteolin. PMID:18991571

  10. [Drug therapy for prevention of falls and fractures].

    PubMed

    Ringe, Johann D

    2006-06-01

    The primary goal in the practical management of osteoporosis is to prevent first or subsequent fractures and thereby to avoid acute or chronic pain and progressive skeletal deformity. Therapeutic strategies should always take the complex pathogenetic mechanisms of fractures into account, especially the fact that mechanical impacts and falls play an important role in the majority of fracture events. Accordingly, recommendations to patients and the selection of drugs should aim at both, falls and fractures. In this context there is an increasing interest in the dual effects of vitamin D on bone and muscle. Controlled studies proved that adequate vitamin D supplementation is able to improve muscle strength, coordination and body sway and thereby reduce the risk of falls and fractures. Alendronate has been studied extensively by large trials of high quality and its efficacy to reduce the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures is in line with the criteria of evidence-based medicine. The innovative combination of 70 mg alendronate with 2,800 IU vitamin D in a once-weekly tablet guarantees a basic supply with this important prohormone for bone and muscle. Due to a regular combined intake an improved compliance can be anticipated which will be followed by better therapeutic results in osteoporosis patients with increased fracture risk.

  11. Multi-targeted prevention and therapy of cancer by proanthocyanidins.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Singh, Tripti; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2008-10-08

    In recent years, a considerable emphasis has been focused on the importance of the naturally available botanicals that can be consumed in an individual's everyday diet and that can also be useful as a chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent for certain diseases, including cancers. A wide variety of botanicals, mostly dietary flavonoids or polyphenolic substances, have been reported to possess substantial anti-carcinogenic and antimutagenic activities because of their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Proanthocyanidins are considered as one of them, and are abundantly available in various parts of the plants, such as fruits, berries, bark and seeds. Their modes of action were evaluated through a number of in vitro and in vivo studies which showed their potential role as anti-carcinogenic agent. We summarize and highlight the latest developments on anti-carcinogenic activities of proanthocyanidins from different sources, specifically from grape seeds, and their molecular targets, such as NF-kappaB, mitogen-activated protein kinases, PI3K/Akt, caspases, cytokines, angiogenesis and cell cycle regulatory proteins and other check points, etc. Although the bioavailability and metabolism data on proanthocyanidins is still largely unavailable, certain reports indicate that at least monomers and smaller oligomeric procyanidins are absorbed in the gut. The modulation of various molecular targets by proanthocyanidins in vitro and in vivo tumor models suggests their importance, contribution and mechanism of action to the prevention of cancers of different organs.

  12. Multi-targeted prevention and therapy of cancer by proanthocyanidins

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Singh, Tripti; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, a considerable emphasis has been focused on the importance of the naturally available botanicals that can be consumed in an individual’s everyday diet and that can also be useful as a chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent for certain diseases, including cancers. A wide variety of botanicals, mostly dietary flavonoids or polyphenolic substances, have been reported to possess substantial anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic activities because of their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Proanthocyanidins are considered as one of them, and are abundantly available in various parts of the plants, such as fruits, berries, bark and seeds. Their modes of action were evaluated through a number of in vitro and in vivo studies which showed their potential role as anti-carcinogenic agent. We summarize and highlight the latest developments on anti-carcinogenic activities of proanthocyanidins from different sources, specifically from grape seeds, and their molecular targets, such as NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinases, PI3K/Akt, caspases, cytokines, angiogenesis and cell cycle regulatory proteins and other check points, etc. Although the bioavailability and metabolism data on proanthocyanidins is still largely unavailable, certain reports indicate that at least monomers and smaller oligomeric procyanidins are absorbed in the gut. The modulation of various molecular targets by proanthocyanidins in vitro and in vivo tumor models suggests their importance, contribution and mechanism of action to the prevention of cancers of different organs. PMID:18457915

  13. Antiretroviral Therapy as Prevention of … Pneumococcal Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Leporrier, Jérémie; Delbos, Valérie; Unal, Guillemette; Honoré, Patricia; Etienne, Manuel; Bouchaud, Olivier; Caron, François

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite antiretroviral therapy, it is generally believed that the risk for pneumococcal infections (PnIs) is high among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, most studies in this field have been conducted before 2010, and the proportion of virologically suppressed patients has drastically increased in these latter years thanks to larger indications and more effective antiretroviral regimens. This study aimed to re-evaluate the current risk of PnI among adult patients infected with HIV. Methods. The incidence of PnI was evaluated between 1996 and 2014 in 2 French regional hospitals. The 80 most recent cases of PnI (2000–2014) were retrospectively compared with 160 controls (HIV patients without PnI) to analyze the residual risk factors of PnI. Results. Among a mean annual follow-up cohort of 1616 patients, 116 PnIs were observed over 18 years. The risk factors of PnI among patients infected with HIV were an uncontrolled HIV infection or “classic” risk factors of PnI shared by the general population such as addiction, renal or respiratory insufficiency, or hepatitis B or C coinfection. Pneumococcal vaccination coverage was low and poorly targeted, because only 5% of the cases had been previously vaccinated. The incidence of invasive PnIs among HIV patients with a nonvirologically suppressed infection or comorbidities was 12 times higher than that reported in the general population at the country level (107 vs 9/100000 patients), whereas the incidence among virologically suppressed HIV patients without comorbidities was lower (7.6/100000 patients). Conclusions. Human immunodeficiency virus infection no longer per se seems to be a significant risk factor for PnI, suggesting a step-down from a systematic to an “at-risk patient” targeted pneumococcal vaccination strategy. PMID:28018929

  14. Low Frequency of Acquired Isoniazid and Rifampicin Resistance in Rifampicin-Susceptible Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a Setting of High HIV-1 Infection and Tuberculosis Coprevalence.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Neesha; Sirgel, Frederick; Streicher, Elizabeth; Warren, Robin; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2017-09-15

    We estimated the incidence of acquired isoniazid and rifampicin resistance in rifampicin-susceptible tuberculosis in a setting of high human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and tuberculosis coprevalence. GeneXpert MTB/RIF-confirmed patients with rifampicin-susceptible tuberculosis were recruited at antituberculosis treatment initiation in Khayelitsha, South Africa. Liquid culture and adherence assessment were performed at 2 and 5-6 months. MTBDRplus was performed on mycobacteria-positive cultures to ascertain acquired drug resistance (ADR). Spoligotyping and whole-genome sequencing were performed to ascertain homogeneity between baseline isolates and isolates with ADR. Baseline isolates were retrospectively tested for isoniazid monoresistance. An electronic database review was performed to ascertain tuberculosis recurrences. A total of 306 participants (62% with HIV-1 coinfection, of whom 71% received antiretroviral therapy) were recruited. Ascertainment of outcomes was complete for 284 participants. Five acquired a resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain during or subsequent to treatment. One strain was confirmed to have ADR, 2 were confirmed as causing exogenous reinfection, and 2 were unrecoverable for genotyping. Incident ADR was estimated to have ranged from 0.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], .1%-1.9%; 1 of 284 participants) to 1% (95% CI, .2%-3%; 3 of 284 participants). Seventeen of 279 baseline isolates (6.1%; 95% CI, 3.6%-9.6%) had isoniazid monoresistance (13 of 17 had an inhA promoter mutation), but 0 of 17 had amplified resistance. Treatment with standardized antituberculosis regimens dosed daily throughout, high uptake of antiretroviral therapy, and low prevalence of isoniazid monoresistance were associated with a low frequency of ADR.

  15. Cardiotrophin-1 therapy prevents gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Yaremi; Blanco-Gozalo, Victor; Sanchez-Gallego, Jose I; López-Hernandez, Francisco J; Ruiz, Juan; Perez de Obanos, María P; López-Novoa, José M

    2016-05-01

    Aminoglycosides are very effective antibiotics for the treatment of severe infections, but they rank among the most frequent causes of drug-induced nephrotoxicity. Thus, prevention of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity is an unmet therapeutic objective. Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a member of the IL-6 family of cytokines, has been reported to protect the kidney against toxic and ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI). We have assessed the effect of rat CT-1 in the severity of gentamicin (G)-induced AKI. Groups of male Wistar rats received the following for 6 consecutive days: i) isotonic saline solution (group CONT), ii) G, 150mg/kg/day, i.p. (group G), iii) CT-1, 100μg/kg/day i.v. (group CT-1), or iv) G and CT-1 at the doses described above. The G group showed a manifest AKI characterized by low creatinine clearance, high plasma creatinine and urea levels, increased urinary excretion of proteins, glucose and AKI markers such as N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, kidney-injury molecule-1 and T-gelsolin, increased kidney levels of CD-68, iNOS, IL-1β and TNF-α, and markedly higher histological renal damage and leukocyte infiltration than the CONT and CT-1 groups. Administration of CT-1 together with G reduced almost all of the above-described manifestations of G-induced AKI. The results of this study have potential clinical application, as CT-1 is near to being used as a drug for organ protection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Towards a new tuberculosis drug: pyridomycin – nature's isoniazid

    PubMed Central

    Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Sala, Claudia; Neres, João; Pojer, Florence; Magnet, Sophie; Mukherjee, Raju; Uplekar, Swapna; Boy-Röttger, Stefanie; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cole, Stewart T

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a global threat to public health, is becoming untreatable due to widespread drug resistance to frontline drugs such as the InhA-inhibitor isoniazid. Historically, by inhibiting highly vulnerable targets, natural products have been an important source of antibiotics including potent anti-tuberculosis agents. Here, we describe pyridomycin, a compound produced by Dactylosporangium fulvum with specific cidal activity against mycobacteria. By selecting pyridomycin-resistant mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whole-genome sequencing and genetic validation, we identified the NADH-dependent enoyl- (Acyl-Carrier-Protein) reductase InhA as the principal target and demonstrate that pyridomycin inhibits mycolic acid synthesis in M. tuberculosis. Furthermore, biochemical and structural studies show that pyridomycin inhibits InhA directly as a competitive inhibitor of the NADH-binding site, thereby identifying a new, druggable pocket in InhA. Importantly, the most frequently encountered isoniazid-resistant clinical isolates remain fully susceptible to pyridomycin, thus opening new avenues for drug development. PMID:22987724

  17. Terbutaline pump maintenance therapy after threatened preterm labor for preventing preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Nanda, K; Cook, L A; Gallo, M F; Grimes, D A

    2002-01-01

    Women with preterm labor that is arrested with tocolytic therapy are at increased risk of recurrent preterm labor. Terbutaline pump maintenance therapy has been given to such women to decrease the risk of recurrent preterm labor, preterm birth, and its consequences. To determine the effectiveness and safety of terbutaline pump maintenance therapy after threatened preterm labor in preventing preterm birth and its complications. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register (searched May 2002) and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2002). Randomized trials comparing terbutaline pump maintenance therapy with alternative therapy, placebo, or no therapy after threatened preterm labor. Two reviewers independently assessed the studies for inclusion and then extracted data from eligible studies. We included two studies. Terbutaline pump maintenance therapy did not appear to offer any advantages over the saline placebo pump or oral terbutaline maintenance therapy in preventing preterm births by prolonging pregnancy or its complications among women with arrested preterm labor. The weighted mean difference (WMD) for gestational age at birth was -0.1 weeks (95% confidence interval (CI) -1.7 to 1.4) for terbutaline pump therapy compared with saline placebo pump for both trials combined and 1.4 weeks (95% CI -1.1 to 3.9) for terbutaline pump versus oral terbutaline therapy for the first trial. The second trial reported a relative risk (RR) of 1.17 (95% CI 0.79 to 1.73) of preterm birth (less than 37 completed weeks) and a RR of 0.97 (95% CI 0.51 to 1.84) of very preterm birth (less than 34 completed weeks) for terbutaline pump compared with saline placebo pump. Terbutaline pump therapy also did not result in a higher rate of therapy continuation or a lower rate of infant complications. No data were reported on long-term infant outcomes, costs, or maternal assessment of therapy. Terbutaline pump maintenance therapy has not

  18. Unintentional injury prevention and the role of occupational therapy in the Solomon Islands: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Daufanamae, Barbara U; Franklin, Richard C; Eagers, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injuries (injuries for which there is no evidence of a predetermined intent) are one of the leading causes of death worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although evidence demonstrates unintentional injuries are preventable it is a public health challenge for many LMICs such as the Solomon Islands. Occupational therapists are well placed to contribute to injury prevention, as they have specialised skills to analyse the accessibility and safety of the environments within which people conduct their daily occupations. While the role of occupational therapy in unintentional injury prevention is well known in high-income countries, it is unfamiliar in LMICs, especially in the Solomon Islands. This integrative review aimed to explore the incidence of common unintentional injuries, and the burden in the Solomon Islands; and explore the potential role of occupational therapy in unintentional injury prevention in the Solomon Islands, based on current activities in LMICs. Articles were reviewed from six databases (Medline, CINAHL, OTDBase, OT Seeker, Scopus and PsychInfo). Five articles met the inclusion criteria for the first objective and 15 articles met the inclusion criteria for the second objective. These articles were thematically analysed where themes and codes associated with the research objectives were extracted and analysed. Unintentional injuries in the Solomon Islands reported in the literature included ocular trauma, falls from fruit trees and coconut palms, and road traffic crashes. Burden of injury reported was mostly associated with loss of productivity. Occupational therapists undertook rehabilitative, biomechanical, neurodevelopmental and educational roles in LMIC, focusing on tertiary and secondary injury prevention. This integrative review suggests that there is limited information regarding injury in the Solomon Islands. However, evidence is available in LMICs to suggest that occupational therapy services can

  19. Preventing Relapse/Recurrence in Recurrent Depression With Cognitive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Schene, Aart H.; Spinhoven, Philip; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Wouters, Luuk F.; Huyser, Jochanan; Kamphuis, Jan H.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on the outcome of a randomized controlled trial of cognitive group therapy (CT) to prevent relapse/recurrence in a group of high-risk patients diagnosed with recurrent depression. Recurrently depressed patients (N = 187) currently in remission following various types of treatment were randomized to treatment as usual,…

  20. Feasibility of a Prototype Web-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Prevention Program for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Michael E.; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Seeley, John R.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the feasibility of a prototype Web-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) program for preventing mental health problems among college students. Participants: Undergraduate first-year students ("N" = 76) participated between May and November 2011. Methods: Participants were randomized to ACT or a…

  1. Integrating Motivational Interviewing and Self-Determination Theory with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Peter C.; Patrick, Heather; Wenzel, Amy; Williams, Geoffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in preventing suicide-related behavior. However, it is often difficult to engage patients who are at-risk in treatment. Motivational Interviewing (MI) has been shown to increase treatment engagement and improve treatment outcomes when it is used to complement other treatments. As a…

  2. Feasibility of a Prototype Web-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Prevention Program for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Michael E.; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Seeley, John R.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the feasibility of a prototype Web-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) program for preventing mental health problems among college students. Participants: Undergraduate first-year students ("N" = 76) participated between May and November 2011. Methods: Participants were randomized to ACT or a…

  3. Antithrombotic Therapy for Secondary Prevention in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus and Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongwhi; Franchi, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a key risk factor for recurrent atherothrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The prothrombotic milieu that characterizes patients with DM underscores the importance of oral antithrombotic therapy for secondary prevention of recurrent events in these patients. Indeed, dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin and the P2Y12inhibitor clopidogrel, which has represented the mainstay of treatment for many years, has significantly reduced the incidence of recurrent atherothrombotic events. However, recurrence rates in DM patients still remain high despite this treatment regimen, which may be partly related to inadequate platelet inhibition induced by standard DAPT with aspirin and clopidogrel. This underpins the need for more potent antithrombotic treatment regimens for secondary prevention of atherothrombotic events in DM patients following ACS or PCI. The development of antiplatelet therapies associated with more potent oral platelet P2Y12receptor inhibition, including prasugrel and ticagrelor, as well as platelet inhibitors blocking alternative pathways, such as thrombin-mediated platelet inhibition with vorapaxar, may represent potential treatment options in DM patients. Moreover, with the introduction of the target-specific oral anticoagulants, there has been a reappraisal of the use of anticoagulation in addition to antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention in patients with ACS. This review provides an update on the recent advances and limitations of oral antithrombotic agents used for secondary prevention in DM patients following ACS or PCI.

  4. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP): treatment model, feasibility, and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Barbara; Brown, Gregory; Brent, David A; Wells, Karen; Poling, Kim; Curry, John; Kennard, Betsy D; Wagner, Ann; Cwik, Mary F; Klomek, Anat Brunstein; Goldstein, Tina; Vitiello, Benedetto; Barnett, Shannon; Daniel, Stephanie; Hughes, Jennifer

    2009-10-01

    To describe the elements of a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP) and to report its feasibility in preventing the recurrence of suicidal behavior in adolescents who have recently attempted suicide. The CBT-SP was developed using a risk reduction and relapse prevention approach and theoretically grounded in principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy, dialectical behavioral therapy, and targeted therapies for suicidal youths with depression. The CBT-SP consists of acute and continuation phases, each lasting about 12 sessions, and includes a chain analysis of the suicidal event, safety plan development, skill building, psychoeducation, family intervention, and relapse prevention. The CBT-SP was administered to 110 recent suicide attempters with depression aged 13 to 19 years (mean 15.8 years, SD 1.6) across five academic sites. Twelve or more sessions were completed by 72.4% of the sample. A specific intervention for adolescents at high risk for repeated suicide attempts has been developed and manual based, and further testing of its efficacy seems feasible.

  5. Current recommendations for prevention and therapy of extravasation reactions in dermato-oncology.

    PubMed

    Kähler, Katharina C; Mustroph, Dieter; Hauschild, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Despite the introduction of many targeted therapies, a wide variety of cytostatic agents are still frequently used in dermato-oncology. In order to avoid further morbidity in tumor patients, prevention of extravasation reactions is of highest importance. The optimal management of extravasation requires an early diagnosis, the application of specific antidotes and a well-trained oncology team.

  6. Endocrine therapy for breast cancer prevention in high-risk women: clinical and economic considerations.

    PubMed

    Groom, Amy G; Younis, Tallal

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of breast cancer highlights the need for primary prevention strategies that demonstrate both favorable clinical benefit/risk profile and good value for money. Endocrine therapy with selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs) or aromatase inhibitors (AIs) has been associated with a favorable clinical benefit/risk profile in the prevention of breast cancer in women at high risk of developing the disease. The available endocrine therapy strategies differ in terms of their relative reductions of breast cancer risk, potential side effects, and upfront drug acquisition costs, among others. This review highlights the clinical trials of SERMs and AIs for the primary prevention of breast cancer, and the cost-effectiveness /cost-utility studies that have examined their "value for money" in various health care jurisdictions.

  7. The challenge of using intermittent preventive therapy with sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine among pregnant women in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Wanzira, Humphrey; Katamba, Henry; Okullo, Allen Eva; Rubahika, Denis

    2016-08-09

    The Uganda National Malaria Control Programme recommends the use of intermittent preventive therapy in pregnancy with sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) to prevent malaria, however, there is overwhelming evidence of low uptake of this intervention. This study, therefore, sought to examine the factors associated with taking two or more doses of therapy among women who had had the most recent live birth. This was a secondary data analysis of the 2014 Malaria Indicator Survey dataset. The outcome was the use of two or more doses of SP for the most recent live birth while independent variables included; age, highest education attained, residence (rural and urban), use of radio and community health teams for malaria related messages, knowledge of taking SP and use of LLINS to prevent malaria, household wealth, skilled attendant seen at ANC and number of children the woman has. Of the 1820 women included in the final analysis, 822 (45.16 %) women took two or more doses of SP. Women who knew that this therapy was used to prevent malaria and those who had been seen by a skilled attendant were 10.72 times [Adjusted OR (95 % CI): 10.72 (7.62-15.08), p-value = 0.001] and 3.19 times [Adjusted OR (95 % CI): 3.19 (1.26-8.07), p-value  = 0.015] more likely to take at least two doses as compared to those who did not know about this therapy and those seen by unskilled attendants, respectively. This study shows that knowledge among women that SP is a medication used for malaria prevention during pregnancy increases the uptake of two or more doses of this therapy among pregnant women. This highlights the importance of behaviour change communication focused on IPTp uptake that can be complemented by having skilled personnel attending to pregnant women at the antenatal clinic.

  8. Three months of weekly rifapentine plus isoniazid is less hepatotoxic than nine months of daily isoniazid for LTBI

    PubMed Central

    Bliven-Sizemore, E. E.; Sterling, T. R.; Shang, N.; Benator, D.; Schwartzman, K.; Reves, R.; Drobeniuc, J.; Bock, N.; Villarino, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING Nine months of daily isoniazid (9H) and 3 months of once-weekly rifapentine plus isoniazid (3HP) are recommended treatments for latent tuberculous infection (LTBI). The risk profile for 3HP and the contribution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to hepatotoxicity are unclear. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the hepatotoxicity risk associated with 3HP compared to 9H, and factors associated with hepatotoxicity DESIGN Hepatotoxicity was defined as aspartate aminotransferase (AST) >3 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) with symptoms (nausea, vomiting, jaundice, or fatigue), or AST >5 × ULN. We analyzed risk factors among adults who took at least 1 dose of their assigned treatment. A nested case-control study assessed the role of HCV. RESULTS Of 6862 participants, 77 (1.1%) developed hepatotoxicity; 52 (0.8%) were symptomatic; 1.8% (61/3317) were on 9H and 0.4% (15/3545) were on 3HP (P < 0.0001). Risk factors for hepatotoxicity were age, female sex, white race, non-Hispanic ethnicity, decreased body mass index, elevated baseline AST, and 9H. In the case-control study, HCV infection was associated with hepatotoxicity when controlling for other factors. CONCLUSION The risk of hepatotoxicity during LTBI treatment with 3HP was lower than the risk with 9H. HCV and elevated baseline AST were risk factors for hepatotoxicity. For persons with these risk factors, 3HP may be preferred. PMID:26260821

  9. Three months of weekly rifapentine plus isoniazid is less hepatotoxic than nine months of daily isoniazid for LTBI.

    PubMed

    Bliven-Sizemore, E E; Sterling, T R; Shang, N; Benator, D; Schwartzman, K; Reves, R; Drobeniuc, J; Bock, N; Villarino, M E

    2015-09-01

    Nine months of daily isoniazid (9H) and 3 months of once-weekly rifapentine plus isoniazid (3HP) are recommended treatments for latent tuberculous infection (LTBI). The risk profile for 3HP and the contribution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to hepatotoxicity are unclear. To evaluate the hepatotoxicity risk associated with 3HP compared to 9H, and factors associated with hepatotoxicity. Hepatotoxicity was defined as aspartate aminotransferase (AST) >3 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) with symptoms (nausea, vomiting, jaundice, or fatigue), or AST >5 x ULN. We analyzed risk factors among adults who took at least 1 dose of their assigned treatment. A nested case-control study assessed the role of HCV. Of 6862 participants, 77 (1.1%) developed hepatotoxicity; 52 (0.8%) were symptomatic; 1.8% (61/3317) were on 9H and 0.4% (15/3545) were on 3HP (P < 0.0001). Risk factors for hepatotoxicity were age, female sex, white race, non-Hispanic ethnicity, decreased body mass index, elevated baseline AST, and 9H. In the case-control study, HCV infection was associated with hepatotoxicity when controlling for other factors. The risk of hepatotoxicity during LTBI treatment with 3HP was lower than the risk with 9H. HCV and elevated baseline AST were risk factors for hepatotoxicity. For persons with these risk factors, 3HP may be preferred.

  10. Pharmacologic Inhibition of Host Phosphodiesterase-4 Improves Isoniazid-Mediated Clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Koo, Mi-Sun; Tsenova, Liana; Khetani, Vikram; Zeldis, Jerome B.; Fallows, Dorothy; Kaplan, Gilla

    2016-01-01

    The lengthy duration of multidrug therapy needed to cure tuberculosis (TB) poses significant challenges for global control of the disease. Moreover, chronic inflammation associated with TB leads to pulmonary damage that can remain even after successful cure. Thus, there is a great need for the development of effective shorter drug regimens to improve clinical outcome and strengthen TB control. Host-directed therapy (HDT) is emerging as a novel adjunctive strategy to enhance the efficacy and shorten the duration of TB treatment. Previously, we showed that the administration of CC-3052, a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor (PDE4i), reduced the host inflammatory response during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection and improved the antimicrobial efficacy of isoniazid (INH) in both the mouse and rabbit models. In the present study, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics and explored the mechanism underlying the efficacy of a more potent PDE4i, CC-11050, as adjunct to INH treatment in a mouse model of pulmonary Mtb infection. Genome-wide lung transcriptome analysis confirmed the dampening of inflammation and associated network genes that we previously reported with CC-3052. Consistent with the reduction in inflammation, a significant improvement in Mtb control and pathology was observed in the lungs of mice treated with CC-11050 plus INH, compared to INH alone. This important confirmatory study will be used to help design upcoming human clinical trials with CC-11050 as an HDT for TB treatment. PMID:27379099

  11. Pharmacologic Inhibition of Host Phosphodiesterase-4 Improves Isoniazid-Mediated Clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Koo, Mi-Sun; Tsenova, Liana; Khetani, Vikram; Zeldis, Jerome B; Fallows, Dorothy; Kaplan, Gilla

    2016-01-01

    The lengthy duration of multidrug therapy needed to cure tuberculosis (TB) poses significant challenges for global control of the disease. Moreover, chronic inflammation associated with TB leads to pulmonary damage that can remain even after successful cure. Thus, there is a great need for the development of effective shorter drug regimens to improve clinical outcome and strengthen TB control. Host-directed therapy (HDT) is emerging as a novel adjunctive strategy to enhance the efficacy and shorten the duration of TB treatment. Previously, we showed that the administration of CC-3052, a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor (PDE4i), reduced the host inflammatory response during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection and improved the antimicrobial efficacy of isoniazid (INH) in both the mouse and rabbit models. In the present study, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics and explored the mechanism underlying the efficacy of a more potent PDE4i, CC-11050, as adjunct to INH treatment in a mouse model of pulmonary Mtb infection. Genome-wide lung transcriptome analysis confirmed the dampening of inflammation and associated network genes that we previously reported with CC-3052. Consistent with the reduction in inflammation, a significant improvement in Mtb control and pathology was observed in the lungs of mice treated with CC-11050 plus INH, compared to INH alone. This important confirmatory study will be used to help design upcoming human clinical trials with CC-11050 as an HDT for TB treatment.

