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Sample records for isoscalar giant dipole

  1. The Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance in {sup 20}Pb, {sup 90}Zr and the Nuclear Compressibility

    SciTech Connect

    Yildirim, Serbulent; Koeroglu, Ulas

    2008-11-11

    The isoscalar giant dipol resonance (ISGDR) in finite nuclei is studied within the framework of a relativistic transport approach. The excitation energies of spherical {sup 90}Zr and {sup 208}Pb nuclei are obtained for different quantum hydrodynamical Lagrangian parametrization. The sensitivity of ISGDR excitation energy on the nuclear bulk to surface properties are also investigated.

  2. Proton decay from the isoscalar giant dipole resonance in {sup 58}Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Hunyadi, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Fujimura, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Hara, K.; Itoh, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Okumura, S.; Li, T.; Garg, U.; Hoffman, J.; Nayak, B. K.; Akimune, H.; Gacsi, Z.; Harakeh, M. N.

    2009-10-15

    Proton decay from the 3({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR) in {sup 58}Ni has been measured using the ({alpha},{alpha}{sup '}p) reaction at a bombarding energy of 386 MeV to investigate its decay properties. We have extracted the ISGDR strength under the coincidence condition between inelastically scattered {alpha} particles at forward angles and decay protons emitted at backward angles. Branching ratios for proton decay to low-lying states of {sup 57}Co have been determined, and the results compared with predictions of recent continuum-RPA calculations. The final-state spectra of protons decaying to the low-lying states in {sup 57}Co were analyzed for a more detailed understanding of the structure of the ISGDR. It is found that there are differences in the structure of the ISGDR as a function of excitation energy.

  3. Charged-particle Decay of the Isoscalar giant dipole resonance in ^58Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Hunyadi, Matyas; Garg, Umesh; Hoffman, Joe; Nayak, B. K.; Fujiwara, M.; Hara, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Itoh, M.; Murakami, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Kishi, S.; Sakaguchi, H.; Terashima, S.; Uchida, M.; Yasuda, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Akimune, H.; Harakeh, M. N.

    2004-10-01

    The isoscalar giant dipole resonance(ISGDR) has been measured by single experiments with the use of inelastic α-scattering in many nuclei[1]. However, information on its decay properties is scarce. The decay properties, especially the relative population and total strength of hole states in the (A-1) nucleus resulting from particle decay of giant resonance in nuclei can provide crucial tests for the microscopic model calculations. Caculations based on continuum-RPA approach have recently become abailable and provide results on partial branching ratios for direct neutron and proton decay of ISGDR [2]. We report on a coincidence experiment searching for these direct particle decay branches from the ISGDR in the nucleus ^58Ni. The experiment was performed at the RCNP, Osaka University, using inelastic α-scattering at a beam energy of 400 MeV. The inelastically scattered α particles were detected by the magnetic spectrometer ``Grand Raiden'' at 2.5^rc, with the decay protons detected by a set of sixteen Si(Li) detectors with a thickness of 5.0 mm and an effective area of 400 mm^2 each placed at backward angles. The result for the observed final states in ^57Co will be presented and compared with the theoretical calculations. References: [1] M.Uchida et al., Phys.Rev. C 69, 051301 (2004), [2] M.L. Gorelik et al., Phys. Rev. C 69, 054322 (2004)

  4. Isoscalar giant dipole resonance in {sup 90}Zr, {sup 116}Sn, and {sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, H. L.; Lui, Y.-W.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2001-03-01

    Strength functions for isoscalar dipole excitations in {sup 90}Zr, {sup 116}Sn, and {sup 208}Pb have been measured with inelastic scattering of 240 MeV {alpha} particles at small angles. The isoscalar E1 strength distribution in each nucleus is found to consist of a broad component at E{sub x}{approx}114/A{sup 1/3}MeV containing approximately 100% of the E1 EWSR and a narrower one at E{sub x}{approx}72/A{sup 1/3}MeV containing 15--28% of the total isoscalar E1 strength. The higher component is the compression mode E1 strength previously reported only in {sup 208}Pb, whereas the lower component may be a new mode not reported previously, but suggested by recent RPA-HF and relativistic mean field calculations.

  5. Isoscalar giant resonances in {sup 48}Ca

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, Y.-W.; Youngblood, D. H.; Shlomo, S.; Chen, X.; Tokimoto, Y.; Krishichayan,; Anders, M.; Button, J.

    2011-04-15

    The giant resonance region from 9.5 MeV < E{sub x} < 40 MeV in {sup 48}Ca has been studied with inelastic scattering of 240-MeV {alpha} particles at small angles, including 0 deg. 95{sub -15}{sup +11}% of E0 energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR), 83{sub -16}{sup +10}% of E2 EWSR, and 137 {+-} 20% of E1 EWSR were located below E{sub x}=40 MeV. A comparison of the experimental data with calculated results for the isoscalar giant monopole resonance, obtained within the mean-field-based random-phase approximation, is also given.

  6. Thermal effects on isoscalar giant resonance energies in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, W.; Dai, G.; Jin, G.

    1995-07-01

    The thermal effects on the energies of the isoscalar giant multipole resonances of hot nuclei are discussed and an approximate formula for the energy as a function of temperature is derived via a hydrodynamic theory. The energy difference between the isoscalar giant multipole resonance of a hot nucleus and its ground-state resonance depends on the competition between the volume expansion and the increase of the average kinetic energy per nucleon of hot nuclei, which lower and raise the resonance energy, respectively, and nearly counteract each other in magnitude. The variaiton of the isoscalar giant resonance energy with temperature is very small.

  7. Isoscalar giant resonance strength in {sup 24}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, D. H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Chen, X. F.; Clark, H. L.

    2009-12-15

    The giant resonance region from 9 MeV Isoscalar E0, E1, E2, and E3 strength was identified from 9 MeV

  8. Isoscalar giant resonance strength in {sup 28}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, D. H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Clark, H. L.

    2007-08-15

    Data taken previously covering the giant resonance region from 9 MeV giant resonance peaks containing 74 {+-} 7% of the isoscalar E0 energy weighted sum rule (EWSR), 102 {+-} 11% of the E2 EWSR, and 84 {+-} 8% of the E3 EWSR were identified.

  9. Isovector and isoscalar dipole excitations in 9Be and 10Be studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2016-02-01

    Isovector and isoscalar dipole excitations in 9Be and 10Be are investigated in the framework of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics, in which angular-momentum and parity projections are performed. In the present method, 1p-1h excitation modes built on the ground state and a large amplitude α -cluster mode are taken into account. The isovector giant dipole resonance (GDR) in E >20 MeV shows the two-peak structure, which is understood from the dipole excitation in the 2 α core part with the prolate deformation. Because of valence neutron modes against the 2 α core, low-energy E 1 resonances appear in E <20 MeV, exhausting about 20 % of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule and 10 % of the calculated energy-weighted sum. The dipole resonance at E ˜15 MeV in 10Be can be interpreted as the parity partner of the ground state having a 6He+α structure and has remarkable E 1 strength because of the coherent contribution of two valence neutrons. The isoscalar dipole strength for some low-energy resonances is significantly enhanced by the coupling with the α -cluster mode. For the E 1 strength of 9Be, the calculation overestimates the energy-weighted sum (EWS) in the low-energy (E <20 MeV) and GDR (20

  10. Study of Isoscalar Giant Resonances in Exotic Nuclei by Means of Inverse Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harakeh, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances in exotic nuclei can be studied using inelastic alpha scattering in inverse kinematics. In particular, the compression modes, i.e. isoscalar giant monopole and dipole resonances, are very interesting because they can furnish information on the different terms of the nuclear incompressibility, especially if measured in long isotopic chains including nuclei far from the valley of stability. As beams of exotic nuclei have relatively low intensities thick targets have to be used in order to get a reasonable yield. However, this leads to degradation of the energy resolution and stops low-energy recoil particles. Two good alternatives exist. The first method is to use an active target, such as MAYA, which is a time-projection chamber and therefore can be used for detection of low-energy recoil particles. Furthermore, its thickness can be increased by increasing the length of the detection volume or the gas pressure without severe loss of energy resolution. The second method is to use a storage ring for storing the exotic nuclei, which then interact with target nuclei from a gas-jet target. Here, the luminosity and hence the yield are increased because the exotic nuclei circulate in the ring at a frequency of around 106 turns/s. Low-energy recoil particles traverse the gas-jet with little loss of energy and can be detected in solid-state detectors. Pioneering experiments with both methods have been performed for inelastic scattering of secondary 56Ni beam off helium nuclei. Here, preliminary results of the experiment with the active target MAYA will be presented.

  11. Evidence of Soft Dipole Resonance in 11Li with Isoscalar Character

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, R.; Sanetullaev, A.; Jansen, Gustav R.; Tanaka, J.; Ishimoto, S.; Myo, T.; Suzuki, T.; Andreoiu, C.; Bender, P.; Chen, A. A.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Fortin, J. P.; Galinski, N.; Gallant, A. T.; Garrett, P. E.; Hackman, G.; Hadinia, B.; Hagen, Gaute; Keefe, M.; Krucken, R.; Lighthall, J.; McNeice, E.; Miller, D.; Otsuka, T.; Purcell, J.; Randhawa, J. S.; Roger, T.; Rojas, A.; Savajols, H.; Shotter, A.; Tanihata, I.; Thompson, I. J.; Unsworth, C.; Voss, P.; Wang, Z.

    2015-05-12

    The first conclusive evidence of a dipole resonance in 11Li having isoscalar character observed from inelastic scattering with a novel solid deuteron target is reported. The experiment was performed at the newly commissioned IRIS facility at TRIUMF. The results show a resonance peak at an excitation energy of 1.03±0.03 MeV with a width of 0.51±0.11 MeV (FWHM). The angular distribution is consistent with a dipole excitation in the distorted-wave Born approximation framework. The observed resonance energy together with shell model calculations show the first signature that the monopole tensor interaction is important in 11Li. The first ab initio calculations in the coupled cluster framework are also included.

  12. Evidence of Soft Dipole Resonance in 11Li with Isoscalar Character

    DOE PAGES

    Kanungo, R.; Sanetullaev, A.; Jansen, Gustav R.; ...

    2015-05-12

    The first conclusive evidence of a dipole resonance in 11Li having isoscalar character observed from inelastic scattering with a novel solid deuteron target is reported. The experiment was performed at the newly commissioned IRIS facility at TRIUMF. The results show a resonance peak at an excitation energy of 1.03±0.03 MeV with a width of 0.51±0.11 MeV (FWHM). The angular distribution is consistent with a dipole excitation in the distorted-wave Born approximation framework. The observed resonance energy together with shell model calculations show the first signature that the monopole tensor interaction is important in 11Li. The first ab initio calculations inmore » the coupled cluster framework are also included.« less

  13. Isoscalar giant resonances for nuclei with mass between 56 and 60

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, Y.-W.; Youngblood, D.H.; Clark, H.L.; Tokimoto, Y.; John, B.

    2006-01-15

    The giant resonance region from 10 MeV isoscalar E0 and E2 strength has been identified below E{sub x}=40 MeV. Between 56 and 72% of the isoscalar E1 strength has been located in these nuclei. The mass dependence of the giant monopole energy between A=40 and 90 is compared to relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations for interactions with compressibility of nuclear matter K{sub NM}{approx}211-225 MeV.

  14. First measurement of isoscalar giant resonances in a stored-beam experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, J. C.; Aumann, T.; Bagchi, S.; Bönig, S.; Csatlós, M.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Egelhof, P.; Eremin, V.; Furuno, T.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hartig, A.-L.; Ilieva, S.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiselev, O.; Kollmus, H.; Kozhuharov, C.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kröll, Th.; Kuilman, M.; Litvinov, S.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Mutterer, M.; Nagae, D.; Najafi, M. A.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Popp, U.; Rigollet, C.; Roy, S.; Scheidenberger, C.; von Schmid, M.; Steck, M.; Streicher, B.; Stuhl, L.; Thürauf, M.; Uesaka, T.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.; Winters, D.; Woods, P. J.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yue, K.; Zenihiro, J.

    2016-12-01

    A new technique developed for measuring nuclear reactions at low momentum transfer with stored beams in inverse kinematics was successfully used to study isoscalar giant resonances. The experiment was carried out at the experimental heavy-ion storage ring (ESR) at the GSI facility using a stored 58Ni beam at 100 MeV/u and an internal helium gas-jet target. In these measurements, inelastically scattered α-recoils at very forward center-of-mass angles (θcm ≤ 1.5 °) were detected with a dedicated setup, including ultra-high vacuum compatible detectors. Experimental results indicate a dominant contribution of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance at this very forward angular range. It was found that the monopole contribution exhausts 79-11+12% of the energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR), which agrees with measurements performed in normal kinematics. This opens up the opportunity to investigate the giant resonances in a large domain of unstable and exotic nuclei in the near future. It is a fundamental milestone towards new nuclear reaction studies with stored ion beams.

  15. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, I. T.; Buthelezi, Z.; Carter, J.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Förtsch, S. V.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Neveling, R.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Pysmenetska, I.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    The isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al has been investigated with high-energy-resolution proton inelastic scattering at Ep=200 MeV and at scattering angles close to the maximum of Δ L =2 angular distributions with the K600 magnetic spectrometer of iThemba LABS, South Africa. Characteristic scales are extracted from the observed fine structure with a wavelet analysis and compared for 28Si with random-phase approximation and second random phase approximation calculations with an interaction derived from the Argonne V18 potential by a unitary transformation. A recent extension of the method to deformed nuclei provides the best description of the data, suggesting the significance of Landau damping.

  16. Isoscalar response of 68Ni to α -particle and deuteron probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Gibelin, J.; Khan, E.; Achouri, N. L.; Baba, H.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Colò, G.; Delaunay, F.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Keeley, N.; Mittig, W.; Pancin, J.; Raabe, R.; Roger, T.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances have been measured in the unstable 68Ni nucleus using inelastic alpha and deuteron scattering at 50 A MeV in inverse kinematics with the active target MAYA at GANIL. Using alpha scattering, the extracted isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) centroid was determined to be 21.1 ±1.9 MeV and the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance (ISGQR) to be 15.9 ±1.3 MeV. Indications for soft isoscalar monopole and dipole modes are provided. Results obtained with both (α ,α' ) and (d ,d' ) probes are compatible. The evolution of isoscalar giant resonances along the Ni isotopic chain from 56Ni to 68Ni is discussed.

  17. The Electric Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woude, A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Experimental Methods to Study Giant Resonances * Introduction * The Tools * Introduction * Tools for Isoscalar Scattering * INELASTIC α-SCATTERING * INELASTIC PROTON SCATTERING * Tools for Isovector Excitations * γ-ABSORPTION AND PARTICLE CAPTURE REACTIONS * CHARGE EXCHANGE REACTIONS - THE (π+, π0) REACTION * Tools For Isoscalar And Isovector Excitations * INELASTIC ELECTRON SCATTERING * GIANT RESONANCE EXCITATION BY FAST HEAVY IONS * From Multipole Cross Section To Multipole Strength * The Electric Isoscalar Resonances * The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance * Systematics on the GMR * Compressibility and the Giant Monopole Resonance * Introduction * The Compressibility of nuclear matter from the GMR energies * Discussion * The Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance * General Trends In Medium-Heavy and Heavy Nuclei * The GQR In Light Nuclei * The Isoscalar 3- Strength, LEOR and HEOR * Isoscalar 4+ Strength * Miscellaneous; Isoscalar 1- and L > 4-Strength * The Electric Isovector Giant Resonances * The Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance: GDR * The Isovector Giant Monopole Resonances: IVGMR * The Isovector Quadrupole Resonance: IVGQR * The Effect of Ground State Deformation on the Shape of Giant Resonance: Microscopic Picture * Giant Resonances Built on Excited States * Introduction * Capture Reactions on Light Nuclei * Statistical decay of GDR γ Emission in Heavy Compound Systems * Introduction * Theoretical Predictions * Some Experimental Results * Summary and Outlook * Acknowledgements * General References * References

  18. Global investigation of the fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Burda, O.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Foertsch, S. V.; Lawrie, J. J.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Lacroix, D.

    2009-04-15

    Fine structure in the region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance (ISGQR) in {sup 58}Ni, {sup 89}Y, {sup 90}Zr, {sup 120}Sn, {sup 166}Er, and {sup 208}Pb has been observed in high-energy-resolution ({delta}E{sub 1/2}{approx_equal}35-50 keV) inelastic proton scattering measurements at E{sub 0}=200 MeV at iThemba LABS. Calculations of the corresponding quadrupole excitation strength functions performed within models based on the random-phase approximation (RPA) reveal similar fine structure when the mixing of one-particle one-hole states with two-particle two-hole states is taken into account. A detailed comparison of the experimental data is made with results from the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) and the extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock (ETDHF) method. For {sup 208}Pb, additional theoretical results from second RPA and the extended theory of finite Fermi systems (ETFFS) are discussed. A continuous wavelet analysis of the experimental and the calculated spectra is used to extract dominant scales characterizing the fine structure. Although the calculations agree with qualitative features of these scales, considerable differences are found between the model and experimental results and amongst different models. Within the framework of the QPM and ETDHF calculations it is possible to decompose the model spaces into subspaces approximately corresponding to different damping mechanisms. It is demonstrated that characteristic scales mainly arise from the collective coupling of the ISGQR to low-energy surface vibrations.

  19. Giant dipole resonance parameters with uncertainties from photonuclear cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plujko, V. A.; Capote, R.; Gorbachenko, O. M.

    2011-09-01

    Updated values and corresponding uncertainties of isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR or GDR) model parameters are presented that are obtained by the least-squares fitting of theoretical photoabsorption cross sections to experimental data. The theoretical photoabsorption cross section is taken as a sum of the components corresponding to excitation of the GDR and quasideuteron contribution to the experimental photoabsorption cross section. The present compilation covers experimental data as of January 2010.

  20. Capillary-induced giant elastic dipoles in thin nematic films

    PubMed Central

    Jeridi, Haifa; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Othman, Tahar; Blanc, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Directed and true self-assembly mechanisms in nematic liquid crystal colloids rely on specific interactions between microparticles and the topological defects of the matrix. Most ordered structures formed in thin nematic cells are thus based on elastic multipoles consisting of a particle and nearby defects. Here, we report, for the first time to our knowledge, the existence of giant elastic dipoles arising from particles dispersed in free nematic liquid crystal films. We discuss the role of capillarity and film thickness on the dimensions of the dipoles and explain their main features with a simple 2D model. Coupling of capillarity with nematic elasticity could offer ways to tune finely the spatial organization of complex colloidal systems. PMID:26554001

  1. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F. D.; Hagel, K.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O.; Charity, R. J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R. S.; Simon, R. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    High-energy γ rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of 136Xe+48Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width Γ is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy E*. A saturation at about Γ=10 MeV is observed for E*/A>=1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  2. Observation of isoscalar multipole strengths in exotic doubly-magic 56Ni in inelastic α scattering in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, S.; Gibelin, J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Achouri, N. L.; Akimune, H.; Bastin, B.; Boretzky, K.; Bouzomita, H.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Damoy, S.; Delaunay, F.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Fujiwara, M.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Kamalou, O.; Khan, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Lhoutellier, G.; Libin, J. F.; Lukyanov, S.; Mazurek, K.; Najafi, M. A.; Pancin, J.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Perrot, L.; Raabe, R.; Rigollet, C.; Roger, T.; Sambi, S.; Savajols, H.; Senoville, M.; Stodel, C.; Suen, L.; Thomas, J. C.; Vandebrouck, M.; Van de Walle, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance (ISGMR) and the Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance (ISGDR) compression modes have been studied in the doubly-magic unstable nucleus 56Ni. They were measured by inelastic α-particle scattering in inverse kinematics at 50 MeV/u with the MAYA active target at the GANIL facility. The centroid of the ISGMR has been obtained at Ex = 19.1 ± 0.5 MeV. Evidence for the low-lying part of the ISGDR has been found at Ex = 17.4 ± 0.7 MeV. The strength distribution for the dipole mode shows similarity with the prediction from the Hartree-Fock (HF) based random-phase approximation (RPA) [1]. These measurements confirm inelastic α-particle scattering as a suitable probe for exciting the ISGMR and the ISGDR modes in radioactive isotopes in inverse kinematics.

  3. Photon scattering studies of the giant dipole resonance in medium weight nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Laszewski, R.M.; McKeown, R.D.; Nathan, A.M.; Specht, J.R.

    1981-11-01

    Quasimonochromatic photons have been used to measure elastic and inelastic photon scattering cross sections in the giant dipole resonance region of /sup 52/Cr, Fe, /sup 60/Ni, /sup 92/Mo, and /sup 96/Mo in an experiment in which the elastic and inelastic scattering are resolved. The elastic scattering cross sections show clear evidence for isospin splitting of the giant dipole resonance. The inelastic scattering to low-lying vibrational levels, which is a measure of the coupling between the giant dipole resonance and collective surface vibrations, is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the dynamic collective model. However, when examined in detail, this model does not provide an adequate description of the scattering data.

  4. Dipole Excitation of Soft and Giant Resonances in 132Sn and neighboring unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boretzky, Konstanze

    2006-04-01

    The evolution of dipole-strength distributions above the one-neutron threshold was investigated for exotic neutron-rich nuclei in a series of experiments using the electromagnetic projectile excitation at beam energies around 500 MeV/u. For halo nuclei, the large observed dipole strength (shown here for 11Be) is explained within the direct-breakup model to be of non-collective character. For neutron-rich oxygen isotopes, the origin of the observed low-lying strength is concluded to be due to single-particle transitions on theoretical grounds. The dipole strength spectra for 130,132Sn exhibit resonance-like structures observed at energies around 10 MeV exhausting a few percent of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule, separated clearly from the dominant Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR). The data agree with predictions for a new dipole mode related to the oscillation of excess neutrons versus the core nucleons ("pygmy resonance").

  5. Coupled-Channel Models of Direct-Semidirect Capture via Giant-Dipole Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, I. J.; Escher, J. E.; Arbanas, G.

    2014-04-01

    Semidirect capture, a two-step process that excites a giant-dipole resonance followed by its radiative de-excitation, is a dominant process near giant-dipole resonances, that is, for incoming neutron energies within 5-20 MeV. At lower energies such processes may affect neutron capture rates that are relevant to astrophysical nucleosynthesis models. We implement a semidirect capture model in the coupled-channel reaction code Fresco and validate it by comparing the cross section for direct-semidirect capture 208Pb(n,γ)209Pb to experimental data. We also investigate the effect of low-energy electric dipole strength in the pygmy resonance. We use a conventional single-particle direct-semidirect capture code Cupido for comparison. Furthermore, we present and discuss our results for direct-semidirect capture reaction 130Sn(n,γ)131Sn, the cross section of which is known to have a significant effect on nucleosynthesis models.

  6. Coupled-Channel Models of Direct-Semidirect Capture via Giant-Dipole Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I J; Escher, Jutta E; Arbanas, Goran

    2013-01-01

    Semidirect capture, a two-step process that excites a giant-dipole resonance followed by its radiative de-excitation, is a dominant process near giant-dipole resonances, that is, for incoming neutron energies within 5 20 MeV. At lower energies such processes may affect neutron capture rates that are relevant to astrophysical nucleosynthesis models. We implement a semidirect capture model in the coupled-channel reaction code Fresco and validate it by comparing the cross section for direct-semidirect capture 208Pb(n,g)209Pb to experimental data. We also investigate the effect of low-energy electric dipole strength in the pygmy resonance. We use a conventional single-particle direct-semidirect capture code Cupido for comparison. Furthermore, we present and discuss our results for direct-semidirect capture reaction 130Sn(n,g)131Sn, the cross section of which is known to have a significant effect on nucleosynthesis models.

  7. Properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, M. L. Shlomo, Sh. Tulupov, B. A. Urin, M. H.

    2015-07-15

    The recently developed particle-hole dispersive optical model is applied to describe properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. In particular, the double transition density averaged over the energy of the isoscalar monopole excitations is considered for {sup 208}Pb in a wide energy interval, which includes the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone. The energy-averaged strength functions of these resonances are also analyzed.

  8. Recent results on giant dipole resonance decays in highly excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Snover, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Some recent results on Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) decays in highly excited, equilibrated nuclei, are discussed based primarily on work done at Seattle. Four sections address the following topics: oblate shapes of rotating, highly excited Zr--Mo nuclei; adiabatic versus motionally narrowed' GDR decay; large spin-driven deformations observed in hot medium-mass nuclei; and search for entrance channel effects in GDR decay following [sup 58]Ni [plus] [sup 92]Zr fusion. 22 refs.

  9. Recent results on giant dipole resonance decays in highly excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Snover, K.A.

    1991-12-31

    Some recent results on Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) decays in highly excited, equilibrated nuclei, are discussed based primarily on work done at Seattle. Four sections address the following topics: oblate shapes of rotating, highly excited Zr--Mo nuclei; adiabatic versus `motionally narrowed` GDR decay; large spin-driven deformations observed in hot medium-mass nuclei; and search for entrance channel effects in GDR decay following {sup 58}Ni {plus} {sup 92}Zr fusion. 22 refs.

  10. Comment on "Thermal shape fluctuation model study of the giant dipole resonance in 152Gd"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, D. R.; Datar, V. M.

    2016-10-01

    A recent paper [A. K. Rhine Kumar and P. Arumugam, Phys. Rev. C 92, 044314 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.044314] presented calculations of the giant dipole resonance width and γ -ray absorption cross sections for 152Gd at various temperatures and angular momenta and compared these with the experimental data. In the comparison of the cross sections, the authors used the linearized representations of the experimental spectra which actually represent the absorption cross sections divided by the γ -ray energy. In this Comment we make the comparison with the appropriate absorption cross sections derived from the data. The comparison shows a reasonable agreement if the higher value of the dipole-dipole interaction parameter, mentioned in the paper, is used in the calculation.

  11. Investigation of the energy-averaged double transition density of isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, M. L.; Shlomo, S.; Tulupov, B. A.; Urin, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    The particle-hole dispersive optical model, developed recently, is applied to study properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. The energy-averaged strength functions of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone in 208Pb are analyzed. In particular, we analyze the energy-averaged isoscalar monopole double transition density, the key quantity in the description of the hadron-nucleus inelastic scattering, and studied the validity of the factorization approximation using semi classical and microscopic one body transition densities, respectively, in calculating the cross sections for the excitation of isoscalar giant resonances by inelastic alpha scattering.

  12. Dipole modes with depressed amplitudes in red giants are mixed modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, B.; Belkacem, K.; Pinçon, C.; Takata, M.; Vrard, M.; Barban, C.; Goupil, M.-J.; Kallinger, T.; Samadi, R.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Seismic observations with the space-borne Kepler mission have shown that a number of evolved stars exhibit low-amplitude dipole modes, which is referred to as depressed modes. Recently, these low amplitudes have been attributed to the presence of a strong magnetic field in the stellar core of those stars. Subsequently, and based on this scenario, the prevalence of high magnetic fields in evolved stars has been inferred. It should be noted, however, that this conclusion remains indirect. Aims: We intend to study the properties of mode depression in evolved stars, which is a necessary condition before reaching conclusions about the physical nature of the mechanism responsible for the reduction of the dipole mode amplitudes. Methods: We perform a thorough characterization of the global seismic parameters of depressed dipole modes and show that these modes have a mixed character. The observation of stars showing dipole mixed modes that are depressed is especially useful for deriving model-independent conclusions on the dipole mode damping. We use a simple model to explain how mode visibilities are connected to the extra damping seen in depressed modes. Results: Observations prove that depressed dipole modes in red giants are not pure pressure modes but mixed modes. This result, observed in more than 90% of the bright stars (mV ≤ 11), invalidates the hypothesis that depressed dipole modes result from the suppression of the oscillation in the radiative core of the stars. Observations also show that, except for visibility, seismic properties of the stars with depressed modes are equivalent to those of normal stars. The measurement of the extra damping that is responsible for the reduction of mode amplitudes, without any prior on its physical nature, potentially provides an efficient tool for elucidating the mechanism responsible for the mode depression. Conclusions: The mixed nature of the depressed modes in red giants and their unperturbed global seismic

  13. Giant dipole resonance in proton capture reactions using an extended quantum molecular dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Ma, Y. G.; Zhang, G. Q.; Cao, X. G.; He, W. B.; Shen, W. Q.

    2017-01-01

    Proton capture reaction is an important process concerning the astrophysical origin of the elements. In present work, we focus on giant dipole resonance (GDR) in proton capture reactions, such as 11B(p ,γ )12C , 27Al(p ,γ )28Si , 39K(p ,γ )40Ca , and 67Co(p ,γ )68Ni in a framework of an extended quantum molecular dynamics model. The systematic properties of GDR parameters including the peak energy, the strength, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) have been studied. The dependence of FWHM on temperature has also been discussed. Some comparisons with experimental data have been presented.

  14. Multineutron photodisintegration of the 197Au nucleus behind the giant dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, A. N.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Htun, Kyaw Kyaw; Makarenko, I. V.; Orlin, V. N.; Shvedunov, V. I.

    2008-03-01

    An experiment in which the gold isotope 197Au was irradiated with a beam of bremsstrahlung photons having an endpoint energy of E {/γ m } = 67.7 MeV and originating from the RTM-70 racetrack microtron of the Institute of Nuclear Physics at Moscow State University was performed. The gammaray spectra of the residual beta activity of an irradiated sample were measured. Multinucleon photonuclear reactions on 197Au nuclei were observed in the experiment. Photonuclear reactions on a 197Au nucleus that involve the emission of up to seven neutrons were recorded for the first time. The experimental results in question suggest the important role of the quasideuteron photodisintegration mechanism in the energy region behind the giant dipole resonance.

  15. Inhomogeneous and intrinsic damping of giant dipole resonance in hot rotating nuclei with A ~ 150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, D. R.; Datar, V. M.; Kumar, Suresh; Mirgule, E. T.; Mitra, A.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Rout, P. C.

    2010-05-01

    High-energy gamma rays in the range of ~4-28 MeV were measured in the reaction 28Si+124Sn at E(28Si) ~ 185 MeV in coincidence with low-energy gamma ray multiplicities and evaporation residues. The centroid energy and width of the giant dipole resonance were extracted for various multiplicity windows from the statistical model analysis. These extracted widths, along with those from an earlier measurement at E(28Si) ~ 149 MeV, show a discrepancy with the results of a calculation under the thermal shape fluctuation model which describes the inhomogeneous damping of the resonance. An empirical form of the temperature and angular momentum dependence of the width, describing the data at both the beam energies, has been derived. The present results suggest that the contributions from both the inhomogeneous damping and the intrinsic collisional damping processes should be included.

  16. Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Krasznahorkay, A.; Stuhl, L.; Csatlos, M.; Algora, A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    The {gamma}-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) to the isobaric analog state has been measured following the p({sup 124}Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RPA) and turned out to be very sensitive to the neutronskin thickness ({Delta}R{sub pn}). By comparing the theoretical results with the measured one, the {Delta}R{sub pn} value for {sup 124}Sn was deduced to be 0.21 {+-} 0.07 fm, which agrees well with the previous results. The present method offers new possibilities for measuring the neutron-skin thicknesses of very exotic isotopes.

  17. Giant permanent dipole moment of two-dimensional excitons bound to a single stacking fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karin, Todd; Linpeng, Xiayu; Glazov, M. M.; Durnev, M. V.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Harvey, Sarah; Rai, Ashish K.; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Fu, Kai-Mei C.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the magneto-optical properties of excitons bound to single stacking faults in high-purity GaAs. We find that the two-dimensional stacking fault potential binds an exciton composed of an electron and a heavy hole, and we confirm a vanishing in-plane hole g -factor, consistent with the atomic-scale symmetry of the system. The unprecedented homogeneity of the stacking-fault potential leads to ultranarrow photoluminescence emission lines (with a full width at half-maximum ≲80 μ eV ) and reveals a large magnetic nonreciprocity effect that originates from the magneto-Stark effect for mobile excitons. These measurements unambiguously determine the direction and magnitude of the giant electric dipole moment (≳e ×10 nm ) of the stacking-fault exciton, making stacking faults a promising new platform to study interacting excitonic gases.

  18. Dipole-dipole-induced giant Goos-Hänchen shift in a photonic crystal doped with quantum dot nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, M.; Solookinejad, G.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.; Hossein Asadpour, Seyyed

    2016-07-01

    The impact of the dipole-dipole interaction on the Goo-Hänchen (GH) shifts in reflected and transmitted lights is investigated. A weak probe beam is incident on a cavity containing the donor and acceptor quantum dots embedded in a nonlinear photonic crystal. We deduced that the GH shifts can be easily adjusted via controlling the corresponding parameters of the system in the presence or absence of dipole-dipole interaction. Our proposed model may be useful to developing the all-optical devices based on photonic materials doped with nanoparticles.

  19. Nonlinear SU(2,1) Model of Multiple Giant Dipole Resonance Coulomb Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Mahir; de Toledo Piza, Antonio; Vorov, Oleg

    2000-10-01

    We construct a three-dimensional analytically soluble model of the nonlinear effects in Coulomb excitation of multiphonon Giant Dipole Resonances (GDR) based on the SU(2,1) algebra^1. Analytical expressions for the multi-phonon transition probabilities are derived. For reasonably small magnitude of nonlinearity x~= 0.15-0.3, the enhancement factor for the Double Giant Resonance excitation probabilities and the cross sections reaches values 1.3-2 compatible^1,2 with experimental data from relativistic ion collision experiments^3. The full 3-dimensional model predicts enhancement of the multiple GDR cross sections at low and high bombarding energies (with the minimum at ~= 1.3 GeV for the Pb+Pb colliding system). Enhancement factors for Double GDR measured in thirteen different processes with various projectiles and targets at different bombarding energies are well reproduced with the same value of the nonlinearity parameter with the exception of the anomalous case of ^136Xe which requires a larger value. The work has been supported by the FAPESP and by the CNPq. References ^1 M. S. Hussein, A. F. R. de Toledo Piza and O. K.Vorov, Ann. Phys. (N.Y.), 2000, to appear. ^2 M. S. Hussein, A. F. R. de Toledo Piza and O. K.Vorov, Phys. Rev. C59,R1242 (1999). ^3 T. Aumann, P.F. Bortignon, and H. Emling, Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 48, 351 (1998).

  20. Double Photon Decay of the Electromagnetically Excited Double Giant Dipole Resonance in LEAD-208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritman, James Lambrecht

    In this work the electromagnetic excitation of high lying collective states has been studied in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The interaction in peripheral collisions is dominated by the exchange of high energy virtual photons. Heavy systems near 1cdotA GeV produce a virtual photon field that is highly luminous and of sufficiently short duration to enable the multiple excitation of Giant Resonances with high probability. In particular, the double excitation of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) has been studied in this work by measuring the photons emitted in peripheral reactions with the system 1.A GeV ^ {209}Bi on ^{208} Pb. This study concentrated on the photon decay of Coulomb excited collective states. Despite the relatively small ground state gamma-decay branching ratio, investigation of this channel provides several advantages compared to measuring statistical particle decay. The most important advantage is the strong enhancement of E1 transitions with respect to higher multipolarities; therefore, study of gamma-decay provides a highly selective measurement of the GDR. Photons in the Giant Resonance region were measured both as singles and as gamma- gamma pairs. For symmetry reasons the target and projectile nuclei can be mutually Coulomb excited. In order to insure that both photons in the gamma -gamma pairs came from the same nucleus, the large Doppler shift of photons emitted from the moving projectile has been exploited. Appropriate placement of the gamma detectors permitted a complete separation of the GDR photons emitted by either the target or projectile nucleus. This work provides the first experimental evidence of the gamma-gamma decay of the Coulomb excited double GDR (GDR2). The position of the resonance indicates harmonicity of the T_{<} multi-GDR. However, the increase of the GDR2 width over the GDR's width by only about a factor of sqrt{2} is significantly less than expected. Finally, the GDR2 excitation cross section is compared with model

  1. Finite amplitude method applied to the giant dipole resonance in heavy rare-earth nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Kortelainen, Markus; Hinohara, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    Background: The quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), within the framework of nuclear density functional theory (DFT), has been a standard tool to access the collective excitations of atomic nuclei. Recently, the finite amplitude method (FAM) was developed in order to perform the QRPA calculations efficiently without any truncation on the two-quasiparticle model space. Purpose: We discuss the nuclear giant dipole resonance (GDR) in heavy rare-earth isotopes, for which the conventional matrix diagonalization of the QRPA is numerically demanding. A role of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule enhancement factor, connected to the isovector effective mass, is also investigated. Methods: The electric dipole photoabsorption cross section was calculated within a parallelized FAM-QRPA scheme. We employed the Skyrme energy density functional self-consistently in the DFT calculation for the ground states and FAM-QRPA calculation for the excitations. Results: The mean GDR frequency and width are mostly reproduced with the FAM-QRPA, when compared to experimental data, although some deficiency is observed with isotopes heavier than erbium. A role of the TRK enhancement factor in actual GDR strength is clearly shown: its increment leads to a shift of the GDR strength to higher-energy region, without a significant change in the transition amplitudes. Conclusions: The newly developed FAM-QRPA scheme shows remarkable efficiency, which enables one to perform systematic analysis of GDR for heavy rare-earth nuclei. The theoretical deficiency of the photoabsorption cross section could not be improved by only adjusting the TRK enhancement factor, suggesting the necessity of an approach beyond self-consistent QRPA and/or a more systematic optimization of the energy density functional (EDF) parameters.

  2. Intense {gamma}-Ray Source in the Giant-Dipole-Resonance Range Driven by 10-TW Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Giulietti, A.; Gamucci, A.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Bourgeois, N.; Marques, J. R.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz, S.; D'Oliveira, P.; Monot, P.; Popescu, H.; Reau, F.; Martin, P.; Galy, J.; Hamilton, D. J.; Giulietti, D.

    2008-09-05

    A {gamma}-ray source with an intense component around the giant dipole resonance for photonuclear absorption has been obtained via bremsstrahlung of electron bunches driven by a 10-TW tabletop laser. 3D particle-in-cell simulation proves the achievement of a nonlinear regime leading to efficient acceleration of several sequential electron bunches per each laser pulse. The rate of the {gamma}-ray yield in the giant dipole resonance region (8

  3. Excitation and photon decay of giant multipole resonances - the role and future of medium-energy heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.; Horen, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of medium energy heavy ions provides very large cross sections and peak-to-continuum ratios for excitation of giant resonances. For energies above about 50 MeV/nucleon, giant resonances are excited primarily through Coulomb excitation, which is indifferent to isospin, thus providing a good probe for the study of isovector giant resonances. The extremely large cross sections available from heavy ion excitation permit the study of rare decay modes of the photon decay of giant resonances following excitation by 22 and 84 MeV/nucleon /sup 17/O projectiles. The singles results at 84 MeV/nucleon yield peak cross sections for the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance and the isovector giant dipole resonance of approximately 0.8 and 3 barns/sr, respectively. Data on the ground state decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole and isovector giant dipole resonances are presented and compared with calculations. Decays to low-lying excited states are also discussed. Preliminary results from an experiment to isolate the /sup 208/Pb isovector quadrupole resonance using its gamma decay are presented.

  4. Effects of thermal shape fluctuations and pairing fluctuations on the giant dipole resonance in warm nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhine Kumar, A. K.; Arumugam, P.; Dang, N. Dinh

    2015-04-01

    Apart from the higher limits of isospin and temperature, the properties of atomic nuclei are intriguing and less explored at the limits of lowest but finite temperatures. At very low temperatures there is a strong interplay between the shell (quantal fluctuations), statistical (thermal fluctuations), and residual pairing effects as evidenced from the studies on giant dipole resonance (GDR). In our recent work [Phys. Rev. C 90, 044308 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevC.90.044308], we have outlined some of our results from a theoretical approach for such warm nuclei where all these effects are incorporated along within the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) extended to include the fluctuations in the pairing field. In this article, we present the complete formalism based on the microscopic-macroscopic approach for determining the deformation energies and a macroscopic approach which links the deformation to GDR observables. We discuss our results for the nuclei 97Tc,120Sn,179Au, and 208Pb, and corroborate with the experimental data available. The TSFM could explain the data successfully at low temperature only with a proper treatment of pairing and its fluctuations. More measurements with better precision could yield rich information about several phase transitions that can happen in warm nuclei.

  5. Experimental study of the isovector giant dipole resonance in 80Zr and 81Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceruti, S.; Camera, F.; Bracco, A.; Mentana, A.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Bocchi, G.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Giaz, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Wieland, O.; Bazzacco, D.; Ciemala, M.; Farnea, E.; Gottardo, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Modamio, V.; Montanari, D.; Napoli, D.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Wasilewska, B.; Zieblinski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR) γ decay was measured in the compound nuclei 80Zr and 81Rb at an excitation energy of E*=54 MeV. The fusion reaction 40Ca+40Ca at Ebeam=136 MeV was used to form the compound nucleus 80Zr, while the reaction 37Cl+44Ca at Ebeam=95 MeV was used to form the compound nucleus 81Rb at the same excitation energy. The IVGDR parameters extracted from the analysis were compared with the ones found at higher excitation energy (E*=83 MeV). The comparison allows one to observe two different nuclear mechanisms: (i) the IVGDR intrinsic width remains constant with the excitation energy in the nucleus 81Rb; (ii) the isospin-violating spreading width (i.e., Coulomb spreading width) remains constant with the excitation energy in the nucleus 80Zr. The experimental setup used for the γ -ray detection was composed by the AGATA demonstrator array coupled to the large-volume LaBr3:Ce detectors of the HECTOR+ array.

  6. Temperature dependence of the giant dipole resonance width in 152Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, C.; Mishra, G.; Rhine Kumar, A. K.; Dokania, N.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Kumar, Suresh; Rout, P. C.; Joshi, Sandeep; Arumugam, P.

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the dependence of giant dipole resonance (GDR) width on temperature (T ) and angular momentum (J ), high energy γ -ray spectra were measured in the reaction 28Si+124Sn at E28Si=135 MeV. The J information was deduced from multiplicity of low-energy γ rays. The GDR parameters, namely, the centroid energy and width are extracted using statistical model analysis. The observed variation of the GDR width for T ˜1.2 -1.37 MeV and J ˜20 ℏ -40 ℏ is consistent with the universal scaling given by Kusnezov et al., which is applicable in the liquid-drop regime. The GDR input cross sections extracted from the statistical model best fits are compared with thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) calculations and are found to be in good agreement. The TSFM calculations predominantly favor the noncollective oblate shape, while the statistical model fit with both prolate and oblate shapes describes the data. The present data together with earlier measurements indicate a very slow variation of the GDR width for T ˜1.2 to 1.5 MeV. The observed trend is well explained by the TSFM calculations, although the calculated values are ˜4 %-13% higher than the data.

  7. Extreme nuclear shapes examined via giant dipole resonance lineshapes in hot light-mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Banerjee, S. R.; De, A.; Gupta, D.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of alpha clustering on nuclear reaction dynamics is investigated using the giant dipole resonance (GDR) lineshape studies in the reactions {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=145,160 MeV) + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=160 MeV) + {sup 27}Al, populating {sup 32}S and {sup 47}V, respectively. The GDR lineshapes from the two systems are remarkably different from each other. Whereas, the non-alpha-like {sup 47}V undergoes Jacobi shape transition and matches exceptionally well with the theoretical GDR lineshape estimated under the framework rotating liquid drop model (RLDM) and thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) signifying shape equilibration, for the alpha cluster {sup 32}S an extended prolate kind of shape is observed. This unusual deformation, seen directly via gamma decay for the first time, is predicted to be due to the formation of orbiting dinuclear configuration or molecular structure of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O in the {sup 32}S superdeformed band.

  8. Giant dipole resonance width in nuclei near Sn at low temperature and high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Srijit; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, Deepak; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Gupta, D.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2008-02-15

    High energy {gamma} rays in coincidence with low energy yrast {gamma} rays have been measured from {sup 113}Sb, at excitation energies of 109 and 122 MeV, formed by bombarding {sup 20}Ne on {sup 93}Nb at projectile energies of 145 and 160 MeV, respectively, to study the role of angular momentum (J) and temperature (T) over giant dipole resonance (GDR) width ({gamma}). The maximum populated angular momenta for fusion were 67({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) and 73({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), respectively, for the above-mentioned beam energies. The high energy photons were detected using a Large Area Modular BaF{sub 2} Detector Array (LAMBDA) along with a 24-element multiplicity filter. After pre-equilibrium corrections, the excitation energy E* was averaged over the decay steps of the compound nucleus (CN). The average values of temperature, angular momentum, CN mass, etc., have been calculated using the statistical model code CASCADE. Using those average values, results show the systematic increase of GDR width with T, which is consistent with Kusnezov parametrization and the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM). The rise of GDR width with temperature also supports the assumptions of adiabatic coupling in the TSFM. But the GDR widths and corresponding reduced plots with J are not consistent with those of the theoretical model at high spins.

  9. The temperature dependence of the width of the giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W.E. |; Bortignon, P.F. |; Broglia, R.A. ||

    1995-12-31

    A systematic study of the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of the giant-dipole resonance (GDR) as a function of temperature for the nuclei {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb confirms the overall theoretical picture of the GDR in hot nuclei; in particular, the role played by large-amplitude thermal fluctuations of the nuclear shape. This is confirmed by the good agreement between theory and experiment achieved over a range of temperatures from 1.25--32 MeV and by the differences in the behavior of the FWHM for {sup 120}Sn and {sup 208}Pb, which can be attributed to the presence of strong shell corrections favoring spherical shapes in {sup 208}Pb that are absent in {sup 120}Sn. Finally, the increase in the FWHM over that expected from thermal averaging at temperatures of the order 3.0 MeV is in accordance with the increase expected from the particle evaporation of the compound system.

  10. Signature of clustering in quantum many-body systems probed by the giant dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Deepak; Mondal, Debasish; Dey, Balaram; Bhattacharya, Srijit; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; De, A.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2017-03-01

    The present experimental study illustrates how large deformations attained by nuclei due to cluster formation are perceived through the giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function. The high energy GDR γ rays have been measured from 32S at different angular momenta (J ) but similar temperatures in the reactions 4He(Elab=45 MeV )+28Si and 20Ne(Elab=145 MeV )+12C . The experimental data at lower J (˜10 ℏ ) suggests a normal deformation, similar to the ground state value, showing no potential signature of clustering. However, it is found that the GDR lineshape is fragmented into two prominent peaks at high J (˜20 ℏ ) providing a direct measurement of the large deformation developed in the nucleus. The observed lineshape is also completely different from the ones seen for Jacobi shape transition at high J pointing towards the formation of cluster structure in superdeformed states of 32S at such high spin. Thus, the GDR can be regarded as a unique tool to study cluster formation at high excitation energies and angular momenta.

  11. Search for magnetic dipole strength and giant spin-flip resonances in heavy nuclei. [120 to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Horen, D J

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the use of high-resolution (n,n) scattering and the (p,n) reaction as tools to investigate highly excited states, with emphasis on information pertaining to magnetic dipole strength and giant spin-flip resonances in heavy nuclei. It is shown how the ability to determine uniquely the spins and parities of resonances observed in neutron scattering has been instrumental to an understanding of the distribution of M1 strength in /sup 207/ /sup 208/Pb. Some recent results of (p,n) studies with intermediate energy protons are discussed. Energy systematics of the giant Gamow-Teller (GT) resonance as well as new ..delta..l = ..delta..S = 1 resonance with J/sup ..pi../ = (1,2)/sup -/ are presented. It is shown how the (p,n) reaction might be useful in locating M1 strength in heavy nuclei. 20 figures.

  12. Giant Dipole Moments of Submicron Ice Crystallites Nucleated on Dust Particles Cause Polarization Catastrophe, Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handel, P. H.

    2007-05-01

    Supersaturation of water vapor in the atmosphere is known to be low, limited to just a few percent, because the nucleation processes of water aggregates and ice crystallites are heterogeneous. Nucleation is on dust particles, known as aerosol particles. Ice nuclei are often sub-micron SiO2 particles. The ice crystallite formed on such a nucleus is different from bulk ice, which has a hindered ferroelectric transition at 78 K, according to Hentschel's calculation and to other, Japanese studies. At this transition temperature the free energy difference between the ordered and disordered states is zero, DF=0. However, the thin ice layer deposited on the nucleus has a preferential direction, the radial direction, roughly perpendicular to the surface. This spoils in the crystallite the isotropy characterizing bulk ice. Therefore, in the free energy difference DF=DU- TDS, between the entropy difference DS that tries to lower the transition temperature, and the internal energy difference DU, the entropy term looses much of its importance. Therefore, the ferroelectric transition temperature of a sub-micron, heterogeneously nucleated, ice crystallite will be much higher, close to the melting temperature of bulk ice. For temperatures below 253 K this could remain valid even for slightly larger crystallites, almost up to 10 microns. The present paper is focused on this collective ordering effect. The ferroelectric transition is never observed in bulk ice, because the activation energy needed to achieve ferroelectric ordering is prohibitive, and causes the transition time to be infinite. On the other hand, at the much higher temperature estimated for the small, defect ridden, ice crystallites, the transition time is finite and the crystallites grow from the beginning with a ferroelectric saturation polarization. This causes each crystallite to have a giant dipole moment, and causes the whole cloud of crystallites to lapse into a Clausius-Mossotti type polarization catastrophe

  13. Probing nuclear shapes close to the fission limit with the giant dipole resonance in {sup 216}Rn

    SciTech Connect

    Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Brekiesz, M.; Krolas, W.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Million, B.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Leoni, S.; Wieland, O.; Brambilla, S.; Herskind, B.; Kicinska-Habior, M.; Dubray, N.; Dudek, J.; Schunck, N.

    2004-12-01

    The gamma-ray decay of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the compound nucleus {sup 216}Rn formed with the reaction {sup 18}O+{sup 198}Pt at the bombarding energy of 96 MeV was investigated. High-energy gamma-ray spectra in coincidence with both prompt and delayed low-energy transitions were measured. The obtained GDR width at the average temperature {approx_equal}1 MeV was found to be larger than that at T=0 MeV and to be approximately constant as a function of spin. The measured width value of 7 MeV is found to be consistent with the predictions based on calculations of the nuclear shape distribution using the newest approach for the treatment of the fission barrier within the liquid drop model. The present study is the first investigation of the giant dipole resonance width from the fusion-evaporation decay channel in this nuclear mass range.

