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Sample records for isotope profiles shed

  1. Polyomavirus detection in multiple sclerosis patients under natalizumab therapy: Profile and frequency of urinary shedding.

    PubMed

    Nali, Luiz Henrique; Fink, Maria Cristina; do Olival, Guilherme S; Moraes, Lenira; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Tilbery, Charles Peter; Vidal, Jose Ernesto; Sumita, Laura Masami; de Oliveira, Augusto C Penalva; Romano, Camila M

    2017-03-01

    Patients undergoing Natalizumab (NTZ) therapy are at risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Besides John Cunningham virus (JCV), BK polyomavirus might represent an additional concern for such patients since it can also infect CNS cells. Currently, data regarding the presence of anti-JCV antibodies added to previous immunosuppressive therapy and prolonged NTZ therapy has been used to classify patients at risk of developing PML. Here, we investigated the profile shedding of JCV and BKV in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients during treatment with NTZ. Serial blood and urine samples from 97 MS patients receiving either NTZ or β-interferon were investigated for polyomavirus shedding. While all blood samples tested negative, 36% of the patients shed polyomavirus in the urine in at least one time point. From these, 21.7%, 9.3%, and 5.1% shed JCV, BKV, and both polyomavirus, respectively. No difference was observed between the rates of urinary shedding of patients treated with NTZ (38.9%) and patients treated with other drugs (34.5%), also no PML event was diagnosed during the follow-up. Therefore, urinary shedding might not be interfered by therapy condition. In our study, we also observed 14/27 (52%) of anti-JCV antibodies prevalence, and nearly half of them (42%) did not present any event of urinary shedding during the follow-up. J. Med. Virol. 89:528-534, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Lead isotope profiling in dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, John; McClure-Brinton, Kimberly; Zyskowski, Justin; Stensen, Lauren; Lehner, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a common cause of heavy metal poisonings in cattle. Sources of Pb on farms include crankcase oil, machinery grease, batteries, plumbing, and paint chips. Consequently, consumption of Pb from these sources may negatively impact animal health and Pb may be inadvertently introduced into the food supply. Therefore, the scope of poisoning incidents must be clearly assessed and sources of intoxication identified and strategies to mitigate exposure evaluated and implemented to prevent future exposures. Stable isotope analysis by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has proven itself of value in forensic investigations. We report on the extension of Pb stable isotope analysis to bovine tissues and profile comparisons with paint chips and soils collected from an affected dairy farm to elucidate the primary source. Pb occurs naturally as four stable isotopes: (204)Pb, (206)Pb, (207)Pb, and (208)Pb. Herein a case is reported to illustrate the use of (207)Pb/(206)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb ratios to link environmental sources of exposure with tissues from a poisoned animal. Chemical Pb profiling provides a valuable tool for field investigative approaches to Pb poisoning in production agriculture and is applicable to subclinical exposures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Isotope and density profile effects on pedestal neoclassical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buller, S.; Pusztai, I.

    2017-10-01

    Cross-field neoclassical transport of heat, particles and momentum is studied in sharp density pedestals, with a focus on isotope and profile effects, using a radially global approach. Global effects—which tend to reduce the peak ion heat flux, and shift it outward—increase with isotope mass for fixed profiles. The heat flux reduction exhibits a saturation with a favorable isotopic trend. A significant part of the heat flux can be convective even in pure plasmas, unlike in the plasma core, and it is sensitive to how momentum sources are distributed between the various species. In particular, if only ion momentum sources are allowed, in global simulations of pure plasmas the ion particle flux remains close to its local value, while this may not be the case for simulations with isotope mixtures or electron momentum sources. The radial angular momentum transport that is a finite orbit width effect, is found to be strongly correlated with heat sources.

  4. Transient soil moisture profile of a water-shedding soil cover in north Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Christopher; Baumgartl, Thomas; Scheuermann, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    In current agricultural and industrial applications, soil moisture determination is limited to point-wise measurements and remote sensing technologies. The former has limitations on spatial resolution while the latter, although has greater coverage in three dimensions, but may not be representative of real-time hydrologic conditions of the substrate. This conference paper discusses the use of elongated soil moisture probes to describe the transient soil moisture profile of water-shedding soil cover trial plots in north Queensland, Australia. Three-metre long flat ribbon cables were installed at designed depths across a soil cover with substrate materials from mining activities comprising of waste rocks and blended tailings. The soil moisture measurement is analysed using spatial time domain reflectometry (STDR) (Scheuermann et al., 2009) Calibration of the flat ribbon cable's soil moisture measurement in waste rocks is undertaken in a glasshouse setting. Soil moisture retention and outflows are monitored at specific time interval by mass balance and water potential measurements. These data sets together with the soil hydrologic properties derived from laboratory and field measurements are used as input in the numerical code on unsaturated flow, Hydrus2D. The soil moisture calculations of the glasshouse calibration using this numerical method are compared with results from the STDR soil moisture data sets. In context, the purpose of the soil cover is to isolate sulphide-rich mine wastes from atmospheric interaction as oxidation and leaching of these materials may result to acid and metalliferous drainage. The long term performance of a soil cover will be described in terms of the quantities and physico-chemical characteristics of its outflows. With the soil moisture probes set at automated and pre-determined measurement time intervals, it is expected to distinguish between macropore and soil moisture flows during high intensity rainfall events and, also continuously

  5. Profiling the gastrointestinal microbiota in response to Salmonella: low versus high Salmonella shedding in the natural porcine host.

    PubMed

    Bearson, Shawn M D; Allen, Heather K; Bearson, Bradley L; Looft, Torey; Brunelle, Brian W; Kich, Jalusa D; Tuggle, Christopher K; Bayles, Darrell O; Alt, David; Levine, Uri Y; Stanton, Thaddeus B

    2013-06-01

    Controlling Salmonella in the food chain is complicated by the ability of Salmonella to colonize livestock without causing clinical symptoms/disease. Salmonella-carrier animals are a significant reservoir for contamination of naïve animals, the environment, and our food supply. Salmonella carriage and shedding in pigs varies greatly both experimentally and on-farm. To investigate the dynamics between the porcine intestinal microbiota and Salmonella shedding, we temporally profiled the microbiota of pigs retrospectively classified as low and high Salmonella-shedders. Fifty-four piglets were collectively housed, fed and challenged with 10(9)Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Bacterial quantitation of Salmonella in swine feces was determined, and total fecal DNA was isolated for 16S rRNA gene sequencing from groups of high-shedder, low-shedder, and non-inoculated pigs (n=5/group; 15 pigs total). Analyses of bacterial community structures revealed significant differences between the microbiota of high-shedder and low-shedder pigs before inoculation and at 2 and 7 days post-inoculation (d.p.i.); microbiota differences were not detected between low-shedder and non-inoculated pigs. Because the microbiota composition prior to Salmonella challenge may influence future shedding status, the "will-be" high and low shedder phylotypes were compared, revealing higher abundance of the Ruminococcaceae family in the "will-be" low shedders. At 2d.p.i., a significant difference in evenness for the high shedder microbiota compared to the other two groups was driven by decreases in Prevotella abundance and increases in various genera (e.g. Catenibacterium, Xylanibacter). By 21 d.p.i., the microbial communities of high-shedder and low-shedder pigs were no longer significantly different from one another, but were both significantly different from non-inoculated pigs, suggesting a similar Salmonella-induced alteration in maturation of the swine intestinal microbiota regardless of

  6. Constraints on post-depositional isotope modifications in East Antarctic firn from analysing temporal changes of isotope profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münch, Thomas; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Freitag, Johannes; Meyer, Hanno; Laepple, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The isotopic composition of water in ice sheets is extensively used to infer past climate changes. In low-accumulation regions their interpretation is, however, challenged by poorly constrained effects that may influence the initial isotope signal during and after deposition of the snow. This is reflected in snow-pit isotope data from Kohnen Station, Antarctica, which exhibit a seasonal cycle but also strong interannual variations that contradict local temperature observations. These inconsistencies persist even after averaging many profiles and are thus not explained by local stratigraphic noise. Previous studies have suggested that post-depositional processes may significantly influence the isotopic composition of East Antarctic firn. Here, we investigate the importance of post-depositional processes within the open-porous firn (≳ 10 cm depth) at Kohnen Station by separating spatial from temporal variability. To this end, we analyse 22 isotope profiles obtained from two snow trenches and examine the temporal isotope modifications by comparing the new data with published trench data extracted 2 years earlier. The initial isotope profiles undergo changes over time due to downward advection, firn diffusion and densification in magnitudes consistent with independent estimates. Beyond that, we find further modifications of the original isotope record to be unlikely or small in magnitude (≪ 1 ‰ RMSD). These results show that the discrepancy between local temperatures and isotopes most likely originates from spatially coherent processes prior to or during deposition, such as precipitation intermittency or systematic isotope modifications acting on drifting or loose surface snow.

  7. Ancient DNA, Strontium isotopes, and osteological analyses shed light on social and kinship organization of the Later Stone Age

    PubMed Central

    Haak, Wolfgang; Brandt, Guido; de Jong, Hylke N.; Meyer, Christian; Ganslmeier, Robert; Heyd, Volker; Hawkesworth, Chris; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Meller, Harald; Alt, Kurt W.

    2008-01-01

    In 2005 four outstanding multiple burials were discovered near Eulau, Germany. The 4,600-year-old graves contained groups of adults and children buried facing each other. Skeletal and artifactual evidence and the simultaneous interment of the individuals suggest the supposed families fell victim to a violent event. In a multidisciplinary approach, archaeological, anthropological, geochemical (radiogenic isotopes), and molecular genetic (ancient DNA) methods were applied to these unique burials. Using autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal markers, we identified genetic kinship among the individuals. A direct child-parent relationship was detected in one burial, providing the oldest molecular genetic evidence of a nuclear family. Strontium isotope analyses point to different origins for males and children versus females. By this approach, we gain insight into a Late Stone Age society, which appears to have been exogamous and patrilocal, and in which genetic kinship seems to be a focal point of social organization. PMID:19015520

  8. Ancient DNA, Strontium isotopes, and osteological analyses shed light on social and kinship organization of the Later Stone Age.

    PubMed

    Haak, Wolfgang; Brandt, Guido; de Jong, Hylke N; Meyer, Christian; Ganslmeier, Robert; Heyd, Volker; Hawkesworth, Chris; Pike, Alistair W G; Meller, Harald; Alt, Kurt W

    2008-11-25

    In 2005 four outstanding multiple burials were discovered near Eulau, Germany. The 4,600-year-old graves contained groups of adults and children buried facing each other. Skeletal and artifactual evidence and the simultaneous interment of the individuals suggest the supposed families fell victim to a violent event. In a multidisciplinary approach, archaeological, anthropological, geochemical (radiogenic isotopes), and molecular genetic (ancient DNA) methods were applied to these unique burials. Using autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal markers, we identified genetic kinship among the individuals. A direct child-parent relationship was detected in one burial, providing the oldest molecular genetic evidence of a nuclear family. Strontium isotope analyses point to different origins for males and children versus females. By this approach, we gain insight into a Late Stone Age society, which appears to have been exogamous and patrilocal, and in which genetic kinship seems to be a focal point of social organization.

  9. Transcriptome profiling of petal abscission zone and functional analysis of AUX/IAA family genes reveal that RhIAA16 is involved in petal shedding in rose

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rose is one of the most important cut flowers among ornamental plants. Rose flower longevity is largely dependent on the timing of petal shedding occurrence. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying petal abscission in rose, we performed transcriptome profiling of the petal abscission zone d...

  10. Multiple Sulfur Isotopes In The Molopo Farms Complex May Shed Light On Mechanisms Of Mineralization In The Bushveld Igneous Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhaes, N.; Feineman, M. D.; Bybee, G. M.; Penniston-Dorland, S.; Farquhar, J.; Draper, C.; Escobar, E.; Gates, M.; Renusch, J.

    2016-12-01

    The 2.056 Ga Bushveld Igneous Complex (BIC) is host to the world's largest layered mafic-ultramafic intrusion, the Rustenburg Layered Suite (RLS), which has >80% of the world's known platinum group elements (PGEs) reserves. The BIC results from large-volume melt extraction from the mantle and may provide insight into the formation and compositional evolution of continental crust. Despite its scientific and economic importance, the total magma volume is poorly known. This is in part because the relationship between the BIC and nearby intrusive bodies of similar age remains uncertain. In this study, we present major element, trace element, and multiple sulfur isotope data for a suite of samples spanning the stratigraphy of the Molopo Farms Complex (MFC), a layered mafic intrusion located 200 km west of the Far Western Limb of the RLS. Similar to the RLS, the MFC contains an ultramafic lower zone, a mafic main zone, and an incompatible element enriched granophyric unit near the contact with the roof rocks. However, it has no Critical Zone, and an insignificant concentration of PGEs. Since the PGEs in the RLS are primarily hosted in sulfides, it has been inferred that the mineralization is closely linked to the source and behavior of sulfur. The RLS displays mass independent fractionation of sulfur (S-MIF; denoted by ∆33S), which suggests incorporation of surface-derived materials into the magma prior to or during emplacement. Multiple sulfur isotopes of MFC samples also show non-zero mean ∆33S (0.04±0.02‰, 1sd), although it is lower than the mean for the RLS (0.11±0.02‰, 1sd). Similarities in trace element ratios between the MFC mafic zone and RLS marginal zone suggest the same parental magma contributed to both intrusions. Taken together, these results suggest that both the RLS and the MFC started with similar magmatic compositions, and while both assimilated sulfur with an Archean surface-derived component, the RLS received more of this component in

  11. Addressing the current bottlenecks of metabolomics: Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis™, an isotopic-labeling technique for accurate biochemical profiling.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Felice A; Beecher, Chris

    2012-09-01

    Metabolomics or biochemical profiling is a fast emerging science; however, there are still many associated bottlenecks to overcome before measurements will be considered robust. Advances in MS resolution and sensitivity, ultra pressure LC-MS, ESI, and isotopic approaches such as flux analysis and stable-isotope dilution, have made it easier to quantitate biochemicals. The digitization of mass spectrometers has simplified informatic aspects. However, issues of analytical variability, ion suppression and metabolite identification still plague metabolomics investigators. These hurdles need to be overcome for accurate metabolite quantitation not only for in vitro systems, but for complex matrices such as biofluids and tissues, before it is possible to routinely identify biomarkers that are associated with the early prediction and diagnosis of diseases. In this report, we describe a novel isotopic-labeling method that uses the creation of distinct biochemical signatures to eliminate current bottlenecks and enable accurate metabolic profiling.

  12. Effect of shed type and sunflower supplementation of fatty acid profile and nutritional implications in lamb tissues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Meat from Small Tail Han sheep is an important dietary component of people in western China. Five-mo-old Small Tail Han ewe lambs (n=40) were used to study the effect of sunflower seed (160 g/d) and protected fat (30 and 60 g/d) supplementation and type of shelter (conventional shed vs. greenhouse s...

  13. Integrating comparative expression profiling data with association of SNPs to Salmonella shedding for improved food safety and porcine disease resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella in swine is a major food safety problem, as a majority of U.S. swine herds are Salmonella-positive. Salmonella can be shed from colonized swine and contaminate a) neighboring pigs; b) slaughter plants and pork products; c) edible crops when swine manure is used as a fertilizer; and d) wat...

  14. Inverse methods for estimating primary input signals from time-averaged isotope profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Cerling, Thure E.; Schuster, Gerard T.; Robinson, Todd F.; Roeder, Beverly L.; Krueger, Stephen K.

    2005-08-01

    Mammalian teeth are invaluable archives of ancient seasonality because they record along their growth axes an isotopic record of temporal change in environment, plant diet, and animal behavior. A major problem with the intra-tooth method is that intra-tooth isotope profiles can be extremely time-averaged compared to the actual pattern of isotopic variation experienced by the animal during tooth formation. This time-averaging is a result of the temporal and spatial characteristics of amelogenesis (tooth enamel formation), and also results from laboratory sampling. This paper develops and evaluates an inverse method for reconstructing original input signals from time-averaged intra-tooth isotope profiles. The method requires that the temporal and spatial patterns of amelogenesis are known for the specific tooth and uses a minimum length solution of the linear system Am = d, where d is the measured isotopic profile, A is a matrix describing temporal and spatial averaging during amelogenesis and sampling, and m is the input vector that is sought. Accuracy is dependent on several factors, including the total measurement error and the isotopic structure of the measured profile. The method is shown to accurately reconstruct known input signals for synthetic tooth enamel profiles and the known input signal for a rabbit that underwent controlled dietary changes. Application to carbon isotope profiles of modern hippopotamus canines reveals detailed dietary histories that are not apparent from the measured data alone. Inverse methods show promise as an effective means of dealing with the time-averaging problem in studies of intra-tooth isotopic variation.

  15. Isotopic ecology and dietary profiles of Liberian chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Smith, Catherine C; Morgan, Michèle E; Pilbeam, David

    2010-01-01

    An extensive suite of isotopic data (delta(13)C, delta(15)N, and delta(18)O) from enamel apatite and bone collagen of adult male and female wild chimpanzees establishes baseline values for Pan troglodytes verus in a primary rainforest setting. The Ganta chimpanzee sample derives from a restricted region in northern Liberia. Diet is examined using stable light isotopes at three life stages-infant, young juvenile, and adult-and developmental differences are investigated within and between individual males and females. The isotopic data are very homogeneous with few exceptions. Juvenile females show consistent enrichment in (13)C relative to infants, while juvenile males do not. These data suggest that age at weaning may be more variable for male offspring who survive to adulthood than for female offspring. Alternatively, or additionally, the weaning diet of males and females may differ, with greater consumption of technologically extracted insects and/or nuts by young females. Metabolic differences, including growth and hormone-mediated responses, may also contribute to the observed variation. The Ganta chimpanzee data offer an independent and objective line of evidence to primatologists interested in the dietary strategies of the great apes and to paleoanthropologists seeking comparative models for reconstructing early hominin subsistence patterns. Despite the high diversity of dietary items consumed by chimpanzees, isotopic signatures of chimpanzees from a primary rainforest setting exhibit narrow ranges of variation similar to chimpanzees in more open habitats.

  16. Transcriptome Profiling of Petal Abscission Zone and Functional Analysis of an Aux/IAA Family Gene RhIAA16 Involved in Petal Shedding in Rose

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuerong; Liu, Chun; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Haiqian; Liang, Yue; Ma, Nan; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Ma, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Roses are one of the most important cut flowers among ornamental plants. Rose flower longevity is largely dependent on the timing of petal shedding occurrence. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying petal abscission in rose, we performed transcriptome profiling of the petal abscission zone during petal shedding using Illumina technology. We identified a total of 2592 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs) during rose petal shedding. Gene ontology term enrichment and pathway analysis revealed that major biochemical pathways the DTGs were involved in included ethylene biosynthesis, starch degradation, superpathway of cytosolic glycolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase and TCA cycle, photorespiration and the lactose degradation III pathway. This suggests that alterations in carbon metabolism are an important part of rose petal abscission. Among these DTGs, approximately 150 genes putatively encoding transcription factors were identified in rose abscission zone. These included zinc finger, WRKY, ERF, and Aux/IAA gene families, suggesting that petal abscission involves complex transcriptional reprogramming. Approximately 108 DTGs were related to hormone pathways, of which auxin and ethylene related DTGs were the largest groups including 52 and 41 genes, respectively. These also included 12 DTGs related to gibberellin and 6 DTGs in jasmonic acid pathway. Surprisingly, no DTGs involved in the biosynthesis/signaling of abscisic acid, cytokinin, brassinosteroid, and salicylic acid pathways were detected. Moreover, among DTGs related to auxin, we identified an Aux/IAA gene RhIAA16 that was up-regulated in response to petal shedding. Down-regulation of RhIAA16 by virus-induced gene silencing in rose promoted petal abscission, suggesting that RhIAA16 plays an important role in rose petal abscission. PMID:27695465

  17. Transcriptome Profiling of Petal Abscission Zone and Functional Analysis of an Aux/IAA Family Gene RhIAA16 Involved in Petal Shedding in Rose.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuerong; Liu, Chun; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Haiqian; Liang, Yue; Ma, Nan; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Ma, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Roses are one of the most important cut flowers among ornamental plants. Rose flower longevity is largely dependent on the timing of petal shedding occurrence. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying petal abscission in rose, we performed transcriptome profiling of the petal abscission zone during petal shedding using Illumina technology. We identified a total of 2592 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs) during rose petal shedding. Gene ontology term enrichment and pathway analysis revealed that major biochemical pathways the DTGs were involved in included ethylene biosynthesis, starch degradation, superpathway of cytosolic glycolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase and TCA cycle, photorespiration and the lactose degradation III pathway. This suggests that alterations in carbon metabolism are an important part of rose petal abscission. Among these DTGs, approximately 150 genes putatively encoding transcription factors were identified in rose abscission zone. These included zinc finger, WRKY, ERF, and Aux/IAA gene families, suggesting that petal abscission involves complex transcriptional reprogramming. Approximately 108 DTGs were related to hormone pathways, of which auxin and ethylene related DTGs were the largest groups including 52 and 41 genes, respectively. These also included 12 DTGs related to gibberellin and 6 DTGs in jasmonic acid pathway. Surprisingly, no DTGs involved in the biosynthesis/signaling of abscisic acid, cytokinin, brassinosteroid, and salicylic acid pathways were detected. Moreover, among DTGs related to auxin, we identified an Aux/IAA gene RhIAA16 that was up-regulated in response to petal shedding. Down-regulation of RhIAA16 by virus-induced gene silencing in rose promoted petal abscission, suggesting that RhIAA16 plays an important role in rose petal abscission.

  18. Isotopic and elemental profiling of ammonium nitrate in forensic explosives investigations.

    PubMed

    Brust, Hanneke; Koeberg, Mattijs; van der Heijden, Antoine; Wiarda, Wim; Mügler, Ines; Schrader, Marianne; Vivo-Truyols, Gabriel; Schoenmakers, Peter; van Asten, Arian

    2015-03-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is frequently encountered in explosives in forensic casework. It is widely available as fertilizer and easy to implement in explosive devices, for example by mixing it with a fuel. Forensic profiling methods to determine whether material found on a crime scene and material retrieved from a suspect arise from the same source are becoming increasingly important. In this work, we have explored the possibility of using isotopic and elemental profiling to discriminate between different batches of AN. Variations within a production batch, between different batches from the same manufacturer, and between batches from different manufacturers were studied using a total of 103 samples from 19 different fertilizer manufacturers. Isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) was used to analyze AN samples for their (15)N and (18)O isotopic composition. The trace-elemental composition of these samples was studied using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). All samples were analyzed for the occurrence of 66 elements. 32 of these elements were useful for the differentiation of AN samples. These include magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), iron (Fe) and strontium (Sr). Samples with a similar elemental profile may be differentiated based on their isotopic composition. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used to calculate likelihood ratios and demonstrated the power of combining elemental and isotopic profiling for discrimination between different sources of AN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Copper and iron isotope fractionation during weathering and pedogenesis: Insights from saprolite profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Li, Shuguang; Wei, Gang-Jian; Ma, Jing-Long; Li, Dandan

    2014-12-01

    Iron and copper isotopes are useful tools to track redox transformation and biogeochemical cycling in natural environment. To study the relationships of stable Fe and Cu isotopic variations with redox regime and biological processes during weathering and pedogenesis, we carried out Fe and Cu isotope analyses for two sets of basalt weathering profiles (South Carolina, USA and Hainan Island, China), which formed under different climatic conditions (subtropical vs. tropical). Unaltered parent rocks from both profiles have uniform δ56Fe and δ65Cu values close to the average of global basalts. In the South Carolina profile, δ56Fe values of saprolites vary from -0.01‰ to 0.92‰ in the lower (reduced) part and positively correlate with Fe3+/ΣFe (R2 = 0.90), whereas δ65Cu values are almost constant. By contrast, δ56Fe values are less variable and negatively correlate with Fe3+/ΣFe (R2 = 0.88) in the upper (oxidized) part, where large (4.85‰) δ65Cu variation is observed with most samples enriched in heavy isotopes. In the Hainan profile formed by extreme weathering under oxidized condition, δ56Fe values vary little (0.05-0.14‰), whereas δ65Cu values successively decrease from 0.32‰ to -0.12‰ with depth below 3 m and increase from -0.17‰ to 0.02‰ with depth above 3 m. Throughout the whole profile, δ65Cu positively correlate with Cu concentration and negatively correlate with the content of total organic carbon (TOC). Overall, the contrasting Fe isotopic patterns under different redox conditions suggest redox states play the key controls on Fe mobility and isotope fractionation. The negative correlation between δ56Fe and Fe3+/ΣFe in the oxidized part of the South Carolina profile may reflect addition of isotopically light Fe. This is demonstrated by leaching experiments, which show that Fe mineral pools extracted by 0.5 N HCl, representing poorly-crystalline Fe (hydr)-oxides, are enriched in light Fe isotopes. The systematic Cu isotopic variation

  20. Limited V and Fe isotopic fractionations in a lateritic profile formed by extremely weathered basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Y.; Gong, Y.; Wu, F.; Huang, F.; Yu, H.

    2016-12-01

    Vanadium is a multivalent element (+2, +3, +4, +5) with two stable isotopes (50V and 51V). Theoretical calculations predicted significant fractionation of V isotopes during redox reactions, which indicates the potential application of V isotopes to tracking the redox variation of geochemical processes [1]. To investigate the transportation mechanism of V and Fe during extreme weathering and pedogenesis process, we analyzed V and Fe isotopes of soil samples from a lateritic profile in Zhanjiang, South China. The δ51V values of laterites range from -0.77 ± 0.06‰ to -0.94 ± 0.05‰, indistinguishable from the parent basalt rock with a δ51V value of -0.79 ± 0.06‰. The δ56Fe values of lateritic soils and base rock basalts are within a narrow range (0.04 ± 0.03‰ to 0.14 ± 0.02‰). Contrast with the limited V and Fe isotopic fractionations, the whole profile exhibits significant V and Fe loss, indicating that losing V and Fe during strong oxidization weathering of basalts does not significantly fractionate V and Fe isotopes in laterites. The possible explanation is that the the primary minerals may be weathered layer by layer during laterite formation, and V and Fe of each layer could be completely oxidized, forming secondary minerals without significant fractionation of V and Fe isotopes. The good correlation between V and Fe contents further suggests that after weathering of the basalts, V species with pentavalence were probably completely adsorbed onto colloidal of iron (hydro)oxides, and transported by aqueous solution downward. This study provides new insights into the behaviour of V isotopes during extreme weathering processes, which is helpful to understand the geochemical cycle of V on the Earth's environment. [1] Wu et al., (2015) EPSL, 426, 216-224

  1. Trace element profiles in modern horse molar enamel as tracers of seasonality: Evidence from micro-XRF, LA-ICP-MS and stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Winter, Niels; Goderis, Steven; van Malderen, Stijn; Vanhaecke, Frank; Claeys, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    A combination of laboratory micro-X-ray Fluorescence (μXRF) and stable carbon and oxygen isotope analysis shows that trace element profiles from modern horse molars reveal a seasonal pattern that co-varies with seasonality in the oxygen isotope records of enamel carbonate from the same teeth. A combination of six cheek teeth (premolars and molars) from the same individual yields a seasonal isotope and trace element record of approximately three years recorded during the growth of the molars. This record shows that reproducible measurements of various trace element ratios (e.g., Sr/Ca, Zn/Ca, Fe/Ca, K/Ca and S/Ca) lag the seasonal pattern in oxygen isotope records by 2-3 months. Laser Ablation-ICP-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis on a cross-section of the first molar of the same individual is compared to the bench-top tube-excitation μXRF results to test the robustness of the measurements and to compare both methods. Furthermore, trace element (e.g. Sr, Zn, Mg & Ba) profiles perpendicular to the growth direction of the same tooth, as well as profiles parallel to the growth direction are measured with LA-ICP-MS and μXRF to study the internal distribution of trace element ratios in two dimensions. Results of this extensive complementary line-scanning procedure shows the robustness of state of the art laboratory micro-XRF scanning for the measurement of trace elements in bioapatite. The comparison highlights the advantages and disadvantages of both methods for trace element analysis and illustrates their complementarity. Results of internal variation within the teeth shed light on the origins of trace elements in mammal teeth and their potential use for paleo-environmental reconstruction.

  2. Historical profiling of maize duplicate genes sheds light on the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in grasses.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Ming; Chang, Chia-Lin; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Shih, Arthur Chun-Chieh

    2013-02-01

    C4 plants evolved from C3 plants through a series of complex evolutionary steps. On the basis of the evolution of key C4 enzyme genes, the evolution of C4 photosynthesis has been considered a story of gene/genome duplications and subsequent modifications of gene function. If whole-genome duplication has contributed to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis, other genes should have been duplicated together with these C4 genes. However, which genes were co-duplicated with C4 genes and whether they have also played a role in C4 evolution are largely unknown. In this study, we developed a simple method to characterize the historical profile of the paralogs of a gene by tracing back to the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the gene and its paralog(s) and then counting the number of paralogs at each MRCA. We clustered the genes into clusters with similar duplication profiles and inferred their functional enrichments. Applying our method to maize, a familiar C4 plant, we identified many genes that show similar duplication profiles with those of the key C4 enzyme genes and found that the functional preferences of the C4 gene clusters are not only similar to those identified by an experimental approach in a recent study but also highly consistent with the functions required for the C4 photosynthesis evolutionary model proposed by S.F. Sage. Some of these genes might have co-evolved with the key C4 enzyme genes to increase the strength of C4 photosynthesis. Moreover, our results suggested that most key C4 enzyme genes had different origins and have undergone a long evolutionary process before the emergence of C4 grasses (Andropogoneae), consistent with the conclusion proposed by previous authors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydrogen isotopic profile in the characterization of sugars. Influence of the metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ben-Li; Billault, Isabelle; Li, Xiaobao; Mabon, Françoise; Remaud, Gérald; Martin, Maryvonne L

    2002-03-13

    The site-specific natural hydrogen isotope ratios of plant metabolites determined by 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR method) can provide powerful criteria for inferring mechanistic and environmental effects on biosynthetic pathways. This work examines the potential of isotopic profiles for the main constituents of carbohydrates, glucose and fructose, to distinguish different photosynthetic pathways. An appropriate analytical strategy, involving three suitable isotopic probes, has been elaborated with a view to measuring simultaneously, in conditions devoid of isotopic perturbations, all (or nearly all) of the carbon-bound hydrogen isotope ratios. It is shown that the type of photosynthetic metabolism, either C3 (sugar beet, orange, and grape), C4 (maize and sugar cane), or CAM (pineapple), and the physiological status of the precursor plant exert strong influences on the deuterium distribution in the sugar molecules. Consequently, this isotopic fingerprint may be a rich source of information for the comparison of mechanisms in metabolic pathways. In addition, it can provide complementary criteria to ethanol as a probe for the origin of sugars.

  4. Stable isotope coded derivatizing reagents as internal standards in metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Bruheim, Per; Kvitvang, Hans Fredrik Nyvold; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2013-06-28

    Gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometric (MS) detection have become the two main techniques for the analysis of metabolite pools (i.e. Metabolomics). These technologies are especially suited for Metabolite Profiling analysis of various metabolite groups due to high separation capabilities of the chromatographs and high sensitivity of the mass analysers. The trend in quantitative Metabolite Profiling is to add more metabolites and metabolite groups in a single method. This should not be done by compromising the analytical precision. Mass spectrometric detection comes with certain limitations, especially in the quantitative aspects as standards are needed for conversion of ion abundance to concentration and ionization efficiencies are directly dependent on eluent conditions. This calls for novel strategies to counteract all variables that can influence the quantitative precision. Usually, internal standards are used to correct any technical variation. For quantitation of single or just a few analytes this can be executed with spiking isotopically labeled standards. However, for more comprehensive analytical tasks, e.g. profiling tens or hundreds of analytes simultaneously, this strategy becomes expensive and in many cases isotopically labeled standards are not available. An alternative is to introduce a derivatizing step where the sample is derivatized with naturally labeled reagent, while a standard solution is separately derivatized with isotopically labeled reagent and spiked into the sample solution prior to analysis. This strategy, named isotope coded derivatization - ICD, is attractive in the emerging field of quantitative Metabolite Profiling where current protocols can easily comprise over hundred metabolites. This review provides an overview of isotopically labeled derivatizing reagents that have been developed for important metabolite groups with the aim to improve analytical performance and precision.

  5. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Martin T.; Markert, Sebastian M.; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  6. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Martin T.; Markert, Sebastian M.; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology. PMID:27796326

  7. High-resolution profiling of the stable isotopes of water in unsaturated coal waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, S. Lee; Hendry, M. Jim; Carey, Sean K.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of the rate of water migration through unsaturated mine waste rock dumps is an essential element in assessing the chemical loading from these landforms; yet our understanding of how water moves into, through and out of waste rock is incomplete. To further understand the rates and magnitude of percolation through waste rock, deep high-resolution (every 0.1-4.5 m) depth profiles of the stable isotopes of water (δ2H and δ18O) at two coal waste rock dumps and a natural alluvial deposit down-gradient of one of the dumps were collected in the Elk Valley, British Columbia, Canada. The profiles were generated using vapor equilibrium techniques applied to continuous core samples collected using dry sonic drilling methods. Elevated core temperatures (up to 80 °C) were measured during sonic coring. The isotopic values of pore waters measured in the core samples were corrected for water loss to the atmosphere attributed to the elevated core temperatures. The average isotopic composition of the core samples were compared to water collected from rock drains discharging from the base of the dumps. The results indicate that high-resolution profiles of δ2H and δ18O can be measured to depths of 86 m in coal waste rock dumps and, based on the seasonal cycles in the isotopic composition of recharging water, can be used to characterize the migration of recharge water within these dumps. These profiles also suggest that recharge into these dumps occurs from both rain as well as snow melt and may be as high as 400-600 mm/yr (60-75% of annual precipitation). Combined with the relatively low volumetric water contents of these dumps (5-10%) the rates of water migration through the dumps are tens of meters each year.

  8. Inferring Paleoenvironments Using Seasonal Isotope and Trace-Metal Profiles of Serially-Sampled Gastropods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, K.; Sosdian, S.; Grossman, E. L.; Lear, C.; Rosenthal, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Early Cenozoic (e.g., Eocene-Oligocene), foraminiferal records of tropical SSTs are controversial, due to the possible alteration of the shells' isotopic and elemental composition by diagenetic recrystalization. Here we test the fidelity of shallow water molluskan skeletons as an alternative archive of tropical SSTs. Because of the long life-spans and rapid growth of mollusks, mollusk shells provide excellent records for Cenozoic seasonality, provided that seasonal variations in the isotopic and trace-metal composition of the carbonate shells reflect the ambient temperature and δ 18O of the water in which the organisms grew. To evaluate the fidelity of gastropod skeletons as recorders of such paleoenvironmental information, we performed isotopic and trace-metal analyses on specimens of Conus ermineus from the Gulf of Mexico. Three adult specimens were collected at Stetson Bank in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary from depths of 21-24 m. Two were sampled alive and remain in aquaria. The shells were milled parallel to growth banding to produce time series profiles along the axes of growth. These profiles were compared with temperature and salinity records from water quality data recorders at the reef surface for the later part of the growth period. For the earlier growth record, we estimated 24 m temperatures using records from nearby surface data buoys. The δ 18O and Sr/Ca profiles covary in a saw-tooth pattern, with a high degree of coherency. Such saw-tooth patterns are often interpreted as resulting from slower growth rates during summer and winter months. However, environmental records show that temperatures at 24 m change in a pattern similar to that seen in the profiles, with summer warming at 24 m lagging behind warming at the surface by up to three months. This asymmetric pattern of temperature change suggests that the shapes of isotope and trace-metal profiles may be dominantly controlled by local hydrography, rather than by intra

  9. Plutonium isotopes offer an alternative approach to establishing chronological profiles in coarse sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pondell, C.; Kuehl, S. A.; Canuel, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    There are several methodologies used to determine chronologies for sediments deposited within the past 100 years, including 210Pb and 137Cs radioisotopes and organic and inorganic contaminants. These techniques are quite effective in fine sediments, which generally have a high affinity for metals and organic compounds. However, the application of these chronological tools becomes limited in systems where coarse sediments accumulate. Englebright Lake is an impoundment in northern California where sediment accumulation is characterized by a combination of fine and coarse sediments. This combination of sediment grain size complicated chronological analysis using the more traditional 137Cs chronological approach. This study established a chronology of these sediments using 239+240Pu isotopes. While most of the 249+240Pu activity was measured in the fine grain size fraction (<63 microns), up to 25% of the plutonium activity was detected in the coarse size fractions of sediments from Englebright Lake. Profiles of 239+240Pu were similar to available 137Cs profiles, verifying the application of plutonium isotopes for determining sediment chronologies and expanding the established geochronology for Englebright Lake sediments. This study of sediment accumulation in Englebright Lake demonstrates the application of plutonium isotopes in establishing chronologies in coarse sediments and highlights the potential for plutonium to offer new insights into patterns of coarse sediment accumulation.

  10. Chernobyl as a population sink for barn swallows: tracking dispersal using stable-isotope profiles.

    PubMed

    Møller, A P; Hobson, K A; Mousseau, T A; Peklo, A M

    2006-10-01

    Stable-isotope profiles of feathers can reveal the location or habitat used by individual birds during the molting period. Heterogeneity in isotope profiles will reflect heterogeneity in molt locations, but also heterogeneity in breeding locations, because spatial heterogeneity in molt locations will be congruent with spatial heterogeneity in breeding locations in species with high connectivity between breeding and molting sites. We used information on the congruence of spatial heterogeneity in molt and breeding location to study population processes in Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica) from a region. near Chernobyl, Ukraine, that has been radioactively contaminated since 1986; from an uncontaminated control region near Kanev, Ukraine; and from a sample of pre-1986 museum specimens used to investigate patterns prior to the nuclear disaster at Chernobyl, from both regions. Previous studies have revealed severe reductions in Barn Swallow reproductive performance and adult survival in the Chernobyl region, implying that the population is a sink and unable to sustain itself. Female Barn Swallows are known to disperse farther from their natal site than males, implying that female stable-isotope profiles should tend to be more variable than profiles of males. However, if the Barn Swallows breeding at Chernobyl are not self-sustaining, we would expect males there also to originate from a larger area than males from the control region. We found evidence that the sample of adult Barn Swallows from the Chernobyl region was more isotopically heterogeneous than the control sample, as evidenced from a significant correlation between feather sigma13C and sigma15N values in the control region, but not in the Chernobyl region. Furthermore, we found a significant difference in feather sigma15N values between regions and periods (before and after 1986). When we compared the variances in sigma13C values of feathers, we found that variances in both sexes from post-1986 samples from

  11. Source Attribution of Cyanides Using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S; Fraga, Carlos G; Carman, April J; Moran, James J

    2016-02-02

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs), such as cyanides, are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. Herein, stocks of KCN and NaCN were analyzed for trace anions by high performance ion chromatography (HPIC), carbon stable isotope ratio (δ(13)C) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The collected analytical data were evaluated using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least-squares (iPLS), genetic algorithm-based partial least-squares (GAPLS), partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminant analysis (SVMDA). HCA of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported countries of origin resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries each having one known solid cyanide factory: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). Classification errors for two validation studies using anion impurity profiles collected over five years on different instruments were as low as zero for KNN and SVMDA, demonstrating the excellent reliability associated with using anion impurities for matching a cyanide sample to its factory using our current cyanide stocks. Variable selection methods reduced errors for those classification methods having errors greater than zero; iPLS-forward selection and F-ratio typically provided the lowest errors. Finally, using anion profiles to classify cyanides to a specific stock

  12. Molecular and Stable Carbon Isotope Composition of Organic Compounds from Particles Sampled from the Lower Fraser Valley, BC Urban and Regional Air Shed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiticar, M. J.; Gray, S. L.

    2001-12-01

    This study examines the character of specific non-volatile organic compounds (N-VOCs) extracted from total suspended particulates. Aerosols are collected on filters by HiVol samplers on monthly intervals, at well-characterized meteorological sites throughout the Lower Fraser Valley. Filters are solvent-extracted , then separated into different compound classes by Silica-gel Chromatography. Selected fractions are analysed for their individual compound molecular compositions by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) and by Continuous Flow-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CF-IRMS) for their stable carbon isotope ratio. The purpose is to identify spatial and temporal variations in N-VOCs, with the long-term goal of understanding their sources, transport processes and atmospheric chemistry. This Health Canada, Toxic Substance Research Initiative offers insights into the levels and signatures of N-VOCs exposed to humans in congested urban settings. The program is also part of the Pacific 2001 field study. This paper presents the initial year's results on our N-VOCs, including alkanes, organic acids, in comparison with bulk isotope analyses.

  13. Differentiation of Natural and Anthropogenic Organic Compounds on Atmospheric Particles by Molecular and Stable Isotope Composition - Pacific 2001, Lower Fraser Valley Air Shed Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiticar, M. J.; Press, R.; Gray, S. L.

    2002-12-01

    This component of the CFCAS Pacific 2001 study examined the character of specific non-volatile organic compounds (nVOCs) extracted from filtered total suspended particulates at the Pacific 2001 sites in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV), Vancouver, BC region. The objective is to identify or fingerprint spatial and temporal variations in both molecular and stable isotope composition of these organic compounds with the goal of understanding their sources or to provide insights into transport and/or atmospheric chemistry processes. This will provide critical information to help assess the potential type and magnitude of exposure that humans receive from nVOCs in such urban settings, and the associated health risks. Aerosol samples were collected over 24hr to 7-day period on HiVol filters in the LFV at Slocan Park, Golden Ears Park, Langley HS, Sumas Mt., and Cassiar Tunnel (2hr). nVOCs s were solvent-extracted from filters, then separated into different compound classes by silica-gel chromatography. Selected fractions are analysed for their individual compound molecular compositions by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) and by Continuous Flow-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CF-IRMS) for their stable carbon ratio. Significant variations in nVOC composition are observed for the 5 LFV sites. These are related to a combination of natural and anthropogenic urban activities. The most striking discovery is the strong odd-even carbon number predominance (OEP) observed for BOTH molecular and carbon isotope data. Recent natural release of hydrocarbons from plants have a clear predominance for the odd-carbon numbered n-alkanes. These C23 - C31 compounds are also systematically depleted in 13-C. The carbon isotope range between the odd and even compounds is up to 10 permil for the plant signatures. Anthropogenic and "aged" hydrocarbons have substantially lower molecular and isotope OEPs. This novel biogeochemical approach has good potential for estimating broad source

  14. Source Attribution of Cyanides using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Carman, April J.; Moran, James J.

    2016-01-08

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs) are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. In a previous study, anionic impurity profiles developed using high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) were demonstrated as CAS for matching samples from eight potassium cyanide (KCN) stocks to their reported countries of origin. Herein, a larger number of solid KCN stocks (n = 13) and, for the first time, solid sodium cyanide (NaCN) stocks (n = 15) were examined to determine what additional sourcing information can be obtained through anion, carbon stable isotope, and elemental analyses of cyanide stocks by HPIC, isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), respectively. The HPIC anion data was evaluated using the variable selection methods of Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least squares (iPLS), and genetic algorithm-based partial least squares (GAPLS) and the classification methods of partial least squares discriminate analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminate analysis (SVMDA). In summary, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported country of origins resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three country groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries with known solid cyanide factories. Both the anion and elemental CAS are believed to originate from the aqueous alkali hydroxides used in cyanide manufacture. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). The carbon isotope CAS is believed to

  15. Uranium isotope composition of a laterite profile during extreme weathering of basalt in Guangdong, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Zhou, Z.; Gong, Y.; Lundstrom, C.; Huang, F.

    2015-12-01

    Rock weathering and soil formation in the critical zone are important for material cycle from the solid Earth to superficial system. Laterite is a major type of soil in South China forming at hot-humid climate, which has strong effect on the global uranium cycle. Uranium is closely related to the environmental redox condition because U is stable at U(Ⅳ) in anoxic condition and U(Ⅵ) as soluble uranyl ion (UO22+) under oxic circumstance. In order to understand the behavior of U isotopes during crust weathering, here we report uranium isotopic compositions of soil and base rock samples from a laterite profile originated from extreme weathering of basalt in Guangdong, South China. The uranium isotopic data were measured on a Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign using the double spike method. The δ238U of BCR-1 is -0.29±0.03‰ (relative to the international standard CRM-112A), corresponding to a 238U/235U ratio of 137.911±0.004. Our result of BCR-1 agrees with previous analyses (e.g., -0.28‰ in Weyer et al. 2008) [1]. U contents of the laterite profile decrease from 1.9 ppm to 0.9 ppm with depth, and peak at 160 - 170 cm (2.3 ppm), much higher than the U content of base rocks (~0.5 ppm). In contrary, U/Th of laterites is lower than that of base rock (0.27) except the peak at the depth of 160-170 cm (0.38), indicating significant U loss during weathering. Notably, U isotope compositions of soils show a small variation from -0.38 to -0.28‰, consistent with the base rock within analytical error (0.05‰ to 0.08‰, 2sd). Such small variation can be explained by a "rind effect" (Wang et al., 2015) [2], by which U(Ⅳ) can be completely oxidized to U(VI) layer by layer during basalt weathering by dissolved oxygen. Therefore, our study indicates that U loss during basalt weathering at the hot-humid climate does not change U isotope composition of superficial water system. [1] Weyer S. et al. (2008) Natural fractionation of 238U/235

  16. Experimental investigation of uranium-series isotope mobility in a basaltic weathering profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosseto, Anthony; Menozzi, Davide; Kinsley, Leslie

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of uranium (U)-series isotopes in regolith can be used to determine the formation rate of weathering profiles. This approach aims at following how the U-series isotope composition of primary minerals (i.e. those derived from the parent material) vary during the development of the weathering profile. Nevertheless, regolith samples are a complex mixture of primary minerals, secondary minerals that are the residue of primary mineral weathering, secondary minerals that precipitate from pore water, minerals derived from atmospheric deposition and organic matter. In this study, firstly we aim at isolating primary minerals and the secondary minerals derived from them, by evaluating a sequential extraction procedure designed to eliminate carbonates, Fe-Mn oxides and organic matter. Secondly, we investigate the behaviour of U-series isotopes during primary mineral dissolution by applying a mild HF/HCl etching solution to the residues of the sequential extraction. These experiments were performed on bedrock, saprolite and soil derived from a basaltic weathering profile in south-eastern Australia. Results show that up to 50% of U is removed during sequential extraction, suggesting that (i) there is a large pool of labile U in the bedrock and (ii) secondary phases and organic matter account for a large fraction of the U budget in bulk saprolite and soil. Sequential extraction has little impact on the (234U/238U) activity ratio of bedrock and saprolite, whilst it shows a decrease in soil. This suggests that the pool of U removed from bedrock and saprolite has a (234U/238U) similar to that of primary minerals; but in the soil, the U removed (mostly from organic matter) is enriched in 234U. This is expected as organic matter uptakes U from pore solutions, which are generally enriched in 234U. During HF/HCl etching, the (234U/238U) of bedrock and saprolite is greater than 1. Sheng and Kuroda [1] previously proposed that (234U/238U) >1 in rocks could be explained by

  17. Heterogeneity in stable isotope profiles predicts coexistence of populations of barn swallows Hirundo rustica differing in morphology and reproductive performance.

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Anders Pape; Hobson, Keith A.

    2004-01-01

    Population studies assume that individuals belonging to a study population are homogeneous for natal and breeding origin, although this assumption is rarely tested. We tested for heterogeneity in stable-isotope profiles (delta15N, delta13C, deltaD) of feathers grown in the African winter quarters from a Danish breeding population of adult barn swallows, Hirundo rustica. Deuterium isotope values did not provide useful information on population segregation of wintering swallows in Africa. However, both delta15N and delta13C values showed a clearly bimodal distribution with 6% belonging to one category and the remaining birds belonging to another category, resulting in this population comprising three categories of birds. Adults belonging to the two categories of delta13C isotope profiles differed weakly in morphology for several different characters. The frequency and the size of second broods differed between categories of delta13C isotope profiles. Phenotypes of nestlings from the first brood in terms of tarsus length, body mass and T-cell response differed significantly between the two delta15N isotope categories, suggesting that conditions during winter carried over to the breeding season at least as late as the first brood. Polymorphism can be maintained only if fitness is similar for birds from categories of isotope profiles. We suggest that fluctuating selection or migration-selection balance may maintain the observed polymorphism. PMID:15306333

  18. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in vertical peat profiles of natural and drained boreal peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykänen, Hannu; Mpamah, Promise; Rissanen, Antti; Pitkänen, Aki; Turunen, Jukka; Simola, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands form a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle. Change in peat hydrology, due to global warming is projected to change microbiological processes and peat carbon pool. We tested if bulk stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes serve as indicators of severe long term drying in peatlands drained for forestry. Depth profile analysis of peat, for their carbon and nitrogen content as well as their carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signatures, were conducted for peatlands in southern and eastern Finland, having ombrotrophic and minerotrophic natural and corresponding drained pairs or separate drained sites. The selection of sites allowed us to compare changes due to different fertility and changes due to long term artificial drying. Drainage lasting over 40 years has led to changes in hydrology, vegetation, nutrient mineralization and respiration. Furthermore, increased nutrient uptake and possible recycling of peat nitrogen and carbon trough vegetation back to the peat surface, also possibly has an effect on the stable isotopic composition of peat carbon and nitrogen. We think that drainage induced changes somehow correspond to those caused by changed hydrology due to climate change. We will present data from these measurements and discuss their implications for carbon and nitrogen flows in peatlands.

  19. Stable carbon isotope ratio profiling of illicit testosterone preparations--domestic and international seizures.

    PubMed

    Brooker, Lance; Cawley, Adam; Drury, Jason; Edey, Claire; Hasick, Nicole; Goebel, Catrin

    2014-10-01

    Gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is now established as a robust and mature analytical technique for the doping control of endogenous anabolic androgenic steroids in human sport. It relies on the assumption that the carbon isotope ratios of naturally produced steroids are significantly different to synthetically manufactured testosterone or testosterone prohormones used in commercial medical or dietary supplement products. Recent publications in this journal have highlighted the existence of black market testosterone preparations with carbon isotope ratios within the range reported for endogenous steroids (i.e. δ(13) C ≥ -25.8 ‰). In this study, we set out to profile domestic and international law enforcement seizures of illicit testosterone products to monitor the prevalence of 'enriched' substrates--which if administered to human subjects would be considered problematic for the use of current GC-C-IRMS methodologies for the doping control of testosterone in sport. The distribution of δ(13) C values for this illicit testosterone sample population (n = 283) ranged from -23.4 ‰ to -32.9 ‰ with mean and median of -28.6 ‰--comparable to previous work. However, only 13 out of 283 testosterone samples (4.6 %) were found to display δ(13) C values ≥ -25.8 ‰, confirming that in the vast majority of cases of illicit testosterone administration, current GC-C-IRMS doping control procedures would be capable of confirming misuse.