  12. Implantable Cardioverter-defibrillator Therapy for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Usefulness in Primary and Secondary Prevention.

    PubMed

    Sarrias, Axel; Galve, Enrique; Sabaté, Xavier; Moya, Àngel; Anguera, Ignacio; Núñez, Elaine; Villuendas, Roger; Alcalde, Óscar; García-Dorado, David

    2015-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a frequent cause of sudden death. Clinical practice guidelines indicate defibrillator implantation for primary prevention in patients with 1 or more risk factors and for secondary prevention in patients with a history of aborted sudden death or sustained ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to analyze the follow-up of patients who received an implantable defibrillator following the current guidelines in nonreferral centers for this disease. This retrospective observational study included all patients who underwent defibrillator implantation between January 1996 and December 2012 in 3 centers in the province of Barcelona. The study included 69 patients (mean age [standard deviation], 44.8 [17] years; 79.3% men), 48 in primary prevention and 21 in secondary prevention. The mean number of risk factors per patient was 1.8 in the primary prevention group and 0.5 in the secondary prevention group (P=.029). The median follow-up duration was 40.5 months. The appropriate therapy rate was 32.7/100 patient-years in secondary prevention and 1.7/100 patient-years in primary prevention (P<.001). Overall mortality was 10.1%. Implant-related complications were experienced by 8.7% of patients, and 13% had inappropriate defibrillator discharges. In patients with a defibrillator for primary prevention, the appropriate therapy rate is extremely low, indicating the low predictive power of the current risk stratification criteria. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Cancer prevention and treatment using combination therapy with plant- and animal-derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Uzoigwe, Jacinta; Sauter, Edward R

    2012-11-01

    Compounds naturally occurring in plants and animals play an essential role in the prevention and treatment of various cancers. There are more than 100 plant- and animal-based natural compounds currently in clinical use. Similar to synthetic compounds, these natural compounds are associated with dose-related toxicity that limits efficacy. Scientists have investigated combination therapy with compounds that have different toxicities in order to optimize efficacy. These combination therapies may work additively or synergistically, there may be no effect or they may promote tumor formation. Combination therapy with agents that have similar mechanisms of action may increase toxicity. In this article, combination therapies that have been investigated, their rationale, mechanism of action and findings are reviewed. When the data warrant it, combined (pharmacologic and natural; two or more natural) interventions that appear to increase efficacy (compared with monotherapy) while minimizing toxicity have been highlighted.

  14. Thyroxine administration during radiation therapy to the neck does not prevent subsequent thyroid dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Bantle, J.P.; Lee, C.K.; Levitt, S.H.

    1985-11-01

    In an attempt to reduce the incidence of hypothyroidism following irradiation of the neck, we administered oral L-thyroxine in doses sufficient to suppress serum TSH to 20 patients receiving radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease or other lymphomas. L-thyroxine was discontinued when radiation therapy was completed. Twenty similar patients who did not receive L-thyroxine during radiation therapy served as a control group. After a mean follow-up period of 33 months, seven patients (35%) in the L-thyroxine group developed elevation of serum TSH and were started on chronic L-thyroxine therapy. In the control group, after mean follow-up of 19 months, five patients (25%) developed elevation of TSH and were started on chronic L-thyroxine. We conclude that suppression of serum TSH during neck irradiation does not prevent subsequent thyroid dysfunction.

  15. Overview of the methods and therapies for the primary prevention of variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2010-08-01

    Patients with cirrhosis develop varices at a rate of 5% per year, and a third of patients with high-risk varices will bleed. The mortality associated with variceal haemorrhage is typically 20%, and still exceeds that of myocardial infarction. Current options to prevent the first variceal bleed include noncardioselective beta-blockers or variceal band ligation. In patients with medium-to-large esophageal varices, both therapies reduce the risk of bleeding by 50% or more. The choice of therapy should take into account patient choice and local availability; although for most patients drug therapy is the preferred first-line treatment. There has been recent interest in carvedilol, with promising initial data. Further studies are necessary before universal recommendation. There is no role for drug therapy in patients without varices, and the use of beta-blockers for patients with small varices is controversial.

  16. [Role of hormone-replacement therapy for prevention of coronary artery disease in women].

    PubMed

    Gohlke-Bärwolf, C; von Schacky, C

    2005-01-01

    The postmenopausal increase in the incidence of coronary artery disease implied a protective effect of estrogens. Nonrandomized, clinical and experimental studies have supported this notion. In the first randomized study (HERS 1998) no protective effect on prognosis of postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease was demonstrated. Also, in healthy postmenopausal women no beneficial effect of a hormone-replacement therapy on coronary events was shown (WHI-Study 2002, 2004). Therefore, hormone-replacement therapy is not recommended for prophylaxis of cardiovascular disease in healthy women or in women with documented coronary artery disease (Recommendation class I, evidence-level A). The continuation or the start of a hormone- replacement therapy is only justified for therapy of severe menopausal symptoms. Women should be informed that changes in lifestyle including not smoking, a heart healthy diet, and regular exercise are the most important measures to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Attentional function in secondary school students receiving isoniazid prophylaxis for tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D.; Anderson, V.; Pentland, L.; Sawyer, S.; Starr, M.; Johnson, P. D.

    2000-01-01

    Reports have suggested that isoniazid treatment may be associated with poor concentration and subtle reduction in memory. This study examines attentional function and processing speed in a group of 25 adolescents who received isoniazid prophylaxis for at least 6 months. As adolescents often face major educational assessment milestones, such cognitive side effects may have important implications. Participants were assessed before treatment, 1 month into treatment and at least 1 week after treatment cessation. Measures included the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test and subtests of the appropriate Wechsler scale sensitive to attention and speed of information processing. Isoniazid does not appear to cause significant adverse effects on attentional function in adolescents. PMID:10722136

  18. Preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infection-the promise and the challenges.

    PubMed

    Fox, G J; Dobler, C C; Marais, B J; Denholm, J T

    2017-03-01

    Around one third of the world's population may harbour latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), an asymptomatic immunological state that confers a heightened risk of subsequently developing tuberculosis (TB). Effectively treating LTBI will be essential if the End TB Strategy is to be realized. This review evaluates the evidence in relation to the effectiveness of preventive antibiotic therapy to treat LTBI due to both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant bacteria. Current national and international preventive therapy guidelines are summarized, as well as ongoing randomized trials evaluating regimens to prevent drug-resistant TB. Populations that may benefit most from screening and treatment for LTBI include close contacts of patients with TB (particularly children under 5 years of age) and individuals with substantial immunological impairment. The risks and benefits of treatment must be carefully balanced for each individual. Electronic decision support tools offer one way in which clinicians can help patients to make informed decisions. Modelling studies indicate that the expanded use of preventive therapy will be essential to achieving substantial reductions in the global TB burden. However, the widespread scale-up of screening and treatment will require careful consideration of cost-effectiveness, while ensuring the drivers of ongoing disease transmission are also addressed.

  19. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Suicide Prevention (CBT-SP): Treatment Model, Feasibility and Acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Barbara; Brown, Gregory; Brent, David; Wells, Karen; Poling, Kim; Curry, John; Kennard, Betsy D.; Wagner, Ann; Cwik, Mary; Klomek, Anat Brunstein; Goldstein, Tina; Vitiello, Benedetto; Barnett, Shannon; Daniel, Stephanie; Hughes, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the elements of a manualized cognitive behavior psychotherapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP) and to report its feasibility in preventing the recurrence of suicidal behavior in adolescents who have recently attempted suicide. Method CBT-SP was developed using a risk reduction, relapse prevention approach and theoretically grounded in principles of cognitive behavior therapy, dialectical behavioral therapy and targeted therapies for suicidal, depressed youth. CBT-SP consists of acute and continuation phases, each lasting about 12 sessions, and includes a chain analysis of the suicidal event, safety plan development, skill building, psychoeducation, family intervention, and relapse prevention. Results CBT-SP was administered to 110 depressed, recent suicide attempters aged 13–19 years (mean 15.8±1.6) across five academic sites. Twelve or more sessions were completed by 72.4% of the sample. Conclusions A specific intervention for adolescents at high risk for repeated suicide attempts has been developed and manualized, and further testing of its efficacy appears feasible. PMID:19730273

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor therapy to prevent complications as well as therapy for Ehler-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sastry, P S R K

    2002-09-01

    Matrixmetalloproteinase inhibitors have been developed as anti-cancer agents. Their usage in pancreatic cancer and other such malignancies is under trial at present. An interesting undesired-effect of one of these agents is contracture of the hand. Ehler-Danlos syndrome is an inherited group of diseases with varying types. At present there is no known treatment or prevention for the complications associated with this inherited condition. Sometimes it is the adverse events of a drug, which provides an insight into its efficacy for another indication. It is hereby being hypothesized that the matrixmetalloproteinase inhibitors especially marimastat may be an effective drug for treatment of Ehler-Danlos syndrome and/or prevention of its major complications.

  1. Adherence to endocrine therapy in breast cancer adjuvant and prevention settings.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, Rowan T; Kim, Jisang; Haque, Reina

    2014-04-01

    Adherence to oral endocrine therapy in adjuvant breast cancer settings is a substantial clinical problem. To provide current perspective on adherence to oral endocrine therapies, a comprehensive literature review was conducted. In adjuvant trials, endocrine therapy adherence is relatively high with greater adherence for aromatase inhibitors compared with tamoxifen. In contrast, adherence to adjuvant therapy in clinical practice is relatively poor, with only about 50% of women successfully completing 5-year therapy. Importantly, good adherence (>80% use) has been associated with lower recurrence risk. Endocrine therapy adherence in primary breast cancer prevention trials parallels that seen in adjuvant trials. Factors associated with nonadherence include low recurrence risk perception, side effects, age extremes, medication cost, suboptimal patient-physician communication, and lack of social support. Few prospective studies have evaluated interventions designed to improve adherence. Interventions currently proposed reflect inferences from clinical trial procedures in which clinical contacts are commonly greater than in usual practice settings. In conclusion, for optimal breast cancer outcome, adherence to endocrine therapy must improve. Although general recommendations likely to improve adherence can be made based on clinical trial results and preliminary prospective trial findings, research specifically targeting this issue is needed to establish effective intervention strategies.

  2. Site-Specific Antioxidative Therapy for Prevention of Atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in pathophysiology of aging and age-associated disease. Antioxidative medicine has become a practice for prevention of atherosclerosis. However, limited success in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in individuals with atherosclerosis using general antioxidants has prompted us to develop a novel antioxidative strategy to prevent atherosclerosis. Reducing visceral adipose tissue by calorie restriction (CR) and regular endurance exercise represents a causative therapy for ameliorating oxidative stress. Some of the recently emerging drugs used for the treatment of CVD may be assigned as site-specific antioxidants. CR and exercise mimetic agents are the choice for individuals who are difficult to continue CR and exercise. Better understanding of molecular and cellular biology of redox signaling will pave the way for more effective antioxidative medicine for prevention of CVD and prolongation of healthy life span. PMID:23738041

  3. Factors Associated With Preventive Pharmacological Therapy Adherence Among Patients With Kidney Stones.

    PubMed

    Dauw, Casey A; Yi, Yooni; Bierlein, Maggie J; Yan, Phyllis; Alruwaily, Abdulrahman F; Ghani, Khurshid R; Wolf, J Stuart; Hollenbeck, Brent K; Hollingsworth, John M

    2016-07-01

    To determine adherence patterns for thiazide diuretics, alkali citrate therapy, and allopurinol, collectively referred to as preventive pharmacological therapy (PPT), among patients with kidney stones. Using medical claims data, we identified adults diagnosed with kidney stones between 2002 and 2006. Through National Drug Codes, we determined those with one or more prescription fills for a PPT agent. We measured adherence to PPT (as determined by the proportion of days covered formula) within the first 6 months of starting therapy and performed multivariate analysis to evaluate patient factors associated with PPT adherence. Among 7980 adults with kidney stones who were prescribed PPT, less than one third (30.2%) were adherent to their regimen (indicated by proportion of days covered  ≥ 80%). Among those on monotherapy, rates of adherence differed by the type of PPT agent prescribed: 42.5% for thiazides, 40.0% for allopurinol, and 13.4% for citrate therapy. Factors that were independently associated with lower odds of PPT adherence included combination therapy receipt, female gender, less generous health insurance, and residence in the South or Northeast. In contrast, older patients and those with salaried employment had a higher probability of PPT adherence. Adherence to PPT is low. These findings help providers identify patients where PPT adherence will be problematic. Moreover, they suggest possible targets for quality improvement efforts in the secondary prevention of kidney stones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A systematic review of the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for treating and preventing perinatal depression.

    PubMed

    Sockol, Laura E

    2015-05-15

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an empirically supported treatment for treating and preventing depression that has been widely studied in perinatal populations. Previous meta-analytic reviews of CBT interventions in this population have not investigated potential moderators of treatment efficacy specific to this type of therapy. Forty randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of CBT during pregnancy and the first year postpartum were included in the meta-analyses. Change in depressive symptoms from pre-treatment to post-treatment was assessed in both treatment and prevention trials, and the difference in prevalence of postpartum depressive episodes was assessed in prevention trials. Characteristics of included studies, interventions and samples were assessed as potential moderators of effect sizes. CBT interventions resulted in significant reductions in depressive symptoms compared to control conditions in both treatment and prevention studies. In prevention studies, individuals who received CBT had significantly lower rates of postpartum depressive episodes compared to control conditions. In both treatment and prevention trials, interventions initiated during the postpartum period were more effective than antenatal interventions. In prevention trials, individually-administered treatments were more effective than group interventions and greater reductions in depressive symptoms were found in studies that included higher proportions of nonwhite, single, and multiparous participants. The methodological quality of included studies varied widely among studies eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. There is strong evidence that CBT interventions are effective for treating and preventing depression during the perinatal period. Further methodologically rigorous studies are needed to further investigate potential moderators of treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fixed-dose combination therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    de Cates, Angharad N; Farr, Matthew RB; Rees, Karen; Casas, Juan P; Huffman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine the effectiveness of fixed-dose combination therapy on optimising CVD risk factors and reducing CVD fatal and non-fatal events for both primary and secondary prevention of CVD. Details of CVD events and risk factors included are listed in the methods. We will also determine any adverse events associated with taking fixed-dose combination therapy. This will include studies conducted in both developed and developing regions of the world. PMID:25267903

  6. Diabetes prevention program in a Mediterranean environment: individual or group therapy? An effectiveness evaluation.

    PubMed

    Endevelt, R; Peled, R; Azrad, A; Kowen, G; Valinsky, L; Heymann, A D

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes as a multifactorial disorder requires prevention measures based upon the modification of several risk factors simultaneously; otherwise, there is insufficient potential for prevention. Following the success of the American Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), we implemented an intervention program in a large Israeli healthcare organization with an emphasize on Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) and physical activity. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of two types of intervention, individual and group therapies, in reducing risk factors and in preventing or delaying the development of type 2 diabetes. Out of 180 primary care physicians, 85 who agreed to participate, were randomly assigned, between the years 2005 and 2006, into two groups: those who would refer pre-diabetes adult patients for individual therapy and those who would refer for group therapy. The two groups of patients consisted of 111 and 112 in each group. The intervention lasted for 6 months and discussed: the benefits of MedDiet, planning nutritional behavior and mindful eating, and the importance of physical activity. All patients were invited to participate in walking groups. Follow up lasted for 24 months and logistic, mixed models, and Cox regressions were employed. No statistically significant differences were detected between the two intervention groups in age; gender and clinical measurements at recruitment. Thirty nine percent of both groups developed diabetes (entered the DR by 2012), including 38.7% from the individual therapy and 39.3% from the group therapy (P=0.933). The mean time from 2005 until entry to the Diabetes Registry (DR) was 2.9 and 2.5 years for the individual and group therapy respectively (P=0.542). Both interventions were equally effective in achieving the desired outcomes and time until entry to the DR. For large health organizations with a high number of pre-diabetes patients and scarce resources, group therapy, where 12 people are reached out by one team

  7. Probiotic therapy for the prevention and treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dendukuri, Nandini; Costa, Vania; McGregor, Maurice; Brophy, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Background The recent increase in the number and severity of cases of nosocomial Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) has prompted interest in the use of probiotics for the prevention and treatment of this disease. We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials to assess the effectiveness of probiotic therapy. Methods We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, INAHTA, HEN and Cochrane Collaboration databases to identify trials in which the prevention or treatment of CDAD with probiotic therapy was the primary or secondary outcome. We extracted data on the number of patients randomly assigned to receive probiotic or placebo, the number of patients with CDAD, the type of probiotic, criteria for diagnosing CDAD, persistence of infection after treatment, compliance and adverse effects. Results We identified 4 eligible studies in which prevention (n = 1) or treatment (n = 3) of CDAD was the primary outcome. The benefit of probiotic therapy seen in 2 of the studies was restricted to subgroups characterized by severe CDAD and increased use of vancomycin. The remaining 2 studies were too methodologically flawed for us to draw meaningful conclusions. We also identified 4 trials in which prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea with probiotics was the primary outcome and prevention of CDAD a secondary outcome. These studies were limited primarily by too few CDAD cases and provided no evidence of effective prophylaxis. Overall, heterogeneity in choice and dose of probiotic and in criteria for diagnosing CDAD makes it difficult to synthesize information from the 8 studies. Interpretation Studies conducted to date provide insufficient evidence for the routine clinical use of probiotics to prevent or treat CDAD. Better designed and larger studies are needed. PMID:16027434

  8. Efficacy and safety of the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii for the prevention and therapy of gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical trials and experimental studies strongly suggest a place for Saccharomyces boulardii as a biotherapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of several gastrointestinal diseases. S. boulardii mediates responses resembling the protective effects of the normal healthy gut flora. The multiple mechanisms of action of S. boulardii and its properties may explain its efficacy and beneficial effects in acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases that have been confirmed by clinical trials. Caution should be taken in patients with risk factors for adverse events. This review discusses the evidence for efficacy and safety of S. boulardii as a probiotic for the prevention and therapy of gastrointestinal disorders in humans. PMID:22423260

  9. Use of Orally Disintegrating Olanzapine During Electroconvulsive Therapy for Prevention of Postictal Agitation.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Adriana P; Janjua, A Umair; Tang, Yilang; Syre, Sharyn R; Job, Gregory; McDonald, William M

    2016-11-01

    A major medical problem for patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the occurrence of postictal agitation (PIA). This phenomenon is associated with confusion and disorientation that can have severe clinical implications for the safety of the patient and health care professionals. Many different pharmacological strategies have been used to prevent PIA. We present data on 40 patients who suffered from PIA after a course of ECT and evaluate the prophylactic use of orally disintegrating olanzapine in the prevention of PIA in subsequent ECT treatments.

  10. Triple antiplatelet therapy for preventing vascular events: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dual antiplatelet therapy is usually superior to mono therapy in preventing recurrent vascular events (VEs). This systematic review assesses the safety and efficacy of triple antiplatelet therapy in comparison with dual therapy in reducing recurrent vascular events. Methods Completed randomized controlled trials investigating the effect of triple versus dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD), cerebrovascular disease or peripheral vascular disease were identified using electronic bibliographic searches. Data were extracted on composite VEs, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, death and bleeding and analysed with Cochrane Review Manager software. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using random effects models. Results Twenty-five completed randomized trials (17,383 patients with IHD) were included which involving the use of intravenous (iv) GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab, eptifibatide, tirofiban), aspirin, clopidogrel and/or cilostazol. In comparison with aspirin-based therapy, triple therapy using an intravenous GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor significantly reduced composite VEs and MI in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS) (VE: OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.55-0.86; MI: OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.56-0.88) and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) (VE: OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.30-0.51; MI: OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.17-0.38). A significant reduction in death was also noted in STEMI patients treated with GP IIb/IIIa based triple therapy (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49-0.99). Increased minor bleeding was noted in STEMI and elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients treated with GP IIb/IIIa based triple therapy. Stroke events were too infrequent for us to be able to identify meaningful trends and no data were available for patients recruited into trials on the basis of stroke or peripheral vascular disease. Conclusions Triple antiplatelet therapy based on iv GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors was more

  11. [Dual antiplatelet therapy for treatment and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease: indications, modalities and duration].

    PubMed

    Degrauwe, Sophie; Iglesias, Juan F

    2016-05-25

    The choice and optimal duration of dualantiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for the treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) represent a challenging clinical dilemma. Antiplatelet treatment strategies are determined by the clinical setting, patient comorbidities and management strategy. While aspirin remains the cornerstone for secondary prevention of CAD, DAPT significantly reduces recurrent ischemic adverse events at the expense of an increased risk of major bleeding complications. A tailored approach based on individual ischemic and hemorrhagic risk assessment is currently recommended. This review aims to provide a contemporary overview on the current body of evidence concerning DAPT for treatment and secondary prevention of CAD with practical emphasis on current indications, choice, combination and optimal duration of antiplatelet therapy.

  12. Hypoglycaemia due to interaction of glimepiride with isoniazid in a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Boglou, Panagiotis; Steiropoulos, Paschalis; Papanas, Nikolaos; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2013-04-16

    Hypoglycaemia is a well-recognised untoward effect of sulfonylureas. We report a case of severe hypoglycaemia after isoniazid initiation in a type 2 diabetic patient. An oral glucose tolerance test revealed high serum insulin and C peptide, suggesting hyperinsulinaemia, and it was used to ascertain the relationship between insulin, glucose and C peptide levels. Insulin and C peptide elevation was attributed to the interaction between the two drugs. As a cytochrome inhibitor, isoniazid increased serum glimepiride concentration, resulting in hyperinsulinaemia. The diagnosis of occult insulinoma or nesidioblastosis was ruled out by CT and MRI, as we could not perform more sensitive, still invasive, diagnostic procedures. After isoniazid withdrawal, hypoglycaemia regressed and glimepiride was reinitiated. In conclusion, this case illustrates the need of caution when prescribing isoniazid in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus receiving glimepiride to avoid hypoglycaemia.

  13. Enhanced bradycardia induced by beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in rats pretreated with isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; Sánchez-Salvatori, M A; Medina, M

    1998-12-01

    High doses of isoniazid increase hypotension induced by vasodilators and change the accompanying reflex tachycardia to bradycardia, an interaction attributed to decreased synthesis of brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In the present study, the possible enhancement by isoniazid of bradycardia induced by beta-adrenoceptor antagonists was determined in rats anaesthetised with chloralose-urethane. Isoniazid significantly increased bradycardia after propranolol, pindolol, labetalol and atenolol, as well as after clonidine, but not after hexamethonium or carbachol. Enhancement was not observed in rats pretreated with methylatropine or previously vagotomised. These results are compatible with interference by isoniazid with GABAergic inhibition of cardiac parasympathetic tone. Such interference could be exerted centrally, possibly at the nucleus ambiguus, or peripherally at the sinus node.

  14. Prevention of Distant Lung Metastasis After Photodynamic Therapy Application in a Breast Cancer Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Longo, João Paulo Figueiró; Muehlmann, Luis Alexandre; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Portilho, Flávia Arruda; de Souza, Ludmilla Regina; Silva, Jaqueline Rodrigues; Lacava, Zulmira Guerrero Marques; Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Chaves, Sacha Braun; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the activity of photodynamic therapy mediated by aluminum-chlorophthalocyanine contained in a polymeric nanostructured carrier composed by methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride (PVM/MA) against local subcutaneous breast cancer tumors and its effects against distant metastasis in a mouse tumor model. In our results, we observed a decrease in breast cancer tumor growth, prevention of distant lung metastases, and a significant increased survival in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. In addition to these results, we observed that tumor-bearing mice without treatment developed a significant extension of liver hematopoiesis that was significantly reduced in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. We hypothesized and showed that this reduction in (1) metastasis and (2) liver hematopoiesis may be related to the systemic activity of immature hematopoietic cells, specifically the myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which were suppressed in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. These cells produce a tolerogenic tumor environment that protects tumor tissues from immunological surveillance. Therefore, we suggest that photodynamic therapy could be employed in combination with other conventional therapies; such as surgery and radiotherapy, to improve the overall survival of patients diagnosed with breast cancer, as observed in our experimental resuIts.