  14. Information Content of the Low-Energy Electric Dipole Strength: Correlation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent experiments on the electric dipole (E1) polarizability in heavy nuclei have stimulated theoretical interest in the low-energy electric dipole strength, both isovector and isoscalar. Purpose: We study the information content carried by the electric dipole strength with respect to isovector and isoscalar indicators characterizing bulk nuclear matter and finite nuclei. To separate isoscalar and isovector modes, and low-energy strength and giant resonances, we analyze the E1 strength as a function of the excitation energy E and momentum transfer q. Methods: We use the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy density functionals, augmented by the random phase approximation, to compute the E1 strength and covariance analysis to assess correlations between observables. Calculations are performed for the spherical, doubly magic nuclei 208Pb and 132Sn. Results: We demonstrate that E1 transition densities in the low-energy region below the giant dipole resonance exhibit appreciable state dependence and multinodal structures, which are fingerprints of weak collectivity. The correlation between the accumulated low-energy strength and the symmetry energy is weak, and dramatically depends on the energy cutoff assumed. On the other hand, a strong correlation is predicted between isovector indicators and the accumulated isovector strength at E around 20 MeV and momentum transfer q 0.65 fm 1. Conclusions: Momentum- and coordinate-space patterns of the low-energy dipole modes indicate a strong fragmentation into individual particle-hole excitations. The global measure of low-energy dipole strength correlates poorly with the nuclear symmetry energy and other isovector characteristics. Consequently, our results do not support the suggestion that there exists a collective pygmy dipole resonance, which is a strong indicator of nuclear isovector properties. By considering nonzero values of momentum transfer, one can isolate individual

  15. Isoscalar meson spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, David Richards, Christopher Thomas, Balint Joo, Michael Peardon

    2011-06-01

    We extract to high statistical precision an excited spectrum of single-particle isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD, including states of high spin and, for the first time, light exotic JPC isoscalars. The use of a novel quark field construction has enabled us to overcome the long-standing challenge of efficiently including quark-annihilation contributions. Hidden-flavor mixing angles are extracted and while most states are found to be close to ideally flavor mixed, there are examples of large mixing in the pseudoscalar and axial sectors in line with experiment. The exotic JPC isoscalar states appear at a mass scale comparable to the exotic isovector states.

  16. Electric dipole strength distribution below the E1 giant resonance in N = 82 nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, Ekber; Kuliev, Ali; Guner, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    In this study quasiparticle random-phase approximation with the translational invariant Hamiltonian using deformed mean field potential has been conducted to describe electric dipole excitations in 136Xe, 138Ba, 140Ce, 142Nd, 144Sm and 146Gd isotones. The distribution of the calculated E1 strength shows a resonance like structure at energies between 6-8 MeV exhausting up to 1% of the isovector electric dipole Energy Weighted Sum Rule and in some aspects nicely confirms the experimental data. It has been shown that the main part of E1 strength, observed below the threshold in these nuclei may be interpreted as main fragments of the Pygmy Dipole resonance. The agreement between calculated mean excitation energies as well as summed B(E1) value of the 1- excitations and the available experimental data is quite good. The calculations indicate the presence of a few prominent positive parity 1+ States in heavy N = 82 isotones in the energy interval 6-8 MeV which shows not all dipole excitations were of electric character in this energy range.

  17. Electric dipole strength distribution below the E1 giant resonance in N = 82 nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, Ekber; Kuliev, Ali; Guner, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    In this study quasiparticle random-phase approximation with the translational invariant Hamiltonian using deformed mean field potential has been conducted to describe electric dipole excitations in 136Xe, 138Ba, 140Ce, 142Nd, 144Sm and 146Gd isotones. The distribution of the calculated E1 strength shows a resonance like structure at energies between 6-8 MeV exhausting up to 1% of the isovector electric dipole Energy Weighted Sum Rule and in some aspects nicely confirms the experimental data. It has been shown that the main part of E1 strength, observed below the threshold in these nuclei may be interpreted as main fragments of the Pygmy Dipole resonance. The agreement between calculated mean excitation energies as well as summed B( E1) value of the 1- excitations and the available experimental data is quite good. The calculations indicate the presence of a few prominent positive parity 1+ States in heavy N = 82 isotones in the energy interval 6-8 MeV which shows not all dipole excitations were of electric character in this energy range.

  18. Structure of the pygmy dipole resonance in 124Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, J.; Savran, D.; Butler, P. A.; Harakeh, M. N.; Harissopulos, S.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Krücken, R.; Lagoyannis, A.; Litvinova, E.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Popescu, L.; Ring, P.; Scheck, M.; Schlüter, F.; Sonnabend, K.; Stoica, V. I.; Wörtche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2012-06-01

    Background: In atomic nuclei, a concentration of electric dipole strength around the particle threshold, commonly denoted as pygmy dipole resonance, may have a significant impact on nuclear structure properties and astrophysical scenarios. A clear identification of these states and the structure of this resonance is still under discussion.Purpose: We present an experimental and theoretical study of the isospin character of the pygmy dipole resonance and investigation of a splitting of the electric dipole strength previously observed in experiments on N=82 nuclei.Method: The pygmy dipole resonance has been studied in the semi-magic Z=50 nucleus 124Sn by means of the (α,α'γ) coincidence method at Eα=136MeV using the Big-Bite Spectrometer at the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut in Groningen, The Netherlands.Results: A splitting of the low-energy part of the electric dipole strength was identified in 124Sn by comparing the differential cross sections measured in (α,α'γ) to results stemming from (γ,γ') photon-scattering experiments. While an energetically lower-lying group of states is observed in both kinds of experiments, a higher-lying group of states is only excited in the (γ,γ') reaction. In addition, theoretical calculations using the self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle time-blocking approximation and the quasiparticle-phonon model have been performed. Both calculations show a qualitative agreement with the experimental data and predict a low-lying isoscalar component that is dominated by neutron-skin oscillations as expected for the pygmy dipole resonance. Furthermore, the states at higher energies show a pronounced isovector component and a different radial dependence of the corresponding transition densities as expected for the tail of the giant dipole resonance.Conclusions: An experimental signature of the neutron-skin oscillation of the pygmy dipole resonance has been corroborated. The combination of the presented reactions might make it

  19. TESTING CONVECTIVE-CORE OVERSHOOTING USING PERIOD SPACINGS OF DIPOLE MODES IN RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Montalban, J.; Noels, A.; Dupret, M.-A.; Scuflaire, R.; Miglio, A.; Ventura, P.

    2013-04-01

    Uncertainties on central mixing in main-sequence (MS) and core He-burning (He-B) phases affect key predictions of stellar evolution such as late evolutionary phases, chemical enrichment, ages, etc. We propose a test of the extension of extra-mixing in two relevant evolutionary phases based on period spacing ({Delta}P) of solar-like oscillating giants. From stellar models and their corresponding adiabatic frequencies (respectively, computed with ATON and LOSC codes), we provide the first predictions of the observable {Delta}P for stars in the red giant branch and in the red clump (RC). We find (1) a clear correlation between {Delta}P and the mass of the helium core (M{sub He}); the latter in intermediate-mass stars depends on the MS overshooting, and hence it can be used to set constraints on extra-mixing during MS when coupled with chemical composition; and (2) a linear dependence of the average value of the asymptotic period spacing (({Delta}P){sub a}) on the size of the convective core during the He-B phase. A first comparison with the inferred asymptotic period spacing for Kepler RC stars also suggests the need for extra-mixing during this phase, as evinced from other observational facts.

  20. Role of deformation on giant resonances within the quasiparticle random-phase approximation and the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, S.; Goutte, H.

    2008-04-15

    Fully consistent axially-symmetric-deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) calculations have been performed, in which the same Gogny D1S effective force has been used for both the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov mean field and the QRPA approaches. Giant resonances calculated in deformed {sup 26-28}Si and {sup 22-24}Mg nuclei as well as in the spherical {sup 30}Si and {sup 28}Mg isotopes are presented. Theoretical results for isovector-dipole and isoscalar monopole, quadrupole, and octupole responses are presented and the impact of the intrinsic nuclear deformation is discussed.

  1. Isomeric ratios in photonuclear reactions of molybdenum isotopes induced by bremsstrahlung in the giant dipole resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiep, Tran Duc; An, Truong Thi; Cuong, Phan Viet; Vinh, Nguyen The; Hue, Bui Minh; Belov, A. G.; Maslov, O. D.; Mishinsky, G. V.; Zhemenik, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    We have determined the isomeric ratios of isomeric pairs 97m,gNb, 95m,gNb and 91m,gMo produced in 98Mo(γ, p)97m,gNb, 96Mo(γ, p)95m,gNb and 92Mo(γ, n)91m,gMo photonuclear reactions in the giant dipole resonance (GDR) region by the activation method. The results were analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar data from literature to examine the role of excitation energy, neutron configuration, channel effect and direct and pre-equilibrium processes in (γ, p) photonuclear reactions. In this work the isomeric ratios for 97m,gNb from 14 to 19 MeV, for 195m,gNb from14 to 24 MeV except 20 and 23.5 MeV and for 91m,gMo at 14 and 15 MeV are the first time measurements.

  2. Excited light isoscalar mesons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas

    2011-07-01

    I report a recent lattice QCD calculation of an excited spectrum of light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now proved challenging for lattice QCD. With novel techniques we extract an extensive spectrum with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and, for the first time, light isoscalars with exotic quantum numbers. In addition, the hidden flavour content of these mesons is determined, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I comment on future prospects including applications to the study of resonances.

  3. Calculations of the giant-dipole-resonance photoneutrons using a coupled EGS4-morse code

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Nelson, W.R.; Kase, K.R.; Mao, X.S.

    1995-10-01

    The production and transport of the photoneutrons from the giant-dipoleresonance reaction have been implemented in a coupled EGS4-MORSE code. The total neutron yield (including both the direct neutron and evaporation neutron components) is calculated by folding the photoneutron yield cross sections with the photon track length distribution in the target. Empirical algorithms based on the measurements have been developed to estimate the fraction and energy of the direct neutron component for each photon. The statistical theory in the EVAP4 code, incorporated as a MORSE subroutine, is used to determine the energies of the evaporation neutrons. These represent major improvements over other calculations that assumed no direct neutrons, a constant fraction of direct neutrons, monoenergetic direct neutron, or a constant nuclear temperature for the evaporation neutrons. It was also assumed that the slow neutrons (< 2.5 MeV) are emitted isotropically and the fast neutrons are emitted anisotropically in the form of 1+Csin{sup 2}{theta}, which have a peak emission at 900. Comparisons between the calculated and the measured photoneutron results (spectra of the direct, evaporation and total neutrons; nuclear temperatures; direct neutron fractions) for materials of lead, tungsten, tantalum and copper have been made. The results show that the empirical algorithms, albeit simple, can produce reasonable results over the interested photon energy range.

  4. Measurement of the Isoscalar Monopole Response in the Neutron-Rich Nucleus Ni68

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Gibelin, J.; Khan, E.; Achouri, N. L.; Baba, H.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Colò, G.; Delaunay, F.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Keeley, N.; Mittig, W.; Pancin, J.; Raabe, R.; Roger, T.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thomas, J. C.

    2014-07-01

    The isoscalar monopole response has been measured in the unstable nucleus Ni68 using inelastic alpha scattering at 50A MeV in inverse kinematics with the active target MAYA at GANIL. The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) centroid was determined to be 21.1±1.9 MeV and indications for a soft monopole mode are provided for the first time at 12.9±1.0 MeV. Analysis of the corresponding angular distributions using distorted-wave-born approximation with random-phase approximation transition densities indicates that the L =0 multipolarity dominates the cross section for the ISGMR and significantly contributes to the low-energy mode. The L=0 part of this low-energy mode, the soft monopole mode, is dominated by neutron excitations. This demonstrates the relevance of inelastic alpha scattering in inverse kinematics in order to probe both the ISGMR and isoscalar soft modes in neutron-rich nuclei.

  5. Measurement of the isoscalar monopole response in the neutron-rich nucleus 68Ni.

    PubMed

    Vandebrouck, M; Gibelin, J; Khan, E; Achouri, N L; Baba, H; Beaumel, D; Blumenfeld, Y; Caamaño, M; Càceres, L; Colò, G; Delaunay, F; Fernandez-Dominguez, B; Garg, U; Grinyer, G F; Harakeh, M N; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Keeley, N; Mittig, W; Pancin, J; Raabe, R; Roger, T; Roussel-Chomaz, P; Savajols, H; Sorlin, O; Stodel, C; Suzuki, D; Thomas, J C

    2014-07-18

    The isoscalar monopole response has been measured in the unstable nucleus (68)Ni using inelastic alpha scattering at 50A  MeV in inverse kinematics with the active target MAYA at GANIL. The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) centroid was determined to be 21.1 ± 1.9 MeV and indications for a soft monopole mode are provided for the first time at 12.9 ± 1.0 MeV. Analysis of the corresponding angular distributions using distorted-wave-born approximation with random-phase approximation transition densities indicates that the L = 0 multipolarity dominates the cross section for the ISGMR and significantly contributes to the low-energy mode. The L=0 part of this low-energy mode, the soft monopole mode, is dominated by neutron excitations. This demonstrates the relevance of inelastic alpha scattering in inverse kinematics in order to probe both the ISGMR and isoscalar soft modes in neutron-rich nuclei.

  6. Effective restoration of dipole sum rules within the renormalized random-phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, N. Quang; Dang, N. Dinh; Hao, T. V. Nhan; Phuc, L. Tan

    2016-12-01

    The dipole excitations for calcium and zirconium isotopes are studied within the fully self-consistent Hartree-Fock mean field incorporated with the renormalized random-phase approximation (RRPA) using the Skyrme interaction SLy5. The RRPA takes into account the effect of ground-state correlations beyond RPA owing to the Pauli principle between the particle-hole pairs that form the RPA excitations as well as the correlations due to the particle-particle and hole-hole transitions, whose effects are treated here in an effective way. By comparing the RPA results with the RRPA ones, which are obtained for isoscalar (IS) and isovector (IV) dipole excitations in 48,52,58Ca and 90,96,110Zr, it is shown that ground-state correlations beyond the RPA reduce the IS transition strengths. They also shift up the energy of the lowest IV dipole state and slightly push down the peak energy of the IV giant dipole resonance. As the result, the energy-weighted sums of strengths of both IS and IV modes decrease, causing the violation of the corresponding energy-weighted sum rules (EWSR). It is shown that this sum rule violation can be eliminated by taking into account the contribution of the particle-particle and hole-hole excitations together with the particle-hole ones in a simple and perturbative way. Consequently, the ratio of the energy-weighted sum of strengths of the pygmy dipole resonance to that of the giant dipole resonance increases.

  7. Isoscalar [ital M]1 strength in lead

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, R.; Choi, S. ); Laszewski, R.M.; Dale, D.S. )

    1993-09-01

    Highly polarized tagged photons were used to measure the distribution of [ital M]1 transition strength in [sup 206]Pb at excitations between 5.5 and 6.9 MeV. The total [ital M]1 strength found in this energy range is consistent with that reported in [sup 208]Pb. For the isoscalar state at 5.8 MeV in [sup 206]Pb, [ital B]([ital M]1[up arrow])=(0.72[plus minus]0.15)[mu][sub [ital N

  8. Internal Pair Decay of Giant Resonances in Hot LEAD-200.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Susan

    Electron-positron pairs emitted during the de -excitation of the hot ^{200}Pb were detected with the Stony Brook pair detector, a phoswich array, in order to observe the internal pair decay of giant resonances (GR) built on excited states. These collective excitations are particularly well defined in heavy nuclei, and the full GR sum rule had been found in the ground state excitations of both the giant dipole resonance and the isoscalar monopole resonance. The excited compound nucleus was formed by bombarding a ^{181} Ta target with a 95 MeV pulsed ^ {19}F beam. While the gamma-decay from giant resonances of multipolarities L >=q 1 results in cross-sections 3-4 orders of magnitudes bigger than the internal pair decay, the decay of giant monopole resonances via a collective E0 transition can only be observed in the e^+ - e^ --decay channel. Another advantage of investigating electro-magnetic transitions via the pair decay channel is the fact that the correlation angle (and also the energy sharing) between the electron and the positron provides insight in the multipolarity of the observed transition. Especially the angular correlation distribution of an L = 0 transition is easily distinguished from the L >=q 1 cases. In the data analysis, the pair spectra were compared to calculations using the statistical model code CASCADE, which was modified to include the internal pair decay of giant resonances from the compound nucleus as well as from the fission fragments. In addition, gamma measurements from the same reaction at a comparable excitation energy (93 MeV) were available. The extracted pair spectra confirmed the CASCADE prediction that the giant dipole resonance dominates the pair decay from a hot, heavy nucleus. Superior statistics would be necessary in order to extract weaker modes like the monopole or quadrupole resonances and due to the lack in statistics this work can only offer a rough estimate for the width and position of the isoscalar giant monopole

  9. Measurement of the Isoscalar Monopole Response in the Neutron-Rich Nucleus 68Ni using the Active Target MAYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Gibelin, J.; Khan, E.; Achouri, N. L.; Baba, H.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Colò, G.; Delaunay, F.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Keeley, N.; Mittig, W.; Pancin, J.; Raabe, R.; Roger, T.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thomas, J. C.

    We report the measurement of the isoscalar monopole strength in the unstable nucleus 68Ni using inelastic alpha scattering at 50A MeV in inverse kinematics. This experiment has been performed at GANIL with LISE spectrometer using a dedicated detector: the active target MAYA. A part of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) has been measured at 21.1 ± 1.9 MeV and indications for a soft monopole mode are provided for the first time at 12.9 ± 1.0 MeV. Distorted-wave born approximation (DWBA) with random-phase approximation (RPA) transition densities have been used to study angular distribution and indicate that the L = 0 multipolarity dominates the cross-section for the ISGMR, and significantly contributes to the soft mode.

  10. Nature of low-lying electric dipole resonance excitations in 74Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, D.; Wiedeking, M.; Lanza, E. G.; Litvinova, E.; Vitturi, A.; Bark, R. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bvumbi, S.; Bucher, T. D.; Daub, B. H.; Dinoko, T. S.; Easton, J. L.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Jones, P.; Kheswa, B. V.; Khumalo, N. A.; Larsen, A. C.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Majola, S. N. T.; Masiteng, L. P.; Nchodu, M. R.; Ndayishimye, J.; Newman, R. T.; Noncolela, S. P.; Orce, J. N.; Papka, P.; Pellegri, L.; Renstrøm, T.; Roux, D. G.; Schwengner, R.; Shirinda, O.; Siem, S.

    2016-08-01

    Isospin properties of dipole excitations in 74Ge are investigated using the (α ,α'γ ) reaction and compared to (γ ,γ' ) data. The results indicate that the dipole excitations in the energy region of 6 to 9 MeV adhere to the scenario of the recently found splitting of the region of dipole excitations into two separated parts: one at low energy, being populated by both isoscalar and isovector probes, and the other at high energy, excited only by the electromagnetic probe. Relativistic quasiparticle time blocking approximation (RQTBA) calculations show a reduction in the isoscalar E 1 strength with an increase in excitation energy, which is consistent with the measurement.

  11. Spin observables for the isovector spin-dipole giant resonance excited in (p,n) reactions at medium energies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, J. W.

    1996-10-01

    For charge-exchange reactions at medium energies, one of the dominant features of small-angle spectra is the excitation of the ΔT = 1, ΔL = 1, ΔS = 1 isovector "spin-dipole" resonance (SDR). We describe how polarization-transfer measurements can be used to identify the overlapping J^π = 0^-, 1^-, and 2^- components of the SDR. Results for ^16O(p,n) and ^40Ca(p,n) using data (J. W. Watson et al.), Nucl. Phys. A577, 79c (1994). (J. W. Watson et al.), Nucl. Phys. A599, 211c (1996). for the transverse polarization-transfer coefficient D_NN' are presented and compared with distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA) calculations with theory of finite Fermi systems (TFFS) wavefunctions. (F. A. Gareev et al.), Sov. J. Part. Nucl. 19, 373 (1988). Future experiments will utilize complete sets of polarization-transfer data to extract the longitudinal and transverse spin responses,(M. Ichimura and K. Kawahigashi, Phys. Rev. C45), 1822 (1992). which will provide a more definitive separation of the different J^πs in the SDR. footnote Supported by NSF PHY 94-09265

  12. Ratio of isoscalar to isovector core polarization for magnetic moments

    SciTech Connect

    Zamick, L.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Robinson, S. J. Q.

    2010-12-15

    In calculations of isoscalar magnetic moments of odd-odd N=Z nuclei, it was found that, for medium- to heavy-mass nuclei, large-scale shell-model calculations yielded results that were very close to those obtained with the much simpler single-j shell model. To understand this, we compare isoscalar and isovector core-polarization configuration-mixing contributions to the magnetic moments of mirror pairs in first-order perturbation theory, using a spin-dependent {delta} interaction. We fit the strength of the {delta} interaction by looking at isovector and isoscalar mirror pairs. We then use the same interaction to calculate corrections due to first-order core polarization of the magnetic moments of odd-odd nuclei.

  13. Study of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysiek, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Fornal, B.; Grȩbosz, J.; Mazurek, K.; Mȩczyński, W.; Ziȩbliński, M.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; De Angelis, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Gottardo, A.; Lenzi, S.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C.; Gadea, A.; Huyuk, T.; Barrientos, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Geibel, K.; Hess, H.; Reiter, P.; Steinbach, T.; Wiens, A.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.

    2014-05-01

    The main aim of this study was a deeper understanding of the nuclear structure properties of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce, excited via inelastic scattering of weakly bound 17O projectiles. An important aim was to investigate the ‘splitting’ of the PDR into two parts: a low-energy isoscalar component dominated by neutron-skin oscillations and a higher-energy component lying on the tail of the giant dipole resonance of a rather isovector character. This was already observed for this nucleus, investigated in (α, α‧) and (γ, γ‧) experiments. The experiment was performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy. Inelastic scattering of 17O ion beam at 20 MeV A-1 was used to excite the resonance modes in the 140Ce target. Gamma-rays were registered by five triple clusters of AGATA-Demonstrator and nine large volume scintillators (LaBr3). The scattered 17O ions were identified by two ΔE - E Si telescopes of the TRACE array mounted inside the scattering chamber. The telescopes consisted of two segmented Si-pad detectors, each of 60 pixels. Very preliminary data have shown a strong domination of the E1 transitions in the ‘pygmy’ region with a character more similar to the one obtained in alpha scattering experiment.

  14. Pygmy dipole resonance and dipole polarizability in 90Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, C.; Tamii, A.; Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Nakada, H.; Shima, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Yamagata, T.; Kawabata, T.; Fujita, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Suzuki, T.; Fujita, H.; Shimbara, Y.; Nagashima, M.; Sakuda, M.; Mori, T.; Izumi, T.; Okamoto, A.; Kondo, T.; Lui, T.-W.; Bilgier, B.; Kozer, H. C.; Hatanaka, K.

    2014-05-01

    Electric dipole (E1) reduced transition probability B(E1) of 90Zr was obtained by the inelastic proton scattering near 0 degrees using a 295 MeV proton beam and multipole decomposition analysis of the angular distribution by the distorted-wave Born approximation with the Hartree-Fock plus random-phase approximation model and inclusion of El Coulomb excitation, and the E1 strength of the pygmy dipole resonance was found in the vicinity of the neutron threshold in the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance. Using the data, we plan to determine the precise dipole polarizability αD which is defined as an inversely energy-weighted sum value of the elecrric dipole strength. The dipole polarizability is expected to constrain the symmetry energy term of the neutron matter equation of state. Thus systematical measurement of the dipole polarizability is important.

  15. Isospin properties of electric dipole excitations in 48Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derya, V.; Savran, D.; Endres, J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hergert, H.; Kelley, J. H.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Roth, R.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Wörtche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2014-03-01

    Two different experimental approaches were combined to study the electric dipole strength in the doubly-magic nucleus 48Ca below the neutron threshold. Real-photon scattering experiments using bremsstrahlung up to 9.9 MeV and nearly mono-energetic linearly polarized photons with energies between 6.6 and 9.51 MeV provided strength distribution and parities, and an (α,α‧γ) experiment at Eα=136 MeV gave cross sections for an isoscalar probe. The unexpected difference observed in the dipole response is compared to calculations using the first-order random-phase approximation and points to an energy-dependent isospin character. A strong isoscalar state at 7.6 MeV was identified for the first time supporting a recent theoretical prediction.

  16. Analogs of the giant dipole and spin-dipole resonances in {sup 4}He and in {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li studied by the {sup 4}He,{sup 6,7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{gamma}) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, S.; Matsumoto, E.; Fushimi, K.; Hayami, R.; Kawasuso, H.; Yasuda, K.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Ikemizu, H.; Asaji, S.; Ishida, T.; Kudoh, T.; Sagara, K.; Fujiwara, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Kawase, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Oota, T.; Yosoi, M.; Greenfield, M. B.

    2008-07-15

    We studied analogs of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) in {sup 4}He and in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li via the ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{gamma}) reactions on {sup 4}He, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 7}Li at an incident energy of 455 MeV and at a scattering angle of 0 deg. by measuring spin-nonflip and spin-flip spectra. The reaction Q-values for the analogs of the GDR and SDR in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li were found to be more negative than those in {sup 4}He by 2.0{+-}0.5 MeV. The ratios of the cross section for the analog of the GDR to that for the analog of the SDR in {sup 4}He and in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li were found to be the same within errors, 0.5{+-}0.1. The cross sections for the analogs of the GDR as well as those for the analogs of the SDR in the {alpha} clusters of {sup 6,7}Li were 0.6{approx}0.8 times smaller than those in {sup 4}He. These results suggest that excitations of {alpha} clusters embedded in nuclei are suppressed as compared with excitations of free {alpha} particles.

  17. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; ...

    2013-11-18

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the η, η' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identifiedmore » as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq¯-like spectrum.« less

  18. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-11-18

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the η, η' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identified as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq¯-like spectrum.

  19. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-11-01

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to ˜400MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between (1)/(2)(uu¯+dd¯) and ss¯ in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the η, η' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identified as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qq¯ pair, along with nonexotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq¯-like spectrum.

  20. Photoresponse of 60Ni below 10-MeV excitation energy: Evolution of dipole resonances in fp-shell nuclei near N=Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheck, M.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Fritzsche, M.; Joubert, J.; Aumann, T.; Beller, J.; Isaak, J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kwan, E.; Pietralla, N.; Raut, R.; Romig, C.; Rusev, G.; Savran, D.; Schorrenberger, L.; Sonnabend, K.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.; Zilges, A.; Zweidinger, M.

    2013-10-01

    Background: Within the last decade, below the giant dipole resonance the existence of a concentration of additional electric dipole strength has been established. This accumulation of low-lying E1 strength is commonly referred to as pygmy dipole resonance (PDR).Purpose: The photoresponse of 60Ni has been investigated experimentally and theoretically to test the evolution of the PDR in a nucleus with only a small neutron excess. Furthermore, the isoscalar and isovector M1 resonances were investigated.Method: Spin-1 states were excited by exploiting the (γ,γ') nuclear resonance fluorescence technique with unpolarized continuous bremsstrahlung as well as with fully linearly polarized, quasimonochromatic, Compton-backscattered laser photons in the entrance channel of the reaction.Results: Up to 10 MeV a detailed picture of J=1 levels was obtained. For the preponderant number of the individual levels spin and parity were firmly assigned. Furthermore, branching ratios, transition widths, and reduced B(E1) or B(M1) excitation probability were calculated from the measured scattering cross sections. A comparison with theoretical results obtained within the quasiparticle phonon model allows an insight into the microscopic structure of the observed states.Conclusions: Below 10 MeV the directly observed E1 strength [∑B(E1)↑=(153.8±9.5) e2(fm)2] exhausts 0.5% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. This value increases to 0.8% of the sum rule [∑B(E1)↑=(250.9±31.1) e2(fm)2] when indirectly observed branches to lower-lying levels are considered. Two accumulations of M1 excited spin-1 states near 8 and 9 MeV excitation energy are identified as isoscalar and isovector M1 resonances dominated by proton and neutron f7/2→f5/2 spin-flip excitations. The B(M1)↑ strength of these structures accumulates to 3.94(27)μN2.

  1. Pygmy dipole mode in deformed neutron-rich Mg isotopes close to the drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kenichi

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the microscopic structure of the low-lying isovector-dipole excitation mode in neutron-rich Mg36,38,40 close to the drip line by means of the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation employing the Skyrme and the local pairing energy-density functionals. It is found that the low-lying bump structure above the neutron emission-threshold energy develops when the drip line is approached, and that the isovector dipole strength at Ex<10 MeV exhausts about 6.0% of the classical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn dipole sum rule in Mg40. We obtained the collective dipole modes at around 8-10 MeV in Mg isotopes, that consist of many two-quasiparticle excitations of the neutron. The transition density clearly shows an oscillation of the neutron skin against the isoscalar core. We found significant coupling effects between the dipole and octupole excitation modes due to the nuclear deformation. It is also found that the responses for the compressional dipole and isoscalar octupole excitations are much enhanced in the lower energy region.

  2. Dipole nanolaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protsenko, I. E.; Uskov, A. V.; Zaimidoroga, O. A.; Samoilov, V. N.; O'Reilly, E. P.

    2005-06-01

    A “dipole” laser is proposed consisting of a nanoparticle and a two-level system with population inversion. If the threshold conditions are fulfilled, the dipole interaction between the two-level system and the nanoparticle leads to coherent oscillations in the polarization of the particles, even in the absence of an external electromagnetic field. The emitted radiation has a dipolar distribution. It does not need an optical cavity, and has a very small volume, ˜0.1μm3 , which can be important for applications in microelectronics. Estimates of the threshold conditions are carried out for a dipole laser composed of a quantum dot and a silver nanoparticle.

  3. Giant Hedge-Hogs: Spikes on Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadri, D

    2004-01-28

    We consider giant gravitons on the maximally supersymmetric plane-wave background of type IIB string theory. Fixing the light-cone gauge, we work out the low energy effective light-cone Hamiltonian of the three-sphere giant graviton. At first order, this is a U(1) gauge theory on R x S{sup 3}. We place sources in this effective gauge theory. Although non-vanishing net electric charge configurations are disallowed by Gauss' law, electric dipoles can be formed. From the string theory point of view these dipoles can be understood as open strings piercing the three-sphere, generalizing the usual BIons to the giant gravitons, BIGGons. Our results can be used to give a two dimensional (worldsheet) description of giant gravitons, similar to Polchinski's description for the usual D-branes, in agreement with the discussions of hep-th/0204196.

  4. Low-lying dipole modes in 26,28Ne in the quasiparticle relativistic random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Li-Gang; Ma, Zhong-Yu

    2005-03-01

    The low-lying isovector dipole strengths in the neutron-rich nuclei 26Ne and 28Ne are investigated in the quasiparticle relativistic random phase approximation. Nuclear ground-state properties are calculated in an extended relativistic mean field theory plus Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) method where the contribution of the resonant continuum to pairing correlations is properly treated. Numerical calculations are tested in the case of isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole modes in the neutron-rich nucleus 22O. It is found that in the present calculation, low-lying isovector dipole strengths at Ex<10MeV in nuclei 26Ne and 26Ne exhaust about 4.9% and 5.8% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn dipole sum rule, respectively. The centroid energy of the low-lying dipole excitation is located at 8.3 MeV in 26Ne and 7.9 MeV in 28Ne.

  5. Dipole Resonances in 4He

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, E.; Nakayama, S.; Hayami, R.; Fushimi, K.; Kawasuso, H.; Yasuda, K.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Ikemizu, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Yosoi, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Kawase, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Oota, T.; Sagara, K.; Kudoh, T.; Asaji, S.; Ishida, T.; Tanaka, M.

    2007-02-26

    We investigated the analogs of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) of 4He by using the 4He(7Li,7Be) reaction at an incident energy of 455 MeV and at forward scattering angles. The {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=1 spectra for 4He were obtained by measuring the 0.43-MeV 7Be {gamma}-ray in coincidence with the scattered 7Be. From the {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=1 spectra thus obtained, the strength distributions of the GDR and SDR in 4He can be derived and the results are compared with the previous data.

  6. New Insight into the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in Stable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2008-11-11

    Two examples of recent work on the structure of low-energy electric dipole modes are presented. The first part discusses the systematics of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in stable tin isotopes deduced from high-resolution ({gamma},{gamma}') experiments. These help to distinguish between microscopic QRPA calculations based on either a relativistic or a nonrelativistic mean-field description, predicting significantly different properties of the PDR. The second part presents attempts to unravel the structure of dipoles modes at energies below the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in {sup 208}Pb with a high-resolution measurement of the (p-vector,p-vector') reaction under 0 deg.

  7. Isoscalar-vector interaction and hybrid quark core in massive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, G. Y.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Liu, Y. X.; Liu, B.

    2013-05-01

    The hadron-quark phase transition in the core of massive neutron stars is studied with a newly constructed two-phase model. For nuclear matter, a nonlinear Walecka type model with general nucleon-meson and meson-meson couplings, recently calibrated by Steiner, Hemper and Fischer, is taken. For quark matter, a modified Polyakov-Nambu—Jona-Lasinio model, which gives consistent results with lattice QCD data, is used. Most importantly, we introduce an isoscalar-vector interaction in the description of quark matter, and we study its influence on the hadron-quark phase transition in the interior of massive neutron stars. With the constraints of neutron star observations, our calculation shows that the isoscalar-vector interaction between quarks is indispensable if massive hybrids star exist in the universe, and its strength determines the onset density of quark matter, as well as the mass-radius relations of hybrid stars. Furthermore, as a connection with heavy-ion-collision experiments we give some discussions about the strength of isoscalar-vector interaction and its effect on the signals of hadron-quark phase transition in heavy-ion collisions, in the energy range of the NICA at JINR-Dubna and FAIR at GSI-Darmstadt facilities.

  8. Pygmy Dipole Strength and Neutron Skins in Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimkiewicz, A.; Paar, N.; Adrich, P.; Fallot, M.; Boretzky, K.; Aumann, T.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Elze, Th. W.; Emling, H.; Geissel, H.; Hellström, M.; Jones, K. L.; Kratz, J. V.; Kulessa, R.; Nociforo, C.; Palit, R.; Simon, H.; Surówka, G.; Sümmerer, K.; Vretenar, D.; Waluś, W.

    2008-05-01

    Dipole strength distributions were determined for the neutron-rich nuclei 129-132Sn and 133,134Sb from electromagnetic excitation in an experiment using the FRS-LAND setup. For all nuclei, a sizeable fraction of ``pygmy'' dipole strength at excitation energies well below the giant dipole resonance was observed. The integrated low-lying dipole strength of the nuclei with low neutron separation energies can be compared to results for stable nuclei (e.g. N = 82 isotopes) determined for the energy regime of 5-9 MeV. A clear increase of the dipole strength with increasing asymmetry of the nuclei is observed. Comparing the ratio of the low-lying dipole over the giant dipole strength to recent relativistic mean field calculations, values for the parameters a4 and p0 of the symmetry energy and for the neutron skin thickness are derived. Averaged over 130Sn and 132Sn we extract a4 = 31.8+/-1.3 MeV and p0 = 2.2+/-0.5 MeV/fm3. The neutron skin sizes are determined to Rn-Rp = 0.23+/-0.03 fm and 0.24+/-0.03 fm for 130Sn and 132Sn, respectively. For 208Pb a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.18+/-0.035 fm follows, when applying the same method and using earlier published experimental findings on the dipole strength.

  9. Giant resonances in {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn: Isotopic dependence of monopole resonance energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, Y.-W.; Youngblood, D.H.; Tokimoto, Y.; Clark, H.L.; John, B.

    2004-07-01

    The giant resonance region from 10 MeVisoscalar E0-E3 strength was located in both nuclei. The isotopic dependence of the giant monopole resonance energies was found to be consistent with relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations for interactions with K{sub NM}{approx}220-240 MeV.

  10. Isoscalar ππ Scattering and the σ Meson Resonance from QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Briceño, Raul A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; ...

    2017-01-09

    Here, we present for the first time a determination of the energy dependence of the isoscalar ππ elastic scattering phase-shift within a first-principles numerical lattice approach to QCD. We also compute the hadronic correlation functions including all required quark propagation diagrams. From these the discrete spectrum of states in the finite volume defined by the lattice boundary is extracted. From the volume dependence of the spectrum we obtain the S-wave phase-shift up to the Kmore » $$\\bar{K}$$ threshold. Calculations are performed at two values of the u, d quark mass corresponding to mπ = 236, 391 MeV and the resulting amplitudes are described in terms of a σ meson which evolves from a bound-state below ππ threshold at the heavier quark mass, to a broad resonance at the lighter quark mass.« less

  11. Isoscalar ππ Scattering and the σ Meson Resonance from QCD.

    PubMed

    Briceño, Raul A; Dudek, Jozef J; Edwards, Robert G; Wilson, David J

    2017-01-13

    We present for the first time a determination of the energy dependence of the isoscalar ππ elastic scattering phase shift within a first-principles numerical lattice approach to QCD. Hadronic correlation functions are computed including all required quark propagation diagrams, and from these the discrete spectrum of states in the finite volume defined by the lattice boundary is extracted. From the volume dependence of the spectrum, we obtain the S-wave phase shift up to the KK[over ¯] threshold. Calculations are performed at two values of the u, d quark mass corresponding to m_{π}=236,391  MeV, and the resulting amplitudes are described in terms of a σ meson which evolves from a bound state below the ππ threshold at the heavier quark mass to a broad resonance at the lighter quark mass.

  12. Isoscalar π π Scattering and the σ Meson Resonance from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Raul A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Wilson, David J.; Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present for the first time a determination of the energy dependence of the isoscalar π π elastic scattering phase shift within a first-principles numerical lattice approach to QCD. Hadronic correlation functions are computed including all required quark propagation diagrams, and from these the discrete spectrum of states in the finite volume defined by the lattice boundary is extracted. From the volume dependence of the spectrum, we obtain the S -wave phase shift up to the K K ¯ threshold. Calculations are performed at two values of the u , d quark mass corresponding to mπ=236 ,391 MeV , and the resulting amplitudes are described in terms of a σ meson which evolves from a bound state below the π π threshold at the heavier quark mass to a broad resonance at the lighter quark mass.

  13. a Survey of Giant Resonance Excitations with 200 Mev Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, James Royce

    The giant resonance region in ('60)Ni, ('90)Zr, ('120)Sn, and ('208)Pb has been studied using inelastic scattering of 200 MeV protons. Angular distributions were obtained for the giant quadrupole resonance, giant octupole resonance, and for the combined giant dipole and giant monopole resonance between 4 and 20 degrees. The 2(H/2PI)(omega) component of the giant hexadecapole resonance has been directly observed for the first time in ('208)Pb. In the other nuclei, upper limits on the amount of hexadecapole strength contained within the giant quadrupole resonance have been obtained. Peaks are observed in ('60)Ni and ('90)Zr that are consistent with recently reported M1 states. Discrepancies between sum rules extracted from this data and from previous work are discussed. Possible explanations include DWBA breakdown or difficulties in estimating the magnitude of the continuum. Systematics obtained for the giant resonances are compared to earlier work.

  14. Ratio of Isoscalar to Isovector Core Polarization Contributions to Magnetic Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Shadow; Zamick, Larry; Sharon, Yitzhak

    2010-11-01

    We found that large scale calculations of isoscalar magnetic moments of odd-odd N=Z nuclei yielded results remarkably similar to those of simple single j calculations. To understand why we use a delta interaction times (1+xPs) where Ps is the spin exchange operator, to calculate the ratio IS/IV of the core polarization contributions to the magnetic moments. The spin exchange contributes a factor (1-2x) to this ratio. A popular choice is x=1/3 for which (1-2x) is also 1/3. Another contribution comes from the fact that the coupling of j=l+1/2 to j'=l-1/2 via the magnetic moment operator is proportional to (gs-gl). The IS values are gl=0.5 gs=0.88; the IV values are 0.5 and 4.71. This yields a (gs-gl) ratio of 0.09 which together with the 1/3 from spin exchange tells us that the isoscalar core polarization is a mere 3% of isovector. If we further divide by single j values to get effective charge corrections then the ration IS/IV ends up being 0.06 (or 6%). We thus gain understanding of the resuts in ref [1] of the near equality of large scale and single j results for IS moments.[4pt] [1] S.Yeager, S.J.Q. Robinson, L.Zamick and Y.Y.Sharon, EPL 88, 52001 (2009)

  15. Changes in earth's dipole.

    PubMed

    Olson, Peter; Amit, Hagay

    2006-11-01

    The dipole moment of Earth's magnetic field has decreased by nearly 9% over the past 150 years and by about 30% over the past 2,000 years according to archeomagnetic measurements. Here, we explore the causes and the implications of this rapid change. Maps of the geomagnetic field on the core-mantle boundary derived from ground-based and satellite measurements reveal that most of the present episode of dipole moment decrease originates in the southern hemisphere. Weakening and equatorward advection of normal polarity magnetic field by the core flow, combined with proliferation and growth of regions where the magnetic polarity is reversed, are reducing the dipole moment on the core-mantle boundary. Growth of these reversed flux regions has occurred over the past century or longer and is associated with the expansion of the South Atlantic Anomaly, a low-intensity region in the geomagnetic field that presents a radiation hazard at satellite altitudes. We address the speculation that the present episode of dipole moment decrease is a precursor to the next geomagnetic polarity reversal. The paleomagnetic record contains a broad spectrum of dipole moment fluctuations with polarity reversals typically occurring during dipole moment lows. However, the dipole moment is stronger today than its long time average, indicating that polarity reversal is not likely unless the current episode of moment decrease continues for a thousand years or more.

  16. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  17. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  18. Electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions in carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Hagino, Kouichi

    2003-07-01

    We carry out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of C isotopes. We point out the configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments of the odd C isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformations and the spin parities of the ground states of these nuclei. We also study the electric dipole states of C isotopes, focusing on the interplay between low energy pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. As far as the energies of the resonances are concerned, reasonable agreement is obtained with available experimental data for the photoreaction cross sections in 12C, 13C, and 14C, both in the low energy region below ħω=14 MeV and in the high energy giant resonance region (14 MeV <ħω⩽30 MeV). The calculated transition strength below the giant dipole resonance (ħω⩽14 MeV) in C isotopes heavier than 15C is found to exhaust about 12 16 % of the classical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule value and 50 80 % of the cluster sum rule value.

  19. Laboratory Dipole Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, Jay

    2011-10-01

    Modern laboratory studies of plasma confined by a strong dipole magnet originated twenty years ago when it was learned that planetary magnetospheres have centrally-peaked plasma pressure profiles that form naturally when solar wind drives plasma circulation and heating. Unlike other internal rings devices, like spherators and octupoles, the magnetic flux tubes of the dipole field expand rapidly with radius. Unlike plasma confinement devices that obtain stability from magnetic shear and average good curvature, like tokamaks and levitrons, the dipole-confined plasma obtains stability from plasma compressibility. These two geometric characteristics of the dipole field have profound consequences: (i) plasma can be stable with local beta exceeding unity, (ii) fluctuations can drive either heat or particles inward to create stationary profiles that are strongly peaked, and (iii) the confinement of particles and energy can decouple. During the past decade, several laboratory dipole experiments and modeling efforts have lead to new understanding of interchange, centrifugal and entropy modes, nonlinear gyrokinetics, and plasma transport. Two devices, the LDX experiment at MIT and RT-1 at the University of Tokyo, operate with levitated superconducting dipole magnets. With a levitated dipole, not only is very high-beta plasma confined in steady state but, also, levitation produces high-temperature at low input power and demonstrates that toroidal magnetic confinement of plasma does not require a toroidal field. Modeling has explained many of the processes operative in these experiments, including the observation of a strong inward particle pinch. Turbulent low-frequency fluctuations in dipole confined plasma cause adiabatic transport and form a fundamental linkage between the radial variation of flux-tube volume and the centrally peaked density and pressure profiles. In collaboration with M.E. Mauel and D.T. Garnier; supported by DoE FG02-98ER54458.

  20. Soft dipole resonance and halo structure of 11Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, Rituparna

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of the nuclear halo in rare isotopes has ushered a new era in nuclear science breaking the boundaries of conventional concepts. The halo properties elucidate new features that till date remain a challenge to decipher from fundamental principles. Our knowledge on the halo is still gradually unfolding and reaching new levels of precision as efforts continue towards new experimental developments. In recent times, low-energy reactions in inverse kinematics have become possible providing a wealth of new structure information. In this presentation we will introduce a new reaction spectroscopy facility, IRIS, with a novel thin windowless solid H2/D2 target for studying transfer and inelastic scattering reactions of rare isotopes with very low yields. It was postulated that the loosely bound halo of two neutrons may lead to a core-halo oscillation resulting in dipole resonance(s) at very low excitation energy, called soft dipole resonance. Despite decades of search for this new phenomenon using various techniques, such as, no firm conclusion was reached. The presentation will discuss new results from IRIS that shows evidence of a soft dipole resonance state and further unveils its isoscalar character. New results of neutron transfer from 11Li will be presented showing resonance state(s) in the neutron unbound 10Li subsystem hence facilitating a description of the wavefunction of 11Li. NSERC, Canada Foundation for Innovation, Nova Scotia Research and Innovation Trust, grant-in-aid program of the Japanese government under Contract No. 23224008, US DOE Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Isospin character of low-lying pygmy dipole states in 208Pb via inelastic scattering of 17O ions.

    PubMed

    Crespi, F C L; Bracco, A; Nicolini, R; Mengoni, D; Pellegri, L; Lanza, E G; Leoni, S; Maj, A; Kmiecik, M; Avigo, R; Benzoni, G; Blasi, N; Boiano, C; Bottoni, S; Brambilla, S; Camera, F; Ceruti, S; Giaz, A; Million, B; Morales, A I; Vandone, V; Wieland, O; Bednarczyk, P; Ciemała, M; Grebosz, J; Krzysiek, M; Mazurek, K; Zieblinski, M; Bazzacco, D; Bellato, M; Birkenbach, B; Bortolato, D; Calore, E; Cederwall, B; Charles, L; de Angelis, G; Désesquelles, P; Eberth, J; Farnea, E; Gadea, A; Görgen, A; Gottardo, A; Isocrate, R; Jolie, J; Jungclaus, A; Karkour, N; Korten, W; Menegazzo, R; Michelagnoli, C; Molini, P; Napoli, D R; Pullia, A; Recchia, F; Reiter, P; Rosso, D; Sahin, E; Salsac, M D; Siebeck, B; Siem, S; Simpson, J; Söderström, P-A; Stezowski, O; Theisen, Ch; Ur, C; Valiente-Dobón, J J

    2014-07-04

    The properties of pygmy dipole states in 208Pb were investigated using the 208Pb(17O, 17O'γ) reaction at 340 MeV and measuring the γ decay with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array. Cross sections and angular distributions of the emitted γ rays and of the scattered particles were measured. The results are compared with (γ, γ') and (p, p') data. The data analysis with the distorted wave Born approximation approach gives a good description of the elastic scattering and of the inelastic excitation of the 2+ and 3- states. For the dipole transitions a form factor obtained by folding a microscopically calculated transition density was used for the first time. This has allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states from 4 to 8 MeV.

  2. Isospin Character of Low-Lying Pygmy Dipole States in Pb208 via Inelastic Scattering of O17 Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Nicolini, R.; Mengoni, D.; Pellegri, L.; Lanza, E. G.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Grebosz, J.; Krzysiek, M.; Mazurek, K.; Zieblinski, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Calore, E.; Cederwall, B.; Charles, L.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Isocrate, R.; Jolie, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Korten, W.; Menegazzo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Sahin, E.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Simpson, J.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2014-07-01

    The properties of pygmy dipole states in Pb208 were investigated using the Pb208(O17, O17'γ) reaction at 340 MeV and measuring the γ decay with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array. Cross sections and angular distributions of the emitted γ rays and of the scattered particles were measured. The results are compared with (γ, γ') and (p, p') data. The data analysis with the distorted wave Born approximation approach gives a good description of the elastic scattering and of the inelastic excitation of the 2+ and 3- states. For the dipole transitions a form factor obtained by folding a microscopically calculated transition density was used for the first time. This has allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states from 4 to 8 MeV.

  3. Multiplicities of charged kaons from deep-inelastic muon scattering off an isoscalar target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Aghasyan, M.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N. V.; Anosov, V.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, M.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bodlak, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Dreisbach, Ch.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; Hamar, G.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O. M.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G. V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Roskot, M.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Subrt, O.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Thiel, A.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2017-04-01

    Precise measurements of charged-kaon multiplicities in deep inelastic scattering were performed. The results are presented in three-dimensional bins of the Bjorken scaling variable x, the relative virtual-photon energy y, and the fraction z of the virtual-photon energy carried by the produced hadron. The data were obtained by the COMPASS Collaboration by scattering 160 GeV muons off an isoscalar 6LiD target. They cover the kinematic domain 1(GeV / c) 2 5 GeV /c2 in the invariant mass of the hadronic system. The results from the sum of the z-integrated K+ and K- multiplicities at high x point to a value of the non-strange quark fragmentation function larger than obtained by the earlier DSS fit.

  4. Average Description of Dipole Gamma Transitions in Hot Atomic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plujko, V. A.; Gorbachenko, O. M.; Rovenskykh, E. P.; Zheltonozhskii, V. A.

    2014-04-01

    A new version of the modified Lorentzian approach for radiative strength function is proposed. It is based on renewed systematics for giant dipole resonance (GDR) parameters. The gamma-decay strength functions are calculated using new GDR parameters and compared with experimental data. It is demonstrated that closed-form approaches with energy-dependent width of the gamma strength, as a rule, provide a reliable simple method for description of gamma-decay processes.

  5. Experiments with Dipole Antennas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Employment of a data-acquisition system for data collection and calculations makes experiments with antennas more convenient and less time consuming. The determined directional patterns of the dipole antennas of different lengths are in reasonable agreement with theory. The enhancement of the signal by using a reflector is demonstrated, and a…

  6. Geometrical Simplification of the Dipole-Dipole Interaction Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocbach, Ladislav; Lubbad, Suhail

    2010-01-01

    Many students meet dipole-dipole potential energy quite early on when they are taught electrostatics or magnetostatics and it is also a very popular formula, featured in encyclopedias. We show that by a simple rewriting of the formula it becomes apparent that, for example, by reorienting the two dipoles, their attraction can become exactly twice…

  7. Giant resonances in {sup 46,48}Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Tokimoto, Y.; Lui, Y.-W.; Clark, H. L.; John, B.; Chen, X.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2006-10-15

    The giant resonance region from 9 MeV Isoscalar monopole strength in {sup 46}Ti ({sup 48}Ti) was found corresponding to have 71+15/-12% (96+14/-12%) of the E0 energy weighted sum rule (EWSR) with a centroid of 18.66+0.65/-0.25% MeV (18.80+0.45/-0.18% MeV), respectively. In {sup 46}Ti ({sup 48}Ti), 46{+-}12% (56{+-}12%) of the E1, and 60{+-}11% (87{+-}11%) of the E2 EWSR were identified.

  8. First Measurement of the Giant Monopole and Quadrupole Resonances in a Short-Lived Nucleus: {sup 56}Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Monrozeau, C.; Khan, E.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Beaumel, D.; Ebran, J. P.; Frascaria, N.; Gupta, D.; Marechal, F.; Scarpaci, J-A.; Mittig, W.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Gelin, M.; Garg, U.; Gillibert, A.; Keeley, N.; Obertelli, A.

    2008-02-01

    The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (GMR) and giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) have been measured in the {sup 56}Ni unstable nucleus by inducing the {sup 56}Ni(d,d{sup '}) reaction at 50A MeV in the Maya active target at the GANIL facility. The GMR and GQR centroids are measured at 19.3{+-}0.5 MeV and 16.2{+-}0.5 MeV, respectively. The corresponding angular distributions are extracted from 3 deg. to 7 deg. A multipole decomposition analysis using distorted wave Born approximation with random phase approximation transition densities shows that both the GMR and the GQR exhaust a large fraction of the energy-weighted sum rule. The demonstration of this new method opens a broad range of giant resonance studies at intermediate-energy radioactive beam facilities.

