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Sample records for isoprenoid biosynthesis studies

  1. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Guggisberg, Ann M.; Amthor, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria kills nearly 1 million people each year, and the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum has become increasingly resistant to current therapies. Isoprenoid synthesis via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway represents an attractive target for the development of new antimalarials. The phosphonic acid antibiotic fosmidomycin is a specific inhibitor of isoprenoid synthesis and has been a helpful tool to outline the essential functions of isoprenoid biosynthesis in P. falciparum. Isoprenoids are a large, diverse class of hydrocarbons that function in a variety of essential cellular processes in eukaryotes. In P. falciparum, isoprenoids are used for tRNA isopentenylation and protein prenylation, as well as the synthesis of vitamin E, carotenoids, ubiquinone, and dolichols. Recently, isoprenoid synthesis in P. falciparum has been shown to be regulated by a sugar phosphatase. We outline what is known about isoprenoid function and the regulation of isoprenoid synthesis in P. falciparum, in order to identify valuable directions for future research. PMID:25217461

  2. Methylerythritol phosphate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lishan; Chang, Wei-chen; Xiao, Youli; Liu, Hung-wen; Liu, Pinghua

    2013-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of natural products with more than 55,000 members. All isoprenoids are constructed from two precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate. Two of the most important discoveries in isoprenoid biosynthetic studies in recent years are the elucidation of a second isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway [the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway] and a modified mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. In this review, we summarize mechanistic insights on the MEP pathway enzymes. Because many isoprenoids have important biological activities, the need to produce them in sufficient quantities for downstream research efforts or commercial application is apparent. Recent advances in both MVA and MEP pathway-based synthetic biology are also illustrated by reviewing the landmark work of artemisinic acid and taxadien-5α-ol production through microbial fermentations.

  3. Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway of Isoprenoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lishan; Chang, Wei-chen; Xiao, Youli; Liu, Hung-wen; Liu, Pinghua

    2016-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of natural products with more than 50,000 members. All isoprenoids are constructed from two precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Two of the most important discoveries in isoprenoid biosynthetic studies in recent years are the elucidation of a second isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway) and a modified mevalonate (MVA) pathway. In this review, mechanistic insights on the MEP pathway enzymes are summarized. Since many isoprenoids have important biological activities, the need to produce them in sufficient quantities for downstream research efforts or commercial application is apparent. Recent advances in both the MVA and MEP pathway-based synthetic biology efforts are also illustrated by reviewing the landmark work of artemisinic acid and taxadien-5α-ol production through microbial fermentations. PMID:23746261

  4. Regulation of Isoprenoid Pheromone Biosynthesis in Bumblebee Males.

    PubMed

    Prchalová, Darina; Buček, Aleš; Brabcová, Jana; Žáček, Petr; Kindl, Jiří; Valterová, Irena; Pichová, Iva

    2016-02-02

    Males of the closely related species Bombus terrestris and Bombus lucorum attract conspecific females by completely different marking pheromones. MP of B. terrestris and B. lucorum pheromones contain mainly isoprenoid (ISP) compounds and fatty acid derivatives, respectively. Here, we studied the regulation of ISP biosynthesis in both bumblebees. RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (AACT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), and farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) transcripts are abundant in the B. terrestris labial gland. Maximal abundance of these transcripts correlated well with AACT enzymatic activity detected in the LG extracts. In contrast, transcript abundances of AACT, HMGR, and FPPS in B. lucorum were low, and AACT activity was not detected in LGs. These results suggest that transcriptional regulation plays a key role in the control of ISP biosynthetic gene expression and ISP pheromone biosynthesis in bumblebee males.

  5. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  6. Disruption of insect isoprenoid biosynthesis with pyridinium bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Sen, Stephanie E; Wood, Lyndsay; Jacob, Reshma; Xhambazi, Alisa; Pease, Britanny; Jones, Alexis; Horsfield, Taylor; Lin, Alice; Cusson, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) catalyzes the condensation of the non-allylic diphosphate, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP; C5), with the allylic diphosphate primer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP; C5) to generate the C15 prenyl chain (FPP) used for protein prenylation as well as sterol and terpene biosynthesis. Here, we designed and prepared a series of pyridinium bisphosphonate (PyrBP) compounds, with the aim of selectively inhibiting FPPS of the lepidopteran insect order. FPPSs of Drosophila melanogaster and the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, were inhibited by several PyrBPs, and as hypothesized, larger bisphosphonates were more selective for the lepidopteran protein and completely inactive towards dipteran and vertebrate FPPSs. Cell growth of a D. melanogaster cell line was adversely affected by exposure to PyrPBs that were strongly inhibitory to insect FPPS, although their effect was less pronounced than that observed upon exposure to the electron transport disrupter, chlorfenapyr. To assess the impact of PyrBPs on lepidopteran insect growth and development, we performed feeding and topical studies, using the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, as our insect model. The free acid form of a PyrBP and a known bisphosphonate inhibitor of vertebrate FPPS, alendronate, had little to no effect on larval M. sexta; however, the topical application of more lipophilic ester PyrBPs caused decreased growth, incomplete larval molting, cuticle darkening at the site of application, and for those insects that survived, the formation of larval-pupal hybrids. To gain a better understanding of the structural differences that produce selective lepidopteran FPPS inhibition, homology models of C. fumiferana and D. melanogaster FPPS (CfFPPS2, and DmFPPS) were prepared. Docking of substrates and PyrBPs demonstrates that differences at the -3 and -4 positions relative to the first aspartate rich motif (FARM) are important factors in the ability of the lepidopteran enzyme to

  7. Isoprenoid Precursor Biosynthesis Is the Essential Metabolic Role of the Apicoplast during Gametocytogenesis in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jessica D.; Merino, Emilio F.; Krai, Priscilla M.; McLean, Kyle J.; Tripathi, Abhai K.; Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Klemba, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The malaria parasite harbors a relict plastid called the apicoplast and its discovery opened a new avenue for drug discovery and development due to its unusual, nonmammalian metabolism. The apicoplast is essential during the asexual intraerythrocytic and hepatic stages of the parasite, and there is strong evidence supporting its essential metabolic role during the mosquito stages of the parasite. Supply of the isoprenoid building blocks isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) is the essential metabolic function of the apicoplast during the asexual intraerythrocytic stages. However, the metabolic role of the apicoplast during gametocyte development, the malaria stages transmitted to the mosquito, remains unknown. In this study, we showed that production of IPP for isoprenoid biosynthesis is the essential metabolic function of the apicoplast during gametocytogenesis, by obtaining normal gametocytes lacking the apicoplast when supplemented with IPP. When IPP supplementation was removed early in gametocytogenesis, developmental defects were observed, supporting the essential role of isoprenoids for normal gametocytogenesis. Furthermore, mosquitoes infected with gametocytes lacking the apicoplast developed fewer and smaller oocysts that failed to produce sporozoites. This finding further supports the essential role of the apicoplast in establishing a successful infection in the mosquito vector. Our study supports isoprenoid biosynthesis as a valid drug target for development of malaria transmission-blocking inhibitors. PMID:25446055

  8. Isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase: A checkpoint to isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Karine; Estevez, Yannick; Deffieux, Alain; Peruch, Frédéric

    2012-08-01

    Even if the isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) isomerases have been discovered in the 50s, it is only in the last decade that the genetical, enzymatical, structural richness and cellular importance of this large family of crucial enzymes has been uncovered. Present in all living kingdoms, they can be classified in two subfamilies: type 1 and type 2 IPP isomerases, which show clearly distinct characteristics. They all perform the regulatory isomerization of isopentenyl diphosphate into dimethylallyl diphosphate, a key rate-limiting step of the terpenoid biosynthesis, via a protonation/deprotonation mechanism. Due to their importance in the isoprenoid metabolism and the increasing interest of industry devoted to terpenoid production, it is foreseen that the biotechnological development of such enzymes should be under intense scrutiny in the near future.

  9. A new alternative non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis in eubacteria and plants.

    PubMed

    Paseshnichenko, V A

    1998-02-01

    Data concerning the discovery of an alternative non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis leading to isopentenyl diphosphate formation are reviewed. This pathway has been discovered in experiments with several eubacteria producing triterpenoids of the hopane series. 13C-labeled acetate, glucose, and triose phosphates were used as precursors. The 13C-labeling patterns in isoprenoids were studied by 13C-NMR spectrometry. In eubacteria the universal C5 precursor--isopentenyl diphosphate--did not appear to form via the classical acetate/mevalonate pathway, but via a novel glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate/pyruvate pathway. It is postulated that the condensation of the C2 unit formed as a result of pyruvate decarboxylation with the C3 unit (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate) and the next transposition leads to the formation of the branched C5 precursor--isopentenyl diphosphate. In Scenedesmus obliquus not only all plastid isoprenoids (carotenoids and prenyl side chains of chlorophylls and plastoquinone-9) were formed via this novel pathway, but also the non-plastid cytoplasmic sterols. In higher plants the plastid isoprenoids were formed via the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate/pyruvate pathway, while the cytoplasmic sterols were formed via the acetate/mevalonate pathway.

  10. A RubisCO like protein links SAM metabolism with isoprenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.; Evans, Bradley S.; Cho, Kyuil; Warlick, Benjamin P.; Sriram, Jaya; Wood, B. McKay; Imker, Heidi J.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Tabita, F. Robert; Gerlt, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Functional assignment of uncharacterized proteins is a challenge in the era of large-scale genome sequencing. Here, we combine in extracto-NMR, proteomics, and transcriptomics with a newly developed (knock-out) metabolomics platform to determine a potential physiological role for a ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO)-like protein (RLP) from Rhodospirillum rubrum. Our studies unravelled an unexpected link in bacterial central carbon metabolism between S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent polyamine metabolism and isoprenoid biosynthesis and also provide an alternative approach to assign enzyme function at the organismic level. PMID:23042035

  11. Current Development in Isoprenoid Precursor Biosynthesis and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-chen; Song, Heng; Liu, Hung-wen; Liu, Pinghua

    2013-01-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest classes of natural products and all of them are constructed from two precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). For decades, the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway was proposed to be the only IPP and DMAPP biosynthetic pathway. This review summarizes the newly discovered IPP and DMAPP production pathways since late 1990s, their distribution among different kingdoms, and their roles in secondary metabolite production. These new IPP and DMAPP production pathways include the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway, a modified MVA pathway, and the 5-Methylthioadenosine shunt pathway. Relative to the studies on the MVA pathway, information on the MEP pathway regulation is limited and the mechanistic details of several of its novel transformations remain to be addressed. Current status on both MEP pathway regulation and mechanistic issues are also presented. PMID:23891475

  12. Inactivation of sll1556 in Synechocystis strain PCC 6803 impairs isoprenoid biosynthesis from pentose phosphate cycle substrates in vitro.

    PubMed

    Poliquin, Kelly; Ershov, Yuri V; Cunningham, Francis X; Woreta, Tinsay T; Gantt, R Raymond; Gantt, Elisabeth

    2004-07-01

    In cyanobacteria many compounds, including chlorophylls, carotenoids, and hopanoids, are synthesized from the isoprenoid precursors isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in extracts of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis strain PCC 6803 grown under photosynthetic conditions, stimulated by pentose phosphate cycle substrates, does not appear to require methylerythritol phosphate pathway intermediates. The sll1556 gene, distantly related to type 2 IPP isomerase genes, was disrupted by insertion of a Kanr cassette. The mutant was fully viable under photosynthetic conditions although impaired in the utilization of pentose phosphate cycle substrates. Compared to the parental strain the Deltasll1556 mutant (i) is deficient in isoprenoid biosynthesis in vitro with substrates including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate; (ii) has smaller cells (diameter ca. 13% less); (iii) has fewer thylakoids (ca. 30% less); and (iv) has a more extensive fibrous outer wall layer. Isoprenoid biosynthesis is restored with pentose phosphate cycle substrates plus the recombinant Sll1556 protein in the Deltasll1556 supernatant fraction. IPP isomerase activity could not be demonstrated for the purified Sll1556 protein under our in vitro conditions. The reduction of thylakoid area and the effect on outer wall layer components are consistent with an impairment of isoprenoid biosynthesis in the mutant, possibly via hopanoid biosynthesis. Our findings are consistent with an alternate metabolic shunt for biosynthesis of isoprenoids. Copyright 2004 American Society for Microbiology

  13. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Plastidic Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Poplar Leaves Emitting and Nonemitting Isoprene1[W

    PubMed Central

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Wright, Louwrance Peter; Bi, Zhen; Rosenkranz, Maaria; Pulido, Pablo; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Niinemets, Ülo; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The plastidic 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is one of the most important pathways in plants and produces a large variety of essential isoprenoids. Its regulation, however, is still not well understood. Using the stable isotope 13C-labeling technique, we analyzed the carbon fluxes through the MEP pathway and into the major plastidic isoprenoid products in isoprene-emitting and transgenic isoprene-nonemitting (NE) gray poplar (Populus × canescens). We assessed the dependence on temperature, light intensity, and atmospheric [CO2]. Isoprene biosynthesis was by far (99%) the main carbon sink of MEP pathway intermediates in mature gray poplar leaves, and its production required severalfold higher carbon fluxes compared with NE leaves with almost zero isoprene emission. To compensate for the much lower demand for carbon, NE leaves drastically reduced the overall carbon flux within the MEP pathway. Feedback inhibition of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase activity by accumulated plastidic dimethylallyl diphosphate almost completely explained this reduction in carbon flux. Our data demonstrate that short-term biochemical feedback regulation of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase activity by plastidic dimethylallyl diphosphate is an important regulatory mechanism of the MEP pathway. Despite being relieved from the large carbon demand of isoprene biosynthesis, NE plants redirected only approximately 0.5% of this saved carbon toward essential nonvolatile isoprenoids, i.e. β-carotene and lutein, most probably to compensate for the absence of isoprene and its antioxidant properties. PMID:24590857

  14. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of an isoprenoid phosphate tool for the analysis of complex bacterial oligosaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Donovan K; Stanziale, Jennifer A; Mostafavi, Anahita Z; Sharma, Sunita; Troutman, Jerry M

    2012-10-01

    Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthase (UPPS) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the production of bactoprenols, which act as membrane anchors for the assembly of complex bacterial oligosaccharides. One of the major hurdles in understanding the assembly of oligosaccharide assembly is a lack of chemical tools to study this process, since bactoprenols and the resulting isoprenoid-linked oligosaccharides lack handles or chromophores for use in pathway analysis. Here we describe the isolation of a new UPPS from the symbiotic microorganism Bacteroides fragilis, a key species in the human microbiome. The protein was purified to homogeneity and utilized to accept a chromophore containing farnesyl diphosphate analogue as a substrate. The analogue was utilized by the enzyme and resulted in a bactoprenyl diphosphate product with an easy to monitor tag associated with it. Furthermore, the diphosphate is shown to be readily converted to monophosphate using a common molecular biology reagent. This monophosphate product allowed for the investigation of complex oligosaccharide biosynthesis, and was used to probe the activity of glycosyltransferases involved in the well characterized Campylobacter jejuni N-linked protein glycosylation. Novel reagents similar to this will provide key tools for the study of uncharacterized oligosaccharide assemblies, and open the possibility for the development of rapid screening methodology for these biosynthetic systems.

  15. A photoactive isoprenoid diphosphate analogue containing a stable phosphonate linkage: synthesis and biochemical studies with prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    DeGraw, Amanda J; Zhao, Zongbao; Strickland, Corey L; Taban, A Huma; Hsieh, John; Jefferies, Michael; Xie, Wenshuang; Shintani, David K; McMahan, Colleen M; Cornish, Katrina; Distefano, Mark D

    2007-06-22

    A number of biochemical processes rely on isoprenoids, including the post-translational modification of signaling proteins and the biosynthesis of a wide array of compounds. Photoactivatable analogues have been developed to study isoprenoid utilizing enzymes such as the isoprenoid synthases and prenyltransferases. While these initial analogues proved to be excellent structural analogues with good cross-linking capability, they lack the stability needed when the goals include isolation of cross-linked species, tryptic digestion, and subsequent peptide sequencing. Here, the synthesis of a benzophenone-based farnesyl diphosphate analogue containing a stable phosphonophosphate group is described. Inhibition kinetics, photolabeling experiments, as well as X-ray crystallographic analysis with a protein prenyltransferase are described, verifying this compound as a good isoprenoid mimetic. In addition, the utility of this new analogue was explored by using it to photoaffinity label crude protein extracts obtained from Hevea brasiliensis latex. Those experiments suggest that a small protein, rubber elongation factor, interacts directly with farnesyl diphosphate during rubber biosynthesis. These results indicate that this benzophenone-based isoprenoid analogue will be useful for identifying enzymes that utilize farnesyl diphosphate as a substrate.

  16. A photoactive isoprenoid diphosphate analogue containing a stable phosphonate linkage: synthesis and biochemical studies with prenyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Zhao, Zongbao; Strickland, Corey L.; Taban, A. Huma; Hsieh, John; Michael, Jefferies; Xie, Wenshuang; Shintani, David; McMahan, Colleen; Cornish, Katrina; Distefano, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    A number of biochemical processes rely on isoprenoids, including the post-translational modification of signaling proteins and the biosynthesis of a wide array of compounds. Photoactivatable analogues have been developed to study isoprenoid utilizing enzymes such as the isoprenoid synthases and prenyltransferases. While these initial analogues proved to be excellent structural analogues with good cross linking capability, they lack the stability needed when the goals include isolation of cross-linked species, tryptic digestion, and subsequent peptide sequencing. Here, the synthesis of a benzophenone-based farnesyl diphosphate analogue containing a stable phosphonophosphate group is described. Inhibition kinetics, photolabeling experiments, as well as x-ray crystallographic analysis with a protein prenyltransferase are described, verifying this compound as a good isoprenoid mimetic. In addition, the utility of this new analogue was explored by using it to photoaffinity label crude protein extracts obtained from Hevea brasiliensis latex. Those experiments suggest that a small protein, Rubber Elongation Factor, interacts directly with farnesyl diphosphate during rubber biosynthesis. These results indicate that this benzophenone-based isoprenoid analogue will be useful for identifying enzymes that utilize farnesyl diphosphate as a substrate. PMID:17477573

  17. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis. Metabolite Profiling of Peppermint Oil Gland Secretory Cells and Application to Herbicide Target Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Lange, B. Markus; Ketchum, Raymond E.B.; Croteau, Rodney B.

    2001-01-01

    Two independent pathways operate in plants for the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, the central intermediates in the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids. The mevalonate pathway is present in the cytosol, whereas the recently discovered mevalonate-independent pathway is localized to plastids. We have used isolated peppermint (Mentha piperita) oil gland secretory cells as an experimental model system to study the effects of the herbicides fosmidomycin, phosphonothrixin, methyl viologen, benzyl viologen, clomazone, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl diphosphate, alendronate, and pamidronate on the pools of metabolites related to monoterpene biosynthesis via the mevalonate-independent pathway. A newly developed isolation protocol for polar metabolites together with an improved separation and detection method based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry have allowed assessment of the enzyme targets for a number of these herbicides. PMID:11553758

  18. Terpenes Arrest Parasite Development and Inhibit Biosynthesis of Isoprenoids in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues Goulart, Herbert; Kimura, Emília A.; Peres, Valnice J.; Couto, Alicia S.; Aquino Duarte, Fulgencio A.; Katzin, Alejandro M.

    2004-01-01

    Development of new drugs is one of the strategies for malaria control. The biosynthesis of several isoprenoids in Plasmodium falciparum was recently described. Interestingly, some intermediates and final products biosynthesized by this pathway in mammals differ from those biosynthesized in P. falciparum. These facts prompted us to evaluate various terpenes, molecules with a similar chemical structure to the intermediates of the isoprenoids pathway, as potential antimalarial drugs. Different terpenes and S-farnesylthiosalicylic acid were tested on cultures of the intraerythrocytic stages of P. falciparum, and the 50% inhibitory concentrations for each one were found: farnesol, 64 μM; nerolidol, 760 nM; limonene, 1.22 mM; linalool, 0.28 mM; and S-farnesylthiosalicylic acid, 14 μM. All the terpenes tested inhibited dolichol biosynthesis in the trophozoite and schizont stages when [1-(n)-3H]farnesyl pyrophosphate triammonium salt ([3H]FPP) was used as precursor. Farnesol, nerolidol, and linalool showed stronger inhibitory activity on the biosynthesis of the isoprenic side chain of the benzoquinone ring of ubiquinones in the schizont stage. Treatment of schizont stages with S-farnesylthiosalicylic acid led to a decrease in intensity of the band corresponding a p21ras protein. The inhibitory effect of terpenes and S-farnesylthiosalicylic acid on the biosynthesis of both dolichol and the isoprenic side chain of ubiquinones and the isoprenylation of proteins in the intraerythrocytic stages of P. falciparum appears to be specific, because overall protein biosynthesis was not affected. Combinations of some terpenes or S-farnesylthiosalicylic acid tested in this work with other antimalarial drugs, like fosmidomycin, could be a new strategy for the treatment of malaria. PMID:15215101

  19. Genetic Profiling of the Isoprenoid and Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway Genes of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Raúl O.; Agüero, Fernán

    2014-01-01

    In Trypanosoma cruzi the isoprenoid and sterol biosynthesis pathways are validated targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. In this work we present a study of the genetic diversity observed in genes from these pathways. Using a number of bioinformatic strategies, we first identified genes that were missing and/or were truncated in the T. cruzi genome. Based on this analysis we obtained the complete sequence of the ortholog of the yeast ERG26 gene and identified a non-orthologous homolog of the yeast ERG25 gene (sterol methyl oxidase, SMO), and we propose that the orthologs of ERG25 have been lost in trypanosomes (but not in Leishmanias). Next, starting from a set of 16 T. cruzi strains representative of all extant evolutionary lineages, we amplified and sequenced ∼24 Kbp from 22 genes, identifying a total of 975 SNPs or fixed differences, of which 28% represent non-synonymous changes. We observed genes with a density of substitutions ranging from those close to the average (∼2.5/100 bp) to some showing a high number of changes (11.4/100 bp, for the putative lathosterol oxidase gene). All the genes of the pathway are under apparent purifying selection, but genes coding for the sterol C14-demethylase, the HMG-CoA synthase, and the HMG-CoA reductase have the lowest density of missense SNPs in the panel. Other genes (TcPMK, TcSMO-like) have a relatively high density of non-synonymous SNPs (2.5 and 1.9 every 100 bp, respectively). However, none of the non-synonymous changes identified affect a catalytic or ligand binding site residue. A comparative analysis of the corresponding genes from African trypanosomes and Leishmania shows similar levels of apparent selection for each gene. This information will be essential for future drug development studies focused on this pathway. PMID:24828104

  20. Biosynthesis of Sesterterpenes, Head-to-Tail Triterpenes, and Sesquarterpenes in Bacillus clausii: Identification of Multifunctional Enzymes and Analysis of Isoprenoid Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Daijiro; Yamaga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Mizuki; Totsuka, Yusuke; Shinada, Tetsuro; Sato, Tsutomu

    2015-06-15

    We performed functional analysis of recombinant enzymes and analysis of isoprenoid metabolites in Bacillus clausii to gain insights into the biosynthesis of rare terpenoid groups of sesterterpenes, head-to-tail triterpenes, and sesquarterpenes. We have identified an (all-E)-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (E-IDS) homologue as a trifunctional geranylfarnesyl diphosphate (GFPP)/hexaprenyl diphosphate (HexPP)/heptaprenyl diphosphate (HepPP) synthase. In addition, we have redefined the function of a tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologue as that of a trifunctional sesterterpene/triterpene/sesquarterpene synthase. This study has revealed that GFPP, HexPP, and HepPP, intermediates of two isoprenoid pathways (acyclic terpenes and menaquinones), are biosynthesized by one trifunctional E-IDS. In addition, GFPP/HexPP and HepPP are the primary substrates for the biosynthesis of acyclic terpenes and menaquinone-7, respectively.

  1. Triterpenoid profiling and functional characterization of the initial genes involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis in neem (Azadirachta indica).

    PubMed

    Pandreka, Avinash; Dandekar, Devdutta S; Haldar, Saikat; Uttara, Vairagkar; Vijayshree, Shinde G; Mulani, Fayaj A; Aarthy, Thiagarayaselvam; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V

    2015-09-03

    Neem tree (Azadirachta indica) is one of the richest sources of skeletally diverse triterpenoids and they are well-known for their broad-spectrum pharmacological and insecticidal properties. However, the abundance of Neem triterpenoids varies among the tissues. Here, we delineate quantitative profiling of fifteen major triterpenoids across various tissues including developmental stages of kernel and pericarp, flower, leaf, stem and bark using UPLC-ESI(+)-HRMS based profiling. Transcriptome analysis was used to identify the initial genes involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis. Based on transcriptome analysis, two short-chain prenyltransferases and squalene synthase (AiSQS) were cloned and functionally characterized. Quantitative profiling revealed differential abundance of both total and individual triterpenoid content across various tissues. RNA from tissues with high triterpenoid content (fruit, flower and leaf) were pooled to generate 79.08 million paired-end reads using Illumina GA ΙΙ platform. 41,140 transcripts were generated by d e novo assembly. Transcriptome annotation led to the identification of the putative genes involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis. Two short-chain prenyltransferases, geranyl diphosphate synthase (AiGDS) and farnesyl diphosphate synthase (AiFDS) and squalene synthase (AiSQS) were cloned and functionally characterized using transcriptome data. RT-PCR studies indicated five-fold and ten-fold higher relative expression level of AiSQS in fruits as compared to leaves and flowers, respectively. Triterpenoid profiling indicated that there is tissue specific variation in their abundance. The mature seed kernel and initial stages of pericarp were found to contain the highest amount of limonoids. Furthermore, a wide diversity of triterpenoids, especially C-seco triterpenoids were observed in kernel as compared to the other tissues. Pericarp, flower and leaf contained mainly ring-intact triterpenoids. The initial genes such as AiGDS, AiFDS and Ai

  2. Distribution of the mevalonate and glyceraldehyde phosphate/pyruvate pathways for isoprenoid biosynthesis in unicellular algae and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6714.

    PubMed Central

    Disch, A; Schwender, J; Müller, C; Lichtenthaler, H K; Rohmer, M

    1998-01-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate, the universal isoprenoid precursor, can be produced by two different biosynthetic routes: either via the acetate/mevalonate (MVA) pathway, or via the more recently identified MVA-independent glyceraldehyde phosphate/pyruvate pathway. These two pathways are easily differentiated by incorporation of [1-13C]glucose and analysis of the resulting labelling patterns found in the isoprenoids. This method was successfully applied to several unicellular algae raised under heterotrophic growth conditions and allowed for the identification of the pathways that were utilized for isoprenoid biosynthesis. All isoprenoids examined (sterols, phytol, carotenoids) of the green algae Chlorella fusca and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were synthesized via the GAP/pyruvate pathway, as in another previously investigated green alga, Scenedesmus obliquus, which was also shown in this study to synthesize ubiquinone by the same MVA-independent route. In the red alga Cyanidium caldarium and in the Chrysophyte Ochromonas danica a clear dichotomy was observed: as in higher plants, sterols were formed via the MVA route, whereas chloroplast isoprenoids (phytol in Cy. caldarium and O. danica and beta-carotene in O. danica) were synthesized via the GAP/pyruvate route. In contrast, the Euglenophyte Euglena gracilis synthesized ergosterol, as well as phytol, via the acetate/MVA route. Similar feeding experiments were performed with the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6714 using [1-13C]- and [6-13C]-glucose. The two isoprenoids examined, phytol and beta-carotene, were shown to have the typical labelling pattern derived from the GAP/pyruvate route. PMID:9657979

  3. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: a novel pathway for the early steps leading to isopentenyl diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Rohmer, M; Knani, M; Simonin, P; Sutter, B; Sahm, H

    1993-10-15

    Incorporation of 13C-labelled glucose, acetate, pyruvate or erythrose allowed the determination of the origin of the carbon atoms of triterpenoids of the hopane series and/or of the ubiquinones from several bacteria (Zymomonas mobilis, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, Escherichia coli and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris) confirmed our earlier results obtained by incorporation of 13C-labelled acetate into the hopanoids of other bacteria and led to the identification of a novel biosynthetic route for the early steps of isoprenoid biosynthesis. The C5 framework of isoprenic units results most probably (i) from the condensation of a C2 unit derived from pyruvate decarboxylation (e.g. thiamine-activated acetaldehyde) on the C-2 carbonyl group of a triose phosphate derivative issued probably from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and not from pyruvate and (ii) from a transposition step. Although this hypothetical biosynthetic pathway resembles that of L-valine biosynthesis, this amino acid or its C5 precursors could be excluded as intermediates in the formation of isoprenic units.

  4. Biosynthesis of isoprenoids, polyunsaturated fatty acids and flavonoids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chemler, Joseph A; Yan, Yajun; Koffas, Mattheos AG

    2006-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology employs the controlled use of microorganisms for the production of synthetic chemicals or simple biomass that can further be used in a diverse array of applications that span the pharmaceutical, chemical and nutraceutical industries. Recent advances in metagenomics and in the incorporation of entire biosynthetic pathways into Saccharomyces cerevisiae have greatly expanded both the fitness and the repertoire of biochemicals that can be synthesized from this popular microorganism. Further, the availability of the S. cerevisiae entire genome sequence allows the application of systems biology approaches for improving its enormous biosynthetic potential. In this review, we will describe some of the efforts on using S. cerevisiae as a cell factory for the biosynthesis of high-value natural products that belong to the families of isoprenoids, flavonoids and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. As natural products are increasingly becoming the center of attention of the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries, the use of S. cerevisiae for their production is only expected to expand in the future, further allowing the biosynthesis of novel molecular structures with unique properties. PMID:16719921

  5. A Chemical Rescue Screen Identifies a Plasmodium falciparum Apicoplast Inhibitor Targeting MEP Isoprenoid Precursor Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wesley; Herrera, Zachary; Ebert, Danny; Baska, Katie; Cho, Seok H.

    2014-01-01

    The apicoplast is an essential plastid organelle found in Plasmodium parasites which contains several clinically validated antimalarial-drug targets. A chemical rescue screen identified MMV-08138 from the “Malaria Box” library of growth-inhibitory antimalarial compounds as having specific activity against the apicoplast. MMV-08138 inhibition of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum growth is stereospecific and potent, with the most active diastereomer demonstrating a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 110 nM. Whole-genome sequencing of 3 drug-resistant parasite populations from two independent selections revealed E688Q and L244I mutations in P. falciparum IspD, an enzyme in the MEP (methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate) isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis pathway in the apicoplast. The active diastereomer of MMV-08138 directly inhibited PfIspD activity in vitro with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 7.0 nM. MMV-08138 is the first PfIspD inhibitor to be identified and, together with heterologously expressed PfIspD, provides the foundation for further development of this promising antimalarial drug candidate lead. Furthermore, this report validates the use of the apicoplast chemical rescue screen coupled with target elucidation as a discovery tool to identify specific apicoplast-targeting compounds with new mechanisms of action. PMID:25367906

  6. New Insight into Isoprenoids Biosynthesis Process and Future Prospects for Drug Designing in Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Saggu, Gagandeep S.; Pala, Zarna R.; Garg, Shilpi; Saxena, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    The MEP (Methyl Erythritol Phosphate) isoprenoids biosynthesis pathway is an attractive drug target to combat malaria, due to its uniqueness and indispensability for the parasite. It is functional in the apicoplast of Plasmodium and its products get transported to the cytoplasm, where they participate in glycoprotein synthesis, electron transport chain, tRNA modification and several other biological processes. Several compounds have been tested against the enzymes involved in this pathway and amongst them Fosmidomycin, targeted against IspC (DXP reductoisomerase) enzyme and MMV008138 targeted against IspD enzyme have shown good anti-malarial activity in parasite cultures. Fosmidomycin is now-a-days prescribed clinically, however, less absorption, shorter half-life, and toxicity at higher doses, limits its use as an anti-malarial. The potential of other enzymes of the pathway as candidate drug targets has also been determined. This review details the various drug molecules tested against these targets with special emphasis to Plasmodium. We corroborate that MEP pathway functional within the apicoplast of Plasmodium is a major drug target, especially during erythrocytic stages. However, the major bottlenecks, bioavailability and toxicity of the new molecules needs to be addressed, before considering any new molecule as a potent antimalarial. PMID:27679614

  7. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A.; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  8. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

  9. Biosynthesis of a natural polyketide-isoprenoid hybrid compound, furaquinocin A: identification and heterologous expression of the gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takashi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Furihata, Kazuo; Itoh, Nobuya; Seto, Haruo; Dairi, Tohru

    2006-02-01

    Furaquinocin (FQ) A, produced by Streptomyces sp. strain KO-3988, is a natural polyketide-isoprenoid hybrid compound that exhibits a potent antitumor activity. As a first step toward understanding the biosynthetic machinery of this unique and pharmaceutically useful compound, we have cloned an FQ A biosynthetic gene cluster by taking advantage of the fact that an isoprenoid biosynthetic gene cluster generally exists in flanking regions of the mevalonate (MV) pathway gene cluster in actinomycetes. Interestingly, Streptomyces sp. strain KO-3988 was the first example of a microorganism equipped with two distinct mevalonate pathway gene clusters. We were able to localize a 25-kb DNA region that harbored FQ A biosynthetic genes (fur genes) in both the upstream and downstream regions of one of the MV pathway gene clusters (MV2) by using heterologous expression in Streptomyces lividans TK23. This was the first example of a gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of a polyketide-isoprenoid hybrid compound. We have also confirmed that four genes responsible for viguiepinol [3-hydroxypimara-9(11),15-diene] biosynthesis exist in the upstream region of the other MV pathway gene cluster (MV1), which had previously been cloned from strain KO-3988. This was the first example of prokaryotic enzymes with these biosynthetic functions. By phylogenetic analysis, these two MV pathway clusters were identified as probably being independently distributed in strain KO-3988 (orthologs), rather than one cluster being generated by the duplication of the other cluster (paralogs).

  10. Cloning and characterization of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway genes for isoprenoid biosynthesis from Indian ginseng, Withania somnifera.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Parul; Agarwal, Aditya Vikram; Akhtar, Nehal; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Singh, Surya Pratap; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) is one of the most valuable medicinal plants used in Ayurvedic and other indigenous medicines. Pharmaceutical activities of this herb are associated with presence of secondary metabolites known as withanolides, a class of phytosteroids synthesized via mevalonate (MVA) and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathways. Though the plant has been well characterized in terms of phytochemical profiles as well as pharmaceutical activities, not much is known about the genes responsible for biosynthesis of these compounds. In this study, we have characterized two genes encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS; EC 2.2.1.7) and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductase (DXR; EC 1.1.1.267) enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids. The full-length cDNAs of W. somnifera DXS (WsDXS) and DXR (WsDXR) of 2,154 and 1,428 bps encode polypeptides of 717 and 475 amino acids residues, respectively. The expression analysis suggests that WsDXS and WsDXR are differentially expressed in different tissues (with maximal expression in flower and young leaf), chemotypes of Withania, and in response to salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, as well as in mechanical injury. Analysis of genomic organization of WsDXS shows close similarity with tomato DXS in terms of exon-intron arrangements. This is the first report on characterization of isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway genes from Withania.

  11. Physiological function of IspE, a plastid MEP pathway gene for isoprenoid biosynthesis, in organelle biogenesis and cell morphogenesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2008-03-01

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis in plants occurs by two independent pathways: the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastidic methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. In this study, we investigated the cellular effects of depletion of IspE, a protein involved in the MEP pathway, using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). The IspE gene is preferentially expressed in young tissues, and induced by light and methyl jasmonate. The GFP fusion protein of IspE was targeted to chloroplasts. Reduction of IspE expression by VIGS resulted in a severe leaf yellowing phenotype. At the cellular level, depletion of IspE severely affected chloroplast development, dramatically reducing both the number and size of chloroplasts. Interestingly, mitochondrial development was also impaired, suggesting a possibility that the plastidic MEP pathway contributes to mitochondrial isoprenoid biosynthesis in leaves. A deficiency in IspE activity decreased cellular levels of the metabolites produced by the MEP pathway, such as chlorophylls and carotenoids, and stimulated expression of some of the downstream MEP pathway genes, particularly IspF and IspG. Interestingly, the IspE VIGS lines had significantly increased numbers of cells of reduced size in all leaf layers, compared with TRV control and other VIGS lines for the MEP pathway genes. The increased cell division in the IspE VIGS lines was particularly pronounced in the abaxial epidermal layer, in which the over-proliferated cells bulged out of the plane, making the surface uneven. In addition, trichome numbers dramatically increased and the stomata size varied in the affected tissues. Our results show that IspE deficiency causes novel developmental phenotypes distinct from the phenotypes of other MEP pathway mutants, indicating that IspE may have an additional role in plant development besides its role in isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  12. Biosynthesis of isoprenoids: a bifunctional IspDF enzyme from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Rohdich, Felix; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Gräwert, Tobias; Hecht, Stefan; Bacher, Adelbert; Hunter, William N

    2004-07-01

    In the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, the conversion of 2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate into its cyclic diphosphate proceeds via nucleotidyl intermediates and is catalyzed by the products of the ispD, ispE and ispF genes. An open reading frame of Campylobacter jejuni with similarity to the ispD and ispF genes of Escherichia coli was cloned into an expression vector directing the formation of a 42 kDa protein in a recombinant E. coli strain. The purified protein was shown to catalyze the transformation of 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate into 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol and the conversion of 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2-phosphate into 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate at catalytic rates of 19 micro mol x mg(-1) x min(-1) and 7 micro mol x mg(-1) x min(-1), respectively. Both enzyme-catalyzed reactions require divalent metal ions. The C. jejuni enzyme does not catalyze the formation of 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 3,4-cyclophosphate from 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol, a side reaction catalyzed in vitro by the IspF proteins of E. coli and Plasmodium falciparum. Comparative genomic analysis show that all sequenced alpha- and epsilon-proteobacteria have fused ispDF genes. These bifunctional proteins are potential drug targets in several human pathogens (e.g. Helicobacter pylori, C. jejuni and Treponema pallidum).

  13. Isoprenoid biosynthesis as a target for antibacterial and antiparasitic drugs: phosphonohydroxamic acids as inhibitors of deoxyxylulose phosphate reducto-isomerase

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis via the methylerythritol phosphate pathway is a target against pathogenic bacteria and the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. 4-(Hydroxyamino)-4-oxobutylphosphonic acid and 4-[hydroxy(methyl)amino]-4-oxobutyl phosphonic acid, two novel inhibitors of DXR (1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reducto-isomerase), the second enzyme of the pathway, have been synthesized and compared with fosmidomycin, the best known inhibitor of this enzyme. The latter phosphonohydroxamic acid showed a high inhibitory activity towards DXR, much like fosmidomycin, as well as significant antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli in tests on Petri dishes. PMID:15473867

  14. Isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis offers potential targets for drug discovery against diseases caused by apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Hunter, William N

    2011-01-01

    Two, simple, C5 compounds, dimethylally diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate, are the universal precursors of isoprenoids, a large family of natural products involved in numerous important biological processes. Two distinct biosynthetic pathways have evolved to supply these precursors. Humans use the mevalonate route whilst many species of bacteria including important pathogens, plant chloroplasts and apicomplexan parasites exploit the non-mevalonate pathway. The absence from humans, combined with genetic and chemical validation suggests that the non-mevalonate pathway holds the potential to support new drug discovery programmes targeting Gram-negative bacteria and the apicomplexan parasites responsible for causing serious human diseases, and also infections of veterinary importance. The non-mevalonate pathway relies on eight enzyme-catalyzed stages exploiting a range of cofactors and metal ions. A wealth of structural and mechanistic data, mainly derived from studies of bacterial enzymes, now exists for most components of the pathway and these will be described. Particular attention will be paid to how these data inform on the apicomplexan orthologues concentrating on the enzymes from Plasmodium spp. these cause malaria, one the most important parasitic diseases in the world today.

  15. Photoactive analogs of farnesyl diphosphate and related isoprenoids: design and applications in studies of medicinally important isoprenoid-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vervacke, Jeffrey S; Wang, Yen-Chih; Distefano, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) is an important metabolic intermediate in the biosynthesis of a variety of molecules including sesquiterpenes and the side chains of a number of cofactors. FPP is also the source of isoprenoid side chains found attached to proteins. Enzymes that employ FPP as a substrate are of interest because they are involved in the semisynthesis of drugs as well as targets for drug design. Photoactive analogs of FPP have been useful for identifying enzymes that use this molecule as a substrate. A variety of photocrosslinking groups have been employed to prepare FPP analogs for use in such experiments including aryl azides, diazotrifluoropropionates and benzophenones. In this review, the design of these probes is described along with an examination of how they have been used in crosslinking experiments.

  16. Chlamydial histone-DNA interactions are disrupted by a metabolite in the methylerythritol phosphate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Grieshaber, Nicole A; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Mead, David J; Dooley, Cheryl A; Hackstadt, Ted

    2004-05-11

    The chlamydial developmental cycle is characterized by an intracellular replicative form, termed the reticulate body, and an extracellular form called the elementary body. Elementary bodies are characterized by a condensed chromatin, which is maintained by a histone H1-like protein, Hc1. Differentiation of elementary bodies to reticulate bodies is accompanied by dispersal of the chromatin as chlamydiae become transcriptionally active, although the mechanisms of Hc1 release from DNA have remained unknown. Dissociation of the nucleoid requires chlamydial transcription and translation with negligible loss of Hc1. A genetic screen was therefore designed to identify chlamydial genes rescuing Escherichia coli from the lethal effects of Hc1 overexpression. CT804, a gene homologous to ispE, which encodes an intermediate enzyme of the non-mevalonate methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, was selected. E. coli coexpressing CT804 and Hc1 grew normally, although they expressed Hc1 to a level equivalent to that which condensed the chromatin of parent Hc1-expressing controls. Inhibition of the MEP pathway with fosmidomycin abolished IspE rescue of Hc1-expressing E. coli. Deproteinated extract from IspE-expressing bacteria caused dispersal of purified chlamydial nucleoids, suggesting that chlamydial histone-DNA interactions are disrupted by a small metabolite within the MEP pathway rather than by direct action of IspE. By partial reconstruction of the MEP pathway, we determined that 2-C-methylerythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate dissociated Hc1 from chlamydial chromatin. These results suggest that chlamydial histone-DNA interactions are disrupted upon germination by a small metabolite in the MEP pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  17. An investigation into the role of malonyl-coenzyme A in isoprenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, M. J. P.; Kekwick, R. G. O.

    1973-01-01

    1. [14C]Malonyl-CoA was incorporated into isoprenoids by cell-free yeast preparations, by preparations from pigeon and rat liver, and by Hevea brasiliensis latex. 2. In agreement with previous reports the incorporation of acetyl-CoA into isoprenoids was not inhibited by avidin and was not stimulated by HCO3−. In a cell-free yeast preparation addition of HCO3− stimulated the formation of fatty acids from acetyl-CoA and decreased the incorporation into unsaponifiable lipids. 3. The labelling patterns of β-hydroxy-β-methylglutaryl-CoA formed from [2-14C]- and [1,3-14C]-malonyl-CoA in rat and pigeon liver preparations were those that would be expected if malonyl-CoA underwent decarboxylation to acetyl-CoA before incorporation. 4. The labelling pattern of ergosterol formed by cell-free yeast preparations from [2-14C]malonyl-CoA was also consistent with decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA before incorporation. 5. The incorporation of [2-14C]malonyl-CoA into mevalonate by rat liver preparations was related to the malonyl-CoA decarboxylase activity present in the preparation. PMID:4579226

  18. Tandem prenyltransferases catalyze isoprenoid elongation and complexity generation in biosynthesis of quinolone alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Zhan, Zhajun; Li, Dehai; Tang, Mancheng; Cacho, Ralph A; Watanabe, Kenji; Tang, Yi

    2015-04-22

    Modification of natural products with prenyl groups and the ensuing oxidative transformations are important for introducing structural complexity and biological activities. Penigequinolones (1) are potent insecticidal alkaloids that contain a highly modified 10-carbon prenyl group. Here we reveal an iterative prenylation mechanism for installing the 10-carbon unit using two aromatic prenyltransferases (PenI and PenG) present in the gene cluster of 1 from Penicillium thymicola. The initial Friedel-Crafts alkylation is catalyzed by PenI to yield dimethylallyl quinolone 6. The five-carbon side chain is then dehydrogenated by a flavin-dependent monooxygenase to give aryl diene 9, which serves as the electron-rich substrate for a second alkylation with dimethylallyl diphosphate to yield stryrenyl product 10. The completed, oxidized 10-carbon prenyl group then undergoes further structural morphing to yield yaequinolone C (12), the immediate precursor of 1. Our studies have therefore uncovered an unprecedented prenyl chain extension mechanism in natural product biosynthesis.

  19. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Pablo D; Sonawane, Prashant D; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-02-15

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops.

  20. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Pablo D.; Sonawane, Prashant D.; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P.; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops. PMID:26876023

  1. Plastidic isoprenoid biosynthesis in tomato: physiological and molecular analysis in genotypes resistant and sensitive to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Loyola, J; Verdugo, I; González, E; Casaretto, J A; Ruiz-Lara, S

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoid compounds synthesised in the plastids are involved in plant response to water deficit. The functionality of the biosynthetic pathway of these compounds under drought stress has been analysed at the physiological and molecular levels in two related species of tomato (Solanum chilense and Solanum lycopersicum) that differ in their tolerance to abiotic challenge. Expression analysis of the genes encoding enzymes of these pathways (DXS, IPI, GGPPS, PSY1, NCED and HPT1) in plants at different RWC values shows significant differences for only GGPPS and HPT1, with higher expression in the tolerant S. chilense. Chlorophyll, carotenoids, α-tocopherol and ABA content was also determined in both species under different drought conditions. In agreement with HPT1 transcriptional activity, higher α-tocopherol content was observed in S. chilense than in S. lycopersicum, which correlates with a lower degree of lipoperoxidation in the former species. These results suggest that, in addition to lower stomatal conductance, α-tocopherol biosynthesis is part of the adaptation mechanisms of S. chilense to adverse environmental conditions.

  2. The Arabidopsis IspH homolog is involved in the plastid nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Goodman, Howard M

    2005-06-01

    Plant isoprenoids are synthesized via two independent pathways, the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastid nonmevalonate pathway. The Escherichia coli IspH (LytB) protein is involved in the last step of the nonmevalonate pathway. We have isolated an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ispH null mutant that has an albino phenotype and have generated Arabidopsis transgenic lines showing various albino patterns caused by IspH transgene-induced gene silencing. The initiation of albino phenotypes rendered by IspH gene silencing can arise independently from multiple sites of the same plant. After a spontaneous initiation, the albino phenotype is systemically spread toward younger tissues along the source-to-sink flow relative to the initiation site. The development of chloroplasts is severely impaired in the IspH-deficient albino tissues. Instead of thylakoids, mutant chloroplasts are filled with vesicles. Immunoblot analysis reveals that Arabidopsis IspH is a chloroplast stromal protein. Expression of Arabidopsis IspH complements the lethal phenotype of an E. coli ispH mutant. In 2-week-old Arabidopsis seedlings, the expression of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), IspD, IspE, IspF, and IspG genes is induced by light, whereas the expression of the IspH gene is constitutive. The addition of 3% sucrose in the media slightly increased levels of DXS, DXR, IspD, IspE, and IspF mRNA in the dark. In a 16-h-light/8-h-dark photoperiod, the accumulation of the IspH transcript oscillates with the highest levels detected in the early light period (2-6 h) and the late dark period (4-6 h). The expression patterns of DXS and IspG are similar to that of IspH, indicating that these genes are coordinately regulated in Arabidopsis when grown in a 16-h-light/8-h-dark photoperiod.

  3. A review of tobacco BY-2 cells as an excellent system to study the synthesis and function of sterols and other isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Gerber, Esther; Feldtrauer, Jean-François; Wentzinger, Laurent; Hartmann, Marie-Andrée; Tritsch, Denis; Hoeffler, Jean-François; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J

    2004-08-01

    In plants, two pathways are utilized for the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP), the universal precursor for isoprenoid biosynthesis. In this paper we review findings and observations made primarily with tobacco BY-2 cells (TBY-2), which have proven to be an excellent system in which to study the two biosynthetic pathways. A major advantage of these cells as an experimental system is their ability to readily take up specific inhibitors and stably- and/or radiolabeled precursors. This permits the functional elucidation of the role of isoprenoid end products and intermediates. Because TBY-2 cells undergo rapid cell division and can be synchronized within the cell cycle, they constitute a highly suitable test system for determination of those isoprenoids and intermediates that act as cell cycle inhibitors, thus giving an indication of which branches of the isoprenoid pathway are essential. Through chemical complementation; and use of precursors, intracellular compartmentation can be elucidated, as well as the extent to which the plastidial and cytosolic pathways contribute to the syntheses of specific groups of isoprenoids (e.g., sterols) via exchange of intermediates across membranes. These topics are discussed in the context of the pertinent literature.

  4. GcpE Is Involved in the 2-C-Methyl-d-Erythritol 4-Phosphate Pathway of Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Altincicek, Boran; Kollas, Ann-Kristin; Sanderbrand, Silke; Wiesner, Jochen; Hintz, Martin; Beck, Ewald; Jomaa, Hassan

    2001-01-01

    In a variety of organisms, including plants and several eubacteria, isoprenoids are synthesized by the mevalonate-independent 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Although different enzymes of this pathway have been described, the terminal biosynthetic steps of the MEP pathway have not been fully elucidated. In this work, we demonstrate that the gcpE gene of Escherichia coli is involved in this pathway. E. coli cells were genetically engineered to utilize exogenously provided mevalonate for isoprenoid biosynthesis by the mevalonate pathway. These cells were then deleted for the essential gcpE gene and were viable only if the medium was supplemented with mevalonate or the cells were complemented with an episomal copy of gcpE. PMID:11274098

  5. [Screening of potential antibiotics, inhibitors of the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis--2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate derivatives].

    PubMed

    Ershov, Iu V; Mazikin, K V; Ostrovskiĭ, D N

    2010-01-01

    The recently discovered nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis is a prospective target in screening of new antibiotics. Because of the absence of the pathway in the animal cells, the specific inhibitors of the pathway will be a new class of antibiotics against many pathogens (which cause, e.g., malaria, tuberculosis, etc), combining high efficiency and low toxicity. Several derivatives of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate (MEC) were synthesized. 4-Phospho-methyl-D-erythritol-1,2-cyclophosphate, benzyl ether and benzyliden derivative of MEC inhibited the 14C-MEC incorporation into isoprenoids of chromoplasts from red pepper with IC50 of 1.7-5 MM. Some inhibition (about 10%) was also observed with the use of dimethyl ether and isopropyliden derivative of MEC.

  6. Biosynthesis of isoprenoids: crystal structure of 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol kinase.

    PubMed

    Miallau, Linda; Alphey, Magnus S; Kemp, Lauris E; Leonard, Gordon A; McSweeney, Sean M; Hecht, Stefan; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix; Hunter, William N

    2003-08-05

    4-Diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-d-erythritol kinase, an essential enzyme in the nonmevalonate pathway of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate biosynthesis, catalyzes the single ATP-dependent phosphorylation stage affording 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-d-erythritol-2-phosphate. The 2-A resolution crystal structure of the Escherichia coli enzyme in a ternary complex with substrate and a nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue reveals the molecular determinants of specificity and catalysis. The enzyme subunit displays the alpha/beta fold characteristic of the galactose kinase/homoserine kinase/mevalonate kinase/phosphomevalonate kinase superfamily, arranged into cofactor and substrate-binding domains with the catalytic center positioned in a deep cleft between domains. Comparisons with related members of this superfamily indicate that the core regions of each domain are conserved, whereas there are significant differences in the substrate-binding pockets. The nonmevalonate pathway is essential in many microbial pathogens and distinct from the mevalonate pathway used by mammals. The high degree of sequence conservation of the enzyme across bacterial species suggests similarities in structure, specificity, and mechanism. Our model therefore provides an accurate template to facilitate the structure-based design of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents.

  7. Surfactants, Aromatic and Isoprenoid Compounds, and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Suppress Staphylococcus aureus Production of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1▿

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Peter J.; Syverson, Rae Ellen; Milligan-Myhre, Kathy; Frolova, Olga; Schroeder, Sarah; Kidder, Joshua; Hoang, Thanh; Proctor, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Menstrual toxic shock syndrome is a rare but potentially life-threatening illness manifest through the actions of Staphylococcus aureus toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). Previous studies have shown that tampon additives can influence staphylococcal TSST-1 production. We report here on the TSST-1-suppressing activity of 34 compounds that are commonly used additives in the pharmaceutical, food, and perfume industries. Many of the tested chemicals had a minimal impact on the growth of S. aureus and yet were potent inhibitors of TSST-1 production. The TSST-1-reducing compounds included surfactants with an ether, amide, or amine linkage to their fatty acid moiety (e.g., myreth-3-myristate, Laureth-3, disodium lauroamphodiacetate, disodium lauramido monoethanolamido, sodium lauriminodipropionic acid, and triethanolamine laureth sulfate); aromatic compounds (e.g. phenylethyl and benzyl alcohols); and several isoprenoids and related compounds (e.g., terpineol and menthol). The membrane-targeting and -altering effects of the TSST-1-suppressing compounds led us to assess the activity of molecules that are known to inhibit fatty acid biosynthesis (e.g., cerulenin, triclosan, and hexachlorophene). These compounds also reduced S. aureus TSST-1 production. This study suggests that more additives than previously recognized inhibit the production of TSST-1. PMID:19223628

  8. FR-900098, an antimalarial development candidate that inhibits the non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway, shows no evidence of acute toxicity and genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Jochen; Ziemann, Christina; Hintz, Martin; Reichenberg, Armin; Ortmann, Regina; Schlitzer, Martin; Fuhst, Rainer; Timmesfeld, Nina; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Jomaa, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FR-900098 is an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) reductoisomerase, the second enzyme in the non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. In previous studies, FR-900098 was shown to possess potent antimalarial activity in vitro and in a murine malaria model. In order to provide a basis for further preclinical and clinical development, we studied the acute toxicity and genotoxicity of FR-900098. We observed no acute toxicity in rats, i.e. there were no clinical signs of toxicity and no substance-related deaths after the administration of a single dose of 3000 mg/kg body weight orally or 400 mg/kg body weight intravenously. No mutagenic potential was detected in the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test) or an in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test using mouse lymphoma L5178Y/TK+/− cells (clone 3.7.2C), both with and without metabolic activation. In addition, FR-900098 demonstrated no clastogenic or aneugenic capability or significant adverse effects on blood formation in an in vivo micronucleus test with bone marrow erythrocytes from NMRI mice. We conclude that FR-900098 lacks acute toxicity and genotoxicity, supporting its further development as an antimalarial drug. PMID:27260413

  9. Isoprenoid biosynthesis via the methylerythritol phosphate pathway: structural variations around phosphonate anchor and spacer of fosmidomycin, a potent inhibitor of deoxyxylulose phosphate reductoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Zinglé, Catherine; Kuntz, Lionel; Tritsch, Denis; Grosdemange-Billiard, Catherine; Rohmer, Michel

    2010-05-21

    Fosmidomycin and its analogue FR-900098 are potent inhibitors of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reducto-isomerase (DXR), the second enzyme of the MEP pathway for the biosynthesis of isoprenoids. This paper describes the synthesis of analogues of the two reverse phosphonohydroxamic acids 3 and 4, in which the length of the carbon spacer is modified, the N-methyl group of 3 is replaced by an ethyl group, and the phosphate group is replaced by potential isosteric moieties, i.e., sulfonate or carboxylate functionalities. The potential of the synthesized analogues to inhibit the E. coli DXR was evaluated.

  10. The non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis of plants as a test system for new herbicides and drugs against pathogenic bacteria and the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Lichtenthaler, H K; Zeidler, J; Schwender, J; Müller, C

    2000-01-01

    Higher plants and several photosynthetic algae contain the plastidic 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate/2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway (DOXP/MEP pathway) for isoprenoid biosynthesis. The first four enzymes and their genes are known of this novel pathway. All of the ca. 10 enzymes of this isoprenoid pathway are potential targets for new classes of herbicides. Since the DOXP/MEP pathway also occurs in several pathogenic bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, all inhibitors and potential herbicides of the DOXP/MEP pathway in plants are also potential drugs against pathogenic bacteria and the malaria parasite. Plants with their easily to handle DOXP/MEP-pathway are thus very suitable test-systems also for new drugs against pathogenic bacteria and the malaria parasite as no particular security measures are required. In fact, the antibiotic herbicide fosmidomycin specifically inhibited not only the DOXP reductoisomerase in plants, but also that in bacteria and in the parasite P. falciparum, and cures malaria-infected mice. This is the first successful application of a herbicide of the novel isoprenoid pathway as a possible drug against malaria.

  11. The pathway of leucine to mevalonate in halophilic archaea: efficient incorporation of leucine into isoprenoidal lipid with the involvement of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase in Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Noriaki

    2010-01-01

    The pathway of leucine to mevalonate, which has attracted attention in the study of the biosynthesis of isoprenoid in parasitic protozoa and myxobacterium, was observed in the biosynthesis of the lipid core in halophilic archaea. The involvement of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase was strongly suggested, with stereospecific conversion of the diastereotopic methyl group of leucine to isoprenoidal lipid.

  12. The Arabidopsis thaliana FPP synthase isozymes have overlapping and specific functions in isoprenoid biosynthesis, and complete loss of FPP synthase activity causes early developmental arrest.

    PubMed

    Closa, Marta; Vranová, Eva; Bortolotti, Cristina; Bigler, Laurent; Arró, Montserrat; Ferrer, Albert; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2010-08-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) synthase (FPS) catalyses the synthesis of FPP, the major substrate used by cytosolic and mitochondrial branches of the isoprenoid pathway. Arabidopsis contains two farnesyl diphosphate synthase genes, FPS1 and FPS2, that encode isozymes FPS1L (mitochondrial), FPS1S and FPS2 (both cytosolic). Here we show that simultaneous knockout of both FPS genes is lethal for Arabidopsis, and embryo development is arrested at the pre-globular stage, demonstrating that FPP-derived isoprenoid metabolism is essential. In addition, lack of FPS enzyme activity severely impairs male genetic transmission. In contrast, no major developmental and metabolic defects were observed in fps1 and fps2 single knockout mutants, demonstrating the redundancy of the genes. The levels of sterols and ubiquinone, the major mitochondrial isoprenoid, are only slightly reduced in the single mutants. Although one functional FPS gene is sufficient to support isoprenoid biosynthesis for normal growth and development, the functions of FPS1 and FPS2 during development are not completely redundant. FPS1 activity has a predominant role during most of the plant life cycle, and FPS2 appears to have a major role in seeds and during the early stages of seedling development. Lack of FPS2 activity in seeds, but not of FPS1 activity, is associated with a marked reduction in sitosterol content and positive feedback regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity that renders seeds hypersensitive to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitor mevastatin. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Hexameric assembly of the bifunctional methylerythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase and protein-protein associations in the deoxy-xylulose-dependent pathway of isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Bond, Charles S; Hallyburton, Irene; Hecht, Stefan; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix; Hunter, William N

    2004-12-10

    The bifunctional methylerythritol 4-phosphate cytidylyltransferase methylerythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase (IspDF) is unusual in that it catalyzes nonconsecutive reactions in the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DOXP) pathway of isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis. The crystal structure of IspDF from the bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni reveals an elongated hexamer with D3 symmetry compatible with the dimeric 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate cytidylyltransferase and trimeric 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase monofunctional enzymes. Complex formation of IspDF with 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol kinase (IspE), the intervening enzyme activity in the pathway, has been observed in solution for the enzymes from C. jejuni and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The monofunctional enzymes (2C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, IspE, and 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase) involved in the DOXP biosynthetic pathway of Escherichia coli also show physical associations. We propose that complex formation of the three enzymes at the core of the DOXP pathway can produce an assembly localizing 18 catalytic centers for the early stages of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  14. Crystal Structure of 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-Phosphate Synthase, A Crucial Enzyme for Isoprenoids Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,S.; Usunow, G.; Busch, G.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) is a common precursor for the synthesis of all isoprenoids, which have important functions in living organisms. IPP is produced by the mevalonate pathway in archaea, fungi, and animals. In contrast, IPP is synthesized by a mevalonate-independent pathway in most bacteria, algae, and plant plastids. 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) catalyzes the first and the rate-limiting step of the mevalonate-independent pathway and is an attractive target for the development of novel antibiotics, antimalarials, and herbicides. We report here the first structural information on DXS, from Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans, in complex with the coenzyme thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The structure contains three domains (I, II, and III), each of which bears homology to the equivalent domains in transketolase and the E1 subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase. However, DXS has a novel arrangement of these domains as compared with the other enzymes, such that the active site of DXS is located at the interface of domains I and II in the same monomer, whereas that of transketolase is located at the interface of the dimer. The coenzyme TPP is mostly buried in the complex, but the C-2 atom of its thiazolium ring is exposed to a pocket that is the substrate-binding site. The structures identify residues that may have important roles in catalysis, which have been confirmed by our mutagenesis studies.

  15. Biosynthesis of isoprenoids (carotenoids, sterols, prenyl side-chains of chlorophylls and plastoquinone) via a novel pyruvate/glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate non-mevalonate pathway in the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Schwender, J; Seemann, M; Lichtenthaler, H K; Rohmer, M

    1996-05-15

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis was investigated in the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus grown heterotrophically on 13C-labelled glucose and acetate. Several isoprenoid compounds were isolated and investigated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. According to the 13C-labelling pattern indicated by the 13C-NMR spectra, the biosynthesis of all plastidic isoprenoids investigated (prenyl side-chains of chlorophylls and plastoquinone-9, and the carotenoids beta-carotene and lutein), as well as of the non-plastidic cytoplasmic sterols, does not proceed via the classical acetate/mevalonate pathway (which leads from acetyl-CoA via mevalonate to isopentenyl diphosphate), but via the novel glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate/pyruvate route recently detected in eubacteria. Formation of isopentenyl diphosphate involves the condensation of a C2 unit derived from pyruvate decarboxylation with glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and a transposition yielding the branched C5 skeleton of isoprenic units.

  16. Exploring Drug Targets in Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway for Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Qidwai, Tabish; Jamal, Farrukh; Khan, Mohd Y; Sharma, Bechan

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of rapid drug resistance to existing antimalarial drugs in Plasmodium falciparum has created the need for prediction of novel targets as well as leads derived from original molecules with improved activity against a validated drug target. The malaria parasite has a plant plastid-like apicoplast. To overcome the problem of falciparum malaria, the metabolic pathways in parasite apicoplast have been used as antimalarial drug targets. Among several pathways in apicoplast, isoprenoid biosynthesis is one of the important pathways for parasite as its multiplication in human erythrocytes requires isoprenoids. Therefore targeting this pathway and exploring leads with improved activity is a highly attractive approach. This report has explored progress towards the study of proteins and inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. For more comprehensive analysis, antimalarial drug-protein interaction has been covered.

  17. Synthetic isoprenoid analogues for the study of prenylated proteins: Fluorescent imaging and proteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Chih; Distefano, Mark D

    2016-02-01

    Protein prenylation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by prenyltransferases involving the attachment of farnesyl or geranylgeranyl groups to residues near the C-termini of proteins. This irreversible covalent modification is important for membrane localization and proper signal transduction. Here, the use of isoprenoid analogues for studying prenylated proteins is reviewed. First, experiments with analogues containing small fluorophores that are alternative substrates for prenyltransferases are described. Those analogues have been useful for quantifying binding affinity and for the production of fluorescently labeled proteins. Next, the use of analogues that incorporate biotin, bioorthogonal groups or antigenic moieties is described. Such probes have been particularly useful for identifying proteins that are naturally prenylated within mammalian cells. Overall, the use of isoprenoid analogues has contributed significantly to the understanding of protein prenlation.

  18. Isoprenoid metabolism in apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, Leah; Odom, Audrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites include some of the most prevalent and deadly human pathogens. Novel antiparasitic drugs are urgently needed. Synthesis and metabolism of isoprenoids may present multiple targets for therapeutic intervention. The apicoplast-localized methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis is distinct from the mevalonate (MVA) pathway used by the mammalian host, and this pathway is apparently essential in most Apicomplexa. In this review, we discuss the current field of research on production and metabolic fates of isoprenoids in apicomplexan parasites, including the acquisition of host isoprenoid precursors and downstream products. We describe recent work identifying the first MEP pathway regulator in apicomplexan parasites, and introduce several promising areas for ongoing research into this well-validated antiparasitic target. PMID:25893156

  19. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in higher plants and in Escherichia coli: on the branching in the methylerythritol phosphate pathway and the independent biosynthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Hoeffler, Jean-François; Hemmerlin, Andréa; Grosdemange-Billiard, Catherine; Bach, Thomas J; Rohmer, Michel

    2002-01-01

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the mevalonic-acid (MVA)-independent 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is characterized by two branches leading separately to isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). The signature of this branching is the retention of deuterium in DMAPP and the deuterium loss in IPP after incorporation of 1-[4-(2)H]deoxy-d-xylulose ([4-(2)H]DX). Feeding tobacco BY-2 cell-suspension cultures with [4-(2)H]DX resulted in deuterium retention in the isoprene units derived from DMAPP, as well as from IPP in the plastidial isoprenoids, phytoene and plastoquinone, synthesized via the MEP pathway. This labelling pattern represents direct evidence for the presence of the DMAPP branch of the MEP pathway in a higher plant, and shows that IPP can be synthesized from DMAPP in plant plastids, most probably via a plastidial IPP isomerase. PMID:12010124

  20. Divergent Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Pathways in Staphylococcus Species Constitute a Drug Target for Treating Infections in Companion Animals

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Christine L.; Morris, Daniel O.; Rankin, Shelley C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus species are a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections in humans and animals, and the antibiotics used to treat these infections are often the same. Methicillin- and multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections are becoming more common in human and veterinary medicine. From a “One Health” perspective, this overlap in antibiotic use and resistance raises concerns over the potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative genomics analysis revealed that Staphylococcus species use divergent pathways to synthesize isoprenoids. Species frequently associated with skin and soft tissue infections in companion animals, including S. schleiferi and S. pseudintermedius, use the nonmevalonate pathway. In contrast, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. lugdunensis use the mevalonate pathway. The antibiotic fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of the nonmevalonate pathway, was effective in killing canine clinical staphylococcal isolates but had no effect on the growth or survival of S. aureus and S. epidermidis. These data identify an essential metabolic pathway in Staphylococcus that differs among members of this genus and suggest that drugs such as fosmidomycin, which targets enzymes in the nonmevalonate pathway, may be an effective treatment for certain staphylococcal infections. IMPORTANCE Drug-resistant Staphylococcus species are a major concern in human and veterinary medicine. There is a need for new antibiotics that exhibit a selective effect in treating infections in companion and livestock animals and that would not be used to treat human bacterial infections. We have identified fosmidomycin as an antibiotic that selectively targets certain Staphylococcus species that are often encountered in skin infections in cats and dogs. These findings expand our understanding of Staphylococcus evolution and may have direct implications for treating staphylococcal infections in veterinary medicine. PMID:27704053

  1. Mutations in Escherichia coli aceE and ribB genes allow survival of strains defective in the first step of the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Perez-Gil, Jordi; Uros, Eva Maria; Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Lois, L Maria; Kirby, James; Nishimoto, Minobu; Baidoo, Edward E K; Keasling, Jay D; Boronat, Albert; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    A functional 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is required for isoprenoid biosynthesis and hence survival in Escherichia coli and most other bacteria. In the first two steps of the pathway, MEP is produced from the central metabolic intermediates pyruvate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate via 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) by the activity of the enzymes DXP synthase (DXS) and DXP reductoisomerase (DXR). Because the MEP pathway is absent from humans, it was proposed as a promising new target to develop new antibiotics. However, the lethal phenotype caused by the deletion of DXS or DXR was found to be suppressed with a relatively high efficiency by unidentified mutations. Here we report that several mutations in the unrelated genes aceE and ribB rescue growth of DXS-defective mutants because the encoded enzymes allowed the production of sufficient DXP in vivo. Together, this work unveils the diversity of mechanisms that can evolve in bacteria to circumvent a blockage of the first step of the MEP pathway.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of cytidine derivatives that inhibit the kinase IspE of the non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christine M; Hirsch, Anna K H; Alphey, Magnus S; Sgraja, Tanja; Lauw, Susan; Illarionova, Victoria; Rohdich, Felix; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hunter, William N; Bacher, Adelbert; Diederich, François

    2008-01-01

    The enzymes of the non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis are attractive targets for the development of novel drugs against malaria and tuberculosis. This pathway is used exclusively by the corresponding pathogens, but not by humans. A series of water-soluble, cytidine-based inhibitors that were originally designed for the fourth enzyme in the pathway, IspD, were shown to inhibit the subsequent enzyme, the kinase IspE (from Escherichia coli). The binding mode of the inhibitors was verified by co-crystal structure analysis, using Aquifex aeolicus IspE. The crystal structures represent the first reported example of a co-crystal structure of IspE with a synthetic ligand and confirmed that ligand binding affinity originates mainly from the interactions of the nucleobase moiety in the cytidine binding pocket of the enzyme. In contrast, the appended benzimidazole moieties of the ligands adopt various orientations in the active site and establish only poor intermolecular contacts with the protein. Defined binding sites for sulfate ions and glycerol molecules, components in the crystallization buffer, near the well-conserved ATP-binding Gly-rich loop of IspE were observed. The crystal structures of A. aeolicus IspE nicely complement the one from E. coli IspE for use in structure-based design, namely by providing invaluable structural information for the design of inhibitors targeting IspE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum. Similar to the enzymes from these pathogens, A. aeolicus IspE directs the OH group of a tyrosine residue into a pocket in the active site. In the E. coli enzyme, on the other hand, this pocket is lined by phenylalanine and has a more pronounced hydrophobic character.