  15. Intravenous calcitriol therapy in an early stage prevents parathyroid gland growth

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Masatomo; Tokumoto, Masanori; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Hirakata, Hideki; Iida, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    Background. Both the phenotypic alterations of parathyroid (PT) cells, e.g. down-regulation of the calcium-sensing receptor, and the increase of the PT cell number in nodular hyperplasia are the main causes of refractory secondary hyperparathyroidism. It is of great importance to prevent PT growth in an early stage. Methods. To examine a more effective method of calcitriol therapy for the prevention of PT hyperplasia, we randomized haemodialysis patients with mild hyperparathyroidism to receive either daily orally administered calcitriol (n = 33) or intravenous calcitriol (n = 27) over a 12-month study period. Calcitriol was modulated so as to keep the serum intact PTH level between 100 and 150 pg/ml. Results. Both groups showed similar reductions of the serum PTH level and similar increases in serum calcium. In both groups, there were no significant changes in the serum phosphate level. Long-term daily oral calcitriol therapy failed to prevent the increase of both maximum PT volume and total volume, as assessed by ultrasonography; however, intravenous calcitriol therapy successfully suppressed this progression. In the daily, oral group, both the bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and the N-telopeptide cross-linked of type I collagen (NTX) significantly decreased, which was probably due to the PTH suppression. However, these bone metabolism markers remained stable in the intravenous group. The total dosage of calcitriol during the study was comparable in both groups. Conclusions. These data indicate that intravenous calcitriol therapy in an early stage of secondary hyperparathyroidism is necessary to prevent PT growth and to keep a good condition of bone metabolism. PMID:18515308

  16. Is preoperative radiation therapy as effective as postoperative radiation therapy for heterotopic ossification prevention in acetabular fractures?

    PubMed

    Archdeacon, Michael T; d'Heurle, Albert; Nemeth, Nicole; Budde, Bradley

    2014-11-01

    Prophylactic approaches to prevent heterotopic ossification after acetabular fracture surgery have included indomethacin and/or single-dose external beam radiation therapy administered after surgery. Although preoperative radiation has been used for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis in the THA population, to our knowledge, no studies have compared preoperative and postoperative radiation therapy in the acetabular fracture population. We determined whether heterotopic ossification frequency and severity were different between patients with acetabular fracture treated with prophylactic radiation therapy preoperatively and postoperatively. Between January 2002 and December 2009, we treated 320 patients with a Kocher-Langenbeck approach for acetabular fractures, of whom 50 (34%) were treated with radiation therapy preoperatively and 96 (66%) postoperatively. Thirty-four (68%) and 71 (74%), respectively, had 6-month radiographs available for review and were included. For hospital logistical reasons, patients who underwent operative treatment on a Friday or Saturday received radiation therapy preoperatively, and all others received it postoperatively. The treatment groups were comparable in terms of most demographic parameters, injury severity, and fracture patterns. Six-month postoperative radiographs were reviewed and graded according to Brooker. Followup ranged from 6 to 93 months and 6 to 97 months for the preoperative and postoperative groups, respectively. Post hoc power analysis showed our study was powered to detect a difference of 22% or more between patients with severe heterotopic ossification. Sample size calculations showed 915 subjects would be needed to detect a 5% relative difference in severe heterotopic ossification status between groups. We detected no difference in heterotopic ossification frequency between the preoperative (eight of 36, 22%) and postoperative (19 of 71, 27%) groups (p=0.609). There was also no difference in heterotopic

  17. Hypnotically facilitated exposure response prevention therapy for an OIF veteran with OCD.

    PubMed

    Proescher, Eric J

    2010-07-01

    The highly stressful conditions of a war zone may exacerbate or trigger a wide variety of symptoms including Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) once a service member returns home. Service members and new veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars present to treatment with multiple psychosocial concerns and co-morbid psychiatric conditions. Evidence-based treatments including exposure based therapies are commonly recommended for use with returning veterans. Although studies support the efficacy of Exposure Response Prevention (ERP) therapy for treating OCD, eligibility for these studies limits participation to subjects who self-report a well-defined, circumscribed complaint. This approach is not typical of clinic clients who, more often than not, report multiple psychological issues. The following individual case study demonstrates how integrating hypnosis facilitated the cognitive-behavioral ERP therapy and treatment for a patient suffering from OCD.

  18. Manualization of Occupational Therapy Interventions: Illustrations from the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Fogelberg, Donald; Diaz, Jesus; Carlson, Mike; Clark, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The manualization of a complex occupational therapy intervention is a crucial step in ensuring treatment fidelity for both clinical application and research purposes. Towards this latter end, intervention manuals are essential for assuring trustworthiness and replicability of randomized controlled trials (RCT’s) that aim to provide evidence of the effectiveness of occupational therapy. In this paper, literature on the process of intervention manualization is reviewed. The prescribed steps are then illustrated through our experience in implementing the University of Southern California/Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center’s collaborative Pressure Ulcer Prevention Project (PUPP). In this research program, qualitative research provided the initial foundation for manualization of a multifaceted occupational therapy intervention designed to reduce incidence of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with SCI. PMID:22214116

  19. Combination therapy for treatment or prevention of atherosclerosis: Focus on the lipid-RAAS interaction☆

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Kwang Kon; Han, Seung Hwan; Oh, Pyung Chun; Shin, Eak Kyun; Quon, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Large clinical trials demonstrate that control of blood pressure or hyperlipidemia reduces risk for cardiovascular events by ~30%. Factors that may further reduce remaining risk are not definitively established. One potential target is atherosclerosis, a crucial feature in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases whose development is determined by multiple mechanism including complex interactions between endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Reciprocal relationships between endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance as well as cross-talk between hyperlipidemia and the rennin–angiotensin–aldosterone system may contribute to development of atherosclerosis. Therefore, one appealing strategy for prevention or treatment of atherosclerosis may be to simultaneously address several risk factors with combination therapies that target multiple pathogenic mechanisms. Combination therapy with statins, peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor agonists, and rennin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers demonstrate additive beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance when compared with monotherapies in patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Additive beneficial effects of combined therapy are mediated by both distinct and interrelated mechanisms, consistent with both pre-clinical and clinical investigations. Thus, combination therapy may be an important concept in developing more effective strategies to treat and prevent atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, and co-morbid metabolic disorders characterized by endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. PMID:19800624

  20. Supportive therapies for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and preservation of liver function.

    PubMed

    Takami, Taro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Saeki, Issei; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Suehiro, Yutaka; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-08-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest cancers in the world and is associated with a high risk of recurrence. The development of a wide range of new therapies is therefore essential. In this study, from the perspective of supportive therapy for the prevention of HCC recurrence and preservation of liver function in HCC patients, we surveyed a variety of different therapeutic agents. We show that branched chain amino acids (BCAA) supplementation and late evening snack with BCAA, strategies that address issues of protein-energy malnutrition, are important for liver cirrhotic patients with HCC. For chemoprevention of HCC recurrence, we show that viral control after radical treatment is important. We also reviewed the therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs, sorafenib, peretinoin, iron chelators. Sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and a standard therapy in the treatment of advanced HCC. Peretinoin is a vitamin A-like molecule that targets the retinoid nuclear receptor to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in HCC cells. Iron chelators, such as deferoxamine and deferasirox, act to prevent cancer cell growth. These chelators may have potential as combination therapies in conjunction with peretinoin. Finally, we review the potential inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells on hepatocarcinogenesis.

  1. Changes in problem-solving appraisal after cognitive therapy for the prevention of suicide.

    PubMed

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, M; Bhar, S S; Brown, G K; Olsen, C; Beck, A T

    2012-06-01

    Cognitive therapy has been found to be effective in decreasing the recurrence of suicide attempts. A theoretical aim of cognitive therapy is to improve problem-solving skills so that suicide no longer remains the only available option. This study examined the differential rate of change in problem-solving appraisal following suicide attempts among individuals who participated in a randomized controlled trial for the prevention of suicide. Changes in problem-solving appraisal from pre- to 6-months post-treatment in individuals with a recent suicide attempt, randomized to either cognitive therapy (n = 60) or a control condition (n = 60), were assessed by using the Social Problem-Solving Inventory-Revised, Short Form. Improvements in problem-solving appraisal were similarly observed for both groups within the 6-month follow-up. However, during this period, individuals assigned to the cognitive therapy condition demonstrated a significantly faster rate of improvement in negative problem orientation and impulsivity/carelessness. More specifically, individuals receiving cognitive therapy were significantly less likely to report a negative view toward life problems and impulsive/carelessness problem-solving style. Cognitive therapy for the prevention of suicide provides rapid changes within 6 months on negative problem orientation and impulsivity/carelessness problem-solving style. Given that individuals are at the greatest risk for suicide within 6 months of their last suicide attempt, the current study demonstrates that a brief cognitive intervention produces a rapid rate of improvement in two important domains of problem-solving appraisal during this sensitive period.

  2. Should acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) therapy for prevention of thromboembolic events be stopped prior to surgical extractions?

    PubMed

    Dodson, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Randomised controlled trial. Patients with coronary artery disease who were receiving 100 mg/day of ASA for the prevention of thromboembolic events, and requiring at least one molar tooth extracted were randomised to either having their ASA therapy suspended for seven days before tooth extraction and restarted the day following the surgical procedure or not having their ASA therapy suspended at any point before or after the procedure. A single dentist who was unaware of the patients' ASA therapy status performed all the extractions. Outcomes were a platelet aggregation test carried out on the day of the operation and the amount of bleeding measured during the intra-operative period. Bleeding was controlled with local haemostatic methods and there were no reported episodes of haemorrhaging during the intra- and post-operative periods. The mean (±SD) volume of bleeding was 12.10 ±9.37 mL for patients who underwent ASA therapy suspension and 16.38±13.54 mL for those patients whose treatments were unaltered (P= .151). The platelet reactivity index values exhibited statistically significant differences between the two investigated groups (P= .004). The platelet reactivity index values for the group with ASA therapy suspended was 242.58 ± 71.26 compared with 192.09 ± 60.54 in the group that continued with ASA. There was no difference in the amount of bleeding that occurred during tooth extraction between patients who continued ASA therapy and patients who suspended their ASA therapy. The platelet reactivity test demonstrated a reduction in platelet aggregation in the ASA therapy group, but this was without clinical consequence.

  3. Metabolomics of urine for the assessment of microvesicular lipid accumulation in the liver following isoniazid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Jason P.; Snyder, Rodney W.; Popp, James A.; Fennell, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop a noninvasive marker of hepatic microvesicular lipid accumulation (MVLA), a histopathological effect currently diagnosed in humans following liver biopsy. MVLA is detected in animal studies of chemicals and drugs and occurs in some humans exposed to chemicals or pharmaceuticals. Because MVLA is a reversible histopathology, early detection of MVLA using a noninvasive method, could aid clinicians in the treatment of patients taking drugs that are known to induce this injury. Isoniazid (INH) was selected as a model compound for this investigation, because MVLA occurs in tuberculosis (TB) patients treated with a combination therapy, which includes INH. This study used male rats dosed daily with INH at 0, 10, or 300 mg/kg/day for up to 8 days. Urine, blood, and liver were obtained following 1 and 8 days. NMR metabolomics of urine revealed markers that correlated (100%) with the findings of MVLA in the right, left, and median liver lobes in 4/9 rats administered the high dose of INH for 8 days. Metabolomics of liver extracts also revealed markers that correlated with the MVLA injury. Serum enzymes that are clinically used to assess liver injury were not consistently correlated to the findings of MVLA. Metabolite changes consistent with the presence of MVLA correlated with interruptions in inositol, carbohydrate, glycerolipid, and glyoxylate metabolism. This study reveals markers that could find pre-clinical use, provides insights into mechanisms involved in MVLA, and demonstrates the need for the validation of noninvasive MVLA markers in human patients. PMID:21057652

  4. Protective Effects of Metallothionein on Isoniazid and Rifampicin-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peiyu; Wang, Yimei; Zhao, Jun; Jia, Li; Fu, Ze; Jing, Li; Liu, Gang; Peng, Shuangqing

    2013-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH) and Rifampicin (RFP) are widely used in the world for the treatment of tuberculosis, but the hepatotoxicity is a major concern during clinical therapy. Previous studies showed that these drugs induced oxidative stress in liver, and several antioxidants abated this effect. Metallothionein (MT), a member of cysteine-rich protein, has been proposed as a potent antioxidant. This study attempts to determine whether endogenous expression of MT protects against INH and RFP-induced hepatic oxidative stress in mice. Wild type (MT+/+) and MT-null (MT−/−) mice were treated intragastrically with INH (150 mg/kg), RFP (300 mg/kg), or the combination (150 mg/kg INH +300 mg/kg RFP) for 21 days. The results showed that MT−/− mice were more sensitive than MT+/+ mice to INH and RFP-induced hepatic injuries as evidenced by hepatic histopathological alterations, increased serum AST levels and liver index, and hepatic oxidative stress as evidenced by the increase of MDA production and the change of liver antioxidant status. Furthermore, INH increased the protein expression of hepatic CYP2E1 and INH/RFP (alone or in combination) decreased the expression of hepatic CYP1A2. These findings clearly demonstrate that basal MT provides protection against INH and RFP-induced toxicity in hepatocytes. The CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 were involved in the pathogenesis of INH and RFP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:23967274

  5. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity.

  6. Factors Influencing the Prescription of Cardiovascular Preventive Therapies in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gauvin, Valerie; Turcotte, Stephane; Milot, Alain; Douville, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend that patients with peripheral arterial disease should be medically treated to reduce the occurrence of serious cardiovascular events. Despite these recommendations, studies conducted in the early 2000s reported that medical therapies for secondary cardiovascular prevention are not given systematically to patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We identified factors associated with the prescription of preventive therapies in patients with symptomatic PAD. Methods and Findings Consecutive patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (n = 362) treated between 2008 and 2010 in one tertiary care center (CHU de Quebec, Canada) were considered. Data were collected from the medical charts. The main outcome was the combined prescription of three therapies: 1) statins, 2) antiplatelets, 3) angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The mean age was 70 years and 43% had a pre-existing coronary artery disease. Antiplatelet therapy was the most prescribed drug (83%). A total of 52% of the patients received the three combined therapies. Less than 10% of patients had a known contraindication to one class of medication. Having at least three cardiovascular risk factors (Odds Ratio (OR) = 4.51; 95% CI: 2.76–7.37) was the factor most strongly associated with the prescription of the combined therapies. Pre-existing coronary artery disease (OR = 2.28; 95% CI: 1.43–3.65) and history of peripheral vascular surgery (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.37–3.86) were two factors independently associated with the prescription of the combined therapies. However, peripheral arterial disease patients with chronic critical limb ischemia were less likely to receive the combined therapies (OR = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.32–0.87) than those with claudication. The retrospective nature of this study, not allowing for an exhaustive report of the contraindication to medication prescription, is the main limitation. Conclusion About half

  7. Epithelial cell culture models for the prevention and therapy of clinical breast cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Clinical breast cancer progresses via a multi-step carcinogenic process wherein genetic, molecular, endocrine and dietary factors play significant roles in the pathogenesis, prevention and therapy of the disease. Preclinical cell culture models, expressing clinically relevant genetic and endocrine defects and exhibiting quantifiable cancer risk, may provide facile, clinically translatable approaches to identify molecular targets and susceptible mechanistic pathways for the efficacy of novel interventional approaches. This review summarizes laboratory investigations focused on i) developing murine and human mammary tissue-derived cell culture models; ii) optimizing mechanism-based quantitative endpoint biomarker assays specific for carcinogenic risk and preventive/therapeutic efficacy; and iii) providing quantifiable proof-of-principle evidence for validation of the present cell culture approaches, capable of prioritizing efficacious lead compounds for subsequent in vivo animal studies and clinical trials for the prevention/therapy of breast cancer. Epithelial cell culture models are developed and characterized where the carcinogenic process is initiated by the targeted expression of clinically relevant oncogenes. The cell culture systems from mouse mammary tissue are in vitro approaches that complement the Ras and Myc transgenic mouse models. The human mammary tissue-derived systems are in vitro models for chemoendocrine, therapy-resistant, clinical, pre-invasive ER-/PR-/HER-2+ comedo ductal carcinoma in situ, ER+/PR+ chemoendocrine therapy-responsive breast cancer and ER-/PR-/HER-2- triple-negative chemoendocrine, therapy-resistant breast cancer. The oncogene-initiated phenotypes exhibit loss of homeostatic growth control, downregulation of cell apoptosis and gain of carcinogenic risk in vitro, as well as transplantable tumor development in vivo. Numerous mechanistically distinct, synthetic pharmacological agents, as well as naturally occurring dietary compounds

  8. Comparison of oral and subcutaneous iron chelation therapies in the prevention of major endocrinopathies in beta-thalassemia major patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Hsing; Wu, Kang-Hsi; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Peng, Ching-Tien; Tsai, Chang-Hai

    2006-01-01

    While hypertransfusion and subcutaneous iron chelation therapy have increased longevity of patients with beta-thalassemia (thal) major, endocrinopathies have become more common and impair the quality of their lives. Additionally, subcutaneous iron chelation therapy is an uncomfortable experience and can prevent patients from regular compliance with iron chelation therapy. We compared the efficacy of oral deferiprone (L1) to subcutaneous desferrioxamine (DFO) chelation therapy for the prevention of major endocrinopathies (growth hormone insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and gonadal dysfunction) among patients with beta-thal major to see if we could offer these patients an easier and more painless way to reduce their body iron load and related endocrine complications.

  9. Outbreak of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis in an immigrant community in Spain.

    PubMed

    Hernán García, Cristina; Moreno Cea, Lourdes; Fernández Espinilla, Virginia; Ruiz Lopez Del Prado, Gema; Fernández Arribas, Socorro; Andrés García, Irene; Rubio, Verónica; Vesenbeckh, Silvan; Eiros Bouza, José María

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health problem. In 2013, 9 million new cases of active TB were estimated globally and the proportion of reported new cases with multi-drug resistance (MDR) was 3.5%. Contact tracing of a case of pulmonary tuberculosis was performed in a Bolivian patient. Diagnostic tests were performed according to national and local protocols. An outbreak of tuberculosis in an immigrant community was detected, with 5 cases originating from one index case. Genotyping and drug susceptibility testing of the sputum samples determined Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to isoniazid (KatG-msp unmutated/inhA 5RBS CT). Active case finding revealed a total of 39 contacts with an incidence of latent infection of 71.43%. The present study confirms the importance of active case finding through contact tracing as well as rapid laboratory diagnosis to achieve improvements in early detection of TB. Early diagnosis of the patient, compliance with appropriate treatment protocols and monitoring of drug resistance are considered essential for the prevention and control of TB. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduced Emergence of Isoniazid Resistance with Concurrent Use of Thioridazine against Acute Murine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.; Pinn, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    The repurposing of existing drugs is being pursued as a means by which to accelerate the development of novel regimens for the treatment of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). In the current study, we assessed the activity of the antipsychotic drug thioridazine (TRZ) in combination with the standard regimen in a well-validated murine TB model. Single-dose and steady-state pharmacokinetic studies were performed in BALB/c mice to establish human-equivalent doses of TRZ. To determine the bactericidal activity of TRZ against TB in BALB/c mice, three separate studies were performed, including a dose-ranging study of TRZ monotherapy and efficacy studies of human-equivalent doses of TRZ with and without isoniazid (INH) or rifampin (RIF). Therapeutic efficacy was assessed by the change in mycobacterial load in the lung. The human-equivalent dose of thioridazine was determined to be 25 mg/kg of body weight, which was well tolerated in mice. TRZ was found to accumulate at high concentrations in lung tissue relative to serum levels. We observed modest synergy during coadministration of TRZ with INH, and the addition of TRZ reduced the emergence of INH-resistant mutants in mouse lungs. In conclusion, this study further illustrates the opportunity to reevaluate the contribution of TRZ to the sterilizing activity of combination regimens to prevent the emergence of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. PMID:24798290

  11. Testing of susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to isoniazid and rifampin by mycobacterium growth indicator tube method.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, S B; Hanna, B A

    1996-01-01

    We tested isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis recovered from 117 patients for their susceptibilities to isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's disk modification of the indirect method of proportions (MOP) test and a three-tube mycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT; BBL) antimycobacterial susceptibility test (AST). Sixty-seven of the M. tuberculosis isolates were recovered from Lowenstein-Jensen (BBL) subcultures, and 50 of the isolates were recovered from MGIT cultures of samples from various body sites. For the MGIT AST method, 0.5 ml of test organism suspension was inoculated into an MGIT with 0.1 micrograms of INH per ml, an MGIT with 1.0 micrograms of RIF per ml, and growth control MGIT. The tubes were incubated at 37 degrees C and were examined daily. The MGIT AST results were interpreted as follows: susceptible if the tubes containing INH or RIF did not fluoresce within 2 days of the time that the positive growth control fluoresced and resistant if the tubes containing INH or RIF did fluoresce within 2 days of the time that the positive growth control fluoresced. The mean time fluorescence for the positive growth control was 5.5 days. The two methods were in agreement for 114 of the 117 isolates from patients, while for 3 isolates there were minor discordant results. PMID:8735121

  12. Mutations in catalase-peroxidase KatG from isoniazid resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates: insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Arethusa Lobo; de Lima Scodro, Regiane Bertin; Caleffi-Ferracioli, Katiany Rizzieri; Siqueira, Vera Lúcia Dias; Campanerut-Sá, Paula Aline Zanetti; Lopes, Luciana Dias Ghiraldi; de Almeida, Aryadne Larissa; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti; Seixas, Flavio Augusto Vicente

    2017-04-01

    The current multidrug therapy for tuberculosis (TB) is based on the use of isoniazid (INH) in combination with other antibiotics such as rifampin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide. Literature reports have shown that Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of TB, has become resistant to this treatment by means of point mutations in the target enzymes of these drugs, such as catalase-peroxidase (KatG). By means of equilibrium molecular dynamics in the presence of the ligand, this work evaluated ten point mutations described in the enzyme KatG that are related to resistance to INH . The results showed that the resistance mechanism is related to stereochemical modifications at the N-terminal domain of the protein, which restrict INH access to its catalytic site, not involving mechanisms of electrostatic nature. These results show insights that can be useful for the identification of new anti-TB drugs which may be able to circumvent this mechanism of resistance.

  13. Systems Pharmacology Approach Toward the Design of Inhaled Formulations of Rifampicin and Isoniazid for Treatment of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cilfone, NA; Pienaar, E; Thurber, GM; Kirschner, DE; Linderman, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Conventional oral therapies for the treatment of tuberculosis are limited by poor antibiotic distribution in granulomas, which contributes to lengthy treatment regimens and inadequate bacterial sterilization. Inhaled formulations are a promising strategy to increase antibiotic efficacy and reduce dose frequency. We develop a multiscale computational approach that accounts for simultaneous dynamics of a lung granuloma, carrier release kinetics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. Using this computational platform, we predict that a rationally designed inhaled formulation of isoniazid given at a significantly reduced dose frequency has better sterilizing capabilities and reduced toxicity than the current oral regimen. Furthermore, we predict that inhaled formulations of rifampicin require unrealistic carrier antibiotic loadings that lead to early toxicity concerns. Lastly, we predict that targeting carriers to macrophages has limited effects on treatment efficacy. Our platform can be extended to account for additional antibiotics and provides a new tool for rapidly prototyping the efficacy of inhaled formulations. PMID:26225241

  14. Efficacy of antiplatelet therapy in secondary prevention following lacunar stroke: pooled analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Chun Shing; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Copley, Hannah Charlotte; Myint, Phyo Kyaw; Loke, Yoon K; Benavente, Oscar R

    2015-04-01

    Lacunar stroke accounts for ≈25% of ischemic stroke, but optimal antiplatelet regimen to prevent stroke recurrence remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of antiplatelet agents in secondary stroke prevention after a lacunar stroke. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane library for randomized controlled trials that reported risk of recurrent stroke or death with antiplatelet therapy in patients with lacunar stroke. We used random effects meta-analysis and evaluated heterogeneity with I(2). We included 17 trials with 42,234 participants (mean age 64.4 years, 65% male) and follow up ranging from 4 weeks to 3.5 years. Compared with placebo, any single antiplatelet agent was associated with a significant reduction in recurrence of any stroke (risk ratio [RR] 0.77, 0.62-0.97, 2 studies) and ischemic stroke (RR 0.48, 0.30-0.78, 2 studies), but not for the composite outcome of any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death (RR 0.89, 0.75-1.05, 2 studies). When other antiplatelet agents (ticlodipine, cilostazol, and dipyridamole) were compared with aspirin, there was no consistent reduction in stroke recurrence (RR 0.91, 0.75-1.10, 3 studies). Dual antiplatelet therapy did not confer clear benefit over monotherapy (any stroke RR 0.83, 0.68-1.00, 3 studies; ischemic stroke RR 0.80, 0.62-1.02, 3 studies; composite outcome RR 0.90, 0.80-1.02, 3 studies). Our results suggest that any of the single antiplatelet agents compared with placebo in the included trials is adequate for secondary stroke prevention after lacunar stroke. Dual antiplatelet therapy should not be used for long-term stroke prevention in this stroke subtype. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Donor-derived tuberculosis (TB): isoniazid-resistant TB transmitted from a lung transplant donor with inadequately treated latent infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, T O; Darley, D R; Goeman, E E; Shaw, K; Marriott, D J; Glanville, A R

    2016-10-01

    Donor-derived tuberculosis (TB) is an increasingly recognized complication of solid organ transplantation. We report a case of isoniazid-resistant pulmonary TB in a lung transplant recipient. The patient acquired the infection from the lung donor who was previously empirically treated with isoniazid for latent TB. The case highlights the caveat that, while adequate treatment of latent TB with isoniazid is presumed, meticulous screening of donors is required.