  20. Effects of lactulose supplementation on performance, blood profiles, excreta microbial shedding of Lactobacillus and Escherichia coli, relative organ weight and excreta noxious gas contents in broilers.

    PubMed

    Cho, J H; Kim, I H

    2014-06-01

    This study was to evaluate the effects of lactulose supplementation on performance, blood profiles, excreta microbial shedding of Lactobacillus and Escherichia coli, relative organ weight and excreta noxious gas contents in broilers. A total of 720 ROSS 308 broilers with a body weight of 46 ± 0.1 g (1 day of age) were used in a 28-d experiment. Broilers were randomly allotted to 4 experiment diets with 12 replicate pens and 15 birds per pen. Dietary treatments were as follows: NC, negative control (without antibiotic); PC, NC + 0.1% tiamulin; L1, NC + 0.1% lactulose; and L2, NC + 0.2% lactulose. Broilers were fed with phase 1 (1-8 day), phase 2 (9-18 day) and phase 3 (19-28 day) diets in the form of mash. During day 1-8, broilers fed the PC and L2 diets had higher (p < 0.05) body weight gain than those fed the NC diet. During day 19-28, broilers fed the L1 and L2 diets had lower (p < 0.05) feed intake than those fed the NC diet. The feed conversion ratio (FCR) was decreased (p < 0.05) in L1 treatment compared with NC treatment. Overall, the FCR was improved (p < 0.05) in all supplementation treatments compared with NC treatment. The apparently metabolizable nitrogen in L1 treatment was higher (p < 0.05) than that in NC treatment at day 28. The excreta Lactobacillus was increased and E. coli was decreased in PC and L2 treatments compared with NC treatment at day 28 (p < 0.05). The excreta NH3, H2S and acetic acid contents were decreased (p < 0.05) in L1 and L2 treatments compared with NC treatment. The relative weight of abdominal fat of broilers fed the PC diet was lowest (p < 0.05) compared with other treatments. In conclusion, this study indicated that dietary supplementation of 0.1% or 0.2% lactulose could improve growth performance, decrease excreta E. coli and excreta NH3 and H2S contents.

  1. Effects of dietary supplementation of modified zinc oxide on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood profiles, fecal microbial shedding and fecal score in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Ho; Upadhaya, Santi Devi; Kim, In Ho

    2015-06-01

    One hundred and forty piglets ((Landrace × Yorkshire) × Duroc, 21 day of age) with an initial weight of 6.50 ± 0.71 kg, were randomly allotted into four treatments to determine the effects of a modified form of zinc oxide (ZnO) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood profiles, fecal microbial shedding and fecal score in weanling pigs. Dietary treatments were: (i) NC, negative control, basal diet containing zinc (Zn) from the premix; (ii) PC, positive control, basal diet containing Zn-free premix + 3000 ppm ZnO; (iii) H1, basal diet containing Zn-free premix + 3000 ppm ZnO (phase 1, days 1 to 14)/200 ppm modified ZnO (phase 2, days 15 to 42); (iv) H2, basal diet containing Zn-free premix + 300 ppm modified ZnO (phase 1)/200 ppm modified ZnO (phase 2). During days 1 to 14, average daily gains (ADG) were higher (P = 0.04) in PC, H1 and H2 groups than that in NC group. Overall, H1 treatment increased the ADG compared with NC (P = 0.05). On day 14, the alkaline phosphatase and plasma Zn concentration were increased (P = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively) in PC, H1 and H2 treatments compared with NC treatment. On days 14 and 42, the fecal Lactobacillus counts in NC group were lowest (P = 0.01, P = 0.04 respectively) among treatments. All supplemented groups showed lower (P = 0.03) fecal score than NC treatment on days 21 and 28. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with modified ZnO increased growth rates and reduced fecal scores in weanling pig. Modified ZnO could be used as a substitute to ZnO as a growth promoter and reduce Zn excretion to the environment because of the lower dosage. [Correction added on 3 February 2015, after first online publication: the initial weight of '6.50 ± 1.11 kg' has been replaced with '6.50 ± 0.71 kg' in the abstract.].

  2. Iron isotope composition of the suspended matter along depth and lateral profiles in the Amazon River and its tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Pinheiro, Giana Márcia; Poitrasson, Franck; Sondag, Francis; Vieira, Lucieth Cruz; Pimentel, Márcio Martins

    2013-07-01

    Samples of suspended matter were collected at different locations, seasons, depths and lateral profiles in the Amazon River and three of its main tributaries, the Madeira, the Solimões and the Negro rivers. Their iron isotope compositions were studied in order to understand the iron cycle and investigate the level of isotopic homogeneity at the river cross-section scale. Samples from four depth profiles and three lateral profiles analyzed show suspended matter δ57Fe values (relative to IRMM-14) between -0.501 ± 0.075‰ and 0.196 ± 0.083‰ (2SE). Samples from the Negro River, a blackwater river, yield the negative values. Samples from other stations (whitewater rivers, the Madeira, the Solimões and the Amazon) show positive values, which are indistinguishable from the average composition of the continental crust (δ57FeIRMM-14 ˜ 0.1‰). Individual analyses of the depth and lateral profiles show no significant variation in iron isotope signatures, indicating that, in contrast to certain chemical or other isotopic tracers, one individual subsurface sample is representative of river deeper waters. This also suggests that, instead of providing detailed information on the riverine iron cycling, iron isotopes of particulate matter in rivers will rather yield a general picture of the iron sources.

  3. Uplifting of palsa peatlands by permafrost identified by stable isotope depth profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Jan Paul; Conen, Franz; Leifeld, Jens; Alewell, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Natural abundances of stable isotopes are a widespread tool to investigate biogeochemical processes in soils. Palsas are peatlands with an ice core and are common in the discontinuous permafrost region. Elevated parts of palsa peatlands, called hummocks, were uplifted by permafrost out of the influence of groundwater. Here we used the combination of δ15N values and C/N ratio along depth profiles to identify perturbation of these soils. In the years 2009 and 2012 we took in total 14 peat cores from hummocks in two palsa peatlands near Abisko, northern Sweden. Peat samples were analysed in 2 to 4 cm layers for stable isotope ratios and concentrations of C and N. The uplifting of the hummocks by permafrost could be detected by stable isotope depth patterns with the highest δ15N value at permafrost onset, a so-called turning point. Regression analyses indicated in 11 of 14 peat cores increasing δ15N values above and decreasing values below the turning point. This is in accordance with the depth patterns of δ13C values and C/N ratios in these palsa peatlands. Onset of permafrost aggradation identified by the highest δ15N value in the profile and calculated from peat accumulation rates show ages ranging from 80 to 545 years and indicate a mean (±SD) peat age at the turning points of 242 (±66) years for Stordalen and 365 (±53) years for Storflaket peatland. The mean peat ages at turning points are within the period of the Little Ice Age. Furthermore, we tested if the disturbance, in this case the uplifting of the peat material, can be displayed in the relation of δ15N and C/N ratio following the concept of Conen et al. (2013). In unperturbed sites soil δ15N values cover a relatively narrow range at any particular C/N ratio. Changes in N cycling, i.e. N loss or gain, results in the loss or gain of 15N depleted forms. This leads to larger or smaller δ15N values than usual at the observed C/N ratio. All, except one, turning point show a perturbation in the depth

  4. EXPOSURE MODELING - SHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a general overview of SHEDS model features, describes algorithms in the SHEDS-Air Toxics model that focus on mobile source exposures and multipathway exposures, and presents examples of results from application of the SHEDS-Air Toxics model to benzene i...

  5. Pedogenic Formation of Perylene in a Terrestrial Soil Profile: Evidence From Carbon Isotopic Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gocht, T.; Jochmann, M. A.; Blessing, M.; Barth, J.; Schmidt, T. C.; Grathwohl, P.

    2005-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent organic pollutants (POP), which are introduced into the environment mainly due to combustion of fossil fuel. Perylene is one compound of the PAHs that consists of 5 condensed rings like the well known carcinogenic benzo(a)pyrene. Apart from the pyrogenic formation, there are strong indications that it is produced biologically and/or diagenetically under anaerobic conditions. This conclusion was derived from the presence of perylene in deeper parts of marine and lacustrine sediment profiles, where the combustion-derived PAHs are almost absent ( Lima et al., 2003). 13C/12C compound-specific stable isotopic ratios were successfully applied for the differentiation of probably biologically generated perylene in tropical termite nests and pyrolytic perylene from surface soils of temperate regions ( Wilcke et al., 2002). Our study is the first aiming on the determination of the different processes of perylene formation at one location using carbon isotopic ratios such as 13C/12C. We determined PAHs in natural soils of southern Germany. At one location in the Black Forest we found for the first time evidence for natural perylene production in the subsoil of terrestrial environments. Apart from the combustion derived PAHs that accumulate at the top of all soil profiles, the depth distribution of perylene shows the highest peak in the subsoil about 1 m below the surface. Due to its very low solubility (0.4 μg l-1 at 25 °C) vertical transport of perylene with seepage water is very unlikely. Thus, we suggest atmospheric deposition of pyrogenic perylene at the top of the profile and in-situ generation in the subsoil, probably due to microbial activities. In order to distinguish between the pyrogenic and natural generation we employed 13C/12C compound-specific stable isotope analysis of perylene in soil samples from the top of the profile as well as from the subsoil. Preliminary measurements with soil extracts show strong

  6. Longitudinal profiling of urinary steroids by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry: diet change may result in carbon isotopic variations.

    PubMed

    Saudan, Christophe; Kamber, Matthias; Barbati, Giulia; Robinson, Neil; Desmarchelier, Aurélien; Mangin, Patrice; Saugy, Martial

    2006-02-02

    Longitudinal profiling of urinary steroids was investigated by using a gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) method. The carbon isotope ratio of three urinary testosterone (T) metabolites: androsterone, etiocholanolone, 5beta-androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol (5beta-androstanediol) together with 16(5alpha)-androsten-3alpha-ol (androstenol) and 5beta-pregnane-3alpha,20alpha-diol (5beta-pregnanediol) were measured in urine samples collected from three top-level athletes over 2 years. Throughout the study, the subjects were living in Switzerland and were residing every year for a month or two in an African country. (13)C-enrichment larger than 2.5 per thousand was observed for one subject after a 2-month stay in Africa. Our findings reveal that (13)C-enrichment caused by a diet change might be reduced if the stay in Africa was shorter or if the urine sample was not collected within the days after return to Switzerland. The steroids of interest in each sample did not show significant isotopic fractionation that could lead to false positive results in anti-doping testing. In contrast to the results obtained with the carbon isotopic ratio, profiling of urinary testosterone/epitestosterone (T/E) ratios was found to be unaffected by a diet change.

  7. Botanical traceability of commercial tannins using the mineral profile and stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Daniela; Santato, Alessandro; Paolini, Mauro; Barbero, Alice; Camin, Federica; Nicolini, Giorgio; Larcher, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Commercial tannins are natural polyphenolic compounds extracted from different plant tissues such as gall, the wood of different species and fruit. In the food industry they are mainly used as flavourings and food ingredients, whereas in winemaking they are classified as clarification agents for wine protein stabilisation, although colour stabilisation, metal removal, unpleasant thiol removal and rheological correction are also well-known and desired effects. Due to their particular technical properties and very different costs, the possibility of correct identification of the real botanical origin of tannins can be considered a primary target in oenology research and in fulfilling the technical and economic requirements of the wine industry. For some categories of tannins encouraging results have already been achieved by considering sugar or polyphenolic composition. For the first time this work verifies the possibility of determining the botanical origin of tannins on the basis of the mineral element profile and analysis of the (13) C/(12) C isotopic ratio. One hundred two commercial tannins originating from 10 different botanical sources (grapes, oak, gall, chestnut, fruit trees, quebracho, tea, acacia, officinal plants and tara) were analysed to determine 57 elements and the (13) C/(12) C isotopic ratio, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, respectively. Forward stepwise discriminant analysis provided good discrimination between the 8 most abundant groups, with 100% correct re-classification. The model was then validated five times on subsets of 10% of the overall samples, randomly extracted, achieving satisfactory results. With a similar approach it was also possible to distinguish toasted and untoasted oak tannins as well as tannins from grape skin and grape seeds. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Metal isotope coded profiling of organic ligands by mass spectrometry in aquatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichard, Thomas; Deicke, Michael; Frieder Mohr, Jan; Klein, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Metal isotope coded profiling (MICP) introduces a universal discovery platform for metal chelating natural products that act as metallophores, ion buffers or sequestering agents. The detection of cation and oxoanion complexing ligands is facilitated by the identification of unique isotopic signatures created by the application of isotopically pure metals. We present a targeted analysis of low-molecular-weight organic ligands based on fast UHPLC-ESI-MS measurements. Replacement of, for example, natural iron or molybdenum with isotopically pure 54Fe/58Fe (ratio 1:1) or 95Mo/98Mo (ratio 1:1) causes easily detectable unique isotopic signatures in the mass spectra of potential metal-complexing ligands. This can be achieved under laboratory conditions not only in growth media, but also by spiking directly aqueous samples or solid-phase extracts. Importantly, as the relative affinity of the metallophores for e.g., Mo or Fe is dependent on the pH, all experiments needs to be conducted under pH-controlled conditions. The improved ionization efficiency of some metal complexes helps to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio compared to the free ligand at the same chromatographic conditions. The methodology does not necessarily depend on HR-ESI-MS measurements (e.g., Q-Exactive Orbitrap) and can be applied to any mass spectrometer. With MICP, two birds can be killed with one stone: (i) the identification of metallophores (e.g., siderophores, molybdophores) for metal uptake by any organism and (ii) organic ligands which solely work as metal buffer in dissolved organic matter (DOM). We currently address following two main research lines: First, DOM has often been used as a proxy for bio-productivity in terms of a carbon source; however, the specific impact of DOM as a "metal buffer" for biological processes is still under-investigated. Upon the administration of individual isotopes or isotopic pairs, for example, 54Fe/58Fe, 63Cu/65Cu, 66Zn/68Zn, or 95Mo/98Mo and subsequent

  9. The Isotope-Coded Affinity Tag Method for Quantitative Protein Profile Comparison and Relative Quantitation of Cysteine Redox Modifications.

    PubMed

    Chan, James Chun Yip; Zhou, Lei; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2015-11-02

    The isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) technique has been applied to measure pairwise changes in protein expression through differential stable isotopic labeling of proteins or peptides followed by identification and quantification using a mass spectrometer. Changes in protein expression are observed when the identical peptide from each of two biological conditions is identified and a difference is detected in the measurements comparing the peptide labeled with the heavy isotope to the one with a normal isotopic distribution. This approach allows the simultaneous comparison of the expression of many proteins between two different biological states (e.g., yeast grown on galactose versus glucose, or normal versus cancer cells). Due to the cysteine-specificity of the ICAT reagents, the ICAT technique has also been applied to perform relative quantitation of cysteine redox modifications such as oxidation and nitrosylation. This unit describes both protein quantitation and profiling of cysteine redox modifications using the ICAT technique.

  10. A review of some recent studies on the stable isotope profiling of methylamphetamine: Is it a useful adjunct to conventional chemical profiling?

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael; Salouros, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews a body of work published by the authors over a number of years aimed at providing a complementary "signature" to conventional chemical profiling of methylamphetamine. The work, beginning in 2009, was undertaken because of the changing nature of clandestine methylamphetamine manufacture which has seen a dramatic rise in production and a major shift to a higher quality product. As manufacturing methods changed and methylamphetamine purity increased some conventional drug profiling techniques became less useful as an intelligence tool. For instance, the value of the organic impurity profile, a mainstay of conventional profiling, decreases as there are fewer impurities present in seized samples. However, whilst many seizures may contain less conventional chemical intelligence another property of the methylamphetamine molecule is always available, i.e. the light element stable isotope ratios. The stable isotope ratios of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen are an integral part of the methylamphetamine molecule itself. This review describes previous work by the authors and by researchers in other national laboratories to investigate and implement the use of stable isotope ratios as an everyday methylamphetamine profiling tool. It also looks at how powerful this technique can be when used to compare samples from different seizures. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Refining Isotopic Parameterization Choices Using Stable Water Isotope Profiles In Surface Layer And Soil To Improve Modeling Of Mid-Latitude Continental Moisture Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, A.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; O'Neill, M.; Noone, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The moisture balance of the continental boundary layer plays an important role in regulating the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and atmosphere. The surface layer moisture balance is controlled by a number of factors including precipitation, infiltration, evaporation and transpiration. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in water can be exploited to better understand the mechanisms controlling atmosphere-land surface water fluxes. We present three years of in situ tower-based measurements of stable isotope ratios of water (δD and δ18O) in vapor, precipitation, vegetation and soil from the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, a semi-arid 300 meter tall-tower site in Erie, Colorado. Co-located meteorological and disdrometer measurements at the surface and 300m allow us to explore key aspects of continental moisture cycling in a semi-arid environment such as the important contribution of sub-surface vapor diffusion to the surface water vapor budget and its implications for partitioning in dry ecosystems, and the role of rain evaporation during precipitation events on inter-event and seasonal time scales. We use our observations to constrain a Craig-Gordon evaporation model at the land surface to weight the contributions of rainfall, surface water vapor exchange and sub-surface vapor diffusion to soil water isotope values. A multi-season in situ time series of surface vapor isotope profiles in conjunction with soil and precipitation allows us to field-validate choices for parameters such as the kinetic fractionation factor for each process. This has implications both for modeling short-term gas exchange at the land surface in modern-day climate models as well as for refining paleoclimate interpretations of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope-based proxies. Tall-tower precipitation and vapor isotope profile data can also be analyzed in conjunction with disdrometer data on inter-event and seasonal time scales to quantify the role of rain evaporation

  12. Diffusion of lithium-6 isotopes in lithium aluminate ceramics using neutron depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhinney, Hylton G.; James, William D.; Schweikert, Emile A.; Williams, John R.; Hollenberg, Glen; Welsh, John; Sereatan, Washington

    1993-07-01

    Lithium Ceramics offer tremendous potential as a source for the production of tritium ( 3H) for fusion power reactors. Their successful application will depend to a great extent upon the diffusion properties of the 6Li within the matrix. Consequently knowledge od 6Li concentration gradients in the ceramic matrices is an important requirement in the continued development of the technology. In this investigation, the neutron depth profile (NDP) technique has been applied to the study of concentration profiles of 6Li in lithium aluminate ceramics, doped with 1.8%, 50% and 95% 6Li isotopic concentrations. Specimen for analysis were prepared at Battelle (PNL) as pellet discs. Samples for diffusion studies were arranged as diffusion couples in the following manner: 1.8% 6Li discs/85% 6Li powder. Experiments were performed at the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center Reactor Building, utilizing 1 MW equivalent thermal neutron fluxes 3 × 10 11n/ m2s. The depth probed by the technique is approximately 15 μ.m. Diffusion coefficients are in the range of 2.1 × 10 -12 to 7.0 × 10 -11m2s-1 for 1.8% 6Li-doped ceramics annealed at 1200 and 1400° C, for 4 to 48-h anneal times.

  13. Inaccuracies in selected ion monitoring determination of isotope ratios obviated by profile acquisition: Nucleotide 18O/16O measurements1

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Adam G.; Wang, Benlian; Anderson, David R.; Previs, Stephen; Harris, Michael E.; Anderson, Vernon E.

    2007-01-01

    Precise and accurate measurements of isotopologue distributions (IDs) in biological molecules are needed for the determination of isotope effects, quantitation by isotope dilution and quantifying isotope tracers employed in both metabolic and biophysical studies. While single ion monitoring (SIM) yields significantly greater sensitivity and signal/noise than profile mode acquisitions, we show that small changes in the SIM window width and/or center can alter experimentally determined isotope ratios by up to 5%, resulting in significant inaccuracies. This inaccuracy is attributed to mass granularity, the differential distribution of digital data points across the m/z ranges sampled by SIM. Acquiring data in the profile mode and fitting the data to an equation describing a series of equally spaced and identically shaped peaks eliminates the inaccuracies associated with mass granularity with minimal loss of precision. Additionally a method of using the complete ID profile data that inherently corrects for “spillover” and for the natural abundance ID has been used to determine 18O/16O ratios for 5′,3′-guanosine bis-[18O1]phosphate and TM[18O1]P with precisions of ~0.005. The analysis protocol is also applied to quadrupole-time of flight tandem mass spectrometry using [2-18O]uridine and 3′-UM[18O1]P which enhances signal/noise and minimizes concerns for background contamination. PMID:17560863

  14. Inaccuracies in selected ion monitoring determination of isotope ratios obviated by profile acquisition: nucleotide 18O/16O measurements.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Adam G; Wang, Benlian; Anderson, David R; Previs, Stephen; Harris, Michael E; Anderson, Vernon E

    2007-08-01

    Precise and accurate measurements of isotopologue distributions (IDs) in biological molecules are needed for determination of isotope effects, quantitation by isotope dilution, and quantification of isotope tracers employed in both metabolic and biophysical studies. While single ion monitoring (SIM) yields significantly greater sensitivity and signal/noise than profile-mode acquisitions, we show that small changes in the SIM window width and/or center can alter experimentally determined isotope ratios by up to 5%, resulting in significant inaccuracies. This inaccuracy is attributed to mass granularity, the differential distribution of digital data points across the m/z ranges sampled by SIM. Acquiring data in the profile mode and fitting the data to an equation describing a series of equally spaced and identically shaped peaks eliminates the inaccuracies associated with mass granularity with minimal loss of precision. Additionally a method of using the complete ID profile data that inherently corrects for "spillover" and for the natural-abundance ID has been used to determine 18O/16O ratios for 5',3'-guanosine bis-[18O1]phosphate and TM[18O1]P with precisions of approximately 0.005. The analysis protocol is also applied to quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry using [2-(18)O] arabinouridine and 3'-UM[18O1]P which enhances signal/noise and minimizes concerns for background contamination.

  15. Long-term carbon and nitrogen dynamics at SPRUCE revealed through stable isotopes in peat profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, Erik A.; Chen, Janet; Hanson, Paul J.; Iversen, Colleen M.; McFarlane, Karis J.; Thorp, Nathan R.; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.

    2017-05-01

    Peatlands encode information about past vegetation dynamics, climate, and microbial processes. Here, we used δ15N and δ13C patterns from 16 peat profiles to deduce how the biogeochemistry of the Marcell S1 forested bog in northern Minnesota responded to environmental and vegetation change over the past ˜ 10 000 years. In multiple regression analyses, δ15N and δ13C correlated strongly with depth, plot location, C / N, %N, and each other. Correlations with %N, %C, C / N, and the other isotope accounted for 80 % of variance for δ15N and 38 % of variance for δ13C, reflecting N and C losses. In contrast, correlations with depth and topography (hummock or hollow) reflected peatland successional history and climate. Higher δ15N in plots closer to uplands may reflect upland-derived DON inputs and accompanying shifts in N dynamics in the lagg drainage area surrounding the bog. The Suess effect (declining δ13CO2 since the Industrial Revolution) lowered δ13C in recent surficial samples. High δ15N from -35 to -55 cm probably indicated the depth of ectomycorrhizal activity after tree colonization of the peatland over the last 400 years, as confirmed by the occasional presence of wood down to -35 cm depth. High δ13C at ˜ 4000 years BP (-65 to -105 cm) could reflect a transition at that time to slower rates of peat accumulation, when 13C discrimination during peat decomposition may increase in importance. Low δ13C and high δ15N at -213 and -225 cm ( ˜ 8500 years BP) corresponded to a warm period during a sedge-dominated rich fen stage. The above processes appear to be the primary drivers of the observed isotopic patterns, whereas there was no clear evidence for methane dynamics influencing δ13C patterns.

  16. Historical Tracking of Nitrate in Contrasting Vineyard Using Water Isotopes and Nitrate Depth Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, M.; Erhardt, M.; Riedel, M.; Weiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (EWFD) aims to achieve a good chemical status for the groundwater bodies in Europe by the year 2015. Despite the effort to reduce the nitrate pollution from agriculture within the last two decades, there are still many groundwater aquifers that exceed nitrate concentrations above the EWFD threshold of 50 mg/l. Viticulture is seen as a major contributor of nitrate leaching and sowing of a green cover was shown to have a positive effect on lowering the nitrate loads in the upper 90 cm of the soil. However, the consequences for nitrate leaching into the subsoil were not yet tested. We analyzed the nitrate concentrations and pore water stable isotope composition to a depth of 380 cm in soil profiles under an old vineyard and a young vineyard with either soil tillage or permanent green cover in between the grapevines. The pore water stable isotopes were used to calibrate a soil physical model, which was then used to infer the age of the soil water at different depths. This way, we could relate elevated nitrate concentrations below an old vineyard to tillage processes that took place during the winter two years before the sampling. We further showed that the elevated nitrate concentration in the subsoil of a young vineyard can be related to the soil tillage prior to the planting of the new vineyard. If the soil is kept bare due to tillage, a nitrate concentration of 200 kg NO3--N/ha is found in 290 to 380 cm depth 2.5 years after the installation of the vineyard. The amount of nitrate leaching is considerably reduced due to a seeded green cover between the grapevines that takes up a high share of the mobilized nitrate reducing a potential contamination of the groundwater.

  17. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: Variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Cloquet, Christophe; Marty, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14,000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150-650 °C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of asteroids from primordial radionuclides and late-stage impact heating. Non-carbonaceous chondrites, most achondrites and the Earth do not show these enrichments in vapor-phase Hg. All meteorites studied here have however isotopically light Hg (δ202Hg = ∼-7 to -1) relative to the Earth's average crustal values, which could suggest that the Earth has lost a significant fraction of its primordial Hg. However, the late accretion of carbonaceous chondritic material on the order of ∼2%, which has been suggested to account for the water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gas inventories of the Earth, can also contribute most or all of the Earth's current Hg budget. In this case, the isotopically heavy Hg of the Earth's crust would have to be the result of isotopic fractionation between surface and deep-Earth reservoirs.

  18. Variability of the CO2 vertical soil profile production and its isotopic composition in a beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, E.; Plain, C.; Epron, D.; Longdoz, B.

    2015-12-01

    The use of stable isotopes has become a useful research tool to understand the complexity of processes involved in the variability of the vertical profile of CO2 production (P). In this context, an approach considering diffusion as the only gas transport, the Flux-Gradient Approach (FGA) is used to relate the temporal variation in soil P and its isotopic composition (δ13P). P of the different soil layers ([1] 0 cm - -10 cm / [2] -10 cm - -20 cm / [3] -20 cm - -40 cm) and their isotopic signature can be computed from continuous measurements of the vertical soil CO2 concentration profile and its isotopic signature and combined to simultaneous measurements of the soil efflux, trunk efflux, their respective isotopic signature and eddy flux measurements. The field campaign was conducted at the beech forest of Hesse (France) in 2011 from April to September. The results show significant temporal variations in P and δ13P. For P, large intra and inter day fluctuations are observed and are explained by a dependence on temperature specific to each layer. For δ13P, the horizon 2 show significant daily fluctuations which are related to lag-timed soil moisture and water use efficiency. These fluctuations dependency appears to be consistent with a response of P sources to environment and to the impact of photosynthetic δ13C fluctuations on δ13P. Comparison of isoprod, defined as the product of CO2 production and its isotopic composition, and soil and trunk isofluxes shows that horizon 2, the largest contributor to soil P (50 % to 77 % of total soil P depending on the period) is mainly affected by root respiration. The fluctuations of horizon 1 isoprod are influenced both by autotrophic and heterotrophic sources. Moreover, some fluctuations can be generated by other physical processes inducing P and δ13P variability, highlighting methodological issues that need to be taken into account to improve FGA.

  19. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles and soil organic carbon dynamics in the lower Mississippi Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, J.G.; Harden, J.W.; Fries, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of depth trends of 13C abundance in soil organic matter and of 13C abundance from soil-respired CO2 provides useful indications of the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon cycle and of paleoecological change. We measured depth trends of 13C abundance from cropland and control pairs of soils in the lower Mississippi Basin, as well as the 13C abundance of soil-respired CO2 produced during approximately 1-year soil incubation, to determine the role of several candidate processes on the 13C depth profile of soil organic matter. Depth profiles of 13C from uncultivated control soils show a strong relationship between the natural logarithm of soil organic carbon concentration and its isotopic composition, consistent with a model Rayleigh distillation of 13C in decomposing soil due to kinetic fractionation during decomposition. Laboratory incubations showed that initially respired CO 2 had a relatively constant 13C content, despite large differences in the 13C content of bulk soil organic matter. Initially respired CO2 was consistently 13C-depleted with respect to bulk soil and became increasingly 13C-depleted during 1-year, consistent with the hypothesis of accumulation of 13C in the products of microbial decomposition, but showing increasing decomposition of 13C-depleted stable organic components during decomposition without input of fresh biomass. We use the difference between 13C / 12C ratios (calculated as ??-values) between respired CO 2 and bulk soil organic carbon as an index of the degree of decomposition of soil, showing trends which are consistent with trends of 14C activity, and with results of a two-pooled kinetic decomposition rate model describing CO2 production data recorded during 1 year of incubation. We also observed inconsistencies with the Rayleigh distillation model in paired cropland soils and reasons for these inconsistencies are discussed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Isotope microscopy visualization of the adsorption profile of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin in powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Asuka; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-09-16

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon may enhance its equilibrium adsorption capacity for small molecules and micropollutants, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin, as well as for macromolecules and natural organic matter. Shell adsorption, in which adsorbates do not completely penetrate the adsorbent but instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the adsorbent, may explain this enhancement in equilibrium adsorption capacity. Here, we used isotope microscopy and deuterium-doped MIB and geosmin to directly visualize the solid-phase adsorbate concentration profiles of MIB and geosmin in carbon particles. The deuterium/hydrogen ratio, which we used as an index of the solid-phase concentration of MIB and geosmin, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of carbon particles. Solid-phase concentrations of MIB and geosmin obtained from the deuterium/hydrogen ratio roughly agreed with those predicted by shell adsorption model analyses of isotherm data. The direct visualization of the localization of micropollutant adsorbates in activated carbon particles provided direct evidence of shell adsorption.

  1. Stable isotope profiles of nitrogen gas indicate denitrification in oxygen-stratified humic lakes.

    PubMed

    Tiirola, Marja A; Rissanen, Antti J; Sarpakunnas, Miika; Arvola, Lauri; Nykänen, Hannu

    2011-06-15

    Mid-summer N(2) profiles were analyzed from nine oxygen-stratified, humic-acid-rich lakes using a continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer and a Gasbench II device. Sample preparation steps were performed under water to avoid air contamination. The instrument precision for the δ(15)N measurement was high (0.03‰), but for the whole sampling and analysis procedure the mean deviation between replicate samples was 0.13‰ for the δ(15)N measurements and 5.5% for the N(2) gas concentration analysis. The results show that the Gasbench peripheral was suitable for measurement of the (15)N natural abundance of dissolved nitrogen gas, with denitrification indicated by the oversaturation and slightly (<1‰) depleted δ(15)N values of the dissolved N(2) gas in the suboxic zones of some of the study lakes. Calculated values for the denitrified (excess) N(2) varied between -5.3 and 0.7‰. The denitrification potential was determined using the (15)N tracer method, with results showing nitrate-inducible denitrification and no signs of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Sulfur Isotopic Inferences of the Controls on Porewater Sulfate Profiles in the Northern Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, T.; Pohlman, J.; Lapham, L.; Riedel, M.; Wing, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    The flux of methane from gas hydrate bearing seeps in the marine environment is partially mitigated by the anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled with sulfate reduction. Sedimentary porewater sulfate profiles above gas hydrate deposits are frequently used to estimate the efficacy of this important microbial biofilter. However, to differentiate how other processes (e.g., sulfate reduction coupled to organic matter oxidation, sulfide re-oxidation and sulfur disproportionation) affect sulfate profiles, a complete accounting of the sulfur cycle is necessary. To this end, we have obtained the first ever measurements of minor sulfur isotopic ratios (33S/32S, 36S/32S), in conjunction with the more commonly measured 34S -32S ratio, from porewater sulfate above a gas hydrate-bearing seep. Characteristic minor isotopic fractionations, even when major isotopic fractionations are similar in magnitude, help to quantify the contributions of different microbial processes to the overall sulfur cycling in the system. Down to sediment depths of 1.5 to 4 meters, the δ34S values of porewater sulfate generally increased in association with a decrease in sulfate concentrations as would be expected for active sulfate reduction. Of greater interest, covariance between the δ34S values and measured minor isotopic fractionation suggests sulfide reoxidation and sulfur disproportionation are important components of the local sulfur cycle. We hypothesize that sulfide reoxidation is coupled to redox processes involving Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction and that the reoxidized forms of sulfur are available for additional methane oxidation. Recognizing that sulfate reduction is only one of several microbial processes controlling sulfate profiles challenges current paradigms for interpreting sulfate profiles and may alter our understanding of methane oxidation at gas hydrate-bearing seeps.

  3. Interpreting δ15N in Soil Profiles: Insights From the N-Isotopes of Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philben, M. J.; Edwards, K. A.; Billings, S. A.; Van Biesen, G.; Podrebarac, F. A.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    The δ15N of soil organic matter is consistently enriched with depth in soil profiles, although the magnitude of enrichment appears to vary with latitude. This could provide important insights on differences in N cycling among ecosystems, but the mechanism responsible for the depth trend remains controversial. Hypothesized explanations are (1) selective loss of depleted N during decomposition; (2) accumulation of 15N-enriched biomass of decomposers at depth; and (3) transfer of depleted N from depth to the soil surface by mycorrhizal fungi. To constrain these possible mechanisms, we analyzed the δ15N of hydrolyzable amino acids in the L, F, and H soil horizons of 2 boreal forests in southeast Labrador and southwest Newfoundland, Canada, before and after 480-day laboratory incubations of the soils. Most amino acids are both produced and degraded by microbes, but some are not resynthesized. The difference between these groups can be used to isolate the effects of decomposition from other fractionating processes. The amino acid δ15N did not change during the soil incubations, indicating peptide depolymerization does not fractionate N isotopes. This is consistent with a previously conducted fallow experiment in which amino acid δ15N remained unchanged after 68 years of decomposition in the absence of plant inputs. In contrast, the δ15N of most amino acids were enriched by 3-7‰ from the L to the H horizon, similar to the enrichment of bulk δ15N with depth. This pattern suggests these amino acids were resynthesized deeper in the soil profile where the bulk δ15N was more enriched. The δ15N amino acids phenylalanine and hydroxyproline, which are not resynthesized by the microbial community with decomposition, did not change with depth, indicating the depth trend was not due to temporal change in the δ15N of plant inputs to the soil. The enrichment of amino acid δ15N with depth in the soil profiles but not in the incubations or the fallow experiment indicates

  4. A GRB tool shed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Hakkila, Jon; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Mallozzi, Robert

    2000-09-01

    We describe the design of a suite of software tools to allow users to query Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data and perform data mining expeditions. We call this suite of tools a shed (SHell for Expeditions using Datamining). Our schedule is to have a completed prototype (funded via the NASA AISRP) by February, 2002. Meanwhile, interested users will find a partially functioning tool shed at http:/grb.mankato.msus.edu. .

  5. View from underneath umbrella shed at rear of Train Shed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from underneath umbrella shed at rear of Train Shed looking W. - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  6. Local load shedding

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M.; Thorne, D.K. )

    1988-08-01

    Equipment overloads in an underground transmission network are caused by unscheduled outages. Repairs or replacements of damaged cables and/or transformers in urban areas are inherently difficult and time-consuming. Therefore, for overloads greatly in excess of short-time ratings, speed of load shedding is of paramount importance. Under such conditions, the system operator is faced with: recognizing the problem, determining the course of action and shedding the correct amount of load at the right locations. These tasks are difficult to perform, particularly under pressure of time. Reliance on pre-specified load shedding lists is not satisfactory since the load shedding lists do not necessarily match the amounts and locations of the required loads to be shed. Clearly, there has been a need for a local load shedding scheme, which in the first order of importance, would relieve the overloaded equipment within the time limits imposed by the equipment short-time ratings and in the second order of importance, would ''minimize'' the amount of load to be curtailed. This paper describes an approach which meets the dual objective, providing a practical solution to a difficult engineering/operating problem.

  7. Long-term carbon and nitrogen dynamics at SPRUCE revealed through stable isotopes in peat profiles

    DOE PAGES

    Hobbie, Erik A.; Chen, Janet; Hanson, Paul J.; ...

    2017-05-17

    Peatlands encode information about past vegetation dynamics, climate, and microbial processes. Here, we used δ15N and δ13C patterns from 16 peat profiles to deduce how the biogeochemistry of the Marcell S1 forested bog in northern Minnesota responded to environmental and vegetation change over the past ~10 000 years. In multiple regression analyses, δ15N and δ13C correlated strongly with depth, plot location, C/N, %N, and each other. Correlations with %N, %C, C/N, and the other isotope accounted for 80 % of variance for δ15N and 38 % of variance for δ13C, reflecting N and C losses. In contrast, correlations with depth andmore » topography (hummock or hollow) reflected peatland successional history and climate. Higher δ15N in plots closer to uplands may reflect upland-derived DON inputs and accompanying shifts in N dynamics in the lagg drainage area surrounding the bog. The Suess effect (declining δ13CO2 since the Industrial Revolution) lowered δ13C in recent surficial samples. High δ15N from –35 to –5 cm probably indicated the depth of ectomycorrhizal activity after tree colonization of the peatland over the last 400 years, as confirmed by the occasional presence of wood down to –35 cm depth. High δ13C at ~4000 years BP (–65 to –105 cm) could reflect a transition at that time to slower rates of peat accumulation, when 13C discrimination during peat decomposition may increase in importance. Low δ13C and high δ15N at –213 and –225 cm (~8500 years BP) corresponded to a warm period during a sedge-dominated rich fen stage. As a result, the above processes appear to be the primary drivers of the observed isotopic patterns, whereas there was no clear evidence for methane dynamics influencing δ13C patterns.« less

  8. 238U, 232Th profiling and U-series isotope analysis of fossil teeth by laser ablation-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggins, Stephen; Grün, Rainer; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Shelley, Michael; Taylor, Lois

    2003-05-01

    U and Th concentration profiles in fossil hominid and faunal teeth have been measured by laser ablation ICPMS. These profiles record diverse modes of U and Th uptake, particularly within enamel, that can be broadly related to the state of sample preservation. Observed U profiles are in general inconsistent with existing diffusion-adsorption models developed for U-uptake in bone and teeth. Where the models appear applicable, calculated diffusion rates are several orders of magnitude smaller than previous estimates. Laser ablation ICPMS offers a means of rapidly characterizing U and Th distributions in the enamel and dentine components of teeth as a precursor to ESR and U-series dating. In particular, it should allow the identification of teeth (and also bone) samples that have simple U-uptake histories and are amenable to precise dating by time-consuming and expensive Th-U and Pa-U TIMS techniques. We also demonstrated the use of laser ablation ICPMS to measure U-series isotopes in dentine and enamel samples with relatively high U concentrations (>20 ppm). These results, obtained using a quadrupole ICPMS, illustrate significant promise for in situ U-series isotope analysis, particularly when combined with the greater sensitivity and multi-collection capabilities of new sector ICPMS instrumentation. The latter may permit precise isotope ratio measurements on samples containing only a few ppm of U.

  9. The Effect of Growth Kinetics on the Development of Element- and Isotope Profiles in Single Mineral Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, E. B.; Mueller, T.

    2008-12-01

    The formation of a rock texture is the consequence of multiple interacting processes controlling the crystallization history of minerals, and is typically recorded in several ways and on different scales. Recent advances in microanalysis enable observation of compositional (elemental as well as isotopic) variations on progressively decreasing (sub-mm) scales, and theoretical approaches for simulating realistic, disequilibrium kinetic effects are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Here we present some new perspectives arising from the continuing development of our numerical approach for describing kinetically controlled element uptake and isotope fractionation during diffusion-controlled mineral growth. We assume a spherical grain growing under local equilibrium at the interface with a spherical matrix of a given size and composition. It has been shown previously that the uptake of a component in a growing crystal depends critically upon the ratio of the crystal growth rate (R) to the diffusivity (D) of that component in the growth medium. Highly compatible (or incompatible) elements potentially will be depleted (or accumulated) near the surface of the growing crystal, forming a disequilibrium compositional boundary layer against the advancing interface. Equilibration of this boundary layer with the bulk reservoir depends mainly on D of the species of interest, and because D is now known to vary with mass of an isotope of a given element, signficant isotope fractionation is predicted to occur during progressive mineral growth under some circumstances. In the present study we focus specifically on the role of crystal-growth kinetics [R=f(time)] in controlling isotope profiles recorded in crystals. We show that the amount of fractionation, and especially the shape of the resulting radial isotope profiles, is quite sensitive to the assumed growth law or history. Differences in the initial grain size - as might apply in the case of xenocrysts in magma - have a

  10. Discerning crystal growth from diffusion profiles in zoned olivine by in situ Mg–Fe isotopic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sio, Corliss Kin I.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Chaussidon, Marc; Helz, Rosalind T.; Roskosz, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Mineral zoning is used in diffusion-based geospeedometry to determine magmatic timescales. Progress in this field has been hampered by the challenge to discern mineral zoning produced by diffusion from concentration gradients inherited from crystal growth. A zoned olivine phenocryst from Kilauea Iki lava lake (Hawaii) was selected for this study to evaluate the potential of Mg and Fe isotopes for distinguishing these two processes. Microdrilling of the phenocryst (∼300 μm drill holes) followed by MC-ICPMS analysis of the powders revealed negatively coupled Mg and Fe isotopic fractionations (δ26Mg from +0.1‰ to −0.2‰ and δ56Fe from −1.2‰ to −0.2‰ from core to rim), which can only be explained by Mg–Fe exchange between melt and olivine. The data can be explained with ratios of diffusivities of Mg and Fe isotopes in olivine scaling as D2/D1 = (m1/m2)β with βMg ∼0.16 and βFe ∼0.27. LA-MC-ICPMS and MC-SIMS Fe isotopic measurements are developed and are demonstrated to yield accurate δ56Fe measurements within precisions of ∼0.2‰ (1 SD) at spatial resolutions of ∼50 μm. δ56Fe and δ26Mg stay constant with Fo# in the rim (late-stage overgrowth), whereas in the core (original phenocryst) δ56Fe steeply trends toward lighter compositions and δ26Mg trends toward heavier compositions with higher Fo#. A plot of δ56Fe vs. Fo# immediately distinguishes growth-controlled from diffusion-controlled zoning in these two regions. The results are consistent with the idea that large isotopic fractionation accompanies chemical diffusion in crystals, whereas fractional crystallization induces little or no isotopic fractionation. The cooling timescale inferred from the chemical-isotope zoning profiles is consistent with the documented cooling history of the lava lake. In the absence of geologic context, in situ stable isotopic measurements may now be used to interpret the nature of mineral zoning. Stable isotope measurements by LA-MC-ICPMS and MC

  11. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures and nitrogen profile to identify adulteration in organic fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Verenitch, Sergei; Mazumder, Asit

    2012-08-29

    Recently it has been shown that stable isotopes of nitrogen can be used to discriminate between organic and synthetic fertilizers, but the robustness of the approach is questionable. This work developed a comprehensive method that is far more robust in identifying an adulteration of organic nitrogen fertilizers. Organic fertilizers of various types (manures, composts, blood meal, bone meal, fish meal, products of poultry and plant productions, molasses and seaweed based, and others) available on the North American market were analyzed to reveal the most sensitive criteria as well as their quantitative ranges, which can be used in their authentication. Organic nitrogen fertilizers of known origins with a wide δ(15)N range between -0.55 and 28.85‰ (n = 1258) were characterized for C and N content, δ(13)C, δ(15)N, viscosity, pH, and nitrogen profile (urea, ammonia, organic N, water insoluble N, and NO3). A statistically significant data set of characterized unique organic nitrogen fertilizers (n = 335) of various known origins has been assembled. Deliberately adulterated samples of different types of organic fertilizers mixed with synthetic fertilizers at a wide range of proportions have been used to develop the quantitative critical characteristics of organic fertilizers as the key indicators of their adulteration. Statistical analysis based on the discriminant functions of the quantitative critical characteristics of organic nitrogen fertilizers from 14 different source materials revealed a very high average rate of correct classification. The developed methodology has been successfully used as a source identification tool for numerous commercial nitrogen fertilizers available on the North American market.

  12. A three-dimensional hydrodynamical line profile analysis of iron lines and barium isotopes in HD 140283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, A. J.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Ryan, S. G.; Aoki, W.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Heavy-elements, i.e. those beyond the iron peak, mostly form via two neutron capture processes: the slow (s-) and the rapid (r-) process. Metal-poor stars should contain fewer isotopes that form via the s-process, according to currently accepted theory. It has been shown in several investigations that theory and observation do not agree well, raising questions on the validity of either the methodology or the theory. Aims: We analyse the metal-poor star HD 140283, for which we have a high quality spectrum. We test whether a three-dimensional (3D) local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) stellar atmosphere and spectrum synthesis code permits a more reliable analysis of the iron abundance and barium isotope ratio than a one-dimensional (1D) LTE analysis. Methods: Using 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres, we examine 91 iron lines of varying strength and formation depth. This provides us with the star's rotational speed. With this, we model the barium isotope ratio by exploiting the hyperfine structure of the singly ionised 4554 Å resonance line, and study the impact of the uncertainties in the stellar parameters. Results: The star's rotational speed was found to be 1.65 ± 0.05 km s-1. Barium isotopes under the 3D paradigm show a dominant r-process signature as 77 ± 6 ± 17% (fodd = 0.38 ± 0.02 ± 0.06) of barium isotopes form via the r-process, where errors represent the assigned random and systematic errors, respectively. We find that 3D LTE fits reproduce iron line profiles better than those in 1D, but do not provide a unique abundance (within the uncertainties). However, we demonstrate that the isotopic ratio is robust against this shortcoming. Conclusions: Our barium isotope result agrees well with currently accepted theory regarding the formation of the heavy-elements during the early Galaxy. The improved fit to the asymmetric iron line profiles suggests that the current state of 3D LTE modelling provides excellent simulations of fluid flows. However

  13. Long-term Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics at SPRUCE Revealed through Stable Isotopes in Peat Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen turnover in peatlands is of considerable interest because peat is a large reservoir of stored carbon that could emit greenhouse gases in response to climate change. Because peat cores preserve a long-term record of system carbon and nitrogen dynamics, it is possible to use stable isotopes as markers of changes in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics over time. Here, we used δ15N and δ13C patterns throughout the depth profile of peat cores to understand controls over C-N cycling in the Marcell S1 forested bog in northern Minnesota. In multiple regression analyses, δ15N and δ13C correlated strongly with depth, plot location, %C, %N, and each other. Negative correlation of δ15N with %N presumably reflected removal of 15N-depleted N via denitrification, diffusion, or plant N transfer via mycorrhizal fungi. A step increase in the depth coefficient for δ15N of ~3‰ from -25 cm to -35 cm suggested that the N removal process primarily operates at a discrete depth corresponding to the juncture between aerobic and anaerobic layers defined by the water table. Higher δ15N and lower δ13C in plots closer to uplands may reflect distinct hydrology and accompanying shifts in C and N dynamics in the lagg area fringing the bog. The Suess effect (declining δ13CO2 since the Industrial Revoluation) and aerobic decomposition lowered δ13C in recent surficial samples. Small increases in δ13C at -112 cm (4300 calibrated years BP) and -85 cm (3800 calibrated years BP) may reflect C dynamics during a suspected transitional fen stage (based on paleoecology at a nearby bog), when reduced methanotrophy retained less 13C-depleted carbon derived from methane than in later periods. The C/N decreased until about -85 cm and thereafter remained steady, suggesting that the active zone of aerobic processing during drought may extend to this depth. The inflection point in calculated carbon accumulation rates at this depth supports this conclusion.

  14. Soil formation rates determined from Uranium-series isotope disequilibria in soil profiles from the southeastern Australian highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, P. O.; Dosseto, A.; Hesse, P. P.; Handley, H. K.

    2013-10-01

    The sustainability of soil resources is determined by the balance between the rates of production and removal of soils. Samples from four weathering profiles at Frogs Hollow in the upper catchment area of the Murrumbidgee River (southeastern Australia) were analyzed for their uranium-series (U-series) isotopic composition to estimate soil production rates. Sequential leaching was conducted on sample aliquots to assess how U-series nuclides are distributed between primary and secondary minerals. Soil is increasingly weathered from bottom to top which is evident from the decrease in (234U/238U) ratios and increase in relative quartz content with decreasing soil depth. One soil profile shows little variation in mineralogy and U-series geochemistry with depth, explained by the occurrence of already extensively weathered saprolite, so that further weathering has minimal effect on mineralogy and geochemistry. Al2O3 is mobilized from these soils, and hence a silicon-based weathering index treating Al2O3 as mobile is introduced, which increases with decreasing soil depth, in all profiles. Leached and unleached aliquots show similar mineralogy with slight variation in relative concentrations, whereas the elemental and isotopic composition of uranium and thorium show notable differences between leached and unleached samples. Unleached samples show systematic variations in uranium-series isotopic compositions with depth compared to leached samples. This is most likely explained by the mobilization of U and Th from the samples during leaching. Soil residence times are calculated by modeling U-series activity ratios for each profile separately. Inferred timescales vary up to 30 kyr for unleached aliquots from profile F1 to up to 12 kyr for both leached and unleached aliquots from profile F2. Muscovite content shows a linear relationship with U-series derived soil residence times. This relationship provides an alternative method to estimate residence timescales for profiles with

  15. Geologic implications of the oxygen isotope profile of the Toa Baja drill hole, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.M. )

    1991-03-01

    The whole-rock O-isotopic compositions of volcanic and volcaniclastic samples from the Toa Baja drill hole demonstrate that low-temperature (< 200C) processes have strongly enriched the island arc materials in {sup 18}O. Subsequent to eruption, processes such as subaerial weathering, alteration during transport and deposition in volcaniclastic aprons, submarine weathering, burial diagenesis, and prograde regional metamorphism through the beginning of the prehnite-pumpellyite facies have raised average whole-rock {delta}{sup 18}O values by {approximately}4% for basalt and andesite lava flows, and by {approximately}8% for volcaniclastic sandstones. These O-isotopic disturbances were probably caused by oxygen exchange with regionally circulating seawater under rather high-water/rock conditions. The processes associated with ageing' of volcanic and volcaniclastic materials in the oceanic environment are probably more important to the global budgets of the oxygen isotopes than has been assumed in the past. Integration of these results into global models for the oxygen isotopes awaits analysis of more varied oceanic terranes, to determine the generality of the O-isotopic conclusions proferred here, and to more carefully evaluate the relative sizes of volcanic, volcaniclastic, and oceanic oxygen reservoirs and their variabilities in time.