  3. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  4. Human isoprenoid synthase enzymes as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios N.; Berghuis, Albert M.; Tsantrizos, Youla S.

    2014-01-01

    In the human body, the complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins, and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP, and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies. PMID:25101260

  5. Characterization of Arabidopsis FPS isozymes and FPS gene expression analysis provide insight into the biosynthesis of isoprenoid precursors in seeds.

    PubMed

    Keim, Verónica; Manzano, David; Fernández, Francisco J; Closa, Marta; Andrade, Paola; Caudepón, Daniel; Bortolotti, Cristina; Vega, M Cristina; Arró, Montserrat; Ferrer, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana contains two genes encoding farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) synthase (FPS), the prenyl diphoshate synthase that catalyzes the synthesis of FPP from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). In this study, we provide evidence that the two Arabidopsis short FPS isozymes FPS1S and FPS2 localize to the cytosol. Both enzymes were expressed in E. coli, purified and biochemically characterized. Despite FPS1S and FPS2 share more than 90% amino acid sequence identity, FPS2 was found to be more efficient as a catalyst, more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of NaCl, and more resistant to thermal inactivation than FPS1S. Homology modelling for FPS1S and FPS2 and analysis of the amino acid differences between the two enzymes revealed an increase in surface polarity and a greater capacity to form surface salt bridges of FPS2 compared to FPS1S. These factors most likely account for the enhanced thermostability of FPS2. Expression analysis of FPS::GUS genes in seeds showed that FPS1 and FPS2 display complementary patterns of expression particularly at late stages of seed development, which suggests that Arabidopsis seeds have two spatially segregated sources of FPP. Functional complementation studies of the Arabidopsis fps2 knockout mutant seed phenotypes demonstrated that under normal conditions FPS1S and FPS2 are functionally interchangeable. A putative role for FPS2 in maintaining seed germination capacity under adverse environmental conditions is discussed.

  6. Engineering Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Artemisia annua L. for the Production of Taxadiene: A Key Intermediate of Taxol

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meiya; Jiang, Fusheng; Yu, Xiangli; Miao, Zhiqi

    2015-01-01

    Taxadiene is the first committed precursor to paclitaxel, marketed as Taxol, arguably the most important anticancer agent against ovarian and breast cancer. In Taxus, taxadiene is directly synthesized from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) that is the common precursor for diterpenoids and is found in most plants and microbes. In this study, Artemisia annua L., a Chinese medicinal herb that grows fast and is rich in terpenoids, was used as a genetic engineering host to produce taxadiene. The TXS (taxadiene synthase) gene, cloned from Taxus and inserted into pCAMBIA1304, was transformed into Artemisia annua L. using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated method. Thirty independent transgenic plants were obtained, and GC-MS analysis was used to confirm that taxadiene was produced and accumulated up to 129.7 μg/g dry mass. However, the high expression of TXS did not affect plant growth or photosynthesis in transgenic Artemisia annua L. It is notable that artemisinin is produced and stored in leaves and most taxadiene accumulated in the stem of transgenic Artemisia annua L., suggesting a new way to produce two important compounds in one transgenic plant: leaves for artemisinin and stem for taxadiene. Overall, this study demonstrates that genetic engineering of the taxane biosynthetic pathway in Artemisia annua L. for the production of taxadiene is feasible. PMID:25705665

  7. Engineering isoprenoid biosynthesis in Artemisia annua L. for the production of taxadiene: a key intermediate of taxol.

    PubMed

    Li, Meiya; Jiang, Fusheng; Yu, Xiangli; Miao, Zhiqi

    2015-01-01

    Taxadiene is the first committed precursor to paclitaxel, marketed as Taxol, arguably the most important anticancer agent against ovarian and breast cancer. In Taxus, taxadiene is directly synthesized from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) that is the common precursor for diterpenoids and is found in most plants and microbes. In this study, Artemisia annua L., a Chinese medicinal herb that grows fast and is rich in terpenoids, was used as a genetic engineering host to produce taxadiene. The TXS (taxadiene synthase) gene, cloned from Taxus and inserted into pCAMBIA1304, was transformed into Artemisia annua L. using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated method. Thirty independent transgenic plants were obtained, and GC-MS analysis was used to confirm that taxadiene was produced and accumulated up to 129.7 μg/g dry mass. However, the high expression of TXS did not affect plant growth or photosynthesis in transgenic Artemisia annua L. It is notable that artemisinin is produced and stored in leaves and most taxadiene accumulated in the stem of transgenic Artemisia annua L., suggesting a new way to produce two important compounds in one transgenic plant: leaves for artemisinin and stem for taxadiene. Overall, this study demonstrates that genetic engineering of the taxane biosynthetic pathway in Artemisia annua L. for the production of taxadiene is feasible.

  8. Isoprenoid-phospholipid conjugates as potential therapeutic agents: Synthesis, characterization and antiproliferative studies

    PubMed Central

    Gliszczyńska, Anna; Niezgoda, Natalia; Gładkowski, Witold; Świtalska, Marta; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to extend application field of isoprenoid compounds by their introduction into phospholipid structure as the transport vehicle. The series of novel isoprenoid phospholipids were synthesized in high yields (24–97%), their structures were fully characterized and its anticancer activity was investigated in vitro towards several cell lines of different origin. Most of synthesized compounds showed a significantly higher antiproliferative effect on tested cell lines than free terpene acids. The most active phosphatidylcholine analogue, containing 2,3-dihydro-3-vinylfarnesoic acids instead of fatty acids in both sn-1 and sn-2 position, inhibits the proliferation of colon cancer cells at 13.6 μM. PMID:28196124

  9. Inhibition of Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis in Cercospora rosicola by Inhibitors of Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Plant Growth Retardants

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Shirley M.; Poling, Stephen M.; Maier, Vincent P.; Orme, Edward D.

    1983-01-01

    The fungus Cercospora rosicola produces abscisic acid (ABA) as a secondary metabolite. We developed a convenient system using this fungus to determine the effects of compounds on the biosynthesis of ABA. Inasmuch as ABA and the gibberellins (GAs) both arise via the isoprenoid pathway, it was of interest to determine if inhibitors of GA biosynthesis affect ABA biosynthesis. All five putative inhibitors of GA biosynthesis tested inhibited ABA biosynthesis. Several plant growth retardants with poorly understood actions in plants were also tested; of these, six inhibited ABA biosynthesis to varying degrees and two had no effect. Effects of plant growth retardants on various branches of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway may help to explain some of the diverse and unexpected results reported for these compounds. Knowledge that certain inhibitors of GA biosynthesis also have the ability to inhibit ABA biosynthesis in C. rosicola indicates the need for further studies in plants on the mode of action of these compounds. PMID:16662775

  10. Stereochemical studies of acyclic isoprenoids-XII. Lipids of methanogenic bacteria and possible contributions to sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risatti, J.B.; Rowland, S.J.; Yon, D.A.; Maxwell, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Abundant volatile lipids of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and Methanosarcina barkeri include isoprenoid hydrocarbons (??? C30), and C15, C20 and C25 isoprenoid alcohols. M. barkeri contains 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethyleicosane, whose relative stereochemistry is the same as found in marine sediments, indicating that it is a marker of methanogenic activity. The C20, C30 and C25 alkenes in M. thermoautotrophicum also have a preferred sterochemistry; the latter have the 2,6,10,14,18-pentamethyleicosanyl skeleton, suggesting that the alkane in marine sediments may derive from methanogens. The stereochemistry of squalane in a marine sediment is also compatible with an origin in methanogens; in contrast, the stereochemistry of pristane in M. thermoautotrophicum indicates a fossil fuel contaminant origin, suggesting that this and certain other alkanes reported in archaebacteria might also be of contaminant origin. There is, therefore, little evidence at present that the pristane in immature marine sediments originates in methanogens. The C15 and C20 saturated alcohols in M. thermoautotrophicum have mainly the all-R configuration. If this is generally true for methanogens, the C20 alcohol in the Messel shale may originate mainly from methanogens, whereas that in the Green River shale may originate mainly from photosynthetic organisms. ?? 1984.

  11. Diazirine-Containing Photoactivatable Isoprenoid: Synthesis and Application in Studies with Isoprenylcysteine Carboxyl Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling is a useful technique employed to identify protein–ligand and protein–protein noncovalent interactions. Photolabeling experiments have been particularly informative for probing membrane-bound proteins where structural information is difficult to obtain. The most widely used classes of photoactive functionalities include aryl azides, diazocarbonyls, diazirines, and benzophenones. Diazirines are intrinsically smaller than benzophenones and generate carbenes upon photolysis that react with a broader range of amino acid side chains compared with the benzophenone-derived diradical; this makes diazirines potentially more general photoaffinity-labeling agents. In this article, we describe the development and application of a new isoprenoid analogue containing a diazirine moiety that was prepared in six steps and incorporated into an a-factor-derived peptide produced via solid-phase synthesis. In addition to the diazirine moiety, fluorescein and biotin groups were also incorporated into the peptide to aid in the detection and enrichment of photo-cross-linked products. This multifuctional diazirine-containing peptide was a substrate for Ste14p, the yeast homologue of the potential anticancer target Icmt, with Km (6.6 μM) and Vmax (947 pmol min–1 mg–1) values comparable or better than a-factor peptides functionalized with benzophenone-based isoprenoids. Photo-cross-linking experiments demonstrated that the diazirine probe photo-cross-linked to Ste14p with observably higher efficiency than benzophenone-containing a-factor peptides. PMID:24502619

  12. Diazirine-containing photoactivatable isoprenoid: synthesis and application in studies with isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Vervacke, Jeffrey S; Funk, Amy L; Wang, Yen-Chih; Strom, Mark; Hrycyna, Christine A; Distefano, Mark D

    2014-03-07

    Photoaffinity labeling is a useful technique employed to identify protein-ligand and protein-protein noncovalent interactions. Photolabeling experiments have been particularly informative for probing membrane-bound proteins where structural information is difficult to obtain. The most widely used classes of photoactive functionalities include aryl azides, diazocarbonyls, diazirines, and benzophenones. Diazirines are intrinsically smaller than benzophenones and generate carbenes upon photolysis that react with a broader range of amino acid side chains compared with the benzophenone-derived diradical; this makes diazirines potentially more general photoaffinity-labeling agents. In this article, we describe the development and application of a new isoprenoid analogue containing a diazirine moiety that was prepared in six steps and incorporated into an a-factor-derived peptide produced via solid-phase synthesis. In addition to the diazirine moiety, fluorescein and biotin groups were also incorporated into the peptide to aid in the detection and enrichment of photo-cross-linked products. This multifuctional diazirine-containing peptide was a substrate for Ste14p, the yeast homologue of the potential anticancer target Icmt, with K(m) (6.6 μM) and V(max) (947 pmol min(-1) mg(-1)) values comparable or better than a-factor peptides functionalized with benzophenone-based isoprenoids. Photo-cross-linking experiments demonstrated that the diazirine probe photo-cross-linked to Ste14p with observably higher efficiency than benzophenone-containing a-factor peptides.

  13. Strategies for strain improvement in Fusarium fujikuroi: overexpression and localization of key enzymes of the isoprenoid pathway and their impact on gibberellin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Albermann, Sabine; Linnemannstöns, Pia; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2013-04-01

    The rice pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi is known to produce a wide range of secondary metabolites, such as the pigments bikaverin and fusarubins, the mycotoxins fusarins and fusaric acid, and the phytohormones gibberellic acids (GAs), which are applied as plant growth regulators in agri- and horticulture. The development of high-producing strains is a prerequisite for the efficient biotechnological production of GAs. In this work, we used different molecular approaches for strain improvement to directly affect expression of early isoprenoid genes as well as GA biosynthetic genes. Overexpression of the first GA pathway gene ggs2, encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 2, or additional integration of ggs2 and cps/ks, the latter encoding the bifunctional ent-copalyldiphosphate synthase/ent-kaurene synthase, revealed an enhanced production level of 150%. However, overexpression of hmgR and fppS, encoding the key enzymes of the mevalonate pathway, hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and farnesyldiphosphate synthase, resulted in a reduced production level probably due to a negative feedback regulation of HmgR. Subsequent deletion of the transmembrane domains of HmgR and overexpression of the remaining catalytic domain led to an increased GA content (250%). Using green fluorescent protein and mCherry fusion constructs, we localized Cps/Ks in the cytosol, Ggs2 in small point-like structures, which are not the peroxisomes, and HmgR at the endoplasmatic reticulum. In summary, it was shown for the first time that amplification or truncation of key enzymes of the isoprenoid and GA pathway results in elevated production levels (2.5-fold). Fluorescence microscopy revealed localization of the key enzymes in different compartments.

  14. Developmental and stress regulation of gene expression for plastid and cytosolic isoprenoid pathways in pepper fruits.

    PubMed Central

    Hugueney, P; Bouvier, F; Badillo, A; Quennemet, J; d'Harlingue, A; Camara, B

    1996-01-01

    Plant cells synthesize a myriad of isoprenoid compounds in different subcellular compartments, which include the plastid, the mitochondria, and the endoplasmic reticulum cytosol. To start the study of the regulation of these parallel pathways, we used pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit as a model. Using different isoprenoid biosynthetic gene probes from cloned cDNAs, we showed that only genes encoding the plastid enzymes (geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, and capasanthin-capsorubin synthase) are specifically triggered during the normal period of development, at the ripening stage. This pattern of expression can be mimicked and precociously induced by a simple wounding stress. Concerning the cytosol-located enzymes, we observed that the expression of the gene encoding farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase is constitutive, whereas that of farnesyl pyrophosphate cyclase (5-epi-aristolochene synthase) is undetectable during the normal development of the fruit. The expression of these later genes are, however, only selectively triggered after elicitor treatment. The results provide evidence for developmental control of isoprenoid biosynthesis occurring in plastids and that cytoplasmic isoprenoid biosynthesis is regulated, in part, by environmental signals. PMID:8787029

  15. Evidence of isoprenoid precursor toxicity in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Sivy, Tami L; Fall, Ray; Rosenstiel, Todd N

    2011-01-01

    The mevalonic acid (MVA) and methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways for isoprenoid biosynthesis both culminate in the production of the two-five carbon prenyl diphosphates: dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). These are the building blocks for higher isoprenoids, including many that have industrial and pharmaceutical applications. With growing interest in producing commercial isoprenoids through microbial engineering, reports have appeared of toxicity associated with the accumulation of prenyl diphosphates in Escherichia coli expressing a heterologous MVA pathway. Here we explored whether similar prenyl diphosphate toxicity, related to MEP pathway flux, could also be observed in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis. After genetic and metabolic manipulations of the endogenous MEP pathway in B. subtilis, measurements of cell growth, MEP pathway flux, and DMAPP contents suggested cytotoxicity related to prenyl diphosphate accumulation. These results have implications as to understanding the factors impacting isoprenoid biosynthesis in microbial systems.

  16. Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches driving isoprenoid production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chonglong; Zada, Bakht; Wei, Gongyuan; Kim, Seon-Won

    2017-10-01

    Isoprenoids comprise the largest family of natural organic compounds with many useful applications in the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and industrial fields. Rapid developments in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology have facilitated the engineering of isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways in Escherichia coli to induce high levels of production of many different isoprenoids. In this review, the stem pathways for synthesizing isoprene units as well as the branch pathways deriving diverse isoprenoids from the isoprene units have been summarized. The review also highlights the metabolic engineering efforts made for the biosynthesis of hemiterpenoids, monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, diterpenoids, carotenoids, retinoids, and coenzyme Q10 in E. coli. Perspectives and future directions for the synthesis of novel isoprenoids, decoration of isoprenoids using cytochrome P450 enzymes, and secretion or storage of isoprenoids in E. coli have also been included. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fast detection of leaf pigments and isoprenoids for ecophysiological studies, plant phenotyping and validating remote-sensing of vegetation.

    PubMed

    Junker, Laura V; Ensminger, Ingo

    2016-12-01

    Rapid developments in remote-sensing of vegetation and high-throughput precision plant phenotyping promise a range of real-life applications using leaf optical properties for non-destructive assessment of plant performance. Use of leaf optical properties for assessing plant performance requires the ability to use photosynthetic pigments as proxies for physiological properties and the ability to detect these pigments fast, reliably and at low cost. We describe a simple and cost-effective protocol for the rapid analysis of chlorophylls, carotenoids and tocopherols using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Many existing methods are based on the expensive solvent acetonitrile, take a long time or do not include lutein epoxide and α-carotene. We aimed to develop an HPLC method which separates all major chlorophylls and carotenoids as well as lutein epoxide, α-carotene and α-tocopherol. Using a C30 -column and a mobile phase with a gradient of methanol, methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) and water, our method separates the above pigments and isoprenoids within 28 min. The broad applicability of our method is demonstrated using samples from various plant species and tissue types, e.g. leaves of Arabidopsis and avocado plants, several deciduous and conifer tree species, various crops, stems of parasitic dodder, fruit of tomato, roots of carrots and Chlorella algae. In comparison to previous methods, our method is very affordable, fast and versatile and can be used to analyze all major photosynthetic pigments that contribute to changes in leaf optical properties and which are of interest in most ecophysiological studies.

  18. Chemo-Immunotherapeutic Antimalarials Targeting Isoprenoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We synthesized 30 lipophilic bisphosphonates and tested them in malaria parasite killing (targeting parasite geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, GGPPS) and human γδ T cell activation (targeting human farnesyl diphosphate synthase, FPPS). Similar patterns of activity were seen in inhibiting human FPPS and Plasmodium GGPPS, with short to medium chain-length species having most activity. In cells, shorter chain-length species had low activity, due to poor membrane permeability, and longer chain length species were poor enzyme inhibitors. Optimal activity was thus seen with ∼C10 side-chains, which have the best combination of enzyme inhibition and cell penetration. We also solved the crystal structure of one potent inhibitor, bound to FPPS. The results are of interest since they suggest the possibility of a combined chemo/immuno-therapeutic approach to antimalarial development in which both direct parasite killing and γδ T cell activation can be achieved with a single compound. PMID:23610597

  19. Rewriting yeast central carbon metabolism for industrial isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Adam L; Hawkins, Kristy M; Tsegaye, Yoseph; Antipov, Eugene; Kim, Youngnyun; Raetz, Lauren; Dahl, Robert H; Tai, Anna; Mahatdejkul-Meadows, Tina; Xu, Lan; Zhao, Lishan; Dasika, Madhukar S; Murarka, Abhishek; Lenihan, Jacob; Eng, Diana; Leng, Joshua S; Liu, Chi-Li; Wenger, Jared W; Jiang, Hanxiao; Chao, Lily; Westfall, Patrick; Lai, Jefferson; Ganesan, Savita; Jackson, Peter; Mans, Robert; Platt, Darren; Reeves, Christopher D; Saija, Poonam R; Wichmann, Gale; Holmes, Victor F; Benjamin, Kirsten; Hill, Paul W; Gardner, Timothy S; Tsong, Annie E

    2016-09-29

    A bio-based economy has the potential to provide sustainable substitutes for petroleum-based products and new chemical building blocks for advanced materials. We previously engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae for industrial production of the isoprenoid artemisinic acid for use in antimalarial treatments. Adapting these strains for biosynthesis of other isoprenoids such as β-farnesene (C15H24), a plant sesquiterpene with versatile industrial applications, is straightforward. However, S. cerevisiae uses a chemically inefficient pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis, resulting in yield and productivity limitations incompatible with commodity-scale production. Here we use four non-native metabolic reactions to rewire central carbon metabolism in S. cerevisiae, enabling biosynthesis of cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA, the two-carbon isoprenoid precursor) with a reduced ATP requirement, reduced loss of carbon to CO2-emitting reactions, and improved pathway redox balance. We show that strains with rewired central metabolism can devote an identical quantity of sugar to farnesene production as control strains, yet produce 25% more farnesene with that sugar while requiring 75% less oxygen. These changes lower feedstock costs and dramatically increase productivity in industrial fermentations which are by necessity oxygen-constrained. Despite altering key regulatory nodes, engineered strains grow robustly under taxing industrial conditions, maintaining stable yield for two weeks in broth that reaches >15% farnesene by volume. This illustrates that rewiring yeast central metabolism is a viable strategy for cost-effective, large-scale production of acetyl-CoA-derived molecules.

  20. Detection of non-sterol isoprenoids by HPLC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, Linda; van Cruchten, Arno G.; Denis, Simone W.; Amolins, Michael W.; Placzek, Andrew T.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Kulik, Willem; Waterham, Hans R.

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids constitute an important class of biomolecules that participate in many different cellular processes. Most available detection methods only allow the identification of one or two specific non-sterol isoprenoid intermediates following radioactive or fluorescent labeling. We here report a rapid, non-radioactive and sensitive procedure for the simultaneous detection and quantification of the 8 main non-sterol intermediates of the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway by means of tandem mass spectrometry. Intermediates were analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode using a silica-based C18 HPLC column. For quantification, their stable-isotope-labeled analogues were used as internal standards. HepG2 cells were used to validate the method. Mevalonate, phosphomevalonate and the 6 subsequent isoprenoid-pyrophosphates were readily determined with detection limits ranging from 0.03 to 1.0 μmol/L. The intra- and interassay variations for HepG2 cell homogenates supplemented with isoprenoid intermediates were 3.6–10.9% and 4.4–11.9%, respectively. Under normal culturing conditions, isoprenoid intermediates in HepG2 cells were below detection limits. However, incubation of the cells with pamidronate, an inhibitor of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, resulted in increased levels of MVA, IPP/DMAPP and GPP. This method will be suitable to measure profiles of isoprenoid intermediates in cells with compromised isoprenoid biosynthesis, and to determine the specificity of potential inhibitors of the pathway. PMID:18782552

  1. Isoprenoids, small GTPases and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hooff, Gero P; Wood, W Gibson; Müller, Walter E; Eckert, Gunter P

    2010-08-01

    The mevalonate pathway is a crucial metabolic pathway for most eukaryotic cells. Cholesterol is a highly recognized product of this pathway but growing interest is being given to the synthesis and functions of isoprenoids. Isoprenoids are a complex class of biologically active lipids including for example, dolichol, ubiquinone, farnesylpyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). Early work had shown that the long-chain isoprenoid dolichol is decreased but that dolichyl phosphate and ubiquinone are elevated in brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Until recently, levels of their biological active precursors FPP and GGPP were unknown. These short-chain isoprenoids are critical in the post-translational modification of certain proteins which function as molecular switches in numerous signaling pathways. The major protein families belong to the superfamily of small GTPases, consisting of roughly 150 members. Recent experimental evidence indicated that members of the small GTPases are involved in AD pathogenesis and stimulated interest in the role of FPP and GGPP in protein prenylation and cell function. A straightforward prediction derived from those studies was that FPP and GGPP levels would be elevated in AD brains as compared with normal neurological controls. For the first time, recent evidence shows significantly elevated levels of FPP and GGPP in human AD brain tissue. Cholesterol levels did not differ between AD and control samples. One obvious conclusion is that homeostasis of FPP and GGPP but not of cholesterol is specifically targeted in AD. Since prenylation of small GTPases by FPP or GGPP is indispensable for their proper function we are proposing that these two isoprenoids are up-regulated in AD resulting in an over abundance of certain prenylated proteins which contributes to neuronal dysfunction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthetic Routes to Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway Intermediates and Downstream Isoprenoids

    PubMed Central

    Jarchow-Choy, Sarah K; Koppisch, Andrew T; Fox, David T

    2014-01-01

    Isoprenoids constitute the largest class of natural products with greater than 55,000 identified members. They play essential roles in maintaining proper cellular function leading to maintenance of human health, plant defense mechanisms against predators, and are often exploited for their beneficial properties in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries. Most impressively, all known isoprenoids are derived from one of two C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) or dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). In order to study the enzyme transformations leading to the extensive structural diversity found within this class of compounds there must be access to the substrates. Sometimes, intermediates within a biological pathway can be isolated and used directly to study enzyme/pathway function. However, the primary route to most of the isoprenoid intermediates is through chemical catalysis. As such, this review provides the first exhaustive examination of synthetic routes to isoprenoid and isoprenoid precursors with particular emphasis on the syntheses of intermediates found as part of the 2C-methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In addition, representative syntheses are presented for the monoterpenes (C10), sesquiterpenes (C15), diterpenes (C20), triterpenes (C30) and tetraterpenes (C40). Finally, in some instances, the synthetic routes to substrate analogs found both within the MEP pathway and downstream isoprenoids are examined. PMID:25009443

  3. The Carotenogenesis Pathway via the Isoprenoid-β-carotene Interference Approach in a New Strain of Dunaliella salina Isolated from Baja California Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Michel, J.; Capa-Robles, Willian; Olmos-Soto, Jorge; Gutierrez-Millan, Luis Enrique

    2009-01-01

    D. salina is one of the recognized natural sources to produce β-carotene, and an useful model for studying the role of inhibitors and enhancers of carotenogenesis. However there is little information in D. salina regarding whether the isoprenoid substrate can be influenced by stress factors (carotenogenic) or selective inhibitors which in turn may further contribute to elucidate the early steps of carotenogenesis and biosynthesis of β-carotene. In this study, Dunaliella salina (BC02) isolated from La Salina BC Mexico, was subjected to the method of isoprenoids-β-carotene interference in order to promote the interruption or accumulation of the programmed biosynthesis of carotenoids. When Carotenogenic and non-carotenogenic cells of D. salina BC02 were grown under photoautotrophic growth conditions in the presence of 200 µM fosmidomycin, carotenogenesis and the synthesis of β-carotene were interrupted after two days in cultured D. salina cells. This result is an indirect consequence of the inhibition of the synthesis of isoprenoids and activity of the recombinant DXR enzyme thereby preventing the conversion of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) to 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol (MEP) and consequently interrupts the early steps of carotenogenesis in D. salina. The effect at the level of proteins and RNA was not evident. Mevinolin treated D. salina cells exhibited carotenogenesis and β-carotene levels very similar to those of control cell cultures indicating that mevinolin not pursued any indirect action in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids and had no effect at the level of the HMG-CoA reductase, the key enzyme of the Ac/MVA pathway. PMID:19370170

  4. The carotenogenesis pathway via the isoprenoid-beta-carotene interference approach in a new strain of Dunaliella salina isolated from Baja California Mexico.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Michel, J; Capa-Robles, Willian; Olmos-Soto, Jorge; Gutierrez-Millan, Luis Enrique

    2009-01-01

    D. salina is one of the recognized natural sources to produce beta-carotene, and an useful model for studying the role of inhibitors and enhancers of carotenogenesis. However there is little information in D. salina regarding whether the isoprenoid substrate can be influenced by stress factors (carotenogenic) or selective inhibitors which in turn may further contribute to elucidate the early steps of carotenogenesis and biosynthesis of beta-carotene. In this study, Dunaliella salina (BC02) isolated from La Salina BC Mexico, was subjected to the method of isoprenoids-beta-carotene interference in order to promote the interruption or accumulation of the programmed biosynthesis of carotenoids. When Carotenogenic and non-carotenogenic cells of D. salina BC02 were grown under photoautotrophic growth conditions in the presence of 200 microM fosmidomycin, carotenogenesis and the synthesis of beta-carotene were interrupted after two days in cultured D. salina cells. This result is an indirect consequence of the inhibition of the synthesis of isoprenoids and activity of the recombinant DXR enzyme thereby preventing the conversion of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) to 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol (MEP) and consequently interrupts the early steps of carotenogenesis in D. salina. The effect at the level of proteins and RNA was not evident. Mevinolin treated D. salina cells exhibited carotenogenesis and beta-carotene levels very similar to those of control cell cultures indicating that mevinolin not pursued any indirect action in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids and had no effect at the level of the HMG-CoA reductase, the key enzyme of the Ac/MVA pathway.

  5. Deuterium-labelled isotopomers of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol as tools for the elucidation of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Charon, L; Hoeffler, J F; Pale-Grosdemange, C; Lois, L M; Campos, N; Boronat, A; Rohmer, M

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli synthesizes its isoprenoids via the mevalonate-independent 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The MC4100dxs::CAT strain, defective in deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase, which is the first enzyme in this metabolic route, exclusively synthesizes its isoprenoids from exogenous 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol (ME) added to the culture medium. The fate of the hydrogen atoms in the MEP pathway was followed by the incorporation of [1,1-(2)H(2)]ME and [3,5,5,5-(2)H(4)]ME. The two C-1 hydrogen atoms of ME were found without any loss in the prenyl chain of menaquinone and/or ubiquinone on the carbon atoms derived from C-4 of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and on the E-methyl group of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), the C-5 hydrogen atoms on the methyl groups derived from IPP C-5 methyl group and the Z-methyl group of DMAPP. This showed that no changes in the oxidation state of these carbon atoms occurred in the reaction sequence between MEP and IPP. Furthermore, no deuterium scrambling was observed between the carbon atoms derived from C-4 and C-5 of IPP or DMAPP, suggesting a completely stereoselective IPP isomerase or no significant activity of this enzyme. The C-3 deuterium atom of [3,5,5,5-(2)H(4)]ME was preserved only in the DMAPP starter unit and was completely missing from all those derived from IPP. This finding, aided by the non-essential role of the IPP isomerase gene, suggests the presence in E. coli of two different routes towards IPP and DMAPP, starting from a common intermediate derived from MEP. PMID:10698701

  6. Studies on the later stage of the biosynthesis of pleuromutilin.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Tae; Tokiwano, Tetsuo; Oikawa, Hideaki

    2007-12-01

    Mutilin (4) and deoxy analogues 2 and 3 are biosynthetic precursors of pleuromutilin (1) in the later stage of biosynthesis. Precursors 2 and 3 are required for studies on the oxygenation steps in biosynthesis, and were synthesized from readily available 1 via 4 by deoxygenation of the hydroxy groups. Feeding experiments with the (2)H-labeled precursors confirmed their microbial conversion into 1.

  7. LC-MS method for screening unknown microbial carotenoids and isoprenoid quinones.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Philipp; Geyer, Roland; Surmann, Peter; Fuhrmann, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    The structure of secondary metabolites from microorganisms provides a useful tool for microbial characterization and chemotaxonomic classification. Microbial isoprenoid quinones, for example, are well described and used to distinguish among photosynthetic microorganism groups. In addition, isoprenoid quinones can also be found, together with carotenoids, in non-photosynthetic microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to develop a LC-MS/MS method which can analyze and identify these microbial isoprenoids. Positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) together with collisionally induced dissociation was applied for generation of informative fragment spectra by mass spectrometry. Enhanced product ion (EPI) scan in a linear ion trap with information dependent data acquisition (IDA) enabled generation of MS fragment data even from minor isoprenoids. The developed liquid chromatography method enabled separation of isoprenoid patterns from their ester derivatives. Discovery and structural characterization of isoprenoid quinones and carotenoids were carried out by comparing characteristics of fragment spectra from unknown compounds with fragment spectra of a range of isoprenoid standard compounds and using published data. Throughout the study 17 microorganisms (e.g., Acremonium butyri, Arthrobacter spp., Brevibacterium linens, Bullera variabilis, Exophiala dermatitidis, Lecythophora hoffmannii, Panthoea agglomerans, Rhodotorula spp., Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous) were screened and probable structures of isoprenoid quinones and carotenoids were suggested. The method lays some foundations on the analysis of yet unknown isoprenoids in microorganisms by using LCMS/MS techniques.

  8. Escherichia coli engineered to synthesize isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate from mevalonate: a novel system for the genetic analysis of the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Campos, N; Rodríguez-Concepción, M; Sauret-Güeto, S; Gallego, F; Lois, L M; Boronat, A

    2001-01-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) constitute the basic building block of isoprenoids, a family of compounds that is extraordinarily diverse in structure and function. IPP and DMAPP can be synthesized by two independent pathways: the mevalonate pathway and the recently discovered 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Although the MEP pathway is essential in most eubacteria, algae and plants and has enormous biotechnological interest, only some of its steps have been determined. We devised a system suitable for the genetic analysis of the MEP pathway in Escherichia coli. A synthetic operon coding for yeast 5-diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase, human 5-phosphomevalonate kinase, yeast mevalonate kinase and E. coli isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase was incorporated in the chromosome of this bacterium. The expression of this operon allowed the synthesis of IPP and DMAPP from mevalonate added exogenously and complementation of lethal mutants of the MEP pathway. We used this system to show that the ygbP, ychB and ygbB genes are essential in E. coli and that the steps catalysed by the products of these genes belong to the trunk line of the MEP pathway. PMID:11115399

  9. Brain isoprenoids farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate are increased in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Hooff, Gero P; Wood, W Gibson; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Igbavboa, Urule; Ong, Wei-Yi; Muller, Walter E; Eckert, Gunter P

    2012-08-01

    The mevalonate/isoprenoids/cholesterol pathway has a fundamental role in the brain. Increasing age could be associated with specific changes in mevalonate downstream products. Other than age differences in brain cholesterol and dolichol levels, there has been little if any evidence on the short-chain isoprenoids farnesylpyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP), as well as downstream lipid products. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether brain levels of FPP, GGPP and sterol precursors and metabolites would be altered in aged mice (23 months) as compared to middle-aged mice (12 months) and young mice (3 months). FPP and GGPP levels were found to be significantly higher in brain homogenates of 23-months-old mice. The ratio of FPP to GGPP did not differ among the three age groups suggesting that increasing age does not alter the relative distribution of the two isoprenoids. Gene expression of FPP synthase and GGPP synthase did not differ among the three age groups. Gene expression of HMG-CoA reductase was significantly increased with age but in contrast gene expression of squalene synthase was reduced with increasing age. Levels of squalene, lanosterol and lathosterol did not differ among the three age groups. Desmosterol and 7-dehydroxycholesterol, which are direct precursors in the final step of cholesterol biosynthesis were significantly lower in brains of aged mice. Levels of cholesterol and its metabolites 24S- and 25S-hydroxycholesterol were similar in all three age groups. Our novel find ings on increased FPP and GGPP levels in brains of aged mice may impact on protein prenylation and contribute to neuronal dysfunction observed in aging and certain neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. MRI study of the cuprizone-induced mouse model of multiple sclerosis: demyelination is not found after co-treatment with polyprenols (long-chain isoprenoid alcohols)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M.; Glazacheva, V.; Pan, E.; Akulov, A.; Krutenkova, E.; Trusov, V.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a neurological disorder with poorly understood pathogenic mechanisms and a lack of effective therapies. Therefore, the search for new MS treatments remains very important. This study was performed on a commonly used cuprizone animal model of multiple sclerosis. It evaluated the effect of a plant-derived substance called Ropren® (containing approximately 95% polyprenols or long-chain isoprenoid alcohols) on cuprizone- induced demyelination. The study was performed on 27 eight-week old male CD-1 mice. To induce demyelination mice were fed 0.5% cuprizone in the standard diet for 10 weeks. Ropren® was administered in one daily intraperitoneal injection (12mg/kg), beginning on the 6th week of the experiment. On the 11th week, the corpus callosum in the brain was evaluated in all animals using magnetic resonance imaging with an 11.7 T animal scanner using T2- weighted sequence. Cuprizone treatment successfully induced the model of demyelination with a significant decrease in the size of the corpus callosum compared with the control group (p<0.01). Mice treated with both cuprizone and Ropren® did not exhibit demyelination in the corpus callosum (p<0.01). This shows the positive effect of polyprenols on cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice.

  11. Mechanisms for autophagy modulation by isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Kaitlyn M; Allen, Cheryl; Born, Ella J; Tong, Huaxiang; Holstein, Sarah A

    2015-12-08

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the production of monoclonal protein (MP). We have shown previously that disruption of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) causes a block in MP secretion through a disruption of Rab GTPase activity, leading to an enhanced unfolded protein response and subsequent apoptosis in MM cells. Autophagy is induced by cellular stressors including nutrient deprivation and ER stress. IBP inhibitors have been shown to have disparate effects on autophagy. Here we define the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of IBP inhibitors on autophagic flux in MM cells utilizing specific pharmacological inhibitors. We demonstrate that IBP inhibition induces a net increase in autophagy as a consequence of disruption of isoprenoid biosynthesis which is not recapitulated by direct geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. IBP inhibitor-induced autophagy is a cellular defense mechanism as treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 enhances the cytotoxic effects of GGPP depletion, but not geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that IBP inhibitors disrupt ER to Golgi trafficking of monoclonal light chain protein and that this protein is not a substrate for alternative degradative pathways such as aggresomes and autophagosomes. These studies support further development of specific GGTase II inhibitors as anti-myeloma agents.

  12. Plastidic Isoprenoid Synthesis during Chloroplast Development 1

    PubMed Central

    Heintze, Adolf; Görlach, Jörn; Leuschner, Carola; Hoppe, Petra; Hagelstein, Petra; Schulze-Siebert, Detlef; Schultz, Gernot

    1990-01-01

    The chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis of very young leaves is supplied by the plastidic CO2 → pyruvate → acetyl-coenzyme A (C3 → C2) metabolism (D Schulze-Siebert, G Schultz [1987] Plant Physiol 84: 1233-1237) and occurs via the plastidic mevalonate pathway. The plastidic C3 → C2 metabolism and/or plastidic mevalonate pathway of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings changes from maximal activity at the leaf base (containing developing chloroplasts with incomplete thylakoid stacking but a considerable rate of photosynthetic CO2-fixation) almost to ineffectivity at the leaf tip (containing mature chloroplasts with maximal photosynthetic activity). The ability to import isopentenyl diphosphate from the extraplastidic space gradually increases to substitute for the loss of endogenous intermediate supply for chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis (change from autonomic to division-of-labor stage). Fatty acid synthesis from NaH14CO3 decreases in the same manner as shown for leaf sections and chloroplasts isolated from these. Evidence has been obtained for a drastic decrease of pyruvate decarboxylase-dehydrogenase activity during chloroplast development compared with other anabolic chloroplast pathways (synthesis of aromatic amino acid and branched chain amino acids). The noncompetition of pyruvate and acetate in isotopic dilution studies indicates that both a pyruvate-derived and an acetate-derived compound are simultaneously needed to form introductory intermediates of the mevalonate pathway, presumably acetoacetyl-coenzyme A. PMID:16667567

  13. Isoprenoid generating systems in plants - A handy toolbox how to assess contribution of the mevalonate and methylerythritol phosphate pathways to the biosynthetic process.

    PubMed

    Lipko, Agata; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2016-07-01

    Isoprenoids comprise an astonishingly diverse group of metabolites with numerous potential and actual applications in medicine, agriculture and the chemical industry. Generation of efficient platforms producing isoprenoids is a target of numerous laboratories. Such efforts are generally enhanced if the native biosynthetic routes can be identified, and if the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the biosynthesis of the compound(s) of interest can be determined. In this review a critical summary of the techniques applied to establish the contribution of the two alternative routes of isoprenoid production operating in plant cells, the mevalonate and methylerythritol pathways, with a focus on their co-operation (cross-talk) is presented. Special attention has been paid to methodological aspects of the referred studies, in order to give the reader a deeper understanding for the nuances of these powerful techniques. This review has been designed as an organized toolbox, which might offer the researchers comments useful both for project design and for interpretation of results obtained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comprehensive Assessment of Transcriptional Regulation Facilitates Metabolic Engineering of Isoprenoid Accumulation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Iris; Poirier, Brenton C.; Herron, Blake K.; Lange, Bernd Markus

    2015-01-01

    In plants, two spatially separated pathways provide the precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis. We generated transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines with modulated levels of expression of each individual gene involved in the cytosolic/peroxisomal mevalonate and plastidial methylerythritol phosphate pathways. By assessing the correlation of transgene expression levels with isoprenoid marker metabolites (gene-to-metabolite correlation), we determined the relative importance of transcriptional control at each individual step of isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis. The accumulation patterns of metabolic intermediates (metabolite-to-gene correlation) were then used to infer flux bottlenecks in the sterol pathway. The extent of metabolic cross talk, the exchange of isoprenoid intermediates between compartmentalized pathways, was assessed by a combination of gene-to-metabolite and metabolite-to-metabolite correlation analyses. This strategy allowed the selection of genes to be modulated by metabolic engineering, and we demonstrate that the overexpression of predictable combinations of genes can be used to significantly enhance flux toward specific end products of the sterol pathway. Transgenic plants accumulating increased amounts of sterols are characterized by significantly elevated biomass, which can be a desirable trait in crop and biofuel plants. PMID:26282236

  15. Comprehensive Assessment of Transcriptional Regulation Facilitates Metabolic Engineering of Isoprenoid Accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Iris; Poirier, Brenton C; Herron, Blake K; Lange, Bernd Markus

    2015-11-01

    In plants, two spatially separated pathways provide the precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis. We generated transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines with modulated levels of expression of each individual gene involved in the cytosolic/peroxisomal mevalonate and plastidial methylerythritol phosphate pathways. By assessing the correlation of transgene expression levels with isoprenoid marker metabolites (gene-to-metabolite correlation), we determined the relative importance of transcriptional control at each individual step of isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis. The accumulation patterns of metabolic intermediates (metabolite-to-gene correlation) were then used to infer flux bottlenecks in the sterol pathway. The extent of metabolic cross talk, the exchange of isoprenoid intermediates between compartmentalized pathways, was assessed by a combination of gene-to-metabolite and metabolite-to-metabolite correlation analyses. This strategy allowed the selection of genes to be modulated by metabolic engineering, and we demonstrate that the overexpression of predictable combinations of genes can be used to significantly enhance flux toward specific end products of the sterol pathway. Transgenic plants accumulating increased amounts of sterols are characterized by significantly elevated biomass, which can be a desirable trait in crop and biofuel plants.

  16. Isoprenoids, Small GTPases and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hooff, Gero P.; Wood, W. Gibson; Müller, Walter E.; Eckert, Gunter P.

    2010-01-01

    The mevalonate-pathway is a crucial metabolic pathway for most eukaryotic cells. Cholesterol is a highly recognized product of this pathway but growing interest is being given to the synthesis and functions of isoprenoids. Isoprenoids are a complex class of biologically active lipids including for example, dolichol, ubiquinone, farnesylpyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). Early work had shown that the long-chain isoprenoid dolichol is decreased, but that dolichyl-phosphate and ubiquinone are elevated in brains of Alzheimer´s diseased (AD) patients. Until recently, levels of their biological active precursors FPP and GGPP were unknown. These short-chain isoprenoids are critical in the post translational modification of certain proteins which function as molecular switches in numerous, signaling pathways. The major protein families belong to the superfamily of small GTPases, consisting of roughly 150 members. Recent experimental evidence indicated that members of the small GTPases are involved in AD pathogenesis and stimulated interest in the role of FPP and GGPP in protein prenylation and cell function. A straightforward prediction derived from those studies was that FPP and GGPP levels would be elevated in AD brains as compared with normal neurological controls. For the first time, recent evidence shows significantly elevated levels of FPP and GGPP in human AD brain tissue. Cholesterol levels did not differ between AD and control samples. One obvious conclusion is that homeostasis of FPP and GGPP but not of cholesterol is specifically targeted in AD. Since prenylation of small GTPases by FPP or GGPP is indispensable for their proper function we are proposing that these two isoprenoids are up-regulated in AD resulting in an over abundance of certain prenylated proteins which contributes to neuronal dysfunction. PMID:20382260

  17. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  18. Resveratrol Intervenes in the Cholesterol- and Isoprenoid-Mediated Amyloidogenic Processing of AβPP in Familial Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sathya, Mohan; Moorthi, Ponnusamy; Premkumar, Palanisamy; Kandasamy, Mahesh; Jayachandran, Kesavan Swaminathan; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy

    2017-12-03

    Deterioration of cholesterol metabolism has recently been a frontier subject of investigation in the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Though amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) primes the pathological cascade, changes in cholesterol levels and its intermediates, geranyl geranyl pyrophosphate and farnesyl pyrophosphate, is expected to have a different consequence on AβPP processing and amyloid-β (Aβ) generation. However, the use of statins (HMG-COA reductase inhibitor) has been widely implicated in slowing down the pathogenic progression of AD, while the epidemiological reports on its biological effect remains controversial. Considering this fact, the choice of drug that could maintain cholesterol homeostasis without altering its biosynthesis may yield a better therapeutic efficacy on AD. Thus, the present study focused on determining the influence of cholesterol and isoprenoids on amyloidogenic-cleavage of AβPP, in addition to resveratrol as a potent therapeutic drug in CHO-APPswe cell lines. High levels of cholesterol were found to enhance the maturation of AβPP and altered the expression and subcellular localization of ADAM10, BACE1, and PS1 thereby promoting Aβ generation, whereas high isoprenoids increased both maturation as well as amyloidogenic-cleavage of AβPP, which was evident through β-CTF production. Interestingly, the therapeutic efficacy of resveratrol maintained cholesterol homeostasis and reduced the amyloidogenic burden through its ability to enhance SIRT1 expression and thereby regulating differential expression of AD determinants.

  19. High isoprenoid flux Escherichia coli as a host for carotenoids production.

    PubMed

    Suh, Wonchul

    2012-01-01

    A noncarotenogenic microbe E. coli was engineered for high production of carotenoids. To increase the isoprenoid flux, the chromosomal native promoters of the rate-controlling steps (dxs, idi and ispDispF) in the isoprenoid pathway were replaced with a strong bacteriophage T5 promoter (P(T5)) by using the λ-Red recombinase system in combination with the Flp/FRT site-specific recombination system for marker excision and P1 transduction for gene trait stacking. The resulting high isoprenoid flux E. coli can be used as a starting strain to produce various carotenoids by introducing heterologous carotenoid genes. In this study, the high isoprenoid flux E. coli was transformed with a plasmid carrying the β-carotene biosynthetic genes from Pantoea stewartii for β-carotene production.

  20. Biosynthesis and microscopic study of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Quester, Katrin; Avalos-Borja, M; Castro-Longoria, E

    2013-01-01

    Nanobiotechnology, bionanotechnology, and nanobiology are terms that have emerged in reference to the combination of nanotechnology and biology. Through the convergence of these disciplines, the production of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) using biological material as reducing agents is rapidly progressing. In the near future, the application of clean, non-toxic, and eco-friendly nanostructured material will be possible in industry and/or biomedicine. Currently, there is a wide range of organisms that have been reported to be useful in producing NPs. However, the development of finer protocols and the applicability of biosynthesized nanostructures are presently under study. Silver and gold are among the most studied metals due to their potential use in medical treatment. In fact, silver NPs have been evaluated as antimicrobial agents, having been successfully used against several types of fungi and bacteria. However, the use of such material in our daily life must be carefully evaluated. This article summarizes some of the most significant results using organisms to produce metallic NPs as well as the microscopic analyses used to characterize the nanostructured material obtained, providing a valuable database for future research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies on the biosynthesis and intracellular transport of gangliosides

    SciTech Connect

    Farrer, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Ganglioside biosynthesis and transport to myelin was studied in brainstem of 17-21 day old rats. Brainstem slices were incubated for up to 2 hours with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine, and gangliosides were isolated by column chromatography and HPTLC. Results from these experiments showed that: (a) ganglioside synthesis was decreased in the slices compared to in vivo, and this decrease was greater in the more complex gangliosides than in the simpler ones; (b) label incorporation into gangliosides GM3 and GM2 increased in a linear fashion, whereas the rate of incorporation continuously increased over the 2 hour period for the more complex gangliosides; (c) label incorporated into gangliosides, which showed almost no effect of chase after 30 minutes; (d) monensin at 0.1 uM inhibited the synthesis of all gangliosides except GM3, GM2 and GD3. Compartmentation of ganglioside biosynthesis was examined by analyzing the subcellular location of two ganglioside synthesizing enzymes, lactosylceramide sialosyltransferase (LCST) and GDlb sialosyltransferase (GDlbST), acting early and late in the ganglioside pathway, respectively.

  2. Complex Ancestries of Isoprenoid Synthesis in Dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Bentlage, Bastian; Rogers, Travis S; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Delwiche, Charles F

    2016-01-01

    Isoprenoid metabolism occupies a central position in the anabolic metabolism of all living cells. In plastid-bearing organisms, two pathways may be present for de novo isoprenoid synthesis, the cytosolic mevalonate pathway (MVA) and nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted nonmevalonate pathway (DOXP). Using transcriptomic data we find that dinoflagellates apparently make exclusive use of the DOXP pathway. Using phylogenetic analyses of all DOXP genes we inferred the evolutionary origins of DOXP genes in dinoflagellates. Plastid replacements led to a DOXP pathway of multiple evolutionary origins. Dinoflagellates commonly referred to as dinotoms due to their relatively recent acquisition of a diatom plastid, express two completely redundant DOXP pathways. Dinoflagellates with a tertiary plastid of haptophyte origin, by contrast, express a hybrid pathway of dual evolutionary origin. Here, changes in the targeting motif of signal/transit peptide likely allow for targeting the new plastid by the proteins of core isoprenoid metabolism proteins. Parasitic dinoflagellates of the Amoebophyra species complex appear to have lost the DOXP pathway, suggesting that they may rely on their host for sterol synthesis. © 2015 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2015 International Society of Protistologists.

  3. Block of the Mevalonate Pathway Triggers Oxidative and Inflammatory Molecular Mechanisms Modulated by Exogenous Isoprenoid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Kleiner, Giulio; Valencic, Erica; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Girardelli, Martina; Crovella, Sergio; Knowles, Alessandra; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of the mevalonate pathway is known to be involved in a number of diseases that exhibit a systemic inflammatory phenotype and often neurological involvements, as seen in patients suffering from a rare disease called mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD). One of the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology could depend on the shortage of isoprenoid compounds and the subsequent mitochondrial damage, leading to oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines’ release. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that cellular death results from the balance between apoptosis and pyroptosis, both driven by mitochondrial damage and the molecular platform inflammasome. In order to rescue the deregulated pathway and decrease inflammatory markers, exogenous isoprenoid compounds were administered to a biochemical model of MKD obtained treating a murine monocytic cell line with a compound able to block the mevalonate pathway, plus an inflammatory stimulus. Our results show that isoprenoids acted in different ways, mainly increasing the expression of the evaluated markers [apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, nucleotide-binding oligomerization-domain protein-like receptors 3 (NALP3), cytokines and nitric oxide (NO)]. Our findings confirm the hypothesis that inflammation is triggered, at least partially, by the shortage of isoprenoids. Moreover, although further studies are necessary, the achieved results suggest a possible role for exogenous isoprenoids in the treatment of MKD. PMID:24758928

  4. Block of the mevalonate pathway triggers oxidative and inflammatory molecular mechanisms modulated by exogenous isoprenoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Kleiner, Giulio; Valencic, Erica; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Girardelli, Martina; Crovella, Sergio; Knowles, Alessandra; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2014-04-22

    Deregulation of the mevalonate pathway is known to be involved in a number of diseases that exhibit a systemic inflammatory phenotype and often neurological involvements, as seen in patients suffering from a rare disease called mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD). One of the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology could depend on the shortage of isoprenoid compounds and the subsequent mitochondrial damage, leading to oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines' release. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that cellular death results from the balance between apoptosis and pyroptosis, both driven by mitochondrial damage and the molecular platform inflammasome. In order to rescue the deregulated pathway and decrease inflammatory markers, exogenous isoprenoid compounds were administered to a biochemical model of MKD obtained treating a murine monocytic cell line with a compound able to block the mevalonate pathway, plus an inflammatory stimulus. Our results show that isoprenoids acted in different ways, mainly increasing the expression of the evaluated markers [apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, nucleotide-binding oligomerization-domain protein-like receptors 3 (NALP3), cytokines and nitric oxide (NO)]. Our findings confirm the hypothesis that inflammation is triggered, at least partially, by the shortage of isoprenoids. Moreover, although further studies are necessary, the achieved results suggest a possible role for exogenous isoprenoids in the treatment of MKD.

  5. Biosynthesis and Total Synthesis Studies on The Jadomycin Family of Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Ehesan U.

    2013-01-01

    Jadomycins are unique angucycline polyketides, which are produced by soil bacteria Streptomyces venezuelae under specific nutrient and environmental conditions. Their unique structural complexity and biological activities have engendered extensive study of the jadomycin class of natural compounds in terms of biological activity, biosynthesis, and synthesis. This review outlines the recent developments in the study of the synthesis and biosynthesis of jadomycins. PMID:24371430

  6. Mitochondrial respiration without ubiquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ), a.k.a. coenzyme Q, is a redox-active lipid that participates in several cellular processes, in particular mitochondrial electron transport. Primary UQ deficiency is a rare but severely debilitating condition. Mclk1 (a.k.a. Coq7) encodes a conserved mitochondrial enzyme that is necessary for UQ biosynthesis. We engineered conditional Mclk1 knockout models to study pathogenic effects of UQ deficiency and to assess potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of UQ deficiencies. We found that Mclk1 knockout cells are viable in the total absence of UQ. The UQ biosynthetic precursor DMQ9 accumulates in these cells and can sustain mitochondrial respiration, albeit inefficiently. We demonstrated that efficient rescue of the respiratory deficiency in UQ-deficient cells by UQ analogues is side chain length dependent, and that classical UQ analogues with alkyl side chains such as idebenone and decylUQ are inefficient in comparison with analogues with isoprenoid side chains. Furthermore, Vitamin K2, which has an isoprenoid side chain, and has been proposed to be a mitochondrial electron carrier, had no efficacy on UQ-deficient mouse cells. In our model with liver-specific loss of Mclk1, a large depletion of UQ in hepatocytes caused only a mild impairment of respiratory chain function and no gross abnormalities. In conjunction with previous findings, this surprisingly small effect of UQ depletion indicates a nonlinear dependence of mitochondrial respiratory capacity on UQ content. With this model, we also showed that diet-derived UQ10 is able to functionally rescue the electron transport deficit due to severe endogenous UQ deficiency in the liver, an organ capable of absorbing exogenous UQ. PMID:23847050

  7. Studies on the biosynthesis of ralfuranones in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kenji; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Kiba, Akinori; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Ralfuranones, aryl-furanone secondary metabolites, are involved in the virulence of Ralstonia solanacearum in solanaceous plants. Ralfuranone I (6) has been suggested as a biosynthetic precursor for other ralfuranones; however, this conversion has not been confirmed. We herein investigate the biosynthesis of ralfuranones using feeding experiments with ralfuranone I (6) and its putative metabolite, ralfuranone B (2). The results obtained demonstrated that the biosynthesis of ralfuranones proceeded in enzymatic and non-enzymatic manners.

  8. A Genetic and Pharmacological Analysis of Isoprenoid Pathway by LC-MS/MS in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Tomonori; Fang, Yue; Zhou, Xin; Jaiseng, Wurentuya; Ma, Yan; Kuno, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Currently, statins are the only drugs acting on the mammalian isoprenoid pathway. The mammalian genes in this pathway are not easily amenable to genetic manipulation. Thus, it is difficult to study the effects of the inhibition of various enzymes on the intermediate and final products in the isoprenoid pathway. In fission yeast, antifungal compounds such as azoles and terbinafine are available as inhibitors of the pathway in addition to statins, and various isoprenoid pathway mutants are also available. Here in these mutants, treated with statins or antifungals, we quantified the final and intermediate products of the fission yeast isoprenoid pathway using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. In hmg1-1, a mutant of the gene encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), ergosterol (a final sterol product), and squalene (an intermediate pathway product), were decreased to approximately 80% and 10%, respectively, compared with that of wild-type cells. Consistently in wild-type cells, pravastatin, an HMGR inhibitor decreased ergosterol and squalene, and the effect was more pronounced on squalene. In hmg1-1 mutant and in wild-type cells treated with pravastatin, the decrease in the levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate respectively was larger than that of ergosterol but was smaller than that of squalene. In Δerg6 or Δsts1 cells, mutants of the genes involved in the last step of the pathway, ergosterol was not detected, and the changes of intermediate product levels were distinct from that of hmg1-1 mutant. Notably, in wild-type cells miconazole and terbinafine only slightly decreased ergosterol level. Altogether, these studies suggest that the pleiotropic phenotypes caused by the hmg1-1 mutation and pravastatin might be due to decreased levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates or other isoprenoid pathway intermediate products rather than due to a decreased ergosterol level. PMID:23145048

  9. Impact of summer drought on isoprenoid emissions and carbon sink of three Scots pine provenances

    PubMed Central

    Lüpke, M.; Leuchner, M.; Steinbrecher, R.; Menzel, A.

    2016-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) provenances cover broad ecological amplitudes. In a greenhouse study, we investigated the impact of drought stress and rewetting on gas exchange for three provenances (Italy: Emilia Romagna; Spain: Alto Ebro; Germany: East-German lowlands) of 2-year old Scots pine seedlings. CO2, water vapour and isoprenoid exchange of stressed and control trees were quantified with a four-chamber dynamic-enclosure system in the controlled environment of a climate chamber. The three provenances showed distinct isoprenoid emission patterns and were classified into a non-Δ3-carene, with either high α-/β-pinene or β-myrcene fraction, and a Δ3-carene dominated type. Isoprenoid emission rates, net-photosynthesis and transpiration were reduced during summer drought stress and significantly recovered after rewetting. A seasonal increase of isoprenoid emission rates towards autumn was observed for all control groups. Compared with the German provenance, the Spanish and Italian provenances revealed higher isoprenoid emission rates and more plastic responses to drought stress and seasonal development, which points to a local adaptation to climate. As a result of drought, net carbon uptake and transpiration of trees was reduced, but recovered after rewetting. We conclude from our study that Scots pine isoprenoid emission is more variable than expected and sensitive to drought periods, likely impacting regional air chemistry. Thus, a provenance-specific emission assessment accounting for reduced emission during prolonged (summer) drought is recommend for setting up biogenic volatile organic compound emission inventories used in air quality models. PMID:27591438

  10. Impact of summer drought on isoprenoid emissions and carbon sink of three Scots pine provenances.

    PubMed

    Lüpke, M; Leuchner, M; Steinbrecher, R; Menzel, A

    2016-11-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) provenances cover broad ecological amplitudes. In a greenhouse study, we investigated the impact of drought stress and rewetting on gas exchange for three provenances (Italy: Emilia Romagna; Spain: Alto Ebro; Germany: East-German lowlands) of 2-year old Scots pine seedlings. CO2, water vapour and isoprenoid exchange of stressed and control trees were quantified with a four-chamber dynamic-enclosure system in the controlled environment of a climate chamber. The three provenances showed distinct isoprenoid emission patterns and were classified into a non-Δ(3)-carene, with either high α-/β-pinene or β-myrcene fraction, and a Δ(3)-carene dominated type. Isoprenoid emission rates, net-photosynthesis and transpiration were reduced during summer drought stress and significantly recovered after rewetting. A seasonal increase of isoprenoid emission rates towards autumn was observed for all control groups. Compared with the German provenance, the Spanish and Italian provenances revealed higher isoprenoid emission rates and more plastic responses to drought stress and seasonal development, which points to a local adaptation to climate. As a result of drought, net carbon uptake and transpiration of trees was reduced, but recovered after rewetting. We conclude from our study that Scots pine isoprenoid emission is more variable than expected and sensitive to drought periods, likely impacting regional air chemistry. Thus, a provenance-specific emission assessment accounting for reduced emission during prolonged (summer) drought is recommend for setting up biogenic volatile organic compound emission inventories used in air quality models. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Chemical approaches to the study of template biosynthesis: general problems and the study of transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorre, Dmitrii G.; Kudryashova, Natal'ya V.; Lavrik, Ol'ga I.

    1997-04-01

    The chemical approaches to the study of systems for template biosynthesis are examined. The general problems of template biosynthesis solved with the aid of these approaches and the principal results obtained as regards transcription are described. Attention is concentrated on the results obtained in the study of the interaction of RNA polymerase and its subunits with DNA and the RNA product. The approaches to the study of the active centre in RNA polymerases by the affinity modification method as well as the interaction of eukaryotic transcription factors with DNA are described. The bibliography includes 64 references.

  12. Targeting the isoprenoid pathway to abrogate progression of pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Alan J.; Shi, Lei; Glogauer, Michael; Neighbors, Jeffrey D.; Hohl, Raymond; Carter, A. Brent

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic remodeling in lung injury is a major cause of morbidity. The mechanism that mediates the ongoing fibrosis is unclear, and there is no available treatment to abate the aberrant repair. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have a critical role in inducing fibrosis by modulating extracellular matrix deposition. Specifically, mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by alveolar macrophages is directly linked to pulmonary fibrosis as inhibition of mitochondrial H2O2 attenuates the fibrotic response in mice. Prior studies indicate that the small GTP-binding protein, Rac1, directly mediates H2O2 generation in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Geranylgeranylation of the C-terminal cysteine residue (Cys189) is required for the for Rac1 activation and mitochondrial import. We hypothesized that impairment of geranylgeranylation would limit mitochondrial oxidative stress, and, thus, abrogate progression of pulmonary fibrosis. By targeting the isoprenoid pathway with a novel agent, digeranyl bisphosphonate (DGBP), which impairs geranylgeranylation, we demonstrate that Rac1 mitochondrial import, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and progression of the fibrotic response to lung injury are significantly attenuated. These observations reveal that targeting the isoprenoid pathway to alter Rac1 geranylgeranylation halts the progression of pulmonary fibrosis after lung injury. PMID:25958207

  13. Withanolide biosynthesis recruits both mevalonate and DOXP pathways of isoprenogenesis in Ashwagandha Withania somnifera L. (Dunal).

    PubMed

    Chaurasiya, Narayan D; Sangwan, Neelam S; Sabir, Farzana; Misra, Laxminarain; Sangwan, Rajender S

    2012-10-01

    Withanolides are pharmaceutically important C(28)-phytochemicals produced in most prodigal amounts and diversified forms by Withania somnifera. Metabolic origin of withanolides from triterpenoid pathway intermediates implies that isoprenogenesis could significantly govern withanolide production. In plants, isoprenogenesis occurs via two routes: mevalonate (MVA) pathway in cytosol and non-mevalonate or DOXP/MEP pathway in plastids. We have investigated relative carbon contribution of MVA and DOXP pathways to withanolide biosynthesis in W. somnifera. The quantitative NMR-based biosynthetic study involved tracing of (13)C label from (13)C(1)-D-glucose to withaferin A in withanolide producing in vitro microshoot cultures of the plant. Enrichment of (13)C abundance at each carbon of withaferin A from (13)C(1)-glucose-fed cultures was monitored by normalization and integration of NMR signal intensities. The pattern of carbon position-specific (13)C enrichment of withaferin A was analyzed by a retro-biosynthetic approach using a squalene-intermediated metabolic model of withanolide (withaferin A) biosynthesis. The pattern suggested that both DOXP and MVA pathways of isoprenogenesis were significantly involved in withanolide biosynthesis with their relative contribution on the ratio of 25:75, respectively. The results have been discussed in a new conceptual line of biosynthetic load-driven model of relative recruitment of DOXP and MVA pathways for biosynthesis of isoprenoids. Key message The study elucidates significant contribution of DOXP pathway to withanolide biosynthesis. A new connotation of biosynthetic load-based role of DOXP/MVA recruitment in isoprenoid biosynthesis has been proposed.

  14. Double bond stereochemistry influences the susceptibility of short-chain isoprenoids and polyprenols to decomposition by thermo-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Molińska, Ewa; Klimczak, Urszula; Komaszyło, Joanna; Derewiaka, Dorota; Obiedziński, Mieczysław; Kania, Magdalena; Danikiewicz, Witold; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2015-04-01

    Isoprenoid alcohols are common constituents of living cells. They are usually assigned a role in the adaptation of the cell to environmental stimuli, and this process might give rise to their oxidation by reactive oxygen species. Moreover, cellular isoprenoids may also undergo various chemical modifications resulting from the physico-chemical treatment of the tissues, e.g., heating during food processing. Susceptibility of isoprenoid alcohols to heat treatment has not been studied in detail so far. In this study, isoprenoid alcohols differing in the number of isoprene units and geometry of the double bonds, β-citronellol, geraniol, nerol, farnesol, solanesol and Pren-9, were subjected to thermo-oxidation at 80 °C. Thermo-oxidation resulted in the decomposition of the tested short-chain isoprenoids as well as medium-chain polyprenols with simultaneous formation of oxidized derivatives, such as hydroperoxides, monoepoxides, diepoxides and aldehydes, and possible formation of oligomeric derivatives. Oxidation products were monitored by GC-FID, GC-MS, ESI-MS and spectrophotometric methods. Interestingly, nerol, a short-chain isoprenoid with a double bond in the cis (Z) configuration, was more oxidatively stable than its trans (E) isomer, geraniol. However, the opposite effect was observed for medium-chain polyprenols, since Pren-9 (di-trans-poly-cis-prenol) was more susceptible to thermo-oxidation than its all-trans isomer, solanesol. Taken together, these results experimentally confirm that both short- and long-chain polyisoprenoid alcohols are prone to thermo-oxidation.

  15. Genomic and Proteomic Studies on Plesiomonas shigelloides Lipopolysaccharide Core Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Regué, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We report here the identification of waa clusters with the genes required for the biosynthesis of the core lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of two Plesiomonas shigelloides strains. Both P. shigelloides waa clusters shared all of the genes besides the ones flanking waaL. In both strains, all of the genes were found in the waa gene cluster, although one common core biosynthetic gene (wapG) was found in a different chromosome location outside the cluster. Since P. shigelloides and Klebsiella pneumoniae share a core LPS carbohydrate backbone extending up at least to the second outer-core residue, the functions of the common P. shigelloides genes were elucidated by genetic complementation studies using well-defined K. pneumoniae mutants. The function of strain-specific inner- or outer-core genes was identified by using as a surrogate acceptor LPS from three well-defined K. pneumoniae core LPS mutants. Using this strategy, we were able to assign a proteomic function to all of the P. shigelloides waa genes identified in the two strains encoding six new glycosyltransferases (WapA, -B, -C, -D, -F, and -G). P. shigelloides demonstrated an important variety of core LPS structures, despite being a single species of the genus, as well as high homologous recombination in housekeeping genes. PMID:24244003

  16. Arabidopsis GERANYLGERANYL DIPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 11 is a hub isozyme required for the production of most photosynthesis-related isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sola, M Águila; Coman, Diana; Beck, Gilles; Barja, M Victoria; Colinas, Maite; Graf, Alexander; Welsch, Ralf; Rütimann, Philipp; Bühlmann, Peter; Bigler, Laurent; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Vranová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Most plastid isoprenoids, including photosynthesis-related metabolites such as carotenoids and the side chain of chlorophylls, tocopherols (vitamin E), phylloquinones (vitamin K), and plastoquinones, derive from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthesized by GGPP synthase (GGPPS) enzymes. Seven out of 10 functional GGPPS isozymes in Arabidopsis thaliana reside in plastids. We aimed to address the function of different GGPPS paralogues for plastid isoprenoid biosynthesis. We constructed a gene co-expression network (GCN) using GGPPS paralogues as guide genes and genes from the upstream and downstream pathways as query genes. Furthermore, knock-out and/or knock-down ggpps mutants were generated and their growth and metabolic phenotypes were analyzed. Also, interacting protein partners of GGPPS11 were searched for. Our data showed that GGPPS11, encoding the only plastid isozyme essential for plant development, functions as a hub gene among GGPPS paralogues and is required for the production of all major groups of plastid isoprenoids. Furthermore, we showed that the GGPPS11 protein physically interacts with enzymes that use GGPP for the production of carotenoids, chlorophylls, tocopherols, phylloquinone, and plastoquinone. GGPPS11 is a hub isozyme required for the production of most photosynthesis-related isoprenoids. Both gene co-expression and protein-protein interaction likely contribute to the channeling of GGPP by GGPPS11. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Exploring the interactions between isoprenoid chain and labdenediol diphosphate synthase based on molecular docking and quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wujun; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Yixin; Zhao, Zongbao Kent

    2014-12-01

    Many natural products and biosynthetic intermediates contain isoprenoid chains. Isoprenoid chains are believed to interact with some proteins in the biological systems, but such interactions remain poorly understood. Here labdenediol diphosphate synthase (LPPS) was used as a model to explore the molecular interactions involving isoprenoid chains. Both homology modeling and docking simulation results indicated that binding form between isoprenoid chain and LPPS is dominated by hydrophobic forces in one binding site. The interactions were also examined via quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technology using synthetic isoprenoid chain-contained probes. The binding constant (1.51 μM(-1)), binding site number (n = 1) and key amino acid residues (Y196, F262, W266, F301, F308, W398, W439, and Y445) were obtained. Both computational and QCM results suggested that LPPS interacts strongly with farnesyl and geranylgeranyl groups. These interactions are primarily caused by hydrophobic and π-π interaction nature. Together, this study provided insightful information to understand molecular interactions between isoprenoid chains and proteins.

  18. Labelling studies on the biosynthesis of terpenes in Fusarium fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Citron, Christian A; Brock, Nelson L; Tudzynski, Bettina; Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2014-05-25

    Synthetic [2-(13)C]mevalonolactone was fed to the gibberellin producer Fusarium fujikuroi and its incorporation into four known terpenoids was investigated by (13)C NMR analysis of crude culture extracts. The experiments gave detailed insights into the mechanisms of terpene biosynthesis by this fungus.

