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Sample records for isotope metabolic tracer

  1. Probing Metabolism in the Intact Retina Using Stable Isotope Tracers.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianhai; Linton, Jonathan D; Hurley, James B

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate retinas have several characteristics that make them particularly interesting from a metabolic perspective. The retinas have a highly laminated structure, high energy demands, and they share several metabolic features with tumors, such as a strong Warburg effect and abundant pyruvate kinase M2 isoform expression. The energy demands of retinas are both qualitatively and quantitatively different in light and darkness and metabolic dysfunction could cause retinal degeneration. Stable isotope-based metabolic analysis with mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to trace the dynamic metabolic reactions and reveal novel metabolic pathways within cells and between cells in retina. Here, we describe methods to quantify retinal metabolism in intact retinas and discuss applications of these methods to the understanding of neuron-glia interaction, light and dark adaptation, and retinal degenerative diseases.

  2. Historical and contemporary stable isotope tracer approaches to studying mammalian protein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Daniel James

    2016-05-16

    Over a century ago, Frederick Soddy provided the first evidence for the existence of isotopes; elements that occupy the same position in the periodic table are essentially chemically identical but differ in mass due to a different number of neutrons within the atomic nucleus. Allied to the discovery of isotopes was the development of some of the first forms of mass spectrometers, driven forward by the Nobel laureates JJ Thomson and FW Aston, enabling the accurate separation, identification, and quantification of the relative abundance of these isotopes. As a result, within a few years, the number of known isotopes both stable and radioactive had greatly increased and there are now over 300 stable or radioisotopes presently known. Unknown at the time, however, was the potential utility of these isotopes within biological disciplines, it was soon discovered that these stable isotopes, particularly those of carbon ((13) C), nitrogen ((15) N), oxygen ((18) O), and hydrogen ((2) H) could be chemically introduced into organic compounds, such as fatty acids, amino acids, and sugars, and used to "trace" the metabolic fate of these compounds within biological systems. From this important breakthrough, the age of the isotope tracer was born. Over the following 80 yrs, stable isotopes would become a vital tool in not only the biological sciences, but also areas as diverse as forensics, geology, and art. This progress has been almost exclusively driven through the development of new and innovative mass spectrometry equipment from IRMS to GC-MS to LC-MS, which has allowed for the accurate quantitation of isotopic abundance within samples of complex matrices. This historical review details the development of stable isotope tracers as metabolic tools, with particular reference to their use in monitoring protein metabolism, highlighting the unique array of tools that are now available for the investigation of protein metabolism in vivo at a whole body down to a single protein

  3. Applications of stable, nonradioactive isotope tracers in in vivo human metabolic research.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Young; Suh, Sang-Hoon; Lee, In-Kyu; Wolfe, Robert R

    2016-01-15

    The human body is in a constant state of turnover, that is, being synthesized, broken down and/or converted to different compounds. The dynamic nature of in vivo kinetics of human metabolism at rest and in stressed conditions such as exercise and pathophysiological conditions such as diabetes and cancer can be quantitatively assessed with stable, nonradioactive isotope tracers in conjunction with gas or liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and modeling. Although measurements of metabolite concentrations have been useful as general indicators of one's health status, critical information on in vivo kinetics of metabolites such as rates of production, appearance or disappearance of metabolites are not provided. Over the past decades, stable, nonradioactive isotope tracers have been used to provide information on dynamics of specific metabolites. Stable isotope tracers can be used in conjunction with molecular and cellular biology tools, thereby providing an in-depth dynamic assessment of metabolic changes, as well as simultaneous investigation of the molecular basis for the observed kinetic responses. In this review, we will introduce basic principles of stable isotope methodology for tracing in vivo kinetics of human or animal metabolism with examples of quantifying certain aspects of in vivo kinetics of carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism.

  4. Applications of stable, nonradioactive isotope tracers in in vivo human metabolic research

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Young; Suh, Sang-Hoon; Lee, In-Kyu; Wolfe, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    The human body is in a constant state of turnover, that is, being synthesized, broken down and/or converted to different compounds. The dynamic nature of in vivo kinetics of human metabolism at rest and in stressed conditions such as exercise and pathophysiological conditions such as diabetes and cancer can be quantitatively assessed with stable, nonradioactive isotope tracers in conjunction with gas or liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and modeling. Although measurements of metabolite concentrations have been useful as general indicators of one's health status, critical information on in vivo kinetics of metabolites such as rates of production, appearance or disappearance of metabolites are not provided. Over the past decades, stable, nonradioactive isotope tracers have been used to provide information on dynamics of specific metabolites. Stable isotope tracers can be used in conjunction with molecular and cellular biology tools, thereby providing an in-depth dynamic assessment of metabolic changes, as well as simultaneous investigation of the molecular basis for the observed kinetic responses. In this review, we will introduce basic principles of stable isotope methodology for tracing in vivo kinetics of human or animal metabolism with examples of quantifying certain aspects of in vivo kinetics of carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. PMID:26795236

  5. Probing the metabolic phenotype of breast cancer cells by multiple tracer stable isotope resolved metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Lane, Andrew N; Tan, Julie; Wang, Yali; Yan, Jun; Higashi, Richard M; Fan, Teresa W-M

    2017-02-02

    Breast cancers vary by their origin and specific set of genetic lesions, which gives rise to distinct phenotypes and differential response to targeted and untargeted chemotherapies. To explore the functional differences of different breast cell types, we performed Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) studies of one primary breast (HMEC) and three breast cancer cells (MCF-7, MDAMB-231, and ZR75-1) having distinct genotypes and growth characteristics, using (13)C6-glucose, (13)C-1+2-glucose, (13)C5,(15)N2-Gln, (13)C3-glycerol, and (13)C8-octanoate as tracers. These tracers were designed to probe the central energy producing and anabolic pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, Krebs Cycle, glutaminolysis, nucleotide synthesis and lipid turnover). We found that glycolysis was not associated with the rate of breast cancer cell proliferation, glutaminolysis did not support lipid synthesis in primary breast or breast cancer cells, but was a major contributor to pyrimidine ring synthesis in all cell types; anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation was activated in breast cancer versus primary cells. We also found that glucose metabolism in individual breast cancer cell lines differed between in vitro cultures and tumor xenografts, but not the metabolic distinctions between cell lines, which may reflect the influence of tumor architecture/microenvironment.

  6. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies of living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, Elise

    1999-05-10

    This dissertation focuses on the development of methods for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies in living systems using inductively coupled plasma single and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers. Sub-nanogram per gram levels of molybdenum (Mo) from human blood plasma are isolated by the use of anion exchange alumina microcolumns. Million-fold more concentrated spectral and matrix interferences such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, etc. in the blood constituents are removed from the analyte. The recovery of Mo from the alumina column is 82 ± 5% (n = 5). Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) is utilized for the quantitative ultra-trace concentration determination of Mo in bovine and human blood samples. The average Mo concentration in reference bovine serum determined by this method is 10.2 ± 0.4 ng/g, while the certified value is 11.5 ± 1.1 ng/g (95% confidence interval). The Mo concentration of one pool of human blood plasma from two healthy male donors is 0.5 ± 0.1 ng/g. The inductively coupled plasma twin quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-TQMS) is used to measure the carbon isotope ratio from non-volatile organic compounds and bio-organic molecules to assess the ability as an alternative analytical method to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-combustion-IRMS). Trytophan, myoglobin, and β-cyclodextrin are chosen for the study, initial observation of spectral interference of 13C+ with 12C 1H+ comes from the incomplete dissociation of myoglobin and/or β-cyclodextrin.

  7. Measurement of metabolic fluxes using stable isotope tracers in whole animals and human patients.

    PubMed

    Reisz, Julie A; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2017-09-01

    Metabolic flux analysis using stable isotope labeled substrates allows for the tracing of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen atoms through metabolic pathways and is an invaluable tool for investigating dynamic metabolic changes occurring in health and disease. Studies of flux analysis in vivo are more technically challenging than in vitro or ex vivo but provide a highly detailed view of organ and/or systemic metabolism. We review here recent efforts in studies of diet and nutrition, non-small cell lung cancer, ischemia/reperfusion injury, and hemorrhagic shock where in vivo flux analysis was utilized to analyze metabolic modulation. Recent technical strides in the field of metabolomics afford sensitive and quantitative in vivo measurements of metabolic fluxes. Stable isotope tracing with C-glucose, C, N-glutamine, C-propionate, and other substrates are used in combination or in parallel to investigate the interplays among central carbon metabolic pathways and many other areas of the metabolome. Stable isotope tracing in vivo provides opportunities to investigate physiological processes in the context of the whole animal. These approaches, often NMR spectroscopy or mass spectrometry (MS)-based, are growing in use and will likely find key applications in studying systemic disease, sports physiology, cancer metabolism, and personalized medicine.

  8. Enhancing Studies of Pharmacodynamic Mechanisms via Measurements of Metabolic Flux: Fundamental Concepts and Guiding Principles for Using Stable Isotope Tracers.

    PubMed

    Daurio, Natalie A; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Ying; Zhou, Haihong; McLaren, David G; Roddy, Thomas P; Johns, Douglas G; Milot, Denise; Kasumov, Takhar; Erion, Mark D; Kelley, David E; Previs, Stephen F

    2017-10-01

    Drug discovery and development efforts are largely based around a common expectation, namely, that direct or indirect action on a cellular process (e.g., statin-mediated enzyme inhibition or insulin-stimulated receptor activation) will have a beneficial impact on physiologic homeostasis. To expand on this, one could argue that virtually all pharmacologic interventions attempt to influence the flow of "traffic" in a biochemical network, irrespective of disease or modality. Since stable isotope tracer kinetic methods provide a measure of traffic flow (i.e., metabolic flux), their inclusion in study designs can yield novel information regarding pathway biology; the application of such methods requires the integration of knowledge in physiology, analytical chemistry, and mathematical modeling. Herein, we review the fundamental concepts that surround the use of tracer kinetics, define basic terms, and outline guiding principles via theoretical and experimental problems. Specifically, one needs to 1) recognize the types of biochemical events that change isotopic enrichments, 2) appreciate the distinction between fractional turnover and flux rate, and 3) be aware of the subtle differences between tracer kinetics and pharmacokinetics. We hope investigators can use the framework presented here to develop applications that address their specific questions surrounding biochemical flux, and thereby gain insight into the pathophysiology of disease states, and examine pharmacodynamic mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Metabolic flux analysis of CHO cells at growth and non-growth phases using isotopic tracers and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Woo Suk; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2011-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the main platform for production of biotherapeutics in the biopharmaceutical industry. However, relatively little is known about the metabolism of CHO cells in cell culture. In this work, metabolism of CHO cells was studied at the growth phase and early stationary phase using isotopic tracers and mass spectrometry. CHO cells were grown in fed-batch culture over a period of six days. On days 2 and 4, [1,2-(13)C] glucose was introduced and the labeling of intracellular metabolites was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) at 6, 12 and 24h following the introduction of tracer. Intracellular metabolic fluxes were quantified from measured extracellular rates and (13)C-labeling dynamics of intracellular metabolites using non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). The flux results revealed significant rewiring of intracellular metabolic fluxes in the transition from growth to non-growth, including changes in energy metabolism, redox metabolism, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and anaplerosis. At the exponential phase, CHO cell metabolism was characterized by a high flux of glycolysis from glucose to lactate, anaplerosis from pyruvate to oxaloacetate and from glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, and cataplerosis though malic enzyme. At the stationary phase, the flux map was characterized by a reduced flux of glycolysis, net lactate uptake, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux, and reduced rate of anaplerosis. The fluxes of pyruvate dehydrogenase and TCA cycle were similar at the exponential and stationary phase. The results presented here provide a solid foundation for future studies of CHO cell metabolism for applications such as cell line development and medium optimization for high-titer production of recombinant proteins.

  10. Stable Isotope Labeled Tracers for Metabolic Pathway Elucidation by GC-MS and FT-MS

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K.; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Lane, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in analytical methodologies, principally nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), over the last decade have made large-scale analysis of the human metabolome a reality. This is leading to the reawakening of the importance of metabolism in human diseases, particularly widespread metabolic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Emerging NMR and MS atom-tracking technologies and informatics is poised to revolutionize metabolomics-based research because they deliver the high information throughput (HIT) that is needed for deciphering systems biochemistry. In particular, Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) enables unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalized metabolic networks, in a wide range of experimental systems, including human subjects. MS offers a wide range of initial capital outlay and operating costs, ranging from gas-chromatography (GC) MS affordable by many individual laboratories, to the HIT-supporting Fourier-transform (FT) class of MS that rivals NMR in cost and infrastructure support. This chapter will focus on sample preparation, instrument, and data processing procedures for these two extremes of MS instrumentation used in SIRM. PMID:25270929

  11. Multi-Isotope Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Combining Heavy Water 2H with 15N Labeling As Complementary Tracers for Metabolic Heterogeneity at the Single-Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, S.; McGlynn, S.; Cowley, E.; Green, A.; Newman, D. K.; Orphan, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic rates of microbial communities constitute a key physiological parameter for understanding the in situ growth constraints for life in any environment. Isotope labeling techniques provide a powerful approach for measuring such biological activity, due to the use of isotopically enriched substrate tracers whose incorporation into biological materials can be detected with high sensitivity by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Nano-meter scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) combined with stable isotope labeling provides a unique tool for studying the spatiometabolic activity of microbial populations at the single cell level in order to assess both community structure and population diversity. However, assessing the distribution and range of microbial activity in complex environmental systems with slow-growing organisms, diverse carbon and nitrogen sources, or heterotrophic subpopulations poses a tremendous technical challenge because the introduction of isotopically labeled substrates frequently changes the nutrient availability and can inflate or bias measures of activity. Here, we present the use of hydrogen isotope labeling with deuterated water as an important new addition to the isotopic toolkit and apply it for the determination of single cell microbial activities by NanoSIMS imaging. This tool provides a labeling technique that minimally alters any aquatic chemical environment, can be administered with strong labels even in minimal addition (natural background is very low), is an equally universal substrate for all forms of life even in complex, carbon and nitrogen saturated systems, and can be combined with other isotopic tracers. The combination of heavy water labeling with the most commonly used NanoSIMS tracer, 15N, is technically challenging but opens up a powerful new set of multi-tracer experiments for the study of microbial activity in complex communities. We present the first truly simultaneous single cell triple isotope system

  12. Using isotopic tracers to assess the impact of tillage and straw management on the microbial metabolic network in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Groenigen, K.; Forristal, D.; Jones, M. B.; Schwartz, E.; Hungate, B. A.; Dijkstra, P.

    2013-12-01

    By decomposing soil organic matter, microbes gain energy and building blocks for biosynthesis and release CO2 to the atmosphere. Therefore, insight into the effect of management practices on microbial metabolic pathways and C use efficiency (CUE; microbial C produced per substrate C utilized) may help to predict long term changes in soil C stocks. We studied the effects of reduced (RT) and conventional tillage (CT) on the microbial central C metabolic network, using soil samples from a 12-year-old field experiment in an Irish winter wheat cropping system. Each year after harvest, straw was removed from half of the RT and CT plots or incorporated into the soil in the other half, resulting in four treatment combinations. We added 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose as metabolic tracer isotopomers to composite soil samples taken at two depths (0-15 cm and 15-30 cm) from each treatment and used the rate of position-specific respired 13CO2 to parameterize a metabolic model. Model outcomes were then used to calculate CUE of the microbial community. We found that the composite samples differed in CUE, but the changes were small, with values ranging between 0.757-0.783 across treatments and soil depth. Increases in CUE were associated with a decrease in tricarboxylic acid cycle and reductive pentose phosphate pathway activity and increased consumption of metabolic intermediates for biosynthesis. Our results indicate that RT and straw incorporation promote soil C storage without substantially changing CUE or any of the microbial metabolic pathways. This suggests that at our site, RT and straw incorporation promote soil C storage mostly through direct effects such as increased soil C input and physical protection from decomposition, rather than by feedback responses of the microbial community.

  13. Stable isotope tracers and exercise physiology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Daniel J; Brook, Matthew S; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-09-09

    Stable isotope tracers have been invaluable assets in physiological research for over 80 years. The application of substrate-specific stable isotope tracers has permitted exquisite insight into amino acid, fatty-acid and carbohydrate metabolic regulation (i.e. incorporation, flux, and oxidation, in a tissue-specific and whole-body fashion) in health, disease and response to acute and chronic exercise. Yet, despite many breakthroughs, there are limitations to 'substrate-specific' stable isotope tracers, which limit physiological insight, e.g. the need for intravenous infusions and restriction to short-term studies (hours) in controlled laboratory settings. In recent years significant interest has developed in alternative stable isotope tracer techniques that overcome these limitations, in particular deuterium oxide (D2 O or heavy water). The unique properties of this tracer mean that through oral administration, the turnover and flux through a number of different substrates (muscle proteins, lipids, glucose, DNA (satellite cells)) can be monitored simultaneously and flexibly (hours/weeks/months) without the need for restrictive experimental control. This makes it uniquely suited for the study of 'real world' human exercise physiology (amongst many other applications). Moreover, using D2 O permits evaluation of turnover of plasma and muscle proteins (e.g. dynamic proteomics) in addition to metabolomics (e.g. fluxomics) to seek molecular underpinnings, e.g. of exercise adaptation. Here, we provide insight into the role of stable isotope tracers, from substrate-specific to novel D2 O approaches, in facilitating our understanding of metabolism. Further novel potential applications of stable isotope tracers are also discussed in the context of integration with the snowballing field of 'omic' technologies.

  14. Fish oils, phytosterols and weight loss in the regulation of lipoprotein transport in the metabolic syndrome: lessons from stable isotope tracer studies.

    PubMed

    Watts, G F; Chan, D C; Ooi, E M M; Nestel, P J; Beilin, L J; Barrett, P H R

    2006-09-01

    1. Dyslipoproteinaemia is a cardinal feature of the metabolic syndrome that accelerates atherosclerosis. It is characterized by high plasma concentrations of triglyceride-rich and apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins, with depressed concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Dysregulation of lipoprotein metabolism in these subjects may be due to a combination of overproduction of very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL) apoB-100, decreased catabolism of apoB-containing particles and increased catabolism of HDL apoA-I particles. 2. Nutritional interventions may favourably alter lipoprotein transport in the metabolic syndrome. We review our collaborative studies, using stable isotopes and compartmental modelling, of the kinetic effects of fish oils, plant sterols (phytosterols) and weight reduction on the dyslipoproteinaemia in this disorder. 3. Fish oil supplementation diminished hepatic secretion of VLDL-apoB and enhanced conversion of VLDL to low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-apoB, without altering catabolism. 4. Plant sterols (phytosterols) did not have a significant effect on plasma concentrations of lipids and lipoprotein or the kinetics of apoB and apoA-I. 5. Modest weight reduction optimally decreased plasma triglyceride and LDL-cholesterol via reduction in hepatic apoB secretion and reciprocal upregulation of LDL catabolism. 6. The scope and potential of future studies using stable isotope tracers is discussed.

  15. AssayR: A Simple Mass Spectrometry Software Tool for Targeted Metabolic and Stable Isotope Tracer Analyses.

    PubMed

    Wills, Jimi; Edwards-Hicks, Joy; Finch, Andrew J

    2017-09-19

    Metabolic analyses generally fall into two classes: unbiased metabolomic analyses and analyses that are targeted toward specific metabolites. Both techniques have been revolutionized by the advent of mass spectrometers with detectors that afford high mass accuracy and resolution, such as time-of-flights (TOFs) and Orbitraps. One particular area where this technology is key is in the field of metabolic flux analysis because the resolution of these spectrometers allows for discrimination between (13)C-containing isotopologues and those containing (15)N or other isotopes. While XCMS-based software is freely available for untargeted analysis of mass spectrometric data sets, it does not always identify metabolites of interest in a targeted assay. Furthermore, there is a paucity of vendor-independent software that deals with targeted analyses of metabolites and of isotopologues in particular. Here, we present AssayR, an R package that takes high resolution wide-scan liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data sets and tailors peak detection for each metabolite through a simple, iterative user interface. It automatically integrates peak areas for all isotopologues and outputs extracted ion chromatograms (EICs), absolute and relative stacked bar charts for all isotopologues, and a .csv data file. We demonstrate several examples where AssayR provides more accurate and robust quantitation than XCMS, and we propose that tailored peak detection should be the preferred approach for targeted assays. In summary, AssayR provides easy and robust targeted metabolite and stable isotope analyses on wide-scan data sets from high resolution mass spectrometers.

  16. Progress in isotope tracer hydrology in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. J.; Edwards, T. W. D.; Birks, S. J.; St Amour, N. A.; Buhay, W. M.; McEachern, P.; Wolfe, B. B.; Peters, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of current research in isotope hydrology, focusing on recent Canadian contributions, is discussed under the headings: precipitation networks, hydrograph separation and groundwater studies, river basin hydrology, lake and catchment water balance, and isotope palaeohydrology from lake sediment records. Tracer-based techniques, relying primarily on the naturally occurring environmental isotopes, have been integrated into a range of hydrological and biogeochemical research programmes, as they effectively complement physical and chemical techniques. A significant geographic focus of Canadian isotope hydrology research has been on the Mackenzie River basin, forming contributions to programmes such as the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment. Canadian research has also directly supported international efforts such as the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation and IAEAs Coordinated Research Project on Large River Basins. One significant trend in Canadian research is toward sustained long-term monitoring of precipitation and river discharge to enable better characterization of spatial and temporal variability in isotope signatures and their underlying causes. One fundamental conclusion drawn from previous studies in Canada is that combined use of 18O and 2H enables the distinction of precipitation variability from evaporation effects, which offers significant advantages over use of the individual tracers alone. The study of hydrological controls on water chemistry is one emerging research trend that stems from the unique ability to integrate isotope sampling within both water quality and water quantity surveys. Copyright

  17. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer

  18. Nickel isotopes as a new geochemical tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, L.; Williams, H. M.; Siebert, C.; Halliday, A.

    2010-12-01

    Research into "non-traditional" stable isotope systems has been of great interest over the past decade. The stable isotope system of nickel (Ni) has not been studied as intensively as other transition metals (e.g. Fe, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Mo), even though it is a ubiquitous element in geological environments and is a bioessential trace metal, e.g. for production of methane by methanogens. We have developed a novel chemical separation procedure to isolate Ni from most geological matrices. Because of its chemical behavior during ion-exchange chromatography complete separation of Ni is very complex. We therefore make use of a Ni double spike that allows us to optimize the chemical separation and correct instrumental mass bias during mass spectrometry analysis. This technique allows high precision Ni isotope measurements resulting in long term external reproducibility of USGS rock standard BHVO-2 of 0.09‰ (2s.d.) on δ60/58Ni with typical measurement errors as low as 0.04‰ (2s.d.). We have measured the isotope composition of Ni in a variety of terrestrial samples demonstrating significant isotope variation. In magmatic rocks Ni isotopes appear to be largely homogeneous, with only small variations (no more than 0.2‰) between different rock types, from ultramafic to felsic. There is no evidence of significant isotopic fractionation during melting and differentiation of the silicate Earth. In contrast we find significant systematic isotope variations (up to 1.5‰) between magmatic rocks and FeMn crusts, shales and sulphides. Our data clearly demonstrate mass-dependent fractionation of Ni isotopes in the marine and terrestrial environment by inorganic processes, in addition to the biological fractionations already reported by others, highlighting the potential of Ni isotopes as a powerful new tracer for Earth Surface processes.

  19. 13C Tracer Studies of Metabolism in Mouse Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Yan, Jun; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2015-01-01

    Mice are widely used for human tumor xenograft studies of cancer development and drug efficacy and toxicity. Stable isotope tracing coupled with metabolomic analysis is an emerging approach for assaying metabolic network activity. In mouse models there are several routes of tracer introduction, which have particular advantages and disadvantages that depend on the model and the questions addressed. This protocol describes the bolus i.v. route via repeated tail vein injections of solutions of stable isotope enriched tracers including 13C6-glucose and 13C5,15N2-glutamine. Repeated injections give higher enrichments and over longer labeling periods than a single bolus. Multiple injections of glutamine are necessary to achieve adequate enrichment in engrafted tumors. PMID:26693168

  20. Evaluating uncertainties in the calibration of isotopic reference materials and multi-element isotopic tracers (EARTHTIME Tracer Calibration Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Noah M.; Condon, Daniel J.; Schoene, Blair; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2015-09-01

    A statistical approach to evaluating uncertainties in the calibration of multi-element isotopic tracers has been developed and applied to determining the isotopic composition of mixed U-Pb (202 Pb-205 Pb-233 U-235 U) tracers used for accurate isotope dilution U-Pb geochronology. Our experiment, part of the EARTHTIME initiative, directly links the tracer calibration to first-principles measurements of mass and purity that are all traceable to SI units, thereby quantifying the accuracy and precision of U-Pb dates in absolute time. The calibration incorporates new more accurate and precise purity measurements for a number of commonly used Pb and U reference materials, and requires inter-relating their isotopic compositions and uncertainties. Similar methods can be used for other isotope systems that utilize multiple isotopic standards for calibration purposes. We also detail the inter-calibration of three publicly available U-Pb gravimetric solutions, which can be used to bring the same first-principles traceability to in-house U-Pb tracers from other laboratories. Accounting for uncertainty correlations in the tracer isotope ratios yields a tracer calibration contribution to the relative uncertainty of a 206 Pb/238 U date that is only half of the relative uncertainty in the 235 U/205 Pb ratio of the tracer, which was historically used to approximate the tracer related uncertainty contribution to 206 Pb/238 U dates. The tracer uncertainty contribution to 206 Pb/238 U dates has in this way been reduced to <300 ppm when using the EARTHTIME and similarly calibrated tracers.

  1. Practical considerations in the use of stable isotope labelled compounds as tracers in clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G N; Pacy, P J; Ford, G C; Halliday, D

    1989-05-01

    Increasingly widespread usage of stable isotope tracers to aid clinical diagnosis and support basic research has stemmed from both advances in mass spectrometry and the availability of competitively priced labelled compounds. Stable isotopes have been used generally to investigate normal and abnormal metabolic pathways, to estimate energy expenditure and body composition and to quantitate substrate flux and oxidation rates. Despite the fact that the underlying principles relating to the use of stable isotopes for in vivo studies are straightforward, careful consideration must be given to all aspects of human studies. This review highlights some of these, including choice of label and tracer molecule, mode of tracer administration and sampling site, analytical instrumentation, interpretation of data and ethical constraints.

  2. Metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Jan G

    2015-03-03

    The biogeochemical cycling of metals in natural systems is often accompanied by stable isotope fractionation which can now be measured due to recent analytical advances. In consequence, a new research field has emerged over the last two decades, complementing the traditional stable isotope systems (H, C, O, N, S) with many more elements across the periodic table (Li, B, Mg, Si, Cl, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Se, Br, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, W, Pt, Hg, Tl, U) which are being explored and potentially applicable as novel geochemical tracers. This review presents the application of metal stable isotopes as source and process tracers in environmental studies, in particular by using mixing and Rayleigh model approaches. The most important concepts of mass-dependent and mass-independent metal stable isotope fractionation are introduced, and the extent of natural isotopic variations for different elements is compared. A particular focus lies on a discussion of processes (redox transformations, complexation, sorption, precipitation, dissolution, evaporation, diffusion, biological cycling) which are able to induce metal stable isotope fractionation in environmental systems. Additionally, the usefulness and limitations of metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry are discussed and future perspectives presented.

  3. Isotope tracers help manage water resources

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.; Hudson, B.; Davisson, L.

    1997-11-01

    Livermore isotope scientists are using stable and radioactive isotopes to learn about groundwater sources, ages, travel times, and flow paths and to determine the path and extent of contaminant movement in the water. These studies started at the Nevada Test Site because of concern about the transport in groundwater of contaminants from underground nuclear testing. When water managers can accurately predict where contaminated groundwater will be, they can avoid using it. Groundwater studies have also been performed for the Orange County Water District, Contra Costa County, and other public agencies, as well as at the Livermore site. Livermore scientists are some of the first to marry isotope tracing techniques and numerical groundwater models, using data from the former to verify and validate the predictions of the latter and thus provide a powerful forecasting tool for water managers.

  4. Isotope tracers in catchment hydrology: How far can we go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    The use of stable isotopes as tracers of water has fundamentally changed the way that we view catchment hydrology. Tracer-based mass balance mixing studies in the past decades have revealed that most of the water comprising the storm hydrograph (in humid areas) is dominated by pre-event water. Furthermore, using the convolution integral approach to long term isotopic time series, studies have revealed a wide range of streamwater residence times (focused mostly on baseflow), from months to decades, but with most on the order of 1-3 years. These findings have now matured to the point where such information is informing rainfall- runoff model testing. As a result, stable isotope tracers offer new and orthogonal data measures for rejecting model structures. Similarly, scaling relations detected in streamwater residence time data offer hope for a new pathway to understand and quantify multi-scale catchment response patterns. So how far can we go with stable isotope tracers in catchment hydrology? Here I offer some suggestions on new research avenues that capitalize on the use of laser spectrometers and how the resulting increased sample frequencies in time and space (with laser specs in the lab and in the field) may offer new hydrological insights. Examples are given that apply to ecohydrological studies in catchments to resolve how vegetation and streams appear to return different pools of water to the hydrosphere; virtual experiments with catchment models to assess the fundamental controls on catchment residence time distribution; multi-tracer approaches to streamwater residence time to reconcile the striking differences in residence time estimates between oxygen-18 and tritium; and labeled isotope additions at the plot, hillslope and catchment scale under controlled input conditions for resolving the age, origin and pathway of flow.

  5. Isotope tracers in oceanographic studies: some sticky wickets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GROUSSET, F. E.

    2001-12-01

    Trace elements and isotopes have found widespread applications in oceanography. In most cases, their use has led to a better understanding of many oceanic processes (viz., chemical inputs to the ocean, chemical fluxes through the water column, particulate- dissolved-matter exchanges, watermass circulation, etc), permitting the application of reliable models. Anomalies have been observed, however, in the data on some tracers of particulates that should be given more attention in future. For example, it is widely recognized that the Sr isotopic composition of detrital particles is grain-size dependant (Dasch, 1969), whereas their Nd isotopic composition would not vary with grain-size (Goldstein et al., 1984). Recent sudies of detrital grain-size fractions, however, reveal that Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes can be strongly grain-size dependant. Some of these same isotopes can be used to study dissolved phases. The isotopic composition of Nd associated with iron oxides deposited on surface sediment planktic foraminifers has been used as a watermass tracer (Palmer et al., 1985). In the northern Atlantic surface sediments, however, the Nd isotope composition of the foraminifers is in fact mostly controled by the isotopic composition of the ambient detrital particles that are partially dissolved into the intertitial waters, subsequently contaminating the foraminifers (Grousset et al., 1986). The original watermass fingerprint is thus partly obscured. Another example is provided by iron-manganese nodules. In the Pacific ocean, the temporal evolution of the Pb-isotope composition of three nodules located at different latitudes has been explained by their plate-tectonic latitudinal shift through time (Meynadier, 2000). In the same ocean, another study still in progress of two nodules from a unique box-core reveals two totally different temporal behaviors of their trace elements and isotopes (Bernard et al., in prep.). Such anomalies will be reviewed and discussed.

  6. Plutonium isotopes as tracers for ocean processes: a review.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Patric; Lee, Sang-Han; Worsfold, Paul; Keith-Roach, Miranda

    2010-03-01

    Since the first nuclear weapons tests in the 1940s, pulsed inputs of plutonium isotopes have served as excellent tracers for understanding sources, pathways, dynamics and the fate of pollutants and particles in the marine environment. Due to the well-defined spatial and temporal inputs of Pu, the long half-lives of (240)Pu and (239)Pu and its unique chemical properties, Pu is a potential tracer for various physical and biogeochemical ocean processes, including circulation, sedimentation and biological productivity, and hence a means of assessing the impacts of global climate change. Due to the source dependency of the Pu isotopic signature, plutonium isotopes are beginning to be exploited as tools for the evaluation and improvement of regional and global ocean models that will enhance understanding of past and future changes in the oceans. This paper addresses the major sources of Pu and the physical and biogeochemical behaviour in the marine environment. Finally, the use of Pu isotopes as tracers for various oceanic processes (e.g. water mass transport, particle export, and sedimentation) is considered.

  7. Measuring technique for thermal ionisation mass spectrometry of human tracer kinetic study with stable cerium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Teresa; Höllriegl, Vera; Giussani, Augusto; Oeh, Uwe

    2011-06-01

    Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) method has been developed for the simultaneous detection of different cerium isotopes in biological samples (i.e., blood and urine) at very low concentrations. The work has been done in the frame of a biokinetic study, where different stable cerium isotopes have been administered orally and intravenously as tracers to the human body. In order to develop an appropriate detection method for the tracers in the biological samples, an optimum sample preparation technique has been set and adapted to the specific requirements of the analysis technique used, i.e., TIMS. For sample evaporation and ionisation, the double tantalum filament technique showed the best results. The ions produced were simultaneously collected on a secondary electron multiplier so that the isotopic ratios of the cerium isotopes in the biological samples could be measured. The technique has been optimised for the determination of cerium down to 1 ng loaded on the evaporation filament corresponding to cerium concentrations of down to 1 ng ml(-1) in the blood or urine samples. It has been shown that the technique is reliable in application and enables studies on cerium metabolism and biokinetics in humans without employing radioactive tracers.

  8. Neonatal Respiratory Diseases in the Newborn Infant: Novel Insights from Stable Isotope Tracer Studies.

    PubMed

    Carnielli, Virgilio P; Giorgetti, Chiara; Simonato, Manuela; Vedovelli, Luca; Cogo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome is a common problem in preterm infants and the etiology is multifactorial. Lung underdevelopment, lung hypoplasia, abnormal lung water metabolism, inflammation, and pulmonary surfactant deficiency or disfunction play a variable role in the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome. High-quality exogenous surfactant replacement studies and studies on surfactant metabolism are available; however, the contribution of surfactant deficiency, alteration or dysfunction in selected neonatal lung conditions is not fully understood. In this article, we describe a series of studies made by applying stable isotope tracers to the study of surfactant metabolism and lung water. In a first set of studies, which we call 'endogenous studies', using stable isotope-labelled intravenous surfactant precursors, we showed the feasibility of measuring surfactant synthesis and kinetics in infants using several metabolic precursors including plasma glucose, plasma fatty acids and body water. In a second set of studies, named 'exogenous studies', using stable isotope-labelled phosphatidylcholine tracer given endotracheally, we could estimate surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholine pool size and half-life. Very recent studies are focusing on lung water and on the endogenous biosynthesis of the surfactant-specific proteins. Information obtained from these studies in infants will help to better tailor exogenous surfactant treatment in neonatal lung diseases.

  9. Dissolved gas and isotopic tracers of denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; McNab, W W; Carle, S F; Cey, B D

    2008-02-28

    We present results from field studies in California (USA) where tritium-helium age dating is used in conjunction with major gases (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}), noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), and stable isotopes ({sup 15}N/{sup 14}N, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) in order to document nitrate loading and denitrification associated with confined animal agricultural operations and septic systems. Preliminary results show that in-field extraction of the full suite of dissolved gases will be possible using a new Gas Extraction System under development to augment the current Noble Gas Mass Spectrometry and Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry techniques. Ascribing observed groundwater nitrate levels to specific current and past land use practices is often complicated by uncertainty in groundwater age and the degree and locus of dentrification. Groundwater age dating at dairy field sites using the {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He method indicates that the highest nitrate concentrations (150-260 mg/L-NO3) occur in waters with apparent ages of <5 yrs, whereas older waters contain excess N{sub 2} from saturated zone denitrification [1]. At a residential septic system site in Livermore, CA, waters with young apparent ages (<1 yr) proximal to leach line drainage have lower nitrate concentrations and elevated nitrate {delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 18}O values consistent with denitrification, but little evidence for excess N{sub 2}, indicating that denitrification is occurring in the unsaturated zone. Degassing of groundwater can complicate efforts to calculate travel times [2] and to quantify denitrification. Degassed groundwater underlying dairy operations is formed by two distinct mechanisms: (1) recharge of manure lagoon water affected by biogenic gas ebullition [3] and (2) saturated zone denitrification producing N{sub 2} gas above solubility in groundwater. Gas loss due to both mechanisms is evident in the concentrations of noble gases and major gases in dairy groundwater samples.

  10. Groundwater surface water interaction study using natural isotopes tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Kim, Yong Chul; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Kil Yong

    2015-04-01

    Tritium and stable isotopes are a component of the water molecule, they are the most conservative tracer for groundwater study. And also, radon is natural radioactive nuclide and well dissolved in groundwater. Therefore, these isotopes are used natural tracer for the study of surface water and groundwater interaction of water curtain greenhouse area. The study area used groundwater as a water curtain for warming tool of greenhouse during the winter, and is associated with issues of groundwater shortage while being subject to groundwater-river water interaction. During the winter time, these interactions were studied by using Rn-222, stable isotopes and H-3. These interaction was monitored in multi depth well and linear direction well of groundwater flow. And dam effect was also compared. Samples were collected monthly from October 2013 to April 2014. Radon and tritium were analyzed using Quantulus low background liquid scintillation counter and stable isotopes were analyzed using an IRIS (Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectroscopy ; L2120-i, Picarro). During the winter time, radon concentration was varied from 0.07 Bq/L to 8.9 Bq/L and different interaction was showed between dam. Surface water intrusion was severe at February and restored April when greenhouse warming was ended. The stable isotope results showed different trend with depth and ranged from -9.16 ‰ to -7.24 ‰ for δ 18O value, while the δD value was ranged from -57.86 ‰ to -50.98 ‰. The groundwater age as dated by H-3 was ranged 0.23 Bq/L - 0.59 Bq/L with an average value of 0.37 Bq/L.

  11. Impact of kinetic isotope effects in isotopic studies of metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    Millard, Pierre; Portais, Jean-Charles; Mendes, Pedro

    2015-09-26

    Isotope labeling experiments (ILEs) are increasingly used to investigate the functioning of metabolic systems. Some enzymes are subject to kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) which modulate reaction rates depending on the isotopic composition of their substrate(s). KIEs may therefore affect both the propagation of isotopes through metabolic networks and their operation, and ultimately jeopardize the biological value of ILEs. However, the actual impact of KIEs on metabolism has never been investigated at the system level. First, we developed a framework which integrates KIEs into kinetic and isotopic models of metabolism, thereby accounting for their system-wide effects on metabolite concentrations, metabolic fluxes, and isotopic patterns. Then, we applied this framework to assess the impact of KIEs on the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli in the context of (13)C-ILEs, under different situations commonly encountered in laboratories. Results showed that the impact of KIEs strongly depends on the label input and on the variable considered but is significantly lower than expected intuitively from measurements on isolated enzymes. The global robustness of both the metabolic operation and isotopic patterns largely emerge from intrinsic properties of metabolic networks, such as the distribution of control across the network and bidirectional isotope exchange. These results demonstrate the necessity of investigating the impact of KIEs at the level of the entire system, contradict previous hypotheses that KIEs would have a strong effect on isotopic distributions and on flux determination, and strengthen the biological value of (13)C-ILEs. The proposed modeling framework is generic and can be used to investigate the impact of all the isotopic tracers ((2)H, (13)C, (15)N, (18)O, etc.) on different isotopic datasets and metabolic systems. By allowing the integration of isotopic and metabolomics data collected under stationary and/or non-stationary conditions, it may

  12. Optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments and (13)C metabolic flux analysis: A new precision and synergy scoring system.

    PubMed

    Crown, Scott B; Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-11-01

    (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) is a widely used approach in metabolic engineering for quantifying intracellular metabolic fluxes. The precision of fluxes determined by (13)C-MFA depends largely on the choice of isotopic tracers and the specific set of labeling measurements. A recent advance in the field is the use of parallel labeling experiments for improved flux precision and accuracy. However, as of today, no systemic methods exist for identifying optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments. In this contribution, we have addressed this problem by introducing a new scoring system and evaluating thousands of different isotopic tracer schemes. Based on this extensive analysis we have identified optimal tracers for (13)C-MFA. The best single tracers were doubly (13)C-labeled glucose tracers, including [1,6-(13)C]glucose, [5,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose, which consistently produced the highest flux precision independent of the metabolic flux map (here, 100 random flux maps were evaluated). Moreover, we demonstrate that pure glucose tracers perform better overall than mixtures of glucose tracers. For parallel labeling experiments the optimal isotopic tracers were [1,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose. Combined analysis of [1,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose labeling data improved the flux precision score by nearly 20-fold compared to widely use tracer mixture 80% [1-(13)C]glucose +20% [U-(13)C]glucose.

  13. Highly enriched multiply-labeled stable isotopic compounds as atmospheric tracers

    DOEpatents

    Goldblatt, M.; McInteer, B.B.

    1974-01-29

    Compounds multiply-labeled with stable isotopes and highly enriched in these isotopes are readily capable of detection in tracer experiments involving high dilutions. Thus, for example, /sup 13/C/sup 18/O/sub 2/ provides a useful tracer for following atmospheric pol lution produced as a result of fossil fuel burning. (Official Gazette)

  14. K isotopes as a tracer of seafloor hydrothermal alteration

    PubMed Central

    Parendo, Christopher A.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2017-01-01

    At ocean spreading ridges, circulation of seawater through rock at elevated temperatures alters the chemical and isotopic composition of oceanic crust. Samples obtained from drilling into ocean floor and from ophiolites have demonstrated that certain isotope systems, such as 18O/16O and 87Sr/86Sr, are systematically modified in hydrothermally altered oceanic crust. Although K is known to be mobile during hydrothermal alteration, there have not yet been any K-isotope analyses of altered oceanic crustal materials. Moreover, the 41K/39K of seawater was recently found to be significantly higher than that of igneous rocks, so the addition of seawater K to oceanic crust would be expected to generate 41K/39K variations in affected rocks. Here, we report high-precision 41K/39K measurements for samples from the Bay of Islands ophiolite, and we document large variations in 41K/39K, covarying with previous determinations of 87Sr/86Sr. Our data indicate that analytically resolvable 41K/39K effects arise in oceanic crust as a result of hydrothermal alteration. This finding raises the possibility that 41K/39K can be used as an effective tracer of oceanic crust recycled into the mantle, as a diagnostic criterion by which to identify ancient fragments of oceanic crust, and as a constraint on the flux of K between oceanic crust and seawater. PMID:28174267

  15. Nitrate in groundwater: an isotopic multi-tracer approach.

    PubMed

    Widory, David; Kloppmann, Wolfram; Chery, Laurence; Bonnin, Jacky; Rochdi, Houda; Guinamant, Jean-Luc

    2004-08-01

    In spite of increasing efforts to reduce nitrogen inputs into groundwater from intensive agriculture, nitrate (NO3) remains one of the major pollutants of drinking-water resources worldwide. Determining the source(s) of NO3 contamination in groundwater is an important first step for improving groundwater quality by emission control, and it is with this aim that we investigated the viability of an isotopic multi-tracer approach (delta15N, delta11B, 87Sr/86Sr), in addition to conventional hydrogeologic analysis, in two small catchments of the Arguenon watershed (Brittany, France). The main anthropogenic sources (fertilizer, sewage effluent, and hog, cattle and poultry manure) were first characterized by their specific B, N and Sr isotope signatures, and compared to those observed in the ground- and surface waters. Chemical and isotopic evidence shows that both denitrification and mixing within the watershed have the effect of buffering NO3 contamination in the groundwater. Coupled delta11B, delta15N and 87Sr/86Sr results indicate that a large part of the NO3 contamination in the Arguenon watershed originates from the spreading of animal manure, with hog manure being a major contributor. Point sources, such as sewage effluents, contribute to the NO3 budget of the two watersheds.

  16. K isotopes as a tracer of seafloor hydrothermal alteration.

    PubMed

    Parendo, Christopher A; Jacobsen, Stein B; Wang, Kun

    2017-02-21

    At ocean spreading ridges, circulation of seawater through rock at elevated temperatures alters the chemical and isotopic composition of oceanic crust. Samples obtained from drilling into ocean floor and from ophiolites have demonstrated that certain isotope systems, such as (18)O/(16)O and (87)Sr/(86)Sr, are systematically modified in hydrothermally altered oceanic crust. Although K is known to be mobile during hydrothermal alteration, there have not yet been any K-isotope analyses of altered oceanic crustal materials. Moreover, the (41)K/(39)K of seawater was recently found to be significantly higher than that of igneous rocks, so the addition of seawater K to oceanic crust would be expected to generate (41)K/(39)K variations in affected rocks. Here, we report high-precision (41)K/(39)K measurements for samples from the Bay of Islands ophiolite, and we document large variations in (41)K/(39)K, covarying with previous determinations of (87)Sr/(86)Sr. Our data indicate that analytically resolvable (41)K/(39)K effects arise in oceanic crust as a result of hydrothermal alteration. This finding raises the possibility that (41)K/(39)K can be used as an effective tracer of oceanic crust recycled into the mantle, as a diagnostic criterion by which to identify ancient fragments of oceanic crust, and as a constraint on the flux of K between oceanic crust and seawater.

  17. Nitrate in groundwater: an isotopic multi-tracer approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widory, David; Kloppmann, Wolfram; Chery, Laurence; Bonnin, Jacky; Rochdi, Houda; Guinamant, Jean-Luc

    2004-08-01

    In spite of increasing efforts to reduce nitrogen inputs into groundwater from intensive agriculture, nitrate (NO 3) remains one of the major pollutants of drinking-water resources worldwide. Determining the source(s) of NO 3 contamination in groundwater is an important first step for improving groundwater quality by emission control, and it is with this aim that we investigated the viability of an isotopic multi-tracer approach ( δ15N, δ11B, 87Sr/ 86Sr), in addition to conventional hydrogeologic analysis, in two small catchments of the Arguenon watershed (Brittany, France). The main anthropogenic sources (fertilizer, sewage effluent, and hog, cattle and poultry manure) were first characterized by their specific B, N and Sr isotope signatures, and compared to those observed in the ground- and surface waters. Chemical and isotopic evidence shows that both denitrification and mixing within the watershed have the effect of buffering NO 3 contamination in the groundwater. Coupled δ11B, δ15N and 87Sr/ 86Sr results indicate that a large part of the NO 3 contamination in the Arguenon watershed originates from the spreading of animal manure, with hog manure being a major contributor. Point sources, such as sewage effluents, contribute to the NO 3 budget of the two watersheds.

  18. Stable isotopes as tracers of organic matter input and transfer in benthic food webs: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Bruce J.

    1999-07-01

    Some of the ways that the application of stable isotopic tracers have contributed to the extremely hard task of understanding the energy and food web relations in benthic communities are illustrated in this review. Several methods are presented and their relative advantages are discussed, namely the use of endmembers, nitrogen isotopes, carbon isotopes, and sulfur isotopes. Special attention is given to the application of multiple tracers and transects sampling, natural and man-made perturbation experiments, and 15N additions as N cycle tracers.

  19. Application of zinc isotope tracer technology in tracing soil heavy metal pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbu, Namkha; Wang, Shuguang; Xu, Yan; Yang, Jianqiang; Liu, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Recent years the soil heavy metal pollution has become increasingly serious, especially the zinc pollution. Due to the complexity of this problem, in order to prevent and treat the soil pollution, it's crucial to accurately and quickly find out the pollution sources and control them. With the development of stable isotope tracer technology, it's able to determine the composition of zinc isotope. Based on the theory of zinc isotope tracer technique, and by means of doing some latest domestic and overseas literature research about the zinc isotope multi-receiving cups of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) testing technology, this paper summarized the latest research results about the pollution tracer of zinc isotope, and according to the deficiencies and existing problems of previous research, made outlooks of zinc isotope fractionation mechanism, repository establishment and tracer multiple solutions.

  20. Isotopes in geobiochemistry: tracing metabolic pathways in microorganisms of environmental relevance with stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Adrian, Lorenz; Marco-Urrea, Ernest

    2016-10-01

    Stable isotopes are flexibly used as tracers to investigate environmental processes, microorganisms responsible for environmental transformations, syntrophic relationships in consortia, and metabolic pathways. With the advent of widely accessible high-resolution, highly accurate and sensitive mass spectrometers connected to liquid chromatography (LC-MS/MS) and the explosion of microbial genome sequence information the options to apply stable isotope tracers to geobiochemical topics have multiplied. With methods at hand to analyze biochemical pathways and enzymatic functions of yet-uncultivated microorganisms even in mixed cultures, a wide field of new discoveries can be expected. Applications rely both on the high sensitivity to detect trace amounts of biological material in slow or non-growing cultures and on the high multi-dimensional resolution of LC-MS/MS to allow the separation of complex samples and to retrieve phylogenetic information. Challenges and examples of stable isotope applications to describe geobiochemical processes are reviewed. Overall, the potential is not yet sufficiently deployed.

  1. Isotopic Tracers for Delineating Non-Point Source Pollutants in Surface Water

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M L

    2001-03-01

    This study tested whether isotope measurements of surface water and dissolved constituents in surface water could be used as tracers of non-point source pollution. Oxygen-18 was used as a water tracer, while carbon-14, carbon-13, and deuterium were tested as tracers of DOC. Carbon-14 and carbon-13 were also used as tracers of dissolved inorganic carbon, and chlorine-36 and uranium isotopes were tested as tracers of other dissolved salts. In addition, large databases of water quality measurements were assembled for the Missouri River at St. Louis and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California to enhance interpretive results of the isotope measurements. Much of the water quality data has been under-interpreted and provides a valuable resource to investigative research, for which this report exploits and integrates with the isotope measurements.

  2. Untargeted profiling of tracer-derived metabolites using stable isotopic labeling and fast polarity-switching LC-ESI-HRMS.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Bernhard; Bueschl, Christoph; Neumann, Nora; Stückler, Romana; Doppler, Maria; Chassy, Alexander W; Waterhouse, Andrew L; Rechthaler, Justyna; Kampleitner, Niklas; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Adam, Gerhard; Krska, Rudolf; Schuhmacher, Rainer

    2014-12-02

    An untargeted metabolomics workflow for the detection of metabolites derived from endogenous or exogenous tracer substances is presented. To this end, a recently developed stable isotope-assisted LC-HRMS-based metabolomics workflow for the global annotation of biological samples has been further developed and extended. For untargeted detection of metabolites arising from labeled tracer substances, isotope pattern recognition has been adjusted to account for nonlabeled moieties conjugated to the native and labeled tracer molecules. Furthermore, the workflow has been extended by (i) an optional ion intensity ratio check, (ii) the automated combination of positive and negative ionization mode mass spectra derived from fast polarity switching, and (iii) metabolic feature annotation. These extensions enable the automated, unbiased, and global detection of tracer-derived metabolites in complex biological samples. The workflow is demonstrated with the metabolism of (13)C9-phenylalanine in wheat cell suspension cultures in the presence of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON). In total, 341 metabolic features (150 in positive and 191 in negative ionization mode) corresponding to 139 metabolites were detected. The benefit of fast polarity switching was evident, with 32 and 58 of these metabolites having exclusively been detected in the positive and negative modes, respectively. Moreover, for 19 of the remaining 49 phenylalanine-derived metabolites, the assignment of ion species and, thus, molecular weight was possible only by the use of complementary features of the two ion polarity modes. Statistical evaluation showed that treatment with DON increased or decreased the abundances of many detected metabolites.

  3. Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Smith, R.L.; Miller, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) is a major constituent of many contaminated groundwaters, but its movement through aquifers is complex and poorly documented. In this study, processes affecting NH4+ movement in a treated wastewater plume were studied by a combination of techniques including large-scale monitoring of NH4+ distribution; isotopic analyses of coexisting aqueous NH4+, NO3-, N2, and sorbed NH 4+; and in situ natural gradient 15NH 4+ tracer tests with numerical simulations of 15NH4+, 15NO3-, and 15N2 breakthrough data. Combined results indicate that the main mass of NH4+ was moving downgradient at a rate about 0.25 times the groundwater velocity. Retardation factors and groundwater ages indicate that much of the NH4+ in the plume was recharged early in the history of the wastewater disposal. NO3- and excess N2 gas, which were related to each other by denitrification near the plume source, were moving downgradient more rapidly and were largely unrelated to coexisting NH 4+. The ??15N data indicate areas of the plume affected by nitrification (substantial isotope fractionation) and sorption (no isotope fractionation). There was no conclusive evidence for NH 4+-consuming reactions (nitrification or anammox) in the anoxic core of the plume. Nitrification occurred along the upper boundary of the plume but was limited by a low rate of transverse dispersive mixing of wastewater NH4+ and O2 from overlying uncontaminated groundwater. Without induced vertical mixing or displacement of plume water with oxic groundwater from upgradient sources, the main mass of NH4+ could reach a discharge area without substantial reaction long after the more mobile wastewater constituents are gone. Multiple approaches including in situ isotopic tracers and fractionation studies provided critical information about processes affecting NH4+ movement and N speciation.

  4. HORMONE MEASUREMENT GUIDELINES: Tracing lipid metabolism: the value of stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Umpleby, A Margot

    2015-09-01

    Labelling molecules with stable isotopes to create tracers has become a gold-standard method to study the metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins in humans. There are a range of techniques which use stable isotopes to measure fatty acid flux and oxidation, hepatic fatty synthesis, cholesterol absorption and synthesis and lipoprotein metabolism in humans. Stable isotope tracers are safe to use, enabling repeated studies to be undertaken and allowing studies to be undertaken in children and pregnant women. This review provides details of the most appropriate tracers to use, the techniques which have been developed and validated for measuring different aspects of lipid metabolism and some of the limitations of the methodology. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  5. New Isotopic Tracers for Shale Gas and Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The combined application of geochemistry, stable isotopes (δ18O, δ2H), strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr), boron isotopes (δ11B), and radium isotopes (228Ra/226Ra) provides a unique methodology for tracing and monitoring shale gas and fracking fluids in the environment.

  6. Review of metabolic pathways activated in cancer cells as determined through isotopic labeling and network analysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wentao; Keibler, Mark A; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2017-02-10

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as an indispensable part of contemporary cancer research. During the past 10 years, the use of stable isotopic tracers and network analysis have unveiled a number of metabolic pathways activated in cancer cells. Here, we review such pathways along with the particular tracers and labeling observations that led to the discovery of their rewiring in cancer cells. The list of such pathways comprises the reductive metabolism of glutamine, altered glycolysis, serine and glycine metabolism, mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) induced reprogramming and the onset of acetate metabolism. Additionally, we demonstrate the critical role of isotopic labeling and network analysis in identifying these pathways. The alterations described in this review do not constitute a complete list, and future research using these powerful tools is likely to discover other cancer-related pathways and new metabolic targets for cancer therapy.

  7. Human calcium metabolism including bone resorption measured with {sup 41}Ca tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.P.H.T.; King, J.C.; Vieira, N.E.; Woodhouse, L.R.; Yergey, A.L.

    1996-08-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is so sensitive to small quantities of {sup 41}Ca that it might be used as a tracer in the study of human calcium kinetics to generate unique kinds of data. In contrast with the use of other Ca isotopic tracers, {sup 41}Ca tracer can be so administered that the tracer movements between the various body pools achieve a quasi steady state. Resorbing bone may thus be directly measured. We have tested such a protocol against a conventional stable isotope experiment with good agreement.

  8. Human calcium metabolism including bone resorption measured with 41Ca tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; King, Janet C.; Vieira, Nancy E.; Woodhouse, Leslie R.; Yergey, Alfred L.

    1997-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is so sensitive to small quantities of 41Ca that it might be used as a tracer in the study of human calcium kinetics to generate unique kinds of data. In contrast with the use of other Ca isotopic tracers, 41Ca tracer can be so administered that the tracer movements between the various body pools achieve a quasi steady state. Resorbing bone may thus be directly measured. We have tested such a protocol against a conventional stable isotope experiment with good agreement.

  9. Isotopes as Tracers of the Hawaiian Coffee-Producing Regions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Green coffee bean isotopes have been used to trace the effects of different climatic and geological characteristics associated with the Hawaii islands. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry ((MC)-ICP-SFMS and ICP-QMS) were applied to determine the isotopic composition of carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N), sulfur (δ34S), and oxygen (δ18O), the isotope abundance of strontium (87Sr/86Sr), and the concentrations of 30 different elements in 47 green coffees. The coffees were produced in five Hawaii regions: Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, and Oahu. Results indicate that coffee plant seed isotopes reflect interactions between the coffee plant and the local environment. Accordingly, the obtained analytical fingerprinting could be used to discriminate between the different Hawaii regions studied. PMID:21838232

  10. Isotopes as tracers of the Hawaiian coffee-producing regions.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Carla; Brunner, Marion; Steiman, Shawn; Bowen, Gabriel J; Nogueira, José M F; Gautz, Loren; Prohaska, Thomas; Máguas, Cristina

    2011-09-28

    Green coffee bean isotopes have been used to trace the effects of different climatic and geological characteristics associated with the Hawaii islands. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry ((MC)-ICP-SFMS and ICP-QMS) were applied to determine the isotopic composition of carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N), sulfur (δ34S), and oxygen (δ18O), the isotope abundance of strontium (87Sr/86Sr), and the concentrations of 30 different elements in 47 green coffees. The coffees were produced in five Hawaii regions: Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, and Oahu. Results indicate that coffee plant seed isotopes reflect interactions between the coffee plant and the local environment. Accordingly, the obtained analytical fingerprinting could be used to discriminate between the different Hawaii regions studied.

  11. Evaluating North Sea carbon sources using radiogenic (224Ra and 228Ra) and stable carbon isotope (DI13C) tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, William; Thomas, Helmuth; Hagens, Mathilde; Brenner, Heiko; Paetsch, Johannes; Clargo, Nikki

    2015-04-01

    In the North Sea, much uncertainty still exists regarding the role of boundary fluxes (e.g. benthic input from sediments or lateral inputs from the coastline) in the overall biogeochemical cycling of the system. The stable carbon isotope signature of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC) is a common tool for following transformations of carbon in the water column and identifying carbon sources and sinks. Here, analyses of the first basin-wide observations of δ13C-DIC reveal that a balance between biological production and respiration, as well as a freshwater input near the European continental coast, predominantly control surface distributions in the North Sea. A strong relationship between the biological component of DIC (DICbio) and δ13C-DIC is then used to quantify the metabolic DIC flux associated with changes in the carbon isotopic signature. Correlations are also found between δ13C-DIC and naturally-occurring Radium isotopes (224Ra and 228Ra), which have well-identified sources from the seafloor and coastal boundaries. The relationship between δ13C-DIC and the longer-lived 228Ra isotope (half-life = 5.8 years) is used to derive a metabolic DIC flux from the European continental coastline. 228Ra is also shown to be a highly effective tracer of North Sea total alkalinity (TA) compared to the more conventional use of salinity as a tracer. Coastal alkalinity inputs are calculated using relationships with 228Ra, and ratios of DIC and TA suggest denitrification as the main metabolic pathway for the formation of these coastal inputs. Finally, coastal TA inputs are translated into inputs of protons to quantify their impact on the buffering capacity of the Southern North Sea.

  12. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Chemical and Isotopic Tracers for Characterization Of Groundwater Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; Singleton, M J; Carle, S F; Esser, B K

    2007-09-13

    In many regions, three dimensional characterization of the groundwater regime is limited by coarse well spacing or borehole lithologic logs of low quality. However, regulatory requirements for drinking water or site remediation may require collection of extensive chemical and water quality data from existing wells. Similarly, for wells installed in the distant past, lithologic logs may not be available, but the wells can be sampled for chemical and isotopic constituents. In these situations, a thorough analysis of trends in chemical and isotopic constituents can be a key component in characterizing the regional groundwater system. On a basin or subbasin scale, especially in areas of intensive groundwater management where artificial recharge is important, introduction of an extrinsic tracer can provide a robust picture of groundwater flow. Dissolved gases are particularly good tracers since a large volume of water can be tagged, there are no real or perceived health risks associated with the tracer, and a very large dynamic range allows detection of a small amount of tagged water in well discharge. Recent applications of the application of extrinsic tracers, used in concert with intrinsic chemical and isotopic tracers, demonstrate the power of chemical analyses in interpreting regional subsurface flow regimes.

  13. Sr isotopic tracer study of the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Lanphere, M.A.; Coleman, R.G.; Hopson, C.A.

    1981-04-10

    We have measured Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr isotopic compositions in 41 whole-rock samples and 12 mineral separates from units of the Samail ophiolite, including peridotite, gabbro, plagiogranite diabase dikes, and gabbro and websterite dikes within the metamorphic peridotite. Ten samples of cummulate gabbro from the Wadir Kadir section and nine samples from the Wadi Khafifah section have mean /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios and standard deviations of 0.70314 +- 0.00030 and 0.70306 +- 0.00034, respectively. The dispersion in Sr isotopic composition may reflect real heterogeneities in the magma source region. The average Sr isotopic composition of cumulate gabbro falls in the range of isotopic compositions of modern midocean ridge basalt. The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of noncumulate gabbro, plagiogranite, and diabase dikes range from 0.7034 to 0.7047, 0.7038 to 0.7046, and 0.7037 to 0.7061, respectively. These higher /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios are due to alteration of initial magmatic compositions by hydrothermal exchange with seawater. Mineral separates from dikes that cut harzburgite tectonite have Sr isotopic compositions which agree with that of cumulate gabbro. These data indicate that the cumulate gabbro and the different dikes were derived from partial melting of source regions that had similar long-term histories and chemical compositions.

  14. Sr isotopic tracer study of the Samail ophiolite, Oman.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Coleman, R.G.; Hopson, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr-isotopic compositions were measured in 41 whole-rock samples and 12 mineral separates from units of the Samail ophiolite, including peridotite, gabbro, plagiogranite, diabase dykes, and gabbro and websterite dykes within the metamorphic peridotite. Ten samples of cumulate gabbro from the Wadir Kadir section and nine samples from the Wadi Khafifah section have 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70314 + or - 0.00030 and 0.70306 + or - 0.00034, respectively. The dispersion in Sr- isotopic composition may reflect real heterogeneities in the magma source region. The average Sr-isotopic composition of cumulate gabbro falls in the range of isotopic compositions of modern MORB. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of noncumulate gabbro, plagiogranite, and diabase dykes range 0.7034-0.7047, 0.7038-0.7046 and 0.7037- 0.7061, respectively. These higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios are due to alteration of initial magmatic compositions by hydrothermal exchange with sea-water. Mineral separates from dykes that cut harzburgite tectonite have Sr-isotopic compositions which agree with that of cumulate gabbro. These data indicate that the cumulate gabbro and the different dykes were derived from partial melting of source regions that had similar long-term histories and chemical compositions.-T.R.

  15. Water isotope tracers of tropical hydroclimate in a warming world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konecky, B. L.; Noone, D.; Nusbaumer, J. M.; Cobb, K. M.; Di Nezio, P. N.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    The tropical water cycle is projected to undergo substantial changes under a warming climate, but direct meteorological observations to contextualize these changes are rare prior to the 20th century. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios (δ18O, δD) of environmental waters preserved in geologic archives are increasingly being used to reconstruct terrestrial rainfall over many decades to millions of years. However, a rising number of new, modern-day observations and model simulations have challenged previous interpretations of these isotopic signatures. This presentation systematically evaluates the three main influences on the δ18O and δD of modern precipitation - rainfall amount, cloud type, and moisture transport - from terrestrial stations throughout the tropics, and uses this interpretive framework to understand past changes in terrestrial tropical rainfall. Results indicate that cloud type and moisture transport have a larger influence on modern δ18O and δD of tropical precipitation than previously believed, indicating that isotope records track changes in cloud characteristics and circulation that accompany warmer and cooler climate states. We use our framework to investigate isotopic records of the land-based tropical rain belt during the Last Glacial Maximum, the period of warming following the Little Ice Age, and the 21st century. Proxy and observational data are compared with water isotope-enabled simulations with the Community Earth System Model in order to discuss how global warming and cooling may influence tropical terrestrial hydroclimate.

  16. Pb isotopic tracers of the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event

    SciTech Connect

    Galer, S.J.G.; Macdougall, J.D.; Erickson, D.J. III )

    1989-11-01

    The global excess of Ir in sediments at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary has been attributed to either a meteorite impact or enhanced volcanism (e.g. Decan Traps). The isotropic composition of Pb associated with this Ir provides a test of these hypotheses because meteoritic Pb is isotopically quite distinct from Pb of volcanic or continental origin. Pb abundances and isotopic compositions of pelagic oozes from DSDP Site 577A (Shatsky Rise, NW Pacific) measured in this study show little change over the deposition interval of Ir-rich sediment ({approximately}10 cm). However, a Pb enriched layer with a more radiogenic isotopic composition is found in the basal {approximately}0.5 cm of the Tertiary. These observations appear to preclude the Ir excess in these sediments originating as impact fallout from a stony meteorite although an iron meteorite impactor cannot be excluded. Any Pb flux accompanying Ir in volcanogenic aerosols from the Decan Traps should be considerable. However, the boundary Pb spike does not isotopically resemble known Deccan Trap lavas. There is isotopic overlap with coal ash although the lack of correlation between soot and Pb abundance precludes any simple relationship between the two. Overall, any wind pattern changes following the K-T event were apparently short-lived as neither airborne sources of Pb nor their magnitude to the then central Pacific were affected while Ir enriched sediments were being laid down.

  17. Stable Isotopes in Ice: Tracers of the Global Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuffey, K. M.

    2003-12-01

    Significant advances in geophysical sciences most often follow from development of new abilities to measure Earth's properties. One major development of the past half century has been the measurement of stable isotopic composition of precipitation and its variations on vast spatial and temporal scales, the latter especially in Arctic and Antarctic glacial ice. The venerable tradition of research in this subject emanates directly from work of Dansgaard, Craig, and Epstein. Here I discuss how isotopic variations induced by atmospheric distillation offer a compelling example of a geophysical phenomenon arising from microphysical properties, but one that is dependent on the global-scale environment. I discuss how the geography of precipitation isotopes is explicable by treating the problem as an advective diffusive reaction system. Three of the most important results of environmental geophysics have emerged from analyses exploiting (in part) the record of this system in polar ice: the strong but quixotic coupling of climate and biogeochemistry on multi-millennial time scales; the high but plausible (and contentious) values for global climate sensitivity to radiative forcings; and the documentation of past very rapid climate changes. Looking forward, I also discuss the major unresolved issues lurking behind this facade of success, including poor understanding of the controls on deuterium excess at low temperatures, and inability to quantify many non-temperature effects on isotope time series (many of which were clearly discussed by Dansgaard nearly forty years ago).

  18. Isotope tracers of organic carbon during artificial recharge

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.

    1998-02-09

    This project developed an analytical technique for measuring the isotope abundance for 14C and 13C in total organic carbon (TOC) in order to test whether these measurements can trace TOC interaction with sedimentary material at the bottom of rivers and lakes, soils, and subsurface aquifer rocks.

  19. Isotopes as tracers of groundwater circulation in a peat land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrel, Philippe; Guerrot, Catherine; Millot, Romain; Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle

    2015-04-01

    Like all wetlands ecosystems, the bio-diversity of peatlands is strongly fragile as it is requiring very specific wet conditions. In the past 20 years, increasing efforts were engaged to restore degraded wetlands, to create new wetlands and to manage wetlands sustainably in order to assess their multiple benefits. Engaging specific actions to restore and preserve wetlands require an important knowledge on the water cycle in such systems. In this study, we use chemical and multi-isotopic approaches to trace the fluxes of water and dissolved element in a peatland and for the drainage network. Aims are to evaluate the origin of dissolved elements and possible anthropogenic impacts through Li, Sr, O and H isotope systematics. This approach clearly demonstrated its effectiveness for improving our understanding of the hydrological functioning of this wetland ecosystem. Water circulation and mixing were traced using strontium and lithium isotopes. The use of Ca/Na ratios coupled with Sr isotopes constraint the end-members and mixing calculations support that in the site, Sr-isotope signatures of water could be explained solely by mixing Sr from water/rock interactions (the rainwater after run-off, basalts and carbonate weathering) without involving any other process. As no carbonate outcrops occur in the area, the carbonate end-member is allocated to the use of Ca-amendment. Lithium contents in the water fluctuate significantly and δ7Li are extremely variable reaching values up to +12267deg;. This extremely enriched 7Li signature of the groundwaters was explained by an external input due to Ca-amendment, used in local agriculture. The main results are that at least three strong groundwater fluxes with distinct chemical and isotopic signatures supply water to the peatland and water volume flowing out is almost negligible as low δ7Li are observed in the stream draining the area. We therefore applied B isotopes to complement the investigation of δ7Li. The δ11B values

  20. Pb Isotopes as Tracers of Weathering in Glacial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. E.; Deuerling, K. M.; Scribner, C. A.; Martin, J. B.; Clements, K.