  16. Safety of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy After Carotid Endarterectomy for Prevention of Restenosis: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Miguel A.; Chang, José; Hernández, Alvaro; Martínez, Emmanuel; Fernández, Huberth; Quirós, Gerardo; Salazar, Johanna; Ramos-Esquivel, Allan; Maud, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of recurrent carotid stenosis after carotid endarterectomy varies from 1% to 37% with only 0–8% symptomatic restenosis. Safety of short-term (30 days) dual-antiplatelet therapy has not been established in this type of procedure. Aims To investigate the safety of dual antiplatelet therapy after carotid endarterectomy to prevent restenosis. Methods We retrospectively identified all the patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy (symptomatic or asymptomatic) treated at our center between July 2010 and July 2013 according to local protocols. All patients received a dose of 100 mg of aspirin daily immediately after carotid endarterectomy, with subsequent 100 mg of aspirin daily for the rest of the study period, and some patients received 75 mg of Clopidogrel for 30 days starting immediately after surgical procedure (dual therapy group), assigned according to medical criteria. Duplex carotid ultrasound and clinical assessments were performed at 30 days and 1 year after the procedure. Results A total of 44 patients (71.2 ± 7.9 years old; 77.2% symptomatic) were analyzed; 35 of them with dual therapy (79.54%). At 30 days, two patients from the mono-therapy group developed restenosis (22.2%), compared to none in dual therapy group (p=0.04). At one year follow-up, only one patient from the dual group showed restenosis (p=0.10). No deaths, major bleeding or new strokes were reported in both groups. Conclusions Short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel after carotid endarterectomy might be associated with a lower incidence of restenosis. This observation must be validated in a prospective trial. PMID:27829964

  17. Fluoroquinolone Therapy for the Prevention of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Contacts. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fox, Gregory J; Oxlade, Olivia; Menzies, Dick

    2015-07-15

    Fluoroquinolone (FQN) therapy of latent tuberculosis infection among contacts of individuals with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is controversial. To determine the potential benefits, risks (including acquired FQN resistance), and cost-effectiveness of FQN therapy to prevent TB in contacts of individuals with MDR-TB. We used decision analysis to estimate costs and outcomes associated with no therapy compared with a 6-month course of daily FQN therapy to treat latent TB infection in contacts of individuals with MDR-TB. Outcomes modeled were the incidence of MDR-TB, MDR-TB with FQN resistance, TB-related death, quality-adjusted life years, and health system costs. FQN preventive therapy resulted in health system savings, lower incidence of MDR-TB, and lower mortality than no treatment. We found the incidence of MDR-TB with acquired FQN resistance would also be lower with FQN therapy of infected contacts. In our model, FQN preventive therapy resulted in substantial health system savings and in reduced mortality, incidence of MDR-TB, and incidence of acquired FQN-resistant disease as well as improved quality of life. FQN therapy remained cost saving with improved outcomes even if the effectiveness of therapy in preventing MDR-TB was as low as 10%.

  18. Functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (5, 0) as a carrier for isoniazid — A tuberculosis drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajarajeswari, M.; Iyakutti, K.; Lakshmi, I.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Kawazoe, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Nanostructures functionalized with amino acid are able to penetrate the cell wall. In this first principle study, we have demonstrated that the amino acid alanine functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (5, 0) can be a drug carrier for the tuberculosis drug isoniazid. Isoniazid is binding with both the non-covalently and covalently functionalized CNTs through the π-π stacking and NH⋯π interactions. The planar structure of isoniazid and hydrophobic nature of CNT promote the π-π stacking interactions. The amine group present in the isoniazid enables the NH⋯π interaction with the delocalized π electron cloud of CNT.

  19. Flow-injection chemiluminescence sensor for determination of isoniazid in urine sample based on molecularly imprinted polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yan; Zhou, Houjiang; Zhang, Zhujun; He, Deyong; He, Chao

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) of isoniazid is synthesized through thermal radical copolymerization of metharylic acid (MAA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) in the presence of isoniazid template molecules. A novel flow injection chemiluminescence sensor for isoniazid determination is developed by packing the isoniazid-MIP into the flow cell as recognition elements. Isoniazid could be selectively adsorbed by the MIPs and the adsorbed isoniazid was sensed by its great enhancing effect on the weak CL reaction between luminol and periodate which were mixed in the flow cell. The enhanced CL intensity is linear in the range 2 × 10 -9 to 2 × 10 -7 g/mL and the detection limit is 7 × 10 -10 g/mL (3 σ) isoniazid with a relative standard deviation 2.8% ( n = 9) for 8 × 10 -8 g/mL. The sensor is reversible and reusable. It has a great improvement in sensitivity and selectivity for CL analysis. As a result, the sensor has been successfully applied to determination of isoniazid in human urine. At the same time, the binding characteristic of the polymer to isoniazid was evaluated by batch method and the dynamic method, respectively.

  20. The role of fluticasone propionate/salmeterol combination therapy in preventing exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yawn, Barbara P; Raphiou, Ibrahim; Hurley, Judith S; Dalal, Anand A

    2010-01-01

    Exacerbations contribute significantly to the morbidity of COPD, leading to an accelerated decline in lung function, reduced functional status, reduced health status and quality of life, poorer prognosis and increased mortality. Prevention of exacerbations is thus an important goal of COPD management. In patients with COPD, treatment with a combination of the inhaled corticosteroid fluticasone propionate (250 μg) and the long-acting β2-agonist salmeterol (50 μg) in a single inhaler (250/50 μg) is an effective therapy option that has been shown to reduce the frequency of exacerbations, to improve lung function, dyspnea and health status, and to be relatively cost-effective as a COPD maintenance therapy. Importantly, results of various studies suggest that fluticasone propionate and salmeterol have synergistic effects when administered together that improve their efficacy in controlling symptoms and reducing exacerbations. The present non-systematic review summarizes the role of fluticasone propionate/salmeterol combination therapy in the prevention of exacerbations of COPD and its related effects on lung function, survival, health status, and healthcare costs. PMID:20631816

  1. Music therapy as an early intervention to prevent chronification of tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Grapp, Miriam; Hutter, Elisabeth; Argstatter, Heike; Plinkert, Peter K; Bolay, Hans V

    2013-01-01

    In the present study a music therapeutic intervention according to the ‘Heidelberg Model’ was evaluated as a complementary treatment option for patients with acute tinnitus whom medical treatment only brought minimal or no improvement. The central question was if music therapy in an early phase of tinnitus was able to reduce tinnitus symptoms and to prevent them from becoming chronical. 23 patients with acute tinnitus (6-12 weeks) were included in this study and took part in our manualized short term music therapeutic treatment which lasted ten consecutive 50-minutes sessions of individualized therapy. Tinnitus severity and individual tinnitus related distress were assessed by the Tinnitus Beeinträchtigungs-Fragebogen (i.e. Tinnitus Impairment Questionnaire, TBF-12) at baseline, start of treatment, and end of treatment. Score changes in TBF-12 from start to end of the treatment showed significant improvements in tinnitus impairment. This indicates that this music therapy approach applied in an initial stage of tinnitus can make an important contribution towards preventing tinnitus from becoming a chronic condition. PMID:23936599

  2. Targeting the NFκB signaling pathways for breast cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Nag, Subhasree A; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2015-01-01

    The activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB), a proinflammatory transcription factor, is a commonly observed phenomenon in breast cancer. It facilitates the development of a hormone-independent, invasive, high-grade, and late-stage tumor phenotype. Moreover, the commonly used cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy approaches activate NFκB, leading to the development of invasive breast cancers that show resistance to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and endocrine therapy. Inhibition of NFκB results in an increase in the sensitivity of cancer cells to the apoptotic effects of chemotherapeutic agents and radiation and restoring hormone sensitivity, which is correlated with increased disease-free survival in patients with breast cancer. In this review article, we focus on the role of the NFκB signaling pathways in the development and progression of breast cancer and the validity of NFκB as a potential target for breast cancer prevention and therapy. We also discuss the recent findings that NFκB may have tumor suppressing activity in certain cancer types. Finally, this review also covers the state-of-the-art development of NFκB inhibitors for cancer therapy and prevention, the challenges in targeting validation, and pharmacology and toxicology evaluations of these agents from the bench to the bedside.

  3. Prevention and therapy of fungal infection in severe acute pancreatitis: A prospective clinical study

    PubMed Central

    He, Yue-Ming; Lv, Xin-Sheng; Ai, Zhong-Li; Liu, Zhi-Su; Qian, Qun; Sun, Quan; Chen, Ji-Wei; Lei, Dao-Xiong; Jiang, Cong-Qing; Yuan, Yu-Fong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevention and therapy of fungal infection in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Seventy patients with SAP admitted from Jan. 1998 to Dec. 2002 were randomly divided into garlicin prevention group, fluconazole (low dosage) prevention group and control group. The incidence of fungal infection, the fungal clearance and mortality after treatment were compared. RESULTS: The incidence of fungal infection in garlicin group and fluconazole group was lower than that in control group (16% vs 30%, P < 0.05 and 9% vs 30%, P < 0.01, respectively). Amphotericin B or therapy-dose fluconazole had effects on patients with fungal infection in garlicin group and control group, but had no effects on patients with fungal infection in fluconzole group. CONCLUSION: Prophylactic dosage of antifungal agents (garlicin or low dosage fluconazole) can reduce the incidence of fungal infection in patients with SAP. But once fungal infection occurs, amphotericin B should be used as early as possible if fluconazole is not effective. PMID:14606111

  4. Transdermal delivery of isoniazid and rifampin in guinea pigs by electro-phonophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Suting; Han, Yi; Yu, Daping; Huo, Fengmin; Wang, Fen; Li, Yunxu; Dong, Lingling; Liu, Zhidong; Huang, Hairong

    2017-11-01

    Electro-phonophoresis (EP) has been used as a drug delivery approach in clinical fields. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the skin permeability of isoniazid and rifampin in guinea pigs by EP to provide reference basis for clinical applications of such transdermal delivery system in the treatment of patients with superficial tuberculosis. Isoniazid and rifampin solutions were delivered transdermally with or without EP in health guinea pigs for 0.5 h. Local skin and blood samples were collected serially at 0, 1/2, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h after dosing. Drug concentrations in local skin and blood were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Isoniazid concentrations in local skin of guinea pigs receiving isoniazid through EP transdermal delivery were significantly higher than in animals receiving only isoniazid with transdermal patch. However, for rifampin, patches alone group presented almost uniform concentration versus time curve with that of EP group, and both groups had concentrations much higher than the therapeutic concentration of the drug over sustainable time. After EP transdermal delivery, the mean peak concentrations of isoniazid and rifampin in skin were 771.0 ± 163.4 μg/mL and 81.2 ± 17.3 μg/mL respectively. Neither isoniazid nor rifampin concentration in blood could be detected (below the lower detection limit of 1 μg/mL) at any time point. The present study showed that application of EP significantly enhanced INH penetration through skin in guinea pigs, while RIF patch alone obtained therapeutic concentration in local skin. Our work suggests several possible medication approaches for efficient treatment of superficial tuberculosis.

  5. Anticoagulation therapy prevents portal-splenic vein thrombosis after splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wei; Lu, Shi-Chun; Li, Guan-Yin; Li, Chuan-Yun; Wu, Ju-Shan; Guo, Qing-Liang; Wang, Meng-Long; Li, Ning

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare the incidence of early portal or splenic vein thrombosis (PSVT) in patients treated with irregular and regular anticoagulantion after splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 301 patients who underwent splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization for portal hypertension due to cirrhosis between April 2004 and July 2010. Patients were categorized into group A with irregular anticoagulation and group B with regular anticoagulation, respectively. Group A (153 patients) received anticoagulant monotherapy for an undesignated time period or with aspirin or warfarin without low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) irregularly. Group B (148 patients) received subcutaneous injection of LMWH routinely within the first 5 d after surgery, followed by oral warfarin and aspirin for one month regularly. The target prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR) was 1.25-1.50. Platelet and PT/INR were monitored. Color Doppler imaging was performed to monitor PSVT as well as the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy. RESULTS: The patients’ data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Among the patients, 94 developed early postoperative mural PSVT, including 63 patients in group A (63/153, 41.17%) and 31 patients in group B (31/148, 20.94%). There were 50 (32.67%) patients in group A and 27 (18.24%) in group B with mural PSVT in the main trunk of portal vein. After the administration of thrombolytic, anticoagulant and anti-aggregation therapy, complete or partial thrombus dissolution achieved in 50 (79.37%) in group A and 26 (83.87%) in group B. CONCLUSION: Regular anticoagulation therapy can reduce the incidence of PSVT in patients who undergo splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization, and regular anticoagulant therapy is safer and more effective than irregular anticoagulant therapy. Early and timely thrombolytic therapy is imperative and feasible for the prevention of PSVT. PMID:22807615

  6. Immunomodulatory gene therapy prevents antibody formation and lethal hypersensitivity reactions in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2010-02-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 x 10(10) particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement.

  7. Immunomodulatory Gene Therapy Prevents Antibody Formation and Lethal Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2009-01-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 × 1010 particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement. PMID:19690517

  8. Selective determination of isoniazid using bentonite clay modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Azad, Uday Pratap; Prajapati, Nandlal; Ganesan, Vellaichamy

    2015-02-01

    Fe(dmbpy)3(2+) (where dmbpy is 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) was immobilized by ion-exchange in a bentonite clay film coating on a glassy carbon electrode. Cyclic voltammetry characteristics of the immobilized Fe(dmbpy)3(2+) were stable and reproducible corresponding to the Fe(dmbpy)3(2+/3+) redox process. In the presence of isoniazid (IZ), the electrogenerated in film Fe(dmbpy)3(3+) oxidized IZ efficiently producing large anodic current. This current was linearly proportional to the IZ concentration in the solution. The process was described by an EC' electrocatalysis mechanism allowing for sensitive determination of IZ with a wide linear dynamic concentration range of 10.0μM to 10.0mM. The electrode was tested for its analytical suitability and possible discrimination of interferences by determining IZ in a commercially available pharmaceutical product. The paper reports on a simple, cheap, and easy to fabricate chronoamperometric chemical sensor for determination of IZ. Kinetic parameters, such as the catalytic rate constant (2.3×10(3)M(-1)s(-1)) and diffusion coefficient of IZ (5.42×10(-5)cm(2)s(-1)), were determined using CV, chronoamperometry, and chronocoulometry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanisms involved in the intrinsic isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Mdluli, K; Swanson, J; Fischer, E; Lee, R E; Barry, C E

    1998-03-01

    Isoniazid (INH), which acts by inhibiting mycolic acid biosynthesis, is very potent against the tuberculous mycobacteria. It is about 100-fold less effective against Mycobacterium avium. This difference has often been attributed to a decreased permeability of the cell wall. We measured the rate of conversion of radiolabelled INH to 4-pyridylmethanol by whole cells and cell-free extracts and estimated the permeability barrier imposed by the cell wall to INH influx in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium. There was no significant difference in the relative permeability to INH between these two species. However, the total conversion rate in M. tuberculosis was found to be four times greater. Examination of in vitro-generated mutants revealed that the major resistance mechanism for both species is loss of the catalase-peroxidase KatG. Analysis of lipid and protein biosynthetic profiles demonstrated that the molecular target of activated INH was identical for both species. M. avium, however, formed colonies at INH concentrations inhibitory for mycolic acid biosynthesis. These mycolate-deficient M. avium exhibited altered colony morphologies, modified cell wall ultrastructure and were 10-fold more sensitive to treatment with hydrophobic antibiotics, such as rifampin. These findings may significantly impact the design of new therapeutic regimens for the treatment of infections with atypical mycobacteria.

  10. The Occurrence of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapies After Generator Replacement in Patients Who No Longer Meet Primary Prevention Indications.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Hiro; Hirai, Taishi; Doukas, Demetrios; Hirai, Rie; Steinbrunner, Jenni; Wilson, John; Noda, Takashi; Hsu, Jonathan; Krummen, David; Feld, Gregory; Wilber, David; Santucci, Peter; Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika

    2016-06-01

    At the time of generator replacement, after ICD implantation for primary prevention, many patients may no longer meet implantation criteria. We investigated the occurrence of ICD therapy after generator replacement in patients initially implanted ICD for primary prevention. Patients from 3 hospitals undergoing ICD generator replacement, who were initially implanted for primary prevention, were retrospectively evaluated for occurrence of appropriate ICD therapy after generator replacement. Patients were categorized as to whether or not they had appropriate ICD therapy during their first battery life, and by their left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) before generator replacement. Data from 168 patients were analyzed, with average follow-up after generator replacement of 41.2 ± 26.5 months. Seventy-six (45.2%) patients had ventricular arrhythmia episodes (>180 beats per minutes) and 63 (37.5%) received appropriate ICD therapy during the first battery life. Among 105 patients without ICD therapy before generator replacement, those with an LVEF ≤35% before ICD replacement had higher occurrence of ICD therapy after generator replacement than patients with an LVEF ≥36%. Patients who no longer met primary prevention ICD indications (no ICD therapy and LVEF ≥36% before generator replacement) showed a lower risk for ICD therapy after generator replacement (11.6% over 5-year follow-up). In patients without ICD therapy before generator replacement, low LVEF (≤35%) contributed to future ICD therapy. In patients initially undergoing ICD implantation for primary prevention, history of ICD therapy during the first battery life and LVEF should be utilized for risk stratification at the time of generator replacement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Prevention and Treatment for Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: Therapies Based on CIPN Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lang-Yue; Mi, Wen-Li; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Wang, Yan-Qing; Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang

    2017-09-15

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a progressive, enduring, and often irreversible adverse effect of many antineoplastic agents, among which sensory abnormities are common and the most suffering issues. The pathogenesis of CIPN has not been completely understood, and strategies for CIPN prevention and treatment are still open problems for medicine. The objective of this paper is to review the mechanism-based therapies against sensory abnormities in CIPN. This is a literature review to describe the uncovered mechanisms underlying CIPN and to provide a summary of mechanism-based therapies for CIPN based on the evidence from both animal and clinical studies. An abundance of compounds has been developed to prevent or treat CIPN by blocking ion channels, targeting inflammatory cytokines and combating oxidative stress. Agents such as glutathione, mangafodipir and duloxetine are expected to be effective for CIPN intervention, while Ca/Mg infusion and venlafaxine, tricyclic antidepressants, and gabapentin display limited efficacy for preventing and alleviating CIPN. And the utilization of erythropoietin, menthol and amifostine needs to be cautious regarding to their side effects. Multiple drugs have been used and studied for decades, their effect against CIPN are still controversial according to different antineoplastic agents due to the diverse manifestations among different antineoplastic agents and complex drug-drug interactions. In addition, novel therapies or drugs that have proven to be effective in animals require further investigation, and it will take time to confirm their efficacy and safety. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Aspirin and proton pump inhibitor combination therapy for prevention of cardiovascular disease and Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Peura, David A; Wilcox, C Mel

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin, used at low doses (75-325 mg daily), prevents aggregation of platelets and is prescribed for patients as pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease. Despite the well-documented beneficial effects of aspirin, prolonged use is associated with damage to the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa in the upper and lower GI tract. Patient risk of hemorrhage and peptic ulcer formation is increased with older age, previous ulcer history, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, or antithrombotic agents. As termination of aspirin therapy can precipitate a cardiovascular event, patients at risk need co-therapy with gastroprotective agents, such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), to reduce the GI side effects of aspirin treatment. Fixed-dose combinations of low-dose aspirin and gastroprotective agents have been designed to increase medication compliance, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce the overall cost of therapy. Prolonged use of PPIs may, however, lead to serious adverse effects or, in some cases, reduce the cardioprotective effects of aspirin. Hence, physicians need to carefully consider the benefits and risks associated with the condition of each patient to optimize clinical outcomes of combination therapy. A growing body of clinical evidence indicates that aspirin may decrease the risk of colorectal and other GI cancers, as well as reduce progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, PPIs have recently been shown to reduce neoplastic transformation in patients with BE. Thus, the use of a fixed-dose aspirin/PPI combination could potentially provide chemopreventive benefit to patients with BE, and, at the same time, treat the underlying gastroesophageal reflux responsible for the condition.

  13. One-year mortality of HIV-positive patients treated for rifampicin- and isoniazid-susceptible tuberculosis in Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and Latin America.

    PubMed

    2017-01-28

    The high mortality among HIV/tuberculosis (TB) coinfected patients in Eastern Europe is partly explained by the high prevalence of drug-resistant TB. It remains unclear whether outcomes of HIV/TB patients with rifampicin/isoniazid-susceptible TB in Eastern Europe differ from those in Western Europe or Latin America. One-year mortality of HIV-positive patients with rifampicin/isoniazid-susceptible TB in Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and Latin America was analysed and compared in a prospective observational cohort study. Factors associated with death were analysed using Cox regression modelsRESULTS:: Three hundred and forty-one patients were included (Eastern Europe 127, Western Europe 165, Latin America 49). Proportions of patients with disseminated TB (50, 58, 59%) and initiating rifampicin + isoniazid + pyrazinamide-based treatment (93, 94, 94%) were similar in Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and Latin America respectively, whereas receipt of antiretroviral therapy at baseline and after 12 months was lower in Eastern Europe (17, 39, 39%, and 69, 94, 89%). The 1-year probability of death was 16% (95% confidence interval 11-24%) in Eastern Europe, vs. 4% (2-9%) in Western Europe and 9% (3-21%) in Latin America; P < 0.0001. After adjustment for IDU, CD4 cell count and receipt of antiretroviral therapy, those residing in Eastern Europe were at nearly 3-fold increased risk of death compared with those in Western Europe/Latin America (aHR 2.79 (1.15-6.76); P = 0.023). Despite comparable use of recommended anti-TB treatment, mortality of patients with rifampicin/isoniazid-susceptible TB remained higher in Eastern Europe when compared with Western Europe/Latin America. The high mortality in Eastern Europe was only partially explained by IDU, use of ART and CD4 cell count. These results call for improvement of care for TB/HIV patients in Eastern Europe.

  14. Role of emerging antithrombotic therapy in the prevention of cardioembolic complications in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Deedwania, Prakash C; Huang, Grace W

    2011-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia and is an independent risk factor of potentially catastrophic cardioembolic strokes. AF patients are categorized into high-, intermediate-, and low-risk for thromboembolic complications using the CHADS(2) or CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc scoring system. Oral anticoagulation using warfarin has been the standard therapy for stroke prevention in intermediate- to high-risk AF patients. However, warfarin use has been limited by several factors such as narrow therapeutic windows, drug-drug and drug-food interactions, and hemorrhagic complications. Rigorous research evaluated dual antiplatelet therapy of clopidogrel and aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) as a potential alternative to warfarin in the ACTIVE W trial. Dual antiplatelet therapy of clopidogrel and aspirin was found to be inferior to warfarin in preventing stroke and systemic embolism with increased bleeding risk. Other extensive research has led to the development of new antithrombotic agents. Recently, dabigatran etexilate 150 mg twice daily, a direct thrombin inhibitor, was approved by the US FDA for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular AF after it was found to be superior to warfarin in preventing thromboembolic events and associated with less bleeding in the RE-LY trial. It was also cost effective when compared with warfarin. Dabigatran can be considered in high-risk AF patients who are unable or unwilling to comply with the frequent laboratory and clinic visits that are required when receiving treatment with warfarin. Factor Xa inhibitors are another class of new anticoagulants that have been developed. Oral rivaroxaban was non-inferior to warfarin in thromboprophylaxis and with similar bleeding in the ROCKET-AF trial (HR 0.88; p = 0.117). Apixaban, another factor Xa inhibitor, was superior to aspirin in reducing stroke and systemic embolism in patients with AF in the AVERROES trial (HR 0.45; p < 0.001). The results of the

  15. How nanotechnology-enabled concepts could contribute to the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Inge K

    2015-05-29

    This viewpoint summarizes a selection of nanotechnology-based key concepts relevant to critical care medicine. It focuses on novel approaches for a trigger-dependent release of antimicrobial substances from degradable nano-sized carriers, the ultra-sensitive detection of analytes in body fluid samples by plasmonic and fluorescent nanoparticles, and the rapid removal of pathogens from whole blood using magnetic nanoparticles. The concepts presented here could significantly contribute to the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of bacterial infections in future and it is now our turn to bring them from the bench to the bedside.