  9. Visualizing dipole radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girwidz, Raimund V.

    2016-11-01

    The Hertzian dipole is fundamental to the understanding of dipole radiation. It provides basic insights into the genesis of electromagnetic waves and lays the groundwork for an understanding of half-wave antennae and other types. Equations for the electric and magnetic fields of such a dipole can be derived mathematically. However these are very abstract descriptions. Interpreting these equations and understanding travelling electromagnetic waves are highly limited in that sense. Visualizations can be a valuable supplement that vividly present properties of electromagnetic fields and their propagation. The computer simulation presented below provides additional instructive illustrations for university lectures on electrodynamics, broadening the experience well beyond what is possible with abstract equations. This paper refers to a multimedia program for PCs, tablets and smartphones, and introduces and discusses several animated illustrations. Special features of multiple representations and combined illustrations will be used to provide insight into spatial and temporal characteristics of field distributions—which also draw attention to the flow of energy. These visualizations offer additional information, including the relationships between different representations that promote deeper understanding. Finally, some aspects are also illustrated that often remain unclear in lectures.

  10. Low-energy dipole excitations in neon isotopes and N=16 isotones within the quasiparticle random-phase approximation and the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, M.; Peru, S.; Dupuis, M.

    2011-03-15

    Low-energy dipole excitations in neon isotopes and N=16 isotones are calculated with a fully consistent axially-symmetric-deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) approach based on Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) states. The same Gogny D1S effective force has been used both in HFB and QRPA calculations. The microscopical structure of these low-lying resonances, as well as the behavior of proton and neutron transition densities, are investigated in order to determine the isoscalar or isovector nature of the excitations. It is found that the N=16 isotones {sup 24}O, {sup 26}Ne, {sup 28}Mg, and {sup 30}Si are characterized by a similar behavior. The occupation of the 2s{sub 1/2} neutron orbit turns out to be crucial, leading to nontrivial transition densities and to small but finite collectivity. Some low-lying dipole excitations of {sup 28}Ne and {sup 30}Ne, characterized by transitions involving the {nu}1d{sub 3/2} state, present a more collective behavior and isoscalar transition densities. A collective proton low-lying excitation is identified in the {sup 18}Ne nucleus.

  11. Retardation effects in induced atomic dipole-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, S. D.; McGuirk, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    We present mean-field calculations of azimuthally averaged retarded dipole-dipole interactions in a Bose-Einstein condensate induced by a laser, at both long and short wavelengths. Our calculations demonstrate that dipole-dipole interactions become significantly stronger at shorter wavelengths, by as much as 30-fold, due to retardation effects. This enhancement, along with the inclusion of the dynamic polarizability, indicate a method of inducing long-range interatomic interactions in neutral atom condensates at significantly lower intensities than previously realized.

  12. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    DOEpatents

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  13. Lithium electric dipole polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Puchalski, M.; KePdziera, D.; Pachucki, K.

    2011-11-15

    The electric dipole polarizability of the lithium atom in the ground state is calculated including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections. The obtained result {alpha}{sub E}=164.0740(5) a.u. is in good agreement with the less accurate experimental value of 164.19(1.08) a.u. The small uncertainty of about 3 parts per 10{sup 6} comes from the approximate treatment of quantum electrodynamics corrections. Our theoretical result can be considered as a benchmark for more general atomic structure methods and may serve as a reference value for the relative measurement of polarizabilities of the other alkali-metal atoms.

  14. The dipole repeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Yehuda; Pomarède, Daniel; Tully, R. Brent; Courtois, Hélène M.

    2017-01-01

    Our Local Group of galaxies is moving with respect to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with a velocity 1 of V CMB = 631 ± 20 km s‑1 and participates in a bulk flow that extends out to distances of ~20,000 km s‑1 or more 2-4 . There has been an implicit assumption that overabundances of galaxies induce the Local Group motion 5-7 . Yet underdense regions push as much as overdensities attract 8 , but they are deficient in light and consequently difficult to chart. It was suggested a decade ago that an underdensity in the northern hemisphere roughly 15,000 km s‑1 away contributes significantly to the observed flow 9 . We show here that repulsion from an underdensity is important and that the dominant influences causing the observed flow are a single attractor — associated with the Shapley concentration — and a single previously unidentified repeller, which contribute roughly equally to the CMB dipole. The bulk flow is closely anti-aligned with the repeller out to 16,000 ± 4,500 km s‑1. This 'dipole repeller' is predicted to be associated with a void in the distribution of galaxies.

  15. Multiplicities of charged pions and charged hadrons from deep-inelastic scattering of muons off an isoscalar target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Aghasyan, M.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alexeev, M. G.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N. V.; Anosov, V.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; von Harrach, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O. M.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuhn, R.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G. V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Montuenga, P.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Roskot, M.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiplicities of charged pions and charged hadrons produced in deep-inelastic scattering were measured in three-dimensional bins of the Bjorken scaling variable x, the relative virtual-photon energy y and the relative hadron energy z. Data were obtained by the COMPASS Collaboration using a 160GeV muon beam and an isoscalar target (6LiD). They cover the kinematic domain in the photon virtuality Q2 > 1(GeV / c) 2, 0.004 < x < 0.4, 0.2 < z < 0.85 and 0.1 < y < 0.7. In addition, a leading-order pQCD analysis was performed using the pion multiplicity results to extract quark fragmentation functions.

  16. Enhancement of high-spin collectivity in N = Z nuclei by the isoscalar neutron-proton pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, K.; Sun, Y.; de Angelis, G.

    2017-01-01

    Pairing from different fermions, neutrons and protons, is unique in nuclear physics. The fingerprint for the isoscalar T = 0 neutron-proton (np) pairing has however remained a question. We study this exotic pairing mode in excited states of rotating N ≈ Z nuclei by applying the state-of-the-art shell-model calculations for 88Ru and the neighboring 90,92Ru isotopes. We show that the T = 0 np pairing is responsible for the distinct rotational behavior between the N = Z and N > Z nuclei. Our calculation suggests a gradual crossover from states with mixed T = 1 and T = 0 pairing near the ground state to those dominated by the T = 0 np pairing at high spins. It is found that the T = 0 np pairing plays an important role in enhancing the high-spin collectivity, thereby reducing shape variations along the N = Z line.

  17. Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.

    2012-10-20

    Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

  18. Ferrofluid Photonic Dipole Contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Michael; Frederick, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Understanding magnetic fields is important to facilitate magnetic applications in diverse fields in industry, commerce, and space exploration to name a few. Large electromagnets can move heavy loads of metal. Magnetic materials attached to credit cards allow for fast, accurate business transactions. And the Earth's magnetic field gives us the colorful auroras observed near the north and south poles. Magnetic fields are not visible, and therefore often hard to understand or characterize. This investigation describes and demonstrates a novel technique for the visualization of magnetic fields. Two ferrofluid Hele-Shaw cells have been constructed to facilitate the imaging of magnetic field lines [1,2,3,4]. We deduce that magnetically induced photonic band gap arrays similar to electrostatic liquid crystal operation are responsible for the photographed images and seek to mathematically prove the images are of exact dipole nature. We also note by comparison that our photographs are very similar to solar magnetic Heliosphere photographs.

  19. Highly Automated Dipole EStimation (HADES)

    PubMed Central

    Campi, C.; Pascarella, A.; Sorrentino, A.; Piana, M.

    2011-01-01

    Automatic estimation of current dipoles from biomagnetic data is still a problematic task. This is due not only to the ill-posedness of the inverse problem but also to two intrinsic difficulties introduced by the dipolar model: the unknown number of sources and the nonlinear relationship between the source locations and the data. Recently, we have developed a new Bayesian approach, particle filtering, based on dynamical tracking of the dipole constellation. Contrary to many dipole-based methods, particle filtering does not assume stationarity of the source configuration: the number of dipoles and their positions are estimated and updated dynamically during the course of the MEG sequence. We have now developed a Matlab-based graphical user interface, which allows nonexpert users to do automatic dipole estimation from MEG data with particle filtering. In the present paper, we describe the main features of the software and show the analysis of both a synthetic data set and an experimental dataset. PMID:21437232

  20. Highly Automated Dipole EStimation (HADES).

    PubMed

    Campi, C; Pascarella, A; Sorrentino, A; Piana, M

    2011-01-01

    Automatic estimation of current dipoles from biomagnetic data is still a problematic task. This is due not only to the ill-posedness of the inverse problem but also to two intrinsic difficulties introduced by the dipolar model: the unknown number of sources and the nonlinear relationship between the source locations and the data. Recently, we have developed a new Bayesian approach, particle filtering, based on dynamical tracking of the dipole constellation. Contrary to many dipole-based methods, particle filtering does not assume stationarity of the source configuration: the number of dipoles and their positions are estimated and updated dynamically during the course of the MEG sequence. We have now developed a Matlab-based graphical user interface, which allows nonexpert users to do automatic dipole estimation from MEG data with particle filtering. In the present paper, we describe the main features of the software and show the analysis of both a synthetic data set and an experimental dataset.

  1. Magnetic Field of a Dipole and the Dipole-Dipole Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    With a data-acquisition system and sensors commercially available, it is easy to determine magnetic fields produced by permanent magnets and to study the dipole-dipole interaction for different separations and angular positions of the magnets. For sufficiently large distances, the results confirm the 1/R[superscript 3] law for the magnetic field…

  2. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  3. Molecular Dipole Osmosis Based on Induced Charge Electro-Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel mechanism of producing a large nonlinear electrokinetic vortex flow around a nonconductive polar molecule in an electrolyte. That is, a large nonlinear electrokinetic slip velocity is derived by considering a local giant permittivity due to a molecular electric dipole moment with induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO). Different from the conventional ICEO theory, our theory predicts that a nonconductive biomaterial, such as a base of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule, has a significantly high ICEO flow velocity because of its large local permittivity. We consider that our findings will contribute markedly to promising biomedical applications.

  4. Observation of Stueckelberg oscillations in dipole-dipole interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ditzhuijzen, C. S. E. van; Tauschinsky, Atreju; Van Linden van den Heuvell, H. B.

    2009-12-15

    We have observed Stueckelberg oscillations in the dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg atoms with an externally applied radio-frequency field. The oscillating rf field brings the interaction between cold Rydberg atoms in two separated volumes into resonance. We observe multiphoton transitions when varying the amplitude of the rf field and the static electric field offset. The angular momentum states we use show a quadratic Stark shift, which leads to a fundamentally different behavior than linearly shifting states. Both cases are studied theoretically using the Floquet approach and are compared. The amplitude of the sidebands, related to the interaction strength, is given by the Bessel function in the linearly shifting case and by the generalized Bessel function in the quadratically shifting case. The oscillatory behavior of both functions corresponds to Stueckelberg oscillations, an interference effect described by the semiclassical Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg model. The measurements prove coherent dipole-dipole interaction during at least 0.6 mus.

  5. BFKL approach and dipole picture

    SciTech Connect

    Fadin, V. S.

    2009-03-23

    Inter-relation of the BFKL approach and the colour dipole model is discussed. In the case of scattering of colourless objects the colour singlet BFKL kernel can be taken in the special representation called Moebius form. In the leading order (LO) it coincides with the kernel of the colour dipole model. In the next-to-leading order (NLO) the quark parts of the Moebius form and the colour dipole kernel are in accord with each other, but the gluon parts do not agree. Possible sources of this discrepancy are analyzed.

  6. Fermion dipole moment and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulaxizi, Manuela; Rahman, Rakibur

    2015-12-01

    In the background of a charged AdS black hole, we consider a Dirac particle endowed with an arbitrary magnetic dipole moment. For non-zero charge and dipole coupling of the bulk fermion, we find that the dual boundary theory can be plagued with superluminal modes. Requiring consistency of the dual CFT amounts to constraining the strength of the dipole coupling by an upper bound. We briefly discuss the implications of our results for the physics of holographic non-Fermi liquids.

  7. Dipole-dipole interaction between rubidium Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Altiere, Emily; Fahey, Donald P.; Noel, Michael W.; Smith, Rachel J.; Carroll, Thomas J.

    2011-11-15

    Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a static electric field can exchange energy via the dipole-dipole interaction. The Stark effect shifts the energy levels of the atoms which tunes the energy exchange into resonance at specific values of the electric field (Foerster resonances). We excite rubidium atoms to Rydberg states by focusing either a 480 nm beam from a tunable dye laser or a pair of diode lasers into a magneto-optical trap. The trap lies at the center of a configuration of electrodes. We scan the electric field by controlling the voltage on the electrodes while measuring the fraction of atoms that interact. Dipole-dipole interaction spectra are presented for initially excited rubidium nd states for n=31 to 46 and for four different pairs of initially excited rubidium ns states. We also present the dipole-dipole interaction spectra for individual rubidium 32d (j, m{sub j}) fine structure levels that have been selectively excited. The data are compared to calculated spectra.

  8. NONLINEAR DIAGNOSTICS USING AC DIPOLES.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.

    1999-03-29

    There are three goals in the accurate nonlinear diagnosis of a storage ring. First, the beam must be moved to amplitudes many times the natural beam size. Second, strong and long lasting signals must be generated. Third, the measurement technique should be non-destructive. Conventionally, a single turn kick moves the beam to large amplitudes, and turn-by-turn data are recorded from multiple beam position monitors (BPMs) [1-6]. Unfortunately, tune spread across the beam causes the center of charge beam signal to ''decohere'' on a time scale often less than 100 turns. Filamentation also permanently destroys the beam emittance (in a hadron ring). Thus, the ''strong single turn kick'' technique successfully achieves only one out of the three goals. AC dipole techniques can achieve all three. Adiabatically excited AC dipoles slowly move the beam out to large amplitudes. The coherent signals then recorded last arbitrarily long. The beam maintains its original emittance if the AC dipoles are also turned off adiabatically, ready for further use. The AGS already uses an RF dipole to accelerate polarized proton beams through depolarizing resonances with minimal polarization loss [7]. Similar AC dipoles will be installed in the horizontal and vertical planes of both rings in RHIC [8]. The RHIC AC dipoles will also be used as spin flippers, and to measure linear optical functions [9].

  9. SEISMIC DIAGNOSTICS OF RED GIANTS: FIRST COMPARISON WITH STELLAR MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Montalban, J.; Miglio, A.; Noels, A.; Scuflaire, R.; Ventura, P.

    2010-10-01

    The clear detection with CoRoT and KEPLER of radial and non-radial solar-like oscillations in many red giants paves the way for seismic inferences on the structure of such stars. We present an overview of the properties of the adiabatic frequencies and frequency separations of radial and non-radial oscillation modes for an extended grid of models. We highlight how their detection allows a deeper insight into the internal structure and evolutionary state of red giants. In particular, we find that the properties of dipole modes constitute a promising seismic diagnostic tool of the evolutionary state of red giant stars. We compare our theoretical predictions with the first 34 days of KEPLER data and predict the frequency diagram expected for red giants in the CoRoT exofield in the galactic center direction.

  10. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  11. Measuring the Forces between Magnetic Dipoles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  12. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  13. Dipole response of neutron-rich Sn isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimkiewicz, A.; Adrich, P.; Boretzky, K.; Fallot, M.; Aumann, T.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Datta Pramanik, U.; Elze, Th. W.; Emling, H.; Geissel, H.; Hellstroem, M.; Jones, K. L.; Kratz, J. V.; Kulessa, R.; Leifels, Y.; Nociforo, C.; Palit, R.; Simon, H.; Surowka, G.; Sümmerer, K.; Typel, S.; Walus, W.

    2007-05-01

    The neutron-rich isotopes 129-133Sn were studied in a Coulomb excitation experiment at about 500 AMeV using the FRS-LAND setup at GSI. From the exclusive measurement of all projectile-like particles following the excitation and decay of the projectile in a high-Z target, the energy differential cross section can be extracted. At these beam energies dipole transitions are dominating, and within the semi-classical approach the Coulomb excitation cross sections can be transformed into photoabsorption cross sections. In contrast to stable Sn nuclei, a substantial fraction of dipole strength is observed at energies below the giant dipole resonance (GDR). For 130Sn and 132Sn this strength is located in a peak-like structure around 10 MeV excitation energy and exhibits a few percent of the Thomas-Reiche Kuhn (TRK) sum-rule strength. Several calculations predict the appearance of dipole strength at low excitation energies in neutron-rich nuclei. This low-lying strength is often referred to as pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) and, in a macroscopic picture, is discussed in terms of a collective oscillation of excess neutrons versus the core nucleons. Moreover, a sharp rise is observed at the neutron separation threshold around 5 MeV for the odd isotopes. A possible contribution of 'threshold strength', which can be described within the direct-breakup model is discussed. The results for the neutron-rich Sn isotopes are confronted with results on stable nuclei investigated in experiments using real photons.

  14. Systematics of the Electric and Magnetic Dipole Response in N=82 Isotones Below the Neutron Separation Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Kwan, E.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Hammond, S.; Kelley, J. H.; Tsoneva, N.; Lenske, H.

    2013-03-01

    In stable and weakly bound neutron-rich nuclei, a resonance-like concentration of dipole states has been observed for excitation energies around the neutron separation energy. This clustering of strong dipole states has been named the pygmy dipole resonance in contrast to the giant dipole resonance that dominates the E1 response. Understanding the pygmy resonance is presently of great interest in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. High-sensitivity studies of E1 and M1 transitions in N=82 nuclei using the quasi monoenergetic and 100% linearly-polarized photon beams from High-Intensity-Gamma-Ray Source facility is presented. The nuclear dipole-strength distribution of the pygmy resonance has been measured and novel information about the character of this mode of excitation has been obtained. The data are compared with predictions from statistical and quasiparticle random-phase approximation models.

  15. Isovector and isoscalar tensor charges of the nucleon from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Cohen, Saul D.; ...

    2015-11-01

    Here, we present results for the isovector and flavor diagonal tensor charges gu–dT, guT, gdT, and gsT needed to probe novel tensor interactions at the TeV scale in neutron and nuclear β-decays and the contribution of the quark electric dipole moment (EDM) to the neutron EDM. The lattice QCD calculations were done using nine ensembles of gauge configurations generated by the MILC collaboration using the HISQ action with 2+1+1 dynamical flavors. These ensembles span three lattice spacings a ≈ 0.06, 0.09 and 0.12 fm and three quark masses corresponding to the pion masses Mπ ≈ 130, 220 and 310 MeV.more » Using estimates from these ensembles, we quantify all systematic uncertainties and perform a simultaneous extrapolation in the lattice spacing, volume and light quark masses for the connected contributions. The final estimates of the connected nucleon (proton) tensor charge for the isovector combination is gu–dT = 1.020(76) in the MS¯ scheme at 2 GeV. The additional disconnected quark loop contributions needed for the flavor-diagonal matrix elements are calculated using a stochastic estimator employing the truncated solver method with the all-mode-averaging technique. We find that the size of the disconnected contribution is smaller than the statistical error in the connected contribution. This allows us to bound the disconnected contribution and include it as an additional uncertainty in the flavor-diagonal charges. After a continuum extrapolation, we find guT = 0.774(66), gdT = –0.233(28) and gu+dT = 0.541(67). The strangeness tensor charge, that can make a significant contribution to the neutron EDM due to the large ratio ms/mu,d, is gsT = 0.008(9) in the continuum limit.« less

  16. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  17. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  18. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2012-10-01

    The 2009 impact on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a Target of Opportunity program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  19. Giant resonances in {sup 116}Sn from 240 MeV {sup 6}Li scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Lui, Y.-W.; Clark, H. L.; Tokimoto, Y.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2009-02-15

    Giant resonances in {sup 116}Sn were measured by inelastic scattering of {sup 6}Li ions at E{sub {sup 6}Li}=240 MeV over the angle range 0 deg. - 6 deg. Isoscalar E0-E3 strength distributions were obtained with a double folding model analysis. A total of 106{sub -11}{sup +27}% of the E0 EWSR was found in the excitation energy range from 8 MeV to 30 MeV with a centroid (m{sub 1}/m{sub 0}) energy 15.39{sub -0.20}{sup +0.35} MeV in agreement with results obtained with {alpha} inelastic scattering.

  20. On the dipole polarisability and dipole sum rules of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalugina, Yulia N.; Thakkar, Ajit J.

    2015-10-01

    Ab initio calculations of the dipole polarisability and other Cauchy moments of the dipole oscillator strength distribution (DOSD) of ozone are reported to help resolve discrepancies between theory and experiment. A number of coupled-cluster methods based on a Hartree-Fock reference function, multiconfiguration-reference configuration interaction methods, and perturbatively corrected, complete-active-space self-consistent field methods are used. The C DOSD of Kumar and Thakkar is probably preferable to their B1 distribution. Our best estimate of the mean polarisability is ? atomic units.

  1. Isovector and isoscalar tensor charges of the nucleon from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Cohen, Saul D.; Gupta, Rajan; Joseph, Anosh; Lin, Huey -Wen; Yoon, Boram

    2015-11-01

    Here, we present results for the isovector and flavor diagonal tensor charges gu–dT, guT, gdT, and gsT needed to probe novel tensor interactions at the TeV scale in neutron and nuclear β-decays and the contribution of the quark electric dipole moment (EDM) to the neutron EDM. The lattice QCD calculations were done using nine ensembles of gauge configurations generated by the MILC collaboration using the HISQ action with 2+1+1 dynamical flavors. These ensembles span three lattice spacings a ≈ 0.06, 0.09 and 0.12 fm and three quark masses corresponding to the pion masses Mπ ≈ 130, 220 and 310 MeV. Using estimates from these ensembles, we quantify all systematic uncertainties and perform a simultaneous extrapolation in the lattice spacing, volume and light quark masses for the connected contributions. The final estimates of the connected nucleon (proton) tensor charge for the isovector combination is gu–dT = 1.020(76) in the MS¯ scheme at 2 GeV. The additional disconnected quark loop contributions needed for the flavor-diagonal matrix elements are calculated using a stochastic estimator employing the truncated solver method with the all-mode-averaging technique. We find that the size of the disconnected contribution is smaller than the statistical error in the connected contribution. This allows us to bound the disconnected contribution and include it as an additional uncertainty in the flavor-diagonal charges. After a continuum extrapolation, we find guT = 0.774(66), gdT = –0.233(28) and gu+dT = 0.541(67). The strangeness tensor charge, that can make a significant contribution to the neutron EDM due to the large ratio ms/mu,d, is gsT = 0.008(9) in the continuum limit.

  2. Dipole oscillations in fermionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chiacchiera, S.; Macri, T.; Trombettoni, A.

    2010-03-15

    We study dipole oscillations in a general fermionic mixture. Starting from the Boltzmann equation, we classify the different solutions in the parameter space through the number of real eigenvalues of the small oscillations matrix. We discuss how this number can be computed using the Sturm algorithm and its relation with the properties of the Laplace transform of the experimental quantities. After considering two components in harmonic potentials having different trapping frequencies, we study dipole oscillations in three-component mixtures. Explicit computations are done for realistic experimental setups using the classical Boltzmann equation without intraspecies interactions. A brief discussion of the application of this classification to general collective oscillations is also presented.

  3. Coherent and incoherent dipole-dipole interactions between atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2016-05-01

    Results will be presented on the collective interaction between atoms due to the electric dipole-dipole coupling between states of different parity on two different atoms. A canonical example of this effect is when the electronic state of one atom has S-character and the state of another atom has P-character. The energy difference between the two states plays an important role in the interaction since the change in energy determines the wave number of a photon that would cause a transition between the states. If the atoms are much closer than the wave length of this photon, then the dipole-dipole interaction is in the near field and has a 1 /r3 dependence on atomic separation. If the atoms are farther apart than the wave length, then the interaction is in the far field and has a 1 / r dependence. When many atoms interact, collective effects can dominate the system with the character of the collective effect depending on whether the atomic separation leads to near field or far field coupling. As an example of the case where the atoms are in the far field, the line broadening of transitions and strong deviations from the Beer-Lambert law in a diffuse gas will be presented. As an example of near field collective behavior, the radiative properties of a Rydberg gas will be presented. Based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1404419-PHY in collaboration with R.T. Sutherland.

  4. Induced dipole-dipole interactions in light diffusion from point dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherroret, Nicolas; Delande, Dominique; van Tiggelen, Bart A.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a perturbative treatment of induced dipole-dipole interactions in the diffusive transport of electromagnetic waves through disordered atomic clouds. The approach is exact at order 2 in the atomic density and accounts for the vector character of light. It is applied to the calculations of the electromagnetic energy stored in the atomic cloud, which modifies the energy transport velocity, and of the light scattering and transport mean free paths. Results are compared to those obtained from a purely scalar model for light.

  5. Dipole polarizabilities of charged pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fil'kov, L. V.; Kashevarov, V. L.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss main experimental works, where dipole polarizabilities of charged pions have been determined. Possible reasons for the differences between the experimental data are discussed. In particular, it is shown that the account of the -meson gives a significant correction to the value of the polarizability obtained in the latest experiment of the COMPASS collaboration.

  6. On the color dipole picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, Dieter

    2017-03-01

    We give a brief representation of the theoretical results from the color dipole picture, covering the total photoabsorption cross section, high-energy J/ψ photoproduction with respect to recent experimental data from the LHCb Collaboration at CERN, and ultra-high energy neutrino scattering, relevant for the ICE-CUBE experiment.

  7. Study of multipole giant resonances in /sup 90/Zr and /sup 120/Sn in scattering of 93-MeV /sup 6/Li ions

    SciTech Connect

    Venikov, N.I.; Glukhov, Y.A.; Dem'yanova, A.S.; Drozdov, S.I.; Novatskii, V.G.; Ogloblin, A.A.; Sakuta, S.B.; Stepanov, D.N.; Unezhev, V.N.; Yupinov, Y.L.; Brynkush, M.; Grama, K.; Lazer, I.

    1981-04-01

    In the inelastic scattering of /sup 6/Li ions with energy 93 MeV we have investigated the regions of quadrupole and octupole giant isoscalar resonances (E/sub x/approx.63A/sup -1/3/ and E/sub x/approx.30A/sup -13/ MeV, respectively) in the nuclei /sup 90/Zr and /sup 120/Sn. The angular distributions of the resonance groups obtained in the region of angles 12--24/sup 0/ are analyzed by the distorted wave Born approximation. Detailed study of the group at E/sub x/approx.63A/sup -1/3/ favors existence of a monopole giant resonance which is located at an excitation energy approx.76A/sup -1/3/ MeV on the left wing of the quadrupole resonance.

  8. New bound on neutrino dipole moments from globular-cluster stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffelt, Georg G.

    1990-01-01

    Neutrino dipole moments mu(nu) would increase the core mass of red giants at the helium flash by delta(Mc) = 0.015 solar mass x mu(nu)/10 to the -12th muB (where muB is the Bohr magneton) because of enhanced neutrino losses. Existing measurements of the bolometric magnitudes of the brightest red giants in 26 globular clusters, number counts of horizontal-branch stars and red giants in 15 globular clusters, and statistical parallax determinations of field RR Lyr luminosities yield delta(Mc) = 0.009 + or - 0.012 solar mass, so that conservatively mu(nu) is less than 3 x 10 to the -12th muB.

  9. Relativistic Dipole Matrix Element Zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.; Pratt, R. H.

    2002-05-01

    There is a special class of relativistic high energy dipole matrix element zeros (RZ), whose positions with respect to photon energy ω , only depend on the bound state l quantum number according to ω^0=mc^2/(l_b+1) (independent of primary quantum number n, nuclear charge Z, central potential V and dipole retardation). These RZ only occur in (n,l_b,j_b)arrow (ɛ , l_b+1,j_b) transitions such as ns_1/2arrow ɛ p_1/2; np_3/2arrow ɛ d_3/2: nd_5/2arrow ɛ f_5/2 etc. The nonrelativistic limit of these matrix elements can be established explicitly in the Coulomb case. Within the general matrix element formalism (such as that in [1]); when |κ | is substituted for γ in analytic expressions for matrix elements, the zeros remain, but ω^0 now becomes dependent on n and Z. When the reduction to nonrelativistic form is completed by application of the low energy approximation ω mc^2 mc^2, the zeros disappear. This nonzero behavior was noted in nonrelativistic dipole Coulomb matrix elements by Fano and Cooper [2] and later proven by Oh and Pratt[3]. (J. H. Scofield, Phys. Rev. A 40), 3054 (1989 (U. Fano and J. W. Cooper, Rev. Mod. Phys. 40), 441 (1968). (D. Oh and R. H. Pratt, Phys. Rev. A 34), 2486 (1986); 37, 1524 (1988); 45, 1583 (1992).

  10. Efficient treatment of induced dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Simmonett, Andrew C.; Pickard, Frank C.; Shao, Yihan; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Most existing treatments of induced dipoles in polarizable molecular mechanics force field calculations use either the self-consistent variational method, which is solved iteratively, or the “direct” approximation that is non-iterative as a result of neglecting coupling between induced dipoles. The variational method is usually implemented using assumptions that are only strictly valid under tight convergence of the induced dipoles, which can be computationally demanding to enforce. In this work, we discuss the nature of the errors that result from insufficient convergence and suggest a strategy that avoids such problems. Using perturbation theory to reintroduce the mutual coupling into the direct algorithm, we present a computationally efficient method that combines the precision of the direct approach with the accuracy of the variational approach. By analyzing the convergence of this perturbation series, we derive a simple extrapolation formula that delivers a very accurate approximation to the infinite order solution at the cost of only a few iterations. We refer to the new method as extrapolated perturbation theory. Finally, we draw connections to our previously published permanent multipole algorithm to develop an efficient implementation of the electric field and Thole terms and also derive some necessary, but not sufficient, criteria that force field parameters must obey. PMID:26298123

  11. Giant resonances of endohedral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, A. S.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2008-04-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that the effect of a fullerene shell on the photoionization of a “caged” atom in an endohedral can result in the formation of giant endohedral resonances or GER. This is illustrated by the concrete case of the Xe@C60 photoionization cross section that, at 17 eV, exhibits a powerful resonance with total oscillator strengths of about 25. The prominent modification of the 5 p 6 electron photoionization cross section of Xe@C60 takes place due to the strong fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and the oscillation of this cross section due to the reflection of the photoelectron from Xe by the C60. These two factors transform the smoothly decreasing 5 p 6 cross section of Xe into a rather complex curve with a powerful maximum for Xe@C60, with the oscillator strength of it being equal to 25. We also present the results for the dipole angular anisotropy parameter that is strongly affected by the reflection of the photoelectron waves, but not modified by C60 polarization.

  12. Giant resonances of endohedral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, Arkadiy; Chernysheva, Larissa

    2008-05-01

    We demonstrate for that the effect of fullerene shell upon photoionization of the ``caged'' atom in an endohedral can result in formation of Giant Endohedral Resonances or GER. This is illustrated by the concrete case of Xe@C60 photoionization cross-section that exhibits at 17 eV a powerful resonance with total oscillator strengths of about 25. The prominent modification of the 5p^6 electron photoionization cross-section of Xe@C60 takes place due to strong fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and oscillation of this cross-section due to the reflection of the photoelectron from Xe by the C60. These two factors transform the smoothly decreasing 5p^6 cross-section of Xe into a rather complex curve with a powerful maximum for Xe@C60, with the oscillator strength of it being equal to 25! We present also the results for the dipole angular anisotropy parameter that is strongly affected by the reflection of the photoelectron waves but not modified by C60 polarization.

  13. Electric dipole response of neutron-rich calcium isotopes in relativistic quasiparticle time blocking approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, Irina A.; Litvinova, Elena

    2016-09-01

    New results for electric dipole strength in the chain of even-even calcium isotopes with the mass numbers A =40 -54 are presented. Starting from the covariant Lagrangian of quantum hadrodynamics, spectra of collective vibrations (phonons) and phonon-nucleon coupling vertices for J ≤6 and natural parity were computed in a self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation (RQRPA). These vibrations coupled to Bogoliubov two-quasiparticle configurations (2 q ⊗phonon ) formed the model space for the calculations of the dipole response function in the relativistic quasiparticle time blocking approximation. The calculations in the latter approach were performed for the giant dipole resonance (GDR) and compared to those obtained with the RQRPA and to available data. The evolution of the dipole strength with the neutron number is investigated for both high-frequency GDRs and low-lying strengths. The development of a pygmy resonant structure on the low-energy shoulder of the GDR is traced and analyzed in terms of transition densities. A dependence of the pygmy dipole strength on the isospin asymmetry parameter is extracted.

  14. RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

  15. Electric dipole excitation of 208Pb by polarized electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubassa-Amundsen, D. H.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    The cross sections and spin asymmetries for the excitation of 1- states in 208Pb by transversely polarized electrons with collision energy of 30-180MeV have been examined within the DWBA scattering formalism. As examples, we have considered a low-lying 1- state and also states belonging to the pygmy dipole and giant dipole resonances. The structure of these states and their corresponding transition charge and current densities have been taken from an RPA calculation within the quasiparticle phonon model. The complex-plane rotation method has been applied to achieve the convergence of the radial DWBA integrals for backward scattering. We have studied the behaviour of the cross sections and spin asymmetries as a function of electron energy and scattering angle. The role of the longitudinal and transversal contributions to the excitation has been thoroughly studied. We conclude that the spin asymmetry S, related to unpolarized outgoing electrons, is mostly well below 1% even at the backward scattering angles and its measurement provides a challenge for future experiments with polarized electrons.

  16. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  17. Nanophotonic control of circular dipole emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Feber, B.; Rotenberg, N.; Kuipers, L.

    2015-04-01

    Controlling photon emission by single emitters with nanostructures is crucial for scalable on-chip information processing. Nowadays, nanoresonators can affect the lifetime of linear dipole emitters, while nanoantennas can steer the emission direction. Expanding this control to the emission of orbital angular momentum-changing transitions would enable a future coupling between solid state and photonic qubits. As these transitions are associated with circular dipoles, such control requires knowledge of the interaction of a complex dipole with optical eigenstates containing local helicity. We experimentally map the coupling of classical, circular dipoles to photonic modes in a photonic crystal waveguide. We show that, depending on the combination of the local helicity of the mode and the dipole helicity, circular dipoles can couple to left- or rightwards propagating modes with a near-unity directionality. The experimental maps are in excellent agreement with calculations. Our measurements, therefore, demonstrate the possibility of coupling the spin to photonic pathway.

  18. Electric dipole polarizability from first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miorelli, M.; Bacca, S.; Barnea, N.; Hagen, G.; Jansen, G. R.; Orlandini, G.; Papenbrock, T.

    2016-09-01

    The electric dipole polarizability quantifies the low-energy behavior of the dipole strength and is related to critical observables such as the radii of the proton and neutron distributions. Its computation is challenging because most of the dipole strength lies in the scattering continuum. In this paper we combine integral transforms with the coupled-cluster method and compute the dipole polarizability using bound-state techniques. Employing different interactions from chiral effective field theory, we confirm the strong correlation between the dipole polarizability and the charge radius, and study its dependence on three-nucleon forces. We find good agreement with data for the 4He,40Ca, and 16O nuclei, and predict the dipole polarizability for the rare nucleus 22O.

  19. Electric dipole polarizability from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Miorelli, M.; Bacca, S.; Barnea, N.; Hagen, G.; Jansen, G. R.; Orlandini, G.; Papenbrock, T.

    2016-09-19

    The electric dipole polarizability quantifies the low-energy behavior of the dipole strength and is related to critical observables such as the radii of the proton and neutron distributions. Its computation is challenging because most of the dipole strength lies in the scattering continuum. In our paper we combine integral transforms with the coupled-cluster method and compute the dipole polarizability using bound-state techniques. Furthermore, employing different interactions from chiral effective field theory, we confirm the strong correlation between the dipole polarizability and the charge radius, and study its dependence on three-nucleon forces. Finally, we find good agreement with data for the 4He, 40Ca, and 16O nuclei, and predict the dipole polarizability for the rare nucleus 22O.

  20. Electric dipole polarizability from first principles calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Miorelli, M.; Bacca, S.; Barnea, N.; ...

    2016-09-19

    The electric dipole polarizability quantifies the low-energy behavior of the dipole strength and is related to critical observables such as the radii of the proton and neutron distributions. Its computation is challenging because most of the dipole strength lies in the scattering continuum. In our paper we combine integral transforms with the coupled-cluster method and compute the dipole polarizability using bound-state techniques. Furthermore, employing different interactions from chiral effective field theory, we confirm the strong correlation between the dipole polarizability and the charge radius, and study its dependence on three-nucleon forces. Finally, we find good agreement with data for themore » 4He, 40Ca, and 16O nuclei, and predict the dipole polarizability for the rare nucleus 22O.« less

  1. Electric dipole radiation near a mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xin; Arnoldus, Henk F.

    2010-05-15

    The emission of radiation by a linearly oscillating electric dipole is drastically altered when the dipole is close to the surface of a mirror. The energy is not emitted along optical rays, as for a free dipole, but as a set of four optical vortices. The field lines of energy flow spiral around a set of two lines through the dipole. At a larger distance from the dipole, singularities and isolated vortices appear. It is shown that these interference vortices are due to the vanishing of the magnetic field at their centers. In the plane of the mirror there is a singular circle with a diameter which is proportional to the distance between the dipole and the mirror. Inside this circle, all energy flows to a singularity on the mirror surface.

  2. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Video Gallery

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  3. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  4. Which dipole are you studying in lab?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, P.-M.; Tate, Reuben B.; Crowder, Callie K.

    2017-01-01

    We explore the similarities and differences between the electric dipole studied in introductory physics and the purportedly equivalent elementary experiment in which the electric potential is measured on a conductive sheet as a current flows. The former is a three-dimensional electrostatic dipole while the latter is a two-dimensional steady-state dipole. In spite of these differences, and as shown in this work, the potentials due to these dipoles look very similar. This may be misleading to either students or unaware instructors.

  5. Spectral Distortions of the CMB Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashev, S. A.; Kholupenko, E. E.; Chluba, J.; Ivanchik, A. V.; Varshalovich, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    We consider the distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole anisotropy related to primordial recombination radiation (PRR) and primordial y- and μ-distortions. The signals arise due to our motion relative to the CMB restframe and appear as a frequency-dependent distortion of the CMB temperature dipole. To leading order, the expected relative distortion of the CMB dipole does not depend on the particular observation directions and reaches the level of 10-6 for the PRR- and μ-distortions and 10-5 for the y-distortion in the frequency range 1-700 GHz. The temperature differences arising from the dipole anisotropy of the relic CMB distortions depend on the observation directions. For mutually opposite directions, collinear to the CMB dipole axis, the temperature differences due to the PRR- and μ-dipole anisotropy attain values {{Δ }}T≃ 10 {nK} in the considered range. The temperature difference arising from the y-dipole anisotropy may reach values of up to 1 μ {{K}}. The key features of the considered effect are as follow: (i) an observation of the effect does not require absolute calibration; (ii) patches of sky with minimal foreground contamination can be chosen. Future measurements of the CMB dipole distortion thus will provide an alternative method for direct detection of the PRR-, y-, and μ-distortions. The y-distortion dipole may be detectable with PIXIE at a few standard deviations.

  6. Hyperfine dipole-dipole broadening of selective reflection spectroscopy at the gas-solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Tengfei; Ji, Zhonghua; Zhao, Yanting; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate hyperfine dipole-dipole broadening in the selective reflection (SR) spectroscopy at the gas-solid interface with the atomic density of 1014-1015 cm-3. The two-level SR theory considering pump beam and dipole-dipole interaction between excited-state atom and ground-state atom is presented. The numerical simulation of the SR spectrum is in agreement with experimental results. The reduction of spectral width is observed by introducing a pump beam which is an effective technique to improve the resolution of spectroscopy. We analyze the dependence of dipole-dipole broadening on atomic density and pump beam power. This study is helpful for the description of the SR spectroscopy at the gas-solid interface where the Doppler broadening is comparable with dipole-dipole broadening.

  7. Testing of a Single 11 T $Nb_3Sn$ Dipole Coil Using a Dipole Mirror Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, Alexander; Andreev, Nicolai; Barzi, Emanuela; Chlachidze, Guram; Kashikhin, Vadim; Nobrega, Alfred; Novitski, Igor; Turrioni, Daniele; Karppinen, Mikko; Smekens, David

    2014-07-01

    FNAL and CERN are developing an 11 T Nb3Sn dipole suitable for installation in the LHC. To optimize coil design parameters and fabrication process and study coil performance, a series of 1 m long dipole coils is being fabricated. One of the short coils has been tested using a dipole mirror structure. This paper describes the dipole mirror magnetic and mechanical designs, and reports coil parameters and test results.

  8. Low-lying dipole resonance in neutron-rich Ne isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kenichi; van Giai, Nguyen

    2008-07-01

    Microscopic structure of the low-lying isovector dipole excitation mode in neutron-rich Ne26,28,30 is investigated by performing deformed quasiparticle-random-phase-approximation (QRPA) calculations. The particle-hole residual interaction is derived from a Skyrme force through a Landau-Migdal approximation. We obtain the low-lying resonance in Ne26 at around 8.6 MeV. It is found that the isovector dipole strength at Ex<10 MeV exhausts about 6.0% of the classical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn dipole sum rule. This excitation mode is composed of several QRPA eigenmodes, one is generated by a ν(2s1/2-12p3/2) transition dominantly and the other mostly by a ν(2s1/2-12p1/2) transition. The neutron excitations take place outside of the nuclear surface reflecting the spatially extended structure of the 2s1/2 wave function. In Ne30, the deformation splitting of the giant resonance is large, and the low-lying resonance overlaps with the giant resonance.

  9. Dipole Engineering for Conducting Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClain, William Edward

    A method for the growth of a TiO2 adhesion layer on PEDOT:PSS (poly[3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene]: poly[styrenesulfonate]) and for further functionalization with self-assembled monolayers of phosphonates (SAMPs) was developed. The TiO2 adhesion layer was grown via chemical vapor deposition using a titanium(IV) t-butoxide precursor, and was characterized by goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TiO 2 grown on a model system, H-terminated silicon, indicated that the surface was t-butoxide terminated. Phenylphosphonic acids were synthesized with a variety of molecular dipoles and were used to change the work function of PEDOT:PSS through the formation of an aggregate surface dipole. Good correlation was found between the z-component of the molecular dipole and the change in work function, indicating that the film was well-ordered and dense. The magnitude of the changes in work function and goniometry measurements were similar to measurements on ITO, a substrate on which phosphonates form well-ordered monolayers. As-grown PEDOT:PSS/TiO 2 electrodes showed a lower work function compared to PEDOT:PSS, which is attributed to residual t-butoxide groups on the TiO 2 surface. UPS measurements revealed that reductions in work function in the modified electrodes lowered the difference in energy between the Fermi energy (EF) of the conducting polymer and the LUMO of PCBM ([6,6]-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid methyl ester). A reduction of this energy difference should translate into increased electron injection in electron-only diodes; however, devices with modified electrodes showed decreased current densities. UPS/IPES measurements show that TiO2 grown using this method has a much larger band gap than bulk or nanocrystalline TiO2, which is likely responsible for this decrease in device currents. At high bias, device currents increase dramatically, and the effects of the phosphonates or t-butoxide terminated TiO2 vanish. This is attributed to a reduction of the TiO2 to

  10. Radiating dipoles in photonic crystals

    PubMed

    Busch; Vats; John; Sanders

    2000-09-01

    The radiation dynamics of a dipole antenna embedded in a photonic crystal are modeled by an initially excited harmonic oscillator coupled to a non-Markovian bath of harmonic oscillators representing the colored electromagnetic vacuum within the crystal. Realistic coupling constants based on the natural modes of the photonic crystal, i.e., Bloch waves and their associated dispersion relation, are derived. For simple model systems, well-known results such as decay times and emission spectra are reproduced. This approach enables direct incorporation of realistic band structure computations into studies of radiative emission from atoms and molecules within photonic crystals. We therefore provide a predictive and interpretative tool for experiments in both the microwave and optical regimes.

  11. How to Introduce the Magnetic Dipole Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezerra, M.; Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Cougo-Pinto, M. V.; Farina, C.

    2012-01-01

    We show how the concept of the magnetic dipole moment can be introduced in the same way as the concept of the electric dipole moment in introductory courses on electromagnetism. Considering a localized steady current distribution, we make a Taylor expansion directly in the Biot-Savart law to obtain, explicitly, the dominant contribution of the…

  12. Dipole Relaxation in an Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    Derives an expression for the orientational entropy of a rigid rod (electric dipole) from Boltzmann's equation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium. (Author/GS)

  13. Magnetic dipole oscillations and radiation damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Daniel R.; Pollack, Gerald L.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the problem of radiation damping for a magnetic dipole oscillating in a magnetic field. An equation for the radiation reaction torque is derived, and the damping of the oscillations is described. Also discussed are runaway solutions for a rotating magnetic dipole moving under the influence of the reaction torque, with no external torque.

  14. Classical and quantum interaction of the dipole

    PubMed

    Anandan

    2000-08-14

    A unified and fully relativistic treatment of the interaction of the electric and magnetic dipole moments of a particle with the electromagnetic field is given. New forces on the particle due to the combined effect of electric and magnetic dipoles are obtained. Several new experiments are proposed, which include observation of topological phase shifts.

  15. Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kesner, Jay; Mauel, Michael

    2013-03-10

    Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier et al., Physics of Plasmas, 13 (2006) 056111]. High- beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability made LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment operating in the U.S. fusion program. A significant measure of progress in the LDX research program was the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole and the resulting observations of confinement improvement. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements were made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma was created by multi frequency electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2.45 GHz, 6.4 GHz, 10.5 GHz and 28 GHz allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole was levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature was estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities to approach 1e18 m-3. We have found that levitation causes a strong inwards density pinch [Boxer et al., Nature Physics, 6 (2010) 207] and we have observed the central plasma density increase dramatically indicating a significant improvement in the confinement of a thermal plasma species.

  16. High-field dipoles for future accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wipf, S.L.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents the concept for building superconducting accelerator dipoles with record high fields. Economic considerations favor the highest possible current density in the windings. Further discussion indicates that there is an optimal range of pinning strength for a superconducting material and that it is not likely for multifilamentary conductors to ever equal the potential performance of tape conductors. A dipole design with a tape-wound, inner high-field winding is suggested. Methods are detailed to avoid degradation caused by flux jumps and to overcome problems with the dipole ends. Concerns for force support structure and field precision are also addressed. An R and D program leading to a prototype 11-T dipole is outlined. Past and future importance of superconductivity to high-energy physics is evident from a short historical survey. Successful dipoles in the 10- to 20-T range will allow interesting options for upgrading present largest accelerators.

  17. Dipole oscillator strengths, dipole properties and dispersion energies for SiF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Mukesh; Meath, William J.

    2003-01-01

    A recommended isotropic dipole oscillator strength distribution (DOSD) has been constructed for the silicon tetrafluoride (SiF4) molecule through the use of quantum mechanical constraint techniques and experimental dipole oscillator strength data. The constraints are furnished by experimental molar refractivity data and the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. The DOSD is used to evaluate a variety of isotropic dipole oscillator strength sums, logarithmic dipole oscillator strength sums and mean excitation energies for the molecule. A pseudo-DOSD for SiF4 is also presented which is used to obtain reliable results for the isotropic dipole-dipole dispersion energy coefficients C6, for the interaction of SiF4 with itself and with 43 other species and the triple-dipole dispersion energy coefficient C9 for (SiF4)3.

  18. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus*

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion. PMID:24474093

  19. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  20. Dipole response in 208Pb within a self-consistent multiphonon approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, F.; Lo Iudice, N.; Veselý, P.; Andreozzi, F.; De Gregorio, G.; Porrino, A.

    2015-11-01

    Background: The electric dipole strength detected around the particle threshold and commonly associated with the pygmy dipole resonance offers unique information on neutron skin and symmetry energy, and is of astrophysical interest. The nature of such a resonance is still under debate. Purpose: We intend to describe the giant and pygmy resonances in 208Pb by enhancing their fragmentation with respect to the random-phase approximation. Method: We adopt the equation of motion phonon method to perform a fully self-consistent calculation in a space spanned by one-phonon and two-phonon basis states using an optimized chiral two-body potential. A phenomenological density-dependent term, derived from a contact three-body force, is added to get single-particle spectra more realistic than the ones obtained by using the chiral potential only. The calculation takes into full account the Pauli principle and is free of spurious center-of-mass admixtures. Results: We obtain a fair description of the giant resonance and obtain a dense low-lying spectrum in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The transition densities as well as the phonon and particle-hole composition of the most strongly excited states support the pygmy nature of the low-lying resonance. Finally, we obtain realistic values for the dipole polarizability and the neutron skin radius. Conclusions: The results emphasize the role of the two-phonon states in enhancing the fragmentation of the strength in the giant resonance region and at low energy, consistently with experiments. For a more detailed agreement with the data, the calculation suggests the inclusion of the three-phonon states as well as a fine tuning of the single-particle spectrum to be obtained by a refinement of the nuclear potential.

  1. Dumbbell dipole model and its application in UXO discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, K.; O'Neill, K.; Barrowes, B. E.; Fernández, J. P.; Shubitidze, F.; Shamatava, I.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2006-05-01

    Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) is one of the most promising techniques for UXO discrimination. Target discrimination is usually formulated as an inverse problem typically requiring fast forward models for efficiency. The most successful and widely applied EMI forward model is the simple dipole model, which works well for simple objects when the observation points are not close to the target. For complicated cases, a single dipole is not sufficient and a number of dipoles (displaced dipoles) has been suggested. However, once more than one dipole is needed, it is difficult to infer a unique set of model parameters from measurement data, which is usually limited. Inspired by the displaced dipole model, we developed the dumbbell dipole model, which consists of a special combination of dipoles. We placed a center dipole and two anti-symmetric side dipoles on the target axis. The center dipole functions like the traditional single dipole model and the two side dipoles provide the non-symmetric response of the target. When the distance between dipoles is small, this model is essentially a dipole plus a quadrupole. The advantage of the dumbbell model is that the model parameters can be inferred more easily from measurement data. The center dipole represents the main response of the target, the side dipoles act as additional backup in case a simple dipole is not sufficient. Regularization terms are applied so that the dumbbell dipole model automatically reduces to the simple dipole model in degenerate cases. Preliminary test shows that the dumbbell model can fit the measurement data better than the simple dipole model, and the inferred model parameters are unique for a given UXO. This suggests that the model parameters can be used as a discriminator for UXO. In this paper the dumbbell dipole model is introduced and its performance is compared with that of both the simple dipole model and the displaced dipole model.

  2. Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kesner, Jay; Mauel, Michael

    2013-03-10

    Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier, Phys. Plasmas, v13, p. 056111, 2006]. High-beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability makes LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment now operating in the U.S. fusion program. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements are made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma is created by multifrequency electron cyclotron resonance heating allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole is levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature is estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities reach 1.0E18 (1/m3). Several significant discoveries resulted from the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole. For the first time, toroidal plasma with pressure approaching the pressure of the confining magnetic field was well-confined in steady-state without a toroidal magnetic field. Magnetic levitation proved to be reliable and is now routine. The dipole's cryostat allows up to three hours of "float time" between re-cooling with liquid helium and providing scientists unprecedented access to the physics of magnetizd plasma. Levitation eliminates field-aligned particle sources and sinks and results in a toroidal, magnetically-confined plasma where profiles are determined by cross

  3. Magnetic Field Generation and Zonal Flows in the Gas Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, L.; Wicht, J.; Gastine, T.