  16. 13. Relationship of east tool shed, west tool shed, residence, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Relationship of east tool shed, west tool shed, residence, claim house, and privy to each other and immediate surroundings, looking north - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  17. 12. Relationship of est tool shed, west tool shed, residence, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Relationship of est tool shed, west tool shed, residence, claim house, and chicken house to each other and immediate surroundings, looking southeast - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  18. Influence of forest disturbance on stable nitrogen isotope ratios in soil and vegetation profiles

    Treesearch

    Jennifer D. Knoepp; Scott R. Taylor; Lindsay R. Boring; Chelcy F. Miniat

    2015-01-01

    Soil and plant stable nitrogen isotope ratios (15 N) are influenced by atmospheric nitrogen (N) inputs and processes that regulate organic matter (OM) transformation and N cycling. The resulting 15N patterns may be useful for discerning ecosystem differences in N cycling. We studied two ecosystems; longleaf pine wiregrass (...

  19. Sulfur isotopic and proteomic profiles of sulfate reducers grown under differential steady-states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, W.; Venceslau, S.; Waldbauer, J.; Smith, D. A.; Boidi, F. J.; Bradley, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reducers (MSR) drive the Earth's biogeochemical sulfur cycle. At the heart of this energy metabolism is a cascade of redox transformations coupling organic carbon and/or hydrogen oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate to sulfide. The product sulfide is depleted in the heavier isotopes of sulfur, relative to the reactant sulfate, consistent with a normal kinetic isotope effect. However, the magnitude of the net fractionation during MSR can range over a range of 70 permil, consistent with a multi-step set of reactions. This range in MSR fractionation has been shown to mainly depend on: i) the cell-specific sulfate reduction rate (csSRR), and ii) the ambient sulfate concentration. However, the fractionation under identical conditions differs among strains (Bradley et al. 2016. Geobio), and so must also be mediated by strain-specific processes, such as the nature and quantity of individual proteins involved in sulfate reduction, electron transport, and growth. In recent work we have examined the influence of electron donor, electron acceptor, and co-limitation under controlled steady-state culture conditions in order better inform models of MSR isotope fractionation, and the physiological and isotopic response to differential environmental forcings (e.g. Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS). Recent models of the fractionation response to MSR rate (c.f. Bradley 2016; Wing & Halevy, 2016) make specific predictions for the responses of the cellular metabolome and proteome. Here we compare the steady-state S-isotopic fractionation and proteome of `fast' versus `slow' grown D. vulgaris, using replicate chemostats under electron donor limitation. We observe clear and statistically robust changes in some key central MSR and C-metabolism enzymes, though a host of the critical energy-transfer enzymes show no statistically discernable change. We discuss these results in light of recent theoretical advances and their relevance to modern and ancient

  20. Nitrogen Isotope Profiles Through the Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary: Comparing Records from the New Jersey Coastal Plain and Demerara Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, T. M.; Nelson, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary (K-Pg) mass extinction (~65 Mya) resulted in the loss of a wide range of terrigenous and marine organisms. Several lines of evidence, including negative δ13C excursions in sedimentary organic and inorganic carbon profiles, indicate that the marine carbon cycle was altered across the K-Pg, but little information is known about the marine nitrogen cycle. There are also indications that post-boundary water column anoxia may have occurred, but the degree and extent of this anoxic period has not yet been determined. Since the sedimentary δ15N record can provide information on bottom water oxygen levels as well as nitrogen cycling, we have chosen to measure nitrogen isotopes across the boundary to learn more about the environmental water column conditions at the K-Pg. On geological time scales, the nitrogen cycle consists of three main processes: nitrogen fixation, nitrification, and denitrification/anammox, all of which are affected by the amount of oxygen present in the water column. The balance between nitrogen fixation and denitrification/anammox controls the pool of fixed inorganic nitrogen, and can be traced using nitrogen isotopes. If the sediment is well-preserved, the nitrogen isotopic profile can be used to assess the relative changes of denitrification/anammox and nitrogen fixation through time at a particular location. Since the sedimentary δ15N signal is also related to the deep water oxygen concentration via a simple non-linear curve, the δ15N profile can also be used to evaluate the past redox environment at a site. We have measured bulk sediment δ15N profiles from two cores: a borehole core from Bass River on the New Jersey coast (ODP 174AX) and a deep sea core from the Demerara Rise in the Western Tropical Atlantic (ODP 207). Although the two cores differ in proximity to the Chicxulub impact site as well as water depth, both δ15N records become relatively more enriched starting at the K-Pg boundary and progressing

  1. In vivo metabolic flux profiling with stable isotopes discriminates sites and quantifies effects of mitochondrial dysfunction in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovsky, Julian; Clarke, Colleen; Preston, Judith; Bennett, Michael J.; Yudkoff, Marc; Xiao, Rui; Falk, Marni J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disease diagnosis is complicated both by an absence of biomarkers that sufficiently divulge all cases and limited capacity to quantify adverse effects across intermediary metabolism. We applied high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) studies of stable-isotope based precursor–product relationships in the nematode, C. elegans, to interrogate in vivo differences in metabolic flux among distinct genetic models of primary RC defects and closely related metabolic disorders. Methods C. elegans strains studied harbor single nuclear gene defects in complex I, II, or III RC subunits (gas-1, mev-1, isp-1); enzymes involved in coenzyme Q biosynthesis (clk-1), the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA, idh-1), or pyruvate metabolism (pdha-1); and central nodes of the nutrient-sensing signaling network that involve insulin response (daf-2) or the sirtuin homologue (sir-2.1). Synchronous populations of 2000 early larval stage worms were fed standard Escherichia coli on nematode growth media plates containing 1,6-13C2-glucose throughout their developmental period, with samples extracted on the first day of adult life in 4% perchloric acid with an internal standard. Quantitation of whole animal free amino acid concentrations and isotopic incorporation into amino and organic acids throughout development was performed in all strains by HPLC and isotope ratio MS, respectively. GC/MS analysis was also performed to quantify absolute isotopic incorporation in all molecular species of key TCA cycle intermediates in gas-1 and N2 adult worms. Results Genetic mutations within different metabolic pathways displayed distinct metabolic profiles. RC complex I (gas-1) and III (isp-1) subunit mutants, together with the coenzyme Q biosynthetic mutant (clk-1), shared a similar amino acid profile of elevated alanine and decreased glutamate. The metabolic signature of the complex II mutant (mev-1) was distinct from that of the other RC

  2. Magnitude and profile of organic carbon isotope records from the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum: Evidence from northern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, Hayley R.; Grimes, Stephen T.; Sutton, Paul A.; Domingo, Laura; Leng, Melanie J.; Twitchett, Richard J.; Hart, Malcolm B.; Dunkley Jones, Tom; Pancost, Richard D.; Duller, Robert; Lopez-Martinez, Nieves

    2013-08-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a hyperthermal event that occurred ca. 56 Ma, has been attributed to the release of substantial amounts of carbon, affecting the atmosphere, biosphere and the oceans. Current issues with respect to our understanding of the PETM include the amount of carbon released, the duration of carbon release, and the mechanism(s) of release, all of which are related to the magnitude and profile of the associated Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE). High-resolution organic carbon profiles (δ13C) of six PETM sections in northern Spain are presented that span a transect from continental to marine environments. These data represent the highest-resolution isotope records for these sections and allow a comparison of the magnitude of the excursion, the shape of the vertical δ13C profile during the PETM episode, and the relative timing of the onset of the excursion across a linked sediment routing system. Previous studies using carbonate δ13C data have suggested that the continental Claret Conglomerate, found in this region, formed synchronously with a marine clay-rich siliciclastic unit, with these key lithological changes interpreted to be driven by increased seasonal rainfall-runoff in the warmer PETM climate. Our data suggest that deposition of these units did not immediately follow the CIE onset, indicating that there may be a temporal lag between the onset of the PETM warming and the response of the depositional systems in northern Spain. No systematic variation in the magnitude of the CIE between different depositional environments was found; the marine CIE magnitudes are at the higher end of those previously described (3.7±1.4‰), and the continental ranges are lower (3.1±1.3‰).

  3. Determination of geographic provenance of cotton fibres using multi-isotope profiles and multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daeid, N. Nic; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Kemp, H. F.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of cotton fibres can be particularly challenging within a forensic science context where discrimination of one fibre from another is of importance. Normally cotton fibre analysis examines the morphological structure of the recovered material and compares this with that of a known fibre from a particular source of interest. However, the conventional microscopic and chemical analysis of fibres and any associated dyes is generally unsuccessful because of the similar morphology of the fibres. Analysis of the dyes which may have been applied to the cotton fibre can also be undertaken though this can be difficult and unproductive in terms of discriminating one fibre from another. In the study presented here we have explored the potential for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) to be utilised as an additional tool for cotton fibre analysis in an attempt to reveal further discriminatory information. This work has concentrated on un-dyed cotton fibres of known origin in order to expose the potential of the analytical technique. We report the results of a pilot study aimed at testing the hypothesis that multi-element stable isotope analysis of cotton fibres in conjunction with multivariate statistical analysis of the resulting isotopic abundance data using well established chemometric techniques permits sample provenancing based on the determination of where the cotton was grown and as such will facilitate sample discrimination. To date there is no recorded literature of this type of application of IRMS to cotton samples, which may be of forensic science relevance.

  4. Profiles of Steroid Hormones in Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy via Stable Isotope Dilution LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Júnior, Helio A.; Simas, Rosineide C.; Brolio, Marina P.; Ferreira, Christina R.; Perecin, Felipe; Nogueira, Guilherme de P.; Miglino, Maria A.; Martins, Daniele S.; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Ambrósio, Carlos E.

    2015-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) provides the best animal model for characterizing the disease progress of the human disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to determine steroid hormone concentration profiles in healthy golden retriever dogs (control group - CtGR) versus GRMD-gene carrier (CaGR) and affected female dogs (AfCR). Therefore, a sensitive and specific analytical method was developed and validated to determine the estradiol, progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone levels in the canine serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To more accurately understand the dynamic nature of the serum steroid profile, the fluctuating levels of these four steroid hormones over the estrous cycle were compared across the three experimental groups using a multivariate statistical analysis. The concentration profiles of estradiol, cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone revealed a characteristic pattern for each studied group at each specific estrous phase. Additionally, several important changes in the serum concentrations of cortisol and estradiol in the CaGR and AfCR groups seem to be correlated with the status and progression of the muscular dystrophy. A comprehensive and quantitative monitoring of steroid profiles throughout the estrous cycle of normal and GRMD dogs were achieved. Significant differences in these profiles were observed between GRMD and healthy animals, most notably for estradiol. These findings contribute to a better understanding of both dog reproduction and the muscular dystrophy pathology. Our data open new venues for hormonal behavior studies in dystrophinopathies and that may affect the quality of life of DMD patients. PMID:26010907

  5. A Comprehensive Metabolic Profile of Cultured Astrocytes Using Isotopic Transient Metabolic Flux Analysis and 13C-Labeled Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Ana I.; Teixeira, Ana P.; Håkonsen, Bjørn I.; Sonnewald, Ursula; Alves, Paula M.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic models have been used to elucidate important aspects of brain metabolism in recent years. This work applies for the first time the concept of isotopic transient 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) to estimate intracellular fluxes in primary cultures of astrocytes. This methodology comprehensively explores the information provided by 13C labeling time-courses of intracellular metabolites after administration of a 13C-labeled substrate. Cells were incubated with medium containing [1-13C]glucose for 24 h and samples of cell supernatant and extracts collected at different time points were then analyzed by mass spectrometry and/or high performance liquid chromatography. Metabolic fluxes were estimated by fitting a carbon labeling network model to isotopomer profiles experimentally determined. Both the fast isotopic equilibrium of glycolytic metabolite pools and the slow labeling dynamics of TCA cycle intermediates are described well by the model. The large pools of glutamate and aspartate which are linked to the TCA cycle via reversible aminotransferase reactions are likely to be responsible for the observed delay in equilibration of TCA cycle intermediates. Furthermore, it was estimated that 11% of the glucose taken up by astrocytes was diverted to the pentose phosphate pathway. In addition, considerable fluxes through pyruvate carboxylase [PC; PC/pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) ratio = 0.5], malic enzyme (5% of the total pyruvate production), and catabolism of branched-chained amino acids (contributing with ∼40% to total acetyl-CoA produced) confirmed the significance of these pathways to astrocytic metabolism. Consistent with the need of maintaining cytosolic redox potential, the fluxes through the malate–aspartate shuttle and the PDH pathway were comparable. Finally, the estimated glutamate/α-ketoglutarate exchange rate (∼0.7 μmol mg prot−1 h−1) was similar to the TCA cycle flux. In conclusion, this work demonstrates the potential of

  6. Weathering processes and dating of soil profiles from São Paulo State, Brazil, by U-isotopes disequilibria.

    PubMed

    Bonotto, Daniel Marcos; Jiménez-Rueda, Jairo Roberto; Fagundes, Isabella Cruz; Filho, Carlos Roberto Alves Fonseca

    2017-01-01

    This study reports the use of the U-series radionuclides (238)U and (234)U for dating two soil profiles. The soil horizons developed over sandstones from Tatuí and Pirambóia formations at the Paraná sedimentary basin, São Paulo State, Brazil. Chemical data in conjunction with the (234)U/(238)U activity ratios (AR's) of the soil horizons allowed investigating the U-isotopes mobility in the shallow oxidizing environment. Kaolinization and laterization processes are taking place in the profiles sampled, as they are especially common in regions characterized by a wet and dry tropical climate and a water table that is close to the surface. These processes are implied by inverse significant correlations between silica and iron in both soil profiles. Iron oxides were also very important to retain uranium in the two sites investigated, helping on the understanding of the weathering processes acting there. (238)U and its progeny (234)U permitted evaluating the processes of physical and chemical alteration, allowing the suggestion of a possible timescale corresponding to the Middle Pleistocene for the development of the more superficial soil horizons.

  7. Lifetimes in neutron-rich Nd isotopes measured by Doppler profile method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    Lifetimes of the rotational levels in neutron-rich even-even Nd isotopes were deduced from the analysis of the Doppler broadened line shapes. The experiment was performed at Daresbury with the Eurogam array, which at that time consisted of 45 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and 5 Low-Energy Photon Spectrometers. The source was in the form of a 7-mm pellet which was prepared by mixing 5-mg; {sup 248}Cm and 65-mg KCl and pressing it under high pressure. Events for which three or more detectors fired were used to construct a cubic data array whose axes represented the {gamma}-ray energies and the contents of each channel the number of events with that particular combination of {gamma}-ray energies. From this cubic array, one-dimensional spectra were generated by placing gates on peaks on the other two axes. Gamma-ray spectra of even-even Nd isotopes were obtained by gating on the transitions in the complimentary Kr fragments. The gamma peaks de-exciting states with I {>=} 12 h were found to be broader than the instrumental line width due to the Doppler effect. The line shapes of they-ray peaks were fitted separately with a simple model for the feeding of the states and assuming a rotational band with constant intrinsic quadruple moment and these are shown in Fig. I-27. The quadrupole moments thus determined were found to be in good agreement with the quadrupole moments measured previously for lower spin states. Because of the success of this technique for the Nd isotopes, we intend to apply this technique to the new larger data set collected with the Eurogam II array. The results of this study were published.

  8. Profiling of Free Fatty Acids Using Stable Isotope Tagging Uncovers a Role for Saturated Fatty Acids in Neuroexocytosis.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Vinod K; Tomatis, Vanesa M; Wang, Tong; Kvaskoff, David; Meunier, Frederic A

    2015-10-20

    The phospholipase-catalyzed release of free fatty acids (FFAs) from phospholipids is implicated in many critical biological processes such as neurotransmission, inflammation, and cancer. However, determining the individual change in FFAs generated during these processes has remained challenging due to the limitations of current methods, and has hampered our understanding of these key mediators. Here, we developed an "iTRAQ"-like method for profiling FFAs by stable isotope tagging (FFAST), based on the differential labeling of the carboxyl group and designed to resolve analytical variance, through a multiplexed assay in cells and subcellular fractions. With nanomolar sensitivity, this method revealed a spectrum of saturated FFAs elicited during stimulation of exocytosis that was identical in neurons and neurosecretory cells. Purified secretory vesicles also generated these FFAs when challenged with cytosol. Our multiplex method will be invaluable to assess the range of FFAs generated in other physiological and pathological settings.

  9. Stable oxygen and carbon isotope profiles in an invasive bivalve ( Corbicula fluminea) in North Carolina watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, John P.; Showers, William J.; Genna, Bernie; Levine, Jay F.

    2009-06-01

    The modern invasive bivalve Corbicula fluminea was collected in 2006 from three sites with different land uses located in a North Carolina River Basin. The primary objective was to describe the δ 18O and δ 13C profiles of C. fluminea shells under various land use conditions. An additional aim was to evaluate whether growth patterns of C. fluminea form seasonally. Annual shell growth patterns were measured from the umbo to the margin and co-varied with estimates of ambient water temperature, corresponding to seasonal variation. The C. fluminea growth patterns as translucent bands (slower growth) appeared to form during winter months and opaque bands (rapid growth) formed during summer. A mixed model analysis (ANOVA) showed a significant site level effect of δ 18O and δ 13C profiles examined among sites ( F = 17.1; p = 0.003). A second model showed a borderline significant site effect among profiles with variability more pronounced at the urban site, Crabtree Creek ( p = 0.085). Previous habitat assessment ratings and water chemistry measurements suggested that the urban site was more impacted by storm water runoff. Understanding δ 18O and δ 13C SHELL profiles and shell growth patterns of the invasive bivalve ( C. fluminea) may help establish a framework for using these animals as biomonitors to record water temperature and nutrient pollution.

  10. Screening halogenated environmental contaminants in biota based on isotopic pattern and mass defect provided by high resolution mass spectrometry profiling.

    PubMed

    Cariou, Ronan; Omer, Elsa; Léon, Alexis; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2016-09-14

    In the present work, we addressed the question of global seeking/screening organohalogenated compounds in a large panel of complex biological matrices, with a particular focus on unknown chemicals that may be considered as potential emerging hazards. A fishing strategy was developed based on untargeted profiling among full scan acquisition datasets provided by high resolution mass spectrometry. Since large datasets arise from such profiling, filtering useful information stands as a central question. In this way, we took advantage of the exact mass differences between Cl and Br isotopes. Indeed, our workflow involved an innovative Visual Basic for Applications script aiming at pairing features according to this mass difference, in order to point out potential organohalogenated clusters, preceded by an automated peak picking step based on the centWave function (xcms package of open access R programming environment). Then, H/Cl-scale mass defect plots were used to visualize the datasets before and after filtering. The filtering script was successfully applied to a dataset generated upon liquid chromatography coupled to ESI(-)-HRMS measurement from one eel muscle extract, allowing for realistic manual investigations of filtered clusters. Starting from 9789 initial obtained features, 1994 features were paired in 589 clusters. Hexabromocyclododecane, chlorinated paraffin series and various other compounds have been identified or tentatively identified, allowing thus broad screening of organohalogenated compounds in this extract. Although realistic, manual review of paired clusters remains time consuming and much effort should be devoted to automation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. DISTANT VIEW, BLM TACK SHED ON LEFT, BLM SEED SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DISTANT VIEW, BLM TACK SHED ON LEFT, BLM SEED SHED AT LEFT CENTER, FIRE DISPATCH OFFICES 1 AND 2 AT RIGHT CENTER, UTILITY BUILDING "B" ON RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  12. A strontium isotope and trace element profile through the Partridge River Troctolite, Duluth complex, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Norman K.; Molling, Philip A.

    1981-10-01

    Initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios down a 2,315 foot-long core (DDH-295) through the Partridge River Troctolite are lower in the depth range 710-1,410 feet (0.70443±22) than in the underlying and overlying rocks (0.70500±18). These initial ratio variations define three zones (I, II, and III) thought to be three intrusive units within the troctolite. The best estimate of the Rb-Sr age of the troctolite is 1,050±105 m.y. The olivine compositions and the abundances of the incompatible trace elements Zr, Y, and Rb show identical variations down the core, with downward repetitions of olivine iron-enrichment and incompatible trace element enrichments. Discontinuities in the olivine compositions and incompatible trace element abundances match the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio discontinuities in the core. The strontium isotope data imply that involatile components of the Proterozoic Virginia Formation and other Archaean rocks were not significantly assimilated by the troctolites, for only three out of the twenty-three initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios depart from normal magmatic values. These three anomalous ratios are not systematically related to the Cu-Ni sulphide mineralization and may be the result of secondary calcite in the troctolite. The strontium isotope systematics of the Virginia Formation xenoliths and underlying hornfelses are highly disturbed as a result of Rb loss. The apparently inverted fractionation sequences in the troctolites are interpreted in terms of downward increases in intercumulus liquid in repeated magma batches and controlled by plagioclase flotation. The amount of intercumulus liquid is estimated to range from 7 to 61 weight per cent. The Cu-Ni sulphides are concentrated in the lower 250 feet of zone I (immediately above the Virginia Formation) and through 400 feet of core across the contact between zones I and II, more than 750 feet above the base. Because the sulphide-bearing troctolites are not systematically related to disturbances in the magmatic initial 87Sr

  13. Regional differences in collagen stable isotope and tissue trace element profiles in populations of long-tailed duck breeding in the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Braune, Birgit M; Hobson, Keith A; Malone, Brian J

    2005-06-15

    Adult long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) were collected from nine locations across their breeding grounds in northern Canada and measurements of stable isotopes of carbon (delta(13)C), nitrogen (delta(15)N) and sulfur (delta(34)S) in bone collagen were used to investigate if relative use of freshwater habitats such as the Great Lakes (with expected depleted stable isotope profiles) compared with coastal marine environments (with expected enriched stable isotope foodweb profiles) could explain tissue trace element profiles. Contrary to expectation, all three stable isotopes did not covary in our sample, suggesting that mechanisms other than simple freshwater vs. marine isotopic gradients were involved among populations. All three stable isotopes varied significantly with collection location and both delta(15)N and delta(13)C values varied significantly between sexes suggesting that males exploit either a different food base or occur in different geographic areas than females for at least part of the year. The delta(34)S data, in particular, suggested that many of the birds breeding in the western Canadian Arctic probably overwinter in the Great Lakes along with many of the birds breeding in Hudson Bay. Males at the majority of collection locations had higher concentrations of hepatic Hg (1.1-8 microg/g dw), Cu (25-40 mug/g dw), Se (7.3-27 mug/g dw) and renal Cd (33-129 microg/g dw) than females. Concentrations of Hg, Cu and Cd were well below toxicological threshold levels found in the literature. However, hepatic Se concentrations in 64% of the females exceeded 10 mug/g dw and concentrations in 8% of the birds measured exceeded 33 microg/g dw suggesting levels of potential concern.

  14. Solute transport in formations of very low permeability: profiles of stable isotope and dissolved noble gas contents of pore water in the Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rübel, André P.; Sonntag, Christian; Lippmann, Johanna; Pearson, F. J.; Gautschi, Andreas

    2002-04-01

    Pore water profiles of water, stable isotope, and dissolved noble gas content have been determined across the Opalinus Clay and adjacent formations at the rock laboratory at Mont Terri. We have found enhanced helium contents (up to [ 4He] = 1 × 10 -4 cubic centimeters at standard pressure and temperature per gram of pore water) and argon isotope ratios ( 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios up to 334) due to accumulation of 4He and 40Ar produced in situ. The helium profile was found to be in steady state with respect to in situ production and diffusive loss into the adjacent limestones where groundwater circulates. From this profile a representative mean value of the apparent diffusion coefficient for helium in the pore water of the whole formation was derived for the first time to be D a = 3.5 × 10 -11 m 2 · s -1, which is more than two orders of magnitude lower than the diffusion coefficient D 0 in free water. The stable isotope profile, however, indicates a component of fossil marine pore water, which has not yet been replaced by molecular diffusion of meteoric water from the adjacent limestone and shale formations over the past 10 million years.

  15. Sulfate, Methane, Alkalinity, Calcium and Carbon Isotope (δ13C) Profiles as an Indicator of Upward Methane Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Bhatnagar, G.; Chapman, W. G.; Dickens, G. R.; Dugan, B.; Hirasaki, G. J.

    2009-12-01

    The upward flux of methane is an important determinant for the amount of hydrate that may potentially be present in the sediments. One approach to measure methane flux is to relate sulfate methane transition (SMT) depth to the methane flux via anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) reaction (Borowski et al., 1996; Dickens and Snyder, 2009). However, numerous prominent authors such as Kastner argue that consumption of pore water sulfate in shallow sediments is a result of oxidation of particulate organic carbon (POC) as opposed to methane. Another contradictory argument between these two groups is based on the carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) across the SMT. The articles in Fire in the ice by Kastner et al. (2008) and Dickens and Snyder (2009) focus on these two important arguments in the gas hydrate community and warrant more detailed modeling to help resolve the questions raised by these two groups. We examine the two hypotheses by the two groups and reconcile their interpretations using Bhatnagar’s 1-D model (2008). This model computes methane and sulfate mass balances with both advective and diffusive fluxes. In addition to the mass balances, sulfate consumption reactions following the two pathways (i.e. POC driven and anaerobic oxidation of methane) have been included in the current model. Setting the model parameters to represent zero net flux, and thus assuming a closed system, we are able to justify Kastner’s interpretations. Bicarbonate (DIC) or alkalinity, Ca2+ (for calculating carbonate precipitation), and δ13C in DIC profiles are computed in addition to the sulfate and methane profiles along depth to provide an understanding of the contribution due to the deep bicarbonate flux. This deep flux of bicarbonate profile would validate Dickens’ interpretations and justify the dominance of the AOM reaction for consumption of sulfate in shallow sediments. This model serves as a tool to interpret methane flux with the

  16. Stable Isotope Profiling of Internet-Sourced Viagra® and 'generic- Viagra' Tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Helen; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram

    2013-04-01

    Viagra® manufactured by Pfizer was the first prescription drug for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED), a condition that is estimated to affect 1 in 10 men at some stage in their lives (1). Viagra® contains the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) sildenafil, as the citrate salt. Sildenafil, along with Tadalafil and Vardenafil belong to a class of drugs known as phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. Since its first production in 1998, Viagra® has generated well in excess of 10 billion US dollars in sales (2) and with Pfizers' patent extended to April 2020 (3) it still remains the only sildenafil-based treatment option for sufferers of ED in the US. There are no legal 'generic-Viagra' formulations available in the US. However, formulations containing sildenafil citrate as API are widely available over the internet and often sold as 'generic Viagra'. These cheaper alternatives are often manufactured under less than ideal conditions with little or no QA/QC procedures in place. The World Health Organisation recognised the scale of the problem in its 2010 bulletin "Growing threat from counterfeit medicines" (4) and quotes a Dutch study cited in the International Journal of Clinical Practice in which from a cohort of 370 seized Viagra® samples, only 10 were genuine. We sourced a variety of tablets sold for the treatment of ED which claimed to have sildenafil citrate as API. Viagra®, 'generic-Viagra', Kamagra, Silagra and Filagra tablets were ordered via the internet and supplied from both UK-based pharmacies as well as overseas suppliers (Hong Kong, India, Vanuata). In this small-scale pilot study, we present results from bulk 2H/18O and 13C/15N stable isotope analysis performed on crushed tablets from 23 samples of internet-sourced tablets sold for the treatment of ED and purported to contain sildenafil citrate as API. References 1. www.healthcare.org.uk 2. www.moneynews.com 3. US Patent & trademark office (www.uspto.gov) 4. WHO bulletin 2010; 88:247-248

  17. Detection of testosterone administration based on the carbon isotope ratio profiling of endogenous steroids: international reference populations of professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Strahm, E; Emery, C; Saugy, M; Dvorak, J; Saudan, C

    2009-12-01

    The determination of the carbon isotope ratio in androgen metabolites has been previously shown to be a reliable, direct method to detect testosterone misuse in the context of antidoping testing. Here, the variability in the 13C/12C ratios in urinary steroids in a widely heterogeneous cohort of professional soccer players residing in different countries (Argentina, Italy, Japan, South Africa, Switzerland and Uganda) is examined. Carbon isotope ratios of selected androgens in urine specimens were determined using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Urinary steroids in Italian and Swiss populations were found to be enriched in 13C relative to other groups, reflecting higher consumption of C3 plants in these two countries. Importantly, detection criteria based on the difference in the carbon isotope ratio of androsterone and pregnanediol for each population were found to be well below the established threshold value for positive cases. The results obtained with the tested diet groups highlight the importance of adapting the criteria if one wishes to increase the sensitivity of exogenous testosterone detection. In addition, confirmatory tests might be rendered more efficient by combining isotope ratio mass spectrometry with refined interpretation criteria for positivity and subject-based profiling of steroids.

  18. Variations in [sup 18]O/[sup 16]O ratios of kaolinites within a lateritic profile: Their significance for laterite genesis and isotope paleoclimatology

    SciTech Connect

    Giral, S.; Girard, J.P.; Savin, S.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Nahon, D.B. )

    1992-01-01

    The authors have made an integrated study of the field occurrence, petrology, mineralogy and crystallography, and oxygen isotope geochemistry of an active lateritic profile from about 60 km north of Manaus (Amazonia, Brazil). The parent rock is an arkosic sandstone. The delta O-18 values of kaolinites from the profile are far from uniform. The total range is about 2.4 per mil (18.7 to 21.1 per mil). The calculated delta O-18 value of kaolinite in isotopic equilibrium with local average precipitation and mean annual temperature is 19.6 per mil, within the range of the measured values. Kaolinite of each of several textural occurrences also shows significant isotopic variation both vertically and within a given horizon. Different size fractions of kaolinite of a single textural occurrence within a single horizon also exhibit differences in delta O-18 values. At depths below a few meters, they expect the temperature and the delta O-18 values of the soil water profile to be relatively uniform at any time. If this is so, the variations in delta O-18 values of the kaolinites would suggest that the formation of different populations occurred at different times. They cannot yet distinguish between variations of conditions that were seasonal and variations that occurred on scales of many years. However, it is most important to resolve the causes of these variations before using the delta O-18 values of soil clays for purposes of paleoclimatic reconstruction.

  19. Isotopic signature of selected lanthanides for nuclear activities profiling using cloud point extraction and ICP-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Charles; Lebed, Pablo J; Larivière, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    The presence of fission products, which include numerous isotopes of lanthanides, can impact the isotopic ratios of these elements in the environment. A cloud point extraction (CPE) method was used as a preconcentration/separation strategy prior to measurement of isotopic ratios of three lanthanides (Nd, Sm, and Eu) by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). To minimise polyatomic interference, the combination of interferents removal by CPE, reaction/collision cell conditions in He and NH3 mode and tandem quadrupole configuration was investigated and provided optimal results for the determination of isotopic ratio in environmental samples. Isotopic ratios were initially measured in San Joaquin soil (NIST-2709a), an area with little contamination of nuclear origin. Finally, samples collected from three sites with known nuclear activities (Fangataufa Lagoon in French Polynesia, Chernobyl and the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratory) were analysed and all exhibited altered isotopic ratios for (143/145)Nd, (147/149)Sm, and (151/153)Eu. These results demonstrate the potential of CPE and ICP-MS/MS for the detection of altered isotopic ratio in environmental samples collected in area subjected to nuclear anthropogenic contamination. The detection of variations in these isotopic ratios of fission products represents the first application of CPE in nuclear forensic investigations of environmental samples.

  20. Continuous profiles of microstructure, stable water isotopes and impurity content of the 2m snow pack from three polar drill sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Johannes; Schaller, Christoph; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Hörhold, Maria; Schaidt, Maximilian; Sander, Merle; Moser, Dorothea

    2017-04-01

    Interpreting polar ice as climate archive requires profound knowledge about the formation of climate-proxies within the upper snow column. In order to investigate different impact factors on signal formation we performed a multiproxy- approach for 2m deep snow profiles by continuously measuring the 3D-microstructure using core-scale X-CT and the isotopic composition and impurity load in discrete samples of 1.1cm spatial resolution. The study includes profiles from a low-accumulation site on the East Antarctic plateau (Kohnen Station, DML), a typical medium-accumulation site on the North-East-Greenland ice sheet (EGRIP drilling camp) and a high-accumulation site on the Renland ice cap (East-coast of Greenland, RECAP drilling camp). Major observations are the tooth-shaped imprint of structural anisotropy and sulfate concentrations at the low accumulation site, the clear isotopic inter-annual variations that are in line with distinct impurity peaks at the high-accumulation site and the unexpected missing footprint of ice crusts and refrozen melt layers within the impurity- and isotope records for all sites.

  1. Stable Isotope Ratio and Elemental Profile Combined with Support Vector Machine for Provenance Discrimination of Oolong Tea (Wuyi-Rock Tea)

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yun-xiao; Fu, Xian-shu; Yu, Xiao-ping; Zhang, Ya-fen

    2017-01-01

    This paper focused on an effective method to discriminate the geographical origin of Wuyi-Rock tea by the stable isotope ratio (SIR) and metallic element profiling (MEP) combined with support vector machine (SVM) analysis. Wuyi-Rock tea (n = 99) collected from nine producing areas and non-Wuyi-Rock tea (n = 33) from eleven nonproducing areas were analysed for SIR and MEP by established methods. The SVM model based on coupled data produced the best prediction accuracy (0.9773). This prediction shows that instrumental methods combined with a classification model can provide an effective and stable tool for provenance discrimination. Moreover, every feature variable in stable isotope and metallic element data was ranked by its contribution to the model. The results show that δ2H, δ18O, Cs, Cu, Ca, and Rb contents are significant indications for provenance discrimination and not all of the metallic elements improve the prediction accuracy of the SVM model. PMID:28473941

  2. View Shed - Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-18

    The View Shed library is a collection of Umbra modules that are used to calculate areas of visual coverage (view sheds). It maps high and low visibility areas and calculates sensor (camera placement for maximum coverage and performance. This assertion includes a managed C++ wrapper code (ViewShedWrapper) to enable C# applications, such as OpShed, to incorporate this library.

  3. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macintosh, Henry G.

    An introduction to profiles is presented with examples provided to permit an overall appraisal of the potential of profiles, of the principles upon which they might be based, and of the problems that will have to be overcome if their potential is to be realized in practice. The larger scale examples of profiles discussed are the Scottish Pupil…

  4. Lead isotopic compositions of soil and near-surface till profiles from a watershed containing arsenic-enriched groundwater in coastal Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, Robert; Foley, Nora; Wandless, Gregory; Dillingham, Jeremy; Colvin, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Lead isotope compositions of soils and near-surface tills from an area of coastal Maine known to have groundwater with anomalously high arsenic contents were measured in order to determine the source of the lead and, by inference, possible sources of arsenic. Five soil and till sites were selected for detailed chemical and isotopic analysis. To construct profiles of the soil and till horizons, five samples were collected at 10-cm intervals from the surface to the base of each horizon. Total lead and arsenic concentrations and lead isotopic compositions were measured for 48 leaches and bulk residues. The soils and tills are underlain by sulfidic schists of the Penobscot Formation. Several generations of minerals containing arsenic and lead exist in the regional bedrock, including rock-forming silicates (feldspar and micas), sulfide minerals formed during diagenesis (for example, arsenic-rich pyrite), and sulfide and oxide minerals that formed as a result of Silurian metamorphic and igneous events (for example, arsenopyrite, galena, iron-oxides, and arsenic-sulfides). A young group of secondary minerals (for example, iron-hydroxides, arsenic-hydroxides, lead-sulfate, and arsenic-jarosite) formed from recent weathering and pedogenic processes.

  5. Shed syndecan-2 inhibits angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Giulia; Evans, Alun R.; Kay, Emma; Woodfin, Abigail; McKay, Tristan R.; Nourshargh, Sussan; Whiteford, James R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Angiogenesis is essential for the development of a normal vasculature, tissue repair and reproduction, and also has roles in the progression of diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. The heparan sulphate proteoglycan syndecan-2 is expressed on mesenchymal cells in the vasculature and, like the other members of its family, can be shed from the cell surface resulting in the release of its extracellular core protein. The purpose of this study was to establish whether shed syndecan-2 affects angiogenesis. We demonstrate that shed syndecan-2 regulates angiogenesis by inhibiting endothelial cell migration in human and rodent models and, as a result, reduces tumour growth. Furthermore, our findings show that these effects are mediated by the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor CD148 (also known as PTPRJ) and this interaction corresponds with a decrease in active β1 integrin. Collectively, these data demonstrate an unexplored pathway for the regulation of new blood vessel formation and identify syndecan-2 as a therapeutic target in pathologies characterised by angiogenesis. PMID:25179601

  6. Equilibrium and kinetic Si isotope fractionation factors and their implications on Si isotope distributions in the Earth's surface environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Zhang, S.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Several important equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors among minerals, organic molecules and the H4SiO4 solution are complemented to facilitate explanation of distributions of Si isotope in the Earth's surface environments. The results reveal that heavy Si isotopes will be significantly enriched in the secondary silicate minerals in comparison to aqueous H4SiO4. On the contrary, quadra-coordinated organosilicon complexes are enriched in light silicon isotope relative to the solution. The extent of 28Si-enrichment in hyper-coordinated organosilicon complexes is found the largest. In addition, the large kinetic isotope effect associated with the polymerization of monosilicic acid and dimer is calculated and the result supports previous statement that highly 28Si-enrichment in the formation of amorphous quartz precursor contributes to the discrepancy between theoretical calculations and field observations. With equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors provided here, Si isotope distributions in many surface systems of the Earth can be explained. For example, the change of bulk soil δ30Si can be predicted as a concave pattern with respect to weathering degree, with the minimum value where allophane completely dissolves and the total amount of sesqui-oxides and poorly crystalline minerals reaches its maximum. When well-crystallized clays start to precipitate from pore solutions under equilibrium conditions, the bulk soil δ30Si will increase again and reach a constant value. Similarly, the precipitation of crystalline smectite and the dissolution of poorly crystalline kaolinite may explain δ30Si variations in the ground water profile. Equilibrium Si isotope fractionations among quadra-coordinated organosilicon complexes and the H4SiO4 solution may also shed the light on the Si isotope distributions in Si-accumulating plants.

  7. Influence of relative abundance of isotopes on depth resolution for depth profiling of metal coatings by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fariñas, Juan C; Coedo, Aurora G; Dorado, Teresa

    2010-04-15

    A systematic study on the influence of relative abundance of isotopes of elements in the coating (A(c)) and in the substrate (A(s)) on both shape of time-resolved signals and depth resolution (Delta z) was performed for depth profile analysis of metal coatings on metal substrates by ultraviolet (266 nm) nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry. Five coated samples with coating thicknesses of the same order of magnitude (20-30 microm) were tested: nickel coating on aluminium, chromium and copper, and steel coated with copper and zinc. A laser repetition rate of 1 Hz and a laser fluence of 21 J cm(-2) were used. Five different depth profile types were established, which showed a clear dependence on A(c)/A(s) ratio. In general, depth profiles obtained for ratios above 1-10 could not be used to determine Delta z. We found that Delta z increased non-linearly with A(c)/A(s) ratio. The best depth profile types, leading to highest depth resolution and reproducibility, were attained in all cases by using the isotopes with low/medium A(c) values and with the highest A(s) values. In these conditions, an improvement of up to 4 times in Delta z values was achieved. The average ablation rates were in the range from 0.55 microm pulse(-1) for copper coating on steel to 0.83 microm pulse(-1) for zinc coating on steel, and the Delta z values were between 2.74 microm for nickel coating on chromium and 5.91 microm for nickel coating on copper, with RSD values about 5-8%.

  8. Stable water isotopes and large-scale vertical motions in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torri, Giuseppe; Ma, Ding; Kuang, Zhiming

    2017-04-01

    A complete understanding of the interaction between convection and the large-scale circulation in the tropics remains an outstanding problem. Although there is evidence that the vertical structure of convective heating has great influence in the large-scale response and that this structure also presents considerable geographical variations, more need to be done. One of the questions that are still unanswered is how the vertical structure of the convective heating, or, similarly, of vertical velocity, varies across the tropical Pacific. Here it is suggested that some light can be shed on this debate by considering stable water isotopes. Because these tend to be progressively less abundant with increasing height, precipitation associated with top heavy profiles should be expected to be more depleted than that associated with bottom heavy profiles. This claim is verified with a variety of data: first, using observations from IAEA/WMO Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation stations; then, using a simple model based on the budget of water isotopes in precipitation; finally, using a more complex isotope-enabled general circulation model. Evidence provided by these sources confirms that different structures of vertical velocities are associated with different isotopic abundances, with top heavy profiles giving rise to more depleted rainfall. Finally, the data from over the Pacific, although scarce, seem to suggest that precipitation in the eastern part is more enriched than in the western, thus hinting at velocity profiles over the East being more bottom heavy than over the West Pacific.

  9. Strontium and oxygen isotopic profiles through 3 km of hydrothermally altered oceanic crust in the Reykjanes Geothermal System, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, N. E.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Schiffman, P.

    2010-12-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Program well of opportunity RN-17 was drilled 3 km into a section of hydrothermally altered basaltic crust in the Reykjanes geothermal system in Iceland. The system is located on the landward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the circulating hydrothermal fluid is modified seawater, making Reykjanes a useful analogue for mid-oceanic ridge hydrothermal systems. Whole rock oxygen isotope ratios range from -0.13 to 3.61‰, which are significantly depleted relative to fresh MORB (5.8±0.2‰). If oxygen isotope exchange between fluid and rock proceeded under equilibrium in a closed system, the bulk of the exchange must have occurred in the presence of a meteoric- as opposed to seawater-derived fluid. The concentrations of Sr in the altered basalt range from well below to well above concentrations in fresh rock, and appear to be strongly correlated with the dominant alteration mineralogy, although there is no correlation with 87Sr/86Sr isotopic ratios. Whole rock Sr isotopic ratios ranged from 0.70329 in the least altered crystalline basalt, to 0.70609 in the most altered hyaloclastite samples; there is no correlation with depth. Sr isotopic variation in epidote grains measured by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS ranged from 0.70353 to 0.70731. Three depth intervals have distinctive isotopic signatures, at 1000 m, 1350 m, and 2000 m depth, where 87Sr/86Sr ratios are elevated (mean value >0.7050) relative to background levels (mean altered basalt value ~0.7042). These areas are proximal to feed zones, and the 1350 m interval directly overlies the transition from dominantly extrusive to intrusive lithologies. Strontium and oxygen isotope data indicate that the greenschist-altered basalts were in equilibrium with modified hydrothermal fluids at a relatively high mean water/rock mass ratios (generally in the range 1-3), and require the presence of both meteoric- and seawater-derived recharge fluids at various stages in the hydrothermal history.

  10. Determining water sources in the boundary layer from tall tower profiles of water vapor and surface water isotope ratios after a snowstorm in Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noone, D.; Risi, C.; Bailey, A.; Berkelhammer, M.; Brown, D. P.; Buenning, N.; Gregory, S.; Nusbaumer, J.; Schneider, D.; Sykes, J.; Vanderwende, B.; Wong, J.; Meillier, Y.; Wolfe, D.

    2012-07-01

    The D/H isotope ratio is used to attribute boundary layer humidity changes to the set of contributing fluxes for a case following a snowstorm in which a snow pack of about 10 cm vanished. Profiles of H2O and CO2 mixing ratio, D/H isotope ratio, and several thermodynamic properties were measured from the surface to 300 m every 15 min during four winter days near Boulder, Colorado. Coeval analysis of the D/H ratios and CO2 concentrations find these two variables to be complementary with the former being sensitive to daytime surface fluxes and the latter particularly indicative of nocturnal surface sources. Together they capture evidence for strong vertical mixing during the day, weaker mixing by turbulent bursts and low level jets within the nocturnal stable boundary layer during the night, and frost formation in the morning. The profiles are generally not well described with a gradient mixing line analysis because D/H ratios of the end members (i.e., surface fluxes and the free troposphere) evolve throughout the day which leads to large uncertainties in the estimate of the D/H ratio of surface water flux. A mass balance model is constructed for the snow pack, and constrained with observations to provide an optimal estimate of the partitioning of the surface water flux into contributions from sublimation, evaporation of melt water in the snow and evaporation from ponds. Results show that while vapor measurements are important in constraining surface fluxes, measurements of the source reservoirs (soil water, snow pack and standing liquid) offer stronger constraint on the surface water balance. Measurements of surface water are therefore essential in developing observational programs that seek to use isotopic data for flux attribution.

  11. Determining water sources in the boundary layer from tall tower profiles of water vapor and surface water isotope ratios after a snowstorm in Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noone, D.; Risi, C.; Bailey, A.; Berkelhammer, M.; Brown, D. P.; Buenning, N.; Gregory, S.; Nusbaumer, J.; Schneider, D.; Sykes, J.; Vanderwende, B.; Wong, J.; Meillier, Y.; Wolfe, D.

    2013-02-01

    The D/H isotope ratio is used to attribute boundary layer humidity changes to the set of contributing fluxes for a case following a snowstorm in which a snow pack of about 10 cm vanished. Profiles of H2O and CO2 mixing ratio, D/H isotope ratio, and several thermodynamic properties were measured from the surface to 300 m every 15 min during four winter days near Boulder, Colorado. Coeval analysis of the D/H ratios and CO2 concentrations find these two variables to be complementary with the former being sensitive to daytime surface fluxes and the latter particularly indicative of nocturnal surface sources. Together they capture evidence for strong vertical mixing during the day, weaker mixing by turbulent bursts and low level jets within the nocturnal stable boundary layer during the night, and frost formation in the morning. The profiles are generally not well described with a gradient mixing line analysis because D/H ratios of the end members (i.e., surface fluxes and the free troposphere) evolve throughout the day which leads to large uncertainties in the estimate of the D/H ratio of surface water flux. A mass balance model is constructed for the snow pack, and constrained with observations to provide an optimal estimate of the partitioning of the surface water flux into contributions from sublimation, evaporation of melt water in the snow and evaporation from ponds. Results show that while vapor measurements are important in constraining surface fluxes, measurements of the source reservoirs (soil water, snow pack and standing liquid) offer stronger constraint on the surface water balance. Measurements of surface water are therefore essential in developing observational programs that seek to use isotopic data for flux attribution.

  12. Influence of chemical weathering on the composition of the continental crust: Insights from Li and Nd isotopes in bauxite profiles developed on Columbia River Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Rudnick, Roberta L.; McDonough, William F.; Cummings, Michael L.

    2013-08-01

    Mineralogical, chemical, and Li and Nd isotopic compositions of two drill cores (8-9 m deep) through bauxites developed on the Miocene Columbia River Basalts document the changes associated with basalt weathering, provide insights into the processes involved, and allow us to examine the overall influence of chemical weathering on juvenile (basaltic) crust. Gibbsite, hematite, ±kaolinite, halloysite, goethite, and maghemite are the weathering products in the bauxites. Quartz is observed near the tops of the cores and its abundance decreases progressively with depth; no quartz is observed below five meters depth in either core. Most major and trace elements, including "mobile" and some "immobile" elements are severely depleted in the bauxites. Niobium is less mobile relative to the rare earth elements, thus chemical weathering attenuates the negative Nb anomaly in the continental crust. Li and Nd are strongly depleted relative to fresh basalt, and both increase systematically towards the surface in the quartz-bearing samples while δ7Li and ɛNd values decrease systematically towards the surface in these same samples. Both Li and Nd were likely lost from the bauxites through leaching. The systematic enrichment of Li, Nd, and quartz, as well as the less radiogenic Nd isotopic composition at the tops of both profiles reflects 20-60 wt.% addition of an eolian component to the soils. The eolian dust is unlikely to have experienced significant post-depositional weathering due to the relatively high Li contents near the tops of the profiles, and, therefore, the low δ7Li and ɛNd values suggest that the dust came from an old, weathered region of the continent. Our results demonstrate that lithium isotopes are sensitive tracers of chemical weathering, particularly in extreme weathering settings, and support the hypothesis that chemical weathering influences the mass and composition of the continental crust.

  13. SHEDS-Dietary Technical Manual Appendices

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The appendices for the SHEDS-Dietary Technical Manual include a sample food diary, backgorund information on the water concentration data used in SHEDS-Dietary, a food list, food definitions and sample code.

  14. Low flow vortex shedding flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugaman, Charles J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose was to continue a development project on a no moving parts vortex shedding flowmeter used for flow measurement of hypergols. The project involved the design and construction of a test loop to evaluate the meter for flow of Freon which simulates the hypergol fluids. Results were obtained on the output frequency characteristics of the flow meter as a function of flow rate. A family of flow meters for larger size lines and ranges of flow was sized based on the results of the tested meter.

  15. Direct infusion electrospray ionization-ion mobility-mass spectrometry for comparative profiling of fatty acids based on stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jiapeng; Guan, Qing; Sun, Tuanqi; Wang, Haoyang; Cui, Jianlan; Liu, Qinghao; Zhang, Zhixu; Zhang, Manyu; Guo, Yinlong

    2015-08-05

    A rapid method for fatty acids (FAs) comparative profiling based on carboxyl-specific stable isotope labeling (SIL) and direct infusion electrospray ionization-ion mobility-mass spectrometry (ESI-IM-MS) is established. The design of the method takes advantage of the three-dimensional characteristics of IM-MS including drift time, m/z and ion intensity, for comparison of d0-/d6-2,4-dimethoxy-6-piperazin-1-yl pyrimidine (DMPP)-labeled FAs. In particular, without chromatographic separation, the method allowed direct FAs profiling in complex samples due to the advantageous priority of DMPP in signal enhancement as well as the extra resolution that IM-MS offered. Additionally, the d0-/d6-DMPP-labeled FAs showed expected features, including very similar drift times, 6 Da mass deviations, specific reporter ions, similar MS responses, and adherence to the drift time rule regarding the influence of carbon chain length and unsaturation on relative drift times. Therefore, the introduction of isotope analogs minimized the matrix effect and variations in quantification and ensured accurate identification of non-targeted FAs by those typical features. Peak intensity ratios between d0-/d6-DMPP-labeled ions were subsequently used in relative quantification for the detected FAs. The established strategy has been applied successfully in the rapid profiling of trace free FAs between normal and cancerous human thyroid tissues. Sixteen free FAs were found with the increased level with a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) compared to the normal tissue samples. The integrated SIL technique and ESI-IM-MS are expected to serve as an alternative tool for high-throughput analysis of FAs in complex samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Constraining Rooting Profile and the Partitioning of Evapotranspiration by Optimization and Sensitivity Analysis in an Isotopically-Enabled Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, T.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Noone, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    The partitioning of latent heat flux into contributions from ground evaporation and plant transpiration in land surface models is a key feature of any hydrological scheme, but notoriously difficult to resolve. Indeed, global scale models show significant differences in the terrestrial energy balance, which can be traced to poor constraints on the pathways of water on the landscape which control the evapotranspiration. In addition, vegetation rooting profiles are quite difficult to observe and therefore present a significant source of uncertainty in models. Stable isotope ratios in water from soil, leaves and water vapor have been used to help constrain the ET partitioning and to track water movement in ecosystems, but many previous studies have been limited in two regards: 1) lack of sufficient data to provide true closure, and 2) lack of an adequate modeling framework to incorporate many of the processes that control the ET. We present results for the partitioning of evaporation and transpiration from an isotopically-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM) that is driven by meteorology, hydrological and isotopic data collected at the Manitou Experimental Forest during the summer of 2011. The data spans 147 days and captures the transition of the hydrological regime in the Rocky Mountains between early season snow melt, mid-summer drying and late summer monsoonal rains. The experiments show that only under certain conditions is the isotopic ratio of evaporation sufficiently different from that of transpiration to allow effective ET partitioning. An sensitivity analysis of rooting profile and evaporation/transpiration partitioning is also conducted and reveals the transition between the water used by vegetation with deep roots and those with shallow roots and that the ecosystem changes abruptly between using water originating as snow melt versus summer rain. These dynamics can be captured by the model, by only once the model is carefully tuned. This suggests that

  17. Intrapopulation variation in gray wolf isotope (delta(15)N and delta(13)C) profiles: implications for the ecology of individuals.