  19. Precise precursor rebalancing for isoprenoids production by fine control of gapA expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Juyoung; Lim, Jae Hyung; Kim, Se Yeon; Im, Dae-Kyun; Seok, Joo Yeon; Lee, Seung-Jae V; Oh, Min-Kyu; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2016-11-01

    Biosynthesis of isoprenoids via the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) pathway requires equimolar glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate to divert carbon flux toward the products of interest. Here, we demonstrate that precursor balancing is one of the critical steps for the production of isoprenoids in Escherichia coli. First, the implementation of the synthetic lycopene production pathway as a model system and the amplification of the native DXP pathway were accomplished using synthetic constitutive promoters and redesigned 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTRs). Next, fine-controlled precursor balancing was investigated by tuning phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA) or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The results showed that tuning-down of gapA improved the specific lycopene content by 45% compared to the overexpression of ppsA. The specific lycopene content in the strains with down-regulated gapA increased by 97% compared to that in the parental strain. Our results indicate that gapA is the best target for precursor balancing to increase biosynthesis of isoprenoids.

  20. Dimethylallyl diphosphate and geranyl diphosphate pools of plant species characterized by different isoprenoid emissions.

    PubMed

    Nogués, Isabel; Brilli, Federico; Loreto, Francesco

    2006-06-01

    Dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP) and geranyl diphosphate (GDP) are the last precursors of isoprene and monoterpenes emitted by leaves, respectively. DMADP and GDP pools were measured in leaves of plants emitting isoprene (Populus alba), monoterpenes (Quercus ilex and Mentha piperita), or nonemitting isoprenoids (Prunus persica). Detectable pools were found in all plant species, but P. persica showed the lowest pool size, which indicates a limitation of the whole pathway leading to isoprenoid biosynthesis in nonemitting species. The pools of DMADP and GDP of nonemitting, isoprene-emitting, and monoterpene-emitting species were partially labeled (generally 40%-60% of total carbon-incorporated (13)C) within the same time by which volatile isoprenoids are fully labeled (15 min). This indicates the coexistence of two pools for both precursors, the rapidly labeled pool presumably occurring in chloroplasts and thereby synthesized by the methylerythritol phosphate pathway and the nonlabeled pool presumably located in the cytosol and synthesized by the mevalonic pathway. In M. piperita storing monoterpenes in specialized leaf structures, the GDP pool remained totally unlabeled, indicating either that monoterpenes are totally formed by the mevalonic pathway or that labeling occurs slowly in comparison to the large pool of stored monoterpenes in this plant. The pools of DMADP and GDP increased during the season (from May to July) but decreased when the leaf was darkened or exposed to very high temperature. In the dark, the pool of DMADP of the isoprene-emitting species decreased faster than the pool of GDP. However, after 6 h of darkness, both pools were depleted to about 10% of the pool size in illuminated leaves. This indicates that both the chloroplastic and the cytosolic pools of precursors are depleted in the dark. When comparing measurements over the season and at different temperatures, an inverse correlation was observed between isoprene emission by P. alba and the

  1. Changes in photosynthesis, mesophyll conductance to CO2, and isoprenoid emissions in Populus nigra plants exposed to excess nickel.

    PubMed

    Velikova, Violeta; Tsonev, Tsonko; Loreto, Francesco; Centritto, Mauro

    2011-05-01

    Poplar (Populus nigra) plants were grown hydroponically with 30 and 200 μM Ni (Ni30 and Ni200). Photosynthesis limitations and isoprenoid emissions were investigated in two leaf types (mature and developing). Ni stress significantly decreased photosynthesis, and this effect depended on the leaf Ni content, which was lower in mature than in developing leaves. The main limitations to photosynthesis were attributed to mesophyll conductance and metabolism impairment. In Ni-stressed developing leaves, isoprene emission was significantly stimulated. We attribute such stimulation to the lower chloroplastic [CO2] than in control leaves. However chloroplastic [CO2] did not control isoprene emission in mature leaves. Ni stress induced the emission of cis-β-ocimene in mature leaves, and of linalool in both leaf types. Induced biosynthesis and emission of isoprenoids reveal the onset of antioxidant processes that may also contribute to reduce Ni stress, especially in mature poplar leaves. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Contribution of understorey vegetation and soil processes to boreal forest isoprenoid exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäki, Mari; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Hellén, Heidi; Bäck, Jaana

    2017-03-01

    Boreal forest floor emits biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from the understorey vegetation and the heterogeneous soil matrix, where the interactions of soil organisms and soil chemistry are complex. Earlier studies have focused on determining the net exchange of VOCs from the forest floor. This study goes one step further, with the aim of separately determining whether the photosynthesized carbon allocation to soil affects the isoprenoid production by different soil organisms, i.e., decomposers, mycorrhizal fungi, and roots. In each treatment, photosynthesized carbon allocation through roots for decomposers and mycorrhizal fungi was controlled by either preventing root ingrowth (50 µm mesh size) or the ingrowth of roots and fungi (1 µm mesh) into the soil volume, which is called the trenching approach. Isoprenoid fluxes were measured using dynamic (steady-state flow-through) chambers from the different treatments. This study aimed to analyze how important the understorey vegetation is as a VOC sink. Finally, a statistical model was constructed based on prevailing temperature, seasonality, trenching treatments, understory vegetation cover, above canopy photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil water content, and soil temperature to estimate isoprenoid fluxes. The final model included parameters with a statistically significant effect on the isoprenoid fluxes. The results show that the boreal forest floor emits monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and isoprene. Monoterpenes were the most common group of emitted isoprenoids, and the average flux from the non-trenched forest floor was 23 µg m-2 h-1. The results also show that different biological factors, including litterfall, carbon availability, biological activity in the soil, and physico-chemical processes, such as volatilization and absorption to the surfaces, are important at various times of the year. This study also discovered that understorey vegetation is a strong sink of monoterpenes. The

  3. Staphylococcus aureus mevalonate kinase: isolation and characterization of an enzyme of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Voynova, Natalya E; Rios, Sandra E; Miziorko, Henry M

    2004-01-01

    It has been proposed that isoprenoid biosynthesis in several gram-positive cocci depends on the mevalonate pathway for conversion of acetyl coenzyme A to isopentenyl diphosphate. Mevalonate kinase catalyzes a key reaction in this pathway. In this study the enzyme from Staphylococcus aureus was expressed in Escherichia coli, isolated in a highly purified form, and characterized. The overall amino acid sequence of this enzyme was very heterologous compared with the sequences of eukaryotic mevalonate kinases. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analytical gel filtration chromatography suggested that the native enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of approximately 33 kDa. The specific activity was 12 U/mg, and the pH optimum was 7.0 to 8.5. The apparent K(m) values for R,S-mevalonate and ATP were 41 and 339 micro M, respectively. There was substantial substrate inhibition at millimolar levels of mevalonate. The sensitivity to feedback inhibition by farnesyl diphosphate and its sulfur-containing analog, farnesyl thiodiphosphate, was characterized. These compounds were competitive inhibitors with respect to ATP; the K(i) values were 46 and 45 micro M for farnesyl diphosphate and its thio analog, respectively. Parallel measurements with heterologous eukaryotic mevalonate kinases indicated that S. aureus mevalonate kinase is much less sensitive to feedback inhibition (K(i) difference, 3 orders of magnitude) than the human enzyme. In contrast, both enzymes tightly bound trinitrophenyl-ATP, a fluorescent substrate analog, suggesting that there are similarities in structural features that are important for catalytic function.

  4. Isoprenoid drugs, biofuels, and chemicals--artemisinin, farnesene, and beyond.

    PubMed

    George, Kevin W; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Keasling, Jay D; Lee, Taek Soon

    2015-01-01

    Isoprenoids have been identified and used as natural pharmaceuticals, fragrances, solvents, and, more recently, advanced biofuels. Although isoprenoids are most commonly found in plants, researchers have successfully engineered both the eukaryotic and prokaryotic isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways to produce these valuable chemicals in microorganisms at high yields. The microbial synthesis of the precursor to artemisinin--an important antimalarial drug produced from the sweet wormwood Artemisia annua--serves as perhaps the most successful example of this approach. Through advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, microbial-derived semisynthetic artemisinin may soon replace plant-derived artemisinin as the primary source of this valuable pharmaceutical. The richness and diversity of isoprenoid structures also make them ideal candidates for advanced biofuels that may act as "drop-in" replacements for gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. Indeed, the sesquiterpenes farnesene and bisabolene, monoterpenes pinene and limonene, and hemiterpenes isopentenol and isopentanol have been evaluated as fuels or fuel precursors. As in the artemisinin project, these isoprenoids have been produced microbially through synthetic biology and metabolic engineering efforts. Here, we provide a brief review of the numerous isoprenoid compounds that have found use as pharmaceuticals, flavors, commodity chemicals, and, most importantly, advanced biofuels. In each case, we highlight the metabolic engineering strategies that were used to produce these compounds successfully in microbial hosts. In addition, we present a current outlook on microbial isoprenoid production, with an eye towards the many challenges that must be addressed to achieve higher yields and industrial-scale production.

  5. Hybrid isoprenoid secondary metabolite production in terrestrial and marine actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kelley A; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R

    2010-12-01

    Terpenoids are among the most ubiquitous and diverse secondary metabolites observed in nature. Although actinomycete bacteria are one of the primary sources of microbially derived secondary metabolites, they rarely produce compounds in this biosynthetic class. The terpenoid secondary metabolites that have been discovered from actinomycetes are often in the form of biosynthetic hybrids called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs). HIs include significant structural diversity and biological activity and thus are important targets for natural product discovery. Recent screening of marine actinomycetes has led to the discovery of a new lineage that is enriched in the production of biologically active HI secondary metabolites. These strains represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and provide unique opportunities to study the evolutionary history and ecological functions of an unusual group of secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Simultaneous production and partitioning of heterologous polyketide and isoprenoid natural products in an Escherichia coli two-phase bioprocess.

    PubMed

    Boghigian, Brett A; Myint, Melissa; Wu, Jiequn; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2011-11-01

    Natural products have long served as rich sources of drugs possessing a wide range of pharmacological activities. The discovery and development of natural product drug candidates is often hampered by the inability to efficiently scale and produce a molecule of interest, due to inherent qualities of the native producer. Heterologous biosynthesis in an engineering and process-friendly host emerged as an option to produce complex natural products. Escherichia coli has previously been utilized to produce complex precursors to two popular natural product drugs, erythromycin and paclitaxel. These two molecules represent two of the largest classes of natural products, polyketides and isoprenoids, respectively. In this study, we have developed a platform E. coli strain capable of simultaneous production of both product precursors at titers greater than 15 mg l(-1). The utilization of a two-phase batch bioreactor allowed for very strong in situ separation (having a partitioning coefficient of greater than 5,000), which would facilitate downstream purification processes. The system developed here could also be used in metagenomic studies to screen environmental DNA for natural product discovery and preliminary production experiments.

  7. Metabolic engineering for isoprenoid-based biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Phulara, S C

    2015-09-01

    Sustainable economic and industrial growth is the need of the hour and it requires renewable energy resources having better performance and compatibility with existing fuel infrastructure from biological routes. Isoprenoids (C ≥ 5) can be a potential alternative due to their diverse nature and physiochemical properties similar to that of petroleum based fuels. In the past decade, extensive research has been done to utilize metabolic engineering strategies in micro-organisms primarily, (i) to overcome the limitations associated with their natural and non-natural production and (ii) to develop commercially competent microbial strain for isoprenoid-based biofuel production. This review briefly describes the engineered isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways in well-characterized microbial systems for the production of several isoprenoid-based biofuels and fuel precursors.

  8. Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase affects isoprenoid pathway and cell wall organization in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Joanna; Kwapisz, Marta; Grabińska, Kariona; Orłowski, Jacek; Boguta, Magdalena; Palamarczyk, Grazyna; Zoładek, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Dimethylallyl diphosphate, an isomer of isopentenyl diphosphate, is a common substrate of Mod5p, a tRNA modifying enzyme, and the farnesyl diphosphate synthase Erg20p, the key enzyme of the isoprenoid pathway. rsp5 mutants, defective in the Rsp5 ubiquitin-protein ligase, were isolated and characterized as altering the mitochondrial/cytosolic distribution of Mod5p. To understand better how competition for the substrate determines the regulation at the molecular level, we analyzed the effect of the rsp5-13 mutation on Erg20p expression. The level of Erg20p was three times lower in rsp5-13 compared to the wild type strain and this effect was dependent on active Mod5p. Northern blot analysis indicated a regulatory role of Rsp5p in ERG20 transcription. ERG20 expression was also impaired in pkc1Delta lacking a component of the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Low expression of Erg20p in rsp5 cells was accompanied by low level of ergosterol, the main end product of the isoprenoid pathway. Additionally, rsp5 strains were resistant to nystatin, which binds to ergosterol present in the plasma membrane, and sensitive to calcofluor white, a drug destabilizing cell wall integrity by binding to chitin. Furthermore, the cell wall structure appeared abnormal in most rsp5-13 cells investigated by electron microscopy and chitin level in the cell wall was increased two-fold. These results indicate that Rsp5p affects the isoprenoid pathway which has important roles in ergosterol biosynthesis, protein glycosylation and transport and in this way may influence the composition of the plasma membrane and cell wall.

  9. Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunde

    2014-01-01

    lndole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most important natural auxin in plants, is mainly synthesized from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp). Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have unambiguously established the first complete Trp-dependent auxin biosynthesis pathway. The first chemical step of auxin biosynthesis is the removal of the amino group from Trp by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) family of transaminases to generate indole-3-pyruvate (IPA). IPA then undergoes oxidative decarboxylation catalyzed by the YUCCA (YUC) family of flavin monooxygenases to produce IAA. This two-step auxin biosynthesis pathway is highly conserved throughout the plant kingdom and is essential for almost all of the major developmental processes. The successful elucidation of a complete auxin biosynthesis pathway provides the necessary tools for effectively modulating auxin concentrations in plants with temporal and spatial precision. The progress in auxin biosynthesis also lays a foundation for understanding polar auxin transport and for dissecting auxin signaling mechanisms during plant development. PMID:24955076

  10. Terpenoid biosynthesis in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Boronat, Albert; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic organisms (archaea and eubacteria) are found in all habitats where life exists on our planet. This would not be possible without the astounding biochemical plasticity developed by such organisms. Part of the metabolic diversity of prokaryotes was transferred to eukaryotic cells when endosymbiotic prokaryotes became mitochondria and plastids but also in a large number of horizontal gene transfer episodes. A group of metabolites produced by all free-living organisms is terpenoids (also known as isoprenoids). In prokaryotes, terpenoids play an indispensable role in cell-wall and membrane biosynthesis (bactoprenol, hopanoids), electron transport (ubiquinone, menaquinone), or conversion of light into chemical energy (chlorophylls, bacteriochlorophylls, rhodopsins, carotenoids), among other processes. But despite their remarkable structural and functional diversity, they all derive from the same metabolic precursors. Here we describe the metabolic pathways producing these universal terpenoid units and provide a complete picture of the main terpenoid compounds found in prokaryotic organisms.

  11. Initiation of rubber biosynthesis: In vitro comparisons of benzophenone-modified diphosphate analogues in three rubber-producing species.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenshuang; McMahan, Colleen M; Degraw, Amanda J; Distefano, Mark D; Cornish, Katrina; Whalen, Maureen C; Shintani, David K

    2008-10-01

    Natural rubber, cis-1,4-polyisoprene, is a vital industrial material synthesized by plants via a side branch of the isoprenoid pathway by the enzyme rubber transferase. While the specific structure of this enzyme is not yet defined, based on activity it is probably a cis-prenyl transferase. Photoactive functionalized substrate analogues have been successfully used to identify isoprenoid-utilizing enzymes such as cis- and trans-prenyltransferases, and initiator binding of an allylic pyrophosphate molecule in rubber transferase has similar features to these systems. In this paper, a series of benzophenone-modified initiator analogues were shown to successfully initiate rubber biosynthesis in vitro in enzymatically-active washed rubber particles from Ficus elastica, Heveabrasiliensis and Parthenium argentatum. Rubber transferases from all three species initiated rubber biosynthesis most efficiently with farnesyl pyrophosphate. However, rubber transferase had a higher affinity for benzophenone geranyl pyrophosphate (Bz-GPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (Bz-DMAPP) analogues with ether-linkages than the corresponding GPP or DMAPP. In contrast, ester-linked Bz-DMAPP analogues were less efficient initiators than DMAPP. Thus, rubber biosynthesis depends on both the size and the structure of Bz-initiator molecules. Kinetic studies thereby inform selection of specific probes for covalent photolabeling of the initiator binding site of rubber transferase.

  12. Biosynthesis of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol: studies with groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.D.; Sastry, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) was investigated using groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) leaf discs and /sup 35/S-labeled precursors. (/sup 35/S)SO/sub 4/(2-) was actively taken up by the leaf discs and rapidly incorporated into SQDG. After 2 h, 1.5% of the (/sup 35/S)SO4(2-) added to the incubation medium was taken up, of which 28% was incorporated into SQDG. The methanol-water phases of the lipid extracts of the leaf discs were analyzed for the /sup 35/S-labeled intermediates. Up to 2 h of incubation, cysteic acid, 3-sulfopyruvate, 3-sulfolactate, 3-sulfolactaldehyde, and sulfoquinovose (SQ) which have been proposed as intermediates were not labeled. Only a negligible amount of radioactivity was observed in these compounds after incubation for 4 h and more. Addition of sodium molybdate inhibited the uptake of (/sup 35/S)SO/sub 4/(2-) as well as its incorporation into SQDG by the leaf discs, suggesting that 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate may be involved in the biosynthesis of SQDG. Addition of unlabeled cysteic acid to the incubation medium enhanced the uptake of (/sup 35/S)SO/sub 4/(2-) but did not affect its incorporation into SQDG. /sup 35/S-labeled cysteic acid was taken up by the leaf discs and metabolized to sulfoacetic acid but not incorporated into SQ or SQDG. These results show that cysteic acid is not an intermediate in SQDG biosynthesis. (/sup 35/S)SQ was taken up by the leaf discs and incorporated into SQDG in a time-dependent manner. (/sup 35/S)Sulfoquinovosylglycerol was also taken up by the leaf discs but not incorporated into SQDG. It is concluded that SQDG is not biosynthesized by the proposed sulfoglycolytic pathway in higher plants.

  13. Isoprenoid quinones and fatty acids of Zoogloea.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, A; Shin, Y K; Sugiyama, J; Komagata, K

    1992-04-01

    Nine Zoogloea strains including the type strain of Z. ramigera (IAM 12136 = ATCC 19544 = N.C. Dondero 106) and newly isolated strains were investigated for isoprenoid quinone composition and whole-cell fatty acid profiles. Seven of the tested strains, having phenotypic properties typical of Zoogloea, were characterized by their production of both ubiquinone-8 and rhodoquinone-8 as major quinones, whereas the remaining two strains, Z. ramigera IAM 12669 (= K. Crabtree I-16-M) and IAM 12670 (= P.R. Dugan 115), formed ubiquinone-10 and ubiquinone-8, respectively, as the sole quinone. All rhodoquinone-producing strains contained palmitoleic acid and 3-hydroxy-decanoic acid as the major components of nonpolar and hydroxylated fatty acids, respectively. Marked differences were noted in the fatty acid composition between the strains with and without rhodoquinones. The chemotaxonomic data suggested that the rhodoquinone-lacking strains should be excluded from the genus Zoogloea. Since there have been no reliable taxonomic tools for Zoogloea, rhodoquinone analysis may provide a new criterion of great promise for identifying Zoogloea strains.

  14. Negative Feedbacks by Isoprenoids on a Mevalonate Kinase Expressed in the Corpora Allata of Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Juvenile hormones (JH) regulate development and reproductive maturation in insects. JHs are synthesized through the mevalonate pathway (MVAP), an ancient metabolic pathway present in the three domains of life. Mevalonate kinase (MVK) is a key enzyme in the MVAP. MVK catalyzes the synthesis of phosphomevalonate (PM) by transferring the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP to the C5 hydroxyl oxygen of mevalonic acid (MA). Despite the importance of MVKs, these enzymes have been poorly characterized in insects. Results We functionally characterized an Aedes aegypti MVK (AaMVK) expressed in the corpora allata (CA) of the mosquito. AaMVK displayed its activity in the presence of metal cofactors. Different nucleotides were used by AaMVK as phosphoryl donors. In the presence of Mg2+, the enzyme has higher affinity for MA than ATP. The activity of AaMVK was regulated by feedback inhibition from long-chain isoprenoids, such as geranyl diphosphate (GPP) and farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). Conclusions AaMVK exhibited efficient inhibition by GPP and FPP (Ki less than 1 μM), and none by isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethyl allyl pyrophosphate (DPPM). These results suggest that GPP and FPP might act as physiological inhibitors in the synthesis of isoprenoids in the CA of mosquitoes. Changing MVK activity can alter the flux of precursors and therefore regulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis. PMID:26566274

  15. Pharmacokinetic and in vivo efficacy studies of the mycobactin biosynthesis inhibitor salicyl-AMS in mice.

    PubMed

    Lun, Shichun; Guo, Haidan; Adamson, John; Cisar, Justin S; Davis, Tony D; Chavadi, Sivagami Sundaram; Warren, J David; Quadri, Luis E N; Tan, Derek S; Bishai, William R

    2013-10-01

    Mycobactin biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis facilitates iron acquisition, which is required for growth and virulence. The mycobactin biosynthesis inhibitor salicyl-AMS [5'-O-(N-salicylsulfamoyl)adenosine] inhibits M. tuberculosis growth in vitro under iron-limited conditions. Here, we conducted a single-dose pharmacokinetic study and a monotherapy study of salicyl-AMS with mice. Intraperitoneal injection yielded much better pharmacokinetic parameter values than oral administration did. Monotherapy of salicyl-AMS at 5.6 or 16.7 mg/kg significantly inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in the mouse lung, providing the first in vivo proof of concept for this novel antibacterial strategy.

  16. The biosynthesis of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol: studies with groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) leaves.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S D; Sastry, P S

    1988-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) was investigated using groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) leaf discs and 35S-labeled precursors. [35S]SO4(2-) was actively taken up by the leaf discs and rapidly incorporated into SQDG. After 2 h, 1.5% of the [35S]SO4(2-) added to the incubation medium was taken up, of which 28% was incorporated into SQDG. The methanol-water phases of the lipid extracts of the leaf discs were analyzed for the 35S-labeled intermediates. Up to 2 h of incubation, cysteic acid, 3-sulfopyruvate, 3-sulfolactate, 3-sulfolactaldehyde, and sulfoquinovose (SQ) which have been proposed as intermediates [Davies et al. (1966) Biochem. J. 98, 369-373] were not labeled. Only a negligible amount of radioactivity was observed in these compounds after incubation for 4 h and more. Addition of sodium molybdate inhibited the uptake of [35S]SO4(2-) as well as its incorporation into SQDG by the leaf discs, suggesting that 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate may be involved in the biosynthesis of SQDG. Addition of unlabeled cysteic acid to the incubation medium enhanced the uptake of [35S]SO4(2-) but did not affect its incorporation into SQDG. 35S-labeled cysteic acid was taken up by the leaf discs and metabolized to sulfoacetic acid but not incorporated into SQ or SQDG. These results show that cysteic acid is not an intermediate in SQDG biosynthesis. [35S]SQ was taken up by the leaf discs and incorporated into SQDG in a time-dependent manner. [35S]Sulfoquinovosylglycerol was also taken up by the leaf discs but not incorporated into SQDG. It is concluded that SQDG is not biosynthesized by the proposed sulfoglycolytic pathway in higher plants. Though [35S]SQ was converted to SQDG, the rates are much lower compared to [35S]SO4(2-) incorporation, which suggests that a more direct pathway involving sulfonation of a lipid precursor may exist in higher plants.

  17. Closed pyrolyses of the isoprenoid algaenan of Botryococcus braunii, L race: geochemical implications for derived kerogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, F.; Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.

    1995-07-01

    Algaenans, i.e., highly aliphatic, nonhydrolysable, insoluble macromolecular constituents, have been identified in a number of microalga cell walls and their selective preservation shown to play a major role in the formation of numerous kerogens. All the algaenans so far examined comprise a network of long polymethylenic chains, except for the L race of Botryococcus braunii. The resistant macromolecular material isolated from the latter, termed PRB L, is based on C 40 isoprenoid chains with a lycopane-type skeleton. Recent comparative studies of PRB L and of Botryococcus-derived sediments provided the first example of kerogen formation via the selective preservation of an "isoprenoid" algaenan. The present study is concerned with PRB L pyrolyses in sealed gold tubes under various temperature/time conditions (260-350°C, 0.5-69 h). For the conversion rates thus obtained, ranging from 30 to 100%, a complete mass balance of the different families of pyrolysis products was established; most of the C 1 to C 40 pyrolysate constituents were identified and the abundances of the above compounds and their variations with conversion progress were determined. This study thus allowed us (1) to derive further information about PRB L chemical structure (location of the ether bridges, contribution of linear chains and their relationships with the C 40 isoprenoid ones), (2) to determine the behaviour of this isoprenoid algaenan to thermal stress (timing of the formation of the different groups of products then released, nature of the primary cleavages, origin and mode of formation of the secondary products, and further degradations), and (3) to show, in connection with previous studies, that PRB L-derived kerogens should exhibit pronounced differences relative to standard type I kerogens, the latter being based on polymethylenic chains, regarding not only the structure of the generated products but also the timing of oil generation (upward shift of the catagenesis zone).

  18. Closed pyrolyses of the isoprenoid algaenan of Botryococcus braunii, L race: Geochemical implications for derived kerogens

    SciTech Connect

    Behar, F.; Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.

    1995-07-01

    Algaenans, i.e, highly aliphatic, nonhydrolysable, insoluble macromolecular constituents, have been identified in a number of microalga cell walls and their selective preservation shown to play a major role in the formation of numerous kerogens. All the algaenans so far examined comprise a network of long polymethylenic chains, except for the L race of Botryococcus braunii. The resistant macromolecular material isolated from the latter, termed PRB L, is based on C{sub 40} isoprenoid chains with a lycopane-type skeleton. Recent comparative studies of PRB L and of Botryococcus-derived sediments provided the first example of kerogen formation via the selective preservation of an {open_quotes}isoprenoid{close_quotes} algaenan. The present study is concerned with PRB L pyrolyses in sealed gold tubes under various temperature/time conditions (260-350{degrees}C, 0.5-69 h). For the conversion rates thus obtained, ranging from 30 to 100%, a complete mass balance of the different families of pyrolysis products was established; most of the C{sub 1} to C{sub 40} pyrolysate constituents were identified and the abundances of the above compounds and their variations with conversion progress were determined. This study thus allowed us (1) to derive further information about PRB L chemical structure (location of the ether bridges, contribution to linear chains and their relationships with the C{sub 40} isoprenoid ones), (2) to determine the behaviour of this isoprenoid algaenan to thermal stress (timing of the formation of the secondary products, and further degradations), and (3) to show, in connection with previous studies, that PRB L-derived kerogens should exhibit pronounced differences relative to standard type I kerogens, the latter being based on polymethylenic chains, regarding not only the structure of the generated products but also the timing of oil generation (upward shift of the catagenesis zone).

  19. Isoprenoid Alcohols are Susceptible to Oxidation with Singlet Oxygen and Hydroxyl Radicals.

    PubMed

    Komaszylo Née Siedlecka, Joanna; Kania, Magdalena; Masnyk, Marek; Cmoch, Piotr; Lozinska, Iwona; Czarnocki, Zbigniew; Skorupinska-Tudek, Karolina; Danikiewicz, Witold; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2016-02-01

    Isoprenoids, as common constituents of all living cells, are exposed to oxidative agents--reactive oxygen species, for example, singlet oxygen or hydroxyl radicals. Despite this fact, products of oxidation of polyisoprenoids have never been characterized. In this study, chemical oxidation of isoprenoid alcohols (Prenol-2 and -10) was performed using singlet oxygen (generated in the presence of hydrogen peroxide/molybdate or upon photochemical reaction in the presence of porphyrin), oxygen (formed upon hydrogen peroxide dismutation) or hydroxyl radical (generated by the hydrogen peroxide/sonication, UV/titanium dioxide or UV/hydrogen peroxide) systems. The structure of the obtained products, hydroxy-, peroxy- and heterocyclic derivatives, was studied with the aid of mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Furthermore, mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization appeared to be a useful analytical tool to detect the products of oxidation of isoprenoids (ESI-MS analysis), as well as to establish their structure on the basis of the fragmentation spectra of selected ions (ESI-MS/MS analysis). Taken together, susceptibility of polyisoprenoid alcohols to various oxidizing agents was shown for the first time.

  20. Metabolite profiling identified methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate efflux as a limiting step in microbial isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kang; Zou, Ruiyang; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Too, Heng-Phon

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids are natural products that are all derived from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). These precursors are synthesized either by the mevalonate (MVA) pathway or the 1-Deoxy-D-Xylulose 5-Phosphate (DXP) pathway. Metabolic engineering of microbes has enabled overproduction of various isoprenoid products from the DXP pathway including lycopene, artemisinic acid, taxadiene and levopimaradiene. To date, there is no method to accurately measure all the DXP metabolic intermediates simultaneously so as to enable the identification of potential flux limiting steps. In this study, a solid phase extraction coupled with ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (SPE UPLC-MS) method was developed. This method was used to measure the DXP intermediates in genetically engineered E. coli. Unexpectedly, methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate (MEC) was found to efflux when certain enzymes of the pathway were over-expressed, demonstrating the existence of a novel competing pathway branch in the DXP metabolism. Guided by these findings, ispG was overexpressed and was found to effectively reduce the efflux of MEC inside the cells, resulting in a significant increase in downstream isoprenoid production. This study demonstrated the necessity to quantify metabolites enabling the identification of a hitherto unrecognized pathway and provided useful insights into rational design in metabolic engineering.

  1. Active isoprenoid pathway in the intra-erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum: presence of dolichols of 11 and 12 isoprene units.

    PubMed Central

    Couto, A S; Kimura, E A; Peres, V J; Uhrig, M L; Katzin, A M

    1999-01-01

    N-glycosylation of proteins is required for the intra-erythrocytic schizogony of Plasmodium falciparum. In eukaryotic cells, this process involves the transfer of oligosaccharides from a dolichyl pyrophosphate derivative to asparagine residues. We have identified dolichol, dolichyl phosphate and dolichyl pyrophosphate species of 11 and 12 isoprenoid residues by metabolic labelling with [(3)H]farnesyl pyrophosphate, [(3)H]geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate and [(14)C]acetate in the different intra-erythrocytic stages of P. falciparum. This is the first demonstration of short-chain dolichols in the phylum Apicomplexa. The results demonstrate the presence of an active isoprenoid pathway in the intra-erythrocytic stages of P. falciparum. Parasites treated with mevastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, show depressed biosynthesis of dolichol, dolichyl phosphate and isoprenoid pyrophosphate. This effect is observed in all intra-erythrocytic stages of the parasite life cycle, but is most pronounced in the ring stage. N-linked glycosylation of proteins was inhibited in the ring and young-trophozoite stages after mevastatin treatment of parasite cultures. Therefore the isoprenoid pathway may represent a different approach to the development of new anti-malarial drugs. PMID:10417326

  2. Volatile isoprenoid constituents of fruits, vegetables and herbs cumulatively suppress the proliferation of murine B16 melanoma and human HL-60 leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Tatman, Dana; Mo, Huanbiao

    2002-01-25

    Substantial evidence from epidemiological studies supports the inverse association between the intake of fruits, vegetables and other plant products and cancer incidence. Cancer-preventive constituents of fruits and vegetables may inhibit carcinogen activation, enhance carcinogen detoxification, prevent carcinogens from interacting with critical target sites, or impede tumor progression. These activities, however, are achievable only when levels of individual bioactive constituents reach beyond those attainable from a normal balanced diet. Isoprenoids, a broad class of mevalonate-derived phytochemicals ubiquitous in the plant kingdom, suppress the proliferation of tumor cells and the growth of implanted tumors. A search for volatile isoprenoid constituents of food products spanning seven plant families identified 179 isoprenoids. Of these, 41 purchased from commercial sources were screened for efficacy in suppressing the proliferation of murine B16 melanoma cells. Individual isoprenoids suppressed the proliferation of B16 and HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells with varying degrees of potency. Cell cycle arrest at the G(0)-G(1) phase and apoptosis account, at least in part, for the suppression. Blends of isoprenoids suppressed B16 and HL-60 cell proliferation with efficacies equal to the sum of the individual impacts. These findings suggest that the cancer-protective property of fruits, vegetables, and related products is partly conferred by the cumulative impact of volatile isoprenoid constituents.

  3. The emission factor of volatile isoprenoids: stress, acclimation, and developmental responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinemets, Ü.; Arneth, A.; Kuhn, U.; Monson, R. K.; Peñuelas, J.; Staudt, M.

    2010-03-01

    Volatile isoprenoid emission rate from plants is driven by plant emission capacity under specified environmental conditions (ES, the emission factor) and by responsiveness of the emissions to instantaneous variations in environment. In models of isoprenoid emission, ES has been often considered as intrinsic species-specific constant invariable in time and space. Here we analyze the variations in species-specific values of ES under field conditions focusing on biotic and abiotic stresses, past environmental conditions and developmental processes. The reviewed studies highlight strong stress-driven (effects of abiotic and biotic stresses), adaptive (previous temperature and light environment and growth CO2 concentration) and developmental (leaf age) variations in ES values. These biological factors can alter species-specific ES values by more than an order of magnitude. Recent models are including some of these biological sources of variation to some degree, while the majority of models based on early concepts still ignore these important sources of variation. This analysis emphasizes the need to include more biological realism in the isoprenoid emission models and also highlights the gaps in knowledge that require further experimental work for mechanistic consideration of ES variation in models.

  4. The emission factor of volatile isoprenoids: stress, acclimation, and developmental responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinemets, Ü.; Arneth, A.; Kuhn, U.; Monson, R. K.; Peñuelas, J.; Staudt, M.

    2010-07-01

    The rate of constitutive isoprenoid emissions from plants is driven by plant emission capacity under specified environmental conditions (ES, the emission factor) and by responsiveness of the emissions to instantaneous variations in environment. In models of isoprenoid emission, ES has been often considered as intrinsic species-specific constant invariable in time and space. Here we analyze the variations in species-specific values of ES under field conditions focusing on abiotic stresses, past environmental conditions and developmental processes. The reviewed studies highlight strong stress-driven, adaptive (previous temperature and light environment and growth CO2 concentration) and developmental (leaf age) variations in ES values operating at medium to long time scales. These biological factors can alter species-specific ES values by more than an order of magnitude. While the majority of models based on early concepts still ignore these important sources of variation, recent models are including some of the medium- to long-term controls. However, conceptually different strategies are being used for incorporation of these longer-term controls with important practical implications for parameterization and application of these models. This analysis emphasizes the need to include more biological realism in the isoprenoid emission models and also highlights the gaps in knowledge that require further experimental work to reduce the model uncertainties associated with biological sources of variation.

  5. Phylogenetic Study of Polyketide Synthases and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Mycotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Antonia; Ferrara, Massimo; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Polyketide synthase (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPSs) are large multimodular enzymes involved in biosynthesis of polyketide and peptide toxins produced by fungi. Furthermore, hybrid enzymes, in which a reducing PKS region is fused to a single NRPS module, are also responsible of the synthesis of peptide-polyketide metabolites in fungi. The genes encoding for PKSs and NRPSs have been exposed to complex evolutionary mechanisms, which have determined the great number and diversity of metabolites. In this study, we considered the most important polyketide and peptide mycotoxins and, for the first time, a phylogenetic analysis of both PKSs and NRPSs involved in their biosynthesis was assessed using two domains for each enzyme: β-ketosynthase (KS) and acyl-transferase (AT) for PKSs; adenylation (A) and condensation (C) for NRPSs. The analysis of both KS and AT domains confirmed the differentiation of the three classes of highly, partially and non-reducing PKSs. Hybrid PKS-NRPSs involved in mycotoxins biosynthesis grouped together in the phylogenetic trees of all the domains analyzed. For most mycotoxins, the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes from distinct fungal species grouped together, except for PKS and NRPS involved in ochratoxin A biosynthesis, for which an unlike process of evolution could be hypothesized in different species. PMID:23604065

  6. Cloning and characterization of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase from the highly branched isoprenoid producing diatom Rhizosolenia setigera

    PubMed Central

    Ferriols, Victor Marco Emmanuel N.; Yaginuma, Ryoko; Adachi, Masao; Takada, Kentaro; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Okada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The diatom Rhizosolenia setigera Brightwell produces highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) hydrocarbons that are ubiquitously present in marine environments. The hydrocarbon composition of R. setigera varies between C25 and C30 HBIs depending on the life cycle stage with regard to auxosporulation. To better understand how these hydrocarbons are biosynthesized, we characterized the farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthase (FPPS) enzyme of R. setigera. An isolated 1465-bp cDNA clone contained an open reading frame spanning 1299-bp encoding a protein with 432 amino acid residues. Expression of the RsFPPS cDNA coding region in Escherichia coli produced a protein that exhibited FPPS activity in vitro. A reduction in HBI content from diatoms treated with an FPPS inhibitor, risedronate, suggested that RsFPPS supplies precursors for HBI biosynthesis. Product analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry also revealed that RsFPPS produced small amounts of the cis-isomers of geranyl pyrophosphate and FPP, candidate precursors for the cis-isomers of HBIs previously characterized. Furthermore, RsFPPS gene expression at various life stages of R. setigera in relation to auxosporulation were also analyzed. Herein, we present data on the possible role of RsFPPS in HBI biosynthesis, and it is to our knowledge the first instance that an FPPS was cloned and characterized from a diatom. PMID:25996801

  7. Cloning and characterization of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase from the highly branched isoprenoid producing diatom Rhizosolenia setigera.

    PubMed

    Ferriols, Victor Marco Emmanuel N; Yaginuma, Ryoko; Adachi, Masao; Takada, Kentaro; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Okada, Shigeru

    2015-05-21

    The diatom Rhizosolenia setigera Brightwell produces highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) hydrocarbons that are ubiquitously present in marine environments. The hydrocarbon composition of R. setigera varies between C25 and C30 HBIs depending on the life cycle stage with regard to auxosporulation. To better understand how these hydrocarbons are biosynthesized, we characterized the farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthase (FPPS) enzyme of R. setigera. An isolated 1465-bp cDNA clone contained an open reading frame spanning 1299-bp encoding a protein with 432 amino acid residues. Expression of the RsFPPS cDNA coding region in Escherichia coli produced a protein that exhibited FPPS activity in vitro. A reduction in HBI content from diatoms treated with an FPPS inhibitor, risedronate, suggested that RsFPPS supplies precursors for HBI biosynthesis. Product analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry also revealed that RsFPPS produced small amounts of the cis-isomers of geranyl pyrophosphate and FPP, candidate precursors for the cis-isomers of HBIs previously characterized. Furthermore, RsFPPS gene expression at various life stages of R. setigera in relation to auxosporulation were also analyzed. Herein, we present data on the possible role of RsFPPS in HBI biosynthesis, and it is to our knowledge the first instance that an FPPS was cloned and characterized from a diatom.

  8. Seasonality of isoprenoid emissions from a primary rainforest in central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Eliane G.; Jardine, Kolby; Tota, Julio; Jardine, Angela; Yãnez-Serrano, Ana Maria; Karl, Thomas; Tavares, Julia; Nelson, Bruce; Gu, Dasa; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Martin, Scot; Artaxo, Paulo; Manzi, Antonio; Guenther, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Tropical rainforests are an important source of isoprenoid and other volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions to the atmosphere. The seasonal variation of these compounds is however still poorly understood. In this study, vertical profiles of mixing ratios of isoprene, total monoterpenes and total sesquiterpenes, were measured within and above the canopy, in a primary rainforest in central Amazonia, using a proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Fluxes of these compounds from the canopy into the atmosphere were estimated from PTR-MS measurements by using an inverse Lagrangian transport model. Measurements were carried out continuously from September 2010 to January 2011, encompassing the dry and wet seasons. Mixing ratios were higher during the dry (isoprene - 2.68 ± 0.9 ppbv, total monoterpenes - 0.67 ± 0.3 ppbv; total sesquiterpenes - 0.09 ± 0.07 ppbv) than the wet season (isoprene - 1.66 ± 0.9 ppbv, total monoterpenes - 0.47 ± 0.2 ppbv; total sesquiterpenes - 0.03 ± 0.02 ppbv) for all compounds. Ambient air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) behaved similarly. Daytime isoprene and total monoterpene mixing ratios were highest within the canopy, rather than near the ground or above the canopy. By comparison, daytime total sesquiterpene mixing ratios were highest near the ground. Daytime fluxes varied significantly between seasons for all compounds. The maximums for isoprene (2.53 ± 0.5 µmol m-2 h-1) and total monoterpenes (1.77 ± 0.05 µmol m-2 h-1) were observed in the late dry season, whereas the maximum for total sesquiterpenes was found during the dry-to-wet transition season (0.77 ± 0.1 µmol m-2 h-1). These flux estimates suggest that the canopy is the main source of isoprenoids emitted into the atmosphere for all seasons. However, uncertainties in turbulence parameterization near the ground could affect estimates of fluxes that come from the ground. Leaf phenology seemed to be an important driver of seasonal

  9. Electrochemical measurement of lateral diffusion coefficients of ubiquinones and plastoquinones of various isoprenoid chain lengths incorporated in model bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Marchal, D; Boireau, W; Laval, J M; Moiroux, J; Bourdillon, C

    1998-01-01

    The long-range diffusion coefficients of isoprenoid quinones in a model of lipid bilayer were determined by a method avoiding fluorescent probe labeling of the molecules. The quinone electron carriers were incorporated in supported dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine layers at physiological molar fractions (<3 mol%). The elaborate bilayer template contained a built-in gold electrode at which the redox molecules solubilized in the bilayer were reduced or oxidized. The lateral diffusion coefficient of a natural quinone like UQ10 or PQ9 was 2.0 +/- 0.4 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) at 30 degrees C, two to three times smaller than the diffusion coefficient of a lipid analog in the same artificial bilayer. The lateral mobilities of the oxidized or reduced forms could be determined separately and were found to be identical in the 4-13 pH range. For a series of isoprenoid quinones, UQ2 or PQ2 to UQ10, the diffusion coefficient exhibited a marked dependence on the length of the isoprenoid chain. The data fit very well the quantitative behavior predicted by a continuum fluid model in which the isoprenoid chains are taken as rigid particles moving in the less viscous part of the bilayer and rubbing against the more viscous layers of lipid heads. The present study supports the concept of a homogeneous pool of quinone located in the less viscous region of the bilayer. PMID:9545054

  10. Cholesterol biosynthesis and ER stress in peroxisome deficiency.

    PubMed

    Faust, Phyllis L; Kovacs, Werner J

    2014-03-01

    Cholesterol biosynthesis is a multi-step process involving more than 20 enzymes in several subcellular compartments. The pre-squalene segment of the cholesterol/isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway is localized in peroxisomes. This review intends to highlight recent findings illustrating the important role peroxisomes play in cholesterol biosynthesis and maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. Disruption of the Pex2 gene leads to peroxisome deficiency and widespread metabolic dysfunction. The Pex2(-/-) mouse model for Zellweger syndrome enabled us to evaluate the role of peroxisomes in cholesterol biosynthesis. These studies have shown that Pex2(-/-) mice exhibit low levels of cholesterol in plasma and liver. Pex2(-/-) mice were unable to maintain normal cholesterol homeostasis despite activation of SREBP-2, the master transcriptional regulator of cholesterol biosynthesis, and increased protein levels and activities of cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes. The SREBP-2 pathway remained activated even after normalization of hepatic cholesterol levels in response to bile acid feeding as well as in extrahepatic tissues and the liver of neonatal and longer surviving Pex2 mutants, where cholesterol levels were normal. Several studies have shown that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress can dysregulate lipid metabolism via SREBP activation independently of intracellular cholesterol concentration. We demonstrated that peroxisome deficiency activates endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways in Pex2(-/-) mice, especially the integrated stress response mediated by PERK and ATF4 signaling, and thereby leads to dysregulation of the SREBP-2 pathway. Our findings suggest that functional peroxisomes are necessary to prevent chronic ER stress and dysregulation of the endogenous sterol response pathway. The constitutive activation of ER stress pathways might contribute to organ pathology and metabolic dysfunction in peroxisomal disorder patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  11. An E. coli-based bioengineering strategy to study Streptolysin S biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Markley, Andrew L.; Jensen, Emily R.; Lee, Shaun W.

    2011-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is a leading human pathogen that produces a powerful cytolytic bacteriocin known as Streptolysin S (SLS). We have developed a bioengineering strategy to successfully reconstitute SLS activity using heterologous expression in lab strains of E. coli. Our E. coli-based heterologous expression system will allow more detailed studies into the biosynthesis of other bacteriocin compounds, and the production of these natural products in much greater yield. PMID:22001374

  12. Probing phosphorylation by non-mammalian isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes using (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Ananya; Shah, Meha H; Bitok, J Kipchirchir; Hassis-LeBeau, Maria E; Freel Meyers, Caren L

    2009-09-01

    The biogenesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) is accomplished by the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway in plants, bacteria and parasites, making it a potential target for the development of anti-infective agents and herbicides. The biosynthetic enzymes comprising this pathway catalyze intriguing chemical transformations on diphosphate scaffolds, offering an opportunity to generate novel analogs in this synthetically challenging compound class. Such a biosynthetic approach to generating new diphosphate analogs may involve transformation through discrete diphosphate species, presenting unique challenges in structure determination and characterization of unnatural enzyme-generated diphosphate products produced in tandem. We have developed (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation NMR spectroscopy techniques for the direct characterization of crude MEP pathway enzyme products at low concentrations (200 microM to 5 mM) on a room temperature (non-cryogenic) NMR probe. Coupling the 100% natural abundance of the (31)P nucleus with the high intrinsic sensitivity of proton NMR, (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation spectroscopy is particularly useful for characterization of unnatural diphosphate enzyme products in the MEP pathway. As proof of principle, we demonstrate the rapid characterization of natural enzyme products of the enzymes IspD, E and F in tandem enzyme incubations. In addition, we have characterized several unnatural enzyme products using this technique, including new products of cytidyltransferase IspD bearing erythritol, glycerol and ribose components. The results of this study indicate that IspD may be a useful biocatalyst and highlight (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation spectroscopy as a valuable tool for the characterization of other unnatural products in non-mammalian isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  13. Revealing Nature’s Synthetic Potential Through the Study of Ribosomal Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Kyle L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a rapidly growing class of natural products with diverse structures and activities. In recent years, a great deal of progress has been made in elucidating the biosynthesis of various RiPP family members. As with the study of nonribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthetic enzymes, these investigations have led to the discovery of entirely new biological chemistry. With each unique enzyme investigated, a more complex picture of Nature’s synthetic potential is revealed. This review focuses on recent reports (since 2008) that have changed the way that we think about ribosomal natural product biosynthesis and the enzymology of complex bond-forming reactions. PMID:23286465

  14. Fuel alcohol biosynthesis by Zymomonas anaerobia: optimization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaric, N.; Ong, S.L.; Davnjak, Z.

    1982-03-01

    The optimum operating conditions for growth and ethanol production of Zymomonas anaerobia ATCC 29501 were established. The optimum pH range and temperature were found to be 5.0-6.0 and 35/sup 0/C, respectively. Based on the results obtained from the temperature optimization study, an Arrhenius-type temperature relationship for the specific growth rate was developed. The growth and ethanol production of this microbe also have been optimized in terms of concentrations of glucose, essential nutrients, and minerals. With optimum medium and operating conditions, an ethanol concentration of 96 g/L was obtained in 23h. Both growth and ethanol yield coefficients in dependence on initial glucose concentrations were determined.

  15. Agrobacterium rhizogenes: Transformed root cultures for the study of polyacetylene metabolism and biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, Y.Y.

    1988-02-01

    Biologically active polyacetylenes are produced at low levels by the roots of members of the Coreopsidinae subtribe in the Asteraceae. Ten taxa of Coreopsis and Bidens were tranformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes Strain A/sub 4/ and hairy root cultures established. These cultures grew rapidly and produced the same arrays of polyacetylenes as intact roots. The use of transformed roots for the study of polyacetylene biosynthesis is described in this paper. The engineering of plants with resistance to herbicides is now a practical reality because there are economic, intellectual and environmental incentives for using recombinant DNA technology in crop improvement programs, and because the biochemical and genetic basis for herbicide resistance is a simple trait conferred by a single gene. The transformation of plants with genes conferring resistance to insects or disease is more daunting, however, as biologically active secondary metabolites such as some alkaloids are typically products of multienzyme reactions. Photoactive polyacetylenes are probably plant defense chemicals and they are derived by a sequence of desaturation steps from oleic acid, which occurs ubiquitously in higher plants. Although the acetylene pathway may encompass as many genetic messages as those for morphine biosynthesis, it is likley that the genes controlling the biosynthesis of polyacetylenes may be isolated, identified in the near future and transferred via Agrobacterium to economically important plants susceptible to pathogen attack. 58 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Microbial Production of Isoprenoids Enabled by Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Immethun, Cheryl M.; Hoynes-O’Connor, Allison G.; Balassy, Andrea; Moon, Tae Seok

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms transform inexpensive carbon sources into highly functionalized compounds without toxic by-product generation or significant energy consumption. By redesigning the natural biosynthetic pathways in an industrially suited host, microbial cell factories can produce complex compounds for a variety of industries. Isoprenoids include many medically important compounds such as antioxidants and anticancer and antimalarial drugs, all of which have been produced microbially. While a biosynthetic pathway could be simply transferred to the production host, the titers would become economically feasible when it is rationally designed, built, and optimized through synthetic biology tools. These tools have been implemented by a number of research groups, with new tools pledging further improvements in yields and expansion to new medically relevant compounds. This review focuses on the microbial production of isoprenoids for the health industry and the advancements though synthetic biology. PMID:23577007

  17. Growth regulating properties of isoprene and isoprenoid-based essential oils.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew Maxwell P; Shukla, Mukund R; Sherif, Sherif M; Brown, Paula B; Saxena, Praveen K

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils have growth regulating properties comparable to the well-documented methyl jasmonate and may be involved in localized and/or airborne plant communication. Aromatic plants employ large amounts of resources to produce essential oils. Some essential oils are known to contain compounds with plant growth regulating activities. However, the potential capacity of essential oils as airborne molecules able to modulate plant growth/development has remained uninvestigated. Here, we demonstrate that essential oils from eight taxonomically diverse plants applied in their airborne state inhibited auxin-induced elongation of Pisum sativum hypocotyls and Avena sativa coleoptiles. This response was also observed using five monoterpenes commonly found in essential oils as well as isoprene, the basic building block of terpenes. Upon transfer to ambient conditions, A. sativa coleoptiles resumed elongation, demonstrating an antagonistic relationship rather than toxicity. Inclusion of essential oils, monoterpenes, or isoprene into the headspace of culture vessels induced abnormal cellular growth along hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana. These responses were also elicited by methyl jasmonate (MeJA); however, where methyl jasmonate inhibited root growth essential oils did not. Gene expression studies in A. thaliana also demonstrated differences between the MeJA and isoprenoid responses. This series of experiments clearly demonstrate that essential oils and their isoprenoid components interact with endogenous plant growth regulators when applied directly or as volatile components in the headspace. The similarities between isoprenoid and MeJA responses suggest that they may act in plant defence signalling. While further studies are needed to determine the ecological and evolutionary significance, the results of this study and the specialized anatomy associated with aromatic plants suggest that essential oils may act as airborne signalling molecules.

  18. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons produced by thermal alteration of Nostoc muscorum and Rhodopseudomonas spheroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philp, R. P.; Brown, S.; Calvin, M.

    1978-01-01

    The potential of algae and photosynthetic bacteria to serve as precursors of kerogen was studied to determine what factors affect the relative rates of formation of precursor hydrocarbons. Cells of Nostoc muscorum and Rhodopseudomonas spheroides were subjected to thermal alteration (by heating samples in glass tubes sealed under nitrogen) for two, four, and twelve weeks. Both unextracted and extracted cells in the absence and presence of montmorillonite were investigated, and the isoprenoid hydrocarbons produced in these experiments were determined. Phytane and five isomeric phytenes were the main hydrocarbons observed; their relative rates of formation in the different experimental conditions are described. No phytadienes, pristane, or pristenes were detected.

  19. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons produced by thermal alteration of Nostoc muscorum and Rhodopseudomonas spheroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philp, R. P.; Brown, S.; Calvin, M.

    1978-01-01

    The potential of algae and photosynthetic bacteria to serve as precursors of kerogen was studied to determine what factors affect the relative rates of formation of precursor hydrocarbons. Cells of Nostoc muscorum and Rhodopseudomonas spheroides were subjected to thermal alteration (by heating samples in glass tubes sealed under nitrogen) for two, four, and twelve weeks. Both unextracted and extracted cells in the absence and presence of montmorillonite were investigated, and the isoprenoid hydrocarbons produced in these experiments were determined. Phytane and five isomeric phytenes were the main hydrocarbons observed; their relative rates of formation in the different experimental conditions are described. No phytadienes, pristane, or pristenes were detected.

  20. Over-expression of DXS gene enhances terpenoidal secondary metabolite accumulation in rose-scented geranium and Withania somnifera: active involvement of plastid isoprenogenic pathway in their biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jadaun, Jyoti Singh; Sangwan, Neelam S; Narnoliya, Lokesh K; Singh, Neha; Bansal, Shilpi; Mishra, Bhawana; Sangwan, Rajender Singh

    2017-04-01

    Rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium spp.) is one of the most important aromatic plants and is well known for its diverse perfumery uses. Its economic importance is due to presence of fragrance rich essential oil in its foliage. The essential oil is a mixture of various volatile phytochemicals which are mainly terpenes (isoprenoids) in nature. In this study, on the geranium foliage genes related to isoprenoid biosynthesis (DXS, DXR and HMGR) were isolated, cloned and confirmed by sequencing. Further, the first gene of 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (GrDXS), was made full length by using rapid amplification of cDNA ends strategy. GrDXS contained a 2157 bp open reading frame that encoded a polypeptide of 792 amino acids having calculated molecular weight 77.5 kDa. This study is first report on heterologous expression and kinetic characterization of any gene from this economically important plant. Expression analysis of these genes was performed in different tissues as well as at different developmental stages of leaves. In response to external elicitors, such as methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, light and wounding, all the three genes showed differential expression profiles. Further GrDXS was over expressed in the homologous (rose-scented geranium) as well as in heterologous (Withania somnifera) plant systems through genetic transformation approach. The over-expression of GrDXS led to enhanced secondary metabolites production (i.e. essential oil in rose-scented geranium and withanolides in W. somnifera). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the expression profile of the three genes related to isoprenoid biosynthesis pathways operated in rose-scented geranium as well as functional characterization study of any gene from rose-scented geranium through a genetic transformation system.

  1. A comparative modeling and molecular docking study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fakhar, Zeynab; Naiker, Suhashni; Alves, Claudio N; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Lameira, Jeronimo; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Kruger, Hendrik G; Honarparvar, Bahareh

    2016-11-01

    An alarming rise of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and the continuous high global morbidity of tuberculosis have reinvigorated the need to identify novel targets to combat the disease. The enzymes that catalyze the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan in M. tuberculosis are essential and noteworthy therapeutic targets. In this study, the biochemical function and homology modeling of MurI, MurG, MraY, DapE, DapA, Alr, and Ddl enzymes of the CDC1551 M. tuberculosis strain involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan cell wall are reported. Generation of the 3D structures was achieved with Modeller 9.13. To assess the structural quality of the obtained homology modeled targets, the models were validated using PROCHECK, PDBsum, QMEAN, and ERRAT scores. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate root mean square deviation (RMSD) and radius of gyration (Rg) of MurI and MurG target proteins and their corresponding templates. For further model validation, RMSD and Rg for selected targets/templates were investigated to compare the close proximity of their dynamic behavior in terms of protein stability and average distances. To identify the potential binding mode required for molecular docking, binding site information of all modeled targets was obtained using two prediction algorithms. A docking study was performed for MurI to determine the potential mode of interaction between the inhibitor and the active site residues. This study presents the first accounts of the 3D structural information for the selected M. tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  2. Asparagus Spears as a Model to Study Heteroxylan Biosynthesis during Secondary Wall Development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Aimin; Picard, Kelsey; Lampugnani, Edwin R.; Cheetamun, Roshan; Beahan, Cherie; Cassin, Andrew; Lonsdale, Andrew; Doblin, Monika S.; Bacic, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a commercially important crop species utilized for its excellent source of vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber. However, after harvest the tissue hardens and its quality rapidly deteriorates because spear cell walls become rigidified due to lignification and substantial increases in heteroxylan content. This latter observation prompted us to investigate the in vitro xylan xylosyltransferase (XylT) activity in asparagus. The current model system for studying heteroxylan biosynthesis, Arabidopsis, whilst a powerful genetic system, displays relatively low xylan XylT activity in in vitro microsomal preparations compared with garden asparagus therefore hampering our ability to study the molecular mechanism(s) of heteroxylan assembly. Here, we analyzed physiological and biochemical changes of garden asparagus spears stored at 4 °C after harvest and detected a high level of xylan XylT activity that accounts for this increased heteroxylan. The xylan XylT catalytic activity is at least thirteen-fold higher than that reported for previously published species, including Arabidopsis and grasses. A biochemical assay was optimized and up to seven successive Xyl residues were incorporated to extend the xylotetraose (Xyl4) acceptor backbone. To further elucidate the xylan biosynthesis mechanism, we used RNA-seq to generate an Asparagus reference transcriptome and identified five putative xylan biosynthetic genes (AoIRX9, AoIRX9-L, AoIRX10, AoIRX14_A, AoIRX14_B) with AoIRX9 having an expression profile that is distinct from the other genes. We propose that Asparagus provides an ideal biochemical system to investigate the biochemical aspects of heteroxylan biosynthesis and also offers the additional benefit of being able to study the lignification process during plant stem maturation. PMID:25894575

  3. Asparagus Spears as a Model to Study Heteroxylan Biosynthesis during Secondary Wall Development.

    PubMed

    Song, Lili; Zeng, Wei; Wu, Aimin; Picard, Kelsey; Lampugnani, Edwin R; Cheetamun, Roshan; Beahan, Cherie; Cassin, Andrew; Lonsdale, Andrew; Doblin, Monika S; Bacic, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a commercially important crop species utilized for its excellent source of vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber. However, after harvest the tissue hardens and its quality rapidly deteriorates because spear cell walls become rigidified due to lignification and substantial increases in heteroxylan content. This latter observation prompted us to investigate the in vitro xylan xylosyltransferase (XylT) activity in asparagus. The current model system for studying heteroxylan biosynthesis, Arabidopsis, whilst a powerful genetic system, displays relatively low xylan XylT activity in in vitro microsomal preparations compared with garden asparagus therefore hampering our ability to study the molecular mechanism(s) of heteroxylan assembly. Here, we analyzed physiological and biochemical changes of garden asparagus spears stored at 4 °C after harvest and detected a high level of xylan XylT activity that accounts for this increased heteroxylan. The xylan XylT catalytic activity is at least thirteen-fold higher than that reported for previously published species, including Arabidopsis and grasses. A biochemical assay was optimized and up to seven successive Xyl residues were incorporated to extend the xylotetraose (Xyl4) acceptor backbone. To further elucidate the xylan biosynthesis mechanism, we used RNA-seq to generate an Asparagus reference transcriptome and identified five putative xylan biosynthetic genes (AoIRX9, AoIRX9-L, AoIRX10, AoIRX14_A, AoIRX14_B) with AoIRX9 having an expression profile that is distinct from the other genes. We propose that Asparagus provides an ideal biochemical system to investigate the biochemical aspects of heteroxylan biosynthesis and also offers the additional benefit of being able to study the lignification process during plant stem maturation.

  4. Remote sensing of plant emissions of volatile isoprenoids with PRI. Prospects for upscaling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penuelas, J.

    2013-12-01

    Josep Peñuelas*1,2, Giovanni Marino1,2,3,4, Joan LLusia1,2, Catherine Morfopoulos1,2,5, Gerard Farre-Armengol1,2, Shawn Kefauver, Alex Guenther6 , Francesca Rapparini7 , Roger Seco1,2,6, Marc Estiarte1,2, Mónica Mejia-Chang1,2, Romà Ogaya1,2, Jordi Sardans1,2 , Andrew Turnipseed6, Peter Harley6, Osvaldo Facini7, Rita Baraldi7, Jim Greenberg6 , Iolanda Filella1,2 1 CSIC, Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CEAB-UAB, Cerdanyola del Vallés 08193, Catalonia, Spain 2 CREAF, Cerdanyola del Vallés 08193, Catalonia, Spain 3 Dipartimento di Bioscienze e Territorio, Università degli Studi del Molise, Contrada Fonte Lappone, 86090 Pesche (IS), Italy 4 Institute for Plant Protection, National Research Council, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI), Italy 5 Division of Ecology and Evolution, Imperial College, Silwood Park, Ascot, SL5 7PY, UK 6 Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000, USA 7 Biometeorology Institute, IBIMET-CNR, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna, Italy Abstract Terrestrial plants re-emit around 1-2% of the carbon they fix as isoprene and monoterpenes. These emissions play major roles in the ecological relationships among living organisms and in atmospheric chemistry and climate, and yet their actual quantification at the ecosystem level in different regions is far from being resolved. Phenomenological models are used to estimate the emission rates, but the limited understanding of the function and regulation of these emissions leads to large uncertainties in such estimations. Many measurements have been made at the foliar but few at the ecosystem level, and those that do exist are limited in space and time. We here provide evidence that a simple remote sensing index, the photochemical reflectance index (PRI), which is indicative of light use efficiency (LUE), is a good indirect estimator of foliar isoprenoid emissions and therefore can be used to sense them remotely. These results open

  5. Chemistry and biosynthesis of isoprenylated flavonoids from Japanese mulberry tree

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Taro; Hano, Yoshio; Fukai, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    Many isoprenylated flavonoids have been isolated from Japanese mulberry tree (Moraceae). Among them, kuwanons G (1) and H (2) were the first isolated active substances exhibiting a hypotensive effect. These compounds are considered to be formed through an enzymatic Diels-Alder type reaction between an isoprenyl portion of an isoprenylphenol as the diene and an α, β-double bond of chalcone as the dienophile. The absolute configurations of these Diels-Alder type adducts were confirmed by three different methods. The stereochemistries of the adducts were consistent with those of ones in the Diels-Alder reaction involving exo- and endo-addition. Some strains of Morus alba callus tissues have a high productivity of mulberry Diels-Alder type adducts, such as chalcomoracin (3) and kuwanon J (4). The biosynthetic studies of the mulberry Diels-Alder type adducts have been carried out with the aid of the cell strain. Chalcomoracin (3) and kuwanon J (4) were proved to be enzymatic Diels-Alder type reaction products by the administration experiments with O-methylchalcone derivatives. Furthermore, for the isoprenoid biosynthesis of prenylflavonoids in Morus alba callus tissues by administration of [1,3-13C2]- and [2-13C]-glycerol, a novel way through the junction of glycolysis and pentose-phosphate cycle was proved. Two independent isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways, that for sterols and that for isoprenoidphenols, operate in the Morus alba cell cultures. The former is susceptible to compactin (ML-236) and the latter resists to compactin in the cell cultures, respectively. PMID:19907125

  6. Studies of astaxanthin biosynthesis in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma). Effect of inhibitors and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Ducrey Sanpietro, L M; Kula, M R

    1998-08-01

    The effect of nicotine and diphenylamine on astaxanthin biosynthesis in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous was studied. The effects were analysed under standard and low temperature conditions. It was found that 10 mM-nicotine inhibits the cyclization of lycopene and de novo protein synthesis was not needed to reverse the inhibition. The oxidation of beta-carotene was irreversibly inhibited by 10 microM-diphenylamine while the dehydrogenation of phytoene was reversibly inhibited by 60 microM-diphenylamine. The simultaneous exposure to low temperature (4 degrees C) overcomes the inhibition of beta-carotene oxidation at low diphenylamine concentration.

  7. Evolutionary diversification and characterization of the eubacterial gene family encoding DXR type II, an alternative isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    an exceptional model of acquisition and maintenance of redundant gene functions between non-homologous genes as a result of convergent evolution. Subsequently, although old episodic events of HGT could not be excluded, the results supported a prevalent role of gene loss in explaining the distribution of DXR-II in specific pathogenic eubacteria. Our results highlight the importance of the functional characterization of evolutionary shortcuts in isoprenoid biosynthesis for screening specific antibacterial drugs and for regulating the production of isoprenoids of human interest. PMID:24004839

  8. Evolutionary diversification and characterization of the eubacterial gene family encoding DXR type II, an alternative isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Lipska, Agnieszka; Pérez-Gil, Jordi; Sangari, Félix J; Albert, Victor A; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2013-09-03

    acquisition and maintenance of redundant gene functions between non-homologous genes as a result of convergent evolution. Subsequently, although old episodic events of HGT could not be excluded, the results supported a prevalent role of gene loss in explaining the distribution of DXR-II in specific pathogenic eubacteria. Our results highlight the importance of the functional characterization of evolutionary shortcuts in isoprenoid biosynthesis for screening specific antibacterial drugs and for regulating the production of isoprenoids of human interest.

  9. Regulation of Squalene Synthase, a Key Enzyme of Sterol Biosynthesis, in Tobacco1

    PubMed Central

    Devarenne, Timothy P.; Ghosh, Anirban; Chappell, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) represents a putative branch point in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway capable of diverting carbon flow specifically to the biosynthesis of sterols and, hence, is considered a potential regulatory point for sterol metabolism. For example, when plant cells grown in suspension culture are challenged with fungal elicitors, suppression of sterol biosynthesis has been correlated with a reduction in SS enzyme activity. The current study sought to correlate changes in SS enzyme activity with changes in the level of the corresponding protein and mRNA. Using an SS-specific antibody, the initial suppression of SS enzyme activity in elicitor-challenged cells was not reflected by changes in the absolute level of the corresponding polypeptide, implicating a post-translational control mechanism for this enzyme activity. In comparison, the absolute level of the SS mRNA did decrease approximately 5-fold in the elicitor-treated cells, which is suggestive of decreased transcription of the SS gene. Study of SS in intact plants was also initiated by measuring the level of SS enzyme activity, the level of the corresponding protein, and the expression of SS gene promoter-reporter gene constructs in transgenic plants. SS enzyme activity, polypeptide level, and gene expression were all localized predominately to the shoot apical meristem, with much lower levels observed in leaves and roots. These later results suggest that sterol biosynthesis is localized to the apical meristems and that apical meristems may be a source of sterols for other plant tissues. PMID:12114564

  10. Isoprenoid geranylgeranylacetone inhibits human colon cancer cells through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoyuki; Tsuno, Nelson H; Okaji, Yurai; Kawai, Kazushige; Shuno, Yasutaka; Nagawa, Hirokazu; Oshima, Noriko; Takahashi, Koki

    2010-10-01

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an isoprenoid compound, is a widely used antiulcer drug developed in Japan. GGA is structurally similar to plaunotol and geranylgeraniol, another isoprenoid reported to exert strong anticancer effects. In an earlier study, GGA was shown to inhibit ovarian cancer invasion by attenuating not only Rho activation, but also Ras-MAPK activation. In this study, we aimed to test whether GGA could have a therapeutic effect on colon cancer cells. As a result, we found that GGA induced a dose-dependent decrease in the proliferative activity through induction of cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. The induction of apoptosis was mediated by the activation of both caspase-8 and caspase-9 pathways. The induction of G1 arrest was mediated by the increase of p21 and p27, and also the decrease of phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein levels. This study showed the potential anticancer activity of GGA. As this drug is already available in Japan for clinical use as an antiulcer/antigastritis agent, clinical trials will be designed to confirm its potential usefulness for cancer patients.

  11. Regulation of the brain isoprenoids farnesyl- and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate is altered in male Alzheimer patients.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Gunter P; Hooff, Gero P; Strandjord, Dana M; Igbavboa, Urule; Volmer, Dietrich A; Müller, Walter E; Wood, W Gibson

    2009-08-01

    Post-translational modification of small GTPases by farnesyl- (FPP) and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP) has generated much attention due to their potential contribution to cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Prenylated proteins have been identified in numerous cell functions and elevated levels of FPP and GGPP have been previously proposed to occur in Alzheimer disease (AD) but have never been quantified. In the present study, we determined if the mevalonate derived compounds FPP and GGPP are increased in brain grey and white matter of male AD patients as compared with control samples. This study demonstrates for the first time that FPP and GGPP levels are significantly elevated in human AD grey and white matter but not cholesterol, indicating a potentially disease-specific targeting of isoprenoid regulation independent of HMG-CoA-reductase. Further suggesting a selective disruption of FPP and GGPP homeostasis in AD, we show that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase in vivo significantly reduced FPP, GGPP and cholesterol abundance in mice with the largest effect on the isoprenoids. A tentative conclusion is that if indeed regulation of FPP and GGPP is altered in AD brain such changes may stimulate protein prenylation and contribute to AD neuropathophysiology.

