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Sample records for isoscalar giant dipole

  1. The Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance in {sup 20}Pb, {sup 90}Zr and the Nuclear Compressibility

    SciTech Connect

    Yildirim, Serbulent; Koeroglu, Ulas

    2008-11-11

    The isoscalar giant dipol resonance (ISGDR) in finite nuclei is studied within the framework of a relativistic transport approach. The excitation energies of spherical {sup 90}Zr and {sup 208}Pb nuclei are obtained for different quantum hydrodynamical Lagrangian parametrization. The sensitivity of ISGDR excitation energy on the nuclear bulk to surface properties are also investigated.

  2. Isoscalar monopole and dipole excitations of cluster states and giant resonances in 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2016-05-01

    The isoscalar monopole (ISM) and dipole (ISD) excitations in 12C are investigated theoretically with the shifted antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) plus 3 α -cluster generator coordinate method (GCM). The small-amplitude vibration modes are described by coherent one-particle one-hole excitations expressed by a small shift of single-nucleon Gaussian wave functions within the AMD framework, whereas the large-amplitude cluster modes are incorporated by superposing 3 α -cluster wave functions in the GCM. The coupling of the excitations in the intrinsic frame with the rotation and parity transformation is taken into account microscopically by the angular-momentum and parity projections. The present a calculation that describes the ISM and ISD excitations over a wide energy region covering cluster modes in the low-energy region and the giant resonances in the high-energy region, although the quantitative description of the high-energy part is not satisfactory. The low-energy ISM and ISD strengths of the cluster modes are enhanced by the distance motion between α clusters, and they split into a couple of states because of the angular motion of α clusters. The low-energy ISM strengths exhaust 26% of the energy-weighted sum rule, which is consistent with the experimental data for the 12C(02+; 7.65 MeV) and 12C(03+; 10.3 MeV) measured by (e ,e') ,(α ,α') , and (6Li,6Li' ) scatterings. In the calculated low-energy ISD strengths, two 1- states (the 11- and 12- states) with the significant strengths are obtained over E =10 -15 MeV. The results indicate that the ISD excitations can be a good probe to experimentally search for new cluster states such as the 12C(12-) obtained in the present calculation.

  3. Isoscalar and isovector giant resonances in a self-consistent phonon coupling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutorovich, N.; Tselyaev, V.; Speth, J.; Krewald, S.; Grümmer, F.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2015-10-01

    We present fully self-consistent calculations of isoscalar giant monopole and quadrupole as well as isovector giant dipole resonances in heavy and light nuclei. The description is based on Skyrme energy-density functionals determining the static Hartree-Fock ground state and the excitation spectra within random-phase approximation (RPA) and RPA extended by including the quasiparticle-phonon coupling at the level of the time-blocking approximation (TBA). All matrix elements were derived consistently from the given energy-density functional and calculated without any approximation. As a new feature in these calculations, the single-particle continuum was included thus avoiding the artificial discretization usually implied in RPA and TBA. The step to include phonon coupling in TBA leads to small, but systematic, down shifts of the centroid energies of the giant resonances. These shifts are similar in size for all Skyrme parametrizations investigated here. After all, we demonstrate that one can find Skyrme parametrizations which deliver a good simultaneous reproduction of all three giant resonances within TBA.

  4. Study of Isoscalar Giant Resonances in Exotic Nuclei by Means of Inverse Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harakeh, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances in exotic nuclei can be studied using inelastic alpha scattering in inverse kinematics. In particular, the compression modes, i.e. isoscalar giant monopole and dipole resonances, are very interesting because they can furnish information on the different terms of the nuclear incompressibility, especially if measured in long isotopic chains including nuclei far from the valley of stability. As beams of exotic nuclei have relatively low intensities thick targets have to be used in order to get a reasonable yield. However, this leads to degradation of the energy resolution and stops low-energy recoil particles. Two good alternatives exist. The first method is to use an active target, such as MAYA, which is a time-projection chamber and therefore can be used for detection of low-energy recoil particles. Furthermore, its thickness can be increased by increasing the length of the detection volume or the gas pressure without severe loss of energy resolution. The second method is to use a storage ring for storing the exotic nuclei, which then interact with target nuclei from a gas-jet target. Here, the luminosity and hence the yield are increased because the exotic nuclei circulate in the ring at a frequency of around 106 turns/s. Low-energy recoil particles traverse the gas-jet with little loss of energy and can be detected in solid-state detectors. Pioneering experiments with both methods have been performed for inelastic scattering of secondary 56Ni beam off helium nuclei. Here, preliminary results of the experiment with the active target MAYA will be presented.

  5. The giant dipole vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoldus, Henk F.; Li, Xin; Xu, Zhangjin

    2016-06-01

    The field lines of energy flow of radiation emitted by an oscillating electric dipole in free space are either straight lines (linear dipole) or they form a vortex (rotating dipole). When the dipole is embedded in a material, the properties of the medium affect the direction of energy flow. Damping due to the imaginary part of the relative permittivity ? makes the field lines curve for the case of a linear dipole, and for a rotating dipole, the shape of the vortex is altered. In addition, a negative value of the real part of ? has the effect that the rotation direction of the vortex reverses for the case of a rotating dipole. The value of the relative permeability ? has in general not much effect on the redistribution of the direction of energy propagation. We show that a dramatic effect occurs when the embedding material is near-single-negative (both ? and ? approximately real, and the real parts of opposite sign). The curving of field lines is in general a sub-wavelength phenomenon. For near-single-negative materials, however, this curving extends over large distances from the dipole. In particular, the small free-space vortex of a rotating dipole becomes a vortex of enormous dimensions when the radiation is emitted into a near-single-negative material.

  6. Evidence of Soft Dipole Resonance in 11Li with Isoscalar Character

    DOE PAGES

    Kanungo, R.; Sanetullaev, A.; Jansen, Gustav R.; Tanaka, J.; Ishimoto, S.; Myo, T.; Suzuki, T.; Andreoiu, C.; Bender, P.; Chen, A. A.; et al

    2015-05-12

    The first conclusive evidence of a dipole resonance in 11Li having isoscalar character observed from inelastic scattering with a novel solid deuteron target is reported. The experiment was performed at the newly commissioned IRIS facility at TRIUMF. The results show a resonance peak at an excitation energy of 1.03±0.03 MeV with a width of 0.51±0.11 MeV (FWHM). The angular distribution is consistent with a dipole excitation in the distorted-wave Born approximation framework. The observed resonance energy together with shell model calculations show the first signature that the monopole tensor interaction is important in 11Li. The first ab initio calculations inmore » the coupled cluster framework are also included.« less

  7. Evidence of Soft Dipole Resonance in 11Li with Isoscalar Character

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, R.; Sanetullaev, A.; Jansen, Gustav R.; Tanaka, J.; Ishimoto, S.; Myo, T.; Suzuki, T.; Andreoiu, C.; Bender, P.; Chen, A. A.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Fortin, J. P.; Galinski, N.; Gallant, A. T.; Garrett, P. E.; Hackman, G.; Hadinia, B.; Hagen, Gaute; Keefe, M.; Krucken, R.; Lighthall, J.; McNeice, E.; Miller, D.; Otsuka, T.; Purcell, J.; Randhawa, J. S.; Roger, T.; Rojas, A.; Savajols, H.; Shotter, A.; Tanihata, I.; Thompson, I. J.; Unsworth, C.; Voss, P.; Wang, Z.

    2015-05-12

    The first conclusive evidence of a dipole resonance in 11Li having isoscalar character observed from inelastic scattering with a novel solid deuteron target is reported. The experiment was performed at the newly commissioned IRIS facility at TRIUMF. The results show a resonance peak at an excitation energy of 1.03±0.03 MeV with a width of 0.51±0.11 MeV (FWHM). The angular distribution is consistent with a dipole excitation in the distorted-wave Born approximation framework. The observed resonance energy together with shell model calculations show the first signature that the monopole tensor interaction is important in 11Li. The first ab initio calculations in the coupled cluster framework are also included.

  8. Splitting of the isovector giant dipole resonance in neutron-rich spherical nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomietz, V.M.; Magner, A.G.; Shlomo, S.

    2006-02-15

    The well-known splitting of the isovector giant dipole resonance is traditionally explained as a phenomenon of the nuclear isospin asymmetry (isospin splitting model) or the nuclear deformation. We suggest a new mechanism of the splitting of the giant multipole resonances in spherical neutron-rich nuclei resulting from the interplay of the isovector and isoscalar sounds with different velocities. Our approach is based on the collisional Landau kinetic theory and can be used for description of the splitting phenomena for both the isoscalar and the isovector modes in a wide region of nuclear masses A{approx}40-240. For the isovector dipole modes, the evaluated values of the splitting energy, the relative strength of the main and satellite resonance peaks, and the contribution to the energy-weighted sum rule are in agreement with experimental data.

  9. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, I. T.; Buthelezi, Z.; Carter, J.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Förtsch, S. V.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Neveling, R.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Pysmenetska, I.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    The isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al has been investigated with high-energy-resolution proton inelastic scattering at Ep=200 MeV and at scattering angles close to the maximum of Δ L =2 angular distributions with the K600 magnetic spectrometer of iThemba LABS, South Africa. Characteristic scales are extracted from the observed fine structure with a wavelet analysis and compared for 28Si with random-phase approximation and second random phase approximation calculations with an interaction derived from the Argonne V18 potential by a unitary transformation. A recent extension of the method to deformed nuclei provides the best description of the data, suggesting the significance of Landau damping.

  10. Isoscalar response of 68Ni to α -particle and deuteron probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Gibelin, J.; Khan, E.; Achouri, N. L.; Baba, H.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Colò, G.; Delaunay, F.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Keeley, N.; Mittig, W.; Pancin, J.; Raabe, R.; Roger, T.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances have been measured in the unstable 68Ni nucleus using inelastic alpha and deuteron scattering at 50 A MeV in inverse kinematics with the active target MAYA at GANIL. Using alpha scattering, the extracted isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) centroid was determined to be 21.1 ±1.9 MeV and the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance (ISGQR) to be 15.9 ±1.3 MeV. Indications for soft isoscalar monopole and dipole modes are provided. Results obtained with both (α ,α' ) and (d ,d' ) probes are compatible. The evolution of isoscalar giant resonances along the Ni isotopic chain from 56Ni to 68Ni is discussed.

  11. Evidence of Soft Dipole Resonance in Li 11 with Isoscalar Character

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, R.; Sanetullaev, A.; Tanaka, J.; Ishimoto, S.; Hagen, G.; Myo, T.; Suzuki, T.; Andreoiu, C.; Bender, P.; Chen, A. A.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Fortin, J. P.; Galinski, N.; Gallant, A. T.; Garrett, P. E.; Hackman, G.; Hadinia, B.; Jansen, G.; Keefe, M.; Krücken, R.; Lighthall, J.; McNeice, E.; Miller, D.; Otsuka, T.; Purcell, J.; Randhawa, J. S.; Roger, T.; Rojas, A.; Savajols, H.; Shotter, A.; Tanihata, I.; Thompson, I. J.; Unsworth, C.; Voss, P.; Wang, Z.

    2015-05-01

    The first conclusive evidence of a dipole resonance in Li 11 having isoscalar character observed from inelastic scattering with a novel solid deuteron target is reported. The experiment was performed at the newly commissioned IRIS facility at TRIUMF. The results show a resonance peak at an excitation energy of 1.03 ±0.03 MeV with a width of 0.51 ±0.11 MeV (FWHM). The angular distribution is consistent with a dipole excitation in the distorted-wave Born approximation framework. The observed resonance energy together with shell model calculations show the first signature that the monopole tensor interaction is important in Li 11 . The first ab initio calculations in the coupled cluster framework are also presented.

  12. Global investigation of the fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Burda, O.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Foertsch, S. V.; Lawrie, J. J.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Lacroix, D.

    2009-04-15

    Fine structure in the region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance (ISGQR) in {sup 58}Ni, {sup 89}Y, {sup 90}Zr, {sup 120}Sn, {sup 166}Er, and {sup 208}Pb has been observed in high-energy-resolution ({delta}E{sub 1/2}{approx_equal}35-50 keV) inelastic proton scattering measurements at E{sub 0}=200 MeV at iThemba LABS. Calculations of the corresponding quadrupole excitation strength functions performed within models based on the random-phase approximation (RPA) reveal similar fine structure when the mixing of one-particle one-hole states with two-particle two-hole states is taken into account. A detailed comparison of the experimental data is made with results from the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) and the extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock (ETDHF) method. For {sup 208}Pb, additional theoretical results from second RPA and the extended theory of finite Fermi systems (ETFFS) are discussed. A continuous wavelet analysis of the experimental and the calculated spectra is used to extract dominant scales characterizing the fine structure. Although the calculations agree with qualitative features of these scales, considerable differences are found between the model and experimental results and amongst different models. Within the framework of the QPM and ETDHF calculations it is possible to decompose the model spaces into subspaces approximately corresponding to different damping mechanisms. It is demonstrated that characteristic scales mainly arise from the collective coupling of the ISGQR to low-energy surface vibrations.

  13. Systematics of Hot Giant Dipole Resonance Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Andreas; Thoennessen, Michael; McAlpine, Katherine

    2008-10-01

    The dependence of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) width on spin and temperature is a much debated subject in the literature. A universal scaling law has been proposed by Kusnezov et al. [D. Kusnezov et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 81,42 (1998)]@. Recently, we completed a literature survey of GDR parameters which provided us with a data set about five times as big as the one which was used by Kusnezov et al. [A. Schiller and M. Thoennessen, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 93,49 (2007)]@. The Kusnezov scaling law is tested over this larger data set. The data is also broken down into subsets of data with common characteristics such as deformation. We will discuss the limits of applicability of the Kusnezov scaling law.

  14. Electric Dipole States and Time Reversal Violation in Nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, N.

    2016-06-01

    The nuclear Schiff moment is essential in the mechanism that induces a parity and time reversal violation in the atom. In this presentation we explore theoretically the properties and systematics of the isoscalar dipole in nuclei with the emphasis on the low-energy strength and the inverse energy weighted sum which determines the Schiff moment. We also study the influence of the isovector dipole strength distribution on the Schiff moment. The influence of a large neutron excess in nuclei is examined. The centroid energies of the isoscalar giant resonance (ISGDR) and the overtone of the isovector giant dipole resonance (OIVGDR) are given for a range of nuclei.

  15. Decay of Isoscalar Electric Giant Resonances in MAGNESIUM-24 and CALCIUM-40.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwarts, Frederik

    1983-01-01

    This dissertation describes an experimental investigation of the decay properties of the ('24)Mg and ('40)Ca nuclei in the excitation energy region from about 10 MeV to 25 MeV (the giant resonance region). The states in this region were populated by means of inelastic scattering of 120 MeV alpha particles. The scattered alpha particles were detected with a magnetic spectrograph at an angle for which the cross section for excitation of 2('+) (quadrupole) and 0('+) (monopole) states has a maximum. Due to the high resolution of the spectrograph the excitation energy of the states in the mother nuclei could be determined accurately. The decay of these states was studied by means of a coincidence experiment where the decay products, protons and alpha particles at low energy (less than 25 MeV), were detected in coincidence with the inelastically scattered alpha particles. Since this measurement is kinematically complete, the excitation energy of the daughter nuclei could be determined, as well. The angular correlation of the decay products, in particular of the alpha decay to the ground state, is typical for the spin and parity of the excited state in the mother nucleus. Most of the strength found in the region 10-16 MeV could in this way by proven to be quadrupole strength, in agreement with other experiments. However, also some monopole strength has been found (8%-20% of the energy weighted sumrule strength (EWSR) in ('24)Mg and 4%-15% EWSR in ('40)Ca). For an excitation energy beyond the Q-value of the decay plus the Coulomb barrier the forward backward asymmetry of the angular correlations increases very rapidly for most of the decay channels. This is explained by taking into account the contribution of the quasi-elastic knock -out reactions. In the case of ('24)Mg it is concluded from the shape of the measured spectra that a (coherent) interference of the two processes is present. The probability of the different decay channels as a function of the excitation energy

  16. Capillary-induced giant elastic dipoles in thin nematic films

    PubMed Central

    Jeridi, Haifa; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Othman, Tahar; Blanc, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Directed and true self-assembly mechanisms in nematic liquid crystal colloids rely on specific interactions between microparticles and the topological defects of the matrix. Most ordered structures formed in thin nematic cells are thus based on elastic multipoles consisting of a particle and nearby defects. Here, we report, for the first time to our knowledge, the existence of giant elastic dipoles arising from particles dispersed in free nematic liquid crystal films. We discuss the role of capillarity and film thickness on the dimensions of the dipoles and explain their main features with a simple 2D model. Coupling of capillarity with nematic elasticity could offer ways to tune finely the spatial organization of complex colloidal systems. PMID:26554001

  17. Driving Rabi oscillations at the giant dipole resonance in xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, Stefan; Wang, Daochen; Santra, Robin

    2015-11-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) produce short and very intense light pulses in the XUV and x-ray regimes. We investigate the possibility to drive Rabi oscillations in xenon with an intense FEL pulse by using the unusually large dipole strength of the giant dipole resonance (GDR). The GDR decays within less than 30 as due to its position, which is above the 4 d ionization threshold. We find that intensities around 1018W /cm2 are required to induce Rabi oscillations with a period comparable to the lifetime. The pulse duration should not exceed 100 as because xenon will be fully ionized within a few lifetimes. Rabi oscillations reveal themselves also in the photoelectron spectrum in the form of Autler-Townes splittings extending over several tens of electronvolts.

  18. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F. D.; Hagel, K.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O.; Charity, R. J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R. S.; Simon, R. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    High-energy γ rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of 136Xe+48Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width Γ is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy E*. A saturation at about Γ=10 MeV is observed for E*/A>=1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  19. Pygmy and giant dipole resonances in the nitrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Yan, Yu-Liang; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Xi-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The configuration-interaction shell model with the WBP10 effective interaction has been used to investigate the pygmy and giant dipole resonances in the nitrogen isotopes. Large enhancement of low-lying dipole strength, i.e., pygmy dipole resonances (PDRs), is predicted in the neutron-rich 17,18,19,20N. The nature of the PDRs is analyzed via the transition densities and transition matrix elements. It turns out these PDRs involve a larger amount of excitations between the 2 s 1 d and loosely bound 1 f 2 p shells. Combining with the transition densities, it is concluded that the PDRs in 17,18,19,20N are collective and due to the oscillation between the excess neutrons and the isospin saturated core. The isospin dependence of energy splitting and sum rule of isospin doublets is discussed. The theoretical energy splitting of isospin doublets can significantly deviate from the systematic values when nucleus is far away from the β -stability line. The ratios of T< and T> energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR) are consistently larger than the systematic values, and it is noticed that the calculated EWSR ratio over the systematic ratio increases with increasing isospin almost linearly. We also calculated the photoabsorption cross sections for the nitrogen isotopes. We proposed the normalization factors for 0 -1 ℏ ω and 2 -3 ℏ ω calculations. After the normalization, the shell model has well reproduced the experimental photoabsorption cross sections in N,1514, especially the detailed structure of resonances.

  20. Observation of isoscalar multipole strengths in exotic doubly-magic 56Ni in inelastic α scattering in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, S.; Gibelin, J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Achouri, N. L.; Akimune, H.; Bastin, B.; Boretzky, K.; Bouzomita, H.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Damoy, S.; Delaunay, F.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Fujiwara, M.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Kamalou, O.; Khan, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Lhoutellier, G.; Libin, J. F.; Lukyanov, S.; Mazurek, K.; Najafi, M. A.; Pancin, J.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Perrot, L.; Raabe, R.; Rigollet, C.; Roger, T.; Sambi, S.; Savajols, H.; Senoville, M.; Stodel, C.; Suen, L.; Thomas, J. C.; Vandebrouck, M.; Van de Walle, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance (ISGMR) and the Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance (ISGDR) compression modes have been studied in the doubly-magic unstable nucleus 56Ni. They were measured by inelastic α-particle scattering in inverse kinematics at 50 MeV/u with the MAYA active target at the GANIL facility. The centroid of the ISGMR has been obtained at Ex = 19.1 ± 0.5 MeV. Evidence for the low-lying part of the ISGDR has been found at Ex = 17.4 ± 0.7 MeV. The strength distribution for the dipole mode shows similarity with the prediction from the Hartree-Fock (HF) based random-phase approximation (RPA) [1]. These measurements confirm inelastic α-particle scattering as a suitable probe for exciting the ISGMR and the ISGDR modes in radioactive isotopes in inverse kinematics.

  1. Compilation of giant electric dipole resonances built on excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, A. . E-mail: schiller@nscl.msu.edu; Thoennessen, M.

    2007-07-15

    Giant Electric Dipole Resonance (GDR) parameters for {gamma} decay to excited states with finite spin and temperature are compiled. Over 100 original works have been reviewed and from some 70 of them, about 350 sets of hot GDR parameters for different isotopes, excitation energies, and spin regions have been extracted. All parameter sets have been brought onto a common footing by calculating the equivalent Lorentzian parameters. The current compilation is complementary to an earlier compilation by Samuel S. Dietrich and Barry L. Berman (At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 38 (1988) 199-338) on ground-state photo-neutron and photo-absorption cross sections and their Lorentzian parameters. A comparison of the two may help shed light on the evolution of GDR parameters with temperature and spin. The present compilation is current as of July 2006.

  2. Systematics of Giant Electric Dipole Resonances in Hot, Rotating Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, Katherine; Schiller, Andreas; Thoennessen, Michael

    2006-10-01

    The dependence of hot Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) widths on spin, temperature, and mass is an exciting field of study. In 2001, Kusnezov et al. [1] developed a scaling law to predict the width as a function of these parameters. The law is a reliable description of their data set. Recently, Schiller and Thoennessen [2] prepared a compilation of GDR parameters built on excited states. The scaling law is tested over this larger data set, about five times the number of entries utilized by Kusnezov. Beyond a more detailed study of the dependence of the width on temperature and spin, the compiled data can be broken into subsets with common characteristics. By analyzing subsets of the data, we hope to gain a clearer understanding of the influence of shell effects, deformation, and gating conditions on the GDR width.[0mm] [1] D. Kusnezov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81,42 (1998).[0mm] [2] A. Schiller and M. Thoennessen, nucl-ex/0605004.

  3. Coupled-Channel Models of Direct-Semidirect Capture via Giant-Dipole Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, I. J.; Escher, J. E.; Arbanas, G.

    2014-04-01

    Semidirect capture, a two-step process that excites a giant-dipole resonance followed by its radiative de-excitation, is a dominant process near giant-dipole resonances, that is, for incoming neutron energies within 5-20 MeV. At lower energies such processes may affect neutron capture rates that are relevant to astrophysical nucleosynthesis models. We implement a semidirect capture model in the coupled-channel reaction code Fresco and validate it by comparing the cross section for direct-semidirect capture 208Pb(n,γ)209Pb to experimental data. We also investigate the effect of low-energy electric dipole strength in the pygmy resonance. We use a conventional single-particle direct-semidirect capture code Cupido for comparison. Furthermore, we present and discuss our results for direct-semidirect capture reaction 130Sn(n,γ)131Sn, the cross section of which is known to have a significant effect on nucleosynthesis models.

  4. Coupled-Channel Models of Direct-Semidirect Capture via Giant-Dipole Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I J; Escher, Jutta E; Arbanas, Goran

    2013-01-01

    Semidirect capture, a two-step process that excites a giant-dipole resonance followed by its radiative de-excitation, is a dominant process near giant-dipole resonances, that is, for incoming neutron energies within 5 20 MeV. At lower energies such processes may affect neutron capture rates that are relevant to astrophysical nucleosynthesis models. We implement a semidirect capture model in the coupled-channel reaction code Fresco and validate it by comparing the cross section for direct-semidirect capture 208Pb(n,g)209Pb to experimental data. We also investigate the effect of low-energy electric dipole strength in the pygmy resonance. We use a conventional single-particle direct-semidirect capture code Cupido for comparison. Furthermore, we present and discuss our results for direct-semidirect capture reaction 130Sn(n,g)131Sn, the cross section of which is known to have a significant effect on nucleosynthesis models.

  5. The gamma decay of the giant dipole resonance: from zero to finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, Angela; Camera, Franco

    2016-08-01

    This paper is intended to give a selected and rather brief overview of the work made in the last thirty years to study the properties of the giant dipole resonance focusing in particular on nuclei formed at finite temperatures using heavy ion reactions. The physical problems that are discussed (using examples of particular results) in this paper can be grouped into 3 major topics: (i) the temperature dependence of the GDR width; (ii) the dipole oscillation in reaction dynamics; (iii) the isospin mixing at finite temperature.

  6. Damping Mechanism of the Giant Dipole Resonance in Hot Nuclei with A=130

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Gramegna, F.; Lanchais, A.; Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; Nannini, A.; Bruno, M.; Geraci, E.

    2007-04-01

    The gamma decay of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) in 132Ce nuclei has been measured using the reactions 64Ni (Elab= 300, 400, 500 MeV) + 68Zn and 16O (Elab= 130,250 MeV) + 116Sn. The analysis of the data shows clearly that the GDR width increases steadily with temperature at least up to 4 MeV of the temperature. The data can be well interpreted within the thermal shape fluctuation model.

  7. Investigation of the energy-averaged double transition density of isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, M. L.; Shlomo, S.; Tulupov, B. A.; Urin, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    The particle-hole dispersive optical model, developed recently, is applied to study properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. The energy-averaged strength functions of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone in 208Pb are analyzed. In particular, we analyze the energy-averaged isoscalar monopole double transition density, the key quantity in the description of the hadron-nucleus inelastic scattering, and studied the validity of the factorization approximation using semi classical and microscopic one body transition densities, respectively, in calculating the cross sections for the excitation of isoscalar giant resonances by inelastic alpha scattering.

  8. Simplest photonuclear reactions accompanied by the excitation of isovector giant dipole and quadrupole resonances: Semimicroscopic description

    SciTech Connect

    Tulupov, B. A.; Urin, M. H.

    2012-09-15

    A semimicroscopic approach based on the continuum version of the random-phase approximation (CRPA) and on a semiphenomenological inclusion of the fragmentation effect is applied to describing cross sections for photoabsorption and direct plus semidirect and inverse reactions accompanied by the excitation of isovector giant dipole and quadrupole resonances. In addition to the spinless part of the Landau-Migdal interaction and a partly self-consistent phenomenological mean field of the nucleus, that version of the approach which is used here takes into account isovector separable velocity-dependent forces, as well as the effect of the fragmentation shift of the giant-resonance energy. The results obtained by calculating various features of the aforementioned cross sections for a number of magic and semimagic medium-mass nuclei are compared with respective experimental data.

  9. Photodisintegration of heavy nuclei in the energy region above the giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ermakov, A. N.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Makarenko, I. V. Orlin, V. N.

    2010-05-15

    Experimental data on yields of multiparticle photonuclear reactions (involving the emission of up to seven neutrons from the nucleus involved) on {sup 197}Au, {sup 203,205}Tl, and {sup 209}Bi nuclei in the region extending from the giant dipole resonance to an energy of 67.7 MeV are presented. These data are compared with the results of modern theoretical calculations that take into account both the excitation of a giant dipole resonance (GDR) in a nucleus and the photodisintegration of quasideutrons (QD) in it. By and large, experimental data confirm the results of theoretical calculations-that is, only upon taking simultaneously into account both alternative photodisintegration mechanisms (GDR excitation and QD photodisintegration) can one describe these experimental data. The contribution of QD photodisintegration grows with increasing photon energy and neutron multiplicity and becomes dominant for reactions involving the emission of not less than five neutrons from the nucleus being considered. The integrated cross sections for the processes in question were estimated on the basis of simultaneously employing experimental yields of multinucleon photonuclear reactions and the respective cross-section shapes calculated theoretically.

  10. Measurement of isospin mixing at a finite temperature in 80Zr via giant dipole resonance decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, A.; Wieland, O.; Barlini, S.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Casini, G.; Ciemala, M.; Cinausero, M.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Giaz, A.; Gramegna, F.; Kmiecik, M.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Marchi, T.; Mazurek, K.; Meczynski, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Morelli, L.; Myalski, S.; Nannini, A.; Nicolini, R.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Vandone, V.; Vannini, G.

    2011-10-01

    Isospin mixing in the hot compound nucleus 80Zr was studied by measuring and comparing the γ-ray emission from the fusion reactions 40Ca+40Ca at Ebeam=200 MeV and 37Cl+44Ca at Ebeam=153 MeV. The γ yield associated with the giant dipole resonance is found to be different in the two reactions because, in self-conjugate nuclei, the E1 selection rules forbid the decay between states with isospin I=0. The degree of mixing is deduced from statistical-model analysis of the γ-ray spectrum emitted by the compound nucleus 80Zr with the standard parameters deduced from the γ decay of the nucleus 81Rb. The results are used to deduce the zero-temperature value, which is then compared with the latest predictions. The Coulomb spreading width is found to be independent of temperature.

  11. Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Krasznahorkay, A.; Stuhl, L.; Csatlos, M.; Algora, A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    The {gamma}-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) to the isobaric analog state has been measured following the p({sup 124}Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RPA) and turned out to be very sensitive to the neutronskin thickness ({Delta}R{sub pn}). By comparing the theoretical results with the measured one, the {Delta}R{sub pn} value for {sup 124}Sn was deduced to be 0.21 {+-} 0.07 fm, which agrees well with the previous results. The present method offers new possibilities for measuring the neutron-skin thicknesses of very exotic isotopes.

  12. Dipole-dipole-induced giant Goos-Hänchen shift in a photonic crystal doped with quantum dot nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, M.; Solookinejad, G.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.; Hossein Asadpour, Seyyed

    2016-07-01

    The impact of the dipole-dipole interaction on the Goo-Hänchen (GH) shifts in reflected and transmitted lights is investigated. A weak probe beam is incident on a cavity containing the donor and acceptor quantum dots embedded in a nonlinear photonic crystal. We deduced that the GH shifts can be easily adjusted via controlling the corresponding parameters of the system in the presence or absence of dipole-dipole interaction. Our proposed model may be useful to developing the all-optical devices based on photonic materials doped with nanoparticles.

  13. Finite amplitude method applied to the giant dipole resonance in heavy rare-earth nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Kortelainen, Markus; Hinohara, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    Background: The quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), within the framework of nuclear density functional theory (DFT), has been a standard tool to access the collective excitations of atomic nuclei. Recently, the finite amplitude method (FAM) was developed in order to perform the QRPA calculations efficiently without any truncation on the two-quasiparticle model space. Purpose: We discuss the nuclear giant dipole resonance (GDR) in heavy rare-earth isotopes, for which the conventional matrix diagonalization of the QRPA is numerically demanding. A role of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule enhancement factor, connected to the isovector effective mass, is also investigated. Methods: The electric dipole photoabsorption cross section was calculated within a parallelized FAM-QRPA scheme. We employed the Skyrme energy density functional self-consistently in the DFT calculation for the ground states and FAM-QRPA calculation for the excitations. Results: The mean GDR frequency and width are mostly reproduced with the FAM-QRPA, when compared to experimental data, although some deficiency is observed with isotopes heavier than erbium. A role of the TRK enhancement factor in actual GDR strength is clearly shown: its increment leads to a shift of the GDR strength to higher-energy region, without a significant change in the transition amplitudes. Conclusions: The newly developed FAM-QRPA scheme shows remarkable efficiency, which enables one to perform systematic analysis of GDR for heavy rare-earth nuclei. The theoretical deficiency of the photoabsorption cross section could not be improved by only adjusting the TRK enhancement factor, suggesting the necessity of an approach beyond self-consistent QRPA and/or a more systematic optimization of the energy density functional (EDF) parameters.

  14. Excitation and photon decay of giant multipole resonances - the role and future of medium-energy heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.; Horen, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of medium energy heavy ions provides very large cross sections and peak-to-continuum ratios for excitation of giant resonances. For energies above about 50 MeV/nucleon, giant resonances are excited primarily through Coulomb excitation, which is indifferent to isospin, thus providing a good probe for the study of isovector giant resonances. The extremely large cross sections available from heavy ion excitation permit the study of rare decay modes of the photon decay of giant resonances following excitation by 22 and 84 MeV/nucleon /sup 17/O projectiles. The singles results at 84 MeV/nucleon yield peak cross sections for the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance and the isovector giant dipole resonance of approximately 0.8 and 3 barns/sr, respectively. Data on the ground state decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole and isovector giant dipole resonances are presented and compared with calculations. Decays to low-lying excited states are also discussed. Preliminary results from an experiment to isolate the /sup 208/Pb isovector quadrupole resonance using its gamma decay are presented.

  15. Extreme nuclear shapes examined via giant dipole resonance lineshapes in hot light-mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Banerjee, S. R.; De, A.; Gupta, D.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of alpha clustering on nuclear reaction dynamics is investigated using the giant dipole resonance (GDR) lineshape studies in the reactions {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=145,160 MeV) + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=160 MeV) + {sup 27}Al, populating {sup 32}S and {sup 47}V, respectively. The GDR lineshapes from the two systems are remarkably different from each other. Whereas, the non-alpha-like {sup 47}V undergoes Jacobi shape transition and matches exceptionally well with the theoretical GDR lineshape estimated under the framework rotating liquid drop model (RLDM) and thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) signifying shape equilibration, for the alpha cluster {sup 32}S an extended prolate kind of shape is observed. This unusual deformation, seen directly via gamma decay for the first time, is predicted to be due to the formation of orbiting dinuclear configuration or molecular structure of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O in the {sup 32}S superdeformed band.

  16. Giant dipole resonance width in nuclei near Sn at low temperature and high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Srijit; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, Deepak; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Gupta, D.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2008-02-15

    High energy {gamma} rays in coincidence with low energy yrast {gamma} rays have been measured from {sup 113}Sb, at excitation energies of 109 and 122 MeV, formed by bombarding {sup 20}Ne on {sup 93}Nb at projectile energies of 145 and 160 MeV, respectively, to study the role of angular momentum (J) and temperature (T) over giant dipole resonance (GDR) width ({gamma}). The maximum populated angular momenta for fusion were 67({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) and 73({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), respectively, for the above-mentioned beam energies. The high energy photons were detected using a Large Area Modular BaF{sub 2} Detector Array (LAMBDA) along with a 24-element multiplicity filter. After pre-equilibrium corrections, the excitation energy E* was averaged over the decay steps of the compound nucleus (CN). The average values of temperature, angular momentum, CN mass, etc., have been calculated using the statistical model code CASCADE. Using those average values, results show the systematic increase of GDR width with T, which is consistent with Kusnezov parametrization and the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM). The rise of GDR width with temperature also supports the assumptions of adiabatic coupling in the TSFM. But the GDR widths and corresponding reduced plots with J are not consistent with those of the theoretical model at high spins.

  17. The temperature dependence of the width of the giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W.E. |; Bortignon, P.F. |; Broglia, R.A. ||

    1995-12-31

    A systematic study of the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of the giant-dipole resonance (GDR) as a function of temperature for the nuclei {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb confirms the overall theoretical picture of the GDR in hot nuclei; in particular, the role played by large-amplitude thermal fluctuations of the nuclear shape. This is confirmed by the good agreement between theory and experiment achieved over a range of temperatures from 1.25--32 MeV and by the differences in the behavior of the FWHM for {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb, which can be attributed to the presence of strong shell corrections favoring spherical shapes in {sup 208}Pb that are absent in {sup 120}Sn. Finally, the increase in the FWHM over that expected from thermal averaging at temperatures of the order 3.0 MeV is in accordance with the increase expected from the particle evaporation of the compound system.

  18. Temperature dependence of the giant dipole resonance width in 152Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, C.; Mishra, G.; Rhine Kumar, A. K.; Dokania, N.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Kumar, Suresh; Rout, P. C.; Joshi, Sandeep; Arumugam, P.

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the dependence of giant dipole resonance (GDR) width on temperature (T ) and angular momentum (J ), high energy γ -ray spectra were measured in the reaction 28Si+124Sn at E28Si=135 MeV. The J information was deduced from multiplicity of low-energy γ rays. The GDR parameters, namely, the centroid energy and width are extracted using statistical model analysis. The observed variation of the GDR width for T ˜1.2 -1.37 MeV and J ˜20 ℏ -40 ℏ is consistent with the universal scaling given by Kusnezov et al., which is applicable in the liquid-drop regime. The GDR input cross sections extracted from the statistical model best fits are compared with thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) calculations and are found to be in good agreement. The TSFM calculations predominantly favor the noncollective oblate shape, while the statistical model fit with both prolate and oblate shapes describes the data. The present data together with earlier measurements indicate a very slow variation of the GDR width for T ˜1.2 to 1.5 MeV. The observed trend is well explained by the TSFM calculations, although the calculated values are ˜4 %-13% higher than the data.

  19. Thermal shape fluctuation model study of the giant dipole resonance in 152Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhine Kumar, A. K.; Arumugam, P.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the hot and rotating nucleus 152Gd within the framework of the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) built on the microscopic-macroscopic calculations of the free energies with a macroscopic approach for the GDR. Our results for GDR cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental values except for a component peaking around 17 MeV, where the data has large uncertainties. Such a component is beyond our description which properly takes care of the splitting of GDR components due to the deformation and Coriolis effects. Around 17 MeV lies the half maximum in experimental cross sections, and hence the extracted GDR widths and deformations (estimated from these widths) turn out to be overestimated and less reliable. Reproducing these widths with empirical formulas could conceal the information contained in the cross sections. Fully microscopic GDR calculations and a more careful look at the data could be useful to understand the GDR component around 17 MeV. We also discuss the occurrence of γ softness in the free energy surfaces of 152Gd and its role on GDR.

  20. Isoscalar and isovector nuclear matter properties and neutron skin thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, H.; Yoshida, S.

    2007-11-01

    Isoscalar and isovector nuclear matter properties are investigated in the Skyrme Hartree-Fock (SHF) and the relativistic mean field (RMF) models. The Skyrme parameters are related analytically to the isoscalar and the isovector nuclear matter properties of the Hamiltonian density. Linear correlations are found among the isovector nuclear matter properties of the Hamiltonian density in both the SHF and the RMF models. We also discovered that the correlations between the isovector properties and the incompressibility K show a singularity at the critical incompressibility Kc=306 MeV. It is shown that the neutron skin thickness gives crucial information about not only for the neutron EOS but also about the isovector nuclear matter properties and about the parameterization of Skyrme interaction. Charge exchange spin-dipole (SD) excitations are proposed to determine the neutron skin thickness model independently.

  1. Measurement of the Am241(γ,n)Am240 reaction in the giant dipole resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Hammond, S. L.; Howell, C. R.; Huibregtse, C.; Hutcheson, A.; Kelley, J. H.; Kwan, E.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Kawano, T.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-11-01

    The photodisintegration cross section of the radioactive nucleus Am241 has been obtained using activation techniques and monoenergetic γ-ray beams from the HIγS facility. The induced activity of Am240 produced via the Am241(γ,n) reaction was measured in the energy interval from 9 to 16 MeV utilizing high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. The experimental data for the Am241(γ,n) reaction in the giant dipole resonance energy region are compared with statistical nuclear-model calculations.

  2. Giant Dipole Resonance in the Hot and Thermalized Ce132 Nucleus: Damping of Collective Modes at Finite Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Crespi, F.; Giussani, A.; Leoni, S.; Mason, P.; Million, B.; Moroni, A.; Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Gramegna, F.; Lanchais, A.; Mastinu, P.; Maj, A.; Brekiesz, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Bruno, M.; Geraci, E.; Vannini, G.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; Nannini, A.; Ordine, A.; Ormand, E.

    2006-07-01

    The γ decay of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the Ce132 compound nucleus with temperature up to ≈4MeV has been measured, using the reaction Ni64+Zn68 at Ebeam=300, 400, and 500 MeV. The γ and charged particles measured in coincidence with recoils are consistent with a fully equilibrated compound nucleus emission. The GDR width, obtained with the statistical model analysis, is found to increase almost linearly with temperature. This increase is rather well reproduced within a model including thermal shape fluctuations and the lifetime of the compound nucleus.

  3. Measurement of the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n){sup 240}Am reaction in the giant dipole resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Tonchev, A. P.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Kwan, E.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Hammond, S. L.; Huibregtse, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Kawano, T.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-11-15

    The photodisintegration cross section of the radioactive nucleus {sup 241}Am has been obtained using activation techniques and monoenergetic {gamma}-ray beams from the HI{gamma}S facility. The induced activity of {sup 240}Am produced via the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n) reaction was measured in the energy interval from 9 to 16 MeV utilizing high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The experimental data for the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n) reaction in the giant dipole resonance energy region are compared with statistical nuclear-model calculations.

  4. Giant dipole resonance built on hot rotating nuclei produced during evaporation of light particles from the 88Mo compound nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Bracco, A.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Carboni, S.; Cinausero, M.; Chbihi, A.; Chiari, M.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fornal, B.; Giaz, A.; Gramegna, F.; Krzysiek, M.; Leoni, S.; Marchi, T.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazumdar, I.; Meczyński, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Morelli, L.; Myalski, S.; Nannini, A.; Nicolini, R.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Prete, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Schmitt, Ch.; Styczeń, J.; Szpak, B.; Valdré, S.; Wasilewska, B.; Wieland, O.; Wieleczko, J. P.; Ziebliński, M.; Dudek, J.; Dinh Dang, N.

    2015-05-01

    High-energy giant dipole resonance (GDR) γ rays were measured following the decay of the hot, rotating compound nucleus of 88Mo, produced at excitation energies of 124 and 261 MeV. The reaction 48Ti + 40Ca at 300 and 600 MeV bombarding energies has been used. The data were analyzed using the statistical model Monte Carlo code gemini++. It allowed extracting the giant dipole resonance parameters by fitting the high-energy γ -ray spectra. The extracted GDR widths were compared with the available data at lower excitation energy and with theoretical predictions based on (i) The Lublin-Strasbourg drop macroscopic model, supplemented with thermal shape fluctuations analysis, and (ii) The phonon damping model. The theoretical predictions were convoluted with the population matrices of evaporated nuclei from the statistical model gemini++. Also a comparison with the results of a phenomenological expression based on the existing systematics, mainly for lower temperature data, is presented and discussed. A possible onset of a saturation of the GDR width was observed around T =3 MeV.

  5. Probing nuclear shapes close to the fission limit with the giant dipole resonance in {sup 216}Rn

    SciTech Connect

    Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Brekiesz, M.; Krolas, W.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Million, B.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Leoni, S.; Wieland, O.; Brambilla, S.; Herskind, B.; Kicinska-Habior, M.; Dubray, N.; Dudek, J.; Schunck, N.

    2004-12-01

    The gamma-ray decay of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the compound nucleus {sup 216}Rn formed with the reaction {sup 18}O+{sup 198}Pt at the bombarding energy of 96 MeV was investigated. High-energy gamma-ray spectra in coincidence with both prompt and delayed low-energy transitions were measured. The obtained GDR width at the average temperature {approx_equal}1 MeV was found to be larger than that at T=0 MeV and to be approximately constant as a function of spin. The measured width value of 7 MeV is found to be consistent with the predictions based on calculations of the nuclear shape distribution using the newest approach for the treatment of the fission barrier within the liquid drop model. The present study is the first investigation of the giant dipole resonance width from the fusion-evaporation decay channel in this nuclear mass range.

  6. Information Content of the Low-Energy Electric Dipole Strength: Correlation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent experiments on the electric dipole (E1) polarizability in heavy nuclei have stimulated theoretical interest in the low-energy electric dipole strength, both isovector and isoscalar. Purpose: We study the information content carried by the electric dipole strength with respect to isovector and isoscalar indicators characterizing bulk nuclear matter and finite nuclei. To separate isoscalar and isovector modes, and low-energy strength and giant resonances, we analyze the E1 strength as a function of the excitation energy E and momentum transfer q. Methods: We use the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy density functionals, augmented by the random phase approximation, to compute the E1 strength and covariance analysis to assess correlations between observables. Calculations are performed for the spherical, doubly magic nuclei 208Pb and 132Sn. Results: We demonstrate that E1 transition densities in the low-energy region below the giant dipole resonance exhibit appreciable state dependence and multinodal structures, which are fingerprints of weak collectivity. The correlation between the accumulated low-energy strength and the symmetry energy is weak, and dramatically depends on the energy cutoff assumed. On the other hand, a strong correlation is predicted between isovector indicators and the accumulated isovector strength at E around 20 MeV and momentum transfer q 0.65 fm 1. Conclusions: Momentum- and coordinate-space patterns of the low-energy dipole modes indicate a strong fragmentation into individual particle-hole excitations. The global measure of low-energy dipole strength correlates poorly with the nuclear symmetry energy and other isovector characteristics. Consequently, our results do not support the suggestion that there exists a collective pygmy dipole resonance, which is a strong indicator of nuclear isovector properties. By considering nonzero values of momentum transfer, one can isolate individual

  7. Isoscalar meson spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, David Richards, Christopher Thomas, Balint Joo, Michael Peardon

    2011-06-01

    We extract to high statistical precision an excited spectrum of single-particle isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD, including states of high spin and, for the first time, light exotic JPC isoscalars. The use of a novel quark field construction has enabled us to overcome the long-standing challenge of efficiently including quark-annihilation contributions. Hidden-flavor mixing angles are extracted and while most states are found to be close to ideally flavor mixed, there are examples of large mixing in the pseudoscalar and axial sectors in line with experiment. The exotic JPC isoscalar states appear at a mass scale comparable to the exotic isovector states.

  8. Giant dipole resonance in 88Mo from phonon damping model strength functions averaged over temperature and angular momentum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh Dang, N.; Ciemala, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.

    2013-05-01

    The line shapes of giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the decay of the compound nucleus 88Mo, which is formed after the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ti + 40Ca at various excitation energies E* from 58 to 308 MeV, are generated by averaging the GDR strength functions predicted within the phonon damping model (PDM) using the empirical probabilities for temperature and angular momentum. The average strength functions are compared with the PDM strength functions calculated at the mean temperature and mean angular momentum, which are obtained by averaging the values of temperature and angular momentum using the same temperature and angular momentum probability distributions, respectively. It is seen that these two ways of generating the GDR linear line shape yield very similar results. It is also shown that the GDR width approaches a saturation at angular momentum J≥ 50 ℏ at T=4 MeV and at J≥ 70 ℏ at any T.

  9. TESTING CONVECTIVE-CORE OVERSHOOTING USING PERIOD SPACINGS OF DIPOLE MODES IN RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Montalban, J.; Noels, A.; Dupret, M.-A.; Scuflaire, R.; Miglio, A.; Ventura, P.

    2013-04-01

    Uncertainties on central mixing in main-sequence (MS) and core He-burning (He-B) phases affect key predictions of stellar evolution such as late evolutionary phases, chemical enrichment, ages, etc. We propose a test of the extension of extra-mixing in two relevant evolutionary phases based on period spacing ({Delta}P) of solar-like oscillating giants. From stellar models and their corresponding adiabatic frequencies (respectively, computed with ATON and LOSC codes), we provide the first predictions of the observable {Delta}P for stars in the red giant branch and in the red clump (RC). We find (1) a clear correlation between {Delta}P and the mass of the helium core (M{sub He}); the latter in intermediate-mass stars depends on the MS overshooting, and hence it can be used to set constraints on extra-mixing during MS when coupled with chemical composition; and (2) a linear dependence of the average value of the asymptotic period spacing (({Delta}P){sub a}) on the size of the convective core during the He-B phase. A first comparison with the inferred asymptotic period spacing for Kepler RC stars also suggests the need for extra-mixing during this phase, as evinced from other observational facts.

  10. Excited light isoscalar mesons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas

    2011-07-01

    I report a recent lattice QCD calculation of an excited spectrum of light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now proved challenging for lattice QCD. With novel techniques we extract an extensive spectrum with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and, for the first time, light isoscalars with exotic quantum numbers. In addition, the hidden flavour content of these mesons is determined, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I comment on future prospects including applications to the study of resonances.

  11. Giant Dipole Resonance in the hot and thermalized 132Ce nucleus: damping of collective modes at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wieland, O; Bracco, A; Camera, F; Benzoni, G; Blasi, N; Brambilla, S; Crespi, F; Giussani, A; Leoni, S; Million, B; Moroni, A; Barlini, S; Kravchuk, V L; Gramegna, F; Lanchais, A; Mastinu, P; Maj, A; Brekiesz, M; Kmiecik, M; Bruno, M; Geraci, E; Vannini, G; Casini, G; Chiari, M; Nannini, A; Ordine, A; Ormand, W E

    2006-06-16

    The {gamma} decay of the Giant Dipole Resonance in the {sup 132}Ce compound nucleus with temperature up to {approx} 4 MeV has been measured. The symmetric {sup 64}Ni + {sup 68}Zn at E{sub beam} = 300, 400, 500 MeV and the asymmetric reaction {sup 16}O + {sup 116}Sn at E{sub beam} = 130, 250 MeV have been investigated. Light charged particles and {gamma} rays have been detected in coincidence with the recoiling compound system. In the case of the mass symmetric {sup 64}Ni induced reaction the {gamma} and charged particle spectral shapes are found to be consistent with the emission from a fully equilibrated compound nuclei and the GDR parameters are extracted from the data using a statistical model analysis. The GDR width is found to increase almost linear with temperature. This increase is rather well reproduced within a model which includes both the thermal fluctuation of the nuclear shape and the lifetime of the compound nucleus.

  12. Role of deformation on giant resonances within the quasiparticle random-phase approximation and the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, S.; Goutte, H.

    2008-04-15

    Fully consistent axially-symmetric-deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) calculations have been performed, in which the same Gogny D1S effective force has been used for both the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov mean field and the QRPA approaches. Giant resonances calculated in deformed {sup 26-28}Si and {sup 22-24}Mg nuclei as well as in the spherical {sup 30}Si and {sup 28}Mg isotopes are presented. Theoretical results for isovector-dipole and isoscalar monopole, quadrupole, and octupole responses are presented and the impact of the intrinsic nuclear deformation is discussed.

  13. Measurement of the Isoscalar Monopole Response in the Neutron-Rich Nucleus Ni68

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Gibelin, J.; Khan, E.; Achouri, N. L.; Baba, H.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Colò, G.; Delaunay, F.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Keeley, N.; Mittig, W.; Pancin, J.; Raabe, R.; Roger, T.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thomas, J. C.

    2014-07-01

    The isoscalar monopole response has been measured in the unstable nucleus Ni68 using inelastic alpha scattering at 50A MeV in inverse kinematics with the active target MAYA at GANIL. The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) centroid was determined to be 21.1±1.9 MeV and indications for a soft monopole mode are provided for the first time at 12.9±1.0 MeV. Analysis of the corresponding angular distributions using distorted-wave-born approximation with random-phase approximation transition densities indicates that the L =0 multipolarity dominates the cross section for the ISGMR and significantly contributes to the low-energy mode. The L=0 part of this low-energy mode, the soft monopole mode, is dominated by neutron excitations. This demonstrates the relevance of inelastic alpha scattering in inverse kinematics in order to probe both the ISGMR and isoscalar soft modes in neutron-rich nuclei.

  14. Light Charged Particles Emission and the Giant Dipole Resonance in Highly Excited Ce Nucleus Formed in Reactions with Different Mass Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.; Gramegna, F.; Airoldi, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Brekiesz, M.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; D'Agostino, M.; De Sanctis, J.; Geraci, E.; Kmiecik, M.; Lanchais, A.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Mastinu, P. F.; Million, B.; Moroni, A.; Nannini, A.; Ordine, A.; Sacchi, R.; Vannini, G.