    2013-12-01

    The surface dynamics of Jupiter and Saturn is dominated by a banded system of fierce zonal winds. The depth of these winds remains unclear but they are thought to be confined to the very outer envelopes where hydrogen remains molecular and the electrical conductivity is negligible. The dynamo responsible for the dipole dominated magnetic fields of both Gas Giants, on the other hand, likely operates in the deeper interior where hydrogen assumes a metallic state. We present numerical simulations that attempt to model both the zonal winds and the interior dynamo action in an integrated approach. Using the anelastic version of the MHD code MagIC, we explore the effects of density stratification and radial electrical conductivity variations. The electrical conductivity is assumed to remain constant in the thicker inner metallic region and decays exponentially towards the outer boundary throughout the molecular envelope. Our results show that the combination of stronger density stratification (Δρ≈55) and a weaker conducting outer layer is essential for reconciling dipole dominated dynamo action and a fierce equatorial zonal jet. Previous simulations with homogeneous electrical conductivity show that both are mutually exclusive, with solutions either having strong zonal winds and multipolar magnetic fields or weak zonal winds and dipole dominated magnetic fields. The particular setup explored here allows the equatorial jet to remain confined to the weaker conducting region where is does not interfere with the deeper seated dynamo action. The equatorial jet can afford to remain geostrophic and reaches throughout the whole shell. This is not an option for the additional mid to higher latitude jets, however. In dipole dominated dynamo solutions, appropriate for the Gas Giants, zonal flows remain very faint in the deeper dynamo region but increase in amplitude in the weakly conducting outer layer in some of our simulations. This suggests that the mid to high latitude jets

  4. Giant M1 resonance in /sup 140/Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Laszewski, R.M.; Rullhusen, P.; Hoblit, S.D.; LeBrun, S.F.

    1986-11-01

    Highly polarized tagged photons were used to measure the distribution of M1 transition strength in /sup 140/Ce at excitations between 6.7 and 8.7 MeV. A strength of summationgGAMMA/sub 0//sup 2/(M1)/GAMMA = 11.2/sub -3.1/ /sup +4.5/ eV corresponding to a B(M1up-arrow) of about 7.5..mu../sub 0//sup 2/ was observed centered at an excitation of 7.95 MeV. This distribution of M1 strength can account for the giant magnetic dipole resonance predicted in /sup 140/Ce.

  5. Dipole strength from first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miorelli, Mirko; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir; Hagen, Gaute; Jansen, Gustav R.; Papenbrock, Thomas; Orlandini, Giuseppina

    2016-09-01

    The electric dipole polarizability quantifies the low-energy behavior of the dipole strength. It is related to the proton and neutron distributions of the nucleus, and thereby can be used to constrain the neutron equation of state and the physics of neutron stars. Only recently however, new developments in ab initio methods finally allowed first principles studies of the dipole strength in medium-mass nuclei. Using the Lorentz integral transform coupled cluster method with the newly developed chiral interaction NNLOsat we study the low energy behavior of the dipole strength in 4He, 16O and 22O. For the exotic 22O we observe large contributions to the dipole strength at very low energy, indicating the presence of a pygmy dipole resonance, in agreement with what experimentally found by Leistenschneider et al.. We then study correlations between the electric dipole polarizability and the charge radius in 16O and 40Ca using a variety of realistic Hamiltonians, showing the importance of three-nucleon forces. We aknowledge NRC and NSERC.

  6. A Method to Calculate Protein Dipole Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, Brett; Mazzeo, Brian

    2009-10-01

    The electric dipole moments of globular proteins, determined experimentally by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, contribute to both protein function and structure. Numerical computations of dipole moments can be obtained from structures in the Protein Data Bank. However, previous computations in literature have agreed with experimental results for only a limited number of proteins. This paper presents a method to compute the pH-dependent dipole moment. The protein molecule is considered as an array of electrical point charges in aqueous solution. The dipole moment is calculated as the vector sum of two components: (1)the core dipole moment which emerges from the unequal sharing of electrons in covalent bonds; (2)the surface charge dipole moment resulting from pH-dependent side chain partial charges. pKa shifts for each side chain amino acid are determined by the H++ server employing the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The net charge and dipole moment over a range of pH are calculated. The Oncley equation is used to predict the dielectric increment at arbitrary pH, temperature, and protein concentration.

  7. An Innocent Giant

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Lakhan Singh; Dhingra, Mandeep; Raghubanshi, Gunjan; Thami, Gurvinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum) is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy. PMID:25484426

  8. Axion induced oscillating electric dipole moments

    DOE PAGES

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-06-24

    In this study, the axion electromagnetic anomaly induces an oscillating electric dipole for any magnetic dipole. This is a low energy theorem which is a consequence of the space-time dependent cosmic background field of the axion. The electron will acquire an oscillating electric dipole of frequency ma and strength ~ 10-32 e-cm, within four orders of magnitude of the present standard model DC limit, and two orders of magnitude above the nucleon, assuming standard axion model and dark matter parameters. This may suggest sensitive new experimental venues for the axion dark matter search.

  9. Axion induced oscillating electric dipole moments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-06-24

    In this study, the axion electromagnetic anomaly induces an oscillating electric dipole for any magnetic dipole. This is a low energy theorem which is a consequence of the space-time dependent cosmic background field of the axion. The electron will acquire an oscillating electric dipole of frequency ma and strength ~ 10-32 e-cm, within four orders of magnitude of the present standard model DC limit, and two orders of magnitude above the nucleon, assuming standard axion model and dark matter parameters. This may suggest sensitive new experimental venues for the axion dark matter search.

  10. Formation number for vortex dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Vahid; Krueger, Paul S.

    2016-11-01

    This investigation considers the axisymmetric formation of two opposite sign concentric vortex rings from jet ejection between concentric cylinders. This arrangement is similar to planar flow in that the vortex rings will travel together when the gap between the cylinders is small, similar to a vortex dipole, but it has the advantage that the vortex motion is less constrained than the planar case (vortex stretching and vortex line curvature is allowed). The flow was simulated numerically at a jet Reynolds number of 1,000 (based on ΔR and the jet velocity), jet pulse length-to-gap ratio (L / ΔR) in the range 10-20, and gap-to-outer radius ratio (ΔR /Ro) in the range 0.01-0.1. Small gap ratios were chosen for comparison with 2D results. In contrast with 2D results, the closely paired vortices in this study exhibited pinch-off from the generating flow and finite formation numbers. The more complex flow evolution afforded by the axisymmetric model and its influence on the pinch-off process will be discussed. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1133876 and SMU. This supports are gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Coupled and uncoupled dipole models of nonlinear scattering.

    PubMed

    Balla, Naveen K; Yew, Elijah Y S; Sheppard, Colin J R; So, Peter T C

    2012-11-05

    Dipole models are one of the simplest numerical models to understand nonlinear scattering. Existing dipole model for second harmonic generation, third harmonic generation and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering assume that the dipoles which make up a scatterer do not interact with one another. Thus, this dipole model can be called the uncoupled dipole model. This dipole model is not sufficient to describe the effects of refractive index of a scatterer or to describe scattering at the edges of a scatterer. Taking into account the interaction between dipoles overcomes these short comings of the uncoupled dipole model. Coupled dipole model has been primarily used for linear scattering studies but it can be extended to predict nonlinear scattering. The coupled and uncoupled dipole models have been compared to highlight their differences. Results of nonlinear scattering predicted by coupled dipole model agree well with previously reported experimental results.

  12. Giant scrotal elephantiasis.

    PubMed

    Kuepper, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    How much can a man carry? Penoscrotal elephantiasis is a debilitating syndrome. This is a case report of a patient with giant genital elephantiasis secondary to long-standing lymphogranuloma venereum infection in Ethiopia. Complete surgical resection of the pathologic tissue and penile reconstruction was undertaken with good cosmetic and functional results.

  13. Electroluminescence of Giant Stretchability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Can Hui; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Chen, Yong Mei; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new type of electroluminescent device achieves giant stretchability by integrating electronic and ionic components. The device uses phosphor powders as electroluminescent materials, and hydrogels as stretchable and transparent ionic conductors. Subject to cyclic voltage, the phosphor powders luminesce, but the ionic conductors do not electrolyze. The device produces constant luminance when stretched up to an area strain of 1500%.

  14. Dipole-dipole induced global motion of Rydberg-dressed atom clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkin, M.; Wüster, S.; Möbius, S.; Eisfeld, A.; Rost, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    We consider two clouds of ground-state alkali atoms in two distinct hyperfine ground states. Each level is far off-resonantly coupled to a Rydberg state, which leads to dressed ground states with a weak admixture of the Rydberg state properties. Due to this admixture, for a proper choice of the Rydberg states, the atoms experience resonant dipole-dipole interactions that induce mechanical forces acting on all atoms within both clouds. This behaviour is in contrast to the dynamics predicted for bare dipole-dipole interactions between Rydberg superatoms, where only a single atom per cloud is subject to dipole-dipole induced motion (Möbius et al 2013 Phys. Rev. A 88 012716).

  15. Magnetic dipole moments for composite dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda, Alfredo; Barajas, Luis; Cembranos, Jose A.R. E-mail: luisedua@buffalo.edu

    2016-03-01

    We study neutral dark matter candidates with a nonzero magnetic dipole moment. We assume that they are composite states of new fermions related to the strong phase of a new gauge interaction. In particular, invoking a dark flavor symmetry, we analyze the composition structure of viable candidates depending on the assignations of hypercharge and the multiplets associated to the fundamental constituents of the extended sector. We determine the magnetic dipole moments for the neutral composite states in terms of their constituents masses.

  16. On the dipole moment of CO/+/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Certain, P. R.; Woods, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Results of self-consistent field calculations on neutral CO, its positive ion, and on neutral CN to verify an earlier estimate of the dipole moment of CO(+) in its ground super 2 Sigma state. Based on the above-mentioned calculations, direct evidence is obtained that the dipole moment (relative to the center of mass) is approximately 2.5 plus or minus 0.5 C, as previously determined by Kopelman and Klemperer (1962).

  17. LOG PERIODIC DIPOLE ARRAY WITH PARASITIC ELEMENTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The design and measured characteristics of dipole and monopole versions of a log periodic array with parasitic elements are discussed. In a dipole...for the elements to obtain log periodic performance of the anntenna. This design with parasitic elements lends itself to a monopole version of the...antenna which has a simplified feeding configuration. The result is a log periodic antenna design that can be used from high frequencies through microwave frequencies.

  18. Magnetic dipole interactions in crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Johnston, David

    2016-01-13

    The influence of magnetic dipole interactions (MDIs) on the magnetic properties of local-moment Heisenberg spin systems is investigated. A general formulation is presented for calculating the eigenvalues λ and eigenvectors μ ˆ of the MDI tensor of the magnetic dipoles in a line (one dimension, 1D), within a circle (2D) or a sphere (3D) of radius r surrounding a given moment μ → i for given magnetic propagation vectors k for collinear and coplanar noncollinear magnetic structures on both Bravais and non-Bravais spin lattices. Results are calculated for collinear ordering on 1D chains, 2D square and simple-hexagonal (triangular) Bravais lattices,more » 2D honeycomb and kagomé non-Bravais lattices, and 3D cubic Bravais lattices. The λ and μ ˆ values are compared with previously reported results. Calculations for collinear ordering on 3D simple tetragonal, body-centered tetragonal, and stacked triangular and honeycomb lattices are presented for c/a ratios from 0.5 to 3 in both graphical and tabular form to facilitate comparison of experimentally determined easy axes of ordering on these Bravais lattices with the predictions for MDIs. Comparisons with the easy axes measured for several illustrative collinear antiferromagnets (AFMs) are given. The calculations are extended to the cycloidal noncollinear 120 ° AFM ordering on the triangular lattice where λ is found to be the same as for collinear AFM ordering with the same k. The angular orientation of the ordered moments in the noncollinear coplanar AFM structure of GdB 4 with a distorted stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland spin-lattice geometry is calculated and found to be in disagreement with experimental observations, indicating the presence of another source of anisotropy. Similar calculations for the undistorted 2D and stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland lattices are reported. The thermodynamics of dipolar magnets are calculated using the Weiss molecular field theory for quantum spins, including the magnetic

  19. Magnetic dipole interactions in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of magnetic dipole interactions (MDIs) on the magnetic properties of local-moment Heisenberg spin systems is investigated. A general formulation is presented for calculating the eigenvalues λ and eigenvectors μ ̂ of the MDI tensor of the magnetic dipoles in a line (one dimension, 1D), within a circle (2D) or a sphere (3D) of radius r surrounding a given moment μ⃗i for given magnetic propagation vectors k for collinear and coplanar noncollinear magnetic structures on both Bravais and non-Bravais spin lattices. Results are calculated for collinear ordering on 1D chains, 2D square and simple-hexagonal (triangular) Bravais lattices, 2D honeycomb and kagomé non-Bravais lattices, and 3D cubic Bravais lattices. The λ and μ ̂ values are compared with previously reported results. Calculations for collinear ordering on 3D simple tetragonal, body-centered tetragonal, and stacked triangular and honeycomb lattices are presented for c /a ratios from 0.5 to 3 in both graphical and tabular form to facilitate comparison of experimentally determined easy axes of ordering on these Bravais lattices with the predictions for MDIs. Comparisons with the easy axes measured for several illustrative collinear antiferromagnets (AFMs) are given. The calculations are extended to the cycloidal noncollinear 120∘ AFM ordering on the triangular lattice where λ is found to be the same as for collinear AFM ordering with the same k. The angular orientation of the ordered moments in the noncollinear coplanar AFM structure of GdB4 with a distorted stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland spin-lattice geometry is calculated and found to be in disagreement with experimental observations, indicating the presence of another source of anisotropy. Similar calculations for the undistorted 2D and stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland lattices are reported. The thermodynamics of dipolar magnets are calculated using the Weiss molecular field theory for quantum spins, including the magnetic transition

  20. Magnetic dipole interactions in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, David

    2016-01-13

    The influence of magnetic dipole interactions (MDIs) on the magnetic properties of local-moment Heisenberg spin systems is investigated. A general formulation is presented for calculating the eigenvalues λ and eigenvectors μ ˆ of the MDI tensor of the magnetic dipoles in a line (one dimension, 1D), within a circle (2D) or a sphere (3D) of radius r surrounding a given moment μ i for given magnetic propagation vectors k for collinear and coplanar noncollinear magnetic structures on both Bravais and non-Bravais spin lattices. Results are calculated for collinear ordering on 1D chains, 2D square and simple-hexagonal (triangular) Bravais lattices, 2D honeycomb and kagomé non-Bravais lattices, and 3D cubic Bravais lattices. The λ and μ ˆ values are compared with previously reported results. Calculations for collinear ordering on 3D simple tetragonal, body-centered tetragonal, and stacked triangular and honeycomb lattices are presented for c/a ratios from 0.5 to 3 in both graphical and tabular form to facilitate comparison of experimentally determined easy axes of ordering on these Bravais lattices with the predictions for MDIs. Comparisons with the easy axes measured for several illustrative collinear antiferromagnets (AFMs) are given. The calculations are extended to the cycloidal noncollinear 120 ° AFM ordering on the triangular lattice where λ is found to be the same as for collinear AFM ordering with the same k. The angular orientation of the ordered moments in the noncollinear coplanar AFM structure of GdB 4 with a distorted stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland spin-lattice geometry is calculated and found to be in disagreement with experimental observations, indicating the presence of another source of anisotropy. Similar calculations for the undistorted 2D and stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland lattices are reported. The thermodynamics of dipolar magnets are calculated using the Weiss molecular field theory for quantum spins

  1. A Dipole Assisted IEC Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Prajakti Joshi Shrestha

    2005-11-28

    A potential opportunity to enhance Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion exists by augmenting it with a magnetic dipole configuration. The theory is that the dipole fields will enhance the plasma density in the center region of the IEC and the combined IEC and dipole confinement properties will reduce plasma losses. To demonstrate that a hybrid Dipole-IEC configuration can provide an improved neutron source vs. a stand alone IEC, a first model Dipole-IEC experiment was benchmarked against a reference IEC. A triple Langmuir probe was used to find the electron temperature and density. It was found that the magnetic field increases the electron density by a factor of 16, the electron temperature decreases in the presence of a magnetic field, the discharge voltage decreases in the presence of a magnetic field, the potential of the dipole strongly influences the densities obtained in the center. The experimental set-up and plasma diagnostics are discussed in detail, as well as the results, and the developmental issues.

  2. Dipole-moment-driven cooperative supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Chidambar; Bejagam, Karteek K; Senanayak, Satyaprasad P; Narayan, K S; Balasubramanian, S; George, Subi J

    2015-03-25

    While the mechanism of self-assembly of π-conjugated molecules has been well studied to gain control over the structure and functionality of supramolecular polymers, the intermolecular interactions underpinning it are poorly understood. Here, we study the mechanism of self-assembly of perylene bisimide derivatives possessing dipolar carbonate groups as linkers. It was observed that the combination of carbonate linkers and cholesterol/dihydrocholesterol self-assembling moieties led to a cooperative mechanism of self-assembly. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of an assembly in explicit solvent strongly suggest that the dipole-dipole interaction between the carbonate groups imparts a macro-dipolar character to the assembly. This is confirmed experimentally through the observation of a significant polarization in the bulk phase for molecules following a cooperative mechanism. The cooperativity is attributed to the presence of dipole-dipole interaction in the assembly. Thus, anisotropic long-range intermolecular interactions such as dipole-dipole interaction can serve as a way to obtain cooperative self-assembly and aid in rationalizing and predicting the mechanisms in various synthetic supramolecular polymers.

  3. electric dipole superconductor in bilayer exciton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qing-Feng; Jiang, Qing-Dong; Bao, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, X. C.

    Recently, it was reported that the bilayer exciton systems could exhibit many new phenomena, including the large bilayer counterflow conductivity, the Coulomb drag, etc. These phenomena imply the formation of exciton condensate superfluid state. On the other hand, it is now well known that the superconductor is the condensate superfluid state of the Cooper pairs, which can be viewed as electric monopoles. In other words, the superconductor state is the electric monopole condensate superfluid state. Thus, one may wonder whether there exists electric dipole superfluid state. In this talk, we point out that the exciton in a bilayer system can be considered as a charge neutral electric dipole. And we derive the London-type and Ginzburg-Landau-type equations of electric dipole superconductivity. From these equations, we discover the Meissner-type effect (against spatial variation of magnetic fields), and the dipole current Josephson effect. The frequency in the AC Josephson effect of the dipole current is equal to that in the normal (monopole) superconductor. These results can provide direct evidence for the formation of exciton superfluid state in the bilayer systems and pave new ways to obtain the electric dipole current. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by NBRP of China (2012CB921303 and 2015CB921102) and NSF-China under Grants Nos. 11274364 and 11574007.

  4. Separation of contributions of isovector E2 and E1 giant resonances in direct and inverse reactions with real and virtual photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Lapik, A. M.; Nedorezov, V. G.; Tulupov, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    A brief overview of the methods for separating the contributions of isovector electric quadrupole ( E2) and dominant dipole ( E1) giant resonances in atomic nuclei, which are excited in direct and inverse reactions with photons (real and virtual), is given. The basic parameters of isovector giant resonance E2, which were declared to date by applying some of these methods to the results with 208Pb, are also presented.

  5. Asteroseismology can reveal strong internal magnetic fields in red giant stars.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Stello, Dennis; Garcia, Rafael A; Bildsten, Lars

    2015-10-23

    Internal stellar magnetic fields are inaccessible to direct observations, and little is known about their amplitude, geometry, and evolution. We demonstrate that strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars can be identified with asteroseismology. The fields can manifest themselves via depressed dipole stellar oscillation modes, arising from a magnetic greenhouse effect that scatters and traps oscillation-mode energy within the core of the star. The Kepler satellite has observed a few dozen red giants with depressed dipole modes, which we interpret as stars with strongly magnetized cores. We find that field strengths larger than ~10(5) gauss may produce the observed depression, and in one case we infer a minimum core field strength of ≈10(7) gauss.

  6. Asteroseismology can reveal strong internal magnetic fields in red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Stello, Dennis; Garcia, Rafael A.; Bildsten, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Internal stellar magnetic fields are inaccessible to direct observations, and little is known about their amplitude, geometry, and evolution. We demonstrate that strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars can be identified with asteroseismology. The fields can manifest themselves via depressed dipole stellar oscillation modes, arising from a magnetic greenhouse effect that scatters and traps oscillation-mode energy within the core of the star. The Kepler satellite has observed a few dozen red giants with depressed dipole modes, which we interpret as stars with strongly magnetized cores. We find that field strengths larger than ~105 gauss may produce the observed depression, and in one case we infer a minimum core field strength of ≈107 gauss.

  7. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  8. Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gary S

    2016-11-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of giant cell arteritis, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  9. Direct summation of dipole-dipole interactions using the Wolf formalism.

    PubMed

    Stenqvist, Björn; Trulsson, Martin; Abrikosov, Alexei I; Lund, Mikael

    2015-07-07

    We present an expanded Wolf formalism for direct summation of long-range dipole-dipole interactions and rule-of-thumbs how to choose optimal spherical cutoff (Rc) and damping parameter (α). This is done by comparing liquid radial distribution functions, dipole-dipole orientation correlations, particle energies, and dielectric constants, with Ewald sums and the Reaction field method. The resulting rule states that ασ < 1 and αRc > 3 for reduced densities around ρ(∗) = 1 where σ is the particle size. Being a pair potential, the presented approach scales linearly with system size and is applicable to simulations involving point dipoles such as the Stockmayer fluid and polarizable water models.

  10. Plasmon-Induced Resonant Energy Transfer: a coherent dipole-dipole coupling mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Alan D.; Cushing, Scott K.; Li, Jiangtian; Wu, Nianqiang

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor core-shell nanoparticles have been used to demonstrate a dipole-dipole coupling mechanism that is entirely dependent on the dephasing time of the localized plasmonic resonance. Consequently, the short-time scale of the plasmons leads to broad energy uncertainty that allows for excitation of charge carriers in the semiconductor via stimulation of photons with energies below the energy band gap. In addition, this coherent energy transfer process overcomes interfacial losses often associated with direct charge transfer. This work explores the efficiency of the energy transfer process, the dipole-dipole coupling strength with dipole separation, shell thickness and plasmonic resonance overlap. We demonstrate limits where the coherent nature of the coupling is switched off and charge transfer processes can dominate. Experiments are performed using transient absorption spectroscopy. Results are compared to calculations using a quantum master equation. These nanostructures show strong potential for improving solar light-harvesting for power and fuel generation.

  11. Electric dipole transition moments and permanent dipole moments for spin-orbit configuration interaction wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roostaei, B.; Ermler, W. C.

    2012-03-01

    A procedure for calculating electric dipole transition moments and permanent dipole moments from spin-orbit configuration interaction (SOCI) wave functions has been developed in the context of the COLUMBUS ab initio electronic structure programs. The SOCI procedure requires relativistic effective core potentials and their corresponding spin-orbit coupling operators to define the molecular Hamiltonian, electric dipole transition moment and permanent dipole moment matrices. The procedure can be used for any molecular system for which the COLUMBUS SOCI circuits are applicable. Example applications are reported for transition moments and dipole moments for a series of electronic states of LiBe and LiSr defined in diatomic relativistic ωω-coupling.

  12. Pygmy Dipole Strength in Exotic Nuclei and the Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Klimkiewicz, A.; Adrich, P.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Fallot, M.; Boretzky, K.; Aksouh, F.; Chatillon, A.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Emling, H.; Ershova, O.; Geissel, H.; Gorska, M.; Heil, M.; Hellstroem, M.; Jones, K. L.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Mahata, K.; Simon, H.

    2009-08-26

    A concentration of dipole strength at energies below the giant dipole resonance was observed in neutron-rich nuclei around {sup 132}Sn in an experiment using the FRS-LAND setup. This so-called 'pygmy' dipole strength can be related to the parameters of the symmetry energy and to the neutron skin thickness on the grounds of a relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. Using this ansatz and the experimental findings for {sup 130}Sn and {sup 132}Sn, we derive a value of the symmetry energy pressure of p-bar{sub 0} = 2.2+-0.5 MeV/fm{sup 3}. Neutron skin thicknesses of R{sub n}-R{sub p} 0.23+-0.03 fm and 0.24+-0.03 fm for {sup 130}Sn and {sup 132}Sn, respectively, have been determined. Preliminary results on {sup 68}Ni from a similar experiment using an improved setup indicate an enhanced cross section at low energies, while the results for {sup 58}Ni are in accordance with results from photoabsorption measurements.

  13. Photoinduced dipoles and charge pairs in condensed phase. Progress report, November 14, 1993--November 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-31

    Efforts during the past year centered on expanding the understanding of the photocurrent transients produced by photoinduced dipoles in solution. In addition to exploring intramolecular charge transfer in a molecule which exhibits a giant dipole, the authors began an intensive look at intermolecular electron transfer between photoexcited electron donors and acceptors. The three projects which are farthest along are described in abstract form in the paragraphs which follow. The first makes use of the generous gift from Dr. Michael Wasielewski (Argonne National Laboratory) of a carefully constructed molecular triad which exemplifies artificial photosynthesis. Measurements reveal that the triad possesses a substantial ground state dipole moment as well as the long-lived charge separation which was expected for the excited state. The second and third abstracts describe the quantification of fractional charge transfer in excited state complexes (exciplexes). All exciplexes are not the same and the authors found that the fractional electron transfer increases with reaction exoergicity. The first and second abstracts describe work which is nearly ready to be submitted. The third outlines the mechanistically fascinating story of how one donor replaces another in an excited state complex. Their tentative conclusion is that the mechanism depends on reaction exoergicity.

  14. Sound scattering by a vortex dipole.

    PubMed

    Naugolnykh, Konstantin

    2013-04-01

    Sound scattering by a system of two counter-rotating vortices (Lamb dipole) is considered, using the effective approach of Pitaevskii [J. Exp. Theor. Phys (USSR) 35, 1271-1275 (1958); Sov. Phys. JETP 85, 888-890 (1959)], based on application of the asymptotic representation of the scattering Green function, the Dirac delta function modeling of the vortex, and the Fourier transformation of the vector of scattering. The sound frequency is supposed to be low. The directivity pattern of the radiation, scattered by the Lamb dipole is obtained. There is no singularity in scattering field in this case as it must be for the vorticity with zero circulation, so the dipole is a more appropriate object for the approximation used.

  15. Bunched beam longitudinal instability: Coherent dipole motion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-04-23

    In this paper, the authors present a new formulation for the longitudinal coherent dipole motion, where a quadrature response of the environmental impedance is shown to be the effective longitudinal impedance for the beam instability. The Robinson-Pedersen formulation for the longitudinal dipole motion is also presented, the difference of the two approaches is discussed in the comparison. The results by using the Sacherer integral equation for the coherent dipole motion can generate the same results as by using the other two approaches, except for a scaling difference. The formulation is further generalized to the rigid bunch motion using signal analysis method, where a form factor shows up naturally. Finally, the formulation is applied to solve the coupled bunch instabilities. Examples of the AGS Booster and the AGS coupled bunch instabilities are used to illustrate the applications of the formulation.

  16. Thermodynamics of systems of aligned dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Blume, D.

    2013-05-01

    The high-temperature thermodynamics of two-component Fermi gases with interspecies s-wave scattering length is well described by the virial equation of state. This work determines the virial equation of state of weakly-interacting dipolar Bose and Fermi gases under external spherically symmetric confinement. The second-order virial coefficients for two identical dipolar bosons, two identical dipolar fermions and two distinguishable dipoles are calculated from the trap energy spectra. Away from resonance, we employ the Born approximation and find that the virial coefficient for two identical fermions depends quadratically on the dipole length. This suggests that dipolar effects are suppressed in the high temperature limit. Fine tuning the scattering properties of two identical fermions, we identify conditions in which the second-order virial coefficient depends linearly on the dipole length. Analytical expressions are derived and corroborated by numerical calculations. We acknowledge support from the NSF.

  17. Color dipole cross section and inelastic structure function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yu Seon; Kim, C. S.; Luu, Minh Vu; Reno, Mary Hall

    2014-11-01

    Instead of starting from a theoretically motivated form of the color dipole cross section in the dipole picture of deep inelastic scattering, we start with a parametrization of the deep inelastic structure function for electromagnetic scattering with protons, and then extract the color dipole cross section. Using the parametrizations of F 2(ξ = x or W 2 , Q 2) by Donnachie-Landshoff and Block et al., we find the dipole cross section from an approximate form of the presumed dipole cross section convoluted with the perturbative photon wave function for virtual photon splitting into a color dipole with massless quarks. The color dipole cross section determined this way reproduces the original structure function within about 10% for 0 .1 GeV2 ≤ Q 2 ≤10 GeV2. We discuss the dipole cross section at large and small dipole sizes and compare our results with other parametrizations.

  18. Suppression of Quadrupole and Octupole Modes in Red Giants Observed by Kepler *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stello, Dennis; Cantiello, Matteo; Fuller, Jim; Garcia, Rafael A.; Huber, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    An exciting new theoretical result shows that observing suppression of dipole oscillation modes in red giant stars can be used to detect strong magnetic fields in the stellar cores. A fundamental facet of the theory is that nearly all the mode energy leaking into the core is trapped by the magnetic greenhouse effect. This results in clear predictions for how the mode visibility changes as a star evolves up the red giant branch, and how that depends on stellar mass, spherical degree, and mode lifetime. Here, we investigate the validity of these predictions with a focus on the visibility of different spherical degrees. We find that mode suppression weakens for higher degree modes with a reduction in the quadrupole mode visibility of up to 49%, and no detectable suppression of octupole modes, in agreement with theory. We find evidence for the influence of increasing mode lifetimes on the visibilities along the red giant branch, in agreement with previous independent observations. These results support the theory that strong internal magnetic fields cause suppression of non-radial modes in red giants. We also find preliminary evidence that stars with suppressed dipole modes on average have slightly lower metallicity than normal stars.

  19. Photoelectron spectroscopy and the dipole approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmers, O.; Hansen, D.L.; Wang, H.

    1997-04-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is a powerful technique because it directly probes, via the measurement of photoelectron kinetic energies, orbital and band structure in valence and core levels in a wide variety of samples. The technique becomes even more powerful when it is performed in an angle-resolved mode, where photoelectrons are distinguished not only by their kinetic energy, but by their direction of emission as well. Determining the probability of electron ejection as a function of angle probes the different quantum-mechanical channels available to a photoemission process, because it is sensitive to phase differences among the channels. As a result, angle-resolved photoemission has been used successfully for many years to provide stringent tests of the understanding of basic physical processes underlying gas-phase and solid-state interactions with radiation. One mainstay in the application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is the well-known electric-dipole approximation for photon interactions. In this simplification, all higher-order terms, such as those due to electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole interactions, are neglected. As the photon energy increases, however, effects beyond the dipole approximation become important. To best determine the range of validity of the dipole approximation, photoemission measurements on a simple atomic system, neon, where extra-atomic effects cannot play a role, were performed at BL 8.0. The measurements show that deviations from {open_quotes}dipole{close_quotes} expectations in angle-resolved valence photoemission are observable for photon energies down to at least 0.25 keV, and are quite significant at energies around 1 keV. From these results, it is clear that non-dipole angular-distribution effects may need to be considered in any application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy that uses x-ray photons of energies as low as a few hundred eV.

  20. Waves in space plasma dipole antenna subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The Waves In Space Plasma (WISP) flight experiment requires a 50-meter-long deployable dipole antenna subsystem (DASS) to radiate radio frequencies from the STS Orbiter cargo bay. The transmissions are to excite outer ionospheric plasma between the dipole and a free-flying receiver (Spartan) for scientific purposes. This report describes the singular DASS design requirements and how the resulting design satisfies them. A jettison latch is described in some detail. The latch releases the antenna in case of any problems which might prevent the bay doors from closing for re-entry and landing of the Orbiter.

  1. The viscous modulation of Lamb's dipole vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Fliert, B. W.

    1996-07-01

    A description of the adiabatic decay of the Lamb dipolar vortex is motivated by a variational characterization of the dipole. The parameters in the description are the values of the entrophy and linear momentum integrals, which change in time due to the dissipation. It is observed that the dipole dilates during the decay process [radius R˜(νt)1/2], while the amplitude of the vortex and its translation speed diminish in time proportional to (νt)-3/2 and (νt)-1.

  2. Dynamo action and magnetic activity of the giant star Pollux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Palacios, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Recent spectropolarimetric observations of the giant star Pollux have revealed that it possesses a weak global magnetic field of the order of a Gauss. Using 3-D nonlinear MHD simulations performed with the ASH code we study the source of this global magnetic field in this slowly rotating giant star (Omega*=Omega_sun/20). We find that the extended convective envelope is able to generate a multi-scales magnetic field reaching of the order of 10% of the kinetic energy contained in the envelope. This global field acts such as to suppress the strong differential rotation present in the purely hydrodynamical progenitor simulation. When filtering the large scale magnetic field components (dipole, quadrupole) we find magnetic field of the order of a few Gauss, hence in qualitative agreeement with observations. Our study confirms that such slowly rotating convective giants are likely to possess global magnetic field maintained through contemporaneous dynamo action and not as the vestige of their past main sequence activity.

  3. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.

    2016-10-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics (AO) imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order AO systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young (≈5-300 Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1 and 3.0 M ⊙, the overall occurrence rate of 5-13 M Jup companions at orbital distances of 30-300 au is {0.6}-0.5+0.7 % assuming hot-start evolutionary models. The most massive giant planets regularly accessible to direct imaging are about as rare as hot Jupiters are around Sun-like stars. Dividing this sample into individual stellar mass bins does not reveal any statistically significant trend in planet frequency with host mass: giant planets are found around {2.8}-2.3+3.7 % of BA stars, <4.1% of FGK stars, and <3.9% of M dwarfs. Looking forward, extreme AO systems and the next generation of ground- and space-based telescopes with smaller inner working angles and deeper detection limits will increase the pace of discovery to ultimately map the demographics, composition, evolution, and origin of planets spanning a broad range of masses and ages.

  4. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  5. Giant left ventricular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sumi; Garg, Nadish; Xie, Gong-Yuan; Dellsperger, Kevin C

    2010-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysm (PS) is an uncommon, often fatal complication associated with myocardial infarction, cardiothoracic surgery, trauma, and, rarely, infective endocarditis. A 28-year-old man with prior history of bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement presented with congestive heart failure and bacteremia with Abiotrophia granulitica. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed bioprosthesis dysfunction, large vegetations, mitral regurgitation, and probable PS. Cardiac and chest CT confirmed a PS communicating with the left ventricle Patient had pulseless electrical activity and died. Autopsy showed a giant PS with layered thrombus and pseudo-endothelialized cavity. Our case highlights the importance of multimodality imaging as an important tool in management of PS.

  6. Dipole-dipole interaction in a quantum dot and metallic nanorod hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Schindel, Daniel G.; Hatef, Ali

    2011-10-01

    We have studied quantum coherence and interference phenomena in a quantum dot (QD)-metallic nanorod (MNR) hybrid system. Probe and control laser fields are applied to the hybrid system. Induced dipole moments are created in the QD and the MNR, and they interact with each other via the dipole-dipole interaction. Using the density matrix method, it was found that the power spectrum of MNR has two transparent, states and they can be switched to one transparent state by the control field. Ultrafast switching and sensing nanodevices could be produced using this model.

  7. Electromagnetic Force on a Moving Dipole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kholmetskii, Alexander L.; Missevitch, Oleg V.; Yarman, T.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the force acting on a moving dipole due to an external electromagnetic field and show that the expression derived in Vekstein (1997 "Eur. J. Phys." 18 113) is erroneous and suggest the correct equation for the description of this force. We also discuss the physical meaning of the relativistic transformation of current for a closed…

  8. The Case of the Disappearing Magnetic Dipole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, W.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of an oscillating magnetic dipole at the centre of a lossless dielectric spherical shell is considered. For simplicity, the free-space wavelength is taken to be much greater than the shell radii, but the relative permittivity [epsilon][subscript r] of the shell is taken as much greater than unity, so the wavelength in the shell could…

  9. Hertzian Dipole Radiation over Isotropic Magnetodielectric Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    public release; distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This report investigates dipole antennas printed on grounded...engineering of thin planar antennas . Since these materials often require complicated constitutive equations to describe their properties rigorously, the...material properties and substrate thickness. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Magnetodielectrics, planar antennas , boundary value problems, contour integration, branch

  10. A Microstrip Reflect Array Using Crossed Dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozar, David M.; Targonski, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    Microstrip reflect arrays offer a flat profile and light weight, combined with many of the electrical characteristics of reflector antennas. Previous work [1]-[7] has demonstrated a variety of microstrip reflect arrays, using different elements at a range of frequencies. In this paper we describe the use of crossed dipoles as reflecting elements in a microstrip reflectarray. Theory of the solution will be described, with experimental results for a 6" square reflectarray operating at 28 GHz. The performance of crossed dipoles will be directly compared with microstrip patches, in terms of bandwidth and loss. We also comment on the principle of operation of reflectarray elements, including crossed dipoles, patches of variable length, and patch elements with tuning stubs. This research was prompted by the proposed concept of overlaying a flat printed reflectarray on the surface of a spacecraft solar panel. Combining solar panel and antenna apertures in this way would lead to a reduction in weight and simpler deployment, with some loss of flexibility in independently pointing the solar panel and the antenna. Using crossed dipoles as reflectarray elements will minimize the aperture blockage of the solar cells, in contrast to the use of elements such as microstrip patches.

  11. Conceptual design of Dipole Research Experiment (DREX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingmei, XIAO; Zhibin, WANG; Xiaogang, WANG; Chijie, XIAO; Xiaoyi, YANG; Jinxing, ZHENG

    2017-03-01

    A new terrella-like device for laboratory simulation of inner magnetosphere plasmas, Dipole Research Experiment, is scheduled to be built at the Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), China, as a major state scientific research facility for space physics studies. It is designed to provide a ground experimental platform to reproduce the inner magnetosphere to simulate the processes of trapping, acceleration, and transport of energetic charged particles restrained in a dipole magnetic field configuration. The scaling relation of hydromagnetism between the laboratory plasma of the device and the geomagnetosphere plasma is applied to resemble geospace processes in the Dipole Research Experiment plasma. Multiple plasma sources, different kinds of coils with specific functions, and advanced diagnostics are designed to be equipped in the facility for multi-functions. The motivation, design criteria for the Dipole Research Experiment experiments and the means applied to generate the plasma of desired parameters in the laboratory are also described. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11505040, 11261140326 and 11405038), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Nos. 2016M591518, 2015M570283) and Project Supported by Natural Scientific Research Innovation Foundation in Harbin Institute of Technology (No. 2017008).

  12. Conductor Development for High Field Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, R.M.; Dietderich, D.R.; Higley, H.C.

    2000-03-01

    Historically, improvements in dipole magnet performance have been paced by improvements in the superconductor available for use in these magnets. The critical conductor performance parameters for dipole magnets include current density, piece length, effective filament size, and cost. Each of these parameters is important for efficient, cost effective dipoles, with critical current density being perhaps the most important. Several promising magnet designs for the next hadron collider or a muon collider require fields of 12 T or higber, i.e. beyond the reach of NbTi. The conductor options include Nb{sub 3}Sn, Nb{sub 3}Al, or the high temperature superconductors. Although these conductors have the potential to provide the combination of performance and cost required, none of them have been developed sufficiently at this point to satisfy all the requirements. This paper will review the status of each class of advanced conductor and discuss the remaining problems that require solutions before these new conductors can be considered as practical. In particular, the plans for a new program to develop Nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Al conductors for high energy physics applications will be presented. Also, the development of a multikiloamp Bi-2212 cable for dipole magnet applications will be reported.

  13. Whistler-Mode Radiation from a Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.

    1999-01-01

    Bistatic observations of an active dipole in a space plasma were made during the suborbital tethered experiment OEDIPUS C, carried out on a sounding rocket flight in late 1995. Throughout the flight, whistler-mode waves were transmitted at 25 kHz from a 19-m dipole on the forward payload to a 13-m dipole on the aft payload. This frequency was very much less than the plasma frequency fp, which in turn lay well below the gyrofrequency fc for most of the flight. The change of fp with time caused the receiver position to be swept through the 25-kHz group resonance cone during a segment of the flight. Signal strengths were found to be enhanced along the group cone, as predicted by theory. Observed radiated levels are about a hundred times greater than theoretical predictions based on independent estimates of the driving-point current. The modulation of the received signal caused by the spin of the receiving dipole was consistent with the theoretical expectation that the quasielectrostatic electric field is polarized predominantly along the wave-vector direction

  14. Dipole nano-laser: Theory and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ghannam, T.

    2014-03-31

    In this paper we outline the main quantum properties of the system of nano-based laser called Dipole Nano-Laser emphasizing mainly on its ability to produce coherent light and for different configurations such as different embedding materials and subjecting it to an external classical electric field.

  15. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  16. Giant extragenital Bowen's disease.

    PubMed

    Bakardzhiev, Ilko; Chokoeva, Anastasiya Atanasova; Tchernev, Georgi

    2015-12-01

    Giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen are extremely rare. The already described cases in the word literature are most commonly with periungual localization, as well as located on the foot and neck area. The clinical manifestation is presented most commonly by non-specific erythematous to erythematous-squamous plaques or papules, which is confusing to the clinician. From the pathogenic point of view, it is important to be confirmed or rejected the presence of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in each case of affected patient, as this information is mandatory in respect to the adequate selection of the subsequent regimen. If HPVs are detected, systemic antiviral therapy could be initiated to reduce the size of the lesions before subsequent surgical eradication. A postoperative prevention through vaccination could be also considered additionally. In cases of HPV-negative giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen (as in the described patient), the focus should be on local immunomodulation by substances such as imiquimod, which reduce the size of the lesions, thereby creating optimal opportunities for their future surgical eradication. Other possible options described in the literature include topical application of 5-fluorouracil, photodynamic therapy, cryotherapy, and laser therapy (carbon dioxide laser). The choice of the most appropriate regimen should have been an individual decision of the clinician, considering also the location and the extent of the lesion.

  17. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  18. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  19. Reinflating Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Two new, large gas-giant exoplanets have been discovered orbiting close to their host stars. A recent study examining these planets and others like them may help us to better understand what happens to close-in hot Jupiters as their host stars reach the end of their main-sequence lives.OversizedGiantsUnbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-65b. [Adapted from Hartman et al. 2016]The discovery of HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, two new transiting hot Jupiters, is intriguing. These planets have periods of just under 3 days and masses of roughly 0.5 and 0.8 times that of Jupiter, but their sizes are whats really interesting: they have inflated radii of 1.89 and 1.59 times that of Jupiter.These two planets, discovered using the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network (HATNet) in Arizona and Hawaii, mark the latest in an ever-growing sample of gas-giant exoplanets with radii larger than expected based on theoretical planetary structure models.What causes this discrepancy? Did the planets just fail to contract to the expected size when they were initially formed, or were they reinflated later in their lifetimes? If the latter, how? These are questions that scientists are only now starting to be able to address using statistics of the sample of close-in, transiting planets.Unbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-66b. [Hartman et al. 2016]Exploring Other PlanetsLed by Joel Hartman (Princeton University), the team that discovered HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b has examined these planets observed parameters and those of dozens of other known close-in, transiting exoplanets discovered with a variety of transiting exoplanet missions: HAT, WASP, Kepler, TrES, and KELT. Hartman and collaborators used this sample to draw conclusions about what causes some of these planets to have such large radii.The team found that there is a statistically significant correlation between the radii of close-in giant planets and the fractional ages of their host stars (i.e., the stars age divided by its full

  20. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  1. BKT phase transition in a 2D system with long-range dipole-dipole interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedichev, P. O.; Men'shikov, L. I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider phase transitions in 2D XY-like systems with long-range dipole-dipole interactions and demonstrate that BKT-type phase transition always occurs separating the ordered (ferroelectric) and the disordered (paraelectric) phases. The low-temperature phase corresponds to a thermal state with bound vortex-antivortex pairs characterized by linear attraction at large distances. Using the Maier-Schwabl topological charge model, we show that bound vortex pairs polarize and screen the vortex-antivortex interaction, leaving only the logarithmic attraction at sufficiently large separations between the vortices. At higher temperatures the pairs dissociate and the phase transition similar to BKT occurs, though at a larger temperature than in a system without the dipole-dipole interaction.

  2. Master equation with quantized atomic motion including dipole-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damanet, François; Braun, Daniel; Martin, John

    2016-05-01

    We derive a markovian master equation for the internal dynamics of an ensemble of two-level atoms including all effects related to the quantization of their motion. Our equation provides a unifying picture of the consequences of recoil and indistinguishability of atoms beyond the Lamb-Dicke regime on both their dissipative and conservative dynamics, and is relevant for experiments with ultracold trapped atoms. We give general expressions for the decay rates and the dipole-dipole shifts for any motional states, and we find analytical formulas for a number of relevant states (Gaussian states, Fock states and thermal states). In particular, we show that the dipole-dipole interactions and cooperative photon emission can be modulated through the external state of motion. The effects predicted should be experimentally observable with Rydberg atoms. FD would like to thank the F.R.S.-FNRS for financial support. FD is a FRIA Grant holder of the Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique-FNRS.

  3. Pygmy dipole response of proton-rich argon nuclei in random-phase approximation and no-core shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, C.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Caurier, E.; Langanke, K.

    2008-02-15

    The occurrence of a pygmy dipole resonance in proton rich {sup 32,34}Ar is studied using the unitary correlator operator method interaction V{sub UCOM}, based on Argonne V18. Predictions from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and the shell model in a no-core basis are compared. It is found that the inclusion of configuration mixing up to two-particles-two-holes broadens the pygmy strength slightly and reduces sensibly its strength, as compared to the RPA predictions. For {sup 32}Ar, a clear peak associated with a pygmy resonance is found. For {sup 34}Ar, the pygmy states are obtained close to the giant dipole resonance and mix with it.

  4. Evidence of dynamical dipole excitation in the fusion-evaporation of the 40Ca+152Sm heavy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Alba, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Agodi, C.; Baran, V.; Boiano, A.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Emanuele, U.; Farinon, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; Inglima, G.; La Commara, M.; Martin, B.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Rizzo, C.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2016-04-01

    The excitation of the dynamical dipole mode along the fusion path was investigated for the first time in the formation of a heavy compound nucleus in the A ˜190 mass region. The compound nucleus was formed at identical conditions of excitation energy and spin from two entrance channels: the charge-asymmetric 40Ca+152Sm and the nearly charge-symmetric 48Ca+144Sm at Elab=11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. High-energy γ rays and light charged particles were measured in coincidence with evaporation residues by means of the MEDEA multidetector array (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Italy) coupled to four parallel plate avalanche counters. The charged particle multiplicity spectra and angular distributions were used to pin down the average excitation energy, the average mass, and the average charge of the compound nucleus. The γ -ray multiplicity spectrum and angular distribution related to the nearly charge-symmetric channel were employed to obtain new data on the giant dipole resonance in the compound nucleus. The dynamical dipole mode excitation in the charge-asymmetric channel was evidenced, in a model-independent way, by comparing the γ -ray multiplicity spectra and angular distributions of the two entrance channels with each other. Calculations of the dynamical dipole mode in the 40Ca+152Sm channel, based on a collective bremsstrahlung analysis of the reaction dynamics, are presented. Possible interesting implications in the superheavy-element quest are discussed.

  5. Competition between finite-size effects and dipole-dipole interactions in few-atom systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damanet, François; Martin, John

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the competition between finite-size effects (i.e. discernibility of particles) and dipole-dipole interactions in few-atom systems coupled to the electromagnetic field in vacuum. We consider two hallmarks of cooperative effects, superradiance and subradiance, and compute for each the rate of energy radiated by the atoms and the coherence of the atomic state during the time evolution. We adopt a statistical approach in order to extract the typical behaviour of the atomic dynamics and average over random atomic distributions in spherical containers with prescribed {k}0R with k 0 the radiation wavenumber and R the average interatomic distance. Our approach allows us to highlight the tradeoff between finite-size effects and dipole-dipole interactions in superradiance/subradiance. In particular, we show the existence of an optimal value of {k}0R for which the superradiant intensity and coherence pulses are the less affected by dephasing effects induced by dipole-dipole interactions and finite-size effects.

  6. A precise measurement of the muon neutrino-nucleon inclusive charged current cross section off an isoscalar target in the energy range 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Mishra, S. R.; Godley, A.; Petti, R.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; de Santo, A.; di Lella, L.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Kim, J. J.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kulagin, S.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Ling, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubič, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Popov, B.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Samoylov, O.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Seaton, M.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.; NOMAD Collaboration

    2008-02-01

    We present a measurement of the muon neutrino-nucleon inclusive charged current cross section, off an isoscalar target, in the neutrino energy range 2.5 ⩽Eν ⩽ 40 GeV. The significance of this measurement is its precision, ±4% in 2.5 ⩽Eν ⩽ 10 GeV, and ±2.6% in 10 ⩽Eν ⩽ 40 GeV regions, where significant uncertainties in previous experiments still exist, and its importance to the current and proposed long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  7. A precise measurement of the muon neutrino nucleon inclusive charged current cross section off an isoscalar target in the energy range 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NOMAD Collaboration; Wu, Q.; Mishra, S. R.; Godley, A.; Petti, R.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; de Santo, A.; di Lella, L.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Kim, J. J.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kulagin, S.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Ling, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubič, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Popov, B.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Samoylov, O.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Seaton, M.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2008-02-01

    We present a measurement of the muon neutrino nucleon inclusive charged current cross section, off an isoscalar target, in the neutrino energy range 2.5⩽E⩽40 GeV. The significance of this measurement is its precision, ±4% in 2.5⩽E⩽10 GeV, and ±2.6% in 10⩽E⩽40 GeV regions, where significant uncertainties in previous experiments still exist, and its importance to the current and proposed long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  8. A new method for the asteroseismic determination of the evolutionary state of red-giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, Yvonne; Hekker, Saskia; Basu, Sarbani; Davies, Guy R.

    2017-04-01

    Determining the ages of red-giant stars is a key problem in stellar astrophysics. One of the difficulties in this determination is to know the evolutionary state of the individual stars - i.e. have they started to burn Helium in their cores? That is the topic of this paper. Asteroseismic data provide a route to achieving this information. What we present here is a highly autonomous way of determining the evolutionary state from an analysis of the power spectrum of the light curve. The method is fast and efficient and can provide results for a large number of stars. It uses the structure of the dipole-mode oscillations, which have a mixed character in red-giant stars, to determine some measures that are used in the categorization. It does not require that all the individual components of any given mode be separately characterized. Some 6604 red-giant stars have been classified. Of these, 3566 are determined to be on the red-giant branch, 2077 are red-clump and 439 are secondary-clump stars. We do not specifically identify the low-metallicity, horizontal-branch stars. The difference between red-clump and secondary-clump stars is dependent on the manner in which Helium burning is first initiated. We discuss that the way the boundary between these classifications is set may lead to mis-categorization in a small number of stars. The remaining 522 stars were not classified either because they lacked sufficient power in the dipole modes (so-called depressed dipole modes) or because of conflicting values in the parameters.