    PubMed

    Urton, Erin J M; Hobson, Keith A

    2005-09-01

    Trophic relationships among organisms in terrestrial boreal ecosystems define ecological communities and are important in determining dynamics of energy flow and ecosystem function. We examined trophic relationships between the gray wolf (Canis lupus) and 18 mammalian species from the boreal forest of central Saskatchewan, Canada, using delta(13)C and delta(15)N stable isotope values measured in guard hair samples. Variance in isotope values for wolves and other carnivores was investigated as a proxy for variation in diet among individuals. Isosource, an isotopic source partitioning model, quantified the relative range in proportions of five most-likely prey items in the diets of wolves. The distribution of feasible contributions from each source was dominated by elk (Cervus elaphus; mean: 48%, range:11-75%), followed by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; mean: 21%, range: 0-54%), moose (Alces alces; mean:14%, range: 0-41%), beaver (Castor canadensis; mean: 8%, range:0-25%) and snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus; mean: 8%, range: 0-24%). Despite social foraging, our results indicate highly variable diets among individuals and we discuss this in terms of individual versus group ecology of boreal wolves.

  18. Phenomenon of Alfvenic Vortex Shedding

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszecki, M.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Arber, T. D.

    2010-07-30

    Generation of Alfvenic (magnetohydrodynamic) vortices by the interaction of compressible plasma flows with magnetic-field-aligned blunt obstacles is modeled in terms of magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that periodic shedding of vortices with opposite vorticity is a robust feature of the interaction in a broad range of plasma parameters: for plasma beta from 0.025 to 0.5, and for the flow speeds from 0.1 to 0.99 of the fast magnetoacoustic speed. The Strouhal number is the dimensionless ratio of the blunt body diameter to the product of the period of vortex shedding and the inflow speed. It is found to be consistently in the range 0.15-0.25 in the whole range of parameters. The induced Alfvenic vortices are compressible and contain spiral-armed perturbations of the magnetic field strength and plasma mass density up to 50%-60% of the background values. The generated electric current also has the spiral-armed structuring.

  19. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  20. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  1. 77 FR 53884 - Automatic Underfrequency Load Shedding and Load Shedding Plans Reliability Standards; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Automatic Underfrequency Load Shedding and Load Shedding Plans Reliability...\\ Automatic Underfrequency Load Shedding and Load Shedding Plans Reliability Standards, 139 FERC ] 61,098... 20426. This filing is accessible on-line at http://www.ferc.gov , using the ``eLibrary'' link and...

  2. Vortex shedding and Maxwell's problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelin, Sebastien; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2006-11-01

    The coupled problem of a flow around a solid body has applications from the fall of objects in a fluid to the computation of forces on wind-exposed structures. A simplified 2D model is proposed here for the interaction between solid bodies and potential flows. Potential flows over sharp edges generate singular velocities at the edges. To satisfy the Kutta condition, vorticity sheets must be shed from the edges to remove these singularities. Here 2D vorticity sheets are represented as discrete point-vortices with monotically varying intensity. From the fluid momentum conservation, an equation of motion for these vortices, the Brown and Michael equation, is derived and mechanical efforts applied by the fluid on the body are computed. The set of dynamical equations obtained for the fluid-body system is closed and is applied to Maxwell's problem of the 2D fall of a plate in an inviscid fluid initially at rest.

  3. Geochemical and isotopic profile of Pico de Orizaba (Citlaltépetl) volcano, Mexico: Insights for magma generation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Peter; Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo

    2010-11-01

    Pico de Orizaba or Citlaltépetl volcano is the easternmost and highest stratovolcano of the subduction-related Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) located > 400 km NNE of the Middle America Trench. This active volcano comprises four evolutionary stages, ranging in age from 0.65 Ma to the Holocene, and is surrounded by Quaternary monogenetic scoria cones and maar volcanoes. Magmatic products of the stratocone range from basaltic andesites to rhyolites and the cinder cones erupted basalts and basaltic andesites. All rock compositions form a continuous calc-alkaline suite. Petrogenetic processes involved in magma generation and evolution include fractional crystallization and mid-crustal assimilation. Trace element patterns with elevated Ba/Nb, positive Pb spikes, and Th enrichments indicate contributions from subducted sediment. Low Ba/Th ratios suggest melting of hydrous sediment without significant loss of fluid-mobile elements prior to melting. Sr-Nd isotopic ratios of Pico de Orizaba and cinder cones are nearly chondritic and are located on a mixing curve between Pacific MORB and Paleozoic crust of SE Mexico. However, vertical Nd distributions in an 87Sr/ 86Sr vs. ɛNd diagram cannot be explained by crustal assimilation and indicate contributions of a sedimentary component with unradiogenic Nd. In contrast to other eastern MVB volcanic centres, Pico de Orizaba magmas are derived almost exclusively from a depleted mantle source. Compared to other MVB stratocones, Pico de Orizaba shows the least radiogenic Nd isotope ratios at nearly identical 87Sr/ 86Sr. Steep trends in a 206Pb/ 204Pb vs. 207Pb/ 204Pb diagram favour the involvement of young, 207Pb-enriched oceanic sediments in magma generation processes of Pico de Orizaba volcano. The Pb isotope data do not support any assimilation of lower crustal Grenvillian basement.

  4. Ion microscopy with resonant ionization mass spectrometry : time-of-flight depth profiling with improved isotopic precision.

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M. J.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Levine, J.; Zinovev, A.; Davis, A. M.; Stephan, T.; Tripa, C. E.; King, B. V.; Savina, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    There are four generally mutually exclusive requirements that plague many mass spectrometric measurements of trace constituents: (1) the small size (limited by the depth probed) of many interesting materials requires high useful yields to simply detect some trace elements, (2) the low concentrations of interesting elements require efficient discrimination from isobaric interferences, (3) it is often necessary to measure the depth distribution of elements with high surface and low bulk contributions, and (4) many applications require precise isotopic analysis. Resonant ionization mass spectrometry has made dramatic progress in addressing these difficulties over the past five years.

  5. CO2 and CH4 Surface Flux, Soil Profile Concentrations, and Stable Isotope Composition, Barrow, Alaska, 2012-2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Curtis, J.B.; Vaughn, L.S.; Torn, M.S.; Conrad, M.S.; Chafe, O.; Bill, M.

    2015-12-31

    In August-October 2012 and June-October 2013, co-located measurements were made of surface CH4 and CO2 flux, soil pore space concentrations and stable isotope compositions of CH4 and CO2, and subsurface temperature and soil moisture. Measurements were made in intensive study site 1 areas A, B, and C, and from the site 0 and AB transects, from high-centered, flat-centered, and low-centered polygons, from the center, edge, and trough of each polygon.

  6. Isotopic discrimination during litter decomposition and delta13C and delta15N soil profiles in a young artificial stand and in an old floodplain forest.

    PubMed

    Gioacchini, Paola; Masia, Andrea; Canaccini, Francesca; Boldreghini, Pietro; Tonon, Giustino

    2006-06-01

    In the present study, rates of litter decomposition and microbial biomass nitrogen were monitored over an 8-month period in a young broadleaf plantation (18 y) and in an old floodplain forest. Moreover, delta13C and delta15N temporal variations within soil profiles were evaluated at both sites. Rates of litter decomposition were higher in spring and autumn than in summer, in both forests. At the end of the observation period the percentage of original litter remaining was not statistically different between the young and the old forest and accounted for 60-70% of the original amount. Microbial biomass nitrogen in the remaining litter and the percentage of litter mass lost during decomposition were positively correlated. The difference in litter quality affected the decomposition rate and also the changes in carbon isotopic composition during the decomposition process. In contrast, 15N isotopic signatures showed a similar trend in the litter of the two forests irrespective of the litter quality. Although delta13Csoil and delta15Nsoil showed considerable temporal variation they increased with depth in the soils of both sites but their seasonal changes did not reflect those of the decomposing litter. Within the same soil horizon, both delta13C and delta15N showed similar seasonal trends in the soils of the two forests, suggesting the involvement of environmental factors acting at regional level, such as soil temperature and rainfall variations, in regulating seasonal delta13C and delta15N soil variations.

  7. 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, 4-androstenedione, and testosterone profiled by routine stable isotope dilution/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in plasma of children.

    PubMed

    Wudy, S A; Wachter, U A; Homoki, J; Teller, W M

    1995-07-01

    Using stable isotope dilution/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (ID/GC-MS), a physicochemical method, we have profiled the plasma steroids 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, 4-androstenedione, and testosterone in normal children of various age groups. Comparison of our values with those obtained by direct immunologic assays and those using an extraction or purification step showed that immunoassays in general overestimate steroid concentrations. This was especially true for plasma samples in the neonatal period and was most expressed for the concentrations of 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone. Our study demonstrated the applicability of ID/GC-MS to routine clinical steroid analysis. The application of ID/GC-MS is recommended whenever problems from matrix effects or cross-reactivity are likely to arise or suspicious results by immunoassays need to be rechecked.

  8. Inverse Ubbelohde effect in the short hydrogen bond of photosystem II: Relation between H/D isotope effect and symmetry in potential energy profile.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Takano, Yu

    2016-09-05

    The short hydrogen bond between tyrosine Yz and D1-His190 of photosystem II (PSII) was investigated using multicomponent quantum mechanics, where the quantum fluctuation of a hydrogen nucleus was incorporated into electronic structure calculation. Our computation demonstrated that the deuteration for hydrogen in the short hydrogen bond of PSII led to the reduction of the O…N distance. It indicated an inverse Ubbelohde effect typically recognized in strong and symmetric hydrogen-bonding clusters such as FHF(-) and H3O2-. We confirmed that the relation between the geometric isotope effect and the symmetry of the potential energy profile of FHF(-) was reasonably agreed with that of PSII. According to this agreement, the short hydrogen bond in PSII can be regarded as a short strong hydrogen bond. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. An Analysis of Diet Quality, How It Controls Fatty Acid Profiles, Isotope Signatures and Stoichiometry in the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles arabiensis

    PubMed Central

    Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca; Schwarzinger, Bettina; Schwarzinger, Clemens; Soliban, Sharon; Madakacherry, Odessa; Aigner, Martina; Watzka, Margarete; Gilles, Jeremie

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowing the underlying mechanisms of mosquito ecology will ensure effective vector management and contribute to the overall goal of malaria control. Mosquito populations show a high degree of population plasticity in response to environmental variability. However, the principle factors controlling population size and fecundity are for the most part unknown. Larval habitat and diet play a crucial role in subsequent mosquito fitness. Developing the most competitive insects for sterile insect technique programmes requires a “production” orientated perspective, to deduce the most effective larval diet formulation; the information gained from this process offers us some insight into the mechanisms and processes taking place in natural native mosquito habitats. Methodology/Principal Findings Fatty acid profiles and de-novo or direct assimilation pathways, of whole-individual mosquitoes reared on a range of larval diets were determined using pyrolysis gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry. We used elemental analysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure individual-whole-body carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous values and to assess the impact of dietary quality on subsequent population stoichiometry, size, quality and isotopic signature. Diet had the greatest impact on fatty acid (FA) profiles of the mosquitoes, which exhibited a high degree of dietary routing, characteristic of generalist feeders. De-novo synthesis of a number of important FAs was observed. Mosquito C:N stoichiometry was fixed in the teneral stage. Dietary N content had significant influence on mosquito size, and P was shown to be a flexible pool which limited overall population size. Conclusions/Significance Direct routing of FAs was evident but there was ubiquitous de-novo synthesis suggesting mosquito larvae are competent generalist feeders capable of survival on diet with varying characteristics. It was concluded that nitrogen availability in the larval diet controlled teneral

  10. Atmospheric Pb deposition since the Industrial Revolution recorded by five Swiss peat profiles: Enrichment factors, fluxes, isotopic composition, and sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.; Shotyk, W.; Kramers, J.D.; Appleby, P.G.; Cheburkin, A.K.

    1999-05-01

    Atmospheric Pb deposition since the Industrial Revolution was studied in western, central, and southern Switzerland using five rural peat bogs. Similar temporal patterns were found in western and central Switzerland, with two distinct periods of Pb enrichment relative to the natural background: between 1880 and 1920 with enrichments ranging from 40 to 80 times, and between 1960 and 1980 with enrichments ranging from 80 to 100 times. The fluxes also were generally elevated in those time periods: in western Switzerland between 1.16 and 1.55 {micro}g cm{sup {minus}2} y{sup {minus}1} during the second period. Between the Industrial Revolution and 1985, nonradiogenic Pb became increasingly important in all five cores because of the replacement of coal by oil after ca. 1920, the use of Australian Pb in industry, and the extensive combustion of leaded gasoline after 1950. The introduction of unleaded gasoline in 1985 had a pronounced effect on the Pb deposition in all five cores. Enrichments dropped sharply, and the isotopic ratios reverted back toward natural values. The cores from western and central Switzerland showed very similar isotopic trends throughout the time period studied, implying that these sites were influenced contemporaneously by similar pollution sources and atmospheric pathways. Southern Switzerland revealed a different record with respect to the Pb pollution: it was dominated by a single massive Pb enrichment dated between 1930 and 1950.

  11. Untargeted profiling of tracer-derived metabolites using stable isotopic labeling and fast polarity-switching LC-ESI-HRMS.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Bernhard; Bueschl, Christoph; Neumann, Nora; Stückler, Romana; Doppler, Maria; Chassy, Alexander W; Waterhouse, Andrew L; Rechthaler, Justyna; Kampleitner, Niklas; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Adam, Gerhard; Krska, Rudolf; Schuhmacher, Rainer

    2014-12-02

    An untargeted metabolomics workflow for the detection of metabolites derived from endogenous or exogenous tracer substances is presented. To this end, a recently developed stable isotope-assisted LC-HRMS-based metabolomics workflow for the global annotation of biological samples has been further developed and extended. For untargeted detection of metabolites arising from labeled tracer substances, isotope pattern recognition has been adjusted to account for nonlabeled moieties conjugated to the native and labeled tracer molecules. Furthermore, the workflow has been extended by (i) an optional ion intensity ratio check, (ii) the automated combination of positive and negative ionization mode mass spectra derived from fast polarity switching, and (iii) metabolic feature annotation. These extensions enable the automated, unbiased, and global detection of tracer-derived metabolites in complex biological samples. The workflow is demonstrated with the metabolism of (13)C9-phenylalanine in wheat cell suspension cultures in the presence of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON). In total, 341 metabolic features (150 in positive and 191 in negative ionization mode) corresponding to 139 metabolites were detected. The benefit of fast polarity switching was evident, with 32 and 58 of these metabolites having exclusively been detected in the positive and negative modes, respectively. Moreover, for 19 of the remaining 49 phenylalanine-derived metabolites, the assignment of ion species and, thus, molecular weight was possible only by the use of complementary features of the two ion polarity modes. Statistical evaluation showed that treatment with DON increased or decreased the abundances of many detected metabolites.

  12. Determining Paleoredox Conditions Across the Cretaceous-Paleogene Mass Extinction at Blake Nose: Evaluation of Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes and Trace Metal Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, T. M.; Nelson, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary (~65 Mya) is marked by a major mass extinction for a wide range of terrestrial and marine organisms. In addition, there is significant evidence for disruptions in the carbon and nutrient cycles, productivity, paleoclimate, and bottom water oxygen levels, but the exact temporal and spatial extent of the disruptions are still unknown. In order to assess changes in nitrogen cycling and post-extinction anoxia, we have been measuring sedimentary nitrogen isotopes (δ15N), carbon isotopes (δ13C), and redox-sensitive trace metal concentrations in several cores across the K-Pg boundary. Since the sedimentary δ15N record can provide information on bottom water oxygen levels as well as nitrogen cycling, we can also investigate the use of bulk sedimentary δ15N as a proxy for paleoredox conditions by comparing the isotope record with that of the redox-sensitive trace metals. We obtained samples from Blake Nose in the North Atlantic (ODP 171B), a site that is proximal to the Chicxulub impact location. The cores at this site have an excellent record through the K-Pg boundary and contain clear evidence of both the impact and subsequent mass extinction. We measured δ15Nbulk, δ13Corg, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN) and trace metal concentrations in samples dating from the Late Maastrichtian (R. fructicosa foraminiferal zone) through to the Early Paleogene (foraminiferal zone P1c). Unlike our previous findings at the more distal Bass River (ODP 174AX) and Demerara Rise (ODP 207) sites, there is no obvious increase in δ15N values through the mass extinction, although there is a slight enrichment in redox-sensitive trace metals after the boundary. As a result, there appears to be no evidence for increased denitrification/anammox activity (and therefore no significant change in deep water redox state) immediately after the K-Pg boundary at Blake Nose based on the δ15N profiles; however, the trace metal profiles suggest

  13. Profiling of urinary steroids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection and confirmation of androstenedione administration using isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingzhu; Wu, Moutian; Liu, Xin; Xu, Youxuan

    2011-12-20

    Androstenedione (4-androstene-3,17-dione) is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as an endogenous steroid. The official method to confirm androstenedione abuse is isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). According to the guidance published by WADA, atypical steroid profiles are required to trigger IRMS analysis. However, in some situations, steroid profile parameters are not effective enough to suspect the misuse of endogenous steroids. The aim of this study was to investigate the atypical steroid profile induced by androstenedione administration and the detection of androstenedione doping using IRMS. Ingestion of androstenedione resulted in changes in urinary steroid profile, including increased concentrations of androsterone (An), etiocholanolone (Etio), 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5α-diol), and 5β-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5β-diol) in all of the subjects. Nevertheless, the testosterone/epitestosterone (T/E) ratio was elevated only in some of the subjects. The rapid increases in the concentrations of An and Etio, as well as in T/E ratio for some subjects could provide indicators for initiating IRMS analysis only for a short time period, 2-22h post-administration. However, IRMS could provide positive determinations for up to 55h post-administration. This study demonstrated that, 5β-diol concentration or Etio/An ratio could be utilized as useful indicators for initiating IRMS analysis during 2-36h post-administration. Lastly, Etio, with slower clearance, could be more effectively used than An for the confirmation of androstenedione doping using IRMS.

  14. Effects of self-heating and phase change on the thermal profile of hydrogen isotopes in confined geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Baxamusa, S. Field, J.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; Suratwala, T.; Sater, J.

    2014-03-28

    Growth of high-quality single-crystal hydrogen in confined geometries relies on the in situ formation of seed crystals. Generation of deuterium-tritium seed crystals in a confined geometry is governed by three effects: self-heating due to tritium decay, external thermal environment, and latent heat of phase change at the boundary between hydrogen liquid and vapor. A detailed computation of the temperature profile for liquid hydrogen inside a hollow shell, as is found in inertial confinement fusion research, shows that seeds are likely to form at the equatorial plane of the shell. Radioactive decay of tritium to helium slowly alters the composition of the hydrogen vapor, resulting in a modified temperature profile that encourages seed formation at the top of the shell. We show that the computed temperature profile is consistent with a variety of experimental observations.

  15. Prevalence of hair shedding among women.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Maja; Goren, Andy; Shapiro, Jerry; Sinclair, Rodney; Lonky, Neal M; Situm, Mirna; Bulat, Vedrana; Bolanca, Zeljana; McCoy, John

    2017-01-01

    Hair shedding in female patients is a frequent complaint in dermatological, endocrinological, and gynecological consults. Previously, the Sinclair Hair Shedding Scale was developed to assess normal versus excessive hair shedding in female pattern hair loss (FPHL) subjects. However, the prevalence of hair shedding in females not suffering from FPHL is unknown. To gain better understanding of hair shedding in the general population, we recruited 300 subjects visiting a public hospital for conditions other than alopecia. Of the 300 subjects recruited, 263 did not suffer from FPHL. Among those subjects, approximately 40% reported experiencing excessive hair shedding (as defined by the Sinclair Hair Shedding Scale) on hair washing days. In comparison, in our subject population, approximately 60% of subjects with FPHL reported excessive hair shedding on hair washing days. To best of our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify the prevalence of hair shedding in women. While, no treatment currently exists for this condition, we hope that this study would encourage physicians and researchers to address this frequent concern.

  16. Analytical approach for the determination of steroid profile of humans by gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry aimed at distinguishing between endogenous and exogenous steroids.

    PubMed

    Bulska, Ewa; Gorczyca, Damian; Zalewska, Izabela; Pokrywka, Andrzej; Kwiatkowska, Dorota

    2015-03-15

    The contamination of commonly used supplements by unknown steroids as well as their metabolites (parent compounds) become a challenge for the analytical laboratories. Although the determination of steroids profile is not trivial because of the complex matrix and low concentration of single compound, one of the most difficult current problem is to distinguish, during analytical procedure, endogenous androgens such as testosterone, dehydrotestosterone or dehydroepiandrosterone from their synthetic equivalents. The aim of this work was to develop and validate an analytical procedure for determination of the steroid profile in human urine by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) toward distinguishing between endogenous and exogenous steroids. Beside the optimization of the experimental parameters for gas chromatography separation and mass spectrometry, attention was focused on urine sample preparation. Using an optimized sample preparation protocol it was possible to achieve better chromatographic resolutions and better sensitivity enabling the determination of 5 steroids, androsterone, etiocholanolone, testosterone, 5-androstandiol, 11-hydroxyandrdostane, pregnandiol, with the expanded uncertainty (k=2) below 1‰. This enable to evaluate the significant shift of the δ(13)C/(12)C [‰] values for each of examined steroids (excluding ERC). The analytical protocol described in this work was successfully used for the confirmation of positive founding urine by evaluation T/E ratio after GC/C/IRMS analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Production of cosmogenic isotopes 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na, and 36Cl in the atmosphere: Altitudinal profiles of yield functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poluianov, S. V.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Mishev, A. L.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2016-07-01

    New consistent and precise computations of the production of five cosmogenic radioisotopes, 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na, and 36Cl, in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic rays are presented in the form of tabulated yield functions. For the first time, a detailed set of the altitude profiles of the production functions is provided which makes it possible to apply the results directly as input for atmospheric transport models. Good agreement with most of the earlier published works for columnar and global isotopic production rates is shown. Altitude profiles of the production are important, in particular for such tasks as studies of strong solar particle events in the past, precise reconstructions of solar activity on long-term scale, tracing air mass dynamics using cosmogenic radioisotopes, etc. As an example, computations of the 10Be deposition flux in the polar region are shown for the last decades and also for a period around 780 A.D. and confronted with the actual measurements in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores.

  18. Shedding patterns of Daubaylia potomaca (Nematoda: Rhabditida).

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael R; Luth, Kyle E; Esch, Gerald W

    2013-12-01

    Daubaylia potomaca is a nematode parasite that exhibits an unusual direct life cycle in planorbid snails in which adult females are the infective stage, after being shed from a definitive host. The present study examined the shedding patterns of this nematode to determine what cues or mechanisms might lead to the parasite leaving its host. A correlation was found between host death and the frequency and number of D. potomaca shed, suggesting that the nematodes can detect that the host is dying and may leave in search of a new host. Furthermore, elevated intensities of D. potomaca in the snail induce shedding earlier, suggesting that competition for space and resources may also play a role in the shedding patterns of the nematode, but not when time to death is controlled. Finally, nematodes shed a longer time before host death were significantly longer and more likely to be gravid than those shed as time to snail death approached, implying that the nematode reaching maturity or being inseminated might also be cues for D. potomaca to leave its snail host. In summary, the shedding patterns of D. potomaca appear to be a complex mix of host death detection, competition, and nematode maturation.

  19. 24. 'HANGAR SHEDS ELEVATIONS DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. 'HANGAR SHEDS - ELEVATIONS - DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS - PLANT AREA; MODIFICATION CENTER NO. 1, DAGGETT, CALIFORNIA.' Partial elevations, and details of sliding doors and ventilator flaps, as built. Contract no. W509 Eng. 2743; File no. 555/81, revision B, dated April 6, 1943. No sheet number. - Barstow-Daggett Airport, Hangar Shed No. 4, 39500 National Trails Highway, Daggett, San Bernardino County, CA

  20. Contribution of NAD 2D-NMR in liquid crystals to the determination of hydrogen isotope profile of methyl groups in miliacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdagué, Philippe; Lesot, Philippe; Jacob, Jérémy; Terwilliger, Valery J.; Le Milbeau, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δD or (D/H) value) of molecular biomarkers preserved in sedimentary archives is increasingly used to provide clues about the evolution of past climatic conditions. The rationale is that intact biomarkers retain isotopic information related to the climatic conditions that prevailed at the time of their synthesis. Some of these biomarkers may be degraded during diagenesis, however. The extent to which these degradations alter the original δD value of the source biomarker is presently debated and the capacity to resolve this question by determination of compound-specific δD values alone is limited. The "bulk" or "global" δD value of any molecule is in fact a composite of δD values at each site within this molecule (δDi or (D/H)i with i = number of hydrogen/deuterium atoms in the considered molecule). Determination of this site-specific δDi value in biomarkers could not only yield outstanding paleoenvironmental information but also help forecast the impacts of diagenesis and define essential steps in biosynthetic pathways. This task is analytically challenging. Here, we examined the capabilities of natural abundance deuterium 2D-NMR (NAD 2D-NMR) using homopolypeptide liquid crystals as an NMR solvent to: (i) analyze the NAD spectra of biomakers; (ii) determine the site-specific distribution of hydrogen in the nine methyl groups (δDMei with i = 23-31) of miliacin, a pentacyclic triterpene of the amyrin family and key biomarker for broomcorn millet in sedimentary archives. Relative (D/H)Mei values were established by anisotropic NAD 2D-NMR. Then absolute δDMei values were obtained by determining δDMei value of the methoxy group of miliacin using two independent approaches: isotropic NAD NMR (SNIF-NMR™) and GC-irMS. The resulting isotope profile for miliacin shows, for the first time, large variations in δDMei values that can directly be explained by biosynthetic processes. This approach has also the potential to permit

  1. Organochlorine contaminant and stable isotope profiles in Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) from the Alaskan and Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, P F; Braune, B M; O'Hara, T M; Elkin, B; Solomon, K R; Muir, D C G

    2003-01-01

    Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) is a circumpolar species distributed across northern Canada and Alaska. Arctic fox muscle and liver were collected at Barrow, AK, USA (n=18), Holman, NT, Canada (n=20), and Arviat, NU, Canada (n=20) to elucidate the feeding ecology of this species and relate these findings to body residue patterns of organochlorine contaminants (OCs). Stable carbon (delta 13C) and nitrogen (delta 15N) isotope analyses of Arctic fox muscle indicated that trophic position (estimated by delta 15N) is positively correlated with increasing delta 13C values, suggesting that Arctic fox with a predominantly marine-based foraging strategy occupy a higher trophic level than individuals mostly feeding from a terrestrial-based carbon source. At all sites, the rank order for OC groups in muscle was polychlorinated biphenyls (Sigma PCB) > chlordane-related compounds (Sigma CHLOR) > hexachlorocyclohexane (Sigma HCH) > total toxaphene (TOX) > or = chlorobenzenes (Sigma ClBz) > DDT-related isomers (Sigma DDT). In liver, Sigma CHLOR was the most abundant OC group, followed by Sigma PCB > TOX > Sigma HCH > Sigma ClBz > Sigma DDT. The most abundant OC analytes detected from Arctic fox muscle and liver were oxychlordane, PCB-153, and PCB-180. The comparison of delta 15N with OC concentrations indicated that relative trophic position might not accurately predict OC bioaccumulation in Arctic fox. The bioaccumulation pattern of OCs in the Arctic fox is similar to the polar bear. While Sigma PCB concentrations were highly variable, concentrations in the Arctic fox were generally below those associated with the toxicological endpoints for adverse effects on mammalian reproduction. Further research is required to properly elucidate the potential health impacts to this species from exposure to OCs.

  2. Molecular and stable carbon isotopic compositions of saturated fatty acids within one sedimentary profile in the Shenhu, northern South China Sea: Source implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Mao, Shengyi; Wu, Nengyou; Sun, Yongge; Guan, Hongxiang

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions of saturated fatty acids (SaFAs) in one 300 cm long sedimentary profile, which was named as Site4B in Shenhu, northern South China Sea. The concentrations of total SaFAs in sediments ranged from 1.80 to 10.16 μg/g (μg FA/g dry sediment) and showed an even-over-odd predominance in the carbon chain of C12 to C32, mostly with n-C16 and n-C18 being the two major components. The short-chain fatty acids (ScFAs; n-C12 to n-C18) mainly from marine microorganisms had average δ13C values of -26.7‰ to -28.2‰, whereas some terrigenous-sourced long-chain fatty acids (LcFAs; n-C21 to n-C32) had average δ13C values of -29.6‰ to -34.1‰. The other LcFAs (n-C24 & n-C26 ∼ n-C28; average δ13C values are -26.1‰ to -28.0‰) as well as n-C19 and n-C20 SaFAs (average δ13C values are -29.1‰ and -29.3‰, respectively) showed a mixed signal of carbon isotope compositions. The relative bioproductivity calculation (marine vs. terrigenous) demonstrated that most of organic carbon accumulation throughout the sedimentary profile was contributed by marine organism. The high marine productivity in Shenhu, South China Sea may be related to the hydrocarbon seepage which evidenced by diapiric structures. Interestingly, there is a sever fluctuation of terrigenous inputs around the depth of 97 cm below the seafloor (bsf), probably resulting from the influence of the Dansgaard-Oeschger events and the Younger Dryas event as revealed by 14C age measurements.

  3. Non-standard Fickian self-diffusion of isotopically pure boron observed by neutron reflectometry and depth profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.M.; Wu, K.; Smith, G.S.; Hubbard, K.M.; Nastasi, M.; Downing, R.G.; Lamaze, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) studies of thin films of amorphous {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B on silicon indicate that a non-standard form of Fickian diffusion occurs across the boron interface upon annealing. In order to verify this observation, the samples were examined by neutron depth profiling (NDP). Comparison of the results from models of a step function, standard Fickian diffusion and Fickian diffusion with a fixed composition at the interface were made and compared to the previous NR results. The diffusion constant resulting from the non-standard Fickian model for the NDP data differs slightly from that obtained from the commonly used Fickian diffusion model and is not inconsistent with the NR results. This finding suggests that more information regarding diffusion at interfaces can be gained from these higher resolution neutron scattering techniques.

  4. Leakage Current Analysis of Bushing with Water-cut Sheds in Heavy Rain Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Zhen; Yu, Xinzhe

    2017-07-01

    In this article, heavy rain tests under two rainfall intensities are introduced. Three kinds of bushings with different water-cut-sheds were used in these tests. Then leakage currents monitored during tests are analysed and contrasted to obtain characteristics and tendency. The results show that maximum value of leakage current is affected by voltage applied, profile of water-cut sheds, and the rainfall intensity. Higher AC voltage applied on bushing leads to higher peak of leakage current. More and larger water-cut sheds makes bushing able to withstand higher leakage current. Heavier rain may cause leakage current rise totally. These results may be helpful in online monitoring of insulation.

  5. Oxygen isotope and deuterium composition of snow cover on the profile of Western Siberia from Tomsk to the Gulf of Ob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'chuk, Yu. K.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Budantseva, N. A.; Vorobiov, S. N.; Kirpotin, S. N.; Krizkov, I. V.; Manasypov, R. M.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Chizhova, Ju. N.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the variability of the isotope composition (δ18O, δD, d exc) of the snow cover on a long transect of Western Siberia from the southern taiga to the tundra. The study of the snow cover is of paleogeographic, paleogeocryological, and paleohydrological value. The snow cover of western Siberia was sampled on a broadly NS transzonal profile from the environs of Tomsk (southern taiga zone) to the eastern coast of the Gulf of Ob (tundra zone) from February 19 to March 4, 2014. Snow samples were collected at 31 sites. Most of the samples represented by fresh snow, i.e., snow that had fallen a day before the moment of sampling were collected in two areas. In the area of Yamburg, the snow specimens collected from the surface are most probably settled snow of different ages. The values of δ18O in the snow from Tomsk to Yamburg varied from-21.89 to-32.82‰, and the values of δD, from-163.3 to-261.2‰. The value of deuterium excess was in the range of 4.06-19.53‰.

  6. Using elemental profiles and stable isotopes to trace the origin of green coffee beans on the global market.

    PubMed

    Santato, Alessandro; Bertoldi, Daniela; Perini, Matteo; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    A broad elemental profile incorporating 54 elements (Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Er, Tm, Yb, Re, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi and U) in combination with δ(2) H, δ(13) C, δ(15) N and δ(18) O was used to characterise the composition of 62 green arabica (Coffea arabica) and robusta (Coffea canephora) coffee beans grown in South and Central America, Africa and Asia, the four most internationally renowned areas of production. The δ(2) H, Mg, Fe, Co and Ni content made it possible to correctly assign 95% of green coffee beans to the appropriate variety. Canonical discriminant analysis, performed using δ(13) C, δ(15) N, δ(18) O, Li, Mg, P, K, Mn, Co, Cu, Se, Y, Mo, Cd, La and Ce correctly traced the origin of 98% of coffee beans. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Vortex shedding by a Savonius rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botrini, M.; Beguier, C.; Chauvin, A.; Brun, R.

    1984-05-01

    A series of flow visualizations was performed to characterize the wake vortices of a Savonius rotor. The trials were undertaken in an attempt to account for discrepancies between theoretical and experimentally-derived power coefficients. The Savonius examined was two-bladed with a center offset. All tests were made in a water tunnel. Dye injection provided the visualization, and average velocities and velocity fluctuations were measured using a laser Doppler anemometer. A system of three vortices was found to be periodically shed by the rotor. Flow velocity fluctuation intensity peaked as a vortex was shed. The vortex shedding alternated from blade to blade, so that one was shed from a blade moving upstream.

  8. Causes of failure of airship shed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonntag, R; Hoff, W

    1922-01-01

    The causes of the collapse of airship shed, which was being taken down at Niediergorsdorf, are discussed. This shed, which was built of iron, was 184 m long, 28 m high, and 35 m wide. The demolition of the shed had been assigned to unskilled men who proceeded to remove certain key structural supports, leaving the structure in such a condition that relatively small eccentricities of the columns or spans or of lateral forces could easily have caused the columns or spans to break down. A small gust of wind would have perhaps sufficed to bring the building down. An analysis is also given of the suction effects on the roof of an air shed in Staaken. The damage to this shed, which occurred during a storm, was due to the fact that the shed had no opening in its top for equalizing the air pressure within and without. The location of the plates blown off the roof correspond to the point of greatest suction.

  9. Reliability Constrained Priority Load Shedding for Aerospace Power System Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Zhu, Jizhong; Kaddah, Sahar S.; Dolce, James L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The need for improving load shedding on board the space station is one of the goals of aerospace power system automation. To accelerate the optimum load-shedding functions, several constraints must be involved. These constraints include congestion margin determined by weighted probability contingency, component/system reliability index, generation rescheduling. The impact of different faults and indices for computing reliability were defined before optimization. The optimum load schedule is done based on priority, value and location of loads. An optimization strategy capable of handling discrete decision making, such as Everett optimization, is proposed. We extended Everett method to handle expected congestion margin and reliability index as constraints. To make it effective for real time load dispatch process, a rule-based scheme is presented in the optimization method. It assists in selecting which feeder load to be shed, the location of the load, the value, priority of the load and cost benefit analysis of the load profile is included in the scheme. The scheme is tested using a benchmark NASA system consisting of generators, loads and network.

  10. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  11. Isotopic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.

    1981-03-10

    Method and apparatus for separating isotopes in an isotopic mixture of atoms or molecules by increasing the mass differential among isotopic species. The mixture containing a particular isotope is selectively irradiated so as to selectively excite the isotope. This preferentially excited species is then reacted rapidly with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product containing the specific isotope, but having a mass different than the original species initially containing the particular isotope. The product and the remaining balance of the mixture is then caused to flow through a device which separates the product from the mixture based upon the increased mass differential.

  12. 5. SOUTHERN END OF INTERIOR OF STEEL FRAMEWORK TRAIN SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SOUTHERN END OF INTERIOR OF STEEL FRAMEWORK TRAIN SHED LOOKING SE TO CAVED IN SHED, CENTER, AND BRICK AND STEEL SHED. - Western Railway of Alabama Montgomery Rail Shops, 701 North Perry Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

  13. Pacific Ocean–Wide Profile of CYP1A1 Expression, Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios, and Organic Contaminant Burden in Sperm Whale Skin Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Godard-Codding, Céline A.J.; Clark, Rebecca; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Maltese, Silvia; West, Adam G.; Valenzuela, Luciano; Rowntree, Victoria; Polyak, Ildiko; Cannon, John C.; Pinkerton, Kim; Rubio-Cisneros, Nadia; Mesnick, Sarah L.; Cox, Stephen B.; Kerr, Iain; Payne, Roger; Stegeman, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ocean pollution affects marine organisms and ecosystems as well as humans. The International Oceanographic Commission recommends ocean health monitoring programs to investigate the presence of marine contaminants and the health of threatened species and the use of multiple and early-warning biomarker approaches. Objective We explored the hypothesis that biomarker and contaminant analyses in skin biopsies of the threatened sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) could reveal geographical trends in exposure on an oceanwide scale. Methods We analyzed cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression (by immunohistochemistry), stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios (as general indicators of trophic position and latitude, respectively), and contaminant burdens in skin biopsies to explore regional trends in the Pacific Ocean. Results Biomarker analyses revealed significant regional differences within the Pacific Ocean. CYP1A1 expression was highest in whales from the Galapagos, a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization World Heritage marine reserve, and was lowest in the sampling sites farthest away from continents. We examined the possible influence of the whales’ sex, diet, or range and other parameters on regional variation in CYP1A1 expression, but data were inconclusive. In general, CYP1A1 expression was not significantly correlated with contaminant burdens in blubber. However, small sample sizes precluded detailed chemical analyses, and power to detect significant associations was limited. Conclusions Our large-scale monitoring study was successful at identifying regional differences in CYP1A1 expression, providing a baseline for this known biomarker of exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists. However, we could not identify factors that explained this variation. Future oceanwide CYP1A1 expression profiles in cetacean skin biopsies are warranted and could reveal whether globally distributed chemicals occur at biochemically

  14. Pacific Ocean-wide profile of CYP1A1 expression, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios, and organic contaminant burden in sperm whale skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Godard-Codding, Céline A J; Clark, Rebecca; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Maltese, Silvia; West, Adam G; Valenzuela, Luciano; Rowntree, Victoria; Polyak, Ildiko; Cannon, John C; Pinkerton, Kim; Rubio-Cisneros, Nadia; Mesnick, Sarah L; Cox, Stephen B; Kerr, Iain; Payne, Roger; Stegeman, John J

    2011-03-01

    Ocean pollution affects marine organisms and ecosystems as well as humans. The International Oceanographic Commission recommends ocean health monitoring programs to investigate the presence of marine contaminants and the health of threatened species and the use of multiple and early-warning biomarker approaches. We explored the hypothesis that biomarker and contaminant analyses in skin biopsies of the threatened sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) could reveal geographical trends in exposure on an oceanwide scale. We analyzed cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression (by immunohistochemistry), stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios (as general indicators of trophic position and latitude, respectively), and contaminant burdens in skin biopsies to explore regional trends in the Pacific Ocean. Biomarker analyses revealed significant regional differences within the Pacific Ocean. CYP1A1 expression was highest in whales from the Galapagos, a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization World Heritage marine reserve, and was lowest in the sampling sites farthest away from continents. We examined the possible influence of the whales' sex, diet, or range and other parameters on regional variation in CYP1A1 expression, but data were inconclusive. In general, CYP1A1 expression was not significantly correlated with contaminant burdens in blubber. However, small sample sizes precluded detailed chemical analyses, and power to detect significant associations was limited. Our large-scale monitoring study was successful at identifying regional differences in CYP1A1 expression, providing a baseline for this known biomarker of exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists. However, we could not identify factors that explained this variation. Future oceanwide CYP1A1 expression profiles in cetacean skin biopsies are warranted and could reveal whether globally distributed chemicals occur at biochemically relevant concentrations on a global basis, which may

  15. Developmental and spatial variations in the diet signatures of hyperbenthic shrimp Nauticaris marionis at the Prince Edward Islands based on stable isotope ratios and fatty acid profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richoux, Nicole B.; Allan, E. Louise; Froneman, P. William

    2016-04-01

    The caridean shrimp Nauticaris marionis is an ecologically important species in the benthic community around the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands (PEI) as it represents a key prey item for a variety of top predators breeding on the islands. We hypothesized that the diet of N. marionis shifts during its development, and that spatial variability in food availability results in differentiation in the diet signatures of specimens collected from various locations of the shelf waters around the PEI. Specimens were collected from nine stations (depth range 70 to 240 m) around the PEI at inter-island shelf (from west to east: upstream, between and downstream) and nearshore regions during austral autumn 2009. Stable isotope and fatty acid data both revealed spatial and developmental variations in the shrimp diet. Nearshore shrimp were more 13C-enriched than those from the inter-island region, suggesting increased kelp detritus entered the food web in the nearshore regions. The shrimp showed increases in δ13C and δ15N signatures (and trophic position) with an increase in body size, resulting in distinctions between size classes that reflected shifts in their trophic niche through development. The fatty acid profiles similarly indicated distinctions in diet with increased shrimp size (in the deep regions), and spatial variability was evident in relation to region and depth. All shrimp contained large proportions of polyunsaturated and essential fatty acids, indicating that the quality of food consumed was similar between regions despite the diet variability. Our results provide new dietary information about a key species operating near the base of the food web at the highly productive PEI, and show that there were no areas of enhanced nutrition available to the shrimp. As such, there was no nutritional advantage to shrimp inhabiting any specific region around the PEI.

  16. Development of Chemical Isotope Labeling LC-MS for Milk Metabolomics: Comprehensive and Quantitative Profiling of the Amine/Phenol Submetabolome.

    PubMed

    Mung, Dorothea; Li, Liang

    2017-04-18

    Milk is a complex sample containing a variety of proteins, lipids, and metabolites. Studying the milk metabolome represents an important application of metabolomics in the general area of nutritional research. However, comprehensive and quantitative analysis of milk metabolites is a challenging task due to the wide range of variations in chemical/physical properties and concentrations of these metabolites. We report an analytical workflow for in-depth profiling of the milk metabolome based on chemical isotope labeling (CIL) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with a focus of using dansylation labeling to target the amine/phenol submetabolome. An optimal sample preparation method, including the use of methanol at a 3:1 ratio of solvent to milk for protein precipitation and dichloromethane for lipid removal, was developed to detect and quantify as many metabolites as possible. This workflow was found to be generally applicable to profile milk metabolomes of different species (cow, goat, and human) and types. Results from experimental replicate analysis (n = 5) of 1:1, 2:1, and 1:2 (12)C-/(13)C-labeled cow milk samples showed that 95.7%, 94.3%, and 93.2% of peak pairs, respectively, had ratio values within ±50% accuracy range and 90.7%, 92.6%, and 90.8% peak pairs had RSD values of less than 20%. In the metabolomic analysis of 36 samples from different categories of cow milk (brands, batches, and fat percentages) with experimental triplicates, a total of 7104 peak pairs or metabolites could be detected with an average of 4573 ± 505 (n = 108) pairs detected per LC-MS run. Among them, 3820 peak pairs were commonly detected in over 80% of the samples with 70 metabolites positively identified by mass and retention time matches to the dansyl standard library and 2988 pairs with their masses matched to the human metabolome libraries. This unprecedentedly high coverage of the amine/phenol submetabolome illustrates the complexity of the milk metabolome

  17. Vortex Shedding Inside a Baffled Air Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Philip; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Common in the operation of both segmented and un-segmented large solid rocket motors is the occurrence of vortex shedding within the motor chamber. A portion of the energy within a shed vortex is converted to acoustic energy, potentially driving the longitudinal acoustic modes of the motor in a quasi-discrete fashion. This vortex shedding-acoustic mode excitation event occurs for every Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) operation, giving rise to subsequent axial thrust oscillations. In order to better understand this vortex shedding/acoustic mode excitation phenomena, unsteady CFD simulations were run for both a test geometry and the full scale RSRM geometry. This paper covers the results from the subscale geometry runs, which were based on work focusing on the RSRM hydrodynamics. Unsteady CFD simulation parameters, including boundary conditions and post-processing returns, are reviewed. The results were further post-processed to identify active acoustic modes and vortex shedding characteristics. Probable locations for acoustic energy generation, and subsequent acoustic mode excitation, are discussed.

  18. Diffusive fractionation of carbon isotopes in γ-Fe: Experiment, models and implications for early solar system processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas; Watson, E. Bruce; Trail, Dustin; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Van Orman, James; Hauri, Erik H.

    2014-02-01

    Carbon is an abundant element of planets and meteorites whose isotopes provide unique insights into both organic and inorganic geochemical processes. The identities of carbonaceous phases and their textural and isotopic characters shed light on dynamical processes in modern Earth systems and the evolution of the early solar system. In meteorites and their parent bodies, reduced carbon is often associated with Fe-Ni alloys, so knowledge of the mechanisms that fractionate C isotopes in such phases is crucial for deciphering the isotopic record of planetary materials. Here we present the results of a diffusion-couple experiment in which cylinders of polycrystalline Fe containing 11,500 and 150 μg/g of C were juxtaposed at 1273 K and 1.5 GPa for a duration of 36 min. Diffusion profiles of total C concentration and 13C/12C were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The elemental diffusivity extracted from the data is ˜3.0 × 10-11 m2 s-1, where 13C/12C was observed to change significantly along the diffusion profile, reflecting a higher diffusivity of 12C relative to 13C. The maximum isotopic fractionation along the diffusion profile is ˜30-40‰. The relative diffusivities (D) of the carbon isotopes can be related to their masses (M) by D/D=(C/M)β; the exponent β calculated from our data has a value of 0.225 ± 0.025. Similarly high β values for diffusion of other elements in metals have been taken as an indication of interstitial diffusion, so our results are consistent with C diffusion in Fe by an interstitial mechanism. The high β-value reported here means that significant fractionation of carbon isotopes in nature may arise via diffusion in Fe(-Ni) metal, which is an abundant component of planetary interiors and meteorites.

  19. Molybdenum Isotopes and Soil Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Halliday, A. N.; Burton, K. W.

    2011-12-01

    The oxygenation state of Earth's oceans is a driver of evolution and extinction events as well as climate change. In recent years stable isotope fractionation of redox sensitive elements such as molybdenum (Mo) have been used as quantitative tracers of past redox-conditions in a number of marine environments. However, little is known about the processes controlling the Mo isotope compositions of the riverine inputs to the oceans and their short- and long-term variations. Several recent studies [Archer & Vance, 2008; Pearce et al., 2010] have shown that many river waters have heavy Mo isotope compositions. In some terrestrial weathering environments dissolved Mo isotope compositions in rivers are controlled by the catchment lithology [Neubert et al., 2011]. However, many rivers show fractionation of Mo isotopes relative to their catchment lithology. Possible mechanisms causing this fractionation are chemical weathering and pedogenic processes. This study has investigated the behavior of Mo isotopes during weathering of basalt under different conditions. Results from oxic to reducing soil profiles in Hawaii show that redox conditions during soil formation can control Mo isotope compositions in soils. Reducing soil profiles have light isotope compositions whereas oxidizing profiles are heavy. This general isotope behavior is confirmed by results from soil profiles from Iceland. Here reducing layers within the profiles show marked negative isotope excursions. In oxic profiles a surprisingly strong interaction of Mo with organic matter can be observed producing significant Mo isotope fractionation. This behavior might explain long term retention of Mo in soils besides its high mobility in molybdate form. Mo associated with organic matter is bioavailable and essential for processes like nitrogen fixation. In addition, we observe that fractionation relative to the source rock is dependent on the degree of weathering, i.e. relatively un-weathered profiles do not show

  20. 25. 'HANGAR SHEDS TRUSSES DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. 'HANGAR SHEDS - TRUSSES - DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS - PLANT AREA; MODIFICATION CENTER NO. 1, DAGGETT, CALIFORNIA.' Sections and details of trusses, ironwork, and joints, as modified to show ridge joint detail. As built. This blueline also shows the fire suppression system, added in orange pencil for 'Project 13: Bldgs. T-30, T-50, T-70, T-90' at a later, unspecified date. Contract no. W509 Eng. 2743; File no. 555/84, revision B, dated August 24, 1942. No sheet number. - Barstow-Daggett Airport, Hangar Shed No. 4, 39500 National Trails Highway, Daggett, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. Shedding Light on and with Example Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Paul; Mason, John

    2008-01-01

    Building on the papers in this special issue as well as on our own experience and research, we try to shed light on the construct of "example spaces" and on how it can inform research and practice in the teaching and learning of mathematical concepts. Consistent with our way of working, we delay definition until after appropriate reader experience…

  2. Vortex shedding from solid rocket propellant inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, P. H.; Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Vortex shedding frequency caused by the protrusion of inhibitors into the flow field of a solid rocket motor is investigated by experimental and mathematical models. The time dependent Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a finite difference technique assuming incompressible, two-dimensional flow under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. For laminar flow, explicit solutions are obtained using a vorticity-transport equation in place of the Navier-Stokes equations. For turbulent flow, a two-equation (k-epsilon) model is used for turbulent modeling and the SIMPLE algorithm is employed as the computational scheme. Cold flow tests were conducted to confirm the basic flow structure and to determine the vortex shedding frequency under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The vortex shedding frequencies were determined using a stroboscope to measure the oscillating frequency of yarn tufts which were fastened to one inhibitor in the models. A hot-film anemometer established the velocity history behind the inhibitor. Good agreement between the theoretical results and measurements of the vortex shedding frequencies is demonstrated.