    2006-08-01

    Recent measurements have been performed at the National Laboratoty of Legnaro using mass-symmetric (400, 500 MeV 64Ni + 68Zn) and mass-asymmetric (250 MeV 16O + 116Sn) entrance channel reactions to form 132Ce compound nucleus at different excitation energies (E*=150, 200 and 200 MeV, respectively). The decay of the composite system has been followed studying the γ-rays and Light Charged Particles (LCP) spectra emitted in coincidence with the Evaporation Residues (ER). In this way the emission mechanism of the LCP, depending on the mass-asymmetry at the entrance channel and on the projectile energy, and the results of the Full Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) of the Giant Dipole Resonance as a function of the nuclear temperature have been studied.

  15. Measurement of the Isoscalar Monopole Response in the Neutron-Rich Nucleus 68Ni using the Active Target MAYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Gibelin, J.; Khan, E.; Achouri, N. L.; Baba, H.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Colò, G.; Delaunay, F.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Keeley, N.; Mittig, W.; Pancin, J.; Raabe, R.; Roger, T.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thomas, J. C.

    We report the measurement of the isoscalar monopole strength in the unstable nucleus 68Ni using inelastic alpha scattering at 50A MeV in inverse kinematics. This experiment has been performed at GANIL with LISE spectrometer using a dedicated detector: the active target MAYA. A part of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) has been measured at 21.1 ± 1.9 MeV and indications for a soft monopole mode are provided for the first time at 12.9 ± 1.0 MeV. Distorted-wave born approximation (DWBA) with random-phase approximation (RPA) transition densities have been used to study angular distribution and indicate that the L = 0 multipolarity dominates the cross-section for the ISGMR, and significantly contributes to the soft mode.

  16. Exact solution of the Isovector-Isoscalar pairing interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Errea, B.; Lerma, S.

    2010-04-26

    A Richardson-Gaudin exactly-solvable model is presented for an isovector-isoscalar pairing interaction. Exact results show the existence of quartet correlations at T = 0, that disappear at higher T where two condensates of identical particles coexist.

  17. Nature of low-lying electric dipole resonance excitations in 74Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, D.; Wiedeking, M.; Lanza, E. G.; Litvinova, E.; Vitturi, A.; Bark, R. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bvumbi, S.; Bucher, T. D.; Daub, B. H.; Dinoko, T. S.; Easton, J. L.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Jones, P.; Kheswa, B. V.; Khumalo, N. A.; Larsen, A. C.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Majola, S. N. T.; Masiteng, L. P.; Nchodu, M. R.; Ndayishimye, J.; Newman, R. T.; Noncolela, S. P.; Orce, J. N.; Papka, P.; Pellegri, L.; Renstrøm, T.; Roux, D. G.; Schwengner, R.; Shirinda, O.; Siem, S.

    2016-08-01

    Isospin properties of dipole excitations in 74Ge are investigated using the (α ,α'γ ) reaction and compared to (γ ,γ' ) data. The results indicate that the dipole excitations in the energy region of 6 to 9 MeV adhere to the scenario of the recently found splitting of the region of dipole excitations into two separated parts: one at low energy, being populated by both isoscalar and isovector probes, and the other at high energy, excited only by the electromagnetic probe. Relativistic quasiparticle time blocking approximation (RQTBA) calculations show a reduction in the isoscalar E 1 strength with an increase in excitation energy, which is consistent with the measurement.

  18. Study of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysiek, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Fornal, B.; Grȩbosz, J.; Mazurek, K.; Mȩczyński, W.; Ziȩbliński, M.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; De Angelis, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Gottardo, A.; Lenzi, S.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C.; Gadea, A.; Huyuk, T.; Barrientos, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Geibel, K.; Hess, H.; Reiter, P.; Steinbach, T.; Wiens, A.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.

    2014-05-01

    The main aim of this study was a deeper understanding of the nuclear structure properties of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce, excited via inelastic scattering of weakly bound 17O projectiles. An important aim was to investigate the ‘splitting’ of the PDR into two parts: a low-energy isoscalar component dominated by neutron-skin oscillations and a higher-energy component lying on the tail of the giant dipole resonance of a rather isovector character. This was already observed for this nucleus, investigated in (α, α‧) and (γ, γ‧) experiments. The experiment was performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy. Inelastic scattering of 17O ion beam at 20 MeV A-1 was used to excite the resonance modes in the 140Ce target. Gamma-rays were registered by five triple clusters of AGATA-Demonstrator and nine large volume scintillators (LaBr3). The scattered 17O ions were identified by two ΔE - E Si telescopes of the TRACE array mounted inside the scattering chamber. The telescopes consisted of two segmented Si-pad detectors, each of 60 pixels. Very preliminary data have shown a strong domination of the E1 transitions in the ‘pygmy’ region with a character more similar to the one obtained in alpha scattering experiment.

  19. Pygmy dipole resonance and dipole polarizability in {sup 90}Zr

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, C.; Tamii, A.; Shima, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Suzuki, T.; Fujita, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Okamoto, A.; Kondo, T.; Nakada, H.; Kawabata, T.; Fujita, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Shimbara, Y.; Nagashima, M.; Sakuda, M.; Mori, T.; and others

    2014-05-02

    Electric dipole (E1) reduced transition probability B(E1) of {sup 90}Zr was obtained by the inelastic proton scattering near 0 degrees using a 295 MeV proton beam and multipole decomposition analysis of the angular distribution by the distorted-wave Born approximation with the Hartree-Fock plus random-phase approximation model and inclusion of El Coulomb excitation, and the E1 strength of the pygmy dipole resonance was found in the vicinity of the neutron threshold in the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance. Using the data, we plan to determine the precise dipole polarizability α{sub D} which is defined as an inversely energy-weighted sum value of the elecrric dipole strength. The dipole polarizability is expected to constrain the symmetry energy term of the neutron matter equation of state. Thus systematical measurement of the dipole polarizability is important.

  20. Landau zeroth-sound and nuclear giant resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutinsky, V.; Magner, A.; Denisov, V.

    1984-10-01

    Analytical solution for the zeroth-sound in the infinite matter is used as a basis for constructing the distribution functions in finite-size nuclei. Simple characteristic equation is obtained which determines frequencies of isoscalar nuclear giant resonances due to the zeroth-sound modes coupled to the surface distortions.

  1. On the nature of the Dipole Pygmy Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, E. G.; Vitturi, A.; Andres, M. V.; Catara, F.; Gambacurta, D.

    2011-10-28

    The nature of the low-lying dipole states in neutron-rich nuclei, often associated to the Pygmy Dipole Resonance, has been investigated. This has been done by describing them within the Hartree-Fock plus RPA formalism. The analysis shows that they are not of collective nature although many particle-hole configurations participate to their formation. Taking advantage of their strong isospin mixing one can envisage combined reaction processes involving the Coulomb and different mixtures of isoscalar and isovector nuclear interactions in order to provide more hints to unveil the characteristic features of these states.

  2. Analogs of the giant dipole and spin-dipole resonances in {sup 4}He and in {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li studied by the {sup 4}He,{sup 6,7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{gamma}) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, S.; Matsumoto, E.; Fushimi, K.; Hayami, R.; Kawasuso, H.; Yasuda, K.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Ikemizu, H.; Asaji, S.; Ishida, T.; Kudoh, T.; Sagara, K.; Fujiwara, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Kawase, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Oota, T.; Yosoi, M.; Greenfield, M. B.

    2008-07-15

    We studied analogs of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) in {sup 4}He and in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li via the ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{gamma}) reactions on {sup 4}He, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 7}Li at an incident energy of 455 MeV and at a scattering angle of 0 deg. by measuring spin-nonflip and spin-flip spectra. The reaction Q-values for the analogs of the GDR and SDR in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li were found to be more negative than those in {sup 4}He by 2.0{+-}0.5 MeV. The ratios of the cross section for the analog of the GDR to that for the analog of the SDR in {sup 4}He and in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li were found to be the same within errors, 0.5{+-}0.1. The cross sections for the analogs of the GDR as well as those for the analogs of the SDR in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li were 0.6{approx}0.8 times smaller than those in {sup 4}He. These results suggest that excitations of {alpha} clusters embedded in nuclei are suppressed as compared with excitations of free {alpha} particles.

  3. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-11-18

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the η, η' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identifiedmore » as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq¯-like spectrum.« less

  4. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-11-18

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the η, η' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identified as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq¯-like spectrum.

  5. Scalar-isoscalar states in the large-N{sub c} Regge approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz Arriola, Enrique; Broniowski, Wojciech

    2010-03-01

    Scalar-isoscalar states (J{sup PC}=0{sup ++}) are investigated within the large-N{sub c} Regge approach. We elaborate on the consequences of including the lightest f{sub 0}(600) scalar-isoscalar state into such an analysis, where the position of f{sub 0}(600) fits very well into the pattern of the radial Regge trajectory. Furthermore, we point out that the pion and nucleon spin-0 gravitational form factors, recently measured on the lattice, provide valuable information on the low-mass spectrum of the scalar-isoscalar states on the basis of the scalar-meson dominance in the spin-0 channel. Through the fits to these data we find m{sub {sigma}=}450-600 MeV. We compare the predictions of various fits and methods. An analysis of the QCD condensates in the two-point correlators provides further constraints on the parameters of the scalar-isoscalar sector. We find that a simple two-state model suggests a meson nature of f{sub 0}(600), and a glueball nature of f{sub 0}(980), which naturally explains the ratios of various coupling constants. Finally, we note that the fine-tuned condition of the vanishing dimension-two condensate in the Regge approach with infinitely many scalar-isoscalar states yields a reasonable value for the mass of the lightest glueball state.

  6. Dynamic dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, David J.

    2011-08-01

    We study stationary but time-dependent ideal (point) electric and magnetic dipoles, both the conventional type consisting of electric charges and currents and the hypothetical kind composed of magnetic monopoles and their currents. We derive their potentials and fields, and calculate the energy, momentum, and angular momentum they radiate.

  7. Fission decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 24Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawitzki, S.; Pade, D.; Gonsior, B.; Uhlhorn, C. D.; Brandenburg, S.; Harakeh, M. N.; Wilschut, H. W.

    1986-07-01

    The 24Mg(α, α‧) 12C+ 12C reaction was studied by measuring 12C fragments in coincidence with inelastically scattered α-particles at Eα = 120 MeV. Both 12C fragments were identified using the ΔE - E technique. The measured angular correlations indicate that the 12C gs+ 12C gs decay channel is dominated by decay of L = 2 strength, which yields an integrated fraction of 0.14% of the E2 EWSR strength in comparison with 22.2% of the E2 EWSR strength observed in singles inelastic α-scattering experiments in the same excitation energy region.

  8. Isoscalar-isovector proton-neutron pairing and quartet condensation in N =Z nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambataro, M.; Sandulescu, N.

    2016-05-01

    We show that the correlations generated in the ground state of N =Z nuclei by the isovector and isoscalar pairing forces can be treated with high precision as a condensate of alpha-like quartets. To treat these correlations, the quartet condensation model (QCM) is extended to the treatment of spherically symmetric isovector (T =1 ,J =0 ) and isoscalar (T =0 ,J =1 ) pairing forces. Within the QCM, we discuss the competition between T =1 and T =0 pairing correlations in the case of a two-level model and for N =Z nuclei with nucleons moving in the open shells above 16O,40Ca, and 100Sn. We show that, in N =Z systems, isovector and isoscalar proton-neutron pairing correlations always coexist.

  9. Dipole Resonances in 4He

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, E.; Nakayama, S.; Hayami, R.; Fushimi, K.; Kawasuso, H.; Yasuda, K.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Ikemizu, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Yosoi, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Kawase, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Oota, T.; Sagara, K.; Kudoh, T.; Asaji, S.; Ishida, T.; Tanaka, M.

    2007-02-26

    We investigated the analogs of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) of 4He by using the 4He(7Li,7Be) reaction at an incident energy of 455 MeV and at forward scattering angles. The {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=1 spectra for 4He were obtained by measuring the 0.43-MeV 7Be {gamma}-ray in coincidence with the scattered 7Be. From the {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=1 spectra thus obtained, the strength distributions of the GDR and SDR in 4He can be derived and the results are compared with the previous data.

  10. New Insight into the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in Stable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2008-11-11

    Two examples of recent work on the structure of low-energy electric dipole modes are presented. The first part discusses the systematics of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in stable tin isotopes deduced from high-resolution ({gamma},{gamma}') experiments. These help to distinguish between microscopic QRPA calculations based on either a relativistic or a nonrelativistic mean-field description, predicting significantly different properties of the PDR. The second part presents attempts to unravel the structure of dipoles modes at energies below the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in {sup 208}Pb with a high-resolution measurement of the (p-vector,p-vector') reaction under 0 deg.

  11. Scalar-isoscalar states, gravitational form factors, and dimension-2 condensates in a large-N{sub c} Regge approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz Arriola, Enrique; Broniowski, Wojciech

    2011-05-23

    Scalar-isoscalar states (J{sup PC} = 0{sup ++}) are analyzed within the large-N{sub c} Regge approach. We find that the lightest f{sub 0}(600) scalar-isoscalar state fits very well into the pattern of the radial Regge trajectory. We confirm the obtained mass values from an analysis of the pion and nucleon spin-0 gravitational form factors, recently measured on the lattice. We find that a simple two-state model suggests a meson nature of f{sub 0}(600), and a glueball nature of f{sub 0}(980), which naturally explains the ratios of various coupling constants. Finally, matching to the OPE requires a fine-tuned mass condition of the vanishing dimension-2 condensate in the Regge approach with infinitely many scalar-isoscalar states.

  12. Isoscalar monopole resonance of the alpha particle: a prism to nuclear Hamiltonians.

    PubMed

    Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir; Leidemann, Winfried; Orlandini, Giuseppina

    2013-01-25

    We present an ab initio study of the isoscalar monopole excitations of (4)He using different realistic nuclear interactions, including modern effective field theory potentials. In particular we concentrate on the transition form factor F(M) to the narrow 0(+) resonance close to threshold. F(M) exhibits a strong potential model dependence, and can serve as a kind of prism to distinguish among different nuclear force models. Compared to the measurements obtained from inelastic electron scattering off ^{4}He, one finds that the state-of-the-art theoretical transition form factors are at variance with experimental data, especially in the case of effective field theory potentials. We discuss some possible reasons for such a discrepancy, which still remains a puzzle.

  13. Ratio of Isoscalar to Isovector Core Polarization Contributions to Magnetic Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Shadow; Zamick, Larry; Sharon, Yitzhak

    2010-11-01

    We found that large scale calculations of isoscalar magnetic moments of odd-odd N=Z nuclei yielded results remarkably similar to those of simple single j calculations. To understand why we use a delta interaction times (1+xPs) where Ps is the spin exchange operator, to calculate the ratio IS/IV of the core polarization contributions to the magnetic moments. The spin exchange contributes a factor (1-2x) to this ratio. A popular choice is x=1/3 for which (1-2x) is also 1/3. Another contribution comes from the fact that the coupling of j=l+1/2 to j'=l-1/2 via the magnetic moment operator is proportional to (gs-gl). The IS values are gl=0.5 gs=0.88; the IV values are 0.5 and 4.71. This yields a (gs-gl) ratio of 0.09 which together with the 1/3 from spin exchange tells us that the isoscalar core polarization is a mere 3% of isovector. If we further divide by single j values to get effective charge corrections then the ration IS/IV ends up being 0.06 (or 6%). We thus gain understanding of the resuts in ref [1] of the near equality of large scale and single j results for IS moments.[4pt] [1] S.Yeager, S.J.Q. Robinson, L.Zamick and Y.Y.Sharon, EPL 88, 52001 (2009)

  14. Are there nuclear structure effects on the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and nuclear incompressibility near A ∼ 90?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. K.; Garg, U.; Howard, K. B.; Matta, J. T.; Şenyiğit, M.; Itoh, M.; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Adachi, S.; Fujiwara, M.; Iwamoto, C.; Tamii, A.; Akimune, H.; Kadono, C.; Matsuda, Y.; Nakahara, T.; Furuno, T.; Kawabata, T.; Tsumura, M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.

    2016-09-01

    "Background-free" spectra of inelastic α-particle scattering have been measured at a beam energy of 385 MeV in 90,92Zr and 92Mo at extremely forward angles, including 0°. The ISGMR strength distributions for the three nuclei coincide with each other, establishing clearly that nuclear incompressibility is not influenced by nuclear shell structure near A ∼ 90 as was claimed in recent measurements.

  15. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  16. Changes in earth's dipole.

    PubMed

    Olson, Peter; Amit, Hagay

    2006-11-01

    The dipole moment of Earth's magnetic field has decreased by nearly 9% over the past 150 years and by about 30% over the past 2,000 years according to archeomagnetic measurements. Here, we explore the causes and the implications of this rapid change. Maps of the geomagnetic field on the core-mantle boundary derived from ground-based and satellite measurements reveal that most of the present episode of dipole moment decrease originates in the southern hemisphere. Weakening and equatorward advection of normal polarity magnetic field by the core flow, combined with proliferation and growth of regions where the magnetic polarity is reversed, are reducing the dipole moment on the core-mantle boundary. Growth of these reversed flux regions has occurred over the past century or longer and is associated with the expansion of the South Atlantic Anomaly, a low-intensity region in the geomagnetic field that presents a radiation hazard at satellite altitudes. We address the speculation that the present episode of dipole moment decrease is a precursor to the next geomagnetic polarity reversal. The paleomagnetic record contains a broad spectrum of dipole moment fluctuations with polarity reversals typically occurring during dipole moment lows. However, the dipole moment is stronger today than its long time average, indicating that polarity reversal is not likely unless the current episode of moment decrease continues for a thousand years or more. PMID:16915369

  17. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  18. Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    Beyond the inner solar system's terrestrial planets, with their compact orbits and rock -metal compositions, lies the realm of the outer solar system and the giant planets. Here the distance between planets jumps by an order of magnitude relative to the spacing of the terrestrial planets, and the masses of the giants are one to two orders of magnitude greater than Venus and Earth - the largest terrestrial bodies. Composition changes as well, since the giant planets are largely gaseous, with inferred admixtures of ice, rock, and metal, while the terrestrial planets are essentially pure rock and metal. The giant planets have many more moons than do the terrestrial planets, and the range of magnetic field strengths is larger in the outer solar system. It is the giant planets that sport rings, ranging from the magnificent ones around Saturn to the variable ring arcs of Neptune. Were it not for the fact that only Earth supports abundant life (with life possibly existing, but not proved to exist, in the martian crust and liquid water regions underneath the ice of Jupiter's moon Europa), the terrestrial planets would pale in interest next to the giant planets for any extraterrestrial visitor.

  19. Soft dipole resonance and halo structure of 11Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, Rituparna

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of the nuclear halo in rare isotopes has ushered a new era in nuclear science breaking the boundaries of conventional concepts. The halo properties elucidate new features that till date remain a challenge to decipher from fundamental principles. Our knowledge on the halo is still gradually unfolding and reaching new levels of precision as efforts continue towards new experimental developments. In recent times, low-energy reactions in inverse kinematics have become possible providing a wealth of new structure information. In this presentation we will introduce a new reaction spectroscopy facility, IRIS, with a novel thin windowless solid H2/D2 target for studying transfer and inelastic scattering reactions of rare isotopes with very low yields. It was postulated that the loosely bound halo of two neutrons may lead to a core-halo oscillation resulting in dipole resonance(s) at very low excitation energy, called soft dipole resonance. Despite decades of search for this new phenomenon using various techniques, such as, no firm conclusion was reached. The presentation will discuss new results from IRIS that shows evidence of a soft dipole resonance state and further unveils its isoscalar character. New results of neutron transfer from 11Li will be presented showing resonance state(s) in the neutron unbound 10Li subsystem hence facilitating a description of the wavefunction of 11Li. NSERC, Canada Foundation for Innovation, Nova Scotia Research and Innovation Trust, grant-in-aid program of the Japanese government under Contract No. 23224008, US DOE Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Symmetry of Isoscalar Matrix Elements and Systematics in the sd and beginning of fp shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orce, J. N.; Petkov, P.; Velázquez, V.; McKay, C. J.; Lesher, S. R.; Choudry, S.; Mynk, M.; Linnemann, A.; Jolie, J.; von Brentano, P.; Werner, V.; Yates, S. W.; McEllistrem, M. T.

    2006-03-01

    A careful determination of the lifetime and measurement of the branching ratio for decay of the first 2T=1+ state in 42Sc has allowed an accurate experimental test of charge independence in the A = 42 isobaric triplet. A lifetime of 69(17) fs was measured at the University of Kentucky, while relative intensities for the 975 keV and 1586 keV transitions depopulating the first 2T=1+ state have been determined at the University of Cologne as 100(1) and 8(1), respectively. Both measurements give an isoscalar matrix element, M0, of 6.4(9) (W.u.)1/2. This result confirms charge independence for the A=42 isobaric triplet. Shell model calculations have been carried out for understanding the global trend of M0 values for A = 4n + 2 isobaric triplets ranging from A = 18 to A = 42. The 21 (T=1)+ → 01 (T=1)+ transition energies, reduced transition probabilities and M0 values are reproduced to a high degree of accuracy. The trend of M0 strength along the sd shell is interpreted in terms of the shell structure. Certain discrepancies arise at the extremes of the sd shell, for the A = 18 and A = 38 isobaric triplets, which might be explained in terms of the low valence space at the extremes of the sd shell.

  1. Semihadronic and hadronic decays of ρ0 and ω mesons coherently photoproduced in isoscalar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Swapan

    2016-08-01

    The interference of ρ0 and ω mesons has been studied in the hadronic and leptonic decay channels, i.e., dipion and dilepton decay channels respectively, but this interference has not been studied yet in the semihadronic or semileptonic decay channel, e.g., V →π0γ . V denotes either a ρ0 or ω meson. To look for this interference in the π0γ decay channel as well as the contribution of the ρ meson to the cross section, the correlated π0γ invariant mass distribution spectra are calculated in the photonuclear reaction in the multi-GeV region. It is assumed that these bosons arise in the final state due to the decay of ρ0 and ω mesons which are photoproduced coherently in the isoscalar nucleus. The elementary reaction in the nucleus is considered to proceed as γ N →V N , V →π0γ . The forward propagation of the ρ and ω mesons and the near forward emission of pions are considered, so that they can be described by the eikonal form. The meson-nucleus interactions are evaluated using the t ϱ approximation. Replacing the decay vertex V →π0γ by V →π+π- in the above formalism, it is also used to study the ρ -ω interference in the π+π- decay channel.

  2. Isospin Character of Low-Lying Pygmy Dipole States in Pb208 via Inelastic Scattering of O17 Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Nicolini, R.; Mengoni, D.; Pellegri, L.; Lanza, E. G.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Grebosz, J.; Krzysiek, M.; Mazurek, K.; Zieblinski, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Calore, E.; Cederwall, B.; Charles, L.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Isocrate, R.; Jolie, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Korten, W.; Menegazzo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Sahin, E.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Simpson, J.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2014-07-01

    The properties of pygmy dipole states in Pb208 were investigated using the Pb208(O17, O17'γ) reaction at 340 MeV and measuring the γ decay with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array. Cross sections and angular distributions of the emitted γ rays and of the scattered particles were measured. The results are compared with (γ, γ') and (p, p') data. The data analysis with the distorted wave Born approximation approach gives a good description of the elastic scattering and of the inelastic excitation of the 2+ and 3- states. For the dipole transitions a form factor obtained by folding a microscopically calculated transition density was used for the first time. This has allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states from 4 to 8 MeV.

  3. Dipole Well Location

    1998-08-03

    The problem here is to model the three-dimensional response of an electromagnetic logging tool to a practical situation which is often encountered in oil and gas exploration. The DWELL code provide the electromagnetic fields on the axis of a borehole due to either an electric or a magnetic dipole located on the same axis. The borehole is cylindrical, and is located within a stratified formation in which the bedding planes are not horizontal. The anglemore » between the normal to the bedding planes and the axis of the borehole may assume any value, or in other words, the borehole axis may be tilted with respect to the bedding planes. Additionally, all of the formation layers may have invasive zones of drilling mud. The operating frequency of the source dipole(s) extends from a few Hertz to hundreds of Megahertz.« less

  4. Isovector and isoscalar meson cloud contributions to the nucleon electromagnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, R. |

    1998-01-01

    We have calculated the nucleon form factors G{sub E,M}{sup (p,n)}(q{sup 2}) in the linear {sigma} model to one-meson-loop order plus (two-loop) {gamma}{pi}{pi}{pi} anomaly. The previously derived {gamma}{pi}{pi}{pi} anomaly generally reduces the nucleon radii and produces a shift of the magnetic moments of order 0.1 {mu}{sub N} or less. We present analytical results for G{sub E,M}{sup p,n}(0) which display explicitly their dependence on hadron masses and coupling constants. Analytical results for the radii are also given and the chiral singularities they contain (lnm{sub {pi}} and m{sub {pi}}{sup {minus}1}) are exposed. These come from the {pi}{pi} intermediate state contribution to the form factors and {ital not} from the chiral quark substructure of nucleons or mesons. The leading chiral singularity has a {ital universal} strength while the chiral log (next-to-leading singularity) picks up a model (or approximation) dependence in terms of g{sub A} and the threshold behavior of the {pi}N amplitude A{sup ({minus})}({nu},0). The chiral singularities appear only in the iso{ital vector} nucleon radii {l_angle}r{sub 1,2}{sup 2}{r_angle}{sup I=1}, the leading m{sub {pi}}{sup {minus}1} term appears only in {l_angle}r{sub 2}{sup 2}{r_angle}{sup I=1} due to a peculiar cancellation between two independent form factor combinations {Gamma}{sub 1,3}(q{sup 2}). The isoscalar anomaly {gamma}{pi}{pi}{pi} is finite for m{sub {pi}}{r_arrow}0. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Experiments with Dipole Antennas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Employment of a data-acquisition system for data collection and calculations makes experiments with antennas more convenient and less time consuming. The determined directional patterns of the dipole antennas of different lengths are in reasonable agreement with theory. The enhancement of the signal by using a reflector is demonstrated, and a…

  6. Geometrical Simplification of the Dipole-Dipole Interaction Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocbach, Ladislav; Lubbad, Suhail

    2010-01-01

    Many students meet dipole-dipole potential energy quite early on when they are taught electrostatics or magnetostatics and it is also a very popular formula, featured in encyclopedias. We show that by a simple rewriting of the formula it becomes apparent that, for example, by reorienting the two dipoles, their attraction can become exactly twice…

  7. The pygmy dipole resonance in neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang Hung, Nguyen; Kiet, Hoang Anh Tuan; Duc, Huynh Ngoc; Thi Chuong, Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    The pygmy dipole resonance (PDR), which has been observed via the enhancement of the electric dipole strength E1 of atomic nuclei, is studied within a microscopic collective model. The latter employs the Hartree-Fock (HF) method with effective nucleon-nucleon interactions of the Skyrme types plus the random-phase approximation (RPA). The results of the calculations obtained for various even-even nuclei such as 16-28O, 40-58Ca, 100-120Sn, and 182-218Pb show that the PDR is significantly enhanced when the number of neutrons outside the stable core of the nucleus is increased, that is, in the neutron-rich nuclei. As the result, the relative ratio between the energy weighted sum of the strength of the PDR and that of the GDR (giant dipole resonance) does not exceed 4%. The collectivity of the PDR and GDR states will be also discussed.

  8. Dipole defects in beryl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, B. A.; Cordeiro, R. C.; Blak, A. R.

    2010-11-01

    Dipole defects in gamma irradiated and thermally treated beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18) samples have been studied using the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) technique. TSDC experiments were performed in pink (morganite), green (emerald), blue (aquamarine) and colourless (goshenite) natural beryl. TSDC spectra present dipole peaks at 190K, 220K, 280K and 310K that change after gamma irradiation and thermal treatments. In morganite samples, for thermal treatments between 700K and 1100K, the 280K peak increase in intensity and the band at 220K disappears. An increase of the 280K peak and a decrease of the 190K peak were observed in the TSDC spectra of morganite after a gamma irradiation of 25kGy performed after the thermal treatments. In the case of emerald samples, thermal treatments enhanced the 280K peak and gamma irradiation partially destroyed this band. The goshenite TSDC spectra present only one band at 280K that is not affected either by thermal treatments or by gamma irradiation. All the observed peaks are of dipolar origin because the intensity of the bands is linearly dependent on the polarization field, behaviour of dipole defects. The systematic study, by means of TSDC measurements, of ionizing irradiation effects and thermal treatments in these crystals makes possible a better understanding of the role played by the impurities in beryl crystals.

  9. Fission and dipole resonances in metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T. P.; Billas, I. M. L.; Branz, W.; Heinebrodt, M.; Tast, F.; Malinowski, N.

    1997-06-20

    It is not obvious that metal clusters should behave like atomic nuclei--but they do. Of course the energy and distance scales are quite different. But aside from this, the properties of these two forms of condensed matter are amazingly similar. The shell model developed by nuclear physicists describes very nicely the electronic properties of alkali metal clusters. The giant dipole resonances in the excitation spectra of nuclei have their analogue in the plasmon resonances of metal clusters. Finally, the droplet model describing the fission of unstable nuclei can be successively applied to the fragmentation of highly charged metal clusters. The similarity between clusters and nuclei is not accidental. Both systems consist of fermions moving, nearly freely, in a confined space.

  10. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  11. Giant Dipole Resonance decay of hot rotating 88Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Gramegna, F.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.; Camera, F.

    2014-03-01

    An experiment focusing on study of the properties of hot rotating compound nucleus of 88Mo was performed in LNL Legnaro using 48Ti beam at energies of 300 and 600 MeV on 40Ca target. The compound nucleus was produced at the temperatures of 3 and 4.5 MeV, with angular momentum distribution with lmax > 60 ħ (i.e. exceeding the crtical angular momentum for fission). High-energy gamma rays, measured in coincidence with evaporation residues and alpha particles, were analyzed with the statistical model. The GDR parameters were obtained from the best fit to the data, which allowed investigating an evolution of the GDR width up to high temperatures.

  12. Low-energy dipole excitations in neon isotopes and N=16 isotones within the quasiparticle random-phase approximation and the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, M.; Peru, S.; Dupuis, M.

    2011-03-15

    Low-energy dipole excitations in neon isotopes and N=16 isotones are calculated with a fully consistent axially-symmetric-deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) approach based on Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) states. The same Gogny D1S effective force has been used both in HFB and QRPA calculations. The microscopical structure of these low-lying resonances, as well as the behavior of proton and neutron transition densities, are investigated in order to determine the isoscalar or isovector nature of the excitations. It is found that the N=16 isotones {sup 24}O, {sup 26}Ne, {sup 28}Mg, and {sup 30}Si are characterized by a similar behavior. The occupation of the 2s{sub 1/2} neutron orbit turns out to be crucial, leading to nontrivial transition densities and to small but finite collectivity. Some low-lying dipole excitations of {sup 28}Ne and {sup 30}Ne, characterized by transitions involving the {nu}1d{sub 3/2} state, present a more collective behavior and isoscalar transition densities. A collective proton low-lying excitation is identified in the {sup 18}Ne nucleus.

  13. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    DOEpatents

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  14. Lithium electric dipole polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Puchalski, M.; KePdziera, D.; Pachucki, K.

    2011-11-15

    The electric dipole polarizability of the lithium atom in the ground state is calculated including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections. The obtained result {alpha}{sub E}=164.0740(5) a.u. is in good agreement with the less accurate experimental value of 164.19(1.08) a.u. The small uncertainty of about 3 parts per 10{sup 6} comes from the approximate treatment of quantum electrodynamics corrections. Our theoretical result can be considered as a benchmark for more general atomic structure methods and may serve as a reference value for the relative measurement of polarizabilities of the other alkali-metal atoms.

  15. Possible Effects of a Composite Iso-Scalar Weak Boson in a Left-Right Symmetric Preon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, S.; Sekiguchi, M.

    1991-08-01

    We assume that a fundamental gauge symmetry is never broken, and any short range interactions should be secondary, appearing as residual effects of some fundamental gauge interactions. On this assumption the weak interaction is considered to be a secondary effective one among composite quarks, leptons and weak bosons with respective appropriate preon and/or anti-preon configurations bounded by a new fundamental gauge interaction. In this work, applying a fermion-boson type preon scheme and supposing confinement and a preon line rule (like the OZI-rule) for the confining force, we concentrate to investigate lower mass limit of the additional iso-scalar particle, whose existence is naturally expected in our scheme, permitted by a low energy experiment.

  16. Spherical Rare Earth Magnets And The Dipole-Dipole Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Al J.

    2006-12-01

    Spherical rare earth magnets (SREMs) are useful for teaching fundamental concepts in introductory physics. These applications include kinematics, force and motion, energy, momentum, and their conservation, as well as the traditional areas of basic magnetism, the magnetic field of the earth, and magnetic interactions. One application for upper level undergraduate physics majors is the dipole-dipole interaction. Previous studies have confirmed the validity of the dipole approximation for SREMs. Their spherical shape allows them to combine in ways that readily demonstrate local minima in the potential energy interaction function for multiple dipoles. The potential energy function for the dipole-dipole interaction will be given and will be shown to predict several of the basic stable configurations for 2 and 3 SREM spheres. The relative stability of several of these local potential energy minima will be discussed and the results of tests for their reliability in predicting preferred configurations presented. The use of commercial mathematical analysis software for modeling the dipole-dipole interaction will also be demonstrated.

  17. Dipole-dipole interaction between nanolaser and external atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    We consider the single-emitter nanolaser coupled through dipole-dipole interaction with the external atom placed into the coherent pump field. We show that varying of the coherent pump parameters allows to control the quantum fluctuations of the laser field.

  18. Splitting of the Dipole and Spin Dipole Resonances in Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Sam M.

    2000-10-01

    The response to different neutrino flavors of a supernova neutrino detector based on Pb depends on the position of the spin-dipole resonance(Fuller, Fowler and McLaughlin, Phys. Rev. D59,085005(1999)). In this talk I will present a phenomenolgical model that allows one to extract the splitting of the dipole and spin-dipole resonances from the variation with bombarding energy of the L=1 resonance in (p,n) reactions. This model has been applied previously to the Zr isotopes (Sam M. Austin, Phys. Rev. C, submitted). The dipole splitting for ^208Pb is determined from available data on the (p,n) reaction for bombarding energies between 45 to 200 MeV. It is found to be 4.7±2.0 MeV, with the spin-dipole resonance lying at lower excitation energy.

  19. Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.

    2012-10-20

    Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

  20. Effect of core polarization on magnetic dipole moments in deformed odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneau, L.; Minkov, N.; Duc, Dao Duy; Quentin, P.; Bartel, J.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic properties of deformed odd-mass nuclei are studied within a nonrelativistic mean-field-plus-pairing approach, namely the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-BCS approach with self-consistent blocking. For an odd number of nucleons these approaches lead to the breaking of the time-reversal invariance. The deviation from the Schmidt values of the isoscalar magnetic dipole moment is known to result from a subtle balance between core-polarization effects and meson-exchange current effects. However, the former are usually calculated in the random phase approximation without time-reversal symmetry breaking at the mean-field level. In this work we show that if one takes into account this symmetry breaking already in the mean-field solution, the correction from core polarization yields a significant contribution to the empirical quenching of the spin gyromagnetic ratios as compared to the free values in deformed odd-mass nuclei. Moreover, we calculate magnetic dipole moments in the Bohr and Mottelson unified-model description with self-consistent blocked mean-field intrinsic states. The obtained results in the A ˜100 and A ˜180 mass regions as well as for three actinide nuclei compare favorably with experimental data.

  1. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  2. Magnetic Field of a Dipole and the Dipole-Dipole Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    With a data-acquisition system and sensors commercially available, it is easy to determine magnetic fields produced by permanent magnets and to study the dipole-dipole interaction for different separations and angular positions of the magnets. For sufficiently large distances, the results confirm the 1/R[superscript 3] law for the magnetic field…

  3. Low-energy electric dipole response of Sn isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakonstantinou, P.; Hergert, H.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Roth, R.

    2014-03-01

    We study the low-energy dipole (LED) strength distribution along the Sn isotopic chain in both the isoscalar (IS) and the isovector (IV, or E1) electric channels, to provide testable predictions and guidance for new experiments with stable targets and radioactive beams. We use the self-consistent quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) with finite-range interactions and mainly the Gogny D1S force. We analyze also the performance of a realistic two-body interaction supplemented by a phenomenological three-body contact term. We find that from N =50 and up to the N =82 shell closure (132Sn) the lowest-energy part of the IS-LED spectrum is dominated by a collective transition whose properties vary smoothly with neutron number and which cannot be interpreted as a neutron-skin oscillation. For the neutron-rich species this state contributes to the E1 strength below particle threshold, but much more E1 strength is carried by other, weak but numerous transitions around or above threshold. We find that strong structural changes in the spectrum take effect beyond N =82, namely increased LED strength and lower excitation energies. Our results with the Gogny interaction are compatible with existing data. On this basis we predict that (a) the summed IS strength below particle threshold shall be of the same order of magnitude for N =50-82, (b) the summed E1 strength up to approximately 12 MeV shall be similar for N =50-82 MeV, while (c) the summed E1 strength below threshold shall be of the same order of magnitude for N ≈64-82 and much weaker for the lighter, more-symmetric isotopes. We point out a general agreement of our results with other nonrelativistic studies, the absence of a collective IS mode in some of those studies, and a possibly radical disagreement with relativistic models.

  4. Molecular Dipole Osmosis Based on Induced Charge Electro-Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel mechanism of producing a large nonlinear electrokinetic vortex flow around a nonconductive polar molecule in an electrolyte. That is, a large nonlinear electrokinetic slip velocity is derived by considering a local giant permittivity due to a molecular electric dipole moment with induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO). Different from the conventional ICEO theory, our theory predicts that a nonconductive biomaterial, such as a base of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule, has a significantly high ICEO flow velocity because of its large local permittivity. We consider that our findings will contribute markedly to promising biomedical applications.

  5. Long-range dipole-dipole interaction and anomalous Förster energy transfer across a hyperbolic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biehs, S.-A.; Menon, Vinod M.; Agarwal, G. S.

    2016-06-01

    We study radiative energy transfer between a donor-acceptor pair across a hyperbolic metamaterial slab. We show that similar to a perfect lens a hyperbolic lens allows for giant energy transfer rates. For a realistic realization of a hyperbolic multilayer metamaterial we find an enhancement of up to three orders of magnitude with respect to the transfer rates across a plasmonic silver film of the same size especially for frequencies which coincide with the epsilon-near zero and the epsilon-near pole frequencies. Furthermore, we compare exact results based on the S -matrix method with results obtained from effective medium theory. Our finding of very large dipole-dipole interaction at distances of the order of a wavelength has important consequences for producing radiative heat transfer, quantum entanglement, etc.

  6. Self-consistent separable random-phase approximation for Skyrme forces: Giant resonances in axial nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterenko, V. O.; Dolci, D. S.; Kleinig, W.; Kvasil, J.; Vesely, P.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2006-12-15

    We formulate the self-consistent separable random phase approximation (SRPA) method and specify it for Skyrme forces with pairing for the case of axially symmetric deformed nuclei. The factorization of the residual interaction allows diagonalization of high-ranking RPA matrices to be avoided, which dramatically reduces the computational expense. This advantage is crucial for the systems with a huge configuration space, first of all for deformed nuclei. SRPA self-consistently takes into account the contributions of both time-even and time-odd Skyrme terms as well as of the Coulomb force and pairing. The method is implemented to describe isovector E1 and isoscalar E2 giant resonances in a representative set of deformed nuclei: {sup 154}Sm, {sup 238}U, and {sup 254}No. Four different Skyrme parameterizations (SkT6, SkM*, SLy6, and SkI3) are employed to explore the dependence of the strength distributions on some basic characteristics of the Skyrme functional and nuclear matter. In particular, we discuss the role of isoscalar and isovector effective masses and their relation to time-odd contributions. The high sensitivity of the right flank of E1 resonance to different Skyrme forces and the related artificial structure effects are analyzed.

  7. Fermion dipole moment and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulaxizi, Manuela; Rahman, Rakibur

    2015-12-01

    In the background of a charged AdS black hole, we consider a Dirac particle endowed with an arbitrary magnetic dipole moment. For non-zero charge and dipole coupling of the bulk fermion, we find that the dual boundary theory can be plagued with superluminal modes. Requiring consistency of the dual CFT amounts to constraining the strength of the dipole coupling by an upper bound. We briefly discuss the implications of our results for the physics of holographic non-Fermi liquids.

  8. Dipole-dipole interaction between rubidium Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Altiere, Emily; Fahey, Donald P.; Noel, Michael W.; Smith, Rachel J.; Carroll, Thomas J.

    2011-11-15

    Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a static electric field can exchange energy via the dipole-dipole interaction. The Stark effect shifts the energy levels of the atoms which tunes the energy exchange into resonance at specific values of the electric field (Foerster resonances). We excite rubidium atoms to Rydberg states by focusing either a 480 nm beam from a tunable dye laser or a pair of diode lasers into a magneto-optical trap. The trap lies at the center of a configuration of electrodes. We scan the electric field by controlling the voltage on the electrodes while measuring the fraction of atoms that interact. Dipole-dipole interaction spectra are presented for initially excited rubidium nd states for n=31 to 46 and for four different pairs of initially excited rubidium ns states. We also present the dipole-dipole interaction spectra for individual rubidium 32d (j, m{sub j}) fine structure levels that have been selectively excited. The data are compared to calculated spectra.

  9. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  10. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... pigmented nevus; Giant hairy nevus; Giant pigmented nevus; Bathing trunk nevus; Congenital melanocytic nevus - large ... baby grows in the womb. In some families bathing trunk nevi may be inherited. The condition may ...

  11. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  12. Neutron and proton transition densities from 32,34S(p,p') at Ep=318 MeV. I. Isoscalar densities for 32S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. J.; Khandaker, M. A.; Boberg, P.; Feldman, A. E.; Flanders, B. S.; Hyman, S.; Seifert, H.; Karen, P.; Norum, B. E.; Welch, P.; Nanda, S.; Saha, A.

    1991-11-01

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers for low-lying states of 32S were measured using 318 MeV protons. The data were analyzed using an empirical effective interaction previously fitted to inelastic scattering data for 16O and 40Ca at the same energy. Transition densities for many states were fitted to the data using general expansions which permit evaluation of uncertainties due to statistical and normalization errors, penetrability and distortion, and incompleteness in momentum space. The accuracy of the procedure was tested by comparing isoscalar densities fitted to (p,p') data for 32S with proton densities fitted to (e,e') data. The good agreement between these analyses supports the quantitative accuracy of densities fitted to (p,p') data. Isoscalar densities were also fitted to data for several states of 32S for which no (e,e') data exist. We find that the experimental densities agree well with the shell model for the first 2+ state, but that the neutron density for the second 2+ state is distinctly different in shape. Good qualitative agreement between the data and the shell model is obtained for the first two 4+ states of 32S. Transition densities were also fitted to the data for the lowest 1-, 3-, and 5- states in 32S. The shape of the 1- transition density is complicated, but the very small matrix element agrees with the approximate selection rule that suppresses isoscalar E1 moments.

  13. Isovector and isoscalar tensor charges of the nucleon from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Cohen, Saul D.; Gupta, Rajan; Joseph, Anosh; Lin, Huey -Wen; Yoon, Boram

    2015-11-01

    Here, we present results for the isovector and flavor diagonal tensor charges gu–dT, guT, gdT, and gsT needed to probe novel tensor interactions at the TeV scale in neutron and nuclear β-decays and the contribution of the quark electric dipole moment (EDM) to the neutron EDM. The lattice QCD calculations were done using nine ensembles of gauge configurations generated by the MILC collaboration using the HISQ action with 2+1+1 dynamical flavors. These ensembles span three lattice spacings a ≈ 0.06, 0.09 and 0.12 fm and three quark masses corresponding to the pion masses Mπ ≈ 130, 220 and 310 MeV.more » Using estimates from these ensembles, we quantify all systematic uncertainties and perform a simultaneous extrapolation in the lattice spacing, volume and light quark masses for the connected contributions. The final estimates of the connected nucleon (proton) tensor charge for the isovector combination is gu–dT = 1.020(76) in the MS¯ scheme at 2 GeV. The additional disconnected quark loop contributions needed for the flavor-diagonal matrix elements are calculated using a stochastic estimator employing the truncated solver method with the all-mode-averaging technique. We find that the size of the disconnected contribution is smaller than the statistical error in the connected contribution. This allows us to bound the disconnected contribution and include it as an additional uncertainty in the flavor-diagonal charges. After a continuum extrapolation, we find guT = 0.774(66), gdT = –0.233(28) and gu+dT = 0.541(67). The strangeness tensor charge, that can make a significant contribution to the neutron EDM due to the large ratio ms/mu,d, is gsT = 0.008(9) in the continuum limit.« less

  14. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  15. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  16. Visualizing coherent intermolecular dipole-dipole coupling in real space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Luo, Yang; Zhang, Yao; Yu, Yun-Jie; Kuang, Yan-Min; Zhang, Li; Meng, Qiu-Shi; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jin-Long; Dong, Zhen-Chao; Hou, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    Many important energy-transfer and optical processes, in both biological and artificial systems, depend crucially on excitonic coupling that spans several chromophores. Such coupling can in principle be described in a straightforward manner by considering the coherent intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions involved. However, in practice, it is challenging to directly observe in real space the coherent dipole coupling and the related exciton delocalizations, owing to the diffraction limit in conventional optics. Here we demonstrate that the highly localized excitations that are produced by electrons tunnelling from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, in conjunction with imaging of the resultant luminescence, can be used to map the spatial distribution of the excitonic coupling in well-defined arrangements of a few zinc-phthalocyanine molecules. The luminescence patterns obtained for excitons in a dimer, which are recorded for different energy states and found to resemble σ and π molecular orbitals, reveal the local optical response of the system and the dependence of the local optical response on the relative orientation and phase of the transition dipoles of the individual molecules in the dimer. We generate an in-line arrangement up to four zinc-phthalocyanine molecules, with a larger total transition dipole, and show that this results in enhanced ‘single-molecule’ superradiance from the oligomer upon site-selective excitation. These findings demonstrate that our experimental approach provides detailed spatial information about coherent dipole-dipole coupling in molecular systems, which should enable a greater understanding and rational engineering of light-harvesting structures and quantum light sources.

  17. Measuring the Forces Between Magnetic Dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-09-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  18. Measuring the Forces between Magnetic Dipoles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  19. Dispersion dipoles for coupled Drude oscillators.

    PubMed

    Odbadrakh, Tuguldur T; Jordan, Kenneth D

    2016-01-21

    We present the dispersion-induced dipole moments of coupled Drude oscillators obtained from two approaches. The first approach evaluates the dipole moment using the second-order Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory wave function allowing for dipole-dipole and dipole-quadrupole coupling. The second approach, based on response theory, employs an integral of the dipole-dipole polarizability of one oscillator and the dipole-dipole-quadrupole hyperpolarizability of the other oscillator over imaginary frequencies. The resulting dispersion dipoles exhibit an R(-7) dependence on the separation between the two oscillators and are connected to the leading-order C6/R(6) dispersion energy through the electrostatic Hellmann-Feynman theorem. PMID:26801024

  20. Dispersion dipoles for coupled Drude oscillators.

    PubMed

    Odbadrakh, Tuguldur T; Jordan, Kenneth D

    2016-01-21

    We present the dispersion-induced dipole moments of coupled Drude oscillators obtained from two approaches. The first approach evaluates the dipole moment using the second-order Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory wave function allowing for dipole-dipole and dipole-quadrupole coupling. The second approach, based on response theory, employs an integral of the dipole-dipole polarizability of one oscillator and the dipole-dipole-quadrupole hyperpolarizability of the other oscillator over imaginary frequencies. The resulting dispersion dipoles exhibit an R(-7) dependence on the separation between the two oscillators and are connected to the leading-order C6/R(6) dispersion energy through the electrostatic Hellmann-Feynman theorem.

  1. Prediction of isoscalar charmoniumlike structures in the hidden-charm di-eta decays of higher charmonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Considering the situation that a single chiral particle, η is initially emitted, we study the hidden-charm di-eta decays of the charmoniumlike state Y(4660) and the predicted charmonium \\psi (4790), i.e., Y(4660)/\\psi (4790)\\to J/\\psi η η through the inetermediates η [{{D}(*)}{{\\bar{D}}(*)}] and/or η [Ds+(*)Ds-(*)], and answer the important question of whether there exist isoscalar charmoniumlike structures in the {{D}(*)}{{\\bar{D}}(*)} and/or Ds+(*)Ds-(*) channels. Our results predict that there will be enhancement structures near D{{\\bar{D}}*}, {{D}*}{{\\bar{D}}*} and {{D}s}\\bar{D}s* thresholds for Y(4660) and near {{D}*}{{\\bar{D}}*}, {{D}s}\\bar{D}s* and Ds*\\bar{D}s* thresholds for \\psi (4790) in the {{M}max }(J/\\psi η ) distributions of Y(4660)/\\psi (4790)\\to η η J/\\psi , respectively. These peaks are accessible in future experiments, especially BESIII, Belle, BaBar, and the forthcoming BelleII.

  2. Isovector and isoscalar tensor charges of the nucleon from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Cohen, Saul D.; Gupta, Rajan; Joseph, Anosh; Lin, Huey -Wen; Yoon, Boram

    2015-11-01

    Here, we present results for the isovector and flavor diagonal tensor charges gu–dT, guT, gdT, and gsT needed to probe novel tensor interactions at the TeV scale in neutron and nuclear β-decays and the contribution of the quark electric dipole moment (EDM) to the neutron EDM. The lattice QCD calculations were done using nine ensembles of gauge configurations generated by the MILC collaboration using the HISQ action with 2+1+1 dynamical flavors. These ensembles span three lattice spacings a ≈ 0.06, 0.09 and 0.12 fm and three quark masses corresponding to the pion masses Mπ ≈ 130, 220 and 310 MeV. Using estimates from these ensembles, we quantify all systematic uncertainties and perform a simultaneous extrapolation in the lattice spacing, volume and light quark masses for the connected contributions. The final estimates of the connected nucleon (proton) tensor charge for the isovector combination is gu–dT = 1.020(76) in the MS¯ scheme at 2 GeV. The additional disconnected quark loop contributions needed for the flavor-diagonal matrix elements are calculated using a stochastic estimator employing the truncated solver method with the all-mode-averaging technique. We find that the size of the disconnected contribution is smaller than the statistical error in the connected contribution. This allows us to bound the disconnected contribution and include it as an additional uncertainty in the flavor-diagonal charges. After a continuum extrapolation, we find guT = 0.774(66), gdT = –0.233(28) and gu+dT = 0.541(67). The strangeness tensor charge, that can make a significant contribution to the neutron EDM due to the large ratio ms/mu,d, is gsT = 0.008(9) in the continuum limit.

  3. Isovector and isoscalar tensor charges of the nucleon from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Cohen, Saul D.; Gupta, Rajan; Joseph, Anosh; Lin, Huey -Wen; Yoon, Boram

    2015-11-10

    Here, we present results for the isovector and flavor diagonal tensor charges gu–dT, guT, gdT, and gsT needed to probe novel tensor interactions at the TeV scale in neutron and nuclear β-decays and the contribution of the quark electric dipole moment (EDM) to the neutron EDM. The lattice QCD calculations were done using nine ensembles of gauge configurations generated by the MILC collaboration using the HISQ action with 2+1+1 dynamical flavors. These ensembles span three lattice spacings a ≈ 0.06, 0.09 and 0.12 fm and three quark masses corresponding to the pion masses Mπ ≈ 130, 220 and 310 MeV. Using estimates from these ensembles, we quantify all systematic uncertainties and perform a simultaneous extrapolation in the lattice spacing, volume and light quark masses for the connected contributions. The final estimates of the connected nucleon (proton) tensor charge for the isovector combination is gu–dT = 1.020(76) in the MS¯ scheme at 2 GeV. The additional disconnected quark loop contributions needed for the flavor-diagonal matrix elements are calculated using a stochastic estimator employing the truncated solver method with the all-mode-averaging technique. We find that the size of the disconnected contribution is smaller than the statistical error in the connected contribution. This allows us to bound the disconnected contribution and include it as an additional uncertainty in the flavor-diagonal charges. After a continuum extrapolation, we find guT = 0.774(66), gdT = –0.233(28) and gu+dT = 0.541(67). The strangeness tensor charge, that can make a significant contribution to the neutron EDM due to the large ratio ms/mu,d, is gsT = 0.008(9) in the continuum limit.