  9. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    PubMed

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  10. Giant resonances: Progress, new directions, new challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, J.R.; Beene, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A review of some recent developments in the field of giant multipole resonances is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on directions that the authors feel will be followed in this field during the next several years. In particular, the use of high-energy heavy ions to excite the giant resonances is shown to provide exciting new capabilities for giant resonance studies. Among subjects covered are: Coulomb excitation of giant resonances, photon decay of giant resonances, the recent controversy over the identity of the giant monopole resonance, the most recent value for incompressibility of nuclear matter from analysis of giant monopole data, the isospin character of the 63 A/sup /minus/1/3/ GQR, agreement between (e,e/prime/) and (hadron, hadron/prime/) excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance, prospects for multiphonon giant resonance observation, and isolation of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance. 55 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. A giant Ordovician anomalocaridid.

    PubMed

    Van Roy, Peter; Briggs, Derek E G

    2011-05-26

    Anomalocaridids, giant lightly sclerotized invertebrate predators, occur in a number of exceptionally preserved early and middle Cambrian (542-501 million years ago) biotas and have come to symbolize the unfamiliar morphologies displayed by stem organisms in faunas of the Burgess Shale type. They are characterized by a pair of anterior, segmented appendages, a circlet of plates around the mouth, and an elongate segmented trunk lacking true tergites with a pair of flexible lateral lobes per segment. Disarticulated body parts, such as the anterior appendages and oral circlet, had been assigned to a range of taxonomic groups--but the discovery of complete specimens from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale showed that these disparate elements all belong to a single kind of animal. Phylogenetic analyses support a position of anomalocaridids in the arthropod stem, as a sister group to the euarthropods. The anomalocaridids were the largest animals in Cambrian communities. The youngest unequivocal examples occur in the middle Cambrian Marjum Formation of Utah but an arthropod retaining some anomalocaridid characteristics is present in the Devonian of Germany. Here we report the post-Cambrian occurrence of anomalocaridids, from the Early Ordovician (488-472 million years ago) Fezouata Biota in southeastern Morocco, including specimens larger than any in Cambrian biotas. These giant animals were an important element of some marine communities for about 30 million years longer than previously realized. The Moroccan specimens confirm the presence of a dorsal array of flexible blades attached to a transverse rachis on the trunk segments; these blades probably functioned as gills.

  12. The Antarctic dipole and its predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaojun; Martinson, Douglas G.

    This study investigates the nature of interannual variability of Antarctic sea ice and its relationship with the tropical climate. We find that the dominant interannual variance structure in the sea ice edge and surface air temperature fields is organized as a quasi-stationary wave which we call the “Antarctic Dipole” (ADP). It is characterized by an out-of-phase relationship between the ice and temperature anomalies in the central/eastern Pacific and Atlantic sectors of the Antarctic. The dipole consists of a strong standing mode and a weaker propagating motion within each basin's ice field. It has the same wavelength as the Antarctic Circumpolar Wave (ACW) and dominates the ACW variance. The dipole is clearly associated with tropical ENSO events; it can be predicted with moderate skill using linear regression involving surface temperature two to four months ahead. The prediction performs better in extreme warm/cold years, and best in La Niña years.

  13. Generation of squeezing: magnetic dipoles on cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, Hyojun; Singh, Swati; Steinke, Steven; Meystre, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the generation of motional squeezed states in a nano-mechanical cantilever. Our model system consists of a nanoscale cantilever - whose center-of-mass motion is initially cooled to its quantum mechanical ground state - magnetically coupled a classically driven mechanical tuning fork. We show that the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction can produce significant phonon squeezing of the center-of-mass motion of the cantilever, and evaluate the effect of various dissipation channels, including the coupling of the cantilever to a heat bath and phase and amplitude fluctuations in the oscillating field driving the tuning fork. US National Science Foundation, the US Army Research Office, DARPA ORCHID program through a grant from AFOSR.

  14. Revisiting the NVSS number count dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Prabhakar; Nusser, Adi E-mail: adi@physics.technion.ac.il

    2016-03-01

    We present a realistic modeling of the dipole component of the projected sky distribution of NVSS radio galaxies. The modeling relies on mock catalogs generated within the context of ΛCDM cosmology, in the linear regime of structure formation. After removing the contribution from the solar motion, the mocks show that the remaining observed signal is mostly (70%) due to structures within z ∼< 0.1. The amplitude of the model signal depends on the bias factor b of the NVSS mock galaxies. For sources with flux density, S > 15 mJy, the bias recipe inferred from higher order moments is consistent with the observed dipole signal at 2.12σ. Flux thresholds above 20 mJy yield a disagreement close to the 3σ level. A constant high bias, b = 3 is needed to mitigate the tension to the ∼ 2.3σ level.

  15. The midpoint between dipole and parton showers

    SciTech Connect

    Höche, Stefan; Prestel, Stefan

    2015-09-28

    We present a new parton-shower algorithm. Borrowing from the basic ideas of dipole cascades, the evolution variable is judiciously chosen as the transverse momentum in the soft limit. This leads to a very simple analytic structure of the evolution. A weighting algorithm is implemented that allows one to consistently treat potentially negative values of the splitting functions and the parton distributions. Thus, we provide two independent, publicly available implementations for the two event generators PYTHIA and SHERPA.

  16. Pygmy dipole response in 238U nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, Ekber; Kuliev, Ali Akbar; Quliyev, Huseynqulu

    2017-02-01

    The presence of the El pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in the actinide nucleus 238U was shown via QRPA. Below the particle threshold energy, 24 excitation states were calculated. The calculations, is demonstrating the presence of a PDR with evidence for K splitting. The calculations further suggest that the PDR in 238U is predominantly K=0. The obtained results show universality of the PDR in atomic nuclei.

  17. Toroidal Dipole Moment of a Massless Neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Mondragon, M.; Perez, E. Reyes

    2009-04-20

    We obtain the toroidal dipole moment of a massless neutrino {tau}{sub v{sub I}}{sup M} using the results for the anapole moment of a massless Dirac neutrino a{sub v{sub I}}{sup D}, which was obtained in the context of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions (SM)SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y}.

  18. Electric dipole moment of light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Benjamin; Afnan, I R

    2010-01-01

    We examine the sensitivity of the deuteron Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) to variation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. In particular, we write the EDM as a sum of two terms, one depends on the target wave function, the second on intermediate multiple scattering states in the {sup 3}P{sub 1} channel. This second contribution is sensitive to off-shell behavior of the {sup 3}P{sub 1} amplitude.

  19. Single-layer high field dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim V. Kashikhin and Alexander V. Zlobin

    2001-07-30

    Fermilab is developing high field dipole magnets for post-LHC hadron colliders. Several designs with a nominal field of 10-12 T, coil bore size of 40-50 mm based on both shell-type and block-type coil geometry are currently under consideration. This paper presents a new approach to magnet design, based on simple and robust single-layer coils optimized for the maximum field, good field quality and minimum number of turns.

  20. Search for the electron electric dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    De Mille, D.; Bickman, S.; Hamilton, P.; Jiang, Y.; Prasad, V.; Kawall, D.; Paolino, R.

    2006-07-11

    Extensions to the Standard Model (SM) typically include new heavy particles and new mechanisms for CP violation. These underlying phenomena can give rise to electric dipole moments of the electron and other particles. Tabletop-scale experiments used to search for these effects are described. Present experiments are already sensitive to new physics at the TeV scale, and new methods could extend this range dramatically. Such experiments could be among the first to show evidence for physics beyond the SM.

  1. Trapped field internal dipole superconducting motor generator

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    2001-01-01

    A motor generator including a high temperature superconductor rotor and an internally disposed coil assembly. The motor generator superconductor rotor is constructed of a plurality of superconductor elements magnetized to produce a dipole field. The coil assembly can be either a conventional conductor or a high temperature superconductor. The superconductor rotor elements include a magnetization direction and c-axis for the crystals of the elements and which is oriented along the magnetization direction.

  2. Local electric dipole moments: A generalized approach.

    PubMed

    Groß, Lynn; Herrmann, Carmen

    2016-09-30

    We present an approach for calculating local electric dipole moments for fragments of molecular or supramolecular systems. This is important for understanding chemical gating and solvent effects in nanoelectronics, atomic force microscopy, and intensities in infrared spectroscopy. Owing to the nonzero partial charge of most fragments, "naively" defined local dipole moments are origin-dependent. Inspired by previous work based on Bader's atoms-in-molecules (AIM) partitioning, we derive a definition of fragment dipole moments which achieves origin-independence by relying on internal reference points. Instead of bond critical points (BCPs) as in existing approaches, we use as few reference points as possible, which are located between the fragment and the remainder(s) of the system and may be chosen based on chemical intuition. This allows our approach to be used with AIM implementations that circumvent the calculation of critical points for reasons of computational efficiency, for cases where no BCPs are found due to large interfragment distances, and with local partitioning schemes other than AIM which do not provide BCPs. It is applicable to both covalently and noncovalently bound systems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dynamics of two-dimensional dipole systems

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, Kenneth I.; Kalman, Gabor J.; Hartmann, Peter; Donko, Zoltan

    2010-09-15

    Using a combined analytical/molecular dynamics approach, we study the current fluctuation spectra and longitudinal and transverse collective mode dispersions of the classical two-dimensional (point) dipole system (2DDS) characterized by the {phi}{sub D}(r)={mu}{sup 2}/r{sup 3} repulsive interaction potential; {mu} is the electric dipole strength. The interest in the 2DDS is twofold. First, the quasi-long-range 1/r{sup 3} interaction makes the system a unique classical many-body system, with a remarkable collective mode behavior. Second, the system may be a good model for a closely spaced semiconductor electron-hole bilayer, a system that is in the forefront of current experimental interest. The longitudinal collective excitations, which are of primary interest for the liquid phase, are acoustic at long wavelengths. At higher wave numbers and for sufficiently high coupling strength, we observe the formation of a deep minimum in the dispersion curve preceded by a sharp maximum; this is identical to what has been observed in the dispersion of the zero-temperature bosonic dipole system, which in turn emulates so-called roton-maxon excitation spectrum of the superfluid {sup 4}He. The analysis we present gives an insight into the emergence of this apparently universal structure, governed by strong correlations. We study both the liquid and the crystalline solid state. We also observe the excitation of combination frequencies, resembling the roton-roton, roton-maxon, etc. structures in {sup 4}He.

  4. Sextupole correction coils for SSC model dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Rechen, J.B.; Gilbert, W.S.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1985-05-01

    Local correction of the sextupole error field is proposed for the dipoles of the SSC. This requirement is imposed on the design by the high field quality required both during injection at low fields and during colliding beam operation at high fields. Error fields in the main dipole windings due to superconductor magnetization and conductor misplacements and unwanted sextupole and decapole magnetic field terms. To correct the sextupole error field we have constructed sextupole coils made of a single layer of superconducting wire and have mounted them with high precision on the stainless steel bore tube. These correction coils have been operated with 1 meter long SSC model dipoles in both the self-powered and externally-powered modes. The sextupole field in the bore has been reduced by as much as a factor of 50. The level of correction depends strongly on the angular alignment of the correction coil with respect to the sextupole error field it is to correct. Results of tests, performance of the correction coils and alignment requirements for the system are presented.

  5. Bent Solenoids with Superimposed Dipole Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Rainer, B.; Goodzeit, Carl, L.

    2000-03-21

    A conceptual design and manufacturing technique were developed for a superconducting bent solenoid magnet with a superimposed dipole field that would be used as a dispersion device in the cooling channel of a future Muon Collider. The considered bent solenoid is equivalent to a 180° section of a toroid with a major radius of ~610 mm and a coil aperture of ~416 mm. The required field components of this magnet are 4 tesla for the solenoid field and 1 tesla for the superimposed dipole field. A magnet of this size and shape, operating at these field levels, has to sustain large Lorentz forces resulting in a maximum magnetic pressure of about 2,000 psi. A flexible round mini-cable with 37 strands of Cu-NbTi was selected as the superconductor. Detailed magnetic analysis showed that it is possible to obtain the required superimposed dipole field by tilting the winding planes of the solenoid by ~25°. A complete structural analysis of the coil support system and the helium containment vessel under thermal, pressure, and Lorentz force loads was carried out using 3D finite element models of the structures. The main technical issues were studied and solutions were worked out so that a highly reliable magnet of this type can be produced at an affordable cost.

  6. Pharma giants swap research programs.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical giants Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) agreed in late April to swap some assets, with Novartis handing off its vaccine business to GSK and getting most of the British company's cancer portfolio in return.

  7. Theories of Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of planetary formation, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. While these models predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, the frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Most models for extrasolar giant planets suggest that they formed as did Jupiter and Saturn (in nearly circular orbits, far enough from the star that ice could), and subsequently migrated to their current positions, although some models suggest in situ formation.

  8. Lichens On Galapagos Giant Tortoises.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, J R; Weber, W A

    1964-06-19

    The association of Physcia picta with the giant Galdpagos tortoise is believed to be the first reported occurrence of lichens on land animals. The habitat is restricted to specific sites on the carapace of male tortoises.

  9. Landscape of the lost giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene megafauna extinction erased a group of remarkable animals. Whether humans had a prominent role in the extinction remains controversial, but it is emerging that the disappearance of the giants has markedly affected the environment.

  10. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  11. Giant resonances in {sup 238}U within the quasiparticle random-phase approximation with the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, S.; Gosselin, G.; Martini, M.; Dupuis, M.; Hilaire, S.

    2011-01-15

    Fully consistent axially-symmetric deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) calculations have been performed, using the same Gogny D1S effective force for both the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov mean field and QRPA matrix. New implementation of this approach leads to the applicability of QRPA to heavy deformed nuclei. Giant resonances and low-energy collective states for monopole, dipole, quadrupole, and octupole modes are predicted for the heavy deformed nucleus {sup 238}U and compared with experimental data.

  12. Giants in the Local Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luck, R. Earle; Heiter, Ulrike

    2007-06-01

    We present parameter and abundance data for a sample of 298 nearby giants. The spectroscopic data for this work have a resolution of R~60,000, S/N>150, and spectral coverage from 475 to 685 nm. Overall trends in the Z>10 abundances are dominated by Galactic chemical evolution, while the light-element abundances are influenced by stellar evolution, as well as Galactic evolution. We find several super-Li stars in our sample and confirm that Li abundances in the first giant branch are related to mixing depths. Once astration of lithium on the main sequence along with the overall range of main-sequence lithium abundances are taken into account, the lithium abundances of the giants are not dramatically at odds with the predictions of standard stellar evolution. We find the giants to be carbon-diluted in accord with standard stellar evolution and that the carbon and oxygen abundances determined for the local giants are consistent with those found in local field dwarfs. We find that there is evidence for systematic carbon variations in the red giant clump in the sense that the blue side of the clump is carbon-poor (more diluted) than the red side.

  13. Extra γ-ray strength for 116,117Sn arising from pygmy dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, M.; Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Itoh, O.; Iwamoto, C.; Kondo, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Goriely, S.

    2010-06-01

    Photoneutron cross sections were measured for 117Sn and 116Sn near neutron thresholds with quasi-monochromatic laser Compton scattering γ-rays. The measured cross sections for 117Sn and 116Sn are strongly enhanced from the threshold behavior expected for L = 1 neutron emissions after E1 photoexcitation. This suggests the presence of extra γ-ray strength in the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance. The present cross sections were analyzed together with radiative neutron capture cross sections for 116Sn within the framework of the statistical model calculation. It is shown that the extra γ-ray strength can be interpreted as pygmy E1 resonance which was previously reported in the nuclear resonance fluorescence experiment for 116Sn and 124Sn.

  14. Extra gamma-ray strength for {sup 116,117}Sn arising from pygmy dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kamata, M.; Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Itoh, O.; Iwamoto, C.; Kondo, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Goriely, S.

    2010-06-01

    Photoneutron cross sections were measured for {sup 117}Sn and {sup 116}Sn near neutron thresholds with quasi-monochromatic laser Compton scattering gamma-rays. The measured cross sections for {sup 117}Sn and {sup 116}Sn are strongly enhanced from the threshold behavior expected for L = 1 neutron emissions after E1 photoexcitation. This suggests the presence of extra gamma-ray strength in the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance. The present cross sections were analyzed together with radiative neutron capture cross sections for {sup 116}Sn within the framework of the statistical model calculation. It is shown that the extra gamma-ray strength can be interpreted as pygmy E1 resonance which was previously reported in the nuclear resonance fluorescence experiment for {sup 116}Sn and {sup 124}Sn.

  15. The Giant Magnetocaloric Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-03-01

    Since the discovery of the magnetocaloric effect in pure iron by E.Warburg in 1881, it has been measured experimentally on many magnetic metals and compounds. The majority of the materials studied order magnetically undergoing a second order phase transformation. The magnetocaloric effect, typically peaking near the Curie or the Néel temperature, generally ranges from 0.5 to 2 K (in terms of adiabatic temperature change) or at 1 to 4 J/kg K (in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change) per 1 T magnetic field change. The giant magnetocaloric effect recently discovered in Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where x <= 0.5, is associated with a first order magnetic phase transition and it reaches values of 3 to 4 K and 6 to 10 J/kg K per 1 T field change, respectively. The refrigerant capacity, which is the measure of how much heat can be transferred from a cold to a hot reservoir in one ideal thermodynamic cycle, is larger than that of the best second order phase transition materials by 25 to 100%. When the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys are compared with other known materials, which show first order magnetic phase transition, such as Dy, Ho, Er, HoCo_2, NdMn_2Si_2, Fe_0.49Rh_0.51, and (Hf_0.83Ta_0.17)Fe_2+x, only Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 has comparable magnetocaloric properties. However, the first order magnetic phase transition in Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 is irreversible, and the magnetocaloric effect disappears after one magnetizing/demagnetizing cycle. A study of the crystal structure, thermodynamics, and magnetism of the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where 0 <= x <= 1 allowed us to obtain a qualitative understanding of the basic relations between the composition, the crystal structure, and the change in thermodynamics and magnetocaloric properties, which occur in the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 system, and which brings about the giant magnetocaloric effect when x <= 0.5.

  16. The asteroseismic signature of strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Stello, Dennis; Garcia, Rafael; Bildsten, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Internal stellar magnetic fields are inaccessible to direct observations and little is known about their amplitude, geometry and evolution. I will discuss how strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giant stars can be identified with asteroseismology. The fields manifest themselves via depressed dipole stellar oscillation modes, which arises from a magnetic greenhouse effect that scatters and traps oscillation mode energy within the core of the star. Physically, the effect stems from magnetic tension forces created by sufficiently strong fields, which break the spherical symmetry of the wave propagation cavity. The loss of wave energy within the core reduces the mode visibility at the stellar surface, and we find that our predicted visibilities are in excellent agreement with a class of red giants exhibiting depressed dipole oscillation modes. The Kepler satellite has already observed hundreds of these red giants, which we identify as stars with strongly magnetized cores. Field strengths larger than roughly 10^5 G can produce the observed depression, and in one case we measure a core field strength of 10^7 G.

  17. Joint inversion of Wenner and dipole-dipole data to study a gasoline-contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Vega, Matías; Osella, Ana; Lascano, Eugenia

    2003-11-01

    The goal of this work was to study a contaminated soil due to a gasoline spill produced by fissures in a concrete purge chamber located along a gas transmission line. A monitoring well drilled 16 m down gradient from the purge chamber revealed the presence of a gasoline layer of 0.5 m thick at 1.5 m depth, floating on top of the water table. A second well, drilled 30 m away from the first well, and in the same direction, did not show any evidence of contamination. To investigate this problem, a geoelectrical survey was conducted, combining dipole-dipole and Wenner arrays. First, four dipole-dipole profiles in a direction perpendicular to the longitudinal axis joining the wells were carried out. The electrical tomographies obtained from the 2D inversion of the data showed that the contaminated region was characterized by a resistive plume located at a depth between 1 to 2 m and had lateral extent of about 6-8 m. The longitudinal extension was less than 20 m, since the last profile located 30 m farther from the chamber did not show this kind of anomaly. To better determine the longitudinal extension, we performed a dipole-dipole profile along a line in this direction. The inverse model confirmed that the extension of the contaminated section was about 16 m. To complete the study of the deeper layer, we carried out Wenner soundings. The results of the inversion process indicated that to a depth of 20 m the soil was very conductive, because of the presence of clays as the main constituents, which confine the contaminant within this impermeable surrounding. To improve the inverse model, we performed a joint inversion of dipole-dipole and Wenner data. Analysis of the depth of penetration showed that it increased to 25 m and comparing the resulting model with the ones obtained from each array separately, we concluded that the joint inversion improves the depth obtained by the survey, while maintaining the shallow lateral resolution.

  18. Passive synchronization of finite dipoles in a doubly periodic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2012-11-01

    We consider the interaction dynamics of finite dipoles in a doubly periodic domain. A finite dipole is a pair of equal and opposite strength point vortices separated by a finite distance throughout its time evolution. The finite dipole dynamical system has been proposed as a model that captures the far-field hydrodynamics interactions in fish schools or collections of swimming bodies in an inviscid fluid. In this work, we formulate the equations of motion governing the dynamics of finite dipoles in a doubly periodic domain. We show that a single dipole in a doubly-periodic box exhibits either regular or chaotic behavior, depending on the initial angle of orientation of the dipole. In the case of the two dipoles, we identify a variety of interesting interaction modes including collision, switching, and passive synchronization of the dipoles. In the case of three dipoles, we observe the formation of relative equilibrium in finite time when the dipoles move together in a way reminiscent to that of flocking behavior.

  19. Probing the Lipid Membrane Dipole Potential by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Mayer, Kathryn M.; Wickremasinghe, Nissanka S.; Hafner, Jason H.

    2008-01-01

    The electrostatic properties of biological membranes can be described by three parameters: the transmembrane potential, the membrane surface potential, and the membrane dipole potential. The first two are well characterized in terms of their magnitudes and biological effects. The dipole potential, however, is not well characterized. Various methods to measure the membrane dipole potential indirectly yield different values, and there is not even agreement on the source of the membrane dipole moment. This ambiguity impedes investigations into the biological effects of the membrane dipole moment, which should be substantial considering the large interfacial fields with which it is associated. Electrostatic analysis of phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes with the atomic force microscope reveals a repulsive force between the negatively charged probe tips and the zwitterionic lipids. This unexpected interaction has been analyzed quantitatively to reveal that the repulsion is due to a weak external field created by the internal membrane dipole potential. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported phosphatidylcholine membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole moment in a noninvasive manner with nanometer scale spatial resolution will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. PMID:18805919

  20. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes.

  1. Formation of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our Solar System contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium, which could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. All three (transiting) extrasolar giant planets with well determined masses and radii also must contain substantial amounts of these light gases. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. HD 149026 b, which is slightly more massive than is Saturn, appears to have comparable quantities of light gases and heavy elements. HD 209458 b and TrES-1 are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our Solar System, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory .experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary questions regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions

  2. Clump Giants in the Hyades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Brickhouse, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The project is entitled 'Clump Giants in the Hyades.' This observation of one of the late-type Hyades giants (Gamma Tau) has implications for understanding the formation of late-type stellar coronae as a function of the evolutionary state of the star. The Hyades giants are interesting because they are all clump giants in the Helium burning phase, similar to the cool primary of Capella. The Hyades giants show significantly more magnetic activity than expected from their state of evolution (and slowed-down rotation). Thus these systems provide an important clue to dynamo action. The data were obtained by the satellite on 13 March 2001 for a total RGS exposure of 58220 seconds. These data were delivered to the PI on 7 August 2001. The data could not be reprocessed until SAS Version 5.3.3 which became available 7 June 2002. Although the guidelines for assessing background rates suggested that half the data were contaminated, it does not appear that the spectral region of the RGS was adversely affected by unusually high background. The spectra show strong lines of Fe XVII and XVIII, O VII and VIII, Ne IX and X, along with numerous weaker lines. The emission measure distribution is highly reminiscent of Capella; if anything, the emission measure distribution is steeper at 6 million K than for Capella. Gamma Tau is the second brightest of the Hyades clump giants. Pallavicini et al. have shown that the luminosity of the brightest Hyades giant (Theta Tau) is remarkably similar to its luminosity as measured by Einstein. Short-term variability is also modest. We are addressing the variability issue now for Gamma Tau. Initial results were reported at the 2003 Seattle AAS meeting. A paper is in preparation for submission to the Astrophysical Journal.

  3. Development of the new gamma-ray calorimeter for the measurement of Pigmy Dipole Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikata, Mizuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Togano, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Yosuke

    2014-09-01

    A new γ-ray calorimeter CATANA (CAlorimeter for gamma γ-ray Transition in Atomic Nuclei at high isospin Asynmetry) has been developed to measure highly excited states like the pygmy dipole resonance and the giant dipole resonance. CATANA will be used with the SAMURAI spectrometer at RIBF. The excitation energy spectrum will be reconstructed combining the invariant mass of the reaction products measured by SAMURAI and γ-ray energies from CATANA. CATANA has focused on achieving a high detection efficiency. It is calculated as 56% for 1 MeV γ-rays from beam with a velocity of β = 0.6. The CATANA array consists of 200 CsI(Na) crystals and covers angles from 10 to 120 degrees along the beam axis. In this study, we have tested prototype crystals of CATANA to evaluate their performance. A position dependence of the light input have been measured and compared with a Monte-Carlo simulation based on GEANT4. In this talk, we will report the design of CATANA and the result of the tests and the simulation.

  4. Multilayer Microstrip Slot And Dipole Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, Ann N.

    1994-01-01

    Multilayer antenna structure contains interleaved linear subarrays of microstrip dipole and slot radiating antenna elements to provide compact, dual-band antenna. Structure also contains associated microstrip transmission lines, plus high-power amplifiers for transmission and low-noise amplifiers for reception. Overall function is to transmit in horizontal polarization at frequency of 29.634 GHz and receive in vertical polarization at 19.914 GHz, in direction 44 degrees from broadside to antenna. Antenna structure is part of apparatus described in "Steerable K/Ka-band Antenna for Land-Mobile Satellite Applications," NPO-18772.

  5. Deuteron dipole polarizabilities and sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Friar, J.L.; Payne, G.L.

    2005-07-01

    The scalar, vector, and tensor components of the (generalized) deuteron electric dipole polarizability are calculated, as well as their logarithmic modifications. Several of these quantities arise in the treatment of the nuclear corrections to the deuterium Lamb shift and the deuterium hyperfine structure. A variety of second-generation potential models are used, and a (subjective) error is assigned to the calculations. The zero-range approximation is used to analyze a subset of the results, and a simple relativistic version of this approximation is developed.

  6. Open questions about giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Jean-Michel; Abergel, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of giant viruses exhibiting double-stranded DNA genomes larger than a million base pairs, encoding more than a thousand proteins and packed in near micron-sized icosahedral particles, opened a new and unexpected chapter in virology. As of today, these giant viruses and their closest relatives of lesser dimensions infect unicellular eukaryotes found in aquatic environments, but belonging to a wide diversity of early branching phyla. This broad phylogenetic distribution of hosts is consistent with the hypothesis that giant viruses originated prior to the radiation of the eukaryotic domain and/or might have been involved in the partition of nuclear versus cytoplasmic functions in ancestral cells. The distinctive features of the known giant viruses, in particular the recurrent presence of components of the translation apparatus in their proteome, raise a number of fundamental questions about their origin, their mode of evolution, and the relationship they may entertain with other dsDNA viruses, the genome size of which exhibits the widest distribution among all biological entities, from less than 5 kb to more than 1.25 Mb (a ratio of 1:250). At a more conceptual level, the convergence between the discovery of increasingly reduced parasitic cellular organisms and that of giant viruses exhibiting a widening array of cellular-like functions may ultimately abolish the historical discontinuity between the viral and the cellular world.

  7. A plasmonic dipole optical antenna coupled quantum dot infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojaverian, Neda; Gu, Guiru; Lu, Xuejun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we report a full-wavelength plasmonic dipole optical antenna coupled quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP). The plasmonic dipole optical antenna can effectively modify the EM wave distribution and convert free-space propagation infrared light to localized surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) within the nanometer (nm) gap region of the full-wavelength dipole antenna. The plasmonic dipole optical antenna coupled QDIP shows incident-angle-dependent photocurrent enhancement. The angular dependence follows the far-field pattern of a full-wavelength dipole antenna. The directivity of the plasmonic dipole optical antenna is measured to be 1.8 dB, which agrees well with the antenna simulation. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the antenna far-field and directivity measurement. The agreement of the detection pattern and the directivity with antenna theory confirms functions of an optical antenna are similar to that of a RF antenna.

  8. Giant Magellan Telescope: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Matt; McCarthy, Patrick; Raybould, Keith; Bouchez, Antonin; Farahani, Arash; Filgueira, Jose; Jacoby, George; Shectman, Steve; Sheehan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is a 25-meter optical/infrared extremely large telescope that is being built by an international consortium of universities and research institutions. It will be located at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The GMT primary mirror consists of seven 8.4-m borosilicate honeycomb mirror segments made at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab (SOML). Six identical off-axis segments and one on-axis segment are arranged on a single nearly-paraboloidal parent surface having an overall focal ratio of f/0.7. The fabrication, testing and verification procedures required to produce the closely-matched off-axis mirror segments were developed during the production of the first mirror. Production of the second and third off-axis segments is underway. GMT incorporates a seven-segment Gregorian adaptive secondary to implement three modes of adaptive-optics operation: natural-guide star AO, laser-tomography AO, and ground-layer AO. A wide-field corrector/ADC is available for use in seeing-limited mode over a 20-arcmin diameter field of view. Up to seven instruments can be mounted simultaneously on the telescope in a large Gregorian Instrument Rotator. Conceptual design studies were completed for six AO and seeing-limited instruments, plus a multi-object fiber feed, and a roadmap for phased deployment of the GMT instrument suite is being developed. The partner institutions have made firm commitments for approximately 45% of the funds required to build the telescope. Project Office efforts are currently focused on advancing the telescope and enclosure design in preparation for subsystem- and system-level preliminary design reviews which are scheduled to be completed in the first half of 2013.

  9. Ozone: Unresolved discrepancies for dipole oscillator strength distributions, dipole sums, and van der Waals coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Thakkar, Ajit J.

    2011-08-01

    Dipole oscillator strength distributions (DOSDs) for ozone are constructed from experimental photoabsorption cross-sections combined with constraints provided by the Kuhn-Reiche-Thomas sum rule, the high-energy behavior of the dipole-oscillator-strength density, and molar refractivity data. A lack of photoabsorption data in the intermediate energy region from 24 to 524 eV necessitates the use of a mixture rule in that region. For this purpose, a DOSD for O2 is constructed first. The dipole properties for O2 are essentially the same as those obtained in earlier work even though most of the input data is from more recent experiments. A discrepancy is found between the refractivity data and photoabsorption data in the 10-20.6 eV range for ozone. A reliable ozone DOSD of the sort obtained for many other species remains out of reach. However, it is suggested that the true dipole properties of ozone lie between those predicted by two distributions that we present.

  10. Angle-dependent quantum Otto heat engine based on coherent dipole-dipole coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shan-He; Luo, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Jin-Can; Sun, Chang-Pu

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between molecules or within a molecule have been widely observed in biological systems and exhibit broad application for molecular structural studies. Quantum delocalization of molecular dipole moments has inspired researchers to explore new avenues to utilize this physical effect for energy harvesting devices. Herein, we propose a simple model of the angle-dependent quantum Otto heat engine which seeks to facilitate the conversion of heat to work. Unlike previous studies, the adiabatic processes are accomplished by varying only the directions of the magnetic field. We show that the heat engine continues to generate power when the angle relative to the vector r joining the centres of coupled dipoles departs from the magic angle θm where the static coupling vanishes. A significant improvement in the device performance has to be attributed to the presence of the quantum delocalized levels associated with the coherent dipole-dipole coupling. These results obtained may provide a promising model for the biomimetic design and fabrication of quantum energy generators.

  11. Local geometry of isoscalar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dopazo, César; Martín, Jesús; Hierro, Juan

    2007-11-01

    An inert dynamically passive scalar in a constant density fluid forced by a statistically homogeneous field of turbulence has been investigated using the results of a 256(3) grid direct numerical simulation. Mixing characteristics are characterized in terms of either principal curvatures or mean and Gauss curvatures. The most probable small-scale scalar geometries are flat and tilelike isosurfaces. Preliminary correlations between flow and scalar small-scale structures associate highly curved saddle points with large-strain regions and elliptic points with vorticity-dominated zones. The concavity of the scalar profiles along the isosurface normal coordinate xn correlates well with negative mean curvatures, Gauss curvatures displaying any sign, which correspond to scalar minima, tiles, or saddle points; on the other hand, convexity along xn is associated with positive mean curvatures, Gauss curvatures ranging from negative to positive signs, featuring maxima, tiles, or saddle points; inflection points along xn correlate well with small values of the mean curvature and zero or negative values of kg, corresponding to plane isosurfaces or saddle points with curvatures of equal and opposite signs. Small values of the scalar gradient are associated with elliptic points, either concave or convex (kg>0) , for both concave and convex scalar profiles along xn. Large values of the scalar gradient (or, equivalently, scalar fluctuation dissipation rates) are generally connected with small values of the Gauss curvature (either flat or moderate-curvature tilelike local geometries), with both concave and convex scalar profiles along xn equally probable. Vortical local flow structures correlate well with small and moderate values of the scalar gradient, while strain-dominated regions are associated with large values.

  12. Giant perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 3d transition-metal thin films on MgO

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kohji Ikeura, Yushi; Akiyama, Toru; Ito, Tomonori

    2015-05-07

    Magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA) of the Fe-based transition-metal thin films was investigated by means of first principles full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method. A giant perpendicular MCA (PMCA), up to 3 meV, was confirmed in a 7-layer Fe-Ni film/MgO(001), where an Fe{sub 2}/Ni/Fe/Ni/Fe{sub 2} atomic-layer alignment with a bcc-like-layer stacking and the Fe/MgO interfaces play key roles for leading to the large PMCA. Importantly, we find that the PMCA overcomes enough over the magnetic dipole-dipole anisotropy that favors the in-plane magnetization even when the film thickness increases.

  13. Mutual impedance of nonplanar-skew sinusoidal dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Geary, N. H.

    1975-01-01

    The mutual impedance expressions for parallel dipoles in terms of sine-integrals and cosine-integrals have been published by King (1957). The investigation reported provides analogous expressions for nonparallel dipoles. The expressions presented are most useful when the monopoles are close together. The theory of moment methods shows an approach for employing the mutual impedance of filamentary sinusoidal dipoles to calculate the impedance and scattering properties of straight and bent wires with small but finite diameter.

  14. Vanishing of dipole matrix elements at level crossings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocher, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    Demonstration that the vanishing of certain coupling matrix elements at level crossings follow from angular momentum commutation relations. A magnetic dipole transition having delta M = plus or minus 1, induced near a crossing of the levels in a nonzero magnetic field, is found to have a dipole matrix element comparable to or smaller than the quotient of the level separation and the field. This result also applies in the analogous electric field electric dipole case.

  15. Hybrid of Quantum Phases for Induced Dipole Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kai

    2016-09-01

    The quantum phase effects for induced electric and magnetic dipole moments are investigated. It is shown that the phase shift received by induced electric dipole has the same form with the one induced by magnetic dipole moment, therefore the total phase is a hybrid of these two types of phase. This feature indicates that in order to have a decisive measurement on either one of these two phases, it is necessary to measure the velocity dependence of the observed phase.

  16. Lunar magnetic field - Permanent and induced dipole moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    Apollo 15 subsatellite magnetic field observations have been used to measure both the permanent and the induced lunar dipole moments. Although only an upper limit of 1.3 x 10 to the 18th gauss-cubic centimeters has been determined for the permanent dipole moment in the orbital plane, there is a significant induced dipole moment which opposes the applied field, indicating the existence of a weak lunar ionosphere.

  17. Propagation of magnetic dipole radiation through a medium.

    PubMed

    Arnoldus, Henk F; Xu, Zhangjin

    2016-05-01

    An oscillating magnetic dipole moment emits radiation. We assume that the dipole is embedded in a medium with relative permittivity ϵr and relative permeability μr, and we have studied the effects of the surrounding material on the flow lines of the emitted energy. For a linear dipole moment in free space the flow lines of energy are straight lines, coming out of the dipole. When located in a medium, these field lines curve toward the dipole axis, due to the imaginary part of μr. Some field lines end on the dipole axis, giving a nonradiating contribution to the energy flow. For a rotating dipole moment in free space, each field line of energy flow lies on a cone around the axis perpendicular to the plane of rotation of the dipole moment. The field line pattern is an optical vortex. When embedded in a material, the cone shape of the vortex becomes a funnel shape, and the windings are much less dense than for the pattern in free space. This is again due to the imaginary part of μr. When the real part of μr is negative, the field lines of the vortex swirl around the dipole axis opposite to the rotation direction of the dipole moment. For a near-single-negative medium, the spatial extent of the vortex becomes huge. We compare the results for the magnetic dipole to the case of an embedded electric dipole.

  18. Simulation of an Ice Giant-style Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, K. M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune, are unique in the solar system. These planets are the only known bodies to have multipolar magnetic fields where the quadrupole and octopole components have strengths comparable to or greater than that of the dipole. Cloud layer observations show that the planets also have zonal (east-west) flows that are fundamentally different from the banded winds of Jupiter and Saturn. The surface winds are characterized by strong retrograde equatorial jets that are flanked on either side by prograde jets at high latitudes. Thermal emission measurements of Neptune show that the surface energy flux pattern peaks in the equatorial and polar regions with minima at mid-latitudes. (The measurements for Uranus cannot adequately resolve the emission pattern.) The winds and magnetic fields are thought to be the result of convection in the planetary interior, which will also affect the heat flux pattern. Typically, it is implicitly assumed that the zonal winds are generated in a shallow layer, separate from the dynamo generation region. However, if the magnetic fields are driven near the surface, a single region can simultaneously generate both the zonal flows and the magnetic fields. Here, we present a novel numerical model of an Ice Giant-style dynamo to investigate this possibility. An order unity convective Rossby number (ratio of buoyancy to Coriolis forces) has been chosen because retrograde equatorial jets tend to occur in spherical shells when the effects of rotation are relatively weak. Our modeling results qualitatively reproduce all of the structural features of the global dynamical observations. Thus, a self-consistent model can generate magnetic field, zonal flow, and thermal emission patterns that agree with those of Uranus and Neptune. This model, then, leads us to hypothesize that the Ice Giants' zonal flows and magnetic fields are generated via dynamically coupled deep convection processes.

  19. Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trial Journal Articles Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis May 2016 Questions and Answers about Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis This publication contains general information about polymyalgia ...

  20. Projected Dipole Model for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Wubs, Martijn; Asger Mortensen, N

    2015-09-25

    Quantum effects of plasmonic phenomena have been explored through ab initio studies, but only for exceedingly small metallic nanostructures, leaving most experimentally relevant structures too large to handle. We propose instead an effective description with the computationally appealing features of classical electrodynamics, while quantum properties are described accurately through an infinitely thin layer of dipoles oriented normally to the metal surface. The nonlocal polarizability of the dipole layer-the only introduced parameter-is mapped from the free-electron distribution near the metal surface as obtained with 1D quantum calculations, such as time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), and is determined once and for all. The model can be applied in two and three dimensions to any system size that is tractable within classical electrodynamics, while capturing quantum plasmonic aspects of nonlocal response and a finite work function with TDDFT-level accuracy. Applying the theory to dimers, we find quantum corrections to the hybridization even in mesoscopic dimers, as long as the gap itself is subnanometric.

  1. Dipole Alignment in Rotating MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.; Fu, Terry; Morin, Lee

    2012-01-01

    We present numerical results from long-term CPU and GPU simulations of rotating, homogeneous, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and discuss their connection to the spherically bounded case. We compare our numerical results with a statistical theory of geodynamo action that has evolved from the absolute equilibrium ensemble theory of ideal MHD turbulence, which is based on the ideal MHD invariants are energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity. However, for rotating MHD turbulence, the cross helicity is no longer an exact invariant, although rms cross helicity becomes quasistationary during an ideal MHD simulation. This and the anisotropy imposed by rotation suggests an ansatz in which an effective, nonzero value of cross helicity is assigned to axisymmetric modes and zero cross helicity to non-axisymmetric modes. This hybrid statistics predicts a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field due to broken ergodicity , as well as dipole vector alignment with the rotation axis, both of which are observed numerically. We find that only a relatively small value of effective cross helicity leads to the prediction of a dipole moment vector that is closely aligned (less than 10 degrees) with the rotation axis. We also discuss the effect of initial conditions, dissipation and grid size on the numerical simulations and statistical theory.

  2. Progress toward 10 tesla accelerator dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.; Gilbert, G.; Taylor, C.; Meuser, R.

    1983-08-01

    A 9.1 T central field has been achieved in a Nb-Ti dipole operating in pressurized helium II at 1.8 K. Three different Nb-Ti dipoles, without iron yokes, have achieved central fields of 8.0, 8.6, and 9.1 T - all short sample performance for the conductors at 1.8 K. In helium I, at 4.3 K, the maximum central fields are from 1.5 to 2.0 T lower. Ten-tesla magnets have been designed for both Nb-Ti operating at 1.8 K and Nb/sub 3/Sn operating at 4.2 K. They are based on a very small beam aperture, (40 to 45 mm), very high current density in the superconductors (over 1000 A/mm/sup 2/), and a very low ratio of stabilizing copper to superconductor (about 1). Both layer and block designs have been developed that utilize Rutherford Cable. Magnet cycling from 0 to 6 T has been carried out for field change rate up to 1 T/s; the cyclic heating at 1 T/s is 36 W per meter. At a more representative rate of 0.2 T/s the heating rate is only 2 W/m. Progress in the program to use Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi superconductor, in 10 T accelerator magnets is also discussed.

  3. Mesoscopic supersolid of dipoles in a trap

    SciTech Connect

    Golomedov, A. E.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2011-09-15

    A mesoscopic system of dipolar bosons trapped by a harmonic potential is considered. The system has a number of physical realizations including dipole excitons, atoms with large dipolar moment, polar molecules, and Rydberg atoms in inhomogeneous electric field. We carry out a diffusion Monte Carlo simulation to define the quantum properties of a two-dimensional system of trapped dipoles at zero temperature. In dimensionless units the system is described by two control parameters, namely, the number of particles and the strength of the interparticle interaction. We have shown that when the interparticle interaction is strong enough a mesoscopic crystal is formed. As the strength of interactions is decreased a multistage melting takes place. Off-diagonal order in the system is tested using natural-orbitals analysis. We have found that the system might be Bose condensed even in the case of strong interparticle interactions. There is a set of parameters for which a spatially ordered structure is formed while simultaneously the fraction of Bose-condensed particles is nonzero. This might be considered as a realization of a mesoscopic supersolid.

  4. SPEAR3 Gradient Dipole Core Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nanyang

    2003-07-29

    Traditional means of core fabrication are to glue the laminations or weld them to form the yoke structure. These means result in good yoke assemblies for shorter (<0.6m) magnets. However, because of weld distortions or mechanical strength limitations, welding and/or gluing techniques are difficult to gain high mechanical precision for longer cores. The SPEAR3 gradient dipoles are up to 1.45m long and require distortions of <0.05mm. Therefore, the SPEAR3 gradient dipole core design incorporated an assembly technique, originally devised for the PEPII insertion quadrupoles and later adapted for the ALS gradient magnets. This technique involved fabricating a rigid frame for the core, precisely stacking and compressing the laminations using hydraulic jacks and granite surfaces and straight edges, and fixing the laminations in the frame by filling the grooves between the laminations and frame using steel loaded epoxy. Although this technique has been used in the past, it has never been fully described and published. This paper is written to provide a detailed description of the procedure and to present measurement data demonstrating the mechanical precision and stiffness of the resulting product.

  5. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution. PMID:20074322

  6. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J.; Seager, S.; Barman, T.

    The key to understanding an extrasolar giant planet's spectrum - and hence its detectability and evolution - lies with its atmosphere. Now that direct observations of thermal emission from extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are in hand, atmosphere models can be used to constrain atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and ultimately the formation and evolution of detected planets. We review the important physical processes that influence the atmospheric structure and evolution of EGPs and consider what has already been learned from the first generation of observations and modeling. We pay particular attention to the roles of cloud structure, metallicity, and atmospheric chemistry in affecting detectable properties through Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transiting giant planets. Our review stresses the uncertainties that ultimately limit our ability to interpret EGP observations. Finally we will conclude with a look to the future as characterization of multiple individual planets in a single stellar system leads to the study of comparative planetary architectures.

  7. CMB lensing and giant rings

    SciTech Connect

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan E-mail: ben.rathaus@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  8. Structure of giant muscle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Logan C.; Wright, Nathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Giant muscle proteins (e.g., titin, nebulin, and obscurin) play a seminal role in muscle elasticity, stretch response, and sarcomeric organization. Each giant protein consists of multiple tandem structural domains, usually arranged in a modular fashion spanning 500 kDa to 4 MDa. Although many of the domains are similar in structure, subtle differences create a unique function of each domain. Recent high and low resolution structural and dynamic studies now suggest more nuanced overall protein structures than previously realized. These findings show that atomic structure, interactions between tandem domains, and intrasarcomeric environment all influence the shape, motion, and therefore function of giant proteins. In this article we will review the current understanding of titin, obscurin, and nebulin structure, from the atomic level through the molecular level. PMID:24376425

  9. International geomagnetic reference field 1965.0 in dipole coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. D.

    1970-01-01

    Computer program transforming spherical harmonic coefficients into arbitrarily tilted coordinate systems, tabulating coefficients of International Geomagnetic Reference Field 1965 in dipole coordinate system

  10. Some requirements for the future giant low frequency ground based radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Falkovich, I. S.; Gridin, A. A.; Lecheux, A.; Rosolen, C.; Rucker, H.

    2003-04-01

    During last years the interest to the low frequency radio astronomy is growing considerably. The projects of space-borne and ground-based new generation giant radio telescope (i.e. LOFAR) are discussed actively. The largest existing low frequency systems, at first, UTR-2 and URAN Ukraine) and NDA (France) are useful for the probing of new astrophysical ideas as well as of new technical approaches and requirements including future giant radio telescopes and solar system radio astronomy purposes. The 30 elements array with active dipoles was created on UTR-2 observatory for the test of some principal requirements. The investigations of the array confirmed the sensitivity, frequency range, interference immunity and low cost what need for the future instruments.

  11. Molecular Line and Continuum Opacities for Modeling of Extrasolar Giant Planet and Cool Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weck, P. F.; Schweitzer, A.; Stancil, P. C.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Kirby, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Allen, W. D.

    2002-01-01

    The molecular line and continuum opacities are investigated in the atmospheres of cool stars and Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs). Using a combination of ab inito and experimentally derived potential curves and dipole transition moments, accurate data have been calculated for rovibrationally-resolved oscillator strengths and photodissociation cross sections in the B' (sup 2)Sigma+ (left arrow) X (sup 2)Sigma+ and A (sup 2)Pi (left arrow) X (sup 2)Sigma+ band systems in MgH. We also report our progress on the study of the electronic structure of LiCl and FeH.

  12. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Ramos Cuadra, José Angel; Lara Toral, Juan; Lozano Cabezas, Cristobal; Fernández Guerrero, Juan Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery.

  13. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Cuadra, José Ángel Ramos; Toral, Juan Lara; Cabezas, Cristobal Lozano; Guerrero, Juan Carlos Fernández

    2008-01-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery. PMID:18401474

  14. Cabergoline treatment in invasive giant prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically.

  15. Charting the Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    zero expansion asymptotically after an infinite time and has a flat geometry). All three observational tests by means of supernovae (green), the cosmic microwave background (blue) and galaxy clusters converge at a Universe around Ωm ~ 0.3 and ΩΛ ~ 0.7. The dark red region for the galaxy cluster determination corresponds to 95% certainty (2-sigma statistical deviation) when assuming good knowledge of all other cosmological parameters, and the light red region assumes a minimum knowledge. For the supernovae and WMAP results, the inner and outer regions corespond to 68% (1-sigma) and 95% certainty, respectively. References: Schuecker et al. 2003, A&A, 398, 867 (REFLEX); Tonry et al. 2003, ApJ, 594, 1 (supernovae); Riess et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665 (supernovae) Galaxy clusters are far from being evenly distributed in the Universe. Instead, they tend to conglomerate into even larger structures, "super-clusters". Thus, from stars which gather in galaxies, galaxies which congregate in clusters and clusters tying together in super-clusters, the Universe shows structuring on all scales, from the smallest to the largest ones. This is a relict of the very early (formation) epoch of the Universe, the so-called "inflationary" period. At that time, only a minuscule fraction of one second after the Big Bang, the tiny density fluctuations were amplified and over the eons, they gave birth to the much larger structures. Because of the link between the first fluctuations and the giant structures now observed, the unique REFLEX catalogue - the largest of its kind - allows astronomers to put considerable constraints on the content of the Universe, and in particular on the amount of dark matter that is believed to pervade it. Rather interestingly, these constraints are totally independent from all other methods so far used to assert the existence of dark matter, such as the study of very distant supernovae (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98) or the analysis of the Cosmic Microwave background (e

  16. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  17. On the Shoulders of Giants...

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    REFERENCES 1. Newton I. Turnbull HW, ed. Correspondence of Isaac Newton . Vol I: 1661Y1675. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press; 1959:416...calendar), Sir Isaac Newtonopined to Robert Hooke, ‘‘If I have seen further [than you and Descartes], it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.’’1 That

  18. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed.

  19. Active flutter suppression using dipole filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.; Waszak, Martin R.

    1992-01-01

    By using traditional control concepts of gain root locus, the active suppression of a flutter mode of a flexible wing is examined. It is shown that the attraction of the unstable mode towards a critical system zero determines the degree to which the flutter mode can be stabilized. For control situations where the critical zero is adversely placed in the complex plane, a novel compensation scheme called a 'Dipole' filter is proposed. This filter ensures that the flutter mode is stabilized with acceptable control energy. The control strategy is illustrated by designing flutter suppression laws for an active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model, where minimal control effort solutions are mandated by control rate saturation problems caused by wind-tunnel turbulence.

  20. BEAM MANIPULATION WITH AN RF DIPOLE.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.

    1999-03-29

    Coherent betatron motion adiabatically excited by an RF dipole has been successfully employed to overcome strong intrinsic spin depolarization resonances in the AGS, while a solenoid partial snake has been used to correct imperfection spin resonances. The experimental results showed that a full spin flip was obtained in passing through an intrinsic spin resonance when all the beam particles were forced to oscillate coherently at a large amplitude without diluting the beam emittance. With this method, we have successfully accelerated polarized beam up to 23.5 GeV/c. A new type of second order spin resonances was also discovered. As a non-destructive manipulation, this method can also be used for nonlinear beam dynamics studies and beam diagnosis such as measuring phase advance and betatron amplitude function.

  1. Nonlinear light scattering by a dipole monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbukh, B. B.; Averbukh, I. B.

    2013-08-01

    Scattering of a strong p-polarized monochromatic field by a dipole monolayer is considered. It is shown that a triplet should be observed at incident angles (between the wave vector of the incident wave and the normal to the monolayer surface) not too close to π/2 in the spectrum of the scattered radiation. For grazing incidence of a strong field on the monolayer, waves with frequencies of the strong field and the high-frequency component of the triplet scatter forward and backward. In this case, radiation with frequency of the low-frequency component of the triplet propagates in the form of two inhomogeneous waves along the monolayer on both sides of it, exponentially decaying with distance from the monolayer.