  3. Vortex shedding from solid rocket propellant inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, P. H.; Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Vortex shedding frequency caused by the protrusion of inhibitors into the flow field of a solid rocket motor is investigated by experimental and mathematical models. The time dependent Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a finite difference technique assuming incompressible, two-dimensional flow under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. For laminar flow, explicit solutions are obtained using a vorticity-transport equation in place of the Navier-Stokes equations. For turbulent flow, a two-equation (k-epsilon) model is used for turbulent modeling and the SIMPLE algorithm is employed as the computational scheme. Cold flow tests were conducted to confirm the basic flow structure and to determine the vortex shedding frequency under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The vortex shedding frequencies were determined using a stroboscope to measure the oscillating frequency of yarn tufts which were fastened to one inhibitor in the models. A hot-film anemometer established the velocity history behind the inhibitor. Good agreement between the theoretical results and measurements of the vortex shedding frequencies is demonstrated.

  4. Vortex shedding from solid rocket propellant inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, P. H.; Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.

    1986-06-01

    Vortex shedding frequency caused by the protrusion of inhibitors into the flow field of a solid rocket motor is investigated by experimental and mathematical models. The time dependent Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a finite difference technique assuming incompressible, two-dimensional flow under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. For laminar flow, explicit solutions are obtained using a vorticity-transport equation in place of the Navier-Stokes equations. For turbulent flow, a two-equation (k-epsilon) model is used for turbulent modeling and the SIMPLE algorithm is employed as the computational scheme. Cold flow tests were conducted to confirm the basic flow structure and to determine the vortex shedding frequency under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The vortex shedding frequencies were determined using a stroboscope to measure the oscillating frequency of yarn tufts which were fastened to one inhibitor in the models. A hot-film anemometer established the velocity history behind the inhibitor. Good agreement between the theoretical results and measurements of the vortex shedding frequencies is demonstrated.

  5. Shedding Light on Dark Matter at Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsou, Vasiliki A.

    2013-12-01

    Dark matter remains one of the most puzzling mysteries in Fundamental Physics of our times. Experiments at high-energy physics colliders are expected to shed light to its nature and determine its properties. This review focuses on recent searches for dark matter signatures at the Large Hadron Collider, also discussing related prospects in future e+e- colliders.

  6. 2. SOUTH FACE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757) SHOWING SIGN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTH FACE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757) SHOWING SIGN HOLDER ON LEFT AND ENTRANCE TO TEST CELL. METEOROLOGICAL TOWER AND METEOROLOGICAL SHED (BLDG. 756) IN BACKGROUND ON LEFT; SOUTHEAST CORNER OF GPS AZIMUTH STATION (BLDG. 775) IN BACKGROUND BEHIND AND RIGHT OF PYROTECHNIC SHED. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Pyrotechnic Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  7. Quantitation of Benzo[a]pyrene Metabolic Profiles in Human Bronchoalveolar H358) Cells by Stable Isotope Dilution Liquid Chromatography-Atmospheric Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ding; Harvey, Ronald G.; Blair, Ian A.; Penning, Trevor M.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants and are carcinogenic in multiple organs and species. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a representative PAH and has been studied extensively for its carcinogenicity and toxicity. B[a]P itself is chemically inert and requires metabolic activation to exhibit its toxicity and carcinogenicity. Three major metabolic pathways have been well documented. The signature metabolites generated from the radical cation (peroxidase or monooxygenase mediated) pathway are B[a]P-1,6-dione and B[a]P-3,6-dione, the signature metabolite generated from the diol-epoxide (P450 mediated) pathway is B[a]P-r-7,t-8,t-9,c-10-tetrahydrotetrol (B[a]P-tetrol-1) and the signature metabolite generated from the o-quinone (aldo-keto reductase mediated) pathway is B[a]P-7,8-dione. The contributions of these different metabolic pathways to cancer initiation and the exploitation of this information for cancer prevention are still under debate. With the availability of a library of [13C4]-labeled B[a]P metabolite internal standards, we developed a sensitive stable isotope dilution atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method to address this issue by quantitating B[a]P metabolites from each metabolic pathway in human lung cells. This analytical method represents a 500 fold increased sensitivity compared with a method using HPLC-radiometric detection. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined to be 6 fmol on column for 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene (3-OH-B[a]P), the generally accepted biomarker for B[a]P exposure. This high level of sensitivity and robustness of the method was demonstrated in a study of B[a]P metabolic profiles in human bronchoalveolar H358 cells induced or uninduced with the AhR ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD). All the signature metabolites were detected and successfully quantitated. Our results suggest that all three metabolic pathways contribute equally in the overall

  8. High-Throughput and Reliable Isotope Label-free Approach for Profiling 24 Metabolic Enzymes in FVB Mice and Sex Differences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiamei; Zhu, Lijun; Li, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Haihui; Yan, Tongmeng; Xie, Cong; Zeng, Sijing; Yu, Jia; Jiang, Huangyu; Lu, Linlin; Qi, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Ying; Hu, Ming; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2017-06-01

    FVB mice are extensively used in transgenic and pharmacokinetic research. In this study, a validated isotope label-free method was constructed using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) to quantify 24 drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) in FVB mice. The DMEs include cytochrome P450s (CYP450s/Cyp450s), UDP-glucuronsyltransferases (UGTs/Ugts), and sulfotransferases (SULTs/Sults), which catalyze a variety of reactions to detoxify xenobiotics and endobiotics. The proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method exhibited good range and high sensitivity for signature peptides, as well as acceptable accuracy, precision, and recovery. The protein expression profiles of the DMEs were determined in male and female mice. Overall, the major Cyps, Ugts, and Sults were expressed in male mice followed the rank order: Cyp2c29 > 2e1 > 3a11 > 1a2 > 2d22 > 27a1 > 2c39; Ugt2b5 > 2b1 > 1a6a > 1a9 > 1a1 > 2a3 > 1a2 > 1a5; and Sult1a1 > 3a > 1d1. In contrast, the rank order in female mice was Cyp2c29 > 2e1 > 2c39 > 2d22 > 3a11 > 1a2 > 27a1; Ugt1a6a > 2b5 > 1a1 > 2b1 > 2a3 > 1a9 > 1a5 > 1a2; and Sult1a1 > 3a1 > 1d1. Cyp2c29, Cyp1a2, Cyp27a1, Ugt2b1, Ugt2b5 and Ugt2b36 were male predominant, whereas Cyp2c39, Cyp2d22, Cyp7a1, Ugt1a1, Ugt1a5, Sult1a1, Sult3a1, and Sult1d1 were female predominant. This work could serve as a useful reference for the metabolic study of new drugs and for elucidating the effectiveness and toxicity of drugs. The method is stable, simple, and rapid for determining the expression of DMEs in animals. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Patterns of vortex shedding from an oscillating circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Sa, Jong-Youb

    1990-01-01

    Vortex shedding from an oscillating circular cylinder was numerically investigated at Re = 100 with the Navier-Stokes equations and the new boundary conditions. The detailed shedding patterns are characterized by means of streakline plotting and lift-coefficient curves. A parameter map is presented which distinguishes the synchronized shedding from the asynchronous and the double vortices shedding from the single vortex shedding. The computational result is in good agreement with earlier experimental results.

  10. TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with Salmonella shedding in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a key factor in the innate immune recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria. Previous studies from our group identified differences in the expression profile of TLR4 and genes affected by the TLR4 signaling pathway among pigs that shed varying...

  11. Depth Profiles of Stable Nitrogen and Carbon Isotopes and C:N Ratios in Surficial Sediments From the NW Insular Slope of Cuba.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, L. A.; de La Lanza, G.; López-Veneroni, D.

    2007-05-01

    The deep sea floor in the studied area remained unexplored for several decades. Recent searching for fossil fuels and gas hydrates in the seabed has renewed interest in studying deep sea processes in the region. Near- surface sediments were recovered with a Reineick box-corer at 3 preselected quadrants located at the channel axis of the Florida Straits and the slope rise off NW Cuba at depths ranging from 1468 to 2094 m. A total of 12- 30 cm long- subcores were sampled for isotopic (15N/14N and 13C/12C) and C:N ratio analyses. Surficial sediment samples exhibited mostly enriched δ15N values ranging from +3.6 to +6.4‰ with an average of +5.4 ± 0.7. δ15N values in the deeper quadrants (I and II) near the channel axis were fairly homogeneous in contrast to the shallower one (III) located at the slope rise, which showed a higher variability and significantly depleted values (+3.6‰). Testing of equality of δ15N values among quadrants was rejected (Friedman's test p<0.368. From the estimated δ15N average value here recorded a significant input of organic matter from a pelagic source is inferred. The δ13C values had a narrow range in all quadrants (-18.5 to -19.13‰) with an average of - 18.71±0.17. A gradient slightly enriched is noted on the seabed from the westernmost quadrants(I and II)towards the slope rise (quadrant III). The average δ13C signal in surficial sediments from the Southern Straits approaches that known for the continental shelf of South Florida (-18.5±0.7). Vertical profiles of TOC and TN are highly heterogeneous among quadrants displaying a diminishing trend with depth (0- 18 cm). TOC values are mostly impoverished ranging from 0.16 to 0.67 mmol/g. Slope rise sites concentrated less TOC than locations near the channel axis. The opposite occurred with TN values. Sites near the slope rise attained 0.90 mmol/g whereas in the channel axis, nitrogen was reduced to 0.46mmol/g. C:N ratios ranged from 1.9 to 10.2. An increasing gradient was noted

  12. Shed king cobra and cobra skins as model membranes for in-vitro nicotine permeation studies.

    PubMed

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Prakongpan, Sompol; Panomsuk, Suwannee; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Priprem, Aroonsri

    2002-10-01

    Shed king cobra skin (SKCS) and shed cobra skin (SCS) were investigated for use as barrier membranes, including some pre-hydration factors, for in-vitro nicotine permeation. Inter-specimen variations in nicotine fluxes using shed snake skin were compared with those using human epidermis. Nicotine in the form of 1% w/v aqueous buffer solution at pH 5 and transdermal patches (dose 14 mg day(-1)) were used. The nicotine fluxes across the shed snake skin were not significantly affected (P > 0.05) by temperature and duration of hydration pre-treatment. Scanning electron micrographs of SKCS and SCS revealed a remarkable difference in surface morphology, but the nicotine fluxes using both shed skins were not significantly different (P > 0.05). When compared with the results obtained using human epidermis, there were similarities in fluxes and permeation profiles of nicotine. Using nicotine solution, the nicotine permeation profiles of all membranes followed zero order kinetics. The amount of nicotine permeated provided good linearity with the square root of time over 24 h (R(2) > 0.98) when using nicotine patches. The nicotine fluxes using SKCS and SCS had less inter-specimen variation than those using human epidermis. The results suggest a potential use for SKCS or SCS as barrier membranes for in-vitro nicotine permeation studies.

  13. Superhydrophobic porous networks for enhanced droplet shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yahua; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-09-01

    Recent research has shown that the use of submillimeter-scale tapered post arrays could generate the so-called pancake bouncing, which is characterized by the fast shedding of impinging drops from the surface in a pancake shape without undergoing the retraction stage as observed on conventional superhydrophobic surfaces. Despite this exciting discovery, the fabrication of this unique superhydrophobic surface with tapered post arrays involves complex processes, hindering its wide applications in practical sectors. Here, we report on the facile strategy to prepare a new hierarchical multilayered superhydrophobic surface directly from commercially available porous matrix that allows for efficient drop shedding. Further study shows that the enhanced drop mobility observed on such a surface is attributed to the synergistic cooperation of hierarchical structures endowing an adequate energy storage and effective energy release. The facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with enhanced drop mobility may find many practical applications including anti-icing, dropwise condensation and self-cleaning.

  14. Superhydrophobic porous networks for enhanced droplet shedding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahua; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-09-20

    Recent research has shown that the use of submillimeter-scale tapered post arrays could generate the so-called pancake bouncing, which is characterized by the fast shedding of impinging drops from the surface in a pancake shape without undergoing the retraction stage as observed on conventional superhydrophobic surfaces. Despite this exciting discovery, the fabrication of this unique superhydrophobic surface with tapered post arrays involves complex processes, hindering its wide applications in practical sectors. Here, we report on the facile strategy to prepare a new hierarchical multilayered superhydrophobic surface directly from commercially available porous matrix that allows for efficient drop shedding. Further study shows that the enhanced drop mobility observed on such a surface is attributed to the synergistic cooperation of hierarchical structures endowing an adequate energy storage and effective energy release. The facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with enhanced drop mobility may find many practical applications including anti-icing, dropwise condensation and self-cleaning.

  15. Superhydrophobic porous networks for enhanced droplet shedding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yahua; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has shown that the use of submillimeter-scale tapered post arrays could generate the so-called pancake bouncing, which is characterized by the fast shedding of impinging drops from the surface in a pancake shape without undergoing the retraction stage as observed on conventional superhydrophobic surfaces. Despite this exciting discovery, the fabrication of this unique superhydrophobic surface with tapered post arrays involves complex processes, hindering its wide applications in practical sectors. Here, we report on the facile strategy to prepare a new hierarchical multilayered superhydrophobic surface directly from commercially available porous matrix that allows for efficient drop shedding. Further study shows that the enhanced drop mobility observed on such a surface is attributed to the synergistic cooperation of hierarchical structures endowing an adequate energy storage and effective energy release. The facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with enhanced drop mobility may find many practical applications including anti-icing, dropwise condensation and self-cleaning. PMID:27644452

  16. Multi-isotope (C - O - S - H - B - Mg - Ca - Ba) and trace element variations along a vertical pore water profile across a brackish-fresh water transition, Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Michael E.; Lapham, Laura; Gussone, Nikolaus; Struck, Ulrich; Buhl, Dieter; Immenhauser, Adrian; Moeller, Kirsten; Pretet, Chloé; Nägler, Thomas F.; Dellwig, Olaf; Schnetger, Bernhard; Huckriede, Hermann; Halas, Stan; Samankassou, Elias

    2013-04-01

    downcore increase in pore water concentrations of earth alkaline ions and the formation of authigenic barites. Coupled S-34 and O-18 isotope signals in authigenic barites suggest that they were formed in pre-Yoldia sediments from pore waters strongly depleted in O-18 (as low as -20 per mil vs. VSMOW). In the present communication, we will discuss possible impacts of diagenetic processes on multi-isotope signals in pore waters and authigenic phases. A combination of mixing between brackish and fresh water, ion exchange, precipitation/dissolution, and transport reactions is considered to explain most of the observed isotope variations along the vertical pore water profile. This work was supported by the Leibniz IOW, BONUS+ program, the Universities of Bern, Geneva, Bochum, Münster, and Oldenburg, and the Natural Museum of History, Berlin.

  17. Multi-element, multi-compound isotope profiling as a means to distinguish the geographical and varietal origin of fermented cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) beans.

    PubMed

    Diomande, Didier; Antheaume, Ingrid; Leroux, Maël; Lalande, Julie; Balayssac, Stéphane; Remaud, Gérald S; Tea, Illa

    2015-12-01

    Multi-element stable isotope ratios have been assessed as a means to distinguish between fermented cocoa beans from different geographical and varietal origins. Isotope ratios and percentage composition for C and N were measured in different tissues (cotyledons, shells) and extracts (pure theobromine, defatted cocoa solids, protein, lipids) obtained from fermented cocoa bean samples. Sixty-one samples from 24 different geographical origins covering all four continental areas producing cocoa were analyzed. Treatment of the data with unsupervised (Principal Component Analysis) and supervised (Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis) multiparametric statistical methods allowed the cocoa beans from different origins to be distinguished. The most discriminant variables identified as responsible for geographical and varietal differences were the δ(15)N and δ(13)C values of cocoa beans and some extracts and tissues. It can be shown that the isotope ratios are correlated with the altitude and precipitation conditions found in the different cocoa-growing regions.

  18. CAD Instructor Designs Eco-Friendly Shed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwendau, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Dissatisfied with the options offered by big box stores--and wanting to save some money and go as green as possible--the author puts his design and construction skills to good use. In this article, he shares how he designed and built an eco-friendly shed. He says he is very pleased with the results of working with his own design, reducing waste,…

  19. CAD Instructor Designs Eco-Friendly Shed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwendau, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Dissatisfied with the options offered by big box stores--and wanting to save some money and go as green as possible--the author puts his design and construction skills to good use. In this article, he shares how he designed and built an eco-friendly shed. He says he is very pleased with the results of working with his own design, reducing waste,…

  20. Biology and biogenesis of shed microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, Christopher; Clancy, James; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2016-08-05

    The ability of cells to transmit bioactive molecules to recipient cells and the extracellular environment is a fundamental requirement for both normal physiology and disease pathogenesis. It has traditionally been thought that soluble factors released from cells were responsible for this cellular signaling but recent research has revealed a fundamental role for microvesicles in this process. Microvesicles are heterogeneous membrane-bound sacs that are shed from the surface of cells into the extracellular environment in a highly regulated process. They are shed following the selective incorporation of a host of molecular cargo including multiple types of proteins and nucleic acids. In addition to providing new insight into the etiology of complex human diseases, microvesicles also show great promise as a tool for advanced diagnosis and therapy as we move forward into a new age of personalized medicine. Here we review current status of the rapidly evolving field of microvesicle biology, highlighting critical regulatory roles for several small GTPases in the biology and biogenesis of shed microvesicles.

  1. Isotopic fractionation by diffusion in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labolle, Eric M.; Fogg, Graham E.; Eweis, Juana B.; Gravner, Janko; Leaist, Derek G.

    2008-07-01

    During the last decade, isotopic fractionation has gained acceptance as an indicator of microbiological and chemical transformations of contaminants in groundwater. These transformation processes typically favor isotopically light, compared to isotopically heavy, contaminants, resulting in enrichment of the latter in the residual aqueous phase. In these isotope applications, it has been generally presumed that physical transport processes in groundwater have a negligible effect on isotopic enrichment. It is well known, however, that aqueous phase diffusion generally proceeds faster for isotopically light, compared to isotopically heavy, solute molecules, often resulting in isotopic fractionation in groundwater. This paper considers the potential for isotopic fractionation during transport in groundwater resulting from minute isotopic effects on aqueous diffusion coefficients. Analyses of transport in heterogeneous systems delimit the viable range of isotopic fractionation by diffusion in groundwater. Results show that diffusion can result in similar degrees of depletion and enrichment of isotopically heavy solutes during transport in heterogeneous systems with significant diffusion rate-limited mass transfer between fast- and slow-flow zones. Additional analyses and examples explore conditions that attenuate the development of significant fractionation. Examples are presented for 13C methyl tertiary butyl ether and deuterated and nondeuterated isopropanol and tertiary butyl alcohol using aqueous diffusion coefficients measured by the Taylor dispersion method with refractive index profiling as a part of this study. Examples elucidate the potential for diffusive fractionation as a confounder in isotope applications and emphasize the importance of hydrogeologic analysis for assessing the role of diffusive fractionation in isotope applications at contaminant field sites.

  2. Isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Rodney J.; Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated.

  3. Experience from insulators with RTV silicon rubber sheds and shed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Vlastos, A.E.; Sherif, E. )

    1990-10-01

    Long-rod composite insulators, with weather sheds made of room temperature vulcanizing silicon rubber compounds (RTV), were exposed for many years to HVAC and HVDC under realistic conditions and natural pollution. This paper reports that it was found that the shed material, quite in contrary to the experience gained from insulators with sheds of other organic materials e.g., EPDM rubber, undergoes a slow degradation which improves the already superior water repelling properties of the silicon rubber compounds. The improvement seems to be due to a low molecular layer which is produced on the surface of the insulator sheds. This layer improves the hydrophobicity of the surface, while protecting the surface from further degradation. Weather sheds of porcelain housing coated with a thin layer of RTV give similar results to those obtained with long-rod silicon rubber insulators. The RTV coating, although it led to increased salt deposit density, reduces the leak currents and the withstand of the insulator under the same pollution conditions.

  4. 2. SOUTH FACE OF METEOROLOGICAL SHED (BLDG. 756) WITH METEOROLOGICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTH FACE OF METEOROLOGICAL SHED (BLDG. 756) WITH METEOROLOGICAL DATA ACQUISITION TERMINAL (MDAT) INSIDE BUILDING - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Meteorological Shed & Tower, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  5. 1. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF METEOROLOGICAL SHED (BLDG. 756) SOUTH FACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF METEOROLOGICAL SHED (BLDG. 756) SOUTH FACE OF SLC-3W MOBILE SERVICE TOWER IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Meteorological Shed & Tower, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. 2. ACID STORAGE SHED, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ACID STORAGE SHED, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - NIKE Missile Base C-84, Acid Storage Shed, North of launch area, northwest of earthen berm of Acid Fueling Station, Barrington, Cook County, IL

  7. VIEW WEST, SOUTH PENN POWERHOUSE, (FROM LEFT) BLEEDER SHED, ENGINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW WEST, SOUTH PENN POWERHOUSE, (FROM LEFT) BLEEDER SHED, ENGINE HOUSE, BELT SHED, ECCENTRIC HOUSE. - South Penn Oil Company, G. M. Mead Lot 492 Lease, Morrison Run Field, Clarendon, Warren County, PA

  8. 9. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH CORNER OF SHED WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH CORNER OF SHED WITH DERRICK AND RAILWAY PASS-TROUGH ON WHARF, LOOKING NORTH - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  9. 7. GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF SHED, SHOWING ALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF SHED, SHOWING ALL EIGHTEEN LOADING BAYS, LOOKING WEST FROM ACROSS TURNING BASIN - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  10. 10. WIDE GENERAL VIEW OF SHED SHOWING SOUTHWEST FACADE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. WIDE GENERAL VIEW OF SHED SHOWING SOUTHWEST FACADE AND TRUCK PLATFORM/STAGING AREA AT SOUTHWEST END OF BUILDING, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  11. 3. OBLIQUE GENERAL VIEW SHOWING EAST CORNER OF SHED, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OBLIQUE GENERAL VIEW SHOWING EAST CORNER OF SHED, WITH RAILROAD TRACKS PASSING UNDER DERRICK ALONG WHARF - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  12. 14. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST CORNER OF SHED, OBSTRUCTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST CORNER OF SHED, OBSTRUCTED BY LATE METAL BUILDING, LOOKING EAST - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  13. Control of rod shedding in the frog retina.

    PubMed

    Basinger, S F; Hollyfield, J G

    1980-01-01

    In all vertebrate species examined thus far, rod outer segment shedding follows a cyclic pattern in which the outer segment tips are shed shortly after the onset of light. Work in the rat retina suggests that rod shedding may follow a circadian rhythm which is controlled by one or more circadian oscillators. Our results in the frog retina are significantly different in that: rod shedding can be driven by the onset of light or other environmental cues; shedding does not persist in constant darkness; shedding is unaffected in frogs with chronic unilateral or bilateral optic nerve section; and shedding will rapidly phase shift to the time of light onset on a wide variety of diurnal cycles. Thus, rod shedding in the frog retina does not appear to be a classical circadian rhythm.

  14. 7. Fog signal house and shed, view south, north and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Fog signal house and shed, view south, north and west sides of fog signal house, northeast and northwest sides of shed - Whitehead Light Station, Whitehead Island, East northeast of Tenants Harbor, Spruce Head, Knox County, ME

  15. 1. PAINT AND OIL STORAGE SHED, FRONT, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PAINT AND OIL STORAGE SHED, FRONT, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Paint & Oil Storage Shed, North end of base, northwest of Mess Hall & south of Basketball Court, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  16. 2. PAINT AND OIL STORAGE SHED, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PAINT AND OIL STORAGE SHED, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTH. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Paint & Oil Storage Shed, North end of base, northwest of Mess Hall & south of Basketball Court, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  17. East elevation of bunkhouse and agriculture storage sheds, looking west. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East elevation of bunkhouse and agriculture storage sheds, looking west. The shower house is adjacent to the storage sheds and just south of the bunkhouse. - Sespe Ranch, Bunkhouse, 2896 Telegraph Road, Fillmore, Ventura County, CA

  18. 9. Relationship of residence, claim house, west tool shed, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Relationship of residence, claim house, west tool shed, and east tool shed to each other and immediate surroundings, looking west - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  19. 32. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 161 TYPICAL SECTION & DETAILS. Sheet 5 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. 33. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 127 STAIR & TOILET ROOM DETAILS. Sheet 6 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  1. 1. GENERAL VIEW SHOWING NORTHEAST END (FRONT) OF TRANSIT SHED, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW SHOWING NORTHEAST END (FRONT) OF TRANSIT SHED, IN CONTEXT WITH LOADING YARD AND DERRICK, LOOKING WEST - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  2. 35. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 127 END WALL FRAMING. Sheet 9 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  3. 34. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 127 70'0' TRUSS. Sheet 7 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  4. 30. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 161 PLOT PLAN & TRANSVERSE SECTION. Sheet 1 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  5. 31. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 127 STAIR & TOILET ROOM DETAILS. Sheet 3 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  6. View from inside Train Shed looking out through arched opening. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from inside Train Shed looking out through arched opening. - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  7. Detail of arch opening on N elevation of Train Shed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of arch opening on N elevation of Train Shed. - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  8. Cherry picker at end of Train Shed with arm fully ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cherry picker at end of Train Shed with arm fully extended and photographer in bucket - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  9. View from inside end of Train Shed showing cherry picker ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from inside end of Train Shed showing cherry picker and photographer at work - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  10. Jack Boucher in bucket of cherry picker photographing Train Shed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Jack Boucher in bucket of cherry picker photographing Train Shed. - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  11. Baggage Room as seen from outside end of Train Shed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Baggage Room as seen from outside end of Train Shed. - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  12. Detail of castiron bracket supporting overhang on Train Shed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of cast-iron bracket supporting overhang on Train Shed. - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  13. 28. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH UNDER EAST SHED AT PLATFORM LEVEL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH UNDER EAST SHED AT PLATFORM LEVEL, SHOWING RELATIONSHIP OF CONCOURSES TO SHEDS - Pennsylvania Railroad, Harrisburg Station & Trainshed, Market & South Fourth Streets, Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  14. View of EPA Farm storage shed, facing north. Greenhouse is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of EPA Farm storage shed, facing north. Greenhouse is in background - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Storage Shed, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  15. VIEW NORTHEAST, WEST FRONT OF PACKING SHED (BUILDING 20) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW NORTHEAST, WEST FRONT OF PACKING SHED (BUILDING 20) AND BAMBOO STAND ALONG SOUTH FRONT - U.S. Plant Introduction Station, Packing Shed, 11601 Old Pond Road, Glenn Dale, Prince George's County, MD

  16. 2. Light tower, keeper's house and shed, view south southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Light tower, keeper's house and shed, view south southwest, northwest and northeast sides of tower, east and north sides of keeper's house and shed - Whitehead Light Station, Whitehead Island, East northeast of Tenants Harbor, Spruce Head, Knox County, ME

  17. North and east elevations of tractor shed facing southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North and east elevations of tractor shed facing southwest - Norris Farm, Tractor Shed-Combine Barn, .5 mile west of County Road 857 & .25 mile east of County Road 88/1, Cheat Neck, Monongalia County, WV

  18. South and west elevations of tractor shed facing northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South and west elevations of tractor shed facing northeast - Norris Farm, Tractor Shed-Combine Barn, .5 mile west of County Road 857 & .25 mile east of County Road 88/1, Cheat Neck, Monongalia County, WV

  19. 3. EAST FACE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757); DOORS FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAST FACE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757); DOORS FOR STORAGE ROOMS. SECURITY FENCE ON RIGHT SIDE OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Pyrotechnic Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  20. 2. SHED, SOUTH END OF SHORTER BARRACKS, FRONT AND RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SHED, SOUTH END OF SHORTER BARRACKS, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - NIKE Missile Base C-84, Paint & Oil Storage Shed, South of Launch Area Entrance Drive, near security fence, Barrington, Cook County, IL

  1. 23. CONTEXTUAL, RAIL CARS IN MU SHED Delaware, Lackawanna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CONTEXTUAL, RAIL CARS IN MU SHED - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  2. INTERIOR VIEW OF SHED, SHOWING STRUCTURAL SYSTEM AND OVERHEAD DOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF SHED, SHOWING STRUCTURAL SYSTEM AND OVERHEAD DOOR MOUNTING, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Marvine Colliery, Shed, West side Boulevard Avenue, between East Parker Street & Route 380, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  3. 15. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second floor support beams. - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  4. 1. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking south, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking south, with road in foreground - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  5. 12. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing floor joist and support beams - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  6. 5. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking northwest showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking northwest showing office - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  7. 13. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second floor window sill - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  8. 4. MACHINERY SHED AND STORAGE ROOM ADDITION, SOUTH AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. MACHINERY SHED AND STORAGE ROOM ADDITION, SOUTH AND WEST WALL LOOKING NORTHEAST SEED STORAGE BUILDING (1963) BEHIND - Tucson Plant Material Center, Machinery Shed, 3241 North Romero Road, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  9. 2. EXTERIOR OF THE STORAGE SHED LOCATED NEAR THE POOL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EXTERIOR OF THE STORAGE SHED LOCATED NEAR THE POOL, BUILDING 305 AND THE TANK, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Storage Shed & Tank, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  10. 1. EXTERIOR OF THE STORAGE SHED LOCATED NEAR THE POOL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR OF THE STORAGE SHED LOCATED NEAR THE POOL, BUILDING 305 AND THE TANK, LOOKING EAST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Storage Shed & Tank, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  11. 15. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed showing posts ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed showing posts looking towards the chute building - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  12. 9. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking north, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking north, with chute building on the left - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  13. 12. Partial view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Partial view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northwest showing office - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  14. 14. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking towards chute building - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  15. 16. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking up ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking up at the trusses of the second floor - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  16. 3. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking southeast; parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking southeast; parking lot in foreground - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  17. 2. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking south; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking south; chute building is in background - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  18. 6. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northeast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northeast, with chute building to the right - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  19. Shedding of hyaluronate synthase from streptococci.

    PubMed

    Mausolf, A; Jungmann, J; Robenek, H; Prehm, P

    1990-04-01

    Hyaluronate synthase was shed into the culture medium from growing streptococci (group C) together with nascent hyaluronate. The mechanism of solubilization was analysed using isolated protoplast membranes. Solubilization increased when membranes were suspended in larger volumes, but it was temperature-independent and was not inhibited by protease inhibitors. Increased hyaluronate chain length enhanced solubilization. The soluble synthase could re-integrate into Streptococcal membranes in a saturable manner. The soluble synthase behaved like an integral membrane protein, although it was not integrated into phospholipid vesicles. In sucrose velocity centrifugation the synthase had a higher sedimentation rate in detergent-free solution, indicating that it existed in an aggregated state.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of a PhosWatch detector using Geant4 for xenon isotope beta-gamma coincidence spectrum profile and detection efficiency calculations.

    PubMed

    Mekarski, P; Zhang, W; Ungar, K; Bean, M; Korpach, E

    2009-10-01

    A simulation tool has been developed using the Geant4 Toolkit to simulate a PhosWatch single channel beta-gamma coincidence detection system consisting of a CsI(Tl)/BC404 Phoswich well detector and pulse shape analysis algorithms implemented digital signal processor. The tool can be used to simulate the detector's response for all the gamma rays and beta particles emitted from (135)Xe, (133m)Xe, (133)Xe, (131m)Xe and (214)Pb. Two- and three-dimensional beta-gamma coincidence spectra from the PhosWatch detector can be produced using the simulation tool. The accurately simulated spectra could be used to calculate system coincidence detection efficiency for each xenon isotope, the corrections for the interference from the various spectral components from radon and xenon isotopes, and system gain calibration. Also, it can generate two- and three-dimensional xenon reference spectra to test beta-gamma coincidence spectral deconvolution analysis software.

  1. A suggested mode of inheritance for wool shedding in sheep.

    PubMed

    Pollott, G E

    2011-08-01

    The ability of a sheep to shed its own wool has an attraction in scenarios where the costs of harvesting wool outweigh its value. Certain breeds and composites have the ability to shed their wool in the spring, and these are investigated in this work in an attempt to outline the genetics of wool shedding. One flock from a breeding group in Southern England (UK) containing sheep with wool-shedding characteristics provided shedding scores (1 to 5 scale; no shedding to complete shedding) that were used in a range of genetic analyses. The particular nature of wool shedding suggested that there may be a major gene segregating in these populations that facilitates wool shedding. In addition, there was clearly variation among wool shedders in the speed and extent of shedding, so a polygenic trait was also investigated. The breeding group used a range of shedding breeds and composites in a regular program to introduce wool-shedding genes into their flocks. This allowed the testing of Mendelian ratios for shedders:nonshedders in both first-cross and first-backcross animals. Four modes of inheritance were tested: autosomal recessive, sex-linked recessive, autosomal dominant, and sex-linked dominant. The most likely mode of inheritance was autosomal dominant (P < 0.05), with a low level of incomplete penetrance. In first back-cross animals, this mode of inheritance was confirmed but with complete penetrance. Approximately 11% of shedders did not exhibit the trait as lambs. Mixed-model analyses of shedding scores allowed an investigation of factors that affected wool shedding and also the extent of any genetic and permanent animal variance. Shedding score was found to have a heritability of 0.54 ± 0.07 in lambs and 0.26 ± 0.06 in animals of all ages in one flock using Easycare, Wiltshire Horn, Katahdin, and Dorper shedding animals. Shedding score as a lamb had a genetic correlation of 0.94 ± 0.08 with shedding score as a 2 yr old, but at the phenotypic level this

  2. Shed syndecan-2 enhances tumorigenic activities of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sojoong; Choi, Youngsil; Jun, Eunsung; Kim, In-San; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Because earlier studies showed the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-2, sheds from colon cancer cells in culture, the functional roles of shed syndecan-2 were assessed. A non-cleavable mutant of syndecan-2 in which the Asn148-Leu149 residues were replaced with Asn148-Ile149, had decreased shedding, less cancer-associated activities of syndecan-2 in vitro, and less syndecan-2-mediated metastasis of mouse melanoma cells in vivo, suggesting the importance of shedding on syndecan-2-mediated pro-tumorigenic functions. Indeed, shed syndecan-2 from cancer-conditioned media and recombinant shed syndecan-2 enhanced cancer-associated activities, and depletion of shed syndecan-2 abolished these effects. Similarly, shed syndecan-2 was detected from sera of patients from advanced carcinoma (625.9 ng/ml) and promoted cancer-associated activities. Furthermore, a series of syndecan-2 deletion mutants showed that the tumorigenic activity of shed syndecan-2 resided in the C-terminus of the extracellular domain and a shed syndecan-2 synthetic peptide (16 residues) was sufficient to establish subcutaneous primary growth of HT29 colon cancer cells, pulmonary metastases (B16F10 cells), and primary intrasplenic tumor growth and liver metastases (4T1 cells). Taken together, these results demonstrate that shed syndecan-2 directly enhances colon cancer progression and may be a promising therapeutic target for controlling colon cancer development. PMID:25686828

  3. Shedding new light on genetic dark matter

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Discoveries from genome-wide association studies have contributed to our knowledge of the genetic etiology of many complex diseases. However, these account for only a small fraction of each disease's heritability. Here, we comment on approaches currently available to uncover more of the genetic 'dark matter,' including an approach introduced recently by Naukkarinen and colleagues. These authors propose a method for distinguishing between gene expression driven by genetic variation and that driven by non-genetic factors. This dichotomy allows investigators to focus statistical tests and further molecular analyses on a smaller set of genes, thereby discovering new genetic variation affecting risk for disease. We need more methods like this one if we are to shed a powerful light on dark matter. By enhancing our understanding of molecular genetic etiology, such methods will help us to understand disease processes better and will advance the promise of personalized medicine. PMID:21067556

  4. Supercomputing Sheds Light on the Dark Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Salman Habib

    2012-11-15

    At Argonne National Laboratory, scientists are using supercomputers to shed light on one of the great mysteries in science today, the Dark Universe. With Mira, a petascale supercomputer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a team led by physicists Salman Habib and Katrin Heitmann will run the largest, most complex simulation of the universe ever attempted. By contrasting the results from Mira with state-of-the-art telescope surveys, the scientists hope to gain new insights into the distribution of matter in the universe, advancing future investigations of dark energy and dark matter into a new realm. The team's research was named a finalist for the 2012 Gordon Bell Prize, an award recognizing outstanding achievement in high-performance computing.

  5. Shedding of hyaluronate synthase from streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Mausolf, A; Jungmann, J; Robenek, H; Prehm, P

    1990-01-01

    Hyaluronate synthase was shed into the culture medium from growing streptococci (group C) together with nascent hyaluronate. The mechanism of solubilization was analysed using isolated protoplast membranes. Solubilization increased when membranes were suspended in larger volumes, but it was temperature-independent and was not inhibited by protease inhibitors. Increased hyaluronate chain length enhanced solubilization. The soluble synthase could re-integrate into Streptococcal membranes in a saturable manner. The soluble synthase behaved like an integral membrane protein, although it was not integrated into phospholipid vesicles. In sucrose velocity centrifugation the synthase had a higher sedimentation rate in detergent-free solution, indicating that it existed in an aggregated state. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2109602

  6. Coupling of vortex shedding with a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahashi, Masaaki; Brocher, Eric; Collini, Paul

    1988-09-01

    A pulsating flow within a tube with one end sealed and the other end open, facing a low-velocity wind tunnel flow, may be generated by using a wedge trip placed upstream of the open end of the tube. However, a reasonable explanation about the generating mechanism of the pulsating flow within the resonator coupled with a tripping device has not been given yet. In order to get a better understanding of the coupling of the flow around the wedge trip and the flow oscillation within the resonator, the interaction between the wedge wake and the pulsating flow has been experimentally investigated by means of the hydraulic analogy. The results of flow visualization with shadow-graph technique have provided a good understanding of the coupling phenomena of vortex shedding on the wedge with the flow at the resonator mouth.

  7. N and O Isotopes of Nitrate in the GISP2 Ice Core: Implications for the Interpretation of Ice-Core Nitrate Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanter, M.; Steig, E. J.; Sigman, D. M.

    2001-05-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is a "reversibly deposited" species in snow: following deposition at the snow surface, nitrate is re-mobilized and a significant amount is re-emitted to the atmosphere. Post-depositional processing of nitrate, including evaporation/sublimation and photolysis, impacts the final concentrations that are archived in the ice core record. Measurement of the isotopic composition of nitrate offers a potentially powerful tool for determining how these variables affect the record of nitrate concentrations. A new method [Andreani et al., Eos Trans. AGU, 80(49), OS189, 1999; Sigman et al., submitted to Anal. Chem., 2001] allows for high-resolution analysis of the N and O isotopes of nitrate in firn and glacial ice. Results of the N isotopic analysis of nitrate in the GISP2 ice core show values of δ 15N-NO3- in the range of -1.4 to 26 per mil through the last 36,000 years. The δ 15N-NO3- is highly correlated (r2 ~0.7) with accumulation rate, consistent with the comparison of nitrate-δ 15N and accumulation rate from alpine and polar sites by Freyer et al. [Tellus 48B, 1996]. For the upper 20 m of firn, results to date show that δ 15N and δ 18O of nitrate are not correlated, with δ 15N (ranging from -1.4 to 4.2 per mil) generally increasing with depth to 20 m and δ 18O (ranging from 48 to 69 per mil) generally decreasing. The high values of δ 18O in the firn are consistent with modern measurements of δ 18O-NO3- in precipitation. These high values probably result from of the interaction of NOx and O3 in the atmosphere prior to deposition of NO3-, a conclusion that is supported by the observation of mass independent behavior of 17O in atmospheric nitrate [Galanter et al., Eos Trans. AGU, 81(48), F191, 2000; Michalski, G. and Thiemens, M. H., Eos Trans. AGU, 81 (48), F120, 2000]. Though there may be several possible explanations for the difference in the firn trends of δ 15N and δ 18O, an intriguing prospect is that it reflects a combination of NO3- loss by

  8. The complete targeted profile of the organic acid intermediates of the citric acid cycle using a single stable isotope dilution analysis, sodium borodeuteride reduction and selected ion monitoring GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Mamer, Orval; Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Choinière, Luc; Chénard, Valérie; St-Pierre, Julie; Avizonis, Daina

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative profiling of the organic acid intermediates of the citric acid cycle (CAC) presents a challenge due to the lack of commercially available internal standards for all of the organic acid intermediates. We developed an analytical method that enables the quantitation of all the organic acids in the CAC in a single stable isotope dilution GC/MS analysis with deuterium-labeled analogs used as internal standards. The unstable α-keto acids are rapidly reduced with sodium borodeuteride to the corresponding stable α-deutero-α-hydroxy acids and these, along with their unlabeled analogs and other CAC organic acid intermediates, are converted to their tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives. Selected ion monitoring is employed with electron ionization. We validated this method by treating an untransformed mouse mammary epithelial cell line with well-known mitochondrial toxins affecting the electron transport chain and ATP synthase, which resulted in profound perturbations of the concentration of CAC intermediates.

  9. Biomagnification profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols and polychlorinated biphenyls in Tokyo Bay elucidated by delta13C and delta15N isotope ratios as guides to trophic web structure.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ichiro; Miyoshi, Noriko; Mizukawa, Kaoruko; Takada, Hideshige; Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Omori, Koji; Tsuchiya, Kotaro

    2009-05-01

    Biomagnification profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the innermost part of Tokyo Bay, Japan were analyzed using stable carbon (delta(13)C) and nitrogen (delta(15)N) isotope ratios as guides to trophic web structure. delta(15)N analysis indicated that all species of mollusks tested were primary consumers, while decapods and fish were secondary consumers. Higher concentrations of PCBs occurred in decapods and fish than in mollusks. In contrast, concentrations of PAHs and alkylphenols were lower in decapods and fish than in mollusks. Unlike PCBs, whose concentrations largely increased with increasing delta(15)N (i.e. increasing trophic level), all PAHs and alkylphenols analyzed followed a reverse trend. Molecular weights of PAHs are lower than those of PCBs, therefore low membrane permeability caused by large molecular size is an unlikely factor in the "biodilution" of PAHs. Organisms at higher trophic levels may rapidly metabolize PAHs or they may assimilate less of them.

  10. Transuranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1985-12-01

    The needs of the research community for the production of transuranium isotopes, the quantities required, the continuity of production desired, and what a new steady state neutron source would have to provide to satisfy these needs are discussed. Examples of past frontier research which need these isotopes as well as an outline of the proposed Large Einsteinium Activation Program, LEAP, which requires roughly ten times the current production of /sup 254/Es are given. 15 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Isotopic Paleoclimatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, R.

    Paleotemperature scales were calculated by H. C. Urey and others in the 1950s to assess past temperatures, and later work using the stable isotopes of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon employed standards such as Peedee belemnite (PDB) and Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW). Subsequently, subjects as diverse as ice volume and paleotemperatures, oceanic ice and sediment cores, Pleistocene/Holocene climatic changes, and isotope chronostratigraphy extending back to the Precambrian were investigated.

  12. Isotopic chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, H.G.

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  13. Using Novel Approaches in Process-Based Modeling for Interpreting Inter-Annual Variability in Tree Ring Widths, Wood Density Profiles, and Cellulose Isotopic Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, A. D.; Babst, F.; Belmecheri, S.; Frank, D. C.; Hacket Pain, A. J.; Hayat, A.; Poulter, B.; Rademacher, T. T.; Trouet, V.

    2015-12-01

    Time series annual of tree ring width, density variation, and oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions have the potential to substantially increase our knowledge of forest responses to environmental variation. However, their interpretation is not straightforward due to the simultaneous influences of a number of confounding factors, including carry-over effects from previous years, variable resource allocation with size, age, and canopy position, species-specific physiologies, and complex interactions between forcings such as temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric CO2. Here we attempt to tease these factors apart and so substantially improve the interpretability of tree ring archives through the construction and application of novel approaches within a process-based model of individual tree growth. The model incorporates descriptions of xylem cell division, expansion, and secondary wall thickening, apical and lateral meristem activities with internal controls from internal signals, internal carbon storage, and the dynamics of canopy photosynthesis, stomatal movements, evapotranspiration, canopy temperatures, and soil moisture. Alternative treatments of isotopic fractionation and growth controls are evaluated using measured datasets. We demonstrate how this new model approach can be used to assess the information contained in tree rings concerning the influence of increasing atmospheric CO2 over the past century on growth and water use efficiency at a range of sites.

  14. Soil properties, strontium isotopic signatures and multi-element profiles to authenticate the origin of vegetables from small-scale regions: illustration with early potatoes from southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Zampella, Mariavittoria; Quétel, Christophe R; Paredes, Eduardo; Goitom Asfaha, Daniel; Vingiani, Simona; Adamo, Paola

    2011-10-15

    We propose a method for the authentication of the origin of vegetables grown under similar weather conditions, in sites less than 10 km distance from the sea and distributed over a rather small scale area (58651 km(2)). We studied how the strontium (Sr) isotopic signature and selected elemental concentrations ([Mn], [Cu], [Zn], [Rb], [Sr] and [Cd]) in early potatoes from three neighbouring administrative regions in the south of Italy were related to the geological substrate (alluvial sediments, volcanic substrates and carbonate rocks) and to selected soil chemical properties influencing the bioavailability of elements in soils (pH, cation exchange capacity and total carbonate content). Through multiple-step multivariate statistics (PLS-DA) we could assign 26 potatoes (including two already commercialised samples) to their respective eight sites of production, corresponding to the first two types of geological substrates. The other 12 potatoes from four sites of production had similar characteristics in terms of the geological substrate (third type) and these soil properties could be grouped together. In this case, more discriminative parameters would be required to allow the differentiation between sites. The validation of our models included external prediction tests with data of potatoes harvested the year before and a study on the robustness of the uncertainties of the measurement results. Annual variations between multi-elemental and Sr isotopic fingerprints were observed in potatoes harvested from soils overlying carbonate rocks, stressing the importance of testing long term variations in authentication studies.

  15. Elucidation of the in vitro metabolic profile of stable isotope labeled BAL19403 by accurate mass capillary liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and isotope exchange.

    PubMed

    Wind, Mathias; Gebhardt, Klaus; Grunwald, Helge; Spickermann, Jochen; Donzelli, Massimiliano; Kellenberger, Laurenz; Muller, Marc; Fullhardt, Pascal; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne; Schleimer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The in vitro metabolic pattern of BAL19403, a novel macrolide antibiotic, was investigated by capillary liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/QTOF-MS) in incubations with human microsomes. For the elucidation of the metabolic pathway, BAL19403 labeled with four deuterium atoms (D4) was used, and detection of metabolites performed using mixtures of the unlabeled (H4) BAL19403 and its D4 analogue (1:1) as substrate. All metabolites appeared with similar chromatographic behavior. MS/MS spectra of BAL19403 and its metabolites are dominated by non-informative fragment ions. Therefore, the structure of the metabolites was elucidated mainly by accurate mass measurements with subsequent proposals of elemental compositions. Main biotransformations were N-demethylation, lactone ring hydrolysis, and oxidation. Additionally, N-dealkylation of the aromatic moiety was identified. This dealkylation results not only in formation of an aldehyde, according to the classical pathway, but also in formation of the corresponding alcohol and carboxylic acid. Final elucidation of their structures was possible, since this dealkylation takes place vicinal to the deuterium-labeled part of BAL19403 and interferes with D/H exchange. The degree of D/H exchange, determined by analysis of the metabolite isotopic pattern, was used to elucidate the adjacent functional group. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Magnesium isotope fractionation during continental weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, F. Z.; Huang, K. J.; Li, W.; Liu, X. M.; Ma, L.