  12. Trypanosoma brucei: a model micro-organism to study eukaryotic phospholipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Serricchio, Mauro; Bütikofer, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Although the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, can acquire lipids from its environment, recent reports have shown that it is also capable of de novo synthesis of all major phospholipids. Here we provide an overview of the biosynthetic pathways involved in phospholipid formation in T. brucei and highlight differences to corresponding pathways in other eukaryotes, with the aim of promoting trypanosomes as an attractive model organism to study lipid biosynthesis. We show that de novo synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine involving CDP-activated intermediates is essential in T. brucei and that a reduction in its cellular content affects mitochondrial morphology and ultrastructure. In addition, we highlight that reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine inhibit nuclear division, suggesting a role for phosphatidylcholine formation in the control of cell division. Furthermore, we discuss possible routes leading to phosphatidylserine and cardiolipin formation in T. brucei and review the biosynthesis of phosphatidylinositol, which seems to take place in two separate compartments. Finally, we emphasize that T. brucei represents the only eukaryote so far that synthesizes all three sphingophospholipid classes, sphingomyelin, inositolphosphorylceramide and ethanolaminephosphorylceramide, and that their production is developmentally regulated.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study of Genetic Control of Seed Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Gacek, Katarzyna; Bayer, Philipp E.; Bartkowiak-Broda, Iwona; Szala, Laurencja; Bocianowski, Jan; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acids and their composition in seeds determine oil value for nutritional or industrial purposes and also affect seed germination as well as seedling establishment. To better understand the genetic basis of seed fatty acid biosynthesis in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) we applied a genome-wide association study, using 91,205 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) characterized across a mapping population with high-resolution skim genotyping by sequencing (SkimGBS). We identified a cluster of loci on chromosome A05 associated with oleic and linoleic seed fatty acids. The delineated genomic region contained orthologs of the Arabidopsis thaliana genes known to play a role in regulation of seed fatty acid biosynthesis such as Fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase B (FATB) and Fatty Acid Desaturase (FAD5). This approach allowed us to identify potential functional genes regulating fatty acid composition in this important oil producing crop and demonstrates that this approach can be used as a powerful tool for dissecting complex traits for B. napus improvement programs. PMID:28163710

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study of Genetic Control of Seed Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Katarzyna; Bayer, Philipp E; Bartkowiak-Broda, Iwona; Szala, Laurencja; Bocianowski, Jan; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids and their composition in seeds determine oil value for nutritional or industrial purposes and also affect seed germination as well as seedling establishment. To better understand the genetic basis of seed fatty acid biosynthesis in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) we applied a genome-wide association study, using 91,205 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) characterized across a mapping population with high-resolution skim genotyping by sequencing (SkimGBS). We identified a cluster of loci on chromosome A05 associated with oleic and linoleic seed fatty acids. The delineated genomic region contained orthologs of the Arabidopsis thaliana genes known to play a role in regulation of seed fatty acid biosynthesis such as Fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase B (FATB) and Fatty Acid Desaturase (FAD5). This approach allowed us to identify potential functional genes regulating fatty acid composition in this important oil producing crop and demonstrates that this approach can be used as a powerful tool for dissecting complex traits for B. napus improvement programs.

  15. Molecular basis of HHQ biosynthesis: molecular dynamics simulations, enzyme kinetic and surface plasmon resonance studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PQS (PseudomonasQuinolone Signal) and its precursor HHQ are signal molecules of the P. aeruginosa quorum sensing system. They explicate their role in mammalian pathogenicity by binding to the receptor PqsR that induces virulence factor production and biofilm formation. The enzyme PqsD catalyses the biosynthesis of HHQ. Results Enzyme kinetic analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor experiments were used to determine mechanism and substrate order of the biosynthesis. Comparative analysis led to the identification of domains involved in functionality of PqsD. A kinetic cycle was set up and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to study the molecular bases of the kinetics of PqsD. Trajectory analysis, pocket volume measurements, binding energy estimations and decompositions ensured insights into the binding mode of the substrates anthraniloyl-CoA and β-ketodecanoic acid. Conclusions Enzyme kinetics and SPR experiments hint at a ping-pong mechanism for PqsD with ACoA as first substrate. Trajectory analysis of different PqsD complexes evidenced ligand-dependent induced-fit motions affecting the modified ACoA funnel access to the exposure of a secondary channel. A tunnel-network is formed in which Ser317 plays an important role by binding to both substrates. Mutagenesis experiments resulting in the inactive S317F mutant confirmed the importance of this residue. Two binding modes for β-ketodecanoic acid were identified with distinct catalytic mechanism preferences. PMID:23916145

  16. Biosynthesis of the Potent Antimalarial Compound FR900098

    PubMed Central

    Eliot, Andrew C.; Griffin, Benjamin M.; Thomas, Paul M.; Johannes, Tyler W.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Zhao, Huimin; Metcalf, William W.

    2008-01-01

    The antibiotics fosmidomycin and FR900098 are members of a unique class of phosphonic acid natural products that inhibit the nonmevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis. Both are potent anti-bacterial and anti-malarial compounds, but despite their efficacy, little is known regarding their biosynthesis. Here we report the identification of the Streptomyces rubellomurinus genes required for the biosynthesis of FR900098. Expression of these genes in Streptomyces lividans results in production of FR900098, demonstrating their role in synthesis of the antibiotic. Analysis of the putative gene products suggests that FR900098 is synthesized by metabolic reactions analogous to portions of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These data greatly expand our knowledge of phosphonate biosynthesis and enable efforts to overproduce this highly useful therapeutic agent. PMID:18721747

  17. Natural rubber biosynthesis in plants: rubber transferase.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Katrina; Xie, Wenshuang

    2012-01-01

    Rubber biosynthesis in plants is a fascinating biochemical system, which evolved at the dawn of the dicotyledoneae and is present in at least four of the dictolydonous superorders. Rubber biosynthesis is catalyzed by a membrane complex in a monolayer membrane envelope, requires two distinct substrates and a divalent cation cofactor, and produces a high-molecular-weight isoprenoid polymer. A solid understanding of this system underpins valuable papers in the literature. However, the published literature is rife with unreliable reports in which the investigators have fallen into traps created by the current incomplete understanding of the biochemistry of rubber synthesis. In this chapter, we attempt to guide both new and more established researchers around these pitfalls.

  18. Potato steroidal glycoalkaloid levels and the expression of key isoprenoid metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Krits, Pinchas; Fogelman, Edna; Ginzberg, Idit

    2007-12-01

    The potato steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGA) are toxic secondary metabolites, and their total content in tubers should not exceed 20 mg/100 g fresh weight. The two major SGA in cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) are alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine. SGA biosynthetic genes and the genetic factors that control their expression have not yet been determined. In the present study, potato genotypes exhibiting different levels of SGA content showed an association between high SGA levels in their leaves and tubers and high expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase 1 (hmg1) and squalene synthase 1 (pss1), genes of the mevalonic/isoprenoid pathway. Transcripts of other key enzymes of branches of the isoprenoid pathway, vetispiradiene/sesquiterpene synthase (pvs1) and sterol C24-methyltransferase type1 (smt1), were undetectable or exhibited stable expression regardless of SGA content, respectively, suggesting facilitated precursor flow to the SGA biosynthetic branch. The transcript ratio of solanidine glucosyltransferase (sgt2) to solanidine galactosyltransferase (sgt1) was correlated to the documented chaconine-to-solanine ratio in the tested genotypes. Significantly higher expression of hmg1, pss1, smt1, sgt1 and sgt2 was monitored in the tuber phelloderm than in the parenchyma of the tuber's flesh, targeting the former as the main SGA-producing tissue in the tuber, in agreement with the known high SGA content in the layers directly under the tuber skin.

  19. Conversion of Isoprenoid Oil by Catalytic Cracking and Hydrocracking over Nanoporous Hybrid Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Liu, Chen; Li, Xiaohong; Maekawa, Takaaki; Asaoka, Sachio

    2012-01-01

    In order to produce petroleum alternatives from biomass, a significant amount of research has been focused on oils from microalgae due to their origin, which would not affect food availability. Nanoporous hybrid catalysts composed of ns Al2O3 and zeolites have been proven to be very useful compared to traditional catalysts in hydrotreating (HT), hydrocracking (HC), and catalytic cracking (CC) of large molecules. To evaluate the reaction scheme and products from model isoprenoid compounds of microalgae oil, nanoporous hybrid catalyst technologies (CC: ns Al2O3/H-USY and ns Al2O3/H-GaAlMFI; HC: [Ni-Mo/γ-Al2O3]/ns Al2O3/H-beta) were studied. The major product from CC on ns Al2O3/H-USY was highly aromatic gasoline, while the product from HC was half-isoparaffinic/olefinic kerosene. Although more than 50 wt% of the products from HT/CC on the USY catalyst was liquefied petroleum gas due to overcracking, the product from HT/CC on the MFI catalyst was high-octane-number gasoline. Delightfully, the product from HT/HC was kerosene and its average number was 11, with more than 80 wt% being isoparaffinic. As a result, it was demonstrated that hydrotreating may convert isoprenoid oil from microalgae over nanoporous hybrid catalysts into a variety of products. PMID:22791962

  20. Hartmut Lichtenthaler: an authority on chloroplast structure and isoprenoid biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Govindjee

    2016-05-01

    We pay tribute to Hartmut Lichtenthaler for making important contributions to the field of photosynthesis research. He was recently recognized for ground-breaking discoveries in chloroplast structure and isoprenoid biochemistry by the Rebeiz Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR; http://vlpbp.org/ ), receiving a 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award for Photosynthesis. The ceremony, held in Champaign, Illinois, was attended by many prominent researchers in the photosynthesis field. We provide below a brief note on his education, and then describe some of the areas in which Hartmut Lichtenthaler has been a pioneer.

  1. Biosynthesis of isoprenoids in Escherichia coli: stereochemistry of the reaction catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Leyes, A E; Baker, J A; Poulter, C D

    1999-10-07

    [formula: see text] Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) synthase from Escherichia coli catalyzes the condensation of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and geranyl diphosphate (GPP) with selective removal of the pro-R hydrogen at C2 of IPP, the same stereochemistry observed for the pig liver, yeast, and avian enzymes.

  2. Some contributions of organic chemistry to the study of the biosynthesis of natural products.

    PubMed

    Hanson, James R

    2017-05-01

    The development over the last 100 years of organic chemists' contributions to the understanding of the biosynthesis of natural products is reviewed. The transitions from speculation to labelling experiments and to the current role of genomics are exemplified, particularly from terpenoid biosynthesis.

  3. Metabolic engineering of higher plants and algae for isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Kempinski, Chase; Jiang, Zuodong; Bell, Stephen; Chappell, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of compounds derived from the five carbon precursors, dimethylallyl diphosphate, and isopentenyl diphosphate. These molecules present incredible natural chemical diversity, which can be valuable for humans in many aspects such as cosmetics, agriculture, and medicine. However, many terpenoids are only produced in small quantities by their natural hosts and can be difficult to generate synthetically. Therefore, much interest and effort has been directed toward capturing the genetic blueprint for their biochemistry and engineering it into alternative hosts such as plants and algae. These autotrophic organisms are attractive when compared to traditional microbial platforms because of their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as a carbon substrate instead of supplied carbon sources like glucose. This chapter will summarize important techniques and strategies for engineering the accumulation of isoprenoid metabolites into higher plants and algae by choosing the correct host, avoiding endogenous regulatory mechanisms, and optimizing potential flux into the target compound. Future endeavors will build on these efforts by fine-tuning product accumulation levels via the vast amount of available "-omic" data and devising metabolic engineering schemes that integrate this into a whole-organism approach. With the development of high-throughput transformation protocols and synthetic biology molecular tools, we have only begun to harness the power and utility of plant and algae metabolic engineering.

  4. Thermal alteration of organic matter in recent marine sediments. 2: Isoprenoids. [Tanner Basin off Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikan, R.; Baedecker, M. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1974-01-01

    A series of isoprenoid compounds were isolated from a heat treated marine sediment (from Tanner Basin) which were not present in the original sediment. Among the compounds identified were: phytol, dihydrophytol, c-18-isoprenoid ketone, phytanic and pristanic acids, c-19 and c-20-monoolefines, and the alkanes pristane and phytane. The significance and possible routes leading to these compounds is discussed.

  5. Studies on the biosynthesis of paraherquamide A. Origin of the {beta}-methylproline ring

    SciTech Connect

    Stocking, E.M.; Sanz-Cervera, J.F.; Williams, R.M.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1996-07-24

    The paraherquamides are potent anthelmintic alkaloids isolated from various Penicillium sp. These substances have attracted considerable attention due to their molecular complexity, intriguing biogenesis, and potential as antiparasitic drugs. The most potent member of this family is paraherquamide A (1), which contains the unusual amino acid, {beta}-methyl-{beta}-hydroxyproline. Recently, a Smith-Kline Beecham group reported the isolation and structural elucidation of the simpler indole alkaloid VM55599 (11), which contains the unusual amino acid {beta}-methylproline. As part of a program directed primarily at elucidating the biosynthetic mechanism of formation of the unique core bicyclo[2.2.2] ring system that is common to all of these alkaloids, we have initiated studies on the biosynthesis of the unusual, functionalized proline derivatives that constitute the paraherquamide family. Herein, we report the biosynthetic incorporation of primary amino acid building blocks that constitute the core framework of this class of alkaloids. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Generation of chemically engineered ribosomes for atomic mutagenesis studies on protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Matthias D; Chirkova, Anna; Voegele, Paul; Polacek, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The protocol describes the site-specific chemical modification of 23S rRNA of Thermus aquaticus ribosomes. The centerpiece of this 'atomic mutagenesis' approach is the site-specific incorporation of non-natural nucleoside analogs into 23S rRNA in the context of the entire 70S ribosome. This technique exhaustively makes use of the available crystallographic structures of the ribosome for designing detailed biochemical experiments aiming at unraveling molecular insights of ribosomal functions. The generation of chemically engineered ribosomes carrying a particular non-natural 23S rRNA residue at the site of interest, a procedure that typically takes less than 2 d, allows the study of translation at the molecular level and goes far beyond the limits of standard mutagenesis approaches. This methodology, in combination with the presented tests for ribosomal functions adapted to chemically engineered ribosomes, allows unprecedented molecular insight into the mechanisms of protein biosynthesis.

  7. Gas chromatographic separation of diastereomeric isoprenoids as molecular markers of oil pollution.

    PubMed

    Berthou, F; Friovourt, M P

    1981-12-18

    By means of high-performance glass capillary gas chromatography (GC), diastereomeric isoprenoids were resolved into double peaks. The retention indices on three liquid phases and the mass spectra of the diastereoisomers were almost similar. The leading GC peaks represent the isoprenoids of fossil origin, while the rear peaks correspond to those of recent origin. Computerized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for fingerprinting isoprenoids in different samples. The mass fragmentation patterns were characteristic of the branched alkanes. Hydrocarbon mixtures from four crude oil spills in the sea and from polluted and oil-free oyster tissues were investigated. The relative ratios of n-alkanes/pristane or phytane were shown to be strongly dependent on the chromatographic resolution of the isoprenoid peaks. It is suggested that the double GC peaks in the isoprenoid series are an unmistakable sign of oil pollution.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769 Isolate, AY201, Producer of Bacterial Cellulose and Important Model Organism for the Study of Cellulose Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kalpa

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose producer and model organism used for the study of cellulose biosynthesis, Gluconacetobacter hansenii AY201, is a variant of G. hansenii ATCC 23769. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence of G. hansenii AY201, information which may be utilized to further the research into understanding the genes necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516506

  9. Isoprenoid is a perfect fit for fat factor.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew J

    2011-08-15

    In humans, there are 48 members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors. These ligand-activated transcription factors help to integrate our growth, reproduction and metabolism via environmental, nutritional and intrinsic cues. It is therefore not surprising that nuclear receptors are commonly used as drug targets. However, perhaps in the rush to discover new drugs that target these receptors, we sometimes lose sight of their 'real' physiological ligands. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal Goto et al. present evidence that the isoprenoid FPP (farnesyl pyrophosphate) may be a bona fide ligand for the master controller of adipocyte differentiation PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ). This work has wide-ranging implications not only for obesity and diabetes, but also for osteoporosis and the control of circadian rhythms in which PPARγ also plays an important role. © The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 Biochemical Society

  10. A double mutation of Escherichia coli 2C-methyl-d-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase disrupts six hydrogen bonds with, yet fails to prevent binding of, an isoprenoid diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Sgraja, Tanja; Kemp, Lauris E.; Ramsden, Nicola; Hunter, William N.

    2005-01-01

    The essential enzyme 2C-methyl-d-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate (MECP) synthase, found in most eubacteria and the apicomplexan parasites, participates in isoprenoid-precursor biosynthesis and is a validated target for the development of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. The structure and mechanism of the enzyme have been elucidated and the recent exciting finding that the enzyme actually binds diphosphate-containing isoprenoids at the interface formed by the three subunits that constitute the active protein suggests the possibility of feedback regulation of MECP synthase. To investigate such a possibility, a form of the enzyme was sought that did not bind these ligands but which would retain the quaternary structure necessary to create the active site. Two amino acids, Arg142 and Glu144, in Escherichia coli MECP synthase were identified as contributing to ligand binding. Glu144 interacts directly with Arg142 and positions the basic residue to form two hydrogen bonds with the terminal phosphate group of the isoprenoid diphosphate ligand. This association occurs at the trimer interface and three of these arginines interact with the ligand phosphate group. A dual mutation was designed (Arg142 to methionine and Glu144 to leucine) to disrupt the electrostatic attractions between the enzyme and the phosphate group to investigate whether an enzyme without isoprenoid diphosphate could be obtained. A low-resolution crystal structure of the mutated MECP synthase Met142/Leu144 revealed that geranyl diphosphate was retained despite the removal of six hydrogen bonds normally formed with the enzyme. This indicates that these two hydrophilic residues on the surface of the enzyme are not major determinants of isoprenoid binding at the trimer interface but rather that hydrophobic interactions between the hydrocarbon tail and the core of the enzyme trimer dominate ligand binding. PMID:16511114

  11. Biosynthesis: Imaging cell-wall biosynthesis live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of peptidoglycan is an important step in bacterial cell division and cell-wall maturation. Now it has been shown that fluorescent D-amino acids can be used to label the peptidoglycan cell wall of living bacteria, providing a new tool to study this important process.

  12. Volatile isoprenoids as defense compounds during abiotic stress in tropical plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.

    2015-12-01

    Emissions of volatile isoprenoids from tropical forests play central roles in atmospheric processes by fueling atmospheric chemistry resulting in modified aerosol and cloud lifecycles and their associated feedbacks with the terrestrial biosphere. However, the identities of tropical isoprenoids, their biological and environmental controls, and functions within plants and ecosystems remain highly uncertain. As part of the DOE ARM program's GoAmazon 2014/15 campaign, extensive field and laboratory observations of volatile isoprenoids are being conducted in the central Amazon. Here we report the results of our completed and ongoing activities at the ZF2 forest reserve in the central Amazon. Among the results of the research are the suprisingly high abundance of light-dependent volatile isoprenoid emissions across abundant tree genera in the Amazon in both primary and secondary forests, the discovery of highly reactive monoterpene emissions from Amazon trees, and evidence for the importance of volatile isoprenoids in protecting photosynthesis during oxidative stress under elevated temperatures including energy consumption and direct antioxidant functions and a tight connection betwen volatile isoprenoid emissions, photorespiration, and CO2 recycling within leaves. The results highlight the need to model allocation of carbon to isoprenoids during elevated temperature stress in the tropics.

  13. Isoprenoid-Based Biofuels: Homologous Expression and Heterologous Expression in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Phulara, Suresh Chandra; Chaturvedi, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Enthusiasm for mining advanced biofuels from microbial hosts has increased remarkably in recent years. Isoprenoids are one of the highly diverse groups of secondary metabolites and are foreseen as an alternative to petroleum-based fuels. Most of the prokaryotes synthesize their isoprenoid backbone via the deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate pathway from glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and pyruvate, whereas eukaryotes synthesize isoprenoids via the mevalonate pathway from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). Microorganisms do not accumulate isoprenoids in large quantities naturally, which restricts their application for fuel purposes. Various metabolic engineering efforts have been utilized to overcome the limitations associated with their natural and nonnatural production. The introduction of heterologous pathways/genes and overexpression of endogenous/homologous genes have shown a remarkable increase in isoprenoid yield and substrate utilization in microbial hosts. Such modifications in the hosts' genomes have enabled researchers to develop commercially competent microbial strains for isoprenoid-based biofuel production utilizing a vast array of substrates. The present minireview briefly discusses the recent advancement in metabolic engineering efforts in prokaryotic hosts for the production of isoprenoid-based biofuels, with an emphasis on endogenous, homologous, and heterologous expression strategies. PMID:27422837

  14. Low-Molecular-Weight Metabolites from Diatoms: Structures, Biological Roles and Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Stonik, Valentin; Stonik, Inna

    2015-06-09

    Diatoms are abundant and important biological components of the marine environment that biosynthesize diverse natural products. These microalgae are rich in various lipids, carotenoids, sterols and isoprenoids, some of them containing toxins and other metabolites. Several groups of diatom natural products have attracted great interest due to their potential practical application as energy sources (biofuel), valuable food constituents, and prospective materials for nanotechnology. In addition, hydrocarbons, which are used in climate reconstruction, polyamines which participate in biomineralization, new apoptotic agents against tumor cells, attractants and deterrents that regulate the biochemical communications between marine species in seawaters have also been isolated from diatoms. However, chemical studies on these microalgae are complicated by difficulties, connected with obtaining their biomass, and the influence of nutrients and contaminators in their environment as well as by seasonal and climatic factors on the biosynthesis of the corresponding natural products. Overall, the number of chemically studied diatoms is lower than that of other algae, but further studies, particularly those connected with improvements in the isolation and structure elucidation technique as well as the genomics of diatoms, promise both to increase the number of studied species with isolated biologically active natural products and to provide a clearer perception of their biosynthesis.

  15. Low-Molecular-Weight Metabolites from Diatoms: Structures, Biological Roles and Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Stonik, Valentin; Stonik, Inna

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are abundant and important biological components of the marine environment that biosynthesize diverse natural products. These microalgae are rich in various lipids, carotenoids, sterols and isoprenoids, some of them containing toxins and other metabolites. Several groups of diatom natural products have attracted great interest due to their potential practical application as energy sources (biofuel), valuable food constituents, and prospective materials for nanotechnology. In addition, hydrocarbons, which are used in climate reconstruction, polyamines which participate in biomineralization, new apoptotic agents against tumor cells, attractants and deterrents that regulate the biochemical communications between marine species in seawaters have also been isolated from diatoms. However, chemical studies on these microalgae are complicated by difficulties, connected with obtaining their biomass, and the influence of nutrients and contaminators in their environment as well as by seasonal and climatic factors on the biosynthesis of the corresponding natural products. Overall, the number of chemically studied diatoms is lower than that of other algae, but further studies, particularly those connected with improvements in the isolation and structure elucidation technique as well as the genomics of diatoms, promise both to increase the number of studied species with isolated biologically active natural products and to provide a clearer perception of their biosynthesis. PMID:26065408

  16. Identification of long-chain isoprenoid alkylbenzenes in sediments and crude oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Kock-van Dalen, A. C.; de Leeuw, Jan W.

    1988-11-01

    A series of novel methylated phytanylbenzenes (phytanylbenzene, 1-methyl-3-phytanylbenzene, 1,4-dimethyl-2-phytanylbenzene, 1,2-dimethyl-4-phytanylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethyl-5-phytanylbenzene) have been identified in sediment extracts and oils ranging in age from Miocene to Permian. Identifications were based on comparison of mass spectra and Chromatographie data of synthetic methylated phytanylbenzenes with those of geologically occurring methylated phytanylbenzenes and by coinjections with the standards. Although methylated phytanylbenzenes are structurally related to the methylated 2-methyl-2-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)chromans, components also present in the samples studied, the former do not appear to be the diagenetic derivatives of the latter. The methylated phytanylbenzenes are thought to be derived diagenetically from isoprenoid quinones or may represent a direct biosynthetic origin from specific archaebacteria.

  17. Studies on the carbohydrate moiety and on the biosynthesis of rat C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Sambasivam, H; Rassouli, M; Murray, R K; Nagpurkar, A; Mookerjea, S; Azadi, P; Dell, A; Morris, H R

    1993-05-15

    Rat C-reactive protein (CRP) is a pentameric glycoprotein composed of five apparently identical monomers, two of which form a disulfide-linked dimer (Rasosouli, M., Sambasivam, H., Azadi, P., Dell, A., Morris, H. R., Nagpurkar, A., Mookerjea, S., and Murray, R. K. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 2947-2954). In this study, the nature of the oligosaccharide chain of rat CRP was investigated by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry (FAB-MS), and general features of its biosynthetic pathway were also analyzed. FAB-MS, electrospray-mass spectrometry, and linkage analysis demonstrated that each monomer of rat CRP contained one oligosaccharide chain, predominantly a disialylated biantennary structure, attached to Asn-128. The biosynthesis of rat CRP was studied by immunoprecipitation of CRP synthesized in vitro and by cultured hepatocytes. The results revealed that each monomer of rat CRP was synthesized individually as a single-chain precursor with a cleavable signal sequence. The translocated species was sensitive to digestion by endoglycosidase H (endo H), indicating that it possessed a high mannose oligosaccharide. Rat CRP acquired the ability to bind to phosphorylcholine-Sepharose and to form the dimeric and oligomeric species prior to acquiring resistance to endo H. Studies using tunicamycin revealed that the N-linked oligosaccharide present in rat CRP was not required for formation of its dimeric component, oligomerization, ability to bind to phosphorylcholine, or secretion. The non-glycosylated rat CRP, however, was still able to bind to phosphorylcholine-Sepharose and to be secreted by hepatocytes.

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhiza increase artemisinin accumulation in Artemisia annua by higher expression of key biosynthesis genes via enhanced jasmonic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shantanu; Upadhyay, Shivangi; Wajid, Saima; Ram, Mauji; Jain, Dharam Chand; Singh, Ved Pal; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Kapoor, Rupam

    2015-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that the formation of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) enhances secondary metabolite production in shoots. Despite mounting evidence, relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms. This study suggests that increase in artemisinin concentration in Artemisia annua colonized by Rhizophagus intraradices is due to altered trichome density as well as transcriptional patterns that are mediated via enhanced jasmonic acid (JA) levels. Mycorrhizal (M) plants had higher JA levels in leaf tissue that may be due to induction of an allene oxidase synthase gene (AOS), encoding one of the key enzymes for JA production. Non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants were exogenously supplied with a range of methyl jasmonic acid concentrations. When leaves of NM and M plants with similar levels of endogenous JA were compared, these matched closely in terms of shoot trichome density, artemisinin concentration, and transcript profile of artemisinin biosynthesis genes. Mycorrhization increased artemisinin levels by increasing glandular trichome density and transcriptional activation of artemisinin biosynthesis genes. Transcriptional analysis of some rate-limiting enzymes of mevalonate and methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways revealed that AM increases isoprenoids by induction of the MEP pathway. A decline in artemisinin concentration in shoots of NM and M plants treated with ibuprofen (an inhibitor of JA biosynthesis) further confirmed the implication of JA in the mechanism of artemisinin production.

  19. Enhancing isoprenoid production through systematically assembling and modulating efflux pumps in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Feng; Xiong, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Yong

    2013-09-01

    Enhancement of the cellular exportation of heterologous compounds is an important aspect to improve the product yield in microbial cell factory. Efflux pumps can expel various intra- or extra-cellular substances out of microbial hosts and increase the cellular tolerance. Thus in this study, by using the hydrophobic sesquiterpene (amorphadiene) and diterpene (kaurene) as two model compounds, we attempted to improve isoprenoid production through systematically engineering the efflux pumps in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The pleiotropic resistant pumps, AcrAB-TolC, MdtEF-TolC from E. coli and heterologous MexAB-OprM pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were overexpressed, assembled, and finely modulated. We found that overexpression of AcrB and TolC components can effectively enhance the specific yield of amorphadiene and kaurene, e.g., 31 and 37 % improvement for amorphadiene compared with control, respectively. The heterologous MexB component can enhance kaurene production with 70 % improvement which is more effective than TolC and AcrB. The results suggest that the three components of tripartite efflux pumps play varied effect to enhance isoprenoid production. Considering the highly organized structure of efflux pumps and importance of components interaction, various component combinations were constructed and the copy number of key components AcrB and TolC was finely modulated as well. The results exhibit that the combination TolC and TolC and AcrB improved the specific yield of amorphadiene with 118 %, and AcrA and TolC and AcrB improved that of kaurene with 104 %. This study indicates that assembling and finely modulating efflux pumps is an effective strategy to improve the production of heterologous compounds in E. coli.

  20. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter--IV. Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, B J; Tannenbaum, E; Kaplan, I R

    1987-01-01

    A series of pyrolysis experiments, utilizing two different immature oil-prone kerogens ("type I": Green River Formation kerogen; "Type II": Monterey Formation kerogen) mixed with common sedimentary minerals (calcite, illite, or Na-montmorillonite), was conducted to study the effects of minerals on the generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes during laboratory-simulated catagenesis of kerogen. The influence of clay minerals on the aliphatic hydrocarbons is critically dependent on the water concentration during laboratory thermal maturation. Under extremely low contents of water (i.e., dry pyrolysis, where only pyrolysate water is present), C12(+) -range n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids are mostly destroyed by montmorillonite but undergo only minor alteration with illite. Both clay minerals significantly reduce alkene formation during dry pyrolysis. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water = 2:1), the effects of the clay minerals are substantially reduced. In addition, the dry pyrolysis experiments show that illite and montmorillonite preferentially retain large amounts of the polar constituents of bitumen, but not n-alkanes or acyclic isoprenoids. Therefore, bitumen fractionation according to polarity differences occurs in the presence of these clay minerals. By this process, n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids are concentrated in the bitumen fraction that is not strongly adsorbed on the clay matrices. The extent of these concentrations effects is greatly diminished during hydrous pyrolysis. In contrast, calcite has no significant influence on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons. In addition, calcite is incapable of retaining bitumen. Therefore, the fractionation of n-alkanes or acyclic isoprenoids relative to the polar constituents of bitumen is insignificant in the presence of calcite.

  1. Indirect Stimulation of Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells Through Alterations in Isoprenoid Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Puan, Kia-Joo; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Feng, Ju; Giner, José-Luis; Cao, Rong; Mönkkönen, Jukka; Oldfield, Eric; Morita, Craig T.

    2011-01-01

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells monitor isoprenoid metabolism by recognizing (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), an intermediate in the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway used by microbes, and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), an intermediate in the mevalonate pathway used by humans. Aminobisphosphonates and alkylamines indirectly stimulate Vγ2Vδ2 cells by inhibiting farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDPS) in the mevalonate pathway, thereby increasing IPP/ApppI that directly stimulate. In this study, we further characterize stimulation by these compounds, and define pathways used by new classes of compounds. Consistent with FDPS inhibition, stimulation of Vγ2Vδ2 cells by aminobisphosphonates and alkylamines was much more sensitive to statin inhibition than stimulation by prenyl pyrophosphates. However, the continuous presence of aminobisphosphonates was toxic for T cells, and blocked their proliferation. Aminobisphosphonate stimulation was rapid and prolonged, independent of known antigen presenting molecules, and resistant to fixation. New classes of stimulatory compounds–mevalonate, the alcohol of HMBPP, and alkenyl phosphonates–likely stimulate differently. Mevalonate, a rate-limiting metabolite, appears to enter cells to increase IPP levels whereas the alcohol of HMBPP and alkenyl phosphonates are directly recognized. The critical chemical feature of bisphosphonates is the amino moiety, because its loss switched aminobisphosphonates to direct antigens. Transfection of APC with siRNA downregulating FDPS rendered them stimulatory for Vγ2Vδ2 cells, and increased cellular IPP. siRNAs for isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase functioned similarly. Our results show that a variety of manipulations affecting isoprenoid metabolism lead to stimulation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells and that pulsing aminobisphosphonates would be more effective for the ex vivo expansion of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22013129

  2. H2S biosynthesis and catabolism: new insights from molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Rose, Peter; Moore, Philip K; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2016-11-14

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has profound biological effects within living organisms and is now increasingly being considered alongside other gaseous signalling molecules, such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Conventional use of pharmacological and molecular approaches has spawned a rapidly growing research field that has identified H2S as playing a functional role in cell-signalling and post-translational modifications. Recently, a number of laboratories have reported the use of siRNA methodologies and genetic mouse models to mimic the loss of function of genes involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of H2S within tissues. Studies utilising these systems are revealing new insights into the biology of H2S within the cardiovascular system, inflammatory disease, and in cell signalling. In light of this work, the current review will describe recent advances in H2S research made possible by the use of molecular approaches and genetic mouse models with perturbed capacities to generate or detoxify physiological levels of H2S gas within tissues.

  3. Carotenoids in unexpected places: gall midges, lateral gene transfer, and carotenoid biosynthesis in animals.

    PubMed

    Cobbs, Cassidy; Heath, Jeremy; Stireman, John O; Abbot, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Carotenoids are conjugated isoprenoid molecules with many important physiological functions in organisms, including roles in photosynthesis, oxidative stress reduction, vision, diapause, photoperiodism, and immunity. Until recently, it was believed that only plants, microorganisms, and fungi were capable of synthesizing carotenoids and that animals acquired them from their diet, but recent studies have demonstrated that two arthropods (pea aphid and spider mite) possess a pair of genes homologous to those required for the first step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Absent in all other known animal genomes, these genes appear to have been acquired by aphids and spider mites in one or several lateral gene transfer events from a fungal donor. We report the third case of fungal carotenoid biosynthesis gene homologs in an arthropod: flies from the family Cecidomyiidae, commonly known as gall midges. Using phylogenetic analyses we show that it is unlikely that lycopene cyclase/phytoene synthase and phytoene desaturase homologs were transferred singly to an ancient arthropod ancestor; instead we propose that genes were transferred independently from related fungal donors after divergence of the major arthropod lineages. We also examine variation in intron placement and copy number of the carotenoid genes that may underlie function in the midges. This trans-kingdom transfer of carotenoid genes may represent a key innovation, underlying the evolution of phytophagy and plant-galling in gall midges and facilitating their extensive diversification across plant lineages.

  4. Genome-Based Analysis and Gene Dosage Studies Provide New Insight into 3-Hydroxy-4-Methylvalerate Biosynthesis in Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Ushimaru, Kazunori; Mizuno, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant Ralstonia eutropha strain PHB−4 expressing the broad-substrate-specificity polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase 1 from Pseudomonas sp. strain 61-3 (PhaC1Ps) synthesizes a PHA copolymer containing the branched side-chain unit 3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate (3H4MV), which has a carbon backbone identical to that of leucine. Mutant strain 1F2 was derived from R. eutropha strain PHB−4 by chemical mutagenesis and shows higher levels of 3H4MV production than does the parent strain. In this study, to understand the mechanisms underlying the enhanced production of 3H4MV, whole-genome sequencing of strain 1F2 was performed, and the draft genome sequence was compared to that of parent strain PHB−4. This analysis uncovered four point mutations in the 1F2 genome. One point mutation was found in the ilvH gene at amino acid position 36 (A36T) of IlvH. ilvH encodes a subunit protein that regulates acetohydroxy acid synthase III (AHAS III). AHAS catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to 2-acetolactate, which is the first reaction in the biosynthesis of branched amino acids such as leucine and valine. Thus, the A36T IlvH mutation may show AHAS tolerance to feedback inhibition by branched amino acids, thereby increasing carbon flux toward branched amino acid and 3H4MV biosynthesis. Furthermore, a gene dosage study and an isotope tracer study were conducted to investigate the 3H4MV biosynthesis pathway. Based on the observations in these studies, we propose a 3H4MV biosynthesis pathway in R. eutropha that involves a condensation reaction between isobutyryl coenzyme A (isobutyryl-CoA) and acetyl-CoA to form the 3H4MV carbon backbone. PMID:25645560

  5. Natural abundance deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Study of the biosynthesis of monoterpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Leopold, M.F.

    1990-01-01

    Deuterium NMR spectroscopy at natural abundance (D NMR-na) is a new technique for exploring the biosynthesis of small molecules such as monoterpenes. The analysis of relative site-specific deuterium integration values is an effective means of measuring isotope effects, and examining the regio- and stereochemistry of biosynthetic reactions. The deuterium integration values of linalyl acetate and limonene isolated from the same source were consistent and showed that proton abstraction from the postulated {alpha}-terpinyl cation intermediate to form limonene is regioselective from the methyl derived from the Cs methyl of the precursor, geranyl diphosphate. This regiochemistry was observed in limonene samples from different sources and the measured primary kinetic isotope effect ranged from 0.25 to in excess of 100 (no deuterium was removed within experimental error). Various {alpha}- and {beta}-pinene samples were isolated and D NMR-na analysis showed evidence of isotopically sensitive partitioning of the pinylcation in the formation of these products. This spectral analysis supported published radiolabeling studies but did not require synthesis of substrates or enzyme purification. The formation of 3-carene occurs without isomerization of the double bond which was previously postulated. The olefinic deuterium of the bicyclic compound was traced to the depleted deuterium at C{sub 2} of isopentyl diphosphate by D NMR-na data and this supported unpublished radiolabeling studies. Study of irregular monoterpenes, chrysanthemyl acetate and lyratyl acetate, showed partitioning of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) by chrysanthemyl cyclase. The {alpha}-secondary kinetic isotope effect of 1.06-1.12, obtained from relative deuterium integration values, suggested that S{sub N}1 ionization of one molecule of DMAPP is the first step in the condensation reaction.

  6. From flavors and pharmaceuticals to advanced biofuels: production of isoprenoids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, Stefan; Chen, Yun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Isoprenoids denote the largest group of chemicals in the plant kingdom and are employed for a wide range of applications in the food and pharmaceutical industry. In recent years, isoprenoids have additionally been recognized as suitable replacements for petroleum-derived fuels and could thus promote the transition towards a more sustainable society. To realize the biofuel potential of isoprenoids, a very efficient production system is required. While complex chemical structures as well as the low abundance in nature demonstrate the shortcomings of chemical synthesis and plant extraction, isoprenoids can be produced by genetically engineered microorganisms from renewable carbon sources. In this article, we summarize the development of isoprenoid applications from flavors and pharmaceuticals to advanced biofuels and review the strategies to design microbial cell factories, focusing on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of these compounds. While the high complexity of biosynthetic pathways and the toxicity of certain isoprenoids still denote challenges that need to be addressed, metabolic engineering has enabled large-scale production of several terpenoids and thus, the utilization of these compounds is likely to expand in the future.

  7. Creating plant molecular factories for industrial and nutritional isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Marilise; Enfissi, Eugenia Ma; Almeida, Juliana; Fraser, Paul D

    2017-08-21

    Chemical refining is a highly efficient process that has driven industrialisation and globalisation. However, dwindling fuel reserves and climatic fluctuation are now imposing key societal and economic challenges to health and welfare provision, agriculture, manufacturing outputs and energy. Plants are potentially exploitable 'green' chemical factories, with vast chemical diversity that can be used for the discovery and production of food, feed, medicines and biomaterials. Despite notable advances, plant based production under real-life scenarios remains, in most cases, economically uncompetitive when compared to inherently non-sustainable petrochemical based processes. In the present review the strategies available and those emerging will be described. Furthermore, how can the new evolving molecular tools such as genome editing be utilised to create a new paradigm of plant-based production? To illustrate the present status quo, we have chosen the isoprenoids as the class of natural products. These compounds display vast chemical diversity and have been used across multiple industrial sectors as medicines, supplements in food and feedstuffs, colourants and fragrances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis during fruit maturation in the red-fleshed orange mutant Cara Cara.

    PubMed

    Alquezar, Berta; Rodrigo, Maria J; Zacarías, Lorenzo

    2008-07-01

    Cara Cara is a spontaneous bud mutation of Navel orange (Citrus. sinensis L. Osbeck) characterized by developing fruits with a pulp of bright red coloration due to the presence of lycopene. Peel of mutant fruits is however orange and indistinguishable from its parental. To elucidate the basis of lycopene accumulation in Cara Cara, we analyzed carotenoid profile and expression of three isoprenoid and nine carotenoid genes in flavedo and pulp of Cara Cara and Navel fruits throughout development and maturation. The pulp of the mutant accumulated high amounts of lycopene, but also phytoene and phytofluene, from early developmental stages. The peel of Cara Cara also accumulated phytoene and phytofluene. The expression of isoprenoid genes and of carotenoid biosynthetic genes downstream PDS (phytoene desaturase) was higher in the pulp of Cara Cara than in Navel. Not important differences in the expression of these genes were observed between the peel of both oranges. Moreover, the content of the plant hormone ABA (abscisic acid) was lower in the pulp of Cara Cara, but the expression of two genes involved in its biosynthesis was higher. The results suggest that an altered carotenoid composition may conduct to a positive feedback regulatory mechanism of carotenoid biosynthesis in citrus fruits. Increased levels of isoprenoid precursors in the mutant that could be channeled to carotenoid biosynthesis may be related to the red-fleshed phenotype of Cara Cara.

  9. Terpenoids and Their Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Lindberg, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids, or isoprenoids, are a family of compounds with great structural diversity which are essential for all living organisms. In cyanobacteria, they are synthesized from the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway, using glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate produced by photosynthesis as substrates. The products of the MEP pathway are the isomeric five-carbon compounds isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, which in turn form the basic building blocks for formation of all terpenoids. Many terpenoid compounds have useful properties and are of interest in the fields of pharmaceuticals and nutrition, and even potentially as future biofuels. The MEP pathway, its function and regulation, and the subsequent formation of terpenoids have not been fully elucidated in cyanobacteria, despite its relevance for biotechnological applications. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge about cyanobacterial terpenoid biosynthesis, both regarding the native metabolism and regarding metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria for heterologous production of non-native terpenoids. PMID:25615610

  10. Polyene macrolide biosynthesis in streptomycetes and related bacteria: recent advances from genome sequencing and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Patrick; De Poire, Eimear; Sheehan, James; Sweeney, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The polyene macrolide group includes important antifungal drugs, to which resistance does not arise readily. Chemical and biological methods have been used in attempts to make polyene antibiotics with fewer toxic side effects. Genome sequencing of producer organisms is contributing to this endeavour, by providing access to new compounds and by enabling yield improvement for polyene analogues obtained by engineered biosynthesis. This recent work is also enhancing bioinformatic methods for deducing the structures of cryptic natural products from their biosynthetic enzymes. The stereostructure of candicidin D has recently been determined by NMR spectroscopy. Genes for the corresponding polyketide synthase have been uncovered in several different genomes. Analysis of this new information strengthens the view that protein sequence motifs can be used to predict double bond geometry in many polyketides.Chemical studies have shown that improved polyenes can be obtained by modifying the mycosamine sugar that is common to most of these compounds. Glycoengineered analogues might be produced by biosynthetic methods, but polyene glycosyltransferases show little tolerance for donors other than GDP-α-D-mycosamine. Genome sequencing has revealed extending glycosyltransferases that add a second sugar to the mycosamine of some polyenes. NppY of Pseudonocardia autotrophica uses UDP-N-acetyl-α-D-glucosamine as donor whereas PegA from Actinoplanes caeruleus uses GDP-α-D-mannose. These two enzymes show 51 % sequence identity and are also closely related to mycosaminyltransferases. These findings will assist attempts to construct glycosyltransferases that transfer alternative UDP- or (d)TDP-linked sugars to polyene macrolactones.

  11. Aflatoxin biosynthesis: current frontiers.

    PubMed

    Roze, Ludmila V; Hong, Sung-Yong; Linz, John E

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are among the principal mycotoxins that contaminate economically important food and feed crops. Aflatoxin B1 is the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known and is also an immunosuppressant. Occurrence of aflatoxins in crops has vast economic and human health impacts worldwide. Thus, the study of aflatoxin biosynthesis has become a focal point in attempts to reduce human exposure to aflatoxins. This review highlights recent advances in the field of aflatoxin biosynthesis and explores the functional connection between aflatoxin biosynthesis, endomembrane trafficking, and response to oxidative stress. Dissection of the regulatory mechanisms involves a complete comprehension of the aflatoxin biosynthetic process and the dynamic network of transcription factors that orchestrates coordinated expression of the target genes. Despite advancements in the field, development of a safe and effective multifaceted approach to solve the aflatoxin food contamination problem is still required.

  12. Crystal structure and biochemical studies of the trans-acting polyketide enoyl reductase LovC from lovastatin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Brian D.; Nguyen, Chi; Bruegger, Joel; Smith, Peter; Xu, Wei; Ma, Suzanne; Wong, Emily; Wong, Steven; Xie, Xinkai; Li, Jesse W.-H.; Vederas, John C.; Tang, Yi; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Lovastatin is an important statin prescribed for the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Biosynthesis of lovastatin uses an iterative type I polyketide synthase (PKS). LovC is a trans-acting enoyl reductase (ER) that specifically reduces three out of eight possible polyketide intermediates during lovastatin biosynthesis. Such trans-acting ERs have been reported across a variety of other fungal PKS enzymes as a strategy in nature to diversify polyketides. How LovC achieves such specificity is unknown. The 1.9-Å structure of LovC reveals that LovC possesses a medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) fold with a unique monomeric assembly. Two LovC cocrystal structures and enzymological studies help elucidate the molecular basis of LovC specificity, define stereochemistry, and identify active-site residues. Sequence alignment indicates a general applicability to trans-acting ERs of fungal PKSs, as well as their potential application to directing biosynthesis. PMID:22733743

  13. Nonsterol Isoprenoids Activate Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor in an Isoform-Selective Manner in Primary Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rondini, Elizabeth A.; Duniec-Dmuchowski, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory previously reported that accumulation of nonsterol isoprenoids following treatment with the squalene synthase inhibitor, squalestatin 1 (SQ1) markedly induced cytochrome P450 (CYP)2B1 mRNA and reporter activity in primary cultured rat hepatocytes, which was dependent on activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). The objective of the current study was to evaluate whether isoprenoids likewise activate murine CAR (mCAR) or one or more isoforms of human CAR (hCAR) produced by alternative splicing (SPTV, hCAR2; APYLT, hCAR3). We found that SQ1 significantly induced Cyp2b10 mRNA (∼3.5-fold) in primary hepatocytes isolated from both CAR–wild-type and humanized CAR transgenic mice, whereas the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor pravastatin had no effect. In the absence of CAR, basal Cyp2b10 mRNA levels were reduced by 28-fold and the effect of SQ1 on Cyp2b10 induction was attenuated. Cotransfection with an expression plasmid for hCAR1, but not hCAR2 or hCAR3, mediated SQ1-induced CYP2B1 and CYP2B6 reporter activation in hepatocytes isolated from CAR-knockout mice. This effect was also observed following treatment with the isoprenoid trans,trans-farnesol. The direct agonist CITCO increased interaction of hCAR1, hCAR2, and hCAR3 with steroid receptor coactivator-1. However, no significant effect on coactivator recruitment was observed with SQ1, suggesting an indirect activation mechanism. Further results from an in vitro ligand binding assay demonstrated that neither farnesol nor other isoprenoids are direct ligands for hCAR1. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that SQ1 activates CYP2B transcriptional responses through farnesol metabolism in an hCAR1-dependent manner. Further, this effect probably occurs through an indirect mechanism. PMID:26798158

  14. Biosynthesis of radiolabeled verruculogen by Penicillium simplicissimum.

    PubMed

    Day, J B; Mantle, P G

    1982-03-01

    In surface culture of Penicillium simplicissimum, verruculogen was shown to be biosynthesized from the intact carbon skeletons of tryptophan and proline, isoprenoid derivatives of mevalonic acid, and a methyl group donated by methionine. Selected radiolabeled precursors (1 mCi) pulse-fed at the optimum stage of fermentation yielded verruculogen (specific activity, 5.89 X 10(2) microCi mmol-1) labeled in the prolyl and isoprenyl regions of the molecule and suitable for metabolic studies.

  15. Biosynthesis of radiolabeled verruculogen by Penicillium simplicissimum.

    PubMed Central

    Day, J B; Mantle, P G

    1982-01-01

    In surface culture of Penicillium simplicissimum, verruculogen was shown to be biosynthesized from the intact carbon skeletons of tryptophan and proline, isoprenoid derivatives of mevalonic acid, and a methyl group donated by methionine. Selected radiolabeled precursors (1 mCi) pulse-fed at the optimum stage of fermentation yielded verruculogen (specific activity, 5.89 X 10(2) microCi mmol-1) labeled in the prolyl and isoprenyl regions of the molecule and suitable for metabolic studies. PMID:7041819

  16. Studies on the regulation of lipid biosynthesis in plants: application of control analysis to soybean.

    PubMed

    Guschina, Irina A; Everard, John D; Kinney, Anthony J; Quant, Patti A; Harwood, John L

    2014-06-01

    Although there is much knowledge of the enzymology (and genes coding the proteins) of lipid biosynthesis in higher plants, relatively little attention has been paid to regulation. We have demonstrated the important role for cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase in the biosynthesis of the major extra-plastidic membrane lipid, phosphatidylcholine. We followed this work by applying control analysis to light-induced fatty acid synthesis. This was the first such application to lipid synthesis in any organism. The data showed that acetyl-CoA carboxylase was very important, exerting about half of the total control. We then applied metabolic control analysis to lipid accumulation in important oil crops - oilpalm, olive, and rapeseed. Recent data with soybean show that the block of fatty acid biosynthesis reactions exerts somewhat more control (63%) than lipid assembly although both are clearly very important. These results suggest that gene stacks, targeting both parts of the overall lipid synthesis pathway will be needed to increase significantly oil yields in soybean. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Upstream regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Alkhayyat, Fahad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins are natural contaminants of food and feed products, posing a substantial health risk to humans and animals throughout the world. A plethora of filamentous fungi has been identified as mycotoxin producers and most of these fungal species belong to the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium. A number of studies have been conducted to better understand the molecular mechanisms of biosynthesis of key mycotoxins and the regulatory cascades controlling toxigenesis. In many cases, the mycotoxin biosynthetic genes are clustered and regulated by one or more pathway-specific transcription factor(s). In addition, as biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites is coordinated with fungal growth and development, there are a number of upstream regulators affecting biosynthesis of mycotoxins in fungi. This review presents a concise summary of the regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis, focusing on the roles of the upstream regulatory elements governing biosynthesis of aflatoxin and sterigmatocystin in Aspergillus.

  18. Molecular evolution and functional characterisation of haplotypes of an important rubber biosynthesis gene in Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Uthup, T K; Rajamani, A; Ravindran, M; Saha, T

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A synthase (HMGS) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the cytoplasmic isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway leading to natural rubber production in Hevea brasiliensis (rubber). Analysis of the structural variants of this gene is imperative to understand their functional significance in rubber biosynthesis so that they can be properly utilised for ongoing crop improvement programmes in Hevea. We report here allele richness and diversity of the HMGS gene in selected popular rubber clones. Haplotypes consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the coding and non-coding regions with a high degree of heterozygosity were identified. Segregation and linkage disequilibrium analysis confirmed that recombination is the major contributor to the generation of allelic diversity, rather than point mutations. The evolutionarily conserved nature of some SNPs was identified by comparative DNA sequence analysis of HMGS orthologues from diverse taxa, demonstrating the molecular evolution of rubber biosynthesis genes in general. In silico three-dimensional structural studies highlighting the structural positioning of non-synonymous SNPs from different HMGS haplotypes revealed that the ligand-binding site on the enzyme remains impervious to the reported sequence variations. In contrast, gene expression results indicated the possibility of association between specific haplotypes and HMGS expression in Hevea clones, which may have a downstream impact up to the level of rubber production. Moreover, haplotype diversity of the HMGS gene and its putative association with gene expression can be the basis for further genetic association studies in rubber. Furthermore, the data also show the role of SNPs in the evolution of candidate genes coding for functional traits in plants.

  19. Genomic insights into the evolution of hybrid isoprenoid biosynthetic gene clusters in the MAR4 marine streptomycete clade

    DOE PAGES

    Gallagher, Kelley A.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-11-17

    Background: Considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular genetics of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Coupled with increased access to genome sequence data, new insight can be gained into the diversity and distributions of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and the evolutionary processes that generate them. Here we examine the distribution of gene clusters predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a structurally diverse class of molecules called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs) in the genus Streptomyces. These compounds are derived from a mixed biosynthetic origin that is characterized by the incorporation of a terpene moiety onto a variety of chemicalmore » scaffolds and include many potent antibiotic and cytotoxic agents. Results: One hundred and twenty Streptomyces genomes were searched for HI biosynthetic gene clusters using ABBA prenyltransferases (PTases) as queries. These enzymes are responsible for a key step in HI biosynthesis. The strains included 12 that belong to the ‘MAR4’ clade, a largely marine-derived lineage linked to the production of diverse HI secondary metabolites. We found ABBA PTase homologs in all of the MAR4 genomes, which averaged five copies per strain, compared with 21 % of the non-MAR4 genomes, which averaged one copy per strain. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that MAR4 PTase diversity has arisen by a combination of horizontal gene transfer and gene duplication. Furthermore, there is evidence that HI gene cluster diversity is generated by the horizontal exchange of orthologous PTases among clusters. Many putative HI gene clusters have not been linked to their secondary metabolic products, suggesting that MAR4 strains will yield additional new compounds in this structure class. Finally, we confirm that the mevalonate pathway is not always present in genomes that contain HI gene clusters and thus is not a reliable query for identifying strains with the potential to produce HI secondary metabolites

  20. Genomic insights into the evolution of hybrid isoprenoid biosynthetic gene clusters in the MAR4 marine streptomycete clade

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Kelley A.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-11-17

    Background: Considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular genetics of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Coupled with increased access to genome sequence data, new insight can be gained into the diversity and distributions of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and the evolutionary processes that generate them. Here we examine the distribution of gene clusters predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a structurally diverse class of molecules called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs) in the genus Streptomyces. These compounds are derived from a mixed biosynthetic origin that is characterized by the incorporation of a terpene moiety onto a variety of chemical scaffolds and include many potent antibiotic and cytotoxic agents. Results: One hundred and twenty Streptomyces genomes were searched for HI biosynthetic gene clusters using ABBA prenyltransferases (PTases) as queries. These enzymes are responsible for a key step in HI biosynthesis. The strains included 12 that belong to the ‘MAR4’ clade, a largely marine-derived lineage linked to the production of diverse HI secondary metabolites. We found ABBA PTase homologs in all of the MAR4 genomes, which averaged five copies per strain, compared with 21 % of the non-MAR4 genomes, which averaged one copy per strain. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that MAR4 PTase diversity has arisen by a combination of horizontal gene transfer and gene duplication. Furthermore, there is evidence that HI gene cluster diversity is generated by the horizontal exchange of orthologous PTases among clusters. Many putative HI gene clusters have not been linked to their secondary metabolic products, suggesting that MAR4 strains will yield additional new compounds in this structure class. Finally, we confirm that the mevalonate pathway is not always present in genomes that contain HI gene clusters and thus is not a reliable query for identifying strains with the potential to produce HI secondary metabolites. In

  1. Physiological significance of isoprenoids and phenylpropanoids in drought response of Arundinoideae species with contrasting habitats and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Velikova, Violeta; Brunetti, Cecilia; Tattini, Massimiliano; Doneva, Dilyana; Ahrar, Mastaneh; Tsonev, Tsonko; Stefanova, Miroslava; Ganeva, Tsveta; Gori, Antonella; Ferrini, Francesco; Varotto, Claudio; Loreto, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Physiological, biochemical and morpho-anatomical traits that determine the phenotypic plasticity of plants under drought were tested in two Arundinoideae with contrasting habitats, growth traits and metabolism: the fast-growing Arundo donax, which also is a strong isoprene emitter, and the slow-growing Hakonechloa macra that does not invest on isoprene biosynthesis. In control conditions, A. donax displayed not only higher photosynthesis but also higher concentration of carotenoids and lower phenylpropanoid content than H. macra. In drought-stressed plants, photosynthesis was similarly inhibited in both species, but substantially recovered only in A. donax after rewatering. Decline of photochemical and biochemical parameters, increased concentration of CO2 inside leaves, and impairment of chloroplast ultrastructure were only observed in H. macra indicating damage of photosynthetic machinery under drought. It is suggested that volatile and non-volatile isoprenoids produced by A. donax efficiently preserve the chloroplasts from transient drought damage, while H. macra invests on phenylpropanoids that are less efficient in preserving photosynthesis but likely offer better antioxidant protection under prolonged stress. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Highly isotopically depleted isoprenoids: Molecular markers for ancient methane venting

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, V.; Peckmann, J.; Seifert, R.; Wehrung, P.; Reitner, J.; Michaelis, W.

    1999-12-01

    The authors propose that organic compounds found in a Miocene limestone from Marmorito (Northern Italy) are source markers for organic matter present in ancient methane vent systems (cold seeps). The limestone contains high concentrations of the tail-to-tail linked, acyclic C{sub 20} isoprenoid 2,6,11,15-tetramethylhexadecane (crocetane), a C{sub 25} homolog 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosane (PME), and a distinctive glycerol ether lipid containing 3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecyl (phytanyl-) moieties. The chemical structures of these biomarkers indicate a common origin from archaea. Their extremely {sup 13}C-depleted isotope compositions ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} {minus}108 to {minus}115.6% PDB) suggest that the respective archaea have directly or indirectly introduced isotopically depleted, methane-derived carbon into their biomass. The authors postulate that a second major cluster of biomarkers showing heavier isotope values ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} {minus}88%) is derived from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The observed biomarkers sustain the idea that methanogenic bacteria, in a syntrophic community with SRB, are responsible for the anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments. Marmorito may thus represent a conceivable ancient scenario for methane consumption performed by a defined, two-membered bacterial consortium: (1) archaea that perform reversed methanogenesis by oxidizing methane and producing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}; and (2) SRB that consume the resulting H{sub 2}. Furthermore, the respective organic molecules are, unlike other compounds, tightly bound to the crystalline carbonate phase. The Marmorito carbonates can thus be regarded as cold seep microbialites rather than mere antigenic carbonates.

  3. Metabolic Labeling with an Alkyne-modified Isoprenoid Analog Facilitates Imaging and Quantification of the Prenylome in Cells.

    PubMed

    Palsuledesai, Charuta C; Ochocki, Joshua D; Kuhns, Michelle M; Wang, Yen-Chih; Warmka, Janel K; Chernick, Dustin S; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Li, Ling; Arriaga, Edgar A; Distefano, Mark D

    2016-10-21

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification that is responsible for membrane association and protein-protein interactions. The oncogenic protein Ras, which is prenylated, has been the subject of intense study in the past 20 years as a therapeutic target. Several studies have shown a correlation between neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease and protein prenylation. Here, a method for imaging and quantification of the prenylome using microscopy and flow cytometry is described. We show that metabolically incorporating an alkyne isoprenoid into mammalian cells, followed by a Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition reaction to a fluorophore, allows for detection of prenylated proteins in several cell lines and that different cell types vary significantly in their levels of prenylated proteins. The addition of a prenyltransferase inhibitor or the precursors to the native isoprenoid substrates lowers the levels of labeled prenylated proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that there is a significantly higher (22%) level of prenylated proteins in a cellular model of compromised autophagy as compared to normal cells, supporting the hypothesis of a potential involvement of protein prenylation in abrogated autophagy. These results highlight the utility of total prenylome labeling for studies on the role of protein prenylation in various diseases including aging-related disorders.

  4. Farnesyl phosphatase, a Corpora allata enzyme involved in juvenile hormone biosynthesis in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Nyati, Pratik; Nouzova, Marcela; Rivera-Perez, Crisalejandra; Clifton, Mark E; Mayoral, Jaime G; Noriega, Fernando G

    2013-01-01

    The juvenile hormones (JHs) are sesquiterpenoid compounds that play a central role in insect reproduction, development and behavior. The late steps of JH III biosynthesis in the mosquito Aedes aegypti involve the hydrolysis of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) to farnesol (FOL), which is then successively oxidized to farnesal and farnesoic acid, methylated to form methyl farnesoate and finally transformed to JH III by a P450 epoxidase. The only recognized FPP phosphatase (FPPase) expressed in the corpora allata (CA) of an insect was recently described in Drosophila melanogaster (DmFPPase). In the present study we sought to molecularly and biochemically characterize the FPP phosphatase responsible for the transformation of FPP into FOL in the CA of A. aegypti. A search for orthologs of the DmFPPase in Aedes aegypti led to the identification of 3 putative FPPase paralogs expressed in the CA of the mosquito (AaFPPases-1, -2, and -3). The activities of recombinant AaFPPases were tested against general phosphatase substrates and isoprenoid pyrophosphates. Using a newly developed assay utilizing fluorescent tags, we analyzed AaFPPase activities in CA of sugar and blood-fed females. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) was used to evaluate the effect of reduction of AaFPPase mRNAs on JH biosynthesis. AaFPPase-1 and AaFPPase-2 are members of the NagD family of the Class IIA C2 cap-containing haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase (HAD) super family and efficiently hydrolyzed FPP into FOL. AaFPPase activities were different in CA of sugar and blood-fed females. Injection of dsRNAs resulted in a significant reduction of AaFPPase-1 and AaFPPase-2 mRNAs, but only reduction of AaFPPase-1 caused a significant decrease of JH biosynthesis. These results suggest that AaFPPase-1 is predominantly involved in the catalysis of FPP into FOL in the CA of A. aegypti.

  5. Molecular characterization of Glycine max squalene synthase genes in seed phytosterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hanh T M; Neelakadan, Anjanasree K; Quach, Truyen N; Valliyodan, Babu; Kumar, Rajesh; Zhang, Zhanyuan; Nguyen, Henry T

    2013-12-01

    The reaction catalyzed by squalene synthase (EC.2.5.1.21) that converts two molecules of farnesyl pyrophosphate to squalene represents a crucial branch point of the isoprenoid pathway in diverting carbon flux towards the biosynthesis of sterols. In the present study two soybean squalene synthase genes, GmSQS1 and GmSQS2, were identified in the soybean genome and functionally characterized for their roles in sterol biosynthesis. Both genes encode a deduced protein of 413 amino acids. Complementation assays showed that the two genes were able to convert yeast sterol auxotrophy erg9 mutant to sterol prototrophy. Expression of GmSQS1 and GmSQS2 was ubiquitous in roots, stem, leaves, flower and young seeds of soybean, however GmSQS1 transcript was preferential in roots while GmSQS2 transcript was more in leaves. Their expression was lower in response to dehydration treatments suggesting they might be negative regulators of water stress adaptation. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GmSQS1 driven by either constitutive or seed-specific promoters showed increases in the major end product sterols: campesterol, sitosterol and stigmasterol, which resulted in up to 50% increase in total sterol content in the seeds. The increase in the end product sterols by GmSQS1 overexpression was at the level achievable by previously reported overexpression of individual or combination of other key enzymes in the sterol pathway. Together the data demonstrate that soybean SQS genes play an important role in diverting carbon flux to the biosynthesis of the end product sterols in the seeds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of aryl isoprenoids in source rocks and crude oils: Biological markers for the green sulphur bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summons, R. E.; Powell, T. G.

    1987-03-01

    A series of C 13 to C 31 aryl isoprenoids (1-alkyl,2,3,6-trimethylbenzenes) have been identified in reef-hosted oils and their source rocks from the Middle and Upper Silurian of the Michigan Basin and Middle Devonian of the Alberta Basin, Canada. Their structure has been confirmed by unambiguous synthesis of the C 14 member of the series. Their structure and isotopic composition indicate that they are derived from isorenieratene from the Chlorobiaceae family of sulphur bacteria. These results are consistent with geological and geochemical studies that show that the source rocks were deposited under metahaline to hypersaline sulphate and sulphide rich water columns. The distribution of other biomarkers in these oils and source rocks indicates that a diverse biota contributed organic matter to the source environment. In conjunction with the aryl isoprenoids, they show that there is a remarkable similarity in composition between the two sets of oils and source rocks despite their great temporal and geographic separation. This reflects the similarity of their environments and emphasizes the importance of sedimentary facies in controlling the composition of organic matter in source rocks and their derived oils.

  7. Chemical approaches to the elucidation of template biosynthesis: study of replication and reverse transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorre, Dmitrii G.; Kudryashova, Natal'ya V.; Lavrik, Ol'ga I.

    1998-05-01

    Chemical approaches to the elucidation of DNA template biosynthesis using DNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases, predominantly DNA polymerase I from E. coli and reverse transcriptase from HIV-1, are considered. Special attention is paid to the comparison of chemical modification and X-ray structural analysis data as well as to quantitative aspects of the interaction of DNA polymerases with templates, primers, and nucleoside 5'-triphosphates. New versions of a catalytically competent labelling method developed in the course of investigation of these enzymes are described. The data obtained in the analysis of replication complexes using primer analogues with photoreactive groups are presented. The bibliography includes 98 references.

  8. Echinomycin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Michio; Nakazawa, Takehito; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    Echinomycin is an antitumor antibiotic secondary metabolite isolated from streptomycetes, whose core structure is biosynthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). The echinomycin biosynthetic pathway was successfully reconstituted in Escherichia coli. NRPS often contains a thioesterase domain at its C terminus for cyclorelease of the elongating peptide chain. Those thioesterase domains were shown to exhibit significant substrate tolerance. More recently, an oxidoreductase Ecm17, which forms the disulfide bridge in triostin A, was characterized. Surprisingly, an unrelated disulfide-forming enzyme GliT for gliotoxin biosynthesis was also able to catalyze the same reaction, providing another example of broad substrate specificity in secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes. Those promiscuous catalysts can be a valuable tool in generating diversity in natural products analogs we can produce heterologously.

  9. Recent advances in synthetic biology for engineering isoprenoid production in yeast.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Claudia E; Williams, Thomas C; Peng, Bingyin; Cherry, Joel

    2017-06-14

    Isoprenoids (terpenes/terpenoids) have many useful industrial applications, but are often not produced at industrially viable level in their natural sources. Synthetic biology approaches have been used extensively to reconstruct metabolic pathways in tractable microbial hosts such as yeast and re-engineer pathways and networks to increase yields. Here we review recent advances in this field, focusing on central carbon metabolism engineering to increase precursor supply, re-directing carbon flux for production of C10, C15, or C20 isoprenoids, and chemical decoration of high value diterpenoids (C20). We also overview other novel synthetic biology strategies that have potential utility in yeast isoprenoid pathway engineering. Finally, we address the question of what is required in the future to move the field forwards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cellular Localization of Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Enzymes in Marchantia polymorpha. Uncovering a New Role of Oil Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Suire, Claude; Bouvier, Florence; Backhaus, Ralph A.; Bégu, Dominique; Bonneu, Marc; Camara, Bilal

    2000-01-01

    Like seed plants, liverworts synthesize and accumulate a myriad of isoprenoid compounds. Using antibodies raised against several isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes, we investigated their intracellular compartmentation by in situ immunolocalization from Marchantia polymorpha. The enzymes examined were deoxy-xylulose phosphate synthase, geranyl diphosphate synthase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, monoterpene synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate reductase, phytoene synthase, and phytoene desaturase. Our results show that liverwort oil bodies, which are organelles bound by a single unit membrane, possess isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in plastids and the cytosol. We postulate that oil bodies play a dynamic role in cell metabolism in addition to their role as sites of essential oil accumulation and sequestration. The occurrence of such enzymes in different cellular compartments might be due to multiple targeting of gene products to various organelles. PMID:11080275

  11. Function of isoprenoid quinones and chromanols during oxidative stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jerzy; Szymańska, Renata; Nowicka, Beatrycze; Dłużewska, Jolanta

    2016-09-25

    Isoprenoid quinones and chromanols in plants fulfill both signaling and antioxidant functions under oxidative stress. The redox state of the plastoquinol pool (PQ-pool), which is modulated by interaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS) during oxidative stress, has a major regulatory function in both short- and long-term acclimatory responses. By contrast, the scavenging of ROS by prenyllipids affects signaling pathways where ROS play a role as signaling molecules. As the primary antioxidants, isoprenoid quinones and chromanols are synthesized under high-light stress in response to any increased production of ROS. During photo-oxidative stress, these prenyllipids are continuously synthesized and oxidized to other compounds. In turn, their oxidation products (hydroxy-plastochromanol, plastoquinol-C, plastoquinone-B) can still have an antioxidant function. The oxidation products of isoprenoid quinones and chromanols formed specifically in the face of singlet oxygen, can be indicators of singlet oxygen stress.

  12. Microbial isoprenoid production: an example of green chemistry through metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Maury, Jérôme; Asadollahi, Mohammad A; Møller, Kasper; Clark, Anthony; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Saving energy, cost efficiency, producing less waste, improving the biodegradability of products, potential for producing novel and complex molecules with improved properties, and reducing the dependency on fossil fuels as raw materials are the main advantages of using biotechnological processes to produce chemicals. Such processes are often referred to as green chemistry or white biotechnology. Metabolic engineering, which permits the rational design of cell factories using directed genetic modifications, is an indispensable strategy for expanding green chemistry. In this chapter, the benefits of using metabolic engineering approaches for the development of green chemistry are illustrated by the recent advances in microbial production of isoprenoids, a diverse and important group of natural compounds with numerous existing and potential commercial applications. Accumulated knowledge on the metabolic pathways leading to the synthesis of the principal precursors of isoprenoids is reviewed, and recent investigations into isoprenoid production using engineered cell factories are described.

  13. Histidine biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Stepansky, A; Leustek, T

    2006-03-01

    The study of histidine metabolism has never been at the forefront of interest in plant systems despite the significant role that the analysis of this pathway has played in development of the field of molecular genetics in microbes. With the advent of methods to analyze plant gene function by complementation of microbial auxotrophic mutants and the complete analysis of plant genome sequences, strides have been made in deciphering the histidine pathway in plants. The studies point to a complex evolutionary origin of genes for histidine biosynthesis. Gene regulation studies have indicated novel regulatory networks involving histidine. In addition, physiological studies have indicated novel functions for histidine in plants as chelators and transporters of metal ions. Recent investigations have revealed intriguing connections of histidine in plant reproduction. The exciting new information suggests that the study of plant histidine biosynthesis has finally begun to flower.

  14. Highly branched isoprenoids (HBIs): identification of the most common and abundant sedimentary isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt, Simon T.; Allard, W. Guy; Massé, Guillaume; Robert, Jean-Michel; Rowland, Steven J.