  4. Electric Dipole Transitions at Magnetoacoustic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichurin, M. I.; Petrov, V. M.; Ryabkov, O. V.; Filippov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. A.; Srinivasan, G.

    2006-03-01

    Ferromagnetic-ferroelectric composites show giant magnetoelectric (ME) effects that are facilitated by the sample response to electric, magnetic, and elastic forces. Composites consisting of magnetostrictive ferrites and piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) or lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) are found to show strong ME coupling. Such materials also provide us with unique opportunities for theoretical and experimental studies on ME coupling when the magnetic and/or electric subsystems show resonance behavior. Two types of resonances are of importance: electromechanical resonance (EMR) for the piezoelectric component and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) for the magnetic component. At the coincidence of EMR and FMR, i.e., at the magneto-acoustic resonance (MAR) ME interaction becomes stronger [1]. This work focuses on electric dipole transitions in multilayer ferromagnetic-ferroelectric composites, such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and PZT, at MAR. Expressions have been obtained for ME susceptibility and the ME coefficient. The results indicate the potential for novel microwave devices based on ME interactions at MAR. Supported by grants from the ARO, ONR and NSF.[1] M.I. Bichurin, V.M. Petrov, O.V. Ryabkov, S.V. Averkin and G. Srinivasan, Phys. Rev. B. 72, 060408(R) (2005).

  5. Fluctuation properties of the strength function associated with the giant quadrupole resonance in {sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Aiba, Hirokazu; Matsuo, Masayuki; Nishizaki, Shigeru; Suzuki, Toru

    2011-02-15

    We performed fluctuation analysis by means of the local scaling dimension for the strength function of the isoscalar (IS) giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) in {sup 208}Pb where the strength function is obtained by the shell model calculation including 1p1h and 2p2h configurations. It is found that at almost all energy scales, fluctuation of the strength function obeys the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) random matrix theory limit. This is contrasted with the results for the GQR in {sup 40}Ca, where at the intermediate energy scale of about 1.7 MeV, a deviation from the GOE limit was detected. It is found that the physical origin for this different behavior of the local scaling dimension is ascribed to the difference in the properties of the damping process.

  6. Calculation of the energy loss for an electron passing near giant fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrard, L.; Lambin, Ph

    1996-11-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the electron energy-loss spectra of isolated giant fullerenes. We use a macroscopic dielectric description of spherical onion-like fullerenes and a discrete dipole approximation (DDA) framework for tubular fullerenes. In the DDA model, an anisotropic dynamical polarizability is assigned to each carbon site. We stress the fundamental importance of the hollow character of giant fullerenes in the electron energy-loss resonances.

  7. Remote Sensing of Dipole Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B.; Mied, Richard P.; Brown, James W.; Kirwan, A. D., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Historical satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) data are reanalyzed with a zebra color palette and a thermal separatrix method. The new results from this reanalysis are as follows: (a) Thirteen observational sequences of six rings from the Gulf Stream and the Brazil Current, which have historically been interpreted as solitary vortices or monopoles are shown to have a dipolar character; (b) some of these dipole rings have been observed in the open ocean, thereby eliminating the possibility that they are sustained by topographic interactions with the continental slope; (c) whether interacting with other features or evolving as isolated circulations, dipoles are seen to rotate within a relatively narrow range of approximately 4-8 deg/day (interacting) and 10-11 deg/day (isolated); and (d) feature tracking delineates energetic fluid in both vortices and eliminates the possibility of interpreting dipole rings as transient features produced by active monopoles and patches of entrained fluid.

  8. Coherent and incoherent dipole-dipole interactions between atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2016-05-01

    Results will be presented on the collective interaction between atoms due to the electric dipole-dipole coupling between states of different parity on two different atoms. A canonical example of this effect is when the electronic state of one atom has S-character and the state of another atom has P-character. The energy difference between the two states plays an important role in the interaction since the change in energy determines the wave number of a photon that would cause a transition between the states. If the atoms are much closer than the wave length of this photon, then the dipole-dipole interaction is in the near field and has a 1 /r3 dependence on atomic separation. If the atoms are farther apart than the wave length, then the interaction is in the far field and has a 1 / r dependence. When many atoms interact, collective effects can dominate the system with the character of the collective effect depending on whether the atomic separation leads to near field or far field coupling. As an example of the case where the atoms are in the far field, the line broadening of transitions and strong deviations from the Beer-Lambert law in a diffuse gas will be presented. As an example of near field collective behavior, the radiative properties of a Rydberg gas will be presented. Based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1404419-PHY in collaboration with R.T. Sutherland.

  9. Dipole relaxation in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-07-01

    From Boltzmann's equation, S=k lnΩ, an expression for the orientational entropy, S of a rigid rod (electric dipole) is derived. The free energy of the dipole in an electric field is then calculated as a function of both the dipole's average orientation and the field strength. Application of the equilibrium criterion to the free energy yields the field dependence of the entropy of the dipole. Irreversible thermodynamics is used to derive the general form of the equation of motion of the dipole's average orientation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium.

  10. Induced dipole-dipole interactions in light diffusion from point dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherroret, Nicolas; Delande, Dominique; van Tiggelen, Bart A.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a perturbative treatment of induced dipole-dipole interactions in the diffusive transport of electromagnetic waves through disordered atomic clouds. The approach is exact at order 2 in the atomic density and accounts for the vector character of light. It is applied to the calculations of the electromagnetic energy stored in the atomic cloud, which modifies the energy transport velocity, and of the light scattering and transport mean free paths. Results are compared to those obtained from a purely scalar model for light.

  11. Dipole rescattering and the nuclear structure function

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, F.; Goncalves, V. P.; Navarra, F. S.; Oliveira, E. G.

    2013-03-25

    In the framework of the dipole model, we study the effects of the dipole multiple scatterings in a nuclear target and compute the nuclear structure function. We compare different unitarization schemes and confront our results with the E665 data.

  12. Critical behavior of isotropic three-dimensional systems with dipole-dipole interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Belim, S. M.

    2013-06-15

    The critical behavior of Heisenberg magnets with dipole-dipole interactions near the line of second-order phase transitions directly in three-dimensional space is investigated in terms of a field-theoretic approach. The dependences of critical exponents on the dipole-dipole interaction parameter are derived. Comparison with experimental facts is made.

  13. New bound on neutrino dipole moments from globular-cluster stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffelt, Georg G.

    1990-01-01

    Neutrino dipole moments mu(nu) would increase the core mass of red giants at the helium flash by delta(Mc) = 0.015 solar mass x mu(nu)/10 to the -12th muB (where muB is the Bohr magneton) because of enhanced neutrino losses. Existing measurements of the bolometric magnitudes of the brightest red giants in 26 globular clusters, number counts of horizontal-branch stars and red giants in 15 globular clusters, and statistical parallax determinations of field RR Lyr luminosities yield delta(Mc) = 0.009 + or - 0.012 solar mass, so that conservatively mu(nu) is less than 3 x 10 to the -12th muB.

  14. Dipole excitations in 96Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnemann, A.; Fransen, C.; Gorska, M.; Jolie, J.; Kneissl, U.; Knoch, P.; Mücher, D.; Pitz, H. H.; Scheck, M.; Scholl, C.; Brentano, P. Von

    2005-12-01

    Candidates for the two-phonon quadrupole-octupole 1- state and the two-phonon mixed-symmetry 1+ms state have been identified in the N=52 isotope 96Ru using the nuclear resonance fluorescence technique at the bremsstrahlung facility of the Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. Detailed information on energies, spins, branching ratios, and transition strengths of four new dipole excitations in 96Ru have been obtained. The observed dipole excitations are nearly at the same energies as in 94Mo, and the transition probabilities are comparable to those for the decay of the (2+1⊗3-1)1- and the (2+1⊗2+ms)1+ms states in 94Mo.

  15. Efficient treatment of induced dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Simmonett, Andrew C.; Pickard, Frank C.; Shao, Yihan; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Most existing treatments of induced dipoles in polarizable molecular mechanics force field calculations use either the self-consistent variational method, which is solved iteratively, or the “direct” approximation that is non-iterative as a result of neglecting coupling between induced dipoles. The variational method is usually implemented using assumptions that are only strictly valid under tight convergence of the induced dipoles, which can be computationally demanding to enforce. In this work, we discuss the nature of the errors that result from insufficient convergence and suggest a strategy that avoids such problems. Using perturbation theory to reintroduce the mutual coupling into the direct algorithm, we present a computationally efficient method that combines the precision of the direct approach with the accuracy of the variational approach. By analyzing the convergence of this perturbation series, we derive a simple extrapolation formula that delivers a very accurate approximation to the infinite order solution at the cost of only a few iterations. We refer to the new method as extrapolated perturbation theory. Finally, we draw connections to our previously published permanent multipole algorithm to develop an efficient implementation of the electric field and Thole terms and also derive some necessary, but not sufficient, criteria that force field parameters must obey. PMID:26298123

  16. Relativistic Dipole Matrix Element Zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.; Pratt, R. H.

    2002-05-01

    There is a special class of relativistic high energy dipole matrix element zeros (RZ), whose positions with respect to photon energy ω , only depend on the bound state l quantum number according to ω^0=mc^2/(l_b+1) (independent of primary quantum number n, nuclear charge Z, central potential V and dipole retardation). These RZ only occur in (n,l_b,j_b)arrow (ɛ , l_b+1,j_b) transitions such as ns_1/2arrow ɛ p_1/2; np_3/2arrow ɛ d_3/2: nd_5/2arrow ɛ f_5/2 etc. The nonrelativistic limit of these matrix elements can be established explicitly in the Coulomb case. Within the general matrix element formalism (such as that in [1]); when |κ | is substituted for γ in analytic expressions for matrix elements, the zeros remain, but ω^0 now becomes dependent on n and Z. When the reduction to nonrelativistic form is completed by application of the low energy approximation ω mc^2 mc^2, the zeros disappear. This nonzero behavior was noted in nonrelativistic dipole Coulomb matrix elements by Fano and Cooper [2] and later proven by Oh and Pratt[3]. (J. H. Scofield, Phys. Rev. A 40), 3054 (1989 (U. Fano and J. W. Cooper, Rev. Mod. Phys. 40), 441 (1968). (D. Oh and R. H. Pratt, Phys. Rev. A 34), 2486 (1986); 37, 1524 (1988); 45, 1583 (1992).

  17. Attosecond delay of xenon 4 d photoionization at the giant resonance and Cooper minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Chakraborty, Himadri S.

    2016-07-01

    A Kohn-Sham time-dependent local-density-functional scheme is utilized to predict attosecond time delays of xenon 4 d photoionization that involves the 4 d giant dipole resonance and Cooper minimum. The fundamental effect of electron correlations to uniquely determine the delay at both regions is demonstrated. In particular, for the giant dipole resonance, the delay underpins strong collective effect, emulating the recent prediction at C60 giant plasmon resonance [T. Barillot et al., Phys. Rev. A 91, 033413 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.033413]. For the Cooper minimum, a qualitative similarity with a photorecombination experiment near argon 3 p minimum [S. B. Schoun et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 153001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.153001] is found. The result should encourage attosecond measurements of Xe 4 d photoemission.

  18. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  19. Electric dipole response of neutron-rich calcium isotopes in relativistic quasiparticle time blocking approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, Irina A.; Litvinova, Elena

    2016-09-01

    New results for electric dipole strength in the chain of even-even calcium isotopes with the mass numbers A =40 -54 are presented. Starting from the covariant Lagrangian of quantum hadrodynamics, spectra of collective vibrations (phonons) and phonon-nucleon coupling vertices for J ≤6 and natural parity were computed in a self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation (RQRPA). These vibrations coupled to Bogoliubov two-quasiparticle configurations (2 q ⊗phonon ) formed the model space for the calculations of the dipole response function in the relativistic quasiparticle time blocking approximation. The calculations in the latter approach were performed for the giant dipole resonance (GDR) and compared to those obtained with the RQRPA and to available data. The evolution of the dipole strength with the neutron number is investigated for both high-frequency GDRs and low-lying strengths. The development of a pygmy resonant structure on the low-energy shoulder of the GDR is traced and analyzed in terms of transition densities. A dependence of the pygmy dipole strength on the isospin asymmetry parameter is extracted.

  20. Electrical dipole-dipole interaction effects on magnetocurrent in organic phosphorescent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Ming; Dai, Yanfeng; Ma, Dongge; Hu, Bin

    2011-08-01

    This letter reports the experimental studies on electrical dipole-dipole interaction effects on magnetocurrent (MC) and magneto-electroluminescence (MFEEL) based on two phosphorescent dyes: heavy-metal complex Ir(ppy)3 and Ir(ppy)2(acac) with strong spin-orbital coupling but different electrical dipole moments. We find that the Ir(ppy)3 with strong electrical dipole moment shows negligible MC and MFEEL. However, the Ir(ppy)2(acac) with weak dipole moment exhibits appreciable MC and MFEEL. The experimental results suggest that the electrical dipole-dipole interaction can change the MC and MFEEL from capture-based regime, where charge carriers are captured through spin-dependent process at short distance, to intersystem crossing-based regime, where charge carriers are captured through spin random process at long distance. As a result, changing electrical dipole-dipole interaction presents a new pathway to tune magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors.

  1. RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

  2. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  3. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Video Gallery

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  4. NLO evolution of color dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky; Giovanni Chirilli

    2008-01-01

    The small-x deep inelastic scattering in the saturation region is governed by the non-linear evolution of Wilson-lines operators. In the leading logarithmic approximation it is given by the BK equation for the evolution of color dipoles. In the next-to-leaing order the BK equation gets contributions from quark and gluon loops as well as from the tree gluon diagrams with quadratic and cubic nonlinearities. We calculate the gluon contribution to small-x evolution of Wilson lines (the quark part was obtained earlier).

  5. Juno and Cassini Proximal: Giant Steps Towards Understanding Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    In 2016-17, Juno and Cassini Proximal will provide comparable large advances in our understanding of the interiors of Jupiter and Saturn. Both will provide high accuracy gravity and magnetic field data, while Juno will in addition determine the water abundance deep in the Jovian atmosphere, essential for understanding of giant planet formation and the density of the outer envelope (needed to construct interior models). Although Jupiter and Saturn are both gas giants, they differ in important ways (magnetic field, strength of zonal flows, enrichment in heavy elements, and probably the distribution of helium within). The opportunity to contrast and compare will be invaluable. Juno and Cassini are expected to determine the gravity field to about a part in 109 though with different spatial coverage and with less accurate determination near the poles. The determination of Jupiter's likely central concentration of heavy elements is particularly challenging because it is only a few percent at most of the total mass and yet important for understanding Jupiter's formation, which in turn likely determined the architecture of our solar system. This determination will be done from gravity, water determination and magnetic field and also aided by advances in our understanding of material properties. The corresponding determination for Saturn may prove easier (because the heavy element enrichment is a larger fraction of the mass) though complicated by lack of knowledge of water abundance and the need to identify a more precise value for the deep rotation of the planet (difficult for Saturn because of the lack of a measurable magnetic dipole tilt thus far). For both planets, the higher harmonics of gravity will likely be controlled by differential rotation (the zonal flows) and this will tell us their depth, an issue of major interest in the dynamics of these bodies. The magnetic field structure for Jupiter will be determined to higher accuracy than the Earth's core field (since

  6. Combinatorics of giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Hanin, L G; Vinogradov, S N

    2000-01-01

    The paper discusses combinatorial and probabilistic models allowing to characterize various aspects of spacial symmetry and structural heterogeneity of the giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins (HBL Hb). Linker-dodecamer configurations of HBL are described for two and four linker types (occurring in the two most studied HBL Hb of Arenicola and Lumbricus, respectively), and the most probable configurations are found. It is shown that, for HBL with marked dodecamers, the number of 'normal-marked' pairs of dodecamers in homological position follows a binomial distribution. The group of symmetries of the dodecamer substructure of HBL is identified with the dihedral group D6. Under natural symmetry assumptions, the total dipole moment of the dodecamer substructure of HBL is shown to be zero. Biological implications of the mathematical findings are discussed.

  7. Nanophotonic control of circular dipole emission.

    PubMed

    le Feber, B; Rotenberg, N; Kuipers, L

    2015-01-01

    Controlling photon emission by single emitters with nanostructures is crucial for scalable on-chip information processing. Nowadays, nanoresonators can affect the lifetime of linear dipole emitters, while nanoantennas can steer the emission direction. Expanding this control to the emission of orbital angular momentum-changing transitions would enable a future coupling between solid state and photonic qubits. As these transitions are associated with circular dipoles, such control requires knowledge of the interaction of a complex dipole with optical eigenstates containing local helicity. We experimentally map the coupling of classical, circular dipoles to photonic modes in a photonic crystal waveguide. We show that, depending on the combination of the local helicity of the mode and the dipole helicity, circular dipoles can couple to left- or rightwards propagating modes with a near-unity directionality. The experimental maps are in excellent agreement with calculations. Our measurements, therefore, demonstrate the possibility of coupling the spin to photonic pathway. PMID:25833305

  8. Electric dipole polarizability from first principles calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Miorelli, M.; Bacca, S.; Barnea, N.; Hagen, G.; Jansen, G. R.; Orlandini, G.; Papenbrock, T.

    2016-09-19

    The electric dipole polarizability quantifies the low-energy behavior of the dipole strength and is related to critical observables such as the radii of the proton and neutron distributions. Its computation is challenging because most of the dipole strength lies in the scattering continuum. In our paper we combine integral transforms with the coupled-cluster method and compute the dipole polarizability using bound-state techniques. Furthermore, employing different interactions from chiral effective field theory, we confirm the strong correlation between the dipole polarizability and the charge radius, and study its dependence on three-nucleon forces. Finally, we find good agreement with data for themore » 4He, 40Ca, and 16O nuclei, and predict the dipole polarizability for the rare nucleus 22O.« less

  9. How to introduce the magnetic dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, M.; Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Cougo-Pinto, M. V.; Farina, C.

    2012-09-01

    We show how the concept of the magnetic dipole moment can be introduced in the same way as the concept of the electric dipole moment in introductory courses on electromagnetism. Considering a localized steady current distribution, we make a Taylor expansion directly in the Biot-Savart law to obtain, explicitly, the dominant contribution of the magnetic field at distant points, identifying the magnetic dipole moment of the distribution. We also present a simple but general demonstration of the torque exerted by a uniform magnetic field on a current loop of general form, not necessarily planar. For pedagogical reasons we start by reviewing briefly the concept of the electric dipole moment.

  10. Testing of a Single 11 T $Nb_3Sn$ Dipole Coil Using a Dipole Mirror Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, Alexander; Andreev, Nicolai; Barzi, Emanuela; Chlachidze, Guram; Kashikhin, Vadim; Nobrega, Alfred; Novitski, Igor; Turrioni, Daniele; Karppinen, Mikko; Smekens, David

    2014-07-01

    FNAL and CERN are developing an 11 T Nb3Sn dipole suitable for installation in the LHC. To optimize coil design parameters and fabrication process and study coil performance, a series of 1 m long dipole coils is being fabricated. One of the short coils has been tested using a dipole mirror structure. This paper describes the dipole mirror magnetic and mechanical designs, and reports coil parameters and test results.

  11. Microwave pump-probe spectroscopy of the dipole-dipole interaction in a cold Rydberg gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunwook; Gallagher, T. F.; Pillet, P.

    2016-05-01

    Microwave pump-probe experiments starting with a cold gas of Rb 34 s atoms confirm that cusped line shapes observed in dipole-dipole broadened microwave transitions are due to atoms which are widely separated and exhibit small dipole-dipole energy shifts. When the experiments are interpreted in terms of a nearest-neighbor model, they demonstrate that it is possible to select pairs of atoms based on their separation and orientation.

  12. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  13. How to Introduce the Magnetic Dipole Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezerra, M.; Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Cougo-Pinto, M. V.; Farina, C.

    2012-01-01

    We show how the concept of the magnetic dipole moment can be introduced in the same way as the concept of the electric dipole moment in introductory courses on electromagnetism. Considering a localized steady current distribution, we make a Taylor expansion directly in the Biot-Savart law to obtain, explicitly, the dominant contribution of the…

  14. Dipole Relaxation in an Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    Derives an expression for the orientational entropy of a rigid rod (electric dipole) from Boltzmann's equation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium. (Author/GS)

  15. Radiating dipoles in photonic crystals

    PubMed

    Busch; Vats; John; Sanders

    2000-09-01

    The radiation dynamics of a dipole antenna embedded in a photonic crystal are modeled by an initially excited harmonic oscillator coupled to a non-Markovian bath of harmonic oscillators representing the colored electromagnetic vacuum within the crystal. Realistic coupling constants based on the natural modes of the photonic crystal, i.e., Bloch waves and their associated dispersion relation, are derived. For simple model systems, well-known results such as decay times and emission spectra are reproduced. This approach enables direct incorporation of realistic band structure computations into studies of radiative emission from atoms and molecules within photonic crystals. We therefore provide a predictive and interpretative tool for experiments in both the microwave and optical regimes.

  16. Dipole-Induced Electromagnetic Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthumpally-Joseph, Raiju; Sukharev, Maxim; Atabek, Osman; Charron, Eric

    2014-10-01

    We determine the optical response of a thin and dense layer of interacting quantum emitters. We show that, in such a dense system, the Lorentz redshift and the associated interaction broadening can be used to control the transmission and reflection spectra. In the presence of overlapping resonances, a dipole-induced electromagnetic transparency (DIET) regime, similar to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), may be achieved. DIET relies on destructive interference between the electromagnetic waves emitted by quantum emitters. Carefully tuning material parameters allows us to achieve narrow transmission windows in, otherwise, completely opaque media. We analyze in detail this coherent and collective effect using a generalized Lorentz model and show how it can be controlled. Several potential applications of the phenomenon, such as slow light, are proposed.

  17. A parallel dipole line system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Oki; Virgus, Yudistira; Tai, Kong Fai

    2015-02-01

    We present a study of a parallel linear distribution of dipole system, which can be realized using a pair of cylindrical diametric magnets and yields several interesting properties and applications. The system serves as a trap for cylindrical diamagnetic object, produces a fascinating one-dimensional camelback potential profile at its center plane, yields a technique for measuring magnetic susceptibility of the trapped object and serves as an ideal system to implement highly sensitive Hall measurement utilizing rotating magnetic field and lock-in detection. The latter application enables extraction of low carrier mobility in several materials of high interest such as the world-record-quality, earth abundant kesterite solar cell, and helps elucidate its fundamental performance limitation.

  18. Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kesner, Jay; Mauel, Michael

    2013-03-10

    Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier et al., Physics of Plasmas, 13 (2006) 056111]. High- beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability made LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment operating in the U.S. fusion program. A significant measure of progress in the LDX research program was the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole and the resulting observations of confinement improvement. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements were made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma was created by multi frequency electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2.45 GHz, 6.4 GHz, 10.5 GHz and 28 GHz allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole was levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature was estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities to approach 1e18 m-3. We have found that levitation causes a strong inwards density pinch [Boxer et al., Nature Physics, 6 (2010) 207] and we have observed the central plasma density increase dramatically indicating a significant improvement in the confinement of a thermal plasma species.

  19. Magnetic Field Generation and Zonal Flows in the Gas Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, L.; Wicht, J.; Gastine, T.

    2013-12-01

    The surface dynamics of Jupiter and Saturn is dominated by a banded system of fierce zonal winds. The depth of these winds remains unclear but they are thought to be confined to the very outer envelopes where hydrogen remains molecular and the electrical conductivity is negligible. The dynamo responsible for the dipole dominated magnetic fields of both Gas Giants, on the other hand, likely operates in the deeper interior where hydrogen assumes a metallic state. We present numerical simulations that attempt to model both the zonal winds and the interior dynamo action in an integrated approach. Using the anelastic version of the MHD code MagIC, we explore the effects of density stratification and radial electrical conductivity variations. The electrical conductivity is assumed to remain constant in the thicker inner metallic region and decays exponentially towards the outer boundary throughout the molecular envelope. Our results show that the combination of stronger density stratification (Δρ≈55) and a weaker conducting outer layer is essential for reconciling dipole dominated dynamo action and a fierce equatorial zonal jet. Previous simulations with homogeneous electrical conductivity show that both are mutually exclusive, with solutions either having strong zonal winds and multipolar magnetic fields or weak zonal winds and dipole dominated magnetic fields. The particular setup explored here allows the equatorial jet to remain confined to the weaker conducting region where is does not interfere with the deeper seated dynamo action. The equatorial jet can afford to remain geostrophic and reaches throughout the whole shell. This is not an option for the additional mid to higher latitude jets, however. In dipole dominated dynamo solutions, appropriate for the Gas Giants, zonal flows remain very faint in the deeper dynamo region but increase in amplitude in the weakly conducting outer layer in some of our simulations. This suggests that the mid to high latitude jets

  20. Giant colon diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Chater, C; Saudemont, A; Zerbib, P

    2015-11-01

    Giant colonic diverticulum is defined by a diverticulum whose diameter is greater than 4 cm. This is a rare entity, arising mainly in the sigmoid colon. The diagnosis is based on abdominal computed tomography that shows a gas-filled structure communicating with the adjacent colon, with a smooth, thin diverticular wall that does not enhance after injection of contrast. Surgical treatment is recommended even in asymptomatic diverticula, due to the high prevalence and severity of complications. The gold standard treatment is segmental colectomy. Some authors propose a diverticulectomy when the giant diverticulum is unique.

  1. Extremely large extinction efficiency and field enhancement in terahertz resonant dipole nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Razzari, Luca; Toma, Andrea; Shalaby, Mostafa; Clerici, Matteo; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; Liberale, Carlo; Marras, Sergio; Al-Naib, Ibraheem A I; Das, Gobind; De Angelis, Francesco; Peccianti, Marco; Falqui, Andrea; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Morandotti, Roberto; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2011-12-19

    The distinctive ability of nanometallic structures to manipulate light at the nanoscale has recently promoted their use for a spectacular set of applications in a wide range of areas of research including artificial optical materials, nano-imaging, biosensing, and nonlinear optics. Here we transfer this concept to the terahertz spectral region, demonstrating a metal nanostructure in shape of a dipole nanoantenna, which can efficiently resonate at terahertz frequencies, showing an effective cross section >100 times larger than its geometrical area, and a field enhancement factor of ~280, confined on a lateral section of ~λ/1,000. These results lead to immediate applications in terahertz artificial materials exhibiting giant dichroism, suggest the use of dipole nanoantennas in nanostructure-based terahertz metamaterials, and pave the way for nanoantenna-enhanced terahertz few-molecule spectroscopy and localized terahertz nonlinear optics.

  2. Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kesner, Jay; Mauel, Michael

    2013-03-10

    Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier, Phys. Plasmas, v13, p. 056111, 2006]. High-beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability makes LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment now operating in the U.S. fusion program. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements are made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma is created by multifrequency electron cyclotron resonance heating allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole is levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature is estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities reach 1.0E18 (1/m3). Several significant discoveries resulted from the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole. For the first time, toroidal plasma with pressure approaching the pressure of the confining magnetic field was well-confined in steady-state without a toroidal magnetic field. Magnetic levitation proved to be reliable and is now routine. The dipole's cryostat allows up to three hours of "float time" between re-cooling with liquid helium and providing scientists unprecedented access to the physics of magnetizd plasma. Levitation eliminates field-aligned particle sources and sinks and results in a toroidal, magnetically-confined plasma where profiles are determined by cross

  3. Constraints on exotic dipole-dipole couplings between electrons at the micron scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Ozeri, Roee; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2015-05-01

    Until recently, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling between electrons had not been directly observed experimentally. This is because at the atomic scale dipole-dipole coupling is dominated by the exchange interaction and at larger distances the dipole-dipole coupling is overwhelmed by ambient magnetic field noise. In spite of these challenges, the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between two electron spins separated by 2.4 microns was recently measured using the valence electrons of trapped Strontium ions [S. Kotler, N. Akerman, N. Navon, Y. Glickman, and R. Ozeri, Nature 510, 376 (2014)]. We have used this measurement to directly constrain exotic dipole-dipole interactions between electrons at the micron scale. For light bosons (mass 0.1 eV), we find that coupling constants describing pseudoscalar and axial-vector mediated interactions must be | gPegPe/4 πℏc | <= 1 . 5 × 10-3 and | gAegAe/4 πℏc | <= 1 . 2 × 10-17 , respectively, at the 90% confidence level. These bounds significantly improve on previous constraints in this mass range: for example, the constraints on axial-vector interactions are six orders of magnitude stronger than electron-positron constraints based on positronium spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation, I-Core: the Israeli excellence center, and the European Research Council.

  4. Axion induced oscillating electric dipole moments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-06-24

    In this study, the axion electromagnetic anomaly induces an oscillating electric dipole for any magnetic dipole. This is a low energy theorem which is a consequence of the space-time dependent cosmic background field of the axion. The electron will acquire an oscillating electric dipole of frequency ma and strength ~ 10-32 e-cm, within four orders of magnitude of the present standard model DC limit, and two orders of magnitude above the nucleon, assuming standard axion model and dark matter parameters. This may suggest sensitive new experimental venues for the axion dark matter search.

  5. Quadrupole radiation from terahertz dipole antennas.

    PubMed

    Rudd, J V; Johnson, J L; Mittleman, D M

    2000-10-15

    We report what is to our knowledge the first detailed investigation of the polarization state of radiation from lens-coupled terahertz dipole antennas. The radiation exhibits a weak but measurable component that is polarized orthogonally to the orientation of the emitter dipole. The angular radiation pattern of this cross-polarized emission reveals that it is quadrupolar, rather than dipolar, in nature. One can understand this result by taking into account the photocurrent flowing in the strip lines that feed the dipole antenna. A Fresnel-Kirchhoff scalar diffraction calculation is used for calculating the frequency-dependent angular distribution of the radiation pattern, providing satisfactory agreement with the measurements. PMID:18066277

  6. Magnetic dipole discharges. III. Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2013-08-15

    Instabilities in a cross-field discharge around a permanent magnet have been investigated. The permanent magnet serves as a cold cathode and the chamber wall as an anode. The magnet is biased strongly negative and emits secondary electrons due to impact of energetic ions. The electrons outside the sheath are confined by the strong dipolar magnetic field and by the ion-rich sheath surrounding the magnet. The electron energy peaks in the equatorial plane where most ionization occurs and the ions are trapped in a negative potential well. The discharge mechanism is the same as that of cylindrical and planar magnetrons, but here extended to a 3-D cathode geometry using a single dipole magnet. While the basic properties of the discharge are presented in a companion paper, the present focus is on various observed instabilities. The first is an ion sheath instability which oscillates the plasma potential outside the sheath below the ion plasma frequency. It arises in ion-rich sheaths with low electron supply, which is the case for low secondary emission yields. Sheath oscillations modulate the discharge current creating oscillating magnetic fields. The second instability is current-driven ion sound turbulence due to counter-streaming electrons and ions. The fluctuations have a broad spectrum and short correlation lengths in all directions. The third type of fluctuations is spiky potential and current oscillations in high density discharges. These appear to be due to unstable emission properties of the magnetron cathode.

  7. Third Elementary Dipole Moment: Toroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordrey, Vincent; Eshete, Amanuel; Majewski, Walerian

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we study the generally unknown characteristics of toroids, magnets without magnetic poles. Toroids have never seemed interesting enough to be studied for their physical features in labs due to the fact that they have no magnetic fields on the outside, but rather a very strong magnetic field trapped inside. Toroidal solenoids or magnets (rings magnetized circumferentially) interact with the external magnetic field only through its curl, which can be created either by an electric current, or by a time-dependent electric flux. We confirmed a theoretical prediction, that a toroid would not interact with the curl-less magnetic field of a current-carrying wire running outside of the torus's hole. We used our toroids as magnetic curlmeters, measuring the torque on the toroid, when the current-carrying wire runs through the toroid. From this torque we found the toroidal dipole moment. We are experimenting on detecting the escape of the inner magnetic field of the toroid outside of it, when magnetic toroid rotates or when electric toroid is driven by AC voltage. We also will discuss toroidal (or anapole) moments of fundamental particles, nuclei and atoms, and toroids' applications in metamaterials.

  8. Asteroseismology can reveal strong internal magnetic fields in red giant stars.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Stello, Dennis; Garcia, Rafael A; Bildsten, Lars

    2015-10-23

    Internal stellar magnetic fields are inaccessible to direct observations, and little is known about their amplitude, geometry, and evolution. We demonstrate that strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars can be identified with asteroseismology. The fields can manifest themselves via depressed dipole stellar oscillation modes, arising from a magnetic greenhouse effect that scatters and traps oscillation-mode energy within the core of the star. The Kepler satellite has observed a few dozen red giants with depressed dipole modes, which we interpret as stars with strongly magnetized cores. We find that field strengths larger than ~10(5) gauss may produce the observed depression, and in one case we infer a minimum core field strength of ≈10(7) gauss. PMID:26494754

  9. Asteroseismology can reveal strong internal magnetic fields in red giant stars.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Stello, Dennis; Garcia, Rafael A; Bildsten, Lars

    2015-10-23

    Internal stellar magnetic fields are inaccessible to direct observations, and little is known about their amplitude, geometry, and evolution. We demonstrate that strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars can be identified with asteroseismology. The fields can manifest themselves via depressed dipole stellar oscillation modes, arising from a magnetic greenhouse effect that scatters and traps oscillation-mode energy within the core of the star. The Kepler satellite has observed a few dozen red giants with depressed dipole modes, which we interpret as stars with strongly magnetized cores. We find that field strengths larger than ~10(5) gauss may produce the observed depression, and in one case we infer a minimum core field strength of ≈10(7) gauss.

  10. The Effect of Dipole-Dipole Interaction on Tripartite Entanglement in Different Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Salman; Jan, Munsif

    2016-03-01

    The effect of dipole-dipole interaction, the initial relative phase and the coupling strength with the cavity on the dynamics of three two level atoms in the good and the bad cavity regime are investigated. It is found that the presence of strong dipole-dipole interaction not only ensures avoiding entanglement sudden death but also retains entanglement for long time. The choice of the phase in the initial state is crucial to the operational regime of the cavity. Under specific conditions, the entanglement can be frozen in time to its initial values through strong dipole-dipole interaction. This trait of tripartite entanglement may prove helpful in engineering multiparticle entanglement for the practical realization of quantum technology.

  11. Study of atomic dipole-dipole interactions via measurement of atom-pair kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee; Gonçalves, Luís Felipe; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    We observe atom-pair kinetics due to binary dipolar forces by direct imaging of the center-of-mass positions of the individual Rydberg atoms and pair-correlation analysis. To prepare a highly dipolar quantum state, Rydberg-atom ensembles are switched from a weakly- into a strongly-interacting regime via adiabatic state transformation. The transformed atoms exhibit a large permanent electric dipole moment that is locked to the direction of an applied electric field. The resultant electric dipole-dipole forces reveal dumbbell-shaped pair correlation images that demonstrate the anisotropy of the binary dipolar force. The dipole-dipole interaction coefficient C3, derived from the time dependence of the images, agrees with the value calculated from the known permanent electric-dipole moment of the atoms. The observations also show the dynamics reminiscent of disorder-induced heating in strongly coupled particle systems.

  12. Tevatron optics measurements using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to study beam optics of hadron synchrotrons. It can produce sustained large amplitude oscillations with virtually no emittance growth. A vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is recently implemented and a maximum oscillation amplitude of 2{sigma} (4{sigma}) at 980 GeV (150 GeV) is achieved [1]. When such large oscillations are measured with the BPM system of the Tevatron (20 {micro}m resolution), not only linear but even nonlinear optics can be directly measured. This paper shows how to measure {beta} function using an AC dipole and the result is compared to the other measurement. The paper also shows a test to detect optics changes when small changes are made in the Tevatron. Since an AC dipole is nondestructive, it allows frequent measurements of the optics which is necessary for such an test.

  13. Dipole Bands in {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D.; Msezane, B.; Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P.; Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M.; Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P.

    2011-10-28

    High spin states in {sup 196}Hg have been populated in the {sup 198}Pt({alpha},6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

  14. Magnetic dipole interactions in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of magnetic dipole interactions (MDIs) on the magnetic properties of local-moment Heisenberg spin systems is investigated. A general formulation is presented for calculating the eigenvalues λ and eigenvectors μ ̂ of the MDI tensor of the magnetic dipoles in a line (one dimension, 1D), within a circle (2D) or a sphere (3D) of radius r surrounding a given moment μ⃗i for given magnetic propagation vectors k for collinear and coplanar noncollinear magnetic structures on both Bravais and non-Bravais spin lattices. Results are calculated for collinear ordering on 1D chains, 2D square and simple-hexagonal (triangular) Bravais lattices, 2D honeycomb and kagomé non-Bravais lattices, and 3D cubic Bravais lattices. The λ and μ ̂ values are compared with previously reported results. Calculations for collinear ordering on 3D simple tetragonal, body-centered tetragonal, and stacked triangular and honeycomb lattices are presented for c /a ratios from 0.5 to 3 in both graphical and tabular form to facilitate comparison of experimentally determined easy axes of ordering on these Bravais lattices with the predictions for MDIs. Comparisons with the easy axes measured for several illustrative collinear antiferromagnets (AFMs) are given. The calculations are extended to the cycloidal noncollinear 120∘ AFM ordering on the triangular lattice where λ is found to be the same as for collinear AFM ordering with the same k. The angular orientation of the ordered moments in the noncollinear coplanar AFM structure of GdB4 with a distorted stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland spin-lattice geometry is calculated and found to be in disagreement with experimental observations, indicating the presence of another source of anisotropy. Similar calculations for the undistorted 2D and stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland lattices are reported. The thermodynamics of dipolar magnets are calculated using the Weiss molecular field theory for quantum spins, including the magnetic transition

  15. Magnetic dipole interactions in crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Johnston, David

    2016-01-13

    The influence of magnetic dipole interactions (MDIs) on the magnetic properties of local-moment Heisenberg spin systems is investigated. A general formulation is presented for calculating the eigenvalues λ and eigenvectors μ ˆ of the MDI tensor of the magnetic dipoles in a line (one dimension, 1D), within a circle (2D) or a sphere (3D) of radius r surrounding a given moment μ → i for given magnetic propagation vectors k for collinear and coplanar noncollinear magnetic structures on both Bravais and non-Bravais spin lattices. Results are calculated for collinear ordering on 1D chains, 2D square and simple-hexagonal (triangular) Bravais lattices,more » 2D honeycomb and kagomé non-Bravais lattices, and 3D cubic Bravais lattices. The λ and μ ˆ values are compared with previously reported results. Calculations for collinear ordering on 3D simple tetragonal, body-centered tetragonal, and stacked triangular and honeycomb lattices are presented for c/a ratios from 0.5 to 3 in both graphical and tabular form to facilitate comparison of experimentally determined easy axes of ordering on these Bravais lattices with the predictions for MDIs. Comparisons with the easy axes measured for several illustrative collinear antiferromagnets (AFMs) are given. The calculations are extended to the cycloidal noncollinear 120 ° AFM ordering on the triangular lattice where λ is found to be the same as for collinear AFM ordering with the same k. The angular orientation of the ordered moments in the noncollinear coplanar AFM structure of GdB 4 with a distorted stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland spin-lattice geometry is calculated and found to be in disagreement with experimental observations, indicating the presence of another source of anisotropy. Similar calculations for the undistorted 2D and stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland lattices are reported. The thermodynamics of dipolar magnets are calculated using the Weiss molecular field theory for quantum spins, including the magnetic

  16. Controlling dipole-dipole frequency shifts in a lattice-based optical atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.E.; Lukin, M.D.; Ye Jun

    2004-02-01

    Motivated by the ideas of using cold alkaline-earth atoms trapped in an optical lattice for realization of optical atomic clocks, we investigate theoretically the perturbative effects of atom-atom interactions on a clock transition frequency. These interactions are mediated by the dipole fields associated with the optically excited atoms. We predict resonancelike features in the frequency shifts when constructive interference among atomic dipoles occur. We theoretically demonstrate that by fine tuning the coherent dipole-dipole couplings in appropriately designed lattice geometries, the undesirable frequency shifts can be greatly suppressed.

  17. A dipole model for spreading cortical depression.

    PubMed

    Tepley, N; Wijesinghe, R S

    1996-01-01

    Spreading Cortical Depression (SCD) is the hyper-excitation, followed by extreme suppression of spontaneous electrical activity in the cortex. This work models SCD propagation using current dipoles to represent excitable pyramidal cells. An area of cortex, either gyrus or sulcus, supporting SCD is represented by surface dipoles oriented perpendicular to the surface. Magnetic fields created by these individual surface dipoles are calculated using the Biot-Savart law. We have assumed a plane volume conductor to represent the sulcus to simplify the mathematical derivation. The sources included in cortical surface area of 10(-4)mm2 is represented by a signal dipole. The magnetic field arising from the entire excited area of the cortex is obtained by summing the fields due to these individual dipoles. The simulated waveforms suggest that the shapes, amplitudes, and durations of the SCD signals depend on the size of the active area of cortex involved in SCD, as well as the location and orientation of the detector. Using this dipole model, we are able to simulate the Large Amplitude Waves (LAWs) similar to those observed by Barkley et al. (1990) while measuring spontaneous activity from migraine headache patients using the assumption that these LAWs arise from propagation of SCD across a sulcus. The shape of the simulated LAW waveform is strongly influenced by the relationships between the detector location and orientation, the propagation direction of the SCD wave, and the orientation of the sulcus. PMID:8813414

  18. A Dipole Assisted IEC Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Prajakti Joshi Shrestha

    2005-11-28

    A potential opportunity to enhance Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion exists by augmenting it with a magnetic dipole configuration. The theory is that the dipole fields will enhance the plasma density in the center region of the IEC and the combined IEC and dipole confinement properties will reduce plasma losses. To demonstrate that a hybrid Dipole-IEC configuration can provide an improved neutron source vs. a stand alone IEC, a first model Dipole-IEC experiment was benchmarked against a reference IEC. A triple Langmuir probe was used to find the electron temperature and density. It was found that the magnetic field increases the electron density by a factor of 16, the electron temperature decreases in the presence of a magnetic field, the discharge voltage decreases in the presence of a magnetic field, the potential of the dipole strongly influences the densities obtained in the center. The experimental set-up and plasma diagnostics are discussed in detail, as well as the results, and the developmental issues.

  19. Bilayer fractional quantum Hall states with dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, N. Y.; Bennett, S. D.; Laumann, C. R.; Lev, B. L.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Using the example of dysprosium atoms in an optical lattice, we show how dipolar interactions between magnetic dipoles can be used to obtain fractional quantum Hall states. In our approach, dysprosium atoms are trapped one atom per site in a deep optical lattice with negligible tunneling. Microwave and spatially dependent optical dressing fields are used to define an effective spin-1/2 or spin-1 degree of freedom in each atom. Thinking of spin-1/2 particles as hard-core bosons, dipole-dipole interactions give rise to boson hopping, topological flat bands with Chern number 1, and the ν =1/2 Laughlin state. Thinking of spin-1 particles as two-component hard-core bosons, dipole-dipole interactions again give rise to boson hopping, topological flat bands with Chern number 2, and the bilayer Halperin (2,2,1) state. By adjusting the optical fields, we find a phase diagram, in which the (2,2,1) state competes with superfluidity. Generalizations to solid-state magnetic dipoles are discussed.

  20. Dipole-moment-driven cooperative supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Chidambar; Bejagam, Karteek K; Senanayak, Satyaprasad P; Narayan, K S; Balasubramanian, S; George, Subi J

    2015-03-25

    While the mechanism of self-assembly of π-conjugated molecules has been well studied to gain control over the structure and functionality of supramolecular polymers, the intermolecular interactions underpinning it are poorly understood. Here, we study the mechanism of self-assembly of perylene bisimide derivatives possessing dipolar carbonate groups as linkers. It was observed that the combination of carbonate linkers and cholesterol/dihydrocholesterol self-assembling moieties led to a cooperative mechanism of self-assembly. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of an assembly in explicit solvent strongly suggest that the dipole-dipole interaction between the carbonate groups imparts a macro-dipolar character to the assembly. This is confirmed experimentally through the observation of a significant polarization in the bulk phase for molecules following a cooperative mechanism. The cooperativity is attributed to the presence of dipole-dipole interaction in the assembly. Thus, anisotropic long-range intermolecular interactions such as dipole-dipole interaction can serve as a way to obtain cooperative self-assembly and aid in rationalizing and predicting the mechanisms in various synthetic supramolecular polymers. PMID:25756951

  1. electric dipole superconductor in bilayer exciton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qing-Feng; Jiang, Qing-Dong; Bao, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, X. C.

    Recently, it was reported that the bilayer exciton systems could exhibit many new phenomena, including the large bilayer counterflow conductivity, the Coulomb drag, etc. These phenomena imply the formation of exciton condensate superfluid state. On the other hand, it is now well known that the superconductor is the condensate superfluid state of the Cooper pairs, which can be viewed as electric monopoles. In other words, the superconductor state is the electric monopole condensate superfluid state. Thus, one may wonder whether there exists electric dipole superfluid state. In this talk, we point out that the exciton in a bilayer system can be considered as a charge neutral electric dipole. And we derive the London-type and Ginzburg-Landau-type equations of electric dipole superconductivity. From these equations, we discover the Meissner-type effect (against spatial variation of magnetic fields), and the dipole current Josephson effect. The frequency in the AC Josephson effect of the dipole current is equal to that in the normal (monopole) superconductor. These results can provide direct evidence for the formation of exciton superfluid state in the bilayer systems and pave new ways to obtain the electric dipole current. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by NBRP of China (2012CB921303 and 2015CB921102) and NSF-China under Grants Nos. 11274364 and 11574007.

  2. Giant intrathyroidal parathyroid adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Zafón, Carlos; Migone, Raul; Baena, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is not an uncommon endocrine disorder. However, acute primary hyperparathyroidism, or parathyroid crisis (PC), is a rare clinical entity characterized by life-threatening hypercalcemia of a sudden onset in patients with PHPT. We describe a patient with PC who presented with acute worsening of depressive symptoms, nausea and vomiting, and required emergency surgery. Serum calcium, alkaline phosphatase, and parathyroid hormone were elevated and serum phosphorus was low. An emergency hemithyroidectomy was performed because of none medical control of hypercalcemia. A giant intrathyroidal parathyroid adenoma was diagnosed. PHTP can be a life-threatening situation for patients, requiring immediate surgical treatment. A giant intrathyroidal parathyroid adenoma is an uncommon cause of PC. PMID:22787355

  3. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  4. Giant thymic carcinoid.

    PubMed

    John, L C; Hornick, P; Lang, S; Wallis, J; Edmondson, S J

    1991-05-01

    Thymic carcinoid is a rare tumour. It may present with ectopic endocrine secretion or with symptoms of compression as a result of its size. A case is reported which presented with symptoms of compression where the size of the tumour was uniquely large such as to warrant the term giant thymic carcinoid. The typical histological features are described, together with its possible origin and its likely prognosis.

  5. A basic program to transform continuous polar dipole-dipole resistivity soundings to half-Schlumberger soundings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zerilli, A.; Bisdorf, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    An interactive HP 9845B BASIC program transforms continuous polar dipole-dipole resistivity soundings to half-Schlumberger soundings. The program features graphic presentation of the field dipole-dipole data as well as the transformed half-Schlumberger data. An example of the transformation and its effectiveness in smoothing "high-frequency" noise is given. ?? 1990.

  6. Optical force on toroidal nanostructures: Toroidal dipole versus renormalized electric dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu-Lin; Wang, S. B.; Lin, Zhifang; Sun, Hong-Bo; Chan, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    We study the optical forces acting on toroidal nanostructures. A great enhancement of optical force is unambiguously identified as originating from the toroidal dipole resonance based on the source representation, where the distribution of the induced charges and currents is characterized by the three families of electric, magnetic, and toroidal multipoles. On the other hand, the resonant optical force can also be completely attributed to an electric dipole resonance in the alternative field representation, where the electromagnetic fields in the source-free region are expressed by two sets of electric and magnetic multipole fields based on symmetry. The confusion is resolved by conceptually introducing the irreducible electric dipole, toroidal dipole, and renormalized electric dipole. We demonstrate that the optical force is a powerful tool to identify toroidal response even when its scattering intensity is dwarfed by the conventional electric and magnetic multipoles.

  7. Dipole-dipole broadening of Rb ns-np microwave transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hyunwook; Tanner, P. J.; Claessens, B. J.; Shuman, E. S.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2011-08-15

    The dipole-dipole broadening of ns-np microwave transitions of cold Rb Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap has been recorded for 28{<=}n{<=}51. Since the electric dipole transition matrix elements scale as n{sup 2}, a broadening rate scaling as n{sup 4} is expected and a broadening rate of 8.2x10{sup -15}n{sup 4} MHz cm{sup 3} is observed. The observed broadening is smaller than expected from a classical picture due to the spin-orbit interaction in the np atoms. The broadened resonances are asymmetric and cusp shaped, and their line shapes can be reproduced by a diatomic model which takes into account the dipole-dipole interaction, including the spin-orbit interaction, the strengths of the allowed microwave transitions, and the distribution of the atomic spacings in the trap.

  8. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.

    2016-10-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics (AO) imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order AO systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young (≈5-300 Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1 and 3.0 M ⊙, the overall occurrence rate of 5-13 M Jup companions at orbital distances of 30-300 au is {0.6}-0.5+0.7 % assuming hot-start evolutionary models. The most massive giant planets regularly accessible to direct imaging are about as rare as hot Jupiters are around Sun-like stars. Dividing this sample into individual stellar mass bins does not reveal any statistically significant trend in planet frequency with host mass: giant planets are found around {2.8}-2.3+3.7 % of BA stars, <4.1% of FGK stars, and <3.9% of M dwarfs. Looking forward, extreme AO systems and the next generation of ground- and space-based telescopes with smaller inner working angles and deeper detection limits will increase the pace of discovery to ultimately map the demographics, composition, evolution, and origin of planets spanning a broad range of masses and ages.

  9. GIANT INTRACANALICULAR FIBROADENOMA

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyn; Parsons, Robert J.; Bogart, William M.

    1951-01-01

    Five cases of giant intracanalicular fibroadenoma (“cystosarcoma phylloides”) were observed at one hospital in a period of three years. In a search of the literature, additional reports of breast tumors of this kind, not included in previous reviews, were noted. As there is record of 229 cases, it would appear that this rapidly growing benign tumor should be kept in mind in the diagnosis of masses in the breast. If removal is incomplete, there may be recurrence. Simple mastectomy is the treatment of choice. Radical mastectomy should be avoided. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2.Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:14848732

  10. The case of the disappearing magnetic dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, W.

    2008-03-01

    The problem of an oscillating magnetic dipole at the centre of a lossless dielectric spherical shell is considered. For simplicity, the free-space wavelength is taken to be much greater than the shell radii, but the relative permittivity ɛr of the shell is taken as much greater than unity, so the wavelength in the shell could be comparable with its dimensions. The vector potential in all regions is found. Under certain conditions, involving the shell radii, the frequency and ɛr, the vector potential outside the shell appears to be infinite. This is impossible, so one must conclude that the dipole moment vanishes. This result, a 'disappearing dipole', although strange, can be justified. Although this paper is aimed primarily at readers with a strong interest in fundamental physics, it could be introduced as an interesting result in an undergraduate course on electromagnetism.