  16. [Preventive and cessation therapy of mental disorders in patients with the acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, V E; Epifanov, A V; Zverev, K V

    2012-01-01

    An open prospective trial of 93 inpatients divided into two main groups (61 patients) - with mental disorders (31) and without mental disorders (30) and a comparison group (32 patients) was carried out. All patients survived the acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction, unstable angina). The efficacy and safety of both preventive and cessation therapy with pantogam active in mean doses 1.8 and 1.2 g /daily, respectively, was demonstrated in respect of heterogeneous depressive, anxiety and somatoform disorders of the neurotic level.

  17. ‘Use a Thorn to Draw Thorn’ Replacement Therapy for Prevention of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Marwah, Nikhil

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the use of conventional physical and chemotherapeutic agents for caries management, dental caries still continues to be the most prevalent oral infectious disease. Thus, there is a need of additional caries prevention approaches. Strain replacement therapy is one such novel approach. In this, relatively avirulent strains of Streptococcus mutans produced by recombinant DNA technology are implanted into the oral cavity. These may either interfere with the colonization of, or compete with the indigenous cariogenic mutans streptococci. This technique might provide a cost-effective, long-term means of achieving tailor made protection for the host against dental caries. PMID:27616834

  18. Preventing stem cell transplantation-associated viral infections using T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Leen, Ann M

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for many hematologic malignancies and genetic diseases. However, viral infections continue to account for substantial post-transplant morbidity and mortality. While antiviral drugs are available against some viruses, they are associated with significant side effects and are frequently ineffective. This review focuses on the immunotherapeutic strategies that have been used to prevent and treat infections over the past 20 years and outlines different refinements that have been introduced with the goal of moving this therapy beyond specialized academic centers.

  19. Racial preferences for participation in a depression prevention trial involving problem-solving therapy.

    PubMed

    Kasckow, John; Brown, Charlotte; Morse, Jennifer Q; Karpov, Irina; Bensasi, Salem; Thomas, Stephen B; Ford, Angela; Reynolds, Charles

    2010-07-01

    This study compared African Americans' and Caucasians' willingness to participate in an indicated intervention to prevent depression with problem-solving therapy. It also examined participants' problem-solving skills. Hypotheses stated that there would be no racial differences in consent rates and that social problem-solving coping skills would be lower among African Americans than Caucasians. Proportions of African Americans and Caucasians who consented were compared, as were Social Problem Solving Inventory scores between the groups. Of 2,788 individuals approached, 82 (4%) of 1,970 Caucasians and 46 (6%) of 818 African Americans signed consent, and the difference was not significant (p=.09). Racial differences were observed in neither Social Problem Solving Inventory scores nor in the relationship between problem-solving skills and depressive symptoms. African Americans with depression demonstrated a willingness to participate in an indicated trial of depression prevention. Furthermore, both groups would appear to benefit from the problem-solving process.

  20. [Botulism in dairy cattle in 2008: symptoms, diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention].

    PubMed

    Holzhauer, M; Roest, H I J; de Jong, M G; Vos, J H

    2009-07-01

    Botulism affects about 20 dairy herds a year in the Netherlands. This article describes the dramatic outcome of botulism in a dairy herd. The main clinical symptoms in this herd were increased lying down, slight ataxia of the hind legs, and a high mortality (98%). The diagnosis is difficult to establish in adult cattle, and for this reason the clinical and laboratory findings, differential diagnosis, therapy, and preventive measures are discussed. On the basis of this outbreak, previous experience with botulism, and cases described in literature, it is suggested that presence of 'free-range" poultry could contaminate grazing pastures with botulism neurotoxins, causing clinical problems in cattle. If there is an increased risk of contamination of the pasture and/or silage with botulinum neurotoxins, vaccination should be considered to prevent substantial economic and emotional damage.

  1. Gene therapy based in antimicrobial peptides and proinflammatory cytokine prevents reactivation of experimental latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Espinosa, Octavio; Hernández-Bazán, Sujhey; Francisco-Cruz, Alejandro; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; Barrios-Payán, Jorge; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; López-Casillas, Fernando; Carretero, Marta; Del Río, Marcela; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) latent infection can lead to reactivation. The design of new strategies to prevent it is an important subject. B6D2F1 mice were infected intratracheally with a low dose of Mtb H37Rv to induce chronic infection. After 7 months, mice were treated with one dose of recombinant adenoviruses encoding TNFα, β defensin-3 and LL37. Immunosupression was induced 1 month later with corticosterone. In comparison with the control group, mice treated with adenoviruses showed significantly less bacterial load and pneumonia, the adenoviruses encoding TNFα and LL37 being the most efficient. Gene therapy based in a proinflammatory cytokine or antimicrobial peptides is a potentially useful system to prevent reactivation of latent tuberculosis.

  2. Prevention of post-stroke generalized anxiety disorder, using escitalopram or problem-solving therapy.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Katsunaka; Jorge, Ricardo E; Moser, David J; Arndt, Stephan; Jang, Mijin; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Hegel, Mark T; Robinson, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of antidepressant treatment for preventing the onset of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) among patients with recent stroke. Of 799 patients assessed, 176 were randomized, and 149 patients without evidence of GAD at the initial visit were included in this double-blind treatment with escitalopram (N=47) or placebo (N=49) or non-blinded problem-solving therapy (PST; 12 total sessions; N=53). Participants given placebo over 12 months were 4.95 times more likely to develop GAD than patients given escitalopram and 4.00 times more likely to develop GAD than patients given PST. Although these results should be considered preliminary, the authors found that both escitalopram and PST were effective in preventing new onset of post-stroke GAD.

  3. Feasibility of a prototype web-based acceptance and commitment therapy prevention program for college students.

    PubMed

    Levin, Michael E; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Seeley, John R; Hayes, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of a prototype Web-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) program for preventing mental health problems among college students. Undergraduate first-year students (N = 76) participated between May and November 2011. Participants were randomized to ACT or a waitlist, with assessments conducted at baseline, posttherapy, and 3-week follow-up. Waitlist participants accessed the program after the second assessment. Program usability/usage data indicated high program acceptability. Significant improvements were found for ACT knowledge, education values, and depression with ACT relative to waitlist. Subgroup analyses indicated that ACT decreased depression and anxiety relative to waitlist among students with at least minimal distress. Within the ACT condition, significant improvements were observed from baseline to 3-week follow-up on all outcome and process measures. Results provide preliminary support for the feasibility of a Web-based ACT prevention program.

  4. Phage therapy as an alternative or complementary strategy to prevent and control biofilm-related infections.

    PubMed

    Pires, D P; Melo, Ldr; Vilas Boas, D; Sillankorva, S; Azeredo, J

    2017-09-28

    The complex heterogeneous structure of biofilms confers to bacteria an important survival strategy. Biofilms are frequently involved in many chronic infections in consequence of their low susceptibility to antibiotics as well as resistance to host defences. The increasing need of novel and effective treatments to target these complex structures has led to a growing interest on bacteriophages (phages) as a strategy for biofilm control and prevention. Phages can be used alone, as a cocktail to broaden the spectra of activity, or in combination with other antimicrobials to improve their efficacy. Here, we summarize the studies involving the use of phages for the treatment or prevention of bacterial biofilms, highlighting the biofilm features that can be tackled with phages or combined therapy approaches. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Feasibility of a Prototype Web-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Prevention Program for College Students

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael E.; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Seeley, John R.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the feasibility of a prototype web-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) program for preventing mental health problems among college students. Participants Undergraduate first-year students (n = 76) participated between May and November 2011. Methods Participants were randomized to ACT or a waitlist with assessments conducted at baseline, post and 3-week follow-up. Waitlist participants accessed the program after the second assessment. Results Program usability/usage data indicated high program acceptability. Significant improvements were found for ACT knowledge, education values and depression with ACT relative to waitlist. Subgroup analyses indicated ACT decreased depression and anxiety relative to waitlist among students with at least minimal distress. Within the ACT condition, significant improvements were observed from baseline to 3-week follow-up on all outcome and process measures. Conclusions Results provide preliminary support for the feasibility of a web-based ACT prevention program. PMID:24313693

  6. Acceptance and commitment therapy universal prevention program for adolescents: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Burckhardt, Rowan; Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Batterham, Philip J; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Shand, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    There is a need to prevent anxiety and depression in young people and mindfulness contains important emotion regulation strategies. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), a mindfulness-based therapy, has yet to be evaluated as a prevention program, but has demonstrated an ability to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression in adult and adolescent populations. This study examines the feasibility of using an ACT-based prevention program in a sample of year 10 (aged 14-16 years) high school students from Sydney, Australia. Participants were allocated to either their usual classes or to the ACT-based intervention. Participants were followed for a period of 5 months post-intervention and completed the Flourishing Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, and a program evaluation questionnaire. Analyses were completed using intention-to-treat mixed models for repeated measures. The results indicated that the intervention was acceptable to students and feasible to administer in a school setting. There were no statistically significant differences between the conditions, likely due to the small sample size (N = 48). However, between-group effect sizes demonstrated small to large differences for baseline to post-intervention mean scores and medium to large differences for baseline to follow-up mean scores, all favouring the ACT-based condition. The results suggest that an ACT-based school program has potential as a universal prevention program and merits further investigation in a larger trial. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry. Trial ID: ACTRN12616001383459. Registered 06/10/2016. Retrospectively registered.

  7. Preventive Antibacterial Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Klehmet, Juliane; Rogge, Witold; Drenckhahn, Christoph; Göhler, Jos; Bereswill, Stefan; Göbel, Ulf; Wernecke, Klaus Dieter; Wolf, Tilo; Arnold, Guy; Halle, Elke; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a major risk factor of death after acute stroke. In a mouse model, preventive antibacterial therapy with moxifloxacin not only prevents the development of post-stroke infections, it also reduces mortality, and improves neurological outcome significantly. In this study we investigate whether this approach is effective in stroke patients. Methods Preventive ANtibacterial THERapy in acute Ischemic Stroke (PANTHERIS) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 80 patients with severe, non-lacunar, ischemic stroke (NIHSS>11) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Patients received either intravenous moxifloxacin (400 mg daily) or placebo for 5 days starting within 36 hours after stroke onset. Primary endpoint was infection within 11 days. Secondary endpoints included neurological outcome, survival, development of stroke-induced immunodepression, and induction of bacterial resistance. Findings On intention-to treat analysis (79 patients), the infection rate at day 11 in the moxifloxacin treated group was 15.4% compared to 32.5% in the placebo treated group (p = 0.114). On per protocol analysis (n = 66), moxifloxacin significantly reduced infection rate from 41.9% to 17.1% (p = 0.032). Stroke associated infections were associated with a lower survival rate. In this study, neurological outcome and survival were not significantly influenced by treatment with moxifloxacin. Frequency of fluoroquinolone resistance in both treatment groups did not differ. On logistic regression analysis, treatment arm as well as the interaction between treatment arm and monocytic HLA-DR expression (a marker for immunodepression) at day 1 after stroke onset was independently and highly predictive for post-stroke infections. Interpretation PANTHERIS suggests that preventive administration of moxifloxacin is superior in reducing infections after severe non-lacunar ischemic stroke compared to placebo. In addition, the results emphasize the

  8. Antiretroviral Therapy in Prevention of HIV and TB: Update on Current Research Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Granich, Reuben; Gupta, Somya; Sutha, Amitabh B; Smyth, Caoimhe; Hoos, David; Vitoria, Marco; Simao, Mariangela; Hankins, Catherine; Schwartlander, Bernard; Ridzon, Renee; Bazin, Brigitte; Williams, Brian; Lo, Ying-Ru; McClure, Craig; Montaner, Julio; Hirnschall, Gottfried

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable scientific evidence supporting the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) infections. The complex nature of the HIV and TB prevention responses, resource constraints, remaining questions about cost and feasibility, and the need to use a solid evidence base to make policy decisions, and the implementation challenges to translating trial data to operational settings require a well-organised and coordinated response to research in this area. To this end, we aimed to catalogue the ongoing and planned research activities that evaluate the impact of ART plus other interventions on HIV- and/or TB-related morbidity, mortality, risk behaviour, HIV incidence and transmission. Using a limited search methodology, 50 projects were identified examining ART as prevention, representing 5 regions and 52 countries with a global distribution. There are 24 randomised controlled clinical trials with at least 12 large randomised individual or community cluster trials in resource-constrained settings that are in the planning or early implementation stages. There is considerable heterogeneity between studies in terms of methodology, interventions and geographical location. While the identified studies will undoubtedly advance our understanding of the efficacy and effectiveness of ART for prevention, some key questions may remain unanswered or only partially answered. The large number and wide variety of research projects emphasise the importance of this research issue and clearly demonstrate the potential for synergies, partnerships and coordination across funding agencies. PMID:21999779

  9. A Pilot Study of Emollient Therapy for the Primary Prevention of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Eric L.; Berry, Trista M.; Brown, Peter A.; Hanifin, Jon M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Prevention strategies in atopic dermatitis (AD) using allergen avoidance have not been consistently effective. New research reveals the importance of the skin barrier in the development of AD and possibly food allergy and asthma. Correcting skin barrier defects from birth may prevent AD onset or moderate disease severity. Objective We sought to determine the feasibility of skin barrier protection as a novel AD prevention strategy. Methods We enrolled 22 neonates at high risk for developing AD in a feasibility pilot study using emollient therapy from birth. Results No intervention-related adverse events occurred in our cohort followed up for a mean time of 547 days. Of the 20 subjects who remained in the study, 3 (15.0%) developed AD, suggesting a protective effect when compared with historical controls. Skin barrier measurements remained within ranges seen in normal-appearing skin. Limitations No conclusions regarding efficacy can be made without a control group. Conclusions Skin barrier repair from birth represents a novel and feasible approach to AD prevention. Further studies are warranted to determine the efficacy of this approach. PMID:20692725

  10. A pilot study of emollient therapy for the primary prevention of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Eric L; Berry, Trista M; Brown, Peter A; Hanifin, Jon M

    2010-10-01

    Prevention strategies in atopic dermatitis (AD) using allergen avoidance have not been consistently effective. New research reveals the importance of the skin barrier in the development of AD and possibly food allergy and asthma. Correcting skin barrier defects from birth may prevent AD onset or moderate disease severity. We sought to determine the feasibility of skin barrier protection as a novel AD prevention strategy. We enrolled 22 neonates at high risk for developing AD in a feasibility pilot study using emollient therapy from birth. No intervention-related adverse events occurred in our cohort followed up for a mean time of 547 days. Of the 20 subjects who remained in the study, 3 (15.0%) developed AD, suggesting a protective effect when compared with historical controls. Skin barrier measurements remained within ranges seen in normal-appearing skin. No conclusions regarding efficacy can be made without a control group. Skin barrier repair from birth represents a novel and feasible approach to AD prevention. Further studies are warranted to determine the efficacy of this approach. Copyright © 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical Therapy for Metabolic Syndrome Prevention in Workers: Novel Role of Physical Therapist.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tomonori; Nemoto, Yuki; Utumi, Takako; Munakata, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, physical therapists have usually been involved in physical therapy for patients with functional disorders associated with cerebrovascular or orthopedic diseases in hospitals. With the aging of Japanese society, the number of diseased people will progressively increase; thus, it is important to pay much more attention to disease prevention. In this regard, physical therapists are expected to play a new role in the field of preventive medicine. Metabolic syndrome or central obesity with multiple cardiometabolic risks is associated with a high risk of type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular diseases and is now a central target for early detection and intervention for disease prevention. The incidence of metabolic syndrome increases with age, and men showed a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome than women in all generations. We have been involved in the guidance of workers with metabolic syndrome for a long time, and we conducted a multicenter study to establish effective guidance for these worker. In this paper, we will use our evidence to discuss the role of physical therapists in providing guidance for preventing metabolic syndrome. We are now conducting worksite supporting exercise intervention for workers who were resistant to conventional lifestyle guidance. In addition, the unique role of physical therapists in this new trial will be introduced.

  12. Targeting the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase for Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, InYoung; He, Yu-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Despite the advances in biomedical research and clinical applications, cancer remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Given the limitations of conventional chemotherapeutics, including serious toxicities and reduced quality of life for patients, the development of safe and efficacious alternatives with known mechanism of action is much needed. Prevention of cancer through dietary intervention may hold promise and has been investigated extensively in the recent years. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an energy sensor that plays a key role in the regulation of protein and lipid metabolism in response to changes in fuel availability. When activated, AMPK promotes energy-producing catabolic pathways while inhibiting anabolic pathways, such as cell growth and proliferation – thereby antagonizing carcinogenesis. Other anti-cancer effects of AMPK may include promoting autophagy and DNA repair upon UVB damage. In the last decade, interest in AMPK has grown extensively as it emerged as an attractive target molecule for cancer prevention and treatment. Among the latest developments is the activation of AMPK by naturally occurring dietary constituents and plant products – termed phytochemicals. Owing to their efficacy and safety, phytochemicals are considered as an alternative to the conventional harmful chemotherapy. The rising popularity of using phytochemicals for cancer prevention and therapy is supported by a substantial progress in identifying the molecular pathways involved, including AMPK. In this article, we review the recent progress in this budding field that suggests AMPK as a new molecular target in the prevention and treatment of cancer by phytochemicals. PMID:23875169

  13. A case of isoniazid-resistant miliary tuberculosis in which tuberculous meningitis paradoxically developed despite systemic improvement.

    PubMed

    Ikegame, Satoshi; Wakamatsu, Kentaro; Fujita, Masaki; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Harada, Mine; Kajiki, Akira

    2011-10-01

    A 63-year-old man with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia was admitted to our hospital with miliary tuberculosis. He received anti-tuberculosis drugs: isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RFP), ethambutol (EB), and pyrazinamide (PZA). His condition clearly and immediately improved after the therapy, but he experienced a high fever of about 38°C every day from 1 month after the initiation of the therapy. Drug-induced fever and tumor fever were suspected as causes, but the etiology could not be determined. The tuberculosis was identified as an INH-resistant strain, so INH was stopped and levofloxacin (LVFX) was introduced, with streptomycin (SM), in addition to RFP, EB, and PZA. At 2 months after the initiation of the therapy (about one week after the change in the anti-tuberculosis drug regimen), his spinal fluid was examined, given his complaints of headache and vomiting. The spinal fluid analysis revealed invasion of lymphocytic inflammatory cells and high adenosine deaminase activity; the patient was thus diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis. His condition gradually improved after the changing of the anti-tuberculosis drugs. Thus, to summarize, the tuberculous meningitis had worsened paradoxically despite his systemic improvement, although it was successfully treated by the addition of LVFX and SM. We must keep in mind that a potential cause of fever during anti-tuberculosis therapy may be INH-resistant tuberculous meningitis.

  14. [The role of chemoprophylaxis in prevention of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Dragana

    2004-01-01

    Chemoprophylaxis represents a preventive antituberculotic treatment of persons at singificant risk of developing tuberculosis, in whom active tuberculosis is excluded The decision on treatment is based on detailed history about close contacts, tuberculin skin testing, data on BCG vaccination, and clinical examination. Conclusions are quite different depending on the fact if BCG vaccine is routinely applied (the case in developing countries, due to high tuberculosis incidence) or not--(in developed countries, where negative tuberkulin skin test is a normal finding), and tuberculin-positive persons are considered recently infected and undergo preventive therapy. The population at increased risk of developing tuberculosis includes: close contacts of patients with acive tuberculosis, recent skin test converters or with positive purified protein derivative (PPD) test, HIV-positive persons, those with underlying diseases that increase the risk of tuberculosis (diabetes mellitus, prolonged glucocorticoid therapy, immunosuppressive therapy, terminal renalfailure, kidney transplantation, all disorders associated with malnutrition etc.), those coming from high TB prevalence countries, immigrants, alchocolics, asylants, drug addicts, patients in psychiatric hospitals, etc. Preventive therapy usually lasts for 6 months and consists of isoniazid 5mg/kg daily for adults and 10 mg/kg/daily for children.

  15. Alpha1-antitrypsin gene therapy modulates cellular immunity and efficiently prevents type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanqing; Tang, Mei; Wasserfall, Clive; Kou, Zhongchen; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Gardemann, Thomas; Crawford, James; Atkinson, Mark; Song, Sihong

    2006-06-01

    An imbalance of the immune-regulatory pathways plays an important role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Therefore, immunoregulatory and antiinflammatory strategies hold great potential for the prevention of this autoimmune disease. Studies have demonstrated that two serine proteinase inhibitors, alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and elafin, act as potent antiinflammatory agents. In the present study, we sought to develop an efficient gene therapy approach to prevent type 1 diabetes. Cohorts of 4-week-old female nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice were injected intramuscularly with rAAV1-CB-hAAT, rAAV1-CB-hElafin, or saline. AAV1 vector mediated sustained high levels of transgene expression, sufficient to overcome a humoral immune response against hAAT. AAT gene therapy, contrary to elafin and saline, was remarkably effective in preventing type 1 diabetes. T cell receptor spectratyping indicated that AAT gene therapy altered T cell repertoire diversity in splenocytes from NOD mice. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that AAT gene therapy attenuated cellular immunity associated with beta cell destruction. This study demonstrates that AAT gene therapy attenuates cell-mediated autoimmunity, alters the T cell receptor repertoire, and efficiently prevents type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse model. These results strongly suggest that rAAV1-mediated AAT gene therapy may be useful as a novel approach to prevent type 1 diabetes.

  16. Treatment for Tuberculosis Infection With 3 Months of Isoniazid and Rifapentine in New York City Health Department Clinics.