    2000-11-01

    Tri- and tetraunsaturated highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) alkenes are widespread sedimentary geochemicals but few have been isolated from sediments in sufficient quantities for rigorous identification. However, two C 25 trienes, four C 25 tetraenes and two C 25 pentaenes have now been isolated from the diatom Pleurosigma intermedium following bulk scale culture, and these have been purified by column chromatography and fully characterised by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The compounds have been used to identify the previously unknown, but common and abundant HBIs found previously in many studies of sediments, particles and biota from around the world. These HBIs are structurally different to those reported from other diatoms. For example, unlike HBIs from the diatoms Haslea ostrearia and Rhizosolenia setigera, the alkenes in P. intermedium are unsaturated at the major branch point of the carbon skeleton and E/Z isomerism is observed for one of the trisubstituted double bonds. There is no evidence for the presence of configurational diastereoisomerism. The distributions of HBIs in P. intermedium (including the E/Z ratios) also show a dependence on the growth conditions within the five cultures studied. The positions of the double bonds in the HBIs of P. intermedium, and by inference, of the sediments, are consistent with the positions of sulphur incorporation in some of the HBI thiolanes and thiophenes which have been reported previously in some sediments and oils.

  15. Natural products as biofuels and bio-based chemicals: fatty acids and isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Beller, Harry R; Lee, Taek Soon; Katz, Leonard

    2015-09-23

    Although natural products are best known for their use in medicine and agriculture, a number of fatty acid-derived and isoprenoid natural products are being developed for use as renewable biofuels and bio-based chemicals. This review summarizes recent work on fatty acid-derived compounds (fatty acid alkyl esters, fatty alcohols, medium- and short-chain methyl ketones, alkanes, α-olefins, and long-chain internal alkenes) and isoprenoids, including hemiterpenes (e.g., isoprene and isopentanol), monoterpenes (e.g., limonene), and sesquiterpenes (e.g., farnesene and bisabolene).

  16. δ-Deuterium Isotope Effects as Probes for Transition-State Structures of Isoprenoid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathways to isoprenoid compounds involve transfer of the prenyl moiety in allylic diphosphates to electron-rich (nucleophilic) acceptors. The acceptors can be many types of nucleophiles, while the allylic diphosphates only differ in the number of isoprene units and stereochemistry of the double bonds in the hydrocarbon moieties. Because of the wide range of nucleophilicities of naturally occurring acceptors, the mechanism for prenyltransfer reactions may be dissociative or associative with early to late transition states. We have measured δ-secondary kinetic isotope effects operating through four bonds for substitution reactions with dimethylallyl derivatives bearing deuterated methyl groups at the distal (C3) carbon atom in the double bond under dissociative and associative conditions. Computational studies with density functional theory indicate that the magnitudes of the isotope effects correlate with the extent of bond formation between the allylic moiety and the electron-rich acceptor in the transition state for alkylation and provide insights into the structures of the transition states for associative and dissociative alkylation reactions. PMID:24665882

  17. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria. PMID:25505460

  18. Unique biosynthesis of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes).

    PubMed

    Sato, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    To the best of my knowledge, only 19 cyclic and 8 linear C35 terpenes have been identified to date, and no family name was assigned to this terpene class until recently. In 2011, it was proposed that these C35 terpenes should be called sesquarterpenes. This review highlights the biosynthesis of two kinds of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes) that are produced via cyclization of a linear C35 isoprenoid in Bacillus and Mycobacterium species. In Bacillus species, a new type of terpene cyclase that has no sequence homology with any known terpene synthases, as well as a bifunctional terpene cyclase that biosynthesizes two classes of cyclic terpenes with different numbers of carbons as natural products, have been identified. On the other hand, in Mycobacterium species, the first bifunctional Z-prenyltransferase has been found, but a novel terpene cyclase and a unique polyprenyl reductase remain unidentified. The identification of novel enzyme types should lead to the discovery of many homologous enzymes and their products including novel natural compounds. On the other hand, many enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of natural products have low substrate specificities in vitro. Therefore, to find novel natural products present in organisms, the multifunctionality of enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of natural products should be analyzed.

  19. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria.

  20. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    PubMed

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses.

  1. Studies on the biosynthesis of the antibiotic reductiomycin in Streptomyces xanthochromogenus

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H.; Beale, J.M.; Floss, H.G. Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH ); Graff, C.; Mocek, U. ); Nakagawa, Akira; Omura, Satoshi )

    1993-12-29

    The biosynthesis of the antibiotic reductiomycin (I) in Streptomyces xanthochromogenus was investigated by feeding experiments with radioactive and stable isotope-labeled precursors. NMR and mass spectroscopic analyses of the labeled I samples revealed that the acetoxy group comes from acetate, the 2-amino-3-hydroxycyclopent-2-enone moiety arises by a novel intramolecular cyclization of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), and the dihydrofuranylacrylic moiety is formed by aromatic ring cleavage of a symmetrical product of the shikimate pathway. Both 4-hydroxy-[7-[sup 13]C]benzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-[7-[sup 13]C]benzaldehyde label 1 very efficiently, and deuterium from various positions in these precursors is incorporated into the predicted positions in the dihydrofuranylacrylic acid moiety of 1. The results are interpreted in terms of a dioxygenase mechanism for the ring cleavage reaction and pyridoxal phosphate catalysis for the ALA cyclization. 42 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Biosynthesis of Nudicaulins: A (13) CO2 -pulse/chase labeling study with Papaver nudicaule.

    PubMed

    Tatsis, Evangelos C; Eylert, Eva; Maddula, Ravi Kumar; Ostrozhenkova, Elena; Svatoš, Aleš; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Schneider, Bernd

    2014-07-21

    Nudicaulins are unique alkaloids responsible for the yellow color of the petals of some papaveraceaous plants. To elucidate the unknown biosynthetic origin of the skeleton, a (13) CO2 -pulse/chase experiment was performed with growing Papaver nudicaule plants. (13) C NMR analysis revealed more than 20 multiple (13) C-enriched isotopologues in nudicaulins from the petals of (13) CO2 -labeled plants. The complex labeling pattern was compared with the isotopologue composition of a kaempferol derivative that was isolated from petals of the same (13) CO2 -labeled plants. The deconvolution of the labeling profiles indicated that the nudicaulin scaffold is assembled from products or intermediates of indole metabolism, the phenylpropanoid pathway, and the polyketide biosynthesis. Naringenin-type compounds and tryptophan/tryptamine are potential substrates for the condensation reaction finally generating the aglycone skeleton of nudicaulins.

  3. Enzymology of the P-C bond. A study of the biosynthesis and biodegradation of 2-aminoethylphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Barry, R.; Hepburn, T.; Olsen, D.; Mariano, P.S.

    1987-05-01

    The mechanisms by which phosphorus-carbon bonds are made and are broken in biological systems are not well understood. In their laboratory they have examined the biosynthesis and biodegradation of the most predominate phosphonate in nature, 2-aminoethylphosphonate (AEP). In Bacillus cereus AEP is first converted to phosphonoacetaldehyde (PA) before hydrolysis of the P-C linkage takes place. They have examined the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme which catalyzes this hydrolysis, phosphonoacetaldehyde hydrolase (phosphonatase). Treatment of the enzyme with (/sup 3/H)-PA and NaBH/sub 4/ resulted in ethylation of an active site lysine and loss of catalytic activity. Thus, hydrolysis appears to occur via a covalent imine intermediate. Their studies of AEP biosynthesis in Tetrahymena pyriformis have focused on testing the precursor roles of PEP, phosphonopyruvate and PA. Resuspended microsomes were found to catalyze in the presence of pyridoxal phosphate and alanine, the conversion of these three precursors to AEP. The P-C bond appears to be formed by rearrangement of PEP.

  4. In-vitro and in-vivo studies on the induction of neopterin biosynthesis by cytokines, alloantigens and lipopolysaccharides (LPS)

    PubMed Central

    Troppmair, J.; Nachbaur, K.; Herold, M.; Aulitzky, W.; Tilg, H.; Gastl, G.; Bieling, P.; Kotlan, B.; Flener, R.; Mull, B.; Aulitzky, W. O.; Rokos, H.; Huber, Ch.

    1988-01-01

    Recently we presented evidence that cellular immune responses are associated with increased in-vitro and in-vivo excretion of neopterin (Huber et al., 1983) and that, in vitro at least, macrophages and IFN-γ play a key role in the induction of this phenomenon (Huber et al., 1984). Although this marker is increasingly applied for monitoring of human disease, there is limited knowledge about the mechanism(s) responsible for its increased biosynthesis during inflammatory states. To further elucidate this question we evaluated neopterin and IFN-levels in culture supernatants of human blood cells and in patients' sera. Cells or patients were exposed to a panel of recombinant cytokines, alloantigens or lipopolysaccharide. To investigate indirect stimulation by induction of production of endogenous IFNs, the impact of neutralization of IFNs by addition of specific antibodies was also studied. The data confirm our previous results which identified the monocyte/macrophage as the main producer cell among human blood cells. They further demonstrate that, at least in vitro, IFN-γ, IFN-α and LPS can all stimulate neopterin release independently from each other. Thirdly, they indicate that stimuli such as alloantigens or TNF-α can indirectly enhance neopterin release by their capacity to induce production of endogenous IFN-γ. On the basis of these data we conclude that enhanced neopterin biosynthesis does not necessarily relate to activation of T cells but can also be caused by non-immune stimuli. PMID:3148378

  5. Mechanistic studies of a novel C-S lyase in ergothioneine biosynthesis: the involvement of a sulfenic acid intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Song, Heng; Hu, Wen; Naowarojna, Nathchar; Her, Ampon Sae; Wang, Shu; Desai, Rushil; Qin, Li; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Pinghua

    2015-01-01

    Ergothioneine is a histidine thio-derivative isolated in 1909. In ergothioneine biosynthesis, the combination of a mononuclear non-heme iron enzyme catalyzed oxidative C-S bond formation reaction and a PLP-mediated C-S lyase (EgtE) reaction results in a net sulfur transfer from cysteine to histidine side-chain. This demonstrates a new sulfur transfer strategy in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing natural products. Due to difficulties associated with the overexpression of Mycobacterium smegmatis EgtE protein, the proposed EgtE functionality remained to be verified biochemically. In this study, we have successfully overexpressed and purified M. smegmatis EgtE enzyme and evaluated its activities under different in vitro conditions: C-S lyase reaction using either thioether or sulfoxide as a substrate in the presence or absence of reductants. Results from our biochemical characterizations support the assignment of sulfoxide 4 as the native EgtE substrate and the involvement of a sulfenic acid intermediate in the ergothioneine C-S lyase reaction. PMID:26149121

  6. Aromatic Prenylation in Phenazine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Orwah; Gust, Bertolt; Boll, Björn; Fiedler, Hans-Peter; Heide, Lutz

    2009-01-01

    The bacterium Streptomyces anulatus 9663, isolated from the intestine of different arthropods, produces prenylated derivatives of phenazine 1-carboxylic acid. From this organism, we have identified the prenyltransferase gene ppzP. ppzP resides in a gene cluster containing orthologs of all genes known to be involved in phenazine 1-carboxylic acid biosynthesis in Pseudomonas strains as well as genes for the six enzymes required to generate dimethylallyl diphosphate via the mevalonate pathway. This is the first complete gene cluster of a phenazine natural compound from streptomycetes. Heterologous expression of this cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor M512 resulted in the formation of prenylated derivatives of phenazine 1-carboxylic acid. After inactivation of ppzP, only nonprenylated phenazine 1-carboxylic acid was formed. Cloning, overexpression, and purification of PpzP resulted in a 37-kDa soluble protein, which was identified as a 5,10-dihydrophenazine 1-carboxylate dimethylallyltransferase, forming a C–C bond between C-1 of the isoprenoid substrate and C-9 of the aromatic substrate. In contrast to many other prenyltransferases, the reaction of PpzP is independent of the presence of magnesium or other divalent cations. The Km value for dimethylallyl diphosphate was determined as 116 μm. For dihydro-PCA, half-maximal velocity was observed at 35 μm. Kcat was calculated as 0.435 s-1. PpzP shows obvious sequence similarity to a recently discovered family of prenyltransferases with aromatic substrates, the ABBA prenyltransferases. The present finding extends the substrate range of this family, previously limited to phenolic compounds, to include also phenazine derivatives. PMID:19339241

  7. Chapter 3: Omics Advances of Biosynthetic Pathways of Isoprenoid Production in Microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Paniagua-Michel, J.; Subramanian, Venkataramanan

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, the current status of microalgal isoprenoids and the role of omics technologies, or otherwise specified, in bioproducts optimization and applications are reviewed. Emphasis is focused in the metabolic pathways of microalgae involved in the production of commercially important products, namely, hydrocarbons and biofuels, nutraceuticals, and pharmaceuticals.

  8. Attempts toward biosynthesis of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone and studies on its breakdown in hypothalamic tissue preparations.

    PubMed

    Bauer, K; Lipmann, F

    1976-07-01

    Attempts were made to study the reported biosynthesis of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH = pyroGlu-His-Pro-amide) by incubating extracts of freeze-dried hypothalamic tissue with radioactively labeled precursor amino acids. Chromatographic analysis indicated a fast incorporation of radioactivity into many metabolites, including one that initially co-migrated with TRH. However, on two-dimensional chromatography, such coincidence disappeared and thus a biosynthesis of TRH could not be confirmed. A very fast degradation of TRH by serum, as well as by brain tissue preparations, was observed and was studied in detail because it could be a cause of difficulties encountered in detecting an in vitro synthesis. In hypothalamic and cortical tissue preparations, on incubation with TRH labeled with [3H]proline, fast formation of radioactively labeled deamido-TRH and liberation of prolineamide and free proline were found. On incubation of serum with labeled TRH there was a similar rapid breakdown, but different products were yielded. Degradation of TRH by serum has been reported to be strongly inhibited by pyroGlu-His-OCH3, a dipeptide analogue of TRH (10). The peptidolytic cleavage of TRH by brain enzymes, yielding proline and prolineamide as split products, was also effectively reduced using comparatively high concentrations of the dipeptide ester without, however, preventing TRH deamidation. Presuming deamido-TRH to be a biosynthetic intermediary, we decided to continue studying the synthesis of TRH with hypothalamic tissue preparations in the presence of inhibitory concentrations of the dipeptide ester, aiming at the isolation of deamido-TRH. Using [14C]proline as the label, it appeared that rather large amounts of radioactively labeled deamido-TRH, which was identified as such by vigorous purification, could be isolated from such incubates. However, only proline was incorporated, but labelled histidine or glutamic acid were not, and ATP addition was, if anything

  9. Initiation of glycogen biosynthesis in rat heart. Studies with a purified preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, M.L.; Krisman, C.R.

    1985-09-25

    Two fractions of glycogen synthase were isolated from rat cardiac muscle on the basis of a different affinity for DEAE-cellulose and omega-aminobutyl-agarose. One of these fractions was able to transfer glucosyl residues from UDP-glucose not only to glycogen (GS-1 activity) but also to an endogenous acceptor. The latter reaction (GS-2 activity) occurred in the absence of added glycogen, and its reaction product was insoluble in trichloroacetic acid. This compound was degraded by amylolytic enzymes, thus showing that the product synthesized on the endogenous acceptor was an alpha 1,4-glucan. After incubation with alpha-amylase-free proteolytic enzyme, the compound was rendered trichloroacetic acid-soluble. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, under both native and denaturing conditions, showed that GS-2 reaction products moved electrophoretically associated to protein. The results give further evidence for the association between an alpha 1,4-glucan and protein, which the authors postulate is related to the initiation of glycogen biosynthesis.

  10. Mechanistic studies on norcoclaurine synthase of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis: an enzymatic Pictet-Spengler reaction.

    PubMed

    Luk, Louis Y P; Bunn, Shannon; Liscombe, David K; Facchini, Peter J; Tanner, Martin E

    2007-09-04

    Norcoclaurine synthase catalyzes an asymmetric Pictet-Spengler condensation of dopamine and 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde to give (S)-norcoclaurine. This is the first committed step in the biosynthesis of the benzylisoquinoline alkaloids that include morphine and codeine. In this work, the gene encoding for the Thalictrum flavum norcoclaurine synthase is highly overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the resulting His-tagged recombinant enzyme is purified for the first time. A continuous assay based on circular dichroism spectroscopy is developed and used to monitor the kinetics of the enzymatic reaction. Dopamine analogues bearing a methoxy or hydrogen substituent in place of the C-1 phenolic group were readily accepted by the enzyme whereas those bearing the same substituents at C-2 were not. This supports a mechanism involving a two-step cyclization of the putative iminium ion intermediate that does not proceed via a spirocyclic intermediate. The reaction of [3,5,6-2H]dopamine was found to be slowed by a kinetic isotope effect of 1.7 +/- 0.1 on the value of kcat/KM. This is interpreted as showing that the deprotonation step causing rearomatization is partially rate determining in the overall reaction.

  11. Biosynthesis of Hemes.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2007-04-01

    This review is concerned specifically with the structures and biosynthesis of hemes in E. coli and serovar Typhimurium. However, inasmuch as all tetrapyrroles share a common biosynthetic pathway, much of the material covered here is applicable to tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in other organisms. Conversely, much of the available information about tetrapyrrole biosynthesis has been gained from studies of other organisms, such as plants, algae, cyanobacteria, and anoxygenic phototrophs, which synthesize large quantities of these compounds. This information is applicable to E. coli and serovar Typhimurium. Hemes play important roles as enzyme prosthetic groups in mineral nutrition, redox metabolism, and gas-and redox-modulated signal transduction. The biosynthetic steps from the earliest universal precursor, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), to protoporphyrin IX-based hemes constitute the major, common portion of the pathway, and other steps leading to specific groups of products can be considered branches off the main axis. Porphobilinogen (PBG) synthase (PBGS; also known as ALA dehydratase) catalyzes the asymmetric condensation of two ALA molecules to form PBG, with the release of two molecules of H2O. Protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase (PPX) catalyzes the removal of six electrons from the tetrapyrrole macrocycle to form protoporphyrin IX in the last biosynthetic step that is common to hemes and chlorophylls. Several lines of evidence converge to support a regulatory model in which the cellular level of available or free protoheme controls the rate of heme synthesis at the level of the first step unique to heme synthesis, the formation of GSA by the action of GTR.

  12. A Comparative Study of Phenolic Antioxidant Activity and Flavonoid Biosynthesis-Related Gene Expression Between Summer and Winter Strawberry Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Park, Doori; Park, Yeri; Lee, Young Hun; Choi, Ik-Young; Park, Kyong Cheul; Park, Sang Un; Kim, Byung Sup; Yeoung, Young Rog; Park, Nam Il

    2017-02-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) possesses good antioxidant properties. Phenolic compounds in strawberries, such as anthocyanins and ellagic acid, mainly act as antioxidants. This study aimed to compare the phenolic content and expression patterns of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis between summer and winter strawberry cultivars affected by seasonal variation, degree of ripeness, and genotype. Antioxidant activity and the total content of phenols and flavonoids decreased with fruit ripening. Most notably, summer strawberry cultivars showed higher antioxidant activity than winter cultivars. The expression patterns of flavonoid biosynthetic genes tested were cultivar-dependent and were also affected by ripening. These results help us understand the nutritional and physiological characteristics of selected cultivars and provide a range of information for strawberry consumption. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  13. Calcium, calcification, and melatonin biosynthesis in the human pineal gland: a postmortem study into age-related factors.

    PubMed

    Schmid, H A; Requintina, P J; Oxenkrug, G F; Sturner, W

    1994-05-01

    It is believed that pineal calcification may be age-associated and that the well-demonstrated age-related decline in melatonin biosynthesis may be an expression of an alteration in calcium homeostasis in the pinealocyte. Prior correlations of melatonin to calcium deposition and age were made on the basis of radiological or semiquantitative analysis. In this postmortem study of 33 subjects (age range 3 months to 65 years) calcium deposits measured by atomic absorption spectrometry correlated positively with age in day and night samples (day: r = 0.56, P < 0.05; night: r = 0.818, P < 0.001). Nighttime (2200 h to 0800 h) pineal melatonin content (HPLC fluorometry) was higher than daytime melatonin levels (nighttime 3.80 +/- 0.3 vs. daytime 0.85 +/- 0.4 ng/mg protein). Nighttime calcium levels in the supernatant correlated negatively with melatonin content (r = -0.59, P < 0.05).

  14. The pattern and control of isoprenoid quinone and tocopherol metabolism in the germinating grain of wheat (Triticum vulgare)

    PubMed Central

    Hall, G. S.; Laidman, D. L.

    1968-01-01

    1. The syntheses of ubiquinone-9 and plastoquinone-9 were used as parameters respectively of mitochondrial and proplastid development in the germinating wheat grain. 2. The changes in the amounts of the tocopherols were also studied and the possible biological significance of these changes is discussed. During germination, the dimethyl tocopherols of the resting grain are probably not utilized for the synthesis of α-tocopherol. 3. It was demonstrated that ubiquinone synthesis, and hence probably mitochondrial development, in the aleurone cells during germination, is independent of control by gibberellic acid from the embryo. 4. The influence of light on the syntheses of the isoprenoid quinones in the etiolated wheat shoot was investigated. In particular, illumination did not stimulate the synthesis of either α-tocopherol or α-tocopherolquinone. PMID:5667257

  15. Molecular biological study of early steps of heme biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianming.

    1989-01-01

    The heme molecule is the prosthetic group of hemoglobins, cytochromes, catalases and peroxidases, and modified tetrapyrroles are the active moieties of the chlorophylls and vitamin B{sub 12}. The pathway of heme biosynthesis is highly conserved except for the formation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), the first common intermediate. ALA can be synthesized from glutamic acid (C{sub 5} pathway) or succinyl CoA and glycine (C{sub 4} pathway). In E. coli, the heme biosynthetic pathway consists of more than eight enzymatic steps. The genes encoding these enzymes are widely scattered on the chromosome. An E. coli heme-requiring, hemin-permeable mutant had no detectable 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA D) or porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG D) activities. The gene which complemented this mutation was cloned. PBG D activity was restored to normal levels, but the activity of ALA D was 20-30 fold higher than normal. A maxicell procedure confirmed that the cloned gene was hemB. The hemB gene was sequenced. Two promoter regions, two Shine-Dalgarno sequences and two possible initiation sites were identified. Extensive homologies with yeast (36%), human liver (40%) and rat liver (40%) amino acid sequences were observed, especially in the sixteen-amino acid Zn-binding region (75%) and the four amino acids surrounding the essential lysine at the active site (100% for rate and human proteins). Analysis of promoter strength and two independent analyses of codon usage indicated that the hemB gene is moderately-expressed. E. coli hemA gene was cloned and sequenced. Complemented mutants overproduced 5-ALA and porphyrins. The cloned sequence appears to encode a 46 kDa protein. The amino acid sequence of the cloned gene product showed no significant homologies with any cloned ALA synthase nor with any protein in two data banks.

  16. Diatom-specific highly branched isoprenoids as biomarkers in Antarctic consumers.

    PubMed

    Goutte, Aurélie; Cherel, Yves; Houssais, Marie-Noëlle; Klein, Vincent; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Raccurt, Mireille; Robineau, Camille; Massé, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    The structure, functioning and dynamics of polar marine ecosystems are strongly influenced by the extent of sea ice. Ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton represent the primary sources of nutrition for higher trophic-level organisms in seasonally ice-covered areas, but their relative contributions to polar marine consumers remain largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the potential of diatom-specific lipid markers and highly branched isoprenoids (HBIs) for estimating the importance of these two carbon pools in an Antarctic pelagic ecosystem. Using GC-MS analysis, we studied HBI biomarkers in key marine species over three years in Adélie Land, Antarctica: euphausiids (ice krill Euphausia crystallorophias and Antarctic krill E. superba), fish (bald notothens Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Antarctic silverfish Pleuragramma antarcticum) and seabirds (Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae, snow petrels Pagodroma nivea and cape petrels Daption capense). This study provides the first evidence of the incorporation of HBI lipids in Antarctic pelagic consumers. Specifically, a di-unsaturated HBI (diene) of sea ice origin was more abundant in ice-associated species than in pelagic species, whereas a tri-unsaturated HBI (triene) of phytoplanktonic origin was more abundant in pelagic species than in ice-associated species. Moreover, the relative abundances of diene and triene in seabird tissues and eggs were higher during a year of good sea ice conditions than in a year of poor ice conditions. In turn, the higher contribution of ice algal derived organic matter to the diet of seabirds was related to earlier breeding and higher breeding success. HBI biomarkers are a promising tool for estimating the contribution of organic matter derived from ice algae in pelagic consumers from Antarctica.

  17. Diatom-Specific Highly Branched Isoprenoids as Biomarkers in Antarctic Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Goutte, Aurélie; Cherel, Yves; Houssais, Marie-Noëlle; Klein, Vincent; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Raccurt, Mireille; Robineau, Camille; Massé, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    The structure, functioning and dynamics of polar marine ecosystems are strongly influenced by the extent of sea ice. Ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton represent the primary sources of nutrition for higher trophic-level organisms in seasonally ice-covered areas, but their relative contributions to polar marine consumers remain largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the potential of diatom-specific lipid markers and highly branched isoprenoids (HBIs) for estimating the importance of these two carbon pools in an Antarctic pelagic ecosystem. Using GC-MS analysis, we studied HBI biomarkers in key marine species over three years in Adélie Land, Antarctica: euphausiids (ice krill Euphausia crystallorophias and Antarctic krill E. superba), fish (bald notothens Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Antarctic silverfish Pleuragramma antarcticum) and seabirds (Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae, snow petrels Pagodroma nivea and cape petrels Daption capense). This study provides the first evidence of the incorporation of HBI lipids in Antarctic pelagic consumers. Specifically, a di-unsaturated HBI (diene) of sea ice origin was more abundant in ice-associated species than in pelagic species, whereas a tri-unsaturated HBI (triene) of phytoplanktonic origin was more abundant in pelagic species than in ice-associated species. Moreover, the relative abundances of diene and triene in seabird tissues and eggs were higher during a year of good sea ice conditions than in a year of poor ice conditions. In turn, the higher contribution of ice algal derived organic matter to the diet of seabirds was related to earlier breeding and higher breeding success. HBI biomarkers are a promising tool for estimating the contribution of organic matter derived from ice algae in pelagic consumers from Antarctica. PMID:23418580

  18. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka; Holst, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur), European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies) in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light intensity was increased in four steps (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 µmol m-2 s-1), whilst other chamber conditions such as temperature, humidity and CO2 levels were fixed. Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds α-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances of Norway spruce, the compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and eucalyptol showed high light-dependent fractions for many of the measured trees. This study highlights differences between compound emissions in their response to a change in light and a possible light independence for certain compounds, which might be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the discussion regarding light or

  19. Investigating the Biosynthesis of Membrane-spanning Lipids Using Model Strains of Acidobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. S.; Chubiz, L. M.

    2016-12-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs), deriving from the membrane-spanning lipids of microbes, are detected in a wide range of environments including marine and lacustrine waters, sediments, and in terrestrial soils. In sediments and soils, ratios of various GDGT structures form the basis of the TEX86 proxy based on isoprenoidal GDGTs derived from archaea, and the MBT/CBT proxy based on bacterial-derived branched GDGTs (brGDGTs), which is influenced by both temperature and pH. While the relationships of the proxy values to environmental variables have been empirically calibrated, much uncertainty remains in understanding genetic and physiological factors that affect the production of these lipid structures by microbes. In this study we compare two model bacterial strains - Edaphobacter aggregans WGB-1 , which has been previously demonstrated to produce brGDGTs (Damsté et al 2011) and Edaphobacter modestus JBG-1 (a non-brGDGT producer) to gain traction into understanding brGDGT production. We have sequenced each genome, facilitating comparisons that can be used to computationally generate hypotheses for genes involved in brGDGT biosynthesis. We will also report the results of initial experiments conducted to understand how the lipid profiles of each strain vary as a function of growth phase. Through a combination of genetic approaches and physiolotical experiments, we aim to bring new understanding to brGDGTs and how proxies derived from these lipids relate to environmental variables. Damsté et al. 2011 AEM 77: 4147

  20. Antiglioma effects of N6-isopentenyladenosine, an endogenous isoprenoid end product, through the downregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ciaglia, Elena; Abate, Mario; Laezza, Chiara; Pisanti, Simona; Vitale, Mario; Seneca, Vincenzo; Torelli, Giovanni; Franceschelli, Silvia; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2017-02-15

    Malignant gliomas are highly dependent on the isoprenoid pathway for the synthesis of lipid moieties critical for cell proliferation. The isoprenoid derivative N6-isopentenyladenosine (iPA) displays pleiotropic biological effects, including a direct anti-tumor activity in several tumor models. The antiglioma effects of iPA was then explored in U87MG cells both in vitro and grafted in mice and the related molecular mechanism confirmed in primary derived patients' glioma cells. iPA powerfully inhibited tumor cell growth and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis through a mechanism involving a marked accumulation of the pro-apoptotic BIM protein and inhibition of EGFR. Indeed, activating AMPK following conversion into its iPAMP active form, iPA stimulated EGFR phosphorylation and ubiquitination along a proteasome-mediated pathway which was responsible for receptor degradation and its downstream signaling pathways inhibition, including the STAT3, ERK and AKT cascade. The inhibition of AMPK by compound C prevented iPA-mediated phosphorylation of EGFR, known to precede receptor loss. As expected the block of EGFR degradation, by exposure to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, significantly reduced iPA-induced cell death. Given the importance of receptor degradation in iPA-mediated cytotoxicity, we also documented that the EGFR expression levels in a panel of primary glioma cells confers them a high sensitivity to iPA treatment. In conclusion our study provides the first evidence of iPA antiglioma effect. Indeed, as glioma is driven by aberrant signaling of growth factor receptors, particularly the EGFR, iPA, alone or in association with EGFR targeted therapies, might be a promising therapeutic tool to achieve a potent anti-tumoral effect.

  1. Biosynthesis of Ether-Type Polar Lipids in Archaea and Evolutionary Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Yosuke; Morii, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    This review deals with the in vitro biosynthesis of the characteristics of polar lipids in archaea along with preceding in vivo studies. Isoprenoid chains are synthesized through the classical mevalonate pathway, as in eucarya, with minor modifications in some archaeal species. Most enzymes involved in the pathway have been identified enzymatically and/or genomically. Three of the relevant enzymes are found in enzyme families different from the known enzymes. The order of reactions in the phospholipid synthesis pathway (glycerophosphate backbone formation, linking of glycerophosphate with two radyl chains, activation by CDP, and attachment of common polar head groups) is analogous to that of bacteria. sn-Glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase is responsible for the formation of the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone of phospholipids in all archaea. After the formation of two ether bonds, CDP-archaeol acts as a common precursor of various archaeal phospholipid syntheses. Various phospholipid-synthesizing enzymes from archaea and bacteria belong to the same large CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase family. In short, the first halves of the phospholipid synthesis pathways play a role in synthesis of the characteristic structures of archaeal and bacterial phospholipids, respectively. In the second halves of the pathways, the polar head group-attaching reactions and enzymes are homologous in both domains. These are regarded as revealing the hybrid nature of phospholipid biosynthesis. Precells proposed by Wächtershäuser are differentiated into archaea and bacteria by spontaneous segregation of enantiomeric phospholipid membranes (with sn-glycerol-1-phosphate and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbones) and the fusion and fission of precells. Considering the nature of the phospholipid synthesis pathways, we here propose that common phospholipid polar head groups were present in precells before the differentiation into archaea and bacteria. PMID:17347520

  2. A model to assess the emission of individual isoprenoids emitted from Italian ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper Pacheco, C. J.; Fares, S.; Loreto, F.; Ciccioli, P.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a GIS-based model to estimate the emissions from the Italian forest ecosystems. The model was aimed at generating a species-specific emission inventory for isoprene and individual monoterpenes that could have been validated with experimental data collected in selected sites of the CARBOITALY network. The model was develop for the year 2006. At a resolution of 1 km2 with a daily time resolution. By using the emission rates of individual components obtained through several laboratory and field experiments carried out on different vegetation species of the Mediterranean basin, maps of individual isoprenoids were generated for the Italian ecosystems. The spatial distribution and fractional contents of vegetation species present in the Italian forest ecosystems was obtained by combining the CORINE IV land cover map with National Forest Inventory based on ground observations performed at local levels by individual Italian regions (22) in which the country is divided. In general, basal emission rates for individual isoprenoids was reported by Steinbrecher et al. 1997 and Karl et al. 2009 were used. In this case, classes were further subdivided into T and L+T emitters as functions of the active pool. In many instances, however they were revised based on the results obtained in our Institute through determinations performed at leaf, branch (cuvette method) or ecosystem level (REA and the gradient method). In the latter case, studies performed in Italy and/or Mediterranean countries were used. An empirical light extinction function as a function of the canopy type and structure was introduced. The algorithms proposed by (Guenther et al. 1993) were used, but, they were often adapted to fit with the experimental observations made in the Mediterranean Areas. They were corrected for a seasonality factor (Steinbrecher et al. 2009) taking into account a time lag in leaf sprouting due to the plant elevation. A simple parameterization with LAI was

  3. Carotenoid-based phenotypic screen of the yeast deletion collection reveals new genes with roles in isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Özaydın, Bilge; Burd, Helcio; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    Beside their essential cellular functions, isoprenoids have value as pharmaceuticals, nutriceuticals, pesticides, and fuel alternatives. Engineering microorganisms for production of isoprenoids is relatively easy, sustainable, and cost effective in comparison to chemical synthesis or extraction from natural producers. We introduced genes encoding carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes into the haploid yeast deletion collection to identify gene deletions that improved isoprenoid production. Deletions that showed significant improvement in carotenoid production were further screened for production of bisabolene, an isoprenoid alternative to petroleum-derived diesel. Combining those deletions with other mevalonate pathway modifications increased production of bisabolene from 40mg/L to 800mg/L in shake-flask cultures. In a fermentation process, this engineered strain produced 5.2g/L of bisabolene.

  4. Bioactive Isoprenoid-Derived Natural Products from a Dongsha Atoll Soft Coral Sinularia erecta.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Yao; Tseng, Yen-Ju; Chokkalingam, Uvarani; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Dai, Chang-Feng; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Sheu, Jyh-Horng

    2016-05-27

    Four new isoprenoids, including two norcembranoids sinulerectols A and B (1 and 2), a cembranoid sinulerectol C (3), and a degraded cembranoid sinulerectadione (4), along with three known isoprenoids, an unnamed norcembrene (5), sinularectin (6), and ineleganolide (7), and a known nitrogen-containing compound (Z)-N-[2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]-3-methyldodec-2-enamide (8), were isolated from an extract of the marine soft coral Sinularia erecta. The structure of sinularectin (6) was revised, too. Compounds 3, 4, and 8 exhibited inhibitory activity against the proliferation of a limited panel of cancer cell lines, whereas 1, 2, and 8 displayed potent anti-inflammatory activity in fMLP/CB-stimulated human neutrophils.

  5. A new C9 nor-isoprenoid glucoside from Rantherium suaveolens.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, M Habib; Ben Jannet, H; Mighri, Zine; Matthew, Susan; Abreu, Pedro M

    2007-08-01

    The new C(9) nor-isoprenoid 3-methyl-octa-1,5-diene-7-one-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, named as ranthenone glucoside (1), together with the previously known 9-hydoxylinaloyl glucoside (2), sitosterol-3beta-O-[6'-palmitoyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside] (3), scopoletin (4), fraxetin (5), and scopolin (6), were isolated from the aerial parts of Rantherium suaveolens. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis.

  6. Taxonomy, Traits, and Environment Determine Isoprenoid Emission from an Evergreen Tropical forest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, T.; Alves, E. G.; Tota, J.; Oliveira Junior, R. C.; Camargo, P. B. D.; Saleska, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Volatile isoprenoid emissions from the leaves of tropical forest trees significantly affects atmospheric chemistry, aerosols, and cloud dynamics, as well as the physiology of the emitting leaves. Emission is associated with plant tolerance to heat and drought stress. Despite a potentially central role of isoprenoid emissions in tropical forest-climate interactions, we have a poor understanding of the relationship between emissions and ecological axes of forest function. We used a custom instrument to quantify leaf isoprenoid emission rates from over 200 leaves and 80 trees at a site in the eastern Brazilian Amazon. We related standardized leaf emission capacity (EC: leaf emission rate at 1000 PAR) to tree taxonomy, height, light environment, wood traits, and leaf traits. Taxonomy was the strongest predictor of EC, and non-emitters could be found throughout the canopy. But we found that environment and leaf carbon economics constrained the upper bound of EC. For example, the relationship between EC and specific leaf area (SLA; fresh leaf area / dry mass) is described by an envelope with a decreasing upper bound on EC as SLA increases (quantile regression: 85th quantile, p<0.01). That result suggests a limitation on emissions related to leaf carbon investment strategies. EC was highest in the mid-canopy, and in leaves growing under less direct light. While inferences of ecosystem emissions focus on environmental conditions in the canopy, our results suggest that sub-canopy leaves are more responsive. This work is allowing us to develop an ecological understanding of isoprenoid emissions from forests, the basis for a predictive model of emissions that depends on both environmental factors and biological emission capacity that is grounded in plant traits and phylogeny.

  7. Structure elucidation and phytotoxicity of C13 nor-isoprenoids from Cestrum parqui.

    PubMed

    D'Abrosca, Brigida; DellaGreca, Marina; Fiorentino, Antonio; Monaco, Pietro; Oriano, Palma; Temussi, Fabio

    2004-02-01

    Twelve C(13) nor-isoprenoids have been isolated from the leaves of Cestrum parqui (Solanaceae). The structure (2R,6R,9R)-2,9-dihydroxy-4-megastigmen-3-one has been assigned to the new compound. All the structures have been determined by spectroscopic means and chemical correlations. The compounds showed phytotoxic effect on the germination and growth of Lactuca sativa L.

  8. The emission factor of volatile isoprenoids: caveats, model algorithms, response shapes and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinemets, Ü.; Monson, R. K.; Arneth, A.; Ciccioli, P.; Kesselmeier, J.; Kuhn, U.; Noe, S. M.; Peñuelas, J.; Staudt, M.

    2010-02-01

    In models of plant volatile isoprenoid emissions, the instantaneous compound emission rate typically scales with the plant's emission capacity under specified environmental conditions, also defined as the emission factor, ES. In the most widely employed plant isoprenoid emission models, the algorithms developed by Guenther and colleagues (1991, 1993), instantaneous variation of the steady-state emission rate is described as the product of ES and light and temperature response functions. When these models are employed in the in atmospheric chemistry modeling community, species-specific ES values and parameter values defining the instantaneous response curves are typically considered as constant. In the current review, we argue that ES is largely a modeling concept, importantly depending on our understanding of which environmental factors affect isoprenoid emissions, and consequently need standardization during ES determination. In particular, there is now increasing consensus that variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, in addition to variations in light and temperature, need to be included in the emission models. Furthermore, we demonstrate that for less volatile isoprenoids, mono- and sesquiterpenes, the emissions are often jointly controlled by the compound synthesis and volatility, and because of these combined biochemical and physico-chemical properties, specification of ES as a constant value is incapable of describing instantaneous emissions within the sole assumptions of fluctuating light and temperature, as are used in the standard algorithms. The definition of ES also varies depending on the degree of aggregation of ES values in different parameterization schemes (leaf- vs. canopy- or region-level, species vs. plant functional type level), and various aggregated ES schemes are not compatible for different integration models. The summarized information collectively emphasizes the need to update model algorithms by including missing environmental and

  9. The leaf-level emission factor of volatile isoprenoids: caveats, model algorithms, response shapes and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinemets, Ü.; Monson, R. K.; Arneth, A.; Ciccioli, P.; Kesselmeier, J.; Kuhn, U.; Noe, S. M.; Peñuelas, J.; Staudt, M.

    2010-06-01

    In models of plant volatile isoprenoid emissions, the instantaneous compound emission rate typically scales with the plant's emission potential under specified environmental conditions, also called as the emission factor, ES. In the most widely employed plant isoprenoid emission models, the algorithms developed by Guenther and colleagues (1991, 1993), instantaneous variation of the steady-state emission rate is described as the product of ES and light and temperature response functions. When these models are employed in the atmospheric chemistry modeling community, species-specific ES values and parameter values defining the instantaneous response curves are often taken as initially defined. In the current review, we argue that ES as a characteristic used in the models importantly depends on our understanding of which environmental factors affect isoprenoid emissions, and consequently need standardization during experimental ES determinations. In particular, there is now increasing consensus that in addition to variations in light and temperature, alterations in atmospheric and/or within-leaf CO2 concentrations may need to be included in the emission models. Furthermore, we demonstrate that for less volatile isoprenoids, mono- and sesquiterpenes, the emissions are often jointly controlled by the compound synthesis and volatility. Because of these combined biochemical and physico-chemical drivers, specification of ES as a constant value is incapable of describing instantaneous emissions within the sole assumptions of fluctuating light and temperature as used in the standard algorithms. The definition of ES also varies depending on the degree of aggregation of ES values in different parameterization schemes (leaf- vs. canopy- or region-scale, species vs. plant functional type levels) and various aggregated ES schemes are not compatible for different integration models. The summarized information collectively emphasizes the need to update model algorithms by including

  10. Homology modeling and dynamics study of aureusidin synthase--an important enzyme in aurone biosynthesis of snapdragon flower.

    PubMed

    Elumalai, Pavadai; Liu, Hsuan-Liang

    2011-08-01

    Aurones, a class of plant flavonoids, provide bright yellow color on some important ornamental flowers, such as cosmos, coreopsis, and snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus). Recently, it has been elucidated that aureusidin synthase (AUS), a homolog of plant polyphenol oxidase (PPO), plays a key role in the yellow coloration of snapdragon flowers. In addition, it has been shown that AUS is a chalcone-specific PPO specialized for aurone biosynthesis. AUS gene has been successfully demonstrated as an attractive tool to engineer yellow flowers in blue flowers. Despite these biological studies, the structural basis for the specificity of substrate interactions of AUS remains elusive. In this study, we performed homology modeling of AUS using Grenache PPO and Sweet potato catechol oxidase (CO). An AUS-inhibitor was then developed from the initial homology model based on the CO and subsequently validated. We performed a thorough study between AUS and PTU inhibitor by means of interaction energy, which indicated the most important residues in the active site that are highly conserved. Analysis of the molecular dynamics simulations of the apo enzyme and ligand-bound complex showed that complex is relatively stable than apo and the active sites of both systems are flexible. The results from this study provide very helpful information to understand the structure-function relationships of AUS.

  11. Diversity of ABBA Prenyltransferases in Marine Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509: Promiscuous Enzymes for the Biosynthesis of Mixed Terpenoid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Leipoldt, Franziska; Zeyhle, Philipp; Kulik, Andreas; Kalinowski, Jörn; Heide, Lutz; Kaysser, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids are arguably the largest and most diverse family of natural products, featuring prominently in e.g. signalling, self-defence, UV-protection and electron transfer. Prenyltransferases are essential players in terpenoid and hybrid isoprenoid biosynthesis that install isoprene units on target molecules and thereby often modulate their bioactivity. In our search for new prenyltransferase biocatalysts we focused on the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509, a particularly rich source of meroterpenoid chemistry. Sequencing and analysis of the genome of Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509 revealed seven putative phenol/phenazine-specific ABBA prenyltransferases, and one putative indole-specific ABBA prenyltransferase. To elucidate the substrate specificity of the ABBA prenyltransferases and to learn about their role in secondary metabolism, CnqP1 –CnqP8 were produced in Escherichia coli and incubated with various aromatic and isoprenoid substrates. Five of the eight prenyltransferases displayed enzymatic activity. The efficient conversion of dihydroxynaphthalene derivatives by CnqP3 (encoded by AA958_24325) and the co-location of AA958_24325 with genes characteristic for the biosynthesis of THN (tetrahydroxynaphthalene)-derived natural products indicates that the enzyme is involved in the formation of debromomarinone or other naphthoquinone-derived meroterpenoids. Moreover, CnqP3 showed high flexibility towards a range of aromatic and isoprenoid substrates and thus represents an interesting new tool for biocatalytic applications. PMID:26659564

  12. Constructing tailored isoprenoid products by structure-guided modification of geranylgeranyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Kung, Yan; McAndrew, Ryan P; Xie, Xinkai; Liu, Charlie C; Pereira, Jose H; Adams, Paul D; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-07-08

    The archaeal enzyme geranylgeranyl reductase (GGR) catalyzes hydrogenation of carbon-carbon double bonds to produce the saturated alkyl chains of the organism's unusual isoprenoid-derived cell membrane. Enzymatic reduction of isoprenoid double bonds is of considerable interest both to natural products researchers and to synthetic biologists interested in the microbial production of isoprenoid drug or biofuel molecules. Here we present crystal structures of GGR from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, including the structure of GGR bound to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The structures are presented alongside activity data that depict the sequential reduction of GGPP to H6GGPP via the intermediates H2GGPP and H4GGPP. We then modified the enzyme to generate sequence variants that display increased rates of H6GGPP production or are able to halt the extent of reduction at H2GGPP and H4GGPP. Crystal structures of these variants not only reveal the structural bases for their altered activities; they also shed light onto the catalytic mechanism employed.

  13. Squalenes, phytanes and other isoprenoids as major neutral lipids of methanogenic and thermoacidophilic 'archaebacteria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornabene, T. G.; Langworthy, T. A.; Holzer, G.; Oro, J.

    1979-01-01

    The neutral lipids from nine species of methanogenic bacteria (five methanobacilli, two methanococci, a methanospirillum and a methanosarcina) and two thermoacidophilic bacteria (Thermo-plasma and Sulfolobus) have been analyzed. The neutral lipids were found to comprise a wide range (C14 to C30) of polyisoprenyl hydrocarbons with varying degrees of saturation. The principal components represented the three major isoprenoid series (C20 phytanyl, C25 pentaisoprenyl, and C30 squalenyl), in contrast with the neutral lipids of extreme halophiles, which consist predominantly of C2O (phytanyl, geranylgeraniol), C30 (squalenes), C40 (carotenes) and C50 (bacterioruberins compounds), as reported by Kates (1978). These results, which indicate strong general similarities between genetically diverse organisms, support the classification of these organisms in a separate phylogenetic group. The occurrence of similar isoprenoid compounds in petroleum and ancient sediments and the fact that the methanogens, halophiles and thermoacidophiles live in conditions presumed to have prevailed in archaen times suggest that the isoprenoid compounds in petroleum compounds and sediment may have been directly synthesized by organisms of this type

  14. Restricted utility of aryl isoprenoids as indicators for photic zone anoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Martin P.; Schouten, Stefan; Kohnen, Math E. L.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    1996-12-01

    In a North Sea oil, the carotenoid derivatives β-carotene, β-isorenieratane, and isorenieratane were identified, together with a series of aryl isoprenoids with a 2,3,6-trimethyl substitution pattern for the aromatic ring. The δ13C values of β-carotene and β-isorenieratane are similar, whereas isorenieratane is ca. 15% heavier. This suggests that β-isorenieratane is not derived from β-isorenieratane biosynthesised by Chlorobiaceae, but from aromatisation of β-carotene. This was confirmed by laboratory aromatisation of partially hydrogenated β-carotene, which yielded β-isorenieratane as the main product. The aryl isoprenoids, which can be formed by Csbnd C bond cleavage of both isorenieratane and β-isorenieratane, have a mixed isotopic signature in the oil. These results indicate that mere identification of aryl isoprenoids, without determination of their δ13C values, cannot be used to assess the presence of Chlorobiaceae, and, thus, photic zone anoxia in the depositional environment.

  15. Isolation and structure determination of a benzofuran and a bis-nor-isoprenoid from Aspergillus niger grown on the water soluble fraction of Morinda citrifolia Linn. leaves.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Bina S; Ismail, Fouzia A Sattar; Gulzar, Tahsin; Begum, Sabira

    2003-10-01

    The leaves of Morinda citrifolia, Linn. afforded a new benzofuran and a bis-nor-isoprenoid, blumenol C, hitherto unreported from this source. The structures of these have been elucidated as 5-benzofuran carboxylic acid-6-formyl methyl ester (1) and 4-(3'(R)-hydroxybutyl)-3,5,5, trimethyl-cyclohex-2-en-1-one (2) respectively through spectroscopic studies. The NMR data (including 1D, 2D techniques) and stereochemistry at C-3' of Compound 2 is also being reported for the first time.

  16. Influence of oxygen on lovastatin biosynthesis by Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542 quantitatively studied on the level of individual pellets.

    PubMed

    Bizukojc, Marcin; Gonciarz, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    Despite oxygen is believed to be the most important environmental factor for any aerobic microbial process, the quantitative studies of its influence on growth and metabolite formation on the level of individual pellets formed by filamentous fungi were seldom performed. Never was it made for lovastatin producer Aspergillus terreus ATCC20542. Thus, this work is a quantitative study of oxygen transfer into A. terreus pellets during lovastatin biosynthesis in the shake flask culture. The basic measurement tool was an oxygen microprobe allowing for obtaining oxygen concentration profiles in the pellets. The pellets of various sizes from 1,600 to 6,400 μm exerting different oxygen transfer conditions were studied. Also various initial concentrations of carbon source were applied to change the conditions of biological reaction running in the pellets. Effective diffusivities in A. terreus pellets ranged from 643 to 1,342 μm s(-1) dependent on their size and structure. It occurred that only the smallest pellets of diameter equal to about 1,400 μm were fully penetrated by oxygen. What is more, apart from the size of pellets, the appropriate lactose concentration was required to effectively produce lovastatin. Its value was correlated with oxygen concentration on the surface of the pellet and could not be either too high, as the aforementioned oxygen level tended then to zero, or too low, as despite high oxygen concentration no biological reaction ran in the pellet and no lovastatin was formed.

  17. Overexpression of a bacterial 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase gene in potato tubers perturbs the isoprenoid metabolic network: implications for the control of the tuber life cycle.

    PubMed

    Morris, Wayne L; Ducreux, Laurence J M; Hedden, Peter; Millam, Steve; Taylor, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    Potato tubers were engineered to express a bacterial gene encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) in order to investigate the effects of perturbation of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Twenty-four independent transgenic lines out of 38 generated produced tubers with significantly elongated shape that also exhibited an early tuber sprouting phenotype. Expression analysis of nine transgenic lines (four exhibiting the phenotype and five showing a wild-type phenotype) demonstrated that the phenotype was strongly associated with dxs expression. At harvest, apical bud growth had already commenced in dxs-expressing tubers whereas in control lines no bud growth was evident until dormancy was released after 56-70 d of storage. The initial phase of bud growth in dxs tubers was followed by a lag period of approximately 56 d, before further elongation of the developing sprouts could be detected. Thus dxs expression results in the separation of distinct phases in the dormancy and sprouting processes. In order to account for the sprouting phenotype, the levels of plastid-derived isoprenoid growth regulators were measured in transgenic and control tubers. The major difference measured was an increase in the level of trans-zeatin riboside in tubers at harvest expressing dxs. Additionally, compared with controls, in some dxs-expressing lines, tuber carotenoid content increased approximately 2-fold, with most of the increase accounted for by a 6-7-fold increase in phytoene.

  18. Low polarity pyrolysis products of Permian to Recent Botryococcus-rich sediments: First evidence for the contribution of an isoprenoid algaenan to kerogen formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.; Behar, F.

    1994-09-01

    Hydrocarbon identification led to the recognition of three distinct chemical races in the green microalga Botryococcus braunii. These three races (A, B, and L) also show pronounced differences in the chemical structure of the algaenans, i.e., the insoluble, highly aliphatic, nonhydrolysable macromolecular constituents (termed PRB) of their outer walls. PRB A and PRBB are based upon polymethylenic chains, while PRB L is based on C40 isoprenoid moieties. Previous studies demonstrated that the selective preservation of PRB A and/or PRB B played a major role in the genesis of various Botryococcus-derived kerogens; in sharp contrast, the above kerogens did not show any indices of a PRB L contribution. The main purpose of this study was therefore to examine, via the screening of a number of Botryococcus-derived kerogens, if some contribution of PRB L, i.e., of an "isoprenoid algaenan", could be observed. To this end, the pyrolysis products of the three PRB and of seven Botryococcus-rich kerogens were examined. Parallel study of the algaenans of the three races of B. braunii indicated that a clear-cut distinction can be made, by analysis of low polarity pyrolysis products, between PRB A and PRB B, on the one hand, and PRB L, on the other hand. Thereafter, identification of the low polarity pyrolysis products of Botryococcus-rich kerogens revealed some contribution of the L race, along with the A or B race, in three samples out of seven: a Pliocene Torbanite and two Recent sediments. These observations thus provided the first example of the formation of kerogen fractions by the selective preservation of an algaenan based on isoprenoid chains. But they also revealed that important transformations of such chains can take place during kerogen early diagenesis. In sharp contrast, examination of the four Palaeozoic Torbanites revealed a complete lack of isoprenoid moieties, and hence no evidence of PRB L contribution. Comparison of n-alkane/n-alk-1-ene doublet distribution in

  19. Biosynthesis of Carotenoids in Plants: Enzymes and Color.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Saavedra, Carolina; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most important biocolor isoprenoids responsible for yellow, orange and red colors found in nature. In plants, they are synthesized in plastids of photosynthetic and sink organs and are essential molecules for photosynthesis, photo-oxidative damage protection and phytohormone synthesis. Carotenoids also play important roles in human health and nutrition acting as vitamin A precursors and antioxidants. Biochemical and biophysical approaches in different plants models have provided significant advances in understanding the structural and functional roles of carotenoids in plants as well as the key points of regulation in their biosynthesis. To date, different plant models have been used to characterize the key genes and their regulation, which has increased the knowledge of the carotenoid metabolic pathway in plants. In this chapter a description of each step in the carotenoid synthesis pathway is presented and discussed.

  20. Strategies for transgenic manipulation of monoterpene biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Soheil S; Croteau, Rodney B

    2002-08-01

    Monoterpenes, the C(10) isoprenoids, are a large family of natural products that are best known as constituents of the essential oils and defensive oleoresins of aromatic plants. In addition to ecological roles in pollinator attraction, allelopathy and plant defense, monoterpenes are used extensively in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. The importance of these plant products has prompted the definition of many monoterpene biosynthetic pathways, the cloning of the relevant genes and the development of genetic transformation techniques for agronomically significant monoterpene-producing plants. Metabolic engineering of monoterpene biosynthesis in the model plant peppermint has resulted in yield increase and compositional improvement of the essential oil, and also provided strategies for manipulating flavor and fragrance production, and plant defense.

  1. Regulation of Oil Biosynthesis in Algae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-14

    transportation fuels can potentially be addressed by exploring oil (triacylglycerol) biosynthesis in microalgae . Many microalgae , including Chlamydomonas...biosynthesis in microalgae have not been studied at the molecular level. Chlamydomonas is being used as a microalgal model to identify genes and regulatory...of this phenomenon will shed light on the physiological significance of oil production in microalgae . A first paper describing this interesting

  2. Lipid Flippases for Bacterial Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of cellular polysaccharides and glycoconjugates often involves lipid-linked intermediates that need to be translocated across membranes. Essential pathways such as N-glycosylation in eukaryotes and biogenesis of the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall in bacteria share a common strategy where nucleotide-sugars are used to build a membrane-bound oligosaccharide precursor that is linked to a phosphorylated isoprenoid lipid. Once made, these lipid-linked intermediates must be translocated across a membrane so that they can serve as substrates in a different cellular compartment. How translocation occurs is poorly understood, although it clearly requires a transporter or flippase. Identification of these transporters is notoriously difficult, and, in particular, the identity of the flippase of lipid II, an intermediate required for PG biogenesis, has been the subject of much debate. Here, I will review the body of work that has recently fueled this controversy, centered on proposed flippase candidates FtsW, MurJ, and AmJ. PMID:26792999

  3. Lipid Flippases for Bacterial Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of cellular polysaccharides and glycoconjugates often involves lipid-linked intermediates that need to be translocated across membranes. Essential pathways such as N-glycosylation in eukaryotes and biogenesis of the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall in bacteria share a common strategy where nucleotide-sugars are used to build a membrane-bound oligosaccharide precursor that is linked to a phosphorylated isoprenoid lipid. Once made, these lipid-linked intermediates must be translocated across a membrane so that they can serve as substrates in a different cellular compartment. How translocation occurs is poorly understood, although it clearly requires a transporter or flippase. Identification of these transporters is notoriously difficult, and, in particular, the identity of the flippase of lipid II, an intermediate required for PG biogenesis, has been the subject of much debate. Here, I will review the body of work that has recently fueled this controversy, centered on proposed flippase candidates FtsW, MurJ, and AmJ.

  4. Cloning and expression study of a putative carotene biosynthesis related (cbr) gene from the halotolerant green alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Bai, Lin Han; Qiao, Dai Rong; Xu, Hui; Dong, Gui Ling; Ruan, Kun; Huang, Fei; Cao, Yi

    2008-09-01

    Dunaliella salina, a unicelluar green alga that can tolerate an extreme variation of salt concentration is being studied as a model system to analyze the tolerance of abiotic stresses at the molecular level. Upon abnormal NaCl levels, new transcripts were abundantly expressed in cells of the alga. EST gene discovery efforts utilizing salt-shock cells had identified one cDNA designated Dscbr (GenBank accession no. DQ867041) with significant similarity to a carotene biosynthesis related gene (cbr) from Dunaliella bardawil and to early light inducible genes (elip) of higher plants. Dscbr was 976 bp in length, encoding a 190 amino acid deduced polypeptide (DsCBR) with a predicted molecular mass of 19.9 kDa and pI of 9.0. The three dimensional structure of DsCBR modeled by computer homology modeling techniques showed that the protein possessed three predicted transmembrane helices and six conserved pigment-binding residues. Real-Time Quantitative PCR clearly demonstrated that Dscbr mRNA can be rapidly induced by high light intensity and salt shocks. The results presented in this work are consistent with the earlier proposal (Jin et al. 2001 Biochim Biophys Acta 1506:244-259, 2003 Plant Physiol 132:352-364) that the DsCBR protein is an adaptive response to stress-induced photodamage within the alga chloroplast, and plays a key role in the protection and/or repair of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  5. Study on ecdysteroid levels and gene expression of enzymes related to ecdysteroid biosynthesis in the larval testis of Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Iga, Masatoshi; Blais, Catherine; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-01-01

    We investigated here the ecdysteroid titers and the expression of six genes coding for known enzymes of the ecdysteroid biosynthesis in the testes of last instar larvae of the pest cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis. We showed that the timing of the ecdysteroid profile was the same in testes and in hemolymph, with a small peak at day 2 and a large one at day 4 after ecdysis. Ecdysone and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) were detected in both tissues. 20E was the major ecdysteroid in testes and in hemolymph from day 4. Interestingly, the gene expression of the steroidogenetic enzymes, Neverland, and the five cytochrome P450 enzymes encoded by the Halloween genes was confirmed in the testes, and varied during the instar. However, from the data obtained so far, we cannot conclude that the measured ecdysteroids in the testes result from the activity of the genes under study. Indeed, it is suggested that the ecdysone produced centrally in the prothoracic glands, could have been transformed into 20E in the testes, where Sl-shade is well expressed. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Studies on the biosynthesis of the m-C/sub 7/N unit in the antibiotics manumycin and asukamycin

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, J.M.; Herrold, R.E.; Floss, H.G.; Thiericke, R.; Zeeck, A.; Nakagawa, A.; Omura, S.

    1988-06-22

    The manumycin group of antibiotics, represented by manumycin (1), asukamycin (2), colabomycin, U-62,162, and U-56,407, contains as a central structural element a multifunctional m-C/sub 7/N unit. This moiety, consisting of a six-membered ring carrying one carbon and one nitrogen atom in a meta disposition, is ubiquitous in nature in a variety of forms. The m-C/sub 7/N unit is most commonly quininoid as exemplified by the rifamycins, mitomycins, and ansamitocins, or aromatic as in the case of pactamycin. In these antibiotics, its biogenesis has been demonstrated to proceed by a branch of the shikimic acid pathway, ultimately via 3-amino-5-hydroxybenzoic acid (AHBA) or 3-aminobenzoic acid (ABA). Other forms of the m-C/sub 7/N unit are found in the valienamine moiety of validamycin and acarbose and in the antibiotic kinamycin; in these cases it has been shown that the unit derives from intermediates of the pentose phosphate pathway and from acetate, respectively. The structural and stereochemical uniqueness observed in 1 (4R) and 2 (4S) led the authors to study the biosynthesis of these antibiotics in parallel. In this communication they present confirming a new biochemical pathway leading to the m-C/sub 7/N unit.

  7. Crystal structure of 4-(cytidine 5'-diphospho)-2-C-methyl-D-erythritol kinase, an enzyme in the non-mevalonate pathway of isoprenoid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Satoh, Shinya; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Unzai, Satoru; Tame, Jeremy R H; Park, Sam-Yong

    2003-08-08

    The crystal structure of the enzyme 4-(cytidine 5'-diphospho)-2-C-methyl-D-erythritol (CDP-ME) kinase from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 1.7-A resolution. This enzyme catalyzes phosphorylation of the 2-hydroxyl group of CDP-ME, the fourth step of the non-mevalonate pathway, which is essential for isoprenoid biosynthesis in several pathogenic microorganisms. Since this pathway is absent in humans, it is an important target for the development of novel antimicrobial compounds. The structure of the enzyme is similar to the structures of mevalonate kinase and homoserine kinase, members of the GHMP superfamily. Lys8 and Asp125 are active site residues in mevalonate kinase that also appear to play a catalytic role in CDP-ME kinase. Both the mevalonate and the non-mevalonate pathways therefore involve closely related kinases with similar mechanisms. Assaying the enzyme showed that CDP-ME kinase will phosphorylate CDP-ME but not 4-(uridine 5'-diphospho)-2-C-methyl-D-erythritol, indicating the substrate pyrimidine moiety is involved in important interactions with the enzyme.

  8. Physiological and molecular responses of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway in a drought-resistant Mediterranean shrub, Cistus creticus exposed to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Falara, Vasiliki; Pateraki, Irene; López-Carbonell, Marta; Cela, Jana; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2009-01-30

    The goal of the present research was to obtain new insights into the mechanisms underlying drought stress resistance in plants. Specifically, we evaluated changes in the expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis, together with the levels of the corresponding metabolites (chlorophylls, carotenoids, tocopherols and abscisic acid), in a drought-resistant Mediterranean shrub, Cistus creticus grown under Mediterranean field conditions. Summer drought led to reductions in the relative leaf water content (RWC) by 25%, but did not alter the maximum efficiency of PSII, indicating the absence of damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. While the expression of genes encoding C. creticus chlorophyll a oxygenase/chlorophyll b synthase (CAO) and phytoene synthase (PSY) were not affected by water deficit, the genes encoding homogentisate phytyl-transferase (HPT) and 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) were induced in water-stressed (WS) plants. Drought-induced changes in gene expression were observed at early stages of drought and were strongly correlated with levels of the corresponding metabolites, with simultaneous increases in abscisic acid and alpha-tocopherol levels of up to 4-fold and 62%, respectively. Furthermore, alpha-tocopherol levels were strongly positively correlated with abscisic acid contents, but not with the levels of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid. We conclude that the abscisic acid and tocopherol biosynthetic pathway may be regulated at the transcript level in WS C. creticus plants, and that the genes encoding HPT and NCED may play a key role in the drought stress resistance of this Mediterranean shrub by modulating abscisic acid and tocopherol biosynthesis.

  9. Co-induction of methyltransferase Rv0560c by naphthoquinones and fibric acids suggests attenuation of isoprenoid quinone action in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garbe, Thomas R

    2004-10-01

    The superoxide generator menadione was previously demonstrated as an inducer of growth stage dependent protein patterns in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The present study refines this observation by characterizing a novel 27-kDa protein that had not been observed in previous studies relying on younger cultures. A very similar response, based on two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analyses, was induced by the closely related naphthoquinone plumbagin. The 27-kDa protein was also induced by the pro-oxidant peroxisome proliferator gemfibrozil and to a lesser extent by the structurally related compounds fenofibrate and clofibrate. N-terminal sequence data of proteolytic fragments from the 27-kDa protein demonstrated its identity with protein Rv0560c, previously demonstrated to be inducible by salicylate, which also possesses peroxisome proliferating properties. Protein Rv0560c bears three conserved motifs characteristic of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases. Further sequence similarities suggest a function in the bio syn thesis of isoprenoid compounds, e.g., tocopherol, ubiquinone, and sterols. Such involvement is supported by the recognized yet unexplained widespread interference of menadione, salicylate, and fibrates with the isoprenoid quinones ubiquinone, menaquinone, and vitamin K. Induction of Rv0560c by fibrates, salicylate, and naphthoquinones is thus suggested to be caused by action on the plasma membrane, reminiscent of cytochrome P450BM-3 induction by fibrates in Bacillus megaterium, which catalyzes the hydroxylation of fatty acids and thus modulates membrane properties.

  10. Crosslinking Studies of Protein-Protein Interactions in Nonribosomal Peptide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Gene H.; Meier, Jordan L.; Baskin, Jeremy; Codelli, Julian A.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Marahiel, Mohamed A.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Selective protein-protein interactions between nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) proteins, governed by communication-mediating (COM) domains, are responsible for proper translocation of biosynthetic intermediates to produce the natural product. In this study, we developed a crosslinking assay, utilizing bioorthogonal probes compatible with carrier protein modification, for probing the protein interactions between COM domains of NRPS enzymes. Employing the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes, we examined crosslinking of cognate NRPS modules within the tyrocidine pathway and demonstrated the sensitivity of our panel of crosslinking probes towards the selective protein interactions of compatible COM domains. These studies indicate that copper-free crosslinking substrates uniquely offer a diagnostic probe for protein-protein interactions. Likewise, these crosslinking probes serve as ideal chemical tools for structural studies between NRPS modules where functional assays are lacking. PMID:19345117

  11. Crosslinking studies of protein-protein interactions in nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Gene H; Meier, Jordan L; Baskin, Jeremy; Codelli, Julian A; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Burkart, Michael D

    2009-04-24

    Selective protein-protein interactions between nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) proteins, governed by communication-mediating (COM) domains, are responsible for proper translocation of biosynthetic intermediates to produce the natural product. In this study, we developed a crosslinking assay, utilizing bioorthogonal probes compatible with carrier protein modification, for probing the protein interactions between COM domains of NRPS enzymes. Employing the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes, we examined crosslinking of cognate NRPS modules within the tyrocidine pathway and demonstrated the sensitivity of our panel of crosslinking probes toward the selective protein interactions of compatible COM domains. These studies indicate that copper-free crosslinking substrates uniquely offer a diagnostic probe for protein-protein interactions. Likewise, these crosslinking probes serve as ideal chemical tools for structural studies between NRPS modules where functional assays are lacking.

  12. Distribution of the 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase gene and isoprenoid production in marine-derived Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Izumikawa, Miho; Motohashi, Keiichiro; Mukai, Akira; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-Ya, Kazuo

    2010-03-01

    During the course of our screening program to isolate isoprenoids from marine Actinobacteria, 523 actinobacterial strains were isolated from 18 marine sponges, a tunicate, and two marine sediments. These strains belonged to 21 different genera, but most were members of Streptomyces, Nocardia, Rhodococcus, and Micromonospora. Some Actinobacteria have been reported to use the mevalonate pathway for the production of isoprenoids as secondary metabolites. Therefore, we investigated whether these strains possessed the 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (hmgr) gene, which indicates the presence of the mevalonate pathway. As a result, six strains belonging to the genera Streptomyces (SpC080624SC-11, SpA080624GE-02, and Sp080513GE-23), Nocardia (Sp080513SC-18), and Micromonospora (Se080624GE-07 and SpC080624GE-05) were found to possess the hmgr gene, and these genes were highly similar to hmgr genes in isoprenoid biosynthetic gene clusters. Among the six strains, the two strains SpC080624SC-11 and SpA080624GE-02 produced the novel isoprenoids, JBIR-46, -47, and -48, which consisted of phenazine chromophores, and Sp080513GE-23 produced a known isoprenoid, fumaquinone. Furthermore, these compounds showed cytotoxic activity against human acute myelogenous leukemia HL-60 cells.

  13. Photosynthetic limitations and volatile and non-volatile isoprenoids in the poikilochlorophyllous resurrection plant Xerophyta humilis during dehydration and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Megan; Loreto, Francesco; Velikova, Violeta; Brunetti, Cecilia; Di Ferdinando, Martina; Tattini, Massimiliano; Calfapietra, Carlo; Farrant, Jill M

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the photosynthetic limitations occurring during dehydration and rehydration of Xerophyta humilis, a poikilochlorophyllous resurrection plant, and whether volatile and non-volatile isoprenoids might be involved in desiccation tolerance. Photosynthesis declined rapidly after dehydration below 85% relative water content (RWC). Raising intercellular CO(2) concentrations during desiccation suggest that the main photosynthetic limitation was photochemical, affecting energy-dependent RuBP regeneration. Imaging fluorescence confirmed that both the number of photosystem II (PSII) functional reaction centres and their efficiency were impaired under progressive dehydration, and revealed the occurrence of heterogeneous photosynthesis during desiccation, being the basal leaf area more resistant to the stress. Full recovery in photosynthetic parameters occurred on rehydration, confirming that photosynthetic limitations were fully reversible and that no permanent damage occurred. During desiccation, zeaxanthin and lutein increased only when photosynthesis had ceased, implying that these isoprenoids do not directly scavenge reactive oxygen species, but rather protect photosynthetic membranes from damage and consequent denaturation. X. humilis was found to emit isoprene, a volatile isoprenoid that acts as a membrane strengthener in plants. Isoprene emission was stimulated by drought and peaked at 80% RWC. We surmise that isoprene and non-volatile isoprenoids cooperate in reducing membrane damage in X. humilis, isoprene being effective when desiccation is moderate while non-volatile isoprenoids operate when water deficit is more extreme. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Modeling the flux of metabolites in the juvenile hormone biosynthesis pathway using generalized additive models and ordinary differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rincón, Raúl O.; Rivera-Pérez, Crisalejandra; Diambra, Luis; Noriega, Fernando G.