  11. Pursuit and Synchronization in Hydrodynamic Dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanso, Eva; Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou

    2015-10-01

    We study theoretically the behavior of a class of hydrodynamic dipoles. This study is motivated by recent experiments on synthetic and biological swimmers in microfluidic Hele-Shaw type geometries. Under such confinement, a swimmer's hydrodynamic signature is that of a potential source dipole, and the long-range interactions among swimmers are obtained from the superposition of dipole singularities. Here, we recall the equations governing the positions and orientations of interacting asymmetric swimmers in doubly periodic domains and focus on the dynamics of pairs of swimmers. We obtain two families of "relative equilibria"-type solutions that correspond to pursuit and synchronization of the two swimmers. Interestingly, the pursuit mode is stable for large-tail swimmers, whereas the synchronization mode is stable for large-head swimmers. These results have profound implications on the collective behavior reported in several recent studies on populations of confined microswimmers.

  12. Sound scattering by a vortex dipole.

    PubMed

    Naugolnykh, Konstantin

    2013-04-01

    Sound scattering by a system of two counter-rotating vortices (Lamb dipole) is considered, using the effective approach of Pitaevskii [J. Exp. Theor. Phys (USSR) 35, 1271-1275 (1958); Sov. Phys. JETP 85, 888-890 (1959)], based on application of the asymptotic representation of the scattering Green function, the Dirac delta function modeling of the vortex, and the Fourier transformation of the vector of scattering. The sound frequency is supposed to be low. The directivity pattern of the radiation, scattered by the Lamb dipole is obtained. There is no singularity in scattering field in this case as it must be for the vorticity with zero circulation, so the dipole is a more appropriate object for the approximation used.

  13. Relationships between dipole moments of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shilin; Bernath, Peter F

    2015-02-14

    The dipole moment is one of the most important physical properties of a molecule. We present a combination rule for the dipole moments of related diatomic molecules. For molecules AB, AX, BY, and XY from two different element groups in the periodic table, if their elements make a small parallelogram, reliable predictions can be obtained. Our approach is particularly useful for systems with heavy atoms. For a large set of molecules tested, the average difference of the prediction from experimental data is less than 0.2 debye (D). The dipole moments for heavy molecules such as GaCl, InBr, SrCl, and SrS, for which no experimental data are available at present, are predicted to be 3.17, 3.76, 3.85 and 11.54 D, respectively. PMID:25588998

  14. Variable-field permanent magnet dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Meyer, R.E.

    1993-10-01

    A new concept for a variable-field permanent-magnet dipole (VFPMD) has been designed, fabricated, and tested at Los Alamos. The VFPMD is a C-shaped sector magnet with iron poles separated by a large block of magnet material (SmCo). The central field can be continuously varied from 0.07 T to 0.3 T by moving an iron shunt closer or further away from the back of the magnet. The shunt is specially shaped to make the dependence of the dipole field strength on the shunt position as linear as possible. The dipole has a 2.8 cm high by 8 cm wide aperture with {approximately}10 cm long poles.

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy and the dipole approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmers, O.; Hansen, D.L.; Wang, H.

    1997-04-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is a powerful technique because it directly probes, via the measurement of photoelectron kinetic energies, orbital and band structure in valence and core levels in a wide variety of samples. The technique becomes even more powerful when it is performed in an angle-resolved mode, where photoelectrons are distinguished not only by their kinetic energy, but by their direction of emission as well. Determining the probability of electron ejection as a function of angle probes the different quantum-mechanical channels available to a photoemission process, because it is sensitive to phase differences among the channels. As a result, angle-resolved photoemission has been used successfully for many years to provide stringent tests of the understanding of basic physical processes underlying gas-phase and solid-state interactions with radiation. One mainstay in the application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is the well-known electric-dipole approximation for photon interactions. In this simplification, all higher-order terms, such as those due to electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole interactions, are neglected. As the photon energy increases, however, effects beyond the dipole approximation become important. To best determine the range of validity of the dipole approximation, photoemission measurements on a simple atomic system, neon, where extra-atomic effects cannot play a role, were performed at BL 8.0. The measurements show that deviations from {open_quotes}dipole{close_quotes} expectations in angle-resolved valence photoemission are observable for photon energies down to at least 0.25 keV, and are quite significant at energies around 1 keV. From these results, it is clear that non-dipole angular-distribution effects may need to be considered in any application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy that uses x-ray photons of energies as low as a few hundred eV.

  16. Neutron electric dipole moment and CP

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Darwin; Chang, We-Fu; Frank, Mariana; Keung, Wai-Yee

    2000-11-01

    We analyze the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with explicit R-parity violating terms. The leading contribution to the EDM occurs at the two-loop level and is dominated by the chromoelectric dipole moments of quarks, assuming there is no tree-level mixings between sleptons and Higgs bosons or between leptons and gauginos. Based on the experimental constraint on the neutron EDM, we set limits on the imaginary parts of complex couplings {lambda}{sub ijk}{prime} and {lambda}{sub ijk} due to the virtual b loop or {tau} loop.

  17. Waves in space plasma dipole antenna subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The Waves In Space Plasma (WISP) flight experiment requires a 50-meter-long deployable dipole antenna subsystem (DASS) to radiate radio frequencies from the STS Orbiter cargo bay. The transmissions are to excite outer ionospheric plasma between the dipole and a free-flying receiver (Spartan) for scientific purposes. This report describes the singular DASS design requirements and how the resulting design satisfies them. A jettison latch is described in some detail. The latch releases the antenna in case of any problems which might prevent the bay doors from closing for re-entry and landing of the Orbiter.

  18. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  19. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma

    PubMed Central

    Teli, Bhavuray; Thrishuli, P. B.; Santhosh, R.; Amar, D. N.; Rajpurohit, Shravan

    2015-01-01

    Adnexal tumors like giant solitary trichoepitheliomas are uncommon to most of us to permit a ready familiarity with them. Information regarding the genesis, clinical profile, behavior, and management options for this tumor is limited. There are 18 cases reported in the world literature till date. This review attempts to provide insight to this rare tumor. Our search included indexed literature from Pubmed, Directory of Open Access Journals, Health Inter Network Access to Research Initiative and Google databases in addition to standard dermatology texts. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma is a rare trichogenic tumor with potential for local recurrence. It has predilection for the older age, but may present at any age including at birth. It has close resemblance to basal cell carcinoma and other skin adnexal tumors - clinically, cytologically, and histologically. CD10, CD 34, PHLDA1 but not p75NTR are useful adjunct markers. Surgical excision is the standard treatment. Recurrence and possible transformation into BCC cautions follow up at regular intervals. PMID:25839021

  20. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  1. Rheology of giant micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, M. E.; Fielding, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Giant micelles are elongated, polymer-like objects created by the self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules (such as detergents) in solution. Giant micelles are typically flexible, and can become highly entangled even at modest concentrations. The resulting viscoelastic solutions show fascinating flow behaviour (rheology) which we address theoretically in this article at two levels. First, we summarize advances in understanding linear viscoelastic spectra and steady-state nonlinear flows, based on microscopic constitutive models that combine the physics of polymer entanglement with the reversible kinetics of self-assembly. Such models were first introduced two decades ago, and since then have been shown to explain robustly several distinctive features of the rheology in the strongly entangled regime, including extreme shear thinning. We then turn to more complex rheological phenomena, particularly involving spatial heterogeneity, spontaneous oscillation, instability and chaos. Recent understanding of these complex flows is based largely on grossly simplified models which capture in outline just a few pertinent microscopic features, such as coupling between stresses and other order parameters such as concentration. The role of ‘structural memory’ (the dependence of structural parameters such as the micellar length distribution on the flow history) in explaining these highly nonlinear phenomena is addressed. Structural memory also plays an intriguing role in the little-understood shear thickening regime, which occurs in a concentration regime close to but below the onset of strong entanglement, and which is marked by a shear-induced transformation from an inviscid to a gelatinous state.

  2. Dipole-dipole interactions in optical lattices do not follow an inverse cube power law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, M. L.; Carr, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    We study the effective dipole-dipole interactions in ultracold quantum gases on optical lattices as a function of asymmetry in confinement along the principal axes of the lattice. In particular, we study the matrix elements of the dipole-dipole interaction in the basis of lowest band Wannier functions which serve as a set of low-energy states for many-body physics on the lattice. We demonstrate that, for shallow lattices in quasi-reduced dimensional scenarios, the effective interaction between dipoles in an optical lattice is non-algebraic in the inter-particle separation at short to medium distance on the lattice scale and has a long-range power-law tail, in contrast to the pure power-law behavior of the dipole-dipole interaction in free space. The modifications to the free-space interaction can be sizable; we identify differences of up to 36% from the free-space interaction at the nearest-neighbor distance in quasi-one-dimensional arrangements. The interaction difference depends essentially on asymmetry in confinement, due to the d-wave anisotropy of the dipole-dipole interaction. Our results do not depend on statistics, applying to both dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases. Using matrix product state simulations, we demonstrate that use of the correct lattice dipolar interaction leads to significant deviations from many-body predictions using the free-space interaction. Our results are relevant to up and coming experiments with ultracold heteronuclear molecules, Rydberg atoms and strongly magnetic atoms in optical lattices.

  3. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  4. Entanglement between two atoms in the presence of dipole-dipole interaction and atomic coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirov, Eugene K.; Litvinova, Darya V.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the influence of dipole-dipole interaction and initial atomic coherence on dynamics of two-atom systems. We have considered a model, in which only one atom is trapped in a cavity, and the other one can be spatially moved freely outside the cavity. We have shown the possibility of disappearance of the entanglement sudden death effect in the presence of the dipole interaction of atoms. We have also derived that the initial atomic coherence can be used for effective control of the degree of the atom-atom entanglement.

  5. Effect of dipole-dipole interaction on self-control magnetization oscillation in double-domain nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y. J.; Guo, Y. J.; Liu, J.-M.

    2012-03-01

    A double-domain model with long-range dipole-dipole interaction is proposed to investigate the self-oscillation of magnetization in nano-magnetic systems driven by self-controlled spin-polarized current. The dynamic behavior of magnetization oscillation is calculated by a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in order to evaluate the effects of the long-range dipole-dipole interaction. While the self-oscillation of magnetization can be maintained substantially, several self-oscillation regions are experienced as the dipole-dipole interaction increases gradually.

  6. The Case of the Disappearing Magnetic Dipole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, W.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of an oscillating magnetic dipole at the centre of a lossless dielectric spherical shell is considered. For simplicity, the free-space wavelength is taken to be much greater than the shell radii, but the relative permittivity [epsilon][subscript r] of the shell is taken as much greater than unity, so the wavelength in the shell could…

  7. Electromagnetic Force on a Moving Dipole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kholmetskii, Alexander L.; Missevitch, Oleg V.; Yarman, T.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the force acting on a moving dipole due to an external electromagnetic field and show that the expression derived in Vekstein (1997 "Eur. J. Phys." 18 113) is erroneous and suggest the correct equation for the description of this force. We also discuss the physical meaning of the relativistic transformation of current for a closed…

  8. Dipole nano-laser: Theory and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ghannam, T.

    2014-03-31

    In this paper we outline the main quantum properties of the system of nano-based laser called Dipole Nano-Laser emphasizing mainly on its ability to produce coherent light and for different configurations such as different embedding materials and subjecting it to an external classical electric field.

  9. Electric Dipole Tests of Time Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    2001-03-01

    If there is either T or P symmetry, there can be no electric dipole moment for particles whose orientations are fully specified by the orientations of their spin angular momenta. As a result, there have been extensive searches for electric dipole moments as tests of these symmetries. CP non-conservation has been observed, which implies non-conservation of T if CPT is conserved, but it has only been seen in the decay of the artificially produced {K}{L}0 . The history of the searches for neutron and atomic electric dipole moments is summarized. The earliest experiments utilized a neutron beam magnetic resonance apparatus, but the present neutron experiments study ultra cold neutrons trapped in bottles whose walls totally reflect the neutrons. Recent atomic and molecular searches are sensitive both to particle electric dipole moments and to other related T non-conserving quantities. The various neutron, atomic and molecular experiments are described. The results of these searches are compared with the predictions of theories that account for the known CP non-conservation in the decay of the {K}{L}0 . The experiments directly set limits to T-odd, P-odd interaction terms, but through electroweak radiative corrections they also set limits to T-odd, P-even interactions.

  10. Electric Dipole Tests of Time Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    1994-08-01

    If there is either T or P symmetry, there can be no electric dipole moment for particles whose orientations are fully specified by the orientations of their spin angular momenta. As a result, there have been extensive searches for electric dipole moments as tests of these symmetries. CP non-conservation has been observed, which implies non-conservation of T if CPT is conserved, but it has only been seen in the decay of the artificially produced K0L. The history of the searches for neutron and atomic electric dipole moments is summarized. The earliest experiments utilized a neutron beam magnetic resonance apparatus, but the present neutron experiments study ultra cold neutrons trapped in bottles whose walls totally reflect the neutrons. Recent atomic and molecular searches are sensitive both to particle electric dipole moments and to other related T non-conserving quantities. The various neutron, atomic and molecular experiments are described. The results of these searches are compared with the predictions of theories that account for the known CP non-conservation in the decay of the K0L. The experiments directly set limits to T-odd, P-odd interaction terms, but through eleectroweak radiative corrections they also set limits to T-odd, P-even interactions.

  11. A Microstrip Reflect Array Using Crossed Dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozar, David M.; Targonski, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    Microstrip reflect arrays offer a flat profile and light weight, combined with many of the electrical characteristics of reflector antennas. Previous work [1]-[7] has demonstrated a variety of microstrip reflect arrays, using different elements at a range of frequencies. In this paper we describe the use of crossed dipoles as reflecting elements in a microstrip reflectarray. Theory of the solution will be described, with experimental results for a 6" square reflectarray operating at 28 GHz. The performance of crossed dipoles will be directly compared with microstrip patches, in terms of bandwidth and loss. We also comment on the principle of operation of reflectarray elements, including crossed dipoles, patches of variable length, and patch elements with tuning stubs. This research was prompted by the proposed concept of overlaying a flat printed reflectarray on the surface of a spacecraft solar panel. Combining solar panel and antenna apertures in this way would lead to a reduction in weight and simpler deployment, with some loss of flexibility in independently pointing the solar panel and the antenna. Using crossed dipoles as reflectarray elements will minimize the aperture blockage of the solar cells, in contrast to the use of elements such as microstrip patches.

  12. Giant magnetostrictive composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duenas, Terrisa Ann

    The limitation of magnetostrictive composites has been in their low magnetostrictive response when compared to their monolithic counterparts. In this dissertation research is presented describing the methods and analysis used to create a giant magnetostrictive composite (GMC) producing giant strains at low fields, exhibiting magnetization ``jumping'' and the ΔE effect. This composite combines the giant magnetostrictive material, Terfenol-D (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2) in particle form, with a nonmetallic binder and is capable of producing strains (at room temperature) exceeding 1000 ppm at a nominal field of 1.5 kOe mechanically unloaded and 1200 ppm at 8 MPa preload (2.5 kOe). Several studies leading to the high response of this composite are presented. A connectivity study shows that a [1-3] connected composite produces 50% more strain than a [0-3] composite. A resin study indicates that the lower the viscosity of the resin, the greater the magnetostrictive response; this is attributed to the removal of voids during degassing. A void study correlates the increase in voids to the decrease in strain response. A model is used to correlate analysis with experimental results within 10% accuracy and shows that an optimal volume fraction exists based on the properties of the binder. Using a Polyscience Spurr low- viscosity (60 cps) binder this volume fraction is nominally 20%; this optimum is attributed to the balance of epoxy contracting on the particle (built-in preload) and the actuation delivered by the magnetostrictive material. In addition to the connectivity, resin, void, and volume-fraction study, particle size and gradation studies are presented. Widely dispersed (<106, <212, <300 μm), narrowly dispersed (<45, (90-106), (275-300) μm), and an optimized bimodal (18.7% of (45-90) μm with 81.3% of (250-300) μm) particle distributions are studied. Results show that the larger the particle size, the higher the magnetostrictive response; this is attributed to the reduction of

  13. Giant vesicles: preparations and applications.

    PubMed

    Walde, Peter; Cosentino, Katia; Engel, Helen; Stano, Pasquale

    2010-05-01

    There is considerable interest in preparing cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles from natural or nonnatural amphiphiles because a giant vesicle membrane resembles the self-closed lipid matrix of the plasma membrane of all biological cells. Currently, giant vesicles are applied to investigate certain aspects of biomembranes. Examples include lateral lipid heterogeneities, membrane budding and fission, activities of reconstituted membrane proteins, or membrane permeabilization caused by added chemical compounds. One of the challenging applications of giant vesicles include gene expressions inside the vesicles with the ultimate goal of constructing a dynamic artificial cell-like system that is endowed with all those essential features of living cells that distinguish them from the nonliving form of matter. Although this goal still seems to be far away and currently difficult to reach, it is expected that progress in this and other fields of giant vesicle research strongly depend on whether reliable methods for the reproducible preparation of giant vesicles are available. The key concepts of currently known methods for preparing giant unilamellar vesicles are summarized, and advantages and disadvantages of the main methods are compared and critically discussed. PMID:20336703

  14. Master equation with quantized atomic motion including dipole-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damanet, François; Braun, Daniel; Martin, John

    2016-05-01

    We derive a markovian master equation for the internal dynamics of an ensemble of two-level atoms including all effects related to the quantization of their motion. Our equation provides a unifying picture of the consequences of recoil and indistinguishability of atoms beyond the Lamb-Dicke regime on both their dissipative and conservative dynamics, and is relevant for experiments with ultracold trapped atoms. We give general expressions for the decay rates and the dipole-dipole shifts for any motional states, and we find analytical formulas for a number of relevant states (Gaussian states, Fock states and thermal states). In particular, we show that the dipole-dipole interactions and cooperative photon emission can be modulated through the external state of motion. The effects predicted should be experimentally observable with Rydberg atoms. FD would like to thank the F.R.S.-FNRS for financial support. FD is a FRIA Grant holder of the Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique-FNRS.

  15. Simulations of the angular dependence of the dipole-dipole interaction among Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Jacob L.; Paul, Jacob T.; Peleg, Matan; Sanford, Veronica L.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-08-01

    The dipole-dipole interaction between two Rydberg atoms depends on the relative orientation of the atoms and on the change in the magnetic quantum number. We simulate the effect of this anisotropy on the energy transport in an amorphous many atom system subject to a homogeneous applied electric field. We consider two experimentally feasible geometries and find that the effects should be measurable in current generation imaging experiments. In both geometries atoms of p character are localized to a small region of space which is immersed in a larger region that is filled with atoms of s character. Energy transfer due to the dipole-dipole interaction can lead to a spread of p character into the region initially occupied by s atoms. Over long timescales the energy transport is confined to the volume near the border of the p region which suggests Anderson localization. We calculate a correlation length of 6.3 μm for one particular geometry.

  16. Pygmy dipole response of proton-rich argon nuclei in random-phase approximation and no-core shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, C.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Caurier, E.; Langanke, K.

    2008-02-15

    The occurrence of a pygmy dipole resonance in proton rich {sup 32,34}Ar is studied using the unitary correlator operator method interaction V{sub UCOM}, based on Argonne V18. Predictions from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and the shell model in a no-core basis are compared. It is found that the inclusion of configuration mixing up to two-particles-two-holes broadens the pygmy strength slightly and reduces sensibly its strength, as compared to the RPA predictions. For {sup 32}Ar, a clear peak associated with a pygmy resonance is found. For {sup 34}Ar, the pygmy states are obtained close to the giant dipole resonance and mix with it.

  17. Light Charged Particle Emission and the Giant Dipole Resonance in Ce Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramegna, F.; Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lanchais, A. L.; Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.; Moroni, A.; Casini, G.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Brekiesz, M.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chiari, M.; Crespi, F.; Geraci, E.; Guiot, B.; Kmiecik, M.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Mastinu, P. F.; Million, B.; Nannini, A.; Ordine, A.; Vannini, G.

    2005-04-01

    The 132Ce compound nucleus was formed in fusion reactions 64Ni + 68Zn and 16O + 116Sn at different excitation energies. High energy γ -rays have been measured in coincidence with Evaporation Residues (ER) in these reactions. At the same time Light Charged Particles (LCP) were measured with the same gate on ER for all the reactions in order to verify and compare the amount of pre-equilibrium emission using mass-symmetric and mass-asymmetric entrance channels. Results on α -particle spectra will be presented together with a moving source fit analysis.

  18. Yields of photoneutron reactions on {sup 197}Au nuclei in the giant-dipole-resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Belyshev, S. S.; Ermakov, A. N.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Kurilik, A. S.; Stopani, K. A.; Troschiev, S. Yu.

    2011-11-15

    Yields of photonuclear reactions on 197Au nuclei were measured in a beam of bremsstrahlung photons, the endpoint energy of the bremsstrahlung spectrum being 29.1 MeV. These measurements were performed by means of the gamma-activation procedure. The results obtained in this way were compared with the results of earlier experiments and theoretical calculations.

  19. Collectivity of the pygmy dipole resonance within schematic Tamm-Dancoff approximation and random-phase approximation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, V.; Palade, D. I.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Croitoru, A.; Nicolin, A. I.

    2015-05-01

    Within schematic models based on the Tamm-Dancoff approximation and the random-phase approximation with separable interactions, we investigate the physical conditions that may determine the emergence of the pygmy dipole resonance in the E 1 response of atomic nuclei. By introducing a generalization of the Brown-Bolsterli schematic model with a density-dependent particle-hole residual interaction, we find that an additional mode will be affected by the interaction, whose energy centroid is closer to the distance between two major shells and therefore well below the giant dipole resonance (GDR). This state, together with the GDR, exhausts all the transition strength in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation and all the energy-weighted sum rule in the random-phase approximation. Thus, within our scheme, this mode, which could be associated with the pygmy dipole resonance, is of collective nature. By relating the coupling constants appearing in the separable interaction to the symmetry energy value at and below saturation density we explore the role of density dependence of the symmetry energy on the low-energy dipole response.

  20. [Giant adrenal myelolipoma].

    PubMed

    El Mejjad, Amine; Fekak, Hamid; Dakir, Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail; Manni, Ahmed; Meziane, Fethi

    2004-02-01

    Adrenal myelolipoma is a rare, benign, non-secreting tumour composed of adipose and haematopoietic tissue. The authors report a rare case of giant adrenal myelolipoma in a 53-year-old patient presenting with low back pain and a palpable flank mass on examination. CT scan suggested the diagnosis and surgical resection was indicated in view of the size and symptomatic nature of this mass. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis. The outcome was favourable without recurrence after a follow-up of one year. The diagnosis of adrenal myelolipoma is based on radiology. Conservative management is generally sufficient for small asymptomatic tumours, but resection is required for large (> 5 cm) and/or symptomatic tumours.

  1. Two giant stellar complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Yu. N.; Efremov, E. Yu.

    Common star complexes are huge (0.3-1 kpc in diameter) groups of relatively young stars, associations and clusters. The complexes usually form regular chains along spiral arms of grand design galaxies, being evidently formed and supported by magneto- gravitational instability developing along an arm. Special attention is given to a few large complexes which have signatures of gravitational boundness, such as round shape and high central density. Concentrations of stars and clusters in such a complex in M51 galaxy were found in this paper; we concluded it is possible to suggest that the complex is gravitationally bound. It is also stressed that some properties of the giant complex in NGC 6946 (such as its semicircular and sharp Western edge) are still enigmatic.

  2. Probing dipole-dipole interaction in a rubidium gas via double-quantum 2D spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Cundiff, Steven T; Li, Hebin

    2016-07-01

    We have implemented double-quantum 2D spectroscopy on a rubidium vapor and shown that this technique provides sensitive and background-free detection of the dipole-dipole interaction. The 2D spectra include signals from both individual atoms and interatomic interactions, allowing quantitative studies of the interaction. A theoretical model based on the optical Bloch equations is used to reproduce the experimental spectrum and confirm the origin of double-quantum signals. PMID:27367074

  3. Effects of hydrophobic and dipole-dipole interactions on the conformational transitions of a model polypeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yan; Gao, Yi Qin

    2007-09-01

    We studied the effects of hydrophobicity and dipole-dipole interactions between the nearest-neighbor amide planes on the secondary structures of a model polypeptide by calculating the free energy differences between different peptide structures. The free energy calculations were performed with low computational costs using the accelerated Monte Carlo simulation (umbrella sampling) method, with a bias-potential method used earlier in our accelerated molecular dynamics simulations. It was found that the hydrophobic interaction enhances the stability of α helices at both low and high temperatures but stabilizes β structures only at high temperatures at which α helices are not stable. The nearest-neighbor dipole-dipole interaction stabilizes β structures under all conditions, especially in the low temperature region where α helices are the stable structures. Our results indicate clearly that the dipole-dipole interaction between the nearest neighboring amide planes plays an important role in determining the peptide structures. Current research provides a more unified and quantitative picture for understanding the effects of different forms of interactions on polypeptide structures. In addition, the present model can be extended to describe DNA/RNA, polymer, copolymer, and other chain systems.

  4. Probing dipole-dipole interactions in a frozen Rydberg gas with millimeter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenhui

    2005-11-01

    Frozen Rydberg gases are currently of interest for two reasons. First, the atoms in such cold samples only move roughly 3% of the average interatomic spacing during the 1mus time scale of experimental interest, so the interactions between them are almost static, as in a disordered solid. Second, a frozen Rydberg gas can spontaneously evolve into an ultracold plasma, and the ultracold plasma can recombine to form Rydberg atoms. In this dissertation, I present experimental studies of these collective phenomena of cold Rydberg gases, with emphasis on the experiments done using millimeter waves. The many-body nature of the dipole-dipole interactions in a cold gas of Rydberg atoms is clearly demonstrated in the resonant energy transfer experiment by adding an additional state to the system using a microwave transition. Moreover, the microwave spectroscopy studies show that the attractive dipole-dipole interaction provides the initial ionization mechanism responsible for producing the free ions for trapping the electrons. This suggests an intimate connection between dipole-dipole interaction and plasma formation.

  5. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  6. Landscape of the lost giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene megafauna extinction erased a group of remarkable animals. Whether humans had a prominent role in the extinction remains controversial, but it is emerging that the disappearance of the giants has markedly affected the environment.

  7. Pharma giants swap research programs.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical giants Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) agreed in late April to swap some assets, with Novartis handing off its vaccine business to GSK and getting most of the British company's cancer portfolio in return.

  8. Geomagnetic Dipole Strength and Reversal Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J.; Meynadier, L.; Guyodo, Y.

    2004-12-01

    We present a first 2 million years long composite curve obtained after stacking records of relative paleointensity from a selection of sedimentary sequences. The composite Sint-2000 record was calibrated using the virtual dipole moments (VDMs) of the 2004 updated volcanic database of absolute paleointensity over 0.1 Myr long intervals. The value of the time-averaged VDM (7.46+/-1.16 x 1022 Am2) for the past 0.8Myr was used for calibration and the mean values of the successive 0.1 Myr intervals were found in very good agreement with the relative paleointensity for the same periods. A striking characteristic of this Sint-2000 curve is the succession of periods with different mean values of paleointensity. During the Brunhes chron the dipole oscillated around a value of 7.51+/-1.66 x 1022 Am2, which was significantly larger than during the previous 400 kyrs (5.3 +/- 1.5 x 1022 Am2). To provide a more quantitative picture of field strength as a function of reversal frequency, we calculated successive running averages of the field intensity over 100 kyrs long intervals and found that the time-averaged field was higher during periods without reversals. We also observe that the amplitude of the short-term oscillations remained the same. As a consequence, less intervals of very low intensity are expected during periods associated with a strong average dipole moment, whereas more excursions or other instabilities are produced during periods of weak field intensity. The relation between the mean dipole strength and the frequency of reversals suggests also the existence of a large field during long periods without reversals, under the assumption that they would be governed by the same processes. Prior to reversals, the axial dipole decays during 60 to 80 kyrs, but rebuilds itself in the opposite direction much more rapidly, in a few thousand years at most. These time constants suggest that the decay phase is caused by diffusion while advection would dominate the dipole

  9. Giant resonances in {sup 238}U within the quasiparticle random-phase approximation with the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, S.; Gosselin, G.; Martini, M.; Dupuis, M.; Hilaire, S.

    2011-01-15

    Fully consistent axially-symmetric deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) calculations have been performed, using the same Gogny D1S effective force for both the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov mean field and QRPA matrix. New implementation of this approach leads to the applicability of QRPA to heavy deformed nuclei. Giant resonances and low-energy collective states for monopole, dipole, quadrupole, and octupole modes are predicted for the heavy deformed nucleus {sup 238}U and compared with experimental data.

  10. RHIC AC DIPOLE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; METH,M.; PAI,C.; PARKER,B.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; SANDERS,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2001-06-18

    Two ac dipoles with vertical and horizontal magnetic field have been proposed at RHIC for applications in linear and non-linear beam dynamics and spin manipulations. A magnetic field amplitude of 380 Gm is required to produce a coherent oscillation of 5 times the rms beam size at the top energy. We take the ac dipole frequency to be 1.0% of the revolution frequency away from the betatron frequency. To achieve the strong magnetic field with minimum power loss, an air-core magnet with two seven turn winding of low loss Litz wire resonating at 64 kHz is designed. The system is also designed to allow one to connect the two magnet winding in series to resonate at 37 kHz for the spin manipulation. Measurements of a half length prototype magnet are also presented.

  11. Terahertz Dipole Nanoantenna Arrays: Resonance Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Razzari, Luca; Toma, Andrea; Clerici, Matteo; Shalaby, Mostafa; Das, Gobind; Liberale, Carlo; Chirumamilla, Manohar; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; De Angelis, Francesco; Peccianti, Marco; Morandotti, Roberto; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2013-03-01

    Resonant dipole nanoantennas promise to considerably improve the capabilities of terahertz spectroscopy, offering the possibility of increasing its sensitivity through local field enhancement, while in principle allowing unprecedented spatial resolutions, well below the diffraction limit. Here, we investigate the resonance properties of ordered arrays of terahertz dipole nanoantennas, both experimentally and through numerical simulations. We demonstrate the tunability of this type of structures, in a range (∼1-2 THz) that is particularly interesting and accessible by means of standard zinc telluride sources. We additionally study the near-field resonance properties of the arrays, finding that the resonance shift observed between near-field and far-field spectra is predominantly ascribable to ohmic damping.

  12. Permanent electric dipole moment of molybdenum carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hailing; Virgo, Wilton L.; Chen, Jinhai; Steimle, Timothy C.

    2007-09-01

    High resolution optical spectroscopy has been used to study a molecular beam of molybdenum monocarbide (MoC). The Stark effect of the Re(0) and Qfe(1) branch features of the [18.6]Π13-XΣ-3(0,0) band system of Mo98C were analyzed to determine the permanent electric dipole moments μe of 2.68(2) and 6.07(18)D for the [18.6]Π13(ν =0) and XΣ-3(ν =0) states, respectively. The dipole moments are compared with the experimental value for ruthenium monocarbide [T. C. Steimle et al., J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2620 (2003)] and with theoretical predictions. A molecular orbital correlation diagram is used to interpret the observed and predicted trends of ground state μe values for the 4d-metal monocarbides series.

  13. Revisiting the NVSS number count dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Prabhakar; Nusser, Adi

    2016-03-01

    We present a realistic modeling of the dipole component of the projected sky distribution of NVSS radio galaxies. The modeling relies on mock catalogs generated within the context of ΛCDM cosmology, in the linear regime of structure formation. After removing the contribution from the solar motion, the mocks show that the remaining observed signal is mostly (70%) due to structures within z lesssim 0.1. The amplitude of the model signal depends on the bias factor b of the NVSS mock galaxies. For sources with flux density, S > 15 mJy, the bias recipe inferred from higher order moments is consistent with the observed dipole signal at 2.12σ. Flux thresholds above 20 mJy yield a disagreement close to the 3σ level. A constant high bias, b = 3 is needed to mitigate the tension to the ~ 2.3σ level.

  14. Generation of squeezing: magnetic dipoles on cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, Hyojun; Singh, Swati; Steinke, Steven; Meystre, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the generation of motional squeezed states in a nano-mechanical cantilever. Our model system consists of a nanoscale cantilever - whose center-of-mass motion is initially cooled to its quantum mechanical ground state - magnetically coupled a classically driven mechanical tuning fork. We show that the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction can produce significant phonon squeezing of the center-of-mass motion of the cantilever, and evaluate the effect of various dissipation channels, including the coupling of the cantilever to a heat bath and phase and amplitude fluctuations in the oscillating field driving the tuning fork. US National Science Foundation, the US Army Research Office, DARPA ORCHID program through a grant from AFOSR.

  15. The asteroseismic signature of strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Stello, Dennis; Garcia, Rafael; Bildsten, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Internal stellar magnetic fields are inaccessible to direct observations and little is known about their amplitude, geometry and evolution. I will discuss how strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars can be identified with asteroseismology. The fields manifest themselves via depressed dipole stellar oscillation modes, which arises from a magnetic greenhouse effect that scatters and traps oscillation mode energy within the core of the star. Physically, the effect stems from magnetic tension forces created by sufficiently strong fields, which break the spherical symmetry of the wave propagation cavity. The loss of wave energy within the core reduces the mode visibility at the stellar surface, and we find that our predicted visibilities are in excellent agreement with a class of red giants exhibiting depressed dipole oscillation modes. The Kepler satellite has already observed hundreds of these red giants, which we identify as stars with strongly magnetized cores. Field strengths larger than roughly 10^5 G can produce the observed depression, and in one case we measure a core field strength of 10^7 G.

  16. Electric dipole moment of light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Afnan, Iraj R.; Gibson, Benjamin F.

    2010-07-27

    We examine the sensitivity of the deuteron Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) to variation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. In particular, we write the EDM as a sum of two terms, one depends on the target wave function, the second on intermediate multiple scattering states in the {sup 3}P{sub 1} channel. This second contribution is sensitive to off-shell behavior of the {sup 3}P{sub 1} amplitude.

  17. Toroidal Dipole Moment of a Massless Neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Mondragon, M.; Perez, E. Reyes

    2009-04-20

    We obtain the toroidal dipole moment of a massless neutrino {tau}{sub v{sub I}}{sup M} using the results for the anapole moment of a massless Dirac neutrino a{sub v{sub I}}{sup D}, which was obtained in the context of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions (SM)SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y}.

  18. Electric dipole moment of light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Benjamin; Afnan, I R

    2010-01-01

    We examine the sensitivity of the deuteron Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) to variation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. In particular, we write the EDM as a sum of two terms, one depends on the target wave function, the second on intermediate multiple scattering states in the {sup 3}P{sub 1} channel. This second contribution is sensitive to off-shell behavior of the {sup 3}P{sub 1} amplitude.

  19. Black Saturn with a dipole ring

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2007-09-15

    We present a new stationary, asymptotically flat solution of 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity describing a Saturn-like black object: a rotating black hole surrounded by a rotating dipole black ring. The solution is generated by combining the vacuum black Saturn solution and the vacuum black ring solution with appropriately chosen parameters. Some basic properties of the solution are analyzed and the basic quantities are calculated.

  20. The midpoint between dipole and parton showers

    SciTech Connect

    Höche, Stefan; Prestel, Stefan

    2015-09-28

    We present a new parton-shower algorithm. Borrowing from the basic ideas of dipole cascades, the evolution variable is judiciously chosen as the transverse momentum in the soft limit. This leads to a very simple analytic structure of the evolution. A weighting algorithm is implemented that allows one to consistently treat potentially negative values of the splitting functions and the parton distributions. Thus, we provide two independent, publicly available implementations for the two event generators PYTHIA and SHERPA.

  1. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate. PMID:25646869

  2. Search for the electron electric dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    De Mille, D.; Bickman, S.; Hamilton, P.; Jiang, Y.; Prasad, V.; Kawall, D.; Paolino, R.

    2006-07-11

    Extensions to the Standard Model (SM) typically include new heavy particles and new mechanisms for CP violation. These underlying phenomena can give rise to electric dipole moments of the electron and other particles. Tabletop-scale experiments used to search for these effects are described. Present experiments are already sensitive to new physics at the TeV scale, and new methods could extend this range dramatically. Such experiments could be among the first to show evidence for physics beyond the SM.

  3. 15 T And Beyond - Dipoles and Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, GianLuca

    2008-05-19

    Starting with the invention of the cyclotron by Lawrence, accelerator-based experiments have been the primary source of new discoveries in particle physics. In order to progress toward higher energy and luminosity, higher field magnets are required. R&D programs are underway to take advantage of new developments in superconducting materials, achieve better efficiency and simplify magnet fabrication while preserving accelerator-class field quality. A review of recent progress on high field dipole and quadrupole magnets is presented.

  4. Single-layer high field dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim V. Kashikhin and Alexander V. Zlobin

    2001-07-30

    Fermilab is developing high field dipole magnets for post-LHC hadron colliders. Several designs with a nominal field of 10-12 T, coil bore size of 40-50 mm based on both shell-type and block-type coil geometry are currently under consideration. This paper presents a new approach to magnet design, based on simple and robust single-layer coils optimized for the maximum field, good field quality and minimum number of turns.

  5. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate.

  6. Trapped field internal dipole superconducting motor generator

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    2001-01-01

    A motor generator including a high temperature superconductor rotor and an internally disposed coil assembly. The motor generator superconductor rotor is constructed of a plurality of superconductor elements magnetized to produce a dipole field. The coil assembly can be either a conventional conductor or a high temperature superconductor. The superconductor rotor elements include a magnetization direction and c-axis for the crystals of the elements and which is oriented along the magnetization direction.

  7. Local electric dipole moments: A generalized approach.

    PubMed

    Groß, Lynn; Herrmann, Carmen

    2016-09-30

    We present an approach for calculating local electric dipole moments for fragments of molecular or supramolecular systems. This is important for understanding chemical gating and solvent effects in nanoelectronics, atomic force microscopy, and intensities in infrared spectroscopy. Owing to the nonzero partial charge of most fragments, "naively" defined local dipole moments are origin-dependent. Inspired by previous work based on Bader's atoms-in-molecules (AIM) partitioning, we derive a definition of fragment dipole moments which achieves origin-independence by relying on internal reference points. Instead of bond critical points (BCPs) as in existing approaches, we use as few reference points as possible, which are located between the fragment and the remainder(s) of the system and may be chosen based on chemical intuition. This allows our approach to be used with AIM implementations that circumvent the calculation of critical points for reasons of computational efficiency, for cases where no BCPs are found due to large interfragment distances, and with local partitioning schemes other than AIM which do not provide BCPs. It is applicable to both covalently and noncovalently bound systems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27520590

  8. Dynamics of two-dimensional dipole systems

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, Kenneth I.; Kalman, Gabor J.; Hartmann, Peter; Donko, Zoltan

    2010-09-15

    Using a combined analytical/molecular dynamics approach, we study the current fluctuation spectra and longitudinal and transverse collective mode dispersions of the classical two-dimensional (point) dipole system (2DDS) characterized by the {phi}{sub D}(r)={mu}{sup 2}/r{sup 3} repulsive interaction potential; {mu} is the electric dipole strength. The interest in the 2DDS is twofold. First, the quasi-long-range 1/r{sup 3} interaction makes the system a unique classical many-body system, with a remarkable collective mode behavior. Second, the system may be a good model for a closely spaced semiconductor electron-hole bilayer, a system that is in the forefront of current experimental interest. The longitudinal collective excitations, which are of primary interest for the liquid phase, are acoustic at long wavelengths. At higher wave numbers and for sufficiently high coupling strength, we observe the formation of a deep minimum in the dispersion curve preceded by a sharp maximum; this is identical to what has been observed in the dispersion of the zero-temperature bosonic dipole system, which in turn emulates so-called roton-maxon excitation spectrum of the superfluid {sup 4}He. The analysis we present gives an insight into the emergence of this apparently universal structure, governed by strong correlations. We study both the liquid and the crystalline solid state. We also observe the excitation of combination frequencies, resembling the roton-roton, roton-maxon, etc. structures in {sup 4}He.

  9. Bent Solenoids with Superimposed Dipole Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Rainer, B.; Goodzeit, Carl, L.

    2000-03-21

    A conceptual design and manufacturing technique were developed for a superconducting bent solenoid magnet with a superimposed dipole field that would be used as a dispersion device in the cooling channel of a future Muon Collider. The considered bent solenoid is equivalent to a 180° section of a toroid with a major radius of ~610 mm and a coil aperture of ~416 mm. The required field components of this magnet are 4 tesla for the solenoid field and 1 tesla for the superimposed dipole field. A magnet of this size and shape, operating at these field levels, has to sustain large Lorentz forces resulting in a maximum magnetic pressure of about 2,000 psi. A flexible round mini-cable with 37 strands of Cu-NbTi was selected as the superconductor. Detailed magnetic analysis showed that it is possible to obtain the required superimposed dipole field by tilting the winding planes of the solenoid by ~25°. A complete structural analysis of the coil support system and the helium containment vessel under thermal, pressure, and Lorentz force loads was carried out using 3D finite element models of the structures. The main technical issues were studied and solutions were worked out so that a highly reliable magnet of this type can be produced at an affordable cost.

  10. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1-2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50-60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion's pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor. PMID:27436926

  11. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes.

  12. Local geometry of isoscalar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dopazo, César; Martín, Jesús; Hierro, Juan

    2007-11-01

    An inert dynamically passive scalar in a constant density fluid forced by a statistically homogeneous field of turbulence has been investigated using the results of a 256(3) grid direct numerical simulation. Mixing characteristics are characterized in terms of either principal curvatures or mean and Gauss curvatures. The most probable small-scale scalar geometries are flat and tilelike isosurfaces. Preliminary correlations between flow and scalar small-scale structures associate highly curved saddle points with large-strain regions and elliptic points with vorticity-dominated zones. The concavity of the scalar profiles along the isosurface normal coordinate xn correlates well with negative mean curvatures, Gauss curvatures displaying any sign, which correspond to scalar minima, tiles, or saddle points; on the other hand, convexity along xn is associated with positive mean curvatures, Gauss curvatures ranging from negative to positive signs, featuring maxima, tiles, or saddle points; inflection points along xn correlate well with small values of the mean curvature and zero or negative values of kg, corresponding to plane isosurfaces or saddle points with curvatures of equal and opposite signs. Small values of the scalar gradient are associated with elliptic points, either concave or convex (kg>0) , for both concave and convex scalar profiles along xn. Large values of the scalar gradient (or, equivalently, scalar fluctuation dissipation rates) are generally connected with small values of the Gauss curvature (either flat or moderate-curvature tilelike local geometries), with both concave and convex scalar profiles along xn equally probable. Vortical local flow structures correlate well with small and moderate values of the scalar gradient, while strain-dominated regions are associated with large values. PMID:18233765

  13. Formation of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, G.; Coradini, A.

    2003-04-01

    In this presentation we address the problem of the formation of giant planets and their regular satellites. We study in particular the problem of formation of the Jupiter System comparing the results of the model with the present characteristics of the system, in order to identify what are those better represented by our approach. In fact here, using a 3-D hydro-dynamical code, we study the modalities of gas accretion onto a solid core, believed to be the seed from which Jupiter started. To do that we have modelled three main regions: the central planet, a turbulent accretion disk surrounding it and an extended region from which the gas is collected. In the extended region we treat the gas as a frictionless fluid. Our main goal is to identify what are the characteristics of the planet during its growth and the physical parameters affecting its growth at the expenses of the nebular gas present in the feeding zone. Moreover we want to understand what are the thermodynamical parameters characterizing the gas captured by the planet and swirling around it. Finally, we check if a disk can be formed in prograde rotation around the planet and if this disk can survive the final phases of the planet formation. Due to the interaction between the accreting planet and the disk it has been necessary to develop a complete model of the Jupiter’s structure. In fact the radiation emitted by the growing planet heats up the surrounding gas. In turn the planet’s thermodynamic structure depend on the mass accretion rate onto it. When the accretion is rapid, shock waves in the gas are formed close to the planet. This region cannot be safely treated by a numerical code; for this reason we have developed a semi-analytically model of a a turbulent accretion disk to be considered as transition between the planet and the surrounding disk.

  14. Giant Magellan Telescope: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Matt; McCarthy, Patrick; Raybould, Keith; Bouchez, Antonin; Farahani, Arash; Filgueira, Jose; Jacoby, George; Shectman, Steve; Sheehan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is a 25-meter optical/infrared extremely large telescope that is being built by an international consortium of universities and research institutions. It will be located at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The GMT primary mirror consists of seven 8.4-m borosilicate honeycomb mirror segments made at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab (SOML). Six identical off-axis segments and one on-axis segment are arranged on a single nearly-paraboloidal parent surface having an overall focal ratio of f/0.7. The fabrication, testing and verification procedures required to produce the closely-matched off-axis mirror segments were developed during the production of the first mirror. Production of the second and third off-axis segments is underway. GMT incorporates a seven-segment Gregorian adaptive secondary to implement three modes of adaptive-optics operation: natural-guide star AO, laser-tomography AO, and ground-layer AO. A wide-field corrector/ADC is available for use in seeing-limited mode over a 20-arcmin diameter field of view. Up to seven instruments can be mounted simultaneously on the telescope in a large Gregorian Instrument Rotator. Conceptual design studies were completed for six AO and seeing-limited instruments, plus a multi-object fiber feed, and a roadmap for phased deployment of the GMT instrument suite is being developed. The partner institutions have made firm commitments for approximately 45% of the funds required to build the telescope. Project Office efforts are currently focused on advancing the telescope and enclosure design in preparation for subsystem- and system-level preliminary design reviews which are scheduled to be completed in the first half of 2013.

  15. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}ȯ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  16. Meibomian gland function and giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Mathers, W D; Billborough, M

    1992-08-15

    We examined 42 contact lens-wearing patients for clinical evidence of giant papillary conjunctivitis and for meibomian gland dysfunction with gland dropout. Fifteen patients were free of clinical signs and symptoms of giant papillary conjunctivitis, whereas 27 had clinical symptoms and evidence of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Patients with giant papillary conjunctivitis had significantly more gland dropout with an average of 0.6 +/- 1.2 gland absent in both lower eyelids compared with 0.2 +/- 0.4 gland absent in patients without giant papillary conjunctivitis. Additionally, the viscosity of meibomian gland excreta was greater in the giant papillary conjunctivitis group. There was no difference in tear osmolarity or in the Schirmer test results between the two groups. These results indicated patients with giant papillary conjunctivitis were more likely to have meibomian gland dysfunction with gland dropout than patients without giant papillary conjunctivitis.

  17. Giant perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 3d transition-metal thin films on MgO

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kohji Ikeura, Yushi; Akiyama, Toru; Ito, Tomonori

    2015-05-07

    Magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA) of the Fe-based transition-metal thin films was investigated by means of first principles full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method. A giant perpendicular MCA (PMCA), up to 3 meV, was confirmed in a 7-layer Fe-Ni film/MgO(001), where an Fe{sub 2}/Ni/Fe/Ni/Fe{sub 2} atomic-layer alignment with a bcc-like-layer stacking and the Fe/MgO interfaces play key roles for leading to the large PMCA. Importantly, we find that the PMCA overcomes enough over the magnetic dipole-dipole anisotropy that favors the in-plane magnetization even when the film thickness increases.

  18. Simulation of an Ice Giant-style Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, K. M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune, are unique in the solar system. These planets are the only known bodies to have multipolar magnetic fields where the quadrupole and octopole components have strengths comparable to or greater than that of the dipole. Cloud layer observations show that the planets also have zonal (east-west) flows that are fundamentally different from the banded winds of Jupiter and Saturn. The surface winds are characterized by strong retrograde equatorial jets that are flanked on either side by prograde jets at high latitudes. Thermal emission measurements of Neptune show that the surface energy flux pattern peaks in the equatorial and polar regions with minima at mid-latitudes. (The measurements for Uranus cannot adequately resolve the emission pattern.) The winds and magnetic fields are thought to be the result of convection in the planetary interior, which will also affect the heat flux pattern. Typically, it is implicitly assumed that the zonal winds are generated in a shallow layer, separate from the dynamo generation region. However, if the magnetic fields are driven near the surface, a single region can simultaneously generate both the zonal flows and the magnetic fields. Here, we present a novel numerical model of an Ice Giant-style dynamo to investigate this possibility. An order unity convective Rossby number (ratio of buoyancy to Coriolis forces) has been chosen because retrograde equatorial jets tend to occur in spherical shells when the effects of rotation are relatively weak. Our modeling results qualitatively reproduce all of the structural features of the global dynamical observations. Thus, a self-consistent model can generate magnetic field, zonal flow, and thermal emission patterns that agree with those of Uranus and Neptune. This model, then, leads us to hypothesize that the Ice Giants' zonal flows and magnetic fields are generated via dynamically coupled deep convection processes.

  19. Giant myoma and erythrocytosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozsaran, A A; Itil, I M; Terek, C; Kazandi, M; Dikmen, Y

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study is to discuss the myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome in a patient with a giant subserous uterine myoma. She presented with plethora and an abdominal mass. After venesection of 4 units of blood, the preoperative haematocrit value of 53.3% and haemoglobin value of 17.5 g/dL had decreased to 48.6% and 16.8 g/dL levels, respectively. After the operative extraction of the giant subserous myoma with attached uterus weighing 14.2 kg, the haematocrit and the haemoglobin values had regressed to 40.3% and 14.3 g/dL levels, respectively. The findings indicated that the giant subserous myoma was the cause of the myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome in this patient. PMID:10554963

  20. Structure of giant muscle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Logan C.; Wright, Nathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Giant muscle proteins (e.g., titin, nebulin, and obscurin) play a seminal role in muscle elasticity, stretch response, and sarcomeric organization. Each giant protein consists of multiple tandem structural domains, usually arranged in a modular fashion spanning 500 kDa to 4 MDa. Although many of the domains are similar in structure, subtle differences create a unique function of each domain. Recent high and low resolution structural and dynamic studies now suggest more nuanced overall protein structures than previously realized. These findings show that atomic structure, interactions between tandem domains, and intrasarcomeric environment all influence the shape, motion, and therefore function of giant proteins. In this article we will review the current understanding of titin, obscurin, and nebulin structure, from the atomic level through the molecular level. PMID:24376425

  1. Electric dipole moments (EDM) of ionic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Sachiko

    2010-03-15

    Recent investigations show that the second-order perturbation calculations of electric dipole moments (EDM) from the finite nuclear size as well as the relativistic effects are all canceled out by the third-order perturbation effects and that this is due to electron screening. To derive the nucleon EDM from the nucleus, we propose to measure the EDM of an ionic system. In this case, it is shown that the nucleon EDM can survive by the reduction factor of 1/Z for the ionic system with one electron stripped off.

  2. Large muon electric dipole moment from flavor?

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, Gudrun; Huitu, Katri; Rueppell, Timo; Laamanen, Jari

    2010-11-01

    We study the prospects and opportunities of a large muon electric dipole moment (EDM) of the order (10{sup -24}-10{sup -22}) ecm. We investigate how natural such a value is within the general minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model with CP violation from lepton flavor violation in view of the experimental constraints. In models with hybrid gauge-gravity-mediated supersymmetry breaking, a large muon EDM is indicative for the structure of flavor breaking at the Planck scale, and points towards a high messenger scale.