  2. Magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1988-08-01

    We have observed that some of our model SSC dipoles have long time constant decays of the magnetic field harmonics with amplitudes large enough to result in significant beam loss, if they are not corrected. The magnets were run at constant current at the SSC injection field level of 0.3 tesla for one to three hours and changes in the magnetic field were observed. One explanation for the observed field decay is time dependent superconductor magnetization. Another explanation involves flux creep or flux flow. Data are presented on how the decay changes with previous flux history. Similar magnets with different Nb-Ti filament spacings and matrix materials have different long time field decay. A theoretical model using proximity coupling and flux creep for the observed field decay is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Roll measurement of Tevatron dipoles and quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, J.T.; Elementi, L.; Gollwitzer, K.; Jostlein, H.; Nobrega, F.; Shiltsev, V.; Stefanski, R.

    2006-09-01

    In 2003 a simple digital level system was developed to allow for rapid roll measurements of all dipoles and quadrupoles in the Tevatron. The system uses a Mitutoyo digital level and a PC running MS WINDOWS XP and LAB VIEW to acquire data on the upstream and downstream roll of each magnet. The system is sufficiently simple that all 1,000 magnets in the Tevatron can be measured in less than 3 days. The data can be quickly processed allowing for correction of rolled magnets by the Fermilab alignment group. Data will be presented showing the state of the Tevatron in 2003 and the changes in rolls as measured in each shutdown since then.

  4. Near-Field Magnetic Dipole Moment Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Patrick K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the data analysis technique used for magnetic testing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Excellent results have been obtained using this technique to convert a spacecraft s measured magnetic field data into its respective magnetic dipole moment model. The model is most accurate with the earth s geomagnetic field cancelled in a spherical region bounded by the measurement magnetometers with a minimum radius large enough to enclose the magnetic source. Considerably enhanced spacecraft magnetic testing is offered by using this technique in conjunction with a computer-controlled magnetic field measurement system. Such a system, with real-time magnetic field display capabilities, has been incorporated into other existing magnetic measurement facilities and is also used at remote locations where transport to a magnetics test facility is impractical.

  5. Concentric Titled Double-Helix Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer Meinke, Ph.D; Carl Goodzeit; Millicent Ball, Ph.D

    2003-09-05

    The high magnetic fields required for future accelerator magnets can only be achieved with Nb3Sn, other A15 or HTS type conductors, which are brittle and sensitive to mechanical strain. The traditional ''cosine-theta'' dipole configuration has intrinsic drawbacks that make it difficult and expensive to employ such conductors in these designs. Some of these problems involve (1) difficulty in applying enough pre-stress to counteract Lorentz forces without compromising conductor performance; (2) small minimum bend radii of the conductor necessitating the intricate wind-and-react coil fabrication; (3) complex spacers in particular for coil ends and expensive tooling for coil fabrication; (4) typically only 2/3 of the coil aperture can be used with achievable field uniformity.

  6. SSC collider dipole magnets field angle data

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Bleadon, M.; Schmidt, E.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Delchamps, S.W.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Lamm, M.J.; Mazur, P.O.; Orris, D.; Ozelis, J.; Strait, J.; Wake, M. ); DiMarco, J.; Devred, A.; Kuzminski, J.; Yu, Y.; Zheng, H. ); Ogitsu, T. (Superconducting Super Collider

    1992-09-01

    In the fabrication of both 40 and 50 mm collider dipole superconducting magnets, surveys of the direction of the magnetic field along their length have been taken. This data besides being used for certifying compliance with the specifications for the finished magnet, yields interesting information on the straightness and rigidity of the coil placement between some stages in their manufacture and testing. A discussion on the measuring equipment and procedures is given. All of the 40 mm magnets that were built or cryostat at Fermilab have at least one of these surveys, and a summary of the data on them is presented. Most of the 50 mm magnets built and cold tested at Fermilab have been surveyed before and after insertion in the cryostat and before and after being cold tested. A summary of this data is also presented.

  7. Electric dipole moments: A global analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Timothy; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael

    2015-03-01

    We perform a global analysis of searches for the permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) of the neutron, neutral atoms, and molecules in terms of six leptonic, semileptonic, and nonleptonic interactions involving photons, electrons, pions, and nucleons. By translating the results into fundamental charge-conjugation-parity symmetry (CP) violating effective interactions through dimension six involving standard model particles, we obtain rough lower bounds on the scale of beyond the standard model CP-violating interactions ranging from 1.5 TeV for the electron EDM to 1300 TeV for the nuclear spin-independent electron-quark interaction. We show that planned future measurements involving systems or combinations of systems with complementary sensitivities to the low-energy parameters may extend the mass reach by an order of magnitude or more.

  8. Plasma expansion in the presence of a dipole magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Omidi, N.

    2005-07-15

    Simulations of the initial expansion of a plasma injected into a stationary magnetized background plasma in the presence of a dipole magnetic field are carried out in two dimensions with a kinetic ion, massless fluid electron (hybrid) electromagnetic code. For small values of the magnetic dipole, the injected ions have large gyroradii compared to the scale length of the dipole field and are essentially unmagnetized. As a result, these ions expand, excluding the ambient magnetic field and plasma to form a diamagnetic cavity. However, for stronger magnetic dipoles, the ratio of the gyroradii of the injected ions to the dipole field scale length is small so that they remain magnetized, and hence trapped in the dipole field, as they expand. The trapping and expansion then lead to additional plasma currents and resulting magnetic fields that not only exclude the background field but also interact with the dipole field in a more complex manner that stretches the closed dipole field lines. A criterion to distinguish between the two regimes is derived and is then briefly discussed in the context of applying the results to the plasma sail scheme for the propulsion of small spacecraft in the solar wind.

  9. Dipole power supply for National Synchrotron Light Source Booster upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.; Dabrowski, J.; Murray, J.

    1992-12-31

    The booster at the NSLS is being upgraded from .75 to 2 pulses per second. To accomplish this, new power supplies for the dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets have been designed and are being constructed. This paper will outline the design of the dipole power supply and control system, and will present results obtained thus far.

  10. Dipole power supply for National Synchrotron Light Source Booster upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.; Dabrowski, J. ); Murray, J. )

    1992-01-01

    The booster at the NSLS is being upgraded from .75 to 2 pulses per second. To accomplish this, new power supplies for the dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets have been designed and are being constructed. This paper will outline the design of the dipole power supply and control system, and will present results obtained thus far.

  11. Microstrip Dipoles for EHF and Millimeter Wave Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-26

    in the areas of: (a) Substrate- superstrate effects on printed circuit antennas (b) Mo- deling electromingnetically coupled microstrip dipoles in a...0067. The research performed during the duration of this grant has made an impact in the areas of: (a) Substrate- superstrate effects on printed...circuit antennas (b) Modeling electromagnetically coupled microstrip dipoles in a substrate- superstrate configuration (c) Modeling Mcrostrip Discontinuities

  12. Helical dipole magnets for polarized protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.

    1997-07-01

    Superconducting helical dipole magnets will be used in the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to maintain polarization of proton beams and to perform localized spin rotations at the two major experimental detector regions. Requirements for the helical dipole system are discussed, and magnet prototype work is reported.

  13. Electric dipole moment of the electron and of the neutron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, S. M.; Zee, A.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that if Higgs-boson exchange mediates CP violation a significant electric dipole moment for the electron can result. Analogous effects can contribute to the neutron's electric dipole moment at a level competitive with Weinberg's three-gluon operator.

  14. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi

    2008-08-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f ~ 20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  15. Nursery of Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    This image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars, depicted in green, can be seen surrounding the

  16. Simulations of the angular dependence of the dipole-dipole interaction among Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Jacob L.; Hollingsworth, Jacob; Paul, Jacob T.; Peleg, Matan; Sanford, Veronica L.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-05-01

    The dipole-dipole interaction between two Rydberg atoms depends on the relative orientation of the atoms and on the change in the magnetic quantum number. We simulate the effect of this anisotropy on the energy transport in an amorphous many atom system of ultracold Rydberg atoms subject to a homogeneous applied electric field. We consider two experimentally feasible geometries and find that the effects should be measurable in current generation imaging experiments. We also examine evidence for Anderson localization. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1205895 and No. 1205897 and used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number OCI-1053575.

  17. Effects of dipole magnet inhomogeneities on the beam ellipsoid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Colman, J.; Levine, M.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Ward, T.; Grand, P.

    1986-01-01

    The RAYTRACE computer code has been modified to accept magnetic fields measured in the median plane of a dipole magnet. This modification allows one to study the effects of a non-ideal dipole magnet on the beam ellipsoid (as defined by the TRANSPORT code manual). The effects on the beam ellipsoid are due to: field inhomogeneities in the interior region of the dipole, and discrepancies from design conditions of the magnetic field values in the fringe field region. The results of the RAYTRACE code calculations based on experimentally measured fields will be compared with the results derived using both an ideal (no inhomogeneities) dipole with SCOFF boundaries and an ideal dipole with perfect (according to design) fringe fields.

  18. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of High-spin Paramagnetic Centers in Disordered Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maryasov, Alexander G.; Bowman, Michael K.; Tsvetkov, Yuri D.

    2007-09-13

    Dipole-dipole interactions between distant paramagnetic centers (PCs) where at least one PC has spin S>1/2 are examined. The results provide a basis for the application of pulsed DEER or PELDOR methods to the measurement of distances between PC involving high-spin species. A projection operator technique based on spectral decomposition of the secular Hamiltonian is used to calculate EPR line splitting caused by the dipole coupling. This allows calculation of operators projecting arbitrary wavefunction onto high PC eigenstates when the eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian are not known. The effective spin vectors-that is, the expectation values for vector spin operators in the PC eigenstates-are calculated. The dependence of these effective spin vectors on the external magnetic field is calculated. There is a qualitative difference between pairs having at least one integer spin (non Karmers PC) and pairs of two half-integer (Kramers PC) spins. With the help of these effective spin vectors, the dipolar lineshape of EPR lines is calculated. Analytical relations are obtained for PCs with spin S=1/2 and 1. The dependence of Pake patterns on variations of zero field splitting, Zeeman energy, temperature and dipolar coupling are illustrated.

  19. Giant Herbig-Haro Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Bally, John; Devine, David

    1997-12-01

    We present the discovery of a number of Herbig-Haro flows which extend over parsec-scale distances. The largest of these is the well known HH 111 jet complex, which is shown, through CCD images and a proper motion study, to have an angular extent of almost one degree on the sky, corresponding to 7.7 pc, making it the largest known HH flow. In our imaging survey we also found that T Tauri is at the center of a huge bipolar HH flow, HH 355, with a total extent of 38 arcmin, corresponding to 1.55 pc, and aligned with the axis of the tiny HH 255 flow surrounding the infrared companion T Tau S. We additionally have found a number of other giant HH flow candidates, including HH 315 at PV Cep, HH 41/295 at Haro 5a/6a, HH 300 in Bl8w, HH 354 in Li 165, HH 376 in Li 152, and HH 114/115 and HH 243/244/245/179 in the X Orionis molecular ring. It thus appears that it is common for HH flows to attain parsec-scale dimensions. The ubiquity of parsec-scale HH flows profoundly alters our view of the impact of young stars on their environment. Giant flows have dynamical ages comparable to the duration of the accretion phase of the sources, and provide a fossil record of their mass loss and accretion history. Multiple internal working surfaces and their S-shaped point symmetry provide evidence for variability of ejection velocity and orientation of the source jets. Giant HH flows are either longer or comparable in length to associated CO outflows, providing evidence for unified models in which HH flows power CO flows. Many giant flows have burst out of their source cloud cores and are dissociating molecules and injecting momentum and kinetic energy into the interclump medium of the host clouds. They contribute to the UV radiation field, and may produce C I and C ii in cloud interiors. Giant flows may contribute to the chemical rejuvenation of clouds, the generation of turbulent motions, and the self-regulation of star formation. The terminal working surfaces of giant flows may be

  20. Proteorhodopsin genes in giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Yutin, Natalya; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-10-04

    Viruses with large genomes encode numerous proteins that do not directly participate in virus biogenesis but rather modify key functional systems of infected cells. We report that a distinct group of giant viruses infecting unicellular eukaryotes that includes Organic Lake Phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus encode predicted proteorhodopsins that have not been previously detected in viruses. Search of metagenomic sequence data shows that putative viral proteorhodopsins are extremely abundant in marine environments. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that giant viruses acquired proteorhodopsins via horizontal gene transfer from proteorhodopsin-encoding protists although the actual donor(s) could not be presently identified. The pattern of conservation of the predicted functionally important amino acid residues suggests that viral proteorhodopsin homologs function as sensory rhodopsins. We hypothesize that viral rhodopsins modulate light-dependent signaling, in particular phototaxis, in infected protists.

  1. Giant viruses come of age.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias G

    2016-06-01

    Viruses with genomes up to a few megabases in length are a common occurrence in nature, even though they have escaped our notice until recently. These giant viruses infect mainly single-celled eukaryotes and isolation efforts concentrating on amoebal hosts alone have spawned hundreds of viral isolates, featuring viruses with previously unseen virion morphologies and the largest known viral genomes and particles. One of the challenges that lie ahead is to analyze and categorize the available data and to establish an approved classification system that reflects the evolutionary relationships and biological properties of these viruses. Extensive sampling of Acanthamoeba-infecting mimiviruses and initial characterization of their virophage parasites have provided a first blueprint of the genetic diversity and composition of a giant virus clade that will facilitate the taxonomic grouping of these fascinating microorganisms.

  2. Giant thermoelectric effect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, D.; Dragoman, M.

    2007-11-01

    The paper predicts a giant thermoelectric coefficient in a nanostructure consisting of metallic electrodes periodically patterned over graphene, which is deposited on a silicon dioxide substrate. The Seebeck coefficient in this device attains 30mV/K, this value being among the largest reported ever. The calculations are based on a transfer matrix approach that takes a particular form for graphene-based devices. The results are important for future nanogenerators with applications in the area of sensors, energy harvesting, and scavenging.

  3. Rotational auto-detachment of dipole-bound anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ard, S. G.; Compton, R. N.; Garrett, W. R.

    2016-04-01

    Rotational auto-detachment of acetonitrile, trimethyl-acetonitrile, acetone, and cyclobutanone dipole-bound anions was studied under varying conditions in a Rydberg electron transfer (RET) time-of-flight apparatus. Varying amounts of auto-detachment was observed for anions with similar electron affinity and dipole moment, but different moments of inertia. These results were found to be consistent with predictions based on the calculated rotational spectra for these anions, highlighting the importance of critical binding properties in understanding the stability and lifetime of dipole bound systems.

  4. Propagation of the Lissajous singularity dipole in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haitao; Gao, Zenghui; Zou, Xuefang; Xiao, Xi; Wang, Fanhou; Yang, Huajun

    2014-01-01

    The propagation properties of a pair of Lissajous singularities with opposite singularity indexes called the Lissajous singularity dipole (LSD) in free space are studied analytically and illustrated numerically. It is shown that the motion, creation, annihilation and change in the degree of polarization of the LSD, and change in the shape of Lissajous figures take place by suitably varying the waist width, off-axis distance or propagation distance. In particular, the creation and shift to infinity of a single Lissajous singularity may appear. A comparison with the free-space propagation of an optical vortex dipole and a C-dipole is also made.

  5. CONSTRAINT ON LIGHT DIPOLE DARK MATTER FROM HELIOSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Ilídio; Kadota, Kenji; Silk, Joseph E-mail: ilopes@uevora.pt E-mail: silk@astro.ox.ac.uk

    2014-01-10

    We investigate the effects of a magnetic dipole moment of asymmetric dark matter (DM) in the evolution of the Sun. The dipole interaction can lead to a sizable DM scattering cross section even for light DM, and asymmetric DM can lead to a large DM number density in the Sun. We find that solar model precision tests, using as diagnostic the sound speed profile obtained from helioseismology data, exclude dipolar DM particles with a mass larger than 4.3 GeV and magnetic dipole moment larger than 1.6 × 10{sup –17} e cm.

  6. Genetic algorithms for dipole location of fetal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Escalona-Vargas, D; Murphy, P; Lowery, C L; Eswaran, H

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we explore the use of Maximum Likelihood (ML) method with Genetic Algorithms (GA) as global optimization procedure for source reconstruction in fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) data. A multiple equivalent current dipole (ECD) model was used for sources active in different time samples. Inverse solutions across time were obtained for a single-dipole approximation to estimate the trajectory of the dipole position. We compared the GA and SIMPLEX methods in a simulation environment under noise conditions. Methods are applied on a real fMCG data. Results show robust estimators of the cardiac sources when GA is used as optimization technique.

  7. Need for remeasurements of nuclear magnetic dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Martin G.; Mårtensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    1998-11-01

    The need for a reassessment of nuclear magnetic dipole moments is prompted by recent experiments on the ground-state hyperfine structure in highly charged hydrogenlike systems which are sufficiently sensitive to probe QED effects. This work gives an overview of the magnetic dipole moments for the nuclei of interest, i.e., 165Ho, 185,187Re, 203,205Tl, 207Pb, and 209Bi. It is found that the present uncertainties in the nuclear magnetic dipole moment limit the interpretation of the accurate experimental hyperfine structures for these systems.

  8. NLO evolution of color dipoles in N=4 SYM

    SciTech Connect

    Chirilli, Giovanni A.; Balitsky, Ian

    2009-07-04

    Here, high-energy behavior of amplitudes in a gauge theory can be reformulated in terms of the evolution of Wilson-line operators. In the leading logarithmic approximation it is given by the conformally invariant BK equation for the evolution of color dipoles. In QCD, the next-to-leading order BK equation has both conformal and non-conformal parts, the latter providing the running of the coupling constant. To separate the conformally invariant effects from the running-coupling effects, we calculate the NLO evolution of the color dipoles in the conformal ${\\cal N}$=4 SYM theory. We define the "composite dipole operator" with the rapidity cutoff preserving conformal invariance.

  9. Electric dipole moments of Escherichia coli HB 101.

    PubMed

    Stoylov, Stoyl P; Gyurova, Anna Y; Bunin, Viktor; Angersbach, Alexander; Georgieva, Ralitsa N; Danova, Svetla T

    2009-04-01

    The theoretical and experimental studies of the particles' electric dipole moments in the microscopic and submicroscopic size range show that in the case of polar and conductive media the interfacial components of the dipole moments are of greatest importance. While in the range of manometer's sizes there seems to be no important problems in the identification and in the estimation of the values of the dipole moments at present, in the micrometer range there are serious problems. In this communication these problems are considered and illustrated by electro-optic investigations of Escherichia coli HB 101.

  10. Acoustic monopoles, dipoles, and quadrupoles: An experiment revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Daniel A.; Titlow, Joseph P.; Bemmen, Ya-Juan

    1999-08-01

    A simple and inexpensive demonstration of acoustic monopole, dipole, and quadrupole sources utilizes four 4-in. boxed loudspeakers and a homemade switch box. The switch box allows the speakers to be driven in any combination of phase relationships. Placing the speakers on a rotating stool allows students to measure directivity patterns for monopole, dipole, and quadrupole speaker combinations. Stacking the speakers in a square, all facing the same direction, allows students to aurally compare the frequency and amplitude dependence of sound radiation from monopoles, dipoles, and quadrupoles.

  11. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.

  12. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  13. Hairpin Furans and Giant Biaryls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xin; Mague, Joel T; Donahue, James P; Pascal, Robert A

    2016-05-06

    The thermal reaction of two cyclopentadienones with 5,5'-binaphthoquinone or 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in refluxing nitrobenzene (210 °C) gives, in a single synthetic step that includes two Diels-Alder additions, two decarbonylations, and two dehydrogenations, giant biaryl bisquinones (compounds 13, 14, 15, 18, and 21). However, when two cyclopentadienones react with 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in nitrobenzene at higher temperatures (250-260 °C), the resulting products are molecular ribbons composed of two twisted aromatic systems fused to a heteropentahelicene (19, 20, and 22). These molecules are representatives of a new class of chiral polycyclic aromatic compounds, the "hairpin furans". Interestingly, reheating a dimethoxy-substituted giant biaryl (e.g., 21) in nitrobenzene at 260 °C does not yield the corresponding hairpin furan (22), and mechanistic studies indicate that some intermediate or byproduct of the synthesis of the giant biaryls is a reagent or catalyst necessary for the conversion of the dimethoxybiaryl to the furan.

  14. Electrodynamics in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Cho, J.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets such as HD209458b are strongly ionized by the UV flux of their host stars. We show that photoionization on such planets creates a dayside ionosphere that extends from the thermosphere to the 100 mbar level. The resulting peak electron density near the 1 mbar level is higher than that encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the model conductivity is in fact comparable to the atmospheres of Sun-like stars. As a result, the momentum and energy balance in the upper atmosphere of HD209458b and similar planets can be strongly affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Despite much weaker ionization, electrodynamics is nevertheless also important on the giant planets of the solar system. We use a generic framework to constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in extrasolar planets, and compare the results with conductivites based on the same approach for Jupiter and Saturn. By using a generalized Ohm's law and assumed magnetic fields, we then demonstrate the basic effects of wind-driven ion drag in giant planet atmospheres. Our results show that ion drag is often significant in the upper atmosphere where it can also substantially alter the energy budget through resistive heating.

  15. A study of microtubule dipole lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Shubhendu

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal protein polymers orchestrating a host of important cellular functions including, but not limited to, cell support, cell division, cell motility and cell transport. In this thesis, we construct a toy-model of the microtubule lattice composed of vector Ising spins representing tubulin molecules, the building block of microtubules. Nearest-neighbor and next-to-nearest neighbor interactions are considered within an anisotropic dielectric medium. As a consequence of the helical topology, we observe that certain spin orientations render the lattice frustrated with nearest neighbor ferroelectric and next-to-nearest neighbor antiferroelectric bonds. Under these conditions, the lattice displays the remarkable property of stabilizing certain spin patterns that are robust to thermal fluctuations. We model this behavior in the framework of a generalized Ising model known as the J1 - J2 model and theoretically determine the set of stable patterns. Employing Monte-Carlo methods, we demonstrate the stability of such patterns in the microtubule lattice at human physiological temperatures. This suggests a novel biological mechanism for storing information in living organisms, whereby the tubulin spin (dipole moment) states become information bits and information gets stored in microtubules in a way that is robust to thermal fluctuations.

  16. Magnetic dipole discharges. I. Basic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Teodorescu-Soare, C. T.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2013-08-15

    A simple discharge is described which uses a permanent magnet as a cold cathode and the metallic chamber wall as an anode. The magnet's equator is biased strongly negative, which produces secondary electrons due to the impact of energetic ions. The emitted electrons are highly confined by the strong dipolar magnetic field and the negative potential in the equatorial plane of the magnet. The emitted electrons ionize near the sheath and produce further electrons, which drift across field lines to the anode while the nearly unmagnetized ions are accelerated back to the magnet. A steady state discharge is maintained at neutral pressures above 10{sup −3} mbar. This is the principle of magnetron discharges, which commonly use cylindrical and planar cathodes rather than magnetic dipoles as cathodes. The discharge properties have been investigated in steady state and pulsed mode. Different magnets and geometries have been employed. The role of a background plasma has been investigated. Various types of instabilities have been observed such as sheath oscillations, current-driven turbulence, relaxation instabilities due to ionization, and high frequency oscillations created by sputtering impulses, which are described in more detail in companion papers. The discharge has also been operated in reactive gases and shown to be useful for sputtering applications.

  17. Pulsar Magnetospheres: Beyond the Flat Spacetime Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gralla, Samuel E.; Lupsasca, Alexandru; Philippov, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Most studies of the pulsar magnetosphere have assumed a pure magnetic dipole in flat spacetime. However, recent work suggests that the effects of general relativity are in fact of vital importance and that realistic pulsar magnetic fields will have a significant nondipolar component. We introduce a general analytical method for studying the axisymmetric force-free magnetosphere of a slowly rotating star of arbitrary magnetic field, mass, radius, and moment of inertia, including all the effects of general relativity. We confirm that spacelike current is generically present in the polar caps (suggesting a pair production region), irrespective of the stellar magnetic field. We show that general relativity introduces a ∼ 60 % correction to the formula for the dipolar component of the surface magnetic field inferred from spindown. Finally, we show that the location and shape of the polar caps can be modified dramatically by even modestly strong higher moments. This can affect emission processes occurring near the star and may help explain the modified beam characteristics of millisecond pulsars.

  18. Electric dipole moments of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Electric dipole moments (EDMs) are extremely sensitive probes of physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). A vibrant experimental program is in place, with the goal to improve the existing neutron EDM bound by one/two orders of magnitude, and to test new ideas for the measurement of EDMs of light ions, such as deuteron and helium, at a comparable level. The success of this program, and its implications for physics beyond the SM, relies on the precise calculation of the EDMs in terms of the couplings of CP-violating operators. In light of the non-perturbative nature both of QCD at low energy and of the nuclear interactions, these calculations have proven difficult, and are affected by large theoretical uncertainties. In this talk I will review the progress that in recent years has been achieved on different aspects of the calculation of hadronic and nuclear EDMs. In particular, I will discuss how the interplay between lattice QCD and Chiral Effective Field Theory (EFT) has allowed to reduce a set of hadronic uncertainties. Finally, I will discuss how the measurements of th EDMs of one, two and three nucleon systems can be used to discriminate between various possible mechanisms of time-reversal violation at high energy.

  19. Electric dipole moment enhancement factor of thallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porsev, Sergey; Safronova, Marianna; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2012-06-01

    A number of extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict electric dipole moments (EDM) of particles that may be observable with the present state-of-the art experiments. The EDMs arise from the violations of both parity and time-reversal invariance. The electron EDM is enhanced in certain atomic and molecular systems. One of the most stringent limits on the electron EDM de was obtained from the experiments with ^205Tl: de<1.6 10-27e cm [Regan et al., PRL 88, 071805 (2002)]. This result crucially depend on the calculated value of the effective electric field on the valence electron. In the case of Tl this effective field is proportional to the applied field E0, Eeff= K,0. The goal of this work is to resolve the present controversy in the value of the EDM enhancement factor K in Tl. We have carried out several calculations by different high-precision methods, studied previously omitted corrections, as well as tested our methodology on other parity conserving quantities. We find the EDM enhancement factor of Tl to be equal to -573(20). This value is 20% larger than the recently published result of Nataraj et al. [PRL 106, 200403 (2011)] but agrees very well with several earlier results.

  20. Two flavors of the Indian Ocean Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Satoru; Tozuka, Tomoki

    2016-06-01

    The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is known as a climate mode in the tropical Indian Ocean accompanied by negative (positive) sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies over the eastern (western) pole during its positive phase. However, the western pole of the IOD is not always covered totally by positive SST anomalies. For this reason, the IOD is further classified into two types in this study based on SST anomalies in the western pole. The first type (hereafter "canonical IOD") is associated with negative (positive) SST anomalies in the eastern (central to western) tropical Indian Ocean. The second type (hereafter "IOD Modoki"), on the other hand, is associated with negative SST anomalies in the eastern and western tropical Indian Ocean and positive SST anomalies in the central tropical Indian Ocean. Based on composite analyses, it is found that easterly wind anomalies cover the whole equatorial Indian Ocean in the canonical IOD, and as a result, positive rainfall anomalies are observed over East Africa. Also, due to the basin-wide easterly wind anomalies, the canonical IOD is accompanied by strong sea surface height (SSH) anomalies. In contrast, zonal wind anomalies converge in the central tropical Indian Ocean in the IOD Modoki, and no significant precipitation anomalies are found over East Africa. Also, only weak SSH anomalies are seen, because equatorial downwelling anomalies induced by westerly wind anomalies in the west are counteracted by equatorial upwelling anomalies caused by easterly wind anomalies in the east.

  1. Strongly magnetized rotating dipole in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Electromagnetic waves arise in many areas of physics. Solutions are difficult to find in the general case. Aims: We numerically integrate Maxwell equations in a 3D spherical polar coordinate system. Methods: Straightforward finite difference methods would lead to a coordinate singularity along the polar axis. Spectral methods are better suited for such artificial singularities that are related to the choice of a coordinate system. When the radiating object rotates like a star, for example, special classes of solutions to Maxwell equations are worthwhile to study, such as quasi-stationary regimes. Moreover, in high-energy astrophysics, strong gravitational and magnetic fields are present especially around rotating neutron stars. Results: To study such systems, we designed an algorithm to solve the time-dependent Maxwell equations in spherical polar coordinates including general relativity and quantum electrodynamical corrections to leading order. As a diagnostic, we computed the spin-down luminosity expected for these stars and compared it to the classical or non-relativistic and non-quantum mechanical results. Conclusions: Quantum electrodynamics leads to an irrelevant change in the spin-down luminosity even for a magnetic field of about the critical value of 4.4 × 109 T. Therefore the braking index remains close to its value for a point dipole in vacuum, namely n = 3. The same conclusion holds for a general-relativistic quantum electrodynamically corrected force-free magnetosphere.

  2. Period spacings in red giants. III. Coupling factors of mixed modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, B.; Pinçon, C.; Belkacem, K.; Takata, M.; Vrard, M.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The power of asteroseismology relies on the capability of global oscillations to infer the stellar structure. For evolved stars, we benefit from unique information directly carried out by mixed modes that probe their radiative cores. This third article of the series devoted to mixed modes in red giants focuses on their coupling factors, which have remained largely unexploited up to now. Aims: With the measurement of coupling factors, we intend to give physical constraints on the regions surrounding the radiative core and the hydrogen-burning shell of subgiants and red giants. Methods: A new method for measuring the coupling factor of mixed modes was implemented, which was derived from the method recently implemented for measuring period spacings. This new method was automated so that it could be applied to a large sample of stars. Results: Coupling factors of mixed modes were measured for thousands of red giants. They show specific variation with mass and evolutionary stage. Weak coupling is observed for the most evolved stars on the red giant branch only; large coupling factors are measured at the transition between subgiants and red giants as well as in the red clump. Conclusions: The measurement of coupling factors in dipole mixed modes provides a new insight into the inner interior structure of evolved stars. While the large frequency separation and the asymptotic period spacings probe the envelope and core, respectively, the coupling factor is directly sensitive to the intermediate region in between and helps determine its extent. Observationally, the determination of the coupling factor is a prior to precise fits of the mixed-mode pattern and can now be used to address further properties of the mixed-mode pattern, such as the signature of buoyancy glitches and core rotation.

  3. Giant-cell granuloma of the axis.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, Emilio; Santamarta, David; Lomas-García, Jesús; Ibáñez-Plágaro, F Javier; Fernández-Fernández, J Javier; Ariño, Teresa Ribas; García-Cosamalón, José

    2012-02-01

    Giant-cell granuloma is a benign and nonneoplastic lesion with an expansive and locally destructive behavior. It typically involves the mandible and the maxilla. Only 1 case arising from the odontoid process of the axis has been reported previously. The authors report on a 64-year-old man with a giant-cell granuloma of the axis. They review this uncommon entity, emphasizing the complexity of differentiating between this lesion and other giant-cell tumors.

  4. Cabergoline Treatment in Invasive Giant Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically. PMID:25002819

  5. Guiding the Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-08-01

    New ESO Survey Provides Targets for the VLT Giant astronomical telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) must be used efficiently. Observing time is expensive and there are long waiting lines of excellent research programmes. Thus the work at the telescope must be very well prepared and optimized as much as possible - mistakes should be avoided and no time lost! Astronomers working with the new 8-m class optical/infrared telescopes must base their observations on detailed lists of suitable target objects if they want to perform cutting-edge science. This is particularly true for research programmes that depend on observations of large samples of comparatively rare, distant objects. This type of work requires that extensive catalogues of such objects must be prepared in advance. One such major catalogue - that will serve as a very useful basis for future VLT observations - has just become available from the new ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). The Need for Sky Surveys Astronomers have since long recognized the need to carry out preparatory observations with other telescopes in order to "guide" large telescopes. To this end, surveys of smaller or larger parts of the sky have been performed by wide-field telescopes, paving the way for subsequent work at the limits of the largest available ground-based telescopes. For instance, a complete photographic survey of the sourthern sky (declination < -17.5°) was carried out in the 1970's with the ESO 1-metre Schmidt Telescope in support of the work at the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory. However, while until recently most observational programmes could rely on samples of objects found on photographic plates, this is no longer possible. New image surveys must match the fainter limiting magnitudes reached by the new and larger telescopes. Modern digital, multi-colour, deep imaging surveys have thus become an indispensable complement to the 8-m telescopes. The new generation of imaging surveys will, without

  6. Red giants: then and now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, John

    Fred Hoyle's work on the structure and evolution of red giants, particularly his pathbreaking contribution with Martin Schwarzschild (Hoyle and Schwarzschild 1955), is both lauded and critically assessed. In his later lectures and work with students in the early 1960s, Hoyle presented more physical ways of understanding some of the approximations used, and results obtained, in that seminal paper. Although later ideas by other investigators will be touched upon, Hoyle's viewpoint - that low-mass red giants are essentially white dwarfs with a serious mass-storage problem - is still extremely fruitful. Over the years, I have further developed his method of attack. Relatively recently, I have been able to deepen and broaden the approach, finally extending the theory to provide a unifying treatment of the structure of low-mass stars from the main sequence though both the red-giant and horizontal-branch phases of evolution. Many aspects of these stars that had remained puzzling, even mysterious, for decades have now fallen into place, and some questions have been answered that were not even posed before. With low-mass red giants as the simplest example, this recent work emphasizes that stars, in general, may have at least two distinct but very important centres: (I) a geometrical centre, and (II) a separate nuclear centre, residing in a shell outside a zero-luminosity dense core for example. This two-centre perspective leads to an explicit, analytical, asymptotic theory of low-mass red-giant structure. It enables one to appreciate that the problem of understanding why such stars become red giants is one of anticipating a remarkable yet natural structural bifurcation that occurs in them. This bifurcation occurs because of a combination of known and understandable facts just summarized namely that, following central hydrogen exhaustion, a thin nuclear-burning shell does develop outside a more-or-less dense core. In the resulting theory, both ρsh/ρolinec and

  7. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  8. ORIGIN OF LITHIUM ENRICHMENT IN K GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Yerra Bharat; Reddy, Bacham E.; Lambert, David L.

    2011-03-20

    In this Letter, we report on a low-resolution spectroscopic survey for Li-rich K giants among 2000 low-mass (M {<=} 3 M{sub sun}) giants spanning the luminosity range from below to above the luminosity of the clump. Fifteen new Li-rich giants including four super Li-rich K giants (log {epsilon}(Li) {>=}3.2) were discovered. A significant finding is that there is a concentration of Li-rich K giants at the luminosity of the clump or red horizontal branch. This new finding is partly a consequence of the fact that our low-resolution survey is the first large survey to include giants well below and above the red giant branch (RGB) bump and clump locations in the H-R diagram. Origin of the lithium enrichment may be plausibly attributed to the conversion of {sup 3}He via {sup 7}Be to {sup 7}Li by the Cameron-Fowler mechanism but the location for the onset of the conversion is uncertain. Two possible opportunities to effect this conversion are discussed: the bump in the first ascent of the RGB and the He-core flash at the tip of the RGB. The finite luminosity spread of the Li-rich giants serves to reject the idea that Li enhancement is, in general, a consequence of a giant swallowing a large planet.

  9. WHT, DIPOL-2 polarimetry of Nova Sgr 2015b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Eamonn; Berdyugin, Andrei; Redman, Matt

    2015-09-01

    We report polarimetry data from three nights observing of Nova Sgr 2015b (also PNV J18365700-2855420 or V5668 Sgr) with the William Herschel Telescope in the BVR passbands using the DIPOL-2 instrument.

  10. Gyre-driven decay of the Earth's magnetic dipole

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Christopher C.; Aubert, Julien; Gillet, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Direct observations indicate that the magnitude of the Earth's magnetic axial dipole has decreased over the past 175 years; it is now 9% weaker than it was in 1840. Here we show how the rate of dipole decay may be controlled by a planetary-scale gyre in the liquid metal outer core. The gyre's meridional limbs on average transport normal polarity magnetic flux equatorward and reverse polarity flux poleward. Asymmetry in the geomagnetic field, due to the South Atlantic Anomaly, is essential to the proposed mechanism. We find that meridional flux advection accounts for the majority of the dipole decay since 1840, especially during times of rapid decline, with magnetic diffusion making an almost steady contribution generally of smaller magnitude. Based on the morphology of the present field, and the persistent nature of the gyre, the current episode of dipole decay looks set to continue, at least for the next few decades. PMID:26814368

  11. Ocular dominance affects magnitude of dipole moment: an MEG study.

    PubMed

    Shima, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Tachibana, Osamu; Nomura, Motohiro; Yamashita, Junkoh; Ozaki, Yuzo; Kawai, Jun; Higuchi, Masanori; Kado, Hisashi

    2010-08-23

    To investigate whether the ocular dominance affects laterality in the activity of the primary visual cortex, we examined the relationship between the ocular dominance and latency or dipole moment measured by checkerboard-pattern and magnetoencephalography in 11 right-handed healthy male participants. Participants with left-eye dominance showed a dipole moment of 21.5+/-6.1 nAm with left-eye stimulation and 16.1+/-3.6 nAm with right, whereas those with right-eye dominance showed a dipole moment of 18.0+/-5.2 and 21.5+/-2.7 nAm with left-eye and right-eye stimulation of the infero-medial quadrant visual field, respectively. Thus, the dipole moment was higher when the dominant eye was stimulated, which implies that ocular dominance is regulated by the ipsilateral occipital lobe.

  12. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment from Gauge-String Duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, Lorenzo; Bigazzi, Francesco; Bolognesi, Stefano; Cotrone, Aldo L.; Manenti, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    We compute the electric dipole moment of nucleons in the large Nc QCD model by Witten, Sakai, and Sugimoto with Nf=2 degenerate massive flavors. Baryons in the model are instantonic solitons of an effective five-dimensional action describing the whole tower of mesonic fields. We find that the dipole electromagnetic form factor of the nucleons, induced by a finite topological θ angle, exhibits complete vector meson dominance. We are able to evaluate the contribution of each vector meson to the final result—a small number of modes are relevant to obtain an accurate estimate. Extrapolating the model parameters to real QCD data, the neutron electric dipole moment is evaluated to be dn=1.8 ×10-16θ e cm . The electric dipole moment of the proton is exactly the opposite.

  13. Gyre-driven decay of the Earth's magnetic dipole.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Christopher C; Aubert, Julien; Gillet, Nicolas

    2016-01-27

    Direct observations indicate that the magnitude of the Earth's magnetic axial dipole has decreased over the past 175 years; it is now 9% weaker than it was in 1840. Here we show how the rate of dipole decay may be controlled by a planetary-scale gyre in the liquid metal outer core. The gyre's meridional limbs on average transport normal polarity magnetic flux equatorward and reverse polarity flux poleward. Asymmetry in the geomagnetic field, due to the South Atlantic Anomaly, is essential to the proposed mechanism. We find that meridional flux advection accounts for the majority of the dipole decay since 1840, especially during times of rapid decline, with magnetic diffusion making an almost steady contribution generally of smaller magnitude. Based on the morphology of the present field, and the persistent nature of the gyre, the current episode of dipole decay looks set to continue, at least for the next few decades.

  14. Electron capture by an electric dipole in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, M. L.; Nieto, L. M.

    2007-06-15

    The question of the existence of a nonzero minimum dipole moment D{sub 0} that can sustain an electron bound state for an electric dipole in two dimensions is examined both classically and quantum mechanically. The results suggest that in the latter case, D{sub 0}{<=}0.209 compared to the Fermi-Teller value 0.904 for three dimensions (in atomic units)

  15. Dipole model analysis of high precision HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luszczak, A.; Kowalski, H.

    2014-04-01

    We analyze, within a dipole model, the inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross section data, obtained from the combination of the measurements of the H1 and ZEUS experiments performed at the HERA collider. We show that these high precision data are very well described within the dipole model framework, which is complemented with valence quark structure functions. We discuss the properties of the gluon density obtained in this way.

  16. Electromagnetic Dipole Strength in 124,128,134Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Junghans, A. R.

    2014-05-01

    The electromagnetic dipole strength in several even nuclei in the chain of Xenon isotopes has been investigated at the bremsstrahlung facility of the ELBE accelerator in Dresden, Germany and at the HIγS facility in Durham, USA. The goal of these measurements is to extend the knowledge about the general behavior of the dipole strength in the energy region below the neutron separation energy under the aspect of neutron excess and nuclear deformation.

  17. Simulation of Whistler Chorus in a Compressed Dipole Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Denton, R. E.; Hudson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's dipole magnetic field is constantly compressed by the solar wind and the compression is enhanced during magnetic storm. We simulate whistler chorus in a compressed dipole field using a hybrid code. The hybrid code uses the particle-in-cell technique in generalized orthogonal coordinates. In the hybrid code, a small fraction of electrons are treated as particles with anisotropic temperature that leads to the whistler instability. Other electrons are treated as a cold fluid without mass. The density of the fluid electrons is large such that the plasma frequency exceeds the electron gyro frequency. Ions serve as a fixed background. We model the compressed dipole field by adding a constant magnetic field component to the dipole field. The direction of the compressed component is the same as that of the dipole field at the equator. This model of the compressed dipole field yields a magnetic field with off-equator minima and smaller inhomogeneity than the dipole field near the equator. The distribution of hot anisotropic electrons along the magnetic field is a function of adiabatic invariants that satisfies MHD force balance. In the compressed dipole field, the hot electron anisotropy, hot electron density and plasma beta in the direction parallel to the background magnetic field are the maximum at the minimum magnetic field. In our simulation, whistler chorus are generated at the minimum magnetic field with a peak frequency in agreement with the prediction by WHAMP, a local dispersion relation solver. The waves propagate in both directions along the magnetic field. Waves that propagate to higher magnetic latitude are damped at the boundary by the artificial resistive layers, while waves that propagate to lower latitude towards the equator continue to grow.

  18. Transition dipole moments of the Qy band in photosynthetic pigments.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, M Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G

    2011-11-10

    From studying the time evolution of the single electron density matrix within a density functional tight-binding formalism we calculate the Q(y) transition dipole moments vector direction and strength for a series of important photosynthetic pigments. We obtain good agreement with first-principles and experimental results and provide insights into the detailed nature of these excitations from the time evolving populations of molecular orbitals involved as well as correlations between pigment chemistry and dipole strength.

  19. OEDIPUS: Onium Evolution, Dipole Interaction and Perturbative Unitarisation Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, G. P.

    1997-09-01

    OEDIPUS is a Monte Carlo simulation program which can be used to determine the small- x evolution of a heavy onium using Mueller's colour dipole formulation, giving the full distribution of dipoles in rapidity and impact parameter. Routines are also provided which calculate onium-onium scattering amplitudes between individual pairs of onium configurations, making it possible to establish the contribution of multiple pomeron exchange terms to onium-onium scattering (the unitarisation corrections).

  20. Historical variation of the geomagnetic axial dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Christopher C.

    2008-09-01

    The geomagnetic axial dipole (hereinafter denoted g10) is the largest component of our planet's magnetic field. Its magnitude determines the morphology of solar-terrestrial electrical current systems and it is the most fundamental diagnostic property of the core-generated geodynamo. Elucidating past and future variations of g10(t) is consequently of central importance in geomagnetism. Previous historical geomagnetic field models, such as gufm1 of Jackson et al. [Jackson, A., Jonkers, A.R.T., Walker, M.R., 2000. Four centuries of geomagnetic secular variation from historical records. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A 358, 957-990], used direct observations to constrain g10(t) only after 1840 A.D.; before this time a crude linear extrapolation of the post-1840 A.D. rate of change (15 nT/year) was employed. In this contribution I construct historical field models with g10(t) instead constrained from 1590 A.D. to 1840 A.D. by an archaeointensity dataset compiled by Korte et al. [Korte, M., Genevey, A., Constable, C.G., Frank, U., Schnepp, E., 2005. Continuous geomagnetic field models for the past 7 millennia. 1. A new global data compilation. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 6, doi:10.1029/2004GC000800]. A range of possible linear models of the form g10(t)=g10(1840)+β(t-1840) are first explored; β=2.74±42.32 nT/year is found to explain the archaeointensity dataset with maximum likelihood, consistent with the recent findings of Gubbins et al. [Gubbins, D., Jones, A.L., Finlay, C.C., 2006. Fall in Earth's magnetic field is erratic. Science 312, 900-902]. Relaxing the linear constraint in an effort to find more physically plausible models, I find it is necessary to artificially increase the weight given to the archaeointensity data in order to obtain acceptable models. Despite satisfactorily explaining both the historical and archaeointensity data, and possessing reasonable spatial and temporal complexity, such free evolution models perform worse than the simpler linearly

  1. Photoconductive dipole antennas for efficient terahertz receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Truong Khang; Kim, Won Tae; Kang, Bong Joo; Bark, Hyeon Sang; Kim, Kangho; Lee, Jaejin; Park, Ikmo; Jeon, Tae-In; Rotermund, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    We designed various photoconductive antennas applicable to efficient terahertz (THz) receivers and experimentally investigated their detection characteristics. Three different antennas based on Grischkowsky (H-), I-, and bowtie shapes were fabricated on a 1.2-μm-thick low-temperature GaAs layer that was grown on a semi-insulating GaAs substrate and subsequently attached to extended hemispherical silicon lenses. The experimental results showed different characteristics for detection responsivity and agreed well with the theoretical prediction. Measurements of the peak-to-peak amplitudes of the detected THz photocurrent were approximately 67, 42, and 59 nA for the H-shaped, I-shaped, and bowtie-shaped antennas, respectively. The I- and bowtie-shaped antennas provided higher THz detection sensitivities than the H-shaped antenna in the low-frequency region, i.e., below 0.6 THz. At a frequency of 0.2 THz, the I- and bowtie-shaped antennas offered an approximately 3.6-fold and 6-fold enhancement, respectively, in THz detection sensitivity compared to the H-shaped antenna. The bowtie-shaped antenna produced better peak amplitude and a wider spectral bandwidth than the I-shaped antenna. The observed detection peak frequencies of the I-shaped and bowtie-shaped antennas possessing very long dipole arms indicate that the lowest limit of the frequency detected in a typical THz-TDS using a GaAs photoconductive antenna as emitter/detector is around 0.2 THz.

  2. Classification of Uxo by Principal Dipole Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, K. N.

    2010-12-01

    Data acquired by multiple-Transmitter, multiple-receiver time-domain electromagnetic devices show great potential for determining the geometric and compositional information relating to near surface conductive targets. Here is presented an analysis of data from one such system; the Berkeley Unexploded-ordnance Discriminator (BUD) system. BUD data are succinctly reduced by processing the multi-static data matrices to obtain magnetic dipole polarizability matrices for data from each time gate. When viewed over all time gates, the projections of the data onto the principal polar axes yield so-called polarizability curves. These curves are especially well suited to discriminating between subsurface conductivity anomalies which correspond to objects of rotational symmetry and irregularly shaped objects. The curves have previously been successfully employed as library elements in a pattern recognition scheme aimed at discriminating harmless scrap metal from dangerous intact unexploded ordnance. However, previous polarizability-curve matching methods have only been applied at field sites which are known a priori to be contaminated by a single type of ordnance, and furthermore, the particular ordnance present in the subsurface was known to be large. Thus signal amplitude was a key element in the discrimination process. The work presented here applies feature-based pattern classification techniques to BUD field data where more than 20 categories of object are present. Data soundings from a calibration grid at the Yuma, AZ proving ground are used in a cross validation study to calibrate the pattern recognition method. The resultant method is then applied to a Blind Test Grid. Results indicate that when lone UXO are present and SNR is reasonably high, Polarizability Curve Matching successfully discriminates UXO from scrap metal when a broad range of objects are present.

  3. High-energy hadron-hadron (dipole-dipole) scattering from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Matteo; Meggiolaro, Enrico

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the problem of high-energy hadron-hadron (dipole-dipole) scattering is approached (for the first time) from the point of view of lattice QCD, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations. In the first part, we give a brief review of how high-energy scattering amplitudes can be reconstructed, using a functional-integral approach, in terms of certain correlation functions of two Wilson loops, and we also briefly recall some relevant analyticity and crossing-symmetry properties of these loop-loop correlation functions, when going from Euclidean to Minkowskian theory. In the second part, we shall see how these (Euclidean) loop-loop correlation functions can be evaluated in lattice QCD, and we shall compare our numerical results with some nonperturbative analytical estimates that appeared in the literature, discussing, in particular, the question of the analytic continuation from Euclidean to Minkowskian theory and its relation to the still unsolved problem of the asymptotic s dependence of the hadron-hadron total cross sections.

  4. Interstrand dipole-dipole interactions can stabilize the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Shoulders, Matthew D; Raines, Ronald T

    2011-07-01

    The amino acid sequence of collagen is composed of GlyXaaYaa repeats. A prevailing paradigm maintains that stable collagen triple helices form when (2S)-proline (Pro) or Pro derivatives that prefer the C(γ)-endo ring pucker are in the Xaa position and Pro derivatives that prefer the C(γ)-exo ring pucker are in the Yaa position. Anomalously, an amino acid sequence in an invertebrate collagen has (2S,4R)-4-hydroxyproline (Hyp), a C(γ)-exo-puckered Pro derivative, in the Xaa position. In certain contexts, triple helices with Hyp in the Xaa position are now known to be hyperstable. Most intriguingly, the sequence (GlyHypHyp)(n) forms a more stable triple helix than does the sequence (GlyProHyp)(n). Competing theories exist for the physicochemical basis of the hyperstability of (GlyHypHyp)(n) triple helices. By synthesizing and analyzing triple helices with different C(γ)-exo-puckered proline derivatives in the Xaa and Yaa positions, we conclude that interstrand dipole-dipole interactions are the primary determinant of their additional stability. These findings provide a new framework for understanding collagen stability.

  5. Superradiant laser: Effect of long-range dipole-dipole interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, H. H.

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of long-range dipole-dipole interaction (LRDDI) on a superradiant laser (SL). This effect is induced from the atom-photon interaction in the dissipation process. In the bad-cavity limit usually performed to initiate SL, we demonstrate that cavity photon number oscillates as an interparticle distance of the atoms varies. Similarly the atom-atom coherence alternates with signs, showing critical transitions alternatively in SL operations. This suggests a complexity of the collective effect emerging in a large ensemble of atoms. Therefore this effect in a SL cannot be simply interpreted by only a part of the whole ensemble. We numerically solve for a steady-state SL including the spatially dependent LRDDI, and locate the maximal cavity photon number and the minimal spectral linewidth respectively at the optimal atomic separations in the setting of an equidistant atomic array. The scaling of a finite number of atoms shows that a steady-state SL outperforms the one without LRDDI, which allows for probing narrow atomic transitions and is potentially useful for precision measurements and next-generation optical clocks.

  6. Constraints on Exotic Dipole-Dipole Couplings between Electrons at the Micrometer Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Ozeri, Roee; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson

    2015-08-01

    New constraints on exotic dipole-dipole interactions between electrons at the micrometer scale are established, based on a recent measurement of the magnetic interaction between two trapped 88Sr+ ions. For light bosons (mass≤0.1 eV ) we obtain a 90% confidence interval for an axial-vector-mediated interaction strength of |gAegAe/4 π ℏc | ≤1.2 ×10-17 . Assuming C P T invariance, this constraint is compared to that on anomalous electron-positron interactions, derived from positronium hyperfine spectroscopy. We find that the electron-electron constraint is 6 orders of magnitude more stringent than the electron-positron counterpart. Bounds on pseudoscalar-mediated interaction as well as on torsion gravity are also derived and compared with previous work performed at different length scales. Our constraints benefit from the high controllability of the experimental system which contained only two trapped particles. It therefore suggests a useful new platform for exotic particle searches, complementing other experimental efforts.