    2013-12-01

    Incongruent chemical weathering of freshly exposed continental material produces weathering solutions with Sr and Pb isotopic values that are distinctly more radiogenic than the parent material. As soils age, weathering becomes more congruent and the isotopic ratio in the solution approaches the composition of parent material. In light of this response, rapid increases in seawater Pb isotopes in the North Atlantic over the last deglacial have been attributed to incongruent weathering of fine grained glacial sediment exposed as the ice sheet retreated. This theory has not been tested using modern glacial river systems due to concerns about contamination by anthropogenic Pb. In this study we analyzed Pb isotopes from: 1) leachates of moraine material, 2) bedload and river water samples along a proglacial river, and 3) sediment and water samples from closed basin lakes in deglaciated terrains, from the Kangerlussuaq region of western Greenland. As expected, 0.1N HCl leachates of moraine soils exhibit 206,207,208Pb/204Pb ratios that are more radiogenic than the bulk soil. Samples from a Little Ice Age moraine close to the Russell Glacier exhibit greater offsets between the leachate and bulk soil Pb isotopes than samples from Orkendalen moraines (6.8 ka), which also record a slightly greater offset than Umivit-Keglen moraines (7.3 ka). Proglacial Watson (Akuliarusuarsuup Kuua) River water samples collected closest to the Russell Glacier also record the most radiogenic Pb isotopes and the largest increase relative to bedload values. Bedload 206Pb/204Pb ratios along the 40 km length of the proglacial river are 14.7+/0.6. Values for all water samples are distinctly more radiogenic than bedload, with the highest value (18.02) closest to the glacier and a general decreasing trend to ~15.82 farthest from the glacier. For comparison to anthropogenic Pb isotopes, 206Pb/207Pb ratios are 1.00+/-.03 for bedload, with water values ranging from 1.18 to 1.06 in a decreasing trend

  1. Application of Stable Isotope-Assisted Metabolomics for Cell Metabolism Studies

    PubMed Central

    You, Le; Zhang, Baichen; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2014-01-01

    The applications of stable isotopes in metabolomics have facilitated the study of cell metabolisms. Stable isotope-assisted metabolomics requires: (1) properly designed tracer experiments; (2) stringent sampling and quenching protocols to minimize isotopic alternations; (3) efficient metabolite separations; (4) high resolution mass spectrometry to resolve overlapping peaks and background noises; and (5) data analysis methods and databases to decipher isotopic clusters over a broad m/z range (mass-to-charge ratio). This paper overviews mass spectrometry based techniques for precise determination of metabolites and their isotopologues. It also discusses applications of isotopic approaches to track substrate utilization, identify unknown metabolites and their chemical formulas, measure metabolite concentrations, determine putative metabolic pathways, and investigate microbial community populations and their carbon assimilation patterns. In addition, 13C-metabolite fingerprinting and metabolic models can be integrated to quantify carbon fluxes (enzyme reaction rates). The fluxome, in combination with other “omics” analyses, may give systems-level insights into regulatory mechanisms underlying gene functions. More importantly, 13C-tracer experiments significantly improve the potential of low-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for broad-scope metabolism studies. We foresee the isotope-assisted metabolomics to be an indispensable tool in industrial biotechnology, environmental microbiology, and medical research. PMID:24957020

  2. Positional Enrichment by Proton Analysis (PEPA): A One‐Dimensional 1H‐NMR Approach for 13C Stable Isotope Tracer Studies in Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Aivio, Suvi; Capellades, Jordi; Gómez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau; Stracker, Travis H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A novel metabolomics approach for NMR‐based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of 13C‐satellite peaks using 1D‐1H‐NMR spectra. In comparison with 13C‐NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of 13C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high‐throughput of 1H‐NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D‐NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts. PMID:28220994

  3. Positional Enrichment by Proton Analysis (PEPA): A One-Dimensional (1) H-NMR Approach for (13) C Stable Isotope Tracer Studies in Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Vinaixa, Maria; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Aivio, Suvi; Capellades, Jordi; Gómez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau; Stracker, Travis H; Yanes, Oscar

    2017-03-20

    A novel metabolomics approach for NMR-based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of (13) C-satellite peaks using 1D-(1) H-NMR spectra. In comparison with (13) C-NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of (13) C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high-throughput of (1) H-NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D-NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts.

  4. Argon isotopes as tracers for martian atmospheric loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slipski, Marek; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2016-07-01

    Recent measurements of the present-day Ar abundance and isotopic ratios in the martian atmosphere by the SAM instrument suite onboard the Curiosity rover can be used to constrain the atmospheric and volatile evolution. We have examined the role of volcanic outgassing, escape to space via sputtering, crustal erosion, impact delivery, and impact erosion in reproducing the Ar isotope ratios from an initial state 4.4 billion years ago. To investigate the effects of each of these processes, their timing, and their intensity we have modeled exchanges of Ar isotopes between various reservoirs (mantle, crust, atmosphere, etc.) throughout Mars' history. Furthermore, we use present-day atmospheric measurements to determine the parameter space consistent with observations. We find that significant loss to space (at least 48% of atmospheric 36Ar) is required to match the observed 36Ar/38Ar ratio. Our estimates of volcanic outgassing do not supply sufficient 40Ar to the atmosphere to match observations, so in our model at least 31% of 40Ar produced in the crust must have also been released to the atmosphere. Of the total 40Ar introduced into the atmosphere about 25% must have been lost to space. By adding the present-day isotopic abundances with our results of total integrated Ar loss we find a "restored" value of atmospheric 40Ar/36Ar, which represents what that ratio would be if the total integrated Ar loss had remained in the atmosphere. We determine the restored value to be ∼900-1500. This is below the present martian atmospheric value (1900 ± 300), but 3-5 times greater than the terrestrial value.

  5. Nitrite isotopes as tracers of marine N cycle processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-11-01

    Nitrite (NO2-) is a key intermediate in the marine nitrogen (N) cycle. It is produced and consumed throughout the ocean by the dominant processes driving the distribution, availability and speciation of N. However, the accumulation of nitrite is typically confined to depths near the base of the sunlit euphotic zone and in oxygen-deficient zones. These features are known as the primary and secondary nitrite maximum (PNM and SNM), respectively. The processes controlling nitrite accumulation in these features are not fully understood, but are thought to depend on the microbial community composition and its response to environmental conditions. A variety of approaches have been applied to understanding these features since their discovery, with the stable N and oxygen (O) isotope measurements of nitrite being added to this toolkit most recently. Large variations in nitrite N isotope ratios (15N/14N) and dramatic depletions in 15N contrast with more consistent nitrite O isotope ratios (18O/16O) in the SNM. These signals provide unique information about the mechanisms of nitrite consumption in the SNM. By contrast, nitrite in the PNM shows less variation in 15N/14N, but variations in 18O/16O that provide insight into the mechanisms and rates of N cycling there. This review presents a synthesis of nitrite isotope measurements in the marine environment, highlighting the insights that have been gained from these measurements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  6. Stable isotope tracer analysis in isolated mitochondria from mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Andrzejewski, Sylvia; Avizonis, Daina; St-Pierre, Julie

    2014-04-10

    Mitochondria are a focal point in metabolism, given that they play fundamental roles in catabolic, as well as anabolic reactions. Alterations in mitochondrial functions are often studied in whole cells, and metabolomics experiments using 13C-labeled substrates, coupled with mass isotopomer distribution analyses, represent a powerful approach to study global changes in cellular metabolic activities. However, little is known regarding the assessment of metabolic activities in isolated mitochondria using this technology. Studies on isolated mitochondria permit the evaluation of whether changes in cellular metabolic activities are due to modifications in the intrinsic properties of the mitochondria. Here, we present a streamlined approach to accurately determine 13C, as well as 12C enrichments in isolated mitochondria from mammalian tissues or cultured cells by GC/MS. We demonstrate the relevance of this experimental approach by assessing the effects of drugs perturbing mitochondrial functions on the mass isotopomer enrichment of metabolic intermediates. Furthermore, we investigate 13C and 12C enrichments in mitochondria isolated from cancer cells given the emerging role of metabolic alterations in supporting tumor growth. This original method will provide a very sensitive tool to perform metabolomics studies on isolated mitochondria.

  7. Mass-dependent Mo isotope variations in oceanic basalts - a new tracer for mantle recycling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willbold, M.; Freymuth, H.; Hibbert, K.; Lai, Y. J.; Elliott, T.

    2016-12-01

    How and to what extent crustal material is recycled into the deeper mantle as a result of plate tectonic processes is a long-standing but still not fully understood question in Earth Sciences. Indirect evidence from chemical as well as radiogenic isotope data in oceanic basalts suggest that such a process may indeed have operated over much of Earth's history. Yet, uncertainties in characterising the age of the presumed recycled crustal components as well as the wide range in their chemical composition do not allow us to verify the mantle recycling hypothesis. Technological advances now enable us to explore new isotopic tracers that could shed light on this question. One of these new tools are mass-dependent isotope variation of molybdenum (Mo). Mass-dependent Mo isotope data in clastic and chemical sediments are a well-established geochemical tool to study redox conditions in the Earth's water masses over the geological past [1, 2, 3]. Being an intrinsic property of rocks exposed to the hydrosphere (see Anbar [4] for an overview), mass-dependent Mo isotope variation in mantle-derived rocks from oceanic settings could therefore be used a tracer of recycled crustal material in the Earth's mantle. In this contribution we provide a current overview over how different geological and magmatic processes - such as seawater alteration of oceanic crust, slab dehydration during plate subduction as well as magmatic emplacement - could affect the Mo isotopic composition of crustal components being transferred into the deeper mantle, as well as that of mantle melts that may contain such a recycled component. With this in mind, we explore the use of mass-dependent Mo isotope variations in mantle-derived rocks as a tracer of recycled crust in the mantle. [1] Archer & Vance (2008) Nature Geoscience 1, 597-600. [2] Barling et al. (2001) EPSL 193, 447-457. [3] Siebert et al. (2003) EPSL 211, 159-171. [4] Anbar (2004) Rev. Min. Geochem. 55, 429-454.

  8. Microanalytical isotope ratio measurements and elemental mapping using laser ablation ICP-MS for tissue thin sections: zinc tracer studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Urgast, Dagmar S; Ou, Ou; Gordon, Margaret-Jane; Raab, Andrea; Nixon, Graeme F; Kwun, In-Sook; Beattie, John H; Feldmann, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of zinc absorption, metabolism and excretion is extensively studied by nutritionists. Stable isotopes of zinc can be used to identify body zinc compartments that have different turnover kinetics. Since the compartments might belong to physiological subsections of different organs, there is a need for microsampling analysis to determine isotope ratios of the trace element zinc in tissue samples. Here, we study the feasibility to use laser ablation coupled to quadrupole ICP-MS for the determination of zinc tracers given to rats at different time points with the aim to generate isotope ratio bioimages of heart tissue. A double tracer ((70)Zn and (67)Zn) experiment with rats was designed to label the exchangeable zinc pool as well as the stable zinc pool. The isotope ratios determined by laser ablation ICP-MS were evaluated by additional measurements of tissue digests. Accumulated tracers which made up more than 0.1% of total zinc could be identified in the tissues of the treated rats. It was established that at least 50 measurements from the microsampling were necessary to distinguish between controls and a tracer treated rat resulting in reduced resolution of the bioimage. With the parameters used, features in the tissue thin sections of at least 250 μm(2) in size are necessary to detect the incorporation of a tracer. When different time points have to be measured, higher precisions are required and therefore a larger area needs to be ablated (1 mm(2)). Using the bioimages and pool measurements from one physiological feature, it was possible to show that the aorta cell walls incorporate the zinc tracer at the different time points.

  9. Stable isotopes in alpine precipitation as tracers of atmospheric deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiuta, V. L.; Lafreniere, M. J.; Kyser, T. K.; Norman, A. L.; Mayer, B.; Wieser, M.

    2010-12-01

    Alpine ecosystems, which are generally nutrient poor and exist under extreme climatic conditions, are particularly sensitive to environmental and climatic stressors. Studies in the USA Rocky Mountains and European Alps have shown that alpine terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are particularly sensitive to enhanced deposition of reactive nitrogen and can show ecologically destructive responses at relatively low levels of nitrogen deposition. However, there is no base line for atmospheric deposition of natural and anthropogenic contaminants in the Canadian alpine. Preliminary results of isotopic and chemical analyses of precipitation from an elevational transect on a glaciated alpine site in the Canadian Rockies are presented. Precipitation accumulating from early autumn through to spring (2008/2009 and 2009/2010) was sampled by means of seasonal snow cover on alpine glaciers. Summer precipitation was sampled through July and August 2010 using bulk collectors installed at the sites of winter sampling. The isotope ratios of dissolved sulphate (δ34S, δ18O), nitrogen (δ15N, δ18O), as well as precipitation (δ2H, δ18O) are utilized in addition to major ion concentrations and trace metal concentrations. Results from 2008/2009 snowpack samples indicate a strong seasonal trend in sulphate (SO42-) and nitrogen (NO3-) deposition which is consistent across the altitudinal transect. Snow horizons representing early autumn and spring precipitation show higher SO42- and NO3- concentrations in contrast to lower concentrations in winter horizons. The aforementioned suite of isotopic and chemical analyses are used to investigate the variability in dominant geographic source regions for atmospheric SO42- and NO3- (local, regional, or long range transported contaminants), as well as to identify contributions from the major biogeochemical source types (e.g. hydrocarbon combustion, lithogenic dust, agricultural emissions).

  10. Isotopic Tracers of Methane in Wetlands and Landfill Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanton, J.; Abichou, T.; Hater, G.

    2006-12-01

    Isotopic characterization is useful for determining variation in methane production mechanism and oxidation. In landfills, the quantity of methane oxidized is one of the largest uncertainties. The extent of methane oxidation can be constrained by measurements of methane within the production zone and captured escaping from the surface of the cover soil. The shift in d13C and dD of methane in these two pools is proportional to the degree of methane oxidation. This approach can be employed in wetlands and rice fields, but it is complicated by the greater complexities of gas transport processes which fractionation methane according to its isotopic composition. For determination of production mechanism, use of d13C is uncontroversial. However, there is disagreement between the results of field studies and laboratory incubation studies concerning the interpretation of dD of CH4. A compilation of field studies will be presented to help resolve this matter. Finally, the natural abundance of radiocarbon can be used to determine the sources of organic matter which fuel microbial respiration. Evidence of differences between wetland types will be presented.

  11. Simple isotopic method using oral stable or radioactive tracers for estimating fractional calcium absorption in adult women.

    PubMed

    Lee, W H; McCabe, G P; Martin, B R; Weaver, C M

    2011-06-01

    We extended a simple oral method for estimating fractional calcium absorption determined by double isotopic methods using radioactive or stable isotope across wide age of adult women. Fractional calcium absorption can be estimated by using either a radioactive or stable oral isotope across the entire age spectrum of adult women. A method for estimating fractional calcium absorption using a single serum collection following a single oral radioactive isotopic tracer has been validated against a classical double isotopic tracer ratio method in adults. Our goal was to extend this simplified method to include use of stable isotopes and a broad age range. We used our database of 56 observations from 26 white adult women aged 19-67 years receiving either radioactive or stable isotopes. Reference values for fractional calcium absorption were determined from 24-h double isotopic ratios in serum and urine and from full kinetic modeling. Equations for estimating fractional calcium absorption were developed from isotopic enrichment in serum and urine from an oral tracer and measures of body size using the multiple linear regression analysis. Equations using a 4- to 6-h sample following an oral dose of either a stable or radioactive isotope corrected for body size were highly correlated with the reference values for fractional calcium absorption across different aged populations (r > 0.8, p < 0.001). Fractional calcium absorption can be estimated by a single oral tracer method using either radioactive or stable calcium isotopes across the entire age spectrum in healthy white adult women.

  12. Isotopic tracers of gold deposition in Paleozoic limestones, southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Z.E.; Widmann, B.L.; Marshall, B.D.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Futa, K.; Mahan, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Strontium isotopic analyses of barren and mineralized Paleozoic carbonate rocks show that hydrothermal fluids added radiogenic strontium (87Sr) to the mineralized zones. At Bare Mountain, samples collected from mineralized areas have ??87Srt values (per mil deviation from primary marine values) ranging from +3.0 to +23.0 (mean of this log-normal distribution is +7.0), whereas unmineralized carbonate rocks have ??87Srt values of -0.6 to +2.9 (mean of +1.07??1.03). In other ranges (Striped Hills, Spring Mountains, and ranges in the vicinity of Indian Springs Valley), ??87Srt values of the unmineralized carbonate rocks are even lower and virtually indistinguishable from primary marine values. This correlation of elevated ??87Srt values with mineralized zones provided a useful technique for assessing the mineral potential of the Paleozoic basement beneath Yucca Mountain, and may find broader use in mineral exploration in the Basin and Range province as a whole.

  13. Isotopes as tracers of the sources of the lunar material and processes of lunar origin.

    PubMed

    Pahlevan, Kaveh

    2014-09-13

    Ever since the Apollo programme, isotopic abundances have been used as tracers to study lunar formation, in particular to study the sources of the lunar material. In the past decade, increasingly precise isotopic data have been reported that give strong indications that the Moon and the Earth's mantle have a common heritage. To reconcile these observations with the origin of the Moon via the collision of two distinct planetary bodies, it has been proposed (i) that the Earth-Moon system underwent convective mixing into a single isotopic reservoir during the approximately 10(3) year molten disc epoch after the giant impact but before lunar accretion, or (ii) that a high angular momentum impact injected a silicate disc into orbit sourced directly from the mantle of the proto-Earth and the impacting planet in the right proportions to match the isotopic observations. Recently, it has also become recognized that liquid-vapour fractionation in the energetic aftermath of the giant impact is capable of generating measurable mass-dependent isotopic offsets between the silicate Earth and Moon, rendering isotopic measurements sensitive not only to the sources of the lunar material, but also to the processes accompanying lunar origin. Here, we review the isotopic evidence that the silicate-Earth-Moon system represents a single planetary reservoir. We then discuss the development of new isotopic tracers sensitive to processes in the melt-vapour lunar disc and how theoretical calculations of their behaviour and sample observations can constrain scenarios of post-impact evolution in the earliest history of the Earth-Moon system.

  14. Elucidating Water Contamination by Fracturing Fluids and Formation Waters from Gas Wells: Integrating Isotopic and Geochemical Tracers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The objective of this presentation is to evaluate the potential and applicability of different geochemical and isotopic tracers for tracing the impacts of fracturing fluids and co-produced waters on water resources.

  15. Use of tracers and isotopes to evaluate vulnerability of water in domestic wells to septic waste

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Fetterman, G.S.; Meyer, M.J.; Bullen, T.; Sebree, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    In Nebraska, a large number (>200) of shallow sand-point and cased wells completed in coarse alluvial sediments along rivers and lakes still are used to obtain drinking water for human consumption, even though construction of sand-point wells for consumptive uses has been banned since 1987. The quality of water from shallow domestic wells potentially vulnerable to seepage from septic systems was evaluated by analyzing for the presence of tracers and multiple isotopes. Samples were collected from 26 sand-point and perforated, cased domestic wells and were analyzed for bacteria, coliphages, nitrogen species, nitrogen and boron isotopes, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), prescription and nonprescription drugs, or organic waste water contaminants. At least 13 of the 26 domestic well samples showed some evidence of septic system effects based on the results of several tracers including DOC, coliphages, NH4+, NO3-, N2, ?? 15N[NO3-] and boron isotopes, and antibiotics and other drugs. Sand-point wells within 30 m of a septic system and <14 m deep in a shallow, thin aquifer had the most tracers detected and the highest values, indicating the greatest vulnerability to contamination from septic waste. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  16. Matching isotopic distributions from metabolically labeled samples.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Sean; Page, David; Huttlin, Edward L; Sussman, Michael R

    2008-07-01

    In recent years stable isotopic labeling has become a standard approach for quantitative proteomic analyses. Among the many available isotopic labeling strategies, metabolic labeling is attractive for the excellent internal control it provides. However, analysis of data from metabolic labeling experiments can be complicated because the spacing between labeled and unlabeled forms of each peptide depends on its sequence, and is thus variable from analyte to analyte. As a result, one generally needs to know the sequence of a peptide to identify its matching isotopic distributions in an automated fashion. In some experimental situations it would be necessary or desirable to match pairs of labeled and unlabeled peaks from peptides of unknown sequence. This article addresses this largely overlooked problem in the analysis of quantitative mass spectrometry data by presenting an algorithm that not only identifies isotopic distributions within a mass spectrum, but also annotates matches between natural abundance light isotopic distributions and their metabolically labeled counterparts. This algorithm is designed in two stages: first we annotate the isotopic peaks using a modified version of the IDM algorithm described last year; then we use a probabilistic classifier that is supplemented by dynamic programming to find the metabolically labeled matched isotopic pairs. Such a method is needed for high-throughput quantitative proteomic metabolomic experiments measured via mass spectrometry. The primary result of this article is that the dynamic programming approach performs well given perfect isotopic distribution annotations. Our algorithm achieves a true positive rate of 99% and a false positive rate of 1% using perfect isotopic distribution annotations. When the isotopic distributions are annotated given 'expert' selected peaks, the same algorithm gets a true positive rate of 77% and a false positive rate of 1%. Finally, when annotating using machine selected peaks, which

  17. Matching isotopic distributions from metabolically labeled samples

    PubMed Central

    McIlwain, Sean; Page, David; Huttlin, Edward L.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: In recent years stable isotopic labeling has become a standard approach for quantitative proteomic analyses. Among the many available isotopic labeling strategies, metabolic labeling is attractive for the excellent internal control it provides. However, analysis of data from metabolic labeling experiments can be complicated because the spacing between labeled and unlabeled forms of each peptide depends on its sequence, and is thus variable from analyte to analyte. As a result, one generally needs to know the sequence of a peptide to identify its matching isotopic distributions in an automated fashion. In some experimental situations it would be necessary or desirable to match pairs of labeled and unlabeled peaks from peptides of unknown sequence. This article addresses this largely overlooked problem in the analysis of quantitative mass spectrometry data by presenting an algorithm that not only identifies isotopic distributions within a mass spectrum, but also annotates matches between natural abundance light isotopic distributions and their metabolically labeled counterparts. This algorithm is designed in two stages: first we annotate the isotopic peaks using a modified version of the IDM algorithm described last year; then we use a probabilistic classifier that is supplemented by dynamic programming to find the metabolically labeled matched isotopic pairs. Such a method is needed for high-throughput quantitative proteomic metabolomic experiments measured via mass spectrometry. Results: The primary result of this article is that the dynamic programming approach performs well given perfect isotopic distribution annotations. Our algorithm achieves a true positive rate of 99% and a false positive rate of 1% using perfect isotopic distribution annotations. When the isotopic distributions are annotated given ‘expert’ selected peaks, the same algorithm gets a true positive rate of 77% and a false positive rate of 1%. Finally, when annotating using

  18. Sources and Residence Times of Groundwater in Shasta County, CA Determined by Isotopic Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E.; Moran, J. E.; Deinhart, A.; Roberts, S. K.; Esser, B.; Visser, A.

    2015-12-01

    Large-volume springs are a significant source of water to communities in Shasta County. Aquifers in this region are developed in young volcanic formations and the age and flow of groundwater is not well characterized, making predicting the impact of drought and climate change on spring flow difficult. To better understand the water resources and the hydrogeology of the region and to better constrain the age of water produced by springs, we have sampled water from wells, springs, and streams for a suite of geochemical and isotopic tracers. We are using isotopic tracers because of the limited number of sampling points over a large area, leaving traditional hydrogeologic methods such as water levels and pump tests inadequate for a regional study. We analyzed samples for sulfur-35 (87.4 day half-life) and found detections in two springs, confirming the presence of a fraction of recently (1-2 years) recharged groundwater. Tritium (12.3 year half-life) activities show that some wells produce water recharged more than 5 decades ago, but most produce more recently recharged water. We will also report results for sodium-22 (2.6 year half-life), krypton-85 (10.8 year half-life), carbon-14 (5,730 year half-life), dissolved noble gases, stable isotopes of water, and helium isotopic composition. These isotopes are applied to determine the age (residence time) of groundwater over a broad age distribution, from less than one year to tens of thousands of years. These tracers should also provide information on aquifer volumes, help delineate groundwater flow, and help to identify recharge areas. A collection of groundwater ages from springs at high elevations to wells in the upper Sacramento Valley will help delineate groundwater flowpaths. Finally, groundwater residence times will help determine groundwater volume and recharge rates, and resolve questions related to drought vulnerability and effective adjustments in water resource management.

  19. Regularized image reconstruction algorithms for dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging using a cross-tracer prior.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Cheng, Lishui; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Frey, Eric C

    2011-06-01

    In simultaneous dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging, data are simultaneously acquired to determine the distributions of two radioactive isotopes. The goal of this work was to develop penalized maximum likelihood (PML) algorithms for a novel cross-tracer prior that exploits the fact that the two images reconstructed from simultaneous dual-isotope MPS projection data are perfectly registered in space. We first formulated the simultaneous dual-isotope MPS reconstruction problem as a joint estimation problem. A cross-tracer prior that couples voxel values on both images was then proposed. We developed an iterative algorithm to reconstruct the MPS images that converges to the maximum a posteriori solution for this prior based on separable surrogate functions. To accelerate the convergence, we developed a fast algorithm for the cross-tracer prior based on the complete data OS-EM (COSEM) framework. The proposed algorithm was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to a single-tracer version of the prior that did not include the cross-tracer term. Quantitative evaluations included comparisons of mean and standard deviation images as well as assessment of image fidelity using the mean square error. We also evaluated the cross tracer prior using a three-class observer study with respect to the three-class MPS diagnostic task, i.e., classifying patients as having either no defect, reversible defect, or fixed defects. For this study, a comparison with conventional ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction with postfiltering was performed. The comparisons to the single-tracer prior demonstrated similar resolution for areas of the image with large intensity changes and reduced noise in uniform regions. The cross-tracer prior was also superior to the single-tracer version in terms of restoring image fidelity. Results of the three-class observer study showed that the proposed cross-tracer prior and the convergent algorithms improved the

  20. Rare-earth isotopes as tracers of particulate emissions: An urban scale test. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ondov, J.M.; Kelly, W.R.; Holland, J.Z.; Lin, Z.C.; Wight, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The particulate emissions of a 100 MW(e) coal-fired power plant were successfully tagged with enriched rare-earth isotopes on three occasions during the month of August, 1988. On 28 August, an 8-hour release was made using 94% isotopically pure 148Nd injected at a rate of 61 mg/hr and 14 ambient aerosol samples collected along a 72 degree arc 20-km distant from the plant were analyzed by pulse-counting thermal-ionization mass spectrometry for excess 148Nd and naturally-occurring (total) Nd background. The results were in good agreement with Gaussian plume model predictions. We conclude that the experiment and preliminary results successfully demonstrate the feasibility of using an enriched rare-earth isotopes as tracers of emissions from coal-fired power plants. The large signal-to-noise ratios achieved here are sufficient for tracing particles over much larger distances.

  1. Turnover of Stable Isotopes Due to Growth and Metabolism in Zebrafish, Danio Rerio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboush, R.; MacAvoy, S.; Macko, S.; Connaughton, V.

    2002-05-01

    Stable isotope ratios of carbon (13C/12C), nitrogen (15 N/14N) and sulfur (34S/32S) in animal tissues can be used as tracers of the nutrient sources of organisms' diets and determining trophic interactions in ecosystems. The isotopic turnover of these elements in a predator's tissues reflects the isotopic signature of the predator's diet (the prey). The rate at which an organism takes up the isotopic signature of its food is correlated with its growth rate and/or metabolism. Hence unless baseline isotopic turnover rates are known, the isotopic signature of a consumer may lead to misinterpretation of predator-prey relationships. Laboratory studies provide isotopic turnover rates of organisms under controlled conditions, which serve as models for understanding the rates at which organisms in the field isotopically incorporate new diets. This study examines the isotopic turnover rates of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in response to a dietary switch in young zebrafish, Danio rerio. Zebrafish, raised on commercial fish food (8.2 ñ 0.5%, d34S; were fed a new, isotopically distinct diet (2.9 ñ 0.5%, d34S) and the rate at which zebra fish muscle tissues changed towards the isotopic signature of their new food was monitored. Preliminary results show a change in the fish sulfur isotope composition of roughly 0.03% per day towards the sulfur isotope ratio of the new food. At the observed turnover rate, approximately 180 days would be required for the zebrafish muscle tissue to resemble a new food. The study is also investigating the importance of growth versus metabolism as a predictor of isotope turnover rate in zebra fish tissues.

  2. Radiogenic Nd and Pb Isotopes as Tracers in North Carolina Estuaries: Preliminary Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benninger, L. K.; Coleman, D. S.; Miller, B. V.

    2002-05-01

    Most estuaries of eastern North America behave as efficient particle traps. Except during extreme river floods, landward flows in bottom water suffice to retain terrigenous particles. Indeed, chemical and mineralogical tracers in estuarine sediments are commonly interpreted as reflecting capture of particles from the continental shelf. We present preliminary data to test the utility of Nd and Pb isotopes as tracers of sediment provenance in North Carolina's Neuse River estuary and Pamlico Sound. Surface sediments (0-2 cm) from the Neuse estuary (5 samples) and Pamlico Sound (2 samples) were totally dissolved for analysis. Nd and Pb concentrations and isotopic compositions were determined by TIMS. Within the Neuse estuary, the two most landward samples have the same Nd-isotopic composition [ɛ Nd(0) = -8.3]. Proceeding down-estuary, ɛ Nd(0) decreases monotonically to -11.3, and the two Pamlico Sound samples have indistinguishable compositions (-11.7, -11.8). While four samples from the estuary define a simple mixing trend \\{ɛ Nd(0) vs 1/[Nd]\\}, neither the most landward sample nor the Pamlico Sound samples fall on this trend. Thus there are probably more than two isotopically distinct Nd sources. Miocene and younger phosphorites from the Coastal Plain [ɛ Nd(0) -5.9 to -7.4] probably do not contribute significantly. Pb isotopes provide no source discrimination. While Pb concentrations vary from about 20 to 70 ppm (highest in upper estuary), 206Pb/207Pb is essentially constant (1.2024-1.2041). Based upon similar ratios in both modern and pre-Colonial sediments from Chesapeake Bay (Marcantonio et al, Marine Chemistry, in press), isotopic compositions of natural and recent contaminant Pb may fortuitously coincide in the Neuse estuary and Pamlico Sound.

  3. Dominant controls on catchment hydrological functions: what can we learn from biological and isotopic tracers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, L.; Klaus, J.; Wetzel, C. E.; Stewart, M. K.; McDonnell, J.; Martinez Carreras, N.

    2014-12-01

    One emerging and important control on catchment hydrological functions of water storage, mixing and release is bedrock geology. Until today, catchment-based work has been limited by small ranges of rock types in adjacent basins. Moreover, conventional hydrological tracer approaches suffer from limitations inherent to the large storages related to certain bedrock types (e.g. the damping of stable isotope tracer signatures in deep storage catchments and obliteration of output signals at larger spatial scales). Here, we show how a multi-tracer approach, based on terrestrial diatoms and different stable and radioactive isotopic tracers can help refining our understanding of the dominant controls on catchment hydrological functions, especially the role of bedrock geology. We present new data and results from a nested catchment set-up, located in the Alzette River basin in Luxembourg (Europe). These 16 catchments (with sizes ranging from 0.47 to 285 km2) are characterized by clean and mixed assemblages of geology and land use. We have monitored these systems since 2002, including meteorological variables (precipitation, air temperature, etc.), as well as 15 minute discharge. Additional parameters have been monitored bi-weekly and at the event time scale, including geochemical and isotopic (3H, D, 18O) tracers, as well as terrestrial diatom communities in streamwater. Our results show that water balance derived dynamic storage significantly differs across the 16 catchments and scales. Catchment mixing potential inferred from standard deviations in stream baseflow ∂D (as a proxy for the damping of isotopic signatures in precipitation), as well as tritium-derived baseflow transit times, both exhibit a significant spatial variability, but strong correlation to bedrock pemeability. Terrestrial diatom assemblages in streamwater, as a proxy for rapid flow pathway connectedness to the stream network, are highly variable across the study catchments but also show strong

  4. Quantifying nutrient sources in an upland catchment using multiple chemical and isotopic tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; Boyer, E. W.; Shanley, J. B.; Doctor, D. H.; Kendall, C.; Aiken, G. R.

    2006-12-01

    To explore processes that control the temporal variation of nutrients in surface waters, we measured multiple environmental tracers at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, an upland catchment in northeastern Vermont, USA. Using a set of high-frequency stream water samples, we quantified the variation of nutrients over a range of stream flow conditions with chemical and isotopic tracers of water, nitrate, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Stream water concentrations of nitrogen (predominantly in the forms of nitrate and dissolved organic nitrogen) and DOC reflected mixing of water contributed from distinct sources in the forested landscape. Water isotopic signatures and end-member mixing analysis revealed when solutes entered the stream from these sources and that the sources were linked to the stream by preferential shallow subsurface and overland flow paths. Results from the tracers indicated that freshly-leached, terrestrial organic matter was the overwhelming source of high DOC concentrations in stream water. In contrast, in this region where atmospheric nitrogen deposition is chronically elevated, the highest concentrations of stream nitrate were attributable to atmospheric sources that were transported via melting snow and rain fall. These findings are consistent with a conceptual model of the landscape in which coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes interact to control stream solute variability over time.

  5. You are not always what we think you eat: selective assimilation across multiple whole-stream isotopic tracer studies

    Treesearch

    W. K. Dodds; S. M. Collins; S. K. Hamilton; J. L. Tank; S. Johnson; J. R. Webster; K. S. Simon; M. R. Whiles; H. M. Rantala; W. H. McDowell; S. D. Peterson; T. Riis; C. L. Crenshaw; S. A. Thomas; P. B. Kristensen; B. M. Cheever; A. S. Flecker; N. A. Griffiths; T. Crowl; E. J. Rosi-Marshall; R. El-Sabaawi; E. Martí

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of 21 15N stable isotope tracer experiments, designed to examine food web dynamics in streams around the world, indicated that the isotopic composition of food resources assimilated by primary consumers (mostly invertebrates) poorly reflected the presumed food sources. Modeling indicated that consumers assimilated only 33–50% of the N...

  6. Limitations of the isotopic composition of nitrates as a tracer of their origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Mayer, Bernhard; Otero, Neus; Sebilo, Mathieu; Gooddy, Daren; Lapworth, Dan; Surridge, Ben; Petelet Giraud, Emmanuelle; Flehoc, Christine; Baran, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen and oxygen isotopes are traditionally considered and frequently used as tracers of nitrate sources in watersheds used for drinking water production. The enrichment of synthetic nitrate-containing fertilizers in 18O due to the contribution of atmospheric oxygen in the production process confers a specific isotopic fingerprint to mineral fertilizers. In spite of the still widespread use on nitrate-containing synthetic fertilizers, their characteristic N and O isotope signatures are rarely unambiguously observed in nitrate-contaminated groundwater. We postulate, in line with Mengis et al. (2001), that fertilizer-derived nitrate is not directly and rapidly transferred to groundwater but rather retained in the soil-plant system as organic N and then mineralized and re-oxidized (termed the mineralization-immobilization turnover, MIT) thereby re-setting the oxygen isotope composition of nitrate and also changing its N isotope ratios. We show examples from watersheds on diverse alluvial/clastic and carbonate aquifers in eastern and northern France where, in spite of the use of mineral fertilizers, evidenced also through other isotopic tracers (boron isotopes), both N and O-isotope ratios are very homogeneous and compatible with nitrification of ammonium where 2/3 of oxygen is derived from soil water and 1/3 from atmospheric O2. These field data are corroborated by lysimeter data from Canada. Even if in areas where ammonium is derived from chemical fertilizers, N values still tend to be lower than in areas where ammonium is derived from manure/sewage, this is clearly a limitation to the dual isotope method (N, O) for nitrate source identification, but has important implications for the nitrogen mobility and residence time in soils amended with synthetic fertilizers (Sebilo et al., 2013). Mengis M., Walther U., Bernasconi S. M., Wehrli B. (2001) Limitations of Using δ18O for the Source Identification of Nitrate in Agricultural Soils. Environmental Science

  7. Tracing wastewater effluents in surface and groundwaters: a couple approach with organic/inorganic tracers and isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Baran, Nicole; Soulier, Coralie

    2017-04-01

    In the context of land use change, the origins of contamination of water resources are often multiple, including for a single chemical element or molecule. For instance, excess of nitrates in both surface and groundwater can originate from agricultural practices and wastewater effluents. The discrimination of the origins and vectors of contamination in the environment is both an environmental and societal issue in order to define an integrated water resources management at the catchment or water body scale by implementing appropriate measures to effectively struggle against pollution. The objective of this study is to define a methodology for the identification of a "domestic wastewater" contamination within surface waters and groundwater. An ideal tracer should be conservative, persistent in the different water compartments, present in quantity above the detection limit and originate from a single type of pollution source. There is, however, no ideal tracer in the strict sense. Indeed, even chloride which is present in quantity in wastewater, and which behaves conservatively in the environment, is not an univocal tracer of wastewater, as it may come from atmospheric inputs, from the dissolution of evaporitic rocks, from the salting of roads or from fertilizers. To overcome this limitation, in this study, we propose a multi-tracer approach (chemical and isotopic) to identify and validate the relevance of foreseen tracers. Among the relevant tracers of wastewater, the following may be used for their intrinsic or combined discriminant power: 1) organic effluent tracers: nitrogen contents and isotopic ratios of nitrogen and oxygen of nitrates; 2) tracer of detergents: boron contents and boron isotopes; 3) pharmaceuticals tracers: e.g. carbamazepine, ibuprofen, paracetamol, gadolinium anomaly; 4) life-style tracers: e.g. caffeine. The originality of the study relies on small capacities wastewater treatment plants without tertiary treatment process. Results on a

  8. Simultaneous Measurement of Tracer and Interdiffusion Coefficients: An Isotopic Phenomenological Diffusion Formalism for the Binary Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, Irina; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Sohn, Yong Ho; Murch, Prof. Graeme

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a new development of the classic Onsager phenomenological formalism is derived using relations based on linear response theory. The development concerns the correct description of the fluxes of the atomic isotopes. The resulting expressions in the laboratory frame are surprisingly simple and consist of terms coming from the standard interdiffusion expressions and from Fick s first law where the tracer diffusion coefficient is involved thus providing a better understanding of the relationship between the two approaches - Fick s first law and the Onsager phenomenological formalism. From an experimental application perspective, the new development is applied to the binary alloy case. The formalism provides the means to obtain the interdiffusion coefficient and tracer diffusion coefficients simultaneously from analysis of the interdiffusion concentration profiles in a single experiment.

  9. Synthesis of isotopically modified ZnO nanoparticles and their potential as nanotoxicity tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dybowska, A.D.; Croteau, M.-N.; Misra, S.K.; Berhanu, D.; Luoma, S.N.; Christian, P.; O'Brien, P.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of engineered nanoparticles in the environment and within organisms is perhaps the biggest obstacle to the safe development of nanotechnologies. Reliable tracing is a particular issue for nanoparticles such as ZnO, because Zn is an essential element and a common pollutant thus present at elevated background concentrations. We synthesized isotopically enriched (89.6%) with a rare isotope of Zn (67Zn) ZnO nanoparticles and measured the uptake of 67Zn by L. stagnalis exposed to diatoms amended with the particles. Stable isotope technique is sufficiently sensitive to determine the uptake of Zn at an exposure equivalent to lower concentration range (<15 ??g g-1). Without a tracer, detection of newly accumulated Zn is significant at Zn exposure concentration only above 5000 ??g g-1 which represents some of the most contaminated Zn conditions. Only by using a tracer we can study Zn uptake at a range of environmentally realistic exposure conditions. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemical and Isotopic Tracers of Groundwater Sustainability: an Overview of New Science Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullen, T.

    2002-12-01

    Groundwater sustainability is an emerging concept that is rapidly gaining attention from both scientists and water resource managers, particularly with regard to contamination and degradation of water quality in strategic aquifers. The sustainability of a groundwater resource is a complex function of its susceptibility to factors such as intrusion of poor-quality water from diverse sources, lack of sufficient recharge and reorganization of groundwater flowpaths in response to excessive abstraction. In theory the critical limit occurs when degradation becomes irreversible, such that remediative efforts may be fruitless on a reasonable human time scale. Chemical and isotopic tracers are proving to be especially useful tools for assessment of groundwater sustainability issues such as characterization of recharge, identification of potential sources, pathways and impacts of contaminants and prediction of how hydrology will change in response to excessive abstraction. A variety of relatively cost-efficient tracers are now available with which to assess the susceptibility of groundwater reserves to contamination from both natural and anthropogenic sources, and may provide valuable monitoring and regulatory tools for water resource managers. In this overview, the results of several ongoing groundwater studies by the U.S. Geological Survey will be discussed from the perspective of implications for new science directions for groundwater sustainability research that can benefit water policy development. A fundamental concept is that chemical and isotopic tracers used individually often provide ambiguous information, and are most effective when used in a rigorous "multi-tracer" context that considers the complex linkages between the hydrology, geology and biology of groundwater systems.

  11. Isotope Tracers To Study the Environmental Fate and Bioaccumulation of Metal-Containing Engineered Nanoparticles: Techniques and Applications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongguang; Tan, Zhiqiang; Hu, Ligang; Yu, Sujuan; Liu, Jingfu; Jiang, Guibin

    2017-03-08

    The rapidly growing applicability of metal-containing engineered nanoparticles (MENPs) has made their environmental fate, biouptake, and transformation important research topics. However, considering the relatively low concentration of MENPs and the high concentration of background metals in the environment and in organisms, tracking the fate of MENPs in environment-related scenarios remains a challenge. Intrinsic labeling of MENPs with radioactive or stable isotopes is a useful tool for the highly sensitive and selective detection of MENPs in the environment and organisms, thus enabling tracing of their transformation, uptake, distribution, and clearance. In this review, we focus on radioactive/stable isotope labeling of MENPs for their environmental and biological tracing. We summarize the advantages of intrinsic radioactive/stable isotopes for MENP labeling and discuss the considerations in labeling isotope selection and preparation of labeled MENPs, as well as exposure routes and detection of labeled MENPs. In addition, current practice in the use of radioactive/stable isotope labeling of MENPs to study their environmental fate and bioaccumulation is reviewed. Future perspectives and potential applications are also discussed, including imaging techniques for radioactive- and stable-isotope-labeled MENPs, hyphenated multistable isotope tracers with speciation analysis, and isotope fractionation as a MENP tracer. It is expected that this critical review could provide the necessary background information to further advance the applications of isotope tracers to study the environmental fate and bioaccumulation of MENPs.

  12. Barium stable isotopes in the global ocean: Tracer of Ba inputs and utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yu-Te; Henderson, Gideon M.

    2017-09-01

    Barium has been used as a biogeochemical tracer for alkalinity, productivity, and riverine inputs in the ocean, but its oceanic cycle remains poorly constrained. Barium stable isotope measurements may improve the use of Ba as a tracer and better constrain the cycling of Ba, but data are only available in limited regions of the oceans. In this study, we present dissolved seawater Ba isotopic compositions in a sample collection spanning the North Atlantic, South Atlantic, North Pacific and Southern Oceans. Compiled global upper-ocean [Ba] data show a relatively constant [Ba] (35-45 nM) in the near-surface waters throughout the global ocean, with the exception of areas near river inputs or strong upwelling. The relatively uniform distribution of [Ba] in the upper ocean seawater indicates that Ba removal is slow relative to supply and mixing, and implies that near-surface Ba isotope values are controlled by basin-scale balances rather than by regional or short-term processes. Seawater Ba isotopic compositions show a large variation of δ 138 / 134 Ba values ranging from 0.24 to 0.65‰, and a tight relationship with [Ba]. This global relationship can be simply modelled assuming a primary deep Southern Ocean source for Ba to yield a maximum isotope fractionation of α = 1.00058 ± 0.00010 (α =seawater 138/134Ba/particle 138/134Ba). This suggested isotope fractionation during Ba removal from seawater is larger than implied by laboratory measurement during barite formation, suggesting additional fractionating phases or a two-stage fractionation process. Riverine input from the Rio de la Plata to the South Atlantic has a signature of δ 138 / 134 Ba = - 0.06- 0.11 ‰, which is too light to explain the heavy values (>0.58‰) observed in the surface open ocean. Globally, the Ba isotope composition of the upper ocean waters is correlated with the fraction of Ba utilization at the basin scale (which varies from <15 to 70% at sites studied here). In the deep Atlantic Ocean

  13. A coupled isotope tracer method to characterize input water to lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yi; Brock, Bronwyn E.; Falcone, Matthew D.; Wolfe, Brent B.; Edwards, Thomas W. D.

    2008-02-01

    SummaryWe develop a new coupled isotope tracer method for characterizing the isotopic composition of input water to lakes, and apply it in the context of ongoing hydrological process studies in the Peace-Athabasca Delta, a large, remote, riparian ecosystem in the boreal region of western Canada. The region has a highly seasonal climate, with floodplain lakes typically receiving input only during the 4-6 month open-water season from varying proportions of spring snowmelt, summer rains and river flooding. These possible input sources have distinct ranges of isotopic compositions that are strongly constrained to a well-defined local meteoric water line, thus affording the opportunity to derive lake-specific estimates of the integrated isotopic composition of input waters after accounting for the effects of secondary evaporative isotopic enrichment. As shown by comparison of the results of isotopic surveys of delta lakes prior to freeze-up in 2000 and 2005, this isotopic characterization of input waters can be combined with other data and field observations to provide new insight into spatial and temporal variability in delta lake recharge processes. This includes evidence that summer rainfall in 2000 played an important role in replenishing shallow basins delta-wide, especially in the central low-lying region, compensating for below-average snow accumulation during the previous winter. In contrast, 2005 was marked by greater relative contributions from both snowmelt and river flooding because of high winter snow accumulation and a spring ice-jam that caused river floodwaters to enter some basins in the southern part of the delta. The method is readily transferable to investigations in other remote regions that are sparsely monitored by conventional hydrometric networks.

  14. Boron and strontium isotopic characterization of coal combustion residuals: validation of new environmental tracers.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Laura S; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Hower, James C; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-12-16

    In the U.S., coal fired power plants produce over 136 million tons of coal combustion residuals (CCRs) annually. CCRs are enriched in toxic elements, and their leachates can have significant impacts on water quality. Here we report the boron and strontium isotopic ratios of leaching experiments on CCRs from a variety of coal sources (Appalachian, Illinois, and Powder River Basins). CCR leachates had a mostly negative δ(11)B, ranging from -17.6 to +6.3‰, and (87)Sr/(86)Sr ranging from 0.70975 to 0.71251. Additionally, we utilized these isotopic ratios for tracing CCR contaminants in different environments: (1) the 2008 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) coal ash spill affected waters; (2) CCR effluents from power plants in Tennessee and North Carolina; (3) lakes and rivers affected by CCR effluents in North Carolina; and (4) porewater extracted from sediments in lakes affected by CCRs. The boron isotopes measured in these environments had a distinctive negative δ(11)B signature relative to background waters. In contrast (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios in CCRs were not always exclusively different from background, limiting their use as a CCR tracer. This investigation demonstrates the validity of the combined geochemical and isotopic approach as a unique and practical identification method for delineating and evaluating the environmental impact of CCRs.

  15. The topology of metabolic isotope labeling networks.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, Michael; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2007-08-29

    Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA) based on isotope labeling experiments (ILEs) is a widely established tool for determining fluxes in metabolic pathways. Isotope labeling networks (ILNs) contain all essential information required to describe the flow of labeled material in an ILE. Whereas recent experimental progress paves the way for high-throughput MFA, large network investigations and exact statistical methods, these developments are still limited by the poor performance of computational routines used for the evaluation and design of ILEs. In this context, the global analysis of ILN topology turns out to be a clue for realizing large speedup factors in all required computational procedures. With a strong focus on the speedup of algorithms the topology of ILNs is investigated using graph theoretic concepts and algorithms. A rigorous determination of all cyclic and isomorphic subnetworks, accompanied by the global analysis of ILN connectivity is performed. Particularly, it is proven that ILNs always brake up into a large number of small strongly connected components (SCCs) and, moreover, there are natural isomorphisms between many of these SCCs. All presented techniques are universal, i.e. they do not require special assumptions on the network structure, bidirectionality of fluxes, measurement configuration, or label input. The general results are exemplified with a practically relevant metabolic network which describes the central metabolism of E. coli comprising 10390 isotopomer pools. Exploiting the topological features of ILNs leads to a significant speedup of all universal algorithms for ILE evaluation. It is proven in theory and exemplified with the E. coli example that a speedup factor of about 1000 compared to standard algorithms is achieved. This widely opens the door for new high performance algorithms suitable for high throughput applications and large ILNs. Moreover, for the first time the global topological analysis of ILNs allows to comprehensively

  16. Quantifying diet-borne metal uptake in Gammarus pulex using stable isotope tracers.

    PubMed

    Pellet, Bastien; Ayrault, Sophie; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine

    2014-12-01

    Gammarids are aquatic amphipods widely used for water quality monitoring. To investigate the copper and cadmium diet-borne metal uptake in Gammarus pulex, we adapted the pulse-chase stable isotopes-based approach to determine the food ingestion rate (IR), the gut retention time (GRT) and the metal assimilation efficiencies (AE). G. pulex were fed with (65)Cu-, (106)Cd-, and (53)Cr-labeled alder leaves for 7.5h and then with unlabeled leaves for 5d. The metal stable isotope contents in the gammarids, leaves, filtered water and periodically collected feces were determined. Chromium was poorly assimilated by the gammarids; thus, Cr was used as an unassimilated tracer. The first tracer defecation occurred before the first feces harvest, indicating a gut passage time of less than 9h. A 24-h GRT and a 0.69gg(-1)d(-1) IR were estimated. The Cd AE value was estimated as 5-47%, depending on the assimilation determination method applied. The Cu AE value could not be evaluated regardless of the determination method used, most likely because of the rapid Cu regulation in gammarids in addition to analytical uncertainties when determining the Cu content in leaves. Application of the Cd AE value in the framework of the biodynamic bioaccumulation model shows that the diet-borne uptake of Cd significantly contributes (66-95%) to the metal bioaccumulation in G. pulex fed with alder leaves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Geochemistry Meets Anthropology: the use of Sr Isotopes as Tracers for Ancient Human Migration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, G.; Schaaf, P.; Hernandez, T.; Horn, P.; Manzanilla, L.

    2005-12-01

    Sr isotopes have increasingly become an important tool in archeology and anthropology in determining provenance of humans. By comparing isotopic signatures of human teeth and bone with the soil environment, Sr isotope ratios have been used as tracers identifying living areas. Sr isotope ratios in tooth enamel reflect the source of diet during youth, whereas ratios in dentine and bones come from the food growing in local geologies around the time of death. However, since analytical procedures vary from lab to lab we present here our new technique and how it affects results. We studied 11 teeth and 12 bone samples from the archeological site of Teotihuacan, central Mexico, as well as soil and water from the locality. Mechanical sample preparation of all teeth involved isolation of the enamel layer with the aid of an orthodontical micro-tool. For some enamel samples up to three fractions (two leachates and residue) were obtained for measurement. Thoroughly cleaned bone material underwent no leaching. As an example, 87Sr/86Sr results from a sample with ratios of 0.70477 for bone (which is identical to highland soil), 0.70530 for first leachate, 0.70590 for second leachate, and 0.70668 (mean accuracy +/- 0.00004) for enamel, clearly show enamel contamination by mobile Sr probably from soil. We thus find that repeated cleaning and particularly repeated leaching procedures, including isotopic measurement of the leachates, are critical to differentiate primary from secondary Sr isotope ratios as product of interaction of soil, sediments and water from the substrate where burials took place.

  18. Lead Stable Isotope Tracers of Atmospheric and Marine Scavenging in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, A. J.; Alleman, L. Y.; Church, T. M.

    2001-12-01

    The element lead is introduced to the marine atmosphere from combustion sources, but has had very large scale reductions in the North Atlantic due to the phasing out of leaded gasoline first in North America followed by Europe. The regional sources and transient fate of lead in the surface Sargasso Sea can be traced using its isotopic signature. The stable lead isotopic record has been documented in the atmosphere and waters of Bermuda over the past decade. Here, lead isotopes can be used as a proxy to trace atmospheric sources and particle exchange processes of trace elements within the water column. The long term record has allowed us to document seasonal/decadinal trends in emission source intensity, as well as atmospheric scavenging processes during changes in regional emissions. Also documented is the close link between such transient changes in lead atmospheric deposition, and its cycling within the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea. The impact of this atmospheric transient has been recorded throughout the water column (down to 4200m) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS). While the lead isotopic profiles show significant seasonal shifts in the mixed layer, they appear quite homogeneous at depth. Thus, one can distinguish the specific isotopic imprint of distinct water masses including (1) Atlantic central waters, (2) North Atlantic deep waters and (3) recirculating deep boundary current water. Included is the downward ventilation of the transient tracer, plus the role of surface advection in its mass balance. The signature in the suspended particles document scavenging and repackaging processes at depth in these oligotrophic waters. Lead isotope ratios (206Pb/207Pb) in suspended particles are confirmed to be in complete equilibrium with the dissolved fraction suggesting a rapid exchange between these reservoirs.

  19. Lead stable isotope tracers of atmospheric and marine scavenging in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, T.; Alleman, L.; Véron, A.

    2003-04-01

    The element lead is present in the marine atmosphere from combustion sources, but has had very large-scale reductions in the North Atlantic due to the phasing out of leaded gasoline first in North America followed by Europe. The regional sources and transient fate of lead in the in the ocean can be traced using its stable isotopic signature. The stable lead isotopic record has been documented in the atmosphere and waters of Bermuda over the past decade. Here, lead stable isotopes can be used as a proxy to trace atmospheric sources and particle exchange processes of trace elements within the water column. The long-term record has allowed us to document seasonal/decadinal trends in emission source intensity, as well as atmospheric scavenging processes during changes in regional emissions. Also documented is the close link between such transient changes in lead atmospheric deposition, and lead cycling within the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea. The impact of this atmospheric transient has been recorded throughout the water column (down to 4200m) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS). While the lead isotopic profiles show significant seasonal shifts in the mixed layer, and longer transients in the meso-pelagic zone, they appear quite homogeneous at depth. Thus, one can distinguish the specific isotopic imprint of distinct water masses including (1) Atlantic central waters, (2) North Atlantic deep waters and (3) re-circulating deep boundary current water. Included is the downward ventilation of the transient tracer, plus the role of surface advection in its mass balance. The signature in the suspended particles document scavenging and repackaging processes at depth in these oligotrophic waters. Lead isotope ratios (206Pb/207Pb) in suspended particles are confirmed to be in complete equilibrium with the dissolved fraction suggesting a rapid exchange between these reservoirs. Alternatively, both dissolved and particulate lead may originate from the same source as conserved

  20. The Use of Stable Isotope Tracers to Quantify the Transit Time Distribution of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, T. M.; Troch, P. A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Water pollution is an important societal problem because it can have harmful effects on human and ecological health. In order to improve water quality, scientists must develop land management methods that can avoid or mitigate environmental pollution. State of the art tools to develop such methods are flow and transport models that trace water and other solutes through the landscape. These models deliver important information that can lead to remediation efforts, and improve the quality of water for humans, plants, and animals. However, these models may be difficult to apply since many details about the catchment may not be available. Instead, a lumped approach is often used to find the water transit time using stable isotope tracers such as 18O and 2H that are naturally applied by precipitation to a catchment. The transit time distribution of water is an important indicator for the amount of solutes soil water and groundwater can contain, and thus a predictor of water quality. We conducted a 2-week long experiment using a tilted weighing lysimeter at Biosphere 2 to observe the breakthrough curves of deuterium and specific artificial DNA particles. We show that hydrological parameters can be computed in order to provide an estimate for the transit time distribution of deuterium. The convolution integral is then used to determine the distribution of the water transit time in the system. Unfortunately, stable isotopes such as deuterium make it difficult to pinpoint a specific flowpath since they naturally occur in the environment. Recent studies have shown that DNA tracers are able to trace water through the landscape. We found that DNA has a similar breakthrough curve happening at similar timescales as the deuterium. Therefore, DNA tracers may be able to identify sources of nonpoint source pollution in the future.

  1. A new Isotope Tracer to Identify Long Range Transport and Transformation of Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Abramian, A.; Dominguez, G.; Bluen, B.; Jackson, T.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2007-12-01

    It is of interest to understand the intercontinental transport of dust particles because they can accumulate anthropogenic nitrate, sulphate and carbonaceous compounds (black carbon and aromatic hydrocarbon) on their surfaces by adsorption during transportation. Carbonate is a prominent component of the soils in north western China where much of the Asian dust is produced. Carbonate can affect atmospheric chemical processes and aerosol characteristics because the acid neutralizing capacity of this species facilitates the heterogeneous conversion of sulphate and nitrate The primary goal of this work is to develop an isotope methodology for carbonates that can be used as a chemical marker for the origin of polluted air plumes. The results will be compared with other established tracers such as nitrate and sulphate that possess anomalous oxygen isotopic composition in polluted environments from reaction with ozone. Aerosol samples were collected on filter papers using Anderson Cascade Impactors at two different locations in La Jolla, California: one at the Scripps Pier and the other one at coastal Mount Soledad (800 ft). The particulate samples were allowed to react with excess H3PO4 at 28 oC for 14h and the gaseous compounds released were collected at liquid nitrogen. CO2 gas was separated from other reaction products by gas chromatography. In order to measure the oxygen isotope composition, CO2 gas was fluorinated to release oxygen gas to be analysed on the isotope ratio mass spectrometer. We discuss the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the CO2 released from the fine (< 1 um) and coarse (> 1um) particles collected at two different sites (Mt. Soledad and Scripps Pier) and its utility as a tracer to identify the long range transport of aerosol from local pollution events. The secondary organic oxidation products and concomitant isotope may provide a new indicator of chemical transformation. The transport situation of the air parcels will be analyzed through

  2. OpenMebius: an open source software for isotopically nonstationary 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Furusawa, Chikara; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a (13)C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas (13)C-MFA is conventionally performed under isotopically constant conditions, isotopically nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis (INST-(13)C-MFA) has recently been developed for flux analysis of cells with photosynthetic activity and cells at a quasi-steady metabolic state (e.g., primary cells or microorganisms under stationary phase). Here, the development of a novel open source software for INST-(13)C-MFA on the Windows platform is reported. OpenMebius (Open source software for Metabolic flux analysis) provides the function of autogenerating metabolic models for simulating isotopic labeling enrichment from a user-defined configuration worksheet. Analysis using simulated data demonstrated the applicability of OpenMebius for INST-(13)C-MFA. Confidence intervals determined by INST-(13)C-MFA were less than those determined by conventional methods, indicating the potential of INST-(13)C-MFA for precise metabolic flux analysis. OpenMebius is the open source software for the general application of INST-(13)C-MFA.

  3. Determining metal assimilation efficiency in aquatic invertebrates using enriched stable metal isotope tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Pellet, B.

    2007-01-01

    We employ a novel approach that combines pulse-chase feeding and multi-labelled stable isotopes to determine gut passage time (GPT), gut retention time (GRT), food ingestion rate (IR) and assimilation efficiency (AE) of three trace elements for a freshwater gastropod. Lettuce isotopically enriched in 53Cr, 65Cu and 106Cd was fed for 2 h to Lymnaea stagnalis. The release of tracers in feces and water was monitored for 48 h, during which unlabelled lettuce was provided ad libidum. The first defecation of 53Cr occurred after 5 h of depuration (GPT), whereas 90% of the ingested 53Cr was recovered in the feces after 22.5 h of depuration (GRT). 53Chromium was not significantly accumulated in the soft tissues upon exposure. In contrast, 65Cu and 106Cd assimilation was detectable for most experimental snails, i.e., 65/63Cu and 106/114Cd ratios in exposed snails were higher than those for controls. Food IR during the labelled feeding phase was 0.16 ?? 0.07 g g-1 d-1. IR was inferred from the amount of 53Cr egested in the feces during depuration and the concentration of 53Cr in the labelled lettuce. Assimilation efficiencies (??95% CI) determined using mass balance calculations were 84 ?? 4% for Cu and 85 ?? 3% for Cd. The ratio method yields similar AE estimates. Expanding the application of this novel stable isotope tracer technique to other metals in a wide variety of species will provide unique opportunities to evaluate the interplay between digestive processes and dietary influx of metals. Understanding the biological processes that modulate dietborne metal uptake is crucial to assess the toxicity of dietborne metals. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Distribution of Isotopic and Environmental Tracers in Groundwater, Northern Ada County, Southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adkins, Candice B.; Bartolino, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Residents of northern Ada County, Idaho, depend on groundwater for domestic and agricultural uses. The population of this area is growing rapidly and groundwater resources must be understood for future water-resource management. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, used a suite of isotopic and environmental tracers to gain a better understanding of groundwater ages, recharge sources, and flowpaths in northern Ada County. Thirteen wells were sampled between September and October 2009 for field parameters, major anions and cations, nutrients, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, tritium, radiocarbon, chlorofluorocarbons, and dissolved gasses. Well depths ranged from 30 to 580 feet below land surface. Wells were grouped together based on their depth and geographic location into the following four categories: shallow aquifer, intermediate/deep aquifer, Willow Creek aquifer, and Dry Creek aquifer. Major cations and anions indicated calcium-bicarbonate and sodium-bicarbonate water types in the study area. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes carried an oxygen-18 excess signature, possibly indicating recharge from evaporated sources or water-rock interactions in the subsurface. Chlorofluorocarbons detected modern (post-1940s) recharge in every well sampled; tritium data indicated modern water (post-1951) in seven, predominantly shallow wells. Nutrient concentrations tended to be greater in wells signaling recent recharge based on groundwater age dating, thus confirming the presence of recent recharge in these wells. Corrected radiocarbon results generated estimated residence times from modern to 5,100 years before present. Residence time tended to increase with depth, as confirmed by all three age-tracers. The disagreement among residence times indicates that samples were well-mixed and that the sampled aquifers contain a mixture of young and old recharge. Due to a lack of data, no conclusions about sources of recharge could be drawn

  5. Surface oceanographic fronts influencing deep-sea biological activity: Using fish stable isotopes as ecological tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louzao, Maite; Navarro, Joan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; de Sola, Luis Gil; Forero, Manuela G.

    2017-06-01

    Ecotones can be described as transition zones between neighbouring ecological systems that can be shaped by environmental gradients over a range of space and time scales. In the marine environment, the detection of ecotones is complex given the highly dynamic nature of marine systems and the paucity of empirical data over ocean-basin scales. One approach to overcome these limitations is to use stable isotopes from animal tissues since they can track spatial oceanographic variability across marine systems and, in turn, can be used as ecological tracers. Here, we analysed stable isotopes of deep-sea fishes to assess the presence of ecological discontinuities across the western Mediterranean. We were specifically interested in exploring the connection between deep-sea biological activity and particular oceanographic features (i.e., surface fronts) occurring in the pelagic domain. We collected samples for three different abundant deep-sea species in May 2004 from an experimental oceanographic trawling cruise (MEDITS): the Mictophydae jewel lanternfish Lampanyctus crocodilus and two species of the Gadidae family, the silvery pout Gadiculus argenteus and the blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou. The experimental survey occurred along the Iberian continental shelf and the upper and middle slopes, from the Strait of Gibraltar in the SW to the Cape Creus in the NE. The three deep-sea species were highly abundant throughout the study area and they showed geographic variation in their isotopic values, with decreasing values from north to south disrupted by an important change point around the Vera Gulf. Isotopic latitudinal gradients were explained by pelagic oceanographic conditions along the study area and confirm the existence of an ecotone at the Vera Gulf. This area could be considered as an oceanographic boundary where waters of Atlantic origin meet Mediterranean surface waters forming important frontal structures such as the Almeria-Oran front. In fact, our results

  6. Hydrogen isotopic composition of individual n-alkanes as an intrinsic tracer for bioremediation and source identification of petroleum contamination.

    PubMed

    Pond, Kristy L; Huang, Yongsong; Wang, Yi; Kulpa, Charles F

    2002-02-15

    The isotopic signatures of crude oil hydrocarbons are potentially powerful intrinsic tracers to their origins and the processes by which the oils are modified in the environment. Stable carbon isotopic data are of limited use for studying petroleum contaminants because of the relatively small amount of isotopic fractionation that occurs during natural processes. Hydrogen isotopes, in contrast, are commonly fractionated to a much greater extent and as a result display larger variations in delta values. We studied the effect of in vitro aerobic biodegradation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of individual n-alkanes from crude oil. The isotopic analysis was conducted using gas chromatography-thermal conversion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. In general, biodegradation rates decreased with increasing hydrocarbon chain length, consistent with previous studies. More importantly the n-alkanes that were degraded at the fastest rates (n-C15 to n-C18) also showed the largest overall isotopic fractionation (approximately 12-25 per thousand deuterium enrichment), suggesting that the lower molecular weight n-alkanes can be used to monitor in-situ bioremediation of crude oil contamination. The hydrogen isotopic compositions of the longer chain alkanes (n-C19 to n-C27) were relatively stable during biodegradation (<5%o overall deuterium enrichment), indicating that these compounds are effective tracers for oil-source identification studies.

  7. Novel and nontraditional use of stable isotope tracers to study metal bioavailability from natural particles.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Marie-Noële; Cain, Daniel J; Fuller, Christopher C

    2013-04-02

    We devised a novel tracing approach that involves enriching test organisms with a stable metal isotope of low natural abundance prior to characterizing metal bioavailability from natural inorganic particles. In addition to circumventing uncertainties associated with labeling natural particles and distinguishing background metals, the proposed "reverse labeling" technique overcomes many drawbacks inherent to using radioisotope tracers. Specifically, we chronically exposed freshwater snails ( Lymnaea stagnalis ) to synthetic water spiked with Cu that was 99.4% (65)Cu to increase the relative abundance of (65)Cu in the snail's tissues from ~32% to >80%. The isotopically enriched snails were then exposed to benthic algae mixed with Cu-bearing Fe-Al particles collected from the Animas River (Colorado), an acid mine drainage impacted river. We used (63)Cu to trace Cu uptake from the natural particles and inferred their bioavailability from calculation of Cu assimilation into tissues. Cu assimilation from these particles was 44%, indicating that 44% of the particulate Cu was absorbed by the invertebrate. This demonstrates that inorganic particulate Cu can be bioavailable. The reverse labeling approach shows great potential in various scientific areas such as environmental contamination and nutrition for addressing questions involving uptake of an element that naturally has multiple isotopes.

  8. Isotopic turnover of a submersed macrophyte following transplant: the roles of growth and metabolism in eutrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Cao, Te; Zhang, Min; Li, Zhongqiang; Zhang, Meng; Ni, Leyi; Xie, Ping

    2011-11-15

    Stable isotopic turnover with isotopic change due to growth and metabolic tissue replacement associated with a change in environmental conditions is a critical aspect of the use of stable isotope analyses as time-integrating tracers of resource-consumer interactions. However, stable isotopic turnover in plants remains poorly understood compared with those of animals, and here we used continuous flow elemental analyzer-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS) to analyse the turnover of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in a submersed macrophyte (Vallisneria natans) after transplantation to hypereutrophic and mesoeutrophic treatments in a field mesocosm experiment. The direction and magnitude of the isotopic shifts of V. natans were suggested to be determined by the inorganic nutrient availability and its isotopic content in the different treatments. Based on the modelling results of turnover, the contribution of growth to the isotopic turnover was as high as those observed in various aquatic ectotherms. However, the contribution of metabolism was also considerable, especially for nitrogen in the hypereutrophic treatment, which was argued to be a response, co-occurring with growth inhabitation and biochemical disorder of V. natans, to the stress induced by the eutrophication. Our results indicated that isotope turnover in a macrophyte is a feasible technique for estimating its ecophysiological conditions in the natural environment, and that it may facilitate understanding of isotopic data in field studies of food web and habitat restoration under eutrophic conditions. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Utility of Li and Li Isotopes as Tracers of Continental Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. H.; Wimpenny, J. B.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Kisakurek, B.; Hathorne, E. C.; Anand, P.; Burton, K. W.