  3. Nanoscale shift of the intensity distribution of dipole radiation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jie; Li, Xin; Arnoldus, Henk F

    2009-02-01

    The energy flow lines (field lines of the Poynting vector) for radiation emitted by a dipole are in general curves, rather than straight lines. For a linear dipole the field lines are straight, but when the dipole moment of a source rotates, the field lines wind numerous times around an axis, which is perpendicular to the plane of rotation, before asymptotically approaching a straight line. We consider an elliptical dipole moment, representing the most general state of oscillation, and this includes the linear dipole as a special case. Due to the spiraling near the source, for the case of a rotating dipole moment, the field lines in the far field are displaced with respect to the outward radial direction, and this leads to a shift of the intensity distribution of the radiation in the far field. This shift is shown to be independent of the distance to the source and, although of nanoscale dimension, should be experimentally observable.

  4. Structure and melting behavior of classical bilayer crystals of dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Xin; Wu Changqin; Micheli, Andrea; Pupillo, Guido

    2008-07-01

    We study the structure and melting of a classical bilayer system of dipoles in a setup where the dipoles are oriented perpendicular to the planes of the layers and the density of dipoles is the same in each layer. Due to the anisotropic character of the dipole-dipole interactions, we find that the ground-state configuration is given by two hexagonal crystals positioned on top of each other, independent of the interlayer spacing and dipolar density. For large interlayer distances these crystals are independent, while in the opposite limit of small interlayer distances the system behaves as a two-dimensional crystal of paired dipoles. Within the harmonic approximation for the phonon excitations, the melting temperature of these crystalline configurations displays a nonmonotonic dependence on the interlayer distance, which is associated with a re-entrant melting behavior in the form of solid-liquid-solid-liquid transitions at fixed temperature.

  5. Review of Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Joseph G.; Chacko, J. Anthony; Salter, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic autoimmune disease affecting primarily the elderly. Giant cell arteritis can cause sudden and potentially bilateral sequential vision loss in the elderly. Therefore, it is considered a medical emergency in ophthalmology and a significant cause of morbidity in an increasingly aging population. Ophthalmologists need to be able to recognize the classic symptoms and signs of this disease, and then be able to work-up and treat these patients in an efficient manner. An in-depth review of GCA from the literature as well as personal clinical experience follows. PMID:25859139

  6. Chemical Abundances of Symbiotic Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, C.; Mikołajewska, J.; Hinkle, K. H.; Joyce, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution (R ˜ 50000), near-IR spectra were used to measure photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak for 24 symbiotic giants. Spectrum synthesis was employed using local thermal equilibrium and hydrostatic model atmospheres. The metallicities are distributed in a wide range with maximum around [Fe/H] ˜-0.4 - - 0.3 dex. Enrichment in 14N indicates that all the sample giants have experienced the first dredge-up. The relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  7. Molecular Line and Continuum Opacities for Modeling of Extrasolar Giant Planet and Cool Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weck, P. F.; Schweitzer, A.; Stancil, P. C.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Kirby, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Allen, W. D.

    2002-01-01

    The molecular line and continuum opacities are investigated in the atmospheres of cool stars and Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs). Using a combination of ab inito and experimentally derived potential curves and dipole transition moments, accurate data have been calculated for rovibrationally-resolved oscillator strengths and photodissociation cross sections in the B' (sup 2)Sigma+ (left arrow) X (sup 2)Sigma+ and A (sup 2)Pi (left arrow) X (sup 2)Sigma+ band systems in MgH. We also report our progress on the study of the electronic structure of LiCl and FeH.

  8. Molecular Line and Continuum Opacities for Modeling of Extrasolar Giant Planet and Cool Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weck, P. F.; Stancil, P. C.; Schweitzer, A.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Kirby, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Allen, W.

    2002-11-01

    The molecular hue and continuum opacities are investigated in the atmospheres of cool stars and Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs). Using a combination of ab inito and experimentally derived potential curves and dipole transition moments, accurate data have been calculated for rovibrationally-resolved oscillator strengths and photodissociation cross sections in the B' 2∑+ ← X 2∑+ and A 2II ← X 2∑+ baud systems in MgH. We also report our progress on the study of the electronic structure of LiCl and FeH.

  9. Charting the Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    zero expansion asymptotically after an infinite time and has a flat geometry). All three observational tests by means of supernovae (green), the cosmic microwave background (blue) and galaxy clusters converge at a Universe around Ωm ~ 0.3 and ΩΛ ~ 0.7. The dark red region for the galaxy cluster determination corresponds to 95% certainty (2-sigma statistical deviation) when assuming good knowledge of all other cosmological parameters, and the light red region assumes a minimum knowledge. For the supernovae and WMAP results, the inner and outer regions corespond to 68% (1-sigma) and 95% certainty, respectively. References: Schuecker et al. 2003, A&A, 398, 867 (REFLEX); Tonry et al. 2003, ApJ, 594, 1 (supernovae); Riess et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665 (supernovae) Galaxy clusters are far from being evenly distributed in the Universe. Instead, they tend to conglomerate into even larger structures, "super-clusters". Thus, from stars which gather in galaxies, galaxies which congregate in clusters and clusters tying together in super-clusters, the Universe shows structuring on all scales, from the smallest to the largest ones. This is a relict of the very early (formation) epoch of the Universe, the so-called "inflationary" period. At that time, only a minuscule fraction of one second after the Big Bang, the tiny density fluctuations were amplified and over the eons, they gave birth to the much larger structures. Because of the link between the first fluctuations and the giant structures now observed, the unique REFLEX catalogue - the largest of its kind - allows astronomers to put considerable constraints on the content of the Universe, and in particular on the amount of dark matter that is believed to pervade it. Rather interestingly, these constraints are totally independent from all other methods so far used to assert the existence of dark matter, such as the study of very distant supernovae (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98) or the analysis of the Cosmic Microwave background (e

  10. Angle-dependent quantum Otto heat engine based on coherent dipole-dipole coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shan-He; Luo, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Jin-Can; Sun, Chang-Pu

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between molecules or within a molecule have been widely observed in biological systems and exhibit broad application for molecular structural studies. Quantum delocalization of molecular dipole moments has inspired researchers to explore new avenues to utilize this physical effect for energy harvesting devices. Herein, we propose a simple model of the angle-dependent quantum Otto heat engine which seeks to facilitate the conversion of heat to work. Unlike previous studies, the adiabatic processes are accomplished by varying only the directions of the magnetic field. We show that the heat engine continues to generate power when the angle relative to the vector r joining the centres of coupled dipoles departs from the magic angle θm where the static coupling vanishes. A significant improvement in the device performance has to be attributed to the presence of the quantum delocalized levels associated with the coherent dipole-dipole coupling. These results obtained may provide a promising model for the biomimetic design and fabrication of quantum energy generators.

  11. Long-term dipole-dipole resistivity monitoring at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Sasaki, Y.

    1984-04-01

    Dipole-dipole resistivity measurements for the combined purposes of reservoir delineation and reservoir monitoring were first made at Cerro Prieto in 1978 and have continued on approximately an annual basis since then. Two 20 km-long dipole-dipole lines with permanently emplaced electrodes at 1-km spacings were established over the field area. Resistivity remeasurements have been made on one line at 6- to 18-month intervals using a 25 kW generator capable of up to 80A output and a microprocessor-controlled signal-averaging receiver. This high-power, low-noise system provides highly accurate measurements even at large transmitter receiver separations. Standard error calculations for collected data indicate errors less than 5% for all points. Results from four years of monitoring (1979-1983) indicate a 5% average annual increase in apparent resistivity over the present production area, and larger decreases in apparent resistivity in the region to the east. The increase in resistivity in the production zone is most likely due to dilution of reservoir fluids with fresher water, as evidenced by a drop in chloride content of produced waters. The area of decreasing resistivity east of the reservoir is associated with a steeply dipping conductive body, a zone of higher thermal gradients and an increase in shale thickness in the section. Decreasing resistivity in this area may be caused by an influx of high temperature, saline water from depths of 3/sup +/ km through a sandy gap in the shales.

  12. Hybrid of Quantum Phases for Induced Dipole Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kai

    2016-09-01

    The quantum phase effects for induced electric and magnetic dipole moments are investigated. It is shown that the phase shift received by induced electric dipole has the same form with the one induced by magnetic dipole moment, therefore the total phase is a hybrid of these two types of phase. This feature indicates that in order to have a decisive measurement on either one of these two phases, it is necessary to measure the velocity dependence of the observed phase.

  13. PROBING THE UNIVERSE'S TILT WITH THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND DIPOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.; Kashlinsky, A. E-mail: alexander.kashlinsky@nasa.gov

    2011-06-10

    Conventional interpretation of the observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole is that all of it is produced by local peculiar motions. Alternative explanations requiring part of the dipole to be primordial have received support from measurements of large-scale bulk flows. A test of the two hypotheses is whether other cosmic dipoles produced by collapsed structures later than the last scattering coincide with the CMB dipole. One background is the cosmic infrared background (CIB) whose absolute spectrum was measured to {approx}30% by the COBE satellite. Over the 100-500 {mu}m wavelength range its spectral energy distribution can provide a probe of its alignment with the CMB. This is tested with the COBE FIRAS data set which is available for such a measurement because of its low noise and frequency resolution which are important for Galaxy subtraction. Although the FIRAS instrument noise is in principle low enough to determine the CIB dipole, the Galactic foreground is sufficiently close spectrally to keep the CIB dipole hidden. A similar analysis is performed with DIRBE, which-because of the limited frequency coverage-provides a poorer data set. We discuss strategies for measuring the CIB dipole with future instruments to probe the tilt and apply it to the Planck, Herschel, and the proposed Pixie missions. We demonstrate that a future FIRAS-like instrument with instrument noise a factor of {approx}10 lower than FIRAS would make a statistically significant measurement of the CIB dipole. We find that the Planck and Herschel data sets will not allow a robust CIB dipole measurement. The Pixie instrument promises a determination of the CIB dipole and its alignment with either the CMB dipole or the dipole galaxy acceleration vector.

  14. Dipole characterization of single neurons from their extracellular action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial variation of the extracellular action potentials (EAP) of a single neuron contains information about the size and location of the dominant current source of its action potential generator, which is typically in the vicinity of the soma. Using this dependence in reverse in a three-component realistic probe + brain + source model, we solved the inverse problem of characterizing the equivalent current source of an isolated neuron from the EAP data sampled by an extracellular probe at multiple independent recording locations. We used a dipole for the model source because there is extensive evidence it accurately captures the spatial roll-off of the EAP amplitude, and because, as we show, dipole localization, beyond a minimum cell-probe distance, is a more accurate alternative to approaches based on monopole source models. Dipole characterization is separable into a linear dipole moment optimization where the dipole location is fixed, and a second, nonlinear, global optimization of the source location. We solved the linear optimization on a discrete grid via the lead fields of the probe, which can be calculated for any realistic probe + brain model by the finite element method. The global source location was optimized by means of Tikhonov regularization that jointly minimizes model error and dipole size. The particular strategy chosen reflects the fact that the dipole model is used in the near field, in contrast to the typical prior applications of dipole models to EKG and EEG source analysis. We applied dipole localization to data collected with stepped tetrodes whose detailed geometry was measured via scanning electron microscopy. The optimal dipole could account for 96% of the power in the spatial variation of the EAP amplitude. Among various model error contributions to the residual, we address especially the error in probe geometry, and the extent to which it biases estimates of dipole parameters. This dipole characterization method can be applied to

  15. Detecting the dipole moment of a single carbon monoxide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, A. Köhler, A.; Grenz, J.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2014-07-07

    Using non-contact atomic force microscopy with metallic tips enabled us to detect the electrostatic dipole moment of single carbon monoxide (CO) molecules adsorbed on three very different substrates. The observed distance dependent contrast can be explained by an interplay between the attractive van der Waals interaction and the repulsive electrostatic interaction, respectively, with the latter stemming from antiparallel aligned dipoles in tip and molecule. Our results suggest that metallic as well as CO-functionalized tips are able to probe electrostatic properties of polar molecules and that repulsive dipole-dipole interactions have to be considered when interpreting complex contrast patterns.

  16. Decomposing the electromagnetic response of magnetic dipoles to determine the geometric parameters of a dipole conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmarais, Jacques K.; Smith, Richard S.

    2016-03-01

    A novel automatic data interpretation algorithm is presented for modelling airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data acquired over resistive environments, using a single-component (vertical) transmitter, where the position and orientation of a dipole conductor is allowed to vary in three dimensions. The algorithm assumes that the magnetic fields produced from compact vortex currents are expressed as a linear combinations of the fields arising from dipoles in the subsurface oriented parallel to the [1, 0, 0], [0, 1, 0], and [0, 0, 1], unit vectors. In this manner, AEM responses can be represented as 12 terms. The relative size of each term in the decomposition can be used to determine geometrical information about the orientation of the subsurface conductivity structure. The geometrical parameters of the dipole (location, depth, dip, strike) are estimated using a combination of a look-up table and a matrix inverted in a least-squares sense. Tests on 703 synthetic models show that the algorithm is capable of extracting most of the correct geometrical parameters of a dipole conductor when three-component receiver data is included in the interpretation procedure. The algorithm is unstable when the target is perfectly horizontal, as the strike is undefined. Ambiguities may occur in predicting the orientation of the dipole conductor if y-component data is excluded from the analysis. Application of our approach to an anomaly on line 15 of the Reid Mahaffy test site yields geometrical parameters in reasonable agreement with previous authors. However, our algorithm provides additional information on the strike and offset from the traverse line of the conductor. Disparities in the values of predicted dip and depth are within the range of numerical precision. The index of fit was better when strike and offset were included in the interpretation procedure. Tests on the data from line 15701 of the Chibougamau MEGATEM survey shows that the algorithm is applicable to situations where

  17. Magnetic Dipole Interaction on a Square Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabel, Hartmut; Ewerlin, Melanie; Demirbas, Derya; Bruessing, Frank; Kronast, Florian

    2013-03-01

    We have studied interactions and phase transitions of circular magnetic islands with dipole character on a square lattice. By lithographic means we have prepared square patterns of periodicity 300 nm decorated with circular islands of 150 nm diameter using Pd0.87Fe0.13 as magnetic alloy. Below the Curie temperature of 260 K each island is in a ferromagnetic, single domain state with dipolar character and zero in-plane anisotropy. Below a second transition temperature the dipoles start to interact. MOKE measurements show a characteristic change in the magnetic hysteresis for temperatures below 160 K with increasing coercivity for decreasing temperatures. Furthermore, below the second transition the in-plane hysteresis becomes anisotropic, having an easy axis along [10] direction and a hard axis along [11] direction. SPEEM experiments at BESSY II of the HZB with circularly polarized incident photons tuned to the Fe L3 - edge show clearly the development of dipolar chains below the second phase transition that increase in length with decreasing temperature. Neighbouring chains are found to be oriented parallel as well as antiparallel. This work was supported by DFG-SFB 491 and BMBF under contracts 05K10PC2 and 05ES3xBA/5

  18. Fast computation of a gated dipole field.

    PubMed

    Mengov, George; Georgiev, Kalin; Pulov, Stefan; Trifonov, Trifon; Atanassov, Krassimir

    2006-12-01

    We address the need to develop efficient algorithms for numerical simulation of models, based in part or entirely on adaptive resonance theory. We introduce modifications that speed up the computation of the gated dipole field (GDF) in the Exact ART neural network. The speed increase of our solution amounts to at least an order of magnitude for fields with more than 100 gated dipoles. We adopt a 'divide and rule' approach towards the original GDF differential equations by grouping them into three categories, and modify each category in a separate way. We decouple the slow-dynamics part - the neurotransmitters from the rest of system, solve their equations analytically, and adapt the solution to the remaining fast-dynamics processes. Part of the node activations are integrated by an unsophisticated numerical procedure switched on and off according to rules. The remaining activations are calculated at equilibrium. We implement this logic in a Generalized Net (GN) - a tool for parallel processes simulation which enables a fresh look at developing efficient models. Our software implementation of generalized nets appears to add little computational overhead.

  19. Projected Dipole Model for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Wubs, Martijn; Asger Mortensen, N

    2015-09-25

    Quantum effects of plasmonic phenomena have been explored through ab initio studies, but only for exceedingly small metallic nanostructures, leaving most experimentally relevant structures too large to handle. We propose instead an effective description with the computationally appealing features of classical electrodynamics, while quantum properties are described accurately through an infinitely thin layer of dipoles oriented normally to the metal surface. The nonlocal polarizability of the dipole layer-the only introduced parameter-is mapped from the free-electron distribution near the metal surface as obtained with 1D quantum calculations, such as time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), and is determined once and for all. The model can be applied in two and three dimensions to any system size that is tractable within classical electrodynamics, while capturing quantum plasmonic aspects of nonlocal response and a finite work function with TDDFT-level accuracy. Applying the theory to dimers, we find quantum corrections to the hybridization even in mesoscopic dimers, as long as the gap itself is subnanometric. PMID:26451583

  20. SSC 50 mm collider dipole cryostat design

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.

    1992-04-01

    The cryostat of a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course of their expected operating life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the structural and thermal considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems.

  1. Projected Dipole Model for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Wubs, Martijn; Asger Mortensen, N

    2015-09-25

    Quantum effects of plasmonic phenomena have been explored through ab initio studies, but only for exceedingly small metallic nanostructures, leaving most experimentally relevant structures too large to handle. We propose instead an effective description with the computationally appealing features of classical electrodynamics, while quantum properties are described accurately through an infinitely thin layer of dipoles oriented normally to the metal surface. The nonlocal polarizability of the dipole layer-the only introduced parameter-is mapped from the free-electron distribution near the metal surface as obtained with 1D quantum calculations, such as time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), and is determined once and for all. The model can be applied in two and three dimensions to any system size that is tractable within classical electrodynamics, while capturing quantum plasmonic aspects of nonlocal response and a finite work function with TDDFT-level accuracy. Applying the theory to dimers, we find quantum corrections to the hybridization even in mesoscopic dimers, as long as the gap itself is subnanometric.

  2. Dipole Alignment in Rotating MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.; Fu, Terry; Morin, Lee

    2012-01-01

    We present numerical results from long-term CPU and GPU simulations of rotating, homogeneous, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and discuss their connection to the spherically bounded case. We compare our numerical results with a statistical theory of geodynamo action that has evolved from the absolute equilibrium ensemble theory of ideal MHD turbulence, which is based on the ideal MHD invariants are energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity. However, for rotating MHD turbulence, the cross helicity is no longer an exact invariant, although rms cross helicity becomes quasistationary during an ideal MHD simulation. This and the anisotropy imposed by rotation suggests an ansatz in which an effective, nonzero value of cross helicity is assigned to axisymmetric modes and zero cross helicity to non-axisymmetric modes. This hybrid statistics predicts a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field due to broken ergodicity , as well as dipole vector alignment with the rotation axis, both of which are observed numerically. We find that only a relatively small value of effective cross helicity leads to the prediction of a dipole moment vector that is closely aligned (less than 10 degrees) with the rotation axis. We also discuss the effect of initial conditions, dissipation and grid size on the numerical simulations and statistical theory.

  3. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed.

  4. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  5. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed. PMID:26143242

  6. Role of dipole-dipole interaction on enhancing Brownian coagulation of charge-neutral nanoparticles in the free molecular regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiyang; Li, Shuiqing; Yan, Wen; Yao, Qiang; Tse, Stephen D.

    2011-02-01

    In contrast to van der Waals (vdW) forces, Coulombic dipolar forces may play a significant role in the coagulation of nanoparticles (NPs) but has received little or no attention. In this work, the effect of dipole-dipole interaction on the enhancement of the coagulation of two spherically shaped charge-neutral TiO2 NPs, in the free molecular regime, is studied using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The enhancement factor is evaluated by determining the critical capture radius of two approaching NPs for different cases of initial dipole direction with respect to path (parallel/perpendicular) and orientation with respect to each other (co-orientated/counterorientated). As particle diameter decreases, the enhancement of coagulation is augmented as the ratio of dipole-dipole force to vdW force becomes larger. For 2-nm TiO2 NPs at 273 K, the MD simulation predicts an average enhancement factor of about 8.59, which is much greater than the value of 3.78 when only the vdW force is considered. Nevertheless, as temperature increases, the enhancement factor due to dipole-dipole interaction drops quickly because the time-averaged dipole moment becomes small due to increased thermal fluctuations (in both magnitude and direction) of the instantaneous dipole moment.

  7. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f˜20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  8. Measurement of coupling resonance driving terms with the AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.

    2010-10-01

    Resonance driving terms for linear coupled betatron motion in a synchrotron ring can be determined from corresponding spectral lines of an excited coherent beam motion. An AC dipole is one of instruments to excite such a motion. When a coherent motion is excited with an AC dipole, measured Courant-Snyder parameters and betatron phase advance have apparent modulations, as if there is an additional quadrupole field at the location of the AC dipole. Hence, measurements of these parameters using the AC dipole require a proper interpretation of observed quantities. The situation is similar in measurements of resonance driving terms using the AC dipole. In this note, we derive an expression of coupled betatron motion excited with two AC dipoles in presence of skew quadrupole fields, discuss an impact of this quadrupole like effect of the AC dipole on a measurement of coupling resonance driving terms, and present an analytical method to determine the coupling resonance driving terms from quantities observed using the AC dipole.

  9. Plasma expansion in the presence of a dipole magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Omidi, N.

    2005-07-15

    Simulations of the initial expansion of a plasma injected into a stationary magnetized background plasma in the presence of a dipole magnetic field are carried out in two dimensions with a kinetic ion, massless fluid electron (hybrid) electromagnetic code. For small values of the magnetic dipole, the injected ions have large gyroradii compared to the scale length of the dipole field and are essentially unmagnetized. As a result, these ions expand, excluding the ambient magnetic field and plasma to form a diamagnetic cavity. However, for stronger magnetic dipoles, the ratio of the gyroradii of the injected ions to the dipole field scale length is small so that they remain magnetized, and hence trapped in the dipole field, as they expand. The trapping and expansion then lead to additional plasma currents and resulting magnetic fields that not only exclude the background field but also interact with the dipole field in a more complex manner that stretches the closed dipole field lines. A criterion to distinguish between the two regimes is derived and is then briefly discussed in the context of applying the results to the plasma sail scheme for the propulsion of small spacecraft in the solar wind.

  10. Electric dipole moment of the electron and of the neutron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, S. M.; Zee, A.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that if Higgs-boson exchange mediates CP violation a significant electric dipole moment for the electron can result. Analogous effects can contribute to the neutron's electric dipole moment at a level competitive with Weinberg's three-gluon operator.

  11. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi

    2008-08-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f ~ 20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  12. Search for the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment

    SciTech Connect

    Plaster, Brad

    2010-08-04

    Searches for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) are motivated by their highly suppressed Standard Model value. The observation of a non-zero signal in the next generation of experiments would point unambiguously to the existence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Several ongoing efforts worldwide hold the potential for an up to two-orders-of-magnitude improvement beyond the current upper limit on the neutron EDM of 2.9x10{sup -6} e-cm. In this talk, I review the basic measurement principles of neutron EDM searches, then discuss a new experiment to be carried out in the United States at the Spallation Neutron Source with ultracold neutrons and an in-situ '3He''co-magnetometer'.

  13. Nuclear electric dipole moment of 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, Ionel; Friar, J L; Hayes, A C; Liu, C P; Navratil, P

    2008-01-01

    In the no-core shell model (NCSM) framework, we calculate the {sup 3}He electric dipole moment (EDM) generated by parity- and time-reversal violation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. While the results are somehow sensitive to the interaction model chosen for the strong two- and three-body interactions, we demonstrate the pion-exchange dominance to the EDM of {sup 3}He, if the coupling constants for {pi}, {rho} and {omega}-exchanges are of comparable magnitude, as expected. Finally, our results suggest that a measurement of {sup 3}He EDM would be complementary to the currently planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and would constitute a powerful constraint to the models of the pion P- and T-violating interactions.

  14. Intrinsic surface dipole in topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Fregoso, Benjamin M; Coh, Sinisa

    2015-10-28

    We calculate the local density of states of two prototypical topological insulators (Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te2Se) as a function of distance from the surface within density functional theory. We find that, in the absence of disorder or doping, there is a 2 nm thick surface dipole the origin of which is the occupation of the topological surface states above the Dirac point. As a consequence, the bottom of the conduction band is bent upward by about 75 meV near the surface, and there is a hump-like feature associated with the top of the valence band. We expect that band bending will occur in all pristine topological insulators as long as the Fermi level does not cross the Dirac point. Our results show that topological insulators are intrinsic Schottky barrier solar cells.

  15. Neutrino mass measurement from correlation dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuelei

    2015-08-01

    The large scale structure measurement can be used as a precision probe for neutrinos. It is well known that the power spectrum is suppressed at relatively small scales by the free-streaming of neutrinos, and this is used to measure the neutrino mass. However, this method is prone to scale-dependent galaxy bias, which can lead to significant system error in the measurement. We proposed a new method to measure the neutrino mass which is free of this problem. Due to their smaller masses, the neutrinos can develop large relative velocities with respect to the dark matter, the neutrino distribution can then affect the structure formation process. Although the effect is very small, it may generate significant dipole in the galaxy cross-correlation function or the galaxy lensing. The neutrino mass may by determined by such observations. We present the feasibility for such measurement.

  16. Active flutter suppression using dipole filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.; Waszak, Martin R.

    1992-01-01

    By using traditional control concepts of gain root locus, the active suppression of a flutter mode of a flexible wing is examined. It is shown that the attraction of the unstable mode towards a critical system zero determines the degree to which the flutter mode can be stabilized. For control situations where the critical zero is adversely placed in the complex plane, a novel compensation scheme called a 'Dipole' filter is proposed. This filter ensures that the flutter mode is stabilized with acceptable control energy. The control strategy is illustrated by designing flutter suppression laws for an active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model, where minimal control effort solutions are mandated by control rate saturation problems caused by wind-tunnel turbulence.

  17. Vacuum electron acceleration by coherent dipole radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Troha, A.L.; Van Meter, J.R.; Landahl, E.C.; Alvis, R.M.; Hartemann, F.V.; Troha, A.L.; Van Meter, J.R.; Landahl, E.C.; Alvis, R.M.; Li, K.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Hartemann, F.V.; Unterberg, Z.A.; Kerman, A.K.

    1999-07-01

    The validity of the concept of laser-driven vacuum acceleration has been questioned, based on an extrapolation of the well-known Lawson-Woodward theorem, which stipulates that plane electromagnetic waves cannot accelerate charged particles in vacuum. To formally demonstrate that electrons can indeed be accelerated in vacuum by focusing or diffracting electromagnetic waves, the interaction between a point charge and coherent dipole radiation is studied in detail. The corresponding four-potential exactly satisfies both Maxwell{close_quote}s equations and the Lorentz gauge condition everywhere, and is analytically tractable. It is found that in the far-field region, where the field distribution closely approximates that of a plane wave, we recover the Lawson-Woodward result, while net acceleration is obtained in the near-field region. The scaling of the energy gain with wave-front curvature and wave amplitude is studied systematically. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Vacuum electron acceleration by coherent dipole radiation.

    PubMed

    Troha, A L; Van Meter, J R; Landahl, E C; Alvis, R M; Unterberg, Z A; Li, K; Luhmann, N C; Kerman, A K; Hartemann, F V

    1999-07-01

    The validity of the concept of laser-driven vacuum acceleration has been questioned, based on an extrapolation of the well-known Lawson-Woodward theorem, which stipulates that plane electromagnetic waves cannot accelerate charged particles in vacuum. To formally demonstrate that electrons can indeed be accelerated in vacuum by focusing or diffracting electromagnetic waves, the interaction between a point charge and coherent dipole radiation is studied in detail. The corresponding four-potential exactly satisfies both Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz gauge condition everywhere, and is analytically tractable. It is found that in the far-field region, where the field distribution closely approximates that of a plane wave, we recover the Lawson-Woodward result, while net acceleration is obtained in the near-field region. The scaling of the energy gain with wave-front curvature and wave amplitude is studied systematically. PMID:11969838

  19. Vacuum electron acceleration by coherent dipole radiation.

    PubMed

    Troha, A L; Van Meter, J R; Landahl, E C; Alvis, R M; Unterberg, Z A; Li, K; Luhmann, N C; Kerman, A K; Hartemann, F V

    1999-07-01

    The validity of the concept of laser-driven vacuum acceleration has been questioned, based on an extrapolation of the well-known Lawson-Woodward theorem, which stipulates that plane electromagnetic waves cannot accelerate charged particles in vacuum. To formally demonstrate that electrons can indeed be accelerated in vacuum by focusing or diffracting electromagnetic waves, the interaction between a point charge and coherent dipole radiation is studied in detail. The corresponding four-potential exactly satisfies both Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz gauge condition everywhere, and is analytically tractable. It is found that in the far-field region, where the field distribution closely approximates that of a plane wave, we recover the Lawson-Woodward result, while net acceleration is obtained in the near-field region. The scaling of the energy gain with wave-front curvature and wave amplitude is studied systematically.

  20. Concentric Titled Double-Helix Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer Meinke, Ph.D; Carl Goodzeit; Millicent Ball, Ph.D

    2003-09-05

    The high magnetic fields required for future accelerator magnets can only be achieved with Nb3Sn, other A15 or HTS type conductors, which are brittle and sensitive to mechanical strain. The traditional ''cosine-theta'' dipole configuration has intrinsic drawbacks that make it difficult and expensive to employ such conductors in these designs. Some of these problems involve (1) difficulty in applying enough pre-stress to counteract Lorentz forces without compromising conductor performance; (2) small minimum bend radii of the conductor necessitating the intricate wind-and-react coil fabrication; (3) complex spacers in particular for coil ends and expensive tooling for coil fabrication; (4) typically only 2/3 of the coil aperture can be used with achievable field uniformity.

  1. Induced axial oscillations in superconducting dipole windings

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, W.B.; Ghosh, A.K.

    1994-12-31

    When superconducting accelerator magnets wound from multi-stranded conductor are energized a periodic variation appears in the magnetic field along the axis. This oscillation is present in al components of the field and has a period that is equal to the transposition pitch of the superconducting cable. Such axial variations have been observed even in windings which are not carrying any transport current. A magnetic field was applied to a portion of a dipole winding using a second magnet. Axial oscillations were induced along the total length of the windings including the portion not in the applied field. The amplitude of these oscillations varied with the amount of inert winding inside the energizing magnet and with t;he angle of the applied field. These field variations could be completely applied field. These field variations could be completely eliminated in the external portion of the coil by heating a small section of the winding above the transition temperature.

  2. Novel Design of Superconducting Helical Dipole Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, R.; Senti, M.; Stelzer, G.

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting helical dipole magnets with a nominal field of 4 Tesla are needed for the spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The magnets are required to operate at a relatively low current of 400 A since many of these magnets have to be independently controlled. The Advanced Magnet Lab, Inc., in Palm Bay, FL has designed and built two prototype magnets using advanced computer controlled coil winding technology. The AML design is extremely cost effective since it avoids magnet specific tooling despite the required complex coil pattern and any precision machined inserts or spacers. It is the first time an accelerator magnet of this technology has reached a field above 4 Tesla. Results from the prototype testing at BNL are presented.

  3. Three-body bound states in dipole-dipole interacting Rydberg atoms.

    PubMed

    Kiffner, Martin; Li, Wenhui; Jaksch, Dieter

    2013-12-01

    We show that the dipole-dipole interaction between three identical Rydberg atoms can give rise to bound trimer states. The microscopic origin of these states is fundamentally different from Efimov physics. Two stable trimer configurations exist where the atoms form the vertices of an equilateral triangle in a plane perpendicular to a static electric field. The triangle edge length typically exceeds R≈2 μm, and each configuration is twofold degenerate due to Kramers degeneracy. The depth of the potential wells and the triangle edge length can be controlled by external parameters. We establish the Borromean nature of the trimer states, analyze the quantum dynamics in the potential wells, and describe methods for their production and detection.

  4. Simulations of the angular dependence of the dipole-dipole interaction among Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Jacob L.; Hollingsworth, Jacob; Paul, Jacob T.; Peleg, Matan; Sanford, Veronica L.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-05-01

    The dipole-dipole interaction between two Rydberg atoms depends on the relative orientation of the atoms and on the change in the magnetic quantum number. We simulate the effect of this anisotropy on the energy transport in an amorphous many atom system of ultracold Rydberg atoms subject to a homogeneous applied electric field. We consider two experimentally feasible geometries and find that the effects should be measurable in current generation imaging experiments. We also examine evidence for Anderson localization. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1205895 and No. 1205897 and used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number OCI-1053575.

  5. Controlling the dipole-dipole interaction using NMR composite rf pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Baudin, Emmanuel

    2014-08-07

    New composite rf pulses are proposed during which the average dipole-dipole interactions within a spin ensemble are controlled, while a global rotation is achieved. The method used to tailor the pulses is based on the average Hamiltonian theory and relies on the geometrical properties of the spin-spin dipolar interaction. I describe several such composite pulses and analyze quantitatively the improvement brought on the control of the NMR dynamics. Numerical simulations show that the magic sandwich pulse sequence, during which the average dipolar field is effectively reversed, is plagued by defects originating from the finite initial and final π/2 rf pulses. A numerical test based on a classical description of nuclear magnetic resonance is used to check that, when these pulses are replaced by magic composite pulses, the efficiency of the magic sandwich is improved.

  6. Self-assembled microspheres driven by dipole-dipole interactions: UCST-type transition in water.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Muramatsu, Kanna; Wazawa, Tetsuichi; Inoue, Yuichi; Suzuki, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    A double hydrophilic block copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(3-dimethyl (methacryloyloxyethyl) ammonium propane sulfonate) (PEG-SB), is synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization using PEG methyl ether (4-cyano-4-pentanoate dodecyl trithiocarbonate) as a chain transfer agent. PEG-SB forms multi-layered microspheres with dipole-dipole interactions of the SB side chains as the driving force. The PEG-SB polymers show an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) and the UCST is controllable by the polymerization degree. The PEG-SB microspheres are dissociated above the UCST and then monodispersed microspheres (∼1 μm) are obtained when the solution temperature is decreased below the UCST again. The disassociation/association of the microspheres is also controllable using the concentration of NaCl. These multi-responsive microspheres could be a powerful tool in the field of nano-biotechnology.

  7. Effects of dipole magnet inhomogeneities on the beam ellipsoid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Colman, J.; Levine, M.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Ward, T.; Grand, P.

    1986-01-01

    The RAYTRACE computer code has been modified to accept magnetic fields measured in the median plane of a dipole magnet. This modification allows one to study the effects of a non-ideal dipole magnet on the beam ellipsoid (as defined by the TRANSPORT code manual). The effects on the beam ellipsoid are due to: field inhomogeneities in the interior region of the dipole, and discrepancies from design conditions of the magnetic field values in the fringe field region. The results of the RAYTRACE code calculations based on experimentally measured fields will be compared with the results derived using both an ideal (no inhomogeneities) dipole with SCOFF boundaries and an ideal dipole with perfect (according to design) fringe fields.

  8. Tailored electronic structure and optical properties of conjugated systems through aggregates and dipole-dipole interactions.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Il; Kuo, Cheng-Yu; Martinez, Jennifer S; Park, Young-Shin; Postupna, Olena; Zhugayevych, Andriy; Kim, Seungho; Park, Jongwook; Tretiak, Sergei; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2013-06-12

    A series of PPVO (p-phenylene vinylene oligomer) derivatives with functional groups of varying electronegativity were synthesized via the Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction. Subtle changes in the end group functionality significantly impact the molecular electronic and optical properties of the PPVOs, resulting in broadly tunable and efficient UV absorption and photoluminescence spectra. Of particular interest is the NO2-substituted PPVO which exhibits photoluminescence color ranging from the blue to the red, thus encompassing the entire visible spectrum. Our experimental study and electronic structure calculations suggest that the formation of aggregates and strong dipole-dipole solute-solvent interactions are responsible for the observed strong solvatochromism. Experimental and theoretical results for the NH2-, H-, and NO2-substituted PPVOs suggest that the stabilization of ground or excited state dipoles leads to the blue or red shift of the optical spectra. The electroluminescence (EL) spectra of H-, COOH-, and NO2-PPVO have maxima at 487, 518, and 587 nm, respectively, in the OLED device. This trend in the EL spectra is in excellent agreement with the end group-dependent PL spectra of the PPVO thin-films. PMID:23607446

  9. Universal Behavior of Dielectric Responses of Glass Formers: Role of Dipole-Dipole Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, M.; Knapik, J.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Grzybowski, A.; Ngai, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    From an exhaustive examination of the molecular dynamics in practically all van der Waals molecular glass formers ever probed by dielectric spectroscopy, we found that the width of the α -loss peak at or near the glass transition temperature Tg is strongly anticorrelated with the polarity of the molecule. The larger the dielectric relaxation strength Δ ɛ (Tg) of the system, the narrower is the α -loss peak. This remarkable property is explained by the contribution from the dipole-dipole interaction potential Vd d(r )=-D r-6 to the attractive part of the intermolecular potential, making the resultant potential more harmonic, and the effect increases rapidly with the dipole moment μ and Δ ɛ (Tg) in view of the relation, D ∝(μ4/k Tg)∝k Tg[Δɛ (Tg)] 2 . Since the novel correlation discovered encompasses practically all van der Waals molecular glass formers studied by dielectric spectroscopy, it impacts the large dielectric research community as well as those engaged in solving the glass transition problem.

  10. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of High-spin Paramagnetic Centers in Disordered Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maryasov, Alexander G.; Bowman, Michael K.; Tsvetkov, Yuri D.

    2007-09-13

    Dipole-dipole interactions between distant paramagnetic centers (PCs) where at least one PC has spin S>1/2 are examined. The results provide a basis for the application of pulsed DEER or PELDOR methods to the measurement of distances between PC involving high-spin species. A projection operator technique based on spectral decomposition of the secular Hamiltonian is used to calculate EPR line splitting caused by the dipole coupling. This allows calculation of operators projecting arbitrary wavefunction onto high PC eigenstates when the eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian are not known. The effective spin vectors-that is, the expectation values for vector spin operators in the PC eigenstates-are calculated. The dependence of these effective spin vectors on the external magnetic field is calculated. There is a qualitative difference between pairs having at least one integer spin (non Karmers PC) and pairs of two half-integer (Kramers PC) spins. With the help of these effective spin vectors, the dipolar lineshape of EPR lines is calculated. Analytical relations are obtained for PCs with spin S=1/2 and 1. The dependence of Pake patterns on variations of zero field splitting, Zeeman energy, temperature and dipolar coupling are illustrated.

  11. Dipole splitting algorithm: A practical algorithm to use the dipole subtraction procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, K.

    2015-11-01

    The Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction is a general and powerful procedure to calculate the QCD next-to-leading order corrections for collider observables. We clearly define a practical algorithm to use the dipole subtraction. The algorithm is called the dipole splitting algorithm (DSA). The DSA is applied to an arbitrary process by following well defined steps. The subtraction terms created by the DSA can be summarized in a compact form by tables. We present a template for the summary tables. One advantage of the DSA is to allow a straightforward algorithm to prove the consistency relation of all the subtraction terms. The proof algorithm is presented in the following paper [K. Hasegawa, arXiv:1409.4174]. We demonstrate the DSA in two collider processes, pp to μ -μ + and 2 jets. Further, as a confirmation of the DSA, it is shown that the analytical results obtained by the DSA in the Drell-Yan process exactly agree with the well known results obtained by the traditional method.

  12. Dipole-dipole interactions in solution mixtures probed by two-dimensional synchronous spectroscopy based on orthogonal sample design scheme.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-zhen; Tao, Dong-liang; Qi, Jian; Wu, Jin-guang; Xu, Yi-zhuang; Noda, Isao

    2014-04-24

    Two-dimensional (2D) synchronous spectroscopy together with a new approach called "Orthogonal Sample Design Scheme" was used to study the dipole-dipole interactions in two representative ternary chemical systems (N,N-dimethyllformamide (DMF)/CH3COOC2H5/CCl4 and C60/CH3COOC2H5/CCl4). For the first system, dipole-dipole interactions among carbonyl groups from DMF and CH3COOC2H5 are characterized by using the cross peak in 2D Fourier Transform Infrared Radiation (FT-IR) spectroscopy. For the second system, intermolecular interaction among π-π transition from C60 and vibration transition from the carbonyl band of ethyl acetate is probed by using 2D spectra. The experimental results demonstrate that "Orthogonal Sample Design Scheme" can effectively remove interfering part that is not relevant to intermolecular interaction. Additional procedures are carried out to preclude the possibilities of producing interfering cross peaks by other reasons, such as experimental errors. Dipole-dipole interactions that manifest in the form of deviation from the Beer-Lambert law generate distinct cross peaks visualized in the resultant 2D synchronous spectra of the two chemical systems. This work demonstrates that 2D synchronous spectra coupled with orthogonal sample design scheme provide us an applicable experimental approach to probing and characterizing dipole-dipole interactions in complex molecular systems. PMID:24582337

  13. Asteroseismology of Red Giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrant, N. J.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Spreckley, S. A.; Stevens, I. R.

    2008-12-01

    Sun-like oscillations, that is p-modes excited stochastically by convective noise, have now been observed in a number of Red Giant stars. Compared to those seen in the Sun, these modes are of large amplitude and long period, making the oscillations attractive prospects for observation. However, the low Q-factor of these modes, and issues relating to the rising background at low frequencies, present some interesting challenges for identifying modes and determining the related asteroseismic parameters. We report on the analysis procedure adopted for peak-bagging by our group at Birming- ham, and the techniques used to robustly ensure these are not a product of noise. I also show results from a number of giants extracted from multi-year observations with the SMEI instrument

  14. Proteorhodopsin genes in giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Yutin, Natalya; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-01-01

    Viruses with large genomes encode numerous proteins that do not directly participate in virus biogenesis but rather modify key functional systems of infected cells. We report that a distinct group of giant viruses infecting unicellular eukaryotes that includes Organic Lake Phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus encode predicted proteorhodopsins that have not been previously detected in viruses. Search of metagenomic sequence data shows that putative viral proteorhodopsins are extremely abundant in marine environments. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that giant viruses acquired proteorhodopsins via horizontal gene transfer from proteorhodopsin-encoding protists although the actual donor(s) could not be presently identified. The pattern of conservation of the predicted functionally important amino acid residues suggests that viral proteorhodopsin homologs function as sensory rhodopsins. We hypothesize that viral rhodopsins modulate light-dependent signaling, in particular phototaxis, in infected protists.

  15. Entangling Dipole-Dipole Interactions for Quantum Logic in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Ivan

    2000-06-01

    The ability to engineer the quantum state of a many-body system represents the ``holy grail" of coherent control and opens the door to a host of new applications and fundamental studies ranging from improvements in precision measurement to quantum computation. At the heart of these quantum-information processing tasks are entangled states. These can be created through a ``quantum-circuit" consisting of a series of simple quantum logic gates acting only on single or pairs of qubits. Any physical implementation of a quantum circuit must contend with an inherent conflict. Qubits must strongly couple to one another and to an external classical field which drives the algorithm, while simultaneously coupling very weakly to the noisy environment which decoheres the quantum superpositions. We have identified a new system for quantum-information processing: ultra-cold trapped neutral atoms (G. K. Brennen et al. ), Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 , 1060 (1999); see also eprint quant- ph/9910031. Neutrals interact very weakly with the environment and coupling between them can be induced on demand through resonant excitation or elastic collisions via direct overlap between wavepackets(D. Jaksch et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 1975 (1999).. The ability to turn interactions on and off reduces decoherence and the spread of errors amongst qubits. In the implementation presented here I will discuss entangling atoms with electric dipole-dipole interactions in optical lattices (P.S. Jessen and I. H. Deutsch, Adv. At. Mol. Phys. 36), 91 (1996).. These traps provide an extremely flexible environment for coherent control of both internal and external degrees of freedom of atom wave packets as in ion traps(D. Wineland et al.), Fortschr. Phys. 46, 363 (1998).. Dipole-dipole interactions can be coherent when atoms are tightly localized at a distance small compared to the optical wavelength. By inducing dipoles conditional on the logical state of the

  16. Giant South Brae platform installed

    SciTech Connect

    Cranfield, J.

    1982-12-01

    During the summer 1982 another giant production platform was installed in the North Sea in Marathon's South Brae field. The complex structure of that field necessitated careful planning of the offshore producing structure design and placement. The platform has 46 well slots; 19 will be used as producing wells, 3 for gas injection, and 14 for water injection. The remainder of the well slots are reserved for future development. The platform structure design is examined.

  17. Giant magnetoresistance in silicene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengyong; Luo, Guangfu; Liu, Qihang; Zheng, Jiaxin; Zhang, Zhimeng; Nagase, Shigeru; Gao, Zhengxiang; Lu, Jing

    2012-05-21

    By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we predict a giant magnetoresistance in zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) connecting two semi-infinite silicene electrodes through switch of the edge spin direction of ZSiNRs. Spin-filter efficiency of both the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic ZSiNRs is sign-changeable with the bias voltage. Therefore, potential application of silicene in spintronics devices is suggested.

  18. A giant juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Yüce, Salim; Uysal, Ismail Önder; Doğan, Mansur; Polat, Kerem; Salk, Ismail; Müderris, Suphi

    2013-05-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas are locally growing and highly vascular tumors. They are primarily treated through surgical excision ranging from an open approach to an endoscopic approach. We presented a 20-year-old man with a giant juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma that bilaterally obliterated the pterygopalatine fossa, invaded the sphenoid bone, and extended to the left nasal passage. His complaints were epistaxis and nasal obstruction. After embolization, the patient was treated surgically using the endoscopic approach and declared cured and discharged without any complications.

  19. A Giant Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Yüce, Salim; Uysal, İsmail Önder; Doğan, Mansur; Polat, Kerem; Şalk, İsmail; Müderris, Suphi

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) are locally growing highly vascular tumours. They are treated primarily by surgical excision ranging from open approach to endoscopic approach. We presented a 20-year-old male with a giant nasopharyngeal juvenile angiofibroma obliterating the pterygopalatine fossa bilaterally, invasing the sphenoid bone and extending to the left nasal passage. His complaints were epistaxis and nasal obstruction. After embolization, the patient was treated surgically with endoscopic approach and discharged as cured without any complication. PMID:23714961

  20. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  1. Hairpin Furans and Giant Biaryls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xin; Mague, Joel T; Donahue, James P; Pascal, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The thermal reaction of two cyclopentadienones with 5,5'-binaphthoquinone or 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in refluxing nitrobenzene (210 °C) gives, in a single synthetic step that includes two Diels-Alder additions, two decarbonylations, and two dehydrogenations, giant biaryl bisquinones (compounds 13, 14, 15, 18, and 21). However, when two cyclopentadienones react with 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in nitrobenzene at higher temperatures (250-260 °C), the resulting products are molecular ribbons composed of two twisted aromatic systems fused to a heteropentahelicene (19, 20, and 22). These molecules are representatives of a new class of chiral polycyclic aromatic compounds, the "hairpin furans". Interestingly, reheating a dimethoxy-substituted giant biaryl (e.g., 21) in nitrobenzene at 260 °C does not yield the corresponding hairpin furan (22), and mechanistic studies indicate that some intermediate or byproduct of the synthesis of the giant biaryls is a reagent or catalyst necessary for the conversion of the dimethoxybiaryl to the furan.

  2. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.

  3. Red Giants and Solar Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matloff, G. L.

    Our Sun will eventually leave the main sequence and expand in size and luminosity to become a giant star. For much of its ~108 year career as a giant, the Sun will reside on the horizontal branch of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, with a surface temperature of ~5000 K, a radius about 10x its present-day radius, and about 50x its current luminosity. A space-manufactured beryllium solar-photon sail could be used for emigration from the solar system during this solar phase. Space environmental effects limit the closest approach distance to the giant star to around 0.5 AU, assuming the quiet phase of the stellar activity cycle. Beryllium spectral reflectivity values are used to calculate a wavelength averaged sail spectral reflectivity. This parameter and a reasonable value of spacecraft areal mass thickness (8.87 x 10-5 kg/m2) are used to estimate the interstellar cruise velocity for a sail fully unfurled at a 0.5-1 AU perihelion from an initially parabolic orbit that is always oriented normal to the star. These will be 2-3x greater than those possible for the same craft launched from today's Sun.

  4. Interaction between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, J. G.; Liu, X. Y.; Chen, H. H.; Deng, R. D.; Yan, Q. X.

    2016-02-01

    A new formula for the interaction force between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field is derived taking their mutual magnetic interaction into consideration and used to simulate their relative motion. Results show that when the angle β between the direction of external magnetic field and the centerline of two magnetic dipoles is 0 ° or 90 °, magnetic dipoles approach each other or move away from each other in a straight line, respectively. And the time required for them to contact each other from the initial position is related to the specific susceptibility and the diameter of magnetic particles, medium viscosity and magnetic field strength. When β is between 0 ° and 90 °, magnetic dipole pair performs approximate elliptical motion, and the motion trajectory is affected by the specific susceptibility, diameter and medium viscosity but not magnetic field strength. However, time required for magnetic dipoles to complete the same motion trajectory is shorter when adopting stronger magnetic field. Moreover, the subsequent motion trajectory of magnetic dipoles is ascertained once the initial position is set in a predetermined motion trajectory. Additionally, magnetic potential energy of magnetic dipole pairs is transformed into kinetic energy and friction energy during the motion.

  5. Geomagnetic dipole moment collapse by convective mixing in the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijun; Olson, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Convective mixing in the fluid outer core can induce rapid transient decrease of the geomagnetic dipole. Here we determine rates of dipole moment decrease as a function of magnetic Reynolds number following convective instability in a numerical dynamo and in axisymmetric kinematic flows. Our calculations show that mixing flows induce reversed magnetic flux on the core-mantle boundary through expulsion of mostly poloidal magnetic field by convective upwellings. The dipole field collapse is accelerated by enhanced radial diffusion and meridional advection of magnetic flux below the core-mantle boundary. Magnetic energy cascades from the dipole to smaller scales during mixing, producing a filamentary magnetic field structure on the core-mantle boundary. We find that the maximum rate of dipole moment decrease on century time scales is weakly sensitive to the mixing flow pattern but varies with the velocity of the flow approximately as cRm β , with Rm the magnetic Reynolds number and (c, β) ≈ (0.2 ± 0.07, 0.78 ± 0.05). According to our calculations, a mixing flow in the outer core with Rm in the range of 200-300 can account for the historically-measured rate of decrease of the geomagnetic dipole moment, although it is unlikely that a single mixing flow event with this intensity would cause a full dipole collapse or polarity reversal.