    PubMed

    Stennis, Natalie L; Burzynski, Joseph N; Herbert, Cheryl; Nilsen, Diana; Macaraig, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Completion of treatment for tuberculosis infection (TBI) with 9 months of self-administered daily isoniazid (9H) has historically been low (<50%) among New York City (NYC) Health Department tuberculosis clinic patients. Treatment of TBI with 3 months of once-weekly isoniazid and rifapentine (3HP) administered under directly observed therapy (DOT) might increase treatment acceptance and completion. The study population included patients diagnosed with TBI at 2 NYC Health Department tuberculosis clinics from January 2013 through November 2013. Treatment acceptance and completion with 3HP were compared with historical estimates. Treatment outcomes, side effects, and reasons for refusing 3HP were described. Among 631 patients eligible for TBI treatment, 503 (80%) were offered 3HP; 302 (60%) accepted, 92 (18%) chose other treatment, and 109 (22%) refused treatment. The most common reason for refusing 3HP was the clinic-based DOT requirement. Forty (13%) patients treated with 3HP experienced side effects--9 were restarted on 3HP, 18 switched treatment regimens, and 13 discontinued. Although treatment acceptance did not differ from historical estimates (78% vs 79%, P = .75), treatment completion increased significantly (65% vs 34%, P < .01). Implementation of 3HP in 2 NYC Health Department tuberculosis clinics increased TBI treatment completion by 31 percentage points compared with historical estimates. More flexible DOT options may improve acceptance of 3HP. Wider use of 3HP may substantially improve TBI treatment completion in NYC and advance progress toward tuberculosis elimination. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. What are the most efficacious treatment regimens for isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis? A systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stagg, H R; Harris, R J; Hatherell, H-A; Obach, D; Tsuchiya, N; Kranzer, K; Nikolayevskyy, V; Kim, J; Lipman, M C; Abubakar, I

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Consensus on the best treatment regimens for patients with isoniazid-resistant TB is limited; global treatment guidelines differ. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis using mixed-treatment comparisons methodology to provide an up-to-date summary of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and relative regimen efficacy. Methods Ovid MEDLINE, the Web of Science and EMBASE were mined using search terms for TB, drug therapy and RCTs. Extracted data were inputted into fixed-effects and random-effects models. ORs for all possible network comparisons and hierarchical rankings for different regimens were obtained. Results 12 604 records were retrieved and 118 remained postextraction, representing 59 studies—27 standalone and 32 with multiple papers. In comparison to a baseline category that included the WHO-recommended regimen for countries with high levels of isoniazid resistance (rifampicin-containing regimens using fewer than three effective drugs at 4 months, in which rifampicin was protected by another effective drug at 6 months, and rifampicin was taken for 6 months), extending the duration of rifampicin and increasing the number of effective drugs at 4 months lowered the odds of unfavourable outcomes (treatment failure or the lack of microbiological cure; relapse post-treatment; death due to TB) in a fixed-effects model (OR 0.31 (95% credible interval 0.12–0.81)). In a random-effects model all estimates crossed the null. Conclusions Our systematic review and network meta-analysis highlight a regimen category that may be more efficacious than the WHO population level recommendation, and identify knowledge gaps where data are sparse. Systematic review registration number PROSPERO CRD42014015025. PMID:27298314

  18. What are the most efficacious treatment regimens for isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis? A systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Stagg, H R; Harris, R J; Hatherell, H-A; Obach, D; Zhao, H; Tsuchiya, N; Kranzer, K; Nikolayevskyy, V; Kim, J; Lipman, M C; Abubakar, I

    2016-10-01

    Consensus on the best treatment regimens for patients with isoniazid-resistant TB is limited; global treatment guidelines differ. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis using mixed-treatment comparisons methodology to provide an up-to-date summary of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and relative regimen efficacy. Ovid MEDLINE, the Web of Science and EMBASE were mined using search terms for TB, drug therapy and RCTs. Extracted data were inputted into fixed-effects and random-effects models. ORs for all possible network comparisons and hierarchical rankings for different regimens were obtained. 12 604 records were retrieved and 118 remained postextraction, representing 59 studies-27 standalone and 32 with multiple papers. In comparison to a baseline category that included the WHO-recommended regimen for countries with high levels of isoniazid resistance (rifampicin-containing regimens using fewer than three effective drugs at 4 months, in which rifampicin was protected by another effective drug at 6 months, and rifampicin was taken for 6 months), extending the duration of rifampicin and increasing the number of effective drugs at 4 months lowered the odds of unfavourable outcomes (treatment failure or the lack of microbiological cure; relapse post-treatment; death due to TB) in a fixed-effects model (OR 0.31 (95% credible interval 0.12-0.81)). In a random-effects model all estimates crossed the null. Our systematic review and network meta-analysis highlight a regimen category that may be more efficacious than the WHO population level recommendation, and identify knowledge gaps where data are sparse. PROSPERO CRD42014015025. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Narrative review: antiretroviral therapy to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Myron S; Gay, Cynthia; Kashuba, Angela D M; Blower, Sally; Paxton, Lynn

    2007-04-17

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has prolonged and improved the lives of persons infected with HIV. Theoretically, it can also be used to prevent the transmission of HIV. The pharmacology of ART in the male and female genital tract can be expected to affect the success of the intervention, and ART agents differ considerably in their ability to concentrate in genital tract secretions. Emergency ART is considered to be the standard of care after occupational exposures to fluids or tissues infected with HIV. More recently, ART for prophylaxis after nonoccupational HIV exposures has been widely used and most countries have developed specific guidelines for its implementation. However, developing clinical trials to prove the efficacy of ART postexposure prophylaxis has not been possible. Experiments with rhesus macaques suggest that therapy must be offered as soon as possible after exposure (within 72 hours) and must be continued for 28 days. Additional nonhuman primate experiments have demonstrated protection from HIV infection with ART preexposure prophylaxis, and several clinical trials are under way to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this approach. The degree to which ART offered to infected persons reduces infectiousness is of considerable public health importance, but the question has not been sufficiently answered. This article provides a review of the data on the use of ART to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV and identify challenges to improving and clarifying this approach.

  20. Pulmonary bacteriophage therapy on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains: first steps towards treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Morello, Eric; Saussereau, Emilie; Maura, Damien; Huerre, Michel; Touqui, Lhousseine; Debarbieux, Laurent

    2011-02-15

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria are the cause of an increasing number of deadly pulmonary infections. Because there is currently a paucity of novel antibiotics, phage therapy--the use of specific viruses that infect bacteria--is now more frequently being considered as a potential treatment for bacterial infections. Using a mouse lung-infection model caused by a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strain isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, we evaluated bacteriophage treatments. New bacteriophages were isolated from environmental samples and characterized. Bacteria and bacteriophages were applied intranasally to the immunocompetent mice. Survival was monitored and bronchoalveolar fluids were analysed. Quantification of bacteria, bacteriophages, pro-inflammatory and cytotoxicity markers, as well as histology and immunohistochemistry analyses were performed. A curative treatment (one single dose) administrated 2 h after the onset of the infection allowed over 95% survival. A four-day preventive treatment (one single dose) resulted in a 100% survival. All of the parameters measured correlated with the efficacy of both curative and preventive bacteriophage treatments. We also showed that in vitro optimization of a bacteriophage towards a clinical strain improved both its efficacy on in vivo treatments and its host range on a panel of 20 P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains. This work provides an incentive to develop clinical studies on pulmonary bacteriophage therapy to combat multidrug-resistant lung infections.

  1. [Progress of researches on prevention and treatment of sports fatigue with moxibustion therapy].

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-Qian; Zhang, Hong-Ru; Gu, Yi-Huang

    2014-04-01

    Sports fatigue belongs to the category of functional deficiency-syndrome according to the theory of traditional Chinese medicine. The moxibustion therapy has a long history and possesses a definite therapeutic effect in the prevention and treatment of sports fatigue. In the present paper, the authors reviewed development of researches on the effects of moxibustion intervention in the prevention and treatment of sports fatigue in recent 5 years. Results of researches showed that moxibustion intervention can 1) eliminate free radicals and reduce oxidative damage; 2) increase energy (glycogen) supply to delay the production of fatigue; 3) raise serum testosterone level (relieve exercise-induced neuroendocrine disorder) and reduce post-sports fatigue; 4) raise the anaerobic exercise ability, reduce the accumulation of metabolic products in the body and strengthen the endurance capacity of the skeletal muscle; and 5) improve ischemic cardiac function, and suppress cardiomyocyte apopotosis, etc. However, we should further strengthen our investigations on the moxibustion therapy in the ancient classical literature and sum up academic thoughts of different academic schools in the successive dynasties, put emphasis on the large sample randomized controlled clinical trails, establish united treatment standards, etc., and provide much evidence for effectively treating sports fatigue in the future.

  2. Preventing cerebral oedema in acute liver failure: the case for quadruple-H therapy.

    PubMed

    Warrillow, S J; Bellomo, R

    2014-01-01

    Severe cerebral oedema is a life-threatening complication of acute liver failure. Hyperammonaemia and cerebral hyperaemia are major contributing factors. A multimodal approach, which incorporates hyperventilation, haemodiafiltration, hypernatraemia and hypothermia (quadruple-H therapy), may prevent or attenuate severe cerebral oedema. This approach is readily administered by critical care clinicians and is likely to be more effective than the use of single therapies. Targeting of PaCO2 in the mild hyperventilation range, as seen in acute liver failure patients before intubation, aims to minimise hyperaemic cerebral oedema. Haemodiafiltration aims to achieve the rapid control of elevated blood ammonia concentrations by its removal and to reduce production via the lowering of core temperature. The administration of concentrated saline increases serum tonicity and further reduces cerebral swelling. In addition, the pathologically increased cerebral blood-flow is further attenuated by therapeutic hypothermia. The combination of all four treatments in a multimodal approach may be a safe and effective means of attenuating or treating the cerebral oedema of acute liver failure and preventing death from neurological complications.

  3. Advances in therapy for the prevention of HIV transmission from mother to child.

    PubMed

    Moretton, Marcela A; Bertera, Facundo; Lagomarsino, Eduardo; Riedel, Jennifer; Chiappetta, Diego A; Höcht, Christian

    2017-05-01

    Actually, ~17.8 million women and 1.8 million children (<15 years) are currently infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Particularly, the majority of pediatric infections (>90%) resulted from 'HIV mother-to-child transmission' (MTCT), both in pregnancy, labour, delivery and later by breastfeeding. Due to its high pediatric incidence, MTCT represents a public health concern. Areas covered: In this review, we focus on available treatments and antiretroviral drugs recommended by the World Health Organization, and the main clinical investigations in antiretroviral pharmacotherapy to prevent the MTCT. Expert opinion: The MTCT has been improved dramatically in the last few years mainly due to prophylactic perinatal antiretroviral therapy for pregnant women living with HIV. However, there is still a milestone to reach since HIV MTCT remains as a public health challenge associated with MTCT though breastfeeding (post-natal transmission). In this context, different strategies could be employed as an attempt to reduce pediatric HIV infections. One of them involves the improvement of patient adherence to the HIV therapy. One possible solution is the development of novel long-acting formulations for prophylaxis of mothers and children, and a second possible solution is increase the inclusion of mothers and infants in care programs to more effectively prevent the vertical transmission.

  4. Probiotics as adjunctive therapy for preventing Clostridium difficile infection – What are we waiting for?

    PubMed Central

    Spinler, Jennifer K.; Ross, Caná L.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    With the end of the golden era of antibiotic discovery, the emergence of a new post-antibiotic age threatens to thrust global health and modern medicine back to the pre-antibiotic era. Antibiotic overuse has resulted in the natural evolution and selection of multi-drug resistant bacteria. One major public health threat, Clostridium difficile, is now the single leading cause of hospital-acquired bacterial infections and is by far the most deadly enteric pathogen for the U.S. population. Due to the high morbidity and mortality and increasing incidence that coincides with antibiotic use, non-traditional therapeutics are ideal alternatives to current treatment methods and also provide an avenue towards prevention. Despite the need for alternative therapies to antibiotics and the safety of most probiotics on the market, researchers are inundated with regulatory issues that hinder the translational science required to push these therapies forward. This review discusses the regulatory challenges of probiotic research, expert opinion regarding the application of probiotics to C. difficile infection and the efficacy of probiotics in preventing this disease. PMID:27180657

  5. Bone targeted therapies for the prevention of skeletal morbidity in men with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Saylor, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Men with prostate cancer suffer substantially from bone-related complications. Androgen deprivation therapy itself is a cause of loss of bone mineral density and is associated with an increased incidence of osteoporotic fractures. In advanced disease, bone is by far the most common site of metastasis. Complications of bone metastases prominently include pain and the potential for skeletal events such as spinal cord compression and pathologic fractures. Elevated osteoclast activity is an important aspect of the pathophysiology of both treatment-related osteoporosis and skeletal complications due to metastases. The osteoclast is therefore a therapeutic target. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody to receptor activator of nuclear factor-κ-B ligand that was designed to potently inhibit osteoclast activity and is the central focus of this review. Bisphosphonates, radiopharmaceuticals and systemically-active hormonal agents such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide have each been shown to improve skeletal morbidity in specific clinical situations. Denosumab is the only agent that has been shown to prevent osteoporotic fractures in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy and at elevated risk for fracture. It has also demonstrated superiority to the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid for the prevention of skeletal-related events in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic to bone. Efficacy and toxicity data will be discussed.

  6. Family outcomes from a randomized control trial of relapse prevention therapy in first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, John F M; Cotton, Sue M; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Wade, Darryl; Crisp, Kingsley; Newman, Belinda; Spiliotacopoulos, Daniela; McGorry, Patrick D

    2010-04-01

    We have previously reported that our combined individual and family cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) relapse prevention therapy (RPT) was effective in reducing relapse rates compared to treatment as usual (TAU) within a specialist program for young, first-episode psychosis patients who had reached remission on positive symptoms. Here, we report the outcomes for family participants of DSM-IV-diagnosed first-episode psychosis patients recruited between November 2003 and May 2005 over a 2.5-year follow-up period. The primary hypothesis was that, compared to family members receiving TAU, family participants who received RPT would have significantly improved appraisals of stressors related to caregiving. Secondary hypotheses were that RPT would be associated with reduced expressed emotion and improved psychological distress. Family members were assessed at baseline and at 7-month, 12-month, 18-month, 24-month, and 30-month follow-up on appraisal of caregiving, expressed emotion, and psychological distress using the Experience of Caregiving Inventory, The Family Questionnaire, and the General Health Questionnaire of 28 Items, respectively. The family component of RPT was based on family behavioral therapy for schizophrenia with a specific focus on psychoeducation and CBT for relapse prevention. Thirty-two families received RPT, and 31 families received TAU. There were significant group effects for aspects of the appraisal of caregiving, including negative symptoms, positive personal experiences, and total positive score on the Experience of Caregiving Inventory. Time effects were evident for emotional overinvolvement and for aspects of the appraisal of caregiving. There were no significant effects for psychological distress. The relatives of patients who received RPT perceived less stress related to their relative's negative symptoms and an increase in perceived opportunities to make a positive contribution to the care of their relative compared to carers in the TAU

  7. Cognitive-behavioral therapy vs. light therapy for preventing winter depression recurrence: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rohan, Kelly J; Evans, Maggie; Mahon, Jennifer N; Sitnikov, Lilya; Ho, Sheau-Yan; Nillni, Yael I; Postolache, Teodor T; Vacek, Pamela M

    2013-03-21

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a subtype of recurrent depression involving major depressive episodes during the fall and/or winter months that remit in the spring. The central public health challenge in the management of SAD is prevention of winter depression recurrence. Light therapy (LT) is the established and best available acute SAD treatment. However, long-term compliance with daily LT from first symptom through spontaneous springtime remission every fall/winter season is poor. Time-limited alternative treatments with effects that endure beyond the cessation of acute treatment are needed to prevent the annual recurrence of SAD. This is an NIMH-funded R01-level randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of a novel, SAD-tailored cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBT) against LT in a head-to-head comparison on next winter outcomes. This project is designed to test for a clinically meaningful difference between CBT and LT on depression recurrence in the next winter (the primary outcome). This is a concurrent two-arm study that will randomize 160 currently symptomatic community adults with major depression, recurrent with seasonal pattern, to CBT or LT. After 6 weeks of treatment in the initial winter, participants are followed in the subsequent summer, the next winter, and two winters later. Key methodological issues surround timing study procedures for a predictably recurrent and time-limited disorder with a focus on long-term outcomes. The chosen design answers the primary question of whether prior exposure to CBT is associated with a substantially lower likelihood of depression recurrence the next winter than LT. This design does not test the relative contributions of the cognitive-behavioral treatment components vs. nonspecific factors to CBT's outcomes and is not adequately powered to test for differences or equivalence between cells at treatment endpoint. Alternative designs addressing these limitations would have required more patients

  8. Changes in physical therapy providers' use of fall prevention strategies following a multicomponent behavioral change intervention.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cynthia J; Gottschalk, Margaret; Van Ness, Peter H; Fortinsky, Richard H; Tinetti, Mary E

    2005-05-01

    An abundance of evidence suggests that interventions targeting fall risk factors are effective; however, it remains unknown whether, or to what extent, this body of evidence has affected the clinical practice of physical therapy providers. The purposes of this study were: (1) to describe knowledge of, and attitudes toward, fall risk factors and fall reduction strategies; (2) to assess self-reported use of fall reduction strategies with patients; and (3) to identify factors associated with increased use of fall reduction strategies with patients among physical therapy providers exposed to a behavioral change strategy. A cross-sectional survey of physical therapy providers from hospital-based and freestanding outpatient physical therapy facilities throughout north-central Connecticut was conducted between October 2002 and April 2003. The participants were 94 physical therapy providers who had been exposed to the Connecticut Collaboration for Fall Prevention (CCFP) behavioral change effort. The CCFP program uses multicomponent professional behavioral change strategies to embed fall risk factor assessment and management, based on evidence from randomized controlled trials, into the clinical care of older patients. A telephone questionnaire--focusing on fall risk factor knowledge and attitudes and self-reported fall risk factor assessment and management practices before and after exposure to the CCFP efforts--was administered to consenting physical therapy providers. Environmental hazards and gait and balance deficits were named as fall risk factors by 86 (91%) and 73 (78%) participants, respectively. All of the targeted risk factors were mentioned by at least 30% of the participants. Sixty-four participants (68%) reported increased fall reduction practice behaviors. The area of multiple medications was noted most frequently, with 77 participants (82%) noting new practices related to medication use. Only knowledge of fall risk factors and pre-CCFP behaviors were

  9. Successful treatment of acquired pendular elliptical nystagmus in multiple sclerosis with isoniazid and base-out prisms.

    PubMed

    Traccis, S; Rosati, G; Monaco, M F; Aiello, I; Agnetti, V

    1990-03-01

    We treated 3 multiple sclerosis patients who had pendular nystagmus with isoniazid (800 to 1,000 mg/d). Isoniazid abolished the nystagmus and relieved oscillopsia in 2 patients but was ineffective in the 3rd in whom the nystagmus was damped with convergence and vision improved with converging (base-out) prisms.

  10. [Comparative data regarding two HPLC methods for determination of isoniazid].

    PubMed

    Gârbuleţ, Daniela; Spac, A F; Dorneanu, V

    2009-01-01

    For the determination of isoniazide (isonicotinic acid hydrazide - HIN) two different HPLC methods were developed and validated. Both experiments were performed using a Waters 2695 liquid chromatograph and a UV - Waters 2489 detector. The first method (I) used a Nucleosil 100-10 C18 column (250 x 4.6 mm), a mobile phase formed by a mixture of acetonitrile/10(-2) M oxalic acid (80/20) and a flow of 1.5 mL/ min; detection was done at 230 nm. The second method (II) used a Luna 100-5 C18 column (250 x 4.6 mm), a mobile phase formed by a mixture of methanol/acetate buffer, pH = 5.0 (20/ 80), a flow of 1 mL/min; detection was done at 270 nm. Both methods were validated, the correlation coefficients were 0.9998 (I) and 0.9999 (II), the detection limits were 0.6 microg/mL (I) and 0.055 microg/mL (II), the quantitation limits were 1.9 microg/mL (I) and 0.2 microg/ mL (II). There were also studied: the system precision (RSD = 0.1692% (I) and 0.2000% (II)), the method precision (RSD = 1.1844% (I) and 0.6170% (II)) and the intermediate precision (RSD = 1.8058% (I) and 0.5970% (II)). The accuracy was good, the calculated recoveries were 102.66% (I) and 101.36 (II). Both validated methods were applied for HIN determination from tablets with good and comparable results.

  11. Primary prevention with a defibrillator: are therapies always really optimized before implantation?

    PubMed

    Foucault, Anthony; Amelot, Mathieu; Gomes, Sophie; Champ-Rigot, Laure; Saloux, Eric; Pellissier, Arnaud; Labombarda, Fabien; Scanu, Patrice; Milliez, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 30-35% is widely accepted as a cut-off for primary prevention with an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) in patients with both ischaemic and non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy supposedly on optimal medical therapy. This study reports evolutions of LVEF and treatments of patients implanted in our institution with an ICD for primary prevention of sudden death, after 2 years of follow-up. Among 84 patients with LVEF under 35% implanted between 2005 and 2007, 28 (33%) had improved their LVEF >35% after the 2 years of follow-up. During this period, even if Beta-blockers (98%) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers (95%) were already initially prescribed, treatments were significantly optimized with improvement of maximal doses of beta-blockers and RAS blockers at 2 year follow-up compared with initial prescription (62 vs. 37% and 68 vs. 45%, respectively). In patients with improved LVEF, a trend toward a better treatment optimization and revascularization procedures (in the sub-group of ischaemic patients) were observed compared with non-improved LVEF patients. In our study of patients with prophylactic ICD, one-third of them have improved their LVEF after a 2 year follow-up. Despite an optimal medical therapy at the time of implantation, we were able to further improve the maximal treatment doses after implantation. This study highlights the issue of what should be considered as 'optimal' therapy and the possibility of improvement of LVEF related to a real optimized treatment before implantation.

  12. Prevention of trismus with different pharmacological therapies after surgical extraction of impacted mandibular third molar.

    PubMed

    Selimović, Edin; Ibrahimagić-Šeper, Lejla; Šišić, Ibrahim; Sivić, Suad; Huseinagić, Senad

    2017-02-01

    Aim To assess prevention and reduction of trismus after surgically extracted impacted mandibular third molars with individual and combined therapy with corticosteroids and anti-inflammatory analgesics. Methods The research included 60 randomly selected patients (3 groups) attended to the Dental Oral Surgery of the Public Institution Healthcare Center Zenica during the period January-December 2008. Patients of both genders, 18-45 years of age, were presented without pain and other inflammatory symptoms at the time of surgery. According to a scheme established in the research protocol, two medications were administered orally: methylprednisolone(corticosteroid) 32 mg and meloxicam (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic, NSAID) 15 mg as a single drug, or a combination of both drugs. The level of trismus is assessed on the basis of differences of preoperative and postoperative values of interincisal spaces when fully opening the mouth on the second and the seventh post-operative day. The differences between groups of patients were evaluated by means of Tukey's HSD test. Results On the second and on the seventh post-operative day significantly better results were registered in the group that received only corticosteroids and in the group that received both, corticosteroids and NSAIDs compared to the group that received only NSAIDs. A tendency of trismus reduction was present in all patient groups for the second and seventh day after surgery. Conclusion Prevention and control of postoperative trismus after surgical extraction of impacted mandibular third molars with combined therapy is effective and superior comparing to individual therapy with meloxicam-or methylprednisolone alone. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  13. Cell-based therapy for prevention and reversal of myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Karantalis, Vasileios; Balkan, Wayne; Schulman, Ivonne H; Hatzistergos, Konstantinos E; Hare, Joshua M

    2012-08-01

    Although pharmacological and interventional advances have reduced the morbidity and mortality of ischemic heart disease, there is an ongoing need for novel therapeutic strategies that prevent or reverse progressive ventricular remodeling following myocardial infarction, the process that forms the substrate for ventricular failure. The development of cell-based therapy as a strategy to repair or regenerate injured tissue offers extraordinary promise for a powerful anti-remodeling therapy. In this regard, the field of cell therapy has made major advancements in the past decade. Accumulating data from preclinical studies have provided novel insights into stem cell engraftment, differentiation, and interactions with host cellular elements, as well as the effectiveness of various methods of cell delivery and accuracy of diverse imaging modalities to assess therapeutic efficacy. These findings have in turn guided rationally designed translational clinical investigations. Collectively, there is a growing understanding of the parameters that underlie successful cell-based approaches for improving heart structure and function in ischemic and other cardiomyopathies.

  14. Preoperative zoledronic acid therapy prevent hungry bone syndrome in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Mayilvaganan, Sabaretnam; Vijaya Sarathi, H. A.; Shivaprasad, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hungry bone syndrome is a common complication of surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism in India which often leads to prolonged hospitalization. There are varying reports on the use and efficacy of bisphosphonates in the prevention of hungry bone syndrome. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the effect of preoperative bisphosphonate therapy on rates of hungry bone syndrome in our patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. A total of 19 patients underwent surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism at our institute between January 2013 and June 2015 among whom eight did not receive preoperative bisphosphonates and 11 received intravenous zoledronic acid 4 mg, 24–48 h preoperatively. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to age, gender, duration of symptoms, preoperative serum calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, alkaline phosphatase, and the presence of radiological evidence of hyperparathyroid bone disease also did not differ between the groups. Three out of the eight patients who did not receive preoperative zoledronic acid therapy had hungry bone syndrome but none in the zoledronic acid group. The prevalence of hungry bone syndrome tended to be lower in the zoledronic acid group (P = 0.058). The need for intravenous calcium and duration of postoperative hospital stay were significantly lesser in the zoledronic acid group. Conclusion: Preoperative intravenous zoledronic acid significantly reduces the need for intravenous calcium therapy and duration of postoperative hospital stay and seems a promising option to reduce the rate of hungry bone syndrome in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:28217502

  15. Metronomic chemotherapy prevents therapy-induced stromal activation and induction of tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tze-Sian; Hsu, Chung-Chi; Pai, Vincent C; Liao, Wen-Ying; Huang, Shenq-Shyang; Tan, Kok-Tong; Yen, Chia-Jui; Hsu, Shu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Yu; Shan, Yan-Shen; Li, Chi-Rong; Lee, Michael T; Jiang, Kuan-Ying; Chu, Jui-Mei; Lien, Gi-Shih; Weaver, Valerie M; Tsai, Kelvin K

    2016-12-12

    Although traditional chemotherapy kills a fraction of tumor cells, it also activates the stroma and can promote the growth and survival of residual cancer cells to foster tumor recurrence and metastasis. Accordingly, overcoming the host response induced by chemotherapy could substantially improve therapeutic outcome and patient survival. In this study, resistance to treatment and metastasis has been attributed to expansion of stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Molecular analysis of the tumor stroma in neoadjuvant chemotherapy-treated human desmoplastic cancers and orthotopic tumor xenografts revealed that traditional maximum-tolerated dose chemotherapy, regardless of the agents used, induces persistent STAT-1 and NF-κB activity in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. This induction results in the expression and secretion of ELR motif-positive (ELR(+)) chemokines, which signal through CXCR-2 on carcinoma cells to trigger their phenotypic conversion into TICs and promote their invasive behaviors, leading to paradoxical tumor aggression after therapy. In contrast, the same overall dose administered as a low-dose metronomic chemotherapy regimen largely prevented therapy-induced stromal ELR(+) chemokine paracrine signaling, thus enhancing treatment response and extending survival of mice carrying desmoplastic cancers. These experiments illustrate the importance of stroma in cancer therapy and how its impact on treatment resistance could be tempered by altering the dosing schedule of systemic chemotherapy. © 2016 Chan et al.