    2008-12-01

    Lithium is potentially an attractive tracer of continental weathering because its two isotopes have a large relative mass difference, it is unaffected by biological activity and it is only slightly incompatible during magmatic processes so tends to be relatively uniformly distributed in the Earth's crust. Moreover, Li is conservative in the oceans, with a residence time of ca. 1 million years, and it is isotopically uniform on a global scale (δ7Li ~+31‰). Seminal work by Lui Chan and her co-workers has shown that the Li and Li isotope balance of the oceans is maintained by inputs of high-temperature hydrothermal fluids at oceanic ridges (with δ7Li ~+6.7‰) and dissolved Li from rivers (average δ7Li = +23‰), and low-temperature removal of Li into oceanic basalts and marine sediments. Despite this potential, relatively little is known about the behaviour of Li during continental weathering. In this study, we will present an overview of the work that we have conducted on Li and Li isotopes in rivers, soils and estuaries from catchments in Greenland, Iceland and the Himalaya, as well as laboratory studies of mineral dissolution and precipitation. Each of these case studies illustrates the effects of weathering processes on the riverine isotope signal, and the estuarine data illustrate how this signal is transferred to the oceans. Our data suggest that variations in rock type have little effect on riverine δ7Li; the principal control is preferential removal of 6Li into secondary minerals formed during weathering, leaving the residual waters enriched in 7Li. In subglacial environments, where weathering rates are very low, uptake of Li by ferric oxyhydroxides formed during sulphide oxidation is important. Our results clearly demonstrate that weathering processes can exert a significant effect on the Li isotope composition of natural waters. In order to understand whether changes in such processes with time are preserved, we have also generated records of the past

  10. Non-targeted Tracer Fate Detection.

    PubMed

    Weindl, Daniel; Wegner, André; Hiller, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotopes have been used to trace atoms through metabolism and quantify metabolic fluxes for several decades. Only recently non-targeted stable isotope labeling approaches have emerged as a powerful tool to gain insights into metabolism. However, the manual detection of isotopic enrichment for a non-targeted analysis is tedious and time consuming. To overcome this limitation, the non-targeted tracer fate detection (NTFD) algorithm for the automated metabolome-wide detection of isotopic enrichment has been developed. NTFD detects and quantifies isotopic enrichment in the form of mass isotopomer distributions (MIDs) in an automated manner, providing the means to trace functional groups, determine MIDs for metabolic flux analysis, or detect tracer-derived molecules in general. Here, we describe the algorithmic background of NTFD, discuss practical considerations for the freely available NTFD software package, and present potential applications of non-targeted stable isotope labeling analysis. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Isotope tracer study of hydrogen spillover on carbon-based adsorbents for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Lachawiec, Anthony J; Yang, Ralph T

    2008-06-17

    A composite material comprising platinum nanoparticles supported on molecular sieve templated carbon was synthesized and found to adsorb 1.35 wt % hydrogen at 298 K and 100 atm. The isosteric heat of adsorption for the material at low coverage was approximately 14 kJ/mol, and it approached a value of 10.6 kJ/mol as coverage increased for pressures at and above 1 atm. The increase in capacity is attributed to spillover, which is observed with the use of isotopic tracer TPD. IRMOF-8 bridged to Pt/C, a material known to exhibit hydrogen spillover at room temperature, was also studied with the hydrogen-deuterium scrambling reaction for comparison. The isotherms were reversible. For desorption, sequential doses of H2 and D2 at room temperature and subsequent TPD yield product distributions that are strong indicators of the surface diffusion controlled reverse spillover process.

  12. The oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate in Elkhorn Slough, California: A tracer for phosphate sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Karen; Cade-Menun, Barbara J.; Paytan, Adina

    2006-11-01

    Elkhorn Slough, a small seasonal estuary in central California, has been subjected to increased nutrient loading from agricultural and other non-point sources. However, because nutrients do not behave conservatively, tracing nutrient sources and cycling in ecosystems like Elkhorn Slough has been difficult to assess. This is particularly true of phosphorus (P), which has only one stable isotope and cannot be used as an isotopic tracer. However, isotopic fractionation of oxygen in phosphate at surface water temperatures only occurs as a result of enzyme-mediated, biochemical reactions. Thus, if phosphate demand is low relative to input and is not heavily cycled within the ecosystem, the δ18O of phosphate will reflect the isotopic composition of phosphate sources to the system. We utilized the δ18O of dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) within the main channel of the slough and nearby Moss Landing Harbor and the δ18O of reactive phosphate from sediment and soil samples collected within the watershed to understand phosphate sources and cycling within Elkhorn Slough. Trends in the δ18O of DIP were seasonally consistent with high values near the mouth reflecting oceanic phosphate (19.1‰-20.3‰), dropping to a minimum value near Hummingbird Island in the central slough (point source, 14.1‰-14.4‰), and increasing again near the head of the slough, reflecting fertilizer input (18.9‰-19.3‰). Reactive phosphate δ18O values extracted from sediments and soils in the watershed range from 10.6‰ in a drainage ditch to 22.3‰ in creek sediments near agriculture fields. The wide range in phosphate δ18O values reflects the variations in land use and application of different fertilizers in this agriculturally dominated landscape. These data suggest that phosphate δ18O can be an effective tool for identifying P sources and understanding phosphate dynamics in estuarine ecosystems.

  13. Use of stable isotopes and mathematical modelling to investigate human mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dainty, J R

    2001-12-01

    Individuals have varying needs for minerals that are dependent, amongst other things, on their lifestyle, age and genetic makeup. Knowledge of exact individual nutritional requirements should lead to better health, increased quality of life and reduced need for expensive medical care. Bioavailability, nutrient-gene interactions and whole-body metabolism all need to be investigated further if we are to progress towards the goal of defining optimal health and nutritional status. The discussion which follows will critically review the latest developments in the area of metabolism for several of the minerals that are essential for human health: Ca, Zn, Cu and Se. Stable-isotope tracers and mathematical modelling are some of the tools being used to facilitate the greater understanding in uptake, utilisation and excretion of these minerals. Stable isotopes, administered in physiological doses, present little or no risk to volunteers and allow metabolic studies to be carried out in vulnerable population groups such as children and pregnant women. Intrinsic labelling of foodstuffs ensures that the tracer and the native mineral will behave similarly once inside the body. Advances in computing power and software dedicated to solving nutritional problems have made it possible for investigators to use mathematical modelling in their experimental work. Mineral metabolism is ideally suited to a form of modelling known as compartmental analysis, which allows rates of mineral transferand sizes of mineral stores to be calculated accurately without the need for invasive sampling of body tissues.

  14. Lithium and carbon isotopes in river catchment: combined tracers to constrain chemical weathering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, S.; Rive, K.; Assayag, N.; Dictor, M.; Garcin, M.

    2012-12-01

    partitioned into surface waters, leaving lighter lithium behind in the weathered products, the signature of C is mainly due to organic matter or partially due to biochemical interaction with assimilation of CO2 by microorganism. The second group involves atmospheric equilibrium with CO2 degassing with organic origin or "cold" CO2 degassing with important fraction of Li. The third group present high fractionation of C, reflecting presence of superficial C with organic origin, with low fractionation of Li underling the hydrothermalism impact. Finally a fourth group with low fractionation mainly due to high temperature water-rock interaction. Therefore, the combination of the two tracers, Li and C isotopes, offers a powerful tool to discriminate chemical weathering processes from sources of alteration during water-rock interactions under multi-lithology terrains. Reference: Rad, S., Rivé, K., Allègre, C.J., 2011. Weathering regime associated with subsurface circulation on volcanic islands. Aquat. Geochem. 17, 3, 221-241.

  15. A radiogenic isotope tracer study of transatlantic dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumar, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S.J.G.; Garrison, V.H.; Williams, E.; Andreae, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that long-range transport of African desert dusts across the Atlantic Ocean occurs, delivering key nutrients and contributing to fertilization of the Amazon rainforest. Here we utilize radiogenic isotope tracers – Sr, Nd and Pb – to derive the provenance, local or remote, and pathways of dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean. Atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter was collected in 2008 on quartz fibre filters, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean at three different locations: in Mali (12.6°N, 8.0°W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3°N, 60.5°W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7°N, 64.6°W; 27 m a.s.l.). Both the labile phase, representative of the anthropogenic signal, and the refractory detrital silicate fraction were analysed. Dust deposits and soils from around the sampling sites were measured as well to assess the potential contribution from local sources to the mineral dust collected. The contribution from anthropogenic sources of Pb was predominant in the labile, leachate phase. The overall similarity in Pb isotope signatures found in the leachates is attributed to a common African source of anthropogenic Pb, with minor inputs from other sources, such as from Central and South America. The Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in the silicate fraction were found to be systematically more radiogenic than those in the corresponding labile phases. In contrast, Nd and Sr isotopic compositions from Mali, Tobago, and the Virgin Islands are virtually identical in both leachates and residues. Comparison with existing literature data on Saharan and Sahelian sources constrains the origin of summer dust transported to the Caribbean to mainly originate from the Sahel region, with some contribution from northern Saharan sources. The source regions derived from the isotope data are consistent with 7-day back-trajectory analyses, demonstrating the usefulness of radiogenic isotopes in tracing dust provenance and

  16. A radiogenic isotope tracer study of transatlantic dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S. J. G.; Garrison, V. H.; Williams, E.; Andreae, M. O.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that long-range transport of African desert dusts across the Atlantic Ocean occurs, delivering key nutrients and contributing to fertilization of the Amazon rainforest. Here we utilize radiogenic isotope tracers - Sr, Nd and Pb - to derive the provenance, local or remote, and pathways of dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean. Atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter was collected in 2008 on quartz fibre filters, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean at three different locations: in Mali (12.6°N, 8.0°W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3°N, 60.5°W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7°N, 64.6°W; 27 m a.s.l.). Both the labile phase, representative of the anthropogenic signal, and the refractory detrital silicate fraction were analysed. Dust deposits and soils from around the sampling sites were measured as well to assess the potential contribution from local sources to the mineral dust collected. The contribution from anthropogenic sources of Pb was predominant in the labile, leachate phase. The overall similarity in Pb isotope signatures found in the leachates is attributed to a common African source of anthropogenic Pb, with minor inputs from other sources, such as from Central and South America. The Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in the silicate fraction were found to be systematically more radiogenic than those in the corresponding labile phases. In contrast, Nd and Sr isotopic compositions from Mali, Tobago, and the Virgin Islands are virtually identical in both leachates and residues. Comparison with existing literature data on Saharan and Sahelian sources constrains the origin of summer dust transported to the Caribbean to mainly originate from the Sahel region, with some contribution from northern Saharan sources. The source regions derived from the isotope data are consistent with 7-day back-trajectory analyses, demonstrating the usefulness of radiogenic isotopes in tracing dust provenance and

  17. Hydrochemistry and boron isotopes as natural tracers in the study of groundwaters from North Chianan Plain, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsueh-Yu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, hydrochemistry and boron isotopes are successfully applied to elucidate hydrogeological processes by the use of natural tracers. The hydrochemical analysis identifies four end-members in the hydrochemical evolution of groundwater from the North Chianan plain groundwater district. A few groundwater contain extraordinary chlorine concentrations of up to 48,000 mg l(-1). However, the hydrochemistry of groundwater only reveals that high saline water is a dominant factor in groundwater hydrochemistry. It is thought that these groundwater experienced precipitation of carbonates during seawater evaporation that did not involve the precipitation of gypsum. Boron isotopes are very efficient tracers in determining the source of salinisation. The boron isotopes reveal the results of mixing of evaporated seawater and water-sediment interaction. In general, the boron isotope ratio of the groundwater is controlled by a two-end-member mixing system, which is composed of evaporated seawater (isotopically heavy) and fresh surface water (isotopically light). Due to a long lagoonal period in the coastal plain, the groundwaters in the downstream area generally have high Cl/B ratios and relatively heavy boron isotope ratios while those in the upstream area are composed of low Cl/B and light boron isotopes. However, there is not a resolvable mixing trend between the Cl/B ratio and the isotopic composition of boron. It is probably obscured by a highly variable boron isotope ratio in fresh surface water and through fractionation associated with water-rock interaction. Both factors would decrease the boron isotope ratio but one effect cannot be distinguished from the other.

  18. Sulfur Isotopic Fractionation During Dissimilatory Sulfate Reduction from the Perspective of an Entire Microbial Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, B.; Lau, L.; Wing, B.

    2009-05-01

    Whether in the investigation of the most ancient life on Earth, examination of surface oxidation properties across geological timescales, or the estimation of microbial metabolism in inaccessible environments, dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) constrains biogeochemical processes in a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Pioneering work in the 1970s established the importance of DSR to biogeochemical processes and its potential as a geochemical tracer, and models for biological controls of DSR were published from empirical results of in vitro microbial cultures. Recent efforts have expanded upon this body of work and further extended toward multiple sulfur isotopes and through the more precise definition of the biological processes themselves. Resulting from these recent efforts is an rigorous description of DSR of the sulfur metabolism of sulfate-reducing bacteria. However, despite these efforts, the exact mechanisms of DSR within the scope of a complex system such as microbial metabolism remain incomplete and obscure. We will be presenting ongoing work coupling together recent mathematical models of isotopic fractionation with a flux-oriented, genomically-derived software model of the metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, a patent sulfate-reducing bacterium. Our presentation will explore the effects on isotopic fractionation throughout the sulfate reduction pathway of D. vulgaris by a multitude of separate and distinct biological pathways within the bacterial metabolism. Further, we will be discussing both the pitfalls and promise of such an approach and its implications for future research.

  19. You are not always what we think you eat. Selective assimilation across multiple whole-stream isotopic tracer studies

    DOE PAGES

    Dodds, W. K.; Collins, S. M.; Hamilton, S. K.; ...

    2014-10-01

    Analyses of 21 15N stable isotope tracer experiments, designed to examine food web dynamics in streams around the world, indicated that the isotopic composition of food resources assimilated by primary consumers (mostly invertebrates) poorly reflected the presumed food sources. Modeling indicated that consumers assimilated only 33–50% of the N available in sampled food sources such as decomposing leaves, epilithon, and fine particulate detritus over feeding periods of weeks or more. Thus, common methods of sampling food sources consumed by animals in streams do not sufficiently reflect the pool of N they assimilate. Lastly, Isotope tracer studies, combined with modeling andmore » food separation techniques, can improve estimation of N pools in food sources that are assimilated by consumers.« less

  20. You are not always what we think you eat. Selective assimilation across multiple whole-stream isotopic tracer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, W. K.; Collins, S. M.; Hamilton, S. K.; Tank, J. L.; Johnson, S.; Webster, J. R.; Simon, K. S.; Whiles, M. R.; Rantala, H. M.; McDowell, W. H.; Peterson, S. D.; Riis, T.; Crenshaw, C. L.; Thomas, S. A.; Kristensen, P. B.; Cheever, B. M.; Flecker, A. S.; Griffiths, N. A.; Crowl, T.; Rosi-Marshall, E. J.; El-Sabaawi, R.; Martí, E.

    2014-10-01

    Analyses of 21 15N stable isotope tracer experiments, designed to examine food web dynamics in streams around the world, indicated that the isotopic composition of food resources assimilated by primary consumers (mostly invertebrates) poorly reflected the presumed food sources. Modeling indicated that consumers assimilated only 33–50% of the N available in sampled food sources such as decomposing leaves, epilithon, and fine particulate detritus over feeding periods of weeks or more. Thus, common methods of sampling food sources consumed by animals in streams do not sufficiently reflect the pool of N they assimilate. Lastly, Isotope tracer studies, combined with modeling and food separation techniques, can improve estimation of N pools in food sources that are assimilated by consumers.

  1. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using {sup 15}N isotopic tracer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim

    2015-09-25

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct {sup 15}N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the {sup 15}N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. {sup 15}N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. {sup 15}N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained.

  2. Use of stable isotopes to measure the metabolic activity of the human intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Nicole; Barclay, Andrew R; Weaver, Lawrence T; Morrison, Douglas J

    2011-11-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is a complex biological system comprising a vast repertoire of microbes with considerable metabolic activity relevant to both bacterial growth and host health. Greater strides have been made in the analysis of microbial diversity than in the measurement of functional activity, particularly in vivo. Stable isotope probing offers a new approach by coupling measurements of metabolic activity with microbial identification. Using a low-enrichment labeling strategy in vitro, this study has identified metabolically active bacterial groups via magnetic-bead capture methodology and stable isotope ratio analysis. Using five probes (EUB338, Bac303, Bif164, EREC482, and Clep866), changes in the activities of key intestinal microbial groups were successfully measured by exploiting tracers of de novo RNA synthesis. Perturbation of the nutrient source with oligofructose generated changes in the activity of bifidobacteria as expected, but also in the Bacteroides-Prevotella group, the Eubacterium rectale-Clostridium coccoides group, and the Clostridium leptum subgroup. Changes in activity were also observed in response to the medium type. This study suggests that changes in the functional activity of the gut microbiota can be assessed using tracers of de novo nucleic acid synthesis combined with measurement of low isotopic enrichment in 16S rRNA. Such tracers potentially limit substrate bias because they are universally available to bacteria. This low-enrichment labeling approach does not depend on the commercial availability of specific labeled substrates and can be easily translated to in vivo probing experiments of the functional activity of the microbiota in the human gut.

  3. Regional prediction of carbon isotopes in soil carbonates for Asian dust source tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Yaqiang

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles emitted from deserts and semi-arid lands in northern China cause particulate pollution that increases the burden of disease particularly for urban population in East Asia. The stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) of carbonates in soils and dust aerosols in northern China were investigated. We found that the δ13C of carbonates in surface soils in northern China showed clearly the negative correlation (R2 = 0.73) with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite-derived NDVI, we predicted the regional distribution of δ13C of soil carbonates in deserts, sandy lands, and steppe areas. The predictions show the mean δ13C of -0.4 ± 0.7‰ in soil carbonates in Taklimakan Desert and Gobi Deserts, and the isotope values decrease to -3.3 ± 1.1‰ in sandy lands. The increase in vegetation coverage depletes 13C in soil carbonates, thus the steppe areas are predicted by the lowest δ13C levels (-8.1 ± 1.7‰). The measurements of atmospheric dust samples at eight sites showed that the Asian dust sources were well assigned by the 13C mapping in surface soils. Predicting 13C in large geographical areas with fine resolution offers a cost-effective tracer to monitor dust emissions from sandy lands and steppe areas which show an increasing role in Asian dust loading driven by climate change and human activities.

  4. Stable carbon isotopes in exhaled breath as tracers for dietary information in birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Christian C; Baier, Leonie; Speakman, John R; Siemers, Björn M

    2008-07-01

    The stable carbon isotope ratio of exhaled CO(2) (delta(13)C(breath)) reflects the isotopic signature of the combusted substrate and is, therefore, suitable for the non-invasive collection of dietary information from free-ranging animals. However, delta(13)C(breath) is sensitive to changes in ingested food items and the mixed combustion of exogenous and endogenous substrates. Therefore, experiments under controlled conditions are pivotal for the correct interpretation of delta(13)C(breath) of free-ranging animals. We measured delta(13)C(breath) in fasted and recently fed insectivorous Myotis myotis (Chiroptera) to assess the residence time of carbon isotopes in the pool of metabolized substrate, and whether delta(13)C(breath) in satiated individuals levels off at values similar to the dietary isotope signature (delta(13)C(diet)) in insect-feeding mammals. Mean delta(13)C(breath) of fasted individuals was depleted by -5.8 per thousand (N=6) in relation to delta(13)C(diet). After feeding on insects, bats exchanged 50% of carbon atoms in the pool of metabolized substrates within 21.6+/-10.5 min, which was slower than bats ingesting simple carbohydrates. After 2 h, delta(13)C(breath) of satiated bats levelled off at -2.6 per thousand below delta(13)C(diet), suggesting that bats combusted both exogenous and endogenous substrate at this time. A literature survey revealed that small birds and mammals metabolize complex macronutrients at slower rates than simple macronutrients. On average, delta(13)C(breath) of fasting birds and mammals was depleted in (13)C by -3.2+/-2.0 per thousand in relation to delta(13)C(diet). delta(13)C(breath) of satiated animals differed by -0.6+/-2.3 per thousand from delta(13)C(diet) when endogenous substrates were not in isotopic equilibrium with exogenous substrates and by +0.5+/-1.8 per thousand (N=6 species) after endogenous substrates were in isotopic equilibrium with exogenous substrates.

  5. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO sub 2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Landscape-gradient assessment of thermokarst lake hydrology using water isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narancic, Biljana; Wolfe, Brent B.; Pienitz, Reinhard; Meyer, Hanno; Lamhonwah, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Thermokarst lakes are widespread in arctic and subarctic regions. In subarctic Québec (Nunavik), they have grown in number and size since the mid-20th century. Recent studies have identified that these lakes are important sources of greenhouse gases. This is mainly due to the supply of catchment-derived dissolved organic carbon that generates anoxic conditions leading to methane production. To assess the potential role of climate-driven changes in hydrological processes to influence greenhouse-gas emissions, we utilized water isotope tracers to characterize the water balance of thermokarst lakes in Nunavik during three consecutive mid- to late summer sampling campaigns (2012-2014). Lake distribution stretches from shrub-tundra overlying discontinuous permafrost in the north to spruce-lichen woodland with sporadic permafrost in the south. Calculation of lake-specific input water isotope compositions (δI) and lake-specific evaporation-to-inflow (E/I) ratios based on an isotope-mass balance model reveal a narrow hydrological gradient regardless of diversity in regional landscape characteristics. Nearly all lakes sampled were predominantly fed by rainfall and/or permafrost meltwater, which suppressed the effects of evaporative loss. Only a few lakes in one of the southern sampling locations, which overly highly degraded sporadic permafrost terrain, appear to be susceptible to evaporative lake-level drawdown. We attribute this lake hydrological resiliency to the strong maritime climate in coastal regions of Nunavik. Predicted climate-driven increases in precipitation and permafrost degradation will likely contribute to persistence and expansion of thermokarst lakes throughout the region. If coupled with an increase in terrestrial carbon inputs to thermokarst lakes from surface runoff, conditions favorable for mineralization and emission of methane, these water bodies may become even more important sources of greenhouse gases.

  7. Chlorine Isotopes: As a Possible Tracer of Fluid/Bio-Activities on Mars and a Progress Report on Chlorine Isotope Analysis by TIMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y.; Numata, M.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2009-01-01

    Significantly large mass fractionations between chlorine isotopes (Cl-35, Cl-37) have been reported for terrestrial materials including both geological samples and laboratory materials. Also, the chlorine isotopic composition can be used as a tracer for early solar system processes. Moreover, chlorine is ubiquitous on the Martian surface. Typical chlorine abundances in Gusev soils are approx.0.5 %. The global surface average chlorine abundance also is approx.0.5 %. Striking variations among outcrop rocks at Meridiani were reported with some chlorine abundances as high as approx.2%. Characterizing conditions under which chlorine isotopic fractionation may occur is clearly of interest to planetary science. Thus, we have initiated development of a chlorine isotopic analysis technique using TIMS at NASA-JSC. We present here a progress report on the current status of development at JSC and discuss the possible application of chlorine isotopic analysis to Martian meteorites in a search for fluid- and possibly biological activity on Mars.

  8. Utilizing gamma isotope tracers to determine sediment source at reef sites near the Charleston Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site.

    PubMed

    Noakes, Scott E; Jutte, Pamela C

    2006-06-01

    The Charleston, South Carolina Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) has been heavily utilized as a disposal site for dredged material resulting from maintenance and channel deepening in the Charleston Harbor. Continuous monitoring by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources at the ODMDS has indicated the presence of fine-grained sediment within the monitoring zones. However, since the Charleston Harbor is formed by the conjunction of three rivers, it has been suggested that some of the fine-grained sediment surrounding the ODMDS could be due to river transport rather than solely by disposal activities. In order to trace the outflow of sediment from the harbor, natural and man-made isotopes were utilized. (7)Be (natural cosmogenic isotope) and (137)Cs (man-made isotope) are often associated with estuarine sediments. Both isotopes were used as tracers in an attempt to determine the extent of density driven sediment flow from the Charleston Harbor. (7)Be was detected in many of the offshore sampling stations indicating a direct correlation to the harbor. (137)Cs was only found in one sediment trap sample offshore, but none the less indicated some transport from the harbor. Further study for utilizing isotopic tracers in determining offshore sediment transport is still being conducted at the disposal site. It is anticipated that further (7)Be and (137)Cs isotopic monitoring offshore Charleston will aid in determining the role that tidal and density driven sediments play in the sediment budgets at the hard bottom reef sites.

  9. Stable isotopes as ecological tracers: an efficient method for assessing the contribution of multiple sources to mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugalho, M. N.; Barcia, P.; Caldeira, M. C.; Cerdeira, J. O.

    2008-09-01

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers of ecological processes potentially providing relevant information to environmental management issues. An application of the methodology consists in relating the stable isotopic composition of a sample mixture to that of sources. The number of stable isotopes, however, is usually lower than that of potential sources existing in an ecosystem, which creates mathematical difficulties in correctly tracing sources. We discuss a linear programming model which efficiently derives information on the contribution of sources to mixtures for any number of stable isotopes and any number of sources by addressing multiple sources simultaneously. The model identifies which sources are present in all, present in a subset of the samples or absent from all samples simultaneously and calculates minimum and maximum values of each source in the mixtures. We illustrate the model using a data set consisting of the isotopic signatures of different plant sources ingested by primary consumers in tropical riverine habitat in Asia. The model discussed may contribute to extend the scope of stable isotopes methodology to a range of new problems dealing with multiple sources and multiple tracers. For instance, in food web studies, if particular organic matter sources disappear or decrease in availability (e.g. climate change scenarios) the model allows simulation of alternative diets of the consumers providing potentially relevant information for managers and decision makers.

  10. Stable isotopes as ecological tracers: an efficient method for assessing the contribution of multiple sources to mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugalho, M. N.; Barcia, P.; Caldeira, M. C.; Cerdeira, J. O.

    2008-06-01

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers of ecological processes potentially providing relevant information to environmental management issues. An application of the methodology consists in relating the stable isotopic composition of a sample mixture to that of sources. The number of stable isotopes, however, is usually lower than that of potential sources existing in an ecosystem, which creates mathematical difficulties in correctly tracing sources. We discuss a linear programming model which efficiently derives information on the contribution of sources to mixtures for any number of stable isotopes and any number of sources by addressing multiple sources simultaneously. The model identifies which sources are present in all, present in a subset of the samples or absent from all samples simultaneously and calculates minimum and maximum values of each source in the mixtures. We illustrate the model using a data set consisting on the isotopic signatures of different plant sources ingested by primary consumers in tropical riverine habitat in Asia. The model discussed may contribute to extend the scope of stable isotopes methodology to a range of new problems dealing with multiple sources and multiple tracers. For instance, in food web studies, if particular organic matter sources disappear or decrease in availability (e.g. climate change scenarios) the model allows simulation of alternative diets of the consumers providing potentially relevant information for managers and decision makers.

  11. Investigating Methylmercury Exposure in North Atlantic Cetaceans Using Multiple Isotope Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Mikkelsen, B.; Yin, R.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions have substantially perturbed the global biogeochemical cycle of mercury (Hg) and high latitude ecosystems are particularly vulnerable to Hg pollution and climate change. We investigated temporal changes in methylmercury (MeHg) exposures of long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas, n=59) between 1985-2015 using multiple isotopes (δ202Hg, Δ199Hg, Δ200Hg, Δ201Hg, δ13C, δ15N) as tracers of the physical environment and foraging ecology. Mass-independent fraction (MIF) of Hg (Δ199Hg, Δ201Hg) is mainly driven by photochemical demethylation in seawater. Enriched δ202Hg has been shown to result from demethylation. The ranges in Δ199Hg and Δ201Hg values in whales are similar across time periods with the exception of a few years following the 2010 volcanic eruption in Iceland that may have affected light penetration in surface waters. The mean δ202Hg values of whale muscle samples are consistently 1.5 ‰ across the study period, which is 1 ‰ higher than their prey (squid, blue whiting, and greater argentine). This fractionation is consistent with in vivo demethylation as a detoxification mechanism in the whales. Individuals with the highest MeHg concentrations have the lowest δ202Hg values and we infer this may result from more limited MeHg demethylation. We find a linear relationship between Δ200Hg anomalies (-0.1 to 0.2‰) and Δ199Hg (R2=0.76) that has not previously been reported. Variability in Δ200Hg is thought to be driven by photochemical reactions in the tropopause and may provide an effective tracer for atmospheric Hg inputs to the ocean that are methylated and accumulated in aquatic biota.

  12. MapMaker and PathTracer for tracking carbon in genome-scale metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Tervo, Christopher J; Reed, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) modeling results can be difficult to interpret given the large numbers of reactions in genome-scale models. While paths in metabolic networks can be found, existing methods are not easily combined with constraint-based approaches. To address this limitation, two tools (MapMaker and PathTracer) were developed to find paths (including cycles) between metabolites, where each step transfers carbon from reactant to product. MapMaker predicts carbon transfer maps (CTMs) between metabolites using only information on molecular formulae and reaction stoichiometry, effectively determining which reactants and products share carbon atoms. MapMaker correctly assigned CTMs for over 97% of the 2,251 reactions in an Escherichia coli metabolic model (iJO1366). Using CTMs as inputs, PathTracer finds paths between two metabolites. PathTracer was applied to iJO1366 to investigate the importance of using CTMs and COBRA constraints when enumerating paths, to find active and high flux paths in flux balance analysis (FBA) solutions, to identify paths for putrescine utilization, and to elucidate a potential CO2 fixation pathway in E. coli. These results illustrate how MapMaker and PathTracer can be used in combination with constraint-based models to identify feasible, active, and high flux paths between metabolites.

  13. MapMaker and PathTracer for tracking carbon in genome-scale metabolic models

    PubMed Central

    Tervo, Christopher J.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) modeling results can be difficult to interpret given the large numbers of reactions in genome-scale models. While paths in metabolic networks can be found, existing methods are not easily combined with constraint-based approaches. To address this limitation, two tools (MapMaker and PathTracer) were developed to find paths (including cycles) between metabolites, where each step transfers carbon from reactant to product. MapMaker predicts carbon transfer maps (CTMs) between metabolites using only information on molecular formulae and reaction stoichiometry, effectively determining which reactants and products share carbon atoms. MapMaker correctly assigned CTMs for over 97% of the 2,251 reactions in an Escherichia coli metabolic model (iJO1366). Using CTMs as inputs, PathTracer finds paths between two metabolites. PathTracer was applied to iJO1366 to investigate the importance of using CTMs and COBRA constraints when enumerating paths, to find active and high flux paths in flux balance analysis (FBA) solutions, to identify paths for putrescine utilization, and to elucidate a potential CO2 fixation pathway in E. coli. These results illustrate how MapMaker and PathTracer can be used in combination with constraint-based models to identify feasible, active, and high flux paths between metabolites. PMID:26771089

  14. Using diatoms, hydrochemical and stable isotope tracers to infer runoff generation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carreras, N.; Wetzel, C. E.; Frentress, J.; Hlúbiková, D.; Ector, L.; McDonnell, J. J.; Hoffmann, L.; Pfister, L.

    2012-04-01

    Imaginative techniques are needed to improve our understanding of runoff generation processes. In this context, the hydrological community calls to cut across disciplines looking for new and exciting advances in knowledge. In this study, hydrologists and ecologists have worked together to use not only hydrochemical and stable isotope tracers, but also diatoms to infer runoff generation processes. Diatoms, one of the most common and divers algal group, can be easily transported by flowing water due to their small size (~10-200 μm). They are present in most terrestrial habitats and their diversified species distributions are largely controlled by physico-geographical factors (e.g. light, temperature, pH and moisture). Thus, hydrological systems largely control diatom species community composition and distribution. This study was conducted in the schistose Weierbach catchment (0.45 km2, NW Luxembourg). Its runoff regime is characterised by seasonal variation and a delayed shallow groundwater component originating from a saprolite zone. The catchment was instrumented with piezometers, suction cups, an automatic streamwater sampler, a sequential rainfall sampler, and soil moisture and temperature sensors. Samples collected bi-weekly and during storm runoff events allowed the characterisation of the different end-members. Chemical and isotopic hydrograph separations of stream discharge were used to determine not only the geographic sources of water, but also the fractions of old and new water contributing to streamflow. Diatoms intra-storm variability was also analysed and samples of diatoms from various terrestrial and subaerial substrates (bryophytes, litter and leaves), as well as from aquatic habitats (epilithon, epipelon and drift samples) were regularly collected. Diatoms were then used to constrain assumptions and to confirm or reject the hypothesis of existing surface runoff during rainfall-runoff events and to document the intermittent character of hydrological

  15. Of flux and flooding: the advantages and problems of different isotopic methods for quantifying protein turnover in vivo: I. Methods based on the dilution of a tracer.

    PubMed

    Reeds, P J; Davis, T A

    1999-01-01

    The advantages and problems, both practical and theoretical, of isotope dilution approaches to the determination of whole-body and tissue protein turnover are discussed. It was concluded that: (1) measurements made on the basis of the labelling of plasma and breath are well suited to the measurement of body amino acid oxidation and balance, but because of the problem of inhomogeneity of the body amino acid pools, this approach generally underestimates protein turnover; (2) in investigations of nutritional effects on whole-body amino acid turnover, closer attention should be paid to first-pass splanchnic amino acid metabolism; (3) the trans-organ tracer balance method, particularly if combined with the measurement of tissue amino acid labelling, is a potentially useful approach to the simultaneous and dynamic measurement of both protein synthesis and degradation; (4) leucine may be the most generally useful label for tracer level studies of both whole-body and muscle protein synthesis, as recent studies have shown quite close isotopic equilibrium between muscle-free and tRNA-bound leucine pools.

  16. Strontium Isotopes as Tracers for Contamination from Potential Marcellus Shale Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Z.; Li, L.; Hakala, A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical conditions vary significantly in natural water systems, including groundwater aquifers and rivers. In addition, contamination events are often elusive. As a result, it is often challenging to pinpoint the contamination of natural waters by specific types of water sources. The strontium isotope ratio R87Sr, defined as 87Sr/86Sr, has shown promise in discerning contamination from different types of wastewaters related to Marcellus Shale development. The R87Sr of potential end members, including Marcellus shale produced water (0.710-0.712) and Upper Devonian/Lower Mississippian formation brine (0.720-0.721), have been shown to be distinct from those in natural waters. Here we use reactive transport modeling (CrunchFlow) to understand key process and factors that govern the evolution of R87Sr, and the conditions under which we can discern contamination sources in natural water systems. Simulation results show that ion exchange reaction plays an important role in the evolution of R87Sr while release rate has a relatively minor impact on R87Sr evolution. Even with large dilution factor where the volumetric flow rate of natural waters is orders of magnitude higher than the release rates of contamination source water, the R87Sr is still sensitive to different types of source contamination waters. Insights gained here suggest that strontium isotopes can potentially be used as a tracers for different type of water contamination. The modeling tool developed can offer a powerful tool for understanding, predicting, monitoring of natural water contamination.

  17. Isotope tracer approaches for characterizing artificial recharge and demonstrating regulatory compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.; Hudson, G.B.; Moran, J.E.; Neimeyer, S.; Herndon, R., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    Potable reuse of groundwater from wastewater origins requires new methods to quantify proposed regulatory criteria such as subsurface residence times, dilution, and water quality transitions. Isotope tracers oxygen-18 ({sup 18}O), tritium ({sup 3}H), dissolved noble gases, and radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) have been used together in Orange County to age-date groundwater, quantify mixing, and characterize changes in total organic carbon (TOC). Simultaneous measurements of {sup 3}H and helium-3 ({sup 3}He) are used to determine groundwater ages between 1 and 40 years with uncertainties of plus/minus one year. These ages map preferred groundwater flowpaths and identify groundwater ages of less than or equal to 1 year. Wells recharged from the Anaheim Lake spreading basin were used to monitor arrival times and dilution of 6000 acre-ft of {sup 18}O-distinct Colorado River (COR) water introduced during a controlled recharge experiment. In addition, isotopically enriched Xe was introduced into the basin to quantify COR dilution of greater than 90%. The COR arrived at 7 wells between 30 and 200 days after recharge commenced. The COR was diluted up to 90% at distances and depths less than 1000 feet from the lake. Results suggest that dilution of 50% is obtained within 6 months from time or recharge. {sup 14}C measured in TOC of Anaheim Lake bottom water was 3 pmc higher than the DOC. The same water collected one month later in a nearby monitoring well, as confirmed by {sup 18}O, showed a 50% reduction in TOC concentration, and a 7 pmc decrease in {sup 14}C relative to the surface water. This result suggests that older carbon components increase in TOC after recharge.

  18. Using hydrochemistry, tracers and isotopes to analyze hydrogeological dynamics and eutrophication processes in coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menció, Anna; Mas-Pla, Josep; Quintana, Xavier D.

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands and coastal lagoons in Mediterranean areas have recently been the focus of an increasing interest due to the degradation of their ecological status in terms of declining biodiversity, alteration of ecological functioning and limitation of the ecosystem services they provide. Accordingly, the Horizon 2020 Programme of the European Union has set, as one of its priorities, to prevent a further degradation of these ecosystems and to recover their ecological functioning. The aim of this project is to analyze the hydrogeological dynamics in the Pletera coastal lagoons (NE, Spain) as a basis to propose guidelines for their sustainable management. Thus, monthly hydrochemical (with major ions, nutrients and tracers) and isotopic (δ18OH2O and δD) campaigns have been conducted, from November 2014 to October 2015, to determine the hydrogeological dynamics of the Pletera lagoons. In addition, in some of the sampling campaigns δ34SSO4, δ18OSO4, δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 have also been analyzed to determine the origin of eutrophication problems observed in these lagoons, mainly caused by nitrogen compounds. Project founded by MEC CGL-2014-57215-C4-2R and LIFE 13 NAT/ES/001001

  19. Tribochemical investigation of DLC coating in water using stable isotopic tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Ohana, T.; Tanaka, A.; Kubo, T.; Nanao, H.; Minami, I.; Mori, S.

    2008-03-01

    Tribochemical reaction of DLC coating in water was investigated by using a stable isotopic tracer, 18O labeled water (H 218O), to carry out the friction test of DLC coating and 440C ball pair, and using ToF-SIMS to analyze the worn surfaces. The result showed that DLC coating tribochemically reacted with water to form hydrophilic hydroxyl and carboxyl groups on surface, and suggested that the formed hydroxyl mainly combined with the secondary or tertiary carbons on the surface. The surface layer on the counter ball mainly consisted of C from the coating, Cr, Fe from the ball and 18O from water, and was rich in 18OH. It is thought that the hydrophilic groups formed at the interfaces play an important role in low friction and wear behaviors of DLC coating and the counter part in a water environment. Comparing with that obtained from the test in D 2O, the result also suggests that hydrogen/deuterium exchange is easy to occur between the products containing OD on the mated ball and some adsorbates in an ambient air environment.

  20. Assessing compartmentalized flux in lipid metabolism with isotopes.

    PubMed

    Allen, Doug K

    2016-09-01

    Metabolism in plants takes place across multiple cell types and within distinct organelles. The distributions equate to spatial heterogeneity; though the limited means to experimentally assess metabolism frequently involve homogenizing tissues and mixing metabolites from different locations. Most current isotope investigations of metabolism therefore lack the ability to resolve spatially distinct events. Recognition of this limitation has resulted in inspired efforts to advance metabolic flux analysis and isotopic labeling techniques. Though a number of these efforts have been applied to studies in central metabolism; recent advances in instrumentation and techniques present an untapped opportunity to make similar progress in lipid metabolism where the use of stable isotopes has been more limited. These efforts will benefit from sophisticated radiolabeling reports that continue to enrich our knowledge on lipid biosynthetic pathways and provide some direction for stable isotope experimental design and extension of MFA. Evidence for this assertion is presented through the review of several elegant stable isotope studies and by taking stock of what has been learned from radioisotope investigations when spatial aspects of metabolism were considered. The studies emphasize that glycerolipid production occurs across several locations with assembly of lipids in the ER or plastid, fatty acid biosynthesis occurring in the plastid, and the generation of acetyl-CoA and glycerol-3-phosphate taking place at multiple sites. Considering metabolism in this context underscores the cellular and subcellular organization that is important to enhanced production of glycerolipids in plants. An attempt is made to unify salient features from a number of reports into a diagrammatic model of lipid metabolism and propose where stable isotope labeling experiments and further flux analysis may help address questions in the field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid

  1. Susceptibility of Soil Bound Mercury to Gaseous Emission As a Function of Source Depth: An Enriched Isotope Tracer Investigation.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Maxwell E E; Eckley, Chris S; Mitchell, Carl P J

    2015-08-04

    Soil mercury (Hg) emissions are an important component of the global Hg cycle. Sunlight induced photoreduction of oxidized Hg to gaseous elemental Hg is an important mechanism controlling emissions from the soil surface, however we currently understand little about how subsurface Hg stores participate in gaseous Hg cycling. Our study objective was to investigate the ability of Hg at deeper soil depths to participate in emissions. Soil fluxes were measured under controlled laboratory conditions utilizing an enriched stable Hg isotope tracer buried at 0, 1, 2, and 5 cm below the surface. Under dry and low-light conditions, the Hg isotope tracer buried at the different depths participated similarly in surface emissions (median flux: 7.5 ng m(-2) h(-1)). When the soils were wetted, Hg isotope tracer emissions increased significantly (up to 285 ng m(-2) h(-1)), with the highest fluxes (76% of emissions) originating from the surface 1 cm amended soils and decreasing with depth. Mercury associated with sandy soil up to 6 cm below the surface can be emitted, clearly demonstrating that volatilization can occur via processes unrelated to sunlight. These results have important implications for considering how long older, legacy soil Hg contamination continues to cycle between soil and atmosphere.

  2. Stable isotopes of water as a natural tracer for infiltration into urban sewer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracht, O.; Gresch, M.; de Bénédittis, J.; Prigiobbe, V.; Gujer, W.

    2003-04-01

    An adequate understanding of the hydraulic interaction between leaky sewers and groundwater is essential for the sustainable management of both sewer systems and aquifers in urbanized areas. Undesirable infiltration of groundwater into sewers can contribute over 50% of the total discharge and is detrimental to treatment plant efficiency. On the other hand, in many European cities groundwater surface levels seem to be particularly controlled by the drainage effect of permeable sewer systems. However, nowadays methods for the quantification of these exchange processes are still subject to considerable uncertainties due to their underlying assumptions. The frequently used assumption that the night time minimum in the diurnal wastewater hydrograph is equal to the "parasitic discharge" has to be reconsidered to today's patterns of human life as well as to the long residence time of wastewater in the sewer networks of modern cities. The suitability of stable water isotopes as a natural tracer to differentiate the origin of water in the sewer ("real" wastewater or infiltrating groundwater) is currently investigated in three different catchment areas. The studies are carried out within the framework of the European research project APUSS (Assessing Infiltration and Exfiltration on the Performance of Urban Sewer Systems): 1) The village of Rümlang (Zürich, Switzerland) is predominantly served with drinking water from the Lake Zürich. A large fraction of the lakes water is derived from precipitation in the Alps. This drinking water represents the intrinsic provenience of the wastewater with an δ18O value around -11,5 per mill and δ^2H value around -82 per mill vs. SMOW. In contrast, the local groundwater is originating from precipitation in a moderate altitude of about 450 m above sea level and shows comparatively enriched mean δ18O values of -9,7 per mill and δ^2H values of -70 per mill with only small natural variations. The isotopic separation between these

  3. Noble gases, stable isotopes, and radiocarbon as tracers of flow in the Dakota aquifer, Colorado and Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.F.; Davisson, M.L.; Hudson, G.B.; Macfarlane, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    A suite of chemical and isotope tracers (dissolved noble gases, stable isotopes of water, radiocarbon, and CI) have been analyzed along a flow path in the Dakota aquifer system to determine likely recharge sources, ground water residence times, and the extent of mixing between local and intermediate flow systems, presumably caused by large well screens. Three water types were distinguished with the tracers, each having a very different history. Two of the water types were found in south-eastern Colorado where the Dakota is poorly confined. The tracer data suggest that the first group recharged locally during the last few thousand years and the second group was composed of ground water that recharged earlier during a cooler climate, presumably during the last glacial period (LGP) and mixed aged water. The paleotemperature record archived in this groundwater system indicates that south-eastern Colorado was about 5??C cooler during the LGP than during the late Holocene. Similar temperature changes derived from dissolved noble gases in other aquifer systems have been reported earlier for the south-western United States. The third water type was located down gradient of the first two in the confined Dakota in western and central Kansas. Groundwater residence time of this water mass is on the order of 104-105 yrs and its recharge location is near the Colorado and Kansas border down gradient of the other water types. The study shows the importance of using multiple tracers when investigating ground water systems.A suite of chemical and isotope tracers (dissolved noble gases, stable isotopes of water, radiocarbon, and CL) were analyzed along a flow path in the Dakota aquifer system to determine likely recharge sources, ground water residence times, and the extent of mixing between local and intermediate flow systems. Three water types were distinguished with the tracers, each having a very different history. Two of the water types were located in south-eastern Colorado

  4. Examining the impacts of precipitation isotope input (δ18Oppt) on distributed, tracer-aided hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavau, Carly J.; Stadnyk, Tricia; Holmes, Tegan

    2017-05-01

    Tracer-aided hydrological models are becoming increasingly popular tools as they assist with process understanding and source separation, which facilitates model calibration and diagnosis of model uncertainty (Tetzlaff et al., 2015; Klaus and McDonnell, 2013). Data availability in high-latitude regions, however, proves to be a major challenge associated with this type of application (Tetzlaff et al., 2015). Models require a time series of isotopes in precipitation (δ18Oppt) to drive simulations, and throughout much of the world - particularly in sparsely populated high-latitude regions - these data are not widely available. Here we investigate the impact that choice of precipitation isotope product (δ18Oppt) has on simulations of streamflow, δ18O in streamflow (δ18OSF), resulting hydrograph separations, and model parameters. In a high-latitude, data-sparse, seasonal basin (Fort Simpson, NWT, Canada), we assess three precipitation isotope products of different spatial and temporal resolutions (i.e. semi-annual static, seasonal KPN43, and daily bias-corrected REMOiso), and apply them to force the isoWATFLOOD tracer-aided hydrologic model. Total simulated streamflow is not significantly impacted by choice of δ18Oppt product; however, simulated isotopes in streamflow (δ18OSF) and the internal apportionment of water (driven by model parameterization) are impacted. The highest-resolution product (REMOiso) was distinct from the two lower-resolution products (KPN43 and static), but could not be verified as correct due to a lack of daily δ18Oppt observations. The resolution of δ18Oppt impacts model parameterization and seasonal hydrograph separations, producing notable differences among simulations following large snowmelt and rainfall events when event compositions differ significantly from δ18OSF. Capturing and preserving the spatial variability in δ18Oppt using distributed tracer-aided models is important because this variability impacts model parameterization

  5. Final report on isotope tracer investigations in the Forebay of the Orange County groundwater basin.

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M; Woodside, G

    2003-12-13

    directly measure groundwater ages and perform two artificial tracer studies using isotope methods to quantify flowpath directions, groundwater residence times, and the rate and extent of recharge water and groundwater mixing. In addition, Jordan Clark at University of California, Santa Barbara also performed an artificial tracer experiment using sulfur-hexafluoride, whose results have been integrated into the LLNL findings.

  6. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  7. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-10-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. 38 references.

  8. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, N; Leu, A; Muñoz, E; Olsen, J; Kwong, E; Des Marais, D

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4% depleted in 13C relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3% enriched in 13C. The acetate 13C enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6% depleted in 13C, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7%, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7%, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. PMID:2867741

  9. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  10. A rapid and convenient method for measuring the fractional rate of protein synthesis in ectothermic animal tissues using a stable isotope tracer.

    PubMed

    Lamarre, S G; Saulnier, R J; Blier, P U; Driedzic, W R

    2015-04-01

    A method was devised to measure the fractional rate of protein synthesis in fish using a stable isotope labelled tracer (ring-D5-phenylalanine) instead of radioactive phenylalanine. This modified flooding dose technique utilizes gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (GC-MS). The technique was validated by measuring the fractional rate of protein synthesis in the liver and white muscle of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) and then tested by comparing the fractional rate of protein synthesis of fed and starved Arctic charr. The modified technique met the assumptions of the flooding dose technique and was successfully used to detect alterations in the rate of protein synthesis in fed and starved fish. This modified technique allows for studies on protein metabolism to be carried out in situations where the use of radioactivity is difficult, if not impossible.

  11. Use of a multi-isotope and multi-tracer approach including organic matter isotopes for quantifying nutrient contributions from agricultural vs wastewater sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Young, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    While nutrient isotopes are a well-established tool for quantifying nutrients inputs from agricultural vs wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) sources, we have found that combining nutrient isotopes with the C, N, and S isotopic compositions of dissolved and particulate organic matter, as part of a comprehensive multi-isotope and multi-tracer approach, is a much more diagnostic approach. The main reasons why organic matter C-N-S isotopes are a useful adjunct to studies of nutrient sources and biogeochemical processes are that the dissolved and particulate organic matter associated with (1) different kinds of animals (e.g., humans vs cows) often have distinctive isotopic compositions reflecting the different diets of the animals, and (2) the different processes associated with the different land uses (e.g., in the WWTP or associated with different crop types) often result in significant differences in the isotopic compositions of the organics. The analysis of the δ34S of particulate organic matter (POM) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been found to be especially useful for distinguishing and quantifying water, nutrient, and organic contributions from different land uses in aquatic systems where much of the organic matter is aquatic in origin. In such environments, the bacteria and algae incorporate S from sulfate and sulfide that is isotopically labeled by the different processes associated with different land uses. We have found that there is ~35 permil range in δ34S of POM along the river-estuary continuum in the San Joaquin/Sacramento River basin, with low values associated with sulfate reduction in the upstream wetlands and high values associated with tidal inputs of marine water into the estuary. Furthermore, rice agriculture results in relatively low δ34S values whereas WWTP effluent in the Sacramento River produces distinctly higher values than upstream of the WWTP, presumably because SO2 is used to treat chlorinated effluent. The fish living

  12. Time Passes - Argon Isotopes as Tracers of Fluids in the Earth's Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Simon P.

    2016-04-01

    Recent experimental measurements of noble gas solubility in silicate minerals (e.g. Jackson et al. 2013, 2015) means that we can begin to explore the use of noble gas partition between minerals and fluids to understand their residence and transport in the Earth's crust. One starting point for this exploration is the distribution of noble gases and halogens in crustal fluids which was reviewed by Kendrick and Burnard (2013). In particular, K&B (2013) noted that time is a key parameter in understanding noble gas tracers in crustal processes; yielding information such as the residence time of water in a reservoir based on 4He acquired from aquifer rocks, and the 40Ar/39Ar age of fluid inclusions based on trapped fluid and minerals in quartz. Argon isotope variations in natural systems have been measured during studies of 40Ar/39Ar ages to quantify the rates and timescales of crustal processes. There are also studies of fluids in similar rocks, notably in fluid inclusions, providing the opportunity to quantify the variations in the crust. Partition of argon between mineral phases under conditions of varying fluid availability can be compared in systems where 40Ar/39Ar measurements indicate the preservation of non-radiogenic argon (both excess and atmospheric) in the minerals. Rather than a simple picture of radiogenic argon contents increasing with crustal age, and gradual depletion of atmospheric argon in deeper fluids, what emerges is a sometimes dynamic and sometimes static system in different zones of the crust. While it can be shown that the hydrous fluid in sandstone reservoirs contained excess argon, analyses of authigenic minerals rarely exhibit 40Ar/39Ar ages in excess of the growth age. In this scenario, the incompatible nature of argon means that the fluid acts as an effective infinite reservoir and radiogenic argon dominates the potassium rich authigenic minerals. The controls on noble gas distribution are also well illustrated by deep crustal rocks such as

  13. Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere: isotopic exchange with ozone and its use as a tracer in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Y. L.; Lee, A. Y.; Irion, F. W.; DeMore, W. B.; Wen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Atmospheric heavy ozone is enriched in the isotopes 18O and 17O. The magnitude of this enhancement, of the order of 100%, is very large compared with that commonly known in atmospheric chemistry and geochemistry. The heavy oxygen atom in heavy ozone is therefore useful as a tracer of chemical species and pathways that involve ozone or its derived products. As a test of the isotopic exchange reactions, we successfully carry out a series of numerical experiments to simulate the results of the laboratory experiments performed by Wen and Thiemens [1993] on ozone and CO2. A small discrepancy between the experimental and the model values for 17O exchange is also revealed. The results are used to compute the magnitude of isotopic exchange between ozone and carbon dioxide via the excited atom O(1D) in the middle atmosphere. The model for 18O is in good agreement with the observed values.

  14. Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere: isotopic exchange with ozone and its use as a tracer in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Y. L.; Lee, A. Y.; Irion, F. W.; DeMore, W. B.; Wen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Atmospheric heavy ozone is enriched in the isotopes 18O and 17O. The magnitude of this enhancement, of the order of 100%, is very large compared with that commonly known in atmospheric chemistry and geochemistry. The heavy oxygen atom in heavy ozone is therefore useful as a tracer of chemical species and pathways that involve ozone or its derived products. As a test of the isotopic exchange reactions, we successfully carry out a series of numerical experiments to simulate the results of the laboratory experiments performed by Wen and Thiemens [1993] on ozone and CO2. A small discrepancy between the experimental and the model values for 17O exchange is also revealed. The results are used to compute the magnitude of isotopic exchange between ozone and carbon dioxide via the excited atom O(1D) in the middle atmosphere. The model for 18O is in good agreement with the observed values.

  15. Stable mercury isotope ratios as tracers for Hg cycling at the inoperative New Idria Hg mine, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederhold, J. G.; Jew, A. D.; Brown, G. E.; Bourdon, B.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2010-12-01

    The seven stable isotopes of Hg are fractionated in the environment as a result of mass-dependent (MDF) and mass-independent (MIF) fractionation processes that can be studied in parallel by analyzing the ratios of even and odd mass Hg isotopes. MDF and MIF Hg isotope signatures of natural samples may provide a new tool to trace sources and transformations in environmental Hg cycling. However, the mechanisms controlling the extent of kinetic and equilibrium Hg isotope fractionations are still only partially understood. Thus, development of this promising tracer requires experimental calibration of relevant fractionation factors as well as assessment of natural variations of Hg isotope ratios under different environmental conditions. The inoperative Hg mine in New Idria (California, USA) represents an ideal case study to explore Hg isotope fractionation during Hg transformation and transport processes. More than a century of Hg mining and on-site thermal refining to obtain elemental Hg until 1972 produced large volumes of contaminated mine wastes which now represent sources of Hg pollution for the surrounding ecosystems. Here, we present Hg isotope data from various materials collected at New Idria using Cold-Vapor-MC-ICPMS with a long-term δ202Hg reproducibility of ±0.1‰ (2SD). Uncalcined mine waste samples were isotopically similar to NIST-3133 and did not exhibit any MIF signatures. In contrast, calcine samples, which represent the residue of the thermal ore processing at 700°C, had significantly heavier δ202Hg values of up to +1.5‰. In addition, we observed small negative MIF anomalies of the odd-mass Hg isotopes in the calcine samples, which could be caused either by nuclear volume fractionation or a magnetic isotope effect during or after the roasting process. The mass-dependent enrichment of heavy Hg isotopes in the calcine materials indicates that light Hg isotopes were preferentially removed during the roasting process, in agreement with a previous

  16. Detection of Septic System Waste in the Groundwaters of Southern California Using Emerging Contaminants and Isotopic Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Conkle, J.; Sickman, J. O.; Lucero, D.; Pang, F.; Gan, J.

    2011-12-01

    In California, groundwater supplies 30-40% of the State's water and in rapidly growing regions like the Inland Empire, groundwater makes up 80-90% of the municipal water supply. However, anthropogenic contamination could adversely affect groundwater quality and thereby reduce available supplies. Appropriate tracers are needed to identify groundwater contamination and protect human health. Stable isotopes δ15N and δ 18O offer unique information about the importance of nitrate sources and processes affecting nitrate in aquifers. We investigated the influence of septic systems on groundwater quality in and around the city of Beaumont, CA during 2010-11. Groundwater samples were collected from 38 active wells and 10 surface water sites in the region (urban and natural streams, agricultural drainage and groundwater recharge basins supplied by the California State Water Project). Stable isotopes and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) were analyzed for all the water samples. The variations of δ15N and δ 18O of nitrate were 2 - 21 per mil and -4 - 9 per mil respectively. δ15N-NO3 values greater than 10 per mil have been associated with nitrate inputs from sewage and animal waste, but in the Beaumont wells, PPCP concentrations were at or below the detection limit in most wells with high isotope ratios. We also observed a strong linear relationship between δ15N and δ 18O of nitrate (slope of~ 0.5) in the vast majority of our samples including those with high isotope ratios. Our results suggest that denitrification was widespread in the Beaumont aquifer and strongly affected the isotope composition of nitrate. In some wells, PPCPs (carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, primidone, meprobamate and diuron) and isotope measurements indicated inputs from human waste, but these sites were affected primarily by local waste-water treatment plant effluent. A mixing model was developed using multiple tracers to determine sources and contributions of groundwater

  17. Bayesian Nitrate Source Apportionment to Individual Groundwater Wells in the Central Valley by Use of Elemental and Isotopic Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, K.; Grote, M. N.; Deinhart, A.; Eppich, G.; Kendall, C.; Sanborn, M.; Souders, K.; Wimpenny, J.; Yin, Q. Z.; Young, M. B.; Harter, T.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater quality is a concern in alluvial aquifers that underlie agricultural areas, such as in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Nitrate from fertilizers and animal waste can leach to groundwater and contaminate drinking water resources. Dairy manure and synthetic fertilizers are prevailing sources of nitrate in groundwater for the San Joaquin Valley with septic waste contributing as a major source in some areas. The rural population in the San Joaquin Valley relies almost exclusively on shallow domestic wells (less than 150 m deep), of which many have been affected by nitrate. Knowledge of the proportion of each of the three main nitrate sources (manure, synthetic fertilizer, and septic waste) contributing to individual well nitrate can aid future regulatory decisions. Mixing models quantify the proportional contributions of sources to a mixture by using the concentration of conservative tracers within each source as a source signature. Deterministic mixing models are common, but do not allow for variability in the tracer source concentration or overlap of tracer concentrations between sources. In contrast, Bayesian mixing models treat source contributions probabilistically, building statistical variation into the inferences for each well. The authors developed a Bayesian mixing model on a pilot network of 56 private domestic wells in the San Joaquin Valley for which nitrogen, oxygen, and boron isotopes as well as nitrate and iodine were measured. Nitrogen, oxygen, and boron isotopes as well as iodine can be used as tracers to differentiate between manure, fertilizers, septic waste, and natural sources of nitrate (which can contribute nitrate in concentrations up to 4 mg/L). In this work, the isotopic and elemental tracers were used to estimate the proportional contribution of manure, fertilizers, septic waste, and natural sources to overall groundwater nitrate concentration in individual wells. Prior distributions for the four tracers for each of the four

  18. Tracers to investigate protein and amino acid metabolism in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Wagenmakers, A J

    1999-11-01

    Three tracer methods have been used to measure protein synthesis, protein breakdown and protein oxidation at whole-body level. The method using L-[1-(13)C]leucine is considered the method of reference. These methods have contributed greatly to the existing knowledge on whole-body protein turnover and its regulation by feeding, fasting, hormones and disease. How exercise and ingestion of mixed protein-containing meals affect whole-body protein metabolism is still open to debate, as there are discrepancies in results obtained with different tracers. The contribution of whole-body methods to the future gain of knowledge is expected to be limited due to the fact that most physiological disturbances have been investigated extensively, and due to the lack of information on the relative contribution of various tissues and proteins to whole-body changes. Tracer amino acid-incorporation methods are most suited to investigate these latter aspects of protein metabolism. These methods have shown that some tissues (liver and gut) have much higher turnover rates and deposit much more protein than others (muscle). Massive differences also exist between the fractional synthesis rates of individual proteins. The incorporation methods have been properly validated, although minor disagreements remain on the identity of the true precursor pool (the enrichment of which should be used in the calculations). Arterio-venous organ balance studies have shown that little protein is deposited in skeletal muscle following a protein-containing meal, while much more protein is deposited in liver and gut. The amount deposited in the feeding period in each of these tissues is released again during overnight fasting. The addition of tracers to organ balance studies allows the simultaneous estimation of protein synthesis and protein breakdown, and provides information on whether changes in net protein balance are caused primarily by a change in protein synthesis or in protein breakdown. In the case

  19. Isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: complex yet highly informative.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) using isotopic tracers aims at the experimental determination of in vivo reaction rates (fluxes). In recent years, the well-established 13C-MFA method based on metabolic and isotopic steady state was extended to INST-MFA (isotopically non-stationary MFA), which is performed in a transient labeling state. INST-MFA offers short-time experiments with a maximal information gain, and can moreover be applied to a wider range of growth conditions or organisms. Some of these conditions are not accessible by conventional methods. This comes at the price of significant methodological complexity involving high-frequency sampling and quenching, precise analysis of many samples and an extraordinary computational effort. This review gives a brief overview of basic principles, experimental workflows, and recent progress in this field. Special emphasis is laid on the trade-off between total effort and information gain, particularly on the suitability of INST-MFA for certain types of biological questions. In order to integrate INST-MFA as a viable method into the toolbox of MFA, some major challenges must be addressed in the coming years. These are discussed in the outlook.

  20. Use of stable isotope-labeled Escherichia coli as a tracer in karst aquifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial contamination of karst aquifers is a large concern across the globe, yet bacterial transport in karst aquifers is not currently well understood. Groundwater tracers typically used in karst systems include fluorescent dyes and latex microspheres. Not only can these tracers can be cost-prohi...

  1. Bayesian nitrate source apportionment to individual groundwater wells in the Central Valley by use of elemental and isotopic tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, Katherine M; Grote, Mark N.; Deinhart, Amanda; Eppich, Gary; Kendall, Carol; Sanborn, Matthew E.; Sounders, A. Kate; Wimpenny, Joshua; Yin, Qing-zhu; Young, Megan B.; Harter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater quality is a concern in alluvial aquifers that underlie agricultural areas, such as in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Shallow domestic wells (less than 150 m deep) in agricultural areas are often contaminated by nitrate. Agricultural and rural nitrate sources include dairy manure, synthetic fertilizers, and septic waste. Knowledge of the relative proportion that each of these sources contributes to nitrate concentration in individual wells can aid future regulatory and land management decisions. We show that nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, boron isotopes, and iodine concentrations are a useful, novel combination of groundwater tracers to differentiate between manure, fertilizers, septic waste, and natural sources of nitrate. Furthermore, in this work, we develop a new Bayesian mixing model in which these isotopic and elemental tracers were used to estimate the probability distribution of the fractional contributions of manure, fertilizers, septic waste, and natural sources to the nitrate concentration found in an individual well. The approach was applied to 56 nitrate-impacted private domestic wells located in the San Joaquin Valley. Model analysis found that some domestic wells were clearly dominated by the manure source and suggests evidence for majority contributions from either the septic or fertilizer source for other wells. But, predictions of fractional contributions for septic and fertilizer sources were often of similar magnitude, perhaps because modeled uncertainty about the fraction of each was large. For validation of the Bayesian model, fractional estimates were compared to surrounding land use and estimated source contributions were broadly consistent with nearby land use types.

  2. Bayesian nitrate source apportionment to individual groundwater wells in the Central Valley by use of elemental and isotopic tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, Katherine M.; Grote, Mark N.; Deinhart, Amanda; Eppich, Gary; Kendall, Carol; Sanborn, Matthew E.; Souders, A. Kate; Wimpenny, Joshua; Yin, Qing-zhu; Young, Megan; Harter, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Groundwater quality is a concern in alluvial aquifers that underlie agricultural areas, such as in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Shallow domestic wells (less than 150 m deep) in agricultural areas are often contaminated by nitrate. Agricultural and rural nitrate sources include dairy manure, synthetic fertilizers, and septic waste. Knowledge of the relative proportion that each of these sources contributes to nitrate concentration in individual wells can aid future regulatory and land management decisions. We show that nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, boron isotopes, and iodine concentrations are a useful, novel combination of groundwater tracers to differentiate between manure, fertilizers, septic waste, and natural sources of nitrate. Furthermore, in this work, we develop a new Bayesian mixing model in which these isotopic and elemental tracers were used to estimate the probability distribution of the fractional contributions of manure, fertilizers, septic waste, and natural sources to the nitrate concentration found in an individual well. The approach was applied to 56 nitrate-impacted private domestic wells located in the San Joaquin Valley. Model analysis found that some domestic wells were clearly dominated by the manure source and suggests evidence for majority contributions from either the septic or fertilizer source for other wells. But, predictions of fractional contributions for septic and fertilizer sources were often of similar magnitude, perhaps because modeled uncertainty about the fraction of each was large. For validation of the Bayesian model, fractional estimates were compared to surrounding land use and estimated source contributions were broadly consistent with nearby land use types.

  3. Ra and Rn isotopes as natural tracers of submarine groundwater discharge in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Reich, C.; Kroeger, K.D.; Baskaran, M.

    2007-01-01

    A suite of naturally occurring radionuclides in the U/Th decay series (222Rn, 223,224,226,228Ra) were studied during wet and dry conditions in Tampa Bay, Florida, to evaluate their utility as groundwater discharge tracers, both within the bay proper and within the Alafia River/estuary — a prominent free-flowing river that empties into the bay. In Tampa Bay, almost 30% of the combined riverine inputs still remain ungauged. Consequently, groundwater/surface water (hyporheic) exchange in the discharging coastal rivers, as well as submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) within the bay, are still unresolved components of this system's water and material budgets. Based on known inputs and sinks, there exists an excess of 226Ra in the water column of Tampa Bay, which can be evaluated in terms of a submarine groundwater contribution to the bay proper. Submarine groundwater discharge rates calculated using a mass balance of excess 226Ra ranged from 2.2 to 14.5 L m− 2 day− 1, depending on whether the estuarine residence time was calculated using 224Ra/xs228Ra isotope ratios, or whether a long term, averaged model-derived estuarine residence time was used. When extrapolated to the total shoreline length of the bay, such SGD rates ranged from 1.6 to 10.3 m3 m− 1 day− 1. Activities of 222Rn were also elevated in surface water and shallow groundwater of the bay, as well as in the Alafia River estuary, where upstream activities as high as 250 dpm L− 1 indicate enhanced groundwater/surface water exchange, facilitated by an active spring vent. From average nutrient concentrations of 39 shallow, brackish, groundwater samples, rates of nutrient loading into Tampa Bay by SGD rates were estimated, and these ranged from 0.2 to 1.4 × 105 mol day− 1 (PO43−), 0.9–6.2 × 105 mol day− 1 (SiO4−), 0.7–5.0 × 105 mol day− 1 (dissolved organic nitrogen, DON), and 0.2–1.4 × 106 mol day− 1 (total dissolved nitrogen, TDN). Such nutrient loading estimates, when compared

  4. THE ROLE OF PRE-EVENT CANOPY STORAGE IN THROUGHFALL AND STEMFLOW USING ISOTOPIC TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes can be a valuable tool for tracing the redistribution, storage, and evaporation of water associated with canopy interception of rainfall. Isotopic differences between throughfall and rainfall have been attributed to three mechanisms: evaporative fractionation, iso...

  5. THE ROLE OF PRE-EVENT CANOPY STORAGE IN THROUGHFALL AND STEMFLOW USING ISOTOPIC TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes can be a valuable tool for tracing the redistribution, storage, and evaporation of water associated with canopy interception of rainfall. Isotopic differences between throughfall and rainfall have been attributed to three mechanisms: evaporative fractionation, iso...

  6. In-Vivo Zinc Metabolism by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this chapter is to highlight some of the methodological and technical issues surrounding the in vivo use of stable isotopes and to provide examples of how such studies have advanced our knowledge of human zinc metabolism. The advantages and disadvantages of the currently available in...

  7. Quantifying plant phenotypes with isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Analyses of metabolic flux using stable isotopes in plants have traditionally been restricted to tissues with presumed homogeneous cell populations such as developing seeds, cell suspensions, or cultured roots and root tips. It is now possible to describe these and other more complex tissues such a...

  8. The role of pre-event canopy storage in throughfall and stemflow by using isotopic tracers

    Treesearch

    S.T. Allen; J.R. Brooks; R.F. Keim; B.J. Bond; J.J. McDonnell

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotopes can be a valuable tool for tracing the redistribution, storage, and evaporation of water associated with canopy interception of rainfall. Isotopic differences between throughfall and rainfall have been attributed to three mechanisms: evaporative fractionation, isotopic exchange with ambient vapor, and temporal redistribution. We demonstrate the...