  6. Guiding the Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-08-01

    New ESO Survey Provides Targets for the VLT Giant astronomical telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) must be used efficiently. Observing time is expensive and there are long waiting lines of excellent research programmes. Thus the work at the telescope must be very well prepared and optimized as much as possible - mistakes should be avoided and no time lost! Astronomers working with the new 8-m class optical/infrared telescopes must base their observations on detailed lists of suitable target objects if they want to perform cutting-edge science. This is particularly true for research programmes that depend on observations of large samples of comparatively rare, distant objects. This type of work requires that extensive catalogues of such objects must be prepared in advance. One such major catalogue - that will serve as a very useful basis for future VLT observations - has just become available from the new ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). The Need for Sky Surveys Astronomers have since long recognized the need to carry out preparatory observations with other telescopes in order to "guide" large telescopes. To this end, surveys of smaller or larger parts of the sky have been performed by wide-field telescopes, paving the way for subsequent work at the limits of the largest available ground-based telescopes. For instance, a complete photographic survey of the sourthern sky (declination < -17.5°) was carried out in the 1970's with the ESO 1-metre Schmidt Telescope in support of the work at the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory. However, while until recently most observational programmes could rely on samples of objects found on photographic plates, this is no longer possible. New image surveys must match the fainter limiting magnitudes reached by the new and larger telescopes. Modern digital, multi-colour, deep imaging surveys have thus become an indispensable complement to the 8-m telescopes. The new generation of imaging surveys will, without

  7. Red giants: then and now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, John

    Fred Hoyle's work on the structure and evolution of red giants, particularly his pathbreaking contribution with Martin Schwarzschild (Hoyle and Schwarzschild 1955), is both lauded and critically assessed. In his later lectures and work with students in the early 1960s, Hoyle presented more physical ways of understanding some of the approximations used, and results obtained, in that seminal paper. Although later ideas by other investigators will be touched upon, Hoyle's viewpoint - that low-mass red giants are essentially white dwarfs with a serious mass-storage problem - is still extremely fruitful. Over the years, I have further developed his method of attack. Relatively recently, I have been able to deepen and broaden the approach, finally extending the theory to provide a unifying treatment of the structure of low-mass stars from the main sequence though both the red-giant and horizontal-branch phases of evolution. Many aspects of these stars that had remained puzzling, even mysterious, for decades have now fallen into place, and some questions have been answered that were not even posed before. With low-mass red giants as the simplest example, this recent work emphasizes that stars, in general, may have at least two distinct but very important centres: (I) a geometrical centre, and (II) a separate nuclear centre, residing in a shell outside a zero-luminosity dense core for example. This two-centre perspective leads to an explicit, analytical, asymptotic theory of low-mass red-giant structure. It enables one to appreciate that the problem of understanding why such stars become red giants is one of anticipating a remarkable yet natural structural bifurcation that occurs in them. This bifurcation occurs because of a combination of known and understandable facts just summarized namely that, following central hydrogen exhaustion, a thin nuclear-burning shell does develop outside a more-or-less dense core. In the resulting theory, both ρsh/ρolinec and

  8. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  9. Speciation and phylogeography of giant petrels Macronectes.

    PubMed

    Techow, N M S M; O'Ryan, C; Phillips, R A; Gales, R; Marin, M; Patterson-Fraser, D; Quintana, F; Ritz, M S; Thompson, D R; Wanless, R M; Weimerskirch, H; Ryan, P G

    2010-02-01

    We examine global phylogeography of the two forms of giant petrel Macronectes spp. Although previously considered to be a single taxon, and despite debate over the status of some populations and the existence of minimal genetic data (one mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence per form), the current consensus based on morphology is that there are two species, Northern Giant Petrel M. halli and Southern Giant Petrel M. giganteus. This study examined genetic variation at cytochrome b as well as six microsatellite loci in giant petrels from 22 islands, representing most island groups at which the two species breed. Both markers support separate species status, although sequence divergence in cytochrome b was only 0.42% (corrected). Divergence was estimated to have occurred approximately 0.2mya, but with some colonies apparently separated for longer (up to 0.5 my). Three clades were found within giant petrels, which separated approximately 0.7mya, with the Southern Giant Petrel paraphyletic to a monophyletic Northern Giant Petrel. There was evidence of past fragmentation during the Pleistocene, with subsequent secondary contact within Southern Giant Petrels. The analysis also suggested a period of past population expansion that corresponded roughly to the timing of speciation and the separation of an ancestral giant petrel population from the fulmar Fulmarus clade. PMID:19755164

  10. Rotational auto-detachment of dipole-bound anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ard, S. G.; Compton, R. N.; Garrett, W. R.

    2016-04-01

    Rotational auto-detachment of acetonitrile, trimethyl-acetonitrile, acetone, and cyclobutanone dipole-bound anions was studied under varying conditions in a Rydberg electron transfer (RET) time-of-flight apparatus. Varying amounts of auto-detachment was observed for anions with similar electron affinity and dipole moment, but different moments of inertia. These results were found to be consistent with predictions based on the calculated rotational spectra for these anions, highlighting the importance of critical binding properties in understanding the stability and lifetime of dipole bound systems.

  11. CONSTRAINT ON LIGHT DIPOLE DARK MATTER FROM HELIOSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Ilídio; Kadota, Kenji; Silk, Joseph E-mail: ilopes@uevora.pt E-mail: silk@astro.ox.ac.uk

    2014-01-10

    We investigate the effects of a magnetic dipole moment of asymmetric dark matter (DM) in the evolution of the Sun. The dipole interaction can lead to a sizable DM scattering cross section even for light DM, and asymmetric DM can lead to a large DM number density in the Sun. We find that solar model precision tests, using as diagnostic the sound speed profile obtained from helioseismology data, exclude dipolar DM particles with a mass larger than 4.3 GeV and magnetic dipole moment larger than 1.6 × 10{sup –17} e cm.

  12. Analysis and design of short, iron-free dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, A.R.

    1981-10-21

    Iron-free, dipole magnets are used extensively as steering magnets to correct for the bending, induced by extraneous magnetic fields, of particle beams that are being transported in vacuum. Generally, the dipoles are long enough that the space occupied by the end conductors is small compared to the overall magnet length. In a recent application, however, this criteria did not apply. This has motivated a reanalysis of the characteristics of a system of small aspect ratio (length/diameter) dipoles that are spaced at relatively large axial distances.

  13. NLO evolution of color dipoles in N=4 SYM

    SciTech Connect

    Chirilli, Giovanni A.; Balitsky, Ian

    2009-07-04

    Here, high-energy behavior of amplitudes in a gauge theory can be reformulated in terms of the evolution of Wilson-line operators. In the leading logarithmic approximation it is given by the conformally invariant BK equation for the evolution of color dipoles. In QCD, the next-to-leading order BK equation has both conformal and non-conformal parts, the latter providing the running of the coupling constant. To separate the conformally invariant effects from the running-coupling effects, we calculate the NLO evolution of the color dipoles in the conformal ${\\cal N}$=4 SYM theory. We define the "composite dipole operator" with the rapidity cutoff preserving conformal invariance.

  14. Propagation of the Lissajous singularity dipole in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haitao; Gao, Zenghui; Zou, Xuefang; Xiao, Xi; Wang, Fanhou; Yang, Huajun

    2014-01-01

    The propagation properties of a pair of Lissajous singularities with opposite singularity indexes called the Lissajous singularity dipole (LSD) in free space are studied analytically and illustrated numerically. It is shown that the motion, creation, annihilation and change in the degree of polarization of the LSD, and change in the shape of Lissajous figures take place by suitably varying the waist width, off-axis distance or propagation distance. In particular, the creation and shift to infinity of a single Lissajous singularity may appear. A comparison with the free-space propagation of an optical vortex dipole and a C-dipole is also made.

  15. Cooperative ordering in lattices of interacting two-level dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettles, Robert J.; Gardiner, Simon A.; Adams, Charles S.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the cooperative behavior of regular monolayers of driven two-level dipoles, using classical electrodynamics simulations. The dipolar response results from the interference of many cooperative eigenmodes, each frequency-shifted from the single resonant dipole case, and with a modified lifetime, due to the interactions between dipoles. Of particular interest is the kagome lattice, where the semiregular geometry permits simultaneous excitation of two dominant modes, one strongly subradiant, leading to an electromagnetically induced transparencylike interference in a two-level system. The interfering modes are associated with ferroelectric and antiferroelectric ordering in alternate lattice rows with long-range interactions.

  16. Pygmy dipole resonance in 140Ce via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysiek, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Lanza, E. G.; Litvinova, E.; Paar, N.; Avigo, R.; Bazzacco, D.; Benzoni, G.; Birkenbach, B.; Blasi, N.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Ciemała, M.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Giaz, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hess, H.; Isocarte, R.; Jungclaus, A.; Leoni, S.; Ljungvall, J.; Lunardi, S.; Mazurek, K.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Milion, B.; Morales, A. I.; Napoli, D. R.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Wieland, O.; Ziebliński, M.

    2016-04-01

    The γ decay from the high-lying states of 140Ce excited via inelastic scattering of 17O at a bombarding energy of 340 MeV was measured using the high-resolution AGATA-demonstrator array in coincidence with scattered ions detected in two segmented Δ E -E silicon detectors. Angular distributions of scattered ions and emitted γ rays were measured, as well as their differential cross sections. The excitation of 1- states below the neutron separation energy is similar to the one obtained in reactions with the α isoscalar probe. The comparison between the experimental differential cross sections and the corresponding predictions using the distorted-wave Born approximation allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of identified 1- pygmy states. For this analysis the form factor obtained by folding microscopically calculated transition densities and optical potentials was used.

  17. Study of KIC 8561221 observed by Kepler: an early red giant showing depressed dipolar modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, R. A.; Pérez Hernández, F.; Benomar, O.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Ballot, J.; Davies, G. R.; Doğan, G.; Stello, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Houdek, G.; Lignières, F.; Mathur, S.; Takata, M.; Ceillier, T.; Chaplin, W. J.; Mathis, S.; Mosser, B.; Ouazzani, R. M.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Reese, D. R.; Régulo, C.; Salabert, D.; Thompson, M. J.; van Saders, J. L.; Neiner, C.; De Ridder, J.

    2014-03-01

    Context. The continuous high-precision photometric observations provided by the CoRoT and Kepler space missions have allowed us to understand the structure and dynamics of red giants better using asteroseismic techniques. A small fraction of these stars show dipole modes with unexpectedly low amplitudes. The reduction in amplitude is more pronounced for stars with a higher frequency of maximum power, νmax. Aims: In this work we want to characterise KIC 8561221 in order to confirm that it is currently the least evolved star among this peculiar subset and to discuss several hypotheses that could help explain the reduction of the dipole mode amplitudes. Methods: We used Kepler short- and long-cadence data combined with spectroscopic observations to infer the stellar structure and dynamics of KIC 8561221. We then discussed different scenarios that could contribute to reducing the dipole amplitudes, such as a fast-rotating interior or the effect of a magnetic field on the properties of the modes. We also performed a detailed study of the inertia and damping of the modes. Results: We have been able to characterise 36 oscillations modes, in particular, a few dipole modes above νmax that exhibit nearly normal amplitudes. The frequencies of all the measured modes were used to determine the overall properties and the internal structure of the star. We have inferred a surface rotation period of ~91 days and uncovered a variation in the surface magnetic activity during the last 4 years. The analysis of the convective background did not reveal any difference compared to "normal" red giants. As expected, the internal regions of the star probed by the ℓ = 2 and 3 modes spin 4 to 8 times faster than the surface. Conclusions: With our grid of standard models we are able to properly fit the observed frequencies. Our model calculation of mode inertia and damping give no explanation for the depressed dipole modes. A fast-rotating core is also ruled out as a possible explanation

  18. The search for permanent electric dipole moments

    SciTech Connect

    Kirch, Klaus

    2013-02-13

    Permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) of fundamental systems with spin - particles, nuclei, atoms or molecules violate parity and time reversal invariance. Invoking the CPT theorem, time reversal violation implies CP violation. Although CP-violation is implemented in the standard electro-weak theory, EDM generated this way remain undetectably small. However, this CP-violation also appears to fail explaining the observed baryon asymmetry of our universe. Extensions of the standard theory usually include new sources of CP violation and often predict sizeable EDMs. EDM searches in different systems are complementary and various efforts worldwide are underway and no finite value has been established yet. The prototype of an EDM search is the pursuit of the EDM of the neutron. It has the longest history and at the same time is at the forefront of present research. The talk aims at giving an overview of the field with emphasis on our efforts within an international collaboration at PSI, nedm.web.psi.ch.

  19. Nuclear Electric Dipole Moment of 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, I; P.Liu, C; Friar, J L; Hayes, A C; Navratil, P

    2008-04-08

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a physical system would require time-reversal (T) violation, which is equivalent to charge-conjugation-parity (CP) violation by CPT invariance. Experimental programs are currently pushing the limits on EDMs in atoms, nuclei, and the neutron to regimes of fundamental theoretical interest. Nuclear EDMs can be studied at ion storage rings with sensitivities that may be competitive with atomic and neutron measurements. Here we calculate the magnitude of the CP-violating EDM of {sup 3}He and the expected sensitivity of such a measurement to the underlying CP-violating interactions. Assuming that the coupling constants are of comparable magnitude for {pi}-, {rho}-, and {omega}-exchanges, we find that the pion-exchange contribution dominates. Finally, our results suggest that a measurement of the {sup 3}He EDM is complementary to the planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and could provide a powerful constraint for the theoretical models of the pion-nucleon P,T-violating interaction.

  20. Nuclear Electric Dipole Moment of ^{3}_He

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, I.; Liu, C.-P.; Friar, J. L.; Hayes, A. C.; Navratil, P.

    2008-01-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a physical system would require time-reversal (T) violation, which is equivalent to charge-conjugation-parity (CP) violation by CPT invariance. Experimental programs are currently pushing the limits on EDMs in atoms, nuclei, and the neutron to regimes of fundamental theoretical interest. Nuclear EDMs can be studied at ion storage rings with sensitivities that may be competitive with atomic and neutron measurements. Here we calculate the magnitude of the CP-violating EDM of ^{3}_He and the expected sensitivity of such a measurement to the underlyng CP-violating interactions. Assuming that the coupling constants are of comparable magnitude for {\\pi}-, {\\rho}-, and {\\omega}-exchanges, we find that the pion-exchange contribution dominates. Our results suggest that a measurement of the ^{3}_He EDM is complementary to the planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and could provide a powerful constraint for the theoretical models of the pion-nucleon P,T-violating interaction.

  1. A study of microtubule dipole lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Shubhendu

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal protein polymers orchestrating a host of important cellular functions including, but not limited to, cell support, cell division, cell motility and cell transport. In this thesis, we construct a toy-model of the microtubule lattice composed of vector Ising spins representing tubulin molecules, the building block of microtubules. Nearest-neighbor and next-to-nearest neighbor interactions are considered within an anisotropic dielectric medium. As a consequence of the helical topology, we observe that certain spin orientations render the lattice frustrated with nearest neighbor ferroelectric and next-to-nearest neighbor antiferroelectric bonds. Under these conditions, the lattice displays the remarkable property of stabilizing certain spin patterns that are robust to thermal fluctuations. We model this behavior in the framework of a generalized Ising model known as the J1 - J2 model and theoretically determine the set of stable patterns. Employing Monte-Carlo methods, we demonstrate the stability of such patterns in the microtubule lattice at human physiological temperatures. This suggests a novel biological mechanism for storing information in living organisms, whereby the tubulin spin (dipole moment) states become information bits and information gets stored in microtubules in a way that is robust to thermal fluctuations.

  2. Full length prototype SSC dipole test results

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.; Engler, N.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.; Koepke, K.; Kuchnir, M.; Larson, E.; Lundy, R.

    1987-04-24

    Results are presented from tests of the first full length prototype SSC dipole magnet. The cryogenic behavior of the magnet during a slow cooldown to 4.5K and a slow warmup to room temperature has been measured. Magnetic field quality was measured at currents up to 2000 A. Averaged over the body field all harmonics with the exception of b/sub 2/ and b/sub 8/ are at or within the tolerances specified by the SSC Central Design Group. (The values of b/sub 2/ and b/sub 8/ result from known design and construction defects which will be be corrected in later magnets.) Using an NMR probe the average body field strength is measured to be 10.283 G/A with point to point variations on the order of one part in 1000. Data are presented on quench behavior of the magnet up to 3500 A (approximately 55% of full field) including longitudinal and transverse velocities for the first 250 msec of the quench.

  3. Two flavors of the Indian Ocean Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Satoru; Tozuka, Tomoki

    2016-06-01

    The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is known as a climate mode in the tropical Indian Ocean accompanied by negative (positive) sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies over the eastern (western) pole during its positive phase. However, the western pole of the IOD is not always covered totally by positive SST anomalies. For this reason, the IOD is further classified into two types in this study based on SST anomalies in the western pole. The first type (hereafter "canonical IOD") is associated with negative (positive) SST anomalies in the eastern (central to western) tropical Indian Ocean. The second type (hereafter "IOD Modoki"), on the other hand, is associated with negative SST anomalies in the eastern and western tropical Indian Ocean and positive SST anomalies in the central tropical Indian Ocean. Based on composite analyses, it is found that easterly wind anomalies cover the whole equatorial Indian Ocean in the canonical IOD, and as a result, positive rainfall anomalies are observed over East Africa. Also, due to the basin-wide easterly wind anomalies, the canonical IOD is accompanied by strong sea surface height (SSH) anomalies. In contrast, zonal wind anomalies converge in the central tropical Indian Ocean in the IOD Modoki, and no significant precipitation anomalies are found over East Africa. Also, only weak SSH anomalies are seen, because equatorial downwelling anomalies induced by westerly wind anomalies in the west are counteracted by equatorial upwelling anomalies caused by easterly wind anomalies in the east.

  4. Magnetic dipole discharges. I. Basic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Teodorescu-Soare, C. T.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2013-08-15

    A simple discharge is described which uses a permanent magnet as a cold cathode and the metallic chamber wall as an anode. The magnet's equator is biased strongly negative, which produces secondary electrons due to the impact of energetic ions. The emitted electrons are highly confined by the strong dipolar magnetic field and the negative potential in the equatorial plane of the magnet. The emitted electrons ionize near the sheath and produce further electrons, which drift across field lines to the anode while the nearly unmagnetized ions are accelerated back to the magnet. A steady state discharge is maintained at neutral pressures above 10{sup −3} mbar. This is the principle of magnetron discharges, which commonly use cylindrical and planar cathodes rather than magnetic dipoles as cathodes. The discharge properties have been investigated in steady state and pulsed mode. Different magnets and geometries have been employed. The role of a background plasma has been investigated. Various types of instabilities have been observed such as sheath oscillations, current-driven turbulence, relaxation instabilities due to ionization, and high frequency oscillations created by sputtering impulses, which are described in more detail in companion papers. The discharge has also been operated in reactive gases and shown to be useful for sputtering applications.

  5. Strongly magnetized rotating dipole in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Electromagnetic waves arise in many areas of physics. Solutions are difficult to find in the general case. Aims: We numerically integrate Maxwell equations in a 3D spherical polar coordinate system. Methods: Straightforward finite difference methods would lead to a coordinate singularity along the polar axis. Spectral methods are better suited for such artificial singularities that are related to the choice of a coordinate system. When the radiating object rotates like a star, for example, special classes of solutions to Maxwell equations are worthwhile to study, such as quasi-stationary regimes. Moreover, in high-energy astrophysics, strong gravitational and magnetic fields are present especially around rotating neutron stars. Results: To study such systems, we designed an algorithm to solve the time-dependent Maxwell equations in spherical polar coordinates including general relativity and quantum electrodynamical corrections to leading order. As a diagnostic, we computed the spin-down luminosity expected for these stars and compared it to the classical or non-relativistic and non-quantum mechanical results. Conclusions: Quantum electrodynamics leads to an irrelevant change in the spin-down luminosity even for a magnetic field of about the critical value of 4.4 × 109 T. Therefore the braking index remains close to its value for a point dipole in vacuum, namely n = 3. The same conclusion holds for a general-relativistic quantum electrodynamically corrected force-free magnetosphere.

  6. Electric dipole polarizability and the neutral skin

    SciTech Connect

    Piechaczek, A.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Reinhard, P.-G.; Agrawal, Bijay K; Colo, Gianluca; Paar, Nils; Roca-Maza, X; Vretenar, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The recent high-resolution measurement of the electric dipole (E1) polarizability {alpha}{sub D} in {sup 208}Pb [A. Tamii et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 062502 (2011)] provides a unique constraint on the neutron-skin thickness of this nucleus. The neutron-skin thickness r{sub skin} of {sup 208}Pb is a quantity of critical importance for our understanding of a variety of nuclear and astrophysical phenomena. To assess the model dependence of the correlation between {alpha}{sub D} and r{sub skin}, we carry out systematic calculations for {sup 208}Pb, {sup 132}Sn, and {sup 48}Ca based on the nuclear density functional theory using both nonrelativistic and relativistic energy density functionals. Our analysis indicates that whereas individual models exhibit a linear dependence between {alpha}{sub D} and r{sub skin}, this correlation is not universal when one combines predictions from a host of different models. By averaging over these model predictions, we provide estimates with associated systematic errors for r{sub skin} and {alpha}{sub D} for the nuclei under consideration. We conclude that precise measurements of r{sub skin} in both {sup 48}Ca and {sup 208}Pb - combined with the recent measurement of {alpha}{sub D} - should significantly constrain the isovector sector of the nuclear energy density functional.

  7. Warm Disks from Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    In the process of searching for exoplanetary systems, weve discovered tens of debris disks close around distant stars that are especially bright in infrared wavelengths. New research suggests that we might be looking at the late stages of terrestrial planet formation in these systems.Forming Terrestrial PlanetsAccording to the widely-accepted formation model for our solar-system, protoplanets the size of Mars formed within a protoplanetary disk around our Sun. Eventually, the depletion of the gas in the disk led the orbits of these protoplanets to become chaotically unstable. Finally, in the giant impact stage, many of the protoplanets collided with each other ultimately leading to the formation of the terrestrial planets and their moons as we know them today.If giant impact stages occur in exoplanetary systems, too leading to the formation of terrestrial exoplanets how would we detect this process? According to a study led by Hidenori Genda of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, we might be already be witnessing this stage in observations of warm debris disks around other stars. To test this, Genda and collaborators model giant impact stages and determine what we would expect to see from a system undergoing this violent evolution.Modeling CollisionsSnapshots of a giant impact in one of the authors simulations. The collision causes roughly 0.05 Earth masses of protoplanetary material to be ejected from the system. Click for a closer look! [Genda et al. 2015]The collaborators run a series of simulations evolving protoplanetary bodies in a solar system. The simulations begin 10 Myr into the lifetime of the solar system, i.e., after the gas from the protoplanetary disk has had time to be cleared and the protoplanetary orbits begin to destabilize. The simulations end when the protoplanets are done smashing into each other and have again settled into stable orbits, typically after ~100 Myr.The authors find that, over an average giant impact stage, the total amount of

  8. ASTEROSEISMIC CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR POPULATIONS AMONG 13,000 RED GIANTS OBSERVED BY KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Stello, Dennis; Bedding, Timothy R.; Benomar, Othman; White, Timothy R.; Huber, Daniel; Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Mosser, Benoit

    2013-03-10

    Of the more than 150,000 targets followed by the Kepler Mission, about 10% were selected as red giants. Due to their high scientific value, in particular for Galaxy population studies and stellar structure and evolution, their Kepler light curves were made public in late 2011. More than 13,000 (over 85%) of these stars show intrinsic flux variability caused by solar-like oscillations making them ideal for large-scale asteroseismic investigations. We automatically extracted individual frequencies and measured the period spacings of the dipole modes in nearly every red giant. These measurements naturally classify the stars into various populations, such as the red giant branch, the low-mass (M/M{sub Sun} {approx}< 1.8) helium-core-burning red clump, and the higher-mass (M/M{sub Sun} {approx}> 1.8) secondary clump. The period spacings also reveal that a large fraction of the stars show rotationally induced frequency splittings. This sample of stars will undoubtedly provide an extremely valuable source for studying the stellar population in the direction of the Kepler field, in particular when combined with complementary spectroscopic surveys.

  9. WHT, DIPOL-2 polarimetry of Nova Sgr 2015b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Eamonn; Berdyugin, Andrei; Redman, Matt

    2015-09-01

    We report polarimetry data from three nights observing of Nova Sgr 2015b (also PNV J18365700-2855420 or V5668 Sgr) with the William Herschel Telescope in the BVR passbands using the DIPOL-2 instrument.

  10. Super-resolved position and orientation of fluorescent dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguet, François; Geissbühler, Stefan; Märki, Iwan; Lasser, Theo; Unser, Michael

    2009-07-01

    We introduce an efficient, image formation model-based algorithm that extends super-resolution fluorescence localization to include orientation estimation, and report experimental accuracies of 5 nanometers for position estimation and 2 degrees for dipole orientation estimation.

  11. Initial Tests of an AC Dipole for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.

    2006-11-20

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2{sigma} at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  12. Initial Tests of an AC Dipole for the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, R.; Jansson, A.; Kopp, S.; Syphers, M.

    2006-11-01

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2σ at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  13. Initial tests of an AC dipole for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Jansson, A.; Kopp, S.; Syphers, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2{sigma} at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  14. SKEW QUADRUPOLES IN RHIC DIPOLE MAGNETS AT HIGH FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; GUPTA, P.; THOMPSON, P.; WANDERER, P.

    1995-06-11

    In the RHIC arc dipoles, the center of the cold mass lies above the center of the cryostat. At the maximum design field, the magnetic flux lines leak through the yoke to the asymmetrically located cryostat, which provides an additional return path. This introduces a systematic top-bottom asymmetry leading to a skew quadrupole term at high fields. A similar asymmetry is also created by any difference in weights of the upper and the lower yoke halves. Data from measurements of several RHIC dipoles are presented to study this effect. In the current production series of the RDIC dipoles, an attempt is made to compensate the effect of the cryostat by an asymmetry in the iron yoke. Seven dipoles with this type of yoke have been cold tested, and show a reduced saturation in the skew quadrupole term, as expected.

  15. Gyre-driven decay of the Earth's magnetic dipole.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Christopher C; Aubert, Julien; Gillet, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Direct observations indicate that the magnitude of the Earth's magnetic axial dipole has decreased over the past 175 years; it is now 9% weaker than it was in 1840. Here we show how the rate of dipole decay may be controlled by a planetary-scale gyre in the liquid metal outer core. The gyre's meridional limbs on average transport normal polarity magnetic flux equatorward and reverse polarity flux poleward. Asymmetry in the geomagnetic field, due to the South Atlantic Anomaly, is essential to the proposed mechanism. We find that meridional flux advection accounts for the majority of the dipole decay since 1840, especially during times of rapid decline, with magnetic diffusion making an almost steady contribution generally of smaller magnitude. Based on the morphology of the present field, and the persistent nature of the gyre, the current episode of dipole decay looks set to continue, at least for the next few decades. PMID:26814368

  16. Development of Cellular Magnetic Dipoles in Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Faivre, Damien; Fischer, Anna; Garcia-Rubio, Inés; Mastrogiacomo, Giovanni; Gehring, Andreas U.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria benefit from their ability to form cellular magnetic dipoles by assembling stable single-domain ferromagnetic particles in chains as a means to navigate along Earth's magnetic field lines on their way to favorable habitats. We studied the assembly of nanosized membrane-encapsulated magnetite particles (magnetosomes) by ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy using Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense cultured in a time-resolved experimental setting. The spectroscopic data show that 1), magnetic particle growth is not synchronized; 2), the increase in particle numbers is insufficient to build up cellular magnetic dipoles; and 3), dipoles of assembled magnetosome blocks occur when the first magnetite particles reach a stable single-domain state. These stable single-domain particles can act as magnetic docks to stabilize the remaining and/or newly nucleated superparamagnetic particles in their adjacencies. We postulate that docking is a key mechanism for building the functional cellular magnetic dipole, which in turn is required for magnetotaxis in bacteria. PMID:20713012

  17. Optimized tapered dipole nanoantenna as efficient energy harvester.

    PubMed

    El-Toukhy, Youssef M; Hussein, Mohamed; Hameed, Mohamed Farhat O; Heikal, A M; Abd-Elrazzak, M M; Obayya, S S A

    2016-07-11

    In this paper, a novel design of tapered dipole nanoantenna is introduced and numerically analyzed for energy harvesting applications. The proposed design consists of three steps tapered dipole nanoantenna with rectangular shape. Full systematic analysis is carried out where the antenna impedance, return loss, harvesting efficiency and field confinement are calculated using 3D finite element frequency domain method (3D-FEFD). The structure geometrical parameters are optimized using particle swarm algorithm (PSO) to improve the harvesting efficiency and reduce the return loss at wavelength of 500 nm. A harvesting efficiency of 55.3% is achieved which is higher than that of conventional dipole counterpart by 29%. This enhancement is attributed to the high field confinement in the dipole gap as a result of multiple tips created in the nanoantenna design. Furthermore, the antenna input impedance is tuned to match a wide range of fabricated diode based upon the multi-resonance characteristic of the proposed structure. PMID:27410898

  18. Gyre-driven decay of the Earth's magnetic dipole

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Christopher C.; Aubert, Julien; Gillet, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Direct observations indicate that the magnitude of the Earth's magnetic axial dipole has decreased over the past 175 years; it is now 9% weaker than it was in 1840. Here we show how the rate of dipole decay may be controlled by a planetary-scale gyre in the liquid metal outer core. The gyre's meridional limbs on average transport normal polarity magnetic flux equatorward and reverse polarity flux poleward. Asymmetry in the geomagnetic field, due to the South Atlantic Anomaly, is essential to the proposed mechanism. We find that meridional flux advection accounts for the majority of the dipole decay since 1840, especially during times of rapid decline, with magnetic diffusion making an almost steady contribution generally of smaller magnitude. Based on the morphology of the present field, and the persistent nature of the gyre, the current episode of dipole decay looks set to continue, at least for the next few decades. PMID:26814368

  19. Nonexistence of the self-accelerating dipole and related questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2014-06-01

    We calculate the self-force of a constantly accelerating electric dipole, showing, in particular, that classical electromagnetism does not predict that an electric dipole could self-accelerate, nor could it levitate in a gravitational field. We also resolve a paradox concerning the inertial mass of a longitudinally accelerating dipole, showing that the combined system of dipole plus field can be assigned a well-defined energy-momentum four-vector, so that the principle of relativity is satisfied. We then present some general features of electromagnetic phenomena in a reference frame described by the Rindler metric, showing in particular that an observer fixed in a gravitational field described everywhere by the Rindler metric will find any charged object supported in the gravitational field to possess an electromagnetic self-force equal to that observed by an inertial observer relative to which the body undergoes rigid hyperbolic motion. It follows that the principle of equivalence is satisfied by these systems.

  20. Optimized tapered dipole nanoantenna as efficient energy harvester.

    PubMed

    El-Toukhy, Youssef M; Hussein, Mohamed; Hameed, Mohamed Farhat O; Heikal, A M; Abd-Elrazzak, M M; Obayya, S S A

    2016-07-11

    In this paper, a novel design of tapered dipole nanoantenna is introduced and numerically analyzed for energy harvesting applications. The proposed design consists of three steps tapered dipole nanoantenna with rectangular shape. Full systematic analysis is carried out where the antenna impedance, return loss, harvesting efficiency and field confinement are calculated using 3D finite element frequency domain method (3D-FEFD). The structure geometrical parameters are optimized using particle swarm algorithm (PSO) to improve the harvesting efficiency and reduce the return loss at wavelength of 500 nm. A harvesting efficiency of 55.3% is achieved which is higher than that of conventional dipole counterpart by 29%. This enhancement is attributed to the high field confinement in the dipole gap as a result of multiple tips created in the nanoantenna design. Furthermore, the antenna input impedance is tuned to match a wide range of fabricated diode based upon the multi-resonance characteristic of the proposed structure.

  1. Fourier-positivity constraints on QCD dipole models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, Bertrand G.; Peschanski, Robi

    2016-09-01

    Fourier-positivity (F-positivity), i.e. the mathematical property that a function has a positive Fourier transform, can be used as a constraint on the parametrization of QCD dipole-target cross-sections or Wilson line correlators in transverse position space r. They are Bessel transforms of positive transverse momentum dependent gluon distributions. Using mathematical F-positivity constraints on the limit r → 0 behavior of the dipole amplitudes, we identify the common origin of the violation of F-positivity for various, however phenomenologically convenient, dipole models. It is due to the behavior r 2 + ɛ, ɛ > 0 softer, even slightly, than color transparency. F-positivity seems thus to conflict with the present dipole formalism when it includes a QCD running coupling constant α (r).

  2. Modifiers of the Dipole Potential of Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Efimova, S. S.; Ostroumova, O. S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the magnitude of change in the dipole potential (φd) of membranes caused by the adsorption of modifiers on lipid bilayers of various compositions. We tested flavonoids, muscle relaxants, thyroid hormones, and xanthene and styrylpyridinium dyes in order to assess their dipole-modifying properties. A quantitative description of the modifying action of flavonoids, muscle relaxants, thyroid hormones, and xanthene dyes is shown as the ratio of the maximum change in the bilayer dipole potential upon saturation and the absolute φd value of the unmodified membrane. The slopes of the linear relationship between the increase in the dipole potential of phospholipid bilayers and the concentration of styrylpyridinium dyes in membrane-bathing solutions were found. We described the relationships between the change in φd and the chemical structure of modifiers, as well as the charge and spontaneous curvature of lipid monolayers. PMID:26798493

  3. Gyre-driven decay of the Earth's magnetic dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Christopher C.; Aubert, Julien; Gillet, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Direct observations indicate that the magnitude of the Earth's magnetic axial dipole has decreased over the past 175 years; it is now 9% weaker than it was in 1840. Here we show how the rate of dipole decay may be controlled by a planetary-scale gyre in the liquid metal outer core. The gyre's meridional limbs on average transport normal polarity magnetic flux equatorward and reverse polarity flux poleward. Asymmetry in the geomagnetic field, due to the South Atlantic Anomaly, is essential to the proposed mechanism. We find that meridional flux advection accounts for the majority of the dipole decay since 1840, especially during times of rapid decline, with magnetic diffusion making an almost steady contribution generally of smaller magnitude. Based on the morphology of the present field, and the persistent nature of the gyre, the current episode of dipole decay looks set to continue, at least for the next few decades.

  4. Dipole response in neutron-rich nuclei with new Skyrme interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Burrello, S.; Colonna, M.; Baran, V.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the isoscalar and isovector E 1 response of neutron-rich nuclei, within a semiclassical transport model employing effective interactions for the nuclear mean field. In particular, we adopt the recently introduced SAMi-J Skyrme interactions, whose parameters are specifically tuned to improve the description of spin-isospin properties of nuclei. Our analysis evidences a relevant degree of isoscalar-isovector mixing of the collective excitations developing in neutron-rich systems. Focusing on the low-lying strength emerging in the isovector response, we show that this energy region essentially corresponds to the excitation of isoscalar-like modes, which also contribute to the isovector response owing to their mixed character. Considering effective interactions which mostly differ in the isovector channels, we observe that these mixing effects increase with the slope L of the symmetry energy at saturation density, leading to a larger strength in the low-energy region of the isovector response. This result appears connected to the increase, with L , of the neutron-proton asymmetry at the surface of the considered nuclei, i.e., to the neutron skin thickness.

  5. Simulation of Whistler Chorus in a Compressed Dipole Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Denton, R. E.; Hudson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's dipole magnetic field is constantly compressed by the solar wind and the compression is enhanced during magnetic storm. We simulate whistler chorus in a compressed dipole field using a hybrid code. The hybrid code uses the particle-in-cell technique in generalized orthogonal coordinates. In the hybrid code, a small fraction of electrons are treated as particles with anisotropic temperature that leads to the whistler instability. Other electrons are treated as a cold fluid without mass. The density of the fluid electrons is large such that the plasma frequency exceeds the electron gyro frequency. Ions serve as a fixed background. We model the compressed dipole field by adding a constant magnetic field component to the dipole field. The direction of the compressed component is the same as that of the dipole field at the equator. This model of the compressed dipole field yields a magnetic field with off-equator minima and smaller inhomogeneity than the dipole field near the equator. The distribution of hot anisotropic electrons along the magnetic field is a function of adiabatic invariants that satisfies MHD force balance. In the compressed dipole field, the hot electron anisotropy, hot electron density and plasma beta in the direction parallel to the background magnetic field are the maximum at the minimum magnetic field. In our simulation, whistler chorus are generated at the minimum magnetic field with a peak frequency in agreement with the prediction by WHAMP, a local dispersion relation solver. The waves propagate in both directions along the magnetic field. Waves that propagate to higher magnetic latitude are damped at the boundary by the artificial resistive layers, while waves that propagate to lower latitude towards the equator continue to grow.

  6. Electric dipole polarizability: from few- to many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miorelli, Mirko; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir; Hagen, Gaute; Orlandini, Giuseppina; Papenbrock, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    We review the Lorentz integral transform coupled-cluster method for the calculation of the electric dipole polarizability. We benchmark our results with exact hyperspherical harmonics calculations for 4He and then we move to a heavier nucleus studying 16O. We observe that the implemented chiral nucleon-nucleon interaction at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order underestimates the electric dipole polarizability.

  7. Vibration modes of giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sumit R.; Jevicki, Antal; Mathur, Samir D.

    2001-01-15

    We examine the spectrum of small vibrations of giant gravitons when the gravitons expand in anti--de Sitter space and when they expand on the sphere. For any given angular harmonic, the modes are found to have frequencies related to the curvature length scale of the background; these frequencies are independent of radius (and hence angular momentum) of the brane itself. This implies that the holographic dual theory must have, in a given R charge sector, low-lying non-BPS excitations with level spacings independent of the R charge.

  8. Giant Sigmoid Diverticula: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kempczinski, Richard F.; Ferrucci, Joseph T.

    1974-01-01

    Two patients with giant sigmoid diverticula are added to 13 cases reported in the literature and the clinical features of this rare complication of diverticulosis are reviewed. These lesions probably arise as pseudodiverticula of the sigmoid colon with herniation of the mucosa through the muscle wall. They become progressively inflated by colonic gas via a ball-valve type mechanism. They are best treated by resection of the diverticulum, in continuity with the involved sigmoid, and primary anastomosis. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:4433171

  9. Classification of Uxo by Principal Dipole Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, K. N.

    2010-12-01

    Data acquired by multiple-Transmitter, multiple-receiver time-domain electromagnetic devices show great potential for determining the geometric and compositional information relating to near surface conductive targets. Here is presented an analysis of data from one such system; the Berkeley Unexploded-ordnance Discriminator (BUD) system. BUD data are succinctly reduced by processing the multi-static data matrices to obtain magnetic dipole polarizability matrices for data from each time gate. When viewed over all time gates, the projections of the data onto the principal polar axes yield so-called polarizability curves. These curves are especially well suited to discriminating between subsurface conductivity anomalies which correspond to objects of rotational symmetry and irregularly shaped objects. The curves have previously been successfully employed as library elements in a pattern recognition scheme aimed at discriminating harmless scrap metal from dangerous intact unexploded ordnance. However, previous polarizability-curve matching methods have only been applied at field sites which are known a priori to be contaminated by a single type of ordnance, and furthermore, the particular ordnance present in the subsurface was known to be large. Thus signal amplitude was a key element in the discrimination process. The work presented here applies feature-based pattern classification techniques to BUD field data where more than 20 categories of object are present. Data soundings from a calibration grid at the Yuma, AZ proving ground are used in a cross validation study to calibrate the pattern recognition method. The resultant method is then applied to a Blind Test Grid. Results indicate that when lone UXO are present and SNR is reasonably high, Polarizability Curve Matching successfully discriminates UXO from scrap metal when a broad range of objects are present.

  10. Modeling Barkhausen Noise in magnetic glasses with dipole-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Awadhesh K.; Hentschel, H. George E.; Jaiswal, Prabhat K.; Mondal, Chandana; Procaccia, Itamar; Gupta, Bhaskar Sen

    2015-10-01

    Long-ranged dipole-dipole interactions in magnetic glasses give rise to magnetic domains having labyrinthine patterns on the scale of about 1 micron. Barkhausen Noise then results from the movement of domain boundaries which is modeled by the motion of elastic membranes with random pinning. Here we propose that on the nanoscale new sources of Barkhausen Noise can arise. We propose an atomistic model of magnetic glasses in which we measure the Barkhausen Noise which results from the creation of new domains and the movement of domain boundaries on the nanoscale. The statistics of the Barkhausen Noise found in our simulations is in striking disagreement with the expectations in the literature. In fact we find exponential statistics without any power law, stressing the fact that Barkhausen Noise can belong to very different universality classes. In the present model the essence of the phenomenon is the fact that the spin response Green's function is decaying too rapidly for having sufficiently large magnetic jumps. A theory is offered in excellent agreement with the measured data without any free parameter.

  11. Magnetic dipole-dipole sensing at atomic scale using electron spin resonance STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, T.; Paul, W.; Rolf-Pissarczyk, S.; MacDonald, A.; Yang, K.; Natterer, F. D.; Lutz, C. P.; Heinrich, A. J.

    Magnetometry having both high magnetic field sensitivity and atomic resolution has been an important goal for applications in diverse fields covering physics, material science, and biomedical science. Recent development of electron spin resonance STM (ESR-STM) promises coherent manipulation of spins and studies on magnetic interaction of artificially built nanostructures, leading toward quantum computation, simulation, and sensors In ESR-STM experiments, we find that the ESR signal from an Fe atom underneath a STM tip splits into two different frequencies when we position an additional Fe atom nearby. We measure an ESR energy splitting that decays as 1/r3 (r is the separation of the two Fe atoms), indicating that the atoms are coupled through magnetic dipole-dipole interaction. This energy and distance relation enables us to determine magnetic moments of atoms and molecules on a surface with high precision in energy. Unique and advantageous aspects of ESR-STM are the atom manipulation capabilities, which allow us to build atomically precise nanostructures and examine their interactions. For instance, we construct a dice cinque arrangement of five Fe atoms, and probe their interaction and energy degeneracy. We demonstrate the ESR-STM technique can be utilized for quantum magnetic sensors.

  12. Constraints on Exotic Dipole-Dipole Couplings between Electrons at the Micrometer Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Ozeri, Roee; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson

    2015-08-01

    New constraints on exotic dipole-dipole interactions between electrons at the micrometer scale are established, based on a recent measurement of the magnetic interaction between two trapped 88Sr+ ions. For light bosons (mass≤0.1 eV ) we obtain a 90% confidence interval for an axial-vector-mediated interaction strength of |gAegAe/4 π ℏc | ≤1.2 ×10-17 . Assuming C P T invariance, this constraint is compared to that on anomalous electron-positron interactions, derived from positronium hyperfine spectroscopy. We find that the electron-electron constraint is 6 orders of magnitude more stringent than the electron-positron counterpart. Bounds on pseudoscalar-mediated interaction as well as on torsion gravity are also derived and compared with previous work performed at different length scales. Our constraints benefit from the high controllability of the experimental system which contained only two trapped particles. It therefore suggests a useful new platform for exotic particle searches, complementing other experimental efforts.

  13. Radio-frequency-driven dipole-dipole interactions in spatially separated volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauschinsky, Atreju; van Ditzhuijzen, C. S. E.; Noordam, L. D.; van den Heuvell, H. B. Van Linden

    2008-12-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) fields in the MHz range are used to induce resonant energy transfer between cold Rydberg atoms in spatially separated volumes. After laser preparation of the Rydberg atoms, dipole-dipole coupling excites the 49s atoms in one cylinder to the 49p state while the 41d atoms in the second cylinder are transferred down to the 42p state. The energy exchanged between the atoms in this process is 33GHz . An external rf field brings this energy transfer into resonance. The strength of the interaction has been investigated as a function of amplitude (0-1V/cm) and frequency (1-30MHz) of the rf field and as a function of a static-field offset. Multiphoton transitions up to fifth order as well as selection rules prohibiting the process at certain fields have been observed. The width of the resonances has been reduced compared to earlier results by switching off external magnetic fields of the magneto-optical trap, making sub-MHz spectroscopy possible. All features are well reproduced by theoretical calculations taking the strong ac Stark shift due to the rf field into account.

  14. High-energy hadron-hadron (dipole-dipole) scattering from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, Matteo; Meggiolaro, Enrico

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the problem of high-energy hadron-hadron (dipole-dipole) scattering is approached (for the first time) from the point of view of lattice QCD, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations. In the first part, we give a brief review of how high-energy scattering amplitudes can be reconstructed, using a functional-integral approach, in terms of certain correlation functions of two Wilson loops, and we also briefly recall some relevant analyticity and crossing-symmetry properties of these loop-loop correlation functions, when going from Euclidean to Minkowskian theory. In the second part, we shall see how these (Euclidean) loop-loop correlation functions can be evaluated in lattice QCD, and we shall compare our numerical results with some nonperturbative analytical estimates that appeared in the literature, discussing, in particular, the question of the analytic continuation from Euclidean to Minkowskian theory and its relation to the still unsolved problem of the asymptotic s dependence of the hadron-hadron total cross sections.

  15. Dipole-dipole resistivity monitoring at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.

    1983-03-01

    Two 20 km-long dipole-dipole lines with permanently emplaced electronics at 1-km spacings were established over the field area; one of these lines is remeasured annually. Resistivity measurements are taken using a 25 kW generator capable of up to 80A output and a microprocessor-controlled signal-averaging receiver; this high power-low noise system is capable of highly accurate measurements even at large transmitter-receiver separations. Standard error calculations for collected data indicate errors less than 5% for all points, but 95% confidence intervals show error limits about 2 to 4 times higher. Data indicate little change of apparent resistivity within the upper 300 m over the field. However, apparent resistivity increases are observed over the producing zone at depths of 1 km and greater. Large zones of decreasing apparent resistivity are observed flanking the zone of increases on both sides. To explain the resistivity changes observed, simple two-dimensional reservoir simulations were performed in which cooler, less saline recharge water enters the reservoir from above through a leaky caprock and laterally through a more permeable vertical boundary. The calculated magnitude of a resistivity change after 3 years of simulated production fits the observed data, but the anomaly shapes differ. It is concluded that the rapidly moving hydraulic front produces a salinity change large enough to explain the resistivity increase, but that our recharge assumptions were probably oversimplified.

  16. Many particle magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions in magnetizable stent assisted magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cregg, P. J.; Murphy, Kieran; Mardinoglu, Adil; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2010-08-01

    The implant assisted magnetic targeted drug delivery system of Avilés, Ebner and Ritter is considered both experimentally ( in vitro) and theoretically. The results of a 2D mathematical model are compared with 3D experimental results for a magnetizable wire stent. In this experiment a ferromagnetic, coiled wire stent is implanted to aid collection of particles which consist of single domain magnetic nanoparticles (radius ≈10 nm). In order to model the agglomeration of particles known to occur in this system, the magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions for multiple particles are included. Simulations based on this mathematical model were performed using open source C++ code. Different initial positions are considered and the system performance is assessed in terms of collection efficiency. The results of this model show closer agreement with the measured in vitro experimental results and with the literature. The implications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine are based on the prediction of the particle efficiency, in conjunction with the magnetizable stent, for targeted drug delivery.

  17. Space Propulsion Based on Dipole Assisted IEC System

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, George H.; Thomas, Robert; Takeyama, Yoshikazu; Momota, Hiromu; Shrestha, Prajakti J.

    2006-01-20

    A potential opportunity to enhance Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion propulsion exists by introducing a magnetic dipole into the IEC chamber. The dipole fields should increase the plasma density, hence fusion rate, in the center region of the IEC and the combined IEC and dipole confinement properties will reduce plasma losses. To demonstrate that a hybrid Dipole-IEC (DaIEC) configuration can provide improved confinement vs. a stand alone IEC, a first model DaIEC experiment has been benchmarked against a reference IEC. A triple Langmuir probe was used to measure the electron temperature and density. It was confirmed that the magnetic field increases the electron density by an order of magnitude and the addition of a controlled electrical potential to the dipole structure allows control of space charge buildup in the dense core region. This paper describes the dipole assisted IEC concept, its advantages, and soon missions it is well suited for. Here the present status of DaIEC experiments are described, the issues for scale up are discussed, and a conceptual plan for a power unit development is presented.

  18. Preferential Rotation of Chiral Dipoles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramel, Stefan; Voth, Greg A.; Tympel, Saskia; Toschi, Federico

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new particle shape which shows preferential rotation in three dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence. We call these particles chiral dipoles because they consist of a rod with two helices of opposite handedness, one at each end. 3D printing is used to fabricate these particles with a length in the inertial range and their rotations are tracked in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids. High aspect ratio chiral dipoles preferentially align with their long axis along the extensional eigenvectors of the strain rate tensor, and the helical ends respond to the extensional strain rate with a mean spinning rate that is nonzero. We use Stokesian dynamics simulations of chiral dipoles in pure strain flow to quantify the dependence of spinning on particle shape. Based on the known response to pure strain, we build a model that gives the spinning rate of small chiral dipoles using velocity gradients along Lagrangian trajectories from high resolution direct numerical simulations. The statistics of chiral dipole spinning determined with this model show surprisingly good agreement with the measured spinning of much larger chiral dipoles in the experiments.

  19. Sodium in weak G-band giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Lambert, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium abundances have been determined for eight weak G-band giants whose atmospheres are greatly enriched with products of the CN-cycling H-burning reactions. Systematic errors are minimized by comparing the weak G-band giants to a sample of similar but normal giants. If, further, Ca is selected as a reference element, model atmosphere-related errors should largely be removed. For the weak-G-band stars (Na/Ca) = 0.16 +/- 0.01, which is just possibly greater than the result (Na/Ca) = 0.10 /- 0.03 from the normal giants. This result demonstrates that the atmospheres of the weak G-band giants are not seriously contaminated with products of ON cycling.

  20. Giant Planets in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, S. N.; White, R. J.; Latham, D. W.

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery of 51 Peg b, more than 200 hot Jupiters have now been confirmed, but the details of their inward migration remain uncertain. While it is widely accepted that short period giant planets could not have formed in situ, several different mechanisms (e.g., Type II migration, planet-planet scattering, Kozai-Lidov cycles) may contribute to shrinking planetary orbits, and the relative importance of each is not well-constrained. Migration through the gas disk is expected to preserve circular, coplanar orbits and must occur quickly (within ˜ 10 Myr), whereas multi-body processes should initially excite eccentricities and inclinations and may take hundreds of millions of years. Subsequent evolution of the system (e.g., orbital circularization and inclination damping via tidal interaction with the host star) may obscure these differences, so observing hot Jupiters soon after migration occurs can constrain the importance of each mechanism. Fortunately, the well-characterized stars in young and adolescent open clusters (with known ages and compositions) provide natural laboratories for such studies, and recent surveys have begun to take advantage of this opportunity. We present a review of the discoveries in this emerging realm of exoplanet science, discuss the constraints they provide for giant planet formation and migration, and reflect on the future direction of the field.

  1. Giant magnetoresistance in silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chengyong; Luo, Guangfu; Liu, Qihang; Zheng, Jiaxin; Zhang, Zhimeng; Nagase, Shigeru; Gao, Zhengxiang; Lu, Jing

    2012-05-01

    By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we predict a giant magnetoresistance in zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) connecting two semi-infinite silicene electrodes through switch of the edge spin direction of ZSiNRs. Spin-filter efficiency of both the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic ZSiNRs is sign-changeable with the bias voltage. Therefore, potential application of silicene in spintronics devices is suggested.By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we predict a giant magnetoresistance in zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) connecting two semi-infinite silicene electrodes through switch of the edge spin direction of ZSiNRs. Spin-filter efficiency of both the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic ZSiNRs is sign-changeable with the bias voltage. Therefore, potential application of silicene in spintronics devices is suggested. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The total current contrasts between the AFM and FM configurations and the spin-resolved I-Vbias characteristics in the AFM and FM configurations of all the checked ZSiNRs as a function of bias voltage; the spin-resolved I-Vbias characteristics and SFEs of different-length 5-ZSiNR in the AFM and FM configurations as a function of bias voltage. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr00037g

  2. Surface tension and phase coexistence for fluids of molecules with extended dipoles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Arellano, Enrique; Benavides, A L; Alejandre, José

    2012-09-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations of fluids of molecules with extended dipoles were performed, with increasing distance between point charges but with a constant dipole moment, to obtain thermodynamic properties. It was found that the effect of varying the dipole length on the dielectric constant in the liquid phase, the vapor-liquid equilibria, and the surface tension was negligible for dipolar lengths up to half the particle diameter. By comparing thermodynamic properties of the predictions of the extended dipole model with those for the Stockmayer fluid of point dipoles, it was found that extended dipoles are equivalent to point dipoles over a wide range of dipole lengths, and not only near the point dipole limit, when the separation length is very small compared with the mean distance between particles. Finally, phase equilibrium results of extended dipoles were compared to those obtained from the discrete perturbation theory for a Stockmayer potential.