    2014-12-01

    Continental weathering links the atmosphere, hydrosphere and continents as it regulates the CO2 content of the atmosphere, shifts the composition of the continental crust from basaltic to andesitic, and ultimately controls the chemical composition of river waters and seawater. Magnesium is a water-soluble major element in the hydrosphere, continental crust and the mantle, and has three stable isotopes (24Mg, 25Mg and 26Mg). Studies of Mg isotopes during continental weathering may help to document the interactions between hydrosphere, crust and mantle. Previous studies have shown that the continental crust has a heterogeneous but on average heavier Mg isotopic composition than the mantle, whereas the hydrosphere is isotopically light. The complementary characteristics of Mg isotopic compositions between continental and hydrosphere have been attributed to continental weathering, with light Mg isotopes partitioned into water, leaving heavy Mg isotopes behind in the crustal residue. Here we summarize our studies of Mg isotope fractionation in four weathering profiles under various climate conditions. We show that large Mg isotope fractionation can occur during continental weathering. Although the weathered residue is usually enriched in heavier Mg isotopes than unaltered parent rocks, some heavily weathered products can be quite light in Mg isotopic composition. The complicated behaviors of Mg isotopes reflect different control factors during weathering such as parent rock lithology, primary mineral dissolution, secondary mineral formation, ion exchange, vegetation uptake etc. Though studies of natural samples can provide direct evidence on isotope fractionation, more well-controlled laboratory experiments on Mg isotope fractionation between fluids and minerals are needed in order to fully understand the behaviors of Mg isotopes during weathering, which ultimately lays the foundation for making Mg isotope geochemistry an important tool for studying different geological

  17. Carbon Isotopes Profiles of Human Whole Blood, Plasma, Red Blood Cells, Urine and Feces for Biological/Biomedical 14C-Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chuang, Jennifer C.; Kelly, Peter B.; Clifford, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) is an ideal tracer for in vivo human ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination) and PBPK (physiological-based pharmacokinetic) studies. Living plants preferentially incorporate atmospheric 14CO2, vs 13CO2, vs 12CO2, which result in unique signature. Furthermore, plants and the food chains they support also have unique carbon isotope signatures. Humans, at the top of the food chain, consequently acquire isotopic concentrations in the tissues and body fluids depending on their dietary habits. In preparation of ADME and PBPK studies, 12 healthy subjects were recruited. The human baseline (specific to each individual and their diet) total carbon (TC) and carbon isotope 13C (δ13C) and 14C (Fm) were quantified in whole blood (WB), plasma, washed red blood cell (RBC), urine, and feces. TC (mg of C/100μL) in WB, plasma, RBC, urine, and feces were 11.0, 4.37, 7.57, 0.53, and 1.90, respectively. TC in WB, RBC, and feces was higher in men over women, P < 0.05. Mean δ13C were ranked low to high as follows, feces < WB = plasma = RBC = urine, P < 0.0001. δ13C was not affected by gender. Our analytic method shifted δ13C by only ± 1.0 ‰ ensuring our Fm measurements were accurate and precise. Mean Fm were ranked low to high as follows, plasma = urine < WB = RBC = feces, P < 0.05. Fm in feces was higher for men over women, P < 0.05. Only in WB, 14C levels (Fm) and TC were correlated with one another (r = 0.746, P < 0.01). Considering the lag time to incorporate atmospheric 14C into plant foods (vegetarian) and or then into animal foods (non-vegetarian), the measured Fm of WB in our population (recruited April 2009) was 1.0468 ± 0.0022 (mean±SD), the Fm of WB matched the (extrapolated) atmospheric Fm of 1.0477 in 2008. This study is important in presenting a procedure to determine a baseline for a study group for human ADME and PBPK studies using 14C as a tracer. PMID:21452856

  18. Carbon isotopes profiles of human whole blood, plasma, red blood cells, urine and feces for biological/biomedical 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chuang, Jennifer C; Kelly, Peter B; Clifford, Andrew J

    2011-05-01

    Radiocarbon ((14)C) is an ideal tracer for in vivo human ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination) and PBPK (physiological-based pharmacokinetic) studies. Living plants peferentially incorporate atmospheric (14)CO(2) versus (13)CO(2) versus (12)CO(2), which result in unique signature. Furthermore, plants and the food chains they support also have unique carbon isotope signatures. Humans, at the top of the food chain, consequently acquire isotopic concentrations in the tissues and body fluids depending on their dietary habits. In preparation of ADME and PBPK studies, 12 healthy subjects were recruited. The human baseline (specific to each individual and their diet) total carbon (TC) and carbon isotope (13)C (δ(13)C) and (14)C (F(m)) were quantified in whole blood (WB), plasma, washed red blood cell (RBC), urine, and feces. TC (mg of C/100 μL) in WB, plasma, RBC, urine, and feces were 11.0, 4.37, 7.57, 0.53, and 1.90, respectively. TC in WB, RBC, and feces was higher in men over women, P < 0.05. Mean δ(13)C were ranked low to high as follows: feces < WB = plasma = RBC = urine, P < 0.0001. δ(13)C was not affected by gender. Our analytic method shifted δ(13)C by only ±1.0 ‰ ensuring our F(m) measurements were accurate and precise. Mean F(m) were ranked low to high as follows: plasma = urine < WB = RBC = feces, P < 0.05. F(m) in feces was higher for men over women, P < 0.05. Only in WB, (14)C levels (F(m)) and TC were correlated with one another (r = 0.746, P < 0.01). Considering the lag time to incorporate atmospheric (14)C into plant foods (vegetarian) and or then into animal foods (nonvegetarian), the measured F(m) of WB in our population (recruited April 2009) was 1.0468 ± 0.0022 (mean ± SD), and the F(m) of WB matched the (extrapolated) atmospheric F(m) of 1.0477 in 2008. This study is important in presenting a procedure to determine a baseline for a study group for human ADME and PBPK studies using (14)C as a tracer.

  19. Cell-based assay of MGAT2-driven diacylglycerol synthesis for profiling inhibitors: use of a stable isotope-labeled substrate and high-resolution LC/MS.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Joelle M; Chu, Ching-Hsuen; Ma, Zhengping; Kopcho, Lisa M; Chao, Hannguang J; Lawrence, R Michael; Cheng, Dong

    2015-03-01

    To demonstrate monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (MGAT2)-mediated enzyme activity in a cellular context, cells of the murine secretin tumor cell-1 line of enteroendocrine origin were used to construct human MGAT2-expressing recombinant cell lines. Low throughput and utilization of radiolabeled substrate in a traditional TLC technique were circumvented by development of a high-resolution LC/MS platform. Monitoring incorporation of stable isotope-labeled D31-palmitate into diacylglycerol (DAG) allowed selective tracing of the cellular DAG synthesis activity. This assay format dramatically reduced background interference and increased the sensitivity and the signal window compared with the TLC method. Using this assay, several MGAT2 inhibitors from different chemotypes were characterized. The described cell-based assay adds a new methodology for the development and evaluation of MGAT2 inhibitors for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Fecal shedding of Salmonella in exotic felids.

    PubMed

    Clyde, V L; Ramsay, E C; Bemis, D A

    1997-06-01

    Two collections of exotic felids were screened for the presence of Salmonella by selective fecal culture utilizing selenite broth and Hektoen enteric agar. In > 90% of the samples, Salmonella was isolated from a single culture. A commercial horsemeat-based diet was fed in both collections, and one collection also was fed raw chicken. Salmonella was cultured from the raw chicken and the horsemeat diet for both collections. Multiple Salmonella serotypes were identified, with S. typhimurium and S. typhimurium (copenhagen) isolated most frequently. Approximately half of the Salmonella isolates demonstrated multiple antibiotic resistance. The ability to harbor Salmonella as normal nonpathogenic bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract may be a physiological adaptation to carnivory. The high rate of fecal shedding of Salmonella in healthy individuals clouds the interpretation of a positive fecal culture in an ill felid, or one with diarrhea. All zoo employees having contact with cat feces or raw diets have a high rate of occupational exposure to Salmonella and should exercise appropriate hygienic precautions.

  1. New rain shed (Building No. 241) interior showing posts, braces, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    New rain shed (Building No. 241) interior showing posts, braces, and roof structure. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  2. ALTERNATE VIEW OF PENSTOCK SHED, NORTH ELEVATION OF POWERHOUSE, TRANSFORMERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ALTERNATE VIEW OF PENSTOCK SHED, NORTH ELEVATION OF POWERHOUSE, TRANSFORMERS, AND HYDRAULIC PUMPHOUSE, INCLUDING HYDRAULIC OIL TANK - Folsom Powerhouse, Adjacent to American River, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  3. 19. ALTERNATE VIEW OF PENSTOCK SHED, NORTH ELEVATION OF POWERHOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. ALTERNATE VIEW OF PENSTOCK SHED, NORTH ELEVATION OF POWERHOUSE, TRANSFORMERS, AND HYDRAULIC PUMPHOUSE, INCLUDING HYDRAULIC OIL TANK - Folsom Powerhouse, Adjacent to American River, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  4. 17. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SORTING AND SHIPPING SHED WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SORTING AND SHIPPING SHED WITH SAWMILL BEHIND - Ichabod T. Williams & Sons Sawmill & Veneer Plant, Roosevelt Avenue at Carteret Avenue, Carteret, Middlesex County, NJ

  5. SOUTH END OF FURNACE WITH CAST AND ENGINE SHED IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH END OF FURNACE WITH CAST AND ENGINE SHED IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Tannehill Furnace, 12632 Confederate Parkway, Tannehill Historical State Park, Bucksville, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  6. Comparative isotope ecology of African great apes.

    PubMed

    Oelze, Vicky M; Fahy, Geraldine; Hohmann, Gottfried; Robbins, Martha M; Leinert, Vera; Lee, Kevin; Eshuis, Henk; Seiler, Nicole; Wessling, Erin G; Head, Josephine; Boesch, Christophe; Kühl, Hjalmar S

    2016-12-01

    The isotope ecology of great apes is a useful reference for palaeodietary reconstructions in fossil hominins. As extant apes live in C3-dominated habitats, variation in isotope signatures is assumed to be low compared to hominoids exploiting C4-plant resources. However, isotopic differences between sites and between and within individuals are poorly understood due to the lack of vegetation baseline data. In this comparative study, we included all species of free-ranging African great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla sp.). First, we explore differences in isotope baselines across different habitats and whether isotopic signatures in apes can be related to feeding niches (faunivory and folivory). Secondly, we illustrate how stable isotopic variations within African ape populations compare to other extant and extinct primates and discuss possible implications for dietary flexibility. Using 701 carbon and nitrogen isotope data points resulting from 148 sectioned hair samples and an additional collection of 189 fruit samples, we compare six different great ape sites. We investigate the relationship between vegetation baselines and climatic variables, and subsequently correct great ape isotope data to a standardized plant baseline from the respective sites. We obtained temporal isotopic profiles of individual animals by sectioning hair along its growth trajectory. Isotopic signatures of great apes differed between sites, mainly as vegetation isotope baselines were correlated with site-specific climatic conditions. We show that controlling for plant isotopic characteristics at a given site is essential for faunal data interpretation. While accounting for plant baseline effects, we found distinct isotopic profiles for each great ape population. Based on evidence from habituated groups and sympatric great ape species, these differences could possibly be related to faunivory and folivory. Dietary flexibility in apes varied, but temporal variation was overall

  7. ISOTOPE SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, C.G.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

  8. Regolith evolution on the millennial timescale from combined U-Th-Ra isotopes and in situ cosmogenic 10Be analysis in a weathering profile (Strengbach catchment, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerer, J.; Chabaux, F.; Van der Woerd, J.; Viville, D.; Pelt, E.; Kali, E.; Lerouge, C.; Ackerer, P.; di Chiara Roupert, R.; Négrel, P.

    2016-11-01

    U-Th-Ra disequilibria, cosmogenic in situ 10Be concentrations and major and trace element concentrations have been analyzed in a 2 m-deep weathering profile sampled at the summit of the granitic Strengbach catchment (France). The data have been used to independently estimate both the long-term regolith production and denudation rates and the weathering and erosion rates. Modeling of the 238U-234U-230Th-226Ra disequilibrium variations in the lower part of the profile yields a regolith production rate of 12 ± 4 mm/kyr (30 ± 10 T/km2/yr), while modeling of the high-resolution 10Be concentration profile leads to an exposure age of 19.7 ± 2.2 kyr, an inherited concentration of 15,000 ± 1,000 at/g in quartz and a mean denudation rate of 22 ± 10 mm/kyr (37 ± 15 T/km2/yr). The consistency between production and denudation rates suggests that, on a millennial timescale, the regolith mass balance at the summit of the catchment is close to a steady state, even if the watershed may have been impacted by Quaternary climatic changes and by recent anthropogenic perturbations (e.g., 20th century acid rain and recent afforestation efforts). The results also indicate that physical erosion is likely the dominant long-term process of regolith denudation in the catchment. Furthermore, the comparison of the long-term production and denudation rates and of weathering and erosion rates determined from the depth profile analyses with the current weathering and erosion rates estimated at the outlet of the watershed based on monitoring of the water chemistry and sediment fluxes suggests that physical erosion may have varied more than the chemical weathering flux during the last 150 kyr. Although very few other sites with U-series, in situ 10Be and stream monitoring data are available for comparison, the current data suggest that (1) the mass balance steady state of regolith might be commonly achieved in soil mantled landscapes, and (2) physical erosion has varied much more than

  9. Preliminary Quantitative Profile of Differential Expression between Rat L6 Myoblasts and Myotubes by Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ziyou; Chen, Xiulan; Lu, Bingwen; Park, Sung Kyu; Xu, Tao; Xie, Zhensheng; Xue, Peng; Hou, Junjie; Hang, Haiying; Yates, John R.; Yang, Fuquan

    2010-01-01

    Defining the mechanisms governing myogenesis has advanced in recent years. Skeletal-muscle differentiation is a multi-step process controlled spatially and temporally by various factors at the transcription level. To explore those factors involved in myogenesis, stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), coupled with high accuracy mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap), was applied successfully. Rat L6 cell line is an excellent model system for studying muslce myogenesis in vitro. When mononucleate L6 myoblast cells reach confluent in culture plate, they could transform into multinucleate myotubes by serum starvation. By comparing protein expression of L6 myoblasts and terminally differentiated multinucleated myotubes, 1170 proteins were quantified and 379 proteins changed significantly in fully differentiated myotubes in contrast to myoblasts. These differentially expressed proteins are mainly involved in inter-or intracellular signaling, protein synthesis and degradation, protein folding, cell adhesion and extracelluar matrix, cell structure and motility, metabolism, substance transportation, etc. These findings were supported by many previous studies on myogenic differentiation, of which many up-regulated proteins were found to be involved in promoting skeletal muscle differentiation for the first time in our study. In sum, our results provide new clues for understanding the mechanism of myogenesis. PMID:19253283

  10. 3. GENERAL VIEW OF 1946 ADDITIONS. WHEN THE FREIGHT SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL VIEW OF 1946 ADDITIONS. WHEN THE FREIGHT SHED WAS CONVERTED TO PASSENGER USE THESE STRUCTURES WERE BUILT TO MOVE FREIGHT FROM THE SHED TO TRUCKS PARKED AT THESE LOADING DOCKS. - North Central Railroad, Baltimore Freight House, Guilford & Centre Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  11. 126. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING CAST SHED NO. 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING CAST SHED NO. 2, FURNACE NO. 2, STOVES, POWER HOUSE, STACKS, FURNACE NO. 1 CAST SHED. FURNACE NO. 2 IS IN PROCESS OF RESTORATION. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. View to westsouthwest, with shed at left, showing east end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to west-southwest, with shed at left, showing east end and north side. Drew-Sherwood Barn (HABS No. CA-2610-C) at right rear. - Drew-Sherwood Farm, Shed, 7927 Elk Grove Boulevard, Elk Grove, Sacramento County, CA

  13. 15. GENERAL VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF SHED, WITH AN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. GENERAL VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF SHED, WITH AN OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE STEP-DOWN ROOF AND TWO BANKS OF CLEARSTORY LIGHTS - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  14. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical posts. Note rock foundations of wood tanks once located under the rain shed on the ground at center of photograph. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  15. 26. VIEW OF METAL SHED OVER SHIELDING TANK WITH CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW OF METAL SHED OVER SHIELDING TANK WITH CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. SHOWS OPEN SIDE OF SHED ROOF, HERCULON SHEET, AND HAND-OPERATED CRANE. TAKEN IN 1983. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 83-476-2-9, TAKEN IN 1983. PHOTOGRAPHER NOT NAMED. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. NORTH ELEVATION. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE AT THE FAR RIGHT. DOCKSIDE STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE IN THE DISTANCE. LAKE WORTH INLET AND THE TOWN OF PALM BEACH ARE IN THE BACKGROUND. - U.S. Coast Guard Lake Worth Inlet Station, Boathouse, Peanut Island, Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, FL

  17. 17. Forge building, fuel storage shed, and foundry, 1906 Photocopied ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Forge building, fuel storage shed, and foundry, 1906 Photocopied from a photograph by Thomas S. Bronson, 'Group at Whitney Factory, 5 November 1906,' NHCHSL. The most reliable view of the fuel storage sheds and foundry, together with a view of the forge building. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  18. 1. VIEW OF WEST AND SOUTH FACES OF PYROTECHNIC SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF WEST AND SOUTH FACES OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757). ENTRANCE TO TEST CELL ON SOUTH SIDE; ENTRANCE TO PERSONNEL ROOM ON WEST SIDE. SECURITY FENCE BETWEEN SLC-3E AND SLC-3W IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Pyrotechnic Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. 11. FREIGHT YARDS AT KEYSER. TRAIN SHED AND B & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. FREIGHT YARDS AT KEYSER. TRAIN SHED AND B & O STORAGE FACILITY ARE VISIBLE AT LEFT. TURNTABLE LIES OUT OF VIEW BEHIND TRAIN SHED. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Keyser Machine Shop, State Route 46 Northwest of Spring Street, Keyser, Mineral County, WV

  20. Global Vorticity Shedding on Rectangular and Streamlined Foil Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Stephanie; Dahl, Jason; Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2012-11-01

    We explore several aspects of the fluid phenomenon we call global vorticity shedding. Global vorticity shedding occurs when an object in a fluid with circulation suddenly vanishes, shedding the entirety of the boundary layer vorticity into the wake at once. Global vorticity shedding is in distinct contrast with traditional massive separation shedding, in which vorticity is shed from a body from only a few separation points into the fluid. In our experiments, we approximate the disappearance of a towed foil by rapidly retracting the foil in the span-wise direction. We show that for a square-tipped vanishing foil at an angle of attack, the globally shed boundary layer vorticity forms into primary vortices, which evolve and eventually amalgamate with secondary vortices to leave two lasting vortices in the wake. The secondary vortices are a result of three-dimensionality in the flow. We further explore streamlined foil geometries to achieve a simpler and less three-dimensional wake. Vortex formation times are small, with vortices fully formed nearly instantaneously in the flow, making the application of global vorticity shedding promising for a force transducer to impart large and fast maneuvering forces on an underwater vehicle. This research was made with Government support under and awarded by DoD, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, 32 CFR 168a.

  1. 27. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING SOUTH CORNER OF SHED WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING SOUTH CORNER OF SHED WITH ONE-STORY OFFICES, SHOWING TYPICAL COLUMN BASE WITH TIMBER BOLTED TO STEEL 'L' SHOE - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  2. 3. Railroad viaduct, keeper's house, light tower and shed, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Railroad viaduct, keeper's house, light tower and shed, view west, southeast side of viaduct, southeast and northeast sides of keeper's house, tower and shed - Seguin Island Light Station, Summit of Seguin Island, south of mouth of Kennebec River, Popham Beach, Sagadahoc County, ME

  3. 1. Shed, railroad, keeper's house, light tower and boathouse, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Shed, railroad, keeper's house, light tower and boathouse, view southwest, northeast side of shed, keeper's house and tower, east and north sides of boathouse - Seguin Island Light Station, Summit of Seguin Island, south of mouth of Kennebec River, Popham Beach, Sagadahoc County, ME

  4. 2. Shed, railroad, light tower and boathouse, view south southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Shed, railroad, light tower and boathouse, view south southwest, northeast and northwest sides of shed, northeast side of tower, east and north sides of boathouse - Seguin Island Light Station, Summit of Seguin Island, south of mouth of Kennebec River, Popham Beach, Sagadahoc County, ME

  5. Acetylsalicylic Acid Treatment Improves Differentiation and Immunomodulation of SHED

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, S.; Liu, D.; Xu, X.; Chen, X.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) possess multipotent differentiation and immunomodulatory properties. They have been used for orofacial bone regeneration and autoimmune disease treatment. In this study, we show that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment is able to significantly improve SHED-mediated osteogenic differentiation and immunomodulation. Mechanistically, ASA treatment upregulates the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)/Wnt/β-catenin cascade, leading to improvement of SHED-mediated bone regeneration, and also upregulates TERT/FASL signaling, leading to improvement of SHED-mediated T-cell apoptosis and ameliorating disease phenotypes in dextran sodium sulfate–induced colitis mice. These data indicate that ASA treatment is a practical approach to improving SHED-based cell therapy. PMID:25394850

  6. DEM Simulation of Rock Shed Failure due to Rockfall Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-An; Lin, Ming-Lang; Wang, Ching-Ping; Lo, Chia-Ming

    2013-04-01

    The rock shed is a more costly but effective traffic facility used to keep out falling rocks in Taiwan. The main function of rock shed is to let the falling rock passing through via the top slab without hitting the road users. The failure mode of the rock shed due to rockfall impact generally includes punching of top slab, flexural cracks of beam, buckling of column, and damage of foundation, etc. Even so, the failure behavior of the rock shed is still complicated and difficult to predict. Accordingly, this study adopts the discrete element program (PFC2D) to simulate the failure behavior of rock shed. A comparison with uniaxial compression test was carried out firstly to determine the micro parameters of structure elements. The model was utilized to simulate the behavior of rock shed with impact load or hitting of falling block separately. Then, a case study of present rock shed of highway NO.18 in middle Taiwan was analyzed. The result indicates that: the primary causes of rock shed failure mode include block size, falling height, impact position, and structure system. The failure mode of punching shear failure or flexural cracks is dominated by block size and falling height. The occurrence of differential settlement is related to impact position and absence of combined footing. Considering the connection of beam and column, the structure is more likely to break at the joints rather than punching of the top slab. As a result, combined footing and beam-to-column joint should be to take into account to obtain safer protection of rock shed. Keywords: rockfall disaster, PFC, rock shed, discrete element method

  7. Influences upon the lead isotopic composition of organic and mineral horizons in soil profiles from the National Soil Inventory of Scotland (2007-09).

    PubMed

    Farmer, John G; Graham, Margaret C; Eades, Lorna J; Lilly, Allan; Bacon, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-15

    Some 644 individual soil horizons from 169 sites in Scotland were analyzed for Pb concentration and isotopic composition. There were three scenarios: (i) 36 sites where both top and bottom (i.e. lowest sampled) soil horizons were classified as organic in nature, (ii) 67 with an organic top but mineral bottom soil horizon, and (iii) 66 where both top and bottom soil horizons were mineral. Lead concentrations were greater in the top horizon relative to the bottom horizon in all but a few cases. The top horizon (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio was lesser (outside analytical error) than the corresponding bottom horizon (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio at (i) 64%, (ii) 94% and (iii) 73% of sites, and greater at only (i) 8%, (ii) 3% and (iii) 8% of sites. A plot of (208)Pb/(207)Pb vs. (208)Pb/(206)Pb ratios showed that the Pb in organic top (i, ii) and bottom (i) horizons was consistent with atmospherically deposited Pb of anthropogenic origin. The (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio of the organic top horizon in (ii) was unrelated to the (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio of the mineral bottom horizon as demonstrated by the geographical variation in the negative shift in the ratio, a result of differences in the mineral horizon values arising from the greater influence of radiogenic Pb in the north. In (iii), the lesser values of the (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio for the mineral top horizon relative to the mineral bottom horizon were consistent with the presence of anthropogenic Pb, in addition to indigenous Pb, in the former. Mean anthropogenic Pb inventories of 1.5 and 4.5 g m(-2) were obtained for the northern and southern halves of Scotland, respectively, consistent with long-range atmospheric transport of anthropogenic Pb (mean (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio~1.16). For cultivated agricultural soils (Ap), this corresponded to about half of the total Pb inventory in the top 30 cm of the soil column.

  8. August 2007 FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel Recommendations for SHEDS-Dietary and SHEDS-Residential Modules (Summarized) and EPA Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past ten years, the Agency has requested the Panel to review several probabilistic dietary exposure software models. These have included DEEM-FCID™, Calendex-FCID, CARES™, LifeLine™, and an earlier (specialized) version of SHEDS (SHEDS-Wood) designed to assess exposure...

  9. August 2007 FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel Recommendations for SHEDS-Dietary and SHEDS-Residential Modules (Summarized) and EPA Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past ten years, the Agency has requested the Panel to review several probabilistic dietary exposure software models. These have included DEEM-FCID™, Calendex-FCID, CARES™, LifeLine™, and an earlier (specialized) version of SHEDS (SHEDS-Wood) designed to assess exposure...

  10. Oral shedding of Marburg virus in experimentally infected Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus).

    PubMed

    Amman, Brian R; Jones, Megan E B; Sealy, Tara K; Uebelhoer, Luke S; Schuh, Amy J; Bird, Brian H; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2015-01-01

    Marburg virus (Marburg marburgvirus; MARV) causes sporadic outbreaks of Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF) in Africa. The Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) has been identified as a natural reservoir based most-recently on the repeated isolation of MARV directly from bats caught at two locations in southwestern Uganda where miners and tourists separately contracted MHF from 2007-08. Despite learning much about the ecology of MARV through extensive field investigations, there remained unanswered questions such as determining the primary routes of virus shedding and the severity of disease, if any, caused by MARV in infected bats. To answer these questions and others, we experimentally infected captive-bred R. aegyptiacus with MARV under high (biosafety level 4) containment. These experiments have shown infection profiles consistent with R. aegyptiacus being a bona fide natural reservoir host for MARV and demonstrated routes of viral shedding capable of infecting humans and other animals.

  11. Blown Away: The Shedding and Oscillation of Sessile Drops by Cross Flowing Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew James Barnabas

    For drops sessile on a solid surface, cross flowing air can drive drop oscillation or shedding, based on the balance and interaction of aerodynamic drag force (based on drop size/shape and air speed) and adhesion/capillary forces (based on surface tension and drop size/shape). Better understanding of the above has applications to, e.g., fuel cell flooding, airfoil icing, and visibility in rain. To understand the basic physics, experiments studying individual sessile drops in a low speed wind tunnel were performed in this thesis. Analysis of high speed video gave time resolved profiles and airspeed for shedding. Testing 0.5 mul to 100 mul drops of water and hexadecane on poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS) yielded a master curve describing critical airspeed for shedding for water drops on all surface tested. This curve predicts behavior for new surfaces, and explains experimental results published previously. It also indicates that the higher contact angle leads to easier shedding due to decreased adhesion and increased drag. Developing a novel floating element differential drag sensor gave the first measurements of the microNewton drag force experienced by drops. Forces magnitude is comparable to gravitational shedding from a tilted plate and to simplified models for drop adhesion, with deviations that suggest effects due to the air flow. Fluid properties are seen to have little effect on drag versus airspeed, and decreased adhesion is seen to be more important than increased drag for easing shedding. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number increases slightly with liquid-solid contact angle, and with drop volume. Results suggest that the drop experiences increased drag compared to similarly shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillations aeroelasticly coupling into the otherwise laminar flow. The bulk and surface oscillations of sessile drops in cross flow was also studied, using a full profile analysis

  12. Photoreceptor disc shedding in the living human eye

    PubMed Central

    Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Liu, Zhuolin; Zhang, Furu; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Miller, Donald T.

    2016-01-01

    Cone photoreceptors undergo a daily cycle of renewal and shedding of membranous discs in their outer segments (OS), the portion responsible for light capture. These physiological processes are fundamental to maintaining photoreceptor health, and their dysfunction is associated with numerous retinal diseases. While both processes have been extensively studied in animal models and postmortem eyes, little is known about them in the living eye, in particular human. In this study, we report discovery of the optical signature associated with disc shedding using a method based on adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) in conjunction with post-processing methods to track and monitor individual cone cells in 4D. The optical signature of disc shedding is characterized by an abrupt transient loss in the cone outer segment tip (COST) reflection followed by its return that is axially displaced anteriorly. Using this signature, we measured the temporal and spatial properties of shedding events in three normal subjects. Average duration of the shedding event was 8.8 ± 13.4 minutes, and average length loss of the OS was 2.1 μm (7.0% of OS length). Prevalence of cone shedding was highest in the morning (14.3%) followed by the afternoon (5.7%) and evening (4.0%), with load distributed across the imaged patch. To the best of our knowledge these are the first images of photoreceptor disc shedding in the living retina. PMID:27895995

  13. Characterization of metabolic profile of honokiol in rat feces using liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and (13)C stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yinfeng; Tang, Minghai; Song, Hang; Li, Rong; Wang, Chunyu; Ye, Haoyu; Qiu, Neng; Zhang, Yongkui; Chen, Lijuan; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-03-15

    As fecal excretion is one of important routes of elimination of drugs and their metabolites, it is indispensable to investigate the metabolites in feces for more comprehensive information on biotransformation in vivo. In this study, a sensitive and reliable approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS) was applied to characterize the metabolic profile of honokiol in rat feces after the administration of an equimolar mixture of honokiol and [(13)C6]-labeled honokiol. Totally 42 metabolites were discovered and tentatively identified in rat feces samples, 26 metabolites were first reported, including two novel classes of metabolites, methylated and dimeric metabolites of honokiol. Moreover, this study provided basic comparative data on the metabolites in rat plasma, feces and urine, which gave better understanding of the metabolic fate of honokiol in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rash of new controversy has emerged around the subject of mass-independent isotope fractionation effects, particularly in the case of the oxygen isotopes. To be sure, the controversy has been around for awhile, but it has been given new impetus by the results of a recent study by Mark H. Thiemens and John E. Heidenreich III of the University of California, San Diego (Science, March 4, 1983).Gustav Arrhenius has been trying to convince the planetary science community that chemical effects in isotope fractionation processes could explain observations in meteorites that appear to be outside of the traditionally understood mass-dependent fractionations (G. Arrhenius, J . L. McCrumb, and N. F. Friedman, Astrophys. Space Sci, 65, 297, 1974). Robert Clayton had made the basic observations of oxygen in carbonaceous chondrites that the slope of the δ17 versus δ18 line was 1 instead of the slope of ½ characteristic of terrestrial rocks and lunar samples (Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 28, 501, 1978). The mass-independent effects were ascribed to the apparent contribution of an ancient presolar system component of O16.

  15. 19. RW Meyer Sugar: 18761889. Cooling Shed Interior, 1881. View: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. RW Meyer Sugar: 1876-1889. Cooling Shed Interior, 1881. View: Looking toward west end of cooling shed. After the concentrated syrup flowed out of the sorghum pan it cooled and crystallized in large sugar coolers. The humidity and vapors caused by the sorghum pan would have retarded the crystallizing and cooling of the sugar in the boiling house. In 1881 this shed was constructed to house the coolers and the sugar before it was dried in the centrifugals. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  16. Numerical Simulations of Vortex Shedding in Hydraulic Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel; Marcu, Bogdan

    2004-01-01

    Turbomachines for rocket propulsion applications operate with many different working fluids and flow conditions. Oxidizer boost turbines often operate in liquid oxygen, resulting in an incompressible flow field. Vortex shedding from airfoils in this flow environment can have adverse effects on both turbine performance and durability. In this study the effects of vortex shedding in a low-pressure oxidizer turbine are investigated. Benchmark results are also presented for vortex shedding behind a circular cylinder. The predicted results are compared with available experimental data.

  17. A study on the frictional response of reptilian shed skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; Vargiolu, R.; Zahouani, H.; El Mansori, M.

    2011-08-01

    Deterministic surfaces are constructs of which profile, topography and textures are integral to the function of the system they enclose. They are designed to yield a predetermined tribological response. Developing such entities relies on controlling the structure of the rubbing interface so that, not only the surface is of optimized topography, but also is able to self-adjust its tribological behaviour according to the evolution of sliding conditions. In seeking inspirations for such designs, many engineers are turning toward the biological world to study the construction and behaviour of bio-analogues, and to probe the role surface topography assumes in conditioning of frictional response. That is how a bio-analogue can self-adjust its tribological response to adapt to habitat constraints. From a tribological point of view, Squamate Reptiles, offer diverse examples where surface texturing, submicron and nano-scale features, achieves frictional regulation. In this paper, we study the frictional response of shed skin obtained from a snake (Python regius). The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakes. The coefficient of friction depends on the direction of sliding: the value in forward motion is lower than that in the backward direction. Diagonal and side winding motion induces a different value of the friction coefficient. We discuss the origin of such a phenomenon in relation to surface texturing and study the energy constraints, implied by anisotropic friction, on the motion of the reptile.

  18. Complex Molybdenum Isotope Behavior During Weathering and Erosional Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Burton, K.; Halliday, A. N.

    2009-12-01

    The oceans play a major role in regulating global climate because they both react and drive changes in other geochemical reservoirs. Non-traditional stable isotope systems have become important proxies for changes in ocean chemistry making the quantification of these changes possible. Molybdenum isotopes have great potential as tracers of changes in the oxygenation of the oceans over geological time scales. Although significant progress has been made and the amount of data on the biogeochemical behaviour of Mo in the marine environment has been increasing rapidly over the last few years, some important aspects of Mo geochemistry remain poorly understood. These include diagenetic processes at continental margins and continental weathering. Mo isotope behaviour in these settings has a potentially large impact on the interpretation of the geological record. A recent study of Archer and Vance (2008) has shown that dissolved Mo in many of Earths major rivers has a heavy isotope composition relative to most magmatic rocks. A potential cause for this isotope composition in modern rivers is isotope fractionation during weathering and erosion processes. We investigated Mo isotope behaviour in weathering profiles from Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Results clearly show significant Mo isotope fractionation during chemical weathering. Mo retained in saprolithe samples from Hawaii has light isotope compositions of up to -0.5 permill. The extent of fractionation is dependent on redox-conditions in the investigated profiles. The particular setting of these profiles keeps other factors that might influence the Mo isotope composition to a minimum. The results also indicate the possible use of Mo isotope signals as paleoredox-proxy of weathering processes. However, a weathering profile with intermittent changes in redox, pH and porewater saturation show more variable Mo isotope signals with partly positive isotope values. Sequential extractions of saphrolite samples show a clear

  19. Hadean Crustal Processes Revealed from Oxygen Isotopes and U-Th-Pb Depth Profiling of Pre-4.0 Ga Detrital Zircons from Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trail, D.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Harrison, T. M.

    2005-01-01

    Because physical and chemical processes of the past are determined from analysis of a preserved geologic record, little is known about terrestrial crustal processes of the first 500 Ma during the so-called Hadean Eon. What is known from direct measurements has been derived almost exclusively from the study of greater than 4.0 Ga detrital zircons from the Jack Hills, Western Australia. The geochemistry of these zircons has direct application to understanding the origin and evolution of the rocks during the Hadean because: (i) U-Th-Pb age determinations by ion microprobe suggests the presence of crust as early as 4.37 Ga, or shortly after lunar formation; (ii) high-resolution U-Th-Pb zircon depth profiles reported here reveal several episodes of zircon growth in the Hadean previously unrecognized; (iii) core regions of pre-4.0 Ga zircons with igneous compositions are enriched in O-18 and contain metaluminous and peraluminous mineral inclusions, both features indicative of S-type grainitod protoliths. Study of these ancient zircons provides a unique window into the first half billion years that permits assessment of the potential of the Hadean Earth to host an emergent biosphere.

  20. 12. View of disassembled steam engine sitting in open shed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View of disassembled steam engine sitting in open shed showing base, columns and entablature. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  1. 16. View of cane mill sitting under open shed showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View of cane mill sitting under open shed showing discharge and top rolls. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  2. View of Irving intake system showing shed and a portion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Irving intake system showing shed and a portion of the concrete cover (foreground). Looking south-southwest - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Irving System, Intake System, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  3. View of Irving Intake System showing shed and steel flume. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Irving Intake System showing shed and steel flume. Looking west-northwest - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Irving System, Intake System, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  4. 2016 Targeted Air Shed Grant Program - Closed Announcement FY 2016

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Targeted Air Shed Grant Program proposal for FY 2016. The overall goal of the program is to reduce air pollution in the Nation’s areas with the highest levels of ozone and PM2.5 ambient air concentrations.

  5. 58. LOOKING EAST DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE WITH BRICK SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. LOOKING EAST DOROTHY SIX BLAST FURNACE WITH BRICK SHED No. 3 IN FOREGROUND ON RIGHT. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  6. 2. WEST SIDE SHOWING SHED ADDITION, BATHROOM AND WOODPOLE TELECOMMUNICATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST SIDE SHOWING SHED ADDITION, BATHROOM AND WOOD-POLE TELECOMMUNICATION ANTENNA. NEW CONTROL STATION BUILDING IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Control Station, Hydrographer's Office, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  7. 103. CABLES ENTERING CABLE TRAY SHED AT EAST OF LSB; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    103. CABLES ENTERING CABLE TRAY SHED AT EAST OF LSB; OXIDIZER APRON AND LAUNCH PAD IN BACKGROUND - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. 29. View of oil storage shed, looking northeast. Photo by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. View of oil storage shed, looking northeast. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  9. 25. View of storage shed and motor house for tramway, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. View of storage shed and motor house for tramway, looking southwest. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  10. Environmental perspective facing south showing chicken house, tractor shed, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Environmental perspective facing south showing chicken house, tractor shed, and homestead - Norris Farm, .5 mile west of County Road 857 & .25 mile east of County Road 88/1, Cheat Neck, Monongalia County, WV

  11. GENERAL VIEW OF DEHYDRATER (STRUCTURE 12), SHED (STRUCTURE 18), FRUIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF DEHYDRATER (STRUCTURE 12), SHED (STRUCTURE 18), FRUIT TRAY STORAGE ROOM (STRUCTURE 11), WITH FRUIT DRYING AREA AND TRAM TRACKS IN FOREGROUND, FROM NORTHWEST - Stevens Ranch Complex, State Route 101, Coyote, Santa Clara County, CA

  12. HISTORIC SHED (NOW WAREHOUSE) AT TRANSFORMER YARD ABOVE GLINES POWERHOUSE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC SHED (NOW WAREHOUSE) AT TRANSFORMER YARD ABOVE GLINES POWERHOUSE. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Glines Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  13. 1. View west, east sides of shed, lighthouse, keeper's house ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View west, east sides of shed, lighthouse, keeper's house and boat house - Squirrel Point Light Station, Off Highway 127, Steen Road to end of Bald Head Road, .8 mile down footpath, Arrowsic, Sagadahoc County, ME

  14. 7. View southwest, east and north sides of shed and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View southwest, east and north sides of shed and keeper's house - Squirrel Point Light Station, Off Highway 127, Steen Road to end of Bald Head Road, .8 mile down footpath, Arrowsic, Sagadahoc County, ME

  15. Interior view of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing truss type A in foreground and truss type B behind that. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  16. Rooftop view of old rain shed (Building No. 43), pipeline ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rooftop view of old rain shed (Building No. 43), pipeline on trestle, and water tanks. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  17. Detail of new rain shed (Building No. 241). Note pipeline ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of new rain shed (Building No. 241). Note pipeline connection from collection trough. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  18. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) with gutter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) with gutter box on northwest side. Maintenance staff in foreground. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  19. Redwood tanks in foreground with old rain shed (Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Redwood tanks in foreground with old rain shed (Building No. 43) and steel tanks in background. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  20. Rooftop view of new rain shed (Building No. 241) showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rooftop view of new rain shed (Building No. 241) showing collection gutter and overhead pipeline. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  1. Interior view of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing redwood dry storage building located inside. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  2. Rooftop detail of new rain shed (Building No. 241) with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rooftop detail of new rain shed (Building No. 241) with flume and overhead pipeline. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  3. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) with collection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) with collection downspouts from gutter to reservoir. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  4. New rain shed (Building No. 241) on right with Tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    New rain shed (Building No. 241) on right with Tanks T5, T4 and T2 on left from front to back. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  5. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical posts on concrete footing with diagonal timber bracing and wire bracing. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  6. New rain shed (Building No. 241), overhead pipeline and raw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    New rain shed (Building No. 241), overhead pipeline and raw water tank T4. Distribution pump house can be seen at the center of building. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  7. PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT CYANAMIDE (LN) COOLING SHED, MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT CYANAMIDE (L-N) COOLING SHED, MILL BUILDING AND CONVEYOR BRIDGE. NOTE CORNERSTONE ON THE MILL BUILDING. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  8. 3. Peeler Shed, SE side, with blower assembly. This structure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Peeler Shed, SE side, with blower assembly. This structure was need to move back to the Chipper Building for processing. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, Log Peeling Operation, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  9. 7. Outhouse and shed, view west northwest, south and east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Outhouse and shed, view west northwest, south and east sides - Ram Island Light Station, Ram Island, south of Ocean Point & just north of Fisherman Island, marking south side of Fisherman Island Passage, Ocean Point, Lincoln County, ME

  10. 64. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CARBIDE COOLING SHED. VIEW IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CARBIDE COOLING SHED. VIEW IS SHOWING CALCIUM CARBIDE IN COOLING CARS ON THE FLOOR. DECEMBER 26, 1918. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  11. Side elevation of Building 477 showing the shed roof addition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Side elevation of Building 477 showing the shed roof addition and horizontal siding at the ends, view facing northwest - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Golf Course Equipment & Repair Shop, Reeves & Moffett Roads, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  12. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF OFFICE AND SHED LOOKING EAST (NORTH SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF OFFICE AND SHED LOOKING EAST (NORTH SIDE OF HOUSE VISIBLE BEHIND OFFICE TO LEFT) - Greenwood Furnace, Bookkeeper's House, East of McAlevy's Fort on State Route 305, McAlevys Fort, Huntingdon County, PA

  13. 7. Detail, machinery shed atop east portal of Tunnel 28, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail, machinery shed atop east portal of Tunnel 28, showing shaft and pulley system, 210mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 28, Milepost 134.75, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  14. View of southernmost section of east facade with Shed in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of southernmost section of east facade with Shed in foreground. View toward north - Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Hanger No. 1, Cummins Avenue, Moffett Field, Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County, CA

  15. 2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING TAILRACE AND SLIDING DOOR UNDER SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING TAILRACE AND SLIDING DOOR UNDER SHED ROOF. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE IS IN BACKGROUND AT RIGHT. VIEW TO EAST-NORTHEAST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. 8. Elevator no. 2: Track shed, showing cable and pulleys ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Elevator no. 2: Track shed, showing cable and pulleys for moving train cars, facing east - Washburn Crosby Company Elevators No. 2 & 3, 900 & 1000 Second Avenue, South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  17. 30. VIEW OF SOUTH END OF EAST SHED, PLAZA LEVEL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF SOUTH END OF EAST SHED, PLAZA LEVEL, SHOWING BAGGAGE BRIDGE AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO THE ELEVATORS AND PLATFORM - Pennsylvania Railroad, Harrisburg Station & Trainshed, Market & South Fourth Streets, Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  18. 2. Relationship of claim house, residence, east tool shed, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Relationship of claim house, residence, east tool shed, and garage to overall farmstead site, looking north - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  19. 6. RElationship of residence, claim house, east tool shed, barn, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. RElationship of residence, claim house, east tool shed, barn, garage, and pole building to overall farmstead site, looking northwest - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  20. 11. INTERIOR VIEW OF 19061910 ONESTORY SHED ADDITION, FIRST FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR VIEW OF 1906-1910 ONE-STORY SHED ADDITION, FIRST FLOOR, SHOWING ROOF MONITOR, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Massachusetts Mills, Cloth Room-Section 15, 95 Bridge Street, Lowell, Middlesex County, MA

  1. DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL CART, WEST SHED AREA Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL CART, WEST SHED AREA - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  2. 5. Shed, keeper's house, boathouse, light tower and oil house, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Shed, keeper's house, boathouse, light tower and oil house, view southeast, northwest and southwest sides - Goat Island Light Station, Goat Island, next to entrance to Cape Porpoise Harbor, just south of Trott Island, Cape Porpoise, York County, ME

  3. 7. Shed and keeper' house with helicopter pad in foreground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Shed and keeper' house with helicopter pad in foreground, view east, southwest and northwest sides - Goat Island Light Station, Goat Island, next to entrance to Cape Porpoise Harbor, just south of Trott Island, Cape Porpoise, York County, ME

  4. Insulation Characteristics of Bushing Shed at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    In the development of high-Tc superconducting(HTS) devices, the bushing for HTS devices (HTS bushing) is the core technology, the need to because of supply high voltage to the cable or the winding of the transformer. The lower part of the bushing is exposed to the liquid nitrogen (LN2), and it has many sheds. In particular, the insulation body with sheds and electrical insulation at cryogenic temperature have attracted a great deal of interest from the view point of the size, weight and efficiency of bushing. This study has mainly investigated the shed and insulation body by comparing glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) in LN2. We investigated the surface discharge characteristics according to insulating materials, width and height of the shed.

  5. Study Sheds Light on Safety of Driving with Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Study Sheds Light on Safety of Driving With Epilepsy Those who had longer seizures during driving tests ... SUNDAY, Dec. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with epilepsy who experienced longer seizures during a simulated driving ...

  6. 3. Keeper's house, shed, light tower and bell, view east, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Keeper's house, shed, light tower and bell, view east, northwest and southwest sides - Monhegan Island Light Station, Monhegan Island, ten miles south by ferry from Port Clyde, Monhegan, Lincoln County, ME

  7. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF THE EXPLOSIVE STORAGE SHED, BUILDING 306, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF THE EXPLOSIVE STORAGE SHED, BUILDING 306, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Explosive Storage, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  8. View north, west (back) wall of canal, mu shed in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north, west (back) wall of canal, mu shed in background. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Long Slip Canal, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  9. 6. VIEW TO WEST, SAMPLING BUILDING, MECHANIC SHED, MILL WAREHOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW TO WEST, SAMPLING BUILDING, MECHANIC SHED, MILL WAREHOUSE, DRYERS, AND GRINDING/ROD MILL. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  10. 43. PROCESS WELDING SHEDS (FABRICATION SHOPS) ON RIGHT, AND TANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. PROCESS WELDING SHEDS (FABRICATION SHOPS) ON RIGHT, AND TANK BARGE, CRANES, PAINT SHOP AND PIPE/MACHINE SHOP IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Hillman Barge & Construction Company, Paul Thomas Boulevard, Brownsville, Fayette County, PA

  11. 1. EAST ELEVATION, SHOWING PENTHOUSE, STAIRS, AND SHED USED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EAST ELEVATION, SHOWING PENTHOUSE, STAIRS, AND SHED USED TO TREAT HELICOPTER COMPONENTS. SOUTHEAST DOOR TO BUILDING 10 AT RIGHT. - Hughes Aircraft Company, Garage & Maintenance Building, 6775 Centinela Avenue, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 5. DETAIL, STEEL SHED, SOUTHEAST FRONT AND SOUTHWEST SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL, STEEL SHED, SOUTHEAST FRONT AND SOUTHWEST SIDE - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  13. FACING NORTH ALONG TERRACE AVENUE OF MAINTENANCE SHED AND LANDSCAPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACING NORTH ALONG TERRACE AVENUE OF MAINTENANCE SHED AND LANDSCAPING IN NORTHEASTERN CORNER OF PARK - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  14. VIEW OF NORTHEAST TOWARD MAINTENANCE SHED AT NORTHEAST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHEAST TOWARD MAINTENANCE SHED AT NORTHEAST CORNER OF PARK - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  15. 15. Elevator no. 2: Scale floor above track shed, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Elevator no. 2: Scale floor above track shed, showing interlocking levers and beams, facing southeast - Washburn Crosby Company Elevators No. 2 & 3, 900 & 1000 Second Avenue, South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  16. Low flow vortex shedding flowmeter for hypergolics/all media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thinh, Ngo

    1990-01-01

    A family of vortex shedding flowmeters for flow measurement of hypergols that requires a long term operation without removal from system lines was further developed. A family of vortex shedding flowmeters without moving parts was designed. The test loop to evaluate the meters for the Freon flow, which simulates the hypergolic fluids, was modified and reconstructed. Preliminary results were obtained on the output frequency characteristics of an 1/2 inch flowmeter as a function of the flow rate.

  17. 4. View north of Lake Whitney Dam. Wood shed at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View north of Lake Whitney Dam. Wood shed at center of photograph houses a turbine installed in 1932. Brick structure to the left of the turbine shed is a gate house which houses the main valves controlling flow of lake to water to the filter plant. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Lake Whitney Dam, East side of Whitney Avenue near intersection with Armory Street, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  18. 8. MACHINERY SHED STORAGE ROOM ADDITION DETAIL SHOWING MATRIX OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. MACHINERY SHED STORAGE ROOM ADDITION DETAIL SHOWING MATRIX OF NAILS USED TO ADHERE PORTLAND CEMENT PLASTER, SOUTH ADOBE WALL ADJACENT TO WINDOW Note: Photographs Nos. AZ-159-A-9 through AZ-159-A-10 are photocopies of photographs. The original prints and negatives are located in the SCS Tucson Plant Materials Center, Tucson, Arizona. Photographer Ted F. Spaller. - Tucson Plant Material Center, Machinery Shed, 3241 North Romero Road, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  19. Vortex shedding effects in grid-generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melina, G.; Bruce, P. J. K.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    The flow on the centerline of grid-generated turbulence is characterized via hot-wire anemometry for three grids with different geometry: a regular grid (RG60), a fractal grid (FSG17), and a single-square grid (SSG). Due to a higher value of the thickness t0 of its bars, SSG produces greater values of turbulence intensity Tu than FSG17, despite SSG having a smaller blockage ratio. However, the higher Tu for SSG is mainly due to a more pronounced vortex shedding contribution. The effects of vortex shedding suppression along the streamwise direction x are studied by testing a three-dimensional configuration, formed by SSG and a set of four splitter plates detached from the grid (SSG+SP). When vortex shedding is damped, the centerline location of the peak of turbulence intensity xpeak moves downstream and Tu considerably decreases in the production region. For FSG17 the vortex shedding is less intense and it disappears more quickly, in terms of x /xpeak , when compared to all the other configurations. When vortex shedding is attenuated, the integral length scale Lu grows more slowly in the streamwise direction, this being verified both for FSG17 and for SSG+SP. In the production region, there is a correlation between the vortex shedding energy and the skewness and the flatness of the velocity fluctuations. When vortex shedding is not significant, the skewness is highly negative and the flatness is much larger than 3. On the opposite side, when vortex shedding is prominent, the non-Gaussian behavior of the velocity fluctuations becomes masked.

  20. Comprehensive profiling of mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide as short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluation of toxicokinetics in rats and daily internal exposure in humans using isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Jingshun; Xu, Jiaojiao; Ren, Yiping

    2015-09-24

    Mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide are important short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of acrylamide. Most of studies have focused on the measurement of two metabolites, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Thus, the comprehensive profile of acrylamide urinary metabolites cannot be fully understood. We developed an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of all four mercapturic acid adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide under the electroscopy ionization negative (ESI-) mode in the present study. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the analytes ranged 0.1-0.3 ng/mL and 0.4-1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery rates with low, intermediate and high spiking levels were calculated as 95.5%-105.4%, 98.2%-114.0% and 92.2%-108.9%, respectively. Acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD<7.0%) substantially supported the use of current method for robust analysis. Rapid pretreatment procedures and short run time (8 min per sample) ensured good efficiency of metabolism profiling, indicating a wide application for investigating short-term internal exposure of dietary acrylamide. Our proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the toxicokinetic study of acrylamide in rats. Meanwhile, results of human urine analysis indicated that the levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine-sulfoxide (AAMA-sul), which did not appear in the mercapturic acid metabolites in rodents, were more than the sum of GAMA and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA). Thus, AAMA-sul may alternatively become a specific biomarker for investigating the acrylamide exposure in humans. Current proposed method provides a substantial methodology support for comprehensive profiling of

  1. ADAM12 is expressed in the tumour vasculature and mediates ectodomain shedding of several membrane-anchored endothelial proteins.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Camilla; Klitgaard, Marie; Noer, Julie B; Kotzsch, Alexander; Nehammer, Camilla; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Berthelsen, Jens; Blobel, Carl; Kveiborg, Marie; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Wewer, Ulla M

    2013-05-15

    ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) 12 is a metalloprotease implicated in cancer progression. ADAM12 can activate membrane-anchored proteins, such as sonic hedgehog, Delta-like 1 and certain epidermal growth factor receptor ligands, through a process called ectodomain shedding. We screened several membrane-anchored proteins to further dissect the substrate profile of ADAM12-mediated ectodomain shedding, and found shedding of five previously unreported substrates [Kitl1, VE-cadherin (vascular endothelial cadherin), Flk-1 (fetal liver kinase 1), Tie-2, and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule 1)], of which the latter four are specifically expressed by endothelial cells. We also observed that ADAM12 expression was increased in the tumour vasculature of infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the human breast as compared with little to no expression in normal breast tissue vasculature, suggesting a role for ADAM12 in tumour vessels. These results prompted us to further evaluate ADAM12-mediated shedding of two endothelial cell proteins, VE-cadherin and Tie-2. Endogenous ADAM12 expression was very low in cultured endothelial cells, but was significantly increased by cytokine stimulation. In parallel, the shed form of VE-cadherin was elevated in such cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells, and ADAM12 siRNA (small interfering RNA) knockdown reduced cytokine-induced shedding of VE-cadherin. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrate a role for ADAM12 in ectodomain shedding of several membrane-anchored endothelial proteins. We speculate that this process may have importance in tumour neovascularization or/and tumour cell extravasation.