  9. A natural abundance stable isotope tracer experiment to define SO2 oxidation pathways and their fractionation during heterogeneous oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, N.; Norman, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols have crucial direct and indirect effects on climate from radiative cooling to modifying clouds by formation of cloud condensation nuclei. Secondary sulfate aerosols are formed by oxidation of SO2 and subsequent nucleation and growth and the characteristics of primary aerosol sulfate can be modified by oxidation of SO2. There are several known oxidation pathways for SO2; gaseous phase OH oxidation and aqueous phase H2O2, O3 and transition metal oxides oxidation. The SO2 oxidation pathway affects the characteristics of the aerosols formed. Stable isotope techniques are useful in determining the oxidation pathway of SO2 due to unique fractionation patterns (Harris et al., 2012). However, there are still gaps in our understanding of the oxidation pathways and fractionations affecting SO2 and secondary sulfate. A tracer experiment to investigate the oxidation of SO2 and fractionation using size segregated aerosols in the presence of different compounds is described. Two high volume samplers situated to measure background sulfate upwind, and the results of a tracer experiment, downwind, is described. After sufficient size segregated aerosol sulfate has been collected, a source of SO2 with known isotopic composition is introduced to the second high volume sampler. Changes in the isotopic composition for size segregated aerosol sulfate in comparison to the first high volume sampler are investigated. The amount of fractionation during heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 on pre-existing aerosols is calculated using the concentrations and known isotopic composition and compared to data from laboratory and field experiments. The experiment is performed downwind of sources of organic compounds such as pine forests, and characterized using co-located canister samples, to determine the effects of SO2 oxidation on secondary aerosol sulfate.

  10. Quantifying plant phenotypes with isotopic labeling & metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Doug K

    2016-02-01

    Analyses of metabolic flux using stable isotopes in plants have traditionally been restricted to tissues with presumed homogeneous cell populations and long metabolic steady states such as developing seeds, cell suspensions, or cultured roots and root tips. It is now possible to describe these and other metabolically more dynamic tissues such as leaves in greater detail using novel methods in mass spectrometry, isotope labeling strategies, and transient labeling-based flux analyses. Such studies are necessary for a systems level description of plant function that more closely represents biological reality, and provides insights into the genes that will need to be modified as natural resources become ever more limited and environments change. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Simulation of glacial ocean biogeochemical tracer and isotope distributions based on the PMIP3 suite of climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatiwala, Samar; Muglia, Juan; Kvale, Karin; Schmittner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In the present climate system, buoyancy forced convection at high-latitudes together with internal mixing results in a vigorous overturning circulation whose major component is North Atlantic Deep Water. One of the key questions of climate science is whether this "mode" of circulation persisted during glacial periods, and in particular at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21000 years before present). Resolving this question is both important for advancing our understanding of the climate system, as well as a critical test of numerical models' ability to reliably simulate different climates. The observational evidence, based on interpreting geochemical tracers archived in sediments, is conflicting, as are simulations carried out with state-of-the-art climate models (e.g., as part of the PMIP3 suite), which, due to the computational cost involved, do not by and large include biogeochemical and isotope tracers that can be directly compared with proxy data. Here, we apply geochemical observations to evaluate the ability of several realisations of an ocean model driven by atmospheric forcing from the PMIP3 suite of climate models to simulate global ocean circulation during the LGM. This results in a wide range of circulation states that are then used to simulate biogeochemical tracer and isotope (13C, 14C and Pa/Th) distributions using an efficient, "offline" computational scheme known as the transport matrix method (TMM). One of the key advantages of this approach is the use of a uniform set of biogeochemical and isotope parameterizations across all the different circulations based on the PMIP3 models. We compare these simulated distributions to both modern observations and data from LGM ocean sediments to identify similarities and discrepancies between model and data. We find, for example, that when the ocean model is forced with wind stress from the PMIP3 models the radiocarbon age of the deep ocean is systematically younger compared with reconstructions. Changes in

  12. Accumulation of Microcystin (LR, RR and YR) in Three Freshwater Bivalves in Microcystis aeruginosa Bloom Using Dual Isotope Tracer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeonjung; Ha, Sun-Yong; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Choi, Jong-Woo; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope tracers were first applied to evaluate the Microcystis cell assimilation efficiency of Sinanodonta bivalves, since the past identification method has been limited to tracking the changes of each chl-a, clearity, and nutrient. The toxicity profile and accumulation of MC-LR, -RR and -YR in different organs (foot and digestive organs) from the three filter-feeders (Sinanodonta woodiana, Sinanodonta arcaeformis, and Unio douglasiae) were assessed under the condition of toxigenic cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa) blooms through an in situ pond experiment using 13C and 15N dual isotope tracers. Chl-a concentration in the manipulated pond was dramatically decreased after the beginning of the second day, ranging from 217.5 to 15.6 μg·L−1. The highest amount of MCs was incorporated into muscle and gland tissues in U. douglasiae during the study period, at nearly 2 or 3 times higher than in S. woodiana and S. arcaeformis. In addition, the incorporated 13C and 15N atom % in the U. douglasiae bivalve showed lower values than in other bivalves. The results demonstrate that U. douglasiae has less capacity to assimilate toxic cyanobacteria derived from diet. However, the incorporated 13C and 15N atom % of S. arcaeformis showed a larger feeding capacity than U. douglasiae and S. woodiana. Our results therefore also indicate that S. arcaeformis can eliminate the toxin more rapidly than U. douglasiae, having a larger detoxification capacity. PMID:28714921

  13. Osmium isotopes and silver as tracers of anthropogenic metals in sediments from Massachusetts and Cape Cod bays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ravizza, G.E.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1996-01-01

    High concentrations of osmium (Os) and silver (Ag) and low 187Os/186Os ratios in Boston sewage make these elements sensitive tracers of the influence of sewage on marine sediments in Massachusetts and Cape Cod bays. Pristine marine sediments have Ag concentrations more than 200 times lower than sewage sludge, Os concentrations 10-40 times lower, and 187Os/186Os ratios six times higher. Surface sediments from both Massachusetts and Cape Cod bays exhibit both high Ag concentrations and low 187Os/186Os ratios indicating the influence of sewage particles on marine sediments in this region extends some 70 km from the point of sewage release. In detail, the distribution of Os and Ag do not support a model of simple physical mixing of sewage particles with normal marine sediments. Deviations from the mixing model may be the result of fractionation of Os and Ag in the marine environment, and [or] independent temporal variations in the Os and Ag content of the waste stream. The results of this investigation suggest that osmium isotopes may be widely applicable as tracers of the influence of sewage on sediments in estuarine environments and that subtle variations in the isotopic composition of Os in the waste stream may help constrain the sources of Os and other metals delivered to the environment.

  14. Osmium isotopes and silver as tracers of anthropogenic metals in sediments from Massachusetts and Cape Cod bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravizza, G. E.; Bothner, M. H.

    1996-08-01

    High concentrations of osmium (Os) and silver (Ag) and low 187Os/ 186Os ratios in Boston sewage make these elements sensitive tracers of the influence of sewage on marine sediments in Massachusetts and Cape Cod bays. Pristine marine sediments have Ag concentrations more than 200 times lower than sewage sludge, Os concentrations 10-40 times lower, and 187OS/ 186Os ratios six times higher. Surface sediments from both Massachusetts and Cape Cod bays exhibit both high Ag concentrations and low 187OS/ 186Os ratios indicating the influence of sewage particles on marine sediments in this region extends some 70 km from the point of sewage release. In detail, the distribution of Os and Ag do not support a model of simple physical mixing of sewage particles with normal marine sediments. Deviations from the mixing model may be the result of fractionation of Os and Ag in the marine environment, and [or] independent temporal variations in the Os and Ag content of the waste stream. The results of this investigation suggest that osmium isotopes may be widely applicable as tracers of the influence of sewage on sediments in estuarine environments and that subtle variations in the isotopic composition of Os in the waste stream may help constrain the sources of Os and other metals delivered to the environment.

  15. Chemical Conversion of PON to Nitrous Oxide for Nitrogen Isotopic Analysis : High- Sensitivity Tracer Assay for Nitrogen Fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunogai, U.; Kido, T.; Hirota, A.; Ohkubo, S.; Komatsu, D. D.; Nakagawa, F.

    2006-12-01

    We present a method for high-sensitivity nitrogen isotopic analysis of particulate organic nitrogen (PON) in seawater and freshwater, for the aim of measuring the rate of nitrogen fixation through 15N2 tracer technique for samples that contain low numeric abundance of organisms. The method composed of the traditional oxidation/reduction methods: such as oxidation of PON to nitrate using persulfate, the reduction of nitrate to nitrite using spongy cadmium, and further reduction of nitrite to nitrous oxide using sodium azide in an acetic acid buffer. Then, Nitrous oxide is purged from the water and trapped cryogenically with subsequent release into a gas chromatography column to analyze stable nitrogen isotopic compositions using a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. A standard deviation less than 0.3 ‰ for nitrogen was found for PON samples containing more than 80 nmolN, with a blank nitrogen of 20 nmolN. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation were consistent within each batch of analysis. Besides, we found that we can also determine nitrogen isotopic compositions of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN, sum of NO3-, NO2-, ammonium, and DON), by applying the method for filtrate samples. Our method may prove to obtain isotopic information for lower quantities of PON and TDN than other methods, so that we can reduce quantities of water samples needed for incubation to determine the nitrogen fixation rate in both seawater and freshwater. Besides, the method is also useful to determine the rate of nitrogen fixation by the small size fraction in ocean. We will also present the results obtained at western subtropical North Pacific to support our conclusions.

  16. Determining the Turnover of Glycosphingolipid Species by Stable-Isotope Tracer Lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Skotland, Tore; Ekroos, Kim; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Bergan, Jonas; Kauhanen, Dimple; Lintonen, Tuulia; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-12-04

    In this study, we used water-soluble stable mass isotope precursors to measure the turnover of endogenous ceramide (Cer) and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in HEp-2 cells. Cells incubated in the presence of [(13)C-U]glucose showed rapid incorporation of hexose residues with an increased mass of 6Da into GSLs. Different turnover rates of GSL classes and their molecular species were observed. Approximately 30% of the glucosylceramide, 50% of the lactosylceramide, and 50% of the globotriaosylceramide species showed a much slower turnover than the rest. This demonstrates the existence of different lipid pools, where a certain fraction of species survived for a long time in the cells. The species with the shortest N-amidated fatty acyl groups (C16:0 and C18:0) showed a more rapid turnover than those with the longest N-amidated fatty acids (C24:0 and C24:1). Experiments with addition of [(13)C-U]serine were performed to study de novo synthesis of Cer from serine and palmitoyl-CoA. These experiments revealed that de novo synthesis contributes to a minor extent to the total synthesis of new sphingolipids and showed that there is a more rapid formation of the longest Cer species (C24:0 and C24:1) than of the shortest species (C16:0), that is, the opposite as observed for the GSLs in the experiments with [(13)C-U]glucose. In conclusion, this FLUX lipidomics experimental approach with the addition of [(13)C-U]glucose to cells allows us to not only study the total turnover but also permit observations of lipid intermediates and metabolic flow of endogenous GSL species at the molecular lipid level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Methylmercury effects on migratory behaviour in glass eels (Anguilla anguilla): an experimental study using isotopic tracers.

    PubMed

    Claveau, Julie; Monperrus, Mathilde; Jarry, Marc; Baudrimont, Magalie; Gonzalez, Patrice; Cavalheiro, Joana; Mesmer-Dudons, Nathalie; Bolliet, Valérie

    2015-05-01

    The effect of methylmercury (MeHg) on glass eels' propensity to migrate, mitochondrial activity and antioxidative defence systems was investigated. Marine glass eels were first sorted in an experimental flume according to their response to dusk. Fish responding to the decrease in light intensity by ascending in the water column and moving with or against the flow were considered as having a high propensity to migrate (migrant). Glass eels still sheltering at the end of the 24 h catching period were considered as having a low propensity to migrate and were called non-migrant. Migrant and non-migrant glass eels were then individually tagged and exposed to isotopically enriched (201)MeHg (50 ng L(-1)) for 11 days. The effect of contamination was studied on muscle fibre structure, and the expression level of genes involved in mitochondrial activity and antioxidative defence systems. To investigate the effect of MeHg on glass eel behaviour, migrant and non-migrant glass eels were sorted again and the bioaccumulation of (201)MeHg and its demethylation product ((201)Hg(II)) were determined for each individual. MeHg exposure increased activity in non-migrant glass eels but not migratory behaviour. Contamination affected mitochondrial structure and metabolism and suggests a higher oxidative stress and activation of antioxidative defence systems in non-migrant glass eels. Overall, our results suggest that exposure to MeHg might induce an increase in energy expenditure and a higher vulnerability to predation in non-migrant glass eels in the wild. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of the metabolic tracer carbon-11-acetate for evaluation of regional myocardial perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.Y.; Brunken, R.C.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R. )

    1991-04-01

    The high first-pass myocardial extraction fraction of carbon-11-acetate suggests that its initial uptake depends on blood flow. Accordingly, regional uptake of {sup 11}C-acetate at 4 min was compared to regional perfusion determined with nitrogen-13-ammonia in 119 segments in 15 patients with stable coronary artery disease by two methods. A close correlation was observed between initial relative myocardial concentrations (segmental activity normalized to maximal activity) of both tracers (11C-acetate = 0.88; 13N-ammonia + 0.079; s.e.e. = 0.064, r = 0.94, p less than 0.001). Furthermore, segmental net extractions (E.F), as calculated from the input function and segmental activities, of the two tracers correlated closely by E.FC-11 = 0.55E.FN-13 + 0.080 (s.e.e. = 0.045, r = 0.87, p less than 0.001). These relationships indicate that initial regional myocardial uptake of {sup 11}C-acetate reflects perfusion and that {sup 11}C-acetate permits near simultaneous evaluation of regional oxidative metabolism and of regional myocardial perfusion.

  19. Isotopic composition of epiphytic lichens as a tracer of the sources of atmospheric lead emissions in southern Quebec, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Carignan, J.; Gariepy, C.

    1995-11-01

    Lead isotopic data are reported for epiphytic lichens, vegetation samples, and lacustrine sediments collected in the boreal forest of Quebec between 47{degrees} and 55{degrees}N, and along the St. Lawrence Valley between 45{degrees} to 48{degrees}N. Lichens located up to 500 km north of Noranda (48{degrees}N) record a significant input is not apparent beyond 53{degrees}N where only the isotopic signal typical of Canadian aerosols is recorded. Lichens along the St. Lawrence Valley show evidences for a dominant input from U.S. sources. The lead isotopic composition of lichens allow quantitative monitoring of the sources of atmospheric Pb. However, their slow metabolism and their unknown age detract from recording the Pb signal on short and precise timescales. Spruce needles have isotopic compositions undistinguishable from that of lichens; this reflects integration of the atmospheric Pb signal over a comparable time span, a result confirmed by the lead isotopic record in lacustrine sediments. Vegetation samples such as spruce bark, spruce wood, and decidous tree leaves are more radiogenic than lichens from the same site. This may reflect mixing of radiogenic Pb metabolized from soil solutions through the root system with atmospheric Pb. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Stable isotopes of transition and post-transition metals as tracers in environmental studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, Thomas D.; Baskaran, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The transition and post-transition metals, which include the elements in Groups 3–12 of the Periodic Table, have a broad range of geological and biological roles as well as industrial applications and thus are widespread in the environment. Interdisciplinary research over the past decade has resulted in a broad understanding of the isotope systematics of this important group of elements and revealed largely unexpected variability in isotope composition for natural materials. Significant kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation has been observed for redox sensitive metals such as iron, chromium, copper, molybdenum and mercury, and for metals that are not redox sensitive in nature such as cadmium and zinc. In the environmental sciences, the isotopes are increasingly being used to understand important issues such as tracing of metal contaminant sources and fates, unraveling metal redox cycles, deciphering metal nutrient pathways and cycles, and developing isotope biosignatures that can indicate the role of biological activity in ancient and modern planetary systems.

  1. Quantitative imaging of cells with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS)—Nanoautography with stable isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Greg; Glassner, Brian J.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2006-07-01

    We describe some technical aspects of the application of multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) to biological research, particularly the use of isotopic tags to localize and measure their incorporation into intracellular compartments. We touch on sample preparation, on image formation, on drift correction and on extraction of quantitative data from isotope ratio imaging. We insist on the wide variety of sample types that can be used, ranging from whole cells prepared directly on Si supports, to thin sections of cells and tissues on Si supports, to ultrathin TEM sections on carbon-coated grid. We attempt to dispel the myth of difficulties in sample preparation, which we view as a needless deterrent to the application of MIMS to the general biological community. We present protocols for the extraction of isotope ratio data from mass images. We illustrate the benefits of using sequential image plane acquisition followed by the application of an autocorrelation algorithm (nanotracking) to remove the effects of specimen drift. We insist on the advantages to display the isotope ratios as hue saturation intensity images.

  2. Oxygen isotopes as a tracer of phosphate sources and cycling in aquatic systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. B.; Kendall, C.; Paytan, A.

    2013-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate can provide valuable information about sources and processes affecting phosphorus as it moves through hydrologic systems. Applications of this technique in soil and water have become more common in recent years due to improvements in extraction methods and instrument capabilities, and studies in multiple aquatic environments have demonstrated that some phosphorus sources may have distinct isotopic compositions within a given system. Under normal environmental conditions, the oxygen-phosphorus bonds in dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) can only be broken by enzymatic activity. Biological cycling of DIP will bring the phosphate oxygen into a temperature-dependent equilibrium with the surrounding water, overprinting any existing isotopic source signals. However, studies conducted in a wide range of estuarine, freshwater, and groundwater systems have found that the phosphate oxygen is often out of biological equilibrium with the water, suggesting that it is common for at least a partial isotopic source signal to be retained in aquatic systems. Oxygen isotope analysis on various potential phosphate sources such as synthetic and organic fertilizers, animal waste, detergents, and septic/wastewater treatment plant effluents show that these sources span a wide range of isotopic compositions, and although there is considerable overlap between the source groups, sources may be isotopically distinct within a given study area. Recent soil studies have shown that isotopic analysis of phosphate oxygen is also useful for understanding microbial cycling across different phosphorus pools, and may provide insights into controls on phosphorus leaching. Combining stable isotope information from soil and water studies will greatly improve our understanding of complex phosphate cycling, and the increasing use of this isotopic technique across different environments will provide new information regarding anthropogenic phosphate inputs and

  3. Analysis of Metabolism of 6FDG: A PET Glucose Transport Tracer

    PubMed Central

    Muzic, Raymond F.; Chandramouli, Visvanathan; Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Wu, Chunying; Wang, Yanming; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We are developing 18F-labeled 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]6FDG) as a tracer of glucose transport. As part of this process it is important to characterize and quantify putative metabolites. In contrast to the ubiquitous PET tracer 18F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]2FDG) which is phosphorylated and trapped intracellularly, the substitution of fluorine for a hydroxyl group at carbon 6 in [18F]6FDG should prevent its phosphorylation. Consequently, [18F]6FDG has the potential to trace the transport step of glucose metabolism without the confounding effects of phosphorylation and subsequent steps of metabolism. Herein the focus is to determine whether, and the degree to which, [18F]6FDG remains unchanged following intravenous injection. Methods Biodistribution studies were performed using 6FDG labeled with 18F as well as the longer-lived radionuclides 3H and 14C. Tissues were harvested at 1, 6, and 24 h following intravenous administration and radioactivity was extracted from the tissues and analyzed using a combination of ion exchange columns, high-performance liquid chromatography, and chemical reactivity. Results At the 1 h time-point, the vast majority of radioactivity in the liver, brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and blood was identified as 6FDG. At the 6- and 24-h time-points there was evidence of a minor amount of radioactive materials that appeared to be 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-sorbitol and possibly 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-gluconic acid. Conclusion On the time scale typical of PET imaging studies radioactive metabolites of [18F]6FDG are negligible. PMID:21718942

  4. Chromium isotopes in carbonates — A tracer for climate change and for reconstructing the redox state of ancient seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.; Døssing, L. N.; Sial, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    Strontium and carbon isotopes of marine carbonates are routinely applied for chemostratigraphic cross correlations of time-equivalent sedimentary sequences and for calibration of the compositional evolution of seawater throughout Earth's history, mainly for the purpose of reconstructing ancient climatic changes. We here present results of a new isotopic tracer system - stable chromium isotopes - applied to a late Ediacaran marine carbonate sequence exposed in the Calera de Recalde syncline, Arroyo del Soldado Group, Uruguay. The aim was to compare Cr isotope signatures directly to δ 13C, 87Sr/ 86Sr and 143Nd/ 144Nd fluctuations in a well defined stratigraphic profile comprising sediments that were deposited during cold-warm periods accompanied by sea-level changes in response to glaciation-deglaciation at higher latitudes. The studied section is characterized by a pronounced negative (down to - 3.3‰) δ 13C excursion in carbonates paralleled by a decrease of 87Sr/ 86Sr values. Chromium isotope signatures over this section also show a correlated decrease in δ 53Cr (δ 53Cr = [(( 53Cr/ 52Cr) sample / ( 53Cr/ 52Cr) SRM979) - 1] × 1000) values from ~+0.29 to - 0.17‰ which mirrors a decrease in positively fractioned seawater signatures to slightly negative values characteristic of high-temperature magmatic sources. Linear correlations between δ 53Cr and ɛNd(570 Ma), 87Sr/ 86Sr and Cr concentrations can be explained by mixing between two major input sources of Cr, Nd and Sr into the shallow seawater: 1) a source characterized by negative δ 53Cr values of ~-0.2‰ , low 87Sr/ 86Sr values of ~ 0.707, and elevated 147Sm/ 144Nd values of ~ 0.13, recognized as a subaqueous hydrothermal dominated input source, and 2) a source characterized by positively fractionated δ 53Cr values of ~+0.2‰, higher 87Sr/ 86Sr values of ~ 0.708, and lower 147Sm/ 144Nd values of ~ 0.11, a source which is strongly affected by continentally derived input. Chromium isotopes provide a

  5. Radiogenic Isotopes As Paleoceanographic Tracers in Deep-Sea Corals: Advances in TIMS Measurements of Pb Isotopes and Application to Southern Ocean Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. J.; van de Flierdt, T.; Bridgestock, L. J.; Paul, M.; Rehkamper, M.; Robinson, L. F.; Adkins, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Deep-sea corals have emerged as a valuable archive of deep ocean paleoceanographic change, with uranium-series dating providing absolute ages and the potential for centennial resolution. In combination with measurements of radiocarbon, neodymium isotopes and clumped isotopes, this archive has recently been exploited to reconstruct changes in ventilation, water mass sourcing and temperature in relation to millennial climate change. Lead (Pb) isotopes in both corals and seawater have also been used to track anthropogenic inputs through space and time and to trace transport pathways within the oceans. Better understanding of the oceanic Pb cycle is emerging from the GEOTRACES programme. However, while Pb isotopes have been widely used in environmental studies, their full potential as a (pre-anthropogenic) paleoceanographic tracer remains to be exploited. In deep-sea corals, challenges exist from low Pb concentrations in aragonite in comparison to secondary coatings, the potential for contamination, and the efficient elemental separation required for measurement by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS). Here we discuss progress in measuring Pb isotopes in coral aragonite using a 207Pb-204Pb double spike on a ThermoFinnigan Triton TIMS. For a 2 ng NIST-981 Pb standard, the long term reproducibility (using 1011 Ω resistors) is ~1000 ppm (2 s.d.) on 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios. We now show that using a new 1012 Ω resistor to measure the small 204Pb beam improves the internal precision on these ratios from ~500 ppm (2 s.e.) to ~250 ppm (2 s.e.) and we envisage a potential improvement in the long term reproducibility as a consequence. We further assess the internal precision and external reproducibility of our method using a BCR-2 rock standard and an in-house coral standard. Preliminary evidence on the application of this method to natural samples is derived from cleaning experiments and replication tests on deep-sea corals from the Southern

  6. Mercury isotope signatures as tracers for Hg cycling at the New Idria Hg mine.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Jan G; Smith, Robin S; Siebner, Hagar; Jew, Adam D; Brown, Gordon E; Bourdon, Bernard; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2013-06-18

    Mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) of Hg isotopes provides a new tool for tracing Hg in contaminated environments such as mining sites, which represent major point sources of Hg pollution into surrounding ecosystems. Here, we present Hg isotope ratios of unroasted ore waste, calcine (roasted ore), and poplar leaves collected at a closed Hg mine (New Idria, CA, U.S.A.). Unroasted ore waste was isotopically uniform with δ(202)Hg values from -0.09 to 0.16‰ (± 0.10‰, 2 SD), close to the estimated initial composition of the HgS ore (-0.26‰). In contrast, calcine samples exhibited variable δ(202)Hg values ranging from -1.91‰ to +2.10‰. Small MIF signatures in the calcine were consistent with nuclear volume fractionation of Hg isotopes during or after the roasting process. The poplar leaves exhibited negative MDF (-3.18 to -1.22‰) and small positive MIF values (Δ(199)Hg of 0.02 to 0.21‰). Sequential extractions combined with Hg isotope analysis revealed higher δ(202)Hg values for the more soluble Hg pools in calcines compared with residual HgS phases. Our data provide novel insights into possible in situ transformations of Hg phases and suggest that isotopically heavy secondary Hg phases were formed in the calcine, which will influence the isotope composition of Hg leached from the site.

  7. Stable isotopes as tracers of residency for fish on inshore coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jean P.; Pitt, Kylie A.; Fry, Brian; Connolly, Rod M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the migratory movements of fish between habitats is an important priority for fisheries management. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotopes were used to evaluate the degree of movement and residency for five fish species collected from coral reefs in Queensland, Australia. Isotope values of fish were measured and compared between slow-turnover muscle tissue and fast-turnover liver tissue, with isotopic agreement between liver and muscle generally indicating resident animals, and relatively low C isotope values in muscle indicating migrants. Three fish species, rabbitfish (Siganus fuscescens), painted sweetlips (Diagramma labiosum) and Guenther's wrasse (Pseudolabrus guentheri) showed relatively consistent carbon isotope values between muscle and liver tissue as expected for resident populations. One quarter of bream (Acanthopagrus australis) individuals showed much lower δ13C values in muscle than liver. These low values diverged from the -10 to -15‰ values of residents and were more similar to the -20‰ values of fish collected from coastal riverine habitats, the presumed migration source. Moses perch (Lutjanus russelli) also showed substantial differences between muscle and liver C isotopes for about a quarter of individuals, but the overall higher C values of these individuals indicated they may have switched diets within island habitats rather than migrating. Our results were consistent with previous studies of fish residency and indicate that measuring stable isotopes in multiple tissues provides a useful methodology for characterizing fish residency in inshore areas.

  8. Isotope and ion selectivity in reverse osmosis desalination: geochemical tracers for man-made freshwater.

    PubMed

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Vengosh, Avner; Guerrot, Catherine; Millot, Romain; Pankratov, Irena

    2008-07-01

    A systematic measurement of ions and 2H/1H, 7Li/6Li, 11B/10B, 18O/ 16O, and 87Sr/86Sr isotopes in feed-waters, permeates, and brines from commercial reverse osmosis (RO) desalination plants in Israel (Ashkelon, Eilat, and Nitzana) and Cyprus (Larnaca) reveals distinctive geochemical and isotopic fingerprints of fresh water generated from desalination of seawater (SWRO) and brackish water (BWRO). The degree of isotope fractionation during the passage of water and solutes through the RO membranes depends on the medium (solvent-water vs. solutes), chemical speciation of the solutes, their charge, and their mass difference. O, H, and Sr isotopes are not fractionated during the RO process. 7Li is preferentially rejected in low pH RO, and B isotope fractionation depends on the pH conditions. Under low pH conditions, B isotopes are not significantly fractionated, whereas at high pH, RO permeates are enriched by 20 per thousand in 11B due to selective rejection of borate ion and preferential permeation of 11B-enriched boric acid through the membrane. The specific geochemical and isotopic fingerprints of SWRO provide a unique tool for tracing "man-made" fresh water as an emerging recharge component of natural water resources.

  9. Evaluating Fe and Zn Isotopes as Tracers in the Marine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, E. A.; Bergquist, B. A.; John, S.

    2005-12-01

    Early work on Fe and Zn isotopes showed that these isotope systems show significant fractionations under earth-surface conditions and that earth-surface samples are significantly fractionated from one another. Because both of these elements are essential to marine life, they may limit the growth of marine organisms in certain circumstances (Fe has been demonstrated to be limiting in parts of the modern ocean; Zn has not yet been shown limiting in the modern ocean, but may have been limiting under different environmental conditions). Hence we need tools to understand their chemistry in the ocean and to evaluate past changes they have undergone. By (very rough) analogy to the carbon and nitrogen isotope system, it seems that the stable isotopes of these elements might be useful in understanding the present and past chemistry of these elements in the ocean. Information is scarce on these isotope systems in the marine environment; most published work concerns samples from sedimentary rocks, ferromanganese nodules, sediment traps, and laboratory experiments. There is no published information on these isotope systems in marine plankton or ocean waters, mainly because these elements occur at very low levels in the ocean and marine samples are difficult to process without contamination. Armed with experience in oceanic trace element sampling and analysis, we have undertaken Fe and Zn isotope analyses of samples of plankton tows and seawater from the marine environment in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans, as well as samples from laboratory cultures and a few other types of marine materials. These samples show significant Fe and Zn isotope fractionations. Although we do not yet have enough information to confidently describe the mechanisms driving these fractionations, this data provide support for the hope that these isotope systems may prove useful in evaluating the marine environmental chemistry of these elements.

  10. Novel and non-traditional use of stable isotope tracers to study metal bioavailability from natural particles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, Marie-Noële; Cain, Daniel J.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    We devised a novel tracing approach that involves enriching test organisms with a stable metal isotope of low natural abundance prior to characterizing metal bioavailability from natural inorganic particles. In addition to circumventing uncertainties associated with labeling natural particles and distinguishing background metals, the proposed "reverse labeling" technique overcomes many drawbacks inherent to using radioisotope tracers. Specifically, we chronically exposed freshwater snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) to synthetic water spiked with Cu that was 99.4% 65Cu to increase the relative abundance of 65Cu in the snail’s tissues from 32% to >80%. The isotopically enriched snails were then exposed to benthic algae mixed with Cu-bearing Fe–Al particles collected from the Animas River (Colorado), an acid mine drainage impacted river. We used 63Cu to trace Cu uptake from the natural particles and inferred their bioavailability from calculation of Cu assimilation into tissues. Cu assimilation from these particles was 44%, indicating that 44% of the particulate Cu was absorbed by the invertebrate. This demonstrates that inorganic particulate Cu can be bioavailable. The reverse labeling approach shows great potential in various scientific areas such as environmental contamination and nutrition for addressing questions involving uptake of an element that naturally has multiple isotopes.

  11. Isotopic studies of urea metabolism in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Regoeczi, E.; Irons, L.; Koj, A.; McFarlane, A. S.

    1965-01-01

    1. The half-life of [15N]urea was found to be significantly longer than that of [14C]urea injected at the same time, the differences being due to endogenous catabolism of urea, which is accompanied by little or no reutilization of 14C but is approx. 20% for 15N. [15N]Urea therefore appears to be valueless as an indicator of nitrogen metabolism unless the extents of endogenous catabolism of urea and of fractional reutilization of 15N can be separately estimated. 2. Though measurements of the radioactivity of expired 14CO2 confirmed the existence of considerable urea catabolism these could not be used for quantitative assessments. 3. Alternative graphical methods based on [14C]urea specific activities in plasma and urine samples were used to calculate the fraction of urea production that is excreted. Values by the two methods were in good agreement and showed that some animals excrete less than half the urea that they produce. 4. Specific activity differences between simultaneous samples of urinary and plasma urea reflect the presence of a pool of urea in the kidney that is not in equilibrium with the body urea pool. Calculations indicate the presence of urea in the kidney that in some cases may represent as much as 15% of the body pool, and in two animals in which post-mortem renal analyses were performed the masses of urea found agreed closely with the calculated values. 5. A model for urea metabolism is proposed that includes this pool in the excretory pathway. The related theory is shown to be adequate to explain the shape of the specific activity curves of urinary urea from the time of injection and the constant delay of the specific activity of urinary urea, relative to that of plasma urea, that is observed after a short preliminary equilibration period. 6. The body urea pool was calculated from the activity retained at 1·5hr. by excluding renal activity and the corrected specific activity of plasma urea at the same time. The urea pool was calculated to be

  12. Oxygen isotope composition as a tracer for the origins of rubies and sapphires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Gaston; Fallick, Anthony E.; Garnier, Virginie; France-Lanord, Christian; Ohnenstetter, Daniel; Schwarz, Dietmar

    2005-04-01

    Oxygen isotopic compositions of rubies and sapphires from 106 deposits worldwide, as well as heated natural corundum, have been measured in this study. Artificially heated corundums have the same oxygen isotopic composition as unheated material. The 18O/16O ratio of natural corundum is a good indicator of its geological environment of formation. The consistently restricted δ18O range found for each type of deposit is explained by host-rock buffering during fluid-rock interaction. The δ18O constrains the geological source of the major type of gem-quality rubies sold on the market and brings new insight to gems found in placers. High-quality blue sapphires from Kashmir, Andranondambo, and Sri Lanka have specific oxygen isotopic ranges, but they overlap those of Mogok in Myanmar. Combined with traditional gemology techniques, oxygen isotope analysis will contribute toward defining the origin of some commercial high-value blue sapphires, especially from Kashmir.

  13. Isotopic Tracers for Waste Fluid Tracking and Fluid-Soil Interactions: Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald J.

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop and advance isotopic methods for characterizing fluid flow and chemical transport through the vadose zone to groundwater. Previous research has been concentrated on developing and comparing different isotopic systems (e.g., hydrogen, oxygen and strontium isotopes) for determining fluid infiltration rates and pathways in the vadose zone (e.g., Maher et al., 2003; DePaolo et al., 2004; Singleton et al., in press). The focus of our current efforts is on using the isotopic compositions of different chemical phases (e.g., uranium, nitrate) to track their movement through the vadose zone. Preliminary results indicate that this will be a powerful tool for assessing environmental risks associated with vadose zone contamination.

  14. Deuterium stable isotope ratios as tracers of water resource use: an experimental test with rock doves.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O; Martínez del Rio, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Naturally-occurring deuterium stable isotope ratios can potentially be used to trace water resource use by animals, but estimating the contribution of isotopically distinct water sources requires the accurate prediction of isotopic discrimination factors between water inputs and an animal's body water pool. We examined the feasibility of using estimates of water fluxes between a bird and its environment with a mass-balance model for the deuterium stable isotope ratio of avian body water (deltaDbody) to predict isotopic discrimination factors. Apparent fractionation and thus discrimination factors were predicted to vary with the proportion of an animal's total water losses than could be attributed to evaporative processes. To test our ability to predict isotopic discrimination, we manipulated water intake and evaporative water loss in rock doves (Columba livia) by providing them with fresh water or 0.15 M NaCl solution in thermoneutral or hot environments. After we switched the birds from drinking water with deltaD=-95 per thousand VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water) to enriched drinking water with deltaD=+52 per thousand VSMOW, steady-state deltaDbody was approached asymptotically. The equilibrium deltaDbody was enriched by 10-50 per thousand relative to water inputs. After isotopic equilibrium was reached, the degree of enrichment was positively related (r2=0.34) to the fraction of total water loss that occurred by evaporation (revap/rH2O)supporting the major prediction of the model. The variation we observed in discrimination factors suggests that the apparent fractionation of deuterium will be difficult to predict accurately under natural conditions. Our results show that accurate estimates of the contribution of different water sources to a bird's body water pool require large deuterium isotopic differences between the sources.

  15. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Matthew L; Lechene, Claude P

    2013-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans.

  16. Verification of Nd Isotopes as a Water Mass Tracer Based on Isotopic Evaluation of Cretaceous Detrital Residues from Demerara Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, E.; Martin, E. E.; MacLeod, K. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous was one of the most recent major greenhouse intervals. Numerous studies focus on temperature trends and CO2 concentrations during this event, but little is known about ocean circulation and structure at that time. Recently published Nd isotopes of fossil fish teeth/debris recovered from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites on Demerara Rise off Suriname, South America highlight the presence of unusual, nonradiogenic background ɛNd values (-14 to -17) that span much of the record from the Cenomanian through Santonian and continue in the Campanian and Maastrichtian following an ~10 my hiatus. This value is less radiogenic than any major water mass documented in the Cretaceous or today and is interrupted by a dramatic positive excursion of 8 ɛNd units during Ocean Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2, ~94 my). The nonradiogenic ɛNd signal has been interpreted to represent local formation of a warm, saline bottom water mass [Demerara Bottom Water (DBW)] on the proximal Guyana Shield, while the positive ɛNd excursion has been attributed to a temporary shutdown of DBW production or enhanced input of a North Atlantic/Tethyan water mass associated with peak greenhouse conditions (MacLeod et al., 2008, Geology; Jiménez Berrocoso et al., 2010, Geology). The goal of this study was to evaluate Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of detrital silicates from ODP sites 1260 and 1261 on Demerara Rise to verify that Nd isotopes preserved in fish debris record a water mass signal rather than sediment-seawater interactions, such as boundary exchange or sediment diagenesis. Results demonstrate no correlation between seawater and residue Nd isotopes for the Cenomanian to Maastrichtian. Over this interval the offset between seawater and residue ɛNd values is highly variable (0.2 to 6 ɛNd units), but there is no relationship between the long term patterns of seawater and residue variations. In particular, residue ɛNd values record no change during the dramatic increase in seawater

  17. Where is the water going: An irrigation experiment using a natural isotopic tracer in karst SE, Australia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowska, Monika; Baker, Andy; Andersen, Martin S.; Cuthbert, Mark; Rau, Gabriel; Jex, Cath; Rutlidge, Helen; Marjo, Chris; Roshan, Hamid; Treble, Pauline

    2014-05-01

    The karst unsaturated zone is a fractured rock environment associated with very heterogeneous water movement; spatial variability in the subsurface water storage; and fast preferential flow through fractures and fissures. These factors dominate the way in which water moves within the unsaturated zone in these environments, giving rise to flow path complexities less common in homogenous media. Currently there is limited research regarding karst infiltration/storage processes and potential evaporation in the unsaturated zone. Such processes may have the potential to alter the stable isotopic composition of groundwater. Caves provide a unique environment within which to examine exfiltration variability and flow dynamics in situ. In semi-arid environments evaporative processes in the unsaturated zone have been shown to directly alter the isotopic δ18O composition of cave drip waters, fractionating them towards heavier ratios, by a magnitude of 1-3 per mil relative to mean annual rainfall (Bar Matthews et al., 1996; Cuthbert et al., 2014). Here we present a novel isotopic drip water study from an artificial infiltration experiment at Wellington Caves, SE Australia. A series of four artificial infiltration events were initiated directly over Cathedral Cave, Wellington over as many days. The first event was spiked with a deuterium tracer and the subsurface response was monitored during several sampling campaigns over the following year. The infiltration study revealed: (1) isotopic break-through curves suggest a front of older water from the unsaturated zone storage arrived ahead of the infiltration water, (2) water residence times in the unsaturated zone were found to be longer than 6 months and, (3) large spatial heterogeneities existed in the proportion of exfiltrated deuterium tracer at different drip sites in the cave suggesting unique pathways and sources of water in the unsaturated zone. Implications from this study include the interpretation of paleo

  18. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ199Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ15N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ13C and Δ199Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:27151563

  19. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ199Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ15N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ13C and Δ199Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions.

  20. Mathematical modeling of isotope labeling experiments for metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Nargund, Shilpa; Sriram, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Isotope labeling experiments (ILEs) offer a powerful methodology to perform metabolic flux analysis. However, the task of interpreting data from these experiments to evaluate flux values requires significant mathematical modeling skills. Toward this, this chapter provides background information and examples to enable the reader to (1) model metabolic networks, (2) simulate ILEs, and (3) understand the optimization and statistical methods commonly used for flux evaluation. A compartmentalized model of plant glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway illustrates the reconstruction of a typical metabolic network, whereas a simpler example network illustrates the underlying metabolite and isotopomer balancing techniques. We also discuss the salient features of commonly used flux estimation software 13CFLUX2, Metran, NMR2Flux+, FiatFlux, and OpenFLUX. Furthermore, we briefly discuss methods to improve flux estimates. A graphical checklist at the end of the chapter provides a reader a quick reference to the mathematical modeling concepts and resources.

  1. Stable sulfur and oxygen isotopes as geochemical tracers of sulfate in karst waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Kobayashi, Tatsuaki; Strosnider, William H. J.; Wu, Pan

    2017-08-01

    Karst water resources, which are extremely sensitive to mining activities, are critical for the support of human societies and ecological systems in many regions worldwide. In order to determine the sources and fate of dissolved sulfate in low-pH karst waters, hydrochemical variations of karst waters with and without acid mine drainage (AMD) impacts were investigated along with stable isotope dynamics. As expected, hydrochemical characteristics and isotopic compositions of the AMD and AMD-downstream water (ADW) were dramatically different from that of the non-AMD-impacted water (NAW). The sources of sulfur isotopes in sulfate were predominantly pyrite oxidation for the AMD and ADW, and atmospheric deposition for the NAW. Based on the general isotope-balance model, the relative proportions of sulfate oxygen derived from water and air were calculated. The mean proportion of sulfate oxygen derived from water in ADW was roughly double that of AMD. This suggests that the sulfate associated with AMD is predominantly influenced by aerobic pyrite oxidation, while that of ADW is likely affected by the dissolution of pyrite under anaerobic conditions in reservoir sediment. This observation was coincident with the noted variations of hydrochemical characteristics and was supported by principal component analysis. These results provide a better understanding of how stable isotopes of sulfate and water can be used to track mining contamination in karst aquifers, which could benefit remediation planning for these distinctive systems.

  2. Isotopic signature of methane as tracer of origins: The effect of post genetic fractionations

    SciTech Connect

    Prinzhofer, A.; Pernaton, E.; Huc, A.Y.

    1995-12-01

    Isotopes measured in hydrocarbon gases have been recognized as a powerful indicator to distinguish gases (mainly methane) generated by thermal cracking, from gases generated by bacterial activity. Some new field observations, and an experiment of methane transport by diffusion through shales impregnated with water, suggest that a severe isotopic fractionation can be induced by such transport processes. The diffused methane is lighter in {delta}{sup 13}C by 11 delta units, when the hydrogen isotopic ratios becomes heavier, from 40 to 0 delta units. If these results are plotted in the usual diagrams setting apart thermogenic from biogenic origins for methane, a purely thermogenic methane, after such a transport process, will fall in the biogenic field or mixing field. The implications of such an observation might be very important when deciphering the origins of gases and might imply to revisit previous interpretations (relative importance of biogenic versus thermogenic methane).

  3. Mercury isotope signatures in contaminated sediments as a tracer for local industrial pollution sources.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Jan G; Skyllberg, Ulf; Drott, Andreas; Jiskra, Martin; Jonsson, Sofi; Björn, Erik; Bourdon, Bernard; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2015-01-06

    Mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) may cause characteristic isotope signatures of different mercury (Hg) sources and help understand transformation processes at contaminated sites. Here, we present Hg isotope data of sediments collected near industrial pollution sources in Sweden contaminated with elemental liquid Hg (mainly chlor-alkali industry) or phenyl-Hg (paper industry). The sediments exhibited a wide range of total Hg concentrations from 0.86 to 99 μg g(-1), consisting dominantly of organically-bound Hg and smaller amounts of sulfide-bound Hg. The three phenyl-Hg sites showed very similar Hg isotope signatures (MDF δ(202)Hg: -0.2‰ to -0.5‰; MIF Δ(199)Hg: -0.05‰ to -0.10‰). In contrast, the four sites contaminated with elemental Hg displayed much greater variations (δ(202)Hg: -2.1‰ to 0.6‰; Δ(199)Hg: -0.19‰ to 0.03‰) but with distinct ranges for the different sites. Sequential extractions revealed that sulfide-bound Hg was in some samples up to 1‰ heavier in δ(202)Hg than organically-bound Hg. The selectivity of the sequential extraction was tested on standard materials prepared with enriched Hg isotopes, which also allowed assessing isotope exchange between different Hg pools. Our results demonstrate that different industrial pollution sources can be distinguished on the basis of Hg isotope signatures, which may additionally record fractionation processes between different Hg pools in the sediments.

  4. Isotopic ordering in atmospheric O2 as a tracer of ozone photochemistry and the tropical atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.; Murray, Lee T.; Ash, Jeanine L.; Young, Edward D.; Boering, Kristie A.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Lueb, Richard A.; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Krummel, Paul. B.; Steele, L. Paul; Eastham, Sebastian D.

    2016-10-01

    The distribution of isotopes within O2 molecules can be rapidly altered when they react with atomic oxygen. This mechanism is globally important: while other contributions to the global budget of O2 impart isotopic signatures, the O(3P) + O2 reaction resets all such signatures in the atmosphere on subdecadal timescales. Consequently, the isotopic distribution within O2 is determined by O3 photochemistry and the circulation patterns that control where that photochemistry occurs. The variability of isotopic ordering in O2 has not been established, however. We present new measurements of 18O18O in air (reported as Δ36 values) from the surface to 33 km altitude. They confirm the basic features of the clumped-isotope budget of O2: Stratospheric air has higher Δ36 values than tropospheric air (i.e., more 18O18O), reflecting colder temperatures and fast photochemical cycling of O3. Lower Δ36 values in the troposphere arise from photochemistry at warmer temperatures balanced by the influx of high-Δ36 air from the stratosphere. These observations agree with predictions derived from the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model, which provides additional insight. We find a link between tropical circulation patterns and regions where Δ36 values are reset in the troposphere. The dynamics of these regions influences lapse rates, vertical and horizontal patterns of O2 reordering, and thus the isotopic distribution toward which O2 is driven in the troposphere. Temporal variations in Δ36 values at the surface should therefore reflect changes in tropospheric temperatures, photochemistry, and circulation. Our results suggest that the tropospheric O3 burden has remained within a ±10% range since 1978.

  5. Isotopic Ordering in Atmospheric O2 as a Tracer of Ozone Photochemistry and the Tropical Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.; Murray, Lee T.; Ash, Jeanine L.; Young, Edward D.; Boering, Kristie A.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Lueb, Richard A.; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Krummel, Paul B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of isotopes within O2 molecules can be rapidly altered when they react with atomic oxygen. This mechanism is globally important: while other contributions to the global budget of O2 impart isotopic signatures, the O(3P) + O2 reaction resets all such signatures in the atmosphere on subdecadal timescales. Consequently, the isotopic distribution within O2 is determined by O3 photochemistry and the circulation patterns that control where that photochemistry occurs. The variability of isotopic ordering in O2 has not been established, however. We present new measurements of 18O18O in air (reported as delta36 values) from the surface to 33 km altitude. They confirm the basic features of the clumped-isotope budget of O2: Stratospheric air has higher delta36 values than tropospheric air (i.e., more 18O18O), reflecting colder temperatures and fast photochemical cycling of O3. Lower delta36 values in the troposphere arise from photochemistry at warmer temperatures balanced by the influx of high-delta36 air from the stratosphere. These observations agree with predictions derived from the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model, which provides additional insight. We find a link between tropical circulation patterns and regions where delta36 values are reset in the troposphere. The dynamics of these regions influences lapse rates, vertical and horizontal patterns of O2 reordering, and thus the isotopic distribution toward which O2 is driven in the troposphere. Temporal variations in delta36 values at the surface should therefore reflect changes in tropospheric temperatures, photochemistry, and circulation. Our results suggest that the tropospheric O3 burden has remained within a +/-10 percent range since 1978.

  6. Isotopic Ordering in Atmospheric O2 as a Tracer of Ozone Photochemistry and the Tropical Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.; Murray, Lee T.; Ash, Jeanine L.; Young, Edward D.; Boering, Kristie A.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Lueb, Richard A.; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Krummel, Paul B.; Steele, L. Paul; Eastham, Sebastian D.

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of isotopes within O2 molecules can be rapidly altered when they react with atomic oxygen. This mechanism is globally important: while other contributions to the global budget of O2 impart isotopic signatures, the O(3P) + O2 reaction resets all such signatures in the atmosphere on subdecadal timescales. Consequently, the isotopic distribution within O2 is determined by O3 photochemistry and the circulation patterns that control where that photochemistry occurs. The variability of isotopic ordering in O2 has not been established, however. We present new measurements of 18O18O in air (reported as delta36 values) from the surface to 33 km altitude. They confirm the basic features of the clumped-isotope budget of O2: Stratospheric air has higher delta36 values than tropospheric air (i.e., more 18O18O), reflecting colder temperatures and fast photochemical cycling of O3. Lower delta36 values in the troposphere arise from photochemistry at warmer temperatures balanced by the influx of high-delta36 air from the stratosphere. These observations agree with predictions derived from the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model, which provides additional insight. We find a link between tropical circulation patterns and regions where delta36 values are reset in the troposphere. The dynamics of these regions influences lapse rates, vertical and horizontal patterns of O2 reordering, and thus the isotopic distribution toward which O2 is driven in the troposphere. Temporal variations in delta36 values at the surface should therefore reflect changes in tropospheric temperatures, photochemistry, and circulation. Our results suggest that the tropospheric O3 burden has remained within a +/-10 percent range since 1978.

  7. Migration of fission products at the Nevada Test Site: Detection with an isotopic tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Thompton, J.L.; Gilmore, J.S. )

    1989-01-01

    Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are studying the migration of fission products away from explosion cavities formed by underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. In some cases, the isotopic composition of the fission products or activation products associated with a particular test are distinctive and we may identify them many years after the event. In this paper we describe a case in which we used rhodium isotopes to identify the source of radioactive material that had moved some 350 m from the explosion site. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Assessing the bioavailability and toxicity of isotopically modified ZnO nanoparticles using enriched isotope tracers and biodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, M.; Dybowska, A.; Luoma, S. N.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2009-12-01

    Industrially produced nanoparticles (NPs) are dispersed in the environment with little knowledge of their environmental impacts. The unique physicochemical properties of metal NPs influence their interactions in the environment and modulate, in part, their bioavailability and toxicity. The limited research to date has focused on NPs dispersed in water at high concentrations, microscopic observation of their uptake, and acute toxicity responses. But the links between NP characteristics, bioaccumulation and toxicity are still unclear. Quantification of bioavailability from both food and water requires understanding uptake and loss rates, but few if any methodology exists for quantifying metallo-NP bioavailability. We introduce a novel approach to quantify engineered metal NPs bioavailability from food and water and develop links to toxicity. The approach combines the synthesis of isotopically modified metal NPs of defined size, composition and unique stable isotope ratios, and the use of organisms as integrators of the biogeochemical processes affecting metal bioavailability. Specifically, we used enriched Zn67 to synthesize isotopically modified ZnO nanoparticles, allowing distinguishing newly accumulated Zn from background Zn levels. We ask whether the NPs themselves are bioavailable or whether they act as a carrier for metals to enter cells. We conducted a series of experiments to determine the physiological parameters controlling the uptake and loss of 67Zn-NP in the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. We compared metal assimilation efficiency, uptake rates and loss rates between metal nanoparticles and those found for the pure metal. Our results indicate that 67ZnO-NPs are taken up by L. stagnalis through food. High dietborne concentrations of 67ZnO-NPs reduced feeding in the snail, suggesting that the particles elicited a biological response. Solubilisation of 67ZnO-NPs was negligible; suggesting that dietborne uptake of Zn is the most important uptake pathway

  9. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes using actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer for U-Th studies; [sup 238]U-[sup 230]Th disequilibrium in recent lavas from Iceland; water-rock interaction from U-Th studies; resonance ionization mass spectrometry of Os and Ti isotopes; and self-diffusion of Mg.

  10. Stable Isotopes of Sr and Pb as Tracers of Sources of Airborne Particulate Matter in Kyrgyzstan

    EPA Science Inventory

    ConclusionsElemental concentrations were higher at the LIDAR site compared to the Bishkek site. Also, concentrations were higher during dust than non-dust events at both sites.The Sr isotopic ratios suggest dust from another region, such as from Western China, Africa, or Middle E...

  11. Cd isotopes as a potential source tracer of metal pollution in river sediments.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Zhou, Haidong; Liang, Xirong; Tu, Xianglin

    2013-10-01

    Tracing the sources of heavy metals in water environment is key important for our understanding of their pollution behavior. In this present study, Cd concentrations and Cd isotopic compositions in sediments were determined to effectively identify possible Cd sources. Results showed that elevated concentrations and high enrichment factor for Cd were found in all sediments, suggesting anthropogenic Cd origin. Cd isotopic compositions in sediments yielded relative variations ranged from -0.35‰ to 0.07‰ in term of δ(114/110)Cd (the mean: -0.08‰). Large fractionated Cd was found in sediments collected from a smelter and an E-waste town. Cd isotopic compositions and Cd concentrations measured in sediments allowed the identification of three main origins (dust from metal refining (δ(114/110)Cd < 0), slag of metal refining (δ(114/110)Cd > 0), and those δ(114/110)Cd = 0, such as background and mining activity). According to the actual precision obtained, Cd isotopes could be a potential tool for tracing metal pollution sources in water environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stable Isotopes of Sr and Pb as Tracers of Sources of Airborne Particulate Matter in Kyrgyzstan

    EPA Science Inventory

    ConclusionsElemental concentrations were higher at the LIDAR site compared to the Bishkek site. Also, concentrations were higher during dust than non-dust events at both sites.The Sr isotopic ratios suggest dust from another region, such as from Western China, Africa, or Middle E...

  13. The isotopic composition of water vapor as a tracer of water balance in the TTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolot, Maximilien; Moyer, Elisabeth; Legras, Bernard; Walker, Kaley; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The relatively small amount of water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) region is of disproportionate radiative importance, and projections of changes in TTL water are hampered by poor understanding of its sources and controls. We show here that the profile of the isotopic composition of water vapor can be used to quantify the contribution of various processes to the water budget of the region: convective sources of water, dehydration via in situ cirrus formation and sedimentation, and moistening from mixing with extratropical air. We combine these processes into a simple model for the isotopic ratio of TTL water vapor. By fitting the model parameters to reproduce an averaged tropical profile of water vapor isotopic ratio in the TTL, we can retrieve the convective contribution to TTL water vapor. Using isotopic measurements from the ACE-FTS solar-occultation instrument, we show that convective injection of water vapor must provide a significant contribution to TTL water vapor. That contribution in turn has large radiative effects, because it increases the production of in-situ cirrus over what would be inferred from large-scale uplift alone, by a factor 2-10 over the TTL (15-17.5 km).

  14. Stable isotopes of lead and strontium as tracers of sources of airborne particulate matter in Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewan, Nitika; Majestic, Brian J.; Ketterer, Michael E.; Miller-Schulze, Justin P.; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Solomon, Paul A.; Artamonova, Maria; Chen, Boris B.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; Carmichael, Greg R.

    2015-11-01

    Central Asia is dominated by an arid climate and desert-like conditions, leading to the potential for long-range transport of desert dust within and out of the region. Of particular interest is the Aral Sea, which has receded in size largely due to water diversion. As a result, newly exposed sediments are resuspended by wind and thus, may be a potential new source of particulate matter within the region. Here, strontium and lead stable isotope ratios are employed along with detailed elemental composition, to explore the contribution of long-range transport of Aral Sea sediments, as well as other potential sources of dust, within Central Asia. Ambient PM10 samples were collected during dust and non-dust events from mid-2008 to mid-2009 at two sites in Kyrgyzstan located ∼1200 and 1500 km ESE of the Aral Sea. Aral Sea sediments and local Kyrgyzstan soils were resuspended and sized to PM10. The Aral Sea sediments have an average 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.70992. In contrast, the Sr isotope ratio in local soils exhibits an average ratio of 0.71579. Ambient PM10 collected in Kyrgyzstan has an average 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.71177, falling between the values of these two potential sources and indicating a complex mixture of contributing sources. At both sites, airborne Sr isotope ratios measured during dust events were similar, suggesting that Aral Sea sediments only minimally affect air quality in Kyrgyzstan. Elemental analysis and Pb isotope ratios supported this finding. While the Pb isotopes and elemental data both indicate an anthropogenic source, long-range dust transport from other deserts inside and outside the region cannot be ruled out as sources of PM10 in Central Asia.

  15. Tracer versus trace element diffusion - Diffusional decoupling of Sr concentration from Sr isotope composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Don R.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical diffusivities for nonalkali major, minor, and selected trace elements have been measured at 10 kbar, 1300 C during interdiffusion of dacitic and rhyolitic melts. Sr tracer diffusivities were measured at the same conditions in melts of dacitic and rhyolitic composition and in a diffusion couple of these two melts undergoing simultaneous chemical diffusion. Chemical diffusivities of all elements studied are functions of the silica content of the melt, but at any one silica content the chemical diffusivities of all elements studied are within a factor of five of the Si and Al diffusivities. Si diffusivity varies from 2.8 x 10 to the -9th sq cm/s at 65 percent SiO2 to 5.1 x 10 to the -10th sq cm/s at 75 percent SiO2. The diffusivities of minor and trace elements are proposed to be controlled by the ability of the local melt structure to accommodate these elements while maintaining LTE. The measured Sr tracer diffusivities are an order of magnitude above Sr chemical diffusivities.

  16. Chromium Isotopes in Carbonates - a Tracer for Climate Change and for Reconstructing the Redox state of Ancient Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.; Dossing, L. N.; Sial, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    Strontium and carbon isotopes of marine carbonates are routinely applied for chemostratigraphic cross correlations of time-equivalent sedimentary sequences and for calibration of the compositional evolution of seawater throughout Earth's history, mainly for the purpose of reconstructing ancient climatic changes. We here present results of a new isotopic tracer system - stable chromium isotopes - applied to a late Ediacaran (Vendian) marine carbonate sequence exposed in the Calera de Recalde syncline, Arroyo del Soldado Group, Uruguay. The aim was to compare Cr isotope signatures directly to δ13C, 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd fluctuations in a well defined stratigraphic profile comprising sediments that were deposited during cold-warm periods accompanied by sea-level changes in response to glaciation-deglaciation at higher latitudes. The studied section is characterized by a pronounced negative (down to -3.3%) δ13C excursion in carbonates paralleled by a decrease of 87Sr/86Sr values. Chromium isotope signatures over this section also show a correlated decrease in δ53Cr (δ53Cr = [(53Cr/52Cr)sample/(53Cr/52Cr)SRM979)-1] x 1000) values from ~+0.29to -0.17% which mirrors a decrease in positively fractioned seawater signatures to slightly negative values characteristic of high-temperature magmatic sources. Linear correlations between δ53Cr and ɛNd(T=570 Ma), 87Sr/86Sr and Cr concentrations can be explained by mixing between two major input sources of Cr, Nd and Sr into the shallow seawater: 1) a source characterized by negative δ53Cr values of ~-0.2% , low 87Sr/86Sr values of ~0.707, and elevated 147Sm/144Nd values of ~0.13, recognized as a subaqueous hydrothermal dominated input source, and 2) a source characterized by positively fractionated δ53Cr values of ~+0.2%, higher 87Sr/86Sr values of ~0.708, and lower 147Sm/144Nd values of ~0.11, a source which is strongly affected by continentally derived input. Chromium isotopes provide a powerful tool for reconstructing

  17. Silicon Isotopic Composition of Isua BIF and Other Early Archean Supracrustal Rocks: a Tracer for Early Life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, L.; Cardinal, D.; Alleman, L. Y.; Moorbath, S.

    2004-12-01

    High temperature vapor condensations and stardust forming stellar outflows strongly differentiate Si-isotopes (-650\\permil<\\delta29Si<+200\\permil). In contrast, on Earth, the major cause of slight Si isotope fractionation (-1.8\\permil <\\delta29Si <+1.5\\permil) is related to preferential biological uptake of 28Si by diatoms, radiolarian, sponges and plants in building their opaline frustules, spicules and phytoliths. As a consequence, modern waters, clays, soils and sediments are also fractionated: -0.9\\permil<\\delta29Si<+1.7\\permil, while Phanerozoic magmatic and metamorphic processes leave terrestrial crystalline rocks almost unfractionated: -0.4\\permil <\\delta29Si <+0.2\\permil. Spectacular claims for discovery of oldest evidence for terrestrial life in early Archean (ca 3.7-3.8 Ga) metamorphosed rocks from southern West Greenland have been challenged in a series of studies, and there is need for some independent tracer to gain new insights into the quest for primitive life. In order to unravel potentialities of silicon isotopes, we determined the Si-isotope composition of four groups of rocks from the Isua Greenstone Belt: magnetite-quartz "Banded Iron Formations" (BIF); mica-feldspar-quartz-(garnet) schists of potential pelitic origin; a series of tonalitic gneisses, metabasalt pillows, volcanogenic sediments and hydrothermal quartz veins and vesicles. Specimens were powdered using diamond-coated microdrills. Si was purified by TEA molybdate co-precipitation and measured on a Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS using Mg external doping in dry plasma mode following Cardinal et al's (2003) methodology. Measured 29Si/28Si are expressed with the \\delta29Si notation relative to the NBS28 quartz standard. Overall reproducibility assessed on 5 BIF duplicates is better than 0.08\\permil. Merck Quartz aliquots processed in the same way as the Isua specimens are unfractionated, showing that our chemical procedure does not produce any isotopic artefacts. Metasediments yield

  18. Isotopic Tracers to Identify Far-traveled Pollutant and Mineral Aerosols in Northern California (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depaolo, D. J.; Christensen, J. N.; Ewing, S. A.; Cliff, S. S.; Brown, S. T.; Vancuren, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Mineral dust and pollutant aerosols can be lofted into the atmosphere and transported 1000s of kilometers, facilitating intercontinental communication of soil components, biological material (bacteria, viruses) and anthropogenic particulates. Far-traveled aerosols also affect air quality, atmospheric radiation balance and cloud formation. Understanding the sources of aerosols, and how they evolve with climate change, land use changes, and emerging industrial activity, is important for assessing air quality and climate processes in California. A particular concern for California is trans-Pacific transport of mineral aerosols from Asian deserts, and the possibility that industrial and other pollutants accompany them. The geographic sources of mineral and pollutant aerosols can in many cases be determined from their isotopic composition, using for example some combination of elements such as Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf, Zn, N, S, C, O, U, B, and Li. With systematic sample collection and analysis, isotopes can provide quantification of the changing proportions of local versus distant sources. Where the far-traveled components can be identified, comparisons can be made to meteorological data to better understand the factors controlling the efficiency of long-range transport. With heavy dust storms, such as those that arise in the Sahel/Sahara or the deserts of Asia, aerosols can be tracked in satellite imagery and other approaches may not be necessary. During more common periods of lesser aerosol loading, and where greater transport distances are involved, ground-based methods such as chemical analysis of a time-series of collected PM2.5 are needed to evaluate sources. Pollutants may or may not accompany mineral dust, and may be added along the transport path. Although chemical analysis is useful, relatively fast and inexpensive, more information, and in some cases more definitive conclusions, can be obtained by adding isotopic measurements. By combining multiple isotopic systems (e

  19. Zinc Isotopes as Tracers of Crust-Mantle Interactions and Mineralization Processes in Layered Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, J. M.; Moynier, F.

    2016-12-01

    Zinc isotopes are a powerful tool for studying igneous processes and may be useful for distinguishing between mantle or crustal origins for mineralization and for examining crystallization processes. Restricted ranges in δ66Zn for mantle-derived rocks (δ66Zn = 0.28±0.05‰; [{66Zn/64Znsample/66Zn/64ZnJMC-Lyon-1} × 1000] all uncertainties reported are 2SD) contrast the large δ66Zn variations in sedimentary rocks ( 0 to 1‰), or in volcanic and sedimentary hosted ore deposits (e.g., SEDEX; VHMS; MVT = -0.6 to 1.3‰). Here, we use Zn isotopes to investigate magmatic processes in the 1.27 Ga Muskox Intrusion (Canada) and 2.7 Ga Stillwater Intrusion (Montana). The Muskox main chromitite horizon has between 270-330 ppm Zn with δ66Zn ranging from 0.16 to 0.31‰. Zinc isotope compositions negatively correlate with Os isotopes. Chromitite (40a) with the lowest 187Os/188Os (0.132) has δ66Zn of 0.31±0.03‰; indistinguishable from the mantle value. CM19 glass from the co-eval Coppermine Volcanics, which has crust-like O and Nd isotopes but low 187Os/188Os (0.131), has been interpreted as the extrusive manifestation of chromitite genesis. The value of δ66Zn (0.27±0.07‰) for CM19 is within uncertainty of 40A, and permissive of formation during silicic-mafic melt mixing and large-scale chromitite crystallization. Stillwater chromitite seams exhibit a larger range in Zn (166-448 ppm), but generally lower δ66Zn (0.13±0.04‰) than Muskox chromitites, or to a JM Reef bulk sample (69 ppm Zn, δ66Zn = 0.22±0.03‰). These results suggest different sources of Zn for Ultramafic series chromitites versus the JM Reef (Banded series). Correspondingly, variations occur in Os isotopes for PGE poor chromitites (γOs = -2 to +4) versus the PGE-rich JM Reef (γOs = +12 to +34). Zinc isotope variations may be explained by either a mantle source with low δ66Zn that was subsequently contaminated by high δ66Zn crust, or from contamination of the ultramafic series by low δ66Zn

  20. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, Kamala Raghunathan

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H2 react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO2 catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D2/CO (or H2/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of 12C-labelled ethylene are added to 13CO/H2 synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C1 monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Using a novel Mg isotope tracer to investigate the dolomitization of the Red River Formation in the Williston Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmig, S. R.; Holmden, C. E.; Qing, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Williston Basin is a sub-circular intracratonic basin spanning central North America with its center in NW North Dakota. The Late Ordovician Red River Formation is an economically viable unit in the Williston Basin containing large hydrocarbon reserves in Saskatchewan, North Dakota, Manitoba, and Montana. Red River dolomitization contributed to the reservoir-quality porosity and permeability observed today with three types of dolomite (burrow, matrix, and saddle) possibly representing three events. Dolomitization is widely believed to have resulted from downward percolating brines, due to the stratigraphically close association between dolomite deposits and overlying basin-scale evaporites. However, in contrast, Sr isotope evidence suggests an upward fluid migration in the basin. Spatial variation of Mg isotopes (δ26Mg) may serve as a direct tracer of dolomitizing fluid flow. Dolomite sequesters light isotopes of Mg from dolomitizing fluids, therefore, the fluid will evolve with time and distance to heavier δ26Mg values. Accordingly, the δ26Mg values of the Red River dolomite should increase in the direction of fluid flow. We test this hypothesis on Red River burrow dolomite from the Williston Basin; the first event most often attributed to downward infiltration of brines. Burrow δ26Mg values range between -1.89‰ and -1.31‰. Using contouring software, the data are shown to form a pattern of increasing δ26Mg values out from the center of the Williston Basin, indicating an up-dip migration of dolomitizing fluids through the burrow network, rather than down-dip as suggested by the brine reflux model. We conclude that dolomitization of the Red River carbonate is not tied to the spatial and temporal history of evaporite deposition in the Williston Basin, but rather to the thermal history of the basin, suggesting dolomitization likely occurred during a late Paleozoic heating event that drove Mg-rich connate waters ponded in the center of the basin upwards

  2. Lead isotopes and trace metal ratios of aerosols as tracers of Pb pollution sources in Kanpur, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Indra; Bizimis, Michael; Tripathi, Sachchida; Paul, Debajyoti; Tyagi, Swati; Sengupta, Deep

    2015-04-01

    The anthropogenic flux of Pb in the Earth's surface is almost an order of magnitude higher than its corresponding natural flux [1]. Identifying the sources and pathways of anthropogenic Pb in environment is important because Pb toxicity is known to have adverse effects on human health. Pb pollution sources for America, Europe, and China are well documented. However, sources of atmospheric Pb are unknown in India, particularly after leaded gasoline was phased out in 2000. India has a developing economy with a rapidly emerging automobile and high temperature industry, and anthropogenic Pb emission is expected to rise in the next decade. In this study, we report on the Pb- isotope compositions and trace metal ratios of airborne particulates collected in Kanpur, an industrial city in northern India. The Pb concentration in the airborne particulate matter varies between 14-216 ng/m3, while the other heavy metals vary by factor of 10 or less, e.g. Cd=0.3-3 ng/m3, As=0.4-3.5 ng/m3, Zn=36-161 ng/m3, and Cu=3-22 ng/m3. The 206Pb/207Pb, 208Pb/206Pb, and 208Pb/207Pb vary between 1.112 - 1.129, 2.123-2.141, and 2.409-2.424 respectively, and are highly correlated with each other (R2>0.9). Pb isotopes and trace metal data reveals that coal combustion is the major source of anthropogenic Pb in the atmosphere, with limited contribution from mining and smelting processes. We further conclude that combination of Pb isotope ratios and V/Pb ratios are powerful tracers for Pb source apportionment studies, which is otherwise difficult to differentiate based only on Pb systematics [1] Sen and Peucker-Ehrenbrink (2012), Environ. Sci. Technol.(46), 8601-8609

  3. Simultaneous measurement of uptake and elimination of cadmium by caddisfly (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae) larvae using stable isotope tracers.