  16. Is it possible to prevent morbidity on post cardiovascular surgery applying low level laser therapy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Nathali C.; Baptista, Ivany Machado d. C.; Pereira, Mara Helena C.; Serrão, Nelson F.; Pomerantzeff, Pablo M. A.; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Background and Objective: Complications following cardiovascular surgery incision are common in mediastinitis and wound dehiscence form, a 47% mortality rate remaining. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) has been employed mainly to its effectiveness analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions, aiding the tissue repair process. The aim of this study was to evaluate infrared LLLT onto surgical incision in patients submitted to cardiovascular surgery. Materials and Methods: 40 patients were divided in two groups: Placebo Group (G1) - conventional therapy + "Laser pointer" and Laser Group (G2) - conventional therapy + Infrared Laser irradiation on surgical incision. Diode Laser was employed, C.W. mode, around the surgical wound bed, on immediate Post Operative (PO), 1st PO and 3rd PO with the following parameters: wavelength (λ): 830nm, P=35mW, E=0,75J. Results: G2 didn't present any complication and 5% of patients in G1 developed incision dehiscence and infection. On 7thPO, still a large amount of G1 patients showed pain and unquestionable inflammatory signs surrounding the surgical wound, when compared to G2. Besides, hospital stay in Laser Group was 2 times shorter than in Placebo Group (p-value=0.001). Conclusion: Infrared Laser denoted to be safe and exceptionally valuable tools in preventing morbidities on post cardiovascular surgeries.

  17. Use of cloud point extraction with derivatizing reagent for the extraction and determination of isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-jun; Liu, Wei; Chen, Jian-bo; Zhou, Zhi-ming; Yang, Ming-min

    2011-02-01

    A simple and sensitive cloud point extraction high-performance liquid chromatography method is proposed for the determination of isoniazid in blood. The procedure is based on the product of the reaction of isoniazid with benzaldehyde. It can be validated that there is a linear relationship between the signal of isonicotinyl hydrazone and the concentration of isoniazid. A cloud point extraction system of nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 is applied for preconcentration of isonicotinyl hydrazone. Then the analytes in surfactant-rich phase are detected with HPLC-UV system. calibration graph was obtained in the range of 2.0 × 10(-3)-0.5 mg/L, the detection limit was 5.0 × 10(-4) mg/L. Method validation is performed on serum samples spiked at two levels, the recoveries ranging from 82.17-83.81%, with relative standard deviations from 2.45% to 3.89%.

  18. Single-dose radiation therapy for prevention of heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, W.L.; Lo, T.C.; Covall, D.J.; Pfeifer, B.A.; Wasilewski, S.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Single-dose radiation therapy was prospectively evaluated for its efficacy in prevention of heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Thirty-one patients (34 hips) were treated between 1981 and 1988. Risk factors for inclusion in the protocol included prior evidence of heterotopic ossification, ankylosing spondylitis, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Patients with hypertrophic osteoarthritis or traumatic arthritis with osteophytes were not included. Operations on 34 hips included 19 primary total and 11 revision total hip arthroplasties and 4 excisions of heterotopic ossification. All patients received radiotherapy to the hip after operation with a single dose of 700 centigray. Radiotherapy is recommended on the first postoperative day. After this single-dose radiation treatment, no patient had clinically significant heterotopic ossification. Recurrent disease developed in two hips (6%), as seen on radiography (grades 2 and 3). This series documents a 100% clinical success rate and a 94% radiographic success rate in preventing heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Single-dose radiotherapy is as effective as other radiation protocols in preventing heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty. It is less expensive and easier to administer than multidose radiotherapy.

  19. Hormone replacement therapy and prevention of osteoporosis: risk assessment and practical advice.

    PubMed

    Balogh, A; Bettembuk, P

    1997-02-01

    A review of the Debrecen Regional Osteoporosis Program (DROP) in Hungary is given, with special reference to the detection of postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMOP) and its treatment by hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The new definition of osteoporosis by focusing on bone mineral density (BMD) measurements has the major advantage of practical usefulness. The algorithm of managing osteoporotic patients can be easily constructed from the result of bone densitometry as the primary diagnostic tool. The DROP serves a total population of 550,000, is equipped with a DXA bone densitometer, a bone metabolism laboratory and backed by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians from gynecology, radiology, rheumatology, internal medicine, and orthopedic surgery. In 1995 the total number of patients undergoing densitometry was 3170. In 2045 patients T scores of -1 or below were found. From this total number, 348 patients received HRT for 1 year or longer. The results of the treatment showed a positive response (i.e. no bone loss, or net gain) in 65%, while half of the 'non responders' proved in fact non compliant. The contradiction between risk assessment and early diagnosis is explained and replacing 'risk assessment' by 'selection criteria for bone densitometry' is proposed. 'Prevention of osteoporosis' is also to be replaced by 'prevention of complications', i.e. osteoporotic fractures. One of these measures is HRT. Its rational use in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and its relation to other treatment methods in the authors' own experience is discussed.

  20. Cognitive-behavioral therapy to prevent relapse in pediatric responders to pharmacotherapy for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kennard, Betsy D; Emslie, Graham J; Mayes, Taryn L; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Nakonezny, Paul A; Hughes, Jennifer L; Jones, Jessica M; Tao, Rongrong; Stewart, Sunita M; Jarrett, Robin B

    2008-12-01

    We present results of a feasibility test of a sequential treatment strategy using continuation phase cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to prevent relapse in youths with major depressive disorder (MDD) who have responded to acute phase pharmacotherapy. Forty-six youths (ages 11-18 years) who had responded to 12 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine were randomized to receive either 6 months of continued antidepressant medication management (MM) or antidepressant MM plus relapse prevention CBT (MM+CBT). Primary outcome was time to relapse, defined as a Childhood Depression Rating Scale-Revised score of 40 or higher and 2 weeks of symptom worsening or clinical deterioration warranting alteration of treatment to prevent full relapse. Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for depression severity at randomization and for the hazard of relapsing by age across the trial, revealed that participants in the MM treatment group had a significantly greater risk for relapse than those in the MM+CBT treatment group (hazard ratio = 8.80; 95% confidence interval 1.01-76.89; chi = 3.86, p =.049) during 6 months of continuation treatment. In addition, patient satisfaction was significantly higher in the MM+CBT group. No differences were found between the two treatment groups on attrition rate, serious adverse events, and overall global functioning. These preliminary results suggest that continuation phase CBT reduces the risk for relapse by eightfold compared with pharmacotherapy responders who received antidepressant medication alone during the 6-month continuation phase.

  1. Determination of the acute toxicity of isoniazid to three invasive carp species and rainbow trout in static exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreier, Theresa M.; Hubert, Terrance D.

    2015-01-01

    Three invasive fishes of considerable concern to aquatic resource managers are the Hypophthalmichthys nobilis (bighead carp),Hypophthalmichthys molitrix (silver carp), and Ctenopharyngodon idella (grass carp), collectively known as Asian carps. There is a need for an effective chemical control agent for Asian carps. Isoniazid was identified as a potential toxicant for grass carp. The selective toxicity of isoniazid to grass carp was verified as a response to an anecdotal report received in 2013. In addition, the toxicity of isoniazid to bighead carp, silver carp, and Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout) was evaluated. Isoniazid was not toxic to grass carp at the reported anecdotal concentration, which was 13 milligrams per liter. Isoniazid (130 milligrams per liter) was not selectively toxic to bighead carp, silver carp, or grass carp when compared to rainbow trout.

  2. Line probe assay for detection of rifampicin and isoniazid resistant tuberculosis in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Joveria Qais; Khan, Erum; Alam, Syed Muhammed Zaheer; Ali, Asho; Hasan, Zahra; Hasan, Rumina

    2012-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of a line-probe assay delta (LiPA) as rapid diagnostic test for early detection of drug-resistant tuberculosis compared to conventional susceptibility methods in Pakistan. Resistance to rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) in 108 smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis samples was detected using a line-probe assay [GenoType MTBDRplus (Hain Lifescience, GmbH, Nehren, Germany)] at the clinical microbiology laboratory of Aga Khan University Hospital in May, 2009. Results were compared with susceptibilities performed while using agar proportion. In comparison to the agar proportion method, the detection rate and specificity of resistance using MTBDR plus was 92.5% and 98.2% for rifampicin, and 76.3% and 100% for isoniazid. Mutations in codons 531 and 533 of rpoB gene (62%S531L) were responsible for 67.9% of rifampicin resistance. S315T mutation of katG gene was detected in 55.9% and inhA promoter mutation at positions -15 (C15T) in 11.9% of isoniazid resistant isolates. Four phenotypically rifampicin-resistant and 14 isoniazid-resistant strains were not detected by MTBDRplus. Sequencing these strains revealed mutations in 4 strains; 2 in rpoB gene S531W, del518 and 2 in katG genesW300L, S315N. Hence, two phenotypic rifampicin-resistant and 13 phenotypic isoniazid-resistant strains were not detected by the commercial line probe assay. The study showed that MTBDRplus had a high detection rate for rifampicin resistance. However, additional probes need to be included in the assay to improve the detection of isoniazid-resistant mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Pakistan.

  3. Mortality Implications of Appropriate Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy in Secondary Prevention Patients: Contrasting Mortality in Primary Prevention Patients From a Prospective Population-Based Registry.

    PubMed

    Almehmadi, Fahad; Porta-Sánchez, Andreu; Ha, Andrew C T; Fischer, Hadas D; Wang, Xuesong; Austin, Peter C; Lee, Douglas S; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy

    2017-08-19

    We sought to examine the mortality impact of appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy between patients who received ICD for primary versus secondary prevention purposes. From a prospective, population-based registry, we identified 7020 patients who underwent de novo ICD implantation between February 2007 and May 2012 in Ontario, Canada. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazard modeling to adjust for differences in baseline characteristics and analyzed the mortality impact of first appropriate ICD therapy (shock and antitachycardia pacing [ATP]) as a time-varying covariate. There were 1929 (27.5%) patients who received ICDs for secondary prevention purposes. The median follow-up period was 5.02 years. Compared with those with secondary prevention ICDs, patients with primary prevention ICDs had more medical comorbidities, and lower ejection fraction. Patients who experienced appropriate ICD shock or ATP had greater risk of death compared with those who did not, irrespective of implant indication. In the primary prevention group, the adjusted hazard ratios of death for appropriate shock and ATP were 2.00 (95% CI: 1.72-2.33) and 1.73 (95% CI: 1.52-1.97), respectively. In the secondary prevention group, the adjusted hazard ratios of death for appropriate ICD shock and ATP were 1.46 (95% CI: 1.20-1.77) and 1.38 (95% CI: 1.16-1.64), respectively. Despite having a more favorable clinical profile, occurrence of appropriate ICD shock or ATP in patients with secondary prevention ICDs was associated with similar magnitudes of mortality risk as those with primary prevention ICDs. A heightened degree of care is warranted for all patients who experience appropriate ICD shock or ATP therapy. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  4. Rifampicin/Cotrimoxazole/Isoniazid Versus Mefloquine or Quinine + Sulfadoxine- Pyrimethamine for Malaria: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Genton, Blaise; Mueller, Ivo; Betuela, Inoni; Casey, Gerard; Ginny, Meza; Alpers, Michael P; Reeder, John C

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Previous studies of a fixed combination including cotrimoxazole, rifampicin, and isoniazid (Cotrifazid) showed efficacy against resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum in animal models and in small-scale human studies. We conducted a multicentric noninferiority trial to assess the safety and efficacy of Cotrifazid against drug-resistant malaria in Papua New Guinea. Design: The trial design was open-label, block-randomised, comparative, and multicentric. Setting: The trial was conducted in four primary care health facilities, two in urban and two in rural areas of Madang and East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea. Participants: Patients of all ages with recurrent uncomplicated malaria were included. Interventions: Patients were randomly assigned to receive Cotrifazid, mefloquine, or the standard treatment of quinine with sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine (SP). Outcome Measures: Incidence of clinical and laboratory adverse events and rate of clinical and/or parasitological failure at day 14 were recorded. Results: The safety analysis population included 123 patients assigned to Cotrifazid, 123 to mefloquine, and 123 to quinine + SP. The Cotrifazid group experienced lower overall incidence of adverse events than the other groups. Among the efficacy analysis population (72 Cotrifazid, 71 mefloquine, and 75 quinine + SP), clinical failure rate (symptoms and parasite load) on day 14 was equivalent for the three groups (0% for Cotrifazid and mefloquine; 1% for quinine + SP), but parasitological failure rate (P. falciparum asexual blood-stage) was higher for Cotrifazid than for mefloquine or quinine + SP (9% [PCR corrected 8%] versus 0% and 3%, respectively [p = 0.02]). Conclusion: Despite what appears to be short-term clinical equivalence, the notable parasitological failure at day 14 in both P. falciparum and P. vivax makes Cotrifazid in its current formulation and regimen a poor alternative combination therapy for malaria. PMID:17192794

  5. Prevention of postoperative progression of pulmonary metastases in osteosarcoma by antiangiogenic therapy using endostatin.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mitsunori; Wada, Takuro; Nagoya, Satoshi; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2007-11-01

    We have previously offered data suggesting a positive linkage of postoperative up-regulation of systemic angiogenic activity and postoperative progression of pulmonary metastasis in osteosarcoma. The finding that the significant down-regulation of endostatin was critical in angiogenic elevation after primary tumor removal suggests that endostatin is a candidate for antiangiogenic therapy for osteosarcoma. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of antiangiogenic therapy using endostatin on postoperative progression of pulmonary metastasis from osteosarcoma. Mouse osteosarcoma cell line LM 8 cells were inoculated in subcutaneous layer of nude mice. Two weeks after tumor inoculation, the primary tumor was removed surgically, and antiangiogenic therapy using adenovirus encoding endostatin expression vector (Ad5CMV-mEnd) was performed. Two weeks after the antiangiogenic treatment, pulmonary metastasis was evaluated by counting the number of metastatic nodules. The evaluation of systemic angiogenic activity was performed using Matrigel plug assay. Two weeks after the viral injection, mice were sacrificed, and the macroscopic pulmonary metastases were counted. Notably, the number of pulmonary metastases was smaller in the mice injected with Ad5CMV-mEnd than in controls, accompanied by significant suppression of systemic angiogenic activity. In addition, the sizes of the pulmonary metastases of the mice injected with Ad5CMV-mEnd were smaller than in the control group. Our results indicate that antiangiogenic therapy using endostatin has the potential to prevent postoperative progression of pulmonary metastasis from osteosarcoma. Although this therapeutic strategy cannot provide a cure for osteosarcoma, it should enable osteosarcoma patients to coexist with dormant pulmonary metastasis and lead to improvement of their prognosis.

  6. An update on short-course episodic and prevention therapies for herpes genitalis.

    PubMed

    Corey, Lawrence; Bodsworth, Neil; Mindel, Adrian; Patel, Raj; Schacker, Timothy; Stanberry, Lawrence

    2007-06-01

    The prevalence of herpes genitalis (genital herpes) has increased markedly over the past three decades. The most common cause is infection with the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), but it can also occur as a result of HSV-1 infection. Herpes genitalis can cause substantial psychosexual as well as physical morbidity and, in immunocompromised individuals, such as those who are HIV-positive, HSV infection can result in severe disease with progressive and extensive lesions. The natural history of herpes genitalis and the pathways of infection are now well known; however, the factors associated with reactivation have yet to be fully defined. A number of management approaches with antiviral medications are commonly used, including episodic and suppressive treatments. For episodic therapy, the duration of both lesions and symptoms, as well as the proportion of aborted episodes, are the most important measures of efficacy. For suppressive therapy, the time to first recurrence and frequency of recurrences over time are the most important clinical measures of antiviral benefit. Regarding the duration of episodic regimens, comparisons of 1-, 2- and 3-day antiviral courses with standard 5-day regimens show similar benefits on healing and relief of symptoms, with the obvious improvement in convenience, economy and compliance. In HIV-positive patients, antiherpes therapy has proved effective in speeding healing of lesions and reducing subclinical shedding, and can be used to treat genital HSV-2 infections in this group. Suppressive antiviral therapy has been shown to decrease the risk of HSV transmission in heterosexual couples. New approaches to the prevention of HSV infection, including vaccines and topical microbicides, are under investigation.

  7. Long-Term Adherence to Evidence Based Secondary Prevention Therapies after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bowblis, John R.; Levin, Carrie; Jan, Saira; Patel, Minalkumar; Crystal, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND After acute myocardial infarction (AMI), treatment with beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) is widely recognized as crucial to reduce risk of a subsequent AMI. However, many patients fail to consistently remain on these treatments over time, and long-term adherence has not been well described. OBJECTIVE To examine the duration of treatment with beta-blockers and ACEI within the 24 months after an AMI. DESIGN A retrospective, observational study using medical and pharmacy claims from a large health plan operating in the Northeastern United States. SUBJECTS Enrollees with an inpatient claim for AMI who initiated beta-blocker (N = 499) or ACEI (N = 526) therapy. MEASUREMENT Time from initiation to discontinuation was measured with pharmacy refill records. Associations between therapy discontinuation and potential predictors were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS ACEI discontinuation rates were high: 7% stopped within 1 month, 22% at 6 months, 32% at 1 year and 50% at 2 years. Overall discontinuation rates for beta-blockers were similar, but predictors of discontinuation differed for the two treatment types. For beta-blockers, the risk of discontinuation was highest among males and those from low-income neighborhoods; patients with comorbid hypertension and peripheral vascular disease were less likely to discontinue therapy. These factors were not associated with ACEI discontinuation. CONCLUSION Many patients initiating evidence-based secondary prevention therapies after an AMI fail to consistently remain on these treatments. Adherence is a priority area for development of better-quality measures and quality-improvement interventions. Barriers to beta-blocker adherence for low-income populations need particular attention. PMID:17922172

  8. ISONIAZID AND RIFAMPIN PHARMACOKINETICS IN TWO ASIAN ELEPHANTS (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS) INFECTED WITH MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS.

    PubMed

    Egelund, Eric F; Isaza, Ramiro; Alsultan, Abdullah; Peloquin, Charles A

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the pharmacokinetic profiles of chronically administered oral isoniazid and rifampin in one adult male and one adult female Asian elephant ( Elephas maximus ) that were asymptomatically infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis . Rifampin's half-life was reduced when compared to previous single-dose pharmacokinetic profiles of healthy uninfected Asian elephants. Both elephants experienced delayed absorption of isoniazid and rifampin as compared to previous pharmacokinetic studies in this species. The altered pharmacokinetics of both drugs in repeated-dosing clinical situations underscores the need for individual therapeutic drug monitoring for tuberculosis treatment.

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Resistant to Isoniazid at a Slow Growth Rate by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in katG Codon Ser315

    PubMed Central

    Pullan, Steven T.; Allnutt, Jon C.; Freire-Martin, Irene; Hendon-Dunn, Charlotte L.; Watson, Robert; Witney, Adam A.; Tyler, Richard H.; Arnold, Catherine; Marsh, Philip D.; McHugh, Timothy D.; Bacon, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    An important aim for improving TB treatment is to shorten the period of antibiotic therapy without increasing relapse rates or encouraging the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. In any M. tuberculosis population there is a proportion of bacteria that are drug-tolerant; this might be because of pre-existing populations of slow growing/non replicating bacteria that are protected from antibiotic action due to the expression of a phenotype that limits drug activity. We addressed this question by observing populations of either slow growing (constant 69.3h mean generation time) or fast growing bacilli (constant 23.1h mean generation time) in their response to the effects of isoniazid exposure, using controlled and defined growth in chemostats. Phenotypic differences were detected between the populations at the two growth rates including expression of efflux mechanisms and the involvement of antisense RNA/small RNA in the regulation of a drug-tolerant phenotype, which has not been explored previously for M. tuberculosis. Genotypic analyses showed that slow growing bacilli develop resistance to isoniazid through mutations specifically in katG codon Ser315 which are present in approximately 50–90% of all isoniazid-resistant clinical isolates. The fast growing bacilli persisted as a mixed population with katG mutations distributed throughout the gene. Mutations in katG codon Ser315 appear to have a fitness cost in vitro and particularly in fast growing cultures. Our results suggest a requirement for functional katG-encoded catalase-peroxide in the slow growers but not the fast-growing bacteria, which may explain why katG codon Ser315 mutations are favoured in the slow growing cultures. PMID:26382066

  10. Overview on mechanisms of isoniazid action and resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Unissa, Ameeruddin Nusrath; Subbian, Selvakumar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Selvakumar, Nagamiah

    2016-11-01

    Isoniazid (INH) is one of the most active compounds used to treat tuberculosis (TB) worldwide. In addition, INH has been used as a prophylactic drug for individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection to prevent reactivation of disease. Importantly, the definition of multidrug resistance (MDR) in TB is based on the resistance of MTB strains to INH and rifampicin (RIF). Despite its simple chemical structure, the mechanism of action of INH is very complex and involves several different concepts. Many pathways pertaining to macromolecular synthesis are affected, notably mycolic acid synthesis. The pro-drug INH is activated by catalase-peroxidase (KatG), and the active INH products are targeted by enzymes namely, enoyl acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (InhA) and beta-ketoacyl ACP synthase (KasA). In contrast, INH is inactivated by arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs). Consequently, the molecular mechanisms of INH resistance involve several genes in multiple biosynthetic networks and pathways. Mutation in the katG gene is the major cause for INH resistance, followed by inhA, ahpC, kasA, ndh, iniABC,fadE, furA, Rv1592c and Rv1772. The recent association of efflux genes with INH resistance has also gained considerable attention. Interestingly, substitutions have also been observed in nat, fabD, and accD recently in resistant isolates. Understanding the mechanisms operating behind INH action and resistance would enable better detection of INH resistance. This information would aid novel drug design strategies. Herein we review all mechanisms known to potentially contribute to the complexity of INH action and mechanisms of resistance in MTB, with insights into methods for detection of INH resistance as well as their limitations.

  11. Harnessing the Prevention Benefits of Antiretroviral Therapy to Address HIV and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Granich, Reuben; Lo, Ying-Ru; Suthar, Amitabh B; Vitoria, Marco; Baggaley, Rachel; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf; McClure, Craig; Souteyrand, Yves; Perriens, Jos; Kahn, James G; Bennett, Rod; Smyth, Caoimhe; Williams, Brian; Montaner, Julio; Hirnschall, Gottfried

    2011-01-01

    After 30 years we are still struggling to address a devastating HIV pandemic in which over 25 million people have died. In 2010, an estimated 34 million people were living with HIV, around 70% of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa. Furthermore, in 2009 there were an estimated 1.2 million new HIV-associated TB cases, and tuberculosis (TB) accounted for 24% of HIV-related deaths. By the end of 2010, 6.6 million people were taking antiretroviral therapy (ART), around 42% of those in need as defined by the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Despite this achievement, around 9 million people were eligible and still in need of treatment, and new infections (approximately 2.6 million in 2010 alone) continue to add to the future caseload. This combined with the international fiscal crisis has led to a growing concern regarding weakening of the international commitment to universal access and delivery of the Millennium Development Goals by 2015. The recently launched UNAIDS/WHO Treatment 2.0 platform calls for accelerated simplification of ART, in line with a public health approach, to achieve and sustain universal access to ART, including maximizing the HIV and TB preventive benefit of ART by treating people earlier, in line with WHO 2010 normative guidance. The potential individual and public health prevention benefits of using treatment in the prevention of HIV and TB enhance the value of the universal access pledge from a life-saving initiative, to a strategic investment aimed at ending the HIV epidemic. This review analyzes the gaps and summarizes the evidence regarding ART in the prevention of HIV and TB. PMID:21999771

  12. Neonatal Thymulin Gene Therapy Prevents Ovarian Dysgenesis and Attenuates Reproductive Derangements in Nude Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reggiani, Paula C.; Barbeito, Claudio G.; Zuccolilli, Gustavo O.; Cónsole, Gloria M.; Flamini, Alicia M.; Dardenne, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Congenitally athymic (nude) female mice show severe ovarian dysgenesis after puberty, which seems to be consequential to a number of neuroendocrine derangements described in these mutants. Thus, considerable evidence suggests that thymulin, a thymic peptide, may be involved in thymus-pituitary communication. In order to clarify the relevance of thymulin for the maturation of the female reproductive system, we assessed at hypothalamic, pituitary, ovarian, and uterine level the preventive action of neonatal thymulin gene therapy (NTGT) on the changes that typically occur after puberty in congenitally athymic female mice. We injected (im) an adenoviral vector harboring a synthetic DNA sequence encoding a biologically active analog of thymulin, methionine-serum thymic factor, in newborn nude mice (which are thymulin deficient) and killed the animals at 70–71 d of age. NTGT in the athymic mice restored the serum thymulin levels. Morphometric analysis revealed that athymic nudes have reduced numbers of brain GnRH neurons and pituitary gonadotropic cells as compared with heterozygous controls. NTGT prevented these changes and also rescued the premature ovarian failure phenotype typically observed in athymic nude mice (marked reduction in the number of antral follicles and corpora lutea, increase in atretic follicles). Serum estrogen, but not progesterone, levels were low in athymic nudes, a reduction that was partially prevented by NTGT. Little to no morphological changes were observed in the endometrium of female nudes. The delay in the age of vaginal opening that occurs in athymic nudes was significantly prevented by NTGT. Our results suggest that thymulin plays a relevant physiologic role in the thymus-hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. PMID:22700775

  13. Neonatal thymulin gene therapy prevents ovarian dysgenesis and attenuates reproductive derangements in nude female mice.