  2. Circadian disc shedding in Xenopus retina in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, J.G.; Fisher, S.K.

    1984-02-01

    To further examine the endogenous rhythm of disc shedding and phagocytosis observed in several species, adult Xenopus were entrained to a 12 hr light/12 hr dark cycle and then placed in constant darkness. At various times during a 3-day period of constant darkness, eyes were explanted and placed into culture medium, then processed for light and electron microscopy. A clear rhythmicity of disc shedding was observed, with pronounced peaks at the times light onset occurred in the original entrainment cycle. Modification of the HCO/sub 3/- ion concentration in the medium was found to raise the amplitude of the peak of endogenous disc shedding. Explants maintained in culture medium containing deuterium oxide (a compound known to perturb circadian oscillators) were found to shed with a longer interval between peaks. The addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin, to this preparation suppressed the shedding rhythm. The action of anisomycin was investigated by autoradiographic examination of the pattern of /sup 3/H-leucine uptake and protein synthesis by the explant. The findings suggest the presence of a circadian oscillator for rhythmic disc shedding within the amphibian eye.

  3. Capacity building in indigenous men's groups and sheds across Australia.

    PubMed

    Southcombe, Amie; Cavanagh, Jillian; Bartram, Timothy

    2015-09-01

    This article presents an investigation into capacity building, at the community level, in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Men's Groups and Sheds. As safe men's spaces, Men's Groups and Sheds represent an ever-growing social, and health and well-being community service across Australia. The study is qualitative and employs 'yarning circles' (focus groups), semi-structured interviews and observations to gather data from 15 Groups/Sheds involving 45 men from urban, regional and remote communities. We found that capacity building is primarily about securing relationships between Group Leaders/Shed Co-ordinators and Government services. Capacity building establishes links to services such as Centrelink, Medicare, Department of Housing, Probation and Control, and positive outcomes such as Indigenous men securing housing and Centrelink payments. Capacity building results in better health outcomes and, educates and empowers men to improve their social, cultural, emotional and economic well-being. It helps men to better connect with family and community. The current research paves the way for countries worldwide to explore the conceptual and empirical approach of capacity building applicable to other Indigenous [and non-Indigenous] Men's Groups/Sheds. We recommend feasibilities studies, on approaches to capacity building in Indigenous Groups/Sheds, be carried out within urban, regional and remote regions across the country. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The Dynamic Relationship Between Clinical Symptomatology and Viral Shedding in Naturally Acquired Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Dennis K. M.; Lau, Lincoln L. H.; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Fang, Vicky J.; Leung, Gabriel M.; Peiris, Malik J. S.; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although the pattern of viral shedding over time has been documented in volunteer challenge studies, understanding of the relationship between clinical symptomatology and viral shedding in naturally acquired influenza infections in humans remains limited. Methods. In a community-based study in Hong Kong from 2008 to 2014, we followed up initially healthy individuals and identified 224 secondary cases of natural influenza virus infection in the household setting. We examined the dynamic relationship between patterns of clinical symptomatology and viral shedding as quantified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and viral culture in 127 cases with a clinical picture of acute respiratory infection. Results. Viral shedding in influenza A virus infections peaked on the first 1–2 days of clinical illness, and decreased gradually to undetectable levels by day 6–7, matching closely with the dynamics of clinical illness. Viral shedding in influenza B virus infections rose up to 2 days prior to symptom onset and persisted for 6–7 days after onset with a bimodal pattern. Conclusions. Our results suggest that while clinical illness profiles may serve as a proxy for clinical infectiousness in influenza A virus infections, patients may potentially be infectious even before symptom onset or after clinical improvement in influenza B virus infections. PMID:26518469

  5. Nickel isotopic composition of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Louise; Williams, Helen M.; Halliday, Alex N.; Kerr, Andrew C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a detailed high-precision study of Ni isotope variations in mantle peridotites and their minerals, komatiites as well as chondritic and iron meteorites. Ultramafic rocks display a relatively large range in δ60 Ni (permil deviation in 60 Ni /58 Ni relative to the NIST SRM 986 Ni isotope standard) for this environment, from 0.15 ± 0.07‰ to 0.36 ± 0.08‰, with olivine-rich rocks such as dunite and olivine cumulates showing lighter isotope compositions than komatiite, lherzolite and pyroxenite samples. The data for the mineral separates shed light on the origin of these variations. Olivine and orthopyroxene display light δ60 Ni whereas clinopyroxene and garnet are isotopically heavy. This indicates that peridotite whole-rock δ60 Ni may be controlled by variations in modal mineralogy, with the prediction that mantle melts will display variable δ60 Ni values due to variations in residual mantle and cumulate mineralogy. Based on fertile peridotite xenoliths and Phanerozoic komatiite samples it is concluded that the upper mantle has a relatively homogeneous Ni isotope composition, with the best estimate of δ60Nimantle being 0.23 ± 0.06‰ (2 s.d.). Given that >99% of the Ni in the silicate Earth is located in the mantle, this also defines the Ni isotope composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE). This value is nearly identical to the results obtained for a suite of chondrites and iron meteorites (mean δ60 Ni 0.26 ± 0.12‰ and 0.29 ± 0.10‰, respectively) showing that the BSE is chondritic with respect to its Ni isotope composition, with little to no Ni mass-dependent isotope fractionation resulting from core formation.

  6. Control of Vortex Shedding on an Airfoil using Mini Flaps at Low Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiyama, Daisuke; Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the effects of mini flaps (MFs) on a NACA0012 airfoil were investigated experimentally at low Reynolds number. MFs are small flat plates attached to the trailing edge of an airfoil perpendicularly. All the tests were conducted at the Tohoku-University Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel at the chord Reynolds number of 25,000. Aerodynamic forces were measured using a 3-component balance and the surface flow was visualized by luminescent oil film technique. The results of force measurement show that attachment of MFs enhances lift and the enhanced lift increases with MF height. On the other hand, the results of oil flow visualization show that attachment of MFs enlarges the separated region on the airfoil rather than diminishes it. To understand the physical mechanism of MFs for lift enhancement, the flow around the airfoil was visualized by the smoke-wire method and the wake profile behind the airfoil was measured using a hot wire anemometer. It was found that vortices shed periodically from the tip of the MFs and interact with the separated shear layer from the upper surface. This unsteady vortex shedding forms a low-pressure region on the upper surface, generating higher lift. These results suggest that the height of MFs controls the frequency of vortex shedding behind the MF, forcing the separated shear layer on the upper surface flow in unsteady manner.

  7. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-12-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacokinetic profile or mode of action of a drug substance. Secondly, stable isotopes may be used for the assessment of drug products or drug delivery systems by determination of parameters such as the bioavailability or the release profile. Thirdly, patients may be assessed in relation to patient-specific drug treatment; this concept is often called personalized medicine. In this article, the application of stable isotope technology in the aforementioned three areas is reviewed, with emphasis on developments over the past 25 years. The applications are illustrated with examples from clinical studies in humans. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacokinetic profile or mode of action of a drug substance. Secondly, stable isotopes may be used for the assessment of drug products or drug delivery systems by determination of parameters such as the bioavailability or the release profile. Thirdly, patients may be assessed in relation to patient-specific drug treatment; this concept is often called personalized medicine. In this article, the application of stable isotope technology in the aforementioned three areas is reviewed, with emphasis on developments over the past 25 years. The applications are illustrated with examples from clinical studies in humans. PMID:21801197

  9. A novel methodology to investigate isotopic biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B. Y.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2012-04-01

    An enduring goal of trace metal isotopic studies of Earth History is to find isotopic 'fingerprints' of life or of life's individual physiochemical processes. Generally, such signatures are sought by relating an isotopic effect observed in controlled laboratory conditions or a well-characterized environment to a more complex system or the geological record. However, such an approach is ultimately limited because life exerts numerous isotopic fractionations on any one element so it is hard to dissect the resultant net fractionation into its individual components. Further, different organisms, often with the same apparent cellular function, can express different isotopic fractionation factors. We have used a novel method to investigate the isotopic fractionation associated with a single physiological process-enzyme specific isotopic fractionation. We selected Cd isotopes since only one biological use of Cd is known, CdCA (a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase from the coastal diatom T. Weissflogii). Thus, our investigation can also inform the long standing mystery as to why this generally toxic element appears to have a nutrient-like dissolved isotopic and concentration profile in the oceans. We used the pET-15b plasmid to insert the CdCA gene into the E. coli genome. There is no known biochemical function for Cd in E. coli, making it an ideal vector for studying distinct physiological processes within a single organism. The uptake of Cd and associated isotopic fractionation was determined for both normal cells and those expressing CdCA. It was found that whole cells always exhibited a preference for the light isotopes of Cd, regardless of the expression of CdCA; adsorption of Cd to cell surfaces was not seen to cause isotopic fractionation. However, the cleaning procedure employed exerted a strong control on the observed isotopic composition of cells. Using existing protein purification techniques, we measured the Cd isotopic composition of different subcellular fractions of E

  10. Nickel isotopes and methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Methanogens require Ni for their growth and as a consequence the microbial fractionation of Ni isotopes can be used as a biomarker for activity of methanogenic communities1. Anaerobic laboratory experiments was performed using methanogens to investigate methanogenic growth in a modified nutrient media2 with olivine Fo91 (5g/l) added as an additional mineral nutrient source and as the only H2 provider. One of the investigated methanogens showed an increased growth in the experiments with added olivine. There were also a close relationship between the mobilized Ni and the growth of the methanogen. Ni is an element that previously has been neglected in the study of fossilized microorganisms and their interaction with mineral substrates and, thus, there are no records or published data of Ni in association with microfossils. However, we have detected enrichments of Ni in fossilized microorganisms and ichno-fossils, respectively, from three separate locations. Ni is not present in the host rock in any of the samples. Thus, Ni is present in association with fossilized microorganisms from environments and more extensive analysis is required to understand the magnitude, uptake, preservation and fractionation of Ni in microfossils. In order to analyze Ni isotope fractionation from microbe-mineral interaction, we plan to use a high-resolution Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS)3. In situ profile ablation will provide detailed and localized data on fractionation patterns between microfossils and their host rock. Also, this technique will allow us to identify the change in Ni isotopic fractionation in rock samples caused by abiotic and biogenic processes in a faster and easier way and with less risk for contamination compared to the wet chemistry analyses of Ni isotopes. 1. Cameron, V., Vance, D., Archer, C. & House, C. H. A biomarker based on the stable isotopes of nickel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, 10944-10948 (2009). 2. Schn

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 ectodomain shedding cleavage-site identification: determinants and constraints.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zon W; Hanchapola, Iresha; Steer, David L; Smith, A Ian

    2011-06-14

    ADAM17, also known as tumor necrosis factor α-converting enzyme, is involved in the ectodomain shedding of many integral membrane proteins. We have previously reported that ADAM17 is able to mediate the cleavage secretion of the ectodomain of human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a functional receptor for the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. In this study, we demonstrate that purified recombinant human ADAM17 is able to cleave a 20-amino acid peptide mimetic corresponding to the extracellular juxtamembrane region of human ACE2 between Arg(708) and Ser(709). A series of peptide analogues were also synthesized, showing that glutamate subtitution at Arg(708) and/or Arg(710) attenuated the cleavage process, while alanine substitution at Arg(708) and/or Ser(709) did not inhibit peptide cleavage by recombinant ADAM17. Analysis of CD spectra showed a minimal difference in the secondary structure of the peptide analogues in the buffer system used for the ADAM17 cleavage assay. The observation of the shedding profiles of ACE2 mutants expressing CHO-K1 and CHO-P cells indicates that the Arg(708) → Glu(708) mutation and the Arg(708)Arg(710) → Glu(708)Glu(710) double mutation produced increases in the amount of ACE2 shed when stimulated by phorbol ester PMA. In summary, we have demonstrated that ADAM17 is able to cleave ACE2 peptide sequence analogues between Arg(708) and Ser(709). These findings also indicate that Arg(708) and Arg(710) play a role in site recognition in the regulation of ACE2 ectodomain shedding mediated by ADAM17.

  12. A carbon isotope mass balance for an anoxic marine sediment: Isotopic signatures of diagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehme, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    A carbon isotope mass balance was determined for the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, NC to constrain the carbon budgets published previously. The diffusive, ebullitive and burial fluxes of sigma CO2 and CH4, as well as the carbon isotope signatures of these fluxes, were measured. The flux-weighted isotopic signature of the remineralized carbon (-18.9 plus or minus 2.7 per mil) agreed with the isotopic composition of the remineralized organic carbon determined from the particulate organic carbon (POC) delta(C-13) profiles (-19.2 plus or minus 0.2), verifying the flux and isotopic signature estimates. The measured delta(C-13) values of the sigma CO2 and CH4 diffusive fluxes were significantly different from those calculated from porewater gradients. The differences appear to be influenced by methane oxidation at the sediment-water interface, although other potential processes cannot be excluded. The isotope mass balance provides important information concerning the locations of potential diagenetic isotope effects. Specifically, the absence of downcore change in the delta(C-13) value of the POC fraction and the identical isotopic composition of the POC and the products of remineralization indicate that no isotopic fractionation is expressed during the initial breakdown of the POC, despite its isotopically heterogeneous composition.

  13. Isotope refinement of late Holocene climatic oscillations in the northern coast of Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, Mamadou; Gaye, Jean P.; Trimborn, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Paleoclimatic changes in the northern coast of Senegal are investigated on a peat core of 350 cm long spanning the past 3500 yrs extracted from the site of Mboro (15.07°N, 16.53°W). This deposit corresponds with a local stage, the Tafolian (4000 BP to 2000 BP) whose paleoclimatic trends, essentially defined by sedimentological methods, were previously considered to be dominated by drought. The δ13C profile obtained from 70 successive peat samples shows climate oscillations between wet and dry periods. A wet period appears around 3200 BP. A shorter but equally wet one occurs around 1000 BP. These two humid phases are separated by a rather arid period that occurs around 2000 BP as shown by an exceptional rise in δ13C values. This dry phase as well as a second one evidenced around 800 BP coincided with increases of dull-quartz abundance; originating from wind-reworking of surrounding dune sand. After 850 BP, the carbon isotope record suggests a progressive return to more humid conditions. Our carbon isotope trends shed new light on past monsoon rainfall oscillations over Sahelian areas during the Tafolian.

  14. Metabolic Profiling as Well as Stable Isotope Assisted Metabolic and Proteomic Analysis of RAW 264.7 Macrophages Exposed to Ship Engine Aerosol Emissions: Different Effects of Heavy Fuel Oil and Refined Diesel Fuel

    PubMed Central

    Sapcariu, Sean C.; Kanashova, Tamara; Dilger, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Oeder, Sebastian; Passig, Johannes; Radischat, Christian; Buters, Jeroen; Sippula, Olli; Streibel, Thorsten; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Krebs, Tobias; Karg, Erwin; Gröger, Thomas; Weiss, Carsten; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hiller, Karsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution resulting from fossil fuel combustion has been linked to multiple short-term and long term health effects. In a previous study, exposure of lung epithelial cells to engine exhaust from heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF), two of the main fuels used in marine engines, led to an increased regulation of several pathways associated with adverse cellular effects, including pro-inflammatory pathways. In addition, DF exhaust exposure was shown to have a wider response on multiple cellular regulatory levels compared to HFO emissions, suggesting a potentially higher toxicity of DF emissions over HFO. In order to further understand these effects, as well as to validate these findings in another cell line, we investigated macrophages under the same conditions as a more inflammation-relevant model. An air-liquid interface aerosol exposure system was used to provide a more biologically relevant exposure system compared to submerged experiments, with cells exposed to either the complete aerosol (particle and gas phase), or the gas phase only (with particles filtered out). Data from cytotoxicity assays were integrated with metabolomics and proteomics analyses, including stable isotope-assisted metabolomics, in order to uncover pathways affected by combustion aerosol exposure in macrophages. Through this approach, we determined differing phenotypic effects associated with the different components of aerosol. The particle phase of diluted combustion aerosols was found to induce increased cell death in macrophages, while the gas phase was found more to affect the metabolic profile. In particular, a higher cytotoxicity of DF aerosol emission was observed in relation to the HFO aerosol. Furthermore, macrophage exposure to the gas phase of HFO leads to an induction of a pro-inflammatory metabolic and proteomic phenotype. These results validate the effects found in lung epithelial cells, confirming the role of inflammation and cellular stress in the

  15. Metabolic Profiling as Well as Stable Isotope Assisted Metabolic and Proteomic Analysis of RAW 264.7 Macrophages Exposed to Ship Engine Aerosol Emissions: Different Effects of Heavy Fuel Oil and Refined Diesel Fuel.

    PubMed

    Sapcariu, Sean C; Kanashova, Tamara; Dilger, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Oeder, Sebastian; Passig, Johannes; Radischat, Christian; Buters, Jeroen; Sippula, Olli; Streibel, Thorsten; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Krebs, Tobias; Karg, Erwin; Gröger, Thomas; Weiss, Carsten; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hiller, Karsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution resulting from fossil fuel combustion has been linked to multiple short-term and long term health effects. In a previous study, exposure of lung epithelial cells to engine exhaust from heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF), two of the main fuels used in marine engines, led to an increased regulation of several pathways associated with adverse cellular effects, including pro-inflammatory pathways. In addition, DF exhaust exposure was shown to have a wider response on multiple cellular regulatory levels compared to HFO emissions, suggesting a potentially higher toxicity of DF emissions over HFO. In order to further understand these effects, as well as to validate these findings in another cell line, we investigated macrophages under the same conditions as a more inflammation-relevant model. An air-liquid interface aerosol exposure system was used to provide a more biologically relevant exposure system compared to submerged experiments, with cells exposed to either the complete aerosol (particle and gas phase), or the gas phase only (with particles filtered out). Data from cytotoxicity assays were integrated with metabolomics and proteomics analyses, including stable isotope-assisted metabolomics, in order to uncover pathways affected by combustion aerosol exposure in macrophages. Through this approach, we determined differing phenotypic effects associated with the different components of aerosol. The particle phase of diluted combustion aerosols was found to induce increased cell death in macrophages, while the gas phase was found more to affect the metabolic profile. In particular, a higher cytotoxicity of DF aerosol emission was observed in relation to the HFO aerosol. Furthermore, macrophage exposure to the gas phase of HFO leads to an induction of a pro-inflammatory metabolic and proteomic phenotype. These results validate the effects found in lung epithelial cells, confirming the role of inflammation and cellular stress in the

  16. A Novel Load Shedding Scheme for Voltage Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damodhar, Sunil S.; Krishna, S.

    2016-12-01

    Undervoltage load shedding serves to maintain voltage stability when a majority of loads are fast acting. An undervoltage load shedding scheme should address two tasks: the detection of voltage instability following a large disturbance and the determination of the amount of load to be shed. Additionally, in case of short-term voltage instability, the scheme should be fast. This paper proposes a method to predict voltage instability arising due to a large disturbance. The amount of load to be shed to maintain voltage stability is then determined from the Thevenin equivalent of the network as seen from the local bus. The proposed method uses local measurements of bus voltage and power, and does not require knowledge of the network. The method is validated by simulation of three test systems subjected to a large disturbance. The proposed scheme is fairly accurate in estimating the minimum amount of load to be shed to maintain stability. The method is also successful in maintaining stability in cases where voltage collapse is detected at multiple buses.

  17. Exploitation of syndecan-1 shedding by Pseudomonas aeruginosa enhances virulence.

    PubMed

    Park, P W; Pier, G B; Hinkes, M T; Bernfield, M

    2001-05-03

    Cell-surface heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are ubiquitous and abundant receptors/co-receptors of extracellular ligands, including many microbes. Their role in microbial infections is poorly defined, however, because no cell-surface HSPG has been clearly connected to the pathogenesis of a particular microbe. We have previously shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, through its virulence factor LasA, enhances the in vitro shedding of syndecan-1-the predominant cell-surface HSPG of epithelia. Here we show that shedding of syndecan-1 is also activated by P. aeruginosa in vivo, and that the resulting syndecan-1 ectodomains enhance bacterial virulence in newborn mice. Newborn mice deficient in syndecan-1 resist P. aeruginosa lung infection but become susceptible when given purified syndecan-1 ectodomains or heparin, but not when given ectodomain core protein, indicating that the ectodomain's heparan sulphate chains are the effectors. In wild-type newborn mice, inhibition of syndecan-1 shedding or inactivation of the shed ectodomain's heparan sulphate chains prevents lung infection. Our findings uncover a pathogenetic mechanism in which a host response to tissue injury-syndecan-1 shedding-is exploited to enhance microbial virulence apparently by modulating host defences.

  18. Vortex shedding induced dynamic response of marine risers

    SciTech Connect

    Rajabi, F.; Mangiavacchi, A.; Zedan, M.F.

    1984-06-01

    An analytical model to predict the dynamic response of a riser in regular waves or in current to vortex shedding-induced lift forces is described. The riser is treated as a continuous beam under tension. A modal superposition scheme is used to solve the linearized equation of motion in the frequency domain. The excitation lift force is represented by a harmonic function with a frequency equal to the dominant vortex shedding frequency. Empirical correlations are used to determine the lift coefficients and shedding frequencies along the riser. Lift amplification is considered at or near the ''lock-in'' conditions. The fluid resistance to riser oscillations is represented by a Morison's equation-type expression.

  19. Circulation shedding in viscous starting flow past a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Monika; Xu, Ling

    2013-11-01

    Numerical simulations of viscous flow past a flat plate moving in direction normal to itself reveal details of the vortical structure of the flow. At early times, most of the vorticity is attached to the plate. We introduce a definition of the shed circulation at all times and show that it indeed represents vorticity that separates and remains separated from the plate. Scaling laws for the shed circulation, and contributions to the shedding rate across various boundary components are presented, as well as their dependence on Reynolds number. The simulations provide benchmark results to evaluate simpler separation models such as point vortex and vortex sheet models. A comparison with vortex sheet results is included.

  20. Numerical and Experimental Study on Unsteady Shedding of Partial Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Bin; Luo, Xianwu; Wu, Yulin; Peng, Xiaoxing; Xu, Hongyuan

    Periodically unsteady shedding of partial cavity and forming of cavitation cloud have a great influence on hydraulic performances and cavitation erosion for ship propellers and hydro machines. In the present study, the unsteady cavitating flow around a hydrofoil has been calculated by using the single fluid approach with a developed cavitation mass transfer expression based on the vaporization and condensation of the fluid. The numerical simulation depicted the unsteady shedding of partial cavity, such as the process of cavity developing, breaking off and collapsing in the downstream under the steady incoming flow condition. It is noted that good agreement between the numerical results and that of experiment conducted at a cavitation tunnel is achieved. The cavitating flow field indicates that the cavity shedding was mainly caused by the re-entrant jet near cavity trailing edge, which was also clearly recorded by high-speed photographing.

  1. Method for separating isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-10-21

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

  2. Predictors of influenza a molecular viral shedding in Hutterite communities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biao; Russell, Margaret L; Fonseca, Kevin; Earn, David J D; Horsman, Gregory; Van Caeseele, Paul; Chokani, Khami; Vooght, Mark; Babiuk, Lorne; Walter, Stephen D; Loeb, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Patterns of influenza molecular viral shedding following influenza infection have been well established; predictors of viral shedding however remain uncertain. We sought to determine factors associated with peak molecular viral load, duration of shedding, and viral area under the curve (AUC) in children and adult Hutterite colony members with laboratory-confirmed influenza. A cohort study was conducted in Hutterite colonies in Alberta, Canada. Flocked nasal swabs were collected during three influenza seasons (2007-2008 to 2009-2010) from both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals infected with influenza. Samples were tested by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for influenza A and influenza B, and the viral load was determined for influenza A-positive samples. For seasonal H1N1, younger age was associated with a larger AUC, female sex was associated with decreased peak viral load and reduced viral shedding duration, while the presence of comorbidity was associated with increased peak viral load. For H3N2, younger age was associated with increased peak viral load and increased AUC. For pandemic H1N1, younger age was associated with increased peak viral load and increased viral AUC, female sex was associated with reduced peak viral load, while inapparent infection was associated with reduced peak viral load, reduced viral shedding duration, and reduced viral AUC. Patterns of molecular viral shedding vary by age, sex, comorbidity, and the presence of symptoms. Predictor variables vary by influenza A subtype. © 2017 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. HydroSHEDS: A global comprehensive hydrographic dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickel, B. A.; Lehner, B.; Sindorf, N.

    2007-12-01

    The Hydrological data and maps based on SHuttle Elevation Derivatives at multiple Scales (HydroSHEDS) is an innovative product that, for the first time, provides hydrographic information in a consistent and comprehensive format for regional and global-scale applications. HydroSHEDS offers a suite of geo-referenced data sets, including stream networks, watershed boundaries, drainage directions, and ancillary data layers such as flow accumulations, distances, and river topology information. The goal of developing HydroSHEDS was to generate key data layers to support regional and global watershed analyses, hydrological modeling, and freshwater conservation planning at a quality, resolution and extent that had previously been unachievable. Available resolutions range from 3 arc-second (approx. 90 meters at the equator) to 5 minute (approx. 10 km at the equator) with seamless near-global extent. HydroSHEDS is derived from elevation data of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) at 3 arc-second resolution. The original SRTM data have been hydrologically conditioned using a sequence of automated procedures. Existing methods of data improvement and newly developed algorithms have been applied, including void filling, filtering, stream burning, and upscaling techniques. Manual corrections were made where necessary. Preliminary quality assessments indicate that the accuracy of HydroSHEDS significantly exceeds that of existing global watershed and river maps. HydroSHEDS was developed by the Conservation Science Program of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), The Nature Conservancy (TNC), and the Center for Environmental Systems Research (CESR) of the University of Kassel, Germany.

  4. On aerodynamic noise generation from vortex shedding in rotating blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, B. T.; Bies, D. A.

    1992-06-01

    The interaction of the shed wakes of plates in a cascade with each following plate is investigated in a water tunnel and shown to provide an explanation for an observed very powerful aerodynamic noise source. In particular, the noise generation of an idling circular saw may be explained as due to the interaction of the wake shed by an upstream tooth with the leading edge of the following downstream tooth. When a vortex travelling downstream in the gullet between teeth encounters the leading edge of the downstream tooth it is deflected out of the gullet into the main stream. The associated impulses which the teeth encounter give rise to the radiated noise.

  5. Distributed Load Shedding over Directed Communication Networks with Time Delays

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tao; Wu, Di

    2016-07-25

    When generation is insufficient to support all loads under emergencies, effective and efficient load shedding needs to be deployed in order to maintain the supply-demand balance. This paper presents a distributed load shedding algorithm, which makes efficient decision based on the discovered global information. In the global information discovery process, each load only communicates with its neighboring load via directed communication links possibly with arbitrarily large but bounded time varying communication delays. We propose a novel distributed information discovery algorithm based on ratio consensus. Simulation results are used to validate the proposed method.

  6. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, K.S.

    1975-10-03

    A photochromatographic method for isotope separation is described. An isotopically mixed molecular species is adsorbed on an adsorptive surface, and the adsorbed molecules are irradiated with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thus separate them from the undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes. (BLM)

  7. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    1977-01-01

    An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

  8. Children's residential exposure to chlorpyrifos: application of CPPAES field measurements of chlorpyrifos and TCPy within MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides model.

    PubMed

    Hore, Paromita; Zartarian, Valerie; Xue, Jianping; Ozkaynak, Halûk; Wang, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Yu-Ching; Chu, Pei-Ling; Sheldon, Linda; Robson, Mark; Needham, Larry; Barr, Dana; Freeman, Natalie; Georgopoulos, Panos; Lioy, Paul J

    2006-08-01

    The comprehensive individual field-measurements on non-dietary exposure collected in the Children's-Post-Pesticide-Application-Exposure-Study (CPPAES) were used within MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides, a physically based stochastic human exposure and dose model. In this application, however, the model was run deterministically. The MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides employed the CPPAES as input variables to simulate the exposure and the dose profiles for seven children over a 2-week post-application period following a routine residential and professional indoor crack-and-crevice chlorpyrifos application. The input variables were obtained from a personal activity diary, microenvironmental measurements and personal biomonitoring data obtained from CPPAES samples collected from the individual children and in their homes. Simulation results were compared with CPPAES field measured values obtained from the children's homes to assess the utility of the different microenvironmental data collected in CPPAES, i.e. indicator toys and wipe samplers to estimate aggregate exposures that can be result from one or more exposure pathways and routes. The final analyses of the database involved comparisons of the actual data obtained from the individual biomarker samples of a urinary metabolite of chlorpyrifos (TCPy) and the values predicted by MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides using the CPPAES-derived variables. Because duplicate diet samples were not part of the CPPAES study design, SHEDs-Pesticides simulated dose profiles did not account for the dietary route. The research provided more confidence in the types of data that can be used in the inhalation and dermal contact modules of MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides to predict the pesticide dose received by a child. It was determined that we still need additional understanding about: (1) the types of activities and durations of activities that result in non-dietary ingestion of pesticides and (2) the influence of dietary exposures on the levels of TCPy found in the

  9. Nonlinear modelling of vortex shedding control in cylinder wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussopoulos, Kimon; Monkewitz, Peter A.

    Kármán vortex shedding behind a cylinder placed at right angles to a uniform flow is known to be a limit cycle oscillation that results from the saturation of a global instability of the wake flow. In this paper we study the feedback control of Kármán vortex shedding for Reynolds numbers (based on cylinder diameter) close to the critical value of Re c ≈ 47 using “single input - single output” (SISO) proportional control. A model is presented that combines the linear streamwise global mode amplitude equation and the nonlinear spanwise Ginzburg-Landau equation and correctly models the three-dimensional effects observed in the controlled wake of finite length cyclinders. In particular it is demonstrated that for long cylinders vortex shedding can only be suppressed at the spanwise location of the sensor even though the actuation occurs uniformly over the entire span. At a fixed streamwise position the spanwise variation of the shedding angle is thereby given by the “hole solution” of Nozaki and Bekki, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 53 (1984) 1581.

  10. Evaluation of the shedding potential of textile materials.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L; Lunstroot, K; Gason, F

    2010-12-01

    A practical method is proposed to assess the shedding potential of textile materials. The evaluation of the sheddability is based on the use of adhesive tapes and on comparison, using three different sheddability scales for cotton, wool and fine man-made fibres.

  11. Older Men as Learners: Irish Men's Sheds as an Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carragher, Lucia; Golding, Barry

    2015-01-01

    To date, little attention has been placed on older men (aged 50+ years) as learners, with much of the literature on adult learning concerned with younger age-groups and issues around gender equity directed mainly at women. This article examines the impact of community-based men's sheds on informal and nonformal learning by older men in Ireland. It…

  12. USEPA SHEDS MODEL: METHODOLOGY FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR WOOD PRESERVATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based, Monte Carlo probabilistic model (SHEDS-Wood: Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for wood preservatives) has been applied to assess the exposure and dose of children to arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) from contact with chromated copper arsenat...

  13. 58. LOOKING WEST AT EAST END OF LUMBERSTORAGE SHED AS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. LOOKING WEST AT EAST END OF LUMBER-STORAGE SHED AS TWO FORKLIFTS CARRY STACK OF LONGEST TIMBERS CUT BY HULL-OAKES LUMBER CO. PHOTOGRAPHER: UNKNOWN. DATE: 1959. COURTESY OF RALPH HULL. - Hull-Oakes Lumber Company, 23837 Dawson Road, Monroe, Benton County, OR

  14. 5. VIEW OF CABLE SHED AND CABLE TRAY EMANATING FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF CABLE SHED AND CABLE TRAY EMANATING FROM SOUTH FACE OF LAUNCH OPERATIONS BUILDING. MICROWAVE DISH IN FOREGROUND. METEOROLOGICAL TOWER IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  15. 5. Close up view of shed which houses the 1932 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Close up view of shed which houses the 1932 turbine. Shaft in foreground was part of a power transmission system providing power to a small industrial complex at the site of the Whitney Armory. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Lake Whitney Dam, East side of Whitney Avenue near intersection with Armory Street, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  16. 6. View to north along dirt lane. Log shed (HABS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View to north along dirt lane. Log shed (HABS No. VA-1290-N) at left, log dogtrot tenant house (HABS No. VA-1290-Q) in distance at end of lane. - Edgewood Farm, West side of State Route 600, .8 mile north of State Route 778, Clover, Halifax County, VA

  17. Older Men as Learners: Irish Men's Sheds as an Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carragher, Lucia; Golding, Barry

    2015-01-01

    To date, little attention has been placed on older men (aged 50+ years) as learners, with much of the literature on adult learning concerned with younger age-groups and issues around gender equity directed mainly at women. This article examines the impact of community-based men's sheds on informal and nonformal learning by older men in Ireland. It…

  18. 4. VIEW OF CABLE SHED AND CABLE TRAY EMANATING FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF CABLE SHED AND CABLE TRAY EMANATING FROM NORTH FACE OF LAUNCH OPERATIONS BUILDING. TOPS OF BUNKER PERISCOPE AND FLAGPOLE ON ROOF OF LAUNCH OPERATIONS BUILDING IN BACKGROUND - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. Geometric Perturbations and Asymmetric vortex shedding About Slender Pointed Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flow about slender, pointed bodies can be characterized by different states with angle of attack. At moderate-to-high angles of attack (alpha approximately equals 40deg), a steady, asymmetric vortex pattern develops along the body, leading to a net lateral force. At higher angles of attack (alpha approximately equals 60deg), the aft-end of the body develops an unsteady von Karman shedding. As the angle of attack approaches 90deg, the entire body length exhibits a time-dependent vortex shedding pattern. The current work uses three-dimensional, thin-layer Navier-Stokes simulations to investigate the physical mechanisms of asymmetric vortex shedding at alpha = 40deg and alpha = 60deg. The development of an asymmetric vortex pattern via a convective instability mechanism is investigated using tip bumps, surface roughness, and tip curvature. It's found that surface roughness simulations can incite an asymmetric vortex state at alpha = 60deg which is consistent with the application of a tip bumps, and the experimentally observed flowfield. The unsteady von Karman vortex shedding on the aft portion of the body is also well resolved. The use of surface roughness did not incite a flow asymmetry at alpha = 40deg, and it was necessary to simulate tip curvature at this angle of attack in order to generate an asymmetric vortex state.

  20. Geometric Perturbations and Asymmetric Vortex Shedding about Slender Pointed Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.

    2000-01-01

    The flow about slender, pointed bodies can be characterized by different states with angle of attack. At moderate-to-high angles of attack (alpha approx. = 40 deg.), a steady, asymmetric vortex pattern develops along the body, leading to a net lateral force. At higher angles of attack (alpha approx. = 60 deg.), the aft-end of the body develops an unsteady von Karman shedding. As the angle of attack approaches 90 deg., the entire body length exhibits a time-dependent vortex shedding pattern. The current work uses three-dimensional, thin-layer Navier-Stokes simulations to investigate the physical mechanisms of asymmetric vortex shedding at alpha = 40 deg. and alpha = 60 deg. The development of an asymmetric vortex pattern via a convective instability mechanism is investigated using tip bumps, surface roughness, and tip curvature. It's found that surface roughness simulations can incite an asymmetric vortex state at alpha = 60 deg. which is consistent with the application of a tip bump, and the experimentally observed flowfield. The unsteady von Karman vortex shedding on the aft. portion of the body is also well resolved. The use of surface roughness did not incite a flow asymmetry at alpha = 40 deg., and it was necessary to simulate tip curvature at this angle of attack in order to generate an asymmetric vortex state.

  1. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing northeast wall and gutter boxes. Two 750,000 gallon steel tanks at right (T19 in foreground with T18 behind). - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  2. 38. DETAIL OF RUINS OF CYANIDE MIXING AND EXTRACTION SHED, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. DETAIL OF RUINS OF CYANIDE MIXING AND EXTRACTION SHED, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE SOLUTION WAS PREPARED HERE AND PUMPED UP INTO THE PROCESSING TANKS, AND THE PREGNANT SOLUTION WAS ALSO EXTRACTED HERE AFTER THE LEACHING PROCESS WAS COMPLETE - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. 5. Log calving barn (center), loafing shed (right of center), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Log calving barn (center), loafing shed (right of center), and wood-frame garage (far right). View to southwest. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, County Road 44, 0.1 mile northeast of Big Hole River Bridge, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  4. 1. Shed, keeper's house and light tower, view west northwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Shed, keeper's house and light tower, view west northwest, south and east sides - Ram Island Light Station, Ram Island, south of Ocean Point & just north of Fisherman Island, marking south side of Fisherman Island Passage, Ocean Point, Lincoln County, ME

  5. 16. Forge building and fuel storage shed from the southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Forge building and fuel storage shed from the southwest, c.1918 Photocopied from a photograph in the collection of William F. Applegate, 43 Grandview Avenue, Wallingford, Connecticut. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  6. A POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PARTICULATE MATTER: SHEDS-PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has developed a population exposure and dose model for particulate matter (PM) that will be publicly available in Fall 2002. The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS-PM) model uses a probabilistic approach ...

  7. Organochlorine detection in the shed skins of snakes.

    PubMed

    Jones, D E; Gogal, R M; Nader, P B; Holladay, S D

    2005-03-01

    Lizards and snakes eliminate heavy metals in their shed skins. There are no data with regard to reptilian skin as a depuration route for organochlorine (OC) compounds; however, birds deposit OCs in feathers. Corn snakes (Elaphe guttata) were therefore fed thawed mice that had been injected with a mixture of alpha-chlordane, Aroclor 1254 (a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture), and lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane) at 2, 8, and 4 mg/kg, respectively. Feeding of contaminated mice occurred on the first weekly feeding of each month, with remaining weekly feedings consisting of noncontaminated mice, and was continued for 6 months. Shed skins were evaluated in a multiresidue OC scan by gas chromatography. All three chemical contaminants were readily detected in the shed skins: chlordane, 0.155-0.213 ppm; PCB, 3.49-7.01 ppm; lindane: 0.028-0.042 ppm. These data suggest that the shed skin of snakes may serve as an elimination route for OC contaminants and as such may have utility as a noninvasive, nondestructive indicator tissue for assessing environmental contamination.

  8. 11. VIEW SHOWING THE SUPERSTRUCTURE OF THE SHED ROOF (REMOVED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW SHOWING THE SUPERSTRUCTURE OF THE SHED ROOF (REMOVED AUTUMN OF 1996) PROTECTING THE PRESENT INTAKE GATES- AND RAKE-LIFTING MECHANISMS AND THE TRASH RACKS (LOWER FOREGROUND), LOOKING NORTH. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Middle Channel Powerhouse & Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  9. Shedding of Water Drops from a Surface under Icing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Deepak Kumar; Criscione, Antonio; Tropea, C; Amirfazli, A

    2015-09-01

    A sessile water drop exposed to an air flow will shed if the adhesion is overcome by the external aerodynamic forces on the drop. In this study, shedding of water drops were investigated under icing conditions, on surfaces with different wettabilities, from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic. A wind tunnel was used for experiments in a temperature range between -8 and 24.5 °C. Results indicate that the temperature has a major influence on the incipient motion of drop shedding. The critical air velocity (U(c)) at which a drop first starts to shed generally increases under icing conditions, indicating an increase in the adhesion force. The contact angle hysteresis (CAH) and the drop base length (L(b)) are found to be the controlling factors for adhesion. A correlation was also developed to deduce the drag coefficient, C(D) for the drop. It was found that C(D) can decrease under icing conditions. In general, a lower C(D) and higher adhesion together lead to a higher critical air velocity. However, there are systems such as water on Teflon for which the critical air velocity remains practically unaffected by temperature because of similar adhesion and C(D) values, at all temperatures tested.

  10. Circulation shedding in viscous starting flow past a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Monika; Xu, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Numerical simulations of viscous flow past a flat plate moving in the direction normal to itself reveal details of the vortical structure of the flow. At early times, most of the vorticity is attached to the plate. This paper introduces a definition of the shed circulation at all times and shows that it indeed represents vorticity that separates and remains separated from the plate. During a large initial time period, the shed circulation satisfies the scaling laws predicted for self-similar inviscid separation. Various contributions to the circulation shedding rate are presented. The results show that during this initial time period, viscous diffusion of vorticity out of the vortex is significant but appears to be independent of the value of the Reynolds number. At later times, the departure of the shed circulation from its large Reynolds number behaviour is significantly affected by diffusive loss of vorticity through the symmetry axis. A timescale is proposed that describes when the viscous loss through the axis becomes relevant. The simulations provide benchmark results to evaluate simpler separation models such as point vortex and vortex sheet models. A comparison with vortex sheet results is included.

  11. 38. East elevation of coffee storage and drying shed with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. East elevation of coffee storage and drying shed with circular, cattle watering pond in left foreground and coffee mill in background right. HAER PR, 6-MAGU, 1C-1 - Hacienda Buena Vista, PR Route 10 (Ponce to Arecibo), Magueyes, Ponce Municipio, PR

  12. 3. VIEW OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION AND 19061010 ONESTORY SHED ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION AND 1906-1010 ONE-STORY SHED ADDITION AT LEFT; NORTHWEST ELEVATION AND PARKING AREA AT RIGHT; PARKING AREA WAS SITE OF FORMER STOREHOUSE 'A' AND 'B'; LANE AT LEFT IS NORTH DRIVEWAY, BUILT CA. 1935 - Massachusetts Mills, Cloth Room-Section 15, 95 Bridge Street, Lowell, Middlesex County, MA

  13. A Robust Load Shedding Strategy for Microgrid Islanding Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Xiao, Bailu; Starke, Michael R; Ceylan, Oguzhan; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    A microgrid is a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources. It can operate in either gridconnected mode to exchange energy with the main grid or run autonomously as an island in emergency mode. However, the transition of microgrid from grid-connected mode to islanded mode is usually associated with excessive load (or generation), which should be shed (or spilled). Under this condition, this paper proposes an robust load shedding strategy for microgrid islanding transition, which takes into account the uncertainties of renewable generation in the microgrid and guarantees the balance between load and generation after islanding. A robust optimization model is formulated to minimize the total operation cost, including fuel cost and penalty for load shedding. The proposed robust load shedding strategy works as a backup plan and updates at a prescribed interval. It assures a feasible operating point after islanding given the uncertainty of renewable generation. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on a simulated microgrid consisting of a wind turbine, a PV panel, a battery, two distributed generators (DGs), a critical load and a interruptible load. Numerical simulation results validate the proposed algorithm.

  14. 12. VIEW OF (PRESUMED) OUTHOUSE SHED. DOOR HAS AN AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF (PRESUMED) OUTHOUSE SHED. DOOR HAS AN AIR FORCE INSIGNIA EMBLEM AFFIXED, 'AIR FORCE WEAPONS LABORATORY.' OTHER SIGN ON DOOR SAYS, 'BSD LIASON OFFICE.' INEL PHOTO NUMBER 65-6173, TAKEN NOVEMBER 10, 1965. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. 13. OVERALL SOUTH ELEVATION FROM STORAGE SHED D, SHOWING SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. OVERALL SOUTH ELEVATION FROM STORAGE SHED D, SHOWING SHOP A, CRANE, SIGN STRUCTURE, AND WATER TOWER. NOTE TOWERS OF BRIDGE BEHIND PLANT. - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Heritage Conservation in the "Back Shed" of the Learning City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boshier, Roger

    2003-01-01

    Describes Back Shed, a group of New Zealand heritage conservationists who center their work in lifelong learning. Situates their activities in the context of the learning city, a community development concept that mobilizes learning resources across many sectors. Discusses heritage conservation as a process of meaning making. (Contains 29…

  17. Drop shedding by shear flow for hydrophilic to superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Milne, A J B; Amirfazli, A

    2009-12-15

    A balance of surface science and aerodynamic knowledge is brought to bear to elucidate the fundamental parameters determining the incipient motion (runback) for a drop exposed to shearing airflow. It was found that wetting parameters such as contact angle are very influential in determining the minimum required air velocity for drop shedding. On the basis of experimental results for drops of water and hexadecane (0.5-100 microL) on PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic aluminum surface, an exponential function is proposed that relates the critical air velocity for shedding to the ratio of drop base length to projected area. The results for all of the water systems can be collapsed to self-similar curves by normalization. Results from other researchers also conform to the exponential self-similar functional form proposed. It was shown that the data for hexadecane drops can be matched relatively well to those for water drops by means of a corrective factor based on fluid properties and contact angles. Also, the critical air velocity for shedding from the superhydrophobic surface is seen to be more constant over a range of volumes than for the other surfaces. Finally, contact angle measurements from airflow shedding experiments are compared to measurements made by tilted plate and quasi-static advancing and receding tests. The observed differences between contact angles from different measurement methods show that the transfer of contact angle data among various applications must be done with care.

  18. 48. EAST TO EAST INTERIOR WALL OF WELLSERVICE SHED ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. EAST TO EAST INTERIOR WALL OF WELL-SERVICE SHED ADDITION ON REAR OF FACTORY BUILDING. HANGING FROM AND LEANING AGAINST THE WALL ARE TOOLS USED IN WATER WELL SERVICE, SUCH AS BAILER, CHAINS, WRENCHES, PULLEYS, ROPE, AND SAFETY BELT. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  19. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing truss ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing truss type B at wall post. New aluminum roofing seen in comparison with older galvanized steel siding. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  20. SHEDS-HT: An Integrated Probabilistic Exposure Model for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) researchers are developing a strategy for highthroughput (HT) exposure-based prioritization of chemicals under the ExpoCast program. These novel modeling approaches for evaluating chemicals based on their potential for biologically relevant human exposures will inform toxicity testing and prioritization for chemical risk assessment. Based on probabilistic methods and algorithms developed for The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Multimedia, Multipathway Chemicals (SHEDS-MM), a new mechanistic modeling approach has been developed to accommodate high-throughput (HT) assessment of exposure potential. In this SHEDS-HT model, the residential and dietary modules of SHEDS-MM have been operationally modified to reduce the user burden, input data demands, and run times of the higher-tier model, while maintaining critical features and inputs that influence exposure. The model has been implemented in R; the modeling framework links chemicals to consumer product categories or food groups (and thus exposure scenarios) to predict HT exposures and intake doses. Initially, SHEDS-HT has been applied to 2507 organic chemicals associated with consumer products and agricultural pesticides. These evaluations employ data from recent USEPA efforts to characterize usage (prevalence, frequency, and magnitude), chemical composition, and exposure scenarios for a wide range of consumer products. In modeling indirec

  1. USEPA SHEDS MODEL: METHODOLOGY FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR WOOD PRESERVATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based, Monte Carlo probabilistic model (SHEDS-Wood: Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for wood preservatives) has been applied to assess the exposure and dose of children to arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) from contact with chromated copper arsenat...

  2. NORTH END OF DOUBLE FURNACE AND CAST AND ENGINE SHED, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH END OF DOUBLE FURNACE AND CAST AND ENGINE SHED, WITH BLOWER HOUSE TO THE EAST AND CHARGING BRIDGE AND TRESSLE TO THE WEST, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. - Tannehill Furnace, 12632 Confederate Parkway, Tannehill Historical State Park, Bucksville, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  3. A POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PARTICULATE MATTER: SHEDS-PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has developed a population exposure and dose model for particulate matter (PM) that will be publicly available in Fall 2002. The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS-PM) model uses a probabilistic approach ...

  4. 10. VIEW OF A DYNAMITE SHED, LOOKING WEST. THIS BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF A DYNAMITE SHED, LOOKING WEST. THIS BUILDING STANDS TO THE SOUTHWEST OF THE FAN HOUSE. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  5. 6. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING TOWARD SOUTH END OF FREIGHT SHED. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING TOWARD SOUTH END OF FREIGHT SHED. STRUCTURES VISIBLE AT END OF PLATFORM ARE PART OF 1946 ALTERATION TO ACCOMADATE PASSENGER TRAFFIC. ARCHWAYS ON RIGHT LEAD TO LOADING DOCKS ALSO BUILT IN 1946. - North Central Railroad, Baltimore Freight House, Guilford & Centre Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  6. Perspective view of rear of barn complex shows northwest shed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of rear of barn complex shows northwest shed on right and the north feed pens in left foreground. The two parts of the main barn are visible in distance. - Kosai Farm, B Street north of Northwest Twenty-ninth Street, Auburn, King County, WA

  7. Vortex shedding flow meter performance at high flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwarth, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    In some of the ducts of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), the maximum liquid oxygen flow velocities approach 10 times those at which liquid flow measurements are normally made. The hydrogen gas flow velocities in other ducts exceed the maximum for gas flow measurement by more than a factor of 3. The results presented here show from water flow tests that vortex shedding flow meters of the appropriate design can measure water flow to velocities in excess of 55 m/s, which is a Reynolds number of about 2 million. Air flow tests have shown that the same meter can measure flow to a Reynolds number of at least 22 million. Vortex shedding meters were installed in two of the SSME ducts and tested with water flow. Narrow spectrum lines were obtained and the meter output frequencies were proportional to flow to + or - 0.5% or better over the test range with no flow conditioning, even though the ducts had multiple bends preceeding the meter location. Meters with the shedding elements only partially spanning the pipe and some meters with ring shaped shedding elements were also tested.

  8. Concrete airship sheds at Orly, France. Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    FREYSSINET

    1925-01-01

    This report details the contest to design and build concrete airship hangers. The difficulty lies in the magnitude of the absolute dimensions. An airship shed must withstand two principal types of stresses: those resulting from its own weight and those due to the wind. This report discusses both problems in detail.

  9. Experiments shed new light on nickel-fluorine reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, J.; Gunther, W.; Jarry, R. L.

    1967-01-01

    Isotopic tracer experiments and scale-impingement experiments show fluorine to be the migrating species through the nickel fluoride scale formed during the fluorination of nickel. This is in contrast to nickel oxide scales, where nickel is the migrating species.