  7. Modeling Barkhausen Noise in magnetic glasses with dipole-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Awadhesh K.; Hentschel, H. George E.; Jaiswal, Prabhat K.; Mondal, Chandana; Procaccia, Itamar; Gupta, Bhaskar Sen

    2015-10-01

    Long-ranged dipole-dipole interactions in magnetic glasses give rise to magnetic domains having labyrinthine patterns on the scale of about 1 micron. Barkhausen Noise then results from the movement of domain boundaries which is modeled by the motion of elastic membranes with random pinning. Here we propose that on the nanoscale new sources of Barkhausen Noise can arise. We propose an atomistic model of magnetic glasses in which we measure the Barkhausen Noise which results from the creation of new domains and the movement of domain boundaries on the nanoscale. The statistics of the Barkhausen Noise found in our simulations is in striking disagreement with the expectations in the literature. In fact we find exponential statistics without any power law, stressing the fact that Barkhausen Noise can belong to very different universality classes. In the present model the essence of the phenomenon is the fact that the spin response Green's function is decaying too rapidly for having sufficiently large magnetic jumps. A theory is offered in excellent agreement with the measured data without any free parameter.

  8. Contribution of dipole-dipole interactions to the stability of the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Improta, Roberto; Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2008-05-01

    Unveiling sequence-stability and structure-stability relationships is a major goal of protein chemistry and structural biology. Despite the enormous efforts devoted, answers to these issues remain elusive. In principle, collagen represents an ideal system for such investigations due to its simplified sequence and regular structure. However, the definition of the molecular basis of collagen triple helix stability has hitherto proved to be a difficult task. Particularly puzzling is the decoding of the mechanism of triple helix stabilization/destabilization induced by imino acids. Although the propensity-based model, which correlates the propensities of the individual imino acids with the structural requirements of the triple helix, is able to explicate most of the experimental data, it is unable to predict the rather high stability of peptides embedding Gly-Hyp-Hyp triplets. Starting from the available X-ray structures of this polypeptide, we carried out an extensive quantum chemistry analysis of the mutual interactions established by hydroxyproline residues located at the X and Y positions of the Gly-X-Y motif. Our data clearly indicate that the opposing rings of these residues establish significant van der Waals and dipole-dipole interactions that play an important role in triple helix stabilization. These findings suggest that triple helix stabilization can be achieved by distinct structural mechanisms. The interplay of these subtle but recurrent effects dictates the overall stability of this widespread structural motif.

  9. Electron dipole-dipole ESEEM in field-step ELDOR of nitroxide biradicals.

    PubMed

    Kulik, L V; Grishin, Yu A; Dzuba, S A; Grigoryev, I A; Klyatskaya, S V; Vasilevsky, S F; Tsvetkov, Yu D

    2002-07-01

    The use of a rapid stepping of the magnetic field for investigation of electron dipole-dipole ESEEM in pulsed X-band ELDOR is described. The magnetic field jump, synchronized with a microwave pumping pulse, is positioned between the second and the third pulses of the stimulated echo pulse sequence. This echo is measured as a function of the delay between the first and the second pulses. The data are analyzed for a Fourier transform resulting in a Pake resonance pattern. To remove the electron-nuclear contributions to ESEEM, time traces with pumping were divided by those without. This resulted in complete elimination of electron-nuclear contributions, which is seen from the absence of peaks at nuclear frequencies and the similarity of results for protonated and deuterated solvents. For increasing the electron-electron modulation depth, a scanning of the magnetic field during the microwave pumping is proposed. The interspin distances and their distribution are determined for two long-chained (ca. 2 nm) nitroxide biradicals in glassy toluene and in frozen nematic liquid crystal 4-cyano-4'-pentyl-biphenyl. For the latter solvent, the alignment of the axis connecting two nitroxides in biradicals is quantitatively analyzed.

  10. Electron Dipole-Dipole ESEEM in Field-Step ELDOR of Nitroxide Biradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulik, L. V.; Grishin, Yu. A.; Dzuba, S. A.; Grigoryev, I. A.; Klyatskaya, S. V.; Vasilevsky, S. F.; Tsvetkov, Yu. D.

    2002-07-01

    The use of a rapid stepping of the magnetic field for investigation of electron dipole-dipole ESEEM in pulsed X-band ELDOR is described. The magnetic field jump, synchronized with a microwave pumping pulse, is positioned between the second and the third pulses of the stimulated echo pulse sequence. This echo is measured as a function of the delay between the first and the second pulses. The data are analyzed for a Fourier transform resulting in a Pake resonance pattern. To remove the electron-nuclear contributions to ESEEM, time traces with pumping were divided by those without. This resulted in complete elimination of electron-nuclear contributions, which is seen from the absence of peaks at nuclear frequencies and the similarity of results for protonated and deuterated solvents. For increasing the electron-electron modulation depth, a scanning of the magnetic field during the microwave pumping is proposed. The interspin distances and their distribution are determined for two long-chained (ca. 2 nm) nitroxide biradicals in glassy toluene and in frozen nematic liquid crystal 4-cyano-4'-pentyl-biphenyl. For the latter solvent, the alignment of the axis connecting two nitroxides in biradicals is quantitatively analyzed.

  11. Application of the discrete dipole approximation to very large refractive indices: Filtered coupled dipoles revived.

    PubMed

    Yurkin, Maxim A; Min, Michiel; Hoekstra, Alfons G

    2010-09-01

    We compared three formulations of the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) for simulation of light scattering by particles with refractive indices m=10+10i , 0.1+i , and 1.6+0.01i . These formulations include the filtered coupled dipoles (FCD), the lattice dispersion relation (LDR) and the radiative reaction correction. We compared the number of iterations required for the convergence of the iterative solver (proportional to simulation time) and the accuracy of final results. We showed that the LDR performance for m=10+10i is especially bad, while the FCD is a good option for all cases studied. Moreover, we analyzed the detailed structure of DDA errors and the spectrum of the DDA interaction matrix to understand the performance of the FCD. In particular, this spectrum, obtained with the FCD for particles smaller than the wavelength, falls into the bounds, physically implied for the spectrum of the infinite-dimensional integral scattering operator, contrary to two other DDA formulations. Finally, such extreme refractive indices can now be routinely simulated using modern desktop computers using the publicly available ADDA code, which includes an efficient implementation of the FCD.

  12. Performance characterization of flexible dipole rectennas for smart actuator use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Yang, Sang Yeol; Song, Kyo D.; Jones, Sean; Choi, Sang H.

    2006-06-01

    The concept of power transmission by a microwave is envisioned as the best option for alleviating the complexity associated with hard-wired control circuitry in controlling smart actuators and robots such as micro-aerial vehicles, biomimetic robots and space vehicles to produce remotely maneuverable capability. A flexible dipole rectenna array is conformably adaptable on the complex structure of vehicles used for practical applications of wireless power. For these applications, various flexible dipole rectennas and arrays were designed, fabricated and characterized over a frequency range of 9-12 GHz with 20 W and 200 W amplifiers through laboratory testing. The irradiance of the microwave power was measured. Also the irradiated power, the output power and the efficiency of the rectenna arrays were evaluated along with the microwave power and frequency. The maximum voltage of 65 VDC was observed from a series connected dipole rectenna array and the maximum current of 2.50 mA was obtained from a parallel connected rectenna array. The efficiency of dipole rectenna arrays ranges from 20% to 50% depending on the input power and the pole configuration. It was also demonstrated that the voltage, current and power output from a dipole rectenna array can be tailored by configuring the dipole rectenna elements in serial and parallel mode connections.

  13. Preferential Rotation of Chiral Dipoles in Isotropic Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kramel, Stefan; Voth, Greg A; Tympel, Saskia; Toschi, Federico

    2016-10-07

    We introduce a new particle shape which shows preferential rotation in three dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence. We call these particles chiral dipoles because they consist of a rod with two helices of opposite handedness, one at each end. 3D printing is used to fabricate these particles with a length in the inertial range and their rotations are tracked in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids. High aspect ratio chiral dipoles preferentially align with their long axis along the extensional eigenvectors of the strain rate tensor, and the helical ends respond to the extensional strain rate with a mean spinning rate that is nonzero. We use Stokesian dynamics simulations of chiral dipoles in pure strain flow to quantify the dependence of spinning on particle shape. Based on the known response to pure strain, we build a model that gives the spinning rate of small chiral dipoles using velocity gradients along Lagrangian trajectories from high resolution direct numerical simulations. The statistics of chiral dipole spinning determined with this model show surprisingly good agreement with the measured spinning of much larger chiral dipoles in the experiments.

  14. Space Propulsion Based on Dipole Assisted IEC System

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, George H.; Thomas, Robert; Takeyama, Yoshikazu; Momota, Hiromu; Shrestha, Prajakti J.

    2006-01-20

    A potential opportunity to enhance Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion propulsion exists by introducing a magnetic dipole into the IEC chamber. The dipole fields should increase the plasma density, hence fusion rate, in the center region of the IEC and the combined IEC and dipole confinement properties will reduce plasma losses. To demonstrate that a hybrid Dipole-IEC (DaIEC) configuration can provide improved confinement vs. a stand alone IEC, a first model DaIEC experiment has been benchmarked against a reference IEC. A triple Langmuir probe was used to measure the electron temperature and density. It was confirmed that the magnetic field increases the electron density by an order of magnitude and the addition of a controlled electrical potential to the dipole structure allows control of space charge buildup in the dense core region. This paper describes the dipole assisted IEC concept, its advantages, and soon missions it is well suited for. Here the present status of DaIEC experiments are described, the issues for scale up are discussed, and a conceptual plan for a power unit development is presented.

  15. Nonlinear dipole-dipole interactions and spectroscopic properties of van der waals complexes in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshiev, N. G.

    2003-09-01

    We suggest a semiempirical approach to describing the influence of local nonlinear dipole-dipole interactions on the formation of van der Waals complexes of 1: 1 composition in the gas phase. Based on this approach, we quantitatively interpret the experimental data on the patterns of the shift in the electronic (complexes of a 3-aminophthalimide molecule with water and methanol molecules) and vibrational (complexes of a HCl molecule with acetone and acetonitrile molecules) absorption spectra attributable to the processes of complex formation. We confirm the conclusion that a nonlinear dipole-dipole interaction should be considered as one of the most important physical mechanisms that result in the association of molecules both in the gas phase and, under certain conditions, in the condensed state.

  16. Warm Disks from Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    In the process of searching for exoplanetary systems, weve discovered tens of debris disks close around distant stars that are especially bright in infrared wavelengths. New research suggests that we might be looking at the late stages of terrestrial planet formation in these systems.Forming Terrestrial PlanetsAccording to the widely-accepted formation model for our solar-system, protoplanets the size of Mars formed within a protoplanetary disk around our Sun. Eventually, the depletion of the gas in the disk led the orbits of these protoplanets to become chaotically unstable. Finally, in the giant impact stage, many of the protoplanets collided with each other ultimately leading to the formation of the terrestrial planets and their moons as we know them today.If giant impact stages occur in exoplanetary systems, too leading to the formation of terrestrial exoplanets how would we detect this process? According to a study led by Hidenori Genda of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, we might be already be witnessing this stage in observations of warm debris disks around other stars. To test this, Genda and collaborators model giant impact stages and determine what we would expect to see from a system undergoing this violent evolution.Modeling CollisionsSnapshots of a giant impact in one of the authors simulations. The collision causes roughly 0.05 Earth masses of protoplanetary material to be ejected from the system. Click for a closer look! [Genda et al. 2015]The collaborators run a series of simulations evolving protoplanetary bodies in a solar system. The simulations begin 10 Myr into the lifetime of the solar system, i.e., after the gas from the protoplanetary disk has had time to be cleared and the protoplanetary orbits begin to destabilize. The simulations end when the protoplanets are done smashing into each other and have again settled into stable orbits, typically after ~100 Myr.The authors find that, over an average giant impact stage, the total amount of

  17. a Measurement of the Isovector Giant Quadrupole Resonance in LEAD-208 Using Elastic Polarized Photon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Daniel Stanton

    This experiment used highly polarized tagged photons to measure polarization asymmetries for elastic scattering in ^{208}Pb in the energy region of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance (IVGQR). These measurements were performed at excitation energies between 16 and 30 MeV. Photons with enhanced linear polarization were obtained from an off-axis tagged photon beam by making a kinematic selection on the post-bremsstrahlung electrons. Scattered photons were detected in two large NaI(Tl) crystals. The polarization asymmetries clearly show the signature for interference between the isovector giant quadrupole resonance and the underlying electric dipole strength. The gross features of the IVGQR strength distribution were obtained in a relatively model independent manner. An isovector giant quadrupole resonance was observed at an excitation energy of 20.1 +/- 0.5 MeV, with a width of 6.3 +/- 0.5 MeV, and an energy weighted strength of 1.4 +/- 0.3 isovector sum rule units.

  18. ASTEROSEISMIC CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR POPULATIONS AMONG 13,000 RED GIANTS OBSERVED BY KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Stello, Dennis; Bedding, Timothy R.; Benomar, Othman; White, Timothy R.; Huber, Daniel; Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Mosser, Benoit

    2013-03-10

    Of the more than 150,000 targets followed by the Kepler Mission, about 10% were selected as red giants. Due to their high scientific value, in particular for Galaxy population studies and stellar structure and evolution, their Kepler light curves were made public in late 2011. More than 13,000 (over 85%) of these stars show intrinsic flux variability caused by solar-like oscillations making them ideal for large-scale asteroseismic investigations. We automatically extracted individual frequencies and measured the period spacings of the dipole modes in nearly every red giant. These measurements naturally classify the stars into various populations, such as the red giant branch, the low-mass (M/M{sub Sun} {approx}< 1.8) helium-core-burning red clump, and the higher-mass (M/M{sub Sun} {approx}> 1.8) secondary clump. The period spacings also reveal that a large fraction of the stars show rotationally induced frequency splittings. This sample of stars will undoubtedly provide an extremely valuable source for studying the stellar population in the direction of the Kepler field, in particular when combined with complementary spectroscopic surveys.

  19. Comparison of dipole-dipole resistivity and electromagnetic induction sounding over the Panther Canyon thermal anomaly, Grass Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, M.; Beyer, J.H.; Goldstein, N.E.

    1980-05-01

    A comparison is made between the dipole-dipole resistivity method and electromagnetic sounding method based on surveys over a geothermal anomaly near Panther Canyon, Grass Valley, Nevada. Dipole-dipole data were taken in conjunction with large-scale geothermal studies in the area. Two orthogonal lines were measured over the heat flow anomaly and two-dimensional modeling was performed on the data. EM sounding data were taken with the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory EM-60 system which is a large-moment, frequency-domain, horizontal-loop system. Relative to single 50-meter-radius transmitter coil, eight soundings were made with detectors at distances of 0.5 to 1.6 km from the loop. Interpreted results from the two surveys indicate substantial agreement in the depth to and thickness of a conductive zone that may be associated with the thermal anomaly. The dipole-dipole method is inherently better for resolving resistive basement beneath the conductive anomaly, and dc resistivity interpretation techniques are presently better to handle the complex two-dimensional geology. However, the EM method is far less labor intensive, requiring only one-third the field time for similar areal coverage.

  20. Plasmonic Nanoantennas Enable Forbidden Förster Dipole-Dipole Energy Transfer and Enhance the FRET Efficiency.

    PubMed

    de Torres, Juan; Mivelle, Mathieu; Moparthi, Satish Babu; Rigneault, Hervé; Van Hulst, Niek F; García-Parajó, María F; Margeat, Emmanuel; Wenger, Jérôme

    2016-10-12

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) plays a key role in biochemistry, organic photovoltaics, and lighting sources. FRET is commonly used as a nanoruler for the short (nanometer) distance between donor and acceptor dyes, yet FRET is equally sensitive to the mutual dipole orientation. The orientation dependence complicates the FRET analysis in biological samples and may even lead to the absence of FRET for perpendicularly oriented donor and acceptor dipoles. Here, we exploit the strongly inhomogeneous and localized fields in plasmonic nanoantennas to open new energy transfer routes, overcoming the limitations from the mutual dipole orientation to ultimately enhance the FRET efficiency. We demonstrate that the simultaneous presence of perpendicular near-field components in the nanoantenna sets favorable energy transfer routes that increase the FRET efficiency up to 50% for nearly perpendicular donor and acceptor dipoles. This new facet of plasmonic nanoantennas enables dipole-dipole energy transfer that would otherwise be forbidden in a homogeneous environment. As such, our approach further increases the applicability of single-molecule FRET over diffraction-limited approaches, with the additional benefits of higher sensitivities and higher concentration ranges toward physiological levels.

  1. Damping, field-field correlation and dipole-dipole interaction effects on the entanglement and atomic inversion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustaee, N.; Tavassoly, M. K.; Daneshmand, R.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we study the interaction between two two-level atoms with a two-mode quantized field in the presence of damping. Dipole-dipole interaction between the two atoms and the correlation between the two modes of field are also taken into account. To solve the model, using appropriate transformations, we reduce the considered model to a well-known Jaynes-Cummings model. After finding the analytical solution for the atom-field system, the effects of damping, field-field correlation and atomic dipole-dipole interaction on the entanglement between atoms and population inversion are investigated, numerically. It is observed that the dynamical behavior of the degree of entanglement for damped systems, in relatively large domains of time, takes a low but constant value adequately far from the beginning of the interaction. In addition, it is found that the value of population inversion after the initial oscillations takes negative values for damped systems and eventually vanishes by increasing time. Also, it is seen that simultaneous presence of both dipole-dipole interaction and field-field correlation provides typical collapse-revival phenomenon in the time-behavior of atomic inversion.

  2. Neutron electric dipole moment from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Shintani, E.; Kanaya, K.; Aoki, S.; Ishizuka, N.; Kuramashi, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Kikukawa, Y.; Okawa, M.

    2005-07-01

    We carry out a feasibility study for the lattice QCD calculation of the neutron electric dipole moment (NEDM) in the presence of the {theta} term. We develop the strategy to obtain the nucleon EDM from the CP-odd electromagnetic form factor F{sub 3} at small {theta}, in which NEDM is given by lim{sub q{sup 2}}{sub {yields}}{sub 0}{theta}F{sub 3}(q{sup 2})/(2m{sub N}), where q is the momentum transfer and m{sub N} is the nucleon mass. We first derive a formula which relates F{sub 3}, a matrix element of the electromagnetic current between nucleon states, with vacuum expectation values of nucleons and/or the current. In the expansion of {theta}, the parity-odd part of the nucleon-current-nucleon three-point function contains contributions not only from the parity-odd form factors but also from the parity-even form factors multiplied by the parity-odd part of the nucleon two-point function, and, therefore, the latter contribution must be subtracted to extract F{sub 3}. We then perform an explicit lattice calculation employing the domain-wall quark action with the renormalization group improved gauge action in quenched QCD at a{sup -1}{approx_equal}2 GeV on a 16{sup 3}x32x16 lattice. At the quark mass m{sub f}a=0.03, corresponding to m{sub {pi}}/m{sub {rho}}{approx_equal}0.63, we accumulate 730 configurations, which allow us to extract the parity-odd part in both two- and three-point functions. Employing two different Dirac {gamma} matrix projections, we show that a consistent value for F{sub 3} cannot be obtained without the subtraction described above. We obtain F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.58 GeV{sup 2})/(2m{sub N})=-0.024(5)e{center_dot}fm for the neutron and F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.58 GeV{sup 2})/(2m{sub N})=0.021(6)e{center_dot}fm for the proton.

  3. Giant Rashba-type splitting in molybdenum-driven bands of MoS2/Bi (111 ) heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyuhwan; Yun, Won Seok; Lee, J. D.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the electronic band structure of the MoS2/Bi (111 ) heterostructure, for which the supercell calculation is performed due to the lattice mismatch between two structures but the effective primitive cell is recovered by using the band unfolding technique. It is found that the strong molybdenum-bismuth band hybridization together with a generation of the interfacial dipole field induces the giant Rashba-type splitting accompanying the proper spin topology in molybdenum-driven bands at the Γ point. Similar splittings are also found in the heterostructure with other transition-metal dichalcogenides, i.e., with MoSe2,WS2, and WSe2.

  4. Sodium in weak G-band giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Lambert, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium abundances have been determined for eight weak G-band giants whose atmospheres are greatly enriched with products of the CN-cycling H-burning reactions. Systematic errors are minimized by comparing the weak G-band giants to a sample of similar but normal giants. If, further, Ca is selected as a reference element, model atmosphere-related errors should largely be removed. For the weak-G-band stars (Na/Ca) = 0.16 +/- 0.01, which is just possibly greater than the result (Na/Ca) = 0.10 /- 0.03 from the normal giants. This result demonstrates that the atmospheres of the weak G-band giants are not seriously contaminated with products of ON cycling.

  5. Mass and Radius Constraints Using Magnetar Giant Flare Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Alex T.; Steiner, A. W.; Brown, E. F.

    2013-04-01

    We extend the study of oscillating neutron stars to include observed magnetic field strengths. The strong magnetic field will alter the equilibrium composition of the outer neutron star crust. We construct a new neutron star crust model which predicts nuclear masses with an accuracy very close to that of the Finite Range Droplet Model. The mass model for equilibrium nuclei also includes recent developments in the nuclear physics, in particular, shell corrections and an updated neutron-drip line. We perturb our crust model to predict axial crust modes and assign them to observed giant flare quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies from SGR 1806-20. The QPOs associated with the fundamental and harmonic crust modes can be used to constrain magnetar masses and radii. We use these modes and the phenomenological equations of state from Steiner et al. to find a magnetar crust which reproduces observations of SGR 1806-20. We find magnetar crusts which match observations for various magnetic field strengths and values of entrainment of the free neutron gas in the inner crust. For a crust without a magnetic field we obtain the approximate values of M = 1.35 Msun and R = 11.85 km. For a magnetized crust with the surface dipole field of SGR 1806-20 we obtain the approximate values of M = 1.25 Msun and R = 12.41 km. If there is less entrainment of the free neutron gas the magnetar requires a larger mass and radius to reproduce observations.

  6. Giant Planets in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, S. N.; White, R. J.; Latham, D. W.

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery of 51 Peg b, more than 200 hot Jupiters have now been confirmed, but the details of their inward migration remain uncertain. While it is widely accepted that short period giant planets could not have formed in situ, several different mechanisms (e.g., Type II migration, planet-planet scattering, Kozai-Lidov cycles) may contribute to shrinking planetary orbits, and the relative importance of each is not well-constrained. Migration through the gas disk is expected to preserve circular, coplanar orbits and must occur quickly (within ˜ 10 Myr), whereas multi-body processes should initially excite eccentricities and inclinations and may take hundreds of millions of years. Subsequent evolution of the system (e.g., orbital circularization and inclination damping via tidal interaction with the host star) may obscure these differences, so observing hot Jupiters soon after migration occurs can constrain the importance of each mechanism. Fortunately, the well-characterized stars in young and adolescent open clusters (with known ages and compositions) provide natural laboratories for such studies, and recent surveys have begun to take advantage of this opportunity. We present a review of the discoveries in this emerging realm of exoplanet science, discuss the constraints they provide for giant planet formation and migration, and reflect on the future direction of the field.

  7. Meta-aromatic polyurea with high dipole moment and dipole density for energy storage capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shan; Lin, Minren; Burlingame, Quinn; Zhang, Q. M.

    2014-02-01

    A dielectric polymer, i.e., meta-aromatic polyurea(meta-PU) was developed and investigated for high energy density, low loss energy storage capacitors. Modifications to the molecular structure can tune the dipolar density and dipole moment in the polyurea systems to improve the dielectric properties. Meta-PU was synthesized via a green synthetic route with a higher volume dipolar density than the aromatic polyurea previously reported. The meta-PU has an enhanced dielectric constant, higher energy density, and a high electrical breakdown. A high storage electrical energy density of 13 J/cm3 and energy storage efficiency of 91% can be achieved at 670 MV/electric field.

  8. Dipole strength in {sup 89}Y up to the neutron-separation energy

    SciTech Connect

    Benouaret, N.; Schwengner, R.; Rusev, G.; Doenau, F.; Beyer, R.; Erhard, M.; Junghans, A. R.; Kosev, K.; Nair, C.; Schilling, K. D.; Wagner, A.; Grosse, E.; Bendjaballah, N.

    2009-01-15

    Photoexcitation of the N=50 nucleus {sup 89}Y has been performed at the bremsstrahlung facility at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE at electron energies of E{sub e}{sup kin}=9.5 and 13.2 MeV. About 250 levels up to the neutron-separation energy were identified. Statistical methods were applied to estimate intensities of inelastic transitions and to correct the intensities of the ground-state transitions for their branching ratios. The photoabsorption cross section derived in this way up to the neutron-separation energy is combined with the photoabsorption cross section obtained from ({gamma}, n) data and provides information about the extension of the giant dipole resonance toward energies below the neutron-separation energy. An enhancement of E1 strength has been found in the range from about 6 to 11 MeV. The experimental photoabsorption cross sections of {sup 89}Y and of the neighboring N=50 isotones {sup 88}Sr and {sup 90}Zr are compared with predictions of the quasiparticle-random-phase approximation.

  9. Large-scale continuum random-phase approximation predictions of dipole strength for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoutidis, I.; Goriely, S.

    2012-09-01

    Large-scale calculations of the E1 strength are performed within the random phase approximation (RPA) based on the relativistic point-coupling mean field approach in order to derive the radiative neutron capture cross sections for all nuclei of astrophysical interest. While the coupling to the single-particle continuum is taken into account in an explicit and self-consistent way, additional corrections like the coupling to complex configurations and the temperature and deformation effects are included in a phenomenological way to account for a complete description of the nuclear dynamical problem. It is shown that the resulting E1-strength function based on the PCF1 force is in close agreement with photoabsorption data as well as the available experimental E1 strength data at low energies. For neutron-rich nuclei, as well as light neutron-deficient nuclei, a low-lying so-called pygmy resonance is found systematically in the 5-10 MeV region. The corresponding strength can reach 10% of the giant dipole strength in the neutron-rich region and about 5% in the neutron-deficient region, and is found to be reduced in the vicinity of the shell closures. Finally, the neutron capture reaction rates of neutron-rich nuclei is found to be about 2-5 times larger than those predicted on the basis of the nonrelativistic RPA calculation and about a factor 50 larger than obtained with traditional Lorentzian-type approaches.

  10. Comparison of double-quantum NMR normalization schemes to measure homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-08-01

    A recent implementation of a double-quantum (DQ) recoupling solid-state NMR experiment, dubbed DQ-DRENAR, provides a quantitative measure of homonuclear dipole-dipole coupling constants in multispin-1/2 systems. It was claimed to be more robust than another, previously known experiment relying on the recording of point-by-point normalized DQ build-up curves. Focusing on the POST-C7 and BaBa-xy16 DQ pulse sequences, I here present an in-depth comparison of both approaches based upon spin-dynamics simulations, stressing that they are based upon very similar principles and that they are largely equivalent when no imperfections are present. With imperfections, it is found that DQ-DRENAR/POST-C7 does not fully compensate for additional signal dephasing related to chemical shifts (CS) and their anisotropy (CSA), which over-compensates the intrinsic CS(A)-related efficiency loss of the DQ Hamiltonian and leads to an apparent cancellation effect. The simulations further show that the CS(A)-related dephasing in DQ-DRENAR can be removed by another phase cycle step or an improved super-cycled wideband version. Only the latter, or the normalized DQ build-up, are unaffected by CS(A)-related signal loss and yield clean pure dipolar-coupling information subject to unavoidable, pulse sequence specific performance reduction related to higher-order corrections of the dipolar DQ Hamiltonian. The intrinsically super-cycled BaBa-xy16 is shown to exhibit virtually no CS(A) related imperfection terms, but its dipolar performance is somewhat more challenged by CS(A) effects than POST-C7, which can however be compensated when applied at very fast MAS (>50 kHz). Practically, DQ-DRENAR uses a clever phase cycle separation to achieve a significantly shorter experimental time, which can also be beneficially employed in normalized DQ build-up experiments.

  11. Dipole-dipole resonance line shapes in a cold Rydberg gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, B. G.; Jones, R. R.

    2016-04-01

    We have explored the dipole-dipole mediated, resonant energy transfer reaction, 32 p3 /2+32 p3 /2→32 s +33 s , in an ensemble of cold 85Rb Rydberg atoms. Stark tuning is employed to measure the population transfer probability as a function of the total electronic energy difference between the initial and final atom-pair states over a range of Rydberg densities, 2 ×108≤ρ ≤3 ×109 cm-3. The observed line shapes provide information on the role of beyond nearest-neighbor interactions, the range of Rydberg atom separations, and the electric field inhomogeneity in the sample. The widths of the resonance line shapes increase approximately linearly with the Rydberg density and are only a factor of 2 larger than expected for two-body, nearest-neighbor interactions alone. These results are in agreement with the prediction [B. Sun and F. Robicheaux, Phys. Rev. A 78, 040701(R) (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.78.040701] that beyond nearest-neighbor exchange interactions should not influence the population transfer process to the degree once thought. At low densities, Gaussian rather than Lorentzian line shapes are observed due to electric field inhomogeneities, allowing us to set an upper limit for the field variation across the Rydberg sample. At higher densities, non-Lorentzian, cusplike line shapes characterized by sharp central peaks and broad wings reflect the random distribution of interatomic distances within the magneto-optical trap (MOT). These line shapes are well reproduced by an analytic expression derived from a nearest-neighbor interaction model and may serve as a useful fingerprint for characterizing the position correlation function for atoms within the MOT.

  12. IS THE TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY CLUSTERING DIPOLE CONVERGENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Bilicki, Maciej; Chodorowski, Michal; Jarrett, Thomas; Mamon, Gary A.

    2011-11-01

    There is a long-standing controversy about the convergence of the dipole moment of the galaxy angular distribution (the so-called clustering dipole). Is the dipole convergent at all, and if so, what is the scale of the convergence? We study the growth of the clustering dipole of galaxies as a function of the limiting flux of the sample from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Contrary to some earlier claims, we find that the dipole does not converge before the completeness limit of the 2MASS Extended Source Catalog, i.e., up to 13.5 mag in the near-infrared K{sub s} band (equivalent to an effective distance of 300 Mpc h{sup -1}). We compare the observed growth of the dipole with the theoretically expected, conditional one (i.e., given the velocity of the Local Group relative to the cosmic microwave background), for the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum and cosmological parameters constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The observed growth turns out to be within 1{sigma} confidence level of its theoretical counterpart once the proper observational window of the 2MASS flux-limited catalog is included. For a contrast, if the adopted window is a top hat, then the predicted dipole grows significantly faster and converges (within the errors) to its final value for a distance of about 300 Mpc h{sup -1}. By comparing the observational windows, we show that for a given flux limit and a corresponding distance limit, the 2MASS flux-weighted window passes less large-scale signal than the top-hat one. We conclude that the growth of the 2MASS dipole for effective distances greater than 200 Mpc h{sup -1} is only apparent. On the other hand, for a distance of 80 Mpc h{sup -1} (mean depth of the 2MASS Redshift Survey) and the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum, the true dipole is expected to reach only {approx}80% of its final value. Eventually, since for the window function of 2MASS the predicted growth is consistent with the observed one, we can compare the two to evaluate

  13. Role of dipole elongation in orientationally ordered liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dong-Qing; Gao, Lin; Zhang, Jiao; Yan, Li-Wei; Hu, Jin-He; Chen, Lang; Gong, Zi-Zheng; Guo, Yong-Xin; Han, Yu

    2011-06-01

    A recent study shows that the dipole elongation in the extended dipole model plays a significant role in the phase transitions of liquid crystal phases. In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed for the dipole model with different distances between the two charges keeping the total dipole moment the same. The potential energy consists of the Lennard-Jones potential and the site-site electrostatic contribution of partial charges. Detailed analyses were made with respect to the average order parameters and as functions of density along with other thermodynamic properties. When the reduced dipole elongations are 0.16 and 0.32, respectively, it is shown that the chainlike structures in the low density regime, liquid phases with columnar and smectic orders, and solid phases are formed; the phase with nematic order is not present anymore. At 0.64, the phases with antiferroelectric order were favored. The transition is found at the reduced elongation 0.55. It shows that the phase transitions are quite sensitive to the molecular charge distribution; this simple system could exhibit rather rich phase behaviors, which represents a significant advance in identifying molecular and state parameters of the future ferroelectric liquids.

  14. Properties of the superconductor in accelerator dipole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teravest, Derk

    Several aspects of the application of superconductors to high field dipole magnets for particle accelerators are discussed. The attention is focused on the 10 tesla (1 m model) magnet that is envisaged for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator. The basic motivation behind the study is the intention of employing superconductors to their utmost performance. An overview of practical supercomputers, their applications and their impact on high field dipole magnets used for particle accelerators, is presented. The LHC reference design for the dipole magnets is outlined. Several models were used to study the influence of a number of factors in the shape and in particular, the deviation from the shape that is due to the flux flow state. For the investigated extrinsic and intrinsic factors, a classification can be made with respect to the effect on the shape of the characteristic of a multifilamentary wire. The optimization of the coil structure for high field dipole magnets, with respect to the field quality is described. An analytical model for solid and hollow filaments, to calculate the effect of filament magnetization in the quality of the dipole field, is presented.

  15. On the orientation of the backbone dipoles in native folds

    PubMed Central

    Ripoll, Daniel R.; Vila, Jorge A.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2005-01-01

    The role of electrostatic interactions in determining the native fold of proteins has been investigated by analyzing the alignment of peptide bond dipole moments with the local electrostatic field generated by the rest of the molecule with and without solvent effects. This alignment was calculated for a set of 112 native proteins by using charges from a gas phase potential. Most of the peptide dipoles in this set of proteins are on average aligned with the electrostatic field. The dipole moments associated with α-helical conformations show the best alignment with the electrostatic field, followed by residues in β-strand conformations. The dipole moments associated with other secondary structure elements are on average better aligned than in randomly generated conformations. The alignment of a dipole with the local electrostatic field depends on both the topology of the native fold and the charge distribution assumed for all of the residues. The influences of (i) solvent effects, (ii) different sets of charges, and (iii) the charge distribution assumed for the whole molecule were examined with a subset of 22 proteins each of which contains <30 ionizable groups. The results show that alternative charge distribution models lead to significant differences among the associated electrostatic fields, whereas the electrostatic field is less sensitive to the particular set of the adopted charges themselves (empirical conformational energy program for peptides or parameters for solvation energy). PMID:15894608

  16. Radiation from an off-centred rotating dipole in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2016-12-01

    When a neutron star forms, after the collapse of its progenitor, a strong magnetic field survives in its interior. This magnetic topology is usually assumed to be well approximated by a dipole located right at the centre of the star. However, there is no particular reason why this dipole should be attached to this very special point. A slight shift from the stellar centre could have strong implications for the surrounding electromagnetic field configuration leading to clear observational signatures. We study the effect of the most general off-centred dipole anchored in the neutron star interior. Exact analytical solutions are given in vacuum outside the star to any order of accuracy in the small parameter ɛ = d/R, where d is the displacement of the dipole from the stellar centre and R the neutron star radius. As a simple diagnostic of this decentred dipole, the spin-down luminosity and the torque exerted on its crust are computed to the lowest leading order in ɛ. Results are compared to earlier works and a discussion on repercussions on pulsar braking index and multiwavelength light curves is proposed.

  17. Polarized emission from an off-centred dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2017-03-01

    Radio polarization measurements of pulsed emission from pulsars offer a valuable insight into the basic geometry of the neutron star: inclination angle between the magnetic and rotation axis and inclination of the line of sight. So far, all studies about radio polarization focused on the standard rotating vector model with the underlying assumption of a centred dipole. In this Letter, we extend this model to the most general off-centred dipole configuration and give an exact closed analytic expression for the phase-resolved polarization angle. It is shown that contrary to the rotating vector model, for an off-centred dipole, the polarization angle also depends on the emission altitude. Although the fitting parameter space increases from two to six (position of the dipole, altitude and shift of the zero phase), statistical analysis should remain tractable. Observations revealing an evolution of the polarization angle with frequency would undeniably furnish a strong hint for the presence of a decentred magnetic dipole in neutron stars.

  18. The optimised sc dipole of SIS100 for series production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Christian; Mierau, Anna; Bleile, Alexander; Fischer, Egbert; Kaether, Florian; Körber, Boris; Schnizer, Pierre; Sugita, Kei; Szwangruber, Piotr

    2017-02-01

    At the international facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, an accelerator complex is developed for fundamental research in various fields of modern physics. In the SIS100 heavy-ion synchrotron, the main accelerator of FAIR, superconducting dipoles are used to bend the particle beam. The fast ramped dipoles are 3 m long super-ferric curved magnets operated at 4.5 K. The demands on field homogeneity required for sufficient beam stability are given by ΔB/B ≤ ±6 · 10‑4. An intense measurement program of the First of Series (FoS) dipole showed excellent quench behavior and lower than expected AC losses yielding the main load on the SIS100 cryoplant. The FoS is capable to provide a field strength of 1.9 T. However, with sophisticated measurement systems slight distortions of the dipole field were detected. Those effects were tracked down to mechanical inaccuracies of the yoke proven by appropriate geometrical measurements and simulations. After a survey on alternative fabrication techniques a magnet with a new yoke was built with substantial changes to improve the mechanical accuracy. Its characteristics concerning cryogenic losses, cold geometry and the resulting magnetic-field quality are presented and an outlook on the series production of superconducting dipoles for SIS100 is given.

  19. Separating gas-giant and ice-giant planets by halting pebble accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, M.; Johansen, A.; Morbidelli, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the solar system giant planets come in two flavours: gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) with massive gas envelopes, and ice giants (Uranus and Neptune) with much thinner envelopes around their cores. It is poorly understood how these two classes of planets formed. High solid accretion rates, necessary to form the cores of giant planets within the life-time of protoplanetary discs, heat the envelope and prevent rapid gas contraction onto the core, unless accretion is halted. We find that, in fact, accretion of pebbles (~cm sized particles) is self-limiting: when a core becomes massive enough it carves a gap in the pebble disc. This halt in pebble accretion subsequently triggers the rapid collapse of the super-critical gas envelope. Unlike gas giants, ice giants do not reach this threshold mass and can only bind low-mass envelopes that are highly enriched by water vapour from sublimated icy pebbles. This offers an explanation for the compositional difference between gas giants and ice giants in the solar system. Furthermore, unlike planetesimal-driven accretion scenarios, our model allows core formation and envelope attraction within disc life-times, provided that solids in protoplanetary discs are predominantly made up of pebbles. Our results imply that the outer regions of planetary systems, where the mass required to halt pebble accretion is large, are dominated by ice giants and that gas-giant exoplanets in wide orbits are enriched by more than 50 Earth masses of solids.

  20. Isovector spin-singlet (T = 1, S = 0) and isoscalar spin-triplet (T = 0, S = 1) pairing interactions and spin-isospin response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, H.; Bai, C. L.; Colò, G.

    2016-08-01

    We review several experimental and theoretical advances that emphasize common aspects of the study of spin-singlet, T = 1, and spin-triplet, T = 0, pairing correlations in nuclei. We first discuss various empirical evidence of the special role played by the T = 1 pairing interaction. In particular, we show the peculiar features of the nuclear pairing interaction in the low-density regime, and possible outcomes such as the BCS-BEC crossover in nuclear matter and, in an analogous way, in loosely bound nuclei. We then move to the competition between T = 1 and T = 0 pairing correlations. The effect of such competition on the low-lying spectra is studied in N = Z odd-odd nuclei by using a three-body model; in this case, it is shown that the inversion of the {J}π ={0}+ and {J}π ={1}+ states near the ground state, and the strong magnetic dipole transitions between them, can be considered as a clear manifestation of strong T = 0 pairing correlations in these nuclei. The effect of T = 0 pairing correlations is also quite evident if one studies charge-changing transitions. The Gamow-Teller (GT) states in N=Z+2 nuclei are studied here by using self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) plus quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculations in which the T = 0 pairing interaction is taken into account. Strong GT states are found, near the ground state of daughter nuclei; these are compared with available experimental data from charge-exchange reactions, and such comparison can pinpoint the value of the strength of the T = 0 interaction. Pair transfer reactions are eventually discussed. While two-neutron transfer has long been proposed as a tool to measure the T = 1 superfluidity in the nuclear ground states, the study of deuteron transfer is still in its infancy, despite its potential interest for revealing effects coming from both T = 1 and T = 0 interactions. We also point out that the reaction mechanism may mask the strong pair transfer amplitudes predicted by the

  1. INTERNAL ROTATION OF THE RED-GIANT STAR KIC 4448777 BY MEANS OF ASTEROSEISMIC INVERSION

    SciTech Connect

    Di Mauro, M. P.; Cardini, D.; Ventura, R.; Paternò, L.; Stello, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Hekker, S.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Beck, P. G.; De Smedt, K.; Tkachenko, A.; Bloemen, S.; Davies, G. R.; Garcia, R. A.; Mosser, B.

    2016-01-20

    We study the dynamics of the stellar interior of the early red-giant star KIC 4448777 by asteroseismic inversion of 14 splittings of the dipole mixed modes obtained from Kepler observations. In order to overcome the complexity of the oscillation pattern typical of red-giant stars, we present a procedure to extract the rotational splittings from the power spectrum. We find not only that the core rotates from a minimum of 8 to a maximum of 17 times faster than the surface, confirming previous inversion results generated for other red giants (Deheuvels et al.), but we also estimate the variation of the angular velocity within the helium core with a spatial resolution of 0.001R and verify the hypothesis of a sharp discontinuity in the inner stellar rotation. The results show that the entire core rotates rigidly and provide evidence for an angular velocity gradient around the base of the hydrogen-burning shell; however, we do not succeed in characterizing the rotational slope, due to the intrinsic limits of the applied techniques. The angular velocity, from the edge of the core, appears to decrease with increasing distance from the center, reaching an average value in the convective envelope of 68 ± 22 nHz. We conclude that a set of data that includes only dipolar modes is sufficient to infer quite accurately the rotation of a red giant not only in the dense core but also, with a lower level of confidence, in part of the radiative region and in the convective envelope.

  2. Internal Rotation of the Red-giant Star KIC 4448777 by Means of Asteroseismic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, M. P.; Ventura, R.; Cardini, D.; Stello, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Paternò, L.; Beck, P. G.; Bloemen, S.; Davies, G. R.; De Smedt, K.; Elsworth, Y.; García, R. A.; Hekker, S.; Mosser, B.; Tkachenko, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the stellar interior of the early red-giant star KIC 4448777 by asteroseismic inversion of 14 splittings of the dipole mixed modes obtained from Kepler observations. In order to overcome the complexity of the oscillation pattern typical of red-giant stars, we present a procedure to extract the rotational splittings from the power spectrum. We find not only that the core rotates from a minimum of 8 to a maximum of 17 times faster than the surface, confirming previous inversion results generated for other red giants (Deheuvels et al.), but we also estimate the variation of the angular velocity within the helium core with a spatial resolution of 0.001R and verify the hypothesis of a sharp discontinuity in the inner stellar rotation. The results show that the entire core rotates rigidly and provide evidence for an angular velocity gradient around the base of the hydrogen-burning shell; however, we do not succeed in characterizing the rotational slope, due to the intrinsic limits of the applied techniques. The angular velocity, from the edge of the core, appears to decrease with increasing distance from the center, reaching an average value in the convective envelope of 68 ± 22 nHz. We conclude that a set of data that includes only dipolar modes is sufficient to infer quite accurately the rotation of a red giant not only in the dense core but also, with a lower level of confidence, in part of the radiative region and in the convective envelope.

  3. Separation of Pygmy Dipole and M1 Resonances in Zr90 by a High-Resolution Inelastic Proton Scattering Near 0°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, C.; Utsunomiya, H.; Tamii, A.; Akimune, H.; Nakada, H.; Shima, T.; Yamagata, T.; Kawabata, T.; Fujita, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Shimbara, Y.; Nagashima, M.; Suzuki, T.; Fujita, H.; Sakuda, M.; Mori, T.; Izumi, T.; Okamoto, A.; Kondo, T.; Bilgier, B.; Kozer, H. C.; Lui, Y.-W.; Hatanaka, K.

    2012-06-01

    A high-resolution measurement of inelastic proton scattering off Zr90 near 0° was performed at 295 MeV with a focus on a pronounced strength previously reported in the low-energy tail of giant dipole resonance. A forest of fine structure was observed in the excitation energy region 7-12 MeV. A multipole decomposition analysis of the angular distribution for the forest was carried out using the ECIS95 distorted-wave Born approximation code with the Hartree-Fock plus random-phase approximation model of E1 and M1 transition densities and inclusion of E1 Coulomb excitation. The analysis separated pygmy dipole and M1 resonances in the forest at EPDR=9.15±0.18MeV with ΓPDR=2.91±0.64MeV and at EM1=9.53±0.06MeV with ΓM1=2.70±0.17MeV in the Lorentzian function, respectively. The B(E1)↑ value for pygmy dipole resonance over 7-11 MeV is 0.75±0.08e2fm2, which corresponds to 2.1±0.2% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule.

  4. INFLATION OF A DIPOLE FIELD IN LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS: TOWARD AN UNDERSTANDING OF MAGNETODISK FORMATION IN THE MAGNETOSPHERE OF A HOT JUPITER

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, V. M.; Boyarinsev, E. L.; Boyko, A. A.; Zakharov, Yu. P.; Melekhov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Posukh, V. G.; Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Lammer, H.

    2013-05-20

    Giant exoplanets at close orbits, or so-called hot Jupiters, are supposed to have an intensive escape of upper atmospheric material heated and ionized by the radiation of a host star. An interaction between outflowing atmospheric plasma and the intrinsic planetary magnetic dipole field leads to the formation of a crucial feature of a hot Jupiter's magnetosphere-an equatorial current-carrying magnetodisk. The presence of a magnetodisk has been shown to influence the topology of a hot Jupiter's magnetosphere and to change a standoff distance of the magnetopause. In this paper, the basic features of the formation of a hot Jupiter's magnetodisk are studied by means of a laboratory experiment. A localized central source produces plasma that expands outward from the surface of the dipole and inflates the magnetic field. The observed structure of magnetic fields, electric currents, and plasma density indicates the formation of a relatively thin current disk extending beyond the Alfvenic point. At the edge of the current disk, an induced magnetic field was found to be several times larger than the field of the initial dipole.

  5. Plasmonic interferometry: Probing launching dipoles in scanning-probe plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollet, Oriane; Bachelier, Guillaume; Genet, Cyriaque; Huant, Serge; Drezet, Aurélien

    2014-03-01

    We develop a semi-analytical method for analyzing surface plasmon interferometry using scanning-probe tips as SP launchers. We apply our approach to Young double-hole interferometry experiments in a scanning tunneling microscope discussed recently in the literature as well as to new experiments—reported here—with an aperture near-field scanning optical microscope source positioned near a ring-like aperture slit in a thick gold film. In both experimental configurations, the agreement between experiments and model is very good. Our work reveals the role of the launching dipole orientations and magnetic versus electric dipole contributions to the interference imaging process. It also stresses the different orientations of the effective dipoles associated with the two different scanning-probe techniques.

  6. NLO evolution of color dipoles in N=4 SYM

    DOE PAGES

    Chirilli, Giovanni A.; Balitsky, Ian

    2009-07-04

    Here, high-energy behavior of amplitudes in a gauge theory can be reformulated in terms of the evolution of Wilson-line operators. In the leading logarithmic approximation it is given by the conformally invariant BK equation for the evolution of color dipoles. In QCD, the next-to-leading order BK equation has both conformal and non-conformal parts, the latter providing the running of the coupling constant. To separate the conformally invariant effects from the running-coupling effects, we calculate the NLO evolution of the color dipoles in the conformalmore » $${\\cal N}$$=4 SYM theory. We define the "composite dipole operator" with the rapidity cutoff preserving conformal invariance.« less

  7. Diabatization based on the dipole and quadrupole: The DQ method

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, Chad E.; Xu, Xuefei; Ma, Dongxia; Gagliardi, Laura E-mail: truhlar@umn.edu; Truhlar, Donald G. E-mail: truhlar@umn.edu

    2014-09-21

    In this work, we present a method, called the DQ scheme (where D and Q stand for dipole and quadrupole, respectively), for transforming a set of adiabatic electronic states to diabatic states by using the dipole and quadrupole moments to determine the transformation coefficients. It is more broadly applicable than methods based only on the dipole moment; for example, it is not restricted to electron transfer reactions, and it works with any electronic structure method and for molecules with and without symmetry, and it is convenient in not requiring orbital transformations. We illustrate this method by prototype applications to two cases, LiH and phenol, for which we compare the results to those obtained by the fourfold-way diabatization scheme.

  8. Magnetic field properties of Fermilab Energy-Saver dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hanft, R.; Brown, B.C.; Cooper, W.E.; Gross, D.A.; Michelotti, L.; Schmidt, E.E.; Turkot, F.

    1983-03-01

    At Fermilab we have operated a production line for the fabrication of 901 21 foot long superconducting dipoles for use in the Energy Saver/Doubler. At any one time 772 of these dipoles are installed in the accelerator and 62 in beamlines; the remainder are spares. Magnetic field data are now available for most of these dipoles; in this paper we present some of these data which show that we have been able to maintain the necessary consistency in field quality throughout the production process. Specifically we report harmonic field coefficients, showing that the mechanical design permits substantial reduction of the magnitudes of the normal and skew quadrupole harmonic coefficients; field shape profiles; integral field data; and field angle data.

  9. Atom-Pair Kinetics with Strong Electric-Dipole Interactions.

    PubMed

    Thaicharoen, N; Gonçalves, L F; Raithel, G

    2016-05-27

    Rydberg-atom ensembles are switched from a weakly to a strongly interacting regime via adiabatic transformation of the atoms from an approximately nonpolar into a highly dipolar quantum state. The resultant electric dipole-dipole forces are probed using a device akin to a field ion microscope. Ion imaging and pair-correlation analysis reveal the kinetics of the interacting atoms. Dumbbell-shaped pair-correlation images demonstrate the anisotropy of the binary dipolar force. The dipolar C_{3} coefficient, derived from the time dependence of the images, agrees with the value calculated from the permanent electric-dipole moment of the atoms. The results indicate many-body dynamics akin to disorder-induced heating in strongly coupled particle systems.

  10. Reply to "Comment on `Axion Induced Oscillating Electric Dipole Moments' "

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-10-19

    A recent paper of Flambaum, Roberts and Stadnik, [1], claims there is no induced oscillating electric dipole moment (OEDM), eg, for the electron, arising from the oscillating cosmic axion background via the anomaly. This claim is based upon the assumption that electric dipoles always be defined by their coupling to static (constant in time) electric fields. The relevant Feynman diagram, as computed by [1], then becomes a total divergence, and vanishes in momentum space. However, an OEDM does arise from the anomaly, coupled to time dependent electric fields. It shares the decoupling properties with the anomaly. The full action, in an arbitrary gauge, was computed in [2], [3]. It is nonvanishing with a time dependent outgoing photon, and yields physics, eg, electric dipole radiation of an electron immersed in a cosmic axion field.