  3. Effects of gastrointestinal tissue structure on computed dipole vectors

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Travis M; Li, Liren; Pullan, Andrew J; Cheng, Leo K

    2007-01-01

    Background Digestive diseases are difficult to assess without using invasive measurements. Non-invasive measurements of body surface electrical and magnetic activity resulting from underlying gastro-intestinal activity are not widely used, in large due to their difficulty in interpretation. Mathematical modelling of the underlying processes may help provide additional information. When modelling myoelectrical activity, it is common for the electrical field to be represented by equivalent dipole sources. The gastrointestinal system is comprised of alternating layers of smooth muscle (SM) cells and Interstitial Cells of Cajal (ICC). In addition the small intestine has regions of high curvature as the intestine bends back upon itself. To eventually use modelling diagnostically, we must improve our understanding of the effect that intestinal structure has on dipole vector behaviour. Methods Normal intestine electrical behaviour was simulated on simple geometries using a monodomain formulation. The myoelectrical fields were then represented by their dipole vectors and an examination on the effect of structure was undertaken. The 3D intestine model was compared to a more computationally efficient 1D representation to determine the differences on the resultant dipole vectors. In addition, the conductivity values and the thickness of the different muscle layers were varied in the 3D model and the effects on the dipole vectors were investigated. Results The dipole vector orientations were largely affected by the curvature and by a transmural gradient in the electrical wavefront caused by the different properties of the SM and ICC layers. This gradient caused the dipoles to be oriented at an angle to the principal direction of electrical propagation. This angle increased when the ratio of the longitudinal and circular muscle was increased or when the the conductivity along and across the layers was increased. The 1D model was able to represent the geometry of the small

  4. Dipole-dipole interaction and its concentration dependence of magnetic fluid evaluated by alternating current hysteresis measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Satoshi; Yamada, Tsutomu; Takemura, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are used as therapeutic and diagnostic tools, such as for treating hyperthermia and in magnetic particle imaging, respectively. Magnetic relaxation is one of the heating mechanisms of MNPs. Brownian and Néel relaxation times are calculated conventional theories; however, the influence of dipole-dipole interactions has not been considered in conventional models. In this study, water-dispersed MNPs of different concentrations and MNPs fixed with an epoxy bond were prepared. dc and ac hysteresis loops for each sample were measured. With respect to both dc and ac hysteresis loops, magnetization decreased with the increase in MNP concentration because of inhibition of magnetic moment rotation due to dipole-dipole interactions. Moreover, intrinsic loss power (ILP) was estimated from the areas of the ac hysteresis loops. The dependence of ILP on the frequency of the magnetic field was evaluated for each MNP concentration. The peak frequency of ILP increased with the decrease in MNP concentration. These peaks were due to Brownian relaxation, as they were not seen with the fixed sample. This indicates that the Brownian relaxation time became shorter with lower MNP concentration, because the weaker dipole-dipole interactions with lower concentrations suggested that the magnetic moments could rotate more freely.

  5. Isovector spin-singlet (T = 1, S = 0) and isoscalar spin-triplet (T = 0, S = 1) pairing interactions and spin-isospin response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, H.; Bai, C. L.; Colò, G.

    2016-08-01

    We review several experimental and theoretical advances that emphasize common aspects of the study of spin-singlet, T = 1, and spin-triplet, T = 0, pairing correlations in nuclei. We first discuss various empirical evidence of the special role played by the T = 1 pairing interaction. In particular, we show the peculiar features of the nuclear pairing interaction in the low-density regime, and possible outcomes such as the BCS–BEC crossover in nuclear matter and, in an analogous way, in loosely bound nuclei. We then move to the competition between T = 1 and T = 0 pairing correlations. The effect of such competition on the low-lying spectra is studied in N = Z odd-odd nuclei by using a three-body model; in this case, it is shown that the inversion of the {J}π ={0}+ and {J}π ={1}+ states near the ground state, and the strong magnetic dipole transitions between them, can be considered as a clear manifestation of strong T = 0 pairing correlations in these nuclei. The effect of T = 0 pairing correlations is also quite evident if one studies charge-changing transitions. The Gamow–Teller (GT) states in N=Z+2 nuclei are studied here by using self-consistent Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov (HFB) plus quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculations in which the T = 0 pairing interaction is taken into account. Strong GT states are found, near the ground state of daughter nuclei; these are compared with available experimental data from charge-exchange reactions, and such comparison can pinpoint the value of the strength of the T = 0 interaction. Pair transfer reactions are eventually discussed. While two-neutron transfer has long been proposed as a tool to measure the T = 1 superfluidity in the nuclear ground states, the study of deuteron transfer is still in its infancy, despite its potential interest for revealing effects coming from both T = 1 and T = 0 interactions. We also point out that the reaction mechanism may mask the strong pair transfer amplitudes predicted

  6. Isovector spin-singlet (T = 1, S = 0) and isoscalar spin-triplet (T = 0, S = 1) pairing interactions and spin-isospin response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, H.; Bai, C. L.; Colò, G.

    2016-08-01

    We review several experimental and theoretical advances that emphasize common aspects of the study of spin-singlet, T = 1, and spin-triplet, T = 0, pairing correlations in nuclei. We first discuss various empirical evidence of the special role played by the T = 1 pairing interaction. In particular, we show the peculiar features of the nuclear pairing interaction in the low-density regime, and possible outcomes such as the BCS-BEC crossover in nuclear matter and, in an analogous way, in loosely bound nuclei. We then move to the competition between T = 1 and T = 0 pairing correlations. The effect of such competition on the low-lying spectra is studied in N = Z odd-odd nuclei by using a three-body model; in this case, it is shown that the inversion of the {J}π ={0}+ and {J}π ={1}+ states near the ground state, and the strong magnetic dipole transitions between them, can be considered as a clear manifestation of strong T = 0 pairing correlations in these nuclei. The effect of T = 0 pairing correlations is also quite evident if one studies charge-changing transitions. The Gamow-Teller (GT) states in N=Z+2 nuclei are studied here by using self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) plus quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculations in which the T = 0 pairing interaction is taken into account. Strong GT states are found, near the ground state of daughter nuclei; these are compared with available experimental data from charge-exchange reactions, and such comparison can pinpoint the value of the strength of the T = 0 interaction. Pair transfer reactions are eventually discussed. While two-neutron transfer has long been proposed as a tool to measure the T = 1 superfluidity in the nuclear ground states, the study of deuteron transfer is still in its infancy, despite its potential interest for revealing effects coming from both T = 1 and T = 0 interactions. We also point out that the reaction mechanism may mask the strong pair transfer amplitudes predicted by the

  7. THE ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS AROUND GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Villaver, Eva; Livio, Mario E-mail: mlivio@stsci.ed

    2009-11-01

    Recent surveys have revealed a lack of close-in planets around evolved stars more massive than 1.2 M{sub sun}. Such planets are common around solar-mass stars. We have calculated the orbital evolution of planets around stars with a range of initial masses, and have shown how planetary orbits are affected by the evolution of the stars all the way to the tip of the red giant branch. We find that tidal interaction can lead to the engulfment of close-in planets by evolved stars. The engulfment is more efficient for more-massive planets and less-massive stars. These results may explain the observed semimajor axis distribution of planets around evolved stars with masses larger than 1.5 M{sub sun}. Our results also suggest that massive planets may form more efficiently around intermediate-mass stars.

  8. Dipole strength in {sup 89}Y up to the neutron-separation energy

    SciTech Connect

    Benouaret, N.; Schwengner, R.; Rusev, G.; Doenau, F.; Beyer, R.; Erhard, M.; Junghans, A. R.; Kosev, K.; Nair, C.; Schilling, K. D.; Wagner, A.; Grosse, E.; Bendjaballah, N.

    2009-01-15

    Photoexcitation of the N=50 nucleus {sup 89}Y has been performed at the bremsstrahlung facility at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE at electron energies of E{sub e}{sup kin}=9.5 and 13.2 MeV. About 250 levels up to the neutron-separation energy were identified. Statistical methods were applied to estimate intensities of inelastic transitions and to correct the intensities of the ground-state transitions for their branching ratios. The photoabsorption cross section derived in this way up to the neutron-separation energy is combined with the photoabsorption cross section obtained from ({gamma}, n) data and provides information about the extension of the giant dipole resonance toward energies below the neutron-separation energy. An enhancement of E1 strength has been found in the range from about 6 to 11 MeV. The experimental photoabsorption cross sections of {sup 89}Y and of the neighboring N=50 isotones {sup 88}Sr and {sup 90}Zr are compared with predictions of the quasiparticle-random-phase approximation.

  9. Atomic electric dipole moment induced by the nuclear electric dipole moment: The magnetic moment effect

    SciTech Connect

    Porsev, S. G.; Ginges, J. S. M.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2011-04-15

    We have considered a mechanism for inducing a time-reversal violating electric dipole moment (EDM) in atoms through the interaction of a nuclear EDM d{sub N} with the hyperfine interaction, the ''magnetic moment effect''. We have derived the operator for this interaction and presented analytical formulas for the matrix elements between atomic states. Induced EDMs in the diamagnetic atoms {sup 129}Xe, {sup 171}Yb, {sup 199}Hg, {sup 211}Rn, and {sup 225}Ra have been calculated numerically. From the experimental limits on the atomic EDMs of {sup 129}Xe and {sup 199}Hg we have placed the following constraints on the nuclear EDMs, |d{sub N}({sup 129}Xe)|<1.1x10{sup -21}|e|cm and |d{sub N}({sup 199}Hg)|<2.8x10{sup -24}|e|cm.

  10. Comparison of double-quantum NMR normalization schemes to measure homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-08-14

    A recent implementation of a double-quantum (DQ) recoupling solid-state NMR experiment, dubbed DQ-DRENAR, provides a quantitative measure of homonuclear dipole-dipole coupling constants in multispin-1/2 systems. It was claimed to be more robust than another, previously known experiment relying on the recording of point-by-point normalized DQ build-up curves. Focusing on the POST-C7 and BaBa-xy16 DQ pulse sequences, I here present an in-depth comparison of both approaches based upon spin-dynamics simulations, stressing that they are based upon very similar principles and that they are largely equivalent when no imperfections are present. With imperfections, it is found that DQ-DRENAR/POST-C7 does not fully compensate for additional signal dephasing related to chemical shifts (CS) and their anisotropy (CSA), which over-compensates the intrinsic CS(A)-related efficiency loss of the DQ Hamiltonian and leads to an apparent cancellation effect. The simulations further show that the CS(A)-related dephasing in DQ-DRENAR can be removed by another phase cycle step or an improved super-cycled wideband version. Only the latter, or the normalized DQ build-up, are unaffected by CS(A)-related signal loss and yield clean pure dipolar-coupling information subject to unavoidable, pulse sequence specific performance reduction related to higher-order corrections of the dipolar DQ Hamiltonian. The intrinsically super-cycled BaBa-xy16 is shown to exhibit virtually no CS(A) related imperfection terms, but its dipolar performance is somewhat more challenged by CS(A) effects than POST-C7, which can however be compensated when applied at very fast MAS (>50 kHz). Practically, DQ-DRENAR uses a clever phase cycle separation to achieve a significantly shorter experimental time, which can also be beneficially employed in normalized DQ build-up experiments.

  11. Comparison of double-quantum NMR normalization schemes to measure homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-08-01

    A recent implementation of a double-quantum (DQ) recoupling solid-state NMR experiment, dubbed DQ-DRENAR, provides a quantitative measure of homonuclear dipole-dipole coupling constants in multispin-1/2 systems. It was claimed to be more robust than another, previously known experiment relying on the recording of point-by-point normalized DQ build-up curves. Focusing on the POST-C7 and BaBa-xy16 DQ pulse sequences, I here present an in-depth comparison of both approaches based upon spin-dynamics simulations, stressing that they are based upon very similar principles and that they are largely equivalent when no imperfections are present. With imperfections, it is found that DQ-DRENAR/POST-C7 does not fully compensate for additional signal dephasing related to chemical shifts (CS) and their anisotropy (CSA), which over-compensates the intrinsic CS(A)-related efficiency loss of the DQ Hamiltonian and leads to an apparent cancellation effect. The simulations further show that the CS(A)-related dephasing in DQ-DRENAR can be removed by another phase cycle step or an improved super-cycled wideband version. Only the latter, or the normalized DQ build-up, are unaffected by CS(A)-related signal loss and yield clean pure dipolar-coupling information subject to unavoidable, pulse sequence specific performance reduction related to higher-order corrections of the dipolar DQ Hamiltonian. The intrinsically super-cycled BaBa-xy16 is shown to exhibit virtually no CS(A) related imperfection terms, but its dipolar performance is somewhat more challenged by CS(A) effects than POST-C7, which can however be compensated when applied at very fast MAS (>50 kHz). Practically, DQ-DRENAR uses a clever phase cycle separation to achieve a significantly shorter experimental time, which can also be beneficially employed in normalized DQ build-up experiments.

  12. IS THE TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY CLUSTERING DIPOLE CONVERGENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Bilicki, Maciej; Chodorowski, Michal; Jarrett, Thomas; Mamon, Gary A.

    2011-11-01

    There is a long-standing controversy about the convergence of the dipole moment of the galaxy angular distribution (the so-called clustering dipole). Is the dipole convergent at all, and if so, what is the scale of the convergence? We study the growth of the clustering dipole of galaxies as a function of the limiting flux of the sample from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Contrary to some earlier claims, we find that the dipole does not converge before the completeness limit of the 2MASS Extended Source Catalog, i.e., up to 13.5 mag in the near-infrared K{sub s} band (equivalent to an effective distance of 300 Mpc h{sup -1}). We compare the observed growth of the dipole with the theoretically expected, conditional one (i.e., given the velocity of the Local Group relative to the cosmic microwave background), for the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum and cosmological parameters constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The observed growth turns out to be within 1{sigma} confidence level of its theoretical counterpart once the proper observational window of the 2MASS flux-limited catalog is included. For a contrast, if the adopted window is a top hat, then the predicted dipole grows significantly faster and converges (within the errors) to its final value for a distance of about 300 Mpc h{sup -1}. By comparing the observational windows, we show that for a given flux limit and a corresponding distance limit, the 2MASS flux-weighted window passes less large-scale signal than the top-hat one. We conclude that the growth of the 2MASS dipole for effective distances greater than 200 Mpc h{sup -1} is only apparent. On the other hand, for a distance of 80 Mpc h{sup -1} (mean depth of the 2MASS Redshift Survey) and the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum, the true dipole is expected to reach only {approx}80% of its final value. Eventually, since for the window function of 2MASS the predicted growth is consistent with the observed one, we can compare the two to evaluate

  13. Properties of the superconductor in accelerator dipole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teravest, Derk

    Several aspects of the application of superconductors to high field dipole magnets for particle accelerators are discussed. The attention is focused on the 10 tesla (1 m model) magnet that is envisaged for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator. The basic motivation behind the study is the intention of employing superconductors to their utmost performance. An overview of practical supercomputers, their applications and their impact on high field dipole magnets used for particle accelerators, is presented. The LHC reference design for the dipole magnets is outlined. Several models were used to study the influence of a number of factors in the shape and in particular, the deviation from the shape that is due to the flux flow state. For the investigated extrinsic and intrinsic factors, a classification can be made with respect to the effect on the shape of the characteristic of a multifilamentary wire. The optimization of the coil structure for high field dipole magnets, with respect to the field quality is described. An analytical model for solid and hollow filaments, to calculate the effect of filament magnetization in the quality of the dipole field, is presented.

  14. Part II: magnetic field produced by a current dipole.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D; Hosaka, H

    1976-01-01

    To understand the MCG, electrical models of the heart must be used in which the basic building-block is usually the current dipole. The dipole's magnetic field is generally made up of two parts: 1. the contribution by the dipole element itself, which is mathematically simple; 2. the contribution by the current generated in the volume conductor by the dipole, which is complicated and depends on the boundaries; for special boundaries this contribution is zero to Bz, the component of magnetic field which is normal to the boundary. This applies to the boundaries of the semi-infinite volume conductor, the infinite slab, and the sphere. This property allows great simplification in solving the magnetic forward and inverse problems. Because of its importance, it is proven with electrolytic tank experiments. Based on this property, a method is presented for estimating the presence of those dipole combinations which produce a suppressed surface potential; it consists of a visual examination of an "arrow" display of Bz.

  15. A 7T Spine Array Based on Electric Dipole Transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Qi; Nair, Govind; Gudino, Natalia; de Zwart, Jacco A.; van Gelderen, Peter; Murphy-Boesch, Joe; Reich, Daniel S.; Duyn, Jeff H.; Merkle, Hellmut

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this work the feasibility of using an array of electric dipole antennas for RF transmission in spine MRI at high field is explored. Method A 2-channel transmit array based on an electric dipole design was quantitatively optimized for 7T spine imaging and integrated with a receive array combining 8 loop coils. Using B1+ mapping, the transmit efficiency of the dipole array was compared to a design using quadrature loop pairs. The radio-frequency (RF) energy deposition for each array was measured using a home-built dielectric phantom and MR thermometry. The performance of the proposed array was qualitatively demonstrated in human studies. Results The results indicate dramatically improved transmit efficiency for the dipole design as compared to the loop excitation. Up to 76% gain was achieved within the spinal region. Conclusion For imaging of the spine, electric-dipole based transmitters provided an attractive alternative to the traditional loop-based design. Easy integration with existing receive array technology facilitates practical use at high field. PMID:26190585

  16. Radiation from an off-centred rotating dipole in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2016-08-01

    When a neutron star forms, after the collapse of its progenitor, a strong magnetic field survives in its interior. This magnetic topology is usually assumed to be well approximated by a dipole located right at the centre of the star. However, there is no particular reason why this dipole should be attached to this very special point. A slight shift from the stellar centre could have strong implications for the surrounding electromagnetic field configuration leading to clear observational signatures. We study the effect of the most general off-centred dipole anchored in the neutron star interior. Exact analytical solutions are given in vacuum outside the star to any order of accuracy in the small parameter ɛ = d/R, where d is the displacement of the dipole from the stellar centre and R the neutron star radius. As a simple diagnostic of this decentred dipole, the spin-down luminosity and the torque exerted on its crust are computed to the lowest leading order in ɛ. Results are compared to earlier works and a discussion on repercussions on pulsar braking index and multi-wavelength light curves is proposed.

  17. The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nityananda, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) of the National Centre of Radio Astrophysics (NCRA) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) at Khodad, India, has been operational in the band 0.2 to 2 metres for the last two and a half years. The system characteristics and performance and recent results from the group will be presented. Details of use over the last six months by scientists from other observatories under the GMRT Time Allocation Committee (GTAC) and future plans will be also be reviewed in this paper. Areas which have been studied include observations made in the GMRT band of neutral hydrogen, nearby galaxies, supernova remnants, the Galactic Centre, pulsars, the Sun and others.

  18. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-01

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  19. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-14

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  20. The Metallicity of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorngren, Daniel P.; Fortney, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Unique clues about the formation processes of giant planets can be found in their bulk compositions. Transiting planets provide us with bulk density determinations that can then be compared to models of planetary structure and evolution, to deduce planet bulk metallicities. At a given mass, denser planets have a higher mass fraction of metals. However, the unknown hot Jupiter "radius inflation" mechanism leads to under-dense planets that severely biases this work. Here we look at cooler transiting gas giants (Teff < 1000 K), which do not exhibit the radius inflation effect seen in their warmer cousins. We identified 40 such planets between 20 M_Earth and 20 M_Jup from the literature and used evolution models to determine their bulk heavy-element ("metal") mass. Several important trends are apparent. We see that all planets have at least ~10 M_Earth of metals, and that the mass of metal correlates strongly with the total mass of the planet. The heavy-element mass goes as the square root of the total mass. Both findings are consistent with the core accretion model. We also examined the effect of the parent star metallicity [Fe/H], finding that planets around high-metallicity stars are more likely to have large amounts of metal, but the relation appears weaker than previous studies with smaller sample sizes had suggested. We also looked for connections between bulk composition and planetary orbital parameters and stellar parameters, but saw no pattern, which is also an important result. This work can be directly compared to current and future outputs from planet formation models, including population synthesis.

  1. Direct Imaging of Giant Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Motohide

    Since the first detection of exoplanets around a Sun-like star 51 Peg in 1995, their detection and characterization are mainly led by indirect methods such as radial velocity and transit methods. However, recent progresses of observational techniques have finally enabled the direct imaging observations of giant planets of solar-system-scale orbit (with their semi-major axes less than about 50 AU) around A-type stars (e.g., Marois et al. 2008, 2010) and G-type stars (e.g., Kuzuhara et al. 2013). Direct imaging is useful to obtain the physical and atmospheric parameters of exoplanets. In fact not only colors but also a medium-resolution spectroscopy of such planets has been successfully obtained for their atmospheric characterization (Barman et al. 2013). Their masses are typically a few to ~10 Jupiter masses and they orbit at a Saturn- to-Pluto distance. Therefore, like hot-Jupiters and super-Earths they are unlike any solar-system planets, and called wide-orbit giant planets. A recent large search for planets and disk on the Subaru 8.2-m telescope (SEEDS project) has detected a 3-5 Jupiter-masses planet around a Sun-like star GJ 504 (Kuzuhara et al. 2013). It is the coolest planetary companion so far directly imaged and its near-infrared color is “bluer” than that of other directly imaged planets. In this contribution, I will review the recent progresses on direct imaging of exoplanets, highlight the results of the SEEDS project, and discuss the future developments.

  2. Studies on the ingestion characteristics of giant freshwater prawn, Chinese prawn and giant tiger prawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Wei-Ling; Wang, Wei-Dong; Dai, Xi-Lin; Jiang, Min; Zhu, Zheng-Guo; Yang, Ming-Hui; Liu, Xian-Zhong; Xu, Gui-Rong; Ding, Fu-Jiang

    2000-12-01

    The ingestion of giant freshwater prawn, Chinese prawn and giant tiger prawn had continuity and the ingestion high peak occurred at night. Light and temperature had significant effects on the daily ingestion rate (DIR) of giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Red light and blue light favorably induced favorable ingestion. In the adaptive range of temperature, the DIR increased with rising temperature and feeding frequency, but decreased with rising body weight.

  3. INFLATION OF A DIPOLE FIELD IN LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS: TOWARD AN UNDERSTANDING OF MAGNETODISK FORMATION IN THE MAGNETOSPHERE OF A HOT JUPITER

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, V. M.; Boyarinsev, E. L.; Boyko, A. A.; Zakharov, Yu. P.; Melekhov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Posukh, V. G.; Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Lammer, H.

    2013-05-20

    Giant exoplanets at close orbits, or so-called hot Jupiters, are supposed to have an intensive escape of upper atmospheric material heated and ionized by the radiation of a host star. An interaction between outflowing atmospheric plasma and the intrinsic planetary magnetic dipole field leads to the formation of a crucial feature of a hot Jupiter's magnetosphere-an equatorial current-carrying magnetodisk. The presence of a magnetodisk has been shown to influence the topology of a hot Jupiter's magnetosphere and to change a standoff distance of the magnetopause. In this paper, the basic features of the formation of a hot Jupiter's magnetodisk are studied by means of a laboratory experiment. A localized central source produces plasma that expands outward from the surface of the dipole and inflates the magnetic field. The observed structure of magnetic fields, electric currents, and plasma density indicates the formation of a relatively thin current disk extending beyond the Alfvenic point. At the edge of the current disk, an induced magnetic field was found to be several times larger than the field of the initial dipole.

  4. Perturbation response of model vortex rings and dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Farrell, Clara; Dabiri, John O.

    2012-11-01

    Jetting swimmers, such as squid or jellyfish, propel themselves by forming axisymmetric vortex rings. It is known that vortex rings cannot grow indefinitely, but rather ``pinch off'' once they reach their physical limit, and that a decrease in efficiency of fluid transport is associated with pinch-off. In contrast, two-dimensional vortex dipoles have been found to grow well beyond the physical limit observed in axisymmetric vortex rings. Previously, the Norbury and Pierrehumbert families of vortices have been used as models for axisymmetric vortex rings and two-dimensional dipoles respectively, and the response of these two families to shape perturbations has been characterized. In this study, we improve upon the Norbury and Pierrehumbert models, using nested contours to obtain more realistic models for experimentally-generated vortex rings and dipoles. The resulting vortices are subjected to shape perturbations akin to those previously introduced to members of the Norbury and Pierrehumbert families, and their response is characterized.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of dipoles in microtubules: Pseudospin model.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Ramírez, Mónica F; Berman, Gennady P; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2016-06-01

    We perform a theoretical study of the dynamics of the electric field excitations in a microtubule by taking into consideration the realistic cylindrical geometry, dipole-dipole interactions of the tubulin-based protein heterodimers, the radial electric field produced by the solvent, and a possible degeneracy of energy states of individual heterodimers. The consideration is done in the frame of the classical pseudospin model. We derive the system of nonlinear dynamical partial differential equations of motion for interacting dipoles and the continuum version of these equations. We obtain the solutions of these equations in the form of snoidal waves, solitons, kinks, and localized spikes. Our results will help to achieve a better understanding of the functional properties of microtubules including the motor protein dynamics and the information transfer processes. Our considerations are based on classical dynamics. Some speculations on the role of possible quantum effects are also made. PMID:27415303

  6. Reply to "Comment on `Axion Induced Oscillating Electric Dipole Moments' "

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-10-19

    A recent paper of Flambaum, Roberts and Stadnik, [1], claims there is no induced oscillating electric dipole moment (OEDM), eg, for the electron, arising from the oscillating cosmic axion background via the anomaly. This claim is based upon the assumption that electric dipoles always be defined by their coupling to static (constant in time) electric fields. The relevant Feynman diagram, as computed by [1], then becomes a total divergence, and vanishes in momentum space. However, an OEDM does arise from the anomaly, coupled to time dependent electric fields. It shares the decoupling properties with the anomaly. The full action, in an arbitrary gauge, was computed in [2], [3]. It is nonvanishing with a time dependent outgoing photon, and yields physics, eg, electric dipole radiation of an electron immersed in a cosmic axion field.

  7. Hadron production at LHC in dipole momentum space

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, E. A.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; De Oliveira, E. G.

    2013-03-25

    The dipole color approach is the framework that considers the quark-antiquark pair scattering off the target. The rapidity evolution of color dipoles is given by the nonlinear Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation, for which analytical solutions are not yet known. A good way to explore the asymptotic BK solutions is through the traveling wave method of QCD, that uses a correspondence between the BK evolution equation in momentum space and reaction-diffusion physics. Using the traveling wave based AGBS model for the dipole amplitude in momentum space, and within the k{sub t}-factorization formalism, we describe the LHC data on single inclusive hadron yield for p-p collisions.

  8. Maximum likelihood dipole fitting in spatially colored noise.

    PubMed

    Baryshnikov, B V; Van Veen, B D; Wakai, R T

    2004-11-30

    We evaluated a maximum likelihood dipole-fitting algorithm for somatosensory evoked field (SEF) MEG data in the presence of spatially colored noise. The method exploits the temporal multiepoch structure of the evoked response data to estimate the spatial noise covariance matrix from the section of data being fit, which eliminates the stationarity assumption implicit in prestimulus based whitening approaches. The performance of the method, including its effectiveness in comparison to other localization techniques (dipole fitting, LCMV and MUSIC) was evaluated using the bootstrap technique. Synthetic data results demonstrated robustness of the algorithm in the presence of relatively high levels of noise when traditional dipole fitting algorithms fail. Application of the algorithm to adult somatosensory MEG data showed that while it is not advantageous for high SNR data, it definitely provides improved performance (measured by the spread of localizations) as the data sample size decreases.

  9. Pinning down electroweak dipole operators of the top quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Markus; Soreq, Yotam

    2016-08-01

    We consider hadronic top quark pair production and pair production in association with a photon or a Z boson to probe electroweak dipole couplings in tbar{b}W, t bar{t}γ , and t bar{t}Z interactions. We demonstrate how measurements of these processes at the 13 TeV LHC can be combined to disentangle and constrain anomalous dipole operators. The construction of cross section ratios allows us to significantly reduce various uncertainties and exploit orthogonal sensitivity between the t bar{t}γ and t bar{t}Z couplings. In addition, we show that angular correlations in tbar{t} production can be used to constrain the remaining tbar{b}W dipole operator. Our approach yields excellent sensitivity to the anomalous couplings and can be a further step toward precise and direct measurements of the top quark electroweak interactions.

  10. Magnetic field properties of Fermilab Energy-Saver dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hanft, R.; Brown, B.C.; Cooper, W.E.; Gross, D.A.; Michelotti, L.; Schmidt, E.E.; Turkot, F.

    1983-03-01

    At Fermilab we have operated a production line for the fabrication of 901 21 foot long superconducting dipoles for use in the Energy Saver/Doubler. At any one time 772 of these dipoles are installed in the accelerator and 62 in beamlines; the remainder are spares. Magnetic field data are now available for most of these dipoles; in this paper we present some of these data which show that we have been able to maintain the necessary consistency in field quality throughout the production process. Specifically we report harmonic field coefficients, showing that the mechanical design permits substantial reduction of the magnitudes of the normal and skew quadrupole harmonic coefficients; field shape profiles; integral field data; and field angle data.

  11. Deciphering the Dipole Anisotropy of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Recent measurements of the dipole anisotropy in the arrival directions of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) indicate a strong energy dependence of the dipole amplitude and phase in the TeV-PeV range. We argue here that these observations can be well understood within standard diffusion theory as a combined effect of (i) one or more local sources at Galactic longitude 12 0 ° ≲l ≲30 0 ° dominating the CR gradient below 0.1-0.3 PeV, (ii) the presence of a strong ordered magnetic field in our local environment, (iii) the relative motion of the solar system, and (iv) the limited reconstruction capabilities of ground-based observatories. We show that an excellent candidate of the local CR source responsible for the dipole anisotropy at 1-100 TeV is the Vela supernova remnant.

  12. Electron electric dipole moment in Inverse Seesaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abada, Asmaa; Toma, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    We consider the contribution of sterile neutrinos to the electric dipole moment of charged leptons in the most minimal realisation of the Inverse Seesaw mechanism, in which the Standard Model is extended by two right-handed neutrinos and two sterile fermion states. Our study shows that the two pairs of (heavy) pseudo-Dirac mass eigen-states can give significant contributions to the electron electric dipole moment, lying close to future experimental sensitivity if their masses are above the electroweak scale. The major contribution comes from two-loop diagrams with pseudo-Dirac neutrino states running in the loops. In our analysis we further discuss the possibility of having a successful leptogenesis in this framework, compatible with a large electron electric dipole moment.

  13. Atom-Pair Kinetics with Strong Electric-Dipole Interactions.

    PubMed

    Thaicharoen, N; Gonçalves, L F; Raithel, G

    2016-05-27

    Rydberg-atom ensembles are switched from a weakly to a strongly interacting regime via adiabatic transformation of the atoms from an approximately nonpolar into a highly dipolar quantum state. The resultant electric dipole-dipole forces are probed using a device akin to a field ion microscope. Ion imaging and pair-correlation analysis reveal the kinetics of the interacting atoms. Dumbbell-shaped pair-correlation images demonstrate the anisotropy of the binary dipolar force. The dipolar C_{3} coefficient, derived from the time dependence of the images, agrees with the value calculated from the permanent electric-dipole moment of the atoms. The results indicate many-body dynamics akin to disorder-induced heating in strongly coupled particle systems. PMID:27284655

  14. Luminescence from oriented emitting dipoles in a birefringent medium.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chang-Ki; Kim, Sei-Yong; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2015-04-01

    We present an optical model to describe the luminescence from oriented emitting dipoles in a birefringent medium and validate the theoretical model through its applications to a dye doped organic thin film and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). We demonstrate that the optical birefringence affects not only far-field radiation characteristics such as the angle-dependent emission spectrum and intensity from the thin film and OLEDs, but also the outcoupling efficiency of OLEDs. The orientation of emitting dipoles in a birefringent medium is successfully analyzed from the far-field radiation pattern of a thin film using the model. In addition, the birefringent model presented here provides a precise analysis of the angle-dependent EL spectra and efficiencies of OLEDs with the determined emitting dipole orientation. PMID:25968793

  15. Atom-Pair Kinetics with Strong Electric-Dipole Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaicharoen, N.; Gonçalves, L. F.; Raithel, G.

    2016-05-01

    Rydberg-atom ensembles are switched from a weakly to a strongly interacting regime via adiabatic transformation of the atoms from an approximately nonpolar into a highly dipolar quantum state. The resultant electric dipole-dipole forces are probed using a device akin to a field ion microscope. Ion imaging and pair-correlation analysis reveal the kinetics of the interacting atoms. Dumbbell-shaped pair-correlation images demonstrate the anisotropy of the binary dipolar force. The dipolar C3 coefficient, derived from the time dependence of the images, agrees with the value calculated from the permanent electric-dipole moment of the atoms. The results indicate many-body dynamics akin to disorder-induced heating in strongly coupled particle systems.

  16. NLO evolution of color dipoles in N=4 SYM

    DOE PAGES

    Chirilli, Giovanni A.; Balitsky, Ian

    2009-07-04

    Here, high-energy behavior of amplitudes in a gauge theory can be reformulated in terms of the evolution of Wilson-line operators. In the leading logarithmic approximation it is given by the conformally invariant BK equation for the evolution of color dipoles. In QCD, the next-to-leading order BK equation has both conformal and non-conformal parts, the latter providing the running of the coupling constant. To separate the conformally invariant effects from the running-coupling effects, we calculate the NLO evolution of the color dipoles in the conformalmore » $${\\cal N}$$=4 SYM theory. We define the "composite dipole operator" with the rapidity cutoff preserving conformal invariance.« less

  17. NLO evolution of color dipoles in N=4 SYM

    SciTech Connect

    Balitsky, Ian; Chirilli, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    High-energy behavior of amplitudes in a gauge theory can be reformulated in terms of the evolution of Wilson-line operators. In the leading logarithmic approximation it is given by the conformally invariant BK equation for the evolution of color dipoles. In QCD, the next-to-leading order BK equation has both conformal and non-conformal parts, the latter providing the running of the coupling constant. To separate the conformally invariant effects from the running-coupling effects, we calculate the NLO evolution of the color dipoles in the conformal ${\\cal N}$=4 SYM theory. We define the ``composite dipole operator' with the rapidity cutoff preserving conformal invariance. The resulting M\\"obius invariant kernel agrees with the forward NLO BFKL calculation of Ref. 1

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of dipoles in microtubules: Pseudospin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, Alexander I.; Ramírez, Mónica F.; Berman, Gennady P.; Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2016-06-01

    We perform a theoretical study of the dynamics of the electric field excitations in a microtubule by taking into consideration the realistic cylindrical geometry, dipole-dipole interactions of the tubulin-based protein heterodimers, the radial electric field produced by the solvent, and a possible degeneracy of energy states of individual heterodimers. The consideration is done in the frame of the classical pseudospin model. We derive the system of nonlinear dynamical partial differential equations of motion for interacting dipoles and the continuum version of these equations. We obtain the solutions of these equations in the form of snoidal waves, solitons, kinks, and localized spikes. Our results will help to achieve a better understanding of the functional properties of microtubules including the motor protein dynamics and the information transfer processes. Our considerations are based on classical dynamics. Some speculations on the role of possible quantum effects are also made.

  19. Quantum phase transitions for two coupled cavities with dipole-interaction atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Lei; Zhang Yuqing; Liu Wuming

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the quantum phase transitions for two weakly coupled atom-cavity sites. The interatomic dipole-dipole interaction is considered. Our numerical results show that the dipole-dipole interaction is a crucial parameter for the quantum phase transition. For small atom-cavity detuning, the ''superfluid'' becomes more and more obvious with the increase of the dipole-dipole interaction. In addition, the strong dipole-dipole interaction can lead the atomic excitation to be suppressed completely, and only the photonic excitation exists for the ground states. When the atom-cavity detuning is comparable with the dipole-dipole interaction, the dipole-dipole interaction enlarges the positive detunings, which is in favor of exhibiting superfluid photonic states. While for the negative detuning, the dipole-dipole interaction will reduce it, and contribute to the formation of the polaritonic insulator states. The cases for extended models have also been briefly analyzed. We also discuss how to find these novel phenomena in future experiments.

  20. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum for giant inguinal hernias.

    PubMed

    Piskin, Turgut; Aydin, Cemalettin; Barut, Bora; Dirican, Abuzer; Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2010-01-01

    Reduction of giant hernia contents into the abdominal cavity may cause intraoperative and postoperative problems such as abdominal compartment syndrome. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum expands the abdominal cavity, increases the patient's tolerability to operation, and can diminish intraoperative and postoperative complications. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum is recommended for giant ventral hernias, but rarely for giant inguinal hernias. We present two giant inguinal hernia patients who were prepared for hernia repair with preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum and then treated successfully by graft hernioplasty. We observed that abdominal expansion correlated with the inflated volume and pressure during the first four days of pneumperitoneum. Although insufflated gas volume can be different among patients, we observed that the duration of insufflation may be the same for similar patients.

  1. Mass loss in red giants and supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanner, F.

    1975-01-01

    The circumstellar envelopes surrounding late-type giants and supergiants were studied using high resolution, photoelectric scans of strong optical resonance lines. A method for extracting the circumstellar from the stellar components of the lines allowed a quantitative determination of the physical conditions in the envelopes and the rates of mass loss at various positions in the red giant region of the HR diagram. The observed strengthening of the circumstellar spectrum with increasing luminosity and later spectral type is probably caused by an increase in the mass of the envelopes. The mass loss rate for individual stars is proportional to the visual luminosity; high rates for the supergiants suggest that mass loss is important in their evolution. The bulk of the mass return to the interstellar medium in the red giant region comes from the normal giants, at a rate comparable to that of planetary nebulae.

  2. Giant Omphalocele in an Adolescent Boy.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Tanveer; Alladi, Anand; Siddappa, O S

    2015-04-01

    Omphalocele is a congenital abdominal wall defect that permits herniation of abdominal viscera into the umbilical cord. We here report a case of a giant omphalocele in an adolescent boy that has not been reported at this age before.

  3. Selecting M-giants with WISE photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing

    2015-08-01

    We use M-giants, M-dwarfs and QSOs identified by LAMOST to assess how well WISE & 2MASS colour-cuts can separate these populations through photometry. We find that the WISE bands are very efficient to separate M-giants from M-dwarfs, especially for the early-type stars. We derive a new photometric relation to estimate [Fe/H] for M-giants. We show that previous photometric distance relations may be biased and devise a new empirical distance relation. We detect M-giants in the Sagittarius stream from the ALLWISE Source Archive. Our detection shows good agreement with the bright stream, although the leading tail appears to be misaligned by a couple of degrees. We have measured the metallicity distribution at four locations along the stream, finding a clear metallicity offset between the leading and trailing tails.

  4. Innate predator recognition in giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Du, Yiping; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Yang, Bo; Wei, Ming; Zhou, Yingmin; Liu, Yang

    2012-02-01

    Innate predator recognition confers a survival advantage to prey animals. We investigate whether giant pandas exhibit innate predator recognition. We analyzed behavioral responses of 56 naive adult captive giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), to urine from predators and non-predators and water control. Giant pandas performed more chemosensory investigation and displayed flehmen behaviors more frequently in response to predator urine compared to both non-predator urine and water control. Subjects also displayed certain defensive behaviors, as indicated by vigilance, and in certain cases, fleeing behaviors. Our results suggest that there is an innate component to predator recognition in captive giant pandas, although such recognition was only slight to moderate. These results have implications that may be applicable to the conservation and reintroduction of this endangered species. PMID:22303845

  5. Giant prostatic fossa with misleading radiographic features.

    PubMed

    Stenzl, A; Fuchs, G J

    1989-01-01

    The long-term complication of a perforation of the prostatic capsule during transurethral resection of the prostate is described. Calcifications in a giant prostatic fossa led to initially misleading radiologic findings.

  6. Bilateral giant abdominoscrotal hydroceles in childhood.

    PubMed

    Serels, S; Kogan, S

    1996-05-01

    There is a paucity of cases in the literature describing the abdominoscrotal hydrocele (ASH). We report the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of a rapidly expanding giant bilateral ASH in a 4-month-old boy.

  7. Tests of the Giant Impact Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The giant impact hypothesis has gained popularity as a means of explaining a volatile-depleted Moon that still has a chemical affinity to the Earth. As Taylor's Axiom decrees, the best models of lunar origin are testable, but this is difficult with the giant impact model. The energy associated with the impact would be sufficient to totally melt and partially vaporize the Earth. And this means that there should he no geological vestige of Barber times. Accordingly, it is important to devise tests that may be used to evaluate the giant impact hypothesis. Three such tests are discussed here. None of these is supportive of the giant impact model, but neither do they disprove it.

  8. Innate predator recognition in giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Du, Yiping; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Yang, Bo; Wei, Ming; Zhou, Yingmin; Liu, Yang

    2012-02-01

    Innate predator recognition confers a survival advantage to prey animals. We investigate whether giant pandas exhibit innate predator recognition. We analyzed behavioral responses of 56 naive adult captive giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), to urine from predators and non-predators and water control. Giant pandas performed more chemosensory investigation and displayed flehmen behaviors more frequently in response to predator urine compared to both non-predator urine and water control. Subjects also displayed certain defensive behaviors, as indicated by vigilance, and in certain cases, fleeing behaviors. Our results suggest that there is an innate component to predator recognition in captive giant pandas, although such recognition was only slight to moderate. These results have implications that may be applicable to the conservation and reintroduction of this endangered species.

  9. On the range of validity of the dipole picture

    SciTech Connect

    Ewerz, Carlo; Manteuffel, Andreas von; Nachtmann, Otto

    2008-04-01

    We derive correlated bounds on ratios of deep inelastic structure functions from the dipole picture of photon-hadron scattering at high energies. In particular we consider ratios of the longitudinal structure function, the total structure function, and the charm part of the latter. We also consider ratios of total structure functions taken at the same energy but at three different photon virtualities. It is shown that by confronting these bounds with experimental data we can significantly constrain the range of validity of the dipole picture.

  10. Scattering from rough thin films: discrete-dipole-approximation simulations.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Hannu; Lumme, Kari

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the wave-optical light scattering properties of deformed thin circular films of constant thickness using the discrete-dipole approximation. Effects on the intensity distribution of the scattered light due to different statistical roughness models, model dependent roughness parameters, and uncorrelated, random, small-scale porosity of the inhomogeneous medium are studied. The suitability of the discrete-dipole approximation for rough-surface scattering problems is evaluated by considering thin films as computationally feasible rough-surface analogs. The effects due to small-scale inhomogeneity of the scattering medium are compared with the analytic approximation by Maxwell Garnett, and the results are found to agree with the approximation.

  11. Dielectric relaxation in weakly ergodic dilute dipole systems.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Shimon E; Mierzwa, Michal; Paluch, Marian; Feldman, Yuri; Ishai, Paul Ben

    2013-05-28

    We introduce a method for calculating dipole correlations in systems containing hopping processes exhibiting weak ergodicity breaking. Modeled after the original Kirkwood-Fröhlich theory, the new method provides a bridge extending Fröhlich's insights from the realm of rigid dipoles into weakly non-ergodic fluctuating virtual dipolar entities. Relevant for the investigation of any system containing transport processes, it provides a testable parameter derived primarily from the static dielectric parameters. Three examples of systems including porous silicon, porous glass, and ferroelectric crystals are brought to demonstrate the model's versatility, including direct confirmation of Fröhlich's original idea.

  12. Ion–dipole interactions and their functions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sippel, Katherine H; Quiocho, Florante A

    2015-01-01

    Ion–dipole interactions in biological macromolecules are formed between atomic or molecular ions and neutral protein dipolar groups through either hydrogen bond or coordination. Since their discovery 30 years ago, these interactions have proven to be a frequent occurrence in protein structures, appearing in everything from transporters and ion channels to enzyme active sites to protein–protein interfaces. However, their significance and roles in protein functions are largely underappreciated. We performed PDB data mining to identify a sampling of proteins that possess these interactions. In this review, we will define the ion–dipole interaction and discuss several prominent examples of their functional roles in nature. PMID:25866296

  13. Soft spin-dipole resonances in 40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhl, L.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Csatlós, M.; Marketin, T.; Litvinova, E.; Adachi, T.; Algora, A.; Daeven, J.; Estevez, E.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Guess, C.; Gulyás, J.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Ong, H. J.; Ishikawa, D.; Matsubara, H.; Meharchand, R.; Molina, F.; Okamura, H.; Perdikakis, G.; Rubio, B.; Scholl, C.; Suzuki, T.; Susoy, G.; Tamii, A.; Thies, J.; Zegers, R.; Zenihiro, J.

    2012-09-01

    High resolution experimental data has been obtained for the 40,42,44,48Ca(3He,t)Sc charge exchange reaction at 420 MeV beam energy, which favors the spin-isospin excitations. The measured angular distributions were analyzed for each state separately, and the relative spin dipole strength has been extracted for the first time. The low-lying spin-dipole strength distribution in 40Sc shows some interesting periodic gross feature. It resembles to a soft, damped multi-phonon vibrational band with hslashω= 1.8 MeV, which might be associated to pairing vibrations around 40Ca.

  14. SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole coil production tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.J.; Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Smith, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider dipole coils must be produced to high precision to ensure uniform prestress and even conductor distribution within the collared coil assembly. Tooling is being prepared at Fermilab for the production of high precision 1M and 16.6M SSC dipole coils suitable for mass production. The design and construction methods builds on the Tevatron tooling and production experience. Details of the design and construction methods and measured coil uniformity of 1M coils will be presented. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipole implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, W.C.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Pai, C.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.

    2010-05-02

    AC-dipole magnets are typically implemented as a parallel LC resonant circuit. To maximize efficiency, it's beneficial to operate at a high Q. This, however, limits the magnet to a narrow frequency range. Current designs therefore operate at a low Q to provide a wider bandwidth at the cost of efficiency. Dynamically tuning a high Q resonant circuit tries to maintain a high efficiency while providing a wide frequency range. The results of ongoing efforts at BNL to implement dynamically tuned high-Q AC dipoles will be presented.

  16. Ion-dipole interactions and their functions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Sippel, Katherine H; Quiocho, Florante A

    2015-07-01

    Ion-dipole interactions in biological macromolecules are formed between atomic or molecular ions and neutral protein dipolar groups through either hydrogen bond or coordination. Since their discovery 30 years ago, these interactions have proven to be a frequent occurrence in protein structures, appearing in everything from transporters and ion channels to enzyme active sites to protein-protein interfaces. However, their significance and roles in protein functions are largely underappreciated. We performed PDB data mining to identify a sampling of proteins that possess these interactions. In this review, we will define the ion-dipole interaction and discuss several prominent examples of their functional roles in nature.

  17. Circular current loops, magnetic dipoles and spherical harmonic analysis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    Spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) is the most used method of describing the Earth's magnetic field, even though spherical harmonic coefficients (SHC) almost completely defy interpretation in terms of real sources. Some moderately successful efforts have been made to represent the field in terms of dipoles placed in the core in an effort to have the model come closer to representing real sources. Dipole sources are only a first approximation to the real sources which are thought to be a very complicated network of electrical currents in the core of the Earth. -Author

  18. Fine structure of the pygmy dipole resonance in (136)Xe.

    PubMed

    Savran, D; Fritzsche, M; Hasper, J; Lindenberg, K; Müller, S; Ponomarev, V Yu; Sonnabend, K; Zilges, A

    2008-06-13

    The photoresponse of the semimagic N=82 nucleus (136)Xe was measured up to the neutron separation energy S(n) using the (gamma, gamma') reaction. A concentration of strong dipole excitations is observed well below S(n) showing a fragmented resonancelike structure. Microscopic calculations in the quasiparticle phonon model including complex configurations of up to three phonons agree well with the experimental data in the total integrated strength, in the shape and the fragmentation of the resonance, which allows us to draw conclusions on the damping mechanism of the pygmy dipole resonance.

  19. Giant rhinophyma: Excision with coblation assisted surgery.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Caner; Turker, Mesut; Celasun, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    An 83-year-old man presented with an unusually severe case of rhinophyma. Giant rhinopyhma is very rare in literature. The giant lesion was widely excised using sharp surgical incision and coblation assisted surgery. Using direct coblation to the nasal dorsum may cause edema in the surrounding tissue. There was minimal edema in surrounding tissue using this technique. A full thickness-skin graft was applied after excision. Cosmetic and functional postoperative results were satisfactory.

  20. Giant rhinophyma: Excision with coblation assisted surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Caner; Turker, Mesut; Celasun, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    An 83-year-old man presented with an unusually severe case of rhinophyma. Giant rhinopyhma is very rare in literature. The giant lesion was widely excised using sharp surgical incision and coblation assisted surgery. Using direct coblation to the nasal dorsum may cause edema in the surrounding tissue. There was minimal edema in surrounding tissue using this technique. A full thickness-skin graft was applied after excision. Cosmetic and functional postoperative results were satisfactory. PMID:25593440

  1. Arterial Embolization of Giant Hepatic Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Giavroglou, Constantinos; Economou, Hippolete; Ioannidis, Ioannis

    2003-02-15

    Hepatic cavernous hemangiomas are usually small and asymptomatic. They are usually discovered incidentally and only a few require treatment. However, giant hemangiomas may cause symptoms,which are indications for treatment. We describe four cases of symptomatic giant hepatic hemangiomas successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization, performed with polyvinyl alcohol particles. There were no complications. Follow-up with clinical and imaging examinations showed disappearance of symptoms and decrease in size of lesions.

  2. The cytology of giant solitary trichoepithelioma

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Jayashree; Divya, KN

    2010-01-01

    Giant solitary trichoepithelioma (GST) is a rare trichogenic tumor, which may present as a pigmented lesion. An 80-year-old man was diagnosed to have giant solitary trichoepithelioma on fine-needle aspiration cytology. The cytological findings represented the histological features. The recognition of GST is important because of its close resemblance to basal cell carcinoma and other skin adnexal tumors – clinically, cytologically and histologically. PMID:21187885

  3. Effects of dipole-dipole interaction on the single-photon transport in a hybrid atom-optomechanical system coupling to a single-mode waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Qing; Zhu, Zhong-Hua; Peng, Zhao-Hui; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Tan, Lei

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the single-photon transport in a hybrid atom-optomechanical system embedded with two dipole-coupled two-level atoms, interacting with a single-mode optical waveguide. The transmission amplitudes for the single-photon propagation in such a hybrid system are obtained via a real-space approach. It is shown that the dipole-dipole interaction can significantly change the amplitudes and symmetries of the single-photon spectra. Interestingly, we find that the dipole-dipole interaction plays a similar role as does the positive atom-cavity detuning. In addition, the influence from the atomic dissipation can be weakened by increasing the dipole-dipole interaction.

  4. Nuclear reactions with 14 MeV neutrons and bremsstrahlungs in giant dipole resonance (GDR) region using small accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiep, Tran Duc; Van Do, Nguyen; An, Truong Thi; Son, Nguyen Ngoc

    2003-07-01

    In 1974 an accelerator of deterium, namely neutron generator NA-3-C was put into operation and in 1982 another accelerator of electron Microtron MT-17 started its work in the Institute of Physics. Though very modest these accelerators are useful for developing countries as Vietnam in both Nuclear Physics Research and Training. In this report we present some results obtained in studies on Nuclear Data, Nuclear Reactions as well as nuclear activation analysis methods. We also would like to discuss about the possibilities of collaboration in the future.

  5. Modeling and analysis of optical properties of a gold nanoring based on electric and magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Safaee, S M R; Janipour, M; Karami, M A

    2015-10-01

    The optical behavior of a plane-wave excited gold nanoring (NR), originated from localized surface plasmon resonance is modeled by two coupled electric- and magnetic-point dipoles. Considering the extinction cross-section spectrum, it is found that the electric-dipole effect is dominant in comparison with the magnetic-dipole effect although the magnetic-dipole signature is observable in the near-field response of the NR. In addition, the far-field electromagnetic radiation pattern of the NR verifies the corresponding radiation pattern of the point dipoles. The numerical simulation near-field results are in agreement with the proposed electric- and magnetic-dipole theory.