    PubMed

    Evans, R Douglas; Balch, Gordon C; Evans, Hayla E; Welbourn, Pamela M

    2002-05-01

    The use of stable isotopes coupled with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry provides a unique opportunity to investigate pathways of metals in aquatic invertebrates. In this study, the simultaneous uptake and elimination of cadmium (Cd) in stream-dwelling caddisfly (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae) larvae was measured in laboratory experiments with stable isotopes of Cd. In one experiment, animals were exposed to low levels (0.5 microg/L) of 114Cd in filtered river water and uptake was measured for 9 d, followed by 9 d during which the larvae were exposed to either 114Cd, 113Cd, or filtered river water. In a second experiment, the initial exposure concentration of 114Cd varied from 0.1 to 1.6 microg/L for 5 d, followed by 5 d during which the larvae were exposed to the same respective levels of 113Cd. The purpose of the two experiments was to test whether or not elimination of 114Cd from Hydropsyche larvae was the same in the presence or absence of Cd in the water and also whether or not elimination rates were dependent on exposure concentration. The results indicated that elimination of Cd by Hydropsyche larvae (elimination rate constant approximately 0.21-0.24/d) in the presence of Cd in the water was the same as the depuration when no metal was present. Furthermore, the elimination rate was independent of exposure concentrations, ranging between 0.1 and 1.6 microg/L. Thus, the stable isotope tracer technique enabled the simultaneous measurement of uptake and elimination of Cd in hydropsychid larvae and may have the potential to facilitate the labeling of various compartments (e.g., water, sediment, and food) in the aquatic environment.

  4. Mercury Stable Isotopes in Ornithogenic Deposits As Tracers of Historical Cycling of Mercury in Ross Sea, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wang; Xie, Zhouqing; Bergquist, Bridget A

    2015-07-07

    Production of methylmercury (MeHg) in ocean waters and its bioaccumulation in marine organisms are critical processes controlling the fate and toxicity of mercury (Hg). However, these processes are not well understood in the Antarctic, where high levels of MeHg are observed in the subsurface ocean (100-1000 m). We explored the use of Hg stable isotope compositions in historical and modern biological deposits as a new approach for discerning Hg sources and tracing MeHg cycling in the ocean and bioaccumulation in marine biota. We found similar mass independent isotope fractionation (MIF) of Hg between a sediment profile containing historical penguin and seal feces deposits from coastal Antarctica and modern penguin and seal feces, suggesting that penguin and seal feces were the dominant sources of Hg to the sediments at different time periods. Furthermore, sediments dominated by seal feces displayed a significantly lower MIF slope (Δ(199)Hg/Δ(201)Hg) than those dominated by penguin feces despite similar extents of MIF. Since seals forage at greater depths (>400 m) than penguins (<100 m), the high MIF values and lower Δ(199)Hg/Δ(201)Hg in seal feces suggest that a significant fraction of MeHg accumulated by seals was produced in situ in the subsurface ocean from residual inorganic Hg(II) that sank from the euphotic zone after partial photoreduction. Our results suggest that in situ Hg methylation can be an important source of MeHg for marine biota, and Hg isotope compositions in biological archives can be valuable tracers of MeHg cycling.

  5. Distinctive stable isotope ratios in important zooplankton species in relation to estuarine salinity gradients: Potential tracer of fish migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Keita W.; Kasai, Akihide; Isoda, Takane; Nakayama, Kouji; Tanaka, Masaru

    2008-07-01

    To assess the potential of stable isotope ratios as an indicator of fish migration within estuaries, stable isotope ratios in important zooplankton species were analyzed in relation to estuarine salinity gradients. Gut contents from migratory juveniles of the euryhaline marine fish Lateolabrax japonicus were examined along the Chikugo River estuary of the Ariake Sea, which has the most developed estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) in Japan. Early juveniles in March and April preyed primarily on two copepod species; Sinocalanus sinensis at lower salinities and Acartia omorii at higher salinities. Late juveniles (standard length > 40 mm) at lower salinities preyed exclusively on the mysid Acanthomysis longirostris until July and complementarily on the decapod Acetes japonicus in August. These prey species were collected along the estuary during the spring-summer seasons of 2003 and 2004, and their carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios ( δ13C and δ15N) were evaluated. The δ13C values of prey species were distinct from each other and were primarily depleted within and in close proximity to the ETM (salinity < 10); S. sinensis (-26.6‰) < Acanthomysis longirostris (-23.3‰) < Acartia omorii (-21.1‰) < Acetes japonicus (-18.5‰). The overall gradient of δ13C with salinity occurred for all prey species and showed minor temporal fluctuations, while it was not directly influenced by the δ13C values in particulate organic matter along the estuary. In contrast to δ13C, the δ15N values of prey species did not exhibit any clear relationship with salinity. The present study demonstrated that δ13C has the potential for application as a tracer of fish migration into lower salinity areas including the ETM.

  6. Adding geochemical and isotope tracers to models of hillslope evolution: valuable constraints or monumental headache?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, S. M.; Yoo, K.; Hurst, M. D.; Weinman, B. A.; Maher, K.

    2011-12-01

    Landscapes evolve through time, both in terms of their geomorphology and their geochemistry. Past studies have highlighted that topography suffers from the problem of equifinality: the topographic configuration of landscapes can be the result of many different, yet equally plausible, erosion histories. In hillslope soils the properties and chemistry of the soils themselves could provide additional constraints on landscape evolution. Here we present results from a combination of modelling and field studies that seek to quantify the co-evolution of hillslope morphology and the solid state chemistry of hillslope soils. The models follow large numbers of individual particles as they are entrained into a physically mobile soil layer, weathered, and accumulate isotopes such as 10Be and 21Ne. We demonstrate that multiple hillslope properties mitigate (but do not eliminate) the problem of equifinality and demonstrate the importance of accounting for individual particle residence times and ages in interpretation of both isotope and weathering data.

  7. Identifying sources of nitrate in select watersheds of the Tahoe Basin using stable isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C. M.; Paytan, A.; Kayhanian, M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of Bayesian stable isotope (SI) models to examine ecological questions is becoming increasingly common, but to our knowledge this approach has not previously been used to partition sources of nutrient contamination to aquatic environments. Bayesian mixing model techniques are particularly powerful in modeling SI mixing because they incorporate the uncertainty inherent in isotopic source signatures and allow explicit comparison of the strength of competing models of source contribution. We present results from a study that utilized the stable isotopes of nitrate to distinguish between various natural and anthropogenic sources of nutrients in streams and highway runoff in three watersheds draining into Lake Tahoe, California. Based on isotopic composition, potential sources were grouped into four categories: vegetation, soils, roads, and atmospheric deposition. The Bayesian SI mixing model MixSIR was used to determine the relative contribution of each source category to runoff samples collected from highways and adjacent streams. Model results indicated variation in the proportional contribution of nitrate sources between sampling locations, but in all three watersheds road related sources contributed a smaller proportion of nitrate than soils, vegetation, or atmospheric sources. The results of this study suggest that the disturbance of soil and hydrologic flow paths in the vicinity of roads plays a more significant role in contributing nutrients to highway runoff than the actual usage of vehicles on the roads themselves. The specific results of this study have implications for nutrient management in the vicinity of roads, and the general approach taken in this research demonstrates a novel application of Bayesian SI mixing models for source attribution of nutrient contamination when computing total maximum daily load (TMDL).

  8. Estimating snow sublimation using natural chemical and isotopic tracers across a gradient of solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, Joseph R.; Brooks, P. D.; Molotch, N. P.; Veatch, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    Changes in both climate and vegetation may dramatically impact the amount of water stored in seasonal snow cover and the timing of spring snowmelt. This study quantifies how spatial variability in solar radiation affects the spatial and temporal patterns in snow water equivalent (SWE), snow chemistry, and snow water isotopes in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico. Depth, density, stratigraphy, temperature, and snow samples were collected approximately monthly from five locations between January and April 2007 to quantify the effects of solar forcing on snowpack water and chemical balance. Locations varied in solar forcing due to topography and vegetation, while minimizing variability in precipitation, elevation, aspect, interception, and wind redistribution. Snowfall (340 ± 5 mm) was similar across all sites, but peak SWE at maximum accumulation ranged from 187 to 340 mm. Solute concentrations were highest directly under canopies, intermediate in nonshaded forest openings, and lowest in shaded forest openings. Conservative solute concentrations (SO42-, R2 = 0.80), Cl- (R2 = 0.60), and isotope values (δ18O R2 = 0.96) were inversely related to SWE at maximum accumulation. Mass balance estimates of snowpack water balance using solute concentrations and isotopes indicated that sublimation ranged from <2% to ˜20% of winter precipitation, consistent with previous studies at the site. The strong relationships between solar forcing, SWE, and chemistry suggest that snow chemistry at maximum accumulation can be used to estimate overwinter sublimation. Furthermore, variability in solar forcing also can be used to refine spatial estimates of catchment solute and isotope input at melt.

  9. Exercise effects on postprandial glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetes: a triple-tracer approach.

    PubMed

    Mallad, Ashwini; Hinshaw, Ling; Schiavon, Michele; Dalla Man, Chiara; Dadlani, Vikash; Basu, Rita; Lingineni, Ravi; Cobelli, Claudio; Johnson, Matthew L; Carter, Rickey; Kudva, Yogish C; Basu, Ananda

    2015-06-15

    To determine the effects of exercise on postprandial glucose metabolism and insulin action in type 1 diabetes (T1D), we applied the triple tracer technique to study 16 T1D subjects on insulin pump therapy before, during, and after 75 min of moderate-intensity exercise (50% V̇o2max) that started 120 min after a mixed meal containing 75 g of labeled glucose. Prandial insulin bolus was administered as per each subject's customary insulin/carbohydrate ratio adjusted for meal time meter glucose and the level of physical activity. Basal insulin infusion rates were not altered. There were no episodes of hypoglycemia during the study. Plasma dopamine and norepinephrine concentrations rose during exercise. During exercise, rates of endogenous glucose production rose rapidly to baseline levels despite high circulating insulin and glucose concentrations. Interestingly, plasma insulin concentrations increased during exercise despite no changes in insulin pump infusion rates, implying increased mobilization of insulin from subcutaneous depots. Glucagon concentrations rose before and during exercise. Therapeutic approaches for T1D management during exercise will need to account for its effects on glucose turnover, insulin mobilization, glucagon, and sympathetic response and possibly other blood-borne feedback and afferent reflex mechanisms to improve both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Lead isotopes in the western North Atlantic: Transient tracers of pollutant lead inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, A.J. |; Church, T.M.; Flegal, A.R.

    1998-08-01

    In the early 1980s, Patterson and colleagues demonstrated that most lead in oceanic surface waters had an anthropogenic origin. Their discovery occurred during the phasing out of leaded gasoline in North America initiated in the previous decade. The corresponding decrease in anthropogenic lead emissions, verified by Pb/{sup 210}Pb ratios, accounted for the systematic decline in lead concentrations in surface waters of the western Sargasso Sea. Subsequent changes in anthropogenic lead inputs to the western Sargasso Sea surface waters have been documented by measurements of lead concentrations, isotopic compositions ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb), and Pb/{sup 210}Pb ratios in precipitation and seawater for the period of 1981 to 1994. These data indicate the easterly trade winds are now the primary source of atmospheric lead in Bermuda, and they confirm that the decline of lead concentrations in the North Atlantic is associated with the phasing out of leaded gasoline in North America and western Europe over the past decade. Moreover, temporal variations in the relative contribution of industrial lead inputs from the two sides of the North Atlantic over that period can be quantified based on differences in their isotopic composition. The transient character of those isotopic signatures also allows calculations of pollutant lead penetration rates into the mixed layer and upper thermocline of the western Sargasso Sea.

  11. Lead isotopes in the western North Atlantic: transient tracers of pollutant lead inputs.

    PubMed

    Véron, A J; Church, T M; Flegal, A R

    1998-08-01

    In the early 1980s, Patterson and colleagues demonstrated that most lead in oceanic surface waters had an anthropogenic origin. Their discovery occurred during the phasing out of leaded gasoline in North America initiated in the previous decade. The corresponding decrease in the anthropogenic lead emissions, verified by Pb/210Pb ratios, accounted for the systematic decline in lead concentrations in surface waters of the western Sargasso Sea. Subsequent changes in anthropogenic lead inputs to the western Sargasso Sea surface waters have been documented by measurements of lead concentrations, isotopic compositions (206Pb/207Pb, 208Pb/206Pb), and Pb/210Pb ratios in precipitation and seawater for the period of 1981 to 1994. These data indicate the easterly trade winds are now the primary source of atmospheric lead in Bermuda, and they confirm that the decline of lead concentrations in the North Atlantic is associated with the phasing out of leaded gasoline in North America and western Europe over the past decade. Moreover, temporal variations in the relative contribution of industrial lead inputs from the two sides of the North Atlantic over that period can be quantified based on differences in their isotopic composition. The transient character of those isotopic signatures also allows calculations of pollutant lead penetration rates into the mixed layer and upper thermocline of the western Sargasso Sea.

  12. Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics Analysis of Ribonucleotide and RNA Metabolism in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Teresa W-M; Tan, Jinlian; McKinney, Martin M; Lane, Andrew N

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a simple NMR-based method to determine the turnover of nucleotides and incorporation into RNA by stable isotope resolved metabolomics (SIRM) in A549 lung cancer cells. This method requires no chemical degradation of the nucleotides or chromatography. During cell growth, the free ribonucleotide pool is rapidly replaced by de novo synthesized nucleotides. Using [U-(13)C]-glucose and [U-(13)C,(15)N]-glutamine as tracers, we showed that virtually all of the carbons in the nucleotide riboses were derived from glucose, whereas glutamine was preferentially utilized over glucose for pyrimidine ring biosynthesis, via the synthesis of Asp through the Krebs cycle. Incorporation of the glutamine amido nitrogen into the N3 and N9 positions of the purine rings was also demonstrated by proton-detected (15)N NMR. The incorporation of (13)C from glucose into total RNA was measured and shown to be a major sink for the nucleotides during cell proliferation. This method was applied to determine the metabolic action of an anti-cancer selenium agent (methylseleninic acid or MSA) on A549 cells. We found that MSA inhibited nucleotide turnover and incorporation into RNA, implicating an important role of nucleotide metabolism in the toxic action of MSA on cancer cells.

  13. Isotope Tracer Studies of Diffusion in Sillicates and of Geological Transport Processes Using Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, Gerald J

    2008-07-31

    The objectives were directed toward understanding the transport of chemical species in nature, with particular emphasis on aqueous transport in solution, in colloids, and on particles. Major improvements in measuring ultra-low concentrations of rare elements were achieved. We focused on two areas of studies: (1) Field, laboratory, and theoretical studies of the transport and deposition of U, Th isotopes and their daughter products in natural systems; and (2) Study of calcium isotope fractionation effects in marine carbonates and in carbonates precipitated in the laboratory, under controlled temperature, pH, and rates of precipitation. A major study of isotopic fractionation of Ca during calcite growth from solution has been completed and published. It was found that the isotopic shifts widely reported in the literature and attributed to biological processes are in fact due to a small equilibrium fractionation factor that is suppressed by supersaturation of the solution. These effects were demonstrated in the laboratory and with consideration of the solution conditions in natural systems, where [Ca{sup 2+}] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] + [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. The controlling rate is not the diffusion of Ca, as was earlier proposed, but rather the rate of supply of [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] ions to the interface. This now opens the issues of isotopic fractionation of many elements to a more physical-chemical approach. The isotopic composition of Ca {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) in calcite crystals has been determined relative to that in the parent solutions by TIMS using a double spike. Solutions were exposed to an atmosphere of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, provided by the decomposition of (NH4)2CO3. Alkalinity, pH, and concentrations of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, and CO{sub 2} in solution were determined. The procedures permitted us to determine {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) over a range of pH conditions, with the associated ranges of alkalinity. Two solutions with

  14. Isotopic Approaches to Allying Productivity and Sulfur Metabolism in Three Symbiotic Hydrothermal Vent Molluscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beinart, R.; Gartman, A.; Sanders, J. G.; Luther, G. W.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Symbioses between animals and chemosynthetic bacteria predominate at hydrothermal vents. In these associations, the endosymbiotic bacteria utilize chemical reductants for the energy to support autotrophy, providing primary nutrition for the host. Despite their ubiquity at vents worldwide, little is known about the rates of productivity of these symbioses under different physico-chemical regimes or how their metabolism effects the local geochemical environment. To address this matter, we used high-pressure flow through incubations and stable isotopic tracers to maintain three genera of symbiotic mollusc - the gastropods Alviniconcha and Ifremeria, and the mussel Bathymodiolus - at vent-like conditions. Via the incorporation of isotopically labeled compounds, we assessed their productivity when using different reduced sulfur species as reductants. Using cyclic voltammetry, mass spectrometry and discrete geochemical analyses, we concurrently measured their effect on sulfur flux from the vessels. We found that the symbionts of all three genera can support autotrophy with hydrogen sulfide and thiosulfate, though at different rates. Additionally, by examining the rate of isotopic incorporation into biomass, we revealed intra-generic variability in productivity among the individuals in our experimental assemblages that are likely related to differences in the geochemical regime along the length of reactor. These geochemical gradients are due to the activity of other individuals within the vessel, since those organisms closest to the influent of the vent-like water had the highest measured carbon incorporation. Finally, we measured the uptake and excretion of sulfur species, which illustrate the degree to which these symbioses might impact local sulfur chemistry in situ. These experiments show that A) access to particular sulfur species differentially affects the productivity of vent symbioses, suggesting that competition for these substrates, both within and between host

  15. Metabolic flux distribution analysis by 13C-tracer experiments using the Markov chain-Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Wongsa, S; Kadirkamanathan, V; Billings, S A; Wright, P C

    2005-12-01

    Metabolic flux analysis using 13C-tracer experiments is an important tool in metabolic engineering since intracellular fluxes are non-measurable quantities in vivo. Current metabolic flux analysis approaches are fully based on stoichiometric constraints and carbon atom balances, where the over-determined system is iteratively solved by a parameter estimation approach. However, the unavoidable measurement noises involved in the fractional enrichment data obtained by 13C-enrichment experiment and the possible existence of unknown pathways prevent a simple parameter estimation method for intracellular flux quantification. The MCMC (Markov chain-Monte Carlo) method, which obtains intracellular flux distributions through delicately constructed Markov chains, is shown to be an effective approach for deep understanding of the intracellular metabolic network. Its application is illustrated through the simulation of an example metabolic network.

  16. Using stable isotopes and integrated flow-tracer modeling to conceptualise vegetation influences on water partitioning, storage and runoff generation in high-latitude environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Buttle, Jim; Carey, Sean; Laudon, Hjalmar; McDonnell, Jeff; McNamara, Jim; Spence, Chris; Sprenger, Matthias; van Huijgevoort, Marjolein; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotopes tracers have been widely used as a means to assess the sources and flow paths of stream flow in a wide range of geographical environments. However, the paucity of high resolution isotope data sets from high latitude northern headwaters hinders the development of a generalized understanding of boreal watershed. As part of the ERC funded "VeWa" project, we use stable isotopes of different waters (that is precipitation, soil water, groundwater, streamwater, plant xylem water) to understand the role of vegetation on the partitioning of precipitation, and the subsequent storage and release of water at six, long-term experimental sites across the wider North (in Scotland, Sweden, Canada and the US). We investigated the effects of vegetation on interception, precipitation partitioning and isotope inputs as well as evaporative losses and dynamics in soil water isotopes. We also used a tracer-aided, spatially distributed rainfall-runoff model to conceptualise and integrate flow paths, storage dynamics and mixing processes at the catchment scale. Whilst inter-site findings differ in detail, in general, vegetation canopy cover had a large influence on the quantity and distribution of interception and throughfall. However, the isotopic signature of throughfall was mainly driven by that of precipitation. Whilst temporal variability in soil water isotopes was mainly driven by throughfall or snowmelt in wet periods, the effects of soil evaporation was dominant in soils during the dry periods, with the effects of evaporative fractionation evident in in the upper 10cm of the soils. At some sites, this evaporative fractionation in the rooting zone seemed to explain the isotopic composition of xylem water. Despite these processes affecting the partitioning of isotopes in the soils, at the catchment scale modelling showed that these differences have limited influence on stream water isotopes. Using the coupled flow-tracer model, we could model stream and soil isotope

  17. Hydrogeochemical and isotopic tracers for identification of seasonal and long-term over-exploitation of the Pleistocene thermal waters.

    PubMed

    Rman, Nina

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and test an optimal and cost-effective regional quality monitoring system in depleted transboundary low-temperature Neogene geothermal aquifers in the west Pannonian basin. Potential tracers for identification of seasonal and long-term quality changes of the Pleistocene thermal waters were investigated at four multiple-screened wells some 720 to 1570 m deep in Slovenia. These thermal waters are of great balneological value owing to their curative effects and were sampled monthly between February 2014 and January 2015. Linear correlation and regression analyses, ANOVA and Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test for two independent samples were used to determine their seasonal and long-term differences. Temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, redox potential and dissolved oxygen did not identify varying inflow conditions; however, they provided sufficient information to distinguish between the four end-members. Characteristic (sodium) and conservative (chloride) tracers outlined long-term trends in changes in quality but could not differentiate between the seasons. Stable isotopes of δ (18)O and δ (2)H were used to identify sequential monthly and long-term trends, and origin and mixing of waters, but failed to distinguish the difference between the seasons. A new local paleo-meteoric water line (δ (2)H = 9.2*δ (18)O + 26.3) was outlined for the active regional groundwater flow system in the Pannonian to Pliocene loose sandstone and gravel. A new regression line (δ (2)H = 2.3*δ (18)O-45.2) was calculated for thermomineral water from the more isolated Badenian to Lower Pannonian turbiditic sandstone, indicating dilution of formation water. Water composition was generally stable over the 1-year period, but long-term trends indicate that changes in quality occur, implying deterioration of the aquifers status.

  18. Disequilibrium δ18O values in microbial carbonates as a tracer of metabolic production of dissolved inorganic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Caroline; Millo, Christian; Ader, Magali; Chaduteau, Carine; Guyot, François; Ménez, Bénédicte

    2017-02-01

    Carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions of carbonates are widely used to retrieve paleoenvironmental information. However, bias may exist in such reconstructions as carbonate precipitation is often associated with biological activity. Several skeleton-forming eukaryotes have been shown to precipitate carbonates with significant offsets from isotopic equilibrium with water. Although poorly understood, the origin of these biologically-induced isotopic shifts in biogenic carbonates, commonly referred to as ;vital effects;, could be related to metabolic effects that may not be restricted to mineralizing eukaryotes. The aim of our study was to determine whether microbially-mediated carbonate precipitation can also produce offsets from equilibrium for oxygen isotopes. We present here δ18O values of calcium carbonates formed by the activity of Sporosarcina pasteurii, a carbonatogenic bacterium whose ureolytic activity produces ammonia (thus increasing pH) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) that precipitates as solid carbonates in the presence of Ca2+. We show that the 1000 lnαCaCO3-H2O values for these bacterially-precipitated carbonates are up to 24.7‰ smaller than those expected for precipitation at isotopic equilibrium. A similar experiment run in the presence of carbonic anhydrase (an enzyme able to accelerate oxygen isotope equilibration between DIC and water) resulted in δ18O values of microbial carbonates in line with values expected at isotopic equilibrium with water. These results demonstrate for the first time that bacteria can induce calcium carbonate precipitation in strong oxygen isotope disequilibrium with water, similarly to what is observed for eukaryotes. This disequilibrium effect can be unambiguously ascribed to oxygen isotope disequilibrium between DIC and water inherited from the oxygen isotope composition of the ureolytically produced CO2, probably combined with a kinetic isotope effect during CO2 hydration/hydroxylation. The fact that

  19. Helium isotopes in hot spring gases as magmatic tracers during incipient rifting in Malawi and Zambia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanless, V. D.; Kurz, M. D.; Elsenbeck, J.; Curtice, J.; Shaw, A. M.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    We present helium isotope ratios from hot spring gases collected in the southern most extent of the East African Rift System to evaluate the role of magmatism in incipient continental rifting. A total of 51 high temperature (30 to 87°C) hot spring localities were sampled Zambia (n=28), Botswana (n=1) and Malawi (n=20), resulting in the most extensive compilation of helium ratios from hot spring gases in these countries. 3He/4He in the gases ranges from0.008 to 2.65 (+/- 0.03) times atmosphere (RA). Neon abundances and isotope ratios were also measured to rule out the role of atmospheric mixing. Of the 51 hot springs, 29 have 3He/4He <0.1 RA, consistent with helium signatures of old continental crust. An additional, 14 samples have helium isotope values between 0.2 and 0.1 RA, which may indicate slightly higher signatures of continental crust or mixing of crust with a deep mantle component. However, 8 hot springs have 3He/4He >0.3, indicating the presence of a magmatic source at depth. There is no simple north-south gradient in helium isotope compositions observed along either Malawi Rift or the Luangwa Rift in Zambia. The highest 3He/4He are observed in two hot springs in northern Malawi ( 3 RA), with the second highest values (1-1.4 RA) occurring in two springs at the southern tip of the Malawi Rift. These hot spring gases require at least 35% and 20% mantle helium, respectively, assuming two component mixing of a continental source (3He/4He of 0.002 Ra) and a depleted upper mantle asthenosphere 3He/4He of 8 RA. Slightly elevated values (0.2-1 RA) are observed in southern Malawi, and in northern Botswana and northeastern Zambia, where there is no surficial expression of rifting. The highest 3He/4He values in northern Malawi correlate well with areas of thinner continental crust, as inferred from gravity and seismic studies. Although the 3He/4He values are lower than hot springs gases in Tanzania, where there are active volcanoes, they indicate a mantle component

  20. Multiple Uses of Hydrogen Isotopes as a Tracer of Rehydration Processes in Glassy Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, B. I.; Fink, J. H.; Guan, Y.; Leshin, L. A.

    2001-12-01

    Silicic lava flows contain zones of enhanced vesicularity with high total H2O contents. This relationship between volatile content and vesicularity has promoted the monitoring of active lava domes using remote sensing techniques in an effort to forecast explosive activity. A persistent complication in attempts to relate surface texture to H2O content and explosivity was the confounding effect of meteoric H2O. Glassy and vesicular lavas exposed at the surface of the Earth for prolonged periods readily interact with meteoric H2O. Rehydration is a time-, temperature-, and porosity-dependent process governed by the slow diffusion of molecular H2O into the glass. This inevitable addition of secondary H2O obscures the spatial distribution of juvenile H2O in lava flows. The ability to distinguish magmatic from meteoric H2O in glassy lavas would help identify regions of overpressure on active domes and thereby improve hazard assessment. Three types of hydrogen isotopic studies of glassy lavas have been utilized to disentangle rehydration processes from primary magmatic ones. First, bulk hydrogen isotopic data on variably textured lava flows reveal enrichments in both δ D and total H2O as vesicularity increases. Mixing between a degassed magmatic and a partially evaporated meteoric H2O best explains the observed trend from lower δ D values in the interior massive obsidian samples to higher δ D in the most surficial vesicular pumice. Second, step-heated hydrogen isotopic analyses further prove that the vesicular samples contain a high percentage of meteoric H2O. Whereas dense massive obsidian samples release a large fraction of deuterium-depleted H2O at temperatures above 600° C, the bubble-rich pumiceous samples lose a majority of their H2O at temperatures below 400° C. Lastly, the Cameca 6f ion microprobe at ASU was used to measure hydrogen isotope transects into the vesicle-melt interface. The gradation from depleted δ D values in the glassy interstices to more

  1. Attempting to link hydro-morphology, transient storage and metabolism in streams: Insights from reactive tracer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Marie J.; Schmidt, Christian; Blaen, Phillip; Knapp, Julia L. A.; Drummond, Jennifer D.; Martí, Eugenia; Zarnetske, Jay P.; Ward, Adam S.; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In-stream transient storage zones, including the hyporheic zone and vegetation beds, can be hotspots of biogeochemical processing in streams, enhancing ecosystem functions such as metabolism and nutrient uptake. The spatio-temporal dynamics and reactivity of these storage zones are influenced by multiple factors, including channel geomorphology, substrate composition and hydrology, and by anthropogenic modifications to flow regimes and nutrient loads. Tracer injections are a commonly employed method to evaluate solute transport and transient storage in streams; however, reactive tracers are needed to differentiate between metabolically active and inactive transient storage zones. The reactive stream tracer resazurin (Raz), a weakly fluorescent dye which irreversibly transforms to resorufin (Rru) under mildly reducing conditions, provides a proxy for aerobic respiration and an estimate of the metabolic activity associated with transient storage zones. Across a range of lotic ecosystems, we try to assess the influence of stream channel hydro-morphology, morphologic heterogeneity, and substrate type on reach (103 m) and sub-reach (102 m) scale transient storage, respiration, and nutrient uptake. To do so, we coupled injections of Raz and conservative tracers (uranine and/or salt) at each study site. The study sites included: vegetated mesocosms controlled for water depth; vegetated and un-vegetated sediment-filled mesocosms fed by waste-water effluent; a contrasting sand- vs. gravel-bedded lowland stream (Q = 0.08 m3/s); and a series of upland streams with varying size (Q = 0.1 - 1.5 m3/s) and prevalence of morphologic features. Continuous time-series of tracer concentrations were recorded using in-situ fluorometers and EC loggers. At the stream sites, time-series were recorded at multiple downstream locations in order to resolve sub-reach dynamics. Analyses yielded highly variable transport metrics and Raz-Rru transformation between study sites and between sub

  2. Selenium metabolism in rats with long-term ingestion of Se-methylselenocysteine using enriched stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yoshiro; Suzuki, Noriyuki; T Suzuki, Kazuo; Ogra, Yasumitsu

    2009-04-01

    Se-methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys) is not only a selenium (Se) supplement but also a more promising precursor of an anti-tumor drug containing Se than selenomethionine, which is currently used as Se supplement. In this study, the metabolism of MeSeCys labeled with an Se isotope, 82Se, in rats depleted of endogenous natural abundance isotopes with another Se isotope, 78Se, was traced for 21 days when MeSeCys was continuously and perorally ingested at a supplemental dose. The tracer experiment was performed with our improved method that utilized an inductively coupled plasma-deuterium reaction-mass spectrometer. The substitution of endogenous Se with a single isotope, 78Se, facilitated the detection of exogenous labeled Se. Exogenous Se in the form of MeSeCys preferably accumulated and/or assimilated in the liver, kidneys and testes with long-term ingestion of MeSeCys and was utilized for the synthesis of selenoproteins, i.e., extracellular and cellular glutathione peroxidases and selenoprotein P. Meanwhile, intact MeSeCys was not excreted into urine although trimethylselenonium was detected in addition to selenosugar. The results suggest that MeSeCys was transformed into selenide via methylselenol by beta-lyase. Consequently, it is surmised that MeSeCys is a precursor of methylselenol under long-term ingestion.

  3. Using combinations of metal isotopes as tracers of tailings pond discharges to subsurface aquifers in the Athabasca Oil Sands area, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, P. R.; Savard, M. M.; Ahad, J. M.; Girard, I.

    2016-12-01

    The Athabasca Oil Sands (AOS) industry in Alberta, Canada deposits voluminous waste streams in Earth's largest tailings ponds (TPs). Detecting and tracing contaminant discharge from TPs to subsurface aquifers has proven difficult because tailings have the same composition as the surrounding environment of unmined oil sand. To trace pond discharge to the subsurface therefore relies on the waste stream hosting additions or alterations induced by mining or industrial processes. Inorganic element or contaminant concentration data have proven ineffective at tracing because there is insufficient alteration of the chemical constituents or their ratios. Metal isotopes have not generally been applied to tracing emissions even though isotopic fractionation is likely induced via the high temperature and pH industrial process. We have generated Mg, Li, Pb and Zn isotopic data for a range of groundwater wells and TPs. Mg isotopes are excellent for distinguishing deep saline brines that are pumped into the waste stream during mine dewatering. Li isotopes appear to be heavily fractionated during processing, which produces a heavy isotopic signature that is an excellent tracer of production water. Pb isotopes discriminate Pb derived from oil-sand versus bedrock carbonate. Juxtapositions of TPs, carbonates and near-surface aquifers are common and of significant regulatory concern, making Pb isotopes particularly useful. Zn isotopic data indicates similarities to Pb isotopes, but are difficult to obtain due to low concentrations. Combining the isotopic data with concentration data and hydrologic models will assist in determining the fluxes of discharges from the TPs to near-surface aquifers. The range of environmental contexts of AOS TPs is limited and thus monitoring discharges to nearby aquifers from TPs could feasibly be accomplished using tailored suites of metal isotopes.

  4. Sulphur and oxygen isotope ratios in spruce needles as a tracer of atmospheric pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jędrysek, Mariusz Orion; Kalużny, Adam; Hoefs, Jochen

    2002-09-01

    The biospheric part of the anthropogenic sulphur cycle was investigated in a heavily polluted area at the northern slope of the Karkonosze Mountains, SW Poland. Norway spruce (Picea abies) needles, from a 900 m vertical transect (400 to 1300 m above sea level), were collected on two consecutive days of spring 1998 and one day of winter 1999. Concentrations of sulphate sulphur (SO42-), and organic sulphur (Sorg)n and isotope ratios of organic sulphur and sulphate from spruce needles have been analyzed. (SO42-)n and (Sorg)n were rather constant and δ34S(SO42-)n and δ34S(Sorg)n values increased with higher altitude. This is attributed to an increase in atmospheric SO2 concentration and light intensity, which enhance emission of 34S-depleted hydrogen sulphide (H2S) from needles. The δ18O(SO42-)n decreases with altitude due to the altitudinal 18O-depletion of atmospheric precipitation and increased formation of needle sulphate from atmospheric SO2. The isotope effect related to a reduction process during spring can also be seen at higher altitudes by a negative correlation between δ18O(SO42-)n versus (SO42-)n and δ34S(SO42-)n versus (SO42-)n of spring needles. Winter needles show an opposite trend of potential oxidation of the SO2 assimilated. The Δ34S(SO42- - Sorg)n value shows a very good correlation to the abundance of dust on needles. Higher abundances of dust may limit foliar gas exchange and thus higher Δ34S(SO42- - Sorg)n values reflect conditions which are closer to sulphur isotope equilibrium in the sulphate-organic sulphur system, whereas lower Δ34S(SO42- - Sorg)n values characterize a higher gas exchange rate and more dynamic conditions for the sulphur system in needles. Hydrogen sulphide emission is the most likely mechanism to control variations in the observed δ-values, and dust abundance may control variations in the Δ-values.

  5. Potassium Isotopes as a New Tracer of Seafloor Hydrothermal Alteration: The Bay of Islands Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parendo, C. A.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Wang, K.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrothermal circulation at and around oceanic spreading ridges results in elemental exchange between seawater and oceanic crust, with profound implications for both the ionic composition of seawater and the elemental composition of various solid-Earth reservoirs over geological time. Potassium is among the elements known to be mobile during hydrothermal alteration. Here we investigate the isotopic character of this K exchange by obtaining high-precision 41K/39K data for 6 samples from the Bay of Islands Ophiolite, Newfoundland, Canada—a piece of ca. 485 Ma oceanic crust that was affected by seafloor hydrothermal alteration prior to being obducted. Our 41K/39K analyses are generated using an Isoprobe-P MC-ICPMS equipped with a hexapole collision and reaction cell, which essentially eliminates interferences from the K-isotope mass spectrum. The analyses have an external reproducibility of about 0.07‰ (2SD). We find that the 41K/39K ratios of the ophiolite rocks span a range of approximately 0.70‰ and covary with previously determined 87Sr/86Sr ratios. The stratigraphically deepest, least-altered sample (an olivine gabbro) has a 41K/39K ratio within error of that typically observed in common igneous rocks. The stratigraphically higher, more-altered samples (which include hornblende gabbro, plagiogranite, diabase, and basalt) have 41K/39K ratios that are markedly heavier. This variability in 41K/39K ratios is interpreted to reflect variable addition of seawater K to the rocks. A simple open-system water-rock interaction calculation shows that the covariation between 41K/39K and 87Sr/86Sr can be plausibly explained as the result of hydrothermal alteration. The simplest scenario assumes that the 41K/39K ratio of seawater at the time of interest was similar to its present-day value, in which case the calculation suggests that isotopically heavy seawater K is added to oceanic crust with little fractionation—i.e., an effective fractionation factor near 0.0‰. The

  6. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    DOE PAGES

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; ...

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore » an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  7. Determining groundwater Ra end-member values for the estimation of the magnitude of submarine groundwater discharge using Ra isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyung-Mi; Kim, Guebuem

    2016-04-01

    Radium isotopes (228Ra and 226Ra) are excellent tracers of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). To estimate SGD magnitudes, information on the end-member values of Ra concentrations in groundwater is critical; however, the distribution characteristics of Ra in coastal aquifers are poorly understood. In this study, we show that Ra concentrations in coastal groundwater are primarily dependent on salinity based on the data (n > 500) obtained from global coastal aquifers, although previous end-member calculations averaged all Ra concentrations without considering salinity. If we assume that SGD is composed mainly of seawater infiltrating the aquifer, previous estimates of SGD for the Atlantic Ocean and the global ocean were overestimated twofold to threefold. This may be similar for other applications using different Ra isotopes. Our study highlights that the end-members of Ra isotopes in groundwater should be carefully considered when estimating SGD using Ra isotope mass balances in the ocean.

  8. An investigation of the oxidation behaviour of zirconium alloys using isotopic tracers and high resolution SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardley, Sean S.; Moore, Katie L.; Ni, Na; Wei, Jang Fei; Lyon, Stuart; Preuss, Michael; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Grovenor, Chris R. M.

    2013-11-01

    High resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis has been used to study the oxidation mechanisms when commercial low tin ZIRLO™Low tin ZIRLO™ is a trademark of Westinghouse Electric Company LLC in the United States and may be registered in other countries throughout the world. Unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.1 and Zircaloy 4 materials are exposed to corroding environments containing both 18O and 2H isotopes. Clear evidence has been shown for different characteristic distributions of 18O before and after the kinetic transitions, and this behaviour has been correlated with the development of porosity in the oxide which allows the corroding medium to penetrate locally to the metal/oxide interface.

  9. Groundwater ''fast paths'' in the Snake River plain aquifer: Radiogenic isotope ratios as natural groundwater tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Thomas M.; Roback, Robert C.; McLing, Travis L.; Bullen, Thomas D.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Doughty, Christine; Hunt, Randall J.; Smith, Robert W.; Cecil, L. DeWayne; Murrell, Michael T.

    2000-09-01

    Preferential flow paths are expected in many groundwater systems and must be located because they can greatly affect contaminant transport. The fundamental characteristics of radiogenic isotope ratios in chemically evolving waters make them highly effective as preferential flow path indicators. These ratios tend to be more easily interpreted than solute-concentration data because their response to water-rock interaction is less complex. We demonstrate this approach with groundwater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios in the Snake River Plain aquifer within and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These data reveal slow-flow zones as lower {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr areas created by prolonged interaction with the host basalts and a relatively fast flowing zone as a high {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr area.

  10. [Application of stable isotopes in the study of whole-body protein metabolism].

    PubMed

    Tian, Ying; Yang, Xiaoguang; Piao, Jianhua

    2007-11-01

    Stable isotopes are non-radioactive, so they are safe and suitable for the study of human nutrition. In this paper, the principle and main methods of stable isotopic technique in the study of whole-body protein metabolism were introduced. Meanwhile, the advantages and disadvantages of different methods were discussed and the splanchnic metabolism of labeled amino acids was analyzed.

  11. Organic matter dynamics and stable isotope signature as tracers of the sources of suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler Wildhaber, Y.; Liechti, R.; Alewell, C.

    2012-06-01

    Suspended sediment (SS) and organic matter in rivers can harm brown trout Salmo trutta by affecting the health and fitness of free swimming fish and by causing siltation of the riverbed. The temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) during the brown trout spawning season in a small river of the Swiss Plateau were assessed and C isotopes as well as the C/N atomic ratio were used to distinguish autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter in SS loads. The visual basic program IsoSource with 13Ctot and 15N as input isotopes was used to quantify the temporal and spatial sources of SS. Organic matter concentrations in the infiltrated and suspended sediment were highest during low flow periods with small sediment loads and lowest during high flow periods with high sediment loads. Peak values in nitrate and dissolved organic C were measured during high flow and high rainfall, probably due to leaching from pasture and arable land. The organic matter was of allochthonous sources as indicated by the C/N atomic ratio and δ13Corg. Organic matter in SS increased from up- to downstream due to an increase of pasture and arable land downstream of the river. The mean fraction of SS originating from upper watershed riverbed sediment decreased from up to downstream and increased during high flow at all measuring sites along the course of the river. During base flow conditions, the major sources of SS are pasture, forest and arable land. The latter increased during rainy and warmer winter periods, most likely because both triggered snow melt and thus erosion. The measured increase in DOC and nitrate concentrations during high flow support these modeling results. Enhanced soil erosion processes on pasture and arable land are expected with increasing heavy rain events and less snow during winter seasons due to climate change. Consequently, SS and organic matter in the river will increase, which will possibly affect brown trout negatively.

  12. Application of natural isotope tracers to geothermal research in the Maechan fault zone (N Thailand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongprawat, Monthon; Kamdee, Kiatipong; Sauter, Martin; Wiegand, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Previous geothermal research in Thailand has mainly focused on high-potential geothermal systems such as the active Maechan fault zone, which is located in the northern part of the country. Fang and Maechan hot springs have been the primary targets for power generation and agricultural applications (Apollaro et al. 2015). Here we present a comprehensive survey of chemical and isotopic compositions of thermal waters from six hot springs, well water, and cold surface water samples. This study aims to identify sources of the geothermal waters, hydrodynamic processes and the thermal capacity of the hot springs along the Maechan fault zone. Field parameters, major ions, stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, as well as radiocarbon and tritium were investigated. The chemical composition of both thermal waters and cold surface waters is dominated by the Na-HCO3 type. δ2HSMOW and δ18OSMOW data of thermal water and cold surface water plot along a local meteoric water line, suggesting local precipitation as the source of thermal water in the area. δ13CPDB values between -4 to -16 ‰ indicate that dissolved carbon in the thermal water samples is mainly from inorganic carbon sources but some mixture with organic carbon may occur. Radiocarbon analyses (10-20 pMC) suggest ages of more than 10,000 years for the formation of the thermal waters. Tritium concentrations range between 0-0.2 TU. Bibliography Apollaro, C., Vespasiano, G., De Rosa, R., Marini, L. Use of Mean Residence Time and Flowrate of Thermal Waters to Evaluate the Volume of Reservoir Water Contributing to the Natural Discharge and the Related Geothermal Reservoir Volume. Application to Northern Thailand Hot Springs." Geothermics 58: 62-74. 2015.

  13. Assessment of postprandial glucose metabolism: conventional dual- vs. triple-tracer method.

    PubMed

    Toffolo, Gianna; Basu, Rita; Dalla Man, Chiara; Rizza, Robert; Cobelli, Claudio

    2006-10-01

    The dual-tracer method has been used conventionally for assessment of postprandial fluxes, i.e., appearance in plasma of ingested glucose (R(a meal)), endogenous glucose production (EGP), and disposal (R(d)). To quantify the magnitude of errors affecting the calculations and their dependence on model assumptions, this method was assessed and compared with the triple-tracer method, which provides model-independent estimates. For this purpose, the dual-tracer protocol was performed twice in eight normal subjects, with [1-(13)C]glucose to trace ingested glucose and [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose constantly infused. A third tracer, [6-(3)H]glucose, was infused at variable rates to render the calculation of R(a meal) and EGP virtually model independent. The dual-tracer method analyzed with a one-compartment model performed poorly, since R(a meal) peak was significantly lower and delayed compared with triple-tracer reference, resulting in a significantly lower estimation of the amount of absorbed glucose (9,036 +/- 558 vs. 11,316 +/- 823 micromol/kg, P = 0.0117). EGP showed a paradoxical pattern, with an initial overshoot followed by a rapid decay to negative values, resulting in a significant underestimation of EGP suppression (57 +/- 3 vs. 65 +/- 4%, P = 0.0117). A two-compartment model performed better but did not overcome the limitations of the dual-tracer approach, since the amount of absorbed glucose was still significantly underestimated (10,231 +/- 661 vs. 12,169 +/- 838 micromol/kg, P = 0.0117) and EGP still showed a paradoxical behavior. R(d), estimated from R(a meal) and EGP, was significantly underestimated with the dual-tracer method, irrespective of adopted model. We conclude that three suitably infused tracers are required for accurate assessment of postprandial R(a meal), EGP, and R(d).

  14. Radium Isotope Ratios as Tracers for Estimating the Influence of Changjiang Outflow Water to the Adjacent Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Kim, S.

    2006-12-01

    In order to understand the influence of Changjiang (Yangtze River) outflow water to the adjacent seas during rainy and draught seasons, we studied the origin and mixing of surface water masses in the East China Sea and the South Sea of Korea. We used Ra-228/Ra-226 activity ratio and salinity as two conservative tracers in three end-members: Changjiang water (CW); Yellow Sea water (YSW); and Kuroshio water (KW). Radium isotopes in each 300-liter of surface water samples were extracted by passing through manganese-fiber cartridges, dissolved in hydroxylamine hydrochloride solution, coprecipitated as barium sulfate, dried and measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy. Results show that surface water of the East China Sea includes all three end-member waters during the rainy season, in the order of KW (50-80%), YSW (20-50%) and CW (5-15%). Surface water of the South Sea of Korea, however, includes a little fraction of, or almost no, CW in drought season. These are the preliminary results from an ongoing 6-year project ending in 2009 which aims to predict the influence of heavily polluted Changjiang outflow water to the adjacent seas after the completion of the gigantic Three Gorges (Sanxia) Dam.

  15. Denitrification and anammox in tropical aquaculture settlement ponds: an isotope tracer approach for evaluating N2 production.

    PubMed

    Castine, Sarah A; Erler, Dirk V; Trott, Lindsay A; Paul, Nicholas A; de Nys, Rocky; Eyre, Bradley D

    2012-01-01

    Settlement ponds are used to treat aquaculture discharge water by removing nutrients through physical (settling) and biological (microbial transformation) processes. Nutrient removal through settling has been quantified, however, the occurrence of, and potential for microbial nitrogen (N) removal is largely unknown in these systems. Therefore, isotope tracer techniques were used to measure potential rates of denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in the sediment of settlement ponds in tropical aquaculture systems. Dinitrogen gas (N(2)) was produced in all ponds, although potential rates were low (0-7.07 nmol N cm(-3) h(-1)) relative to other aquatic systems. Denitrification was the main driver of N(2) production, with anammox only detected in two of the four ponds. No correlations were detected between the measured sediment variables (total organic carbon, total nitrogen, iron, manganese, sulphur and phosphorous) and denitrification or anammox. Furthermore, denitrification was not carbon limited as the addition of particulate organic matter (paired t-Test; P = 0.350, n = 3) or methanol (paired t-Test; P = 0.744, n = 3) did not stimulate production of N(2). A simple mass balance model showed that only 2.5% of added fixed N was removed in the studied settlement ponds through the denitrification and anammox processes. It is recommended that settlement ponds be used in conjunction with additional technologies (i.e. constructed wetlands or biological reactors) to enhance N(2) production and N removal from aquaculture wastewater.

  16. Organotin persistence in contaminated marine sediments and porewaters: In situ degradation study using species-specific stable isotopic tracers.

    PubMed

    Furdek, Martina; Mikac, Nevenka; Bueno, Maite; Tessier, Emmanuel; Cavalheiro, Joana; Monperrus, Mathilde

    2016-04-15

    This paper provides a comprehensive study of the persistence of butyltins and phenyltins in contaminated marine sediments and presents the first data on their degradation potentials in porewaters. The study's aim was to explain the different degradation efficiencies of organotin compounds (OTC) in contaminated sediments. The transformation processes of OTC in sediments and porewaters were investigated in a field experiment using species-specific, isotopically enriched organotin tracers. Sediment characteristics (organic carbon content and grain size) were determined to elucidate their influence on the degradation processes. The results of this study strongly suggest that a limiting step in OTC degradation in marine sediments is their desorption into porewaters because their degradation in porewaters occurs notably fast with half-lives of 9.2 days for tributyltin (TBT) in oxic porewaters and 2.9±0.1 and 9.1±0.9 days for dibutyltin (DBT) in oxic and anoxic porewaters, respectively. By controlling the desorption process, organic matter influences the TBT degradation efficiency and consequently defines its persistence in contaminated sediments, which thus increases in sediments rich in organic matter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Denitrification and Anammox in Tropical Aquaculture Settlement Ponds: An Isotope Tracer Approach for Evaluating N2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Castine, Sarah A.; Erler, Dirk V.; Trott, Lindsay A.; Paul, Nicholas A.; de Nys, Rocky; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2012-01-01

    Settlement ponds are used to treat aquaculture discharge water by removing nutrients through physical (settling) and biological (microbial transformation) processes. Nutrient removal through settling has been quantified, however, the occurrence of, and potential for microbial nitrogen (N) removal is largely unknown in these systems. Therefore, isotope tracer techniques were used to measure potential rates of denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in the sediment of settlement ponds in tropical aquaculture systems. Dinitrogen gas (N2) was produced in all ponds, although potential rates were low (0–7.07 nmol N cm−3 h−1) relative to other aquatic systems. Denitrification was the main driver of N2 production, with anammox only detected in two of the four ponds. No correlations were detected between the measured sediment variables (total organic carbon, total nitrogen, iron, manganese, sulphur and phosphorous) and denitrification or anammox. Furthermore, denitrification was not carbon limited as the addition of particulate organic matter (paired t-Test; P = 0.350, n = 3) or methanol (paired t-Test; P = 0.744, n = 3) did not stimulate production of N2. A simple mass balance model showed that only 2.5% of added fixed N was removed in the studied settlement ponds through the denitrification and anammox processes. It is recommended that settlement ponds be used in conjunction with additional technologies (i.e. constructed wetlands or biological reactors) to enhance N2 production and N removal from aquaculture wastewater. PMID:22962581

  18. Black Carbon, Metal Concentrations and Lead Isotopes Ratios in Aerosols as Tracers of Human and Natural Activities in Northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinot, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric brown clouds (ABC) observed as widespread layers of brownish haze are regional scale plumes of air pollutants with a hot spot of emission located in East Asia. ABC are mainly composed of aerosol particles such as Black Carbon (BC) emitted to the atmosphere during biomass burning and fossil fuels combustion. The atmospheric lifetime of BC ranges from a few days in wet season up to one month in dry season. The use of stable lead isotopes and 21 elements as tracers of air pollution was applied to identify and characterized the main sources of anthropogenic activities in Asian region. Aerosol samples from Haiphong (North Vietnam) were collected by a high volume sampler for a period of one year from October 2012 to October 2013. Vietnam's 207Pb/206Pb ratios were almost identical to those found for China. Ratios of 207Pb/206Pb ranged from 0.837 to 0.871 which agrees with values previously reported for the last 10 years in China (0.841 - 0.879). No significant variation in isotope ratio was observed during the sampling period, which suggests that there was no large seasonal variation in the isotope ratios of airborne lead. Trajectory analysis showed that almost two third of the air masses originated from East Northeast which implies that China was a major source of lead in atmosphere. Enrichment factor calculations indicated a large influence of coal activity (EF(Al) As = 1982 ± 796, EF(Al) Cd = 972 ± 659, EF(Al) Sb = 1358 ± 930) but the difference between combustion and mining exploitation could not be evidenced. Significant correlations were found between two others groups of elements: As, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Al, Fe K, Co. Wind dilution was effective on metals concentration variation. During the cold and dry season (winter) ambient concentrations were high and variable, during the warm and wet season (summer) concentrations were stable and low. Taken together, these factors also identified industrial and lithogenic activities in the region.

  19. Tritium records to trace stratospheric moisture inputs in Antarctica along with stable water isotopes and other tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourré, Elise; Landais, Amaëlle; Cauquoin, Alexandre; Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Petit, Jean-Robert

    2017-04-01

    Tritium is one of the very few proxies which can document the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange. In fact natural tritium (3H) is mainly produced in the stratosphere by spallation and rapidly enters the water cycle in the form of tritiated water molecules HTO. Due to the high content of H2O in the troposphere compared to the stratosphere, the present-day tritium content of the stratosphere is 105 times the tropospheric one. HTO concentration in precipitation can thus be related to stratospheric moisture input. Apart from being a key region for climate studies, the East Antarctica Plateau with its low water pressure and precipitation is especially sensitive to stratospheric inputs enriched in tritium. In turn, tritium concentrations in East Antarctica snow should ideally be used to assess the dynamics of stratosphere - troposphere exchanges, but tritium data are very sparse. In this study, we present high resolution measurements of tritium concentration over the last 50 years at the Vostok station from three different snow pits: this allows us to identify similar cyclic interannual pattern despite stratigraphic noise. For one of the pits, stable water isotopes including 17O-excess, sodium concentration, as well 10Be have been measured on the very same samples [1,2]. As for tritium, variations in 10Be are modulated by the production under the influence of solar activity and partly by the stratospheric inputs, but once produced 10Be becomes attached to ambient aerosols and are transported and deposited with them. At Vostok, a possible link between 17O-excess and stratospheric moisture inputs variability has also been suggested [2]. We explore the correlations between these different tracers to confirm the link with stratospheric moisture inputs and to investigate the mechanisms at play in relation with the climatic conditions. In this aim, confrontation with modeling outputs [3] from the LMDZ Atmospheric General Circulation Model enhanced with both stable water

  20. Use of uranium isotopes as a temporal and spatial tracer of nuclear contamination in the environment.

    PubMed

    Tortorello, R; Widom, E; Renwick, W H

    2013-10-01

    The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center (FFMPC) was established in 1951 to process natural uranium (U) ore, enriched uranium (EU) and depleted uranium (DU). This study tests the utility of U isotopic ratios in sediment cores and lichens as indicators of the aerial extent, degree and timing of anthropogenic U contamination, using the FFMPC as a test case. An 80-cm-long sediment core was extracted from an impoundment located approximately 6.7 km southwest of the FFMPC. Elemental concentrations of thorium (2.7-6.2 μg g(-1)) and U (0.33-1.33 μg g(-1)) as well as major and minor U isotopes were analyzed in the core. The lack of measurable (137)Cs in the deepest sample as well as a natural (235)U/(238)U signature and no measurable (236)U, are consistent with pre-FFMPC activity. Anomalously elevated U with respect to Th concentrations occur in seven consecutive samples immediately above the base of the core (62-76 cm depth). Samples with elevated U concentrations also show variable (235)U/(238)U (0.00645-0.00748), and all contain measurable (236)U ((236)U/(238)U = 2.1 × 10(-6)-3.6 × 10(-5)). Correspondence between the known releases of U dust from the FFMPC through time and variations in sediment core U concentrations, (235)U/(238)U and (236)U/(238)U ratios provide evidence for distinct releases of both DU and EU. Furthermore, these relationships demonstrate that the sediment core serves as a robust archive of past environmental U contamination events. Samples in the upper 40 cm display natural (235)U/(238)U, but measurable (236)U/(238)U ((236)U/(238)U = 5.68 × 10(-6)-1.43 × 10(-5)), further indicating the continued presence of anthropogenic U in present-day sediment. Three local lichen samples were also analyzed, and all display either EU or DU signatures coupled with elevated (236)U/(238)U, recording airborne U contamination from the FFMPC.

  1. Chemical and isotopic provenance tracers in ancient copper and bronze artifacts: a geochemical database of copper mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunti, I.; Artioli, G.; Giussani, B.; Marelli, M.; Recchia, S.; Angelini, I.; Baumgarten, B.; Omenetto, P.; Villa, I. M.

    2009-04-01

    The provenance of ore minerals used in prehistoric and historic times for copper smelting and extraction is one of the basic questions that archaeologists pose to modern analytical archaeometry [1]. To aid metal provenancing studies, a database of fully characterized Alpine copper mineralisations is being developed as the fundamental reference frame for metal extraction and diffusion in the past. In the early stages of the project, some of the most well known copper deposits in the Western Alps were selected and compared with very different minerogenetic deposits from the French Queyras (Saint Veran) and the Ligurian Apennines (Libiola, Monte Loreto). The fully characterized samples were then analysed by ICP-QMS (inductively coupled plasma-quadrupolar mass spectrometry). The abundances of about 60 minor and trace elements, including most transition metals and chalcophile elements, and the rare earths were measured in all samples. Furthermore, the feasibility of the routine reliable measurement of the 65Cu/63Cu isotope ratio [2] and its eventual use as a possible ore tracer was tested. Multicollector ICP-Mass Spectrometry was used to determine precise Pb isotopic ratios (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, 208Pb/204Pb) and is being used for 65Cu/63Cu ratios as well. Advanced strategies based on multivariate analysis were then used to discriminate the ore mineral provenance. Data were treated with the chemometric software "The Unscrambler Version 9.5" (CAMO AS, Trondheim, Norway). Data pre-treatment, PCA [3] and PLS-DA [4,5] models were performed as implemented in the software. The availability of such unprecedented and complete amount of data of Alpine copper deposits also yields information relevant for the geochemical and minerogenetic intepretation of the deposits themselves. Application of PCA and PLS-DA to the geochemical and isotopic database proved to be a very powerful tool to discriminate the ore source areas with very little ambiguity. The applications to

  2. Use of water isotope tracers to characterize present and past hydrology of northern boreal freshwater landscapes in Canada (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, B. B.; Brock, B. E.; Yi, Y.; Turner, K. W.; Dobson, E. M.; Farquharson, N. M.; Edwards, T. W.; Hall, R. I.

    2010-12-01

    The impact of climate change and variability on water resources is a pressing issue for northern boreal freshwater landscapes in Canada. Water in this region plays a central role in maintaining the ecological integrity of ecosystems, economic development and prosperity, and traditional use of the land and its resources by indigenous communities. In the Peace-Athabasca-Slave River Corridor in western Canada, shrinking headwater glaciers, decreasing alpine snowmelt runoff, and declining river discharges impact sustainability of hydroelectric and oil sands production and the vitality of floodplain ecosystems of the Peace-Athabasca and Slave river deltas. In the Old Crow Flats of northern Yukon Territory, declining lake and river water levels threaten wildlife populations and cultural activities of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation. In Wapusk National Park in northeastern Manitoba, over 10,000 lakes provide key habitat for large populations of wildlife, but their hydrological fate under conditions of continued warming is uncertain. Inadequate short- and long-term understanding of hydrological variability and its relationship to climate change hamper informed stewardship of water resources in these remote landscapes and presents a significant challenge to managers and policy-makers. Over the past decade, our research has targeted these critical water-related issues. Investigations have focused on integrating contemporary hydroecological studies with long-term (past centuries to millennia) records of hydroecological changes derived from analyses of lake sediment cores using multi-proxy techniques. Spearheaded by the use of water isotope tracers, these leading-edge approaches to water science have provided critical new knowledge to inform stewardship of these important landscapes to contemporary conditions and in light of projected future scenarios. For example, water isotope tracers were used to map the spatial extent of river flooding in the Slave River Delta over a

  3. Microbial Utilization of Estuarine Dissolved Organic Carbon: a Stable Isotope Tracer Approach Tested by Mass Balance

    PubMed Central

    Hullar, M.; Fry, B.; Peterson, B. J.; Wright, R. T.

    1996-01-01

    The natural stable isotope values of different plants have been used to trace the fate of organic carbon that enters estuarine ecosystems. Experiments were designed to determine the magnitude of (delta) (sup13)C changes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) derived from tidal marsh vegetation that occurred during bacterial decomposition. Bacteria were grown on DOC leached from estuarine Spartina alterniflora and Typhus angustifolia plants. In four experiments, 25 to 80% of the initial carbon (2.6 to 9.1 mM organic C) was converted to bacterial biomass and CO(inf2). Mass balance calculations showed good recovery of total C and (sup13)C at the end of these experiments (100% (plusmn) 14% total C; (plusmn) 1(permil) (delta) (sup13)C). The (delta) (sup13)C values of DOC, bacterial biomass, and respired CO(inf2) changed only slightly in the four experiments by average values of -0.6, +1.4, and +0.5(permil), respectively. These changes are small relative to the range of (delta) (sup13)C values represented by different organic carbon sources to estuaries. Thus, microbial (delta) (sup13)C values determined in the field helped to identify the source of the carbon assimilated by bacteria. PMID:16535358

  4. Origins of elements building travertine and tufa: New perspectives provided by isotopic and geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teboul, P.-A.; Durlet, C.; Gaucher, E. C.; Virgone, A.; Girard, J.-P.; Curie, J.; Lopez, B.; Camoin, G. F.

    2016-04-01

    Fluid/rock interaction represents a major process in the formation of calcitic or aragonitic travertine and tufa (CATT). In most cases, CATT is associated to limestone dissolution somewhere along the hydrogeological pathway. However, a wide array of other substratum (basalts, rhyolites, carbonatites, ultramafics, granites, dolomites, evaporites) can act as potential source of elements involved in the formation of CATT. This study reports on the evaluation of potential geochemical tracers linking CATT to their substratum, and unravelling the origin of elements. A large database was established from available literature data as well as new data acquired in the frame of this study for a set of Modern to Recent CATT (Ligurian ophiolites, Italy; the Chaine des Puys, Limagne graben and Paris Basin, France; Reunion Island, Indian Ocean; Jebel Oust, Tunisia). Four most reliable tracing methods are identified (1) δ13C and δ18O cross-plot allows distinguishing epigean (minδ13C = - 27.2 ‰, maxδ13C = 0.9 ‰, meanδ13C = - 12.3 ‰ for N = 314) from hypogean systems (minδ13C = - 4 ‰, maxδ13C = 11.7 ‰, meanδ13C = - 2.87 ‰ for N = 198). Very low δ13C values (<- 12 ‰) and δ18O >- 4 ‰ associated to negative δ13C values are specifically indicative of an ultramafic source rock. (2) Barium and strontium cross-plot helps to discriminate different groups of source rocks amongst the hypogean CATT: (i) source rocks composed of mixed limestones, evaporites, and dolomites are characterised by low barium (< 100 ppm) and high strontium (> 400 ppm) contents, (ii) mafic and granitic source rocks are undifferentiated and display similar barium (from 15 to 930 ppm) and high strontium (> 200 ppm) contents, (iii) the carbonatite group is characterised by its exceptional high barium and strontium values. In epigean CATT, a pure limestone source rock usually relates to very low barium and strontium contents (< 50 ppm and < 70 ppm respectively), whereas mixed limestone

  5. Isotopic Tracer Study of Hydraulic Transfer Between Native Woody Shrubs and Associated Annual Crops Under Dry Conditions in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogie, Nathaniel; Bayala, Roger; Diedhiou, Ibrahima; Fogel, Marilyn; Dick, Richard; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2015-04-01

    Erratic precipitation at the beginning and end of the rainy season combined with short drought periods during the cropping season pose a major challenge for rain-fed agriculture and food security in the Sahel. Research has shown that intercropping annual crops with native evergreen woody shrubs in Senegal can greatly increase crop productivity. Hydraulic redistribution (HR), or the diurnal rewetting of dry soil by the pathway of the root system that extends into wetter soil has been found in many plants and climates worldwide. The HR pathway could be a factor in Senegal where water provided by shrubs aids crop growth during dry periods but this has not been confirmed. Therefore, the objective was to determine the ability of shrubs to provide water to millet plants using the deuterium tracer. Penisetum glaucum (Pearl Millet) was grown in association with the native woody shrub Guiera senegalensis under drip irrigation until 68 days after sowing, followed by a with holding of water during late flowering and early grain-filling stage. Within 10 days the soils in the stressed plots became extremely dry with water potentials ranging from -0.5 Mpa to -3.0 Mpa at 20cm depth. Twenty days after the initiation of water stress, vials of isotopically enriched deuterium tracer was sealed around cut roots of three separate shrubs at a depth of 1.0 m followed by sampling of aboveground tissue from injection shrubs and closely growing crop plants over a period of five days. Using cryogenic vacuum distillation, plant water samples were extracted from plant tissue. With lab work completed on two replications, a highly enriched deuterium signal was observed in the tissue water of the shrub beginning twelve hours after the injection. In the same replication thirty-six hours after the beginning of injection, a highly enriched pulse of deuterium in the crop growing directly adjacent to the injection shrub was observed. In a concurrent injection to a nearby shrub under much drier

  6. Metabolic characterization of cultured mammalian cells by mass balance analysis, tracer labeling experiments and computer-aided simulations.

    PubMed

    Okahashi, Nobuyuki; Kohno, Susumu; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Matsuda, Fumio; Takahashi, Chiaki; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Studying metabolic directions and flow rates in cultured mammalian cells can provide key information for understanding metabolic function in the fields of cancer research, drug discovery, stem cell biology, and antibody production. In this work, metabolic engineering methodologies including medium component analysis, (13)C-labeling experiments, and computer-aided simulation analysis were applied to characterize the metabolic phenotype of soft tissue sarcoma cells derived from p53-null mice. Cells were cultured in medium containing [1-(13)C] glutamine to assess the level of reductive glutamine metabolism via the reverse reaction of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). The specific uptake and production rates of glucose, organic acids, and the 20 amino acids were determined by time-course analysis of cultured media. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the (13)C-labeling of citrate, succinate, fumarate, malate, and aspartate confirmed an isotopically steady state of the cultured cells. After removing the effect of naturally occurring isotopes, the direction of the IDH reaction was determined by computer-aided analysis. The results validated that metabolic engineering methodologies are applicable to soft tissue sarcoma cells derived from p53-null mice, and also demonstrated that reductive glutamine metabolism is active in p53-null soft tissue sarcoma cells under normoxia.

  7. PHOTOLYSIS STUDIES UTILIZING RADIOACTIVE TRACERS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PHOTOLYSIS, *TRACER STUDIES), (* TRITIATED COMPOUNDS, PHOTOLYSIS), (*GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY, LABELED SUBSTANCES), ALKENES, KETENES, TRITIUM, ATOMIC ENERGY LEVELS, ALKANES, METHANE , ISOTOPES, ETHYLENES, MOLECULAR ORBITALS

  8. Bayesian Nitrate Source Apportionment to Individual Groundwater Wells in the Central Valley by use of Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Boron Isotopic Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, K.; Harter, T.; Grote, M.; Young, M. B.; Eppich, G.; Deinhart, A.; Wimpenny, J.; Yin, Q. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater quality is a concern in alluvial aquifers underlying agricultural areas worldwide, an example of which is the San Joaquin Valley, California. Nitrate from land applied fertilizers or from animal waste can leach to groundwater and contaminate drinking water resources. Dairy manure and synthetic fertilizers are the major sources of nitrate in groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley, however, septic waste can be a major source in some areas. As in other such regions around the world, the rural population in the San Joaquin Valley relies almost exclusively on shallow domestic wells (≤150 m deep), of which many have been affected by nitrate. Consumption of water containing nitrate above the drinking water limit has been linked to major health effects including low blood oxygen in infants and certain cancers. Knowledge of the proportion of each of the three main nitrate sources (manure, synthetic fertilizer, and septic waste) contributing to individual well nitrate can aid future regulatory decisions. Nitrogen, oxygen, and boron isotopes can be used as tracers to differentiate between the three main nitrate sources. Mixing models quantify the proportional contributions of sources to a mixture by using the concentration of conservative tracers within each source as a source signature. Deterministic mixing models are common, but do not allow for variability in the tracer source concentration or overlap of tracer concentrations between sources. Bayesian statistics used in conjunction with mixing models can incorporate variability in the source signature. We developed a Bayesian mixing model on a pilot network of 32 private domestic wells in the San Joaquin Valley for which nitrate as well as nitrogen, oxygen, and boron isotopes were measured. Probability distributions for nitrogen, oxygen, and boron isotope source signatures for manure, fertilizer, and septic waste were compiled from the literature and from a previous groundwater monitoring project on several

  9. Measuring and modeling C flux rates through the central metabolic pathways in microbial communities using position-specific 13C-labeled tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; van Groenigen, K.; Hagerty, S.; Salpas, E.; Fairbanks, D. E.; Hungate, B. A.; KOCH, G. W.; Schwartz, E.

    2012-12-01

    The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We use position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers, combined with models of microbial metabolic organization, to analyze the response of microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, and C use efficiency (CUE) in soils, decomposing litter, and aquatic communities. The method consists of adding position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through the various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and assumptions of microbial precursor demand. This new method enables direct estimation of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, CUE, and soil organic matter formation in relatively undisturbed microbial communities. We will present results showing the range of metabolic patterns observed in these communities and discuss results from testing metabolic models.