  11. Hadron production at LHC in dipole momentum space

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, E. A.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; De Oliveira, E. G.

    2013-03-25

    The dipole color approach is the framework that considers the quark-antiquark pair scattering off the target. The rapidity evolution of color dipoles is given by the nonlinear Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation, for which analytical solutions are not yet known. A good way to explore the asymptotic BK solutions is through the traveling wave method of QCD, that uses a correspondence between the BK evolution equation in momentum space and reaction-diffusion physics. Using the traveling wave based AGBS model for the dipole amplitude in momentum space, and within the k{sub t}-factorization formalism, we describe the LHC data on single inclusive hadron yield for p-p collisions.

  12. Deciphering the Dipole Anisotropy of Galactic Cosmic Rays.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, Markus

    2016-10-07

    Recent measurements of the dipole anisotropy in the arrival directions of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) indicate a strong energy dependence of the dipole amplitude and phase in the TeV-PeV range. We argue here that these observations can be well understood within standard diffusion theory as a combined effect of (i) one or more local sources at Galactic longitude 120°≲l≲300° dominating the CR gradient below 0.1-0.3 PeV, (ii) the presence of a strong ordered magnetic field in our local environment, (iii) the relative motion of the solar system, and (iv) the limited reconstruction capabilities of ground-based observatories. We show that an excellent candidate of the local CR source responsible for the dipole anisotropy at 1-100 TeV is the Vela supernova remnant.

  13. Infinite geometric frustration in a cubic dipole cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönke, Johannes; Schneider, Tobias M.; Rehberg, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The geometric arrangement of interacting (magnetic) dipoles is a question of fundamental importance in physics, chemistry, and engineering. Motivated by recent progress concerning the self-assembly of magnetic structures, the equilibrium orientation of eight interacting dipoles in a cubic cluster is investigated in detail. Instead of discrete equilibria we find a type of ground state consisting of infinitely many orientations. This continuum of energetically degenerate states represents a yet unknown form of magnetic frustration. The corresponding dipole rotations in the flat potential valley of this Goldstone mode enable the construction of frictionless magnetic couplings. Using computer-assisted algebraic geometry methods, we moreover completely enumerate all equilibrium configurations. The seemingly simple cubic system allows for exactly 9536 unstable discrete equilibria falling into 183 distinct energy families.

  14. Diabatization based on the dipole and quadrupole: The DQ method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Chad E.; Xu, Xuefei; Ma, Dongxia; Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we present a method, called the DQ scheme (where D and Q stand for dipole and quadrupole, respectively), for transforming a set of adiabatic electronic states to diabatic states by using the dipole and quadrupole moments to determine the transformation coefficients. It is more broadly applicable than methods based only on the dipole moment; for example, it is not restricted to electron transfer reactions, and it works with any electronic structure method and for molecules with and without symmetry, and it is convenient in not requiring orbital transformations. We illustrate this method by prototype applications to two cases, LiH and phenol, for which we compare the results to those obtained by the fourfold-way diabatization scheme.

  15. Statistical thermodynamics of fluids with both dipole and quadrupole moments.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Ana L; Delgado, Francisco J García; Gámez, Francisco; Lago, Santiago; Garzón, Benito

    2011-06-21

    New Gibbs ensemble simulation data for a polar fluid modeled by a square-well potential plus dipole-dipole, dipole-quadrupole, and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions are presented. This simulation data is used in order to assess the applicability of the multipolar square-well perturbation theory [A. L. Benavides, Y. Guevara, and F. del Río, Physica A 202, 420 (1994)] to systems where more than one term in the multipole expansion is relevant. It is found that this theory is able to reproduce qualitatively well the vapor-liquid phase diagram for different multipolar moment strengths, corresponding to typical values of real molecules, except in the critical region. Hence, this theory is used to model the behavior of substances with multiple chemical bonds such as carbon monoxide and nitrous oxide and we found that with a suitable choice of the values of the intermolecular parameters, the vapor-liquid equilibrium of these species is adequately estimated.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of dipoles in microtubules: Pseudospin model.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Ramírez, Mónica F; Berman, Gennady P; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2016-06-01

    We perform a theoretical study of the dynamics of the electric field excitations in a microtubule by taking into consideration the realistic cylindrical geometry, dipole-dipole interactions of the tubulin-based protein heterodimers, the radial electric field produced by the solvent, and a possible degeneracy of energy states of individual heterodimers. The consideration is done in the frame of the classical pseudospin model. We derive the system of nonlinear dynamical partial differential equations of motion for interacting dipoles and the continuum version of these equations. We obtain the solutions of these equations in the form of snoidal waves, solitons, kinks, and localized spikes. Our results will help to achieve a better understanding of the functional properties of microtubules including the motor protein dynamics and the information transfer processes. Our considerations are based on classical dynamics. Some speculations on the role of possible quantum effects are also made.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics of dipoles in microtubules: Pseudospin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, Alexander I.; Ramírez, Mónica F.; Berman, Gennady P.; Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2016-06-01

    We perform a theoretical study of the dynamics of the electric field excitations in a microtubule by taking into consideration the realistic cylindrical geometry, dipole-dipole interactions of the tubulin-based protein heterodimers, the radial electric field produced by the solvent, and a possible degeneracy of energy states of individual heterodimers. The consideration is done in the frame of the classical pseudospin model. We derive the system of nonlinear dynamical partial differential equations of motion for interacting dipoles and the continuum version of these equations. We obtain the solutions of these equations in the form of snoidal waves, solitons, kinks, and localized spikes. Our results will help to achieve a better understanding of the functional properties of microtubules including the motor protein dynamics and the information transfer processes. Our considerations are based on classical dynamics. Some speculations on the role of possible quantum effects are also made.

  18. SUPERCONDUCTING RF-DIPOLE DEFLECTING AND CRABBING CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, Jean; De Silva, Paygalage Subashini

    2013-09-01

    Recent interests in designing compact deflecting and crabbing structures for future accelerators and colliders have initiated the development of novel rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance, the absence of lower order modes and widely separated higher order modes. Two rf-dipole designs of 400 MHz and 499 MHz have been designed, fabricated and tested as proof-of-principle designs of compact deflecting and crabbing cavities for the LHC high luminosity upgrade and Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The first rf tests have been performed on the rf-dipole geometries at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in a vertical test assembly with excellent results. The cavities have achieved high gradients with high intrinsic quality factors, and multipacting levels were easily processed.

  19. Investigations of dipole localization accuracy in MEG using the bootstrap.

    PubMed

    Darvas, F; Rautiainen, M; Pantazis, D; Baillet, S; Benali, H; Mosher, J C; Garnero, L; Leahy, R M

    2005-04-01

    We describe the use of the nonparametric bootstrap to investigate the accuracy of current dipole localization from magnetoencephalography (MEG) studies of event-related neural activity. The bootstrap is well suited to the analysis of event-related MEG data since the experiments are repeated tens or even hundreds of times and averaged to achieve acceptable signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). The set of repetitions or epochs can be viewed as a set of independent realizations of the brain's response to the experiment. Bootstrap resamples can be generated by sampling with replacement from these epochs and averaging. In this study, we applied the bootstrap resampling technique to MEG data from somatotopic experimental and simulated data. Four fingers of the right and left hand of a healthy subject were electrically stimulated, and about 400 trials per stimulation were recorded and averaged in order to measure the somatotopic mapping of the fingers in the S1 area of the brain. Based on single-trial recordings for each finger we performed 5000 bootstrap resamples. We reconstructed dipoles from these resampled averages using the Recursively Applied and Projected (RAP)-MUSIC source localization algorithm. We also performed a simulation for two dipolar sources with overlapping time courses embedded in realistic background brain activity generated using the prestimulus segments of the somatotopic data. To find correspondences between multiple sources in each bootstrap, sample dipoles with similar time series and forward fields were assumed to represent the same source. These dipoles were then clustered by a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) clustering algorithm using their combined normalized time series and topographies as feature vectors. The mean and standard deviation of the dipole position and the dipole time series in each cluster were computed to provide estimates of the accuracy of the reconstructed source locations and time series.

  20. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-14

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  1. [Endovascular treatment of giant intracranial aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Bracard, S; Derelle, A L; Tonnelet, R; Barbier, C; Proust, F; Anxionnat, R

    2016-02-01

    Giant aneurysms are defined as having a maximal diameter higher than 25mm. The dynamic aspect of giant aneurysms, in particular, is its growth, which was responsible for parenchyma sequellae either due to haemorrhagic complications or a compression of cranial nerves. The treatment of these giant aneurysms was challenging because of its size, the mass effect and the neck diameter. These morphologic conditions required complex endovascular procedures such as remodelling, stenting, using flow diverters. Subsequently, the complex procedures increased the risk of morbidity because of ischemic complications. Despite these procedures, the risk of recurrence was high.

  2. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  3. Idiopathic Giant Cell Myocarditis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumari M.K., Kalpana; Mysorekar, Vijaya V.; S., Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Giant-cell myocarditis is a disease of relatively young, predominantly healthy adults. The patients usually die of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia unless a cardiac transplantation is performed. We are reporting here an autopsy case of idiopathic giant cell myocarditis with no symptoms in a 27-year old -worker who died suddenly. The purpose of this report was to emphasize that idiopathic giant cell myocarditis was a rare disease and that it could exist in the absence of any symptomatic heart disease. PMID:23205365

  4. A giant pancreatic pseudocyst treated by cystogastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Grace C; Misra, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a giant pancreatic pseudocyst in a 65-year-old man presenting with abdominal pain, loss of appetite and abdominal distension. CT scans demonstrated a giant pancreatic pseudocyst measuring 25.7 cm×15.3 cm×10.9 cm anteroposteriorly, with significant compression of surrounding organs. An open cystogastrostomy was performed through a midline incision, and 3 L of fluid was drained from the giant pseudocyst. Recovery has been uneventful. PMID:25804943

  5. Rotation and macroturbulence in bright giants

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1986-11-01

    Spectral line profiles of 35 F, G, and K bright giants were analyzed to obtain rotation rates, v sin i, and macroturbulence dispersion. This sample indicates that rotation rates of cool class II giants is less than 11 km/s, in contrast with some recent periodicity measurements. Macroturbulence dispersion generally increases with effective temperature, but the range of values at a given effective temperature is much larger than seen for lower luminosity classes; this is interpreted in terms of red-giant and blue-loop evolution. No evidence is found for angular momentum dissipation on the first crossing of the H-R diagram. 57 references.

  6. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  7. Direct Imaging of Giant Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Motohide

    Since the first detection of exoplanets around a Sun-like star 51 Peg in 1995, their detection and characterization are mainly led by indirect methods such as radial velocity and transit methods. However, recent progresses of observational techniques have finally enabled the direct imaging observations of giant planets of solar-system-scale orbit (with their semi-major axes less than about 50 AU) around A-type stars (e.g., Marois et al. 2008, 2010) and G-type stars (e.g., Kuzuhara et al. 2013). Direct imaging is useful to obtain the physical and atmospheric parameters of exoplanets. In fact not only colors but also a medium-resolution spectroscopy of such planets has been successfully obtained for their atmospheric characterization (Barman et al. 2013). Their masses are typically a few to ~10 Jupiter masses and they orbit at a Saturn- to-Pluto distance. Therefore, like hot-Jupiters and super-Earths they are unlike any solar-system planets, and called wide-orbit giant planets. A recent large search for planets and disk on the Subaru 8.2-m telescope (SEEDS project) has detected a 3-5 Jupiter-masses planet around a Sun-like star GJ 504 (Kuzuhara et al. 2013). It is the coolest planetary companion so far directly imaged and its near-infrared color is “bluer” than that of other directly imaged planets. In this contribution, I will review the recent progresses on direct imaging of exoplanets, highlight the results of the SEEDS project, and discuss the future developments.

  8. Late kinetic decoupling of light magnetic dipole dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gondolo, Paolo; Kadota, Kenji

    2016-06-07

    We study the kinetic decoupling of light (≲10 GeV) magnetic dipole dark matter (DM). We find that present bounds from collider, direct DM searches, and structure formation allow magnetic dipole DM to remain in thermal equilibrium with the early universe plasma until as late as the electron-positron annihilation epoch. This late kinetic decoupling leads to a minimal mass for the earliest dark protohalos of thousands of solar masses, in contrast to the conventional weak scale DM scenario where they are of order 10{sup −6} solar masses.

  9. The dipole moment function and vibrational transition intensities of OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David D., Jr.; Schiffman, Aram; Nesbitt, David J.

    1989-05-01

    Flash-kinetic IR absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the relative intensities of nine pairs of rovibrational transitions of OH in the v=1-0 fundamental. These intensities are found to be strongly J-dependent in a way that furnishes detailed data on the shape of the OH dipole moment function, and therefore of the absolute IR transition strengths. The rotationless Einstein A coefficient for the OH fundamental is determined on the basis of the dipole moment function to be 16.7(19) Hz; this is noted to be in substantial disagreement with most other experimental and theoretical results.

  10. All-dielectric hollow nanodisk for tailoring magnetic dipole emission.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tianhua; Xu, Yi; Liang, Zixian; Zhang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    We propose a silicon hollow nanodisk for enhancing magnetic dipole (MD) emission. The Purcell factor can be more than 300, which is one order of magnitude larger than the silicon nanosphere case. It is demonstrated that the silicon hollow nanodisk resembles the function of an azimuthally polarized beam for tailoring the magnetic and electric dipole (ED) emission. It is shown that MD emission can be significantly enhanced, while ED emission will be suppressed when emitters are located in the hollow of the nanodisk. The dependence of the Purcell factor on the geometry parameters is also studied. Our results might facilitate the on-chip engineering of magnetic light emission.

  11. Multiple Magnetic Dipole Modeling Coupled with a Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lientschnig, G.

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic field measurements of scientific spacecraft can be modelled successfully with the multiple magnetic dipole method. The existing GANEW software [1] uses a modified Gauss-Newton algorithm to find good magnetic dipole models. However, this deterministic approach relies on suitable guesses of the initial parameters which require a lot of expertise and time-consuming interaction of the user. Here, the use of probabilistic methods employing genetic algorithms is put forward. Stochastic methods like these are well- suited for providing good initial starting points for GANEW. Furthermore a computer software is reported upon that was successfully tested and used for a Cluster II satellite.

  12. Role of dipole charges in black hole thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Copsey, Keith; Horowitz, Gary T.

    2006-01-15

    Modern derivations of the first law of black holes appear to show that the only charges that arise are monopole charges that can be obtained by surface integrals at infinity. However, the recently discovered five dimensional black ring solutions empirically satisfy a first law in which dipole charges appear. We resolve this contradiction and derive a general form of the first law for black rings. Dipole charges do appear together with a corresponding potential. We also include theories with Chern-Simons terms and generalize the first law to other horizon topologies and more generic local charges.

  13. Quantum Electromagnetic Nonlinearity Affecting Charges and Dipole Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adorno, T. C.; Gitman, D. M.; Shabad, A. E.; Shishmarev, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Due to the nonlinearity of QED, a static charge becomes a magnetic dipole if placed in a magnetic field, and a magnetic monopole on the background is a combination of constant electric and magnetic fields. Already without external field, the cubic Maxwell equation for the field of a point charge has a soliton solution with a finite field energy and finite potential, the energy-momentum vector of a moving soliton being the same as that of a point massive particle. Equations are given for self-coupling dipole moments. Any theoretically found value for a multipole moment of a baryon or a meson should be subjected to nonlinear renormalization.

  14. SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole coil production tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.J.; Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Smith, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider dipole coils must be produced to high precision to ensure uniform prestress and even conductor distribution within the collared coil assembly. Tooling is being prepared at Fermilab for the production of high precision 1M and 16.6M SSC dipole coils suitable for mass production. The design and construction methods builds on the Tevatron tooling and production experience. Details of the design and construction methods and measured coil uniformity of 1M coils will be presented. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Supersolid phase in atomic gases with magnetic dipole interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Adam; Buechler, Hans Peter

    2011-08-15

    A major obstacle for the experimental realization of a supersolid phase with cold atomic gases in an optical lattice is the weakness of the nearest-neighbor interactions achievable via magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. In this paper, we show that by using a large filling of atoms within each well, the characteristic energy scales are strongly enhanced. Within this regime, the system is well described by the rotor model, and the qualitative behavior of the phase diagram derives from mean-field theory. We find a stable supersolid phase for realistic parameters with chromium atoms.

  16. Possible benefits from shuffling dipoles in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, S.

    1986-01-06

    An example is given which demonstrates how dipole shuffling can be done to minimize various effects of magnetic errors. The concepts of ''global'' and ''local'' compensation are explained. With a Gaussian distribution, it is found to be possible to achieve an improvement of factor four or five over the statistically expected values without too much sacrifice in nonlinear distortion. There was no difference found in the performance between shuffling eight dipoles and shuffling twelve, and the tune dependence of the performance is found to be acceptable when the change in tune is less than about 0.5. (LEW)

  17. Circular current loops, magnetic dipoles and spherical harmonic analysis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    Spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) is the most used method of describing the Earth's magnetic field, even though spherical harmonic coefficients (SHC) almost completely defy interpretation in terms of real sources. Some moderately successful efforts have been made to represent the field in terms of dipoles placed in the core in an effort to have the model come closer to representing real sources. Dipole sources are only a first approximation to the real sources which are thought to be a very complicated network of electrical currents in the core of the Earth. -Author

  18. Dipole-dipole interactions in the computational micromagnetism of iron (1955-2010) (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrott, Anthony S.

    2011-04-01

    Basic treatment of magnetically soft ferromagnetic metals has been a long struggle during the 55 years of the MMM conferences. At the first conference, Charles Bean brought on stage a four-foot-long mechanical analog of a domain wall. Landau, twenty years earlier had shown that the wall exists to minimize the magnetostatic self-energy of the dipole moments that accompany the spins responsible for ferromagnetism, but no one could calculate the energy of the simple structure that Landau used to illustrate his conjecture. The structure itself was not adequately described. Today, computer programs use the full power of micromagnetics to properly describe the vortex structure that was hidden in Landau's model. Vortices terminate in swirls that can be manipulated by small bias fields (mT) or currents (mA). The swirls carry external fields of 0.5 T and can oscillate (driven or freely) over distances of tens of nm in times of tenths of ns, providing new tools for scientific and technical advances on the atomic scale. That this could have been overlooked for so long is evidence of the difficulty of visualizing the consequence of what for all these years has been called the pole-avoidance principle.

  19. Lithium Abundance in M3 Red Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givens, Rashad; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the abundance of lithium in the red giant star vZ 1050 (SK 291) in the globular cluster M3. A previous survey of giants in the cluster showed that like IV-101, vZ 1050 displays a prominent Li I 6707 Å feature. vZ 1050 lies on the blue side of the red giant branch about 1.3 magnitudes above the level of the horizontal branch, and may be an asymptotic giant branch star. A high resolution spectrum of M3 vZ1050 was obtained with the ARC 3.5m telescope and the ARC Echelle Spectrograph (ARCES). Atmospheric parameters were determined using Fe I and Fe II lines from the spectrum using the MOOG spectral analysis program, and the lithium abundance was determined using spectrum synthesis.

  20. Giant cell arteritis presenting as scalp necrosis.

    PubMed

    Maidana, Daniel E; Muñoz, Silvia; Acebes, Xènia; Llatjós, Roger; Jucglà, Anna; Alvarez, Alba

    2011-07-07

    The differential of scalp ulceration in older patients should include several causes, such as herpes zoster, irritant contact dermatitis, ulcerated skin tumors, postirradiation ulcers, microbial infections, pyoderma gangrenosum, and giant cell arteritis. Scalp necrosis associated with giant cell arteritis was first described in the 1940s. The presence of this dermatological sign within giant cell arteritis represents a severity marker of this disease, with a higher mean age at diagnosis, an elevated risk of vision loss and tongue gangrene, as well as overall higher mortality rates, in comparison to patients not presenting this manifestation. Even though scalp necrosis due to giant cell arteritis is exceptional, a high level of suspicion must be held for this clinical finding, in order to initiate prompt and proper treatment and avoid blindness.

  1. Mass loss in red giants and supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanner, F.

    1975-01-01

    The circumstellar envelopes surrounding late-type giants and supergiants were studied using high resolution, photoelectric scans of strong optical resonance lines. A method for extracting the circumstellar from the stellar components of the lines allowed a quantitative determination of the physical conditions in the envelopes and the rates of mass loss at various positions in the red giant region of the HR diagram. The observed strengthening of the circumstellar spectrum with increasing luminosity and later spectral type is probably caused by an increase in the mass of the envelopes. The mass loss rate for individual stars is proportional to the visual luminosity; high rates for the supergiants suggest that mass loss is important in their evolution. The bulk of the mass return to the interstellar medium in the red giant region comes from the normal giants, at a rate comparable to that of planetary nebulae.

  2. "GIANT" Steps to Create Online Orientations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    Online orientation is provided due to the flexibility of online learning. The online orientation consists of the GIANT steps which stands for Get support, Identify your curriculum, Assemble your program, Navigate students through the pilot project and Test students.

  3. Tests of the Giant Impact Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The giant impact hypothesis has gained popularity as a means of explaining a volatile-depleted Moon that still has a chemical affinity to the Earth. As Taylor's Axiom decrees, the best models of lunar origin are testable, but this is difficult with the giant impact model. The energy associated with the impact would be sufficient to totally melt and partially vaporize the Earth. And this means that there should he no geological vestige of Barber times. Accordingly, it is important to devise tests that may be used to evaluate the giant impact hypothesis. Three such tests are discussed here. None of these is supportive of the giant impact model, but neither do they disprove it.

  4. Giant salivary calculi of the submandibular gland

    PubMed Central

    Fowell, C; MacBean, A

    2012-01-01

    Sialolithasis is the most common salivary gland disease. A case of an unusually large sialolith arising in the submandibular gland is presented, along with a review of the management of giant salivary gland calculi. PMID:24960792

  5. Arterial Embolization of Giant Hepatic Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Giavroglou, Constantinos; Economou, Hippolete; Ioannidis, Ioannis

    2003-02-15

    Hepatic cavernous hemangiomas are usually small and asymptomatic. They are usually discovered incidentally and only a few require treatment. However, giant hemangiomas may cause symptoms,which are indications for treatment. We describe four cases of symptomatic giant hepatic hemangiomas successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization, performed with polyvinyl alcohol particles. There were no complications. Follow-up with clinical and imaging examinations showed disappearance of symptoms and decrease in size of lesions.

  6. Cold Rydberg atoms in a CO2 optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Luis; Kondo, Jorge; Cabral, Jader; Marcassa, Luis

    2012-06-01

    There has been increasing interest in cold Rydberg atoms over the last several years. The primary reason for this attention is that interactions between Rydberg atoms are strong and lead to many interesting and useful phenomena, which require high atomic density samples. In this work, we have built an experimental setup to investigate cold Rydberg atom collision in a CO2 optical dipole trap. Briefly, we have loaded a Rb standard magneto-optical trap from an atomic vapor provided by a dispenser. Then we turn on 100W CO2 dipole trap and we apply a loading phase, in which the repumper light intensity is reduced and the trapping frequency is detuned to the red. After this phase, the trapping and repumper laser beams are turned off and we wait 100ms for the atoms, that were not trapped, to fall off the dipole trap region due to gravity. Finally, we turn off the dipole trap and excite the Rydberg state using a two photon transition. The Rydberg atoms are detected using pulsed field ionization technique. During the presentation we shall present preliminary results involving collisions between nD states.

  7. Cold Rydberg atom collisions in a dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Jader; Gonçalves, Luis; Kondo, Jorge; Marcassa, Luis

    2011-05-01

    We have built a new experimental setup to investigate cold Rydberg atom collision in a high atomic density sample in a CO2 dipole trap. Briefly, we load a Rb standard magneto-optical trap from an atomic vapor provided by a dispenser. Then we turn on 100W CO2 dipole trap and we apply a loading phase, in which the repumper light intensity is reduced. After this phase, the trapping and repumper laser beams are turned off and we wait 100 ms for the atoms that were not trapped to fall off the dipole trap region due to gravity. Finally, we turn off the dipole trap and excite the Rydberg state using a two photon transition. The Rydberg atoms are detected using pulsed field ionization technique. In this new setup, we can image the ions onto a MCP detector to study the spatial distribution. The electrons maybe detected also by another MCP. During the presentation we shall present preliminary results involving the excitation of nD+nD states. We acknowledge financial support from FAPESP, CNPq, INCT-IQ, AFOSR (FA9550-09-1-0503)

  8. Backward dilepton production in color dipole and parton models

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, Maria Beatriz; Graeve de Oliveira, Emmanuel

    2010-03-01

    The Drell-Yan dilepton production at backward rapidities is studied in proton-nucleus collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and LHC energies by comparing two different approaches: the k{sub T} factorization at next-to-leading order with intrinsic transverse momentum and the same process formulated in the target rest frame, i.e., the color dipole approach. Our results are expressed in terms of the ratio between p(d)-A and p-p collisions as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity. Three nuclear parton distribution functions are used: EKS (Eskola, Kolhinen, and Ruuskanen), EPS08, and EPS09 and, in both approaches, dileptons show sensitivity to nuclear effects, specially regarding the intrinsic transverse momentum. Also, there is room to discriminate between formalisms: the color dipole approach lacks soft effects introduced by the intrinsic k{sub T}. Geometric scaling GBW (Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff) and BUW (Boer, Utermann, and Wessels) color dipole cross section models and also a DHJ (Dumitru, Hayashigaki, and Jalilian-Marian) model, which breaks geometric scaling, are used. No change in the ratio between collisions is observed, showing that this observable is not changed by the particular shape of the color dipole cross section. Furthermore, our k{sub T} factorization results are compared with color glass condensate results at forward rapidities: the results agree at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider although disagree at LHC, mainly due to the different behavior of target gluon and quark shadowing.

  9. Detail of the base of dipole antenna element with graduated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of the base of dipole antenna element with graduated pole, note the arms supporting the vertical wires away from the mast and the metal mesh covering the concrete base, view facing west - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Detail of dipole antenna element (right) and 94' lowband reflector ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of dipole antenna element (right) and 94' low-band reflector screen poles (left), note the guy wires from the antenna element, view facing north northeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Generating intrinsic dipole anisotropy in the large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shamik

    2014-03-01

    There have been recent reports of unexpectedly large velocity dipole in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) data. We investigate whether the excess in the NVSS dipole reported can be of cosmological origin. We assume a long wavelength inhomogeneous scalar perturbation of the form αsin(κz) and study its effects on the matter density contrasts. Assuming an ideal fluid model, we calculate, in the linear regime, the contribution of the inhomogeneous mode to the density contrast. We calculate the expected dipole in the large scale structure (LSS) for two cases, first assuming that the mode is still superhorizon everywhere, and second assuming the mode is subhorizon but has crossed the horizon deep in matter domination and is subhorizon everywhere in the region of the survey (NVSS). In both cases, we find that such an inhomogeneous scalar perturbation is sufficient to generate the reported values of dipole anisotropy in LSS. For the superhorizon modes, we find values which are consistent with both cosmic microwave background and NVSS results. We also predict signatures for the model which can be tested by future observations.

  12. Four Centuries of the Geocentric Axial Dipole Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, L.; Kent, D. V.

    2004-12-01

    William Gilbert first articulated what has come to be known as the geocentric axial dipole hypothesis. The GAD hypothesis is the principle on which paleogeographic reconstructions rely to constrain paleolatitude. For decades there have been calls for permanent non-dipole contributions to the time averaged field. Recently, these have demanded large contributions of the axial octupole, which, if valid, would call into question the general utility of the GAD hypothesis. In the process of geological recording of the geomagnetic field, ``Earth filters'' distort the directions. Many processes, for example, sedimentary inclination error and random tilting lead to a net shallowing of the observed direction. Therefore inclinations that are shallower than expected from GAD can be explained by recording biases, northward transport, or non-dipole geomagnetic fields. Using paleomagnetic data from the last five million years from well constrained lava flow data allows the construction of a statistical geomagnetic field model. Such a model can predict not only the average expected direction for a given latitude, but also the shape of the distribution of directions produced by secular variation. This allows us to differentiate among the possible explanations for shallow bias. We find no compelling reason to abandon the geocentric dipole hypothesis that has served us well for four centuries.

  13. Investigation of pygmy dipole resonance in 154Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quliyev, Huseynqulu; Zenginerler, Zemine; Guliyev, Ekber; Kuliev, Ali Akbar

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an investigation of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in 154Sm nucleus has been performed using quasi particle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Analysis of the numerical results indicates that both ΔK=1 and ΔK=0 branches plays significant role in formation of PDR.

  14. Semiclassical Quantization of the Electron-Dipole System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents a derivation of the number given by Fermi in 1925, in his semiclassical treatment of the motion of an electron in the field of two stationary positive charges, for Bohr quantization of the electron orbits when the stationary charges are positive, and applies it to an electron moving in the field of a stationary dipole.…

  15. Enhancement of the electron electric dipole moment in gadolinium garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhamedjanov, T.N.; Dzuba, V.A.; Sushkov, O.P.

    2003-10-01

    Effects caused by the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) in gadolinium garnets are considered. Experimental studies of these effects could improve the current upper limit on the electron EDM by several orders of magnitude. We suggest a consistent theoretical model and perform calculations of observable effects in gadolinium gallium garnet and gadolinium iron garnet. Our calculation accounts for both direct and exchange diagrams.

  16. Cholesterol effect on the dipole potential of lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Starke-Peterkovic, Thomas; Turner, Nigel; Vitha, Mark F; Waller, Mark P; Hibbs, David E; Clarke, Ronald J

    2006-06-01

    The effect of cholesterol removal by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin on the dipole potential, psi(d), of membrane vesicles composed of natural membrane lipids extracted from the kidney and brain of eight vertebrate species was investigated using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent probe di-8-ANEPPS. Cyclodextrin treatment reduced cholesterol levels by on average 80% and this was associated with an average reduction in psi(d) of 50 mV. Measurements of the effect of a range of cholesterol derivatives on the psi(d) of DMPC lipid vesicles showed that the magnitude of the effect correlated with the component of the sterol's dipole moment perpendicular to the membrane surface. The changes in psi(d) observed could not be accounted for solely by the electric field originating from the sterols' dipole moments. Additional factors must arise from sterol-induced changes in lipid packing, which changes the density of dipoles in the membrane, and changes in water penetration into the membrane, which changes the effective dielectric constant of the interfacial region. In DMPC membranes, the cholesterol-induced change in psi(d) was biphasic, i.e., a maximum in psi(d) was observed at approximately 35-45 mol %, after which psi(d) started to decrease. We suggest that this could be associated with a maximum in the strength of DMPC-cholesterol intermolecular forces at this composition.

  17. Collectivity of dipole bands in {sup 196}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Liang, Y.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    The region of nuclei with mass {approximately} 190 was studied extensively over the last few years following the discovery of superdeformation in {sup 190}Hg. More recently, considerable interest in the neutron-deficient Pb isotopes developed with the discover of a number of bands at high spin connected by dipole transitions in both even {sup 192-200}Pb and odd {sup 197-201}Pb nuclei. The majority of the dipole bands are regular in character (i.e. transition energies increase smoothly with spin) while the remaining bands are referred to as irregular in character, due to the fact that the transition energies do not increase smoothly with spin. The properties of the dipole bands were interpreted in terms of high-K, moderately-deformed oblate states built on configurations involving high-J, shape-driving quasiproton excitations coupled to rotation-aligned quasineutrons. It was suggested that the difference between the regular and irregular dipole sequences is related to the deformation where the irregular sequences are thought to be less collective than their regular counterparts.

  18. Shell Model Estimate of Electric Dipole Moments for Xe Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teruya, Eri; Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Higashiyama, Koji

    The nuclear Schiff moments of Xe isotopes which induce electric dipole moments of neutral Xe atoms is theoretically estimated. Parity and time-reversal violating two-body nuclear interactions are assumed. The nuclear wave functions are calculated in terms of the nuclear shell model. Influences of core excitations on the Schiff moments in addition to the over-shell excitations are discussed.

  19. Improved limit on the Ra225 electric dipole moment

    DOE PAGES

    Bishof, Michael; Parker, Richard H.; Bailey, Kevin G.; ...

    2016-08-03

    In this study, octupole-deformed nuclei, such as that of 225Ra, are expected to amplify observable atomic electric dipole moments (EDMs) that arise from time-reversal and parity-violating interactions in the nuclear medium. In 2015 we reported the first “proof-of-principle” measurement of the 225Ra atomic EDM.

  20. FOHI-D: An iterative Hirshfeld procedure including atomic dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Geldof, D.; Blockhuys, F.; Van Alsenoy, C.; Krishtal, A.

    2014-04-14

    In this work, a new partitioning method based on the FOHI method (fractional occupation Hirshfeld-I method) will be discussed. The new FOHI-D method uses an iterative scheme in which both the atomic charge and atomic dipole are calculated self-consistently. In order to induce the dipole moment on the atom, an electric field is applied during the atomic SCF calculations. Based on two sets of molecules, the atomic charge and intrinsic atomic dipole moment of hydrogen and chlorine atoms are compared using the iterative Hirshfeld (HI) method, the iterative Stockholder atoms (ISA) method, the FOHI method, and the FOHI-D method. The results obtained are further analyzed as a function of the group electronegativity of Boyd et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 110, 4182 (1988); Boyd et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 114, 1652 (1992)] and De Proft et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 97, 1826 (1993)]. The molecular electrostatic potential (ESP) based on the HI, ISA, FOHI, and FOHI-D charges is compared with the ab initio ESP. Finally, the effect of adding HI, ISA, FOHI, and FOHI-D atomic dipoles to the multipole expansion as a function of the precision of the ESP is analyzed.

  1. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1983-08-31

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  2. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1985-01-01

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  3. DESIGN OF AN AC-DIPOLE FOR USE IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; BAI,M.; JAIN,A.; MCINTYRE,G.; METH,M.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; SANDERS,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.

    1999-03-29

    We present two options for implementing a pair of AC-dipoles in RHIC for spin flipping, measuring linear optical functions and nonlinear diagnostics. AC-dipoles are magnets that can be adiabatically excited and de-excited with a continuous sine-wave in order to coherently move circulating beam out to large betatron amplitudes without incurring emittance blow up [1]. The AGS already uses a similar device for getting polarized proton beams through depolarizing resonances [2]. By placing the magnets in the IP4 common beam region, two AC-dipoles are sufficient to excite both horizontal and vertical motion in both RHIC rings. While we initially investigated an iron-dominated magnet design using available steel tape cores; we now favor a new air coil plus ferrite design featuring mechanical frequency tuning, in order to best match available resources to demanding frequency sweeping requirements. Both magnet designs are presented here along with model magnet test results. The challenge is to make AC-dipoles available for year 2000 RHIC running.

  4. Dipole-Potential-Mediated Effects on Ion Pump Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of conformational changes of P-type ATPases necessary for the occlusion or deocclusion of transported ions are known to be sensitive to the composition of the surrounding membrane, e.g., phospholipid content, mole percentage of cholesterol, and the presence of lipid-bound anions. Research has shown that many membrane components modify the dipole potential of the lipid head-group region. Based on the observation that occlusion/deocclusion reactions of ion pumps perturb the membrane surrounding the protein, a mechanism is suggested whereby dipole potential modifiers induce preferential stabilization or destabilization of occluded or nonoccluded states of the protein, leading to changes in the forward and backward rate constants for the transition. The mechanism relies on the assumption that conformational changes of the protein are associated with changes in its hydrophobic thickness that requires a change in local lipid packing density to allow hydrophobic matching with the membrane. The changes in lipid packing density cause changes in local lipid dipole potential that are responsible for the dependence of conformational kinetics on dipole potential modifiers. The proposed mechanism has the potential to explain effects of lipid composition on the kinetics of any membrane protein undergoing significant changes in its membrane cross-sectional area during its activity. PMID:26488640

  5. Quantum electric-dipole liquid on a triangular lattice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shi-Peng; Wu, Jia-Chuan; Song, Jun-Da; Sun, Xue-Feng; Yang, Yi-Feng; Chai, Yi-Sheng; Shang, Da-Shan; Wang, Shou-Guo; Scott, James F; Sun, Young

    2016-02-04

    Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations may prohibit the formation of long-range ordering even at the lowest temperature, and therefore liquid-like ground states could be expected. A good example is the quantum spin liquid in frustrated magnets. Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations can happen beyond magnetic systems. Here we propose that quantum electric-dipole liquids, analogues of quantum spin liquids, could emerge in frustrated dielectrics where antiferroelectrically coupled electric dipoles reside on a triangular lattice. The quantum paraelectric hexaferrite BaFe12O19 with geometric frustration represents a promising candidate for the proposed electric-dipole liquid. We present a series of experimental lines of evidence, including dielectric permittivity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity measured down to 66 mK, to reveal the existence of an unusual liquid-like quantum phase in BaFe12O19, characterized by itinerant low-energy excitations with a small gap. The possible quantum liquids of electric dipoles in frustrated dielectrics open up a fresh playground for fundamental physics.

  6. The evolution of a dipole in a periodic forced flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier; Hernandez Zapata, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    In a tidal induced flow between a channel and an open domain a pair of counter-rotating vortices is produced during each cycle. Such pair of vortices is known as a dipole. The Strouhal number (S) is the parameter determining if dipole escapes or is sucked during the stage of negative flowrate. Some years ago an analytical model has been proposed to determine the evolution of the vortices. This model agrees with experimental and observational data when S is close to the critical value 0.13. However, no realistic predictions are given for small values of S. In this work we present a modification of this model to take into account some details not considered before. In particular the fact that not all vorticity created into the channel is incorporates into the dipole. This fact leads to have a lower translational velocity and also to the formation of a vorticity band behind the vortices. Our results have a better agreement with numerical simulations and experimental data. Finally we study the influence of the Reynolds number in the evolution of the vortices and the interaction between dipoles produced in subsequent cycles. Authors akknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project IN115315 ``Ondas y estrcturas coherentes en dinamica de fluidos.''

  7. The Electromagnetic Dipole Radiation Field through the Hamiltonian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likar, A.; Razpet, N.

    2009-01-01

    The dipole radiation from an oscillating charge is treated using the Hamiltonian approach to electrodynamics where the concept of cavity modes plays a central role. We show that the calculation of the radiation field can be obtained in a closed form within this approach by emphasizing the role of coherence between the cavity modes, which is…

  8. Report of the SSC Collider Dipole Review Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, G.; Kirk, T.

    1989-06-01

    This report contains the following review on the SSC dipole magnets: subpanel on the R&D program and industrialization; subpanel on magnet measurement; subpanel on cold mass mechanics; subpanel on superconductor; subpanel on cryogenics; subpanel on quench protection; and subpanel on bore tube corrector coils.

  9. Quantitative analysis on electric dipole energy in Rashba band splitting

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jisook; Rhim, Jun-Won; Kim, Changyoung; Ryong Park, Seung; Hoon Shim, Ji

    2015-01-01

    We report on quantitative comparison between the electric dipole energy and the Rashba band splitting in model systems of Bi and Sb triangular monolayers under a perpendicular electric field. We used both first-principles and tight binding calculations on p-orbitals with spin-orbit coupling. First-principles calculation shows Rashba band splitting in both systems. It also shows asymmetric charge distributions in the Rashba split bands which are induced by the orbital angular momentum. We calculated the electric dipole energies from coupling of the asymmetric charge distribution and external electric field, and compared it to the Rashba splitting. Remarkably, the total split energy is found to come mostly from the difference in the electric dipole energy for both Bi and Sb systems. A perturbative approach for long wave length limit starting from tight binding calculation also supports that the Rashba band splitting originates mostly from the electric dipole energy difference in the strong atomic spin-orbit coupling regime. PMID:26323493

  10. An alternative subspace approach to EEG dipole source localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Liang; Xu, Bobby; He, Bin

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate a new approach to electroencephalography (EEG) three-dimensional (3D) dipole source localization by using a non-recursive subspace algorithm called FINES. In estimating source dipole locations, the present approach employs projections onto a subspace spanned by a small set of particular vectors (FINES vector set) in the estimated noise-only subspace instead of the entire estimated noise-only subspace in the case of classic MUSIC. The subspace spanned by this vector set is, in the sense of principal angle, closest to the subspace spanned by the array manifold associated with a particular brain region. By incorporating knowledge of the array manifold in identifying FINES vector sets in the estimated noise-only subspace for different brain regions, the present approach is able to estimate sources with enhanced accuracy and spatial resolution, thus enhancing the capability of resolving closely spaced sources and reducing estimation errors. The present computer simulations show, in EEG 3D dipole source localization, that compared to classic MUSIC, FINES has (1) better resolvability of two closely spaced dipolar sources and (2) better estimation accuracy of source locations. In comparison with RAP-MUSIC, FINES' performance is also better for the cases studied when the noise level is high and/or correlations among dipole sources exist.

  11. Emittance growth due to dipole ripple and sextupole

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, H.J.; Ellison, J.A.; Syphers, M.J.; Newberger, B.S.

    1993-05-01

    Ripple in the power supplies for storage ring magnets can have adverse effects on the circulating beams: orbit distortion and emittance growth from dipole ripple, tune modulation and dynamic aperture reduction from quadrupole ripple, etc. In this paper, we study the effects of ripple in the horizontal bending field of the SSC in the presence of nonlinearity, in particular, the growth in beam emittance.

  12. Singular Behaviour of the Electrodynamic Fields of an Oscillating Dipole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, P. T.

    2008-01-01

    The singularity of the exact electromagnetic fields is derived to include the "source terms" for harmonically oscillating electric (and magnetic) dipoles, so that the fields will be consistent with the full Maxwell equations with a source. It is shown explicitly, as somewhat expected, that the same [delta]-function terms for the case of static…

  13. An alternative subspace approach to EEG dipole source localization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Liang; Xu, Bobby; He, Bin

    2004-01-21

    In the present study, we investigate a new approach to electroencephalography (EEG) three-dimensional (3D) dipole source localization by using a non-recursive subspace algorithm called FINES. In estimating source dipole locations, the present approach employs projections onto a subspace spanned by a small set of particular vectors (FINES vector set) in the estimated noise-only subspace instead of the entire estimated noise-only subspace in the case of classic MUSIC. The subspace spanned by this vector set is, in the sense of principal angle, closest to the subspace spanned by the array manifold associated with a particular brain region. By incorporating knowledge of the array manifold in identifying FINES vector sets in the estimated noise-only subspace for different brain regions, the present approach is able to estimate sources with enhanced accuracy and spatial resolution, thus enhancing the capability of resolving closely spaced sources and reducing estimation errors. The present computer simulations show, in EEG 3D dipole source localization, that compared to classic MUSIC, FINES has (1) better resolvability of two closely spaced dipolar sources and (2) better estimation accuracy of source locations. In comparison with RAP-MUSIC, FINES' performance is also better for the cases studied when the noise level is high and/or correlations among dipole sources exist.

  14. A velocity dipole in the distribution of radio galaxies.

    PubMed

    Blake, Chris; Wall, Jasper

    2002-03-14

    The motion of our Galaxy through the Universe is reflected in a systematic shift in the temperature of the cosmic microwave background-because of the Doppler effect, the temperature of the background is about 0.1 per cent higher in the direction of motion, with a correspondingly lower temperature in the opposite direction. This effect is known as dipole anisotropy. If our standard cosmological model is correct, a related dipole effect should also be present as an enhancement in the surface density of distant galaxies in the direction of motion. The main obstacle to finding this signal is the uneven distribution of galaxies in the local supercluster, which drowns out the small cosmological signal. Here we report a detection of the expected cosmological dipole anisotropy in the distribution of galaxies. We use a survey of radio galaxies that are mainly located at cosmological distances, so the contamination from nearby clusters is small. When local radio galaxies are removed from the sample, the resulting dipole is in the same direction as the temperature anisotropy of the microwave background, and close to the expected amplitude. The result therefore confirms the standard cosmological interpretation of the microwave background.

  15. Quantum electric-dipole liquid on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shi-Peng; Wu, Jia-Chuan; Song, Jun-Da; Sun, Xue-Feng; Yang, Yi-Feng; Chai, Yi-Sheng; Shang, Da-Shan; Wang, Shou-Guo; Scott, James F.; Sun, Young

    2016-02-01

    Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations may prohibit the formation of long-range ordering even at the lowest temperature, and therefore liquid-like ground states could be expected. A good example is the quantum spin liquid in frustrated magnets. Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations can happen beyond magnetic systems. Here we propose that quantum electric-dipole liquids, analogues of quantum spin liquids, could emerge in frustrated dielectrics where antiferroelectrically coupled electric dipoles reside on a triangular lattice. The quantum paraelectric hexaferrite BaFe12O19 with geometric frustration represents a promising candidate for the proposed electric-dipole liquid. We present a series of experimental lines of evidence, including dielectric permittivity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity measured down to 66 mK, to reveal the existence of an unusual liquid-like quantum phase in BaFe12O19, characterized by itinerant low-energy excitations with a small gap. The possible quantum liquids of electric dipoles in frustrated dielectrics open up a fresh playground for fundamental physics.

  16. Quantum electric-dipole liquid on a triangular lattice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shi-Peng; Wu, Jia-Chuan; Song, Jun-Da; Sun, Xue-Feng; Yang, Yi-Feng; Chai, Yi-Sheng; Shang, Da-Shan; Wang, Shou-Guo; Scott, James F.; Sun, Young

    2016-01-01

    Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations may prohibit the formation of long-range ordering even at the lowest temperature, and therefore liquid-like ground states could be expected. A good example is the quantum spin liquid in frustrated magnets. Geometric frustration and quantum fluctuations can happen beyond magnetic systems. Here we propose that quantum electric-dipole liquids, analogues of quantum spin liquids, could emerge in frustrated dielectrics where antiferroelectrically coupled electric dipoles reside on a triangular lattice. The quantum paraelectric hexaferrite BaFe12O19 with geometric frustration represents a promising candidate for the proposed electric-dipole liquid. We present a series of experimental lines of evidence, including dielectric permittivity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity measured down to 66 mK, to reveal the existence of an unusual liquid-like quantum phase in BaFe12O19, characterized by itinerant low-energy excitations with a small gap. The possible quantum liquids of electric dipoles in frustrated dielectrics open up a fresh playground for fundamental physics. PMID:26843363

  17. Bayesian Inference of Giant Exoplanet Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorngren, Daniel; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2017-01-01

    The physical processes within a giant planet directly set its observed radius for a given mass, age, and insolation. The important aspects are the planet’s bulk composition and its interior thermal evolution. By studying many giant planets as an ensemble, we can gain insight into this physics. We demonstrate two novel examples here. We examine 50 cooler transiting giant planets, whose insolation is sufficiently low (T_eff < 1000 K) that they are not affected by the hot Jupiter radius inflation effect. For these planets, the thermal evolution is relatively well understood, and we show that the bulk planet metallicity increases with the total planet mass, which directly impacts plans for future atmospheric studies. We also examine the relation with stellar metallicity and discuss how these relations place new constraints on the core accretion model of planet formation. Our newest work seeks to quantify the flow of energy into hot Jupiters needed to explain their enlarged radii, in addition to their bulk composition. Because the former is related to stellar insolation and the latter is related to mass, we are able to create a hierarchical Bayesian model to disentangle the two effects in our sample of ~300 transiting giant planets. Our results show conclusively that the inflation power is not a simple fraction of stellar insolation: instead, the power increases with incident flux at a much higher rate. We use these results to test published models of giant planet inflation and to provide accurate empirical mass-radius relations for giant planets.

  18. Formation of Giant Planets and Brown Dwarves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2003-01-01

    According to the prevailing core instability model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Models predict that rocky planets should form in orbit about most stars. It is uncertain whether or not gas giant planet formation is common, because most protoplanetary disks may dissipate before solid planetary cores can grow large enough to gravitationally trap substantial quantities of gas. Ongoing theoretical modeling of accretion of giant planet atmospheres, as well as observations of protoplanetary disks, will help decide this issue. Observations of extrasolar planets around main sequence stars can only provide a lower limit on giant planet formation frequency . This is because after giant planets form, gravitational interactions with material within the protoplanetary disk may cause them to migrat inwards and be lost to the central star. The core instability model can only produce planets greater than a few jovian masses within protoplanetary disks that are more viscous than most such disks are believed to be. Thus, few brown dwarves (objects massive enough to undergo substantial deuterium fusion, estimated to occur above approximately 13 jovian masses) are likely to be formed in this manner. Most brown dwarves, as well as an unknown number of free-floating objects of planetary mass, are probably formed as are stars, by the collapse of extended gas/dust clouds into more compact objects.

  19. Management of giant liver hemangiomas: an update.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Lisette T; Bieze, Matthanja; Erdogan, Deha; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Beuers, Ulrich H W; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2013-03-01

    Liver hemangiomas are the most common benign liver tumors and are usually incidental findings. Liver hemangiomas are readily demonstrated by abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Giant liver hemangiomas are defined by a diameter larger than 5 cm. In patients with a giant liver hemangioma, observation is justified in the absence of symptoms. Surgical resection is indicated in patients with abdominal (mechanical) complaints or complications, or when diagnosis remains inconclusive. Enucleation is the preferred surgical method, according to existing literature and our own experience. Spontaneous or traumatic rupture of a giant hepatic hemangioma is rare, however, the mortality rate is high (36-39%). An uncommon complication of a giant hemangioma is disseminated intravascular coagulation (Kasabach-Merritt syndrome); intervention is then required. Herein, the authors provide a literature update of the current evidence concerning the management of giant hepatic hemangiomas. In addition, the authors assessed treatment strategies and outcomes in a series of patients with giant liver hemangiomas managed in our department.

  20. Constraining the neutrino magnetic dipole moment from white dwarf pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Córsico, A.H.; Althaus, L.G.; García-Berro, E. E-mail: althaus@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar E-mail: kepler@if.ufrgs.br

    2014-08-01

    Pulsating white dwarf stars can be used as astrophysical laboratories to constrain the properties of weakly interacting particles. Comparing the cooling rates of these stars with the expected values from theoretical models allows us to search for additional sources of cooling due to the emission of axions, neutralinos, or neutrinos with magnetic dipole moment. In this work, we derive an upper bound to the neutrino magnetic dipole moment (μ{sub ν}) using an estimate of the rate of period change of the pulsating DB white dwarf star PG 1351+489. We employ state-of-the-art evolutionary and pulsational codes which allow us to perform a detailed asteroseismological period fit based on fully DB white dwarf evolutionary sequences. Plasmon neutrino emission is the dominant cooling mechanism for this class of hot pulsating white dwarfs, and so it is the main contributor to the rate of change of period with time (Pidot) for the DBV class. Thus, the inclusion of an anomalous neutrino emission through a non-vanishing magnetic dipole moment in these sequences notably influences the evolutionary timescales, and also the expected pulsational properties of the DBV stars. By comparing the theoretical Pidot value with the rate of change of period with time of PG 1351+489, we assess the possible existence of additional cooling by neutrinos with magnetic dipole moment. Our models suggest the existence of some additional cooling in this pulsating DB white dwarf, consistent with a non-zero magnetic dipole moment with an upper limit of μ{sub ν} ∼< 10{sup -11} μ{sub B}. This bound is somewhat less restrictive than, but still compatible with, other limits inferred from the white dwarf luminosity function or from the color-magnitude diagram of the Globular cluster M5. Further improvements of the measurement of the rate of period change of the dominant pulsation mode of PG 1351+489 will be necessary to confirm our bound.