  6. Anticorrelation between the Evolution of Molecular Dipole Moments and Induced Work Function Modifications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We explore the limits of modifying metal work functions with large molecular dipoles by systematically increasing the dipole moment of archetype donor–acceptor molecules in self-assembled monolayers on gold. Contrary to intuition, we find that enhancing the dipoles leads to a reduction of the adsorption-induced change of the work function. Using atomistic simulations, we show that large dipoles imply electronic localization and level shifts that drive the interface into a thermodynamically unstable situation and trigger compensating charge reorganizations working against the molecular dipoles. Under certain circumstances, these are even found to overcompensate the effect that increasing the dipoles has for the work function. PMID:24163725

  7. Formation of Giant Planets and Brown Dwarves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2003-01-01

    According to the prevailing core instability model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Models predict that rocky planets should form in orbit about most stars. It is uncertain whether or not gas giant planet formation is common, because most protoplanetary disks may dissipate before solid planetary cores can grow large enough to gravitationally trap substantial quantities of gas. Ongoing theoretical modeling of accretion of giant planet atmospheres, as well as observations of protoplanetary disks, will help decide this issue. Observations of extrasolar planets around main sequence stars can only provide a lower limit on giant planet formation frequency . This is because after giant planets form, gravitational interactions with material within the protoplanetary disk may cause them to migrat inwards and be lost to the central star. The core instability model can only produce planets greater than a few jovian masses within protoplanetary disks that are more viscous than most such disks are believed to be. Thus, few brown dwarves (objects massive enough to undergo substantial deuterium fusion, estimated to occur above approximately 13 jovian masses) are likely to be formed in this manner. Most brown dwarves, as well as an unknown number of free-floating objects of planetary mass, are probably formed as are stars, by the collapse of extended gas/dust clouds into more compact objects.

  8. Giant Flexoelectric Effect In Two-Dimensional Boron-Nitride Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Ivan; Bratkovsky, Alexander; Ranjan, Vivek

    2009-03-01

    The direct conversion of ambient motion into electrical energy is a challenging fundamental and technological problem that is currently a focus of research. Boron-Nitride non-centrosymmetric monolayers are piezoelectrics that can sustain much larger structural and produce very large (a few Volts) voltage drop across flexed nanostrips. We show, by way of first-principles calculations, the existence of giant nonlinear flexoelectric effect in BN 2D strips. The induced polarization is quadratic in amplitude of atomic displacements A, yet the dipole moment per unit cell is about four times larger compared to PbZrTiO3 [1]. The new effect may find a variety of practical applications and, in particular, as nanogenerators and tactile sensors powered by an ambient motion or agitation. BN material is inert and can be used in biological environment.[3pt] [1] I.Naumov, A.Bratkovsky, V.Ranjan, arXiv:0810.1775 (2008).

  9. Influence of vibrations and rotations of diatomic molecules on their physical properties: I. Dipole moment and static dipole polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukhovitski, Boris I.; Sharipov, Alexander S.; Starik, Alexander M.

    2016-06-01

    Electronic dipole moment and static polarizability functions for some diatomic molecules (H2, N2, O2, NO, OH, CO, CH, HF and HCl) that are important for combustion and atmospheric chemistry are calculated by using ab initio methods over a broad range of internuclear distances. Using the ab initio calculated data on the electric properties and potential energy functions, the effective values of dipole moment and static polarizability as well as the energy levels of these molecules in individual vibrational and rotational states until the dissociation threshold are determined. It is revealed that, for the ground electronic states of molecules under study, the excitation of molecule vibrations can affect the averaged dipole moment and static polarizability substantially, whereas the effect of excitation of the rotational states is less pronounced.

  10. Electric dipole response of nuclei studied by proton inelastic scattering: neutron thickness, symmetry energy, and pygmy dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamii, Atsushi; RCNP E282/E316/E326/E350/E376/E377 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Electric dipole (E1) responses of heavy nuclei have been studied by high-resolution measurement of proton inelastic scattering at forward angles including zero degrees. Here the proton scattering at 300 MeV is used as an electromagnetic probe to extract precisely the distribution of E1 reduced transition probability B(E1). The measurement has been done on various stable nuclei such as 208Pb, 120Sn, 90Zr, 154Sm, and 96Mo. The dipole polarizability and pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) strength has been extracted. Those quantities are considered to have strong correlations to the neutron skin thickness and the first order density dependence of the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state. We will present the experimental methods and highlights of the results as well as the preliminary ones of recent analyses. Electric dipole (E1) responses of heavy nuclei have been studied by high-resolution measurement of proton inelastic scattering at forward angles including zero degrees. Here the proton scattering at 300 MeV is used as an electromagnetic probe to extract precisely the distribution of E1 reduced transition probability B(E1). The measurement has been done on various stable nuclei such as 208Pb, 120Sn, 90Zr, 154Sm, and 96Mo. The dipole polarizability and pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) strength has been extracted. Those quantities are considered to have strong correlations to the neutron skin thickness and the first order density dependence of the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state. We will present the experimental methods and highlights of the results as well as the preliminary ones of recent analyses. JSPS No. 25105509.

  11. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF A ROTATING RED GIANT STAR. I. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELS OF TURBULENT CONVECTION AND ASSOCIATED MEAN FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, A. S. E-mail: palacios@graal.univ-montp2.fr

    2009-09-10

    With the development of one-dimensional stellar evolution codes including rotation and the increasing number of observational data for stars of various evolutionary stages, it becomes more and more possible to follow the evolution of the rotation profile and angular momentum distribution in stars. In this context, understanding the interplay between rotation and convection in the very extended envelopes of giant stars is very important considering that all low- and intermediate-mass stars become red giants after the central hydrogen burning phase. In this paper, we analyze the interplay between rotation and convection in the envelope of red giant stars using three-dimensional numerical experiments. We make use of the Anelastic Spherical Harmonics code to simulate the inner 50% of the envelope of a low-mass star on the red giant branch. We discuss the organization and dynamics of convection, and put a special emphasis on the distribution of angular momentum in such a rotating extended envelope. To do so, we explore two directions of the parameter space, namely, the bulk rotation rate and the Reynolds number with a series of four simulations. We find that turbulent convection in red giant stars is dynamically rich, and that it is particularly sensitive to the rotation rate of the star. Reynolds stresses and meridional circulation establish various differential rotation profiles (either cylindrical or shellular) depending on the convective Rossby number of the simulations, but they all agree that the radial shear is large. Temperature fluctuations are found to be large and in the slowly rotating cases, a dominant l = 1 temperature dipole influences the convective motions. Both baroclinic effects and turbulent advection are strong in all cases and mostly oppose one another.

  12. Biomass yield comparisons of giant miscanthus, giant reed, and miscane grown under irrigated and rainfed conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated efforts to decrease the nation’s dependence on imported oil by developing domestic renewable sources of cellulosic-derived bioenergy. In this study, giant miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus), sugarcane (complex hybrid of Saccharum spp.), and giant reed (Ar...

  13. Screening of nucleon electric dipole moments in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Satoru; Gudkov, Vladimir; Schindler, Matthias R.; Song, Young-Ho

    2016-05-01

    A partial screening of nucleon electric dipole moments (EDMs) in nuclear systems, which is related to the Schiff mechanism known for neutral atomic systems, is discussed. It is shown that the direct contribution from the neutron EDM to the deuteron EDM is partially screened by about 1% in a zero-range approximation calculation.

  14. Enhancement of the electron electric dipole moment in gadolinium garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhamedjanov, T.N.; Dzuba, V.A.; Sushkov, O.P.

    2003-10-01

    Effects caused by the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) in gadolinium garnets are considered. Experimental studies of these effects could improve the current upper limit on the electron EDM by several orders of magnitude. We suggest a consistent theoretical model and perform calculations of observable effects in gadolinium gallium garnet and gadolinium iron garnet. Our calculation accounts for both direct and exchange diagrams.

  15. Review of Electric Dipole Moments of Fundamental Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2009-08-04

    Electric dipole moments (EDM) experiments are in the research frontier of CP-violation beyond the standard model (SM). EDM experiments set the current limits on CP-violation beyond the SM and are most likely to be the first ones to discover if nature has indeed chosen that path.

  16. Vibrationally averaged dipole moments of methane and benzene isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Arapiraca, A F C; Mohallem, J R

    2016-04-14

    DFT-B3LYP post-Born-Oppenheimer (finite-nuclear-mass-correction (FNMC)) calculations of vibrationally averaged isotopic dipole moments of methane and benzene, which compare well with experimental values, are reported. For methane, in addition to the principal vibrational contribution to the molecular asymmetry, FNMC accounts for the surprisingly large Born-Oppenheimer error of about 34% to the dipole moments. This unexpected result is explained in terms of concurrent electronic and vibrational contributions. The calculated dipole moment of C6H3D3 is about twice as large as the measured dipole moment of C6H5D. Computational progress is advanced concerning applications to larger systems and the choice of appropriate basis sets. The simpler procedure of performing vibrational averaging on the Born-Oppenheimer level and then adding the FNMC contribution evaluated at the equilibrium distance is shown to be appropriate. Also, the basis set choice is made by heuristic analysis of the physical behavior of the systems, instead of by comparison with experiments. PMID:27083715

  17. Collectivity of dipole bands in {sup 196}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Liang, Y.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    The region of nuclei with mass {approximately} 190 was studied extensively over the last few years following the discovery of superdeformation in {sup 190}Hg. More recently, considerable interest in the neutron-deficient Pb isotopes developed with the discover of a number of bands at high spin connected by dipole transitions in both even {sup 192-200}Pb and odd {sup 197-201}Pb nuclei. The majority of the dipole bands are regular in character (i.e. transition energies increase smoothly with spin) while the remaining bands are referred to as irregular in character, due to the fact that the transition energies do not increase smoothly with spin. The properties of the dipole bands were interpreted in terms of high-K, moderately-deformed oblate states built on configurations involving high-J, shape-driving quasiproton excitations coupled to rotation-aligned quasineutrons. It was suggested that the difference between the regular and irregular dipole sequences is related to the deformation where the irregular sequences are thought to be less collective than their regular counterparts.

  18. Active dipole clusters: From helical motion to fission.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Popowa, Katarina; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    The structure of a finite particle cluster is typically determined by total energy minimization. Here we consider the case where a cluster of soft-sphere dipoles becomes active, i.e., when the individual particles exhibit an additional self-propulsion along their dipole moments. We numerically solve the overdamped equations of motion for soft-sphere dipoles in a solvent. Starting from an initial metastable dipolar cluster, the self-propulsion generates a complex cluster dynamics. The final cluster state has in general a structure widely different to the initial one, the details depend on the model parameters and on the protocol of how the self-propulsion is turned on. The center of mass of the cluster moves on a helical path, the details of which are governed by the initial cluster magnetization. An instantaneous switch to a high self-propulsion leads to fission of the cluster. However, fission does not occur if the self-propulsion is increased slowly to high strengths. Our predictions can be verified through experiments with self-phoretic colloidal Janus particles and for macroscopic self-propelled dipoles in a highly viscous solvent.

  19. Quantum electric-dipole liquid on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shi-Peng; Wu, Jia-Chuan; Song, Jun-Da; Sun, Xue-Feng; Yang, Yi-Feng; Chai, Yi-Sheng; Shang, Da-Shan; Wang, Shou-Guo; Scott, James F.; Sun, Young

    2016-02-01

    Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations may prohibit the formation of long-range ordering even at the lowest temperature, and therefore liquid-like ground states could be expected. A good example is the quantum spin liquid in frustrated magnets. Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations can happen beyond magnetic systems. Here we propose that quantum electric-dipole liquids, analogues of quantum spin liquids, could emerge in frustrated dielectrics where antiferroelectrically coupled electric dipoles reside on a triangular lattice. The quantum paraelectric hexaferrite BaFe12O19 with geometric frustration represents a promising candidate for the proposed electric-dipole liquid. We present a series of experimental lines of evidence, including dielectric permittivity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity measured down to 66 mK, to reveal the existence of an unusual liquid-like quantum phase in BaFe12O19, characterized by itinerant low-energy excitations with a small gap. The possible quantum liquids of electric dipoles in frustrated dielectrics open up a fresh playground for fundamental physics.

  20. The evolution of a dipole in a periodic forced flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier; Hernandez Zapata, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    In a tidal induced flow between a channel and an open domain a pair of counter-rotating vortices is produced during each cycle. Such pair of vortices is known as a dipole. The Strouhal number (S) is the parameter determining if dipole escapes or is sucked during the stage of negative flowrate. Some years ago an analytical model has been proposed to determine the evolution of the vortices. This model agrees with experimental and observational data when S is close to the critical value 0.13. However, no realistic predictions are given for small values of S. In this work we present a modification of this model to take into account some details not considered before. In particular the fact that not all vorticity created into the channel is incorporates into the dipole. This fact leads to have a lower translational velocity and also to the formation of a vorticity band behind the vortices. Our results have a better agreement with numerical simulations and experimental data. Finally we study the influence of the Reynolds number in the evolution of the vortices and the interaction between dipoles produced in subsequent cycles. Authors akknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project IN115315 ``Ondas y estrcturas coherentes en dinamica de fluidos.''

  1. Discrete dipole approximation in time domain through the Laplace transform.

    PubMed

    Chaumet, Patrick C; Zhang, Ting; Rahmani, Adel; Gralak, Boris; Belkebir, Kamal

    2013-12-01

    We present a form of the discrete dipole approximation for electromagnetic scattering computations in time domain. We show that the introduction of complex frequencies, through the Laplace transform, significantly improves the computation time. We also show that the Laplace transform and its inverse can be combined to extract the field inside a scatterer at a real resonance frequency.

  2. FOHI-D: An iterative Hirshfeld procedure including atomic dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Geldof, D.; Blockhuys, F.; Van Alsenoy, C.; Krishtal, A.

    2014-04-14

    In this work, a new partitioning method based on the FOHI method (fractional occupation Hirshfeld-I method) will be discussed. The new FOHI-D method uses an iterative scheme in which both the atomic charge and atomic dipole are calculated self-consistently. In order to induce the dipole moment on the atom, an electric field is applied during the atomic SCF calculations. Based on two sets of molecules, the atomic charge and intrinsic atomic dipole moment of hydrogen and chlorine atoms are compared using the iterative Hirshfeld (HI) method, the iterative Stockholder atoms (ISA) method, the FOHI method, and the FOHI-D method. The results obtained are further analyzed as a function of the group electronegativity of Boyd et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 110, 4182 (1988); Boyd et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 114, 1652 (1992)] and De Proft et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 97, 1826 (1993)]. The molecular electrostatic potential (ESP) based on the HI, ISA, FOHI, and FOHI-D charges is compared with the ab initio ESP. Finally, the effect of adding HI, ISA, FOHI, and FOHI-D atomic dipoles to the multipole expansion as a function of the precision of the ESP is analyzed.

  3. Electric Dipole Moments of Nanosolvated Acid Molecules in Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggemos, Nicholas; Slavíček, Petr; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-01-01

    The electric dipole moments of (H2O)nDCl (n =3 - 9 ) clusters have been measured by the beam-deflection method. Reflecting the (dynamical) charge distribution within the system, the dipole moment contributes information about the microscopic structure of nanoscale solvation. The addition of a DCl molecule to a water cluster results in a strongly enhanced susceptibility. There is evidence for a noticeable rise in the dipole moment occurring at n ≈5 - 6 . This size is consistent with predictions for the onset of ionic dissociation. Additionally, a molecular-dynamics model suggests that even with a nominally bound impurity an enhanced dipole moment can arise due to the thermal and zero-point motion of the proton and the water molecules. The experimental measurements and the calculations draw attention to the importance of fluctuations in defining the polarity of water-based nanoclusters and generally to the essential role played by motional effects in determining the response of fluxional nanoscale systems under realistic conditions.

  4. Detail of dipole antenna element (right) and 94' lowband reflector ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of dipole antenna element (right) and 94' low-band reflector screen poles (left), note the guy wires from the antenna element, view facing north northeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Detail of the base of dipole antenna element with graduated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of the base of dipole antenna element with graduated pole, note the arms supporting the vertical wires away from the mast and the metal mesh covering the concrete base, view facing west - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Backward dilepton production in color dipole and parton models

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, Maria Beatriz; Graeve de Oliveira, Emmanuel

    2010-03-01

    The Drell-Yan dilepton production at backward rapidities is studied in proton-nucleus collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and LHC energies by comparing two different approaches: the k{sub T} factorization at next-to-leading order with intrinsic transverse momentum and the same process formulated in the target rest frame, i.e., the color dipole approach. Our results are expressed in terms of the ratio between p(d)-A and p-p collisions as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity. Three nuclear parton distribution functions are used: EKS (Eskola, Kolhinen, and Ruuskanen), EPS08, and EPS09 and, in both approaches, dileptons show sensitivity to nuclear effects, specially regarding the intrinsic transverse momentum. Also, there is room to discriminate between formalisms: the color dipole approach lacks soft effects introduced by the intrinsic k{sub T}. Geometric scaling GBW (Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff) and BUW (Boer, Utermann, and Wessels) color dipole cross section models and also a DHJ (Dumitru, Hayashigaki, and Jalilian-Marian) model, which breaks geometric scaling, are used. No change in the ratio between collisions is observed, showing that this observable is not changed by the particular shape of the color dipole cross section. Furthermore, our k{sub T} factorization results are compared with color glass condensate results at forward rapidities: the results agree at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider although disagree at LHC, mainly due to the different behavior of target gluon and quark shadowing.

  7. Semiclassical Quantization of the Electron-Dipole System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents a derivation of the number given by Fermi in 1925, in his semiclassical treatment of the motion of an electron in the field of two stationary positive charges, for Bohr quantization of the electron orbits when the stationary charges are positive, and applies it to an electron moving in the field of a stationary dipole.…

  8. FOHI-D: an iterative Hirshfeld procedure including atomic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Geldof, D; Krishtal, A; Blockhuys, F; Van Alsenoy, C

    2014-04-14

    In this work, a new partitioning method based on the FOHI method (fractional occupation Hirshfeld-I method) will be discussed. The new FOHI-D method uses an iterative scheme in which both the atomic charge and atomic dipole are calculated self-consistently. In order to induce the dipole moment on the atom, an electric field is applied during the atomic SCF calculations. Based on two sets of molecules, the atomic charge and intrinsic atomic dipole moment of hydrogen and chlorine atoms are compared using the iterative Hirshfeld (HI) method, the iterative Stockholder atoms (ISA) method, the FOHI method, and the FOHI-D method. The results obtained are further analyzed as a function of the group electronegativity of Boyd et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 110, 4182 (1988); Boyd et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 114, 1652 (1992)] and De Proft et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 97, 1826 (1993)]. The molecular electrostatic potential (ESP) based on the HI, ISA, FOHI, and FOHI-D charges is compared with the ab initio ESP. Finally, the effect of adding HI, ISA, FOHI, and FOHI-D atomic dipoles to the multipole expansion as a function of the precision of the ESP is analyzed.

  9. Quantum electric-dipole liquid on a triangular lattice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shi-Peng; Wu, Jia-Chuan; Song, Jun-Da; Sun, Xue-Feng; Yang, Yi-Feng; Chai, Yi-Sheng; Shang, Da-Shan; Wang, Shou-Guo; Scott, James F; Sun, Young

    2016-01-01

    Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations may prohibit the formation of long-range ordering even at the lowest temperature, and therefore liquid-like ground states could be expected. A good example is the quantum spin liquid in frustrated magnets. Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations can happen beyond magnetic systems. Here we propose that quantum electric-dipole liquids, analogues of quantum spin liquids, could emerge in frustrated dielectrics where antiferroelectrically coupled electric dipoles reside on a triangular lattice. The quantum paraelectric hexaferrite BaFe12O19 with geometric frustration represents a promising candidate for the proposed electric-dipole liquid. We present a series of experimental lines of evidence, including dielectric permittivity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity measured down to 66 mK, to reveal the existence of an unusual liquid-like quantum phase in BaFe12O19, characterized by itinerant low-energy excitations with a small gap. The possible quantum liquids of electric dipoles in frustrated dielectrics open up a fresh playground for fundamental physics. PMID:26843363

  10. DESIGN OF AN AC-DIPOLE FOR USE IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; BAI,M.; JAIN,A.; MCINTYRE,G.; METH,M.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; SANDERS,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.

    1999-03-29

    We present two options for implementing a pair of AC-dipoles in RHIC for spin flipping, measuring linear optical functions and nonlinear diagnostics. AC-dipoles are magnets that can be adiabatically excited and de-excited with a continuous sine-wave in order to coherently move circulating beam out to large betatron amplitudes without incurring emittance blow up [1]. The AGS already uses a similar device for getting polarized proton beams through depolarizing resonances [2]. By placing the magnets in the IP4 common beam region, two AC-dipoles are sufficient to excite both horizontal and vertical motion in both RHIC rings. While we initially investigated an iron-dominated magnet design using available steel tape cores; we now favor a new air coil plus ferrite design featuring mechanical frequency tuning, in order to best match available resources to demanding frequency sweeping requirements. Both magnet designs are presented here along with model magnet test results. The challenge is to make AC-dipoles available for year 2000 RHIC running.

  11. Quantum electric-dipole liquid on a triangular lattice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shi-Peng; Wu, Jia-Chuan; Song, Jun-Da; Sun, Xue-Feng; Yang, Yi-Feng; Chai, Yi-Sheng; Shang, Da-Shan; Wang, Shou-Guo; Scott, James F.; Sun, Young

    2016-01-01

    Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations may prohibit the formation of long-range ordering even at the lowest temperature, and therefore liquid-like ground states could be expected. A good example is the quantum spin liquid in frustrated magnets. Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations can happen beyond magnetic systems. Here we propose that quantum electric-dipole liquids, analogues of quantum spin liquids, could emerge in frustrated dielectrics where antiferroelectrically coupled electric dipoles reside on a triangular lattice. The quantum paraelectric hexaferrite BaFe12O19 with geometric frustration represents a promising candidate for the proposed electric-dipole liquid. We present a series of experimental lines of evidence, including dielectric permittivity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity measured down to 66 mK, to reveal the existence of an unusual liquid-like quantum phase in BaFe12O19, characterized by itinerant low-energy excitations with a small gap. The possible quantum liquids of electric dipoles in frustrated dielectrics open up a fresh playground for fundamental physics. PMID:26843363

  12. Four Centuries of the Geocentric Axial Dipole Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, L.; Kent, D. V.

    2004-12-01

    William Gilbert first articulated what has come to be known as the geocentric axial dipole hypothesis. The GAD hypothesis is the principle on which paleogeographic reconstructions rely to constrain paleolatitude. For decades there have been calls for permanent non-dipole contributions to the time averaged field. Recently, these have demanded large contributions of the axial octupole, which, if valid, would call into question the general utility of the GAD hypothesis. In the process of geological recording of the geomagnetic field, ``Earth filters'' distort the directions. Many processes, for example, sedimentary inclination error and random tilting lead to a net shallowing of the observed direction. Therefore inclinations that are shallower than expected from GAD can be explained by recording biases, northward transport, or non-dipole geomagnetic fields. Using paleomagnetic data from the last five million years from well constrained lava flow data allows the construction of a statistical geomagnetic field model. Such a model can predict not only the average expected direction for a given latitude, but also the shape of the distribution of directions produced by secular variation. This allows us to differentiate among the possible explanations for shallow bias. We find no compelling reason to abandon the geocentric dipole hypothesis that has served us well for four centuries.

  13. An analysis of the fluctuations of the geomagnetic dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendel, K.; Kuipers, J.; Barkema, G. T.; Hoyng, P.

    2007-07-01

    The time evolution of the strength of the Earth's virtual axial dipole moment (VADM) is analyzed by relating it to the Fokker-Planck equation, which describes a random walk with VADM-dependent drift and diffusion coefficients. We demonstrate first that our method is able to retrieve the correct shape of the drift and diffusion coefficients from a time series generated by a test model. Analysis of the Sint-2000 data shows that the geomagnetic dipole mode has a linear growth time of 20-7+13 kyear, and that the nonlinear quenching of the growth rate follows a quadratic function of the type [1-(]. On theoretical grounds, the diffusive motion of the VADM is expected to be driven by multiplicative noise, and the corresponding diffusion coefficient to scale quadratically with dipole strength. However, analysis of the Sint-2000 VADM data reveals a diffusion which depends only very weakly on the dipole strength. This may indicate that the magnetic field quenches the amplitude of the turbulent velocity in the Earth's outer core.

  14. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1985-01-01

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  15. Quantum electric-dipole liquid on a triangular lattice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shi-Peng; Wu, Jia-Chuan; Song, Jun-Da; Sun, Xue-Feng; Yang, Yi-Feng; Chai, Yi-Sheng; Shang, Da-Shan; Wang, Shou-Guo; Scott, James F; Sun, Young

    2016-02-04

    Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations may prohibit the formation of long-range ordering even at the lowest temperature, and therefore liquid-like ground states could be expected. A good example is the quantum spin liquid in frustrated magnets. Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations can happen beyond magnetic systems. Here we propose that quantum electric-dipole liquids, analogues of quantum spin liquids, could emerge in frustrated dielectrics where antiferroelectrically coupled electric dipoles reside on a triangular lattice. The quantum paraelectric hexaferrite BaFe12O19 with geometric frustration represents a promising candidate for the proposed electric-dipole liquid. We present a series of experimental lines of evidence, including dielectric permittivity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity measured down to 66 mK, to reveal the existence of an unusual liquid-like quantum phase in BaFe12O19, characterized by itinerant low-energy excitations with a small gap. The possible quantum liquids of electric dipoles in frustrated dielectrics open up a fresh playground for fundamental physics.

  16. The Electromagnetic Dipole Radiation Field through the Hamiltonian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likar, A.; Razpet, N.

    2009-01-01

    The dipole radiation from an oscillating charge is treated using the Hamiltonian approach to electrodynamics where the concept of cavity modes plays a central role. We show that the calculation of the radiation field can be obtained in a closed form within this approach by emphasizing the role of coherence between the cavity modes, which is…

  17. Energetics of dislocation dipoles in capped epitaxially strained layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, A.; Jain, S. C.

    1994-08-01

    Most device structures based on strained epitaxial layers are capped by a second, unstrained layer to increase the mechanical stability of the structure. In order to calculate the energies of these structures it is necessary to synthesize the total energy from the energies of the line defects they contain (interfacial dislocations and dislocation dipoles). The self energies and interaction energies of dislocations and dipoles are calculated and their behavoir examined as a function of their spacing and the thicknesses of the strained and capping layers. The results confirm the observations that capped strained layers are more stable than uncapped ones (of the same strained layer thickness) and that capping layers do not need to be thicker than approximately three times the strained layer thickness. An expression is deduced for the total energy of finite, nonuniform arrays of dipoles in capped layers and, by analogy with a similar earlier expression for dislocation in uncapped layers, it is concluded that the effect of a nonuniformity in the dipole spacing will be to increase the energy of the system compared with that of a uniform array having the same average spacing. The results in this paper can be used to assess the stability of devices and their rate of degradation by strain relaxation.

  18. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1983-08-31

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  19. Open-Midplane Dipoles for a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Weggel, R.; Gupta, R.; Kolonko, J., Scanlan, R., Cline, D., Ding, X., Anerella, M., Kirk, H., Palmer, B., Schmalzle, J.

    2011-03-28

    For a muon collider with copious decay particles in the plane of the storage ring, open-midplane dipoles (OMD) may be preferable to tungsten-shielded cosine-theta dipoles of large aperture. The OMD should have its midplane completely free of material, so as to dodge the radiation from decaying muons. Analysis funded by a Phase I SBIR suggests that a field of 10-20 T should be feasible, with homogeneity of 1 x 10{sup -4} and energy deposition low enough for conduction cooling to 4.2 K helium. If funded, a Phase II SBIR would refine the analysis and build and test a proof-of-principle magnet. A Phase I SBIR has advanced the feasibility of open-midplane dipoles for the storage ring of a muon collider. A proposed Phase II SBIR would refine these predictions of stresses, deformations, field quality and energy deposition. Design optimizations would continue, leading to the fabrication and test, for the first time, of a proof-of-principle dipole of truly open-midplane design.

  20. Singular Behaviour of the Electrodynamic Fields of an Oscillating Dipole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, P. T.

    2008-01-01

    The singularity of the exact electromagnetic fields is derived to include the "source terms" for harmonically oscillating electric (and magnetic) dipoles, so that the fields will be consistent with the full Maxwell equations with a source. It is shown explicitly, as somewhat expected, that the same [delta]-function terms for the case of static…

  1. Obscurin: a multitasking muscle giant.

    PubMed

    Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini; Bloch, Robert J

    2005-01-01

    Obscurin (approximately 800 kDa) is the third member of a family of giant proteins expressed in vertebrate striated muscle, along with titin (3-3.7 MDa) and nebulin (approximately 800 kDa). Like its predecessors, it is a multidomain protein composed of tandem adhesion modules and signaling domains. Unlike titin and nebulin, which are integral components of sarcomeres, obscurin is concentrated at the peripheries of Z-disks and M-lines, where it is appropriately positioned to communicate with the surrounding myoplasm. This unique distribution allows obscurin to bind small ankyrin 1, an integral component of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane. Obscurin also associates with the contractile apparatus through its binding to titin, sarcomeric myosin and perhaps other proteins of the contractile apparatus. Overexpression of the COOH-terminus of obscurin in primary myotubes has a dramatic and specific effect on the organization of sarcomeric myosin, indicating a role in the organization and regular assembly of A-bands. Given its ability to associate tightly, selectively and periodically with the periphery of the myofibril, its high affinity for an integral membrane protein of the SR and its close association with thick filaments, we speculate that obscurin is ideally suited to play key roles in modulating the organization and assembly of both the myofibril and the SR.

  2. A giant thunderstorm on Saturn.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G; Kurth, W S; Gurnett, D A; Zarka, P; Dyudina, U A; Ingersoll, A P; Ewald, S P; Porco, C C; Wesley, A; Go, C; Delcroix, M

    2011-07-06

    Lightning discharges in Saturn's atmosphere emit radio waves with intensities about 10,000 times stronger than those of their terrestrial counterparts. These radio waves are the characteristic features of lightning from thunderstorms on Saturn, which last for days to months. Convective storms about 2,000 kilometres in size have been observed in recent years at planetocentric latitude 35° south (corresponding to a planetographic latitude of 41° south). Here we report observations of a giant thunderstorm at planetocentric latitude 35° north that reached a latitudinal extension of 10,000 kilometres-comparable in size to a 'Great White Spot'-about three weeks after it started in early December 2010. The visible plume consists of high-altitude clouds that overshoot the outermost ammonia cloud layer owing to strong vertical convection, as is typical for thunderstorms. The flash rates of this storm are about an order of magnitude higher than previous ones, and peak rates larger than ten per second were recorded. This main storm developed an elongated eastward tail with additional but weaker storm cells that wrapped around the whole planet by February 2011. Unlike storms on Earth, the total power of this storm is comparable to Saturn's total emitted power. The appearance of such storms in the northern hemisphere could be related to the change of seasons, given that Saturn experienced vernal equinox in August 2009.

  3. Red Giant Plunging Through Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.

    Bow shocks are formed where the stellar wind from a star are pushed into a bow shape (illustration, right panel) as the star plunges through the gas and dust between stars. Our own Sun has a bow shock, but prior to this image one had never been observed around this particular class of red giant star.

    R Hya moves through space at approximately 50 kilometers per second. As it does so, it discharges dust and gas into space. Because the star is relatively cool, that ejecta quickly assumes a solid state and collides with the interstellar medium. The resulting dusty nebula is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected using an infrared telescope. This bow shock is 16,295 astronomical units from the star to the apex and 6,188 astronomical units thick (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The mass of the bow shock is about 400 times the mass of the Earth.

    The false-color Spitzer image shows infrared emissions at 70 microns. Brighter colors represent greater intensities of infrared light at that wavelength. The location of the star itself is drawn onto the picture in the black 'unobserved' region in the center.

  4. A giant thunderstorm on Saturn.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G; Kurth, W S; Gurnett, D A; Zarka, P; Dyudina, U A; Ingersoll, A P; Ewald, S P; Porco, C C; Wesley, A; Go, C; Delcroix, M

    2011-07-01

    Lightning discharges in Saturn's atmosphere emit radio waves with intensities about 10,000 times stronger than those of their terrestrial counterparts. These radio waves are the characteristic features of lightning from thunderstorms on Saturn, which last for days to months. Convective storms about 2,000 kilometres in size have been observed in recent years at planetocentric latitude 35° south (corresponding to a planetographic latitude of 41° south). Here we report observations of a giant thunderstorm at planetocentric latitude 35° north that reached a latitudinal extension of 10,000 kilometres-comparable in size to a 'Great White Spot'-about three weeks after it started in early December 2010. The visible plume consists of high-altitude clouds that overshoot the outermost ammonia cloud layer owing to strong vertical convection, as is typical for thunderstorms. The flash rates of this storm are about an order of magnitude higher than previous ones, and peak rates larger than ten per second were recorded. This main storm developed an elongated eastward tail with additional but weaker storm cells that wrapped around the whole planet by February 2011. Unlike storms on Earth, the total power of this storm is comparable to Saturn's total emitted power. The appearance of such storms in the northern hemisphere could be related to the change of seasons, given that Saturn experienced vernal equinox in August 2009. PMID:21734705

  5. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., lo, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  6. Dipole-exchange spin waves in magnetic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thi Hoa

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the dipole-exchange spin waves in several low-dimensional ferromagnetic nanosystems. A microscopic theory is employed based on a Hamiltonian approach and a discrete lattice model. The Hamiltonian includes both the exchange and the magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, as well as the single-ion anisotropy and a Zeeman term for an externally applied magnetic field. Some of the advantages of this microscopic theory over the macroscopic methods are that it is convenient for describing the dynamical properties of samples where the magnetization may be spatially inhomogeneous, and it does not require the specification of phenomenological boundary conditions at the sample surfaces. The spin wave frequencies are obtained by employing a boson operator method with a diagonalization procedure. The spectral intensity, spin wave amplitudes and effective pinning are also studied within a Green function theory. The spin wave properties are first studied for ultrathin ferromagnetic films with simple cubic, body-centered cubic and face-centered cubic lattice structures. Results are deduced for the spin wave frequencies as a function of the in-plane wave vector, the magnetic field applied either parallel or perpendicular to the film surfaces, and the material parameters. The spin wave properties are shown to depend sensitively on the lattice structures in certain wave-vector regimes. Next we carry out spin wave calculations for individual (non-interacting) ferromagnetic stripes or wires. The numerical results are compared with the macroscopic theories and with the experimental data, where available. Then we examine the role of the long-range dipole-dipole interactions between stripes on the spin waves for two different types of stripe arrays. The coupling is found to depend on the array geometry and the direction of the applied field. Comparison of our results with experimental data (e.g., for Permalloy) shows a good agreement, confirming the

  7. YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM's FIFTH GIANT PLANET?

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David

    2011-12-15

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside {approx}15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  8. Giant elves: Lightning-generated electromagnetic pulses in giant planets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque Estepa, Alejandro; Dubrovin, Daria; José Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco; Ebert, Ute; Parra-Rojas, Francisco Carlos; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    We currently have direct optical observations of atmospheric electricity in the two giant gaseous planets of our Solar System [1-5] as well as radio signatures that are possibly generated by lightning from the two icy planets Uranus and Neptune [6,7]. On Earth, the electrical activity of the troposphere is associated with secondary electrical phenomena called Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the mesosphere and lower ionosphere. This led some researchers to ask if similar processes may also exist in other planets, focusing first on the quasi-static coupling mechanism [8], which on Earth is responsible for halos and sprites and then including also the induction field, which is negligible in our planet but dominant in Saturn [9]. However, one can show that, according to the best available estimation for lightning parameters, in giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter the effect of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) dominates the effect that a lightning discharge has on the lower ionosphere above it. Using a Finite-Differences, Time-Domain (FDTD) solver for the EMP we found [10] that electrically active storms may create a localized but long-lasting layer of enhanced ionization of up to 103 cm-3 free electrons below the ionosphere, thus extending the ionosphere downward. We also estimate that the electromagnetic pulse transports 107 J to 1010 J toward the ionosphere. There emissions of light of up to 108 J would create a transient luminous event analogous to a terrestrial elve. Although these emissions are about 10 times fainter than the emissions coming from the lightning itself, it may be possible to target them for detection by filtering the appropiate wavelengths. [1] Cook, A. F., II, T. C. Duxbury, and G. E. Hunt (1979), First results on Jovian lightning, Nature, 280, 794, doi:10.1038/280794a0. [2] Little, B., C. D. Anger, A. P. Ingersoll, A. R. Vasavada, D. A. Senske, H. H. Breneman, W. J. Borucki, and The Galileo SSI Team (1999), Galileo images of

  9. An Insightful Problem Involving the Electromagnetic Radiation from a Pair of Dipoles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glenn S.

    2010-01-01

    The time-average power radiated by a pair of infinitesimal dipoles is examined as their spacing is varied. The results elucidate the effect of the interaction of the dipoles on their radiation. (Contains 4 figures.)

  10. Visualizing coherent intermolecular dipole–dipole coupling in real space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Luo, Yang; Zhang, Yao; Yu, Yun-Jie; Kuang, Yan-Min; Zhang, Li; Meng, Qiu-Shi; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jin-Long; Dong, Zhen-Chao; Hou, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    Many important energy-transfer and optical processes, in both biological and artificial systems, depend crucially on excitonic coupling that spans several chromophores. Such coupling can in principle be described in a straightforward manner by considering the coherent intermolecular dipole–dipole interactions involved. However, in practice, it is challenging to directly observe in real space the coherent dipole coupling and the related exciton delocalizations, owing to the diffraction limit in conventional optics. Here we demonstrate that the highly localized excitations that are produced by electrons tunnelling from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, in conjunction with imaging of the resultant luminescence, can be used to map the spatial distribution of the excitonic coupling in well-defined arrangements of a few zinc-phthalocyanine molecules. The luminescence patterns obtained for excitons in a dimer, which are recorded for different energy states and found to resemble σ and π molecular orbitals, reveal the local optical response of the system and the dependence of the local optical response on the relative orientation and phase of the transition dipoles of the individual molecules in the dimer. We generate an in-line arrangement up to four zinc-phthalocyanine molecules, with a larger total transition dipole, and show that this results in enhanced ‘single-molecule’ superradiance from the oligomer upon site-selective excitation. These findings demonstrate that our experimental approach provides detailed spatial information about coherent dipole–dipole coupling in molecular systems, which should enable a greater understanding and rational engineering of light-harvesting structures and quantum light sources.

  11. Constraining the neutrino magnetic dipole moment from white dwarf pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Córsico, A.H.; Althaus, L.G.; García-Berro, E. E-mail: althaus@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar E-mail: kepler@if.ufrgs.br

    2014-08-01

    Pulsating white dwarf stars can be used as astrophysical laboratories to constrain the properties of weakly interacting particles. Comparing the cooling rates of these stars with the expected values from theoretical models allows us to search for additional sources of cooling due to the emission of axions, neutralinos, or neutrinos with magnetic dipole moment. In this work, we derive an upper bound to the neutrino magnetic dipole moment (μ{sub ν}) using an estimate of the rate of period change of the pulsating DB white dwarf star PG 1351+489. We employ state-of-the-art evolutionary and pulsational codes which allow us to perform a detailed asteroseismological period fit based on fully DB white dwarf evolutionary sequences. Plasmon neutrino emission is the dominant cooling mechanism for this class of hot pulsating white dwarfs, and so it is the main contributor to the rate of change of period with time (Pidot) for the DBV class. Thus, the inclusion of an anomalous neutrino emission through a non-vanishing magnetic dipole moment in these sequences notably influences the evolutionary timescales, and also the expected pulsational properties of the DBV stars. By comparing the theoretical Pidot value with the rate of change of period with time of PG 1351+489, we assess the possible existence of additional cooling by neutrinos with magnetic dipole moment. Our models suggest the existence of some additional cooling in this pulsating DB white dwarf, consistent with a non-zero magnetic dipole moment with an upper limit of μ{sub ν} ∼< 10{sup -11} μ{sub B}. This bound is somewhat less restrictive than, but still compatible with, other limits inferred from the white dwarf luminosity function or from the color-magnitude diagram of the Globular cluster M5. Further improvements of the measurement of the rate of period change of the dominant pulsation mode of PG 1351+489 will be necessary to confirm our bound.

  12. Thermally induced polarizabilities and dipole moments of small tin clusters.

    PubMed

    Kast, Stefan M; Schäfer, Sascha; Schäfer, Rolf

    2012-04-01

    We study the influence of thermal excitation on the electric susceptibilities for Sn(6) and Sn(7) clusters by molecular beam electric deflection and Monte-Carlo simulations in conjunction with quantum-chemical calculations. At low temperatures (40 K), no field-induced broadening of the Sn(6) and Sn(7) cluster beams are observed, in agreement with vanishing permanent electric dipole moments due to their centro-symmetrical ground states. The electric polarizabilities of Sn(6) and Sn(7), as inferred from the field-induced molecular beam deflection, are in good agreement with the quantum-chemical predictions. At elevated temperatures of 50-100 K, increased polarizabilities of about 2-3 Å(3) are obtained. Also, we found indications of a field-induced beam broadening which points to the existence of permanent dipole moments of about 0.01-0.02 D per atom at higher temperatures. These results cannot be explained by thermal excitations within a harmonic oscillator model, which would yield a temperature-independent polarizability and fluxional, but not permanent, dipole moments. We analyze this behavior by Monte-Carlo simulations in order to compute average temperature-induced electric dipole moments. For that purpose, we developed a novel technique for predicting observables sampled on the quantum-chemical potential energy surface by an umbrella sampling correction of Monte-Carlo results obtained from simulations utilizing an empirical potential. The calculated, fluxional dipole moments are in tune with the observed beam broadenings. The cluster dynamics underlying the polarizability appear to be intermediate between rigid and floppy molecules which leads to the conclusion that the rotational, not the vibrational temperature seems to be the key parameter that determines the temperature dependence of the polarizability.

  13. Coherent dipole-dipole coupling between two single Rydberg atoms at an electrically-tuned Förster resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravets, Sylvain; Labuhn, Henning; Barredo, Daniel; Béguin, Lucas; Lahaye, Thierry; Browaeys, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Resonant energy transfers, the non-radiative redistribution of an electronic excitation between two particles coupled by the dipole-dipole interaction, lie at the heart of a variety of phenomena, notably photosynthesis. In 1948, Förster established the theory of fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) between broadband, nearly-resonant donors and acceptors. The 1/R6 scaling of the energy transfer rate, where R is the distance between particles, enabled widespread use of FRET as a `spectroscopic ruler’ for determining nanometric distances in biomolecules. The underlying mechanism is a coherent dipolar coupling between particles, as recognized in the early days of quantum mechanics, but this coherence has not been directly observed so far. Here we study, spectroscopically and in the time domain, the coherent, dipolar-induced exchange of excitations between two Rydberg atoms separated by up to 15 μm, and brought into resonance by applying an electric field. Coherent oscillation of the system between two degenerate pair states then occurs at a frequency scaling as 1/R3, the hallmark of resonant dipole-dipole interactions. Our results not only demonstrate, at the fundamental level of two atoms, the basic mechanism underlying FRET, but also open exciting prospects for active tuning of strong, coherent interactions in quantum many-body systems.

  14. Energy-driven pattern formation in planar dipole-dipole systems in the presence of weak noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent-Dobias, Jaron; Bernoff, Andrew J.

    2015-03-01

    We study pattern formation in planar fluid systems driven by intermolecular cohesion (which manifests as a line tension) and dipole-dipole repulsion, which are observed in physical systems including ferrofluids in Hele-Shaw cells and Langmuir layers. When the dipolar repulsion is sufficiently strong, domains undergo forked branching reminiscent of viscous fingering. A known difficulty with these models is that the energy associated with dipole-dipole interactions is singular at small distances. Following previous work, we demonstrate how to ameliorate this singularity and show that in the macroscopic limit only the scale of the microscopic details relative to the macroscopic extent of a system is relevant and develop an expression for the system energy that depends only on a generalized line tension Λ that in turn depends logarithmically on that scale. We conduct numerical studies that use energy minimization to find equilibrium states. Following the subcritical bifurcations from the circle, we find a few highly symmetric stable shapes, but nothing that resembles the observed diversity of experimental and dynamically simulated domains. The application of a weak random background to the energy landscape stabilizes a wide range of domain morphologies recovering the diversity observed experimentally. With this technique, we generate a large sample of qualitatively realistic shapes and use them to create an empirical model for extracting Λ with high accuracy using only a shape's perimeter and morphology.

  15. Energy-driven pattern formation in planar dipole-dipole systems in the presence of weak noise.

    PubMed

    Kent-Dobias, Jaron; Bernoff, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    We study pattern formation in planar fluid systems driven by intermolecular cohesion (which manifests as a line tension) and dipole-dipole repulsion, which are observed in physical systems including ferrofluids in Hele-Shaw cells and Langmuir layers. When the dipolar repulsion is sufficiently strong, domains undergo forked branching reminiscent of viscous fingering. A known difficulty with these models is that the energy associated with dipole-dipole interactions is singular at small distances. Following previous work, we demonstrate how to ameliorate this singularity and show that in the macroscopic limit only the scale of the microscopic details relative to the macroscopic extent of a system is relevant and develop an expression for the system energy that depends only on a generalized line tension Λ that in turn depends logarithmically on that scale. We conduct numerical studies that use energy minimization to find equilibrium states. Following the subcritical bifurcations from the circle, we find a few highly symmetric stable shapes, but nothing that resembles the observed diversity of experimental and dynamically simulated domains. The application of a weak random background to the energy landscape stabilizes a wide range of domain morphologies recovering the diversity observed experimentally. With this technique, we generate a large sample of qualitatively realistic shapes and use them to create an empirical model for extracting Λ with high accuracy using only a shape's perimeter and morphology. PMID:25871184

  16. Avoiding bias effects in NMR experiments for heteronuclear dipole-dipole coupling determinations: principles and application to organic semiconductor materials.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Ricardo; Cobo, Marcio Fernando; de Azevedo, Eduardo Ribeiro; Sommer, Michael; Wicklein, André; Thelakkat, Mukundan; Hempel, Günter; Saalwächter, Kay

    2013-09-16

    Carbon-proton dipole-dipole couplings between bonded atoms represent a popular probe of molecular dynamics in soft materials or biomolecules. Their site-resolved determination, for example, by using the popular DIPSHIFT experiment, can be challenged by spectral overlap with nonbonded carbon atoms. The problem can be solved by using very short cross-polarization (CP) contact times, however, the measured modulation curves then deviate strongly from the theoretically predicted shape, which is caused by the dependence of the CP efficiency on the orientation of the CH vector, leading to an anisotropic magnetization distribution even for isotropic samples. Herein, we present a detailed demonstration and explanation of this problem, as well as providing a solution. We combine DIPSHIFT experiments with the rotor-directed exchange of orientations (RODEO) method, and modifications of it, to redistribute the magnetization and obtain undistorted modulation curves. Our strategy is general in that it can also be applied to other types of experiments for heteronuclear dipole-dipole coupling determinations that rely on dipolar polarization transfer. It is demonstrated with perylene-bisimide-based organic semiconductor materials, as an example, in which measurements of dynamic order parameters reveal correlations of the molecular dynamics with the phase structure and functional properties.

  17. Sunspots and Giant-Cell Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron L.; Hathaway, David H.; Reichmann, Ed J.

    2000-01-01

    From analysis of Doppler velocity images from SOHO/MDI, Hathaway et al (2000, Solar Phys., in press) have found clear evidence for giant convection cells that fill the solar surface, have diameters 3 - 10 times that typical of supergranules, and have lifetimes approx. greater than 10 days. Analogous to the superposition of the granular convection on the supergranular convection, the approx. 30,000 km diameter supergranules are superposed on these still larger giant cells. Because the giant cells make up the large-scale end of a continuous power spectrum that peaks at the size scale of supergranules, it appears that the giant cells are made by the same mode of convection as the supergranules. This suggests that the giant cells are similar to supergranules, just longer-lived, larger in diameter, and deeper. Here we point out that the range of lengths of large bipolar sunspot groups is similar to the size range of giant cells. This, along with the long lives (weeks) of large sunspots, suggests that large sunspots sit in long-lived, deep downflows at the corners of giant cells, and that the distance from leader to follower sunspots in large bipolar groups is the distance from one giant-cell corner to the next. By this line of reasoning, an unusually large and strong downdraft might pull in both legs of a rising spot-group magnetic flux loop, resulting in the formation of a delta sunspot. This leads us to suggest that a large, strong giant-cell corner downdraft should be present at the birthplaces of large delta sunspots for some time (days to weeks) before the birth. Thus, early detection of such downdrafts by local helioscismology might provide an early warning for the formation of those active regions (large delta sunspot groups) that produce the Sun's most violent flares and coronal mass ejections. This work is supported by NASA's Office of Space Science through the Solar Physics Branch of its Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  18. Giant components in directed multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi-Tafreshi, N.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the complex global structure of giant components in directed multiplex networks that generalizes the well-known bow-tie structure, generic for ordinary directed networks. By definition, a directed multiplex network contains vertices of one type and directed edges of m different types. In directed multiplex networks, we distinguish a set of different giant components based on the existence of directed paths of different types between their vertices such that for each type of edges, the paths run entirely through only edges of that type. If, in particular, m =2 , we define a strongly viable component as a set of vertices in which for each type of edges each two vertices are interconnected by at least two directed paths in both directions, running through the edges of only this type. We show that in this case, a directed multiplex network contains in total nine different giant components including the strongly viable component. In general, the total number of giant components is 3m. For uncorrelated directed multiplex networks, we obtain exactly the size and the emergence point of the strongly viable component and estimate the sizes of other giant components.

  19. An MHD model for magnetar giant flares

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Y.; Lin, J.; Zhang, Q. S.; Zhang, L.; Reeves, K. K.; Yuan, F. E-mail: jlin@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-04-10

    Giant flares on soft gamma-ray repeaters that are thought to take place on magnetars release enormous energy in a short time interval. Their power can be explained by catastrophic instabilities occurring in the magnetic field configuration and the subsequent magnetic reconnection. By analogy with the coronal mass ejection events on the Sun, we develop a theoretical model via an analytic approach for magnetar giant flares. In this model, the rotation and/or displacement of the crust causes the field to twist and deform, leading to flux rope formation in the magnetosphere and energy accumulation in the related configuration. When the energy and helicity stored in the configuration reach a threshold, the system loses its equilibrium, the flux rope is ejected outward in a catastrophic way, and magnetic reconnection helps the catastrophe develop to a plausible eruption. By taking SGR 1806–20 as an example, we calculate the free magnetic energy released in such an eruptive process and find that it is more than 10{sup 47} erg, which is enough to power a giant flare. The released free magnetic energy is converted into radiative energy, kinetic energy, and gravitational energy of the flux rope. We calculated the light curves of the eruptive processes for the giant flares of SGR 1806–20, SGR 0526–66, and SGR 1900+14, and compared them with the observational data. The calculated light curves are in good agreement with the observed light curves of giant flares.

  20. Visualizing Special Relativity: The Field of An Electric Dipole Moving at Relativistic Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glenn S.

    2011-01-01

    The electromagnetic field is determined for a time-varying electric dipole moving with a constant velocity that is parallel to its moment. Graphics are used to visualize this field in the rest frame of the dipole and in the laboratory frame when the dipole is moving at relativistic speed. Various phenomena from special relativity are clearly…