  10. A new methodology involving stable isotope tracer to compare short- and long- term selenium mobility in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolu, Julie; Thiry, Yves; Potin-gautier, Martine; Le hécho, Isabelle; Bueno, Maïté

    2013-04-01

    Selenium is an element of environmental concern given its dual beneficial and toxic character to animal and human health. Its radioactive isotope 79Se, a fission product of 235U, is considered critical in safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories in case of leakage and hypothetical soil contamination. Therefore, Se species transformations and interactions with soil components have to be clearly understood to predict its dispersion in the biosphere (e.g., accumulation in soils, migration to waters, transfer to living organisms). While natural Se interactions with soils run over centuries to millennia time scales, transformations and partitioning are generally studied with short-term experiments (often inferior to 1 month) after Se addition. The influence of slower, long-term processes involved in Se speciation and mobility in soils is thus not properly accounted for. We tested if using ambient Se would be relevant for long-term risk assessment while added Se would be more representative of short-term contamination impact. For that purpose, we developed a new methodology to trace the differential reactivity of ambient and spiked Se at trace level (µg kg-1) in soils. It combined the use of a stable isotopically enriched tracer with our previous published analytical method based on specific extractions and HPLC-ICP-MS to determine trace Se species partition in different soil phases. Given that soil extracts contains very high concentrations of various elements interfering Se (e.g., Fe, Cl, Br), the ICP-MS parameters and mathematical corrections were optimized to cope with such interferences. Following optimization, three correct and accurate (<2%) isotope ratios were obtained with 77Se, 78Se, 80Se and 82Se. The optimized method was then applied to an arable and a forest soil submitted to an aging process (drying/wetting cycles) during three months, to which 77Se(IV) was previously added. The results showed that ambient Se was at steady state in terms of water

  11. Effectiveness of sulfur and boron isotopes in aerosols as tracers of emissions from coal burning in Asian continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Tomomi; Mitsunobu, Satoshi

    2013-03-01

    The atmospheric concentrations and isotopic compositions of sulfur and boron were measured for aerosol samples (water soluble fraction) collected from April 2004 to March 2006 at two sites on the Japan Sea coast. SO42- originating from sea salts in the aerosols was negligible (only 1-2% of the total SO42-). The atmospheric concentrations of nonsea-salt SO42- (Snss) and total B (BT) were scattered widely, but the concentration ratio BT/Snss was relatively high during winter and relatively low during summer. Moreover, aerosols during winter were characterized by a high δ34S (δ34Snss) of nonsea-salt SO42- and a low δ11B (δ11BT) of total B, whereas aerosols during summer were characterized by a low δ34Snss and a high δ11BT. A negative correlation (r2 = 0.34, p < 0.001) was observed between δ34Snss and δ11BT in aerosols from the two sites, suggesting that those values are governed primarily by a mixing of two end-members. On the basis of air trajectory analysis, the first end-member is the air mass from "Northern China (>30°N)", whereas the second end-member is the air mass from "Japan and the Pacific Ocean". It is likely that SO42- and B in the air mass from northern China are strongly affected by coal burning, which satisfactorily reflects the characteristics of δ34S and δ11B (i.e., high δ34S and low δ11B) of coals formed in this region. Thus, both sulfur and boron isotopes in aerosols are effective as tracers of emissions from coal burning in northern China mainly during winter when the air mass from this region is dominant. On the other hand, the results of source identification suggested that the major sources of SO42- and B in the air mass from Japan and the Pacific Ocean are oil combustion in Japan and ocean sea salts, respectively.

  12. Using chemical and isotopic tracers to conceptualise hydrological function in a larger scale catchment draining contrasting geomorphic provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, R.; Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.; Hartley, A. J.; Malcolm, I. A.

    2010-12-01

    A multivariate tracer study in the 749 km2 catchment of the North-Esk in north east Scotland was carried out to infer the dominant hydrological processes in two markedly different geomorphic provinces. The upper 60% of the catchment has montane headwaters dominated by impermeable metamorphic rocks, steep topography, peaty soils and a sub-arctic climate with over 1400mm of precipitation. The lowlands of the catchment are underlain by a major sandstone aquifer, and mainly have freely draining, fertile soils that support intensive arable farming under a drier climate with around 800mm of precipitation. Runoff in the uplands is dominated by near-surface processes with water of low alkalinity and low ionic strength. In contrast, tributaries in the lower parts of the catchment are characterised by alkaline waters with high concentrations of base cations and high levels of nitrate. Stable water isotope dynamics in precipitation and stream water were used to estimate mean transit times (MTT), indicating shorter MTTs in uplands with short turnover times especially in winter, while lowland stream MTTs are largely influenced by sandstone aquifer water and exceed several years. Multivariate statistical methods were used to derive a generic typology of catchment source waters, their spatial and temporal dynamics and particularly, how they integrate together at the larger catchment scale. The uplands dominate the winter high flow response of the whole catchment. The influence of lowland groundwater from major aquifers becomes more apparent under low flows. However, groundwater from small upland aquifers plays a critical ecosystem service in providing base flows which dilute pollutant inputs from lowland areas at the large catchment scale.

  13. Molecular distributions and isotopic compositions of marine aerosols over the western North Atlantic: Dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids, α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal), fatty acids, sugars, and SOA tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Ono, K.; Tachibana, E.; Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Marine aerosols were collected over the western North Atlantic from off the coast of Boston to Bermuda during the WACS (Western Atlantic Climate Study) cruise of R/V Ronald H. Brown in August 2012 using a high volume air sampler and pre-combusted quartz fiber filters. Aerosol filter samples (n=5) were analyzed for OC/EC, major inorganic ions, low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids and various secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers using carbon analyzer, ion chromatograph, GC/FID and GC/MS, respectively. Homologous series (C2-C12) of dicarboxylic acids (31-335 ng m-3) were detected with a predominance of oxalic acid. Total carbon and nitrogen and their stable isotope ratios were determined as well as stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual diacids using IRMS. Diacids were found to be the most abundant compound class followed by monoterpene-SOA tracers > isoprene-SOA tracers > sugar compounds > ketoacids > fatty alcohols > fatty acids > α-dicarbonyls > aromatic acids > n-alkanes. The concentrations of these compounds were higher in the coastal site and decreased in the open ocean. However, diacids stayed relatively high even in the remote ocean. Interestingly, contributions of oxalic acid to total aerosol carbon increased from the coast (2.3%) to the remote ocean (5.6%) during long-range atmospheric transport. Stable carbon isotopic composition of oxalic acid increased from the coast (-17.5‰) to open ocean (-12.4‰), suggesting that photochemical aging of organic aerosols occurred during the atmospheric transport over the ocean. Stable carbon isotope ratios of bulk aerosol carbon also increased from the coast near Boston to the open ocean near Bermuda.

  14. Food Resources of Stream Macronivertebrates Determined by Natural-Abundance stable C and N Isotopes and a 15N Tracer Addition

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    Trophic relationships were examined using natural-abundance {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N analyses and a {sup 15}N-tracer addition experiment in Walker Branch, a 1st-order forested stream in eastern Tennessee. In the {sup 15}N-tracer addition experiment, we added {sup 15}NH{sub 4} to stream water over a 6-wk period in early spring, and measured {sup 15}N:{sup 14}N ratios in different taxa and biomass compartments over distance and time. Samples collected from a station upstream from the {sup 15}N addition provided data on natural-abundance {sup 13}C:{sup 12}C and {sup 15}N:{sup 14}N ratios. The natural-abundance {sup 15}N analysis proved to be of limited value in identifying food resources of macroinvertebrates because {sup 15}N values were not greatly different among food resources. In general, the natural-abundance stable isotope approach was most useful for determining whether epilithon or detritus were important food resources for organisms that may use both (e.g., the snail Elimia clavaeformis), and to provide corroborative evidence of food resources of taxa for which the {sup 15}N tracer results were not definitive. The {sup 15}N tracer results showed that the mayflies Stenonema spp. and Baetis spp. assimilated primarily epilithon, although Baetis appeared to assimilate a portion of the epilithon (e.g., algal cells) with more rapid N turnover than the bulk pool sampled. Although Elimia did not reach isotopic equilibrium during the tracer experiment, application of a N-turnover model to the field data suggested that it assimilated a combination of epilithon and detritus. The amphipod Gammarus minus appeared to depend mostly on fine benthic organic matter (FBOM), and the coleopteran Anchytarsus bicolor on epixylon. The caddisfly Diplectrona modesta appeared to assimilate primarily a fast N-turnover portion of the FBOM pool, and Simuliidae a fast N-turnover component of the suspended particulate organic matter pool rather than the bulk pool sampled. Together, the

  15. Tracing Cationic Nutrients from Xylem into Stem Tissue of French Bean by Stable Isotope Tracers and Cryo-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Metzner, Ralf; Schneider, Heike Ursula; Breuer, Uwe; Thorpe, Michael Robert; Schurr, Ulrich; Schroeder, Walter Heinz

    2010-01-01

    Fluxes of mineral nutrients in the xylem are strongly influenced by interactions with the surrounding stem tissues and are probably regulated by them. Toward a mechanistic understanding of these interactions, we applied stable isotope tracers of magnesium, potassium, and calcium continuously to the transpiration stream of cut bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) shoots to study their radial exchange at the cell and tissue level with stem tissues between pith and phloem. For isotope localization, we combined sample preparation with secondary ion mass spectrometry in a completely cryogenic workflow. After 20 min of application, tracers were readily detectable to various degrees in all tissues. The xylem parenchyma near the vessels exchanged freely with the vessels, its nutrient elements reaching a steady state of strong exchange with elements in the vessels within 20 min, mainly via apoplastic pathways. A slow exchange between vessels and cambium and phloem suggested that they are separated from the xylem, parenchyma, and pith, possibly by an apoplastic barrier to diffusion for nutrients (as for carbohydrates). There was little difference in these distributions when tracers were applied directly to intact xylem via a microcapillary, suggesting that xylem tension had little effect on radial exchange of these nutrients and that their movement was mainly diffusive. PMID:19965970

  16. Spatial separation of groundwater flow paths from a multi-flow system by a simple mixing model using stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen as natural tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaya, Shinji; Uesugi, Kenji; Motodate, Yusuke; Ohmiya, Isao; Komiya, Hiroyuki; Masuda, Harue; Kusakabe, Minoru

    2007-09-01

    Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen have the potential to serve as tracers for both source and flow paths in a groundwater system. The ratios of stable isotopes of oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) can be used as natural tracer parameters to separate multiflow groundwater paths by applying a simple inversion analysis method to determine the differences between observed and calculated δ18O and δD data in a simple mixing model. The model presented here assumes that the distribution of natural tracers in the steady state is governed by simple mixing between flow paths with a normal distribution of flow rate. When the inversion analysis and simple mixing model were applied to the multiflow system of the Matsumoto Basin, which is surrounded by Japanese alpine ranges, the end-members of the relationship between observed δ18O and δD could be separated spatially into specific groundwater flow paths in the multiflow system of shallow and deep groundwater flow paths.

  17. Using Water Isotope Tracers to Investigate Past and Present Water Balance Conditions in the Old Crow Flats, Yukon Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, K.; Wolfe, B. B.; Edwards, T. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Old Crow Flats (OCF), Yukon Territory, is a wetland of international significance that comprises approximately 2700 shallow thermokarst lakes. Located near the northern limit of the boreal forest, the OCF provides vital habitat for abundant wildlife including waterfowl, moose, muskrat, and the Porcupine Caribou Herd, which support the traditional lifestyle of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation. Thermokarst lakes, which occupy vast northern regions, are greatly influenced by climate conditions. In the OCF and other regions there have been observations of decreasing water levels and an increase in frequency of lake drainage events over recent decades. Though there is widespread concern that thermokarst landscape changes are accelerating as a result of ongoing climate change, there are few studies that have investigated current and past variability of lake water balances and climate interactions at the landscape scale. As part of a Government of Canada International Polar Year multidisciplinary project, the present and past hydrology of lakes spanning the OCF are being investigated using water isotope tracers and paleolimnological approaches. Water samples were obtained from 57 lakes three times over three ice-free seasons (2007-09) and analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition in order to capture seasonal and interannual changes in water balance conditions. Results highlight strong diversity in the hydrology of lakes throughout the OCF. Based on patterns of isotopic evolution and calculations of input source compositions and evaporation-to-inflow ratios, we identified snowmelt-dominated, rainfall-dominated, groundwater-influenced, evaporation-dominated and drained lake types, which represent the dominant hydrological processes influencing lake water balances. Lake physical and catchment land cover characteristics influence dominant input type (rain or snow). Snowmelt-dominated catchments are large relative to lake surface areas and typically contain

  18. Use of geochemical and isotope tracers to assess groundwater dependency of a terrestrial ecosystem: case study from southern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Anna J.; Witczak, Stanislaw; Kania, Jaroslaw; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Dulinski, Marek; Wachniew, Przemyslaw

    2015-04-01

    The presented study was aimed at better understanding of the functioning of groundwater dependent terrestrial ecosystem (GDTE) located in the south of Poland. The studied GDTE consists of a valuable forest stand (Niepolomice Forest) and associated wetland (Wielkie Bloto fen). It relies not only on shallow, unconfined aquifer but indirectly also on groundwater originating from the deeper confined aquifer, underlying the Quaternary cover and separated from it by an aquitard of variable thickness. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the contribution of groundwater to the water balance of the studied GDTE and thereby assess the potential risk to this system associated with intense exploitation of the deeper aquifer. The Wielkie Błoto fen area and the adjacent parts of Niepolomice Forest are drained by the Dluga Woda stream with 8.2 km2 of gauged catchment area. Hydrometric measurements, carried out on the Dluga Woda stream over two-year period (August 2011 - August 2013) were supplemented by chemical and isotope analyses of stream water, monitored on monthly basis. Physico-chemical parameters of the stream water (SEC, pH, Na content, Na/Cl molar ratio) and isotope tracers (deuterium, oxygen-18 and tritium) were used to quantify the expected contribution of groundwater seepage from the deeper aquifer to the water balance of the Dluga Woda catchment. The mean transit time of water through the catchment, derived from temporal variations of δ18O and tritium content in the Dluga Woda stream, was in the order of three months. This fast component of the total discharge of Dluga Woda stream is associated surface runoff and groundwater flow paths through the Quaternary cover. The slow component devoid of tritium and probably originated from the deeper Neogene aquifer is equal to approximately 30% of the total discharge. The relationships between the physico-chemical parameters of the stream water and the flow rate of Dluga Woda clearly indicate that the monitored

  19. Tracer-based Metabolomics: Concepts and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W-N. Paul; Wahjudi, Paulin N.; Xu, Jun; Go, Vay Liang

    2010-01-01

    Tracer-based metabolomics is a systems biology tool that combines advances in tracer methodology for physiological studies, high throughput “-omics” technologies and constraint based modeling of metabolic networks. It is different from the commonly known metabolomics or metabonomics in that it is a targeted approach based on a metabolic network model in cells. Because of its complexity, it is the least understood among the various “-omics”. In this review, the development of concepts and practices of tracer-based metabolomics is traced from the early application of radioactive isotopes in metabolic studies to the recent application of stable isotopes and isotopomer analysis using mass spectrometry; and from the modeling of biochemical reactions using flux analysis to the recent theoretical formulation of the constraint based modeling. How these newer experimental methods and concepts of constraint-based modeling approaches can be applied to metabolic studies is illustrated by examples of studies in determining metabolic responses of cells to pharmacological agents and nutrient environment changes. PMID:20713038

  20. Correction of MS data for naturally occurring isotopes in isotope labelling experiments.

    PubMed

    Millard, Pierre; Letisse, Fabien; Sokol, Serguei; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in combination with isotope labelling experiments is widely used for investigations of metabolism and other biological processes. Quantitative applications-e.g., (13)C metabolic flux analysis-require correction of raw MS data (isotopic clusters) for the contribution of all naturally abundant isotopes. This chapter describes how to perform such correction using the software IsoCor. This flexible, user-friendly software can be used to exploit any isotopic tracer, from well-known ((13)C, (15)N, (18)O, etc.) to unusual ((57)Fe, (77)Se, etc.) isotopes. It also provides options-e.g., correction for the isotopic purity of the tracer-to improve the accuracy of quantitative isotopic studies, and allows automated correction of large datasets that can be collected with modern MS methods.

  1. Sauna, sweat and science - quantifying the proportion of condensation water versus sweat using a stable water isotope ((2)H/(1)H and (18)O/(16)O) tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Bösel, Stefanie; Tuthorn, Mario; Benesch, Marianne; Dubbert, Maren; Cuntz, Matthias; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Most visitors of a sauna appreciate the heat pulse that is perceived when water is poured on the stones of a sauna stove. However, probably only few bathers are aware that this pleasant heat pulse is caused by latent heat being released onto our skin due to condensation of water vapour. In order to quantify the proportion of condensation water versus sweat to dripping water of test persons we conducted sauna experiments using isotopically labelled (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) thrown water as tracer. This allows differentiating between 'pure sweat' and 'condensation water'. Two ways of isotope mass balance calculations were applied and yielded similar results for both water isotopes. Accordingly, condensation contributed considerably to dripping water with mean proportions of 52 ± 12 and 54 ± 7% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2011/12 and 30 ± 13 and 33 ± 6% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2012/13, respectively, depending on the way of calculating the isotope mass balance. It can be concluded from the results of our dual isotope labelling sauna experiment that it is not all about sweat in the sauna.

  2. Use of chemical and isotopic tracers to assess nitrate contamination and ground-water age, Woodville Karst Plain, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; Chelette, A.R.; Pratt, T.R.

    2004-01-01

    Concerns regarding ground-water contamination in the Woodville Karst Plain have arisen due to a steady increase in nitrate-N concentrations (0.25-0.90 mg/l) during the past 30 years in Wakulla Springs, a large regional discharge point for water (9.6 m3/s) from the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA). Multiple isotopic and chemical tracers were used with geochemical and lumped-parameter models (exponential mixing (EM), dispersion, and combined exponential piston flow) to assess: (1) the sources and extent of nitrate contamination of ground water and springs, and (2) mean transit times (ages) of ground water. Delta 15N-NO3 values (1.7-13.8???) indicated that nitrate in ground water originated from localized sources of inorganic fertilizer and human/animal wastes. Nitrate in spring waters (??15N-NO3=5.3-8.9???) originated from both inorganic and organic N sources. Nitrate-N concentrations (1.0 mg/l) were associated with shallow wells (open intervals less than 15 m below land surface), elevated nitrate concentrations in deeper wells are consistent with mixtures of water from shallow and deep zones in the UFA as indicated from geochemical mixing models and the distribution of mean transit times (5-90 years) estimated using lumped-parameter flow models. Ground water with mean transit times of 10 years or less tended to have higher dissolved organic carbon concentrations, lower dissolved solids, and lower calcite saturation indices than older waters, indicating mixing with nearby surface water that directly recharges the aquifer through sinkholes. Significantly higher values of pH, magnesium, dolomite saturation index, and phosphate in springs and deep water (>45 m) relative to a shallow zone (<45 m) were associated with longer ground-water transit times (50-90 years). Chemical differences with depth in the aquifer result from deep regional flow of water recharged through low permeability sediments (clays and clayey sands of the Hawthorn Formation) that overlie the UFA

  3. Use of chemical and isotopic tracers to assess nitrate contamination and ground-water age, Woodville Karst Plain, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Brian G.; Chelette, Angela R.; Pratt, Thomas R.

    2004-04-01

    Concerns regarding ground-water contamination in the Woodville Karst Plain have arisen due to a steady increase in nitrate-N concentrations (0.25-0.90 mg/l) during the past 30 years in Wakulla Springs, a large regional discharge point for water (9.6 m 3/s) from the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA). Multiple isotopic and chemical tracers were used with geochemical and lumped-parameter models (exponential mixing (EM), dispersion, and combined exponential piston flow) to assess: (1) the sources and extent of nitrate contamination of ground water and springs, and (2) mean transit times (ages) of ground water. Delta 15N-NO 3 values (1.7-13.8‰) indicated that nitrate in ground water originated from localized sources of inorganic fertilizer and human/animal wastes. Nitrate in spring waters (δ 15N-NO 3=5.3-8.9‰) originated from both inorganic and organic N sources. Nitrate-N concentrations (<0.02-16 mg/l) were highly variable both spatially and vertically in the oxic UFA, based on water samples from 46 wells and four springs collected from 1997 to 2000. During high-flow conditions, spring waters had decreased nitrate and increased DOC concentrations that resulted from mixtures of 20-95% surface water. Although higher nitrate-N concentrations (>1.0 mg/l) were associated with shallow wells (open intervals less than 15 m below land surface), elevated nitrate concentrations in deeper wells are consistent with mixtures of water from shallow and deep zones in the UFA as indicated from geochemical mixing models and the distribution of mean transit times (5-90 years) estimated using lumped-parameter flow models. Ground water with mean transit times of 10 years or less tended to have higher dissolved organic carbon concentrations, lower dissolved solids, and lower calcite saturation indices than older waters, indicating mixing with nearby surface water that directly recharges the aquifer through sinkholes. Significantly higher values of pH, magnesium, dolomite saturation index

  4. The use of isotopically enriched tin tracers to follow the transformation of organotin compounds in landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Kelly; Zuliani, Tea; Ščančar, Janez; Milačič, Radmila

    2014-04-15

    Landfill leachates are an important pool of organotin compounds (OTCs). Several studies have been performed on the occurrence of OTCs in landfill leachates, but only a few of them report degradation and biomethylation processes by bacteria. In the present study transformation of OTCs in landfill leachate was investigated under simulated landfill conditions over a time span of six months. The degradation and biomethylation processes of OTCs were followed by the use of isotopically enriched tin tracers, namely (117)Sn-enriched tributyltin (TBT), (119)Sn-enriched dibutyltin (DBT), (117)Sn-enriched SnCl2, (117)Sn-enriched SnCl4 and a (119)Sn-enriched butyltin mix containing TBT, DBT and monobutyltin (MBT). Transformation of OTCs in spiked leachates was followed at m/z of the enriched spikes and at m/z 120, which allowed simultaneous observation of the transformation of OTCs in the leachate itself and of the added spike. In parallel, these processes were also monitored in a non-spiked leachate sample at m/z 120. Quantification of OTCs was performed by gas chromatography - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS). To discriminate the biotic and abiotic transformations of OTCs and inorganic tin species, sterilization of leachate was also performed and data compared to non-sterilized samples. During the course of the experiment the microbial degradation of TBT was clearly manifested in Sn-enriched spiked leachate samples, while abiotic pathway of degradation was observed for DBT. Biomethylation process was also observed in the leachate spiked with Sn-enriched Sn(2+) or Sn(4+), in concentrations close to those found for total tin in landfill leachates. Monomethyltin (MMeT) was formed first. Stepwise alkylation resulted in dimethyltin (DMeT) and trimethyltin (TMeT) species formation. Hydrolysis of Sn(2+) and Sn(4+) species was found to be a limiting factor which controlled the extent of methyltin formation. The results of the present investigation importantly

  5. Glial Activation and Glucose Metabolism in a Transgenic Amyloid Mouse Model: A Triple-Tracer PET Study.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Matthias; Probst, Federico; Jaworska, Anna; Overhoff, Felix; Korzhova, Viktoria; Albert, Nathalie L; Beck, Roswitha; Lindner, Simon; Gildehaus, Franz-Josef; Baumann, Karlheinz; Bartenstein, Peter; Kleinberger, Gernot; Haass, Christian; Herms, Jochen; Rominger, Axel

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid imaging by small-animal PET in models of Alzheimer disease (AD) offers the possibility to track amyloidogenesis and brain energy metabolism. Because microglial activation is thought to contribute to AD pathology, we undertook a triple-tracer small-animal PET study to assess microglial activation and glucose metabolism in association with amyloid plaque load in a transgenic AD mouse model. Groups of PS2APP and C57BL/6 wild-type mice of various ages were examined by small-animal PET. We acquired 90-min dynamic emission data with (18)F-GE180 for imaging activated microglia (18-kD translocator protein ligand [TSPO]) and static 30- to 60-min recordings with (18)F-FDG for energy metabolism and (18)F-florbetaben for amyloidosis. Optimal fusion of PET data was obtained through automatic nonlinear spatial normalization, and SUVRs were calculated. For the novel TSPO tracer (18)F-GE180, we then calculated distribution volume ratios after establishing a suitable reference region. Immunohistochemical analyses with TSPO antisera, methoxy-X04 staining for fibrillary β-amyloid, and ex vivo autoradiography served as terminal gold standard assessments. SUVR at 60-90 min after injection gave robust quantitation of (18)F-GE180, which correlated well with distribution volume ratios calculated from the entire recording and using a white matter reference region. Relative to age-matched wild-type, (18)F-GE180 SUVR was slightly elevated in PS2APP mice at 5 mo (+9%; P < 0.01) and distinctly increased at 16 mo (+25%; P < 0.001). Over this age range, there was a high positive correlation between small-animal PET findings of microglial activation with amyloid load (R = 0.85; P < 0.001) and likewise with metabolism (R = 0.61; P < 0.005). Immunohistochemical and autoradiographic findings confirmed the in vivo small-animal PET data. In this first triple-tracer small-animal PET in a well-established AD mouse model, we found evidence for age-dependent microglial activation. This activation

  6. Reach-scale isotope tracer experiment to quantify denitrification and related processes in a nitrate-rich stream, midcontinent United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Harvey, J.W.; Voytek, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We conducted an in-stream tracer experiment with Br and 15N-enriched NO3- to determine the rates of denitrification and related processes in a gaining NO3--rich stream in an agricultural watershed in the upper Mississippi basin in September 2001. We determined reach-averaged rates of N fluxes and reactions from isotopic analyses of NO3-, NO 2-, N2, and suspended particulate N in conjunction with other data in a 1.2-km reach by using a forward time-stepping numerical simulation that included groundwater discharge, denitrification, nitrification, assimilation, and air-water gas exchange with changing temperature. Denitrification was indicated by a systematic downstream increase in the ??15N values of dissolved N2. The reach-averaged rate of denitrification of surface-water NO3- indicated by the isotope tracer was approximately 120 ?? 20 ??mol m-2 h-1 (corresponding to zero- and first-order rate constants of 0.63 ??mol L-1 h-1 and 0.009 h -1, respectively). The overall rate of NO3- loss by processes other than denitrification (between O and about 200 ??mol m-2 h-1) probably was less than the denitrification rate but had a large relative uncertainty because the NO3- load was large and was increasing through the reach. The rates of denitrification and other losses would have been sufficient to reduce the stream NO 3- load substantially in the absence of NO 3- sources, but the losses were more than offset by nitrification and groundwater NO3- inputs at a combined rate of about 500-700 ??mol m-2 h-1. Despite the importance of denitrification, the overall mass fluxes of N2 were dominated by discharge of denitrified groundwater and air-water gas exchange in response to changing temperature, whereas the flux of N2 attributed to denitrification was relatively small. The in-stream isotope tracer experiment provided a sensitive direct reach-scale measurement of denitrification and related processes in a NO3--rich stream where other mass-balance methods were not suitable because

  7. Effect of tracer metabolism on PET measurement of [11C]pyrilamine binding to histamine H1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kim, S E; Szabo, Z; Seki, C; Ravert, H T; Scheffel, U; Dannals, R F; Wagner, H N

    1999-04-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the time course of [11C]pyrilamine metabolism and the degree of entry of metabolites into the brain. PET studies were performed in seven healthy volunteers and arterial plasma concentrations of [11C]pyrilamine and its labeled metabolites were determined. After intravenous injection, [11C]pyrilamine metabolized gradually in the human body, with less than 10% of plasma activity being original radioligand at 60 min. Tracer metabolism markedly affected the input function and the calculated impulse response function of the brain. Rat experiments demonstrated that although metabolites of [11C]pyrilamine might enter the brain, they were not retained for prolonged periods of time. At 30-90 min after injection of [11C]pyrilamine, less than 1% of the radioactivity in the brain was originating from metabolites of [11C]pyrilamine. Based on the rat data, the contribution of 11C-labeled metabolites to total [11C]pyrilamine radioactivity in the human brain was estimated and found to be negligible. These results suggest that the metabolites of [11C]pyrilamine do not accumulate within the cerebral extravascular space and that there is minimal metabolism of [11C]pyrilamine by brain tissue itself. Therefore, [11C]pyrilamine metabolites can be neglected in kinetic analysis, using either a compartmental or a noncompartmental model, of the [11C]pyrilamine binding to histamine H1 receptors.

  8. Kinetic measurements of bone mineral metabolism: The use of Na-22 as a tracer for long-term bone mineral turnover studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    Sodium-22 was studied as a tracer for bone mineral metabolism in rats and dogs. When incorporated into bone during growth from birth to adulthood, the bone becomes uniformly tagged with (22)Na which is released through the metabolic turnover of the bone. The (22)Na which is not incorporated in the bone matrix is rapidly excreted within a few days when animals are fed high but nontoxic levels of NaCl. The (22)Na tracer can be used to measure bone mineral loss in animals during space flight and in research on bone disease.

  9. Calcium and Titanium Isotope Fractionation in CAIS: Tracers of Condensation and Inheritance in the Early Solar Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, J. I.; Jordan, M. K.; Tappa, M. J.; Kohl, I. E.; Young, E. D.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic compositions of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) can be used to understand the conditions present in the protoplantary disk where they formed. The isotopic compositions of these early-formed nebular materials are largely controlled by chemical volatility. The isotopic effects of evaporation/sublimation, which are well explained by both theory and experimental work, lead to enrichments of the heavy isotopes that are often exhibited by the moderately refractory elements Mg and Si. Less well understood are the isotopic effects of condensation, which limits our ability to determine whether a CAI is a primary condensate and/or retains any evidence of its primordial formation history.

  10. In situ experiments for element species-specific environmental reactivity of tin and mercury compounds using isotopic tracers and multiple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Pablo; Bouchet, Sylvain; Monperrus, Mathilde; Tessier, Emmanuel; Amouroux, David

    2013-03-01

    The fate of mercury (Hg) and tin (Sn) compounds in ecosystems is strongly determined by their alkylation/dealkylation pathways. However, the experimental determination of those transformations is still not straightforward and methodologies need to be refined. The purpose of this work is the development of a comprehensive and adaptable tool for an accurate experimental assessment of specific formation/degradation yields and half-lives of elemental species in different aquatic environments. The methodology combines field incubations of coastal waters and surface sediments with the addition of species-specific isotopically enriched tracers and a mathematical approach based on the deconvolution of isotopic patterns. The method has been applied to the study of the environmental reactivity of Hg and Sn compounds in coastal water and surface sediment samples collected in two different coastal ecosystems of the South French Atlantic Coast (Arcachon Bay and Adour Estuary). Both the level of isotopically enriched species and the spiking solution composition were found to alter dibutyltin and monomethylmercury degradation yields, while no significant changes were measurable for tributyltin and Hg(II). For butyltin species, the presence of light was found to be the main source of degradation and removal of these contaminants from surface coastal environments. In contrast, photomediated processes do not significantly influence either the methylation of mercury or the demethylation of methylmercury. The proposed method constitutes an advancement from the previous element-specific isotopic tracers' approaches, which allows for instance to discriminate the extent of net and oxidative Hg demethylation and to identify which debutylation step is controlling the environmental persistence of butyltin compounds.

  11. Stable isotopes in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Marsh, Julian B; Das, Sai Krupa; Welty, Francine K

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is recognized as a major public health problem. Obesity is a multifactorial disease and is often associated with a wide range of comorbidities including hypertension, non-insulin dependent (Type II) diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease, all of which contribute to morbidity and mortality. This review deals with stable isotope mass spectrometric methods and the application of stable isotopes to metabolic studies of obesity. Body composition and total energy expenditure (TEE) can be measured by mass spectrometry using stable isotope labeled water, and the metabolism of protein, lipid, and carbohydrate can be measured using appropriate labeled tracer molecules.

  12. Internal correction of spectral interferences and mass bias for selenium metabolism studies using enriched stable isotopes in combination with multiple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Lunøe, Kristoffer; Martínez-Sierra, Justo Giner; Gammelgaard, Bente; Alonso, J Ignacio García

    2012-03-01

    The analytical methodology for the in vivo study of selenium metabolism using two enriched selenium isotopes has been modified, allowing for the internal correction of spectral interferences and mass bias both for total selenium and speciation analysis. The method is based on the combination of an already described dual-isotope procedure with a new data treatment strategy based on multiple linear regression. A metabolic enriched isotope ((77)Se) is given orally to the test subject and a second isotope ((74)Se) is employed for quantification. In our approach, all possible polyatomic interferences occurring in the measurement of the isotope composition of selenium by collision cell quadrupole ICP-MS are taken into account and their relative contribution calculated by multiple linear regression after minimisation of the residuals. As a result, all spectral interferences and mass bias are corrected internally allowing the fast and independent quantification of natural abundance selenium ((nat)Se) and enriched (77)Se. In this sense, the calculation of the tracer/tracee ratio in each sample is straightforward. The method has been applied to study the time-related tissue incorporation of (77)Se in male Wistar rats while maintaining the (nat)Se steady-state conditions. Additionally, metabolically relevant information such as selenoprotein synthesis and selenium elimination in urine could be studied using the proposed methodology. In this case, serum proteins were separated by affinity chromatography while reverse phase was employed for urine metabolites. In both cases, (74)Se was used as a post-column isotope dilution spike. The application of multiple linear regression to the whole chromatogram allowed us to calculate the contribution of bromine hydride, selenium hydride, argon polyatomics and mass bias on the observed selenium isotope patterns. By minimising the square sum of residuals for the whole chromatogram, internal correction of spectral interferences and mass

  13. Development of Fluorine-18 Labeled Metabolically Activated Tracers for Imaging of Drug Efflux Transporters with Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sander, Kerstin; Galante, Eva; Gendron, Thibault; Yiannaki, Elena; Patel, Niral; Kalber, Tammy L; Badar, Adam; Robson, Mathew; Johnson, Sean P; Bauer, Florian; Mairinger, Severin; Stanek, Johann; Wanek, Thomas; Kuntner, Claudia; Kottke, Tim; Weizel, Lilia; Dickens, David; Erlandsson, Kjell; Hutton, Brian F; Lythgoe, Mark F; Stark, Holger; Langer, Oliver; Koepp, Matthias; Årstad, Erik

    2015-08-13

    Increased activity of efflux transporters, e.g., P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), at the blood-brain barrier is a pathological hallmark of many neurological diseases, and the resulting multiple drug resistance represents a major clinical challenge. Noninvasive imaging of transporter activity can help to clarify the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance and facilitate diagnosis, patient stratification, and treatment monitoring. We have developed a metabolically activated radiotracer for functional imaging of P-gp/BCRP activity with positron emission tomography (PET). In preclinical studies, the tracer showed excellent initial brain uptake and clean conversion to the desired metabolite, although at a sluggish rate. Blocking with P-gp/BCRP modulators led to increased levels of brain radioactivity; however, dynamic PET did not show differential clearance rates between treatment and control groups. Our results provide proof-of-concept for development of prodrug tracers for imaging of P-gp/BCRP function in vivo but also highlight some challenges associated with this strategy.

  14. Calcium and titanium isotope fractionation in refractory inclusions: Tracers of condensation and inheritance in the early solar protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J. I.; Jordan, M. K.; Tappa, M. J.; Schauble, E. A.; Kohl, I. E.; Young, E. D.

    2017-08-01

    Measured and modeled Ca and Ti isotopic fractionation effects in a diverse suite of refractory inclusions are used to understand processes of condensation in the solar protoplanetary disk where they and their precursor materials formed. This coordinated approach reveals largely decoupled isotopic signatures and implies that few, if any, of the studied inclusions can be considered primary condensates. All studied inclusions are enriched in light Ca isotopes (∼-0.2 to - 2.8 ‰ /amu), but only two show correspondingly light Ti isotopes. Studied inclusions exhibit both heavy and light Ti isotope enrichments (∼0.3 to - 0.4 ‰ /amu). These refractory element isotopic signatures, therefore, suggest admixture and reprocessing of earlier formed materials with distinct condensation histories. Along with coordinated measurements of 50Ti isotopic anomalies, which span a range from ∼0 to ∼40 epsilon-unit excesses, the comparison of measured and modeled fractionation of Ca and Ti isotopes provides a powerful approach to understanding primitive nebular processes and environments in the protoplanetary disk. Remarkable evidence for Ca isotopic zoning within a typical Type B1 inclusion exemplifies the potential record of the earliest solar nebula that is likely lost and/or overprinted in the isotopic compositions of more volatile elements (e.g., Mg, Si, and O) by later modification processes.

  15. New insights to the use of ethanol in automotive fuels: a stable isotopic tracer for fossil- and bio-fuel combustion inputs to the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Giebel, Brian M; Swart, Peter K; Riemer, Daniel D

    2011-08-01

    Ethanol is currently receiving increased attention because of its use as a biofuel or fuel additive and because of its influence on air quality. We used stable isotopic ratio measurements of (13)C/(12)C in ethanol emitted from vehicles and a small group of tropical plants to establish ethanol's δ(13)C end-member signatures. Ethanol emitted in exhaust is distinctly different from that emitted by tropical plants and can serve as a unique stable isotopic tracer for transportation-related inputs to the atmosphere. Ethanol's unique isotopic signature in fuel is related to corn, a C4 plant and the primary source of ethanol in the U.S. We estimated a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for ethanol's oxidative loss in the atmosphere and used previous assumptions with respect to the fractionation that may occur during wet and dry deposition. A small number of interpretive model calculations were used for source apportionment of ethanol and to understand the associated effects resulting from atmospheric removal. The models incorporated our end-member signatures and ambient measurements of ethanol, known or estimated source strengths and removal magnitudes, and estimated KIEs associated with atmospheric removal processes for ethanol. We compared transportation-related ethanol signatures to those from biogenic sources and used a set of ambient measurements to apportion each source contribution in Miami, Florida-a moderately polluted, but well ventilated urban location.

  16. Glucose Metabolism in Sediments of a Eutrophic Lake: Tracer Analysis of Uptake and Product Formation †

    PubMed Central

    King, Gary M.; Klug, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The uptake of glucose and the formation of end products from glucose catabolism have been measured for sediments of eutrophic Wintergreen Lake with a combination of tritiated and 14C-labeled tracers. Time course analyses of the loss of [3H]glucose from sediments were used to establish rate constants for glucose uptake at natural substrate concentrations. Turnover times from these analyses were about 1 min for littoral and profundal sediments. No seasonal or site differences were noted in turnover times. Time course analyses of [U-14C]glucose uptake and 14C-labeled end product formation indicated that glucose mass flow could not be calculated from end product formation since the specific activity of added [14C]glucose was significantly diluted by pools of intracellular glucose and glucose metabolites. Mass flow could only be accurately estimated by use of rates of uptake from tracer studies. Intermediate fermentation end products included acetate (71%), propionate (15%), lactate (9%), and only minor amounts of butyrates or valerates. Addition of H2 to sediments resulted in greater production of lactate (28%) and decreased formation of acetate (50%), but did not affect glucose turnover. Depth profiles of glucose uptake indicated that rates of uptake decreased with depth over the 0- to 18-cm interval and that glucose uptake accounted for 30 to 40% of methanogenesis in profundal sediments. PMID:16346148

  17. Sources and sinks of methyl bromide and methyl chloride in the tallgrass prairie: Applying a stable isotope tracer technique over highly variable gross fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, Robert C.

    2011-09-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl chloride (CH3Cl) are important stratospheric ozone depleting compounds, but their natural terrestrial sources and sinks have large uncertainties. Gross fluxes of these compounds were measured during the growing season using a stable isotope tracer technique at a temperate tallgrass prairie in northeastern Kansas, United States. Results show that the tallgrass prairie acts as both a source and sink for CH3Br and CH3Cl, with large emissions associated with Amorpha spp. shrubs and a smaller soil sink than expected. Net flux behavior is not significantly altered by the addition of stable isotope tracers. Four models employed to calculate gross fluxes are largely in agreement with each other except at sites with high CH3Cl emissions, where one model most robustly quantifies gross consumption. Gross production rates may increase at Amorpha sites following simulated rainfall, but gross consumption shows no clear response, suggesting that late season microbial uptake of methyl halides is not strongly influenced by sudden changes in soil moisture.

  18. The effects of CaNa(2)EDTA on brain lead mobilization in rodents determined using a stable lead isotope tracer.

    PubMed

    Seaton, C L; Lasman, J; Smith, D R

    1999-09-15

    Studies have demonstrated the efficacy of CaNa(2)EDTA for reducing lead (Pb) levels in blood and soft tissues, including brain. However, a concern remains that a single dose of CaNa(2)EDTA may cause a significant increase in brain Pb levels due to a redistribution of endogenous Pb. Here we utilized a rodent model of Pb exposure in combination with a sensitive stable Pb isotope tracer methodology to assess the effects of CaNa(2)EDTA chelation treatment on the redistribution of Pb in brain, blood, kidney, and bone tissues. Thirty-two adult female albino rats (n = 6-7 animals/group) were exposed to 100 microg Pb/mL in drinking water for 4 weeks. Stable (204)Pb tracer was administered via i.p. injection over 2 days prior to chelation. CaNa(2)EDTA was administered i.p. at a dose of 150 mg/kg/day for 1 to 5 days. Statistical differences were evaluated with univariate ANOVA. Under the Pb exposure and chelation treatment regimens utilized here, there was no evidence of a measurable redistribution of endogenous Pb (as total Pb or labile (204)Pb tracer) into the brain after a single CaNa(2)EDTA dose. Further, CaNa(2)EDTA was not efficacious in measurably reducing brain or bone Pb levels, although brain levels of labile (204)Pb tracer were significantly reduced after 5 days of chelation. CaNa(2)EDTA treatment was effective in significantly reducing both blood and kidney Pb levels. Overall, these data substantiate the efficacy of CaNa(2)EDTA for reducing soft tissue Pb levels, but not total brain Pb, and they do not support concern for a transient increase in brain Pb levels with treatment. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Assessing compartmentalized flux in lipid metabolism with isotopes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Metabolism in plants takes place across multiple cell types and subpopulations in distinct organelles. The distributions equate to spatial heterogeneity; though the limited means to experimentally asses metabolism frequently involve homogenizing tissues and mixing metabolites from different location...

  20. A Multi-isotope Tracer Approach Linking Land Use With Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in the San Joaquin River System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. B.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Stringfellow, W. T.

    2008-12-01

    The San Joaquin River (SJR) is a large hypereutrophic river located in the Central Valley, California, a major agricultural region. Nutrient subsidies, algae, and other organic material from the San Joaquin River contribute to periods of low dissolved oxygen in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel, inhibiting salmon migration. We used a multi-isotope approach to link nitrate and particulate organic matter (POM) to different sources and related land uses. The isotope data was also used to better understand the physical and biological processes controlling the distribution of nitrate and POM throughout the river system. Samples collected from the mainstem SJR and tributaries twice-monthly to monthly between March 2005 and December 2007 were analyzed for nitrate, POM, and water isotopes. There are many land uses surrounding the SJR and its tributaries, including multiple types of agriculture, dairies, wetlands, and urban areas. Samples from SJR tributaries containing both major and minor contributions of wetland discharge generally had distinct nitrate and POM isotope signatures compared to other tributaries. Unique nitrate and POM isotope signatures associated with wetland discharges may reflect anaerobic biological processes occurring in flooded soils. For the mainstem SJR, we applied an isotope mass balance approach using nitrate and water isotopes to calculate the expected downstream isotope values based upon measured inputs from known water sources such as drains and tributaries. Differences between the calculated downstream isotope values and the measured values indicate locations and time periods when either biological processes such as algal uptake, or physical process such as the input of unidentified water sources, significantly altered the isotope signatures of water, POM, or nitrate within the SJR. This research will provide a better understanding of how different land uses affect the delivery of carbon and nitrogen to the SJR, and will provide a better

  1. Use of stable isotopes of selenium in human metabolic studies: development of analytical methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Janghorbani, M.; Ting, B.T.; Young, V.R.

    1981-12-01

    Use of stable isotopes of selenium in relation to enrichment of diets for studies of selenium absorption and metabolism in human subjects is discussed. A method based on radiochemical neutron activation analysis is described which allows accurate measurement of stable isotopes 74Se, 76Se, and 80Se in matrices (feces, plasma, red blood cells, and urine) of interest in metabolic studies. We show that these isotopes can routinely be measured with analytical precision and accuracy of 10% in samples of available size. This precision and accuracy is satisfactory for conduct of many nutritional experiments concerned with gastrointestinal absorption, plasma and red cell selenium turnover, and urinary excretion of the element, using an oral dose of 74Se. Original, experimental data are presented to illustrate the degree of enrichment of 74Se in feces, plasma, and urine after a single oral ingestion of 50 micrograms of the isotope with a breakfast meal in healthy young men.

  2. Paleoclimatic tracers: An investigation using an atmospheric general circulation model under ice age conditions. 2. Water isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Joussaume, S. ); Jouzel, J. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Grenoble )

    1993-02-20

    The linear relationship observed between the water isotopic contents of precipitation and surface air temperatures leads to the use of the water isotopes, H[sub 2][sup 18]O and HDO, in paleoclimatology. Applied to the measurements of the isotopic content of paleowaters, like groundwaters and deep ice cores, this relationship is used to infer paleotemperatures. However, this interpretation of paleo-isotopic contents is only valid if the isotope-temperature relationship is not affected by climate change. To address this problem, the authors have developed a water isotope modeling inside an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) and performed simultations of both the present-day and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climatic conditions. AGCM are indeed the only appropriate tools able to account the whole complexity of the atmospheric circulation. For the present-day climate, preliminary results for January were presented by Joussaume et al. (1984) and are complemented by new simulations performed for both February and August climatic conditions with a higher-resolution version of the model. Model results are well corroborated by observations. They also exhibit some effects of the atmospheric circulation on the isotopic fields. For the simulated LGM climate, the model results compare well with paleoclimatic data of water isotopic contents, except for a higher than observed spatial variability. The overall patterns of the simulated [delta][sup 18]O-temperature relationship for the LGM climate are practically unchanged, which tends to comfort the use of water isotopes in paleoclimatology. However, concerning the deuterium excess, i.e., the relationship between oxyen 18 and deuterium, the model results are not sufficiently valid to allow a discussion of the use of deuterium excess in paleoclimatology. 46 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Absorption, retention, and utilization of two forms of selenium given simultaneously as stable isotope tracers to lactating and nonlactating women

    SciTech Connect

    Mangels, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated absorption, retention, and utilization of selenomethionine (SeMet) and selenite (SeO{sub 3}) in 6 lactating and 6 nonlactating women, 2 to 3 mo postpartum, and 7 never pregnant women. Subjects were maintained on controlled diets for 3 wk. After 1 wk equilibration, subjects received simultaneous oral doses of {sup 74}Se L-SeMet and {sup 76}Se SeO{sub 3}. Complete urine and fecal collections were made for 1 d prior to and 2 wk after isotope dosing. Lactating women collected milk samples from all feedings for 24 h before and 48 h after isotopes. Blood was collected from subjects before isotope dosing and 2,24, 168, and 336 h later. All samples were analyzed for natural Se, {sup 74}Se, and {sup 76}Se by isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

  4. Nitrogen isotope tracers of high-temperature fluid-rock interactions: Case study of the Catalina Schist, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, Gray E.

    1997-09-01

    Nitrogen isotope data for metasomatized rocks, veins, and pegmatites in the Catalina Schist subduction zone metamorphic complex allow futher characterization of complex, high-P/T metasomatic proceses and evaluation of the scales of isotopic equilibration and fluid transport during subduction-zone metamorphism. Throughout the Catalina Schist, N resides predominantly as NH 4+ in white mica, which occurs in nearly all bulk compositions (i.e., metasedimentary, metamafic and, to a lesser extent, metaultramafic mélange) at all grades. Within each metamorphic unit of the Catalina Schist (ranging in grade from lawsonite-albite to amphibolite facies), δ 15N values of mica in metasomatized metamafic and metaultramafic rocks are consistent with the metasomatic addition of N from nearby, devolatilizing metasedimentary rocks into the initially N-poor mafic and ultramafic rocks. Within each unit, uniformity of mica δ 15N in metasomatized rocks relative to the δ 15N of metasedimentary rocks in the same unit implies mixing of N from nearby, heterogeneous metasedimentary sources, perhaps producing fluids with unifrom δ 15N at up to the kilometer scale. However, the trend in δ 15N of metasedimentary sources, with increasing metamorphic grade is inconsistent with larger scale up-temperature transfer of fluid (in this case, N 2-bearing) in the Catalina Schist paleosubduction zone; such flow (at scales of up to tens of kilometers) has been inferred through previous oxygen isotope study. Nitrogen isotope compositions are instead believed to have been controlled at a more local scale than the O isotope systematics, due to the more rock-dominated fluid-rock mass balance for N. The δ 15N of muscovite in leucosomes and pegmatites in amphibolite-grade metasedimentary exposures matches that of muscovite in metasedimentary hosts, implying minimal N-isotope fractionation during migmatization processes and possible transfer of metasedimentary N-isotope signatures in silicate melts. These

  5. Carbon and sulfur isotopes as tracers of fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interaction in geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, A.; Keller, N. S.; Gunnarsson Robin, J.; Kjartansdottir, R.; Ono, S.; Sveinbjörnsdottir, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon and sulfur are among major components in geothermal systems. They are found in various oxidation state and present in solid phases and fluids (water and vapor). In order to study the reactions and mass movement within multiphase geothermal systems, we have combined geochemical fluid-fluid and fluid-rock modelling with sulfur and carbon isotope fractionation modelling and compared the results with measured carbon and sulfur isotopes in geothermal fluids (water and vapor) for selected low- and high-enthalpy geothermal systems in Iceland. In this study we have focused on δ34S for H2S in vapor and water and SO4 in water as well as δ13C for CO2 in vapor and water phases. Isotope fractionations for CO2 and H2S between vapor and liquid water, upon aqueous speciation and upon carbonate and sulfide mineral formation were revised. These were combined with reaction modelling involving closed system boiling and progressive water-rock interaction to constrain the mass movement and isotope abundance between various phases. The results indicate that for a closed system, carbon and sulfur isotope abundance is largely dependent on progressive fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interaction and the initial total δ34S and δ13C value of the system. Initially, upon progressive fluid rock interaction the δ34S and δ13C values for the bulk aqueous phase approach that of the host rocks. Secondary mineral formation may alter these values, the exact isotope value of the mineral and resulting aqueous phase depending on aqueous speciation and isotope fractionation factor. In turn, aqueous speciation and mineral saturation depends on progressive fluid-rock interaction, fluid-fluid interaction, temperature and acid supply to the system. Depressurization boiling also results in isotope fractionation, the exact isotope value of the vapor and aqueous phase depending on aqueous speciation and isotope fractionation fractor. In this way, carbon and sulfur isotopes may be used combined with

  6. Stable isotope tracing: a powerful tool for selenium speciation and metabolic studies in non-hyperaccumulator plants (ryegrass Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Di Tullo, Pamela; Versini, Antoine; Bueno, Maïté; Le Hécho, Isabelle; Thiry, Yves; Biron, Philippe; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse; Pannier, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Selenium is both essential and toxic for mammals; the range between the two roles is narrow and not only dose-dependent but also related to the chemical species present in foodstuff. Unraveling the metabolism of Se in plants as a function of Se source may thus lead to ways to increase efficiency of fertilization procedures in selenium deficient regions. In this study, stable-isotope tracing was applied for the first time in plants to simultaneously monitor the bio-incorporation of two inorganic Se species commonly used as foodstuff enrichment sources. Occurrence and speciation of Se coming from different Se sources were investigated in root and leaf extracts of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), which had been co-exposed to two labeled Se species ((77)SeIV and (82)SeVI). Although the plant absorbed similar amounts of Se when supplied in the form of selenite or selenate, the results evidenced marked differences in speciation and tissues allocation. Selenite was converted into organic forms incorporated mostly into high molecular weight compounds with limited translocation to leaves, whereas selenate was highly mobile being little assimilated into organic forms. Double-spike isotopic tracer methodology makes it possible to compare the metabolism of two species-specific Se sources simultaneously in a single experiment and to analyze Se behavior in not-hyperaccumulator plants, the ICP-MS sensitivity being improved by the use of enriched isotopes.

  7. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes. PMID:27678172

  8. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes.

  9. Isotope tracer investigation and ab-initio simulation of anisotropic hydrogen transport and possible multi-hydrogen centers in tin dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Ken Sakaguchi, Isao; Hashiguchi, Minako Saito, Noriko; Ross, Emily M.; Haneda, Hajime; Ohsawa, Takeo; Ohashi, Naoki

    2016-06-14

    Hydrogen as an impurity in single crystals of tin dioxide was investigated through diffusivity and vibrational-mode analyses performed using isotope tracers and density functional theory calculations. It was found that hydrogen diffusion along the 〈001〉 axis is very fast, even at relatively low temperatures (400 °C), but is considerably slower within the (001) plane. Using transitional state calculations, this diffusion behavior was determined to be the result of anisotropy in the migration barrier for interstitial hydrogen (H{sub i}). In addition, the two distinct vibrational modes observed in the optical spectrum were identified as the O-H stretching modes of Hi and the substitutional hydrogen at the tin sites.

  10. Seeing the sink beneath the source: an improved stable isotope tracer method for measuring highly variable gross fluxes of methyl halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Measuring methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl chloride (CH3Cl) fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems is complicated by the presence of simultaneous production (typically associated with plants and/or fungi) and consumption (typically associated with soils). Thus, specific sites within an ecosystem can act as either a net source or net sink, depending on season, soil conditions, or vegetative cover. To interpret the highly variable net fluxes found in many of these ecosystems, a stable isotope tracer technique has been developed to measure gross fluxes of CH3Br and CH3Cl. This method entails adding small amounts of 13CH3Br and 13CH3Cl to an incubation chamber, monitoring the headspace concentration changes of both 13C and 13C isotopologues, and applying a box model to simultaneously solve for gross production and consumption. Over the last decade, this technique has been successfully applied to laboratory soil incubations and field studies from a variety of ecosystems, including boreal forest, annual grasslands, shortgrass steppe, oak-savanna woodland, and Arctic tundra. These studies demonstrate that gross uptake rates are strongly affected by soil moisture within ecosystems but are on average much lower than previously estimated, and that gross production rates are highly dependent on plant species enclosed, with minor production within the soils as well. Measuring gross uptake rates is more challenging in ecosystems with large net emissions of methyl halides, such as coastal salt marshes, rice fields and certain grassland sites. Using the tallgrass prairie of Kansas as a case study, four slightly different models to calculate gross fluxes are compared. These models are largely in agreement except at sites with large emissions (i.e., sites with Amorpha shrubs), where one of the models most robustly quantifies gross consumption. This improved stable isotope tracer method is used to track the separate responses of gross production and gross consumption of methyl halides

  11. Strontium isotopes as tracers of water-rocks interactions, mixing processes and residence time indicator of groundwater within the granite-carbonate coastal aquifer of Bonifacio (Corsica, France).

    PubMed

    Santoni, S; Huneau, F; Garel, E; Aquilina, L; Vergnaud-Ayraud, V; Labasque, T; Celle-Jeanton, H

    2016-12-15

    This study aims at identifying the water-rock interactions and mixing rates within a complex granite-carbonate coastal aquifer under high touristic pressure. Investigations have been carried out within the coastal aquifer of Bonifacio (southern Corsica, France) mainly composed of continental granitic weathering products and marine calcarenite sediments filling a granitic depression. A multi-tracer approach combining physico-chemical parameters, major ions, selected trace elements, stable isotopes of the water molecule and (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios measurements is undertaken for 20 groundwater samples during the low water period in November 2014. 5 rock samples of the sedimentary deposits and surrounding granites are also analysed. First, the water-rock interactions processes governing the groundwater mineralization are described in order to fix the hydrogeochemical background. Secondly, the flow conditions are refined through the quantification of inter aquifer levels mixing, and thirdly, the kinetics of water-rock interaction based on groundwater residence time from a previous study using CFCs and SF6 are quantified for the two main flow lines. A regional contrast in the groundwater recharge altitude allowed the oxygene-18 to be useful combined with the (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios to differentiate the groundwater origins and to compute the mixing rates, revealing the real extension of the watershed and the availability of the resource. The results also highlight a very good correlation between the groundwater residence time and the spatial evolution of (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios, allowing water-rock interaction kinetics to be defined empirically for the two main flow lines through the calcarenites. These results demonstrate the efficiency of strontium isotopes as tracers of water-rock interaction kinetics and by extension their relevance as a proxy of groundwater residence time, fundamental parameter documenting the long term sustainability of the hydrosystem. Copyright © 2016

  12. INCA: a computational platform for isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Jamey D

    2014-05-01

    13C flux analysis studies have become an essential component of metabolic engineering research. The scope of these studies has gradually expanded to include both isotopically steady-state and transient labeling experiments, the latter of which are uniquely applicable to photosynthetic organisms and slow-to-label mammalian cell cultures. Isotopomer network compartmental analysis (INCA) is the first publicly available software package that can perform both steady-state metabolic flux analysis and isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis. The software provides a framework for comprehensive analysis of metabolic networks using mass balances and elementary metabolite unit balances. The generation of balance equations and their computational solution is completely automated and can be performed on networks of arbitrary complexity.

  13. Analysis of mitochondrial metabolism in situ: Combining stable isotope labeling with selective permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Nonnenmacher, Yannic; Palorini, Roberta; d'Herouël, Aymeric Fouquier; Krämer, Lisa; Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando; Skupin, Alexander; Wegner, Andre; Hiller, Karsten

    2016-12-15

    To date, it is well-established that mitochondrial dysfunction does not only play a vital role in cancer but also in other pathological conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases and inflammation. An important tool for the analysis of cellular metabolism is the application of stable isotope labeled substrates, which allow for the tracing of atoms throughout metabolic networks. While such analyses yield very detailed information about intracellular fluxes, the determination of compartment specific fluxes is far more challenging. Most approaches for the deconvolution of compartmented metabolism use computational models whereas experimental methods are rare. Here, we developed an experimental setup based on selective permeabilization of the cytosolic membrane that allows for the administration of stable isotope labeled substrates directly to mitochondria. We demonstrate how this approach can be used to infer metabolic changes in mitochondria induced by either chemical or genetic perturbations and give an outlook on its potential applications.

  14. Forward Modeling of Carbonate Proxy Data from Planktonic Foraminifera using Oxygen Isotope Tracers in a Global Ocean Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution and variation of oxygen isotopes in seawater are calculated using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies global ocean model. Simple ecological models are used to estimate the planktonic foraminiferal abundance as a function of depth, column temperature, season, light intensity, and density stratification. These models are combined to forward model isotopic signals recorded in calcareous ocean sediment. The sensitivity of the results to the changes in foraminiferal ecology, secondary calcification, and dissolution are also examined. Simulated present-day isotopic values for ecology relevant for multiple species compare well with core-top data. Hindcasts of sea surface temperature and salinity are made from time series of the modeled carbonate isotope values as the model climate changes. Paleoclimatic inferences from these carbonate isotope records are strongly affected by erroneous assumptions concerning the covariations of temperature, salinity, and delta (sup 18)O(sub w). Habitat-imposed biases are less important, although errors due to temperature-dependent abundances can be significant.

  15. Application of multiple isotopic and geochemical tracers for investigation of recharge, salinization, and residence time of water in the Souss-Massa aquifer, southwest of Morocco

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouchaou, L.; Michelot, J.L.; Vengosh, A.; Hsissou, Y.; Qurtobi, M.; Gaye, C.B.; Bullen, T.D.; Zuppi, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Groundwater and surface water in Souss-Massa basin in the west-southern part of Morocco is characterized by a large variation in salinity, up to levels of 37 g L-1. The high salinity coupled with groundwater level decline pose serious problems for current irrigation and domestic water supplies as well as future exploitation. A combined hydrogeologic and isotopic investigation using several chemical and isotopic tracers such as Br/Cl, ??18O, ??2H, 3H, 87Sr/86Sr, ??11B, and 14C was carried out in order to determine the sources of water recharge to the aquifer, the origin of salinity, and the residence time of water. Stable isotope, 3H and 14C data indicate that the high Atlas mountains in the northern margin of the Souss-Massa basin with high rainfall and low ??18O and ??2H values (-6 to -8??? and -36 to -50???) is currently constitute the major source of recharge to the Souss-Massa shallow aquifer, particularly along the eastern part of the basin. Localized stable isotope enrichments offset meteoric isotopic signature and are associated with high nitrate concentrations, which infer water recycling via water agricultural return flows. The 3H and 14C data suggest that the residence time of water in the western part of the basin is in the order of several thousands of years; hence old water is mined, particularly in the coastal areas. The multiple isotope analyses and chemical tracing of groundwater from the basin reveal that seawater intrusion is just one of multiple salinity sources that affect the quality of groundwater in the Souss-Massa aquifer. We differentiate between modern seawater intrusion, salinization by remnants of seawater entrapped in the middle Souss plains, recharge of nitrate-rich agricultural return flow, and dissolution of evaporate rocks (gypsum and halite minerals) along the outcrops of the high Atlas mountains. The data generated in this study provide the framework for a comprehensive management plan in which water exploitation should shift

  16. Uptake and elimination of lead, zinc, and copper by caddisfly larvae (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae) using stable isotope tracers.

    PubMed

    Evans, R D; Balch, G C; Evans, H E; Welbourn, P M

    2006-07-01

    Stable isotopes of Pb, Zn, and Cu were used in laboratory experiments to determine the uptake and elimination of these metals by stream-dwelling caddisfly (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae) larvae. For Pb and Cu, larvae were exposed to environmentally realistic levels (2.5 and 4.5 microg x L(-1), respectively) of one isotope for 9 days followed by a 9-day exposure to either the same isotope, to a second stable isotope of the same metal, or to RW containing no added isotope (two phases in total). For zinc, the exposure concentration was 15 microg x L(-1), and the experiment lasted for a total of 27 (i.e., three phases) rather than 18 days to see if uptake and elimination changed during the extended time period. The uptake clearances (k(u)) determined for the various metals averaged 7.8, 1.4, and 0.6 L x g dw(-1) x d(-1) for Pb, Zn, and Cu, respectively, if the total metal concentration in the water was used in the calculations. The clearance rate constants (k(e)) were less variable, averaging 0.15 d(-1) for Pb, 0.22 d(-1) for Zn, and approximately 0.1 d(-1) for Cu and were similar in both the presence (i.e., elimination) and absence (i.e., depuration) of metal in the water. These values are also comparable with those reported in the literature for other aquatic invertebrates. The use of stable isotopes thus allowed simultaneous measurement of uptake and clearance (elimination and depuration) of these metals at environmentally realistic concentrations and could be of great benefit for determining partitioning, assimilation efficiency, and pathways of these and other metals in the environment.

  17. Fully automated software solution for protein quantitation by global metabolic labeling with stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, L V; Cramer, R

    2011-06-15

    Metabolic stable isotope labeling is increasingly employed for accurate protein (and metabolite) quantitation using mass spectrometry (MS). It provides sample-specific isotopologues that can be used to facilitate comparative analysis of two or more samples. Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) has been used for almost a decade in proteomic research and analytical software solutions have been established that provide an easy and integrated workflow for elucidating sample abundance ratios for most MS data formats. While SILAC is a discrete labeling method using specific amino acids, global metabolic stable isotope labeling using isotopes such as (15)N labels the entire element content of the sample, i.e. for (15)N the entire peptide backbone in addition to all nitrogen-containing side chains. Although global metabolic labeling can deliver advantages with regard to isotope incorporation and costs, the requirements for data analysis are more demanding because, for instance for polypeptides, the mass difference introduced by the label depends on the amino acid composition. Consequently, there has been less progress on the automation of the data processing and mining steps for this type of protein quantitation. Here, we present a new integrated software solution for the quantitative analysis of protein expression in differential samples and show the benefits of high-resolution MS data in quantitative proteomic analyses.

  18. Hydrogen isotopic profile in the characterization of sugars. Influence of the metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ben-Li; Billault, Isabelle; Li, Xiaobao; Mabon, Françoise; Remaud, Gérald; Martin, Maryvonne L

    2002-03-13

    The site-specific natural hydrogen isotope ratios of plant metabolites determined by 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR method) can provide powerful criteria for inferring mechanistic and environmental effects on biosynthetic pathways. This work examines the potential of isotopic profiles for the main constituents of carbohydrates, glucose and fructose, to distinguish different photosynthetic pathways. An appropriate analytical strategy, involving three suitable isotopic probes, has been elaborated with a view to measuring simultaneously, in conditions devoid of isotopic perturbations, all (or nearly all) of the carbon-bound hydrogen isotope ratios. It is shown that the type of photosynthetic metabolism, either C3 (sugar beet, orange, and grape), C4 (maize and sugar cane), or CAM (pineapple), and the physiological status of the precursor plant exert strong influences on the deuterium distribution in the sugar molecules. Consequently, this isotopic fingerprint may be a rich source of information for the comparison of mechanisms in metabolic pathways. In addition, it can provide complementary criteria to ethanol as a probe for the origin of sugars.

  19. Multiresponse modeling of variably saturated flow and isotope tracer transport for a hillslope experiment at the Landscape Evolution Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudeler, Carlotta; Pangle, Luke; Pasetto, Damiano; Niu, Guo-Yue; Volkmann, Till; Paniconi, Claudio; Putti, Mario; Troch, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores the challenges of model parameterization and process representation when simulating multiple hydrologic responses from a highly controlled unsaturated flow and transport experiment with a physically based model. The experiment, conducted at the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO), involved alternate injections of water and deuterium-enriched water into an initially very dry hillslope. The multivariate observations included point measures of water content and tracer concentration in the soil, total storage within the hillslope, and integrated fluxes of water and tracer through the seepage face. The simulations were performed with a three-dimensional finite element model that solves the Richards and advection-dispersion equations. Integrated flow, integrated transport, distributed flow, and distributed transport responses were successively analyzed, with parameterization choices at each step supported by standard model performance metrics. In the first steps of our analysis, where seepage face flow, water storage, and average concentration at the seepage face were the target responses, an adequate match between measured and simulated variables was obtained using a simple parameterization consistent with that from a prior flow-only experiment at LEO. When passing to the distributed responses, it was necessary to introduce complexity to additional soil hydraulic parameters to obtain an adequate match for the point-scale flow response. This also improved the match against point measures of tracer concentration, although model performance here was considerably poorer. This suggests that still greater complexity is needed in the model parameterization, or that there may be gaps in process representation for simulating solute transport phenomena in very dry soils.

  20. Stable isotope-labeling studies in metabolomics: new insights into structure and dynamics of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Barrett, Michael P; Breitling, Rainer; Creek, Darren J

    2014-02-01

    The rapid emergence of metabolomics has enabled system-wide measurements of metabolites in various organisms. However, advances in the mechanistic understanding of metabolic networks remain limited, as most metabolomics studies cannot routinely provide accurate metabolite identification, absolute quantification and flux measurement. Stable isotope labeling offers opportunities to overcome these limitations. Here we describe some current approaches to stable isotope-labeled metabolomics and provide examples of the significant impact that these studies have had on our understanding of cellular metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss recently developed software solutions for the analysis of stable isotope-labeled metabolomics data and propose the bioinformatics solutions that will pave the way for the broader application and optimal interpretation of system-scale labeling studies in metabolomics.

  1. Stable isotope-labeling studies in metabolomics: new insights into structure and dynamics of metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Barrett, Michael P; Breitling, Rainer; Creek, Darren J

    2014-01-01

    The rapid emergence of metabolomics has enabled system-wide measurements of metabolites in various organisms. However, advances in the mechanistic understanding of metabolic networks remain limited, as most metabolomics studies cannot routinely provide accurate metabolite identification, absolute quantification and flux measurement. Stable isotope labeling offers opportunities to overcome these limitations. Here we describe some current approaches to stable isotope-labeled metabolomics and provide examples of the significant impact that these studies have had on our understanding of cellular metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss recently developed software solutions for the analysis of stable isotope-labeled metabolomics data and propose the bioinformatics solutions that will pave the way for the broader application and optimal interpretation of system-scale labeling studies in metabolomics. PMID:24568354

  2. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes using actinide elements. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1992-12-31

    The following are reported: high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer for U-Th studies; {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th disequilibrium in recent lavas from Iceland; water-rock interaction from U-Th studies; resonance ionization mass spectrometry of Os and Ti isotopes; and self-diffusion of Mg.

  3. Phosphate oxygen isotope ratios as a tracer for sources and cycling of phosphate in North San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, K.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S.R.; Young, M.; Paytan, A.

    2006-01-01

    A seasonal analysis assesing variations in the oxygen isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) was conducted in the San Francisco Bay estuarine system, California. Isotopic fractionation of oxygen in DIP (exchange of oxygen between phosphate and environmental water) at surface water temperatures occurs only as a result of enzyme-mediated, biological reactions. Accordingly, if phospate demand is low relative to input and phosphate is not heavily cycled in the ecosystem, the oxygen isotopic composition of DIP (?? 18Op) will reflect the isotopic composition of the source of phosphate to the system. Such is the case for the North San Francisco Bay, an anthropogenically impacted estuary with high surface water phosphate concentrations. Variability in the ?? 18Op in the bay is primarily controlled by mixing of water masses with different ??18Op signatures. The ??18Op values range from 11.4??? at the Sacramento River to 20.1??? at the Golden Gate. Deviations from the two-component mixing model for the North Bay reflect additional, local sources of phosphate to the estuary that vary seasonally. Most notably, deviations from the mixing model occur at the confluence of a major river into the bay during periods of high river discharge and near wastewater treatment outlets. These data suggest that ??18Op can be an effective tool for identifying P point sources and understanding phosphate dynamics in estuarine systems. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Chemical and Isotopic Tracers of Natural Gas and Formation Waters in Fractured Shales, Feb 24-25, 2011

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation by J.McIntosh, M.Schlegal, and B.Bates from the University of Arizona compares the chemical and isotope formation in fractured shales with shallow drift aquifers, coalbeds and other deep geologic formations, based on the Illinois basin.