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates development and reproductive maturation in insects. The corpora allata (CA) from female adult mosquitoes synthesize fluctuating levels of JH, which have been linked to the ovarian development and are influenced by nutritional signals. The rate of JH biosynthesis is controlled by the rate of flux of isoprenoids in the pathway, which is the outcome of a complex interplay of changes in precursor pools and enzyme levels. A comprehensive study of the changes in enzymatic activities and precursor pool sizes have been previously reported for the mosquito Aedes aegypti JH biosynthesis pathway. In the present studies, we used two different quantitative approaches to describe and predict how changes in the individual metabolic reactions in the pathway affect JH synthesis. First, we constructed generalized additive models (GAMs) that described the association between changes in specific metabolite concentrations with changes in enzymatic activities and substrate concentrations. Changes in substrate concentrations explained 50% or more of the model deviances in 7 of the 13 metabolic steps analyzed. Addition of information on enzymatic activities almost always improved the fitness of GAMs built solely based on substrate concentrations. GAMs were validated using experimental data that were not included when the model was built. In addition, a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE) was developed to describe the instantaneous changes in metabolites as a function of the levels of enzymatic catalytic activities. The results demonstrated the ability of the models to predict changes in the flux of metabolites in the JH pathway, and can be used in the future to design and validate experimental manipulations of JH synthesis. PMID:28158248

  15. Modeling the flux of metabolites in the juvenile hormone biosynthesis pathway using generalized additive models and ordinary differential equations.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rincón, Raúl O; Rivera-Pérez, Crisalejandra; Diambra, Luis; Noriega, Fernando G

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates development and reproductive maturation in insects. The corpora allata (CA) from female adult mosquitoes synthesize fluctuating levels of JH, which have been linked to the ovarian development and are influenced by nutritional signals. The rate of JH biosynthesis is controlled by the rate of flux of isoprenoids in the pathway, which is the outcome of a complex interplay of changes in precursor pools and enzyme levels. A comprehensive study of the changes in enzymatic activities and precursor pool sizes have been previously reported for the mosquito Aedes aegypti JH biosynthesis pathway. In the present studies, we used two different quantitative approaches to describe and predict how changes in the individual metabolic reactions in the pathway affect JH synthesis. First, we constructed generalized additive models (GAMs) that described the association between changes in specific metabolite concentrations with changes in enzymatic activities and substrate concentrations. Changes in substrate concentrations explained 50% or more of the model deviances in 7 of the 13 metabolic steps analyzed. Addition of information on enzymatic activities almost always improved the fitness of GAMs built solely based on substrate concentrations. GAMs were validated using experimental data that were not included when the model was built. In addition, a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE) was developed to describe the instantaneous changes in metabolites as a function of the levels of enzymatic catalytic activities. The results demonstrated the ability of the models to predict changes in the flux of metabolites in the JH pathway, and can be used in the future to design and validate experimental manipulations of JH synthesis.

  16. Tomato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 1A and 1B: Relaxed double bond specificity leads to a plenitude of dialdehydes, mono-apocarotenoids and isoprenoid volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, Andrea; Bruno, Mark; Beyer, Peter; Al-Babili, Salim

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthetic processes leading to many of the isoprenoid volatiles released by tomato fruits are still unknown, though previous reports suggested a clear correlation with the carotenoids contained within the fruit. In this study, we investigated the activity of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (SlCCD1B), which is highly expressed in fruits, and of its homolog SlCCD1A. Using in vitro assays performed with purified recombinant enzymes and by analyzing products formed by the two enzymes in carotene-accumulating Escherichia coli strains, we demonstrate that SlCCD1A and, to a larger extent, SlCCD1B, have a very relaxed specificity for both substrate and cleavage site, mediating the oxidative cleavage of cis- and all-trans-carotenoids as well as of different apocarotenoids at many more double bonds than previously reported. This activity gives rise to a plenitude of volatiles, mono-apocarotenoids and dialdehyde products, including cis-pseudoionone, neral, geranial, and farnesylacetone. Our results provide a direct evidence for a carotenoid origin of these compounds and point to CCD1s as the enzymes catalyzing the formation of the vast majority of tomato isoprenoid volatiles, many of which are aroma constituents. PMID:25057464

  17. Current status and prospects for the study of Nicotiana genomics, genetics, and nicotine biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2015-02-01

    Nicotiana, a member of the Solanaceae family, is one of the most important research model plants, and of high agricultural and economic value worldwide. To better understand the substantial and rapid research progress with Nicotiana in recent years, its genomics, genetics, and nicotine gene studies are summarized, with useful web links. Several important genetic maps, including a high-density map of N. tabacum consisting of ~2,000 markers published in 2012, provide tools for genetics research. Four whole genome sequences are from allotetraploid species, including N. benthamiana in 2012, and three N. tabacum cultivars (TN90, K326, and BX) in 2014. Three whole genome sequences are from diploids, including progenitors N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis in 2013 and N. otophora in 2014. These and additional studies provide numerous insights into genome evolution after polyploidization, including changes in gene composition and transcriptome expression in N. tabacum. The major genes involved in the nicotine biosynthetic pathway have been identified and the genetic basis of the differences in nicotine levels among Nicotiana species has been revealed. In addition, other progress on chloroplast, mitochondrial, and NCBI-registered projects on Nicotiana are discussed. The challenges and prospects for genomic, genetic and application research are addressed. Hence, this review provides important resources and guidance for current and future research and application in Nicotiana.

  18. Differential Activities of Thalidomide and Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway Inhibitors in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Sarah A.; Tong, Huaxiang; Hohl, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Thalidomide has emerged as an effective agent for treating multiple myeloma, however the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. Agents known to target the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) can have cytotoxic effects in myeloma cells. The interactions between thalidomide and IBP inhibitors in human multiple myeloma cells were evaluated. Enhanced cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis was observed in RPMI-8226 cells. Examination of intracellular levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) revealed a wide variance in basal levels and response to IBP inhibitors. These findings provide a mechanism for the differential sensitivity of myeloma cells to pharmacologic manipulation of the IBP. PMID:19646757

  19. Biosynthesis, characterization and antibacterial studies of silver nanoparticles using pods extract of Acacia auriculiformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalawade, Pradnya; Mukherjee, Poulomi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2014-08-01

    The present study reports an environmental friendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using an aqueous extract of Acacia auriculiformis that acts as reducing agent as well as capping agent. The obtained NPs were characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and showed a sharp surface plasmon absorption band at ∼400 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed nanoparticles were capped with plant compounds. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the particles were spherical in nature with diameter ranging from 20 to 150 nm depending on the pH of the solution. The as-synthesized Ag NPs showed antibacterial activity against both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria with more efficacy against Gram negative bacteria.

  20. Structure-activity studies of allatostatin 4 on the inhibition of juvenile hormone biosynthesis by corpora allata: the importance of individual side chains and stereochemistry.

    PubMed

    Hayes, T K; Guan, X C; Johnson, V; Strey, A; Tobe, S S

    1994-01-01

    The production of juvenile hormone III (JH III) by the corpora allata of the cockroach Diploptera punctata is regulated in part by peptides originating from the brain. One group of these peptides, termed allatostatins, reversibly inhibits the biosynthesis of JH in vitro. Allatostatin 4 (AST4: Asp-Arg-Leu-Tyr-Ser-Phe-Gly-Leu-amide) is the smallest member of the AST family yet defined and was used as the benchmark peptide for these initial structure-activity studies. Two initial analog series of AST4 were examined for the ability of each analog to inhibit JH biosynthesis by corpora allata in vitro. Each analog series consisted of analogs that contained a single amino acid change from the native AST4 sequence. The first series contained Ala replacement analogs and the second contained analogs with D-amino acid replacements. The first analog series used Ala replacements to help indicate which amino acid side chains were most important for inhibition of JH biosynthesis. The most important side chain appeared to be Leu8 followed by Phe6 and Tyr4. Additionally, the D-amino acid series suggested that a secondary structural element(s) at the C-terminus of AST4 could be important to the biological activity.

  1. Crystallographic Study of Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis Enzyme MurD: Domain Movement Revisited.

    PubMed

    Šink, Roman; Kotnik, Miha; Zega, Anamarija; Barreteau, Hélène; Gobec, Stanislav; Blanot, Didier; Dessen, Andréa; Contreras-Martel, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of peptidoglycan, an essential component of bacterial cell wall, is a well-recognized target for antibiotic development. Peptidoglycan precursors are synthesized in the bacterial cytosol by various enzymes including the ATP-hydrolyzing Mur ligases, which catalyze the stepwise addition of amino acids to a UDP-MurNAc precursor to yield UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. MurD catalyzes the addition of D-glutamic acid to UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala in the presence of ATP; structural and biochemical studies have suggested the binding of the substrates with an ordered kinetic mechanism in which ligand binding inevitably closes the active site. In this work, we challenge this assumption by reporting the crystal structures of intermediate forms of MurD either in the absence of ligands or in the presence of small molecules. A detailed analysis provides insight into the events that lead to the closure of MurD and reveals that minor structural modifications contribute to major overall conformation alterations. These novel insights will be instrumental in the development of new potential antibiotics designed to target the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway.

  2. Crystallographic Study of Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis Enzyme MurD: Domain Movement Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Zega, Anamarija; Barreteau, Hélène; Gobec, Stanislav; Blanot, Didier; Dessen, Andréa; Contreras-Martel, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of peptidoglycan, an essential component of bacterial cell wall, is a well-recognized target for antibiotic development. Peptidoglycan precursors are synthesized in the bacterial cytosol by various enzymes including the ATP-hydrolyzing Mur ligases, which catalyze the stepwise addition of amino acids to a UDP-MurNAc precursor to yield UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. MurD catalyzes the addition of D-glutamic acid to UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala in the presence of ATP; structural and biochemical studies have suggested the binding of the substrates with an ordered kinetic mechanism in which ligand binding inevitably closes the active site. In this work, we challenge this assumption by reporting the crystal structures of intermediate forms of MurD either in the absence of ligands or in the presence of small molecules. A detailed analysis provides insight into the events that lead to the closure of MurD and reveals that minor structural modifications contribute to major overall conformation alterations. These novel insights will be instrumental in the development of new potential antibiotics designed to target the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway. PMID:27031227

  3. [Study on biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using fagopyri dibotryis rhizoma extract and optimization of synthesis conditions].

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Jie; Qu, Ding; Chen, Yan; Yuan, Ling; He, Jun-Jie

    2014-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized from the extract of Fagopyri Dibotryis Rhizoma and the optimization of synthesis was studied. The absorbance of UV-visible spectroscopy was determined under the different influencing factors such as extracting time of Fagopyri Dibotryis Rhizoma powder, reation temperature of synthesis, volume of Fagopyri Dibotryis Rhizoma extract and concentration of AgNO3 to seek the optimization conditions. By means of FT-IR, TEM, DLS and XRD, the silver nanoparticles were characterized. The results showed that when the boiling time of Fagopyri Dibotryis Rhizoma powder was 5 min, resultant temperature was 25 degrees C, the volume ratio of 0.1 g x mL(-1) Fagopyri Dibotryis Rhizoma extract and 1 mmol x L(-1) AgNO3 was 1 to 10, and the reaction time was 3.5 h, the obtained silver nanoparticles had mean size about 27 nm and Zeta potential about -34.3 mV with good uniformity and dispersivity. Therefore, the green synthesis method of silver nanoparticles using extract of traditional Chinese medicine is stable and feasible.

  4. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  5. Further Studies on Oxalic Acid Biosynthesis in Oxalate-accumulating Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Nuss, Richard F.; Loewus, Frank A.

    1978-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid functions as a precursor of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulating plants. The present study extends this observation to include Rumex crispus L. (curly dock), Amaranthus retroflexus L. (red root pigweed), Chenopodium album L. (lamb's-quarters), Beta vulgaris L. (sugar beet), Halogeton glomeratus M. Bieb. (halogeton), and Rheum rhabarbarum L. (rhubarb). Several species with low oxalate content are also examined. When l-[1-14C]ascorbic acid is supplied to young seedlings of R. crispus or H. glomeratus, a major portion of the 14C is released over a 24-hour period as 14CO2 and only a small portion is recovered as [14C]oxalate, unlike cuttings from 2- or 4-month-old plants which retain a large part of the 14C as [14C]oxalic acid and release very little 14CO2. Support for an intermediate role of oxalate in the release of 14CO2 from l-[1-14C]ascorbic acid is seen in the rapid release of 14CO2 by R. crispus and H. glomeratus seedlings labeled with [14C]oxalic acid. The common origin of oxalic acid carbon in the C1 and C2 fragment from l-ascorbic acid is demonstrated by comparison of 14C content of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulators after cuttings or seedlings are supplied equal amounts of l-[1-14C]- or l-[UL-14C]ascorbic acid. Theoretically, l-[1-14C]ascorbic acid will produce labeled oxalic acid containing three times as much 14C as l-[UL-14C]ascorbic acid when equal amounts of label are provided. Experimentally, a ratio of 2.7 ± 0.5 is obtained in duplicate experiments with six different species. PMID:16660342

  6. Further Studies on Oxalic Acid Biosynthesis in Oxalate-accumulating Plants.

    PubMed

    Nuss, R F; Loewus, F A

    1978-04-01

    l-Ascorbic acid functions as a precursor of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulating plants. The present study extends this observation to include Rumex crispus L. (curly dock), Amaranthus retroflexus L. (red root pigweed), Chenopodium album L. (lamb's-quarters), Beta vulgaris L. (sugar beet), Halogeton glomeratus M. Bieb. (halogeton), and Rheum rhabarbarum L. (rhubarb). Several species with low oxalate content are also examined.When l-[1-(14)C]ascorbic acid is supplied to young seedlings of R. crispus or H. glomeratus, a major portion of the (14)C is released over a 24-hour period as (14)CO(2) and only a small portion is recovered as [(14)C]oxalate, unlike cuttings from 2- or 4-month-old plants which retain a large part of the (14)C as [(14)C]oxalic acid and release very little (14)CO(2). Support for an intermediate role of oxalate in the release of (14)CO(2) from l-[1-(14)C]ascorbic acid is seen in the rapid release of (14)CO(2) by R. crispus and H. glomeratus seedlings labeled with [(14)C]oxalic acid.The common origin of oxalic acid carbon in the C1 and C2 fragment from l-ascorbic acid is demonstrated by comparison of (14)C content of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulators after cuttings or seedlings are supplied equal amounts of l-[1-(14)C]- or l-[UL-(14)C]ascorbic acid. Theoretically, l-[1-(14)C]ascorbic acid will produce labeled oxalic acid containing three times as much (14)C as l-[UL-(14)C]ascorbic acid when equal amounts of label are provided. Experimentally, a ratio of 2.7 +/- 0.5 is obtained in duplicate experiments with six different species.

  7. A Genetic and Biochemical Study of Histidine Biosynthesis in MICROCOCCUS LUTEUS

    PubMed Central

    Kane-Falce, Caroline; Kloos, Wesley E.

    1975-01-01

    Histidine auxotrophs of Micrococcus luteus strain ATCC 27141 were induced by treatment of the parent strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitro-soguanidine. Auxotrophs were biochemically characterized by examining culture accumulations of histidine intermediates, using paper chromatography and the Bratton-Marshall test, and growth responses to L-histidinol. his(IG) mutants failed to accumulate Pauly-positive imidazoles; his(EAHF) mutants accumulated 5-amino-1-ribosyl-4-imidazole carboxamide; hisB mutants accumulated imidazoleglycerol; hisC mutants accumulated imidazoleacetol; hisD mutants accumulated histidinol. L-histidinol failed to stimulate the growth of hisD mutants, but did stimulate all other histidine mutants, blocked at earlier steps in the biosynthetic pathway. In addition, imidazoleglycerol phosphate dehydrase activity was assayed in representative mutants of each class. hisB mutants lacked activity for this enzyme.—Two-point, three-point, and cotransformation analyses resolved linkage relationships of histidine genes and in two gene clusters aided in determining their sequences. Histidine biosynthetic genes exist in at least four separate, unlinked regions of the chromosome. One histidine gene cluster is closely linked to a tryptophan gene cluster and appears to be contiguous in the sequence his(IG)–his(EAHF)–trpE–trpC–trpB–trpA. A second and unlinked histidine cluster has the tentative gene sequence his(EAHF)–hisB–hisC–his(EAHF). The hisD gene and an unclassified mutant site his-94 are not linked to any of the other histidine genes examined in this study or to each other. PMID:1126626

  8. Fate of the isoprenoid hydrocarbon, pristane, in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bon, A.M.; Cravedi, J.P.; Tulliez, J.

    1987-06-01

    The excretion routes and tissue distribution of (/sup 3/H)pristane were measured in rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, after a single intragastric dose (0.1 mg). This branched-alkane was quickly and largely absorbed. The balance study showed that the major routes of excretion were fecal (40.4% of the dose) and branchial (39.6%). In feces radioactivity was exclusively due to (/sup 3/H)pristane, whereas /sup 3/H resulting from gill excretion was principally associated with tritiated water. Only 2.6% of the radioactivity was cleared via the kidneys and found in the urine as metabolites. After 48 hr, no hydrocarbon accumulation was observed in gall bladder, while in liver and fat, respectively, 69 and 34% of the radioactivity originated from pristane, the rest of the labeling being mostly associated with lipid components.

  9. Sterol biosynthesis in oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gaulin, Elodie; Bottin, Arnaud; Dumas, Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Oomycetes are a diverse group of filamentous eukaryotic microbes comprising devastating animal and plant pathogens. They share many characteristics with fungi, including polarized hyphal extension and production of spores, but phylogenetics studies have clearly placed oomycetes outside the fungal kingdom, in the kingdom Stramenopila which also includes marine organisms such as diatoms and brown algae. Oomycetes display various specific biochemical features, including sterol metabolism. Sterols are essential isoprenoid compounds involved in membrane function and hormone signaling. Oomycetes belonging to Peronosporales, such as Phytophthora sp., are unable to synthesize their own sterols and must acquire them from their plant or animal hosts. In contrast, a combination of biochemical and molecular approaches allowed us to decipher a nearly complete sterol biosynthetic pathway leading to fucosterol in the legume pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, an oomycete belonging to Saprolegniales. Importantly, sterol demethylase, a key enzyme from this pathway, is susceptible to chemicals widely used in agriculture and medicine as antifungal drugs, suggesting that similar products could be used against plant and animal diseases caused by Saprolegniales.

  10. Sterol biosynthesis in oomycete pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gaulin, Elodie; Bottin, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    Oomycetes are a diverse group of filamentous eukaryotic microbes comprising devastating animal and plant pathogens. They share many characteristics with fungi, including polarized hyphal extension and production of spores, but phylogenetics studies have clearly placed oomycetes outside the fungal kingdom, in the kingdom Stramenopila which also includes marine organisms such as diatoms and brown algae. Oomycetes display various specific biochemical features, including sterol metabolism. Sterols are essential isoprenoid compounds involved in membrane function and hormone signaling. Oomycetes belonging to Peronosporales, such as Phytophthora sp., are unable to synthesize their own sterols and must acquire them from their plant or animal hosts. In contrast, a combination of biochemical and molecular approaches allowed us to decipher a nearly complete sterol biosynthetic pathway leading to fucosterol in the legume pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, an oomycete belonging to Saprolegniales. Importantly, sterol demethylase, a key enzyme from this pathway, is susceptible to chemicals widely used in agriculture and medicine as antifungal drugs, suggesting that similar products could be used against plant and animal diseases caused by Saprolegniales. PMID:20023385

  11. In vitro study of lipid biosynthesis in an anaerobically methane-oxidizing microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Blumenberg, Martin; Seifert, Richard; Nauhaus, Katja; Pape, Thomas; Michaelis, Walter

    2005-08-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a key process in the global methane cycle, and the majority of methane formed in marine sediments is oxidized in this way. Here we present results of an in vitro 13CH4 labeling study (delta13CH4, approximately 5,400 per thousand) in which microorganisms that perform AOM in a microbial mat from the Black Sea were used. During 316 days of incubation, the 13C uptake into the mat biomass increased steadily, and there were remarkable differences for individual bacterial and archaeal lipid compounds. The greatest shifts were observed for bacterial fatty acids (e.g., hexadec-11-enoic acid [16:1Delta11]; difference between the delta13C at the start and the end of the experiment [Deltadelta13C(start-end)], approximately 160 per thousand). In contrast, bacterial glycerol diethers exhibited only slight changes in delta13C (Deltadelta13C(start-end), approximately 10 per thousand). Differences were also found for individual archaeal lipids. Relatively high uptake of methane-derived carbon was observed for archaeol (Deltadelta13C(start-end), approximately 25 per thousand), a monounsaturated archaeol, and biphytanes, whereas for sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol there was considerably less change in the delta13C (Deltadelta13C(start-end), approximately 2 per thousand). Moreover, an increase in the uptake of 13C for compounds with a higher number of double bonds within a suite of polyunsaturated 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethyleicosenes indicated that in methanotrophic archaea there is a biosynthetic pathway similar to that proposed for methanogenic archaea. The presence of group-specific biomarkers (for ANME-1 and ANME-2 associations) and the observation that there were differences in 13C uptake into specific lipid compounds confirmed that multiple phylogenetically distinct microorganisms participate to various extents in biomass formation linked to AOM. However, the greater 13C uptake into the lipids of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) than into the

  12. Light Remodels Lipid Biosynthesis in Nannochloropsis gaditana by Modulating Carbon Partitioning between Organelles1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vitulo, Nicola; Diretto, Gianfranco; Block, Maryse; Jouhet, Juliette; Meneghesso, Andrea; Valle, Giorgio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Maréchal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The seawater microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana is capable of accumulating a large fraction of reduced carbon as lipids. To clarify the molecular bases of this metabolic feature, we investigated light-driven lipid biosynthesis in Nannochloropsis gaditana cultures combining the analysis of photosynthetic functionality with transcriptomic, lipidomic and metabolomic approaches. Light-dependent alterations are observed in amino acid, isoprenoid, nucleic acid, and vitamin biosynthesis, suggesting a deep remodeling in the microalgal metabolism triggered by photoadaptation. In particular, high light intensity is shown to affect lipid biosynthesis, inducing the accumulation of diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomo-Ser and triacylglycerols, together with the up-regulation of genes involved in their biosynthesis. Chloroplast polar lipids are instead decreased. This situation correlates with the induction of genes coding for a putative cytosolic fatty acid synthase of type 1 (FAS1) and polyketide synthase (PKS) and the down-regulation of the chloroplast fatty acid synthase of type 2 (FAS2). Lipid accumulation is accompanied by the regulation of triose phosphate/inorganic phosphate transport across the chloroplast membranes, tuning the carbon metabolic allocation between cell compartments, favoring the cytoplasm, mitochondrion, and endoplasmic reticulum at the expense of the chloroplast. These results highlight the high flexibility of lipid biosynthesis in N. gaditana and lay the foundations for a hypothetical mechanism of regulation of primary carbon partitioning by controlling metabolite allocation at the subcellular level. PMID:27325666

  13. Review: Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    King, Jerry D; Kocíncová, Dana; Westman, Erin L; Lam, Joseph S

    2009-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes serious nosocomial infections, and an important virulence factor produced by this organism is lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This review summarizes knowledge about biosynthesis of all three structural domains of LPS - lipid A, core oligosaccharide, and O polysaccharides. In addition, based on similarities with other bacterial species, this review proposes new hypothetical pathways for unstudied steps in the biosynthesis of P. aeruginosa LPS. Lipid A biosynthesis is discussed in relation to Escherichia coli and Salmonella, and the biosyntheses of core sugar precursors and core oligosaccharide are summarised. Pseudomonas aeruginosa attaches a Common Polysaccharide Antigen and O-Specific Antigen polysaccharides to lipid A-core. Both forms of O polysaccharide are discussed with respect to their independent synthesis mechanisms. Recent advances in understanding O-polysaccharide biosynthesis since the last major review on this subject, published nearly a decade ago, are highlighted. Since P. aeruginosa O polysaccharides contain unusual sugars, sugar-nucleotide biosynthesis pathways are reviewed in detail. Knowledge derived from detailed studies in the O5, O6 and O11 serotypes is applied to predict biosynthesis pathways of sugars in poorly-studied serotypes, especially O1, O4, and O13/O14. Although further work is required, a full understanding of LPS biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa is almost within reach.

  14. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Davis, Edward M.; Ringer, Kerry L.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint ( Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4 S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general “allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction” scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1 R, 3 R, 4 S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  15. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L; Wildung, Mark R

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general "allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction" scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1R, 3R, 4S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  16. Methionine Biosynthesis in Lemna

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Gregory A.; Datko, Anne H.; Mudd, S. Harvey; Giovanelli, John

    1982-01-01

    Regulation of enzymes of methionine biosynthesis was investigated by measuring the specific activities of O-phosphohomoserine-dependent cystathionine γ-synthase, O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase, and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase in Lemna paucicostata Hegelm. 6746 grown under various conditions. For cystathionine γ-synthase, it was observed that (a) adding external methionine (2 μm) decreased specific activity to 15% of control, (b) blocking methionine synthesis with 0.05 μml-aminoethoxyvinylglycine or with 36 μm lysine plus 4 μm threonine (Datko, Mudd 1981 Plant Physiol 69: 1070-1076) caused a 2- to 3-fold increase in specific activity, and (c) blocking methionine synthesis and adding external methionine led to the decreased specific activity characteristic of methionine addition alone. Activity in extracts from control cultures was unaffected by addition of methionine, lysine, threonine, lysine plus threonine, S-adenosylmethionine, or S-methylmethionine sulfonium to the assay mixture. Parallel studies of O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase showed that O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase activity responded to growth conditions identically to cystathionine γ-synthase activity, whereas O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase activity remained unaffected. Lemna extracts did not catalyze lanthionine formation from O-acetylserine and cysteine. Estimates of kinetic constants for the three enzyme activities indicate that O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase has much higher activity and affinity for sulfide than O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase. The results suggest that (a) methionine, or one of its products, regulates the amount of active cystathionine γ-synthase in Lemna, (b) O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and cystathionine γ-synthase are probably activities of one enzyme that has low specificity for its sulfur-containing substrate, and (c) O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase is a separate enzyme. The relatively high activity and affinity for sulfide of

  17. Rat p67 GBP is induced by interferon-gamma and isoprenoid-modified in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vestal, D J; Buss, J E; Kelner, G S; Maciejewski, D; Asundi, V K; Maki, R A

    1996-07-16

    The guanylate binding proteins, GBPs, are a family of interferon-induced GTP-binding proteins that include the rat p67. We report here that rat p67, for which interferon regulation had not previously been demonstrated, is induced by IFN-gamma and also by LPS in both cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages and microglia. The basal level of rat p67 in macrophages is low but increases dramatically between 2 and 4 hours after treating cells with either IFN-gamma or LPS. It then remains elevated over the next 24 hours. Rat p67 is isoprenoid modified. The isoprenoid modification was detected in p67 isolated both from primary IFN-gamma-activated macrophages and when the gene for p67 was transfected into COS cells. This is the first demonstration of in vivo prenylation of a GBP. The interferon regulation and prenylation of rat p67 point toward this protein being significant in the functions of both activated macrophages and microglia.

  18. Isoprenoid emissions of trees in a tropical rainforest in Xishuangbanna, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilske, B.; Cao, K.-F.; Schebeske, G.; Chen, J.-W.; Wang, A.; Kesselmeier, J.

    Isoprenoid emissions of eight tropical tree species of SE Asia were investigated using dynamic Teflon bag branch enclosures. Emission potentials of four species were considerably deviating from a previous report. Two species, Garcinia cowa and Celtis philippensis, emitted isoprene with standard emission factors, given as carbon on dry weight basis of 20.7 and 0.2μgg-1h-1, respectively, before the peak of the rainy season. After the peak of the rainy reason the standard emission changed to 17.5 and 0.7μgg-1h-1, respectively. The other six species emitted monoterpenes with low standard emission factors between <0.1 and 0.5μgg-1h-1. Four out of five species investigated at two different times of the year showed seasonal differences in emission rates and composition. Total isoprenoid emissions were generally higher with new leaf flush than with aged leaves. Overall, the results suggest that better understanding of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission from tropical species of SE Asia requires investigations that cover different seasons.

  19. Evaluation of alkyne-modified isoprenoids as chemical reporters of protein prenylation.

    PubMed

    DeGraw, Amanda J; Palsuledesai, Charuta; Ochocki, Joshua D; Dozier, Jonathan K; Lenevich, Stepan; Rashidian, Mohammad; Distefano, Mark D

    2010-12-01

    Protein prenyltransferases catalyze the attachment of C15 (farnesyl) and C20 (geranylgeranyl) groups to proteins at specific sequences localized at or near the C-termini of specific proteins. Determination of the specific protein prenyltransferase substrates affected by the inhibition of these enzymes is critical for enhancing knowledge of the mechanism of such potential drugs. Here, we investigate the utility of alkyne-containing isoprenoid analogs for chemical proteomics experiments by showing that these compounds readily penetrate mammalian cells in culture and become incorporated into proteins that are normally prenylated. Derivatization via Cu(I) catalyzed click reaction with a fluorescent azide reagent allows the proteins to be visualized and their relative levels to be analyzed. Simultaneous treatment of cells with these probes and inhibitors of prenylation reveals decreases in the levels of some but not all of the labeled proteins. Two-dimensional electrophoretic separation of these labeled proteins followed by mass spectrometric analysis allowed several labeled proteins to be unambiguously identified. Docking experiments and density functional theory calculations suggest that the substrate specificity of protein farnesyl transferase may vary depending on whether azide- or alkyne-based isoprenoid analogs is employed. These results demonstrate the utility of alkyne-containing analogs for chemical proteomic applications.

  20. Evaluation of alkyne-modified isoprenoids as chemical reporters of protein prenylation

    PubMed Central

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Palsuledesai, Charuta; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Dozier, Jonathan K.; Lenevich, Stepan; Rashidian, Mohammad; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Protein prenyltransferases catalyze the attachment of C15 (farnesyl) and C20 (geranylgeranyl) groups to proteins at specific sequences localized at or near the C-termini of specific proteins. Determination of the specific protein prenyltransferase substrates affected by the inhibition of these enzymes is critical for enhancing knowledge of the mechanism of such potential drugs. Here we investigate the utility of alkyne-containing isoprenoid analogues for chemical proteomics experiments by showing that these compounds readily penetrate mammalian cells in culture and become incorporated into proteins that are normally prenylated. Derivatization via Cu(I) catalyzed Click reaction with a fluorescent azide reagent allows the proteins to be visualized and their relative levels to be analyzed. Simultaneous treatment of cells with these probes and inhibitors of prenylation reveals decreases in the levels of some but not all of the labeled proteins. Two-dimensional electrophoretic separation of these labeled proteins followed by mass spectrometric analysis allowed several labeled proteins to be unambiguously identified. Docking experiments and DFT calculations suggest that the substrate specificity of PFTase may vary depending on whether azide- or alkyne-based isoprenoid analogues are employed. These results demonstrate the utility of alkyne-containing analogues for chemical proteomic applications. PMID:21040496

  1. Rapid analysis of protein farnesyltransferase substrate specificity using peptide libraries and isoprenoid diphosphate analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Chih; Dozier, Jonathan K; Beese, Lorena S; Distefano, Mark D

    2014-08-15

    Protein farnesytransferase (PFTase) catalyzes the farnesylation of proteins with a carboxy-terminal tetrapeptide sequence denoted as a Ca1a2X box. To explore the specificity of this enzyme, an important therapeutic target, solid-phase peptide synthesis in concert with a peptide inversion strategy was used to prepare two libraries, each containing 380 peptides. The libraries were screened using an alkyne-containing isoprenoid analogue followed by click chemistry with biotin azide and subsequent visualization with streptavidin-AP. Screening of the CVa2X and CCa2X libraries with Rattus norvegicus PFTase revealed reaction by many known recognition sequences as well as numerous unknown ones. Some of the latter occur in the genomes of bacteria and viruses and may be important for pathogenesis, suggesting new targets for therapeutic intervention. Screening of the CVa2X library with alkyne-functionalized isoprenoid substrates showed that those prepared from C10 or C15 precursors gave similar results, whereas the analogue synthesized from a C5 unit gave a different pattern of reactivity. Lastly, the substrate specificities of PFTases from three organisms (R. norvegicus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans) were compared using CVa2X libraries. R. norvegicus PFTase was found to share more peptide substrates with S. cerevisiae PFTase than with C. albicans PFTase. In general, this method is a highly efficient strategy for rapidly probing the specificity of this important enzyme.

  2. Protein biosynthesis in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, A V; Levitskii, S A; Vinogradova, E N; Atkinson, G C; Hauryliuk, V; Zenkin, N; Kamenski, P A

    2013-08-01

    Translation, that is biosynthesis of polypeptides in accordance with information encoded in the genome, is one of the most important processes in the living cell, and it has been in the spotlight of international research for many years. The mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in bacteria and in the eukaryotic cytoplasm are now understood in great detail. However, significantly less is known about translation in eukaryotic mitochondria, which is characterized by a number of unusual features. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about mitochondrial translation in different organisms while paying special attention to the aspects of this process that differ from cytoplasmic protein biosynthesis.

  3. Protein Biosynthesis in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenko, A. V.; Levitskii, S. A.; Vinogradova, E. N.; Atkinson, G. C.; Hauryliuk, V.; Zenkin, N.; Kamenski, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Translation, that is biosynthesis of polypeptides in accordance with information encoded in the genome, is one of the most important processes in the living cell, and it has been in the spotlight of international research for many years. The mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in bacteria and in the eukaryotic cytoplasm are now understood in great detail. However, significantly less is known about translation in eukaryotic mitochondria, which is characterized by a number of unusual features. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about mitochondrial translation in different organisms while paying special attention to the aspects of this process that differ from cytoplasmic protein biosynthesis. PMID:24228873

  4. Studies of the role of selenium-independent and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases in eicosanoid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, A.H.

    1990-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases are involved in the biotransformation and/or detoxification of a wide range of organic compounds, including allylic epoxides. GSTs catalyze the transformation of prostaglandin (PG)H[sub 2] into PGE[sub 2] and/or PGF[sub 2alpha]. Specific GST isozymes possessing non-selenium glutathione-peroxidase activity (NonSe-GSH-PX) catalyze the direct reduction of PGH[sub 2] to PGF[sub 2alpha]. Other GST isozymes have been reported to catalyze the transformation of leukotriene (LT)A[sub 4] into LTC[sub 4]. In this study, human liver GSTs were purified and individual isozymes were characterized by SDS electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, substrate specificities, immunological cross reactivities, and their ability to catalyze the transformation of PGH[sub 2] to PGF[sub 2alpha], and LTA[sub 4] to LTC[sub 4]. The GST isozyme expression pattern in man varies between individuals. Se-dependent GSH-PX activity (Se-GSH-PX) also plays a role in eicosanoid metabolism. The author infused Se-adequate and Se-deficient dairy cattle with endotoxin into the mammary gland to simulate an inflammation. Arachidonic acid metabolites were extracted and analyzed in both the milk and the milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). PMN's cytosol was assayed for Se- and nonSe-GSH-PX, and GST activity. The results indicate that the Se-deficient cows had lower levels (p < 0.05) of PGE[sub 2] and TXB[sub 2] released into the milk following challenge; however, there was no significant effect on the arachidonic acid metabolites produced by the milk PMNs. Although the Se-deficient cows had significantly lower levels (p < 0.05) of Se-GSH-PX activity, there was no effect on the GST nor NonSe-GSH-PX activity. Overall, eicosanoid biosynthesis is complex, being influenced by both dietary and enzymatic manipulation. The data support Se- and nonSe-GSH-PX playing important roles in eicosanoid formation.

  5. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Intraerythrocytic Stages of Plasmodium falciparum*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Tonhosolo, Renata; D'Alexandri, Fabio L.; de Rosso, Veridiana V.; Gazarini, Marcos L.; Matsumura, Miriam Y.; Peres, Valnice J.; Merino, Emilio F.; Carlton, Jane M.; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Mercadante, Adriana Z.; Kimura, Emília A.; Katzin, Alejandro M.

    2009-01-01

    Carotenoids are widespread lipophilic pigments synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms and some nonphotosynthetic fungi and bacteria. All carotenoids are derived from the C40 isoprenoid precursor geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, and their chemical and physical properties are associated with light absorption, free radical scavenging, and antioxidant activity. Carotenoids are generally synthesized in well defined subcellular organelles, the plastids, which are also present in the phylum Apicomplexa, which comprises a number of important human parasites, such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Recently, it was demonstrated that Toxoplasma gondii synthesizes abscisic acid. We therefore asked if Plasmodium falciparum is also capable of synthesizing carotenoids. Herein, biochemical findings demonstrated the presence of carotenoid biosynthesis in the intraerythrocytic stages of the apicomplexan parasite P. falciparum. Using metabolic labeling with radioisotopes, in vitro inhibition tests with norflurazon, a specific inhibitor of plant carotenoid biosynthesis, the results showed that intraerythrocytic stages of P. falciparum synthesize carotenoid compounds. A plasmodial enzyme that presented phytoene synthase activity was also identified and characterized. These findings not only contribute to the current understanding of P. falciparum evolution but shed light on a pathway that could serve as a chemotherapeutic target. PMID:19203994

  6. A structural and functional study on the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate cytidyltransferase (IspD) from Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yun; Liu, Zhongchuan; Li, Yanjie; Liu, Weifeng; Tao, Yong; Wang, Ganggang

    2016-01-01

    2-C-Methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate cytidyltransferase (IspD) is an essential enzyme in the mevalonate-independent pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis. This enzyme catalyzes 2-C-Methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) and cytosine triphosphate (CTP) to 4-diphosphocytidyl-2-C-methyl-d-erythritol (CDPME) and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). Bacillus subtilis was a kind of excellent isoprene producer. However, the studies on the key enzymes of MEP pathway in B. subtilis were still absent. In this work, the crystal structures of IspD and IspD complexed with CTP from B.subtilis were determined. For the first time, the intact P-loop was observed in the apo structure of IspD enzyme. Structural comparisons revealed that the concerted movements of the P-loop and loops close to the active site were essential in the reaction catalyzed by IspD. Meanwhile, kinetic analysis showed that the CTP hydrolytic activity of IspD from B.subtilis was over two times higher than that from Escherichia coli. These results will be useful for future target-based screening of potential inhibitors and the metabolic engineering for isoprenoid biosynthesis. PMID:27821871

  7. Gibberellin biosynthesis in Gibberlla fujikuroi

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.W.; Coolbaugh, R.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a group of plant growth hormones which were first isolated from the fungus Gibberella fujikuori. We have examined the biosynthesis of GAs in this fungus in liquid cultures using HPLC followed by GC-MS. Furthermore we have used cell-free enzyme extracts with {sup 14}C-labeled intermediates to examine the regulation of specific parts of the biosynthetic pathway. GA{sub 3} is the predominant GA in well aerated cultures. GA{sub 4} and GA{sub 7}, intermediates in GA{sub 3} biosynthesis, accumulate in cultures with low levels of dissolved oxygen, but are not detectable in more aerated cultures. Light stimulates GA production in G. fujikuroi cultures grown from young stock. Cell-free enzyme studies indicate that light has no effect on incorporation of mevalonic acid into kaurene, but does significantly stimulate the oxidation of kaurenoic acid.

  8. Polymer prodrug nanoparticles based on naturally occurring isoprenoid for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Trung Bui, Duc; Maksimenko, Andrei; Desmaële, Didier; Harrisson, Simon; Vauthier, Christine; Couvreur, Patrick; Nicolas, Julien

    2013-08-12

    The synthesis of a novel class of polymer prodrug nanoparticles with anticancer activity is reported by using squalene, a naturally occurring isoprenoid, as a building block by the reversible addition-fragmentation (RAFT) technique. The RAFT agent was functionalized by gemcitabine (Gem) as anticancer drug, and the polymerization of squalenyl-methacrylate (SqMA) led to well-defined macromolecular prodrugs comprising one Gem at the extremity of each polymer chain. The amphiphilic nature of the resulting Gem-PSqMA conjugates allowed them to self-assemble into long-term stable and narrowly dispersed nanoparticles with significant anticancer activity in vitro on various cancer cell lines. To confer stealth properties on these nanoparticles, their PEGylation was successfully performed, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and complement activation assay. It was also shown that the PEGylated nanoparticles could be internalized in cancer cells to a greater extent than their non-PEGylated counterparts.

  9. Propiconazole-enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras farnesylation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Lynea A.; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen

    2012-04-15

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic cholesterol metabolites and bile acids, and transcriptomic studies revealed that genes within the cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol metabolism and bile acid biosyntheses pathways were up-regulated. Hepatic cell proliferation was also increased by propiconazole. AML12 immortalized hepatocytes were used to study propiconazole's effects on cell proliferation focusing on the dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and resulting effects on Ras farnesylation and Erk1/2 activation as a primary pathway. Mevalonate, a key intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, increases cell proliferation in several cancer cell lines and tumors in vivo and serves as the precursor for isoprenoids (e.g. farnesyl pyrophosphate) which are crucial in the farnesylation of the Ras protein by farnesyl transferase. Farnesylation targets Ras to the cell membrane where it is involved in signal transduction, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In our studies, mevalonic acid lactone (MVAL), a source of mevalonic acid, increased cell proliferation in AML12 cells which was reduced by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (L-744,832 or manumycin) or simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, indicating that this cell system responded to alterations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Cell proliferation in AML12 cells was increased by propiconazole which was reversed by co-incubation with L-744,832 or simvastatin. Increasing concentrations of exogenous cholesterol muted the proliferative effects of propiconazole and the inhibitory effects of L-733,832, results ascribed to reduced stimulation of the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Western blot analysis of subcellular

  10. Stereoselectivity in Polyphenol Biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.

    1992-01-01

    Stereoselectivity plays an important role in the late stages of phenyl-propanoid metabolism, affording lignins, lignans, and neolignans. Stereoselectivity is manifested during monolignol (glucoside) synthesis, e.g., where the geometry (E or Z) of the pendant double bond affects the specificity of UDPG:coniferyl alcohol glucosyltransferases in different species. Such findings are viewed to have important ramifications in monolignol transport and storage processes, with roles for both E- and Z-monolignols and their glucosides in lignin/lignan biosynthesis being envisaged. Stereoselectivity is also of great importance in enantiose-lective enzymatic processes affording optically active lignans. Thus, cell-free extracts from Forsythia species were demonstrated to synthesize the enantiomerically pure lignans, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, and (-)-pinoresinol, when NAD(P)H, H2O2 and E-coniferyl alcohol were added. Progress toward elucidating the enzymatic steps involved in such highly stereoselective processes is discussed. Also described are preliminary studies aimed at developing methodologies to determine the subcellular location of late-stage phenylpropanoid metabolites (e.g., coniferyl alcohol) and key enzymes thereof, in intact tissue or cells. This knowledge is essential if questions regarding lignin and lignan tissue specificity and regulation of these processes are to be deciphered.

  11. [Direct biosynthesis of ethylene].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhilan; Chen, Yifeng

    2013-10-01

    Ethylene is the most widely used petrochemical feedstock globally. The development of bio-ethylene is essential due to limited fossil fuels and rising oil prices. Bio-ethylene is produced primarily by the dehydration of ethanol, but can alternatively be directly produced from ethylene biosynthesis pathways in plants, algae, or microorganisms by using cheap and renewable substrates. This review addressed the biosynthesis of ethylene in plants and microorganisms, the characterization of key enzymes, genetic engineering strategies for ethylene biosynthesis in microorganisms, and evaluated its perspective and successful cases toward the industrial application. The direct production of bio-ethylene from a biological process in situ is promising to supplement and even replace the petrochemical ethylene production.

  12. In Vivo Studies of the Biosynthesis of [alpha]-Eleostearic Acid in the Seed of Momordica charantia L.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L.; Hammond, E. G.; Nikolau, B. J.

    1997-01-01

    In vivo radiotracer experiments using 14C-labeled acetate, oleate, linoleate, and linolenate were conducted to investigate the biosynthesis of [alpha]-eleostearic acid in the seeds of Momordica charantia. With the exception of [14C]linolenate, all of these precursors radioactively labeled [alpha]-eleostearate. Kinetics of the time course of metabolism of the radioactive precursors indicate that linoleate is the acyl precursor of [alpha]-eleostearate and that its conversion to [alpha]-eleostearate occurs while the acyl moiety is esterified to PC. Pulse-chase experiments with 14C-labeled acetate or linoleate provided additional corroborative evidence that linoleoyl PC is the precursor of [alpha]-eleostearoyl PC. PMID:12223677

  13. An ultrastructural and biochemical study of the effects of three inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis upon murine adrenal gland and testis. Histochemical evidence for a lysosome response.

    PubMed

    Dietert, S E; Scallen, T J

    1969-01-01

    Triparanol and 20,25-diazacholesterol inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and result in the accumulation of desmosterol. AY-9944, another inhibitor, produces an accumulation of 7-dehydrocholesterol. Adult male C3H mice receive one of these drugs intraperitoneally. Livers, adrenal glands, and testes from each drug group are excised, and portions of each are analyzed by a modified Liebermann-Burchard reaction for quantitation of sterols. Adrenals and testes are examined also by electron microscopy. Fine-structural localization of acid phosphatase has been studied in triparanol-treated adrenal glands. Biochemical analysis reveals that 14-64% of the sterols occurs as desmosterol or 7-dehydrocholesterol. Fine-structural alterations in the adrenal glands and testes from each drug group are essentially identical. The predominant cytological feature is the occurrence of increased numbers of pleomorphic, unit-membrane-limited, electron-opaque, cytoplasmic inclusions. Hence, the cellular modifications following triparanol administration are not unique, as has been suggested. They represent a generalized phenomenon, probably related to inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis, which is an effect common to each drug. Lead phosphate reaction product (indicating acid phosphatase activity) is demonstrable within these membrane-limited cytoplasmic bodies, identifying them as morphological lysosomes. The utilization of a lysosomal mechanism in sterol-synthesizing cells, which are accumulating cholesterol intermediates, is discussed.

  14. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical study of catalytic mechanism and role of key residues in methylation reactions catalyzed by dimethylxanthine methyltransferase in caffeine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yufei; Guo, Hong

    2014-02-24

    The caffeine biosynthetic pathway is of considerable importance for the beverage and pharmaceutical industries which produces two blockbuster products: theobromine and caffeine. The major biochemistry in caffeine biosynthesis starts from the initial substrate of xanthosine and ends with the final product caffeine, with theobromine serving as an intermediate. The key enzyme, S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) dependent 3,7-dimethyl-xanthine methyltransferase (DXMT), catalyzes two important methyl transfer steps in caffeine biosynthesis: (1) methylation of N3 of 7-methylxanthine (7mX) to form theobromine (Tb); (2) methylation of N1 of theobromine to form caffeine (Cf). Although DXMT has been structurally characterized recently, our understanding of the detailed catalytic mechanism and role of key catalytic residues is still lacking. In this work, the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD and free energy simulations are performed to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme-catalyzed reactions and to explain experimental observations concerning the activity of this enzyme. The roles of certain active-site residues are studied, and the results of computer simulation seem to suggest that a histidine residue (His160) at the active site of DXMT may act as a general base/acid catalyst during the methyl transfer process.

  15. Juvenile hormone biosynthesis, oocyte growth and vitellogenin accumulation in Choristoneura fumiferana and C. rosaceana: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Delisle, J; Cusson, M

    1999-06-01

    We assessed the effects of age and mating status on in vitro juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis, oocyte growth, egg production and vitellogenin (Vg) accumulation in the tortricid moths, Choristoneura fumiferana and C. rosaceana. To determine whether vitellogenesis is dependent on the presence of JH, we also examined the effects of decapitation and JH analog treatments on egg production. In both species, the corpora allata (CA) of adult females released fmol quantities of JH, with JH II being the major homolog produced. The CA began producing detectable quantities of JH around the time of emergence. Full activation of the CA was observed a few hours sooner in C. fumiferana than in C. rosaceana. In pharate adults and young virgin females of both species, growth of the basal oocyte reflected changes in CA activity. Decapitation of newly emerged females significantly reduced egg production, but treatment of decapitated females with the JH analog methoprene resulted in egg production that was similar to (C. fumiferana) or greater than (C. rosaceana) that of controls, indicating that JH is required for oocyte maturation. Vg was first observed in the hemolymph before the presumptive time of CA activation, suggesting that the synthesis of this protein is not dependent on JH. The presence of normal quantities of Vg in the hemolymph of pupae decapitated before CA activation confirmed this hypothesis. The Vg titer underwent a transient decline following CA activation and was significantly lower in mated than in virgin females of both species 3 and 5 days after copulation. Since CA activation at emergence and mating are both expected to cause a rise in the JH titer, we suggest that the declines in the levels of Vg result from JH-enhanced Vg uptake by the developing oocytes. Mating induced a significant increase in egg production but had no measurable impact on rates of JH biosynthesis in vitro.

  16. Methylerythritol phosphate pathway to isoprenoids: kinetic modeling and in silico enzyme inhibitions in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek Kumar; Ghosh, Indira

    2013-09-02

    The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) has become an attractive target for anti-malarial drug discovery. This study describes a kinetic model of this pathway, its use in validating 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) as drug target from the systemic perspective, and additional target identification, using metabolic control analysis and in silico inhibition studies. In addition to DXR, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) can be targeted because it is the first enzyme of the pathway and has the highest flux control coefficient followed by that of DXR. In silico inhibition of both enzymes caused large decrement in the pathway flux. An added advantage of targeting DXS is its influence on vitamin B1 and B6 biosynthesis. Two more potential targets, 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase and 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate synthase, were also identified. Their inhibition caused large accumulation of their substrates causing instability of the system. This study demonstrates that both types of enzyme targets, one acting via flux reduction and the other by metabolite accumulation, exist in P. falciparum MEP pathway. These groups of targets can be exploited for independent anti-malarial drugs.

  17. v-K-ras leads to preferential farnesylation of p21ras in FRTL-5 cells: Multiple interference with the isoprenoid pathway

    PubMed Central

    Laezza, Chiara; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Bifulco, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    The isoprenoid pathway in FRTL-5 thyroid cells was found to be deeply altered on transformation with v-K-ras. A dramatic overall reduction of protein prenylation was found in v-K-ras-transformed cells in comparison with the parent FRTL-5 cells, as shown by labeling cells with [3H]mevalonic acid. This phenomenon was accompanied by a relative increase of p21ras farnesylation and by a decrease of the ratio between the amounts of geranylgeraniol and farnesol bound to prenylated proteins. Analysis of protein prenylation in FRTL-5 cells transformed by a temperature-sensitive mutant of the v-K-ras oncogene indicated that these variations represent an early and specific marker of active K-ras. Conversely, FRTL-5 cells transformed with Harvey-ras showed a pattern of [3H]-mevalonate (MVA)-labeled proteins similar to that of nontransformed cells. The K-ras oncogene activation also resulted in an overall decrease of [3H]-MVA incorporation into isopentenyl-tRNA together with an increase of unprocessed [3H]-MVA and no alteration in [3H]-MVA uptake. The effects of v-K-ras on protein prenylation could be mimicked in FRTL-5 cells by lowering the concentration of exogenous [3H]-MVA whereas increasing the [3H]-MVA concentration did not revert the alterations observed in transformed cells. Accordingly, v-K-ras expression was found to: (i) down-regulate mevalonate kinase; (ii) induce farnesyl-pyrophosphate synthase expression; and (iii) augment protein farnesyltransferase but not protein geranylgeranyl-transferase-I activity. Among these events, mevalonate kinase down-regulation appeared to be related strictly to differential protein prenylation. This study represents an example of how expression of the v-K-ras oncogene, through multiple interferences with the isoprenoid metabolic pathway, may result in the preferential farnesylation of the ras oncogene product p21ras. PMID:9811854

  18. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C5 alcohols in E. coli

    DOE PAGES

    George, Kevin W.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Kang, Aram; ...

    2015-06-08

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulationmore » by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Lastly, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol.« less

  19. Bakuchiol Is a Phenolic Isoprenoid with Novel Enantiomer-selective Anti-influenza A Virus Activity Involving Nrf2 Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Masaki; Arakaki, Yumie; Esumi, Tomoyuki; Kohnomi, Shuntaro; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Etsuhisa; Konishi, Shiro; Kido, Hiroshi; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Influenza represents a substantial threat to human health and requires novel therapeutic approaches. Bakuchiol is a phenolic isoprenoid compound present in Babchi (Psoralea corylifolia L.) seeds. We examined the anti-influenza viral activity of synthetic bakuchiol using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. We found that the naturally occurring form, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol, and its enantiomer, (−)-(R)-bakuchiol, inhibited influenza A viral infection and growth and reduced the expression of viral mRNAs and proteins in these cells. Furthermore, these compounds markedly reduced the mRNA expression of the host cell influenza A virus-induced immune response genes, interferon-β and myxovirus-resistant protein 1. Interestingly, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol had greater efficacy than (−)-(R)-bakuchiol, indicating that chirality influenced anti-influenza virus activity. In vitro studies indicated that bakuchiol did not strongly inhibit the activities of influenza surface proteins or the M2 ion channel, expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Analysis of luciferase reporter assay data unexpectedly indicated that bakuchiol may induce some host cell factor(s) that inhibited firefly and Renilla luciferases. Next generation sequencing and KeyMolnet analysis of influenza A virus-infected and non-infected cells exposed to bakuchiol revealed activation of transcriptional regulation by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf), and an Nrf2 reporter assay showed that (+)-(S)-bakuchiol activated Nrf2. Additionally, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol up-regulated the mRNA levels of two Nrf2-induced genes, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 and glutathione S-transferase A3. These findings demonstrated that bakuchiol had enantiomer-selective anti-influenza viral activity involving a novel effect on the host cell oxidative stress response. PMID:26446794

  20. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C5 alcohols in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Kevin W.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Kang, Aram; Baidoo, Edward; Wang, George; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Adams, Paul D.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Soon Lee, Taek

    2015-06-01

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulation by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Finally, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol.

  1. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C5 alcohols in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    George, Kevin W.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Kang, Aram; Baidoo, Edward; Wang, George; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Adams, Paul D.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Soon Lee, Taek

    2015-01-01

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulation by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Finally, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol. PMID:26052683

  2. The hedgehog Pathway Gene shifted Functions together with the hmgcr-Dependent Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway to Orchestrate Germ Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Girish; Zhou, Keren; Wan, Joy Y.; Friedrich, Jana; Jourjine, Nicholas; Smith, Daniel; Schedl, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila embryonic gonad is assembled from two distinct cell types, the Primordial Germ Cells (PGCs) and the Somatic Gonadal Precursor cells (SGPs). The PGCs form at the posterior of blastoderm stage embryos and are subsequently carried inside the embryo during gastrulation. To reach the SGPs, the PGCs must traverse the midgut wall and then migrate through the mesoderm. A combination of local repulsive cues and attractive signals emanating from the SGPs guide migration. We have investigated the role of the hedgehog (hh) pathway gene shifted (shf) in directing PGC migration. shf encodes a secreted protein that facilitates the long distance transmission of Hh through the proteoglycan matrix after it is released from basolateral membranes of Hh expressing cells in the wing imaginal disc. shf is expressed in the gonadal mesoderm, and loss- and gain-of-function experiments demonstrate that it is required for PGC migration. Previous studies have established that the hmgcr-dependent isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway plays a pivotal role in generating the PGC attractant both by the SGPs and by other tissues when hmgcr is ectopically expressed. We show that production of this PGC attractant depends upon shf as well as a second hh pathway gene gγ1. Further linking the PGC attractant to Hh, we present evidence indicating that ectopic expression of hmgcr in the nervous system promotes the release/transmission of the Hh ligand from these cells into and through the underlying mesodermal cell layer, where Hh can contact migrating PGCs. Finally, potentiation of Hh by hmgcr appears to depend upon cholesterol modification. PMID:24068944

  3. Biosynthesis of Polyisoprenoids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The invention is a process for synthesis of a polymer with the same chemical structure as Natural Rubber (NR) obtained from Hevea brasiliensis and other plant species. The research collaborators recently proposed that NR biosynthesis proceeds via a carbocationic polymerization. Based on this theory...

  4. The biosynthesis of dicoumarol

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, D. M.; Spring, M. S.; Stoker, J. R.

    1967-01-01

    Micro-organisms have been isolated that can utilize o-coumaric acid as a sole carbon source with the subsequent production of 4-hydroxycoumarin and dicoumarol. One of these organisms, Penicillium jenseni, has been used to examine the biosynthesis of dicoumarol. Certain thermophilic fungi have also been found that can convert o-coumaric acid into dicoumarol. PMID:6033758

  5. Increased Ratio of Electron Transport to Net Assimilation Rate Supports Elevated Isoprenoid Emission Rate in Eucalypts under Drought1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Kaidala Ganesha Srikanta; Jamie, Ian McLeod; Prentice, Iain Colin; Atwell, Brian James

    2014-01-01

    Plants undergoing heat and low-CO2 stresses emit large amounts of volatile isoprenoids compared with those in stress-free conditions. One hypothesis posits that the balance between reducing power availability and its use in carbon assimilation determines constitutive isoprenoid emission rates in plants and potentially even their maximum emission capacity under brief periods of stress. To test this, we used abiotic stresses to manipulate the availability of reducing power. Specifically, we examined the effects of mild to severe drought on photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) and net carbon assimilation rate (NAR) and the relationship between estimated energy pools and constitutive volatile isoprenoid emission rates in two species of eucalypts: Eucalyptus occidentalis (drought tolerant) and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (drought sensitive). Isoprenoid emission rates were insensitive to mild drought, and the rates increased when the decline in NAR reached a certain species-specific threshold. ETR was sustained under drought and the ETR-NAR ratio increased, driving constitutive isoprenoid emission until severe drought caused carbon limitation of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway. The estimated residual reducing power unused for carbon assimilation, based on the energetic status model, significantly correlated with constitutive isoprenoid emission rates across gradients of drought (r2 > 0.8) and photorespiratory stress (r2 > 0.9). Carbon availability could critically limit emission rates under severe drought and photorespiratory stresses. Under most instances of moderate abiotic stress levels, increased isoprenoid emission rates compete with photorespiration for the residual reducing power not invested in carbon assimilation. A similar mechanism also explains the individual positive effects of low-CO2, heat, and drought stresses on isoprenoid emission. PMID:25139160

  6. Geosmin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis. Molecular cloning, expression, and mechanistic study of the germacradienol/geosmin synthase.

    PubMed

    Cane, David E; He, Xiaofei; Kobayashi, Seiji; Omura, Satoshi; Ikeda, Haruo

    2006-08-01

    Geosmin (1) is responsible for the characteristic odor of moist soil. The Gram-positive soil bacterium Streptomyces avermitilis produces geosmin (1) as well as its precursor germacradienol (3). The S. avermitilis gene SAV2163 (geoA) is extremely similar to the S. coelicolor A3(2) SCO6073 gene that encodes a germacradienol/geosmin synthase. S. avermitilis mutants with a deleted geoA were unable to produce either germacradienol (3) or geosmin (1). Biosynthesis of both compounds was restored by introducing an intact geoA gene into the mutants. Incubation of recombinant GeoA, encoded by the SAV2163 gene of S. avermitilis, with farnesyl diphosphate (2) in the presence of Mg2+ gave a mixture of (4S,7R)-germacra-1(10)E,5E-diene-11-ol (3) (66%), (7S)-germacrene D (4) (24%), geosmin (1) (8%), and a hydrocarbon, tentatively assigned the structure of octalin 5 (2%). Incubation of this germacradienol/geosmin synthase with [1,1-(2)H2] FPP (2a) gave geosmin-d1 (1a), as predicted. When recombinant GeoA from either S. avermitilis or S. coelicolor A3(2) was incubated with nerolidyl diphosphate (8), only the acyclic elimination products beta3-farnesene (10), (Z)-alpha-farnesene (11), and (E)-alpha-farnesene (12) were formed, thereby ruling out nerolidyl diphosphate as an intermediate in the conversion of farnesyl diphosphate to geosmin, germacradienol, and germacrene D.

  7. Biosynthesis, molecular structure, and domain architecture of potato suberin: a (13)C NMR study using isotopically labeled precursors.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Stark, R E

    2000-08-01

    Although suberin in potato wound periderm is known to be a polyester containing long-chain fatty acids and phenolics embedded within the cell wall, many aspects of its molecular structure and polymer-polymer connectivities remain elusive. The present work combines biosynthetic incorporation of site-specifically (13)C-enriched acetates and phenylalanines with one- and two-dimensional solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopic methods to monitor the developing suberin polymer. Exogenous acetate is found to be incorporated preferentially at the carboxyl end of the aliphatic carbon chains, suggesting addition during the later elongation steps of fatty acid synthesis. Carboxyl-labeled phenylalanine precursors provide evidence for the concurrent development of phenolic esters and of monolignols typical of lignin. Experiments with ring-labeled phenylalanine precursors demonstrate a predominance of sinapyl and guaiacyl structures among suberin's phenolic moieties. Finally, the analysis of spin-exchange (solid-state NOESY) NMR experiments in ring-labeled suberin indicates distances of no more than 0.5 nm between pairs of phenolic and oxymethine carbons, which are attributed to the aromatic-aliphatic polyester and the cell wall polysaccharide matrix, respectively. These results offer direct and detailed molecular information regarding the insoluble intermediates of suberin biosynthesis, indicate probable covalent linkages between moieties of its polyester and polysaccharide domains, and yield a clearer overall picture of this agriculturally important protective material.

  8. Nonmevalonate terpene biosynthesis enzymes as antiinfective drug targets: substrate synthesis and high-throughput screening methods.

    PubMed

    Illarionova, Victoria; Kaiser, Johannes; Ostrozhenkova, Elena; Bacher, Adelbert; Fischer, Markus; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix

    2006-11-10

    The nonmevalonate isoprenoid pathway is an established target for antiinfective drug development. This paper describes high-throughput methods for the screening of 2C-methyl-D-erythritol synthase (IspC protein), 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol synthase (IspD protein), 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol kinase (IspE protein), and 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase (IspF protein) against large compound libraries. The assays use up to three auxiliary enzymes. They are all monitored photometrically at 340 nm and are robust as documented by Z-factors of >or=0.86. 13C NMR assays designed for hit verification via direct detection of the primary reaction product are also described. Enzyme-assisted methods for the preparation, on a multigram scale, of isoprenoid biosynthesis intermediates required as substrates for these assays are reported. Notably, these methods enable the introduction of single or multiple 13C labels as required for NMR-monitored assays. The preparation of 4-diphosphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2-phosphate in multigram quantities is described for the first time.

  9. A highly spatially resolved GIS-based model to assess the isoprenoid emissions from key Italian ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Claudia Kemper; Fares, Silvano; Ciccioli, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    The amount of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) emitted from terrestrial vegetation is of great importance in atmospheric reactivity, particularly for ozone-forming reactions and as condensation nuclei in aerosol formation and growth. This work presents a detailed inventory of isoprenoid emissions from vegetation in Italy using an original approach which combines state of the art models to estimate the species-specific isoprenoid emissions and a Geographic Information System (GIS) where emissions are spatially represented. Isoprenoid species and basal emission factors were obtained by combining results from laboratory experiments with those published in literature. For the first time, our investigation was not only restricted to isoprene and total monoterpenes, but our goal was to provide maps of isoprene and individual monoterpenes at a high-spatial (˜1 km2) and temporal resolution (daily runs, monthly trends in emissions are discussed in the text). Another novelty in our research was the inclusion of the effects of phenology on plant emissions. Our results show that: a) isoprene, a-pinene, sabinene and b-pinene are the most important compounds emitted from vegetation in Italy; b) annual biogenic isoprene and monoterpene fluxes for the year 2006 were ˜31.30 Gg and ˜37.70 Gg, respectively; and c) Quercus pubescens + Quercus petrea + Quercus robur, Quercus ilex, Quercus suber and Fagus sylvatica are the principal isoprenoid emitting species in the country. The high spatial and temporal resolution, combined with the species-specific emission output, makes the model particularly suitable for assessing local budgets, and for modeling photochemical pollution in Italy.

  10. Isoprenoid quantitation in human brain tissue: a validated HPLC-fluorescence detection method for endogenous farnesyl- (FPP) and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP).

    PubMed

    Hooff, Gero P; Volmer, Dietrich A; Wood, W Gibson; Müller, Walter E; Eckert, Gunter P

    2008-10-01

    Farnesyl- and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (FPP and GGPP) are isoprenoid intermediates in the mevalonate pathway. They play a crucial role in cell survival, growth and differentiation due to their attachment (isoprenylation) to small GTPases (Ras, Rho, etc.). Isoprenoid formation seems to be tightly regulated within the mevalonate pathway and its perturbation has been linked to certain diseases (e.g., cancer, Alzheimer's disease), but tissue levels are unknown. It is therefore of the utmost importance to quantify these isoprenoids in diseased tissue or in tissue after drug administration. The current work describes an isolation procedure utilizing a combination of Extrelut(R) liquid/liquid and reversed-phase solid-phase extraction (SPE) for homogenized human frontal cortex tissue. In addition, after a careful validation of an HPLC-fluorescence method, this assay allowed the determination of nanomolar concentrations of endogenous FPP and GGPP levels (4.5 and 10.6 ng/mg protein, respectively) in human brain tissue. The method is selective, precise (<15% RSD), accurate (<15% relative error) and sensitive over a linear range of 10-400 ng/mL for FPP and 50-1000 ng/mL for GGPP according to the current FDA criteria for bioanalytical method validation. Overall, this new method introduces the ability to simultaneously quantify FPP and GGPP in human brain tissue, and is potentially applicable to several other tissues and species.

  11. Isoprenoid quantitation in human brain tissue. A validated HPLC-fluorescence detection method for endogenous farnesyl- (FPP) and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Farnesyl- and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (FPP and GGPP) are isoprenoid intermediates in the mevalonate pathway. They play a crucial role in cell survival, growth and differentiation by their attachment (isoprenylation) to small GTPases (Ras, Rho etc.). Isoprenoid formation seems to be tightly regulated within the mevalonate pathway and its perturbation has been linked to certain diseases (e.g., cancer, Alzheimer's disease) but tissue levels are unknown. It is therefore of utmost importance to quantify these isoprenoids in diseased tissue or in tissue after drug administration. The current work describes an isolation procedure utilizing a combination of Extrelut® liquid/liquid and reversed-phase solid-phase extraction (SPE) for homogenized human frontal cortex tissue. In addition, after a careful validation of an HPLC-fluorescence method, this assay allowed determination of nanomolar concentrations of endogenous FPP and GGPP levels (4.5 and 10.6 ng/mg protein, respectively) in human brain tissue. The method is selective, precise (< 15% RSD), accurate (< 15% relative error) and sensitive over a linear range of 10 – 400 ng/mL for FPP and 50 – 1000 ng/mL for GGPP according to the current FDA criteria for bioanalytical method validation. Overall, this new method introduces the ability to simultaneously quantify FPP and GGPP in human brain tissue with the prospect for application to several other tissues and species. PMID:18690423

  12. Production of a Polyunsaturated Isoprenoid Wax Ester during Aerobic Metabolism of Squalene by Marinobacter squalenivorans sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Rontani, Jean-François; Mouzdahir, Abdelkrim; Michotey, Valerie; Caumette, Pierre; Bonin, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the production of 5,9,13-trimethyltetradeca-4E,8E,12-trienyl-5,9,13-trimethyltetradeca-4E,8E,12-trienoate during the aerobic degradation of squalene by a Marinobacter strain, 2Asq64, isolated from the marine environment. A pathway involving initial cleavage of the C10-C11 or C14-C15 double bonds of the squalene molecule is proposed to explain the formation of this polyunsaturated isoprenoid wax ester. The isoprenoid wax ester content reached 1.1% of the degraded squalene at the mid-exponential growth phase and then decreased during the stationary phase. The wax ester content increased by approximately threefold in N-limited cultures, in which the ammonium concentration corresponds to conditions often found in marine sediments. This suggests that the bacterial formation of isoprenoid wax esters might be favored in such environments. The bacterial strain is then characterized as a member of a new species, for which we propose the name Marinobacter squalenivorans sp. nov. PMID:12839795

  13. Natural isoprenoids inhibit LPS-induced-production of cytokines and nitric oxide in aminobisphosphonate-treated monocytes.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Tommasini, Alberto; Crovella, Sergio; Pontillo, Alessandra

    2010-06-01

    The inhibition of mevalonate pathway through genetic defects (mevalonate kinase deficiency, MKD) or pharmacologic drugs (aminobisphosphonates) causes a shortage of intermediate compounds and, in particular, of geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate (GGPP) associated to the activation of caspase-1 and IL-1beta release. Geraniol (GOH), farnesol (FOH), geranylgeraniol (GGOH) and menthol (MOH), due to their isoprenoid structure, are supposed to enter the mevalonate pathway and to by-pass the biochemical block, reconstituting the pathway. Considering the already known side effects of aminobisphosphonates, and the lack of a specific treatment for MKD, we evaluated the impact of these natural isoprenoids compounds in a RAW cell lines chemically treated with the aminobisphosphonate alendronate, and in monocytes isolated from 2 patients affected by MKD. GOH, FOH, GGOH and MOH were all capable to diminish inflammatory marker levels induced by LPS. These natural isoprenoids could be proposed as novel therapeutic approach for the still orphan drug MKD, but also considered for the evaluation of possible inflammatory side effects of aminobisphosphonates.