    PubMed

    Reggiani, Paula C; Barbeito, Claudio G; Zuccolilli, Gustavo O; Cónsole, Gloria M; Flamini, Alicia M; Dardenne, Mireille; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2012-08-01

    Congenitally athymic (nude) female mice show severe ovarian dysgenesis after puberty, which seems to be consequential to a number of neuroendocrine derangements described in these mutants. Thus, considerable evidence suggests that thymulin, a thymic peptide, may be involved in thymus-pituitary communication. In order to clarify the relevance of thymulin for the maturation of the female reproductive system, we assessed at hypothalamic, pituitary, ovarian, and uterine level the preventive action of neonatal thymulin gene therapy (NTGT) on the changes that typically occur after puberty in congenitally athymic female mice. We injected (im) an adenoviral vector harboring a synthetic DNA sequence encoding a biologically active analog of thymulin, methionine-serum thymic factor, in newborn nude mice (which are thymulin deficient) and killed the animals at 70-71 d of age. NTGT in the athymic mice restored the serum thymulin levels. Morphometric analysis revealed that athymic nudes have reduced numbers of brain GnRH neurons and pituitary gonadotropic cells as compared with heterozygous controls. NTGT prevented these changes and also rescued the premature ovarian failure phenotype typically observed in athymic nude mice (marked reduction in the number of antral follicles and corpora lutea, increase in atretic follicles). Serum estrogen, but not progesterone, levels were low in athymic nudes, a reduction that was partially prevented by NTGT. Little to no morphological changes were observed in the endometrium of female nudes. The delay in the age of vaginal opening that occurs in athymic nudes was significantly prevented by NTGT. Our results suggest that thymulin plays a relevant physiologic role in the thymus-hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  14. When a Single Antiplatelet Agent for Stroke Prevention Is Not Enough: Current Evidence and Future Applications of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kristy; Kim, Anthony S

    2016-04-01

    For secondary stroke prevention, long-term dual antiplatelet therapy is not recommended due to increased bleeding risks. There is no specific evidence for using dual antiplatelet therapy for cervical artery dissection or for adding a second antiplatelet agent after a stroke while taking aspirin monotherapy. For patients with atrial fibrillation and stroke/TIA unable to tolerate warfarin, aspirin monotherapy is reasonable. Dual antiplatelet therapy carries a similar risk of major bleeding as warfarin that offsets reductions in stroke risk. Dual antiplatelet therapy is recommended for endovascular cerebrovascular stenting procedures, although the optimal duration of therapy is not well established. Short-term dual antiplatelet therapy when initiated acutely after minor stroke/TIA, particularly in Asian populations or for intracranial atherosclerosis, holds promise though studies to evaluate this approach more generally are ongoing. New antiplatelet agents and additional data on the pharmacogenetics of clopidogrel metabolism have the potential to help to individualize these recommendations moving forward.

  15. CROI 2015: Advances in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Olender, Susan A; Taylor, Barbara S; Wong, Marcia; Wilkin, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections included new and exciting advances in the realm of antiretroviral therapy. The Temprano trial demonstrated benefits from early antiretroviral therapy and isoniazid preventive therapy. Important data on investigational antiretroviral drugs were presented, including tenofovir alafenamide fumarate and BMS-955176, an HIV-1 maturation inhibitor. Novel data on the HIV care continuum from resource-rich and -limited settings highlighted persistent sex- and race-related disparities in care engagement, and the crucial need to bring HIV testing and care into the community to improve engagement across the care continuum. Life expectancy data from resource-limited settings reveal dramatic improvements across sub-Saharan Africa, although people with HIV still live 5 years to 10 years less than those without HIV, and new cost-effectiveness research revealed that the price of antiretroviral therapy itself remains a key driver of cost and cost-effectiveness calculations. Results from the PROMISE trial showed reduced rates of mother-to-child transmission among women who received antiretroviral therapy with 3 drugs compared with women who received zidovudine monotherapy, supporting current World Health Organization guidelines.

  16. Appropriateness of antiplatelet therapy for primary and secondary cardio- and cerebrovascular prevention in acutely hospitalized older people.

    PubMed

    Ardoino, Ilaria; Rossio, Raffaella; Di Blanca, Donnatella; Nobili, Alessandro; Pasina, Luca; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Peyvandi, Flora; Franchi, Carlotta

    2017-07-19

    Antiplatelet therapy is recommended for the secondary prevention of cardio- and cerebrovascular disease, but for primary prevention it is advised only in patients at very high risk. With this background, this study aims to assess the appropriateness of antiplatelet therapy in acutely hospitalized older people according to their risk profile. Data were obtained from the REPOSI register held in Italian and Spanish internal medicine and geriatric wards in 2012 and 2014. Hospitalized patients aged ≥65 assessable at discharge were selected. Appropriateness of the antiplatelet therapy was evaluated according to their primary or secondary cardiovascular prevention profiles. Of 2535 enrolled patients, 2199 were assessable at discharge. Overall 959 (43.6%, 95% CI 41.5-45.7) were prescribed an antiplatelet drug, aspirin being the most frequently chosen. Among patients prescribed for primary prevention, just over half were inappropriately prescribed (52.1%), being mainly overprescribed (155/209 patients, 74.2%). On the other hand, there was also a high rate of inappropriate underprescription in the context of secondary prevention (222/726 patients, 30.6%, 95% CI 27.3-34.0%). This study carried out in acutely hospitalized older people shows a high degree of inappropriate prescription among patients prescribed with antiplatelets for primary prevention, mainly due to overprescription. Further, a large proportion of patients who had had overt cardio- or cerebrovascular disease were underprescribed, in spite of the established benefits of antiplatelet drugs in the context of secondary prevention. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  18. COX-2 inhibition potentiates antiangiogenic cancer therapy and prevents metastasis in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lihong; Stevens, Janine; Hilton, Mary Beth; Seaman, Steven; Conrads, Thomas P; Veenstra, Timothy D; Logsdon, Daniel; Morris, Holly; Swing, Deborah A; Patel, Nimit L; Kalen, Joseph; Haines, Diana C; Zudaire, Enrique; St Croix, Brad

    2014-06-25

    Antiangiogenic agents that block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling are important components of current cancer treatment modalities but are limited by alternative ill-defined angiogenesis mechanisms that allow persistent tumor vascularization in the face of continued VEGF pathway blockade. We identified prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a soluble tumor-derived angiogenic factor associated with VEGF-independent angiogenesis. PGE2 production in preclinical breast and colon cancer models was tightly controlled by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, and COX-2 inhibition augmented VEGF pathway blockade to suppress angiogenesis and tumor growth, prevent metastasis, and increase overall survival. These results demonstrate the importance of the COX-2/PGE2 pathway in mediating resistance to VEGF pathway blockade and could aid in the rapid development of more efficacious anticancer therapies. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. [Physical activity for prevention and therapy of internal diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Weisser, Burkhard; Preuss, Manuela; Predel, Hans-Georg

    2009-04-15

    There is a growing number of elderly people in Western societies. Therefore, the prevalence of age-associated diseases increases. For most of these conditions, exercise and physical activity play a major role in the prevention and therapy. However, it is well established that the level of physical activity is lowest in elderly people. Physical fitness continues to be the most important protective health factor and should be improved in the elderly population. Many exercise recommendations include only endurance programs, but strength and coordination also deliver positive therapeutic effects in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, lung diseases, neoplasms, and many other pathologic conditions including dementia. Age-specific recommendations should be included in exercise programs for health.

  20. Prevention and management of hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients with hematological malignancies treated with anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Law, Man Fai; Ho, Rita; Cheung, Carmen K M; Tam, Lydia H P; Ma, Karen; So, Kent C Y; Ip, Bonaventure; So, Jacqueline; Lai, Jennifer; Ng, Joyce; Tam, Tommy H C

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation can be severe and potentially fatal, but is preventable. HBV reactivation is most commonly reported in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, especially rituximab-containing therapy for hematological malignancies and those receiving stem cell transplantation. All patients with hematological malignancies receiving anticancer therapy should be screened for active or resolved HBV infection by blood tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). Patients found to be positive for HBsAg should be given prophylactic antiviral therapy to prevent HBV reactivation. For patients with resolved HBV infection, no standard strategy has yet been established to prevent HBV reactivation. There are usually two options. One is pre-emptive therapy guided by serial HBV DNA monitoring, whereby antiviral therapy is given as soon as HBV DNA becomes detectable. However, there is little evidence regarding the optimal interval and period of monitoring. An alternative approach is prophylactic antiviral therapy, especially for patients receiving high-risk therapy such as rituximab, newer generation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, obinutuzumab or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This strategy may effectively prevent HBV reactivation and avoid the inconvenience of repeated HBV DNA monitoring. Entecavir or tenofovir are preferred over lamivudine as prophylactic therapy. Although there is no well-defined guideline on the optimal duration of prophylactic therapy, there is growing evidence to recommend continuing prophylactic antiviral therapy for at least 12 mo after cessation of chemotherapy, and even longer for those who receive rituximab or who had high serum HBV DNA levels before the start of immunosuppressive therapy. Many novel agents have recently become available for the treatment of hematological malignancies, and these agents may be associated with HBV reactivation. Although

  1. Fixed-dose combination therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    de Cates, Angharad N; Farr, Matthew R B; Wright, Nicola; Jarvis, Morag C; Rees, Karen; Ebrahim, Shah; Huffman, Mark D

    2014-04-16

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet CVD risk factor control and secondary prevention rates remain low. A fixed-dose combination of blood pressure and cholesterol lowering and antiplatelet treatments into a single pill, or polypill, has been proposed as one strategy to reduce the global burden of CVD by up to 80% given its potential for better adherence and lower costs. To determine the effectiveness of fixed-dose combination therapy on reducing fatal and non-fatal CVD events and on improving blood pressure and lipid CVD risk factors for both primary and secondary prevention of CVD. We also aimed to determine discontinuation rates, adverse events, health-related quality of life, and costs of fixed-dose combination therapy. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 6), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to week 2 July 2013), EMBASE Ovid (1980 to Week 28 2013), ISI Web of Science (1970 to 19 July 2013), and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA), and Health Economics Evaluations Database (HEED) (2011, Issue 4) in The Cochrane Library. We used no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials of a fixed-dose combination therapy including at least one blood pressure lowering and one lipid lowering component versus usual care, placebo, or a single drug active component for any treatment duration in adults ≥ 18 years old with no restrictions on presence or absence of pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Three review authors independently selected studies for inclusion and extracted the data. We evaluated risk of bias using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. We sought to include outcome data on all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal CVD events, adverse events, changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations

  2. Fixed-dose combination therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    de Cates, Angharad N; Farr, Matthew RB; Wright, Nicola; Jarvis, Morag C; Rees, Karen; Ebrahim, Shah; Huffman, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet CVD risk factor control and secondary prevention rates remain low. A fixed-dose combination of blood pressure and cholesterol lowering and antiplatelet treatments into a single pill, or polypill, has been proposed as one strategy to reduce the global burden of CVD by up to 80% given its potential for better adherence and lower costs. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of fixed-dose combination therapy on reducing fatal and non-fatal CVD events and on improving blood pressure and lipid CVD risk factors for both primary and secondary prevention of CVD. We also aimed to determine discontinuation rates, adverse events, health-related quality of life, and costs of fixed-dose combination therapy. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library(2013, Issue 6), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to week 2 July 2013), EMBASE Ovid (1980 to Week 28 2013), ISI Web of Science (1970 to 19 July 2013), and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA), and Health Economics Evaluations Database (HEED) (2011, Issue 4) in The Cochrane Library. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials of a fixed-dose combination therapy including at least one blood pressure lowering and one lipid lowering component versus usual care, placebo, or a single drug active component for any treatment duration in adults ≥ 18 years old with no restrictions on presence or absence of pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Data collection and analysis Three review authors independently selected studies for inclusion and extracted the data. We evaluated risk of bias using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. We sought to include outcome data on all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal CVD events, adverse events, changes in systolic and diastolic blood

  3. Antiplatelet therapy for preventing stroke in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Jae; Bang, Oh Young

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as reduced glomerular filtration rate and/or proteinuria, is a serious worldwide health problem. The incidence and prevalence of CKD are increasing with age, and patients with CKD are a population at very high risk for developing stroke. CKD may increase the risk for incident stroke independent of conventional stroke risk factors. A common pathological process including anemia, homocysteine, nitric oxide, oxidative stress, inflammation, and conditions promoting coagulation may be related to the development of stroke in the course of CKD. CKD can also serve as a marker of brain injury, because the cerebral microvascular system has similar hemodynamic features with the vascular beds of the kidney. CKD has been linked with markers of cerebral small artery disease including white matter lesions, lacunar infarctions, and cerebral microbleeds. CKD has been implicated with neurological deterioration during hospitalization, poor functional outcome, and hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke. Recurrence of stroke may also be higher in CKD patients compared with those having normal kidney function. However, there have been no specific recommendations for antiplatelet therapy in patients with ischemic stroke plus CKD. As CKD patients have distinct characteristics including high bleeding complications and poor response to antiplatelet agents, selecting and adjusting platelet aggregation inhibitors should be individualized. In addition, it should be noted that aspirin may aggravate renal dysfunction. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors restore endothelial dysfunction and may serve as a target for preventing stroke in CKD patients. Aside from antiplatelet therapy, other treatments including lipid control, blood pressure lowering, and renal transplantation are also important. Further studies are warranted for optimal treatment in stroke prevention in CKD patients.

  4. Antibody-mediated p53 protein therapy prevents liver metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James E; Fischer, Laurice K; Chan, Grace; Chang, Sophia S; Baldwin, Scott W; Aragon, Robert J; Carter, Jacqueline J; Lilly, Michael; Nishimura, Robert N; Weisbart, Richard H; Reeves, Mark E

    2007-02-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3E10 Fv antibody-mediated p53 protein therapy, an Fv-p53 fusion protein produced in Pichia pastoris was tested on CT26.CL25 colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model of colon cancer metastasis to the liver. In vitro experiments showed killing of CT26.CL25 cells by Fv-p53 but not Fv or p53 alone, and immunohistochemical staining confirmed that Fv was required for transport of p53 into cells. Prevention of liver metastasis in vivo was tested by splenic injection of 100 nmol/L Fv-p53 10 min and 1 week after injection of CT26.CL25 cancer cells into the portal vein of BALB/c mice. Mice were sacrificed 1 week after the second injection of Fv-p53 and assigned a quantitative metastasis score. Control mice had an average metastasis score of 3.3 +/- 1.3, whereas mice treated with Fv-p53 had an average metastasis score of 0.8 +/- 0.4 (P = 0.004). These results indicate that Fv-p53 treatment had a profound effect on liver metastasis and represent the first demonstration of effective full-length p53 protein therapy in vivo. mAb 3E10 Fv has significant clinical potential as a mediator of intracellular and intranuclear delivery of p53 for prevention and treatment of cancer metastasis.

  5. Partial prevention of hepatic lipid alterations in nude mice by neonatal thymulin gene therapy.

    PubMed

    García de Bravo, Margarita M; Polo, Mónica P; Reggiani, Paula C; Rimoldi, Omar J; Dardenne, Mireille; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2006-08-01

    During adult life athymic (nude) male mice display not only a severe T-cell-related immunodeficiency but also endocrine imbalances and a moderate hyperglycemia. We studied the impact of congenital athymia on hepatic lipid composition and also assessed the ability of neonatal thymulin gene therapy to prevent the effects of athymia. We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector, RAd-metFTS, expressing a synthetic DNA sequence encoding met-FTS, an analog of the thymic peptide facteur thymique sérique (FTS), whose Zn-bound biologically active form is known as thymulin. On postnatal day 1-2 homozygous (nu/nu) nude and heterozygous (nu/+) mice were injected with 10(8) pfu of RAd-metFTS or RAd-betagal (control vector) intramuscularly. The animals were processed at 52 d of age. Serum thymulin, glycemia, hepatic phospholipid FA composition and free and esterified cholesterol were determined. Adult homozygous male nudes were significantly (P < 0.01) hyperglycemic when compared with their heterozygous counterparts (2.04 vs. 1.40 g/L, respectively). The relative percentage of 16:0, 18:1 n-9, and 18:1n-7 FA was lower, whereas that of 18:0, 20:4n-6, and 22:6n-3 FA was higher, in hepatic phospholipid (PL) of nu/nu animals as compared with their nu/+ counterparts. Some of these alterations, such as that in the relative content of 22:6n-3 in liver PL and the unsaturation index, were completely or partially prevented by neonatal thymulin gene therapy. We conclude that the thymus influences lipid metabolism and that thymulin is involved in this modulatory activity.

  6. Escitalopram and problem-solving therapy for prevention of poststroke depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Robert G; Jorge, Ricardo E; Moser, David J; Acion, Laura; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Hegel, Mark; Arndt, Stephan

    2008-05-28

    Depression occurs in more than half of patients who have experienced a stroke. Poststroke depression has been shown in numerous studies to be associated with both impaired recovery in activities of daily living and increased mortality. Prevention of depression thus represents a potentially important goal. To determine whether treatment with escitalopram or problem-solving therapy over the first year following acute stroke will decrease the number of depression cases that develop compared with placebo medication. A multisite randomized controlled trial for prevention of depression among 176 nondepressed patients was conducted within 3 months following acute stroke from July 9, 2003, to October 1, 2007. The 12-month trial included 3 groups: a double-blind placebo-controlled comparison of escitalopram (n = 59) with placebo (n = 58), and a nonblinded problem-solving therapy group (n = 59). The main outcome measure was the development of major or minor poststroke depression based on symptoms elicited by the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) (DSM-IV) and the diagnostic criteria from DSM-IV for depression due to stroke with major depressive-like episode or minor depression (ie, research criteria). Patients who received placebo were significantly more likely to develop depression than individuals who received escitalopram (11 major and 2 minor cases of depression [22.4%] vs 3 major and 2 minor cases of depression [8.5%], adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 4.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4-8.2; P < .001) and also more likely than individuals who received problem-solving therapy (5 major and 2 minor cases of depression [11.9%], adjusted HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4-3.5; P < .001). These results were adjusted for history of mood disorders and remained significant after considering possible confounders such as age, sex, treatment site, and severity of impairment in the model. Using an intention

  7. Escitalopram and Problem-Solving Therapy for Prevention of Poststroke Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Robert G.; Jorge, Ricardo E.; Moser, David J.; Acion, Laura; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L.; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Hegel, Mark; Arndt, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Context Depression occurs in more than half of patients who have experienced a stroke. Poststroke depression has been shown in numerous studies to be associated with both impaired recovery in activities of daily living and increased mortality. Prevention of depression thus represents a potentially important goal. Objective To determine whether treatment with escitalopram or problem-solving therapy over the first year following acute stroke will decrease the number of depression cases that develop compared with placebo medication. Design, Setting, and Participants A multisite randomized controlled trial for prevention of depression among 176 nondepressed patients was conducted within 3 months following acute stroke from July 9, 2003, to October 1, 2007. The 12-month trial included 3 groups: a double-blind placebo-controlled comparison of escitalopram (n=59) with placebo (n=58), and a nonblinded problem-solving therapy group (n=59). Main Outcome Measures The main outcome measure was the development of major or minor poststroke depression based on symptoms elicited by the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) (DSM-IV) and the diagnostic criteria from DSM-IV for depression due to stroke with major depressivelike episode or minor depression (ie, research criteria). Results Patients who received placebo were significantly more likely to develop depression than individuals who received escitalopram (11 major and 2 minor cases of depression [22.4%] vs 3 major and 2 min or cases of depression [8.5%], adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 4.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4–8.2; P<.001) and also more likely than individuals who received problem-solving therapy (5 major and 2 minor cases of depression [11.9%], adjusted HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4–3.5; P<.001). These results were adjusted for history of mood disorders and remained significant after considering possible confounders such as age, sex, treatment site

  8. Group Music Therapy as a Preventive Intervention for Young People at Risk: Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Gold, Christian; Saarikallio, Suvi; Crooke, Alexander Hew Dale; McFerran, Katrina Skewes

    2017-07-01

    Music forms an important part of the lives and identities of adolescents and may have positive or negative mental health implications. Music therapy can be effective for mental disorders such as depression, but its preventive potential is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether group music therapy (GMT) is an effective intervention for young people who may be at risk of developing mental health problems, as indicated via unhealthy music use. The main question was whether GMT can reduce unhealthy uses of music and increase potentials for healthy uses of music, compared to self-directed music listening (SDML). We were also interested in effects of GMT on depressive symptoms, psychosocial well-being, rumination, and reflection. In an exploratory cluster-randomized trial in Australian schools, 100 students with self-reported unhealthy music use were invited to GMT (weekly sessions over 8 weeks) or SDML. Changes in the Healthy-Unhealthy Music Scale (HUMS) and mental health outcomes were measured over 3 months. Both interventions were well accepted. No effects were found between GMT and SDML (all p > 0.05); both groups tended to show small improvements over time. Younger participants benefited more from GMT, and older ones more from SDML (p = 0.018). GMT was associated with similar changes as SDML. Further research is needed to improve the processes of selecting participants for targeted interventions; to determine optimal dosage; and to provide more reliable evidence of effects of music-based interventions for adolescents.

  9. Home infusion therapy. First things first: the patient and the prevention of central catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Polzien, Gladys

    2006-01-01

    During the past seventeen years, I've had the privilege of working as a home healthcare nurse in two rural counties in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. In the early 1990s, it was rare that our agency received referrals for IV antibiotics, opiate infusions for pain management or for total parenteral infusion (TPN) to be administered at home. Most patients stayed in the hospital for infusion therapy. Today, as more healthcare treatments are being shifted from hospital to outpatient or home care settings, referrals for home infusion have become more common in our area as well as across the nation (Jarvis, 2001). I'll never forget my first patient whom I cared for with home infusion therapy for pain management. I learned a great deal from Sally, and to this day I always remember that I can make a real difference in patient outcomes when I keep--"First Things First": the patient and infection prevention--when caring for any of my patients.

  10. Bone targeted therapy for preventing skeletal-related events in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Irelli, Azzurra; Cocciolone, Valentina; Cannita, Katia; Zugaro, Luigi; Di Staso, Mario; Lanfiuti Baldi, Paola; Paradisi, Stefania; Sidoni, Tina; Ricevuto, Enrico; Ficorella, Corrado

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cells can alter physiological mechanisms within bone resulting in high bone turnover, and consequently in skeletal-related events (SREs), causing severe morbidity in affected patients. The goals of bone targeted therapy, as bisphosphonates and denosumab, are the reduction of incidence and the delay in occurrence of the SREs, to improve quality of life and pain control. The toxicity profile is similar between bisphosphonates and denosumab, even if pyrexia, bone pain, arthralgia, renal failure and hypercalcemia are more common with bisphosphonates, while hypocalcemia and toothache are more frequently reported with denosumab. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) occurred infrequently without statistically significant difference. The present review aims to provide an assessment on bone targeted therapies for preventing the occurrence of SREs in bone metastatic breast cancer patients, critically analyzing the evidence available so far on their effectiveness, in light of the different mechanisms of action. Thus, we try to provide tools for the most fitting treatment of bone metastatic breast cancer patients. We also provide an overview on the usefulness of bone turnover markers in clinical practice and new molecules currently under study for the treatment of bone metastatic disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Centering prayer as an alternative to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for depression relapse prevention.

    PubMed

    Knabb, Joshua J

    2012-09-01

    In the last two decades, mindfulness has made a significant impact on Western secular psychology, as evidenced by several new treatment approaches that utilize mindfulness practices to ameliorate mental illness. Based on Buddhist teachings, mindfulness offers individuals the ability to, among other things, decenter from their thoughts and live in the present moment. As an example, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) teaches decentering and mindfulness techniques to adults in an eight-session group therapy format so as to reduce the likelihood of depression relapse. Yet, some Christian adults may prefer to turn to their own religious heritage, rather than the Buddhist tradition, in order to stave off depression relapse. Thus, the purpose of this article is to present centering prayer, a form of Christian meditation that is rooted in Catholic mysticism, as an alternative treatment for preventing depression relapse in adults. I argue that centering prayer overlaps considerably with MBCT, which makes it a suitable treatment alternative for many Christians in remission from depressive episodes.

  12. Intensive insulin therapy for preventing postoperative infection in patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jin-ping; Song, Ying-lun; Zhao, Qi-huang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the effect of intensive insulin therapy (IIT) for preventing postoperative inf