  5. Copper stable isotopes as tracers of metal-sulphide segregation and fractional crystallisation processes on iron meteorite parent bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Helen M.; Archer, Corey

    2011-06-01

    We report high precision Cu isotope data coupled with Cu concentration measurements for metal, troilite and silicate fractions separated from magmatic and non-magmatic iron meteorites, analysed for Fe isotopes (δ 57Fe; permil deviation in 57Fe/ 54Fe relative to the pure iron standard IRMM-014) in an earlier study ( Williams et al., 2006). The Cu isotope compositions (δ 65Cu; permil deviation in 65Cu/ 63Cu relative to the pure copper standard NIST 976) of both metals (δ 65Cu M) and sulphides (δ 65Cu FeS) span much wider ranges (-9.30 to 0.99‰ and -8.90 to 0.63‰, respectively) than reported previously. Metal-troilite fractionation factors (Δ 65Cu M-FeS = δ 65Cu M - δ 65Cu FeS) are variable, ranging from -0.07 to 5.28‰, and cannot be explained by equilibrium stable isotope fractionation coupled with either mixing or reservoir effects, i.e. differences in the relative proportions of metal and sulphide in the meteorites. Strong negative correlations exist between troilite Cu and Fe (δ 57Fe FeS) isotope compositions and between metal-troilite Cu and Fe (Δ 57Fe M-FeS) isotope fractionation factors, for both magmatic and non-magmatic irons, which suggests that similar processes control isotopic variations in both systems. Clear linear arrays between δ 65Cu FeS and δ 57Fe FeS and calculated Cu metal-sulphide partition coefficients (D Cu = [Cu] metal/[Cu] FeS) are also present. A strong negative correlation exists between Δ 57Fe M-FeS and D Cu; a more diffuse positive array is defined by Δ 65Cu M-FeS and D Cu. The value of D Cu can be used to approximate the degree of Cu concentration equilibrium as experimental studies constrain the range of D Cu between Fe metal and FeS at equilibrium to be in the range of 0.05-0.2; D Cu values for the magmatic and non-magmatic irons studied here range from 0.34 to 1.11 and from 0.04 to 0.87, respectively. The irons with low D Cu values (closer to Cu concentration equilibrium) display the largest Δ 57Fe M-FeS and the

  6. Development of a Carbon Isotope-Based Tracer of Groundwater Fluxes into Estuaries and the Coastal Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkle, D. C.; Gramling, C. M.; Mulligan, A. E.; Woods, T. L.

    2001-05-01

    We will show how the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) - in particular, its radiocarbon content (Δ 14C) - can be used to quantify the contribution of confined groundwater flow to the total land-sea freshwater flux. The key observation underlying this approach is that groundwater in confined aquifers typically has a much lower radiocarbon content than surface fresh water (rivers and streams, and the water table groundwater that feeds them). We illustrate this method using chemical and isotopic data from Pages Creek and Futch Creek, two small estuaries on the Intracoastal Waterway near Wilmington, NC. Isotopic analyses of groundwater in coastal NC, of springs in Pages Creek and Futch Creek, and of the known DIC sources to these tidal creeks (sea water, stream water, and CO2 from salt marsh decomposition processes), show that confined aquifers are the only significant low-Δ 14C DIC source to these estuaries. Salinity data constrain the total freshwater fraction (surface water + artesian groundwater) of each estuarine sample, and the radiocarbon data are then used to estimate the fractional groundwater contribution to the Pages Creek and Futch Creek freshwater budgets. We will also present preliminary carbon isotopic results from a unique set of salty "groundwater" samples from shallow seafloor wells from the South Carolina continental shelf. These data suggest that sub-bottom recirculation of seawater may impart a low-Δ 14C signal to shelf waters in this region.

  7. Oxygen isotopes as tracers of tektite source rocks: An example from the Ivory Coast tektites and Lake Bosumtwi Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Koeberl, Christian; Chamberlain, C. Page

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen isotope studies of tektites and impact glasses provide an important tool to help in identifying the target lithologies for terrestrial impacts, including the K-T boundary impact. However, such studies may be complicated by modification of the original oxygen isotope values of some source rocks during the tektite formation process either by vapor fractionation or incorporation of meteoric water. To further investigate the relationship between the oxygen isotopic composition of tektites and their source rocks, Ivory Coast tektites and samples of impact glasses and bedrock lithologies from the Bosumtwi Crater in Ghana--which is widely believed to be the source crater for the Ivory Coast tektites--were studied. Our preliminary results suggest that the phyllites and metagraywackes from the Bosumtwi Crater were the predominant source materials for the impact glasses and tektites and that no significant oxygen isotope modification (less than 1 percent delta(O-18)) took place during impact melting. This contrasts with previous studies of moldavites and Australasian tektites and their sedimentary source materials which suggests a 4 to 5 percent lowering of delta(O-18) due to meteoric water incorporation during impact melting.

  8. Oxygen isotopes as tracers of tektite source rocks: An example from the Ivory Coast tektites and Lake Bosumtwi Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Koeberl, Christian; Chamberlain, C. Page

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen isotope studies of tektites and impact glasses provide an important tool to help in identifying the target lithologies for terrestrial impacts, including the K-T boundary impact. However, such studies may be complicated by modification of the original oxygen isotope values of some source rocks during the tektite formation process either by vapor fractionation or incorporation of meteoric water. To further investigate the relationship between the oxygen isotopic composition of tektites and their source rocks, Ivory Coast tektites and samples of impact glasses and bedrock lithologies from the Bosumtwi Crater in Ghana--which is widely believed to be the source crater for the Ivory Coast tektites--were studied. Our preliminary results suggest that the phyllites and metagraywackes from the Bosumtwi Crater were the predominant source materials for the impact glasses and tektites and that no significant oxygen isotope modification (less than 1 percent delta(O-18)) took place during impact melting. This contrasts with previous studies of moldavites and Australasian tektites and their sedimentary source materials which suggests a 4 to 5 percent lowering of delta(O-18) due to meteoric water incorporation during impact melting.

  9. Phosphate oxygen isotope ratios as a tracer for sources and cycling of phosphate in North San Francisco Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Karen; Kendall, Carol; Silva, Steven R.; Young, Megan; Paytan, Adina

    2006-09-01

    A seasonal analysis assesing variations in the oxygen isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) was conducted in the San Francisco Bay estuarine system, California. Isotopic fractionation of oxygen in DIP (exchange of oxygen between phosphate and environmental water) at surface water temperatures occurs only as a result of enzyme-mediated, biological reactions. Accordingly, if phospate demand is low relative to input and phosphate is not heavily cycled in the ecosystem, the oxygen isotopic composition of DIP (δ18Op) will reflect the isotopic composition of the source of phosphate to the system. Such is the case for the North San Francisco Bay, an anthropogenically impacted estuary with high surface water phosphate concentrations. Variability in the δ18Op in the bay is primarily controlled by mixing of water masses with different δ18Op signatures. The δ18Op values range from 11.4‰ at the Sacramento River to 20.1‰ at the Golden Gate. Deviations from the two-component mixing model for the North Bay reflect additional, local sources of phosphate to the estuary that vary seasonally. Most notably, deviations from the mixing model occur at the confluence of a major river into the bay during periods of high river discharge and near wastewater treatment outlets. These data suggest that δ18Op can be an effective tool for identifying P point sources and understanding phosphate dynamics in estuarine systems.

  10. Using dissolved noble gas and isotopic tracers to evaluate the vulnerability of groundwater resources in a small, high elevation catchment to predicted climate changes

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E

    2009-10-02

    We use noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers in groundwater and stream water in a small high elevation catchment to provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge; and to determine subsurface residence times of different groundwater components. They identify three sources that contribute to groundwater flow: (1) seasonal groundwater recharge with short travel times, (2) water from bedrock aquifers that have elevated radiogenic {sup 4}He, and (3) upwelling of deep fluids that have 'mantle' helium and hydrothermal carbon isotope signatures. Although a bimodal distribution in apparent groundwater age indicates that groundwater storage times range from less than a year to several decades, water that recharges seasonally is the largest likely contributor to stream baseflow. Under climate change scnearios with earlier snowmelt, the groundwater that moves through the alluvial aquifer seasonally will be depleted earlier, providing less baseflow and possible extreme low flows in the creek during summer and fall. Dissolved noble gas measurements indciate recharge temperatures are 5 to 11 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that excess air concentrations are lower than would be expected for recharge through bedrock fractures. Instead, recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, as indicated by {delta}{sup 13}C-DIC values that are consistent with incorporation of CO{sub 2} from soil respiration. Recharge temperatures are close to or slightly higher than mean annual air temperature, and are consistent with recharge during May and June, when snowpack melting occurs.

  11. Dissolved noble gas and isotopic tracers reveal vulnerability of groundwater in a small, high-elevation catchment to predicted climate changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Michael J.; Moran, Jean E.

    2010-12-01

    Noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers in groundwater and stream water at a small, high-elevation catchment of the Sierra Nevada Mountains constrain recharge conditions and subsurface residence times of different groundwater components. We identify three sources that contribute to groundwater flow: (1) seasonal groundwater recharge with short travel times, (2) water with elevated radiogenic 4He that has experienced longer flow paths, and (3) upwelling of deep fluids that have "magmatic" helium and carbon isotope signatures. Results from our study illuminate two important aspects of the hydrological system that will have a direct impact on how this system responds to climate change: (1) recharge to the alluvial aquifer occurs primarily on the lower slopes of the catchment and is therefore sensitive to changes in snowline elevation and (2) deep groundwater in the western part of the aquifer is very young and provides very little buffering capacity. Although apparent groundwater ages indicate residence times range from less than a year to several decades, the water that recharges seasonally dominates the alluvial aquifer. Noble gas recharge temperatures are close to mean annual air temperature, and are 5°-11° higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt. Excess air concentrations, indicating entrapment of air bubbles during recharge, are lower than would be expected for recharge through bedrock fractures. Instead, recharge likely occurs over vegetated areas on the lower slopes, as indicated by δ13C-dissolved inorganic carbon values that are consistent with incorporation of CO2 from soil respiration.

  12. A Comprehensive Metabolic Profile of Cultured Astrocytes Using Isotopic Transient Metabolic Flux Analysis and 13C-Labeled Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Ana I.; Teixeira, Ana P.; Håkonsen, Bjørn I.; Sonnewald, Ursula; Alves, Paula M.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic models have been used to elucidate important aspects of brain metabolism in recent years. This work applies for the first time the concept of isotopic transient 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) to estimate intracellular fluxes in primary cultures of astrocytes. This methodology comprehensively explores the information provided by 13C labeling time-courses of intracellular metabolites after administration of a 13C-labeled substrate. Cells were incubated with medium containing [1-13C]glucose for 24 h and samples of cell supernatant and extracts collected at different time points were then analyzed by mass spectrometry and/or high performance liquid chromatography. Metabolic fluxes were estimated by fitting a carbon labeling network model to isotopomer profiles experimentally determined. Both the fast isotopic equilibrium of glycolytic metabolite pools and the slow labeling dynamics of TCA cycle intermediates are described well by the model. The large pools of glutamate and aspartate which are linked to the TCA cycle via reversible aminotransferase reactions are likely to be responsible for the observed delay in equilibration of TCA cycle intermediates. Furthermore, it was estimated that 11% of the glucose taken up by astrocytes was diverted to the pentose phosphate pathway. In addition, considerable fluxes through pyruvate carboxylase [PC; PC/pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) ratio = 0.5], malic enzyme (5% of the total pyruvate production), and catabolism of branched-chained amino acids (contributing with ∼40% to total acetyl-CoA produced) confirmed the significance of these pathways to astrocytic metabolism. Consistent with the need of maintaining cytosolic redox potential, the fluxes through the malate–aspartate shuttle and the PDH pathway were comparable. Finally, the estimated glutamate/α-ketoglutarate exchange rate (∼0.7 μmol mg prot−1 h−1) was similar to the TCA cycle flux. In conclusion, this work demonstrates the potential of

  13. Normal variations in the isotopic composition of metabolically relevant transition metals in human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Heghe, L.; Cloquet, C.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2012-04-01

    Cu, Fe and Zn are transition metals with great catalytic, structural and regulating importance in the human body. Hence, an aberrant metabolism of these elements can have serious implications on the health of a person. It is assumed that, due to differences in isotope fractionation, the isotopic composition of these elements in whole blood of patients can be different from that in blood of healthy subjects. Therefore, isotopic analysis of the element affected by the disease can be a promising approach for early diagnosis. A method for isotopic analysis of Cu, Fe and Zn in human whole blood was developed. The simultaneous chromatographic isolation of these elements and the conditions for isotope ratio measurement via multi-collector ICP - mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) were optimized. So far, only whole blood of supposedly healthy volunteers (reference population) was analyzed. Results for Fe confirmed the known differences in isotopic composition between male and female blood. It is also shown that other parameters can have influence as well, e.g., the isotopic composition of Zn seems to be governed by the diet.

  14. Understanding the pharmacological properties of a metabolic PET tracer in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viola-Villegas, Nerissa Therese; Carlin, Sean D.; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Sevak, Kuntal K.; Divilov, Vadim; Serganova, Inna; Kruchevsky, Natalia; Anderson, Michael; Blasberg, Ronald G.; Andreev, Oleg A.; Engelman, Donald M.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2014-01-01

    Generally, solid tumors (>400 mm3) are inherently acidic, with more aggressive growth producing greater acidity. If the acidity could be targeted as a biomarker, it would provide a means to gauge the pace of tumor growth and degree of invasiveness, as well as providing a basis for predicting responses to pH-dependent chemotherapies. We have developed a 64Cu pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP) for targeting, imaging, and quantifying acidic tumors by PET, and our findings reveal utility in assessing prostate tumors. The new pHLIP version limits indiscriminate healthy tissue binding, and we demonstrate its targeting of extracellular acidification in three different prostate cancer models, each with different vascularization and acid-extruding protein carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression. We then describe the tumor distribution of this radiotracer ex vivo, in association with blood perfusion and known biomarkers of acidity, such as hypoxia, lactate dehydrogenase A, and CAIX. We find that the probe reveals metabolic variations between and within tumors, and discriminates between necrotic and living tumor areas. PMID:24785505

  15. 13CO2 as a universal metabolic tracer in isotopologue perturbation experiments.

    PubMed

    Römisch-Margl, Werner; Schramek, Nicholas; Radykewicz, Tanja; Ettenhuber, Christian; Eylert, Eva; Huber, Claudia; Römisch-Margl, Lilla; Schwarz, Christine; Dobner, Maria; Demmel, Norbert; Winzenhörlein, Bernhard; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    A tobacco plant was illuminated for 5h in an atmosphere containing (13)CO(2) and then maintained for 10 days under standard greenhouse conditions. Nicotine, glucose, and amino acids from proteins were isolated chromatographically. Isotopologue abundances of isolated metabolites were determined quantitatively by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The observed non-stochastic isotopologue patterns indicate (i) formation of multiply labeled photosynthetic carbohydrates during the (13)CO(2) pulse phase followed by (ii) partial catabolism of the primary photosynthetic products, and (iii) recombination of the (13)C-labeled fragments with unlabeled intermediary metabolites during the chase period. The detected and simulated isotopologue profiles of glucose and amino acids reflect carbon partitioning that is dominated by the Calvin cycle and glycolysis/glucogenesis. Retrobiosynthetic analysis of the nicotine pattern is in line with its known formation from nicotinic acid and putrescine via aspartate, glyceraldehyde phosphate and alpha-ketoglutarate as basic building blocks. The study demonstrates that pulse/chase labeling with (13)CO(2) as precursor is a powerful tool for the analysis of quantitative aspects of plant metabolism in completely unperturbed whole plants.

  16. Intramolecular stable isotope distributions detect plant metabolic responses on century time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleucher, Jürgen; Ehlers, Ina; Augusti, Angela; Betson, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Plants respond to environmental changes on a vast range of time scales, and plant gas exchanges constitute important feedback mechanisms in the global C cycle. Responses on time scales of decades to centuries are most important for climate models, for prediction of crop productivity, and for adaptation to climate change. Unfortunately, responses on these timescale are least understood. We argue that the knowledge gap on intermediate time scales is due to a lack of adequate methods that can bridge between short-term manipulative experiments (e.g. FACE) and paleo research. Manipulative experiments in plant ecophysiology give information on metabolism on time scales up to years. However, this information cannot be linked to results from retrospective studies in paleo research, because little metabolic information can be derived from paleo archives. Stable isotopes are prominent tools in plant ecophysiology, biogeochemistry and in paleo research, but in all applications to date, isotope ratios of whole molecules are measured. However, it is well established that stable isotope abundance varies among intramolecular groups of biochemical metabolites, that is each so-called "isotopomer" has a distinct abundance. This intramolecular variation carries information on metabolic regulation, which can even be traced to individual enzymes (Schleucher et al., Plant, Cell Environ 1999). Here, we apply intramolecular isotope distributions to study the metabolic response of plants to increasing atmospheric [CO2] during the past century. Greenhouse experiments show that the deuterium abundance among the two positions in the C6H2 group of photosynthetic glucose depends on [CO2] during growth. This is observed for all plants using C3 photosynthesis, and reflects the metabolic flux ratio between photorespiration and photosynthesis. Photorespiration is a major C flux that limits assimilation in C3 plants, which encompass the overwhelming fraction of terrestrial photosynthesis and the

  17. Tracing Anthropogenic Salinity Inputs to the Semi-arid Rio Grande River: A Multi-isotope Tracer (U, S, B and Sr) Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, S.; Nyachoti, S. K.; Ma, L.; Szynkiewicz, A.; McIntosh, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    High salinity in the Rio Grande has led to severe reductions in crop productivity and accumulation of salts in soils. These pressing issues exist for other arid rivers worldwide. Salinity contributions to the Rio Grande have not been adequately quantified, especially from agriculture, urban activities, and geological sources. Here, we use major element concentrations and U, S, B, Sr isotopic signatures to fingerprint the salinity sources. Our study area focuses on a 200 km long stretch of the Rio Grande from Elephant Butte Reservoir, NM to El Paso, TX. River samples were collected monthly from 2014 to 2015. Irrigation drains, groundwater wells, city drains and wastewater effluents were sampled as possible anthropogenic salinity end-members. Major element chemistry, U, S and Sr isotope ratios in the Rio Grande waters suggest multiple salinity inputs from geological, agricultural, and urban sources. Natural upwelling of groundwater is significant for the Rio Grande near Elephant Butte, as suggested by high TDS values and high (234U/238U), 87Sr/86Sr, δ34S ratios. Agricultural activities (e.g. flood irrigation, groundwater pumping, fertilizer use) are extensive in the Mesilla Valley. Rio Grande waters from this region have characteristic lower (234U/238U), 87Sr/86Sr, and δ34S ratios, with possible agricultural sources from use of fertilizers and gypsum. Agricultural practices during flood irrigation also intensify evaporation of Rio Grande surface water and considerably increase water salinity. Shallow groundwater signatures were also identified at several river locations, possibly due to the artificial pumping of local groundwater for irrigation. Impacts of urban activities to river chemistry (high NO3 and B concentrations) were evident for locations downstream to Las Cruces and El Paso wastewater treatment plants, supporting the use of the B isotope as an urban salinity tracer. This study improves our understanding of human impacts on water quality and elemental

  18. Variation in the Carbon Isotope Composition of a Plant with Crassulacean Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, J. C.; Deleens, Eliane; Nato, Aimé; Moyse, Alexis

    1974-01-01

    The content of 13C varies in plants with Crassulacean acid metabolism. Differences up to 3.5‰ in the 13C/12C ratios were observed between leaves of different age in the same plant of Bryophyllum daigremontianum. Soluble and insoluble carbon in the same leaf differed up to 8‰, the largest difference occurring in the leaves with the highest Crassulacean acid metabolism activity. Models to account for the isotope discrimination by C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism plants are proposed. PMID:16658746

  19. O, H and S Isotopes as Tracers of Groundwater Discharge Into the Rio Grande and the Gila River, Southwest USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastoe, C. J.; Hibbs, B. J.; Hogan, J. F.; Harris, R. C.

    2004-05-01

    In the semi-arid Basin-and-Range province, large rivers commonly enter and exit basins through hard-rock barriers impermeable to groundwater. Isotopic contrasts characteristically exist between river water entering a basin and locally-derived groundwater in basin-fill sediment. Basin aquifers must discharge to the river near the river exit point, and may contribute significantly to river water and solute load. O, H and S isotopes can potentially indicate the location of discharge zones. At times of low river flow, the Gila River enters Safford Basin with isotope delta values, here presented as [d18O‰ , dD‰ , d34S‰ ], of [-8.5, -65, +4.5]. Deep basin water has values [-11.5, -85, +11], the d34S reflecting gypsum evaporite. Values in river water change by km 50 to [-7.5, -60, +4.5] and between km 50 and 80 to [-8.5, -65, +7.5]. The increase in d18O and dD from 0-50 km indicates irrigation water discharge; the change from 50-80 km is accompanied by doubling of sulfate content and requires addition of deep basin water. The Rio Grande enters the Hueco Bolson with isotope composition [-6.5 to -8.5, -65 to -75, +2 to +4], the d18O and dD values defining an evaporation line (RGEL) resulting from passage of water through upstream reservoirs. Basin groundwater is sulfate-rich and has variable isotope composition: [-9 to -11, -66 to -76, +5 to +10]; it includes both evaporated and non-evaporated types. Groundwater discharge is generally insufficient to shift water away from the RGEL, but d34S values in river water increase to +5 to +9‰ with increasing sulfate content downstream of Fabens, TX, indicating discharge of high-d34S groundwater. Variable sewage discharge from Ciudad Juàrez limits the possibility of detecting isotope shifts in Rio Grande water.

  20. The importance of accurately correcting for the natural abundance of stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Midani, Firas S; Wynn, Michelle L; Schnell, Santiago

    2017-03-01

    The use of isotopically labeled tracer substrates is an experimental approach for measuring in vivo and in vitro intracellular metabolic dynamics. Stable isotopes that alter the mass but not the chemical behavior of a molecule are commonly used in isotope tracer studies. Because stable isotopes of some atoms naturally occur at non-negligible abundances, it is important to account for the natural abundance of these isotopes when analyzing data from isotope labeling experiments. Specifically, a distinction must be made between isotopes introduced experimentally via an isotopically labeled tracer and the isotopes naturally present at the start of an experiment. In this tutorial review, we explain the underlying theory of natural abundance correction of stable isotopes, a concept not always understood by metabolic researchers. We also provide a comparison of distinct methods for performing this correction and discuss natural abundance correction in the context of steady state (13)C metabolic flux, a method increasingly used to infer intracellular metabolic flux from isotope experiments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protein Retention Assessment of Four Levels of Poultry By-Product Substitution of Fishmeal in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Diets Using Stable Isotopes of Nitrogen (δ15N) as Natural Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Badillo, Daniel; Herzka, Sharon Z.; Viana, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    This is second part from an experiment where the nitrogen retention of poultry by-product meal (PBM) compared to fishmeal (FM) was evaluated using traditional indices. Here a quantitative method using stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ15N values) as natural tracers of nitrogen incorporation into fish biomass is assessed. Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were fed for 80 days on isotopically distinct diets in which 0, 33, 66 and 100% of FM as main protein source was replaced by PBM. The diets were isonitrogenous, isolipidic and similar in gross energy content. Fish in all treatments reached isotopic equilibrium by the end of the experiment. Two-source isotope mixing models that incorporated the isotopic composition of FM and PBM as well as that of formulated feeds, empirically derived trophic discrimination factors and the isotopic composition of fish that had reached isotopic equilibrium to the diets were used to obtain a quantitative estimate of the retention of each source of nitrogen. Fish fed the diets with 33 and 66% replacement of FM by PBM retained poultry by-product meal roughly in proportion to its level of inclusion in the diets, whereas no differences were detected in the protein efficiency ratio. Coupled with the similar biomass gain of fishes fed the different diets, our results support the inclusion of PBM as replacement for fishmeal in aquaculture feeds. A re-feeding experiment in which all fish were fed a diet of 100% FM for 28 days indicated isotopic turnover occurred very fast, providing further support for the potential of isotopic ratios as tracers of the retention of specific protein sources into fish tissues. Stable isotope analysis is a useful tool for studies that seek to obtain quantitative estimates of the retention of different protein sources. PMID:25226392

  2. Protein retention assessment of four levels of poultry by-product substitution of fishmeal in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) diets using stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) as natural tracers.

    PubMed

    Badillo, Daniel; Herzka, Sharon Z; Viana, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    This is second part from an experiment where the nitrogen retention of poultry by-product meal (PBM) compared to fishmeal (FM) was evaluated using traditional indices. Here a quantitative method using stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15)N values) as natural tracers of nitrogen incorporation into fish biomass is assessed. Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were fed for 80 days on isotopically distinct diets in which 0, 33, 66 and 100% of FM as main protein source was replaced by PBM. The diets were isonitrogenous, isolipidic and similar in gross energy content. Fish in all treatments reached isotopic equilibrium by the end of the experiment. Two-source isotope mixing models that incorporated the isotopic composition of FM and PBM as well as that of formulated feeds, empirically derived trophic discrimination factors and the isotopic composition of fish that had reached isotopic equilibrium to the diets were used to obtain a quantitative estimate of the retention of each source of nitrogen. Fish fed the diets with 33 and 66% replacement of FM by PBM retained poultry by-product meal roughly in proportion to its level of inclusion in the diets, whereas no differences were detected in the protein efficiency ratio. Coupled with the similar biomass gain of fishes fed the different diets, our results support the inclusion of PBM as replacement for fishmeal in aquaculture feeds. A re-feeding experiment in which all fish were fed a diet of 100% FM for 28 days indicated isotopic turnover occurred very fast, providing further support for the potential of isotopic ratios as tracers of the retention of specific protein sources into fish tissues. Stable isotope analysis is a useful tool for studies that seek to obtain quantitative estimates of the retention of different protein sources.

  3. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes in aqueous systems using actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1999-02-01

    This research program has moved ahead with success in several areas. The isotopic composition of osmium in seawater and in some rivers was directly determined for the first time. The concentration of osmium was first estimated in both seawater and rivers. A major effort was directed toward the transport of the U,Th series nuclides in a watershed in Sweden. A serious effort was directed at developing a transport model for the U,Th series nuclides in aquifers. A detailed study of {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th dating of a cave in Israel was carried out collaboratively. The Os-Re fractionation between silicate and sulfide melts were determined in MORB basalts and glasses and the isotopic composition of Os was measured in sulfide samples.

  4. Chemical Tracer Methods: Chapter 7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Tracers have a wide variety of uses in hydrologic studies: providing quantitative or qualitative estimates of recharge, identifying sources of recharge, providing information on velocities and travel times of water movement, assessing the importance of preferential flow paths, providing information on hydrodynamic dispersion, and providing data for calibration of water flow and solute-transport models (Walker, 1998; Cook and Herczeg, 2000; Scanlon et al., 2002b). Tracers generally are ions, isotopes, or gases that move with water and that can be detected in the atmosphere, in surface waters, and in the subsurface. Heat also is transported by water; therefore, temperatures can be used to trace water movement. This chapter focuses on the use of chemical and isotopic tracers in the subsurface to estimate recharge. Tracer use in surface-water studies to determine groundwater discharge to streams is addressed in Chapter 4; the use of temperature as a tracer is described in Chapter 8.Following the nomenclature of Scanlon et al. (2002b), tracers are grouped into three categories: natural environmental tracers, historical tracers, and applied tracers. Natural environmental tracers are those that are transported to or created within the atmosphere under natural processes; these tracers are carried to the Earth’s surface as wet or dry atmospheric deposition. The most commonly used natural environmental tracer is chloride (Cl) (Allison and Hughes, 1978). Ocean water, through the process of evaporation, is the primary source of atmospheric Cl. Other tracers in this category include chlorine-36 (36Cl) and tritium (3H); these two isotopes are produced naturally in the Earth’s atmosphere; however, there are additional anthropogenic sources of them.

  5. A synthesis of thermokarst lake water balance in high-latitude regions of North America from isotope tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, Lauren A.; Wolfe, Brent B.; Turner, Kevin W.; Anderson, Lesleigh; Arp, Christopher D.; Birks, Jean; Bouchard, Frédéric; Edwards, Thomas W.D.; Farquharson, Nicole; Hall, Roland I.; McDonald, Ian; Narancic, Biljana; Ouimet, Chantal; Pienitz, Reinhard; Tondu, Jana; White, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies utilizing remote sensing imagery and other methods have documented that thermokarst lakes are undergoing varied hydrological transitions in response to recent climate changes, from surface area expansion to drainage and evaporative desiccation. Here, we provide a synthesis of hydrological conditions for 376 lakes of mainly thermokarst origin across high-latitude North America. We assemble surface water isotope compositions measured during the past decade at five lake-rich landscapes including Arctic Coastal Plain (Alaska), Yukon Flats (Alaska), Old Crow Flats (Yukon), northwestern Hudson Bay Lowlands (Manitoba), and Nunavik (Quebec). These landscapes represent the broad range of thermokarst environments by spanning gradients in meteorological, permafrost, and vegetation conditions. An isotope framework was established based on flux-weighted long-term averages of meteorological conditions for each lake to quantify water balance metrics. The isotope composition of source water and evaporation-to-inflow ratio for each lake were determined, and the results demonstrated a substantial array of regional and subregional diversity of lake hydrological conditions. Controls on lake water balance and how these vary among the five landscapes and with differing environmental drivers are assessed. Findings reveal that lakes in the Hudson Bay Lowlands are most vulnerable to evaporative desiccation, whereas those in Nunavik are most resilient. However, we also identify the complexity in predicting hydrological responses of these thermokarst landscapes to future climate change.

  6. Assessing mineral metabolism in children using stable isotopes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mineral metabolism may be altered in children with acute or chronic illnesses. The effects may be short term, such as hypomagnesemia associated with chemotherapy, or long-term, such as loss of bone mineral mass after steroid use. Understanding the causes, consequences, and potential therapies for mi...

  7. Nc100668, a new tracer for imaging of venous thromboembolism: disposition and metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Skotland, Tore; Hustvedt, Svein Olaf; Oulie, Inger; Jacobsen, Petter Balke; Friisk, Grete Arneberg; Langøy, Ann Svendsen; Uran, Steinar; Sandosham, Jessie; Cuthbertson, Alan; Toft, Kim Gunnar

    2006-01-01

    The 99mTc-complex of NC100668 [Acetyl-Asn-Gln-Glu-Gln-Val-Ser-Pro-Tyr(3-iodo)-Thr-Leu-Leu-Lys-Gly-NC100194] is being evaluated for nuclear medical imaging of venous thromboembolism. NC100668 is a 13-amino acid peptide with a Tc-binding chelator [NC100194; -NH-CH2-CH2-N(CH2-CH2-NH-C(CH3)2-C(CH3)=N-OH)2] linked to the C-terminal end. Following injection in rats of [Asn-U-14C]NC100668 (labeling of the N-terminal amino acid), approximately 70% of the radioactivity was recovered in urine within 3 days. Following injection of [Lys-U-14C]NC100668 (labeling close to the C-terminal amino acid), radioactivity was cleared more slowly, with only 8% recovered in urine and approximately 80% of the radioactivity present in the body after 3 days. The highest concentration of radioactivity in the body following injection of [Lys-U-14C]NC100668 was observed in the kidney inner cortex; this probably represents 14C-labeled Lys, which is reabsorbed in the kidney tubules and incorporated into protein metabolism. Metabolite profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography with radiochemical detection revealed that following injection of [Asn-U-14C]NC100668, there is a rapid appearance in blood of one peak containing radioactive metabolite(s) originating from the N-terminal part of the molecule. In urine samples, only this radioactive peak was observed with no intact NC100668 remaining; this very hydrophilic N-terminal metabolite was probably either the N-terminal amino acid or a very short peptide. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of rat urine samples obtained after injection of nonlabeled NC100668 confirmed the identity of two metabolites generated from the C-terminal end of the molecule; Gly-NC100194 was identified as the major of these metabolites and NC100194 as a minor metabolite present at approximately one-tenth the amount of Gly-NC100194. No other metabolites were identified.

  8. Use of isotopic tracers and SIMS analysis for evaluating the oxidation behaviour of protective coatings on nickel based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibhai, A. A.; Chater, R. J.; McPhail, D. S.; Shollock, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    In this investigation, the oxide growth mechanisms of a Pt-aluminide type coating were investigated using a two-stage oxidation treatment. The samples are first oxidised in unlabelled 16O2, followed by a second oxidation in 18O2 enriched tracer gas. Oxygen diffusion characteristics through the oxide scale were determined by SIMS depth profiling. Focused ion beam analysis was also conducted using a Ga + ion beam to mill cross-sections and then perform elemental mapping. Encouraging results have been obtained from this series of experiments and have clearly shown the two different oxidation mechanisms that occur at temperatures above and below approximately 1000 °C which are associated with the formation of θ and α alumina scales.

  9. Novel tracer method to measure isotopic labeled gas-phase nitrous acid (HO15NO) in biogeochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianming; Kampf, Christopher J; Pöschl, Ulrich; Oswald, Robert; Cui, Junfang; Ermel, Michael; Hu, Chunsheng; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2014-07-15

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO), the protonated form of nitrite, contributes up to ∼60% to the primary formation of hydroxyl radical (OH), which is a key oxidant in the degradation of most air pollutants. Field measurements and modeling studies indicate a large unknown source of HONO during daytime. Here, we developed a new tracer method based on gas-phase stripping-derivatization coupled to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to measure the 15N relative exceedance, ψ(15N), of HONO in the gas-phase. Gaseous HONO is quantitatively collected and transferred to an azo dye, purified by solid phase extraction (SPE), and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). In the optimal working range of ψ(15N)=0.2-0.5, the relative standard deviation of ψ(15N) is <4%. The optimum pH and solvents for extraction by SPE and potential interferences are discussed. The method was applied to measure HO15NO emissions from soil in a dynamic chamber with and without spiking 15) labeled urea. The identification of HO15NO from soil with 15N urea addition confirmed biogenic emissions of HONO from soil. The method enables a new approach of studying the formation pathways of HONO and its role for atmospheric chemistry (e.g., ozone formation) and environmental tracer studies on the formation and conversion of gaseous HONO or aqueous NO2- as part of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, e.g., in the investigation of fertilization effects on soil HONO emissions and microbiological conversion of NO2- in the hydrosphere.

  10. Accurate and precise quantification of atmospheric nitrate in streams draining land of various uses by using triple oxygen isotopes as tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunogai, Urumu; Miyauchi, Takanori; Ohyama, Takuya; Komatsu, Daisuke D.; Nakagawa, Fumiko; Obata, Yusuke; Sato, Keiichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Land use in a catchment area has significant impacts on nitrate eluted from the catchment, including atmospheric nitrate deposited onto the catchment area and remineralised nitrate produced within the catchment area. Although the stable isotopic compositions of nitrate eluted from a catchment can be a useful tracer to quantify the land use influences on the sources and behaviour of the nitrate, it is best to determine these for the remineralised portion of the nitrate separately from the unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to obtain a more accurate and precise quantification of the land use influences. In this study, we determined the spatial distribution and seasonal variation of stable isotopic compositions of nitrate for more than 30 streams within the same watershed, the Lake Biwa watershed in Japan, in order to use 17O excess (Δ17O) of nitrate as an additional tracer to quantify the mole fraction of atmospheric nitrate accurately and precisely. The stable isotopic compositions, including Δ17O of nitrate, in precipitation (wet deposition; n = 196) sampled at the Sado-seki monitoring station were also determined for 3 years. The deposited nitrate showed large 17O excesses similar to those already reported for midlatitudes: Δ17O values ranged from +18.6 to +32.4 ‰ with a 3-year average of +26.3 ‰. However, nitrate in each inflow stream showed small annual average Δ17O values ranging from +0.5 to +3.1 ‰, which corresponds to mole fractions of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to total nitrate from (1.8 ± 0.3) to (11.8 ± 1.8) % respectively, with an average for all inflow streams of (5.1 ± 0.5) %. Although the annual average Δ17O values tended to be smaller in accordance with the increase in annual average stream nitrate concentration from 12.7 to 106.2 µmol L-1, the absolute concentrations of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate were almost stable at (2.3 ± 1.1) µmol L-1 irrespective of the changes in population density and land use in each catchment area

  11. Tracing oxygen variations and its biogeochemical expression during the late hauterivian Faraoni Event: A multi tracers approach using paired carbon, nitrogen, sulfur isotopes and trace metallic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomazo, Christophe; Riquier, Laurent; Martinez, Mathieu; Mathieu, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    During the Cretaceous, several occurrences of Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE) are described in the sedimentary record. Among them, the late Hauterivian Faraoni Event has been extensively studied in several locations including Italy, Switzerland, France and Spain and interpreted as a short-lived OAE from palaeontological, sedimentological and geochemical observations. However, the biogeochemical response to water column oxygen depletion is poorly documented and mostly stands on carbon carbonates isotopes during the Faraoni event. In order to bring further insights into the biogeochemical cycles modifications during O2 variations across the Faraoni Event, we performed an integrated geochemical study including C, N and S isotopes together with paleo-redox tracers (i.e. trace metallic elements and iron speciation) on about 25 samples from the Río Argos section (S.E. Spain). δ13Ccarb increases from 1.23‰ to 1.61‰ at the base of the studied section before the Faraoni event. Maximum values, ranging between 1.21‰ and 1.73‰, are observed within this event and are followed by a rapid decrease in δ13Ccarb values down to 0.50‰ toward the top of the section. δ13Corg and TOC values show a narrow range of variations around -26.3±0.3‰ and 0.15±0.3 wt.%, respectively. Only one sample records a higher TOC content up to 1.53 wt.% at the very base of the Faraoni Event while no sensible variations can be deduced form organic carbon isotopes. Bulk sediments nitrogen isotopes have a mean value of 2.3±0.2‰ and nitrogen contents vary between 320 and 790 ppm. A noticeable δ15N excursion (i.e. 0.86‰) is observed at the very base of the Faraoni Event and is associated with the highest TOC value. Sulfur contents vary between 100 and 2480 ppm, the highest content being recorded just bellow the base of the Faraoni Event. δ34S show a wide range of variations from -44.8 to -10.1‰ on a short scale without easily recognizable stratigraphic trend. Finally, slight increases of

  12. Growth versus metabolic tissue replacement in mouse tissues determined by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macavoy, S. E.; Jamil, T.; Macko, S. A.; Arneson, L. S.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis is becoming an extensively used tool in animal ecology. The isotopes most commonly used for analysis in terrestrial systems are those of carbon and nitrogen, due to differential carbon fractionation in C3 and C4 plants, and the approximately 3‰ enrichment in 15N per trophic level. Although isotope signatures in animal tissues presumably reflect the local food web, analysis is often complicated by differential nutrient routing and fractionation by tissues, and by the possibility that large organisms are not in isotopic equilibrium with the foods available in their immediate environment. Additionally, the rate at which organisms incorporate the isotope signature of a food through both growth and metabolic tissue replacement is largely unknown. In this study we have assessed the rate of carbon and nitrogen isotopic turnover in liver, muscle and blood in mice following a diet change. By determining growth rates, we were able to determine the proportion of tissue turnover caused by growth versus that caused by metabolic tissue replacement. Growth was found to account for approximately 10% of observed tissue turnover in sexually mature mice (Mus musculus). Blood carbon was found to have the shortest half-life (16.9 days), followed by muscle (24.7 days). Liver carbon turnover was not as well described by the exponential decay equations as other tissues. However, substantial liver carbon turnover was observed by the 28th day after diet switch. Surprisingly, these tissues primarily reflect the carbon signature of the protein, rather than carbohydrate, source in their diet. The nitrogen signature in all tissues was enriched by 3 - 5‰ over their dietary protein source, depending on tissue type, and the isotopic turnover rates were comparable to those observed in carbon.

  13. Carbon and nitrogen tracers of land use effects on net ecosystem metabolism in mangrove estuaries, southwest Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Matthew; Mora, Germán; Graniero, Lauren; Surge, Donna

    2016-11-01

    Four estuaries in southwest Florida with different land-use characteristics in their watersheds were chosen to investigate the effects of anthropogenic land use on estuarine biogeochemical cycling. We compared C:N ratios, concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), chlorophyll-a (chl-a) and particulate organic carbon (POC), stable isotope ratios of DIC (δ13CDIC) and POC (δ13CPOC), and nitrogen isotope ratios of particulate organic nitrogen (δ15NPON) among these estuaries. Values of δ13CDIC ranged from -14.1 to +0.9‰. The more negative values occurred upstream, resulting from DIC inputs derived from both the degradation of organic carbon and dissolution of carbonates. Upstream DIC concentrations were as high as 8066 μmol L-1, suggesting high respiration rates. Further, a comparison of DIC values to a conservative mixing model indicates net heterotrophic metabolic state in all four estuaries. Supporting this interpretation, low δ13CPOC values suggest that terrestrial plants were the main source of POC in the upstream sampling points. However, C:N ratios ranged from 7.2 to 13.4, and were consistent with the decomposition of both terrestrial and aquatic sources. Chl-a concentrations were variable and typically below 20 μg L-1, indicating moderate to low levels of autotrophy in all estuaries. Elevated chl-a concentrations indicative of increased primary productivity occurred at intermediate salinities, and were possibly caused by the mixing front at mid-estuary locations. There were no apparent differences in δ15NPON among estuaries, suggesting that the N sources to these estuaries are comparable. The combined results show no differences between near-natural and anthropogenically influenced estuaries, indicating a minimal effect of anthropogenic activities on the parameters measured, possibly as a result of the filtering capacity of the extensive surrounding mangrove vegetation.

  14. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, John; Schwender, Jörg; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Morgan, John A

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (13)CO(2) dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  15. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady J.; Schwender J.; Shachar-Hill, Y.; Morgan, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on {sup 13}CO{sub 2} dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  16. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady, J; Schwender, J; Shachar-Hill, Y; Morgan, JA

    2012-03-26

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (CO2)-C-13 dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  17. The impact of metabolism on stable isotope dynamics: a theoretical framework

    PubMed Central

    Pecquerie, Laure; Nisbet, Roger M.; Fablet, Ronan; Lorrain, Anne; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool used for reconstructing individual life histories, identifying food-web structures and tracking flow of elemental matter through ecosystems. The mechanisms determining isotopic incorporation rates and discrimination factors are, however, poorly understood which hinders a reliable interpretation of field data when no experimental data are available. Here, we extend dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory with a limited set of new assumptions and rules in order to study the impact of metabolism on stable isotope dynamics in a mechanistic way. We calculate fluxes of stable isotopes within an organism by following fluxes of molecules involved in a limited number of macrochemical reactions: assimilation, growth but also structure turnover that is here explicitly treated. Two mechanisms are involved in the discrimination of isotopes: (i) selection of molecules occurs at the partitioning of assimilation, growth and turnover into anabolic and catabolic sub-fluxes and (ii) reshuffling of atoms occurs during transformations. Such a framework allows for isotopic routing which is known as a key, but poorly studied, mechanism. As DEB theory specifies the impact of environmental conditions and individual state on molecule fluxes, we discuss how scenario analysis within this framework could help reveal common mechanisms across taxa. PMID:20921045

  18. Use of chemical and isotopic tracers to characterize the interactions between ground water and surface water in mantled karst

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; Coplen, T.B.; Bullen, T.D.; Hal, Davis J.

    1997-01-01

    In the mantled karst terrane of northern Florida, the water quality of the Upper Floridan aquifer is influenced by the degree of connectivity between the aquifer and the surface. Chemical and isotopic analyses [18O/16O (??18O), 2H/1H (??D), 13C/12C (??13C), tritium(3H), and strontium-87/strontium-86(87Sr/86Sr)]along with geochemical mass-balance modeling were used to identify the dominant hydrochemical processes that control the composition of ground water as it evolves downgradient in two systems. In one system, surface water enters the Upper Floridan aquifer through a sinkhole located in the Northern Highlands physiographic unit. In the other system, surface water enters the aquifer through a sinkhole lake (Lake Bradford) in the Woodville Karst Plain. Differences in the composition of water isotopes (??18O and ??D) in rainfall, ground water, and surface water were used to develop mixing models of surface water (leakage of water to the Upper Floridan aquifer from a sinkhole lake and a sinkhole) and ground water. Using mass-balance calculations, based on differences in ??18O and ??D, the proportion of lake water that mixed with meteoric water ranged from 7 to 86% in water from wells located in close proximity to Lake Bradford. In deeper parts of the Upper Floridan aquifer, water enriched in 18O and D from five of 12 sampled municipal wells indicated that recharge from a sinkhole (1 to 24%) and surface water with an evaporated isotopic signature (2 to 32%) was mixing with ground water. The solute isotopes, ??13C and 87Sr/86Sr, were used to test the sensitivity of binary and ternary mixing models, and to estimate the amount of mass transfer of carbon and other dissolved species in geochemical reactions. In ground water downgradient from Lake Bradford, the dominant processes controlling carbon cycling in ground water were dissolution of carbonate minerals, aerobic degradation of organic matter, and hydrolysis of silicate minerals. In the deeper parts of the Upper

  19. The application of stable isotope tracers to evaluate the extent of sulfate reduction in a BTEX-contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoeller, K.; Weise, S. M.; Goedeke, S.; Weiss, H.; Schirmer, M.

    2003-04-01

    Due to its contribution to the mineralization of organic contaminants to carbon dioxide and water, bacterial sulphate reduction may be an important process for long-term natural attenuation of contaminated aquifers. A Quaternary aquifer, partly contaminated with various BTEX-species, has been investigated by high-resolution groundwater sampling to evaluate the potential and extent of bacterial sulphate reduction. The aquifer, located on the site of a former hydrogenation plant near the town of Zeitz (Saxonia-Anhalt, Germany), mainly consists of sandy and clayey deposits from the Pleistocene Elster-glacial and has a thickness of 5--10 m. More than 100 groundwater samples have been analyzed for both δ34S-SO_4 and δ18O-SO_4. The isotopic composition of the dissolved groundwater sulphate showed a very heterogeneous regional distribution that cannot be explained by a simple mixing pattern. Generally, δ34S-sulphate values ranged from -1 to +48 ppm (VCDT). Smaller variations (+1 ...+16 ppm VSMOW) were observed for δ18O-sulphate. Sulphur from historic atmospheric deposition appears to be the predominant sulphate source for the regional groundwater in the aquifer. Relatively low δ18O-sulphate values in some samples suggest that part of the sulphate may be derived from the oxidation of sedimentary pyrite. Increasing δ34S values and simultaneously decreasing sulphate concentrations along the groundwater flow path in the northern outflow of the contaminant plume indicate the occurrence of bacterial sulphate reduction. While sulphate concentration drop from over 300 to less than 20 mg/L, δ34S values increase up to +45 ppm (VCDT). Using a Rayleigh model for the reduction process, an isotope enrichment factor (ɛ) of ca. -12 ppm was obtained. In contrast, no enrichment of 18O was observed. This is due to the specific reaction conditions that inhibit the oxygen isotope exchange between sulphate and water during the reduction process and hence disable the 18O enrichment in

  20. Use of chemical and isotopic tracers to characterize the interactions between ground water and surface water in mantled karst

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, B.G.; Davis, J.H.; Coplen, T.B.; Bullen, T.D.

    1997-11-01

    In the mantled karst terrane of northern Florida, the water quality of the Upper Floridan aquifer is influenced by the degree of connectivity between the aquifer and the surface. Chemical and isotopic analyses [{sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ({delta}{sup 18}O), {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H ({delta}D), {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ({delta}{sup 13}C), tritium ({sup 3}H), and strontium-87/strontium-86 ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr)] along with geochemical mass-balance modeling were used to identify the dominant hydrochemical processes that control the composition of ground water as it evolves downgradient in two systems. In one system, surface water enters the Upper Florida aquifer through a sinkhole located in the Northern Highlands physiographic unit. In the other system, surface water enters the aquifer through a sinkhole lake (Lake Bradford) in the Woodville Karst Plain. Differences in the composition of water isotopes ({delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}D) in rainfall, ground water, and surface water were used to develop mixing models of surface water (leakage of water to the Upper Floridan aquifer from a sinkhole lake and a sinkhole) and ground water. Using mass-balance calculations, based on differences in {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}D, the proportion of lake water that mixed with meteoric water ranged from 7 to 86% in water from wells located in close proximity to lake Bradford. In deeper parts of the Upper Floridan aquifer, water enriched in {sup 18}O and D from five of 12 samples municipal wells indicated that recharge from a sinkhole (1 to 24%) and surface water with an evaporated isotopic signature (2 to 32%) was mixing with ground water. The solute isotopes, {delta}{sup 13}C and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, were used to test the sensitivity of binary and ternary mixing models, and to estimate the amount of mass transfer of carbon and other dissolved species in geochemical reactions.

  1. 15N tracer incubations and natural abundance isotopes reveal nitrification and denitrification production of nitrous oxide in the oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Q.; Ward, B. B.

    2016-02-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and ozone depletion agent. The ocean is a major source of N2O to the atmosphere. The Eastern Tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone (ETSP-OMZ) is a region of intense N2O efflux, characterized by N2O oversaturation at the oxic-anoxic interfaces above and below the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ). Nitrification and denitrification are the two main N2O production pathways in oxic and anoxic waters, respectively, which overlap at oxic-anoxic interfaces. To investigate instantaneous N2O production, tracer incubations with 15N-labeled substrates (NH4+, NO2- and NO3-) were performed. Parallel analyses of natural abundance isotopes (δ15N, δ18O) were used to investigate long-term, integrated N2O cycling. The investigations focused on three depth intervals. 1) In the upper oxycline above the ODZ, the highest N2O production occurred at the N2O concentration peak. Tracer experiments showed that denitrification was probably the major biological process responsible for the observed low natural abundance δ15N- and δ18O-N2O. Although the contribution of N2O from nitrification in the upper oxycline was small, the N2O yield from nitrification (the ratio of N2O to NO2- production from NH4+) increased by 100-fold as oxygen concentration decreased from 100% to 1% saturation. 2) Within the ODZ, N2O was produced and consumed by denitrification. Tracer experiments showed NO2- and NO3- were reduced to N2O, which was further reduced to N2. As a result, high δ15N- and δ18O-N2O were associated with under-saturated N2O concentration. 3) Below the ODZ, instantaneous N2O production was slow. Natural abundance distributions suggest both nitrification and denitrification maintain N2O concentration peaks of up to a few hundred percent oversaturation in this depth interval. Overall, denitrification is the most important pathway of N2O cycling in the ETSP-OMZ, and is responsible for this "hot spot" of marine N2O efflux.

  2. Different Trophic Tracers Give Different Answers for the Same Bugs - Comparing a Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Based Analysis of Resource Utilization in a Marine Isopod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, A. W. E.; Eisenlord, M. E.; Brett, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    Stable isotope (SI) based mixing models are the most common approach used to infer resource pathways in consumers. However, SI based analyses are often underdetermined, and consumer SI fractionation is usually unknown. The use of fatty acid (FA) tracers in mixing models offers an alternative approach that can resolve the underdetermined constraint. A limitation to both methods is the considerable uncertainty about consumer `trophic modification' (TM) of dietary FA or SI, which occurs as consumers transform dietary resources into tissues. We tested the utility of SI and FA approaches for inferring the diets of the marine benthic isopod (Idotea wosnesenskii) fed various marine macroalgae in controlled feeding trials. Our analyses quantified how the accuracy and precision of Bayesian mixing models was influenced by choice of algorithm (SIAR vs MixSIR), fractionation (assumed or known), and whether the model was under or overdetermined (seven sources and two vs 26 tracers) for cases where isopods were fed an exclusive diet of one of the seven different macroalgae. Using the conventional approach (i.e., 2 SI with assumed TM) resulted in average model outputs, i.e., the contribution from the exclusive resource = 0.20 ± 0.23 (0.00-0.79), mean ± SD (95% credible interval), that only differed slightly from the prior assumption. Using the FA based approach with known TM greatly improved model performance, i.e., the contribution from the exclusive resource = 0.91 ± 0.10 (0.58-0.99). The choice of algorithm only made a difference when fractionation was known and the model was overdetermined (FA approach). In this case SIAR and MixSIR had outputs of 0.86 ± 0.11 (0.48-0.96) and 0.96 ± 0.05 (0.79-1.00), respectively. This analysis shows the choice of dietary tracers and the assumption of consumer trophic modification greatly influence the performance of mixing model dietary reconstructions, and ultimately our understanding of what resources actually support aquatic consumers.

  3. Impact of metabolism and growth phase on the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Heinzelmann, Sandra M.; Villanueva, Laura; Sinke-Schoen, Danielle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are involved in all elemental cycles and therefore it is important to study their metabolism in the natural environment. A recent technique to investigate this is the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids, i.e., heterotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids enriched in deuterium (D) while photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids depleted in D compared to the water in the culture medium (growth water). However, the impact of factors other than metabolism have not been investigated. Here, we evaluate the impact of growth phase compared to metabolism on the hydrogen isotopic composition of fatty acids of different environmentally relevant microorganisms with heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic metabolisms. Fatty acids produced by heterotrophs are enriched in D compared to growth water with εlipid/water between 82 and 359‰ when grown on glucose or acetate, respectively. Photoautotrophs (εlipid/water between −149 and −264‰) and chemoautotrophs (εlipid/water between −217 and −275‰) produce fatty acids depleted in D. Fatty acids become, in general, enriched by between 4 and 46‰ with growth phase which is minor compared to the influence of metabolisms. Therefore, the D/H ratio of fatty acids is a promising tool to investigate community metabolisms in nature. PMID:26005437

  4. Ne ISOTOPES IN INDIVIDUAL PRESOLAR GRAPHITE GRAINS FROM THE MURCHISON METEORITE TOGETHER WITH He, C, O, Mg-Al ISOTOPIC ANALYSES AS TRACERS OF THEIR ORIGINS

    SciTech Connect

    Heck, Philipp R.; Hoppe, Peter; Amari, Sachiko; Baur, Heinrich; Wieler, Rainer; Lewis, Roy S. E-mail: prheck@uchicago.edu

    2009-08-20

    Ne isotopes measured in individual presolar graphite grains, solid samples of extinct stars preserved in primitive meteorites, provide information on the type of stellar sources of the grains and on nucleosynthetic mixing and ion-trapping processes which were operating. We present Ne and He isotope analyses of single presolar graphite grains from the KFB1 density fraction extracted from the carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. In addition, we measured isotopes of C, O, and Mg-Al with the NanoSIMS ion microprobe to better constrain the origin of the grains. Eleven out of 51 presolar graphite grains contain nucleosynthetic {sup 22}Ne above our detection limit. This fraction of {sup 22}Ne-rich grains is similar to the one reported by Nichols et al. although we have a lower {sup 22}Ne detection limit. We detected rare He-shell {sup 20}Ne in one {sup 22}Ne-rich grain and obtained the {sup 20}Ne/{sup 22}Ne ratio (0.03 {+-} 0.02) of the He-shell of an Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) star with 1.5-2 M {sub sun} and subsolar metallicity. We also detected {sup 4}He in this grain, while in the other grains, which originally acquired He, He-loss seems to be significant. We found unequivocal evidence for radiogenic {sup 22}Ne (Ne-R) in another graphite grain, which likely condensed in a core-collapse supernova and which incorporated live radioactive {sup 22}Na (t {sub 1/2} = 2.6 yr). For the other grains, a clear assignment to a stellar source is more difficult to make. Putative stellar sources are supernovae, AGB stars, born-again AGB stars, J-type carbon stars, and CO novae.

  5. Accumulation of methylmercury in rice and flooded soil in experiments with an enriched isotopic Hg(II) tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickman, R. J.; Mitchell, C. P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin produced in anoxic aquatic sediments. Numerous factors, including the presence of aquatic plants, alter the biogeochemistry of sediments, affecting the rate at which microorganisms transform bioavailable inorganic Hg (IHg) to MeHg. Methylmercury produced in flooded paddy soils and its transfer into rice has become an important dietary consideration. An improved understanding of how MeHg reaches the grain and the extent to which rice alters MeHg production in rhizosphere sediments could help to inform rice cultivation practices. We conducted a controlled greenhouse experiment with thirty rice plants grown in individual, flooded pots amended with enriched 200Hg. Unvegetated controls were maintained under identical conditions. At three plant growth stages (vegetative growth, flowering, and grain maturity), ten plants were sacrificed and samples collected from soil, roots, straw, panicle, and grain of vegetated and unvegetated pots, and assessed for MeHg and THg concentrations. We observed consistent ratios between ambient and tracer MeHg between soils (0.36 ±0.04 — 0.44 ± 0.09) and plant compartments (0.23 ± 0.07 -0.34 ± 0.05) indicating that plant MeHg contamination originates in the soil rather than in planta methylation. The majority of this MeHg was absorbed between the tillering (4.48 ± 2.38 ng/plant) and flowering (8.43 ± 5.12 ng/pl) phases, with a subsequent decline at maturity (2.87 ± 1.23 ng/pl) only partly explained by translocation to the developing grain, indicating that MeHg was demethylated in planta. In contrast, IHg was absorbed from both soil and air, as evidenced by the higher ambient IHg concentrations compared to tracer (3.76 ± 1.19 vs. 0.27 ± 0.40 ng/g). Surprisingly, MeHg accumulation was significantly (p= 0.042-- 0.003) lower in vegetated vs. unvegetated sediments at flowering (1.41 ± 0.26 vs. 1.57 ± 0.23) and maturity (1.27 ± 0.22 vs. 1.71 ± 0.25), suggesting that plant exudates bound Hg

  6. Stable isotopes as tracers of methane dynamics in Everglades marshes with and without active populations of methane oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happell, James D.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Whiting, Gary J.; Showers, William J.

    1993-01-01

    The stable carbon isotopic composition of CH4 is used to study the processes that affect it during transport through plants from sediment to the atmosphere. The enhancement of CH4 flux from Cladium and Eleocharis over the flux from open water or clipped sites indicated that these plants served as gas conduits between the sediments and the atmosphere. Lowering of the water table below the sediment surface caused an Everglades sawgrass marsh to shift from emission of CH4 to consumption of atmospheric CH4. Cladium transported gases passively mainly via molecular diffusion and/or effusion instead of actively via bulk flow. Stable isotropic data gave no evidence that CH4 oxidation was occurring in the rhizosphere of Cladium. Both CH4 stable carbon isotope and flux data indicated a lack of CH4 oxidation at the sediment-water interface in Everglades marl soils and its presence in peat soils where 40 to 92 percent of the flux across the sediment-water interface was oxidized.

  7. Stable isotopes as tracers of methane dynamics in Everglades marshes with and without active populations of methane oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happell, James D.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Whiting, Gary J.; Showers, William J.

    1993-01-01

    The stable carbon isotopic composition of CH4 is used to study the processes that affect it during transport through plants from sediment to the atmosphere. The enhancement of CH4 flux from Cladium and Eleocharis over the flux from open water or clipped sites indicated that these plants served as gas conduits between the sediments and the atmosphere. Lowering of the water table below the sediment surface caused an Everglades sawgrass marsh to shift from emission of CH4 to consumption of atmospheric CH4. Cladium transported gases passively mainly via molecular diffusion and/or effusion instead of actively via bulk flow. Stable isotropic data gave no evidence that CH4 oxidation was occurring in the rhizosphere of Cladium. Both CH4 stable carbon isotope and flux data indicated a lack of CH4 oxidation at the sediment-water interface in Everglades marl soils and its presence in peat soils where 40 to 92 percent of the flux across the sediment-water interface was oxidized.

  8. Zn and Cu isotopes as tracers of anthropogenic contamination in a sediment core from an Urban Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thapalia, A.; Borrok, D.M.; Van Metre, P.C.; Musgrove, M.; Landa, E.R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we use stable Zn and Cu isotopes to identify the sources and timing of the deposition of these metals in a sediment core from Lake Ballinger near Seattle, Washington, USA. The base of the Lake Ballinger core predates settlement in the region, while the upper sections record the effects of atmospheric emissions from a nearby smelter and rapid urbanization of the watershed. ??66Zn and ??65Cu varied by 0.50% and 0.29%, respectively, over the 500 year core record. Isotopic changes were correlated with the presmelter period (~1450 to 1900 with ??66Zn = +0.39% ?? 0.09% and ??65Cu = +0.77% ?? 0.06%), period of smelter operation (1900 to 1985 with ??66Zn = +0.14 ?? 0.06% and ??65Cu = +0.94 ?? 0.10%), and postsmelting/stable urban land use period (post 1985 with ??66Zn = 0.00 ?? 0.10% and ??65Cu = +0.82% ?? 0.12%). Rapid early urbanization during the post World War II era increased metal loading to the lake but did not significantly alter the ??66Zn and ??65Cu, suggesting that increased metal loads during this time were derived mainly from mobilization of historically contaminated soils. Urban sources of Cu and Zn were dominant since the smelter closed in the 1980s, and the (??66Zn measured in tire samples suggests tire wear is a likely source of Zn. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  9. Use of environmental tracers and isotopes to evaluate sources of water, nitrate, and uranium in an irrigated alluvial valley, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Böhlke, John Karl; Kraemer, Thomas F.; Cannia, James C.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of irrigation canals and the North Platte River on ground-water movement and quality in an irrigated alluvial valley, western Nebraska, were evaluated using environmental tracers. The results indicated that most of the ground water in the alluvium was derived from the North Platte River and generally was less than 30 years old. Ground-water-recharge rates varied substantially from about 0.6 to 9 feet per year with the larger recharge rates reflecting localized canal seepage. Younger water had higher nitrate concentrations than older water. Increases in nitrate concentrations in recharging ground water over time may be associated with an increase in nitrogen fertilizer use over time. Denitrification was limited in the ground water in the alluvium. Uranium concentrations in ground water resulted from dissolution of volcanic ash or other sediments in the underlying bedrock or incorporated in the alluvium. High uranium concentrations in the North Platte River during the winter months were a result of the addition of uranium-rich water from local tributaries and seepage of uranium-rich ground water.

  10. Use of Environmental Tracers and Isotopes to Evaluate Sources of Water, Nitrate, and Uranium in an Irrigated Alluvial Valley, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Bohlke, John K.; Kraemer, Thomas F.; Cannia, James C.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of irrigation canals and the North Platte River on ground-water movement and quality in an irrigated alluvial valley, western Nebraska, were evaluated using environmental tracers. The results indicated that most of the ground water in the alluvium was derived from the North Platte River and generally was less than 30 years old. Ground-water-recharge rates varied substantially from about 0.6 to 9 feet per year with the larger recharge rates reflecting localized canal seepage. Younger water had higher nitrate concentrations than older water. Increases in nitrate concentrations in recharging ground water over time may be associated with an increase in nitrogen fertilizer use over time. Denitrification was limited in the ground water in the alluvium. Uranium concentrations in ground water resulted from dissolution of volcanic ash or other sediments in the underlying bedrock or incorporated in the alluvium. High uranium concentrations in the North Platte River during the winter months were a result of the addition of uranium-rich water from local tributaries and seepage of uranium-rich ground water.

  11. Uninhibited methane biogeochemistry: A candid view of interactions among soil processes made possible by stable isotope and inert tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Fischer, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    Methane emission emerges as a highly variable property of ecosystems because the proximate controlling processes, methane production, consumption and transport, appear to vary considerably in both space and time. But the extent and importance of any co-correlation among these processes remains unclear. The idea of co-correlation is supported by a simplified model of methane fluxes that we have developed and by the frequently-observed relationship between net ecosystem productivity and methane emission. Yet the dominant approach toward problems in methane biogeochemistry remains focused on measuring or modeling each process individually and then assembling them into an understanding of the whole. This approach has arisen, in part, from our historic inability to measure methane production, consumption and transport simultaneously. Instead, one or more processes have been inhibited or excluded from consideration, leading to an incomplete picture of soil methane biogeochemistry. To overcome this limitation, we have used additions of 13C- labeled methane to simultaneously measure methane production and consumption in wetland soils. When coupled with additions of inert hydrologic and gas tracers (e.g., Br- and SF6), we have measured methane production, consumption and soil-atmosphere transport under field conditions with minimal disturbance. Our results reveal strong co-correlations among the processes that can be useful for building simpler, mechanistically-based models of ecosystem methane emissions.

  12. Water budgets of Italian and Dutch gravel pit lakes: a study using a fen as a natural evaporation pan, stable isotopes and conservative tracer modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nella Mollema, Pauline; Antonellini, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Gravel pits are excavated in aquifers to fulfill the need for construction materials. Flow-through lakes form where the gravel pits are below the water table and fill with groundwater. Their presence changes the drainage patterns, water- and hydrochemical budgets of a watershed. We have studied the water budget of two gravel pit lakes systems using stable H and O isotopes of water as well as conservative tracer (Cl) modeling. The Dutch gravel pit lakes are a fluvial fresh water system of 70 lakes along the Meuse River and the Italian gravel pit lakes are a brackish system along the Adriatic coast. Surface water evaporation from the gravel pit lakes is larger than the actual evapotranspiration of the grass land and forests that were replaced. The ratio of evaporation to total flow into the Dutch lakes was determined by using a Fen as a natural evaporation pan: the isotope content of the Tuspeel Fen, filled with rain water and sampled in a dry and warm summer period (August 2012), is representative for the limiting isotopic enrichment under local hydro meteorological conditions. The Local Evaporation line (LEL) was determined δ2 H = 4.20 δ 18O - 14.10 (R² = 0.99) and the ratio of total inflow to evaporation for three gravel pit lakes were calculated to be 22.6 for the De Lange Vlieter lake used for drinking water production, 11.3 for the Boschmolen Lake and 8.9 for the Anna's Beemd lake showing that groundwater flow is much larger than evaporation. The Italian gravel pit lakes are characterized by high salinity (TDS = 4.6-12.3 g L-1). Stable isotope data show that these latter gravel pit lakes are fed by groundwater, which is a mix between fresh Apennine River water and brackish (Holocene) Adriatic Sea water. The local evaporation line is determined: δ2H = 5.02 δ18O - 10.49. The ratio of total inflow to evaporation is 5. Conservative tracer modeling indicates that the chloride concentration in the Italian gravel pit lakes stabilizes after a short period of rapid

  13. Assessment of recharge and flowpaths in a limestone thermomineral aquifer system using environmental isotope tracers (Central Portugal).

    PubMed

    Marques, Jose M; Eggenkamp, Hans G M; Graca, Henrique; Carreira, Paula M; Jose Matias, Maria; Mayer, Bernhard; Nunes, Dina

    2010-06-01

    We conducted chemical and isotopic analyses to develop and test a hydrogeological model of thermomineral water circulation in a limestone aquifer system at Caldas da Rainha (Central Portugal), contributing to future borehole-drilling and development strategies, with the aim of extracting waters with the best possible flow and/or temperature. The thermomineral waters (T approximately 33 degrees C) discharge from springs and boreholes located close to a locally N-S-oriented oblique fault (60 degrees E) that places loamy and detritic Upper Jurassic rocks and Hettangian-Rhaetian marls (and evaporitic deposits) in contact. (14)C determinations indicate a pmC content between 29.33+/-0.14 and 44.39+/-0.20 pmC. The presence of HCO[image omitted] , Ca(2+) (and Mg(2+)) are ascribed to water-limestone interactions, while Na(+), Cl(-) and SO[image omitted] concentrations are mainly associated with the dissolution of halite and gypsum lenses found along the regional syncline structure. The delta(18)O values of Caldas da Rainha thermomineral water were slightly lower than those of shallow groundwater from the Upper Jurassic rocks, suggesting the existence of two distinct aquifer systems. The different isotopic composition of water also indicates that the main recharge of the thermomineral waters likely occurs in the Middle and Lower Jurassic limestone formations of the Candeeiros Mountains. The presence of (3)H (from 1.1 to 2.8 TU) in some thermomineral borehole waters (showing rather similar geochemical signatures) suggests mixing of small amounts of shallow groundwater with thermomineral waters, as a result of leaking borehole casing construction or a recharge when the (3)H content in the atmosphere was higher than that at present. Caldas da Rainha thermomineral waters having delta(34)S(sulphate) and delta(18)O(sulphate) values between+14.9 and+19.1 per thousand and+11.1 and+16.2 per thousand, respectively, indicate that the sulphate is the result of water-rock interaction

  14. Os Isotopic Composition and Highly Siderophile Elements: Tracers of Mantle Melting and Melt Percolation Processes (Voykar Complex, Polar Ural Ophiolites)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batanova, V.; Bruegmann, G.; Savelieva, G.