  14. Redirection of metabolite biosynthesis from hydroxybenzoates to volatile terpenoids in green hairy roots of Daucus carota.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Chiranjit; Samanta, Tanmoy; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2016-02-01

    A metabolic shift in green hairy root cultures of carrot from phenylpropanoid/benzenoid biosynthesis toward volatile isoprenoids was observed when compared with the metabolite profile of normal hairy root cultures. Hairy roots cultures of Daucus carota turned green under continuous illumination, while the content of the major phenolic compound p-hydroxybenzoic acid (p-HBA) was reduced to half as compared to normal hairy roots cultured in darkness. p-Hydroxybenzaldehyde dehydrogenase (HBD) activity was suppressed in the green hairy roots. However, comparative volatile analysis of 14-day-old green hairy roots revealed higher monoterpene and sesquiterpene contents than found in normal hairy roots. Methyl salicylate content was higher in normal hairy roots than in green ones. Application of clomazone, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), reduced the amount of total monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in green hairy roots compared to normal hairy roots. However, methyl salicylate content was enhanced in both green and normal hairy roots treated with clomazone as compared to their respective controls. Because methyl-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) and phenylpropanoid pathways, respectively, contribute to the formation of monoterpenes and phenolic acids biosynthesis, the activities of enzymes regulating those pathways were measured in terms of their in vitro activities, in both green and normal hairy root cultures. These key enzymes were 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), an early regulatory enzyme of the MEP pathway, pyruvate kinase (PK), an enzyme of primary metabolism related to the MEP pathway, shikimate dehydrogenase (SKDH) which is involved in biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) that catalyzes the first step of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Activities of DXR and PK were higher in green hairy roots as compared to normal ones, whereas the opposite trend was observed for SKDH and PAL

  15. Engineering of a plasmid-free Escherichia coli strain for improved in vivo biosynthesis of astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The xanthophyll astaxanthin is a high-value compound with applications in the nutraceutical, cosmetic, food, and animal feed industries. Besides chemical synthesis and extraction from naturally producing organisms like Haematococcus pluvialis, heterologous biosynthesis in non-carotenogenic microorganisms like Escherichia coli, is a promising alternative for sustainable production of natural astaxanthin. Recent achievements in the metabolic engineering of E. coli strains have led to a significant increase in the productivity of carotenoids like lycopene or β-carotene by increasing the metabolic flux towards the isoprenoid precursors. For the heterologous biosynthesis of astaxanthin in E. coli, however, the conversion of β-carotene to astaxanthin is obviously the most critical step towards an efficient biosynthesis of astaxanthin. Results Here we report the construction of the first plasmid-free E. coli strain that produces astaxanthin as the sole carotenoid compound with a yield of 1.4 mg/g cdw (E. coli BW-ASTA). This engineered E. coli strain harbors xanthophyll biosynthetic genes from Pantoea ananatis and Nostoc punctiforme as individual expression cassettes on the chromosome and is based on a β-carotene-producing strain (E. coli BW-CARO) recently developed in our lab. E. coli BW-CARO has an enhanced biosynthesis of the isoprenoid precursor isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and produces β-carotene in a concentration of 6.2 mg/g cdw. The expression of crtEBIY along with the β-carotene-ketolase gene crtW148 (NpF4798) and the β-carotene-hydroxylase gene (crtZ) under controlled expression conditions in E. coli BW-ASTA directed the pathway exclusively towards the desired product astaxanthin (1.4 mg/g cdw). Conclusions By using the λ-Red recombineering technique, genes encoding for the astaxanthin biosynthesis pathway were stably integrated into the chromosome of E. coli. The expression levels of chromosomal integrated recombinant biosynthetic genes were

  16. Isoprenoid emission of oak species typical for the Mediterranean area: Source strength and controlling variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrecher, Rainer; Hauff, Karin; Rabong, Richard; Steinbrecher, Jutta

    Measurements of isoprenoid emission on five Mediterranean oak species in the field revealed that Quercus frainetto, Quercus petraea and Quercus pubescens are strong emitters of isoprene. In contrast Quercus cerris and Quercus suber emitted no significant amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes. For Q. pubenscens and Q. frainetto median emission factors of 16.68 nmol m -2 s -1 (86.06 μg g -1 dw h -1) and 30.72 nmol m -2 s -1 (133.95 μg g -1 dw h -1 were calculated, respectively. The 25 to 75 percentiles span of the emission factor data sets ranged from - 53% to + 56% of the median values. Light and temperature are the main controlling factors for isoprene emission. The influence of other environmental and plant physiological parameters on the isoprene emission is discussed. The "Guenther" emission algorithm is able to predict the daily maximum of the isoprene emission within the plant specific uncertainty range. However, the morning increase and the afternoon drop in the isoprene emission is not well parameterized. On the basis of process oriented models for the synthesis of isoprene in plants, a further reduction in the uncertainty may be achieved resulting in a more reliable prediction of short-time variation in isoprene emission.

  17. Constraints in the application of the Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether index as a terrestrial input proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fietz, Susanne; MartíNez-Garcia, Alfredo; Huguet, Carme; Rueda, Gemma; Rosell-Melé, Antoni

    2011-10-01

    Determination of the relative inputs of aquatic autochthonous and terrestrial allochthonous organic matter into marine and lacustrine environments is essential to understanding the global carbon budget. A variety of proxies are used for this purpose, including the Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether (BIT) index. This is calculated from the concentrations of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs), derived from unidentified terrestrial bacteria, and crenarchaeol, a marker for aquatic mesophile Thaumarchaeota (Crenarchaeota group I). As the index is a ratio, its value depends on both the crenarchaeol aquatic in situ production and the soil-derived branched GDGT input. Therefore, the BIT index reflects not only changes in the input of terrestrial or soil organic matter but also relative variations in aquatic Thaumarchaeota abundance in the water column. In fact, we show that in oceanic and lacustrine settings, the BIT index can be dominated by the aquatic end-member of the ratio. Consequently, the BIT index by itself can be an unreliable proxy to compare the input of terrestrial matter between sites and over time, and we propose that the quantification of branched GDGT fluxes or concentrations may instead be a better indicator of soil terrestrial inputs.

  18. Nonionic diethanolamide amphiphiles with isoprenoid-type hydrocarbon chains: thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Krodkiewska, Irena; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    The thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behaviour of a series of diethanolamide amphiphiles with isoprenoid-type hydrocarbon chains (geranoyl, H-farnesoyl, and phytanoyl) has been investigated. When neat, both H-farnesoyl and phytanoyl diethanolamide form a smectic liquid crystalline structure at sub-zero temperatures. In addition, all three diethanolamides exhibit a glass transition temperature at around -73 C. Geranoyl diethanolamide forms a lamellar crystalline phase with a lattice parameter of 17.4 {angstrom} following long term storage accompanied by the loss of the glass transition. In the presence of water, H-farnesoyl and phytanoyl diethanolamide form lyotropic liquid crystalline phases, whilst geranoyl diethanolamide forms an L{sub 2} phase. H-farnesoyl diethanolamide forms a fluid lamellar phase (L{sub {alpha}}) at room temperature and up to {approx} 40 C. Phytanoyl diethanolamide displays a rich mesomorphism forming the inverse diamond (Q{sub II}{sup D}) and gyroid (Q{sub II}{sup G}) bicontinuous cubic phases in addition to an L{sub {alpha}} phase.

  19. Applicability of highly branched isoprenoids as a sea ice proxy in the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Jae Il; Belt, Simon T.; Gal, Jong-Ku; Smik, Lukas; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Sea ice is an integral component of the polar climate system, constraining the effect of changing surface albedo, ocean-atmosphere heat exchanges, the formation of deep and intermediate waters that participate in driving the meridional overturning circulation and thus global climate. In recent years, a mono-unsaturated highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) alkene which is biosynthesised by certain sea ice diatoms during the spring bloom and, upon ice melt, deposited into underlying sediments, has been uniquely observed in Arctic sea ice and in Arctic sediments. Hence, the term IP25 (ice proxy with 25 carbon atoms) was proposed to distinguish this compound from other HBI isomers and has become an established proxy for the reconstruction of Arctic sea ice. In contrast, a monounsaturated HBI alkene, i.e. IP25, has not been observed in sea ice or sediments from the Antarctic. Hence, the application of diene and triene HBI concentrations and the resulting diene/triene (D/T) ratio was alternatively introduced as sea ice/open water indicators in the Southern Ocean. However, there is still lack of data covering the wide areas around the Antarctic, especially from the Ross Sea. Hence, we investigated surface sediment samples from the Ross Sea (n=14) collected during the R/V ARAON cruise in 2015 as well as from the Antarctic Peninsula (n=17) collected during several R/V ARAON cruises between 2001 and 2013. We will present our preliminary results and will discuss the applicability of the HBI in the Ross Sea.

  20. Glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yim, Grace; Thaker, Maulik N; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides such as vancomycin, teicoplanin and telavancin are essential for treating infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Unfortunately, the dwindled pipeline of new antibiotics into the market and the emergence of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci and other resistant bacteria are increasingly making effective antibiotic treatment difficult. We have now learned a great deal about how bacteria produce antibiotics. This information can be exploited to develop the next generation of antimicrobials. The biosynthesis of glycopeptides via nonribosomal peptide assembly and unusual amino acid synthesis, crosslinking and tailoring enzymes gives rise to intricate chemical structures that target the bacterial cell wall. This review seeks to describe recent advances in our understanding of both biosynthesis and resistance of these important antibiotics.

  1. BIOSYNTHESIS OF YEAST CAROTENOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kenneth L.; Nakayama, T. O. M.; Chichester, C. O.

    1964-01-01

    Simpson, Kenneth L. (University of California, Davis), T. O. M. Nakayama, and C. O. Chichester. Biosynthesis of yeast carotenoids. J. Bacteriol. 88:1688–1694. 1964.—The biosynthesis of carotenoids was followed in Rhodotorula glutinis and in a new strain, 62-506. The treatment of the growing cultures by methylheptenone, or ionone, vapors permitted observations of the intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway. On the basis of concentration changes and accumulation in blocked pathways, the sequence of carotenoid formation is postulated as phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, β-zeacarotene, γ-carotene, torulin, a C40 aldehyde, and torularhodin. Torulin and torularhodin were established as the main carotenoids of 62-506. PMID:14240958

  2. [Studies on the biosynthesis and secretion of parathyroid hormone in monolayer cultures of bovine parathyroid cells (I) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Okano, K; Nakai, R; Goto, H; Yoshikawa, M

    1976-11-20

    We have developed a preparation of monolayer cultures of bovine parathyroid cells in order to elucidate the control mechanism of the biosynthesis and secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) at cellular level. Dispersion of parathyroid cells was performed by stirring minced bovine parathyroid tissues in Hanks' BSS containing 0.3 yields to 0.5 percent collagenase at 37 degrees C for 60 min. Dispersed cells were cultured at 37 degrees C in MEM-Hanks' BSS containing 10 percent fetal calf serum and 15 mM HEPES. On the 5th day of the culture, the medium was replaced with 1 percent BSA-MEM-Hanks-HEPES buffer, and the cells were incubated with 3H-leucine or in the media containing various concentrations of calcium, magnesium, PGE1, PGE2 or DBcAMP. At the end of incubation, the cells were detouched and homogenized in 8M urea, 0.2 N HCL and 0.01 M cysteine solution. The isolation of proparathyroid hormone (ProPTH) and PTH was performed through the preparation of TCA-powder followed by CMC column chromatography. PTH in the incubation medium was determined by radioimmunoassay. It was demonstrated that the monolayer cultures of bovine parathyroid cells were synthesizing ProPTH and converting it to PTH. The cultures exhibited linear secretion rates of PTH into the medium. The secretion of PTH was markedly increased by PGE1, PGE2 or DBcAMP in the range of 10(-7) yields to 10(-5)M in the former and 10(-5) yields to 10(-3)M in the latter, while calcium or magnesium changed secretion rate in the range of 0.3 yields to 4.4 mM.

  3. Genomics-Based Discovery of Plant Genes for Synthetic Biology of Terpenoid Fragrances: A Case Study in Sandalwood oil Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Celedon, J M; Bohlmann, J

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoid fragrances are powerful mediators of ecological interactions in nature and have a long history of traditional and modern industrial applications. Plants produce a great diversity of fragrant terpenoid metabolites, which make them a superb source of biosynthetic genes and enzymes. Advances in fragrance gene discovery have enabled new approaches in synthetic biology of high-value speciality molecules toward applications in the fragrance and flavor, food and beverage, cosmetics, and other industries. Rapid developments in transcriptome and genome sequencing of nonmodel plant species have accelerated the discovery of fragrance biosynthetic pathways. In parallel, advances in metabolic engineering of microbial and plant systems have established platforms for synthetic biology applications of some of the thousands of plant genes that underlie fragrance diversity. While many fragrance molecules (eg, simple monoterpenes) are abundant in readily renewable plant materials, some highly valuable fragrant terpenoids (eg, santalols, ambroxides) are rare in nature and interesting targets for synthetic biology. As a representative example for genomics/transcriptomics enabled gene and enzyme discovery, we describe a strategy used successfully for elucidation of a complete fragrance biosynthetic pathway in sandalwood (Santalum album) and its reconstruction in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We address questions related to the discovery of specific genes within large gene families and recovery of rare gene transcripts that are selectively expressed in recalcitrant tissues. To substantiate the validity of the approaches, we describe the combination of methods used in the gene and enzyme discovery of a cytochrome P450 in the fragrant heartwood of tropical sandalwood, responsible for the fragrance defining, final step in the biosynthesis of (Z)-santalols. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biosynthesis of a specifically deuteriated diunsaturated fatty acid (18:2/sub. delta. 6,9/) for /sup 2/H NMR membrane studies

    SciTech Connect

    Baenziger, J.E.; Smith, I.C.P.; Hill, R.J.

    1987-12-15

    A unique procedure for the biosynthesis and subsequent isolation of a series of specifically deuteriated cis,cis-octadeca-6,9-dienoic acids has been developed. An auxotroph of Tetrahymena, which lacks ..delta..9 and ..delta..12 desaturase activity, is supplemented with specifically deuteriated oleic acid and converts it to the corresponding deuteriated cis,cis-octadeca-6,9-dienoic acid, 18:2/sup ..delta..6,9/. The deuteriated fatty acid is subsequently isolated by argentation chromatography and HPLC. To demonstrate the utility of the procedure, we describe here the biosynthesis of cis,cis-octadeca-6,9-dienoic acid deuteriated at positions 9 and 10. Gas and thin-layer chromatography of the isolated fatty acid showed that it was greater than 99% pure while /sup 13/C NMR and mass spectrometry of the O-(trimethylsilyl) derivative confirmed that the 18-carbon fatty acid contains two double bonds located at positions 6 and 9. The yield, from an 11-L culture, was typically 100 mg of which 35% was found to be deuteriated at both the 9- and 10-positions. The deuteriated fatty acid was esterified to 1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and aqueous, multilamellar dispersions of the lipid were studied by /sup 2/H NMR. Each spectrum consists of two overlapping powder patterns and therefore yields two quadrupolar splittings. Over a temperature range of 0 to 40/sup 0/C, one splitting decreases from 6.6 to 1.8 kHz while other increases from 4.5 to 5.3 kHz. The magnitudes of the two splittings are equivalent between 10 and 15/sup 0/ C. The values of the splittings, and their response to temperature, differ significantly from those of the corresponding deuteriated oleic acid in microbial membranes and in bilayers of 1-hexadecanoyl-2-cis-octadec-9-enoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC).

  5. Application of CRISPRi for prokaryotic metabolic engineering involving multiple genes, a case study: Controllable P(3HB-co-4HB) biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Li; Ren, Yi-Lin; Chen, Jin-Chun; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-05-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference (CRISPRi) is used to edit eukaryotic genomes. Here, we show that CRISPRi can also be used for fine-tuning prokaryotic gene expression while simultaneously regulating multiple essential gene expression with less labor and time consumption. As a case study, CRISPRi was used to control polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthesis pathway flux and to adjust PHA composition. A pathway was constructed in Escherichia coli for the production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB-co-4HB)] from glucose. The native gene sad encoding E. coli succinate semi-aldehyde dehydrogenase was expressed under the control of CRISPRi using five specially designed single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for regulating carbon flux to 4-hydroxybutyrate (4HB) biosynthesis. The system allowed formation of P(3HB-co-4HB) consisting of 1-9mol% 4HB. Additionally, succinate, generated by succinyl-coA synthetase and succinate dehydrogenase (respectively encoded by genes sucC, sucD and sdhA, sdhB) was channeled preferentially to the 4HB precursor by using selected sgRNAs such as sucC2, sucD2, sdhB2 and sdhA1 via CRISPRi. The resulting 4HB content in P(3HB-co-4HB) was found to range from 1.4 to 18.4mol% depending on the expression levels of down-regulated genes. The results show that CRISPRi is a feasible method to simultaneously manipulate multiple genes in E. coli.

  6. [Regulation of the biosynthesis of extracellular phosphohydrolases in Penicillium brevicompactum].

    PubMed

    Ezhov, V A; Bezborodova, S I; Santsevich, N I

    1978-01-01

    The effect of certain metabolites of Penicillium brevi-compactum on the biosynthesis of exocellular ribonucleases and phosphomonoesterase was studied. Their synthesis was found to be inhibited by RNA and AMP, as well as by high concentrations of these enzymes in the medium. The mechanism which regulates the biosynthesis of exocellular phosphohydrolases by both phosphate and the enzymes is discussed.

  7. Fruit carotenoid-deficient mutants in tomato reveal a function of the plastidial isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI1) in carotenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pankratov, Ilya; McQuinn, Ryan; Schwartz, Jochanan; Bar, Einat; Fei, Zhangjun; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Zamir, Dani; Giovannoni, James J; Hirschberg, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Isoprenoids consist of a large class of compounds that are present in all living organisms. They are derived from the 5C building blocks isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP). In plants, IDP is synthesized in the cytoplasm from mevalonic acid via the MVA pathway, and in plastids from 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate through the MEP pathway. The enzyme IDP isomerase (IDI) catalyzes the interconversion between IDP and DMADP. Most plants contain two IDI enzymes, the functions of which are characteristically compartmentalized in the cells. Carotenoids are isoprenoids that play essential roles in photosynthesis and provide colors to flowers and fruits. They are synthesized in the plastids via the MEP pathway. Fruits of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) accumulate high levels of the red carotene lycopene. We have identified mutations in tomato that reduce overall carotenoid accumulation in fruits. Four alleles of a locus named FRUIT CAROTENOID DEFICIENT 1 (fcd1) were characterized. Map-based cloning of fcd1 indicated that this gene encodes the plastidial enzyme IDI1. Lack of IDI1 reduced the concentration of carotenoids in fruits, flowers and cotyledons, but not in mature leaves. These results indicate that the plastidial IDI plays an important function in carotenoid biosynthesis, thus highlighting its role in optimizing the ratio between IDP and DMADP as precursors for different downstream isoprenoid pathways.

  8. Down-regulation of tomato PHYTOL KINASE strongly impairs tocopherol biosynthesis and affects prenyllipid metabolism in an organ-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Juliana; Azevedo, Mariana da Silva; Spicher, Livia; Glauser, Gaétan; vom Dorp, Katharina; Guyer, Luzia; del Valle Carranza, Andrea; Asis, Ramón; de Souza, Amanda Pereira; Buckeridge, Marcos; Demarco, Diego; Bres, Cécile; Rothan, Christophe; Peres, Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Kessler, Félix; Dörmann, Peter; Carrari, Fernando; Rossi, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Tocopherol, a compound with vitamin E (VTE) activity, is a conserved constituent of the plastidial antioxidant network in photosynthetic organisms. The synthesis of tocopherol involves the condensation of an aromatic head group with an isoprenoid prenyl side chain. The latter, phytyl diphosphate, can be derived from chlorophyll phytol tail recycling, which depends on phytol kinase (VTE5) activity. How plants co-ordinate isoprenoid precursor distribution for supplying biosynthesis of tocopherol and other prenyllipids in different organs is poorly understood. Here, Solanum lycopersicum plants impaired in the expression of two VTE5-like genes identified by phylogenetic analyses, named SlVTE5 and SlFOLK, were characterized. Our data show that while SlFOLK does not affect tocopherol content, the production of this metabolite is >80% dependent on SlVTE5 in tomato, in both leaves and fruits. VTE5 deficiency greatly impacted lipid metabolism, including prenylquinones, carotenoids, and fatty acid phytyl esters. However, the prenyllipid profile greatly differed between source and sink organs, revealing organ-specific metabolic adjustments in tomato. Additionally, VTE5-deficient plants displayed starch accumulation and lower CO2 assimilation in leaves associated with mild yield penalty. Taken together, our results provide valuable insights into the distinct regulation of isoprenoid metabolism in leaves and fruits and also expose the interaction between lipid and carbon metabolism, which results in carbohydrate export blockage in the VTE5-deficient plants, affecting tomato fruit quality. PMID:26596763

  9. Farnesylation Directs AtIPT3 Subcellular Localization and Modulates Cytokinin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Galichet, Arnaud; Hoyerová, Klára; Kamínek, Miroslav; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Cytokinins regulate cell division and differentiation as well as a number of other processes implicated in plant development. The first step of cytokinin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is catalyzed by adenosine phosphate-isopentenyltransferases (AtIPT). The enzymes are localized in plastids or the cytoplasm where they utilize the intermediate dimethylallyl-diphosphate from the methylerythritolphosphate or mevalonic acid pathways. However, the regulatory mechanisms linking AtIPT activity and cytokinin biosynthesis with cytokinin homeostasis and isoprenoid synthesis are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that expression of AtIPT3, one member of the adenosine AtIPT protein family in Arabidopsis, increased the production of specific isopentenyl-type cytokinins. Moreover, AtIPT3 is a substrate of the protein farnesyl transferase, and AtIPT3 farnesylation directed the localization of the protein in the nucleus/cytoplasm, whereas the nonfarnesylated protein was located in the plastids. AtIPT3 gain-of-function mutant analysis indicated that the different subcellular localization of the farnesylated protein and the nonfarnesylated protein was closely correlated with either isopentenyl-type or zeatin-type cytokinin biosynthesis. In addition, mutation of the farnesyl acceptor cysteine-333 of AtIPT3 abolishes cytokinin production, suggesting that cysteine-333 has a dual and essential role for AtIPT3 farnesylation and catalytic activity. PMID:18184738

  10. [Microbial metabolites that inhibit sterol biosynthesis, their chemical diversity and characteristics of mode of action].

    PubMed

    Trenin, A S

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis (ISB) are widespread in nature and characterized by appreciable diversity both in their chemical structure and mode of action. Many of these inhibitors express noticeable biological activity and approved themselves in development of various pharmaceuticals. In this review there is a detailed description of biologically active microbial metabolites with revealed chemical structure that have ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis. Inhibitors of mevalonate pathway in fungous and mammalian cells, exhibiting hypolipidemic or antifungal activity, as well as inhibitors of alternative non-mevalonate (pyruvate gliceraldehyde phosphate) isoprenoid pathway, which are promising in the development of affective antimicrobial or antiparasitic drugs, are under consideration in this review. Chemical formulas of the main natural inhibitors and their semi-synthetic derivatives are represented. Mechanism of their action at cellular and biochemical level is discussed. Special attention is given to inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (group of lovastatin) and inhibitors of acyl-CoA-cholesterol-acyl transferase (ACAT) that possess hypolipidemic activity and could be affective in the treatment of atherosclerosis. In case of inhibitors of late stages of sterol biosynthesis (after squalene formation) special attention is paid to compounds possessing evident antifungal and antitumoral activity. Explanation of mechanism of anticancer and antiviral action of microbial ISB, as well as the description of their ability to induce apoptosis is given.

  11. The Terpenoid Biosynthesis Toolkit of Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ravindra; Mukherjee, Prasun Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The widely used biotechnologically important fungi belonging to the genus Trichoderma are rich sources of secondary metabolites. Even though the genomes of several Trichoderma spp. have been published, and data are available on the genes involved in biosynthesis of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases, no genome-wide data are available for the terpenoid biosynthesis machinery in these organisms. In the present study, we have identified the genes involved in terpene biosynthesis in the genomes of three Trichoderma spp., viz., T. virens, T. atroviride and T. reesei. While the genes involved in the condensation steps are highly conserved across the three species, these fungi differed in the number and organization of terpene cyclases. T. virens genome harbours eleven terpene cyclases, while T. atroviride harbours seven, and T. reeseisix in their genomes; seven, three and two being part of putative secondary metabolism related gene clusters.

  12. [Advances in the biosynthesis research of ginsenosides].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Ling; Gao, Li-Li; Zhu, Ping

    2013-02-01

    Ginsenosides are the main active components of medicinal herbs including Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolium, which have potent effects of anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and apoptosis inhibition. But the low content of ginsenosides limits its development and usage. At present, how to improve the production of ginsenosides by biological technology has been a new research focus. Some advances in the biosynthesis of ginsenosides by tissue culture and biotransformation have been made in recent years. So far at least twenty genes related to the biosynthesis of ginsenosides from Panax genus plants have been cloned and functionally identified, which has laid a good foundation for the study on the synthetic biology of ginsenosides. This review outlines recent advances in several aspects and is expected to provide a theoretical support to the thorough research of the pathway and regulation of ginsenosides biosynthesis.

  13. Biosynthesis and biological functions of terpenoids in plants.

    PubMed

    Tholl, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids (isoprenoids) represent the largest and most diverse class of chemicals among the myriad compounds produced by plants. Plants employ terpenoid metabolites for a variety of basic functions in growth and development but use the majority of terpenoids for more specialized chemical interactions and protection in the abiotic and biotic environment. Traditionally, plant-based terpenoids have been used by humans in the food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries, and more recently have been exploited in the development of biofuel products. Genomic resources and emerging tools in synthetic biology facilitate the metabolic engineering of high-value terpenoid products in plants and microbes. Moreover, the ecological importance of terpenoids has gained increased attention to develop strategies for sustainable pest control and abiotic stress protection. Together, these efforts require a continuous growth in knowledge of the complex metabolic and molecular regulatory networks in terpenoid biosynthesis. This chapter gives an overview and highlights recent advances in our understanding of the organization, regulation, and diversification of core and specialized terpenoid metabolic pathways, and addresses the most important functions of volatile and nonvolatile terpenoid specialized metabolites in plants.

  14. Taxadiene Synthase Structure and Evolution of Modular Architecture in Terpene Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    M Köksal; Y Jin; R Coates; R Croteau; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    With more than 55,000 members identified so far in all forms of life, the family of terpene or terpenoid natural products represents the epitome of molecular biodiversity. A well-known and important member of this family is the polycyclic diterpenoid Taxol (paclitaxel), which promotes tubulin polymerization and shows remarkable efficacy in cancer chemotherapy. The first committed step of Taxol biosynthesis in the Pacific yew (Taxus brevifolia) is the cyclization of the linear isoprenoid substrate geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to form taxa-4(5),11(12)diene, which is catalysed by taxadiene synthase. The full-length form of this diterpene cyclase contains 862 residues, but a roughly 80-residue amino-terminal transit sequence is cleaved on maturation in plastids. We now report the X-ray crystal structure of a truncation variant lacking the transit sequence and an additional 27 residues at the N terminus, hereafter designated TXS. Specifically, we have determined structures of TXS complexed with 13-aza-13,14-dihydrocopalyl diphosphate (1.82 {angstrom} resolution) and 2-fluorogeranylgeranyl diphosphate (2.25 {angstrom} resolution). The TXS structure reveals a modular assembly of three {alpha}-helical domains. The carboxy-terminal catalytic domain is a class I terpenoid cyclase, which binds and activates substrate GGPP with a three-metal ion cluster. The N-terminal domain and a third 'insertion' domain together adopt the fold of a vestigial class II terpenoid cyclase. A class II cyclase activates the isoprenoid substrate by protonation instead of ionization, and the TXS structure reveals a definitive connection between the two distinct cyclase classes in the evolution of terpenoid biosynthesis.

  15. Taxadiene synthase structure and evolution of modular architecture in terpene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Köksal, Mustafa; Jin, Yinghua; Coates, Robert M; Croteau, Rodney; Christianson, David W

    2011-01-06

    With more than 55,000 members identified so far in all forms of life, the family of terpene or terpenoid natural products represents the epitome of molecular biodiversity. A well-known and important member of this family is the polycyclic diterpenoid Taxol (paclitaxel), which promotes tubulin polymerization and shows remarkable efficacy in cancer chemotherapy. The first committed step of Taxol biosynthesis in the Pacific yew (Taxus brevifolia) is the cyclization of the linear isoprenoid substrate geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to form taxa-4(5),11(12)diene, which is catalysed by taxadiene synthase. The full-length form of this diterpene cyclase contains 862 residues, but a roughly 80-residue amino-terminal transit sequence is cleaved on maturation in plastids. We now report the X-ray crystal structure of a truncation variant lacking the transit sequence and an additional 27 residues at the N terminus, hereafter designated TXS. Specifically, we have determined structures of TXS complexed with 13-aza-13,14-dihydrocopalyl diphosphate (1.82 Å resolution) and 2-fluorogeranylgeranyl diphosphate (2.25 Å resolution). The TXS structure reveals a modular assembly of three α-helical domains. The carboxy-terminal catalytic domain is a class I terpenoid cyclase, which binds and activates substrate GGPP with a three-metal ion cluster. The N-terminal domain and a third 'insertion' domain together adopt the fold of a vestigial class II terpenoid cyclase. A class II cyclase activates the isoprenoid substrate by protonation instead of ionization, and the TXS structure reveals a definitive connection between the two distinct cyclase classes in the evolution of terpenoid biosynthesis.

  16. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics.

  17. Carotenoid biosynthesis regulatory mechanisms in plants.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rashidi; Mohd Zaifuddin, Fatimah Azzahra; Hassan, Norazian Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids are bioactive compounds with remarkably special properties produced by plants in response to internal and external stresses. In this review paper, we focus on the subject of carotenoid biosynthesis and several factors that have been reported to significantly enhance or reduce carotenoid accumulation in studied plant species. These factors include varietal aspects, location, growing season, and type of stress experienced by a plant. In addition, we propose that there are three stress resistance mechanisms in plants: avoidance, tolerance, and acclimation. Better understanding of the environmental factors affecting carotenoid biosynthesis will help researchers to develop methods for enhancing the production of carotenoids and other pigments to desired concentrations in plant crops.

  18. [Jasmonate biosynthesis--the latest discoveries].

    PubMed

    Wilmowicz, Emilia; Frankowski, Kamil; Sidłowska, Magdalena; Kućko, Agata; Kesy, Jacek; Gasiorowski, Adam; Glazińska, Paulina; Kopcewicz, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Jasmonates are plant hormones involved in many growth and development processes. They also participate in plant defense responses. Current progress in the study on biosynthesis and signaling of jasmonates has contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms regulating concentration of these hormones in the cell. Sustaining a proper level of jasmonates allow the plant to respond appropriately to changing conditions. It is possible due to the large number of enzymes and genes involved in biosynthesis of these hormones as well as multilevel control of their expression.

  19. [Biosynthesis of biologically active low-molecular weight compounds by fungi of the genus Penicillium (review)].

    PubMed

    Kozlovskii, A G; Antipova, T V; Zhelifonova, V P

    2015-01-01

    The recent data on exometabolite biosynthesis in fungi of the genus Penicillium is summarized. The study of creative species, as well as those isolated from extreme ecotopes, resulted in the identification of a number of novel, biologically active compounds. Alkaloid biosynthesis has been shown to begin on.the first day of fungus cultivation and to proceed throughout the cultivation period. Idiophase kinetics was observed for the biosynthesis of polyketide metabolites. The mechanisms of regulation of biosynthesis of promising bioactive compounds are discussed.

  20. Glucosinolate biosynthesis in Eruca sativa.

    PubMed

    Katsarou, Dimitra; Omirou, Michalis; Liadaki, Kalliopi; Tsikou, Daniela; Delis, Costas; Garagounis, Constantine; Krokida, Afrodite; Zambounis, Antonis; Papadopoulou, Kalliope K

    2016-12-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs) are a highly important group of secondary metabolites in the Caparalles order, both due to their significance in plant-biome interactions and to their chemoprotective properties. This study identified genes involved in all steps of aliphatic and indolic GSL biosynthesis in Eruca sativa, a cultivated plant closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana with agronomic and nutritional value. The impact of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) availability on GSL biosynthetic pathways at a transcriptional level, and on the final GSL content of plant leaf and root tissues, was investigated. N and S supply had a significant and interactive effect on the GSL content of leaves, in a structure-specific and tissue-dependent manner; the metabolites levels were significantly correlated with the relative expression of the genes involved in their biosynthesis. A more complex effect was observed in roots, where aliphatic and indolic GSLs and related biosynthetic genes responded differently to the various nutritional treatments suggesting that nitrogen and sulfur availability are important factors that control plant GSL content at a transcriptional level. The biological activity of extracts derived from these plants grown under the specific nutritional schemes was examined. N and S availability were found to significantly affect the cytotoxicity of E. sativa extracts on human cancer cells, supporting the notion that carefully designed nutritional schemes can promote the accumulation of chemoprotective substances in edible plants.

  1. Temperature and drug treatments in mevalonate kinase deficiency: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Kleiner, Giulio; Piscianz, Elisa; Zanin, Valentina; Monasta, Lorenzo; Crovella, Sergio; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2013-01-01

    Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency (MKD) is a rare autosomal recessive inborn disorder of cholesterol biosynthesis caused by mutations in the mevalonate kinase (MK) gene, leading to MK enzyme decreased activity. The consequent shortage of mevalonate-derived isoprenoid compounds results in an inflammatory phenotype, caused by the activation of the NALP3 inflammasome that determines an increased caspase-1 activation and IL-1 β release. In MKD, febrile temperature can further decrease the residual MK activity, leading to mevalonate pathway modulation and to possible disease worsening. We previously demonstrated that the administration of exogenous isoprenoids such as geraniol or the modulation of the enzymatic pathway with drugs, such as Tipifarnib, partially rescues the inflammatory phenotype associated with the defective mevalonic pathway. However, it has not been investigated yet how temperature can affect the success of these treatments. Thus, we investigated the effect of temperature on primary human monocytes from MKD patients. Furthermore the ability of geraniol and Tipifarnib to reduce the abnormal inflammatory response, already described at physiological temperature in MKD, was studied in a febrile condition. We evidenced the role of temperature in the modulation of the inflammatory events and suggested strongly considering this variable in future researches aimed at finding a treatment for MKD.

  2. Temperature and Drug Treatments in Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency: An Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Piscianz, Elisa; Crovella, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency (MKD) is a rare autosomal recessive inborn disorder of cholesterol biosynthesis caused by mutations in the mevalonate kinase (MK) gene, leading to MK enzyme decreased activity. The consequent shortage of mevalonate-derived isoprenoid compounds results in an inflammatory phenotype, caused by the activation of the NALP3 inflammasome that determines an increased caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release. In MKD, febrile temperature can further decrease the residual MK activity, leading to mevalonate pathway modulation and to possible disease worsening. We previously demonstrated that the administration of exogenous isoprenoids such as geraniol or the modulation of the enzymatic pathway with drugs, such as Tipifarnib, partially rescues the inflammatory phenotype associated with the defective mevalonic pathway. However, it has not been investigated yet how temperature can affect the success of these treatments. Thus, we investigated the effect of temperature on primary human monocytes from MKD patients. Furthermore the ability of geraniol and Tipifarnib to reduce the abnormal inflammatory response, already described at physiological temperature in MKD, was studied in a febrile condition. We evidenced the role of temperature in the modulation of the inflammatory events and suggested strongly considering this variable in future researches aimed at finding a treatment for MKD. PMID:24073415

  3. Identification of cold acclimation-responsive Rhododendron genes for lipid metabolism, membrane transport and lignin biosynthesis: importance of moderately abundant ESTs in genomic studies.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hui; Dhanaraj, Anik L; Arora, Rajeev; Rowland, Lisa J; Fu, Yan; Sun, Li

    2006-04-01

    We have previously analysed expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from non-acclimated (NA) and cold-acclimated (CA) Rhododendron leaves, and identified highly abundant complementary DNAs (cDNAs) possibly involved in cold acclimation. A potentially significant, but relatively unexplored, application of these EST data sets is the study of moderately abundant cDNAs, such as those picked only 1-3 times from each Rhododendron EST library containing approximately 430 ESTs. Using statistical tests and Northern blots, we established that the probability of differential expression of moderately abundant cDNAs based on the EST data is, indeed, a reasonably accurate predictor of their 'true' upregulation or downregulation as 11 out of 13 cDNAs (85%) studied fit this criterion. The analyses also revealed four aspects of cold acclimation in Rhododendron leaf tissues. Firstly, the concomitant upregulation of long-chain acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetase, CTP:cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase and delta-12 fatty acid desaturase in CA leaf tissues suggests that phospholipid biosynthesis and desaturation are important components of cold hardening in Rhododendron. Secondly, upregulation of plastidic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphatemalic enzyme (NADP-ME) in CA tissues suggests that malate is an important source of acetyl-CoA used for fatty acid biosynthesis during cold acclimation. Thirdly, down-regulation of plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP)2-1 aquaporin and upregulation of gated outward rectifying K+ channel (GORK) in CA tissues may be associated with the protection of overwintering leaves from freeze-induced cellular dehydration. Fourthly, upregulation of coumarate 3-hydroxylase may be associated with cell wall thickening in CA tissues. Physiological implications of these results, which reveal potentially novel regulations of cold acclimation in overwintering woody evergreens, are discussed. This work highlights the importance of also investigating low

  4. Chirality and protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Banik, Sindrila Dutta; Nandi, Nilashis

    2013-01-01

    Chirality is present at all levels of structural hierarchy of protein and plays a significant role in protein biosynthesis. The macromolecules involved in protein biosynthesis such as aminoacyl tRNA synthetase and ribosome have chiral subunits. Despite the omnipresence of chirality in the biosynthetic pathway, its origin, role in current pathway, and importance is far from understood. In this review we first present an introduction to biochirality and its relevance to protein biosynthesis. Major propositions about the prebiotic origin of biomolecules are presented with particular reference to proteins and nucleic acids. The problem of the origin of homochirality is unresolved at present. The chiral discrimination by enzymes involved in protein synthesis is essential for keeping the life process going. However, questions remained pertaining to the mechanism of chiral discrimination and concomitant retention of biochirality. We discuss the experimental evidence which shows that it is virtually impossible to incorporate D-amino acids in protein structures in present biosynthetic pathways via any of the two major steps of protein synthesis, namely aminoacylation and peptide bond formation reactions. Molecular level explanations of the stringent chiral specificity in each step are extended based on computational analysis. A detailed account of the current state of understanding of the mechanism of chiral discrimination during aminoacylation in the active site of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase and peptide bond formation in ribosomal peptidyl transferase center is presented. Finally, it is pointed out that the understanding of the mechanism of retention of enantiopurity has implications in developing novel enzyme mimetic systems and biocatalysts and might be useful in chiral drug design.

  5. Biological source and provenance of deep-water derived isoprenoid tetraether lipids along the Portuguese continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Villanueva, Laura; Zell, Claudia; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that nitrifying Thaumarchaeota in the deep ocean waters may contribute to the sedimentary composition of isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (isoGDGTs), impacting TEX86 paleothermometry. We investigated the potential effect of deep-water dwelling Thaumarchaeota in the warm and saline Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) on the distribution of isoGDGTs by analysing suspended particulate matter (SPM) and surface sediments collected along five land-ocean transects along the southern Portuguese continental margin. To this end, we directly compared for the first time the composition of intact polar lipid (IPL)-derived isoGDGTs of SPM with the diversity, abundance, and activity of Thaumarchaeota based on the genetic analysis of the genes coding for the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) and the geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate (GGGP) synthase involved in the isoGDGT biosynthetic pathway. Our results revealed a strong positive relationship between water depth and TEX86H values for both SPM and surface sediments. The increasing TEX86H trends for both core lipid (CL) and IPL-derived fractions were accompanied by increasing fractional abundances of GDGT-2 and crenarchaeol regio-isomer and decreasing fractional abundances of GDGT-1 and GDGT-3 with increasing water depth. Phylogenetic analyses based on the archaeal amoA and the GGGP synthase proteins showed that Thaumarchaeota populations detected at 1 m and 50 m water depth were different from those detected in 200 m and 1000 m water depth, which had an increased contribution of so-called 'deep water' Thaumarchaeota. The differences in the fractional abundances of isoGDGTs with water depth were compatible with the increasing contribution of 'deep water' Thaumarchaeota harboring a different GGGP synthase enzyme which has been suggested to relate to changes in the relative proportion of synthesized isoGDGTs. Accordingly, it appears that the sedimentary distribution of CL isoGDGTs used

  6. Auxin biosynthesis and its role in plant development

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunde

    2011-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the main auxin in higher plants, has profound effects on plant growth and development. Both plants and some plant pathogens can produce IAA to modulate plant growth. While the genes and biochemical reactions for auxin biosynthesis in some plant pathogens are well understood, elucidation of the mechanisms by which plants produce auxin has proven to be difficult. So far, no complete pathway of de novo auxin biosynthesis in plants has been firmly established. However, recent studies have led to the discoveries of several genes in tryptophan dependent auxin biosynthesis pathways. Recent findings have also revealed that local auxin biosynthesis plays essential roles in many developmental processes including gametogenesis, embryogenesis, seedling growth, vascular patterning, and flower development. In this review, I summarize the recent advances in dissecting auxin biosynthetic pathways and how the understanding of auxin biosynthesis provides a different angle for analyzing the mechanisms of plant development. PMID:20192736

  7. Biosynthesis, characterization and antimicrobial studies of green synthesized silver nanoparticles from fruit extract of Syzygium alternifolium (Wt.) Walp. an endemic, endangered medicinal tree taxon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugandhar, P.; Savithramma, N.

    2016-02-01

    In nanotechnology, the plant mediated synthesis of nanoparticles has terrific application in biomedicine due to its novel properties and its eco-friendly nature. The present study deals with the biosynthesis of stable silver nanoparticles (SNPs) from aqueous fruit extract of S. alternifolium an endemic medicinal plant to Eastern Ghats. The synthesized nanoparticles are characterized by UV-VIS spectroscopy, FTIR, XRD, AFM, SEM with EDAX and TEM. Colour change from brown to grey indicates the formation of nanoparticles and UV-VIS surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy observed at 442 nm further confirms the synthesized nanoparticles are SNPs. FTIR studies reveal that the phenols and primary amines of proteins are main responsible for reduction, stabilization and capping agents towards these SNPs. The XRD data show crystalline nature of nanoparticles and EDAX measurements reveal the (12.74 %) percentage presence of Ag metal. AFM, SEM and TEM microscopic analyses revealed that the size of synthesized SNPs ranging from 5 to 68 nm has spherical shape and they are in polydispersed condition. Further, the antimicrobial studies of synthesized SNPs show high toxicity towards different bacterial and fungal isolates. This is the first report on fruit mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles from S. alternifolium.

  8. A Decade of Molecular Understanding of Withanolide Biosynthesis and In vitro Studies in Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal: Prospects and Perspectives for Pathway Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Niha; Razdan, Sumeer; Rana, Satiander; Bhat, Wajid W.; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K.

    2015-01-01

    Withania somnifera, a multipurpose medicinal plant is a rich reservoir of pharmaceutically active triterpenoids that are steroidal lactones known as withanolides. Though the plant has been well-characterized in terms of phytochemical profiles as well as pharmaceutical activities, limited attempts have been made to decipher the biosynthetic route and identification of key regulatory genes involved in withanolide biosynthesis. This scenario limits biotechnological interventions for enhanced production of bioactive compounds. Nevertheless, recent emergent trends vis-à-vis, the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics, and in vitro studies have opened new vistas regarding pathway engineering of withanolide production. During recent years, various strategic pathway genes have been characterized with significant amount of regulatory studies which allude toward development of molecular circuitries for production of key intermediates or end products in heterologous hosts. Another pivotal aspect covering redirection of metabolic flux for channelizing the precursor pool toward enhanced withanolide production has also been attained by deciphering decisive branch point(s) as robust targets for pathway modulation. With these perspectives, the current review provides a detailed overview of various studies undertaken by the authors and collated literature related to molecular and in vitro approaches employed in W. somnifera for understanding various molecular network interactions in entirety. PMID:26640469

  9. Biosynthesis of 14C-phytoene from tomato cell suspension cultures (Lycopersicon esculentum) for utilization in prostate cancer cell culture studies.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jessica K; Rogers, Randy B; Lila, Mary Ann; Erdman, John W

    2006-02-08

    This work describes the development and utilization of a plant cell culture production approach to biosynthesize and radiolabel phytoene and phytofluene for prostate cancer cell culture studies. The herbicide norflurazon was added to established cell suspension cultures of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. VFNT cherry), to induce the biosynthesis and accumulation of the lycopene precursors, phytoene and phytofluene, in their natural isomeric forms (15-cis-phytoene and two cis-phytofluene isomers). Norflurazon concentrations, solvent carrier type and concentration, and duration of culture exposure to norflurazon were screened to optimize phytoene and phytofluene synthesis. Maximum yields of both phytoene and phytofluene were achieved after 7 days of treatment with 0.03 mg norflurazon/40 mL fresh medium, provided in 0.07% solvent carrier. Introduction of 14C-sucrose to the tomato cell culture medium enabled the production of 14C-labeled phytoene for subsequent prostate tumor cell uptake studies. In DU 145 prostate tumor cells, it was determined that 15-cis-phytoene and an oxidized product of phytoene were taken up and partially metabolized by the cells. The ability to biosynthesize, radiolabel, and isolate these carotenoids from tomato cell cultures is a novel, valuable methodology for further in vitro and in vivo investigations into the roles of phytoene and phytofluene in cancer chemoprevention.

  10. Hypoxia reduces and redirects selenoprotein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Niels-Peter; Martitz, Janine; Renko, Kostja; Stoedter, Mette; Hybsier, Sandra; Cramer, Thorsten; Schomburg, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Selenium deficiency constitutes a risk factor for the incidence and negative course of severe diseases including sepsis, stroke, autoimmune diseases or cancer. In this study, hypoxia is identified as a powerful stimulus to redirect selenoprotein biosynthesis causing reduced selenoprotein P expression and diminished selenium export from hepatocytes in favour of increased biosynthesis of the essential protective intracellular phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase GPX4. Specifically, hypoxia decreases transcript concentrations of central factors controlling selenium and selenocysteine metabolism including selenophosphate synthetase-2, phosphoseryl-tRNA(SerSec) kinase and selenocysteine lyase, which are all proven to be rate-limiting enzymes in selenoprotein biosynthesis. These effects are paralleled by a general decline of selenoprotein expression; however, not all selenoproteins are affected to the same extent by hypoxia, and GPX4 constitutes an exception as its expression becomes slightly increased. Supplemental selenium is able to overcome the hypoxia-dependent down regulation of selenoprotein expression in our cell culture model system, supporting the concept of using selenium as an adjuvant treatment option in severe diseases. Although it remains to be tested whether these effects constitute a hepatocyte-specific response, the selenium-dependent decline of selenoprotein P biosynthesis under hypoxic conditions may explain the progressive selenium deficit developing in severe diseases.

  11. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the biosynthesis by Microbacterium ammoniaphilum of L-glutamate selectively enriched with carbon-13

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; Han, C.H.; Kollman, V.H.; London, R.E.; Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1982-02-10

    /sup 13/C NMR of isotopically enriched metabolites has been used to study the metabolism of Microbacterium ammoniaphilum, a bacterium which excretes large quantities of L-glutamic acid into the medium. Biosynthesis from 90% (1-/sup 13/C) glucose results in relatively high specificity of the label, with (2,4-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) glutamate as the major product. The predominant biosynthetic pathway for synthesis of glutamate from glucose was determined to be the Embden Meyerhof glycolytic pathway followed by P-enolpyruvate carboxylase and the first third of the Krebs cycle. Different metabolic pathways are associated with different correlations in the enrichment of the carbons, reflected in the spectrum as different /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C scalar multiplet intensities. Hence, intensity and /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C multiplet analysis allows quantitation of the pathways involved. Although blockage of the Krebs cycle at the ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase step is the basis for the accumulation of glutamate, significant Krebs cycle activity was found in glucose grown cells, and extensive Krebs cycle activity in cells metabolizing (1-/sup 13/C) acetate. In addition to the observation of the expected metabolites, the disaccharide ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-trehalose and ..cap alpha..,..beta..-glucosylamine were identified from the /sup 13/C NMR spectra.

  12. Specifically decreased collagen biosynthesis in scurvy dissociated from an effect on proline hydroxylation and correlated with body weight loss. In vitro studies in guinea pig calvarial bones.

    PubMed Central

    Chojkier, M; Spanheimer, R; Peterkofsky, B

    1983-01-01

    The question whether ascorbate regulates collagen production solely through its direct role in proline hydroxylation was investigated. Proteins in calvarial bones from control and scorbutic weanling guinea pigs were labeled in short-term cultures with radioactive proline. Proteins were digested with purified bacterial collagenase to distinguish between effects on collagen polypeptide production and hydroxyproline formation. There was a preferential decrease in the absolute rate of collagen biosynthesis beginning after 2 wk of ascorbate deficiency, and this effect was temporally dissociated from decreased proline hydroxylation. There were no significant changes in the absolute rates of collagen degradation or noncollagen protein production. In vitro inhibition of proline hydroxylation in normal bone with alpha, alpha'-dipyridyl did not affect the relative rate of collagen synthesis, further dissociating these functions. Ascorbate added to scorbutic bone cultures reversed defective proline hydroxylation but not defective collagen synthesis, suggesting that the latter was an indirect effect of scurvy. There was a linear correlation between the extent of body weight lost during the 3rd and 4th wk of scurvy and the rate of collagen synthesis in scorbutic bone. This correlation also applied to control animals receiving ascorbate, but with weight loss induced by food restriction. These studies establish for the first time that ascorbate deficiency in guinea pigs leads to a specific decrease in collagen polypeptide synthesis and suggest that this decrease results from the reduced food intake and/or weight-loss characteristic of scurvy. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:6309911

  13. Studies on the nonmevalonate pathway of terpene biosynthesis. The role of 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate in plants.

    PubMed

    Fellermeier, M; Raschke, M; Sagner, S; Wungsintaweekul, J; Schuhr, C A; Hecht, S; Kis, K; Radykewicz, T; Adam, P; Rohdich, F; Eisenreich, W; Bacher, A; Arigoni, D; Zenk, M H

    2001-12-01

    2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate was recently shown to be formed from 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate by the consecutive action of IspD, IspE, and IspF proteins in the nonmevalonate pathway of terpenoid biosynthesis. To complement previous work with radiolabelled precursors, we have now demonstrated that [U-13C5]2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate affords [U-13C5]2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate in isolated chromoplasts of Capsicum annuum and Narcissus pseudonarcissus. Moreover, chromoplasts are shown to efficiently convert 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate as well as 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate into the carotene precursor phytoene. The bulk of the kinetic data collected in competition experiments with radiolabeled substrates is consistent with the notion that the cyclodiphosphate is an obligatory intermediate in the nonmevalonate pathway to terpenes. Studies with [2,2'-13C2]2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate afforded phytoene characterized by pairs of jointly transferred 13C atoms in the positions 17/1, 18/5, 19/9, and 20/13 and, at a lower abundance, in positions 16/1, 4/5, 8/9, and 12/13. A detailed scheme is presented for correlating the observed partial scrambling of label with the known lack of fidelity of the isopentenyl diphosphate/dimethylethyl diphosphate isomerase.

  14. A study on the biosynthesis of hygrophorone B(12) in the mushroom Hygrophorus abieticola reveals an unexpected labelling pattern in the cyclopentenone moiety.

    PubMed

    Otto, Alexander; Porzel, Andrea; Schmidt, Jürgen; Wessjohann, Ludger; Arnold, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    The hitherto unknown natural formation of hygrophorones, antibacterial and antifungal cyclopentenone derivatives from mushrooms, was investigated for hygrophorone B(12) in Hygrophorus abieticola Krieglst. ex Gröger & Bresinsky by feeding experiments in the field using (13)C labelled samples of D-glucose and sodium acetate. The incorporation of (13)C isotopes was extensively studied using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy as well as ESI-HRMS analyses. In the experiment with [U-(13)C6]-glucose, six different (13)C2 labelled isotopomers were observed in the 2D INADEQUATE spectrum due to incorporation of [1,2-(13)C2]-acetyl-CoA. This labelling pattern demonstrated that hygrophorone B(12) is derived from a fatty acid-polyketide route instead of a 1,4-α-D-glucan derived anhydrofructose pathway. The experiment with [2-(13)C]-acetate revealed an unexpected incorporation pattern in the cyclopentenone functionality of hygrophorone B(12). Four single-labelled isotopomers, in particular [1-(13)C]-, [2-(13)C]-, [3-(13)C]-, and [4-(13)C]-hygrophorone B(12), were detected that showed only half enrichment in comparison to the respective labelled alkyl side chain carbons. This labelling pattern indicates the formation of a symmetrical intermediate during hygrophorone B(12) biosynthesis. Based on these observations, a biogenetic route via a 4-oxo fatty acid and a chrysotrione B homologue is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Abscisic acid biosynthesis and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Nambara, Eiji; Marion-Poll, Annie

    2005-01-01

    The level of abscisic acid (ABA) in any particular tissue in a plant is determined by the rate of biosynthesis and catabolism of the hormone. Therefore, identifying all the genes involved in the metabolism is essential for a complete understanding of how this hormone directs plant growth and development. To date, almost all the biosynthetic genes have been identified through the isolation of auxotrophic mutants. On the other hand, among several ABA catabolic pathways, current genomic approaches revealed that Arabidopsis CYP707A genes encode ABA 8'-hydroxylases, which catalyze the first committed step in the predominant ABA catabolic pathway. Identification of ABA metabolic genes has revealed that multiple metabolic steps are differentially regulated to fine-tune the ABA level at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Furthermore, recent ongoing studies have given new insights into the regulation and site of ABA metabolism in relation to its physiological roles.

  16. [Properties of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclopyrophosphate--an intermediate in the non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskiĭ, D N; Demina, G P; Deriabina, Iu I; Goncharenko, A V; Eberl, M; Shumaev, K B; Shashkov, A S

    2003-01-01

    Extraction and purification from the biomass of Corynebacterium ammoniagenes of 2-C-methyl-D-erhythritol 2,4-cyclopyrophosphate (MEC) was associated with its spontaneous transformation into a number of derivatives (which was due to pyrophosphate bond lability and the formation of complexes with metals). These derivatives included 1,2-cyclophospho-4-phosphate, 2,4-diphosphate, 2,3-cyclophosphate, 1,4-diphosphate, and 3,5-diphosphate (identified by 1H, 31P, and 13C NMR spectroscopy) and accounted for about 10% MEC. When added to a solution of DNA in the presence of the Fenton reagent, MEC prevented DNA decomposition. In addition, MEC slowed down the interaction of the reagent with tempol radicals, which indicates that complexation of ferrous ions by MEC attenuates their ability to catalyze the formation of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide. In the presence of 0.23 mM MEC, the rate of respiration of rat liver mitochondria increased 1.8 times. At 0.1-1.0 mM, MEC activated in vitro proliferation of human Vgamma9 T-cells. It is suggested that MEC acts as an endogenous stabilizing agent for bacterial cells subjected to oxidative stress and as an immunomodulator for eukaryotic hosts.

  17. Biosynthesis of polyacetylenes in Ambrosia maritima hairy roots.

    PubMed

    AbouZid, Sameh; Orihara, Yutaka

    2007-10-01

    Thiophene A and thiophene A diol are the major polyacetylenes isolated from the hairy roots of Ambrosia maritima (Asteraceae) cultured under continuous light irradiation. The biosynthesis of thiophene A was studied using [1-(13)C]-, [2-(13)C]-, [1,2-(13)C]-acetates. The biosynthesis of thiarubrine A, produced by hairy roots cultured in the dark, was studied using [1,2-(13)C]-acetates and [18-(13)C]-linoleic acid. Our results suggest a catabolic pathway for polyacetylenes biosynthesis from linoleic acid in hairy roots of Ambrosia maritima.

  18. Designer microbes for biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Quin, Maureen B.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have long been adapted for the biosynthetic production of useful compounds. There is increasing demand for the rapid and cheap microbial production of diverse molecules in an industrial setting. Microbes can now be designed and engineered for a particular biosynthetic purpose, thanks to recent developments in genome sequencing, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology. Advanced tools exist for the genetic manipulation of microbes to create novel metabolic circuits, making new products accessible. Metabolic processes can be optimized to increase yield and balance pathway flux. Progress is being made towards the design and creation of fully synthetic microbes for biosynthetic purposes. Together, these emerging technologies will facilitate the production of designer microbes for biosynthesis. PMID:24646570

  19. Genetics of Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, Martin S; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Crick, Dean C

    2014-08-01

    The complex cell envelope is a hallmark of mycobacteria and is anchored by the peptidoglycan layer, which is similar to that of Escherichia coli and a number of other bacteria but with modifications to the monomeric units and other structural complexities that are likely related to a role for the peptidoglycan in stabilizing the mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan complex (MAPc). In this article, we will review the genetics of several aspects of peptidoglycan biosynthesis in mycobacteria, including the production of monomeric precursors in the cytoplasm, assembly of the monomers into the mature wall, cell wall turnover, and cell division. Finally, we will touch upon the resistance of mycobacteria to β-lactam antibiotics, an important class of drugs that, until recently, have not been extensively exploited as potential antimycobacterial agents. We will also note areas of research where there are still unanswered questions.

  20. Microbial biosynthesis of alkanes.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Andreas; Rude, Mathew A; Li, Xuezhi; Popova, Emanuela; del Cardayre, Stephen B

    2010-07-30

    Alkanes, the major constituents of gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel, are naturally produced by diverse species; however, the genetics and biochemistry behind this biology have remained elusive. Here we describe the discovery of an alkane biosynthesis pathway from cyanobacteria. The pathway consists of an acyl-acyl carrier protein reductase and an aldehyde decarbonylase, which together convert intermediates of fatty acid metabolism to alkanes and alkenes. The aldehyde decarbonylase is related to the broadly functional nonheme diiron enzymes. Heterologous expression of the alkane operon in Escherichia coli leads to the production and secretion of C13 to C17 mixtures of alkanes and alkenes. These genes and enzymes can now be leveraged for the simple and direct conversion of renewable raw materials to fungible hydrocarbon fuels.

  1. Bacterioopsin-mediated regulation of bacterioruberin biosynthesis in Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Dummer, Antoinette M; Bonsall, Jessica C; Cihla, Jacob B; Lawry, Stephanie M; Johnson, Gabriela C; Peck, Ronald F

    2011-10-01

    Integral membrane protein complexes consisting of proteins and small molecules that act as cofactors have important functions in all organisms. To form functional complexes, cofactor biosynthesis must be coordinated with the production of corresponding apoproteins. To examine this coordination, we study bacteriorhodopsin (BR), a light-induced proton pump in the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. This complex consists of a retinal cofactor and bacterioopsin (BO), the BR apoprotein. To examine possible novel regulatory mechanisms linking BO and retinal biosynthesis, we deleted bop, the gene that encodes BO. bop deletion resulted in a dramatic increase of bacterioruberins, carotenoid molecules that share biosynthetic precursors with retinal. Additional studies revealed that bacterioruberins accumulate in the absence of BO regardless of the presence of retinal or BR, suggesting that BO inhibits bacterioruberin biosynthesis to increase the availability of carotenoid precursors for retinal biosynthesis. To further examine this potential regulatory mechanism, we characterized an enzyme, encoded by the lye gene, that catalyzes bacterioruberin biosynthesis. BO-mediated inhibition of bacterioruberin synthesis appears to be specific to the H. salinarum lye-encoded enzyme, as expression of a lye homolog from Haloferax volcanii, a related archaeon that synthesizes bacterioruberins but lacks opsins, resulted in bacterioruberin synthesis that was not reduced in the presence of BO. Our results provide evidence for a novel regulatory mechanism in which biosynthesis of a cofactor is promoted by apoprotein-mediated inhibition of an alternate biochemical pathway. Specifically, BO accumulation promotes retinal production by inhibiting bacterioruberin biosynthesis.

  2. Biosynthesis of methanopterin

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.H. )

    1990-06-05

    The biosynthetic pathway for the generation of the methylated pterin in methanopterins was determined for the methanogenic bacteria Methanococcus volta and Methanobacterium formicicum. Extracts of M. volta were found to readily cleave L-7,8-dihydroneopterin to 7,8-dihydro-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, which was confirmed to be a precursor of the pterin portion of the methanopterin. (methylene{sup 2}H)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin was incorporated into methanopterin by growing cells of M. volta to an extent of 30%. Both the C-11 and C-12 methyl groups of methanopterin originate from (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})methionine. Cells grown in the presence of (methylene-{sup 2}H)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, (ethyl-{sup 2}H{sub 4})-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)pterin, (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})-6-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methylpterin, (ethyl-{sup 2}H{sub 4}, methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)-7-methylpterin, and (1-ethyl-{sup 3}H)-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)-7-methylpterin showed that only the non-7-methylated pterins were incorporated into methanopterin. Cells extracts of M. formicicum readily condensed synthetic (methylene-{sup 3}H)-7,8-H{sub 2}-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin-PP with methaniline to generate demethylated methanopterin, which is then methylated to methanopterin by the cell extract in the presence of S-adenosylmethionine. These observations indicate that the pterin portion of methanopterin is biosynthetically derived from 7,8-H{sub 2}-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, which is coupled to methaniline by a pathway analogous to the biosynthesis of folic acid. This pathway for the biosynthesis of methanopterin represents the first example of the modification of the specificity of a coenzyme through a methylation reaction.

  3. Update on selenoprotein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Chavatte, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element that is incorporated in the small but vital family of proteins, namely the selenoproteins, as the selenocysteine amino acid residue. In humans, 25 selenoprotein genes have been characterized. The most remarkable trait of selenoprotein biosynthesis is the cotranslational insertion of selenocysteine by the recoding of a UGA codon, normally decoded as a stop signal. In eukaryotes, a set of dedicated cis- and trans-acting factors have been identified as well as a variety of regulatory mechanisms, factors, or elements that control the selenoprotein expression at the level of the UGA-selenocysteine recoding process, offering a fascinating playground in the field of translational control. It appeared that the central players are two RNA molecules: the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element within selenoprotein mRNA and the selenocysteine-tRNA([Ser]Sec); and their interacting partners. After a couple of decades, despite many advances in the field and the discovery of many essential and regulatory components, the precise mechanism of UGA-selenocysteine recoding remains elusive and more complex than anticipated, with many layers of control. This review offers an update of selenoproteome biosynthesis and regulation in eukaryotes. The regulation of selenoproteins in response to a variety of pathophysiological conditions and cellular stressors, including selenium levels, oxidative stress, replicative senescence, or cancer, awaits further detailed investigation. Clearly, the efficiency of UGA-selenocysteine recoding is the limiting stage of selenoprotein synthesis. The sequence of events leading Sec-tRNA([Ser]Sec) delivery to ribosomal A site awaits further analysis, notably at the level of a three-dimensional structure.

  4. Biosynthesis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Extracellular Polysaccharides, Alginate, Pel, and Psl

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Michael J.; Nivens, David E.; Weadge, Joel T.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa thrives in many aqueous environments and is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause both acute and chronic infections. Environmental conditions and host defenses cause differing stresses on the bacteria, and to survive in vastly different environments, P. aeruginosa must be able to adapt to its surroundings. One strategy for bacterial adaptation is to self-encapsulate with matrix material, primarily composed of secreted extracellular polysaccharides. P. aeruginosa has the genetic capacity to produce at least three secreted polysaccharides; alginate, Psl, and Pel. These polysaccharides differ in chemical structure and in their biosynthetic mechanisms. Since alginate is often associated with chronic pulmonary infections, its biosynthetic pathway is the best characterized. However, alginate is only produced by a subset of P. aeruginosa strains. Most environmental and other clinical isolates secrete either Pel or Psl. Little information is available on the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides. Here, we review the literature on the alginate biosynthetic pathway, with emphasis on recent findings describing the structure of alginate biosynthetic proteins. This information combined with the characterization of the domain architecture of proteins encoded on the Psl and Pel operons allowed us to make predictive models for the biosynthesis of these two polysaccharides. The results indicate that alginate and Pel share certain features, including some biosynthetic proteins with structurally or functionally similar properties. In contrast, Psl biosynthesis resembles the EPS/CPS capsular biosynthesis pathway of Escherichia coli, where the Psl pentameric subunits are assembled in association with an isoprenoid lipid carrier. These models and the environmental cues that cause the cells to produce predominantly one polysaccharide over the others are subjects of current investigation. PMID:21991261

  5. Structure of geranyl diphosphate C-methyltransferase from Streptomyces coelicolor and implications for the mechanism of isoprenoid modification†

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Mustafa; Chou, Wayne K. W.; Cane, David E.; Christianson, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Geranyl diphosphate C-methyltransferase (GPPMT) from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is the first methyltransferase discovered that modifies an acyclic isoprenoid diphosphate, geranyl diphosphate (GPP), to yield a non-canonical acyclic allylic diphosphate product, 2-methylgeranyl diphosphate, which serves as the substrate for a subsequent cyclization reaction catalyzed by a terpenoid cyclase, methylisoborneol synthase. Here, we report the crystal structures of GPPMT in complex with GPP or the substrate analogue geranyl-S-thiolodiphosphate (GSPP) along with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine in the cofactor binding site, resulting from in situ demethylation of S-adenosyl-l-methionine, at 2.05 Å and 1.82 Å resolution, respectively. These structures suggest that both GPP and GSPP can undergo catalytic methylation in crystalline GPPMT, followed by dissociation of the isoprenoid product. S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine remains bound in the active site, however, and does not exchange with a fresh molecule of cofactor S-adenosyl-l-methionine. These structures provide important clues regarding the molecular mechanism of the reaction, especially with regard to the face of the 2,3 double bond of GPP that is methylated as well as the stabilization of the resulting carbocation intermediate through cation-π interactions. PMID:22455498

  6. Glucose enhances indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis without reducing primary sulfur assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Wei, Jia; Huang, Jirong; Chang, Jiaqi; Qian, Hongmei; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yanting; Sun, Bo; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of glucose as a signaling molecule on induction of aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis was reported in our former study. Here, we further investigated the regulatory mechanism of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis by glucose in Arabidopsis. Glucose exerted a positive influence on indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis, which was demonstrated by induced accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and enhanced expression of related genes upon glucose treatment. Genetic analysis revealed that MYB34 and MYB51 were crucial in maintaining the basal indolic glucosinolate accumulation, with MYB34 being pivotal in response to glucose signaling. The increased accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and mRNA levels of MYB34, MYB51, and MYB122 caused by glucose were inhibited in the gin2-1 mutant, suggesting an important role of HXK1 in glucose-mediated induction of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis. In contrast to what was known on the function of ABI5 in glucose-mediated aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, ABI5 was not required for glucose-induced indolic glucosinolate accumulation. In addition, our results also indicated that glucose-induced glucosinolate accumulation was due to enhanced sulfur assimilation instead of directed sulfur partitioning into glucosinolate biosynthesis. Thus, our data provide new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying glucose-regulated glucosinolate biosynthesis. PMID:27549907

  7. The regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bulley, Sean; Laing, William

    2016-10-01

    We review the regulation of ascorbate (vitamin C) biosynthesis, focusing on the l-galactose pathway. We discuss the regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis at the level of gene transcription (both repression and enhancement) and translation (feedback inhibition of translation by ascorbate concentration) and discuss the eight proteins that have been demonstrated to date to affect ascorbate concentration in plant tissues. GDP-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) and GDP-mannose epimerase are critical steps that regulate ascorbate biosynthesis. These and other biosynthetic genes are controlled at the transcriptional level, while GGP is also controlled at the translational level. Ascorbate feedback on enzyme activity has not been observed unequivocally.

  8. Structural and mechanistic studies on carboxymethylproline synthase (CarB), a unique member of the crotonase superfamily catalyzing the first step in carbapenem biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, Mark C; Sorensen, John L; Batchelar, Edward T; McDonough, Michael A; Schofield, Christopher J

    2005-10-14

    The first step in the biosynthesis of the medicinally important carbapenem family of beta-lactam antibiotics is catalyzed by carboxymethylproline synthase (CarB), a unique member of the crotonase superfamily. CarB catalyzes formation of (2S,5S)-carboxymethylproline [(2S,5S)-t-CMP] from malonyl-CoA and l-glutamate semialdehyde. In addition to using a cosubstrate, CarB catalyzes C-C and C-N bond formation processes as well as an acyl-coenzyme A hydrolysis reaction. We describe the crystal structure of CarB in the presence and absence of acetyl-CoA at 2.24 A and 3.15 A resolution, respectively. The structures reveal that CarB contains a conserved oxy-anion hole probably required for decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA and stabilization of the resultant enolate. Comparison of the structures reveals that conformational changes (involving His(229)) in the cavity predicted to bind l-glutamate semialdehyde occur on (co)substrate binding. Mechanisms for the formation of the carboxymethylproline ring are discussed in the light of the structures and the accompanying studies using isotopically labeled substrates; cyclization via 1,4-addition is consistent with the observed labeling results (providing that hydrogen exchange at the C-6 position of carboxymethylproline does not occur). The side chain of Glu(131) appears to be positioned to be involved in hydrolysis of the carboxymethylproline-CoA ester intermediate. Labeling experiments ruled out the possibility that hydrolysis proceeds via an anhydride in which water attacks a carbonyl derived from Glu(131), as proposed for 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase. The structural work will aid in mutagenesis studies directed at altering the selectivity of CarB to provide intermediates for the production of clinically useful carbapenems.

  9. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Lipid Biosynthesis of Piezophilic Bacteria - Implications for Studying Microbial Metabolism and Carbon Cycle in Deep Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.; Dasgupta, S.; Zhang, L.; Li, J.; Kato, C.; Bartlett, D.

    2012-12-01

    Piezophiles are pressure-loving microorganisms, which reproduce preferentially or exclusively at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. In this study, we examined stable carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation in fatty acid biosynthesis of a piezophilic bacterium Moritella japonica DSK1. The bacterium was grown to stationary phase at hydrstatic pressures of 0.1, 10, 20, and 50 MPa (mega-passcal) in media prepared using sterilized natural seawater supplied with glucose as the sole carbon source. Bacterial cell biomass and individual fatty acids exhibited consistent pressure-dependent carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations relative to substrates. Average carbon isotope fractionation (delta(FA-glucose)) at high pressures was much higher than that for surface bacteria: -15.7, -15.3, and -18.3‰ at 10, 20, and 50 MPa, respectively. For deltaD, fatty acids are more depleted in D relative to glucose than to water. Monounsaturated fatty acids are more depleted in D than corresponding saturated fatty acids by as much as 36‰. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are most depleted in D. For example, DHA (22:6omega3) has the most negative hydrogen isotope ratio (-170.91‰) (delta(FA-glucose) = -199, delta(FA-water) = -176). The observed isotope effects can be ascribed to the kinetics of enzymatic reactions that are affected by hydrostatic pressure and to operating of two independent lipid biosynthetic pathways of the piezophilic bacteria. Given that most of the biosphere lives under high pressures, our results have important important implications for studying microbial metabolism and carbon cycle in the deep biosphere.

  10. Regulation of insulin secretion and proinsulin biosynthesis by succinate.

    PubMed

    Attali, Veronique; Parnes, Marcela; Ariav, Yafa; Cerasi, Erol; Kaiser, Nurit; Leibowitz, Gil

    2006-11-01

    Succinate stimulates insulin secretion and proinsulin biosynthesis. We studied the effects of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-modulating pathways on glucose- and succinate-stimulated insulin secretion and proinsulin biosynthesis in the rat and the insulin-resistant Psammomys obesus. Disruption of the anaplerotic pyruvate/malate shuttle by phenylacetic acid inhibited glucose- and succinate-stimulated insulin secretion and succinate-stimulated proinsulin biosynthesis in both species. In contrast, phenylacetic acid failed to inhibit glucose-stimulated proinsulin biosynthesis in P. obesus islets. Inhibition of the NADPH-consuming enzyme neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) with l-N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester or with N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine(G) doubled succinate-stimulated insulin secretion in rat islets, suggesting that succinate- and nNOS-derived signals interact to regulate insulin secretion. In contrast, nNOS inhibition had no effect on succinate-stimulated proinsulin biosynthesis in both species. In P. obesus islets, insulin secretion was not stimulated by succinate in the absence of glucose, whereas proinsulin biosynthesis was increased 5-fold. Conversely, under stimulating glucose levels, succinate doubled insulin secretion, indicating glucose-dependence. Pyruvate ester and inhibition of nNOS partially mimicked the permissive effect of glucose on succinate-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting that anaplerosis-derived signals render the beta-cells responsive to succinate. We conclude that beta-cell anaplerosis via pyruvate carboxylase is important for glucose- and succinate-stimulated insulin secretion and for succinate-stimulated proinsulin biosynthesis. In P. obesus, pyruvate/malate shuttle dependent and independent pathways that regulate proinsulin biosynthesis coexist; the latter can maintain fuel stimulated biosynthetic activity when the succinate-dependent pathway is inhibited. nNOS signaling is a negative regulator

  11. Genome-wide association study dissects the genetic architecture of oil biosynthesis and accumulation in maize kernel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) on a population of 368 maize inbreds with 1.06 million SNPs was performed and identified 74 highly significantly associated genes influencing maize kernel oil content and fatty acid composition. To validate these findings, three biparental linkage mapping popul...

  12. Mitochondrial ADCK3 employs an atypical protein kinase-like fold to enable coenzyme Q biosynthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Stefely, Jonathan A.; Reidenbach, Andrew G.; Ulbrich, Arne; ...

    2014-12-11

    The ancient UbiB protein kinase-like family is involved in isoprenoid lipid biosynthesis and is implicated in human diseases, but demonstration of UbiB kinase activity has remained elusive for unknown reasons. In this paper, we quantitatively define UbiB-specific sequence motifs and reveal their positions within the crystal structure of a UbiB protein, ADCK3. We find that multiple UbiB-specific features are poised to inhibit protein kinase activity, including an N-terminal domain that occupies the typical substrate binding pocket and a unique A-rich loop that limits ATP binding by establishing an unusual selectivity for ADP. A single alanine-to-glycine mutation of this loop flipsmore » this coenzyme selectivity and enables autophosphorylation but inhibits coenzyme Q biosynthesis in vivo, demonstrating functional relevance for this unique feature. Finally, our work provides mechanistic insight into UbiB enzyme activity and establishes a molecular foundation for further investigation of how UbiB family proteins affect diseases and diverse biological pathways.« less

  13. Biosynthesis of sterols and triterpenes in cell suspension cultures of Uncaria tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Flores-Sánchez, Isvett J; Ortega-López, Jaime; del Carmen Montes-Horcasitas, María; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2002-12-01

    Pectin administered to Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures, was found to increase the production of triterpene acids (ursolic and oleanolic acid), however, neither growth nor sterol accumulation were affected. Cell cultures showed that pectin treatment caused a rapid threefold increase in the activities of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of C(5) and C(30 )isoprenoid, such as isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase and squalene synthase. The activity of a farnesyl diphosphatase, which could divert the flux of farnesyl diphosphate to farnesol, was two times lower in elicited than in control cells. Elicited cells also transformed more rapidly a higher percentage of [5-(3)H]mevalonic acid into triterpene acids. Interestingly, addition of terbinafine, an inhibitor of squalene epoxidase, to elicited cell cultures inhibited sterol accumulation while triterpene production was not inhibited. These results suggest that in U. tomentosa cells, both the previously mentioned enzymes and those involved in squalene 2,3-oxide formation play an important regulatory role in the biosynthesis of sterols and triterpenes.

  14. Tomato fruit carotenoid biosynthesis is adjusted to actual ripening progression by a light-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Briardo; D'Andrea, Lucio; Ruiz-Sola, M Aguila; Botterweg, Esther; Pulido, Pablo; Andilla, Jordi; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds that are essential for plants to protect the photosynthetic apparatus against excess light. They also function as health-promoting natural pigments that provide colors to ripe fruit, promoting seed dispersal by animals. Work in Arabidopsis thaliana unveiled that transcription factors of the phytochrome-interacting factor (PIF) family regulate carotenoid gene expression in response to environmental signals (i.e. light and temperature), including those created when sunlight reflects from or passes though nearby vegetation or canopy (referred to as shade). Here we show that PIFs use a virtually identical mechanism to modulate carotenoid biosynthesis during fruit ripening in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). However, instead of integrating environmental information, PIF-mediated signaling pathways appear to fulfill a completely new function in the fruit. As tomatoes ripen, they turn from green to red due to chlorophyll breakdown and carotenoid accumulation. When sunlight passes through the flesh of green fruit, a self-shading effect within the tissue maintains high levels of PIFs that directly repress the master gene of the fruit carotenoid pathway, preventing undue production of carotenoids. This effect is attenuated as chlorophyll degrades, causing degradation of PIF proteins and boosting carotenoid biosynthesis as ripening progresses. Thus, shade signaling components may have been co-opted in tomato fruit to provide information on the actual stage of ripening (based on the pigment profile of the fruit at each moment) and thus finely coordinate fruit color change. We show how this mechanism may be manipulated to obtain carotenoid-enriched fruits.

  15. Metabolic engineering and in vitro biosynthesis of phytochemicals and non-natural analogues.

    PubMed

    Mora-Pale, Mauricio; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Sandra P; Linhardt, Robert J; Dordick, Jonathan S; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2013-09-01

    Over the years, natural products from plants and their non-natural derivatives have shown to be active against different types of chronic diseases. However, isolation of such natural products can be limited due to their low bioavailability, and environmental restrictions. To address these issues, in vivo and in vitro reconstruction of plant metabolic pathways and the metabolic engineering of microbes and plants have been used to generate libraries of compounds. Significant advances have been made through metabolic engineering of microbes and plant cells to generate a variety of compounds (e.g. isoprenoids, flavonoids, or stilbenes) using a diverse array of methods to optimize these processes (e.g. host selection, operational variables, precursor selection, gene modifications). These approaches have been used also to generate non-natural analogues with different bioactivities. In vitro biosynthesis allows the synthesis of intermediates as well as final products avoiding post-translational limitations. Moreover, this strategy allows the use of substrates and the production of metabolites that could be toxic for cells, or expand the biosynthesis into non-conventional media (e.g. organic solvents, supercritical fluids). A perspective is also provided on the challenges for generating novel chemical structures and the potential of combining metabolic engineering and in vitro biocatalysis to produce metabolites with more potent biological activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Photo-irradiated biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using edible mushroom pleurotus Florida and their antibacterial activity studies.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ravishankar; Deshpande, Raghunandan; Ganachari, Sharanabasava V; Huh, Do Sung; Venkataraman, A

    2011-01-01

    This is a report on photo-irradiated extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles using the aqueous extract of edible oyster mushroom (Pleurotus florida) as a reducing agent. The appearance, size, and shape of the silver nanoparticles are understood by UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The X-ray diffraction studies, energy dispersive X-ray analysis indicate that particles are crystalline in nature. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis revealed that the nanoparticles are covered with biomoieties on their surface. As can be seen from our studies, the biofunctionalized silver nanoparticles thus produced have shown admirable antimicrobial effects, and the synthetic procedure involved is eco-friendly and simple, and hence high range production of the same can be considered for using them in many pharmaceutical applications.

  17. Photo-Irradiated Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Edible Mushroom Pleurotus florida and Their Antibacterial Activity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ravishankar; Deshpande, Raghunandan; Ganachari, Sharanabasava V.; Huh, Do Sung; Venkataraman, A.

    2011-01-01

    This is a report on photo-irradiated extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles using the aqueous extract of edible oyster mushroom (Pleurotus florida) as a reducing agent. The appearance, size, and shape of the silver nanoparticles are understood by UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The X-ray diffraction studies, energy dispersive X-ray analysis indicate that particles are crystalline in nature. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis revealed that the nanoparticles are covered with biomoieties on their surface. As can be seen from our studies, the biofunctionalized silver nanoparticles thus produced have shown admirable antimicrobial effects, and the synthetic procedure involved is eco-friendly and simple, and hence high range production of the same can be considered for using them in many pharmaceutical applications. PMID:22190895

  18. Structural and Functional Studies of WlbA: A Dehydrogenase Involved in the Biosynthesis of 2,3-Diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-d-mannuronic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2010-09-08

    2,3-Diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-D-mannuronic acid (ManNAc3NAcA) is an unusual dideoxy sugar first identified nearly 30 years ago in the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa O:3a,d. It has since been observed in other organisms, including Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. Five enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of UDP-ManNAc3NAcA starting from UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Here we describe a structural study of WlbA, the NAD-dependent dehydrogenase that catalyzes the second step in the pathway, namely, the oxidation of the C-3{prime} hydroxyl group on the UDP-linked sugar to a keto moiety and the reduction of NAD{sup +} to NADH. This enzyme has been shown to use {alpha}-ketoglutarate as an oxidant to regenerate the oxidized dinucleotide. For this investigation, three different crystal structures were determined: the enzyme with bound NAD(H), the enzyme in a complex with NAD(H) and {alpha}-ketoglutarate, and the enzyme in a complex with NAD(H) and its substrate (UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminuronic acid). The tetrameric enzyme assumes an unusual quaternary structure with the dinucleotides positioned quite closely to one another. Both {alpha}-ketoglutarate and the UDP-linked sugar bind in the WlbA active site with their carbon atoms (C-2 and C-3{prime}, respectively) abutting the re face of the cofactor. They are positioned {approx}3 {angstrom} from the nicotinamide C-4. The UDP-linked sugar substrate adopts a highly unusual curved conformation when bound in the WlbA active site cleft. Lys 101 and His 185 most likely play key roles in catalysis.

  19. Green Biosynthesis, Characterization, In vitro Antidiabetic Activity, and Investigational Acute Toxicity Studies of Some Herbal-mediated Silver Nanoparticles on Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Kalakotla; Mohan, Gottumukkala Krishna; Hussain, Md. Ashwaq; Jayarambabu, Naradala; Pravallika, Poka Lakshmi

    2017-01-01

    . Characterization techniques employed to determine the Crystallanity, size, shape and elemental composition of HMSNPs. The results obtained from acute oral toxicity studies and histopathological studies showed that the synthesized HMSNPs were non-toxic and safe. and also had good in vitro anti diabetic activity. The results would provide certain references to screen out more pharmacological activities of silver nanoparticles using green biosynthesis methods. Abbreviations used: HMSNPs: Herbal mediated silver nanoparticles, XRD: X-ray diffraction, EDX: Energy dispersive X-ray analysis, TEM: Transmission electron microscope, PTP1B: Protein tyrosine phosphotase 1B, OECD: Organization for economic cooperation and development PMID:28216905

  20. Effect of latitude on flavonoid biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Jaakola, Laura; Hohtola, Anja

    2010-08-01

    The growth conditions in different latitudes vary markedly with season, day length, light quality and temperature. Many plant species have adapted well to the distinct environments through different strategies, one of which is the production of additional secondary metabolites. Flavonoids are a widely spread group of plant secondary metabolites that are involved in many crucial functions of plants. Our understanding of the biosynthesis, occurrence and function of flavonoids has increased rapidly in recent decades. Numerous studies have been published on the influence of environmental factors on the biosynthesis of flavonoids. However, extensive long-term studies that examine the effect of the characteristics of northern climates on flavonoid biosynthesis are still scarce. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the effect of light intensity, photoperiod and temperature on the gene-environment interaction related to flavonoid biosynthesis in plants.

  1. Studies on the structure and biosynthesis of the linkage region between chitin and protein in Artemia salina

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, M.N.

    1986-05-01

    In vivo and in vitro studies on chitin synthesis in Artemia nauplii indicate that two classes of /sup 3/H GlcNAc labeled products are synthesized. The first is soluble in urea and contains a chitoprotein with short chitin oligosaccharides and attached to a high molecular weight polypeptide. The other product is insoluble in urea and SDS, and contains crosslinked, macromolecular chitin. Both classes of chitin products bind the fluorescent probe Calcofluor White (CW), as do glycopeptides prepared from these samples by pronase digestion. The in vivo and in vitro effect of CW on synthesis of both chitin products has been examined. /sup 3/H GlcNAc-labeled glycopeptides have been generated from both products by HCl partial hydrolysis, CNBr cleavage or pronase digestion. Analysis of the pronase soluble fraction after digestion of the urea residue has been carried out by gel permeation and paper chromatography. Sic glycopeptide fractions have been isolated which contain up to 85% (w/w) GlcN and 4-6 predominant amino acids. Common amino acids in all fractions are Asp, Arg and Thr; others found include Lys, Glu and Ala. Synthesis of /sup 3/H GlcNAc-labeled chitopeptides has been achieved in vitro using artificial peptide acceptors such as DNS-Ala-Ile-Glu-Asn-Ala-Thr-Leu and N/sup ..cap alpha../-/sup 3/H Ac-Asn-Tyr-Thr-NHCH/sub 3/. Further studies on the synthesis of Dol-PP-(GlcNAc)/sub 3-8/ and the properties of the oligosaccharide transferase are in progress.

  2. Parallels in lignin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Banks, Jo Ann

    2008-01-01

    A hallmark of vascular plants is the development of a complex water-conducting system, which is physically reinforced by the heterogeneous aromatic polymer lignin. Syringyl lignin, a major building block of lignin, is often thought to be uniquely characteristic of angiosperms; however, it was demonstrated over fifty years ago that that syringyl lignin is found in another group of plants, known as the lycophytes, the ancestors of which diverged from all the other vascular plant lineages 400 million years ago.1 To determine the biochemical basis for this common biosynthetic ability, we isolated and characterized cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases (P450s) from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii and compared them to the enzyme that is required for syringyl lignin synthesis in angiosperms. Our results showed that one of these P450s encodes an enzyme that is functionally analogous to but phylogenetically independent from its angiosperm counterpart. Here, we discuss the evolution of lignin biosynthesis in vascular plants and the role of Selaginella moellendorffii in plant comparative biology and genomics. PMID:19704782

  3. Biosynthesis of Tetrahydroisoquinoline Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gong-Li; Tang, Man-Cheng; Song, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ) alkaloids are naturally occurring antibiotics isolated from a variety of microorganisms and marine invertebrates. This family of natural products exhibit broad spectrum antimicrobial and strong antitumor activities, and the potency of clinical application has been validated by the marketing of ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743) as anticancer drug. In the past 20 years, the biosynthetic gene cluster of six THIQ antibiotics has been characterized including saframycin Mx1 from Myxococcus xanthus, safracin-B from Pseudomonas fluorescens, saframycin A, naphthyridinomycin, and quinocarcin from Streptomyces, as well as ET-743 from Ecteinascidia turbinata. This review gives a brief summary of the current status in understanding the molecular logic for the biosynthesis of these natural products, which provides new insights on the biosynthetic machinery involved in the nonribosomal peptide synthetase system. The proposal of the THIQ biosynthetic pathway not only shows nature's route to generate such complex molecules, but also set the stage to develop a different process for production of ET-743 by synthetic biology.

  4. Lysine biosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa): study of enzymes and nitrogen-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Varisi, Vanderlei A; Camargos, Liliane S; Aguiar, Leandro F; Christofoleti, Renata M; Medici, Leonardo O; Azevedo, Ricardo A

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate kinase (AK, EC 2.7.2.4), homoserine dehydrogenase (HSDH, EC 1.1.1.3) and dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS, EC 4.2.1.52) were isolated and partially purified from immature Chenopodium quinoa Willd seeds. Enzyme activities were studied in the presence of the aspartate-derived amino acids lysine, threonine and methionine and also the lysine analogue S-2-aminoethyl-l-cysteine (AEC), at 1 mM and 5 mM. The results confirmed the existence of, at least, two AK isoenzymes, one inhibited by lysine and the other inhibited by threonine, the latter being predominant in quinoa seeds. HSDH activity was also shown to be partially inhibited by threonine, whereas some of the activity was resistant to the inhibitory effect, indicating the presence of two isoenzymes, one resistant and another sensitive to threonine inhibition. Only one DHDPS isoenzyme highly sensitive to lysine inhibition was detected. The results suggest that the high concentration of lysine observed in quinoa seeds is possibly due to a combined effect of increased lysine synthesis and accumulation in the soluble form and/or as protein lysine. Nitrogen assimilation was also investigated and based on nitrate content, nitrate reductase activity, amino acid distribution and ureide content, the leaves were identified as the predominant site of nitrate reduction in this plant species. The amino acid profile analysis in leaves and roots also indicated an important role of soluble glutamine as a nitrogen transporting compound.

  5. Biochemical characterization, homology modeling and docking studies of ornithine delta-aminotransferase--an important enzyme in proline biosynthesis of plants.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, P Nataraj; Amrutha, R Naga; Sangam, Shubhada; Verma, D P S; Kishor, P B Kavi

    2007-11-01

    Ornithine delta-aminotransferase (OAT) is an important enzyme in proline biosynthetic pathway and is implicated in salt tolerance in higher plants. OAT transaminates ornithine to pyrroline 5-carboxylate, which is further catalyzed to proline by pyrroline 5-carboxylate reductase. The Vigna aconitifolia OAT cDNA, encoding a polypeptide of 48.1 kDa, was expressed in Escherichia coli and the enzyme was partially characterized following its purification using (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation and gel filtration techniques. Optimal activity of the enzyme was observed at a temperature of 25 degrees C and pH 8.0. The enzyme appeared to be a monomer and exhibited high activity at 4mM ornithine. Proline did not show any apparent effect but isoleucine, valine and serine inhibited the activity when added into the assay mixture along with ornithine. Omission of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate from the reaction mixture reduced the activity of this enzyme by 60%. To further evaluate these biochemical observations, homology modeling of the OAT was performed based on the crystal structure of the ornithine delta-aminotransferase from humans (PDB code 1OAT) by using the software MODELLER6v2. With the aid of the molecular mechanics and dynamics methods, the final model was obtained and assessed subsequently by PROCHECK and VERIFY-3D graph. With this model, a flexible docking study with the substrate and inhibitors was performed and the results indicated that Gly106 and Lys256 in OAT are the important determinant residues in binding as they have strong hydrogen bonding contacts with the substrate and inhibitors. These observations are in conformity with the results obtained from experimental investigations.

  6. Characterization of cyclo-Acetoacetyl-L-Tryptophan Dimethylallyltransferase in Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis: Substrate Promiscuity and Site Directed Mutagenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyu; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2009-01-01

    The fungal neurotoxin α-cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a nanomolar inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase with a unique pentacyclic indole tetramic acid scaffold is assembled by a three enzyme pathway CpaS, CpaD and CpaO in Aspergillus sp. We recently characterized the first pathway-specific enzyme CpaS, a hybrid two module polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) that generates cyclo-acetoacetyl-L-tryptophan (cAATrp). Here we report the characterization of the second pathway-specific enzyme CpaD that regiospecifically dimethylallylates cAATrp to form β-cyclopiazonic acid. By exploring the tryptophan and tetramate moieties of cAATrp, we demonstrate that CpaD discriminates against free Trp but accepts tryptophan-containing thiohydantoins, diketopiperazines and linear peptides as substrates for C4-prenylation and also acts as regiospecific O-dimethylallyltransferase (DMAT) on a tyrosine-derived tetramic acid. Comparative evaluation of CpaDs from A. oryzae RIB40 and A. flavus NRRL3357 indicated the importance of the N-terminal region for its activity. Sequence alignment of CpaD with eleven homologous fungal Trp-DMATs revealed five regions of conservation suggesting the presense of critical motifs that could be diagonostic for discovering additional Trp-DMATs. Subsequent site-directed mutagenesis studies identified five polar/charged residues and five tyrosine residues within these motifs that are critical for CpaD activity. This motif characerization will enable a gene probe-based approach to discover additional biosynthetic Trp-DMATs. PMID:19877600

  7. Variation in short-term and long-term responses of photosynthesis and isoprenoid-mediated photoprotection to soil water availability in four Douglas-fir provenances

    PubMed Central

    Junker, Laura Verena; Kleiber, Anita; Jansen, Kirstin; Wildhagen, Henning; Hess, Moritz; Kayler, Zachary; Kammerer, Bernd; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Gessler, Arthur; Ensminger, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    For long-lived forest tree species, the understanding of intraspecific variation among populations and their response to water availability can reveal their ability to cope with and adapt to climate change. Dissipation of excess excitation energy, mediated by photoprotective isoprenoids, is an important defense mechanism against drought and high light when photosynthesis is hampered. We used 50-year-old Douglas-fir trees of four provenances at two common garden experiments to characterize provenance-specific variation in photosynthesis and photoprotective mechanisms mediated by essential and non-essential isoprenoids in response to soil water availability and solar radiation. All provenances revealed uniform photoprotective responses to high solar radiation, including increased de-epoxidation of photoprotective xanthophyll cycle pigments and enhanced emission of volatile monoterpenes. In contrast, we observed differences between provenances in response to drought, where provenances sustaining higher CO2 assimilation rates also revealed increased water-use efficiency, carotenoid-chlorophyll ratios, pools of xanthophyll cycle pigments, β-carotene and stored monoterpenes. Our results demonstrate that local adaptation to contrasting habitats affected chlorophyll-carotenoid ratios, pool sizes of photoprotective xanthophylls, β-carotene, and stored volatile isoprenoids. We conclude that intraspecific variation in isoprenoid-mediated photoprotective mechanisms contributes to the adaptive potential of Douglas-fir provenances to climate change. PMID:28071755

  8. Photosynthesis and assimilate partitioning between carbohydrates and isoprenoid products in vegetatively active and dormant guayule: physiological and environmental constraints on rubber accumulation in a semiarid shrub

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The stems and roots of the desert shrub guayule, Parthenium argentatum, contain a significant amount of latex that can be used as a source of natural rubber. Photosynthesis and the levels of carbohydrates and volatile isoprenoid products were measured in guayule plants grown under simulated summer-...

  9. Effect of temperature and CO2-enrichment on photosynthesis and the levels of carbohydrates and isoprenoid pathway products in guayule, a latex producing shrub

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The stems and roots of the desert shrub guayule, Parthenium argentatum, contain a significant amount of latex, a potential source of natural rubber. To determine the factors regulating carbon partitioning, net photosynthesis (Pn) and the levels of carbohydrates and isoprenoid compounds were measured...

  10. Variation in short-term and long-term responses of photosynthesis and isoprenoid-mediated photoprotection to soil water availability in four Douglas-fir provenances

    DOE PAGES

    Junker, Laura Verena; Kleiber, Anita; Jansen, Kirstin; ...

    2017-01-10

    For long-lived forest tree species, the understanding of intraspecific variation among populations and their response to water availability can reveal their ability to cope with and adapt to climate change. Dissipation of excess excitation energy, mediated by photoprotective isoprenoids, is an important defense mechanism against drought and high light when photosynthesis is hampered. We used 50-year-old Douglas-fir trees of four provenances at two common garden experiments to characterize provenance-specific variation in photosynthesis and photoprotective mechanisms mediated by essential and non-essential isoprenoids in response to soil water availability and solar radiation. All provenances revealed uniform photoprotective responses to high solar radiation,more » including increased de-epoxidation of photoprotective xanthophyll cycle pigments and enhanced emission of volatile monoterpenes. In contrast, we observed differences between provenances in response to drought, where provenances sustaining higher CO2 assimilation rates also revealed increased water-use efficiency, carotenoid-chlorophyll ratios, pools of xanthophyll cycle pigments, β-carotene and stored monoterpenes. Our results demonstrate that local adaptation to contrasting habitats affected chlorophyll-carotenoid ratios, pool sizes of photoprotective xanthophylls, β-carotene, and stored volatile isoprenoids. We conclude that intraspecific variation in isoprenoid-mediated photoprotective mechanisms contributes to the adaptive potential of Douglas-fir provenances to climate change.« less

  11. Variation in short-term and long-term responses of photosynthesis and isoprenoid-mediated photoprotection to soil water availability in four Douglas-fir provenances.

    PubMed

    Junker, Laura Verena; Kleiber, Anita; Jansen, Kirstin; Wildhagen, Henning; Hess, Moritz; Kayler, Zachary; Kammerer, Bernd; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Gessler, Arthur; Ensminger, Ingo

    2017-01-10

    For long-lived forest tree species, the understanding of intraspecific variation among populations and their response to water availability can reveal their ability to cope with and adapt to climate change. Dissipation of excess excitation energy, mediated by photoprotective isoprenoids, is an important defense mechanism against drought and high light when photosynthesis is hampered. We used 50-year-old Douglas-fir trees of four provenances at two common garden experiments to characterize provenance-specific variation in photosynthesis and photoprotective mechanisms mediated by essential and non-essential isoprenoids in response to soil water availability and solar radiation. All provenances revealed uniform photoprotective responses to high solar radiation, including increased de-epoxidation of photoprotective xanthophyll cycle pigments and enhanced emission of volatile monoterpenes. In contrast, we observed differences between provenances in response to drought, where provenances sustaining higher CO2 assimilation rates also revealed increased water-use efficiency, carotenoid-chlorophyll ratios, pools of xanthophyll cycle pigments, β-carotene and stored monoterpenes. Our results demonstrate that local adaptation to contrasting habitats affected chlorophyll-carotenoid ratios, pool sizes of photoprotective xanthophylls, β-carotene, and stored volatile isoprenoids. We conclude that intraspecific variation in isoprenoid-mediated photoprotective mechanisms contributes to the adaptive potential of Douglas-fir provenances to climate change.

  12. Regulation of volatile benzenoid biosynthesis in petunia flowers.

    PubMed

    Schuurink, Robert C; Haring, Michel A; Clark, David G

    2006-01-01

    The petunia flower has served as a model for the study of several physiological processes including floral development, self-incompatibility, anthocyanin biosynthesis and ethylene signalling during senescence. More recently, Petunia hybrida 'Mitchell' has been used to understand the complex regulation of volatile benzenoid biosynthesis, which occurs predominantly in flower petal tissues. Benzenoid biosynthesis is temporally and circadian controlled and is tightly down-regulated by ethylene during floral senescence. Using targeted transcriptomics and gene knockouts, both biosynthetic genes and a transcription factor regulating benzenoid synthesis have been recently discovered and characterized. It appears that benzenoid production is regulated predominantly by transcriptional control of the shikimate pathway, benzenoid biosynthesis genes and S-adenosyl-methionine cycle genes.

  13. Investigating the Elusive Mechanism of Glycosaminoglycan Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Xylophone V.; Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Tran, Vy M.; Nguyen, Khiem V.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2009-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis requires numerous biosynthetic enzymes and activated sulfate and sugar donors. Although the sequence of biosynthetic events is resolved using reconstituted systems, little is known about the emergence of cell-specific GAG chains (heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, and dermatan sulfate) with distinct sulfation patterns. We have utilized a library of click-xylosides that have various aglycones to decipher the mechanism of GAG biosynthesis in a cellular system. Earlier studies have shown that both the concentration of the primers and the structure of the aglycone moieties can affect the composition of the newly synthesized GAG chains. However, it is largely unknown whether structural features of aglycone affect the extent of sulfation, sulfation pattern, disaccharide composition, and chain length of GAG chains. In this study, we show that aglycones can switch not only the type of GAG chains, but also their fine structures. Our findings provide suggestive evidence for the presence of GAGOSOMES that have different combinations of enzymes and their isoforms regulating the synthesis of cell-specific combinatorial structures. We surmise that click-xylosides are differentially recognized by the GAGOSOMES to generate distinct GAG structures as observed in this study. These novel click-xylosides offer new avenues to profile the cell-specific GAG chains, elucidate the mechanism of GAG biosynthesis, and to decipher the biological actions of GAG chains in model organisms. PMID:19628873

  14. Biosynthesis of terpenoid natural products in fungi.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Tens of thousands of terpenoid natural products have been isolated from plants and microbial sources. Higher fungi (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) are known to produce an array of well-known terpenoid natural products, including mycotoxins, antibiotics, antitumor compounds, and phytohormones. Except for a few well-studied fungal biosynthetic pathways, the majority of genes and biosynthetic pathways responsible for the biosynthesis of a small number of these secondary metabolites have only been discovered and characterized in the past 5-10 years. This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on fungal terpenoid biosynthesis from biochemical, genetic, and genomic viewpoints. Enzymes involved in synthesizing, transferring, and cyclizing the prenyl chains that form the hydrocarbon scaffolds of fungal terpenoid natural products are systematically discussed. Genomic information and functional evidence suggest differences between the terpenome of the two major fungal phyla--the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota--which will be illustrated for each group of terpenoid natural products.

  15. Heterocyclic Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Pharmacological Applications.

    PubMed

    Hotchandani, Tarun; Desgagne-Penix, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Amaryllidaceae alkaloids (AAs), which are natural heterocyclic compounds, are isolated from Amaryllidaceae plants such as narcissus, snowdrop and spider lily. AAs have been extensively studied due to their multiple pharmacological properties. Nevertheless, knowledge of AA synthesis in plants is lacking and most genes encoding enzymes involved in their production remain unknown. AAs are structurally complex compounds which are challenging for total chemical synthesis that is economically viable. Therefore the understanding of AA biosynthesis could allow for the development of biotechnologies for the production of natural AAs or analogues, maintaining or improving their pharmacological properties. In this review, we describe the progress regarding the biosynthesis and pharmacological properties of AAs. The most recent developments in neurological, anti-cancer and anti-microbial bioactivities of heterocyclic AAs are covered.

  16. Amino Acid Biosynthesis Pathways in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids are not only building blocks for proteins but serve as precursors for the synthesis of many metabolites with multiple functions in growth and other biological processes of a living organism. The biosynthesis of amino acids is tightly connected with central carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. Recent publication of genome sequences for two diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum created an opportunity for extensive studies on the structure of these metabolic pathways. Based on sequence homology found in the analyzed diatomal genes, the biosynthesis of amino acids in diatoms seems to be similar to higher plants. However, one of the most striking differences between the pathways in plants and in diatomas is that the latter possess and utilize the urea cycle. It serves as an important anaplerotic pathway for carbon fixation into amino acids and other N-containing compounds, which are essential for diatom growth and contribute to their high productivity. PMID:24957993

  17. Biosynthesis and Toxicological Effects of Patulin

    PubMed Central

    Puel, Olivier; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2010-01-01

    Patulin is a toxic chemical contaminant produced by several species of mold, especially within Aspergillus, Penicillium and Byssochlamys. It is the most common mycotoxin found in apples and apple-derived products such as juice, cider, compotes and other food intended for young children. Exposure to this mycotoxin is associated with immunological, neurological and gastrointestinal outcomes. Assessment of the health risks due to patulin consumption by humans has led many countries to regulate the quantity in food. A full understanding of the molecular genetics of patulin biosynthesis is incomplete, unlike other regulated mycotoxins (aflatoxins, trichothecenes and fumonisins), although the chemical structures of patulin precursors are now known. The biosynthetic pathway consists of approximately 10 steps, as suggested by biochemical studies. Recently, a cluster of 15 genes involved in patulin biosynthesis was reported, containing characterized enzymes, a regulation factor and transporter genes. This review includes information on the current understanding of the mechanisms of patulin toxinogenesis and summarizes its toxicological effects. PMID:22069602

  18. Identification and geochemical significance of cyclic di-and trisulphides with linear and acyclic isoprenoid carbon skeletons in immature sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnen, Math E. L.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; ten Haven, H. L.; Van Dalen, A. C. Kock; Schouten, Stefan; De Leeuw, Jan W.

    1991-12-01

    Homologous series (C 15-C 24) of novel 3- n-alkyl-1,2-dithianes and 3- n-alkyl-6-methyl-1,2-di-thianes have been identified in immature sediments. The identification of these compounds was based on comparison of mass spectra and Chromatographie data with those of synthesized 3-methyl-6-tridecyll, 2-dithiane. In addition, 4-methyl-3-(3,7,11-trimethyldodecyl)-1,2-dithiane, 4-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)-1,2-dithiane, 5-methyl-4-(3,7,11-trimethyldodecyl)-1,2,3-trithiepane, and a 1,2-dithiane possessing a pentakishomohopane carbon skeleton were tentatively assigned on the basis of mass spectral characteristics, selective chemolysis, and desulphurisation. The occurrence of these cyclic di-and trisulphides with linear, acyclic isoprenoid and hopanoid carbon skeletons in thermally immature sediments indicates that inorganic polysulphides are incorporated into functionalised lipids during the early stages of diagenesis.

  19. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alison W.; Roberts, Eric M.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperms encode the same families of cell wall glycosyl transferases, yet, in many cases these families have diversified independently in each lineage. Our understanding of land plant evolution could be enhanced by more complete knowledge of the relationships among glycosyl transferase functional diversification, cell wall structural and biochemical specialization, and the roles of cell walls in plant adaptation. As a foundation for these studies, we review the features of P. patens as an experimental system, analyses of cell wall composition in various moss species, recent studies that elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides in P. patens, and phylogenetic analysis of P. patens genes potentially involved in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:22833752

  20. Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, David Allen

    1992-11-01

    A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

  1. Differential Selection on Carotenoid Biosynthesis Genes as a Function of Gene Position in the Metabolic Pathway: A Study on the Carrot and Dicots

    PubMed Central

    Clotault, Jérémy; Peltier, Didier; Soufflet-Freslon, Vanessa; Briard, Mathilde; Geoffriau, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Background Selection of genes involved in metabolic pathways could target them differently depending on the position of genes in the pathway and on their role in controlling metabolic fluxes. This hypothesis was tested in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway using population genetics and phylogenetics. Methodology/Principal Findings Evolutionary rates of seven genes distributed along the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, IPI, PDS, CRTISO, LCYB, LCYE, CHXE and ZEP, were compared in seven dicot taxa. A survey of deviations from neutrality expectations at these genes was also undertaken in cultivated carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus), a species that has been intensely bred for carotenoid pattern diversification in its root during its cultivation history. Parts of sequences of these genes were obtained from 46 individuals representing a wide diversity of cultivated carrots. Downstream genes exhibited higher deviations from neutral expectations than upstream genes. Comparisons of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates between genes among dicots revealed greater constraints on upstream genes than on downstream genes. An excess of intermediate frequency polymorphisms, high nucleotide diversity and/or high differentiation of CRTISO, LCYB1 and LCYE in cultivated carrot suggest that balancing selection may have targeted genes acting centrally in the pathway. Conclusions/Significance Our results are consistent with relaxed constraints on downstream genes and selection targeting the central enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway during carrot breeding history. PMID:22737218

  2. Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, D.A.

    1992-11-01

    A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

  3. Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway as Target for Anti-trypanosomatid Drugs

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are constituents of the cellular membranes that are essential for their normal structure and function. In mammalian cells, cholesterol is the main sterol found in the various membranes. However, other sterols predominate in eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi and protozoa. It is now well established that an important metabolic pathway in fungi and in members of the Trypanosomatidae family is one that produces a special class of sterols, including ergosterol, and other 24-methyl sterols, which are required for parasitic growth and viability, but are absent from mammalian host cells. Currently, there are several drugs that interfere with sterol biosynthesis (SB) that are in use to treat diseases such as high cholesterol in humans and fungal infections. In this review, we analyze the effects of drugs such as (a) statins, which act on the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, (b) bisphosphonates, which interfere with the isoprenoid pathway in the step catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase, (c) zaragozic acids and quinuclidines, inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS), which catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, (d) allylamines, inhibitors of squalene epoxidase, (e) azoles, which inhibit C14α-demethylase, and (f) azasterols, which inhibit Δ24(25)-sterol methyltransferase (SMT). Inhibition of this last step appears to have high selectivity for fungi and trypanosomatids, since this enzyme is not found in mammalian cells. We review here the IC50 values of these various inhibitors, their effects on the growth of trypanosomatids (both in axenic cultures and in cell cultures), and their effects on protozoan structural organization (as evaluted by light and electron microscopy) and lipid composition. The results show that the mitochondrial membrane as well as the membrane lining the protozoan cell body and flagellum are the main targets. Probably as a consequence of these primary effects, other important changes take place in

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Controlling the delicate balance of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Liang; Bauer, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are a family of compounds that contain four pyrrole rings. They are involved in many fundamental biological processes such as photoreception, electron transport, gas transport and also as cofactors for enzymatic reactions. As regulators of protein activity, tetrapyrroles mediate cellular response to light, oxygen and nutrient levels in the surrounding environment. Biosynthesis of haem tetrapyrroles shares, conserved pathways and enzymes among all three domains of life. This is contrasted by chlorophyll biosynthesis that is only present in eubacteria and chloroplasts, or cobalamin biosynthesis that is only present in eubacteria and archaea. This implicates haem as the most ancient, and chlorophyll as the most recent, of the common tetrapyrroles that are currently synthesized by existing organisms. Haem and chlorophyll are both toxic when synthesized in excess over apo-proteins that bind these tetrapyrroles. Accordingly, the synthesis of these tetrapyrroles has to be tightly regulated and coordinated with apo-protein production. The mechanism of regulating haem and chlorophyll synthesis has been studied intensively in Rhodobacter species and will be discussed. PMID:23754814

  6. UV-B and UV-C pre-treatments induce physiological changes and artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua L. - an antimalarial plant.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rashmi; Meena, Ram Prasad; Smita, Shachi Shuchi; Shukla, Aparna; Rai, Sanjay Kumar; Pandey-Rai, Shashi

    2011-12-02

    Present study was undertaken to investigate if short-term UV-B (4.2 kJ m(-2) day(-1)) and UV-C (5.7 kJ m(-2) day(-1)), pre-treatments can induce artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua. Twenty-one day old Artemisia seedlings were subjected to short-term (14 days) UV pre-treatment in an environmentally controlled growth chamber and then transplanted to the field under natural conditions. Treatment of A. annua with artificial UV-B and UV-C radiation not only altered the growth responses, biomass, pigment content and antioxidant enzyme activity but enhanced the secondary metabolites (artemisinin and flavonoid) content at all developmental stages as compared to non-irradiated plants. The extent of oxidative damage was measured in terms of the activities of enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase. Reinforcement in the antioxidative defense system seems to be a positive response of plants in ameliorating the negative effects of UV-B and UV-C radiations. While the carotenoid content was elevated, the chlorophyll content decreased under UV-B and UV-C pre-treatments. The reverse transcription PCR analysis of the genes associated in artemisinin/isoprenoid biosynthesis like 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CPR) and amorpha-4,11-diene synthase (ADS) genes at different growth stages revealed UV induced significant over-expression of the above protein genes. UV-B and UV-C pre-treatments, led to an increase in the concentrations of artemisinin at full bloom stage by 10.5% and 15.7% than that of the control respectively. Thus, the result of our study suggests that short term UV-B pre-treatment of seedlings in greenhouse prior to transplantation into the field enhances artemisinin production with lesser yield related damages as compared to UV-C radiation in A. annua. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Stereochemical control of DNA biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sosunov, Vasily V.; Santamaria, Fanny; Victorova, Lyubov S.; Gosselin, Gilles; Rayner, Bernard; Krayevsky, Alexander A.

    2000-01-01

    Stereochemical control of DNA biosynthesis was studied using several DNA-synthesizing complexes containing, in each case, a single substitution of a 2′-deoxy-d-nucleotide residue by an enantiomeric l-nucleotide residue in a DNA chain (either in the primer or in the template) as well as 2′-deoxy-l-ribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates (l-dNTPs) as substrates. Three template-dependent DNA polymerases were tested, Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I Klenow fragment, Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase and avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase, as well as template-independent calf-thymus terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Very stringent control of stereoselectivity was demonstrated for template-dependent DNA polymerases, whereas terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase was less selective. DNA polymerase I and reverse transcriptase catalyzed formation of dinucleoside 5′,5′-tetraphosphates when l-dTTP was used as substrate. Comparison between models of template–primer complexes, modified or not by a single l-nucleotide residue, revealed striking differences in their geometry. PMID:10666459

  8. Cryogenian evolution of stigmasteroid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Yosuke; Poshibaeva, Aleksandra; Meredith, William; Snape, Colin; Poshibaev, Vladimir; Versteegh, Gerard J. M.; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Leider, Arne; van Maldegem, Lennart; Neumann, Mareike; Naeher, Sebastian; Moczydłowska, Małgorzata; Brocks, Jochen J.; Jarrett, Amber J. M.; Tang, Qing; Xiao, Shuhai; McKirdy, David; Das, Supriyo Kumar; Alvaro, José Javier; Sansjofre, Pierre; Hallmann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Sedimentary hydrocarbon remnants of eukaryotic C26–C30 sterols can be used to reconstruct early algal evolution. Enhanced C29 sterol abundances provide algal cell membranes a density advantage in large temperature fluctuations. Here, we combined a literature review with new analyses to generate a comprehensive inventory of unambiguously syngenetic steranes in Neoproterozoic rocks. Our results show that the capacity for C29 24-ethyl-sterol biosynthesis emerged in the Cryogenian, that is, between 720 and 635 million years ago during the Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth glaciations, which were an evolutionary stimulant, not a bottleneck. This biochemical innovation heralded the rise of green algae to global dominance of marine ecosystems and highlights the environmental drivers for the evolution of sterol biosynthesis. The Cryogenian emergence of C29 sterol biosynthesis places a benchmark for verifying older sterane signatures and sets a new framework for our understanding of early algal evolution. PMID:28948220

  9. Amino acid residues that define both the isoprenoid and CAAX preferences of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein farnesyltransferase. Creating the perfect farnesyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Caplin, B E; Ohya, Y; Marshall, M S

    1998-04-17

    Studies of the yeast protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) have shown that the enzyme preferentially farnesylates proteins ending in CAAX (C = cysteine, A = aliphatic residue, X = cysteine, serine, methionine, alanine) and to a lesser degree CAAL. Furthermore, like the type I protein geranylgeranyltransferase (GGTase-I), FTase can also geranylgeranylate methionine- and leucine-ending substrates both in vitro and in vivo. Substrate overlap of FTase and GGTase I has not been determined to be biologically significant. In this study, specific residues that influence the substrate preferences of FTase have been identified using site-directed mutagenesis. Three of the mutations altered the substrate preferences of the wild type enzyme significantly. The ram1p-74D FTase farnesylated only Ras-CIIS and not Ras-CII(M,L), and it geranylgeranylated all three substrates as well or better than wild type. The ram1p-206DDLF FTase farnesylated Ras-CII(S,M,L) at wild type levels but could no longer geranylgeranylate the Ras-CII(M,L) substrates. The ram1p-351FSKN FTase farnesylated Ras-CIIS and Ras-CIIM but not Ras-CIIL. The ram1p-351FSKN FTase was not capable of geranylgeranylating the Ras-CII(M,L) substrates, giving this mutant the attributes of the dogmatic FTase that only farnesylates non-leucine-ending CAAX substrates and does not geranylgeranylate any substrate. These results suggest that the isoprenoid and protein substrate specificities of FTase are interrelated. The availability of a mutant FTase that lacked substrate overlap with the protein GGTase-I made possible an analysis of the role of substrate overlap in normal cellular processes of yeast, such as mating and growth at elevated temperatures. Our findings suggest that neither farnesylation of leucine-ending CAAX substrates nor geranylgeranylation by the FTase is necessary for these cellular processes.

  10. Auxin biosynthesis and storage forms.

    PubMed

    Korasick, David A; Enders, Tara A; Strader, Lucia C

    2013-06-01

    The plant hormone auxin drives plant growth and morphogenesis. The levels and distribution of the active auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) are tightly controlled through synthesis, inactivation, and transport. Many auxin precursors and modified auxin forms, used to regulate auxin homeostasis, have been identified; however, very little is known about the integration of multiple auxin biosynthesis and inactivation pathways. This review discusses the many ways auxin levels are regulated through biosynthesis, storage forms, and inactivation, and the potential roles modified auxins play in regulating the bioactive pool of auxin to affect plant growth and development.

  11. Auxin biosynthesis and storage forms

    PubMed Central

    Strader, Lucia C.

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin drives plant growth and morphogenesis. The levels and distribution of the active auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) are tightly controlled through synthesis, inactivation, and transport. Many auxin precursors and modified auxin forms, used to regulate auxin homeostasis, have been identified; however, very little is known about the integration of multiple auxin biosynthesis and inactivation pathways. This review discusses the many ways auxin levels are regulated through biosynthesis, storage forms, and inactivation, and the potential roles modified auxins play in regulating the bioactive pool of auxin to affect plant growth and development. PMID:23580748

  12. Prerequisite for highly efficient isoprenoid production by cyanobacteria discovered through the over-expression of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase and carbon allocation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, Kai; Kawano, Yusuke; Hotta, Shingo; Sekine, Midori; Watanabe, Takafumi; Ihara, Masaki

    2014-07-01

    Cyanobacteria have recently been receiving considerable attention owing to their potential as photosynthetic producers of biofuels and biomaterials. Here, we focused on the production of isoprenoids by cyanobacteria, and aimed to provide insight into metabolic engineering design. To this end, we examined the over-expression of a key enzyme in 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. In the DXS-over-expression strain (Dxs_ox), the mRNA and protein levels of DXS were 4-times and 1.5-times the levels in the wild-type (WT) strain, respectively. The carotenoid content of the Dxs_ox strain (8.4 mg/g dry cell weight [DCW]) was also up to 1.5-times higher than that in the WT strain (5.6 mg/g DCW), whereas the glycogen content dramatically decreased to an undetectable level. These observations suggested that the carotenoid content in the Dxs_ox strain was increased by consuming glycogen, which is a C-storage compound in cyanobacteria. We also quantified the total sugar (145 and 104 mg/g DCW), total fatty acids (31 and 24 mg/g DCW) and total protein (200 and 240 mg/g DCW) content in the WT and Dxs_ox strains, respectively, which were much higher than the carotenoid content. In particular, approximately 54% of the proteins were phycobiliproteins. This study demonstrated the major destinations of carbon flux in cyanobacteria, and provided important insights into metabolic engineering. Target yield can be improved through optimization of gene expression, the DXS protein stabilization, cell propagation depression and restriction of storage compound synthesis.

  13. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C5 alcohols in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    George, Kevin W.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Kang, Aram; Baidoo, Edward; Wang, George; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Adams, Paul D.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Soon Lee, Taek

    2015-06-08

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulation by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Lastly, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol.

  14. Hemosomegenesis and hemoglobin biosynthesis in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Brunner Júnior, A; de Rizzo, E; Morena, D D; Cianciarullo, A M; Jared, C; Morena, P

    1992-08-01

    1. Ultrastructural observations on maturing rabbit embryo erythroid cells led to the finding of hemoglobinized organelles distinguishable from mitochondria due to their highly dense matrix, two or three longitudinally arranged double lamellae, and smaller diameters. Intraorganellar 50-60 A particles identical to those contained in the hemoglobinized cytoplasm were found. 2. Their hemoglobin (Hb) content was demonstrated by electrophoresis of the concentrated supernatant from the isolated, washed, and osmotically lysed organellar fraction. We have proposed that these organelles are the sites for heme integration into the globin (G) polypeptide chains and subunits assembly. The term hemosome has been suggested for such entities. 3. This hypothesis has been sustained by several analytical and experimental works based on the postulation that hemosomes should be found at higher frequencies where the Hb biosynthesis rate is more intensive, or where the induction of this biosynthesis is always dependent on the formation of hemosomes. 4. Maturing erythroid cells of the circulating embryo blood contain hemosomes in higher frequency than in liver erythroid cells, coinciding with the higher Hb biosynthesis rate in peripheral blood than in the liver. In bleeding anemia, the decay of Hb concentration parallels the reduction of the mean number of hemosomes per reticulocyte, in comparison with normal reticulocytes. 5. In HeLa cells and epithelial cultured cells induced to synthesize Hb, it was shown that this biosynthesis is ever concomitant with the formation of hemosomes and depends on the presence of erythropoietin, as occurs in erythroid cells. 6. Studies on hemosomegenesis and Hb biosynthesis experimentally effected in epithelial cultured cells, allowed the interpretation of the sequence of events leading to hemosome formation in maturing erythroid cells. Simultaneously with iron uptake, mitochondria differentiate to lamellated bodies and, successively, expansions rise for

  15. Phermone biosynthesis activation in fire ants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN), was identified to stimulate sex pheromone biosynthesis in a moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in mot...

  16. Regulation of Oil Biosynthesis in Algae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-25

    genes and mutants are currently under investigation for their potential roles in oil biosynthesis in microalgae . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Target genes for oil ...engineering, transcriptional profile comparison, lipid mutants, microalgae oil biosynthesis, enzymes involved in oil body formation in micro algae 16...addressed by exploring oil (triacylglycerol) biosynthesis in microalgae . Many algae including Chlamydomonas accumulate triacylglycerols when cultures

  17. Early and brain region-specific decrease of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis in Huntington's disease: A cross-validation study in Q175 knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; Di Paolo, Eleonora; Leoni, Valerio; Caccia, Claudio; Ferrari Bardile, Costanza; Mohammed, Hussein; Di Donato, Stefano; Kwak, Seung; Marchionini, Deanna; Turner, Scott; Cattaneo, Elena; Valenza, Marta

    2017-02-01

    Cholesterol precursors and cholesterol levels are reduced in brain regions of Huntington's disease (HD) mice. Here we quantified the rate of in vivo de novo cholesterol biosynthesis in the HD brain. Samples from different brain regions and blood of the heterozygous knock-in mouse model carrying 175 CAG repeats (Q175) at different phenotypic stages were processed independently by two research units to quantify cholesterol synthesis rate by (2)H2O labeling and measure the concentrations of lathosterol, cholesterol and its brain-specific cholesterol catabolite 24-hydroxy-cholesterol (24OHC) by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The daily synthesis rate of cholesterol and the corresponding concentration of lathosterol were significantly reduced in the striatum of heterozygous Q175 mice early in the disease course. We also report that the decrease in lathosterol was inversely correlated with CAG-size at symptomatic stage, as observed in striatal samples from an allelic series of HD mice. There was also a significant correlation between the fractional synthesis rates of total cholesterol and 24OHC in brain of wild-type (WT) and Q175 mice, supporting the evidence that plasma 24OHC may reflect cholesterol synthesis in the adult brain. This comprehensive analysis demonstrates consistent cholesterol biosynthesis defects in HD mouse models and suggests that plasma 24OHC may serve as a biomarker of brain cholesterol metabolism.

  18. Biosynthesis and combinatorial biosynthesis of pikromycin-related macrolides in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y; Sherman, D H

    2001-01-01

    Pikromycin-related macrolides have recently attracted significant research interest because they are structurally related to the semisynthetic ketolide antibiotics that have demonstrated promising potential in combating multi-drug-resistant respiratory pathogens. Cloning and in-depth studies of the pikromycin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces venezuelae have led to new avenues in modular polyketide synthases, deoxysugar biosynthesis, cytochrome P450 hydroxylase, secondary metabolite gene regulation, and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, the knowledge and tools used for these studies are proving to be valuable in the development of advanced technologies for combinatorial biosynthesis of new macrolide antibiotics. This review summarizes these new developments and introduces S. venezuelae as a powerful new system for secondary metabolite pathway engineering from bench-top genetic manipulation to product fermentation.

  19. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. IV - Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizinga, Bradley J.; Tannenbaum, Eli; Kaplan, Isaac R.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of common sedimentary minerals (illite, Na-montmorillonite, or calcite) under different water concentrations on the generation and release of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and select alkenes from oil-prone kerogens was investigated. Matrices containing Green River Formation kerogen or Monterey Formation kerogen, alone or in the presence of minerals, were heated at 200 or 300 C for periods of up to 1000 hours, and the pyrolysis products were analyzed. The influence of the first two clay minerals was found to be critically dependent on the water content. Under the dry pyrolysis conditions, both minerals significantly reduced alkene formation; the C12+ n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids were mostly destroyed by montmorillonite, but underwent only minor alteration with illite. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water of 2/1), the effects of both minerals were substantially reduced. Calcite had no significant effect on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons.

  20. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. IV - Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huizinga, Bradley J.; Tannenbaum, Eli; Kaplan, Isaac R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of common sedimentary minerals (illite, Na-montmorillonite, or calcite) under different water concentrations on the generation and release of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and select alkenes from oil-prone kerogens was investigated. Matrices containing Green River Formation kerogen or Monterey Formation kerogen, alone or in the presence of minerals, were heated at 200 or 300 C for periods of up to 1000 hours, and the pyrolysis products were analyzed. The influence of the first two clay minerals was found to be critically dependent on the water content. Under the dry pyrolysis conditions, both minerals significantly reduced alkene formation; the C12+ n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids were mostly destroyed by montmorillonite, but underwent only minor alteration with illite. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water of 2/1), the effects of both minerals were substantially reduced. Calcite had no significant effect on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons.

  1. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. IV - Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huizinga, Bradley J.; Tannenbaum, Eli; Kaplan, Isaac R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of common sedimentary minerals (illite, Na-montmorillonite, or calcite) under different water concentrations on the generation and release of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and select alkenes from oil-prone kerogens was investigated. Matrices containing Green River Formation kerogen or Monterey Formation kerogen, alone or in the presence of minerals, were heated at 200 or 300 C for periods of up to 1000 hours, and the pyrolysis products were analyzed. The influence of the first two clay minerals was found to be critically dependent on the water content. Under the dry pyrolysis conditions, both minerals significantly reduced alkene formation; the C12+ n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids were mostly destroyed by montmorillonite, but underwent only minor alteration with illite. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water of 2/1), the effects of both minerals were substantially reduced. Calcite had no significant effect on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons.

  2. Complexity of the transcriptional network controlling secondary wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2014-12-01

    Secondary walls in the form of wood and fibers are the most abundant biomass produced by vascular plants, and are important raw materials for many industrial uses. Understanding how secondary walls are constructed is of significance in basic plant biology and also has far-reaching implications in genetic engineering of plant biomass better suited for various end uses, such as biofuel production. Secondary walls are composed of three major biopolymers, i.e., cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin, the biosynthesis of which requires the coordinated transcriptional regulation of all their biosynthesis genes. Genomic and molecular studies have identified a number of transcription factors, whose expression is associated with secondary wall biosynthesis. We comprehensively review how these secondary wall-associated transcription factors function together to turn on the secondary wall biosynthetic program, which leads to secondary wall deposition in vascular plants. The transcriptional network regulating secondary wall biosynthesis employs a multi-leveled feed-forward loop regulatory structure, in which the top-level secondary wall NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2) master switches activate the second-level MYB master switches and they together induce the expression of downstream transcription factors and secondary wall biosynthesis genes. Secondary wall NAC master switches and secondary wall MYB master switches bind to and activate the SNBE (secondary wall NAC binding element) and SMRE (secondary wall MYB-responsive element) sites, respectively, in their target gene promoters. Further investigation of what and how developmental signals trigger the transcriptional network to regulate secondary wall biosynthesis and how different secondary wall-associated transcription factors function cooperatively in activating secondary wall biosynthetic pathways will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the transcriptional control of secondary wall biosynthesis.

  3. Pteridine biosynthesis and nitric oxide synthase in Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Werner-Felmayer, G; Golderer, G; Werner, E R; Gröbner, P; Wachter, H

    1994-11-15

    Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mould, serves as a model system to study cell-cycle-dependent events since nuclear division is naturally synchronous. This organism was shown to release isoxanthopterin which is structurally related to tetrahydrobiopterin, a cofactor of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) (EC 1.14.13.39). Here, we studied Physarum pteridine biosynthesis in more detail and found that high amounts of tetrahydrobiopterin are produced and NOS activity is expressed. Physarum pteridine biosynthesis is peculiar in as much as 7,8-dihydroneopterin aldolase (EC 4.1.2.25), an enzyme of folic acid biosynthesis usually not found in organisms producing tetrahydrobiopterin, is detected in parallel. NOS purified from Physarum depends on NADPH, tetrahydrobiopterin and flavins. Enzyme activity is independent of exogenous Ca2+ and is inhibited by arginine analogues. The purified enzyme (with a molecular mass of 130 kDa) contains tightly bound tetrahydrobiopterin and flavins. During the synchronous cell cycle of Physarum, pteridine biosynthesis increases during S-phase whereas NOS activity peaks during mitosis, drops at telophase and peaks again during early S-phase. Our results characterize Physarum pteridine biosynthesis and NOS and suggest a possible link between NOS activity and mitosis.

  4. Pteridine biosynthesis and nitric oxide synthase in Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Felmayer, G; Golderer, G; Werner, E R; Gröbner, P; Wachter, H

    1994-01-01

    Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mould, serves as a model system to study cell-cycle-dependent events since nuclear division is naturally synchronous. This organism was shown to release isoxanthopterin which is structurally related to tetrahydrobiopterin, a cofactor of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) (EC 1.14.13.39). Here, we studied Physarum pteridine biosynthesis in more detail and found that high amounts of tetrahydrobiopterin are produced and NOS activity is expressed. Physarum pteridine biosynthesis is peculiar in as much as 7,8-dihydroneopterin aldolase (EC 4.1.2.25), an enzyme of folic acid biosynthesis usually not found in organisms producing tetrahydrobiopterin, is detected in parallel. NOS purified from Physarum depends on NADPH, tetrahydrobiopterin and flavins. Enzyme activity is independent of exogenous Ca2+ and is inhibited by arginine analogues. The purified enzyme (with a molecular mass of 130 kDa) contains tightly bound tetrahydrobiopterin and flavins. During the synchronous cell cycle of Physarum, pteridine biosynthesis increases during S-phase whereas NOS activity peaks during mitosis, drops at telophase and peaks again during early S-phase. Our results characterize Physarum pteridine biosynthesis and NOS and suggest a possible link between NOS activity and mitosis. Images Figure 2 PMID:7528004

  5. Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Pyridoacridines are a class of strictly marine-derived alkaloids that constitute one of the largest chemical families of marine alkaloids. During the last few years, both natural pyridoacridines and their analogues have constituted excellent targets for synthetic works. They have been the subject of intense study due to their significant biological activities; cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, insecticidal, anti-HIV, and anti-parasitic activities. In the present review, 95 pyridoacridine alkaloids isolated from marine organisms are discussed in term of their occurrence, biosynthesis, biological activities, and structural assignment.

  6. Caste-Selective Pheromone Biosynthesis in Honeybees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plettner, Erika; Slessor, Keith N.; Winston, Mark L.; Oliver, James E.

    1996-03-01

    Queen and worker honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) produce a caste-related blend of functionalized 8- and 10-carbon fatty acids in their mandibular glands. The biological functions of these compounds match the queen's reproductive and the worker's nonreproductive roles in the colony. Studies with deuterated substrates revealed that the biosynthesis of these acids begins with stearic acid, which is hydroxylated at the 17th or 18th position. The 18-carbon hydroxy acid chains are shortened, and the resulting 10-carbon hydroxy acids are oxidized in a caste-selective manner, thereby determining many of the functional differences between queens and workers.

  7. Biosynthesis of caldariellaquinone in Sulfolobus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, D; White, R H

    1989-01-01

    The biosynthesis of caldariellaquionone (CQ) was studied in species of Sulfolobus by measuring the incorporation of stable isotopically labeled tyrosines into CQ. By feeding a series of tyrosines labeled with deuterium or 13C and then measuring the extent and position at which label was incorporated into CQ by mass spectrometry, it was shown that more than 95% of the label was incorporated into the benzo[b]thiophen-4,7-quinone moiety of CQ. From the labeling experiments, it is concluded that the benzo[b]thiophen-4,7-quinone is derived as an intact unit from all of the carbons of tyrosine except C-1. PMID:2512282

  8. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Mohseni, Soudabeh; Mardani Jouneghani, Rasoul; Pourhossein, Meraj; Iravani, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (NPs) by biotransformations using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and analysis of the sizes and shapes of the NPs produced. Dried and freshly cultured S. cerevisiae were used as the biocatalyst. Dried yeast synthesized few NPs, but freshly cultured yeast produced a large amount of them. Silver NPs were spherical, 2-20 nm in diameter, and the NPs with the size of 5.4 nm were the most frequent ones. NPs were seen inside the cells, within the cell membrane, attached to the cell membrane during the exocytosis, and outside of the cells.

  9. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis: A Colorful Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Sola, M. Águila; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are a family of pigments that participate in light harvesting and are essential for photoprotection against excess light. Furthermore, they act as precursors for the production of apocarotenoid hormones such as abscisic acid and strigolactones. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the genes and enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway (which is now almost completely elucidated) and on the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We also discuss the relevance of Arabidopsis as a model system for the study of carotenogenesis and how metabolic engineering approaches in this plant have taught important lessons for carotenoid biotechnology. PMID:22582030

  10. Mono-, di- and trimethylated homologues of isoprenoid tetraether lipid cores in archaea and environmental samples: mass spectrometric identification and significance.

    PubMed

    Knappy, Chris; Barillà, Daniela; Chong, James; Hodgson, Dominic; Morgan, Hugh; Suleman, Muhammad; Tan, Christine; Yao, Peng; Keely, Brendan

    2015-12-01

    Higher homologues of widely reported C(86) isoprenoid diglycerol tetraether lipid cores, containing 0-6 cyclopentyl rings, have been identified in (hyper)thermophilic archaea, representing up to 21% of total tetraether lipids in the cells. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry confirms that the additional carbon atoms in the C(87-88) homologues are located in the etherified chains. Structures identified include dialkyl and monoalkyl ('H-shaped') tetraethers containing C(40-42) or C(81-82) hydrocarbons, respectively, many representing novel compounds. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of hydrocarbons released from the lipid cores by ether cleavage suggests that the C(40) chains are biphytanes and the C(41) chains 13-methylbiphytanes. Multiple isomers, having different chain combinations, were recognised among the dialkyl lipids. Methylated tetraethers are produced by Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus in varying proportions depending on growth conditions, suggesting that methylation may be an adaptive mechanism to regulate cellular function. The detection of methylated lipids in Pyrobaculum sp. AQ1.S2 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius represents the first reported occurrences in Crenarchaeota. Soils and aquatic sediments from geographically distinct mesotemperate environments that were screened for homologues contained monomethylated tetraethers, with di- and trimethylated structures being detected occasionally. The structural diversity and range of occurrences of the C(87-89) tetraethers highlight their potential as complementary biomarkers for archaea in natural environments.

  11. Impact of deep-water derived isoprenoid tetraether lipids on the TEX86 paleothermometry along the portuguese continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Villanueva, Laura; Zell, Claudia; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-04-01

    The TEX86 proxy was developed based on isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (isoGDGTs) biosynthesized by Thaumarchaeota and afterwards slightly modified to TEX86-H, a logarithmic function for TEX86. However, it remains uncertain how well this proxy reconstructs annual mean SST, especially due to the water depth influence. We investigated the potential effect of deep-water dwelling Thaumarchaeota in the warm and saline Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) on the distribution of isoGDGTs by analysing suspended particulate matter (SPM) and surface sediments collected along five land-ocean transects along the southern Portuguese continental margin. To this end, we directly compared for the first time the composition of intact polar lipid (IPL)-derived isoGDGTs of SPM with the diversity, abundance, and activity of Thaumarchaeota based on the genetic analysis of the genes coding for the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) and the geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate (GGGP) synthase involved in the isoGDGT biosynthetic pathway. Our results show that the sedimentary distribution of CL isoGDGTs used in TEX86-H along the Portuguese margin is primarily influenced by water depth due to the increasing contribution of the deep-water population of Thaumarchaeota residing in the MOW.

  12. Enhanced Production of Bioactive Isoprenoid Compounds from Cell Suspension Cultures of Artemisia annua L. Using β-Cyclodextrins

    PubMed Central

    Rizzello, Francesca; De Paolis, Angelo; Durante, Miriana; Blando, Federica; Mita, Giovanni; Caretto, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell cultures as valuable tools for the production of specific metabolites can be greatly improved by the application of elicitors including cyclodextrins (CDs) for enhancing the yields of the desired plant compounds. Here the effects of 2,6-dimethyl-β-cyclodextrins (DIMEB) on the production of carotenoids and quinones from Artemisia annua L. cell suspension cultures were investigated. The addition of 50 mM DIMEB induced an early increase of intracellular carotenoid and quinone contents, which could be observed to a higher extent for lutein (10-fold), Q9 (3-fold) and Q10 (2.5-fold). Real Time PCR analysis revealed that the expression of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) gene in DIMEB treated cell cultures after three days was 2.5-fold higher than in untreated samples, thus suggesting that the DIMEB induced increase of carotenoids and quinones could be due to the induction of the plastidial isoprenoid biosynthetic route. In addition, the DIMEB treatment induced an enhanced release of carotenoids and quinones into the culture medium of A. annua cell suspension cultures possibly due to the ability of CDs to form inclusion complexes with hydrophobic molecules. PMID:25338048

  13. Biosynthesis of resorcylic acid lactone lasiodiplodin in Lasiodiplodia theobromae.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Takasumi; Takahashi, Kosaku; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Nabeta, Kensuke

    2009-05-01

    The biosynthesis of lasiodiplodin (1) and its (5S)-5-hydroxylated derivative (2) were investigated by the administration of (13)C-labeled acetates to Lasiodiplodia theobromae. The labeling patterns of biosynthetically (13)C-labeled 1 and 2 were determined by (13)C-NMR and INADEQUATE spectra, demonstrating the octaketide origins of 1 and 2. Taking into account the biosynthetic study of resorcylic acid lactones, the involvement of highly reduced acyl intermediates in the biosynthesis of lasiodiplodins was presumed; thus, we synthesized (2)H-labeled hypothetical acyl intermediates of 1, 9-hydroxydecanoic acid (4) and its N-acetylcysteamine thioester (SNAC, 5). When L. theobromae was incubated with 5 mM of a (2)H-labeled intermediate, the (2)H-label from the intermediate was incorporated at the expected position of 1. These incorporation studies revealed that 1 was produced via a pathway which closely resembles that of resorcylic acid lactone biosynthesis.

  14. Fungal lipopeptide mating pheromones: a model system for the study of protein prenylation.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, G A; Naider, F; Becker, J M

    1995-01-01

    In a variety of fungal species, mating between haploid cells is initiated by the action of peptide pheromones. The identification and characterization of several fungal pheromones has revealed that they have common structural features classifying them as lipopeptides. In the course of biosynthesis, these pheromones undergo a series of posttranslational processing events prior to export. One common modification is the attachment of an isoprenoid group to the C terminus of the pheromone precursor. Genetic and biochemical investigations of this biosynthetic pathway have led to the elucidation of genes and enzymes which are responsible for isoprenylation of other polypeptides including the nuclear lamins, several vesicular transport proteins, and the oncogene product Ras. The alpha-factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as a model for studying the biosynthesis, export, and bioactivity of lipopeptide pheromones. In addition to being isoprenylated with a farnesyl group, the alpha-factor is secreted by a novel peptide export pathway utilizing a yeast homolog of the mammalian multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein. The identification of putative lipopeptide-encoding loci within other fungi, including