    2006-12-01

    The Voykar complex is located in the Northern part of the Uralian ophiolite belt and represents Early Devonian lithosphere formed in a suprasubduction environment (e. g. (1)). It is unique in that the mantle peridotites are very well preserved and virtually free of serpentine, and it provides excellent exposures. The mantle section of Voykar complex is composed of harzburgite which is intruded by numerous dunite and pyroxenite channels and contains chromitite ore deposits. The distribution of highly siderophile elements (HSE) in harzburgite and dunite channels can be explained by melt-peridotite reaction processes. The harzburgites (Cr/(Cr+Al) of cr-spinel = 0.3-0.4) show two types of HSE patterns. One is depleted in Pd, Pt and Re relatively to Os, Ir, Ru with (Pt/Ir)N=0.3, the second pattern is flat with (Pt/Ir)N=0.9. The first type of harzburgite has lower ratios of 187Os/188Os (0.1149) compared to the second (0.1236). Dunite and associated orthopyroxenite are significantly enriched in 187Os (187Os/188Os=0.1279 - 0.1327), hence shifted towards lava compositions. Their HSE patterns also show the influence of mantle melts, because they are enriched in Pd ((Pt/Ir)N=5-6). The clinopyroxenite has the highest ratio of 187Os/188Os up to 32.38 and shows even stronger depletion of Os, Ir, Ru relative to Pt, Pd, Re ((Pt/Ir)N=20). They could represent crystallization products of percolating melts. Chromitites have variable 187Os/188Os=0.1244-0.1352, and their HSE concentrations overlap with the range observed in chromitites world-wide. Osmium isotope data show evidence for at least two significant events in the magmatic history of the Voykar ophiolite mantle section: an ancient (2.1-1.9 Ga) melting event formed the depleted spinel harzburgite; a younger melt percolation event (0.6-0.5 Ga) led to the formation of pyroxenite veins, dunite channels and chromitites. The age of melt percolation events based on Os isotopic data coincides with the U-Pb age of zircons found in

  15. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; Maher, Kate

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.

  16. Environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornberger, George

    Several naturally occurring tracers of water in natural systems (for example, stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen) are being widely used to determine the flow paths that water takes through a catchment. These chart the course of water from when it lands on the soil surface as rain or snow until it flows out of the catchment as streamflow. Tracing of hydrological flow paths, in conjunction with geochemical studies of how water interacts with rocks and soils, has led to new understanding of the hydrochemistry of upland forested catchments. Although a large fraction of precipitation that reaches the forest floor infiltrates into the very permeable soils, studies have disproved the once-prevalent notion that water slowly percolates through soils and rocks. Instead, preferred flow paths along old root channels, dessication cracks, and other heterogeneities in the soils transmit water and solute rapidly both vertically and downslope. This rapid movement profoundly affects the chemical reactions in the soils, influencing, for example, how “acid rain” affects the chemical composition of soil and stream water. Major findings from recent work are that downslope transport occurs along preferred paths in the shallow, normally unsaturated portions of the soil; and that riparian areas (wetlands immediately adjacent to the stream channel) play an extraordinarily important role in catchment hydrochemistry.

  17. Hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic compounds in plants reflect the plant's carbon metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. A.; Kahmen, A.; Werner, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The main factors controlling δ2H of plant organic compounds are generally assumed to be the plant's source water and the evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water. Hydrogen isotope analyses of plant compounds from sediments or tree rings are therefore mainly applied to assess hydrological conditions at different spatial and temporal scales. However, the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of plant organic compounds (ɛbio) also accounts for a large part of the variability observed in the δ2H values. Nevertheless, only few studies have directly addressed the physiological basis of this variability and even fewer studies have thus explored possible applications of hydrogen isotope variability in plant organic compounds for plant physiological research. Here we show two datasets indicating that the plant's carbon metabolism can have a substantial influence on δ2H values of n-alkanes and cellulose. First, we performed a controlled experiment where we forced plants into heterotrophic and autotrophic C-metabolism by growing them under four different light treatments. Second, we assessed the δ2H values of different parasitic heterotrophic plants and their autotrophic host plants. Our two datasets show a systematic shift in ɛbio of up to 80 ‰ depending on the plant's carbon metabolism (heterotrophic or autotrophic). Differences in n-alkane and cellulose δ2H values in plants with autotrophic vs. heterotrophic metabolisms can be explained by different NADPH pools that are used by the plants to build their compounds either with assimilates that originate directly from photosynthesis or from stored carbohydrates. Our results have significant implications for the calibration and interpretation of geological records. More importantly, as the δ2H values reflect the plant's carbon metabolism involved during the tissue formation, our findings highlight the potential of δ2H values as new tool for studying plant and ecosystem carbon

  18. Groundwater “fast paths” in the Snake River Plain aquifer: Radiogenic isotope ratios as natural groundwater tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Thomas M.; Roback, Robert C.; McLing, Travis L.; Bullen, Thomas D.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Doughty, Christine; Hunt, Randall J.; Smith, Robert W.; Cecil, L. DeWayne; Murrell, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    Preferential flow paths are expected in many groundwater systems and must be located because they can greatly affect contaminant transport. The fundamental characteristics of radiogenic isotope ratios in chemically evolving waters make them highly effective as preferential flow path indicators. These ratios tend to be more easily interpreted than solute-concentration data because their response to water-rock interaction is less complex. We demonstrate this approach with groundwater 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Snake River Plain aquifer within and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These data reveal slow-flow zones as lower 87Sr/86Sr areas created by prolonged interaction with the host basalts and a relatively fast flowing zone as a high 87Sr/86Sr area.

  19. Stable Chromium Isotopes as tracer of changes in weathering processes and redox state of the ocean during Neoproterozoic glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossing, L. N.; Gaucher, C.; Boggiani, P. C.; Frei, R.

    2010-12-01

    The chemistry of surface environments on Earth has essentially evolved from early anoxic conditions to a present day oxic state. How in detail this transition occurred is still a matter of debate but the last 200 million years (My) of the Neoproterozoic Era [(1000 to 542 million years ago (Ma)] show an emerging picture of large scale fluctuations in the redox state of the oceans [1-2]. The reasons for these fluctuations are to be sought in Earth’s atmospheric oxygenation which led to the rapid radiation of oxygen-utilizing macroscopic metazoans, but details regarding the nature of these fluctuations remain unclear. The Late Neoproterozoic is known for a number of widespread glaciations causing the return of ferruginous oceans which were absent for more than a billion years of Earth history. This study elaborates on the idea that Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes in Fe-rich chemical sediments deposited during glacial events are suitable for tracing oxygenation of surface environments through Earth's history [3]. The focus of this study is to apply the Cr isotope system to one of the Marinoan (650-630 Ma) glacio-marine sequences (Jacadigo Group, Brazil) in order to get a detailed spatial and relative temporal resolution of changes in weathering processes and redox states of the respective ocean basin during the depositional period of the sediments. The Jacadigo Group is a glacio-marine succession which is composed of the Urucum Fm. (sandstones) at the base, the Santa Cruz Fm. (BIFs) and the Puga Fm. (Fe-rich glacial diamictites) at the top. Cr stable isotope measurements on various BIF horizons of the Santa Cruz Fm. yielded positive δ53/52Cr values range from +0.4 to+ 0.9‰, while the overlying Fe-rich glaciogenic diamictites of the Puga Fm. show δ53/52Cr values range from to +0.1 to+ 0.4‰. These positively fractionated values correspond to positive δ53/52Cr values measured in other Late Neoproterozoic BIFs and speak for the occurrence of potential oxygenation

  20. Zn and Cu Isotopes as Tracers of Anthropogenic Contamination in a Sediment Core from an Urban Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thapalia, Anita; Borrok, David M.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Landa, Edward R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we use stable Zn and Cu isotopes to identify the sources and timing of the deposition of these metals in a sediment core from Lake Ballinger near Seattle, Washington, USA. The base of the Lake Ballinger core predates settlement in the region, while the upper sections record the effects of atmospheric emissions from a nearby smelter and rapid urbanization of the watershed. δ66Zn and δ65Cu varied by 0.50%o and 0.29%o, respectively, over the 500 year core record. Isotopic changes were correlated with the presmelter period (~1450 to 1900 with δ66Zn = +0.39%o ± 0.09%o and δ65Cu = +0.77%o ± 0.06%o), period of smelter operation (1900 to 1985 with δ66Zn = +0.14 ± 0.06%o and δ65Cu = +0.94 ± 0.10%o), and postsmelting/stable urban land use period (post 1985 with δ66Zn = 0.00 ± 0.10%o and δ65Cu = +0.82%o ± 0.12%o). Rapid early urbanization during the post World War II era increased metal loading to the lake but did not significantly alter the δ66Zn and δ65Cu, suggesting that increased metal loads during this time were derived mainly from mobilization of historically contaminated soils. Urban sources of Cu and Zn were dominant since the smelter closed in the 1980s, and the δ66Zn measured in tire samples suggests tire wear is a likely source of Zn.

  1. Incorporating tracer-tracee differences into models to improve accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The ideal tracer for metabolic studies is one that behaves exactly like the tracee. Compounds labeled with isotopes come the closest to this ideal because they are chemically identical to the tracee except for the substitution of a stable or radioisotope at one or more positions. Even this substitution, however, can introduce a difference in metabolism that may be quantitatively important with regard to the development of the mathematical model used to interpret the kinetic data. The doubly labeled water method for the measurement of carbon dioxide production and hence energy expenditure in free-living subjects is a good example of how differences between the metabolism of the tracers and the tracee can influence the accuracy of the carbon dioxide production rate determined from the kinetic data.

  2. Use of stable isotope tracers as a diagnostic tool for determining connectedness of road runoff to stream peak flows in disturbed forest environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaugset, A.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    Forest disturbance, and in particular forest road construction can cause changes in hydrological processes emergent at the catchment scale. The magnitude of the impacts of forest roads on stream peak flows and chronic sedimentation is perceived to be directly proportional to the degree that roads are connected to the stream system. Scientific studies to date that have examined the degree to which the roadside ditch acts as an extension of the stream system have been highly equivocal. The engineering prescription to "fix" the perceived impacts of roads is to isolate the road system from the stream system. This is generally carried out by upgrading the drainage system for the forest road by either installing more drainage structures, cross drain culverts, or simply isolating live stream crossing culverts using water bars or rolling dips. At this time there is no simple, universally applicable method to determine the degree of connectivity of a road system to the stream. This paper presents some preliminary research using stable isotope tracer approaches as a diagnostic tool for quantifying connectedness of road runoff to stream peak flows. We argue that time source hydrograph separation may be a tool for determining whether or not engineering improvements have "worked" and how much current road systems in any given watershed influence stream peak flow. We present data for a rainstorm in the Winter of 2003 from nested sub-catchments and road ditches at the Oak Creek Watershed in the McDonald/Dunn Research Forest, Western Oregon.

  3. Cr isotope fractionation factors for Cr(VI) reduction by a metabolically diverse group of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban; Johnson, Thomas M.; Sanford, Robert A.

    2014-10-01

    Reduction of Cr(VI) is an important process that determines the geochemical behavior, mobility and bioavailability of Cr in both terrestrial and marine environments. Many metabolically diverse microorganisms possess Cr(VI) reduction capacity. Cr(VI) reduction fractionates Cr isotopes and thus 53Cr/52Cr ratios can be used to monitor Cr(VI) reduction and redox conditions. The magnitude of isotopic fractionation (ε) for a variety of microbial reduction mechanisms must be known for accurate interpretation of observed shifts in 53Cr/52Cr ratios. We determined isotopic fractionation factors for Cr(VI) reduction by metal reducers Geobacter sulfurreducens and Shewanella sp. strain NR, a denitrifying soil bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri DCP-Ps1, and a sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris. All bacteria investigated in this study produced significant Cr isotope fractionation. The fractionation (ε) for G. sulfurreducens, Shewanella sp. (NR), P. stutzeri DCP-Ps1, and D. vulgaris were -3.03‰ ± 0.12‰, -2.17‰ ± 0.22‰, -3.14‰ ± 0.13‰, and -3.01‰ ± 0.11‰, respectively. Despite differences in microbial strains in this study, the ε did not vary significantly except for Shewanella sp. (NR). Our results suggest that strong isotopic fractionation is induced during Cr(VI) reduction under electron donor poor (∼300 μM) conditions.

  4. Characterizing the role of hydrological processes on lake water balances in the Old Crow Flats, Yukon Territory, Canada, using water isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Kevin W.; Wolfe, Brent B.; Edwards, Thomas W. D.

    2010-05-01

    SummaryWe employ water isotope tracers to assess hydrological processes controlling lake water balances in the Old Crow Flats (OCF) landscape, northern Yukon Territory, Canada. Fifty-six lakes were sampled in June and July 2007 and 26 of these were re-sampled in September 2007. Based on patterns of isotopic evolution in δ18O- δ2H space, calculations of input water compositions ( δI) and evaporation-to-inflow ( E/ I) ratios, and field observations we identify snowmelt-dominated, rainfall-dominated, groundwater-influenced, evaporation-dominated and drained lake types, which represent the dominant hydrological process influencing the lake water balance. These results highlight the diversity in lake water balance conditions in the OCF, which are strongly associated with landscape characteristics. Snowmelt-dominated lakes are located where more dense vegetation cover entraps snow transported by prevailing northeasterly winds. Rainfall-dominated lakes occupy areas of sparse tundra vegetation cover where less snow accumulates. Groundwater-influenced oxbow lakes are located along the floodplain of higher-order river and creek channels and receive input throughout the ice-free season from snowmelt-recharged channel fens and sub-surface flow. Only one basin became evaporation-dominated during the 2007 open-water season probably because extremely high precipitation during the preceding late summer, late winter and early spring offset vapour loss. However, rainfall-dominated lakes appear to be more susceptible to evaporative drawdown than snowmelt-dominated and groundwater-influenced lakes, and many would likely evolve to evaporation-dominated during drier summers. Drained lakes are commonly observed throughout the landscape and in most cases likely result from elevated water levels and channel erosion between waterbodies. Unusually high amounts of snowmelt and/or rainfall triggered the drainage of two lakes in early June 2007 in which overflow led to rapid erosion of

  5. Fate of injected CO2 in the Wilcox Group, Louisiana, Gulf Coast Basin: Chemical and isotopic tracers of microbial-brine-rock-CO2 interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Warwick, Peter D.; Lee Zhi Yi, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    The “2800’ sandstone” of the Olla oil field is an oil and gas-producing reservoir in a coal-bearing interval of the Paleocene–Eocene Wilcox Group in north-central Louisiana, USA. In the 1980s, this producing unit was flooded with CO2 in an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project, leaving ∼30% of the injected CO2 in the 2800’ sandstone post-injection. This study utilizes isotopic and geochemical tracers from co-produced natural gas, oil and brine to determine the fate of the injected CO2, including the possibility of enhanced microbial conversion of CO2 to CH4 via methanogenesis. Stable carbon isotopes of CO2, CH4 and DIC, together with mol% CO2 show that 4 out of 17 wells sampled in the 2800’ sandstone are still producing injected CO2. The dominant fate of the injected CO2appears to be dissolution in formation fluids and gas-phase trapping. There is some isotopic and geochemical evidence for enhanced microbial methanogenesis in 2 samples; however, the CO2 spread unevenly throughout the reservoir, and thus cannot explain the elevated indicators for methanogenesis observed across the entire field. Vertical migration out of the target 2800’ sandstone reservoir is also apparent in 3 samples located stratigraphically above the target sand. Reservoirs comparable to the 2800’ sandstone, located along a 90-km transect, were also sampled to investigate regional trends in gas composition, brine chemistry and microbial activity. Microbial methane, likely sourced from biodegradation of organic substrates within the formation, was found in all oil fields sampled, while indicators of methanogenesis (e.g. high alkalinity, δ13C-CO2 and δ13C-DIC values) and oxidation of propane were greatest in the Olla Field, likely due to its more ideal environmental conditions (i.e. suitable range of pH, temperature, salinity, sulfate and iron concentrations).

  6. Integrating isotopic tracer techniques with Bayesian modelling for improved assessment and management of sedimentation problems in the Gilgel-Gibe catchment, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dume, Bayu; Amsalu, Nebiyu; Bode, Samuel; Mtei, Kelvin; Munishi, Linus; Navas, Ana; Semmens, Brice; Smith, Hugh; Stock, Brian; Blake, Will; Boeckx, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    receptor cobble bed river after the 2016 rainy season. In order to extract reliable information on the sources of fine sediment delivered into rivers and dam, new isotopic techniques (e.g., Compound Specific Stable Isotopes (CSSIs)) combined with other isotopic techniques (fallout radionuclides) and geochemical tracer properties (via WD-XRF) were employed to quantify sediment sources. Results from this demonstration catchment are discussed in the context of the wider sediment pressures on the Hydro-Electric Power infrastructure of the Gilgel Gibe system.

  7. Using Multi-Isotope Tracer Methods to Understand the Sources of Nitrate in Aerosols, Fog and River Water in Podocarpus National Forest, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, L. A.; Dominguez, G.; Fabian, P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    sulfate and nitrate concentrations in rain and fog water by standard methods to investigate water and nutrient pathways along with data from satellite and ground based remote sensing, observations and numerical models. We hope to pair this with a multi-isotope tracer method and NOAA Hysplit Back trajectories, and satellite imagery for information about the number of fires burning in the region to help identify sources of the high nitrate deposition.

  8. Determining CO2 storage potential during miscible CO2 enhanced oil recovery: Noble gas and stable isotope tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hunt, Andrew; Beebe, Thomas L; Parker, Andrew D; Warwick, Peter D.; Drake, Ronald; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are fueling anthropogenic climate change. Geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs is one option for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere while enhancing oil recovery. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) sites in the United States for permanent CO2 storage, an active multi-stage miscible CO2flooding project in the Permian Basin (North Ward Estes Field, near Wickett, Texas) was investigated. In addition, two major natural CO2 reservoirs in the southeastern Paradox Basin (McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon) were also investigated as they provide CO2 for EOR operations in the Permian Basin. Produced gas and water were collected from three different CO2 flooding phases (with different start dates) within the North Ward Estes Field to evaluate possible CO2 storage mechanisms and amounts of total CO2retention. McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon were sampled for produced gas to determine the noble gas and stable isotope signature of the original injected EOR gas and to confirm the source of this naturally-occurring CO2. As expected, the natural CO2produced from McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon is a mix of mantle and crustal sources. When comparing CO2 injection and production rates for the CO2 floods in the North Ward Estes Field, it appears that CO2 retention in the reservoir decreased over the course of the three injections, retaining 39%, 49% and 61% of the injected CO2 for the 2008, 2010, and 2013 projects, respectively, characteristic of maturing CO2 miscible flood projects. Noble gas isotopic composition of the injected and produced gas for the flood projects suggest no active fractionation, while δ13CCO2 values suggest no active CO2dissolution into formation water, or mineralization. CO2 volumes capable of dissolving in residual formation fluids were also estimated along with the potential to store pure-phase supercritical CO2. Using a combination

  9. The Triple Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric O2 as a Tracer of the Rate of Global Photorespiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angert, A.; Luz, B.; Barkan, E.; Rachmilevitch, S.

    2001-12-01

    The triple isotopic composition of atmospheric O2 is controlled by different signatures of biological and stratospheric processes. Ultraviolet induced interactions in the stratosphere cause an equal depletion of 17O and 18O of atmospheric O2 (mass-independent fractionation). This equal lowering is in contrast to biological processes, and most terrestrial processes, in which the discrimination against 17O is about half of the discrimination against 18O relative to 16O (mass-dependent fractionation). Thus, O2 that was produced by photosynthesis and was affected only by biological consumption will have excess 17O relatively to atmospheric O2 with the same delta 18O. In previous interpretations of changes in the triple isotopic composition, it was assumed that the ratio of discrimination against 17O to the discrimination against 18O is identical for all biological processes. In the present study, we evaluated this ratio, for the first time, for some of the most important oxygen consumption processes: The cytochrome and alternative pathways of dark respiration, and photorespiration. The value for the dark respiration processes was evaluated in dark incubation experiments, and inhibitors were used to separate the two pathways. The value for photorespiration was evaluated from experiments in airtight terrarium containing soil, plant and water. We have found similar discrimination ratio for the cytochrome and alternative pathways, but considerably lower ratio for photorespiration. One important conclusion derived from this finding is that much of the change in the atmospheric 17O depletion during the LGM can be related to an increase in the global rate of photorespiration. The increased rate of photorespiration during the LGM was the result of lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Previous interpretations of the 17O depletion change in the LGM attributed it only to changes in global productivity, and in stratospheric processes. Another important conclusion is that the

  10. Application of isotopic tracers as a tool for understanding hydrodynamic behavior of the highly exploited Diass aquifer system (Senegal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madioune, Diakher Hélène; Faye, Serigne; Orban, Philippe; Brouyère, Serge; Dassargues, Alain; Mudry, Jacques; Stumpp, Christine; Maloszewski, Piotr

    2014-04-01

    The Diass horst aquifer system located 50 km east of Dakar (Senegal) is exploited in two main aquifers covered by a sandy superficial aquifer: the confined/unconfined Palaeocene karstic limestone and the confined Maastrichtian sandstone aquifer underneath. This system has experienced intensive groundwater abstraction during the last 50 years to supply increasing water demand, agricultural and industrial needs. The high abstraction rate from 1989 to 2009 (about 109,000 m3/d) has caused a continuous groundwater level decline (up to 30 m), a modification of the groundwater flow and salinization in parts of the aquifers. The objective of the study is to improve our understanding of the system functioning with regards to high pumping, identify the geochemical reactions that take place in the system, infer origin and timing of recharge by using mainly stable (δ18O, δ2H, 13C) and radioactive (3H and 14C) isotopes. Water types defined in the Piper diagram vary in order of abundance from Ca-HCO3 (65%), Ca/Na-Cl (20%), Na-HCO3 (3%) and Na-Cl (12%). Values of δ18O and δ2H for the superficial aquifer range between -5.8 and -4.2‰ and between -42 and -31‰, respectively. For the Palaeocene aquifer they range from -5.8 to -5.0‰ and from -38 to -31‰, respectively; values in the Maastrichtian aquifer are between -5.9 and -4.3‰ for δ18O and -38 to -26‰ for δ2H. Plotted against the conventional δ18O vs δ2H diagram, data from the upper aquifer exhibit a dispersed distribution with respect to isotopic fractionation while those of the Palaeocene and Maastrichtian aquifers are aligned parallel and slightly below/or on the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) evidencing ancient waters which had evaporated during infiltration. The low tritium (generally <0.7 TU) and 14C (0.7-57.2 pmc) contents indicate predominance of older water being recharged during the Pleistocene and Holocene periods. However, few boreholes which exhibit high tritium (1.2-4.3 TU) and 14C (65.7-70.8 pmc

  11. U-isotopes and (226)Ra as tracers of hydrogeochemical processes in carbonated karst aquifers from arid areas.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, José Luis; Vallejos, Ángela; Cerón, Juan Carlos; Sánchez-Martos, Francisco; Pulido-Bosch, Antonio; Bolívar, Juan Pedro

    2016-07-01

    Sierra de Gádor is a karst macrosystem with a highly complex geometry, located in southeastern Spain. In this arid environment, the main economic activities, agriculture and tourism, are supported by water resources from the Sierra de Gádor aquifer system. The aim of this work was to study the levels and behaviour of some of the most significant natural radionuclides in order to improve the knowledge of the hydrogeochemical processes involved in this groundwater system. For this study, 28 groundwater and 7 surface water samples were collected, and the activity concentrations of the natural U-isotopes ((238)U, (235)U and (234)U) and (226)Ra by alpha spectrometry were determined. The activity concentration of (238)U presented a large variation from around 1.1 to 65 mBq L(-1). Elevated groundwater U concentrations were the result of oxidising conditions that likely promoted U dissolution. The PHREEQC modelling code showed that dissolved U mainly existed as uranyl carbonate complexes. The (234)U/(238)U activity ratios were higher than unity for all samples (1.1-3.8). Additionally, these ratios were in greater disequilibrium in groundwater than surface water samples, the likely result of greater water-rock contact time. (226)Ra presented a wide range of activity concentrations, (0.8 up to about 4 × 10(2) mBq L(-1)); greatest concentrations were detected in the thermal area of Alhama. Most of the samples showed (226)Ra/(234)U activity ratios lower than unity (median = 0.3), likely the result of the greater mobility of U than Ra in the aquifer system. The natural U-isotopes concentrations were strongly correlated with dissolution of sulphate evaporites (mainly gypsum). (226)Ra had a more complex behaviour, showing a strong correlation with water salinity, which was particularly evident in locations where thermal anomalies were detected. The most saline samples showed the lowest (234)U/(238)U activity ratios, probably due to fast uniform bulk mineral dissolution

  12. Biodegradability of algal-derived organic matter in a large artificial lake by using stable isotope tracers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonjung; Lee, Bomi; Hur, Jin; Min, Jun-Oh; Ha, Sun-Yong; Ra, Kongtae; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-05-01

    In order to understand the biodegradability of algal-derived organic matter, biodegradation experiments were conducted with (13)C and (15)N-labeled natural phytoplankton and periphytic algal populations in experimental conditions for 60 days. Qualitative changes in the dissolved organic matter were also determined using parallel factor analysis and the stable carbon isotopic composition of the hydrophobic dissolved organic matter through the experimental period. Although algal-derived organic matter is considered to be easily biodegradable, the initial amounts of total organic carbon newly produced by phytoplankton and periphytic algae remained approximately 16 and 44 % after 60 days, respectively, and about 22 and 43 % of newly produced particulate nitrogen remained. Further, the dissolved organic carbon derived from both algal populations increased significantly after 60 days. Although the dissolved organic matter gradually became refractory, the contributions of the algal-derived organic matter to the dissolved organic matter and hydrophobic dissolved organic matter increased. Our laboratory experimental results suggest that algal-derived organic matter produced by phytoplankton and periphytic algae could contribute significantly to the non-biodegradable organic matter through microbial transformations.

  13. Isotope- and tracer-based measurements of fossil fuel and biospheric carbon dioxide in Paris during winter 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, M.; Schmidt, M.; Delmotte, M.; Colomb, A.; Gros, V.; Janssen, C.; Lehman, S. J.; Mondelain, D.; Perrussel, O.; Ramonet, M.; Xueref-Remy, I.; Bousquet, P.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the mole fraction of the CO2 and its isotopes were performed in Paris during the MEGAPOLI winter campaign (January-February 2010). Radiocarbon (14CO2) measurements were used to identify the relative contributions of 77% CO2 from fossil fuel consumption (CO2ff from liquid and gas combustion) and 23% from biospheric CO2 (CO2 from the use of biofuels and from human and plant respiration: CO2bio). These percentages correspond to average mole fractions of 26.4 ppm and 8.2 ppm for CO2ff and CO2bio, respectively. The 13CO2 analysis indicated that gas and liquid fuel contributed 70% and 30%, respectively, of the CO2 emission from fossil fuel use. Continuous measurements of CO and NOx and the ratios CO/CO2ff and NOx/CO2ff derived from radiocarbon measurements during four days make it possible to estimate the fossil fuel CO2 contribution over the entire campaign. The ratios CO/CO2ff and NOx/CO2ff are functions of air mass origin and exhibited daily ranges of 7.9 to 14.5 ppb ppm-1 and 1.1 to 4.3 ppb ppm-1, respectively. These ratios are sufficiently consistent with different emission inventories given the uncertainties of the different approaches.

  14. Evaluating the role of re-adsorption of dissolved Hg(2+) during cinnabar dissolution using isotope tracer technique.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; Li, Yanbin; Liu, Guangliang; Yang, Guidi; Lagos, Leonel; Yin, Yongguang; Gu, Baohua; Jiang, Guibin; Cai, Yong

    2016-11-05

    Cinnabar dissolution is an important factor controlling mercury (Hg) cycling. Recent studies have suggested the co-occurrence of re-adsorption of the released Hg during the course of cinnabar dissolution. However, there is a lack of feasible techniques that can quantitatively assess the amount of Hg re-adsorbed on cinnabar when investigating cinnabar dissolution. In this study, a new method, based on isotope tracing and dilution techniques, was developed to study the role of Hg re-adsorption in cinnabar dissolution. The developed method includes two key components: (1) accurate measurement of both released and spiked Hg in aqueous phase and (2) estimation of re-adsorbed Hg on cinnabar surface via the reduction in spiked (202)Hg(2+). By adopting the developed method, it was found that the released Hg for trials purged with oxygen could reach several hundred μgL(-1), while no significant cinnabar dissolution was detected under anaerobic condition. Cinnabar dissolution rate when considering Hg re-adsorption was approximately 2 times the value calculated solely with the Hg detected in the aqueous phase. These results suggest that ignoring the Hg re-adsorption process can significantly underestimate the importance of cinnabar dissolution, highlighting the necessity of applying the developed method in future cinnabar dissolution studies.

  15. Evaluating the role of re-adsorption of dissolved Hg2+ during cinnabar dissolution using isotope tracer technique

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Ping; Li, Yanbin; Liu, Guangliang; ...

    2016-06-02

    Cinnabar dissolution is an important factor controlling mercury (Hg) cycling. Recent studies have suggested the co-occurrence of re-adsorption of the released Hg during the course of cinnabar dissolution. However, there is a lack of feasible techniques that can quantitatively assess the amount of Hg re-adsorbed on cinnabar when investigating cinnabar dissolution. In this study, a new method, based on isotope tracing and dilution techniques, was developed to study the role of Hg re-adsorption in cinnabar dissolution. The developed method includes two key components: (1) accurate measurement of both released and spiked Hg in aqueous phase and (2) estimation of re-adsorbedmore » Hg on cinnabar surface via the reduction in spiked 202Hg2+. By adopting the developed method, it was found that the released Hg for trials purged with oxygen could reach several hundred g L–1, while no significant cinnabar dissolution was detected under anaerobic condition. Cinnabar dissolution rate when considering Hg re-adsorption was approximately 2 times the value calculated solely with the Hg detected in the aqueous phase. Lastly, these results suggest that ignoring the Hg re-adsorption process can significantly underestimate the importance of cinnabar dissolution, highlighting the necessity of applying the developed method in future cinnabar dissolution studies.« less

  16. Mechanism of Microwave-Assisted Pyrolysis of Glucose to Furfural Revealed by Isotopic Tracer and Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Bao, Liwei; Shi, Lei; Luo, Hu; Kong, Lingzhao; Li, Shenggang; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2017-08-10

    Glucose labeled with (13) C or (18) O was used to investigate the mechanism of its conversion into furfural by microwaveassisted pyrolysis. The isotopic content and location in furfural were determined from GC-MS and (13) C NMR spectroscopic measurements and data analysis. The results suggest that the carbon skeleton in furfural is mainly derived from C1 to C5 of glucose, whereas the C of the aldehyde group and the O of the furan ring in furfural primarily originate from C1 and O5 of glucose, respectively. For the first time, the source of O in the furan ring of furfural was elucidated directly by experiment, providing results that are consistent with predictions from recent quantum chemical calculations. Moreover, further theoretical calculations indicate substantially lower energy barriers than previous predictions by considering the potential catalytic effect of formic acid, which is one of the pyrolysis products. The catalytic role of formic acid is further confirmed by experimental evidence. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Technical Report: Investigation of Carbon Cycle Processes within a Managed Landscape: An Ecosystem Manipulation and Isotope Tracer Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Griffis, Timothy J; Baker, John M; Billmark, Kaycie

    2009-06-01

    The goal of this research is to provide a better scientific understanding of carbon cycle processes within an agricultural landscape characteristic of the Upper Midwest. This project recognizes the need to study processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales to reduce uncertainty in ecosystem and landscape-scale carbon budgets to provide a sound basis for shaping future policy related to carbon management. Specifically, this project has attempted to answer the following questions: 1. Would the use of cover crops result in a shift from carbon neutral to significant carbon gain in corn-soybean rotation ecosystems of the Upper Midwest? 2. Can stable carbon isotope analyses be used to partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic components? 3. Can this partitioning be used to better understand the fate of crop residues to project changes in the soil carbon reservoir? 4. Are agricultural ecosystems of the Upper Midwest carbon neutral, sinks, or sources? Can the proposed measurement and modeling framework help address landscape-scale carbon budget uncertainties and help guide future carbon management policy?

  18. Novel diagnostics of metabolic dysfunction detected in breath and plasma by selective isotope-assisted labeling.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Julia A; Tonelli, Marco; Haughey, Dermot T; Porter, Warren P; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M

    2012-08-01

    Metabolomics is the study of a unique fingerprint of small molecules present in biological systems under healthy and disease conditions. One of the major challenges in metabolomics is validation of fingerprint molecules to identify specifically perturbed pathways in metabolic aberrations. This step is crucial to the understanding of budding metabolic pathologies and the ability to identify early indicators of common diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. We present a novel approach to diagnosing aberrations in glucose utilization including metabolic pathway switching in a disease state. We used a well-defined prenatally exposed glucocorticoid mouse model that results in adult females with metabolic dysfunction. We applied the complementary technologies of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy to analyze serial plasma samples and real-time breath measurements following selective (13)C-isotope-assisted labeling. These platforms allowed us to trace metabolic markers in whole animals and identify key metabolic pathway switching in prenatally glucocorticoid-treated animals. Total glucose flux is significantly proportionally increased through the major oxidative pathways of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway in the prenatally glucocorticoid-treated animals relative to the control animals. This novel diagnostics approach is fast, noninvasive, and sensitive for determining specific pathway utilization, and provides a direct translational application in the health care field.

  19. Identifying groundwater recharge connections in the Moscow (USA) sub-basin using isotopic tracers and a soil moisture routing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, Jasper; Brooks, Erin; Sánchez-Murillo, Ricardo; Grader, George; Dijksma, Roel

    2016-11-01

    Globally, aquifers are suffering from large abstractions resulting in groundwater level declines. These declines can be caused by excessive abstraction for drinking water, irrigation purposes or industrial use. Basaltic aquifers also face these conflicts. A large flood basalt area (1.1 × 105 km2) can be found in the Northwest of the USA. This Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) consists of a thick series of basalt flows of Miocene age. The two major hydrogeological units (Wanapum and Grand Ronde formations) are widely used for water abstraction. The mean decline over recent decades has been 0.6 m year-1. At present day, abstraction wells are drying up, and base flow of rivers is reduced. At the eastern part of CRBG, the Moscow sub-basin on the Idaho/Washington State border can be found. Although a thick poorly permeable clay layer exists on top of the basalt aquifer, groundwater level dynamics suggest that groundwater recharge occurs at certain locations. A set of wells and springs has been monitored bi-weekly for 9 months for δ18O and δ2H. Large isotopic fluctuations and d-excess values close to the meteoric water line in some wells are indicating that recharge occurs at the granite/basalt interface through lateral flow paths in and below the clay. A soil moisture routing (SMR) model showed that most recharge occurs on the granitic mountains. The basaltic aquifer receives recharge from these sedimentary zones around the granite/basalt interface. The identification of these types of areas is of major importance for future managed-aquifer recharge solutions to solve problems of groundwater depletion.

  20. Determination of the strontium isotope ratio by ICP-MS ginseng as a tracer of regional origin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Min; Lee, Hae-Suk; Lee, Gae-Ho; Han, Jae-Kil

    2008-06-01

    This study presents the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as a method for tracing the regional origin of ginseng. The results of the analysis of 15 Korean ginsengs from three different regions and of 15 Chinese ginsengs from three different regions reveal that the Sr isotope ratios (87)Sr/(86)Sr of the ginsengs differed according to their origin. For pretreatment, the ginseng samples were dried, and were dissolved through microwave digestion, then were each made to amount to 6ml with 11.9M HCl. Rb was then separated from Sr to enable an interference-free measurement through cation exchange chromatography. Six millilitres of the ginseng sample were injected in the column, and 60ml of 11.9M HCl was passed through the column at a 1mlmin(-1) flow rate to separate Rb from Sr. After Rb was eluted completely, 60ml of 5.0M HCl was passed at a 1mlmin(-1) flow rate to collect Sr. In the Sr collection step, the first 10ml portion of 30ml eluate was discarded, and the next 10ml portion was taken and was diluted with de-ionized water at a ratio of 1:3, for analysis purposes. The results of the analysis of 30 ginseng samples revealed that the Chinese ginsengs have an (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio range of 0.672-0.701, and the Korean ginsengs 0.705-0.714. The Korean ginsengs, therefore, have a higher (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio range than the Chinese ginsengs. Of the Korean ginsengs, (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio range of ginsengs from Punggi, Geumsan and Hongcheon are about 0.706-0.709, 0.705-0.706, and 0.710-0.714, respectively. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence for substantial forestry canopy processing of nitrogen deposition using isotopic tracer experiments in low deposition conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraretto, Daniele; Heal, Kate

    2017-04-01

    Temperate forest ecosystems are significant sinks for nitrogen deposition (Ndep) yielding benefits such as protection of waterbodies from eutrophication and enhanced sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Previous studies have shown evidence of biological nitrification and Ndep processing and retention in forest canopies. However, this was reported only at sites with high environmental or experimentally enhanced rates of Ndep (˜18 kg N ha-1 y-1) and has not yet been demonstrated in low Ndep environments. We have used bulk field hydrochemical measurements and labelled isotopic experiments to assess canopy processing in a lower Ndep environment (˜7 kg N ha-1 year-1) at a Sitka spruce plantation in Perthshire, Scotland, representing the dominant tree species (24%) in woodlands in Great Britain. Analysis of 4.5 years of measured N fluxes in rainfall (RF) and fogwater onto the canopy and throughfall (TF) and stemflow (SF) below the canopy suggests strong transformation and uptake of Ndep in the forest canopy. Annual canopy Ndep uptake was ˜4.7 kg N ha-1 year-1, representing 60-76% of annual Ndep. To validate these plot-scale results and track N uptake within the forest canopy in different seasons, double 15N-labelled NH4NO3 (98%) solution was sprayed in summer and winter onto the canopy of three trees at the measurement site. RF, TF and SF samples have been collected and analysed for 15NH4 and 15NO3. Comparing the amount of labelled N recovered under the sample trees with the measured δ15N signal is expected to provide further evidence of the role of forest canopies in actively processing and retaining atmospheric N deposition.

  2. Uranium isotopes in tree bark as a spatial tracer of environmental contamination near former uranium processing facilities in southwest Ohio.

    PubMed

    Conte, Elise; Widom, Elisabeth; Kuentz, David

    2017-09-14

    Inappropriate handling of radioactive waste at nuclear facilities can introduce non-natural uranium (U) into the environment via the air or groundwater, leading to anthropogenic increases in U concentrations. Uranium isotopic analyses of natural materials (e.g. soil, plants or water) provide a means to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic U in areas near sources of radionuclides to the environment. This study examines the utility of two different tree bark transects for resolving the areal extent of U atmospheric contamination using several locations in southwest Ohio that historically processed U. This study is the first to utilize tree bark sampling transects to assess environmental contamination emanating from a nuclear facility. The former Fernald Feed Materials Production Center (FFMPC; Ross, Ohio) produced U metal from natural U ores and recycled nuclear materials from 1951 to 1989. Alba Craft Laboratory (Oxford, Ohio) machined several hundred tons of natural U metal from the FFMPC between 1952 and 1957. The Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Company (HHM; Hamilton, Ohio) intermittently fabricated slugs rolled from natural U metal stock for use in nuclear reactors from 1943 to 1951. We have measured U concentrations and isotope signatures in tree bark sampled along an ∼35 km SSE-NNW transect from the former FFMPC to the vicinity of the former Alba Craft laboratories (transect #1) and an ∼20 km SW- NE (prevailing local wind direction) transect from the FFMPC to the vicinity of the former HHM (transect #2), with a focus on old trees with thick, persistent bark that could potentially record a time-integrated signature of environmental releases of U related to anthropogenic activity. Our results demonstrate the presence of anthropogenic U contamination in tree bark from the entire study area in both transects, with U concentrations within 1 km of the FFMPC up to ∼400 times local background levels of 0.066 ppm. Tree bark samples from the Alba Craft and

  3. Mechanisms linking metabolism of Helicobacter pylori to (18)O and (13)C-isotopes of human breath CO2.

    PubMed

    Som, Suman; De, Anulekha; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Maity, Abhijit; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Pal, Mithun; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Jana, Subhra; Pradhan, Manik

    2015-06-03

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilize glucose during metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms linking to oxygen-18 ((18)O) and carbon-13 ((13)C)-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 during glucose metabolism are poorly understood. Using the excretion dynamics of (18)O/(16)O and (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios of breath CO2, we found that individuals with Helicobacter pylori infections exhibited significantly higher isotopic enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 during the 2h-glucose metabolism regardless of the isotopic nature of the substrate, while no significant enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 were manifested in individuals without the infections. In contrast, the (13)C-isotopic enrichments of breath CO2 were significantly higher in individuals with Helicobacter pylori compared to individuals without infections in response to (13)C-enriched glucose uptake, whereas a distinguishable change of breath (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios was also evident when Helicobacter pylori utilize natural glucose. Moreover, monitoring the (18)O and (13)C-isotopic exchange in breath CO2 successfully diagnosed the eradications of Helicobacter pylori infections following a standard therapy. Our findings suggest that breath (12)C(18)O(16)O and (13)C(16)O(16)O can be used as potential molecular biomarkers to distinctively track the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori and also for eradication purposes and thus may open new perspectives into the pathogen's physiology along with isotope-specific non-invasive diagnosis of the infection.

  4. Beryllium isotopes as tracers of Lake Lisan (last Glacial Dead Sea) hydrology and the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmaker, Reuven; Stein, Mordechai; Beer, Jürg; Christl, Marcus; Fink, David; Lazar, Boaz

    2014-08-01

    The content of the cosmogenic isotope 10Be (t1/2=1.39 Ma) in lacustrine sediments that deposit in lakes with a large watershed is susceptible to both climate and cosmogenic production rate variations. In order to distinguish between these two controls, we measured 10Be and major elements in several sections of the annually laminated sediments of the Lake Lisan (the last Glacial precursor of the Dead Sea) that are composed of detrital sediments and primary (evaporitic) aragonites. The sections were selected to represent regional hydrology and climate as reflected by different lake configurations (level rise, drop and high-stands) and rapid change in the 10Be production rate during the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion. Since the short-lived cosmogenic “sister” of 10Be, 7Be (t1/2=53.3 d) has virtually no recycled component, the recycled 10Be in Lake Lisan detrital sediments was evaluated by measuring 7Be in their modern equivalents: modern flood suspended matter, dust and mud cracks. Our results demonstrate that although the recycled 10Be component is significant, secular variations in the 10Be concentration in Lake Lisan sediments correlate with hydrological variations and geomagnetic excursions. During periods of moderate variations in 10Be production rate, the 10Be concentration in the Lisan detrital sediments positively correlates with lake level, Al + Fe content and the (Al + Fe)/(Ca + Mg) ratio. These correlations suggest that the 10Be is adsorbed on the fine silicate component (probably clays) of the detrital laminae. The fine silicates together with carbonates were transported to Dead Sea drainage basin mainly as airborne dust that after a short residence time was washed into Lake Lisan as flood suspended matter. We suggest that preferential dissolution of carbonates in the flood suspended matter concentrated the residual fine component leading to the positive correlation between 10Be and the (Al + Fe)/(Ca + Mg) ratio. During periods of increased water

  5. Multiple Sulfur Isotopes and Sulfur/Selenium Ratios as Tracers for the Subsurface Biosphere in Altered Oceanic Basalts in the Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxel, O. J.; Ono, S.; Alt, J.; Rumble, D.

    2006-05-01

    Alteration of oceanic crust by seawater is one of the most important processes controlling the global fluxes of elements and microbes likely play a significant role in this process. However, the study of the extent and nature of an active biosphere in the oceanic basement is currently limited due to technical difficulties involved in identifying indigenous microbes. Here, we report S isotope compositions of secondary sulfides in ~170 Ma altered basalt from ODP Site 801 in the western Pacific to assess the potential presence of microbial sulfate reduction within the basaltic oceanic crust. In-situ ion microprobe and bulk rock S isotope analyses show large variations of δ34S values ranging from -45‰ to 1‰. Low δ34S values are consistent with the coupled effects of bacterial reduction of seawater sulfate and disproportionation of S-intermediate species as observed in sedimentary environments. These low and variable δ34S values, together with bulk rock S concentrations ranging from 0.02% up to 1.28% are consistent with a net addition of reduced sulfur in some sections of the crust and constitute clear evidence for microbial activity in basaltic ocean crust. Preliminary results of high-precision multiple-sulfur isotope analyses (33S/32S, and 36S/32S) show at least two generations of secondary pyrite in altered basalt. One is mass- dependent with seawater sulfate, consistent with microbial sulfate reduction under low metabolic rate. Another set of data are consistent with either mixing of these sulfate-derived sulfides with basaltic primary sulfide or with partial oxidation-reprecipitation origin. Since Se substitutes for S in sulfides, S/Se ratios coupled to S isotopes provide further constraints on the source of S (whether remobilization of basaltic sulfide or seawater sulfate). Bacterial sulfate reduction is expected to produce a negative relationship between δ34S and S/Se composition of altered basalt since the S/Se ratio of seawater (~1.6x107) differs

  6. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E

    2016-05-24

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition-including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism-based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the (18)O/(16)O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ∼30-40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered.

  7. Rock magnetic parameters and Sr-Nd isotopes as tracers of continental erosion in Red Sea and in Gulf of Aden during the last 20,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, V.; Bouilloux, A.; Meynadier, L.; Valet, J.-P.; Joron, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Over the past 20,000 years earth climate has undergone important changes that include the transition from the last glaciation to the Holocene with the retreat of glaciers, the modification of atmospheric circulation systems and hydrologic regimes. The production and transport of matter into the ocean was influenced by these variations in climatic conditions. In this study we considered the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden as basins that offer a particular geographic and geological setting and that could be of interest in understanding climate variations and their effects in local erosion. The study of two cores in each side of the Bab-el-Mandeb strait (MD 92-1002 in the Gulf of Aden and MD 92-1008 in the Red Sea) allows the comparison between the open ocean and a more isolated basin. Additionally, this is an intertropical region influenced by African and Asian monsoons whose intensities can vary depending on climate and wind patterns. Erosion and matter transfer from the continents to these basins in response to climate changes can be studied using different approaches including rock magnetism, sedimentology and radiogenic isotopes. Neodymium isotope ratios (expressed here in ɛNd) are a useful tracer of oceanic sediments sources and type of transport and can be used as a signature of specific water masses. The main sources of Nd in oceans are fluvial and eolian inputs originated from the erosion of the continental crust. We measured ɛNd values in both cores of the silicate and carbonate phases, which correspond respectively to detrital and dissolved Nd. We observe differences between the isotopic records of the two basins. In the Gulf of Aden detrital and dissolved ɛNd values show large changes linked to the Glacial-Interglacial transition, in agreement with other studies in the equatorial Indian Ocean. Both signals decreased by 1.5 ɛNd units between the LGM and the Holocene. By comparing these results with those from the Red Sea, we observe a less clear decrease

  8. Integration of stable carbon isotope, microbial community, dissolved hydrogen gas, and 2HH2O tracer data to assess bioaugmentation for chlorinated ethene degradation in fractured rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Révész, Kinga M.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Tiedeman, Claire R.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Goode, Daniel J.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Voytek, Mary A.; Lancombe, Pierre J.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2014-01-01

    An in situ bioaugmentation (BA) experiment was conducted to understand processes controlling microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, NJ. In the BA experiment, an electron donor (emulsified vegetable oil and sodium lactate) and a chloro-respiring microbial consortium were injected into a well in fractured mudstone of Triassic age. Water enriched in 2H was also injected as a tracer of the BA solution, to monitor advective transport processes. The changes in concentration and the δ13C of TCE, cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC); the δ2H of water; changes in the abundance of the microbial communities; and the concentration of dissolved H2 gas compared to pre- test conditions, provided multiple lines of evidence that enhanced biodegradation occurred in the injection well and in two downgradient wells. For those wells where the biodegradation was stimulated intensively, the sum of the molar chlorinated ethene (CE) concentrations in post-BA water was higher than that of the sum of the pre-BA background molar CE concentrations. The concentration ratios of TCE/(cis-DCE + VC) indicated that the increase in molar CE concentration may result from additional TCE mobilized from the rock matrix in response to the oil injection or due to desorption/diffusion. The stable carbon isotope mass-balance calculations show that the weighted average 13C isotope of the CEs was enriched for around a year compared to the background value in a two year monitoring period, an effective indication that dechlorination of VC was occurring. Insights gained from this study can be applied to efforts to use BA in other fractured rock systems. The study demonstrates that a BA approach can substantially enhance in situ bioremediation not only in fractures connected to the injection well, but also in the rock matrix around the well due to processes such as diffusion and desorption. Because the effect of the

  9. Integration of stable carbon isotope, microbial community, dissolved hydrogen gas, and ²HH₂O tracer data to assess bioaugmentation for chlorinated ethene degradation in fractured rocks.

    PubMed

    Révész, Kinga M; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Kirshtein, Julie D; Tiedeman, Claire R; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E; Goode, Daniel J; Shapiro, Allen M; Voytek, Mary A; Lacombe, Pierre J; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2014-01-01

    An in situ bioaugmentation (BA) experiment was conducted to understand processes controlling microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, NJ. In the BA experiment, an electron donor (emulsified vegetable oil and sodium lactate) and a chloro-respiring microbial consortium were injected into a well in fractured mudstone of Triassic age. Water enriched in ²H was also injected as a tracer of the BA solution, to monitor advective transport processes. The changes in concentration and the δ¹³C of TCE, cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC); the δ²H of water; changes in the abundance of the microbial communities; and the concentration of dissolved H₂ gas compared to pre- test conditions, provided multiple lines of evidence that enhanced biodegradation occurred in the injection well and in two downgradient wells. For those wells where the biodegradation was stimulated intensively, the sum of the molar chlorinated ethene (CE) concentrations in post-BA water was higher than that of the sum of the pre-BA background molar CE concentrations. The concentration ratios of TCE/(cis-DCE+VC) indicated that the increase in molar CE concentration may result from additional TCE mobilized from the rock matrix in response to the oil injection or due to desorption/diffusion. The stable carbon isotope mass-balance calculations show that the weighted average ¹³C isotope of the CEs was enriched for around a year compared to the background value in a two year monitoring period, an effective indication that dechlorination of VC was occurring. Insights gained from this study can be applied to efforts to use BA in other fractured rock systems. The study demonstrates that a BA approach can substantially enhance in situ bioremediation not only in fractures connected to the injection well, but also in the rock matrix around the well due to processes such as diffusion and desorption. Because the effect

  10. Stable hydrogen isotopic composition of n-alkanes in atmospheric aerosols as a tracer for the source region of terrestrial plant waxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Kawamura, K.

    2009-12-01

    Studies on molecular composition and compound-specific carbon isotopic ratio (δ13C) of leaf wax n-alkanes in atmospheric aerosols have revealed a long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial higher plant materials over the south Atlantic and western Pacific oceans. However, molecular and δ13C compositions of terrestrial plant waxes in the eastern part of the Asian continent are relatively constant reflecting C3-dominated vegetation, which makes it difficult to specify the source regions of plant materials in the atmospheric aerosols over the East Asia and northwest Pacific regions. Recent observation displays a large (>100‰) spatial variation in hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of rainwater in East Asia. Because δD values of terrestrial higher plants sensitively reflect those of precipitation waters, δD of leaf waxes are expected to provide information on their source region. In this study, we measured the δD of n-alkanes in atmospheric aerosols from Tokyo to better understand the origin of leaf wax n-alkanes in atmospheric aerosols. The δD values of fossil fuel n-alkanes (C21 to C24) in Tokyo aerosols range from -65 to -94‰, which are in a range of those reported in marine crude oils. In contrast, the δD of higher molecular weight (C29 and C31) n-alkanes (δDHMW) show much larger values by ~70‰ than those of fossil fuel n-alkanes. Their values were found to exhibit concomitant variations with carbon preference index (CPI), suggesting that the δDHMW reflect the δD of leaf wax n-alkanes with a variable contribution from fossil fuel n-alkanes. Nevertheless, good positive correlation (r = 0.89, p < 0.01) between the δDHMW and CPI values enable us to remove the contribution of fossil fuels using a mass balance approach by assuming that CPI of fossil fuel is 1 and CPI of plant waxes is 5-15. Calculated n-alkane δD values averaged from -170 to -185‰ for C29 and from -155 to -168‰ for C31. These values are consistent with those reported from

  11. Tracking the metabolic pulse of plant lipid production with isotopic labeling and flux analyses: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Allen, Doug K; Bates, Philip D; Tjellström, Henrik

    2015-04-01

    Metabolism is comprised of networks of chemical transformations, organized into integrated biochemical pathways that are the basis of cellular operation, and function to sustain life. Metabolism, and thus life, is not static. The rate of metabolites transitioning through biochemical pathways (i.e., flux) determines cellular phenotypes, and is constantly changing in response to genetic or environmental perturbations. Each change evokes a response in metabolic pathway flow, and the quantification of fluxes under varied conditions helps to elucidate major and minor routes, and regulatory aspects of metabolism. To measure fluxes requires experimental methods that assess the movements and transformations of metabolites without creating artifacts. Isotopic labeling fills this role and is a long-standing experimental approach to identify pathways and quantify their metabolic relevance in different tissues or under different conditions. The application of labeling techniques to plant science is however far from reaching it potential. In light of advances in genetics and molecular biology that provide a means to alter metabolism, and given recent improvements in instrumentation, computational tools and available isotopes, the use of isotopic labeling to probe metabolism is becoming more and more powerful. We review the principal analytical methods for isotopic labeling with a focus on seminal studies of pathways and fluxes in lipid metabolism and carbon partitioning through central metabolism. Central carbon metabolic steps are directly linked to lipid production by serving to generate the precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis and lipid assembly. Additionally some of the ideas for labeling techniques that may be most applicable for lipid metabolism in the future were originally developed to investigate other aspects of central metabolism. We conclude by describing recent advances that will play an important future role in quantifying flux and metabolic operation in plant

  12. Kinetic and metabolic isotope effects in coral skeletal carbon isotopes: A re-evaluation using experimental coral bleaching as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepf, Verena; Levas, Stephen J.; Rodrigues, Lisa J.; McBride, Michael O.; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D.; Matsui, Yohei; Warner, Mark E.; Hughes, Adam D.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2014-12-01

    Coral skeletal δ13C can be a paleo-climate proxy for light levels (i.e., cloud cover and seasonality) and for photosynthesis to respiration (P/R) ratios. The usefulness of coral δ13C as a proxy depends on metabolic isotope effects (related to changes in photosynthesis) being the dominant influence on skeletal δ13C. However, it is also influenced by kinetic isotope effects (related to calcification rate) which can overpower metabolic isotope effects and thus compromise the use of coral skeletal δ13C as a proxy. Heikoop et al. (2000) proposed a simple data correction to remove kinetic isotope effects from coral skeletal δ13C, as well as an equation to calculate P/R ratios from coral isotopes. However, despite having been used by other researchers, the data correction has never been directly tested, and isotope-based P/R ratios have never been compared to P/R ratios measured using respirometry. Experimental coral bleaching represents a unique environmental scenario to test this because bleaching produces large physiological responses that influence both metabolic and kinetic isotope effects in corals. Here, we tested the δ13C correction and the P/R calculation using three Pacific and three Caribbean coral species from controlled temperature-induced bleaching experiments where both the stable isotopes and the physiological variables that cause isotopic fractionation (i.e., photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification) were simultaneously measured. We show for the first time that the data correction proposed by Heikoop et al. (2000) does not effectively remove kinetic effects in the coral species studied here, and did not improve the metabolic signal of bleached and non-bleached corals. In addition, isotope-based P/R ratios were in poor agreement with measured P/R ratios, even when the data correction was applied. This suggests that additional factors influence δ13C and δ18O, which are not accounted for by the data correction. We therefore recommend that the

  13. Explicit representation of microbes, enzymes, mineral surfaces, and isotopic tracers helps explain soil organic carbon decomposition and priming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Tang, J.; Riley, W. J.; Wallenstein, M. D.; Cotrufo, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Increased plant carbon inputs from CO2 fertilization could accelerate native soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition through the priming effect. Although this increase in SOC turnover rate due to priming might have important consequences for SOC dynamics, there are large uncertainties in the sign and magnitude of priming, as well as large challenges in identifying underlying mechanisms. Current SOC models, mostly based on first-order decomposition representations, do no represent many important biotic and abiotic processes, including the priming effect. The incorporation of explicit biotic and abiotic interactions in modeling SOC decomposition may improve our ability to accurately predict SOC dynamics. In this study, we (1) develop a microbe-explicit SOC decomposition model to simulate SOC turnovers and priming and (2) test the model with a soil incubation experiment with 14C-labeled glucose addition. We report (1) the evolutions of modeled carbon pools, (2) the fate of 14C labeled glucose addition, (3) the model performance compared to observations, (4) the transient behavior of priming components, and (5) an analysis of the effects of carbon input magnitudes and frequencies on the priming effect. Here are some findings from our model-experiment analyses: (1) the inclusion of an extracellular oxidative metabolism (EXOMET) in addition to intracellular microbial respiration helps improve the model performance; (2) priming is dominated by intracellular microbial respiration at the beginning of incubation (~ first 5 days) but later on dominated by EXOMET, which explains observed long-term sustaining priming; (3) the varying magnitudes of glucose addition do not change the magnitude of priming per unit addition; (4) the varying frequencies of glucose addition change the magnitude of priming per unit addition, but with contrast changing patterns for non-steady-state and steady state simulations; (5) constant annual total glucose addition shift the system to another

  14. Discovery and validation of colonic tumor-associated proteins via metabolic labeling and stable isotopic dilution

    PubMed Central

    Huttlin, Edward L.; Chen, Xiaodi; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A.; Hegeman, Adrian D.; Halberg, Richard B.; Harms, Amy C.; Newton, Michael A.; Dove, William F.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    The unique biology of a neoplasm is reflected by its distinct molecular profile compared with normal tissue. To understand tumor development better, we have undertaken a quantitative proteomic search for abnormally expressed proteins in colonic tumors from ApcMin/+ (Min) mice. By raising pairs of Min and wild-type mice on diets derived from natural-abundance or 15N-labeled algae, we used metabolic labeling to compare protein levels in colonic tumor versus normal tissue. Because metabolic labeling allows internal control throughout sample preparation and analysis, technical error is minimized as compared with in vitro labeling. Several proteins displayed altered expression, and a subset was validated via stable isotopic dilution using synthetic peptide standards. We also compared gene and protein expression among tumor and nontumor tissue, revealing limited correlation. This divergence was especially pronounced for species showing biological change, highlighting the complementary perspectives provided by transcriptomics and proteomics. Our work demonstrates the power of metabolic labeling combined with stable isotopic dilution as an integrated strategy for the identification and validation of differentially expressed proteins using rodent models of human disease. PMID:19805096

  15. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition—including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism—based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the 18O/16O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ∼30–40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered. PMID:27170190

  16. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition—including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism—based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the 18O/16O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ˜30-40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered.

  17. Metabolic Flux Elucidation for Large-Scale Models Using 13C Labeled Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Suthers, Patrick F.; Burgard, Anthony P.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Nowroozi, Farnaz; Van Dien, Stephen; Keasling, Jay D.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2007-01-01

    A key consideration in metabolic engineering is the determination of fluxes of the metabolites within the cell. This determination provides an unambiguous description of metabolism before and/or after engineering interventions. Here, we present a computational framework that combines a constraint-based modeling framework with isotopic label tracing on a large-scale. When cells are fed a growth substrate with certain carbon positions labeled with 13C, the distribution of this label in the intracellular metabolites can be calculated based on the known biochemistry of the participating pathways. Most labeling studies focus on skeletal representations of central metabolism and ignore many flux routes that could contribute to the observed isotopic labeling patterns. In contrast, our approach investigates the importance of carrying out isotopic labeling studies using a more comprehensive reaction network consisting of 350 fluxes and 184 metabolites in Escherichia coli including global metabolite balances on cofactors such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. The proposed procedure is demonstrated on an E. coli strain engineered to produce amorphadiene, a precursor to the anti-malarial drug artemisinin. The cells were grown in continuous culture on glucose containing 20% [U-13C]glucose; the measurements are made using GC-MS performed on 13 amino acids extracted from the cells. We identify flux distributions for which the calculated labeling patterns agree well with the measurements alluding to the accuracy of the network reconstruction. Furthermore, we explore the robustness of the flux calculations to variability in the experimental MS measurements, as well as highlight the key experimental measurements necessary for flux determination. Finally, we discuss the effect of reducing the model, as well as shed light onto the customization of the developed computational framework to other systems. PMID:17632026

  18. Stable Isotopic Studies of n-Alkane Metabolism by a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Enrichment Culture

    PubMed Central

    Davidova, Irene A.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Nanny, Mark; Kropp, Kevin G.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to study the metabolism of deuterated n-alkanes (C6 to C12) and 1-13C-labeled n-hexane by a highly enriched sulfate-reducing bacterial culture. All substrates were activated via fumarate addition to form the corresponding alkylsuccinic acid derivatives as transient metabolites. Formation of d14-hexylsuccinic acid in cell extracts from exogenously added, fully deuterated n-hexane confirmed that this reaction was the initial step in anaerobic alkane metabolism. Analysis of resting cell suspensions amended with 1-13C-labeled n-hexane confirmed that addition of the fumarate occurred at the C-2 carbon of the parent substrate. Subsequent metabolism of hexylsuccinic acid resulted in the formation of 4-methyloctanoic acid, and 3-hydroxy-4-methyloctanoic acid was tentatively identified. We also found that 13C nuclei from 1-13C-labeled n-hexane became incorporated into the succinyl portion of the initial metabolite in a manner that indicated that 13C-labeled fumarate was formed and recycled during alkane metabolism. Collectively, the findings obtained with a sulfate-reducing culture using isotopically labeled alkanes augment and support the previously proposed pathway (H. Wilkes, R. Rabus, T. Fischer, A. Armstroff, A. Behrends, and F. Widdel, Arch. Microbiol. 177:235-243, 2002) for metabolism of deuterated n-hexane by a denitrifying bacterium. PMID:16332800

  19. Stable isotopic studies of n-alkane metabolism by a sulfate-reducing bacterial enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Davidova, Irene A; Gieg, Lisa M; Nanny, Mark; Kropp, Kevin G; Suflita, Joseph M

    2005-12-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to study the metabolism of deuterated n-alkanes (C6 to C12) and 1-13C-labeled n-hexane by a highly enriched sulfate-reducing bacterial culture. All substrates were activated via fumarate addition to form the corresponding alkylsuccinic acid derivatives as transient metabolites. Formation of d14-hexylsuccinic acid in cell extracts from exogenously added, fully deuterated n-hexane confirmed that this reaction was the initial step in anaerobic alkane metabolism. Analysis of resting cell suspensions amended with 1-13C-labeled n-hexane confirmed that addition of the fumarate occurred at the C-2 carbon of the parent substrate. Subsequent metabolism of hexylsuccinic acid resulted in the formation of 4-methyloctanoic acid, and 3-hydroxy-4-methyloctanoic acid was tentatively identified. We also found that 13C nuclei from 1-13C-labeled n-hexane became incorporated into the succinyl portion of the initial metabolite in a manner that indicated that 13C-labeled fumarate was formed and recycled during alkane metabolism. Collectively, the findings obtained with a sulfate-reducing culture using isotopically labeled alkanes augment and support the previously proposed pathway (H. Wilkes, R. Rabus, T. Fischer, A. Armstroff, A. Behrends, and F. Widdel, Arch. Microbiol. 177:235-243, 2002) for metabolism of deuterated n-hexane by a denitrifying bacterium.

  20. Food resources of stream macroinvertebrates determined by natural-abundance stable C and N isotopes and a 15N tracer addition

    Treesearch

    Patrick J. Mulholland; Jennifer L. Tank; Diane M. Sanzone; Wilfrid M. Wollheim; Bruce J. Peterson; Jackson R. Webster; Judy L. Meyer

    2000-01-01

    Trophic relationships were examined using natural-abundance 13C and 15N analyses and a 15N-tracer addition experiment in Walker Branch, a 1st-order forested stream in eastern Tennessee. In the 15N-tracer addition experiment, we added 15NH4...

  1. Exotic tracers for atmospheric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, James E.; Ferber, Gilbert J.

    Tracer materials can be injected into the atmosphere to study transport and dispersion processes and to validate air pollution model calculations. Tracers should be inert, non-toxic and harmless to the environment. Tracers for long-range experiments, where dilution is very great, must be measurable at extremely low concentrations, well below the parts per trillion level. Compounds suitable for long-range tracer work are rare and efforts should be made to reserve them for meteorological studies, barring them from commercial uses which would increase atmospheric background concentrations. The use of these exotic tracers, including certain perfluorocarbons and isotopically labelled methanes, should be coordinated within the meteorological community to minimize interferences and maximize research benefits.

  2. A Method for Measuring Metabolism in Sorted Subpopulations of Complex Cell Communities Using Stable Isotope Tracing.

    PubMed

    Roci, Irena; Gallart-Ayala, Hector; Watrous, Jeramie; Jain, Mohit; Wheelock, Craig E; Nilsson, Roland

    2017-02-04

    Mammalian cell types exhibit specialized metabolism, and there is ample evidence that various co-existing cell types engage in metabolic cooperation. Moreover, even cultures of a single cell type may contain cells in distinct metabolic states, such as resting or cycling cells. Methods for measuring metabolic activities of such subpopulations are valuable tools for understanding cellular metabolism. Complex cell populations are most commonly separated using a cell sorter, and subpopulations isolated by this method can be analyzed by metabolomics methods. However, a problem with this approach is that the cell sorting procedure subjects cells to stresses that may distort their metabolism. To overcome these issues, we reasoned that the mass isotopomer distributions (MIDs) of metabolites from cells cultured with stable isotope-labeled nutrients are likely to be more stable than absolute metabolite concentrations, because MIDs are formed over longer time scales and should be less affected by short-term exposure to cell sorting conditions. Here, we describe a method based on this principle, combining cell sorting with liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). The procedure involves analyzing three types of samples: (1) metabolite extracts obtained directly from the complex population; (2) extracts of "mock sorted" cells passed through the cell sorter instrument without gating any specific population; and (3) extracts of the actual sorted populations. The mock sorted cells are compared against direct extraction to verify that MIDs are indeed not altered by the cell sorting procedure itself, prior to analyzing the actual sorted populations. We show example results from HeLa cells sorted according to cell cycle phase, revealing changes in nucleotide metabolism.

  3. IDAWG: Metabolic incorporation of stable isotope labels for quantitative glycomics of cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Ron; Lim, Jae-Min; Atwood, James A.; Angel, Peggi M.; Fang, Meng; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Alvarez-Manilla, Gerardo; Moremen, Kelley W.; York, William S.; Tiemeyer, Michael; Pierce, Michael; Dalton, Stephen; Wells, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Robust quantification is an essential component of comparative –omic strategies. In this regard, glycomics lags behind proteomics. Although various isotope-tagging and direct quantification methods have recently enhanced comparative glycan analysis, a cell culture labeling strategy, that could provide for glycomics the advantages that SILAC provides for proteomics, has not been described. Here we report the development of IDAWG, Isotopic Detection of Aminosugars With Glutamine, for the incorporation of differential mass tags into the glycans of cultured cells. In this method, culture media containing amide-15N-Gln is used to metabolically label cellular aminosugars with heavy nitrogen. Because the amide side chain of Gln is the sole source of nitrogen for the biosynthesis of GlcNAc, GalNAc, and sialic acid, we demonstrate that culturing mouse embryonic stems cells for 72 hours in the presence of amide-15N-Gln media results in nearly complete incorporation of 15N into N-linked and O-linked glycans. The isotopically heavy monosaccharide residues provide additional information for interpreting glycan fragmentation and also allow quantification in both full MS and MS/MS modes. Thus, IDAWG is a simple to implement, yet powerful quantitative tool for the glycomics toolbox. PMID:19449840

  4. Soil carbon dioxide emissions controlled by an extracellular oxidative metabolism identifiable by its isotope signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kéraval, Benoit; Lehours, Anne Catherine; Colombet, Jonathan; Amblard, Christian; Alvarez, Gaël; Fontaine, Sébastien

    2016-11-01

    Soil heterotrophic respiration is a major determinant of the carbon (C) cycle and its interactions with climate. Given the complexity of the respiratory machinery, it is traditionally consi