  10. Fungal recognition enhances mannose receptor shedding through dectin-1 engagement.

    PubMed

    Gazi, Umut; Rosas, Marcela; Singh, Sonali; Heinsbroek, Sigrid; Haq, Imran; Johnson, Simon; Brown, Gordon D; Williams, David L; Taylor, Philip R; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa

    2011-03-11

    The mannose receptor (MR) is an endocytic type I membrane molecule with a broad ligand specificity that is involved in both hemostasis and pathogen recognition. Membrane-anchored MR is cleaved by a metalloproteinase into functional soluble MR (sMR) composed of the extracellular domains of intact MR. Although sMR production was initially considered a constitutive process, enhanced MR shedding has been observed in response to the fungal pathogen Pneumocystis carinii. In this work, we have investigated the mechanism mediating enhanced MR shedding in response to fungi. We show that other fungal species, including Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus, together with zymosan, a preparation of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mimic the effect of P. carinii on sMR production and that this effect takes place mainly through β-glucan recognition. Additionally, we demonstrate that MR cleavage in response to C. albicans and bioactive particulate β-glucan requires expression of dectin-1. Our data, obtained using specific inhibitors, are consistent with the canonical Syk-mediated pathway triggered by dectin-1 being mainly responsible for inducing MR shedding, with Raf-1 being partially involved. As in the case of steady-state conditions, MR shedding in response to C. albicans and β-glucan particles requires metalloprotease activity. The induction of MR shedding by dectin-1 has clear implications for the role of MR in fungal recognition, as sMR was previously shown to retain the ability to bind fungal pathogens and can interact with numerous host molecules, including lysosomal hydrolases. Thus, MR cleavage could also impact on the magnitude of inflammation during fungal infection.

  11. Development of Warp Yarn Tension During Shedding: A Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subrata; Chary, Prabhakara; Roy, Sukumar

    2015-10-01

    Theoretical investigation on the process of development of warp yarn tension during weaving for tappet shedding is carried out, based on the dynamic nature of shed geometry. The path of warp yarn on a weaving machine is divided into four different zones. The tension developed in each zone is estimated for every minute rotation of the bottom shaft. A model has been developed based on the dynamic nature of shed geometry and the possible yarn flow from one zone to another. A computer program, based on the model of shedding process, is developed for predicting the warp yarn tension variation during shedding. The output of the model and the experimental values of yarn tension developed in zone-D i.e. between the back rest and the back lease rod are compared, which shows a good agreement between them. The warp yarn tension values predicted by the model in zone-D are 10-13 % lesser than the experimentally measured values. By analyzing the theoretical data of the peak value of developed yarn tension at four zones i.e. zone-A, zone-B, zone-C and zone-D, it is observed that the peak yarn tension value of A, B, C-zones are much higher than the peak tension near the back rest i.e. at zone-D. It is about twice or more than the yarn tension near the back rest. The study also reveals that the developed yarn tension peak values are different for the extreme positions of a heald. The impact of coefficient of friction on peak value of yarn tension is nominal.

  12. Study of the isotopic features of Swan bands in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna Swamy, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown from a detailed statistical equilibrium calculation of the (C-12)(C-13) molecule that the interpretation of the observed intensities of Swan bands of the normal and the isotopic molecule of C2 in terms of the abundance ratio of C-12 and C-13 is a reasonable one. The synthetic profile of some isotopic features in the (0.0) Swan band is compared with the observed profiles for comet West.

  13. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry in continental tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Katharine W.; Lechler, Alex R.

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the thermal history of minerals and fluids in continental environments is a cornerstone of tectonics research. Paleotemperature constraints from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry have provided important tests of geodynamic, structural, topographic and basin evolution models. The thermometer is based on the 13C-18O bond ordering in carbonates (mass-47 anomaly, Δ47) and provides estimates of the carbonate formation temperature independent of the δ18O value of the water from which the carbonate grew; Δ47 is measured simultaneously with conventional measurements of carbonate δ13C and δ18O values, which together constrain the isotopic composition of the parent water. Depending on the geologic setting of carbonate growth, this information can help constrain paleoenvironmental conditions or basin temperatures and fluid sources. This review examines how clumped isotope thermometry can shed new light on problems in continental tectonics, focusing on paleoaltimetry, basin evolution and structural diagenesis applications. Paleoaltimetry is inherently difficult, and the precision in carbonate growth temperature estimates is at the limit of what is useful for quantitative paleoelevation reconstruction. Nevertheless, clumped isotope analyses have enabled workers to address previously intractable problems and in many settings offer the best chance of understanding topographic change from the geologic record. The portion of the shallow crust residing at temperatures up to ca. 200 °C is important as host to economic resources and records of tectonics and climate, and clumped isotope thermometry is one of the few proxies that can access this critical range with sensitivity to temperature alone. Only a handful of studies to date have used clumped isotopes to investigate diagenesis and other sub-surface processes using carbonate crystallization temperatures or the sensitivity of Δ47 values to a sample's thermal history. However, the thermometer is

  14. Contrasting lithium and magnesium isotope fractionation during continental weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, F.; Li, W.; Rudnick, R. L.; Gardner, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Magnesium isotopic compositions of a profile through saprolites developed on a diabase dike from South Carolina have been measured in order to study the behavior of Mg isotopes during continental weathering. As weathering progresses, Mg isotopes are strongly fractionated and are correlated with Mg concentration, clay mineral proportions and density of the saprolites. δ26Mg values increase from -0.22 in the unweathered diabase to +0.65 in the most weathered saprolite. These observations are consistent with release of light Mg to the hydrosphere and formation of isotopically heavy Mg in the weathered products. The process can be modeled by Rayleigh distillation with an apparent fractionation factor between the saprolite and fluid (α) of 1.00005 to 1.00043, i.e., up to 0.43‰ fractionation in the 26Mg/24Mg ratio between the rocks and fluid during weathering. Like Mg isotopes, Li isotopes in the saprolite profile are also greatly fractionated, with δ7Li values as low as -20. The large Li isotope fractionation and variation in Li concentration, as well as irregularities in the δ7Li profile with depth, however, cannot be explained by Rayleigh distillation alone. Instead, Li can be modeled by a two-step process: (1) equilibrium isotope fractionation during weathering, which lowered δ7Li and Li concentrations and produced a Li concentration gradient in the saprolites like that seen in Mg isotopes, 2) subsequent kinetic isotope fractionation produced by diffusion of Li in the saprolites, possibly across a paleo water table. The results presented here suggest that continental weathering will shift the Mg isotopic composition of the continental crust to values higher than the mantle value, whereas crustal recycling over the history of the Earth will have no discernible effect on the Mg isotopic composition of the mantle.

  15. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röckmann, Thomas; Popa, Maria Elena; Krol, Maarten; Hofmann, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope in environmental samples are becoming available with new instrumentation and may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk isotopic composition of the molecule, which for rare heavy isotopes is approximated by the arithmetic average of the isotope ratios of single substituted atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies when the indistinguishable atoms are from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule and these anomalies have to be taken into account in data interpretation. The size of the signal is closely related to the relative standard deviation of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules.

  16. Incidence of Latent Virus Shedding during Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gilden, Donald H.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of immune parameters of both cellular and innate immunity indicate alterations in immune function in astronauts. Immune changes are due to stress and perhaps other factors associated with launch, flight, and landing phases. Medical relevance of observed changes is not known. The reactivation of latent viruses has been identified as an important in vivo indicator of clinically relevant immune changes. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the presence of specific viral DNA in body fluids. Initial studies demonstrated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation during all 3 mission phases. EBV is shed in saliva following reactivation from B-cells. Incidence of EBV in saliva was higher than control subjects during all 3 mission phases. However, quantitative PCR revealed 10-fold higher levels of EBV DNA present in saliva collected during flight than found in pre- and post flight specimens. To determine if other latent viruses showed similar effects, cytomegalovirus (CMV), another herpes virus, shed in urine following reactivation was studied. A very low incidence (less than 2%) of CMV in urine is found in healthy, lowstressed individuals. However, 25-50% of astronauts shed CMV in their urine before, during, or after flight. Our studies are now focused on varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the etiological agent of chicken-pox during childhood and shingles later in life. We demonstrated reactivation of VZV and shedding of the virus during and after spaceflight in saliva of astronauts with no sign of active infection or symptoms. The maximum shedding of VZV occurred during the flight phase and diminishes rapidly during the first five days after landing. We have utilized the same PCR assay for VZV in a clinical study of shingles patients. Generally, shingles patients shed much more VZV in saliva than astronauts. However, the VZV levels in astronauts overlap with the lower range of VZV numbers in shingles patients. Saliva from shingles patients and

  17. Incidence of Latent Virus Shedding during Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gilden, Donald H.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of immune parameters of both cellular and innate immunity indicate alterations in immune function in astronauts. Immune changes are due to stress and perhaps other factors associated with launch, flight, and landing phases. Medical relevance of observed changes is not known. The reactivation of latent viruses has been identified as an important in vivo indicator of clinically relevant immune changes. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the presence of specific viral DNA in body fluids. Initial studies demonstrated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation during all 3 mission phases. EBV is shed in saliva following reactivation from B-cells. Incidence of EBV in saliva was higher than control subjects during all 3 mission phases. However, quantitative PCR revealed 10-fold higher levels of EBV DNA present in saliva collected during flight than found in pre- and post flight specimens. To determine if other latent viruses showed similar effects, cytomegalovirus (CMV), another herpes virus, shed in urine following reactivation was studied. A very low incidence (less than 2%) of CMV in urine is found in healthy, lowstressed individuals. However, 25-50% of astronauts shed CMV in their urine before, during, or after flight. Our studies are now focused on varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the etiological agent of chicken-pox during childhood and shingles later in life. We demonstrated reactivation of VZV and shedding of the virus during and after spaceflight in saliva of astronauts with no sign of active infection or symptoms. The maximum shedding of VZV occurred during the flight phase and diminishes rapidly during the first five days after landing. We have utilized the same PCR assay for VZV in a clinical study of shingles patients. Generally, shingles patients shed much more VZV in saliva than astronauts. However, the VZV levels in astronauts overlap with the lower range of VZV numbers in shingles patients. Saliva from shingles patients and

  18. Isotopic Composition of the Neolithic Alpine Iceman's Tooth Enamel and Clues to his Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, W.; Muller, W.; Halliday, A. N.

    2001-12-01

    Five small enamel fragments from three teeth of the upper right jaw from the mummy of the Neolithic Alpine Iceman have been investigated for their isotopic composition in order to shed light on his geographic origins. Soils from approximately contemporaneous sites were sampled for comparison. Tooth enamel forms ontogenetically very early and is not re-mineralized during later lifetime (unlike with bone material). Therefore, unique insights into the Iceman's childhood can be acquired. Enamel also is the densest tissue of a human body and is thus less susceptible to post-mortem alteration. Both radiogenic (Sr, Pb, Nd) and stable isotopes (O, C) are investigated. Radiogenic isotopes allow reconstruction of the local geological background, because humans incorporate Sr, Pb and Nd from their local environment by eating local food. Stable isotopes provide information about altitude and/or position relative to the main Alpine watershed. High spatial-resolution laser-ablation ICPMS profiles reveal that most elements are distributed in a manner that is essentially similar to modern human teeth except of that La, Ce, Nd (LREE) show up to a 100-fold enrichment towards the outer enamel surface. These uptake-profiles may reflect interaction with melt water, consistent with data for the composition of samples of the Iceman's skin. Biogenic apatites (enamel, bone) have very low in-vivo LREE concentrations, but take up LREEs post-mortem from the burial environment. Ice core samples from the finding site show concentrations up to 400 ppt Ce. Such high uptake of the LREEs precludes the derivation of an in-vivo Nd isotopic signal, but both other radiogenic tracers, Sr and Pb, show pristine (in-vivo) concentrations of 87 ppm and 0.1 ppm, respectively. Strontium isotopic compositions were determined on fragments from the canine, the first and second premolar (1 - 9 mg) and two hip bone samples, utilizing three sequential leaching steps for each sample to detect possible alteration

  19. Intraseasonal variability in South America recorded in stable water isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Christophe; Vimeux, FrançOise; Krinner, Gerhard

    2007-10-01

    The recent number isotopic records extracted from Andean ice cores (South America) has illustrated the key role such archives can play in past climate reconstructions. Nevertheless, interpreting isotopic archives as quantified climate proxies requires an understanding of which climate parameters control the stable isotopic composition of water. Mesoscale modeling sheds new light on the meteorological mechanisms dominant during austral summer. Here we focus on the variability of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) and its repercussions on upstream regions. The SACZ is a major component of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS). The present study uses the isotopic signature of the SAMS, as simulated by the stable water isotope enabled regional circulation model REMOiso to answer the question: how does the SAMS affect the isotopic composition of precipitation during the wet season? In order to analyze the internal, purely atmospheric variability mode, the model was forced by climatological sea-surface temperatures. We investigate the concurrent intraseasonal variability of meteorological and isotopic parameters at pentad (5 days) interval using empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). REMOiso reproduces the main meteorological characteristics of the SAMS consistent with observations as well as previous modeling studies. Furthermore, we demonstrate that δ18O integrates both circulation and precipitation variability. This new evidence contributes to the comprehension of the δ18O signal in tropical South America, highlighting the internal atmospheric variability, as opposed to external forcing by Pacific and Atlantic sea-surface temperature.

  20. Ceramide mediates nanovesicle shedding and cell death in response to phosphatidylinositol ether lipid analogs and perifosine

    PubMed Central

    Gills, J J; Zhang, C; Abu-Asab, M S; Castillo, S S; Marceau, C; LoPiccolo, J; Kozikowski, A P; Tsokos, M; Goldkorn, T; Dennis, P A

    2012-01-01

    Anticancer phospholipids that inhibit Akt such as the alkylphospholipid perifosine (Per) and phosphatidylinositol ether lipid analogs (PIAs) promote cellular detachment and apoptosis and have a similar cytotoxicity profile against cancer cell lines in the NCI60 panel. While investigating the mechanism of Akt inhibition, we found that short-term incubation with these compounds induced rapid shedding of cellular nanovesicles containing EGFR, IGFR and p-Akt that occurred in vitro and in vivo, while prolonged incubation led to cell detachment and death that depended on sphingomyelinase-mediated generation of ceramide. Pretreatment with sphingomyelinase inhibitors blocked ceramide generation, decreases in phospho-Akt, nanovesicle release and cell detachment in response to alkylphospholipids and PIAs in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. Similarly, exogenous ceramide also decreased active Akt and induced nanovesicle release. Knockdown of neutral sphingomyelinase decreased, whereas overexpression of neutral or acid sphingomyelinase increased cell detachment and death in response to the compounds. When transferred in vitro, PIA or Per-induced nanovesicles increased ceramide levels and death in recipient cells. These results indicate ceramide generation underlies the Akt inhibition and cytotoxicity of this group of agents, and suggests nanovesicle shedding and uptake might potentially propagate their cytotoxicity in vivo. PMID:22764099

  1. The relative DNA-shedding propensity of the palm and finger surfaces.

    PubMed

    Oleiwi, A A; Morris, M R; Schmerer, W M; Sutton, R

    2015-09-01

    The relative DNA shedding propensity of palmar and finger surfaces has not previously been examined. In the study presented here, palm and fingermarks of six volunteers were analysed for DNA recovery, after deposition at a pressure of approximately 4900 Pa onto glass plates or slides, respectively. The marks were swabbed; DNA extracted using a modified Chelex® method, and then quantified using qPCR, followed by genotype analysis. To assess the availability of DNA-containing material on the skin surface, DNA was analysed by directly swabbing the palm and fingerprint areas of the skin. A further set of palm and fingermarks was subjected to microscopic examination. The results demonstrated that the quantity of DNA shed from the palmar surface is significantly less than from two fingers. Single donor DNA profiles were obtained from deposited fingermarks by applying a low copy number protocol (32 cycles). DNA retrieved from palm and fingers may be degraded, as suggested by reduced peak intensity and allelic dropout amongst the larger STR loci. These findings suggest that, owing to the low levels of DNA deposition, when palmar marks are found at crime scenes, every effort should be made to recover friction ridge detail to use as an identification metric, with collection for DNA analysis performed afterwards.

  2. Reactivation and shedding of cytomegalovirus in astronauts during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R. P.; Feiveson, A. H.; Tyring, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    The reactivation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in 71 astronauts was investigated, using polymerase chain reaction. A significantly greater (P<.0001) shedding frequency was found in urine samples from astronauts before spaceflight (10.6%) than in urine from the healthy control subject group (1.2%). Two of 4 astronauts studied during spaceflight shed CMV in urine. A significant increase (P<.0001) in CMV antibody titer, compared with baseline values, was also found 10 days before spaceflight. CMV antibody titer was further increased (P<.001) 3 days after landing, compared with 10 days before the mission. Significant increases in stress hormones were also found after landing. These results demonstrate that CMV reactivation occurred in astronauts before spaceflight and indicate that CMV may further reactivate during spaceflight.

  3. Natural/passive solar heating and cooling for poultry sheds

    SciTech Connect

    Abd El-Salam, E.M.

    1980-12-01

    Arid climates, as in Egypt and the Middle-East regions, are characterized by large durinal and seasonal temperature variation coupled with clear skies and ample sunshine duration. Partial stabilization of indoor thermal environment in habitation is of great comfort for human and have large effects on animals or birds productivities. In case of poultry or animal sheds, can have some economical turn over in terms of increased egg or animal productivity and reduction of mortality rates if their indoor thermal environment is favorably controlled. Poultry birds are sensitive to changes of ambient temperatures, humidity and other environmental variables. This investigation describes an unconventional method of maintaining moderate thermal environment within poultry sheds by using the roof for storage of heat and coolness in appropriate seasons. During winter, underground water is circulated through specially designed pipe matrix imbeded in the roof slab and through radiant wall panels.

  4. Numerical investigation of shedding partial cavities over a sharp wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budich, B.; Neuner, S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution, we examine transient dynamics and cavitation patterns of periodically shedding partial cavities by numerical simulations. The investigation reproduces reference experiments of the cavitating flow over a sharp wedge. Utilizing a homogeneous mixture model, full compressibility of the two-phase flow of water and water vapor is taken into account by the numerical method. We focus on inertia-dominated mechanisms, thus modeling the flow as inviscid. Based on the assumptions of thermodynamic equilibrium and barotropic flow, the thermodynamic properties are computed from closed-form analytical relations. Emphasis is put on a validation of the employed numerical approach. We demonstrate that computed shedding dynamics are in agreement with the references. Complex flow features observed in the experiments, including cavitating hairpin and horse-shoe vortices, are also predicted by the simulations. Furthermore, a condensation discontinuity occurring during the collapse phase at the trailing portion of the partial cavity is equally obtained.

  5. The decay of longitudinal vortices shed from airfoil vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.; Reichert, Bruce A.; Foster, Jeffry D.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted to examine the crossplane structure and streamwise decay of vortices shed from airfoil-type vortex generators. The vortex generators are set in a counter-rotating array spanning the full circumference of a straight pipe. The span of the vortex generators above the duct surface, h, is approximately equal to the local turbulent boundary layer thickness, delta. Measurement of three-component mean flow velocity in downstream crossplanes are used to characterize the structure of the shed vortices. Measurements in adjacent crossplanes (closely spaced along the streamwise coordinate) characterize the interaction and decay of the embedded vortices. A model constructed by the superposition of Oseen vortices is compared to the data for one test case.

  6. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    DOEpatents

    Spevack, J.S.

    1957-04-01

    An isotope concentration process is described which consists of exchanging, at two or more different temperature stages, two isotopes of an element between substances that are physically separate from each other and each of which is capable of containing either of the isotopes, and withdrawing from a point between at least two of the temperatare stages one of the substances containing an increased concentration of the desired isotope.

  7. 50. SOUTHEAST TO SOUTHEAST CORNER OF WELLSERVICE SHED ADDITION ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. SOUTHEAST TO SOUTHEAST CORNER OF WELL-SERVICE SHED ADDITION ON REAR OF FACTORY BUILDING. HANGING FROM AND LEANING AGAINST THE WALL ARE TOOLS USED IN WATER WELL SERVICE, SUCH AS BAILER, CHAINS, WRENCHES, PULLEYS, ROPE, SAFETY BELT, CHAIN TONGS, AND LEATHER SEALS FOR PISTON DISPLACEMENT PUMPS. CLEARLY VISIBLE ON RAFTERS IS HISTORIC ELECTRICAL WIRING. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  8. 25. VIEW OF METAL SHED CONSTRUCTED OVER SHIELDING TANK FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF METAL SHED CONSTRUCTED OVER SHIELDING TANK FOR WASTE FORMS RESPONSE PROJECT (WFRP) IN 1980. CAMERA FACING EAST. SHOWS REMAINS OF CABLE CHASE AND ITS COVER, DISCARDED COVERS TO THE TEST PIT. PHOTOGRAPHER STANDING ON THE DIRT FILL OVER THE BUNKER. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 83-476-2-8, TAKEN IN 1983. PHOTOGRAPHER NOT NAMED. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Birds shed RNA-viruses according to the pareto principle.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Mark D; Williams, Christopher J; Fair, Jeanne M; Owen, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in disease ecology is to understand the role of individual variation of infection load on disease transmission dynamics and how this influences the evolution of resistance or tolerance mechanisms. Such information will improve our capacity to understand, predict, and mitigate pathogen-associated disease in all organisms. In many host-pathogen systems, particularly macroparasites and sexually transmitted diseases, it has been found that approximately 20% of the population is responsible for approximately 80% of the transmission events. Although host contact rates can account for some of this pattern, pathogen transmission dynamics also depend upon host infectiousness, an area that has received relatively little attention. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of pathogen shedding rates of 24 host (avian) - pathogen (RNA-virus) studies, including 17 bird species and five important zoonotic viruses. We determined that viral count data followed the Weibull distribution, the mean Gini coefficient (an index of inequality) was 0.687 (0.036 SEM), and that 22.0% (0.90 SEM) of the birds shed 80% of the virus across all studies, suggesting an adherence of viral shedding counts to the Pareto Principle. The relative position of a bird in a distribution of viral counts was affected by factors extrinsic to the host, such as exposure to corticosterone and to a lesser extent reduced food availability, but not to intrinsic host factors including age, sex, and migratory status. These data provide a quantitative view of heterogeneous virus shedding in birds that may be used to better parameterize epidemiological models and understand transmission dynamics.

  10. Shear driven droplet shedding and coalescence on a superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghtadernejad, S.; Tembely, M.; Jadidi, M.; Esmail, N.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The interest on shedding and coalescence of sessile droplets arises from the importance of these phenomena in various scientific problems and industrial applications such as ice formation on wind turbine blades, power lines, nacelles, and aircraft wings. It is shown recently that one of the ways to reduce the probability of ice accretion on industrial components is using superhydrophobic coatings due to their low adhesion to water droplets. In this study, a combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate droplet shedding and coalescence phenomena under the influence of air shear flow on a superhydrophobic surface. Droplets with a size of 2 mm are subjected to various air speeds ranging from 5 to 90 m/s. A numerical simulation based on the Volume of Fluid method coupled with the Large Eddy Simulation turbulent model is carried out in conjunction with the validating experiments to shed more light on the coalescence of droplets and detachment phenomena through a detailed analysis of the aerodynamics forces and velocity vectors on the droplet and the streamlines around it. The results indicate a contrast in the mechanism of two-droplet coalescence and subsequent detachment with those related to the case of a single droplet shedding. At lower speeds, the two droplets coalesce by attracting each other with successive rebounds of the merged droplet on the substrate, while at higher speeds, the detachment occurs almost instantly after coalescence, with a detachment time decreasing exponentially with the air speed. It is shown that coalescence phenomenon assists droplet detachment from the superhydrophobic substrate at lower air speeds.

  11. GeoSHED Software for Wetlands Drainage Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    WRP Technical Note HY-IA-5. 1 August 1993 GeoSHED Software for Wetlands Drainage Analysis PURPOSE: This technical note documents recent software...developments in automated drainage basin analysis and describes how the tools can be used in wetland enviromnents. BACKGROUND: A detailed knowledge of...streams and sub-basins, calculating drainage areas and other pertinent hydrologic statistics, and writing out this information in a form expected by

  12. Syndecan-4 shedding impairs macrovascular angiogenesis in diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ran; Xie, Jun; Wu, Han; Li, Guannan; Chen, Jianzhou; Chen, Qinhua; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao

    2016-05-20

    Purpose: Syndecan-4 (synd4) is a ubiquitous heparan sulfate proteoglycan cell surface receptor that modulates cell proliferation, migration, mechanotransduction, and endocytosis. The extracellular domain of synd4 sheds heavily in acute inflammation, but the shedding of synd4 in chronic inflammation, such as diabetes mellitus (DM), is still undefined. We investigated the alterations of synd4 endothelial expression in DM and the influence of impaired synd4 signaling on angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), diabetic rats, synd4 null mice, and db/db mice. Material and methods: HUVECs were incubated with advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Western blot analysis was used to determine synd4 protein expression and ELISA was used to detect soluble synd4 fragments. The concentration of synd4 in the aortic endothelia of diabetic rats was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Aortic ring assays were performed to study the process of angiogenesis in the diabetic rats and in synd4 null and db/db mice. Recombinant adenoviruses containing the synd4 gene or null were constructed to enhance synd4 aortic expression in db/db mice. Results: Western blot analysis showed decreased expression of the synd4 extracellular domain in HUVECs, and ELISA detected increased soluble fragments of synd4 in the media. Synd4 endothelial expression in the aortas of diabetic rats was decreased. Aortic ring assay indicated impaired angiogenesis in synd4 null and db/db mice, which was partially reversed by synd4 overexpression in db/db mice. Conclusion: Synd4 shedding from vascular endothelial cells played an important role in the diabetes-related impairment of angiogenesis. -- Highlights: •Synd4 shedding from endothelial cells is accelerated under the stimulation of AGEs. •Extracellular domain of synd4 is diminished in the endothelium of DM rats. •Aortic rings of synd4 null mice showed impaired angiogenesis. •Overexpression of synd4 partly rescues macrovascular

  13. Growing bacteria shed elicitors of Drosophila humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Jenny; Oldenvi, Sandra; Fahlander, Carina; Daenthanasanmak, Anusara; Steiner, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    It has been much debated how the Drosophila immune system can recognize bacterial peptidoglycan that is often hidden. We show that bacteria separated from Drosophila S2 cells by a semipermeable membrane can upregulate the Imd pathway. Supernatants from exponentially growing but not from stationary-phase bacterial cultures induce antimicrobial peptides. It is also made likely that the shed elicitors are of peptidoglycan nature. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. 51. WEST ACROSS CLUTTER TO WEST WALL OF WELLSERVICE SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. WEST ACROSS CLUTTER TO WEST WALL OF WELL-SERVICE SHED ADDITION ON REAR OF FACTORY BUILDING. AT LOWER RIGHT FOREGROUND IS 1960S PICKUP TRUCK, THE LAST MOTOR VEHICLE USED IN WELL SERVICE BY THE KREGEL WINDMILL COMPANY. MOST OF THE OBJECTS VISIBLE IN THIS VIEW ARE CLUTTER NOT RELATED TO THE WELL SERVICE BUSINESS. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  15. Acetylsalicylic acid reduces viral shedding induced by thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Bryan M; Varnell, Emily D; Kaufman, Herbert E

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid on ocular shedding of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Mice that were latent for the McKrae strain of HSV-1 were treated with acetylsalicylic acid, a nonspecific inhibitor of cyclooxygenases, either prophylactically or at the time of heat stress-induced viral reactivation. The effect of the drug on viral shedding in the tear film, infectious virus in the cornea and trigeminal ganglion, and viral DNA in the cornea and trigeminal ganglion was determined. Acetylsalicylic acid inhibited heat stress-induced shedding of virus in the tears and reduced the numbers of corneal and trigeminal ganglion homogenates containing virus. Intraperitoneal therapeutic and oral prophylactic plus therapeutic treatments were similar in their ability to inhibit reactivation. The results indicate that a cyclooxygenase inhibitor such as acetylsalicylic acid can reduce recurrent viral infection in mice. These findings may implicate prostaglandins as agents in the viral reactivation process and suggest that therapy to suppress viral reactivation using nontoxic inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis may be effective in humans.

  16. HSV oropharyngeal shedding among HIV-infected children in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Richard; Manji, Karim; Matee, Mecky; Naburi, Helga; Bisimba, Jema; Martinez, Raquel; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Kim, Faith; von Reyn, C Fordham; Palumbo, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) oral shedding has not been studied among HIV-positive children in Africa. We sought to evaluate longitudinal oral HSV reactivation in HIV-positive and -negative children. Twenty HIV-positive antiretroviral-naive and 10 HIV-negative children aged 3-12 years in Tanzania were followed prospectively for 14 days. Oral swabs were collected daily and submitted for HSV DNA PCR analysis. Clinical data were collected via chart review and daily diaries. HSV DNA was detected in 10 (50%) of HIV-positive and 4 (40%) of HIV-negative children. Children who shed HSV had virus detected in a median of 21.4% of samples; shedding was intermittent. Median CD4 count among HIV-infected children was 667 cells/µL in those with positive HSV DNA and 886 cells/µL in those who were negative (p = 0.6). Of the HIV-positive children reporting prior sores, five (83%) had positive HSV swabs, whereas the one HIV-negative child with prior sores did not have a PCR-positive swab. HSV is detected frequently in children with and without HIV. HIV-infected children reporting oral sores have a high rate of HSV detection. Given the proven strong interactions between HIV and HSV, further study of co-infection with these viruses is warranted in children.

  17. Genital HSV Shedding among Kenyan Women Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manguro, Griffins O.; Masese, Linnet N.; Deya, Ruth W.; Magaret, Amalia; Wald, Anna; McClelland, R. Scott; Graham, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Genital ulcer disease (GUD) prevalence increases in the first month of antiretroviral treatment (ART), followed by a return to baseline prevalence by month 3. Since most GUD is caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), we hypothesized that genital HSV detection would follow a similar pattern after treatment initiation. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 122 HSV-2 and HIV-1 co-infected women with advanced HIV disease who initiated ART and were followed closely with collection of genital swab specimens for the first three months of treatment. Results At baseline, the HSV detection rate was 32%, without significant increase in genital HSV detection noted during the first month or the third month of ART. HIV-1 shedding declined during this period; no association was also noted between HSV and HIV-1 shedding during this period. Conclusion Because other studies have reported increased HSV detection in women initiating ART and we have previously reported an increase in GUD during early ART, it may be prudent to counsel HIV-1 infected women initiating ART that HSV shedding in the genital tract may continue after ART initiation. PMID:27683204

  18. Synapse Maturation by Activity-Dependent Ectodomain Shedding of SIRPα

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Anna B.; Terauchi, Akiko; Zhang, Lily Y.; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M.; Larsen, David J.; Sutton, Michael A.; Umemori, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    Formation of appropriate synaptic connections is critical for proper functioning of the brain. After initial synaptic differentiation, active synapses are stabilized by neural activity-dependent signals to establish functional synaptic connections. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent synapse maturation remain to be elucidated. Here we show that activity-dependent ectodomain shedding of SIRPα mediates presynaptic maturation. Two target-derived molecules, FGF22 and SIRPα, sequentially organize the glutamatergic presynaptic terminals during the initial synaptic differentiation and synapse maturation stages, respectively, in the mouse hippocampus. SIRPα drives presynaptic maturation in an activity-dependent fashion. Remarkably, neural activity cleaves the extracellular domain of SIRPα, and the shed ectodomain, in turn, promotes the maturation of the presynaptic terminal. This process involves CaM kinase, matrix metalloproteinases, and the presynaptic receptor CD47. Finally, SIRPα-dependent synapse maturation has significant impacts on synaptic function and plasticity. Thus, ectodomain shedding of SIRPα is an activity-dependent trans-synaptic mechanism for the maturation of functional synapses. PMID:24036914

  19. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates LOX-1 Shedding in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Magda; Vindigni, Giulia; Testa, Barbara; Raniolo, Sofia; Fasciglione, Giovanni Francesco; Coletta, Massimiliano; Biocca, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a scavenger receptor responsible for ox-LDL recognition, binding and internalization, which is up-regulated during atherogenesis. Its activation triggers endothelium dysfunction and induces inflammation. A soluble form of LOX-1 has been identified in the human blood and its presence considered a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. We recently showed that cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit ox-LDL binding and internalization, rescuing the ox-LDL induced apoptotic phenotype in primary endothelial cells. Here we have investigated the molecular bases of human LOX-1 shedding by metalloproteinases and the role of cell membrane cholesterol on the regulation of this event by modulating its level with MβCD and statins. We report that membrane cholesterol affects the release of different forms of LOX-1 in cells transiently and stably expressing human LOX-1 and in a human endothelial cell line (EA.hy926). In particular, our data show that i) cholesterol depletion triggers the release of LOX-1 in exosomes as a full-length transmembrane isoform and as a truncated ectodomain soluble fragment (sLOX-1); ii) endothelial cells secrete a soluble metalloproteinase which induces LOX-1 ectodomain shedding and iii) long term statins treatment enhances sLOX-1 proteolytic shedding.

  20. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    PubMed Central

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  1. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-08-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules.

  2. Cosmic ray isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    The isotopic composition of cosmic rays is studied in order to develop the relationship between cosmic rays and stellar processes. Cross section and model calculations are reported on isotopes of H, He, Be, Al and Fe. Satellite instrument measuring techniques separate only the isotopes of the lighter elements.

  3. Isotope reference materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of the same isotopically homogeneous sample by any laboratory worldwide should yield the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty. International distribution of light element isotopic reference materials by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology enable laboratories to achieve this goal.

  4. Initial Circulation and Peak Vorticity Behavior of Vortices Shed from Airfoil Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.; Biesiadny, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An extensive parametric study of vortices shed from airfoil vortex generators has been conducted to determine the dependence of initial vortex circulation and peak vorticity on elements of the airfoil geometry and impinging flow conditions. These elements include the airfoil angle of attack, chord length, span, aspect ratio, local boundary layer thickness, and free stream Mach number. In addition, the influence of airfoil-to-airfoil spacing on the circulation and peak vorticity has been examined for pairs of co-rotating and counter-rotating vortices. The vortex generators were symmetric airfoils having a NACA-0012 cross-sectional profile. These airfoils were mounted either in isolation, or in pairs, on the surface of a straight pipe. The turbulent boundary layer thickness to pipe radius ratio was about 17 percent. The circulation and peak vorticity data were derived from cross-plane velocity measurements acquired with a seven-hole probe at one chord-length downstream of the airfoil trailing edge location. The circulation is observed to be proportional to the free-stream Mach number, the angle-of-attack, and the span-to-boundary layer thickness ratio. With these parameters held constant, the circulation is observed to fall off in monotonic fashion with increasing airfoil aspect ratio. The peak vorticity is also observed to be proportional to the free-stream Mach number, the airfoil angle-of-attack, and the span-to-boundary layer thickness ratio. Unlike circulation, however, the peak vorticity is observed to increase with increasing aspect ratio, reaching a peak value at an aspect ratio of about 2.0 before falling off again at higher values of aspect ratio. Co-rotating vortices shed from closely spaced pairs of airfoils have values of circulation and peak vorticity under those values found for vortices shed from isolated airfoils of the same geometry. Conversely, counter-rotating vortices show enhanced values of circulation and peak vorticity when compared to values

  5. Shedding of Live Vaccine Virus, Comparative Safety, and Influenza-Specific Antibody Responses after Administration of Live Attenuated and Inactivated Trivalent Influenza Vaccines to HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Myron J.; Song, Lin-Ye; Fenton, Terrence; Nachman, Sharon; Patterson, Julie; Walker, Robert; Kemble, George; Allende, Maria; Hultquist, Micki; Yi, Tingting; Nowak, Barbara; Weinberg, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    HIV-infected children (n = 243), ≥5 to <18 years old, receiving stable antiretroviral therapy, were stratified by immunologic status and randomly assigned to receive intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) or intramuscular trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV). The safety profile after LAIV or TIV closely resembled the previously reported tolerability to these vaccines in children without HIV infection. Post-vaccination hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody responses and shedding of LAIV virus were also similar, regardless of immunological stratum, to antibody responses and shedding previously reported for children without HIV infection. LAIV should be further evaluated for a role in immunizing HIV-infected children. PMID:18597900

  6. Application of Molybdenum isotopes as proxy for weathering conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Burton, K.; Halliday, A. N.

    2008-12-01

    Molybdenum isotopes have become an important tracer for paleo-redox conditions in the oceans and paleo- oceans. Mo is also an essential enzyme co-factor in organisms and therefore important in studies of nitrogen fixation and reduction. With an increasing amount of data on the biogeochemical behavior of Mo in the oceans, it is now possible to better constrain the general behavior of Mo in the marine environment. However, the terrestrial geochemistry of Mo remains very poorly understood. For example, in contrast to earlier assumptions, recent measurements of river-waters (Archer & Vance(2008) Nature Geoscience, Vol. 1, P. 597; Pearce et al. (2008) Geology, Vol. 36, 3, P. 231) suggest that the Mo isotopic input into the oceans is more variable and more enriched in heavy isotopes then previously assumed. So far these variations do not easily correlate with the isotope composition of the source rocks in the catchment area of rivers. Therefore, fractionation during weathering and transport does indeed occur and it is essential to understand the processes controlling the Mo isotope composition of rivers, if one wants to utilize Mo isotopes as quantitative (paleo-)proxy for marine redox-conditions. The aim of this study is to investigate the biogeochemistry of molybdenum in weathering profiles. Results are promising and suggest that molybdenum isotopes may also become useful tracers for redox-conditions during weathering. Results show a clear correlation of Mo isotope compositions with rainfall gradients (i.e. redox conditions) in saprolites from Hawaii. Weathering profiles from Puerto Rico also imply a strong dependence of the Mo isotope composition on pH shifts within a weathering profile. More data are necessary to judge the influence of these processes on the overall Mo isotope composition of rivers and therefore the Mo input to the oceans. However, it becomes clear that the processes affecting Mo isotopes in the terrestrial environment might be complex and need to be

  7. Development of cyclic shedding teeth from semi-shedding teeth: the inner dental arcade of the stem osteichthyan Lophosteus

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Henning; Sanchez, Sophie; Tafforeau, Paul; Märss, Tiiu; Ahlberg, Per E.

    2017-01-01

    The numerous cushion-shaped tooth-bearing plates attributed to the stem group osteichthyan Lophosteus superbus, which are argued here to represent an early form of the osteichthyan inner dental arcade, display a previously unknown and presumably primitive mode of tooth shedding by basal hard tissue resorption. They carry regularly spaced, recumbent, gently recurved teeth arranged in transverse tooth files that diverge towards the lingual margin of the cushion. Three-dimensional reconstruction from propagation phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography (PPC-SRµCT) reveals remnants of the first-generation teeth embedded in the basal plate, a feature never previously observed in any taxon. These teeth were shed by semi-basal resorption with the periphery of their bases retained as dentine rings. The rings are highly overlapped, which evidences tooth shedding prior to adding the next first-generation tooth at the growing edge of the plate. The first generation of teeth is thus diachronous. Successor teeth at the same sites underwent cyclical replacing and shedding through basal resorption, producing stacks of buried resorption surfaces separated by bone of attachment. The number and spatial arrangement of resorption surfaces elucidates that basal resorption of replacement teeth had taken place at the older tooth sites before the addition of the youngest first-generation teeth at the lingual margin. Thus, the replacement tooth buds cannot have been generated by a single permanent dental lamina at the lingual edge of the tooth cushion, but must have arisen either from successional dental laminae associated with the individual predecessor teeth, or directly from the dental epithelium of these teeth. The virtual histological dissection of these Late Silurian microfossils broadens our understanding of the development of the gnathostome dental systems and the acquisition of the osteichthyan-type of tooth replacement. PMID:28573003

  8. Development of cyclic shedding teeth from semi-shedding teeth: the inner dental arcade of the stem osteichthyan Lophosteus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Donglei; Blom, Henning; Sanchez, Sophie; Tafforeau, Paul; Märss, Tiiu; Ahlberg, Per E.

    2017-05-01

    The numerous cushion-shaped tooth-bearing plates attributed to the stem group osteichthyan Lophosteus superbus, which are argued here to represent an early form of the osteichthyan inner dental arcade, display a previously unknown and presumably primitive mode of tooth shedding by basal hard tissue resorption. They carry regularly spaced, recumbent, gently recurved teeth arranged in transverse tooth files that diverge towards the lingual margin of the cushion. Three-dimensional reconstruction from propagation phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography (PPC-SRµCT) reveals remnants of the first-generation teeth embedded in the basal plate, a feature never previously observed in any taxon. These teeth were shed by semi-basal resorption with the periphery of their bases retained as dentine rings. The rings are highly overlapped, which evidences tooth shedding prior to adding the next first-generation tooth at the growing edge of the plate. The first generation of teeth is thus diachronous. Successor teeth at the same sites underwent cyclical replacing and shedding through basal resorption, producing stacks of buried resorption surfaces separated by bone of attachment. The number and spatial arrangement of resorption surfaces elucidates that basal resorption of replacement teeth had taken place at the older tooth sites before the addition of the youngest first-generation teeth at the lingual margin. Thus, the replacement tooth buds cannot have been generated by a single permanent dental lamina at the lingual edge of the tooth cushion, but must have arisen either from successional dental laminae associated with the individual predecessor teeth, or directly from the dental epithelium of these teeth. The virtual histological dissection of these Late Silurian microfossils broadens our understanding of the development of the gnathostome dental systems and the acquisition of the osteichthyan-type of tooth replacement.

  9. Generation of Radixenon Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Pitts, W. K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Reeder, Paul L.; Thomas, Charles W.

    2003-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed an automated system for separating Xe from air and can detect the following radioxenon isotopes, 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, and 135Xe. This report details the techniques used to generate the various radioxenon isotopes that are used for the calibration of the detector as well as other isotopes that have the potential to interfere with the fission produced radioxenon isotopes. Fission production is covered first using highly enriched uranium followed by a description and results from an experiment to produce radioxenon isotopes from neutron activation of ambient xenon.

  10. ISOTOPE CONVERSION DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of tbe type utilizing a liquid fuel and designed to convert a non-thermally fissionable isotope to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A tank containing a reactive composition of a thermally fissionable isotope dispersed in a liquid moderator is disposed within an outer tank containing a slurry of a non-thermally fissionable isotope convertible to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A control rod is used to control the chain reaction in the reactive composition and means are provided for circulating and cooling the reactive composition and slurry in separate circuits.

  11. Vortex shedding noise of a cylinder with hairy flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamps, Laura; Geyer, Thomas F.; Sarradj, Ennes; Brücker, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    This study describes the modification of acoustic noise emitted from cylinders in a stationary subsonic flow for a cylinder equipped with flexible hairy flaps at the aft part as a passive way to manipulate the flow and acoustics. The study was motivated by the results from previous water tunnel measurements, which demonstrated that hairy flaps can modify the shedding cycle behind the cylinder and can reduce the wake deficit. In the present study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted on such a modified cylinder and the results were compared to the reference case of a plain cylinder. The acoustic spectrum was measured using two microphones while simultaneously recording the flap motion. To further examine the flow structures in the downstream vicinity of the cylinder, constant temperature anemometry measurements as well as flow visualizations were also performed. The results show that, above a certain Reynolds number, the hairy flaps lead to a jump in the vortex shedding frequency. This phenomenon is similarly observed in the water flow experiments as a jump in the non-dimensional Strouhal number that is related to the change of the shedding cycle. This jump appears to be coupled to a resonant excitation of the flaps. The specific Reynolds number at which the jump occurs is higher in the present case, which is attributed to the lower added mass in air as compared with the one in water. The flow visualizations confirmed that such action of the flaps lead to a more slender elongated shape of the time-averaged separation bubble. In addition, the hairy flaps induce a noticeable reduction of the tonal noise as well as broadband noise as long as the flaps do not touch each other.

  12. Vortex shedding from a hydrofoil at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgoyne, Dwayne A.; Ceccio, Steven L.; Dowling, David R.

    2005-05-01

    High Reynolds number (Re) wall-bounded turbulent flows occur in many hydro- and aerodynamic applications. However, the limited amount of high-Re experimental data has hampered the development and validation of scaling laws and modelling techniques applicable to such flows. This paper presents measurements of the turbulent flow near the trailing edge of a two-dimensional lifting surface at chord-based Reynolds numbers, Re_{C}, typical of heavy-lift aircraft wings and full-scale ship propellers. The experiments were conducted in the William B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel at flow speeds from 0.50 to 18.3ms(-1) with a cambered hydrofoil having a 3.05m span and a 2.13m chord that generated 60 metric tons of lift at the highest flow speed, Re_{C}{≈}50{×}10(6) . Flow-field measurements concentrated on the foil's near wake and include results from trailing edges having terminating bevel angles of 44(°) and 56(°) . Although generic turbulent boundary layer and wake characteristics were found at any fixed Re_{C} in the trailing-edge region, the variable strength of near-wake vortex shedding caused the flow-field fluctuations to be Reynolds-number and trailing-edge-geometry dependent. In the current experiments, vortex-shedding strength peaked at Re_{C}{=}4{×}10(6) with the 56(°) bevel-angle trailing edge. A dimensionless scaling for this phenomenon constructed from the free-stream speed, the wake thickness, and an average suction-side shear-layer vorticity at the trailing edge collapses the vortex-shedding strength measurements for 1.4{×}10(6}{≤) Re_{C}{≤}50{×}10(6) from both trailing edges and from prior measurements on two-dimensional struts at Re_{C}{˜}2{×}10(6) with asymmetrical trailing edges.

  13. Trichomonas Vaginalis Treatment Reduces Vaginal HIV-1 Shedding

    PubMed Central

    KISSINGER, PATRICIA; AMEDEE, ANGELA; CLARK, REBECCA A.; DUMESTRE, JEANNE; THEALL, KATHERINE P.; MYERS, LEANN; HAGENSEE, MICHAEL E.; FARLEY, THOMAS A.; MARTIN, DAVID H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vaginal HIV-1 shedding has been associated with Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) infection and could play a role in HIV transmission. The purpose of the study was to examine if effective TV treatment reduces the presence of vaginal HIV-1 RNA. Methods: TV+ women attending an HIV outpatient clinic in New Orleans, LA, who resolved infection (n = 58) and TV-negative controls (n = 92), matched on antiretroviral therapy (ART) were examined and interviewed at baseline, 1, and 3 months. TV status was tested by culture and the amount of cell free HIV-1 RNA in the vaginal fluids was determined by the Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor ultrasensitive assay. Results: Most women (81.3%) were black and the mean age was 37.5 (SD 8.7). At baseline, 46.0% had plasma HIV-1 RNA ≥10,000 copies/mL, 26.4% had CD4<200 cells/μL, 54.7% were taking ART, and only 26.0% had detectable HIV-1 RNA in their vaginal fluids. TV-positive women who were effectively treated for TV were less likely to shed HIV vaginally at 3-months post-treatment compared to baseline (R.R. 0.34, 95% CI: 0.12–0.92, P = 0.03), whereas there was no change for TV-negative women. Conclusion: This study provides additional support that reducing TV infection among HIV-positive women may have an impact on the prevention of HIV transmission. Reasons for the delayed treatment effect and the effect on cervical shedding need further investigation. PMID:19008776

  14. View northnorthwest of turret shed (building 56), at right of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north-northwest of turret shed (building 56), at right of photograph. Electrical and electronics facility (building 1000) located south of drydock no. 2. The gantry crane and its supporting structure (left foreground) was used to load assembled gun turrets onto barges moored in the barge basin under the gantry structure. After loading on a crane on pier 4 and lifted into positioned on a battleship or cruiser. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 2, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. PHAROS: Shedding Light on the Near-Earth Asteroid Apophis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Jonathan; Lafleur, Jarret; Barron, Kreston; Townley, Jonathan; Shah, Nilesh; Apa, Jillian

    2007-01-01

    The Pharos mission to asteroid Apophis provides the first major opportunity to enhance orbital state and scientific knowledge of the most threatening Earth-crossing asteroid that has ever been tracked. Pharos aims to accomplish concrete and feasible orbit determination and scientific objectives while achieving balance among mission cost, nsk,and schedule. Similar to its ancient Egyptian namesake, Pharos acts as a beacon shedding light not only on the physical characteristics of Apophis, but also on its state as it travels through the solar system.

  16. Henri Bénard: Thermal convection and vortex shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    We present in this article the work of Henri Bénard (1874-1939), a French physicist who began the systematic experimental study of two hydrodynamic systems: the thermal convection of fluids heated from below (the Rayleigh-Bénard convection and the Bénard-Marangoni convection) and the periodical vortex shedding behind a bluff body in a flow (the Bénard-Kármán vortex street). Across his scientific biography, we review the interplay between experiments and theory in these two major subjects of fluid mechanics.

  17. Managing Saginaw Bay nutrient loading by surrounding watersheds through near real time hydrologic resource sheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    We can quantify source areas contributing material to a location during various time periods as resource sheds. Various kinds of resource sheds and their source material distributions are defined. For watershed hydrology, we compute resource sheds and their source material distri...

  18. On strontium isotopic anomalies and odd-A p-process abundances. [in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    Several aspects of the nucleosynthesis of Sr isotopes are considered in an attempt to shed light on the problem of the Sr isotopic anomalies discovered in an inclusion of the Allende meteorite. Decomposition of the Sr isotopes into average r-, s-, and p-process nucleosynthetic classes is performed. It is suggested that the Allende inclusion most likely has an excess of s-process Sr and that the initial Sr-87/Sr-86 isotopic ratio is probably slightly more primitive than basaltic achondrites. The results also show that Sn-115 is mostly due to the r-process and that odd-A yields are very small. It is concluded that if the Sr anomaly in the inclusion is an average s enhancement, it argues somewhat in favor of a model of gas/dust fractionation of s and r isotopes during accumulation of the inclusion parent in the protosolar cloud.

  19. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, Christa E; Lim, So-Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T; Omange, Robert Were; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter T; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S; Estes, Jacob D; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G; Whitney, James B

    2017-01-01

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans. PMID:27694931

  20. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D.; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T.; Omange, Robert; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter Thomas; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L.; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S.; Estes, Jacob D.; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G.; Whitney, James B.

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.

  1. Periodic mass shedding of a retracting solid film step

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.; Voorhees, P.W.; Miksis, M.J.; Davis, S.H.

    2000-05-11

    A semi-infinite, uniform film on a substrate tends to contract from the edge to reduce the surface energy of the system. This work studies the two-dimensional retraction of such a film step, assuming that the film evolves by capillarity-driven surface diffusion. It is found that the retracting film edge forms a thickened ridge followed by a valley. The valley sinks with time and eventually touches the substrate. The ridge then detaches from the film. The new film edge retracts to form another ridge accompanied again by a valley, and the mass shedding cycle is repeated. This periodic mass shedding is simulated numerically for contact angle {alpha} between 30 and 180{degree}. For smaller {alpha}, a small-slope late-time solution is found that agrees with the numerical solution for {alpha} = 30{degree}. Thus, the complete range of {alpha} is covered. The long-time retraction speed and the distance traveled per cycle agree quantitatively with experiments.

  2. Increased EBV Shedding in Astronaut Saliva During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Stowe, R. P.; Phillips, T.; Lugg, D. J.; Mehta, S. K.

    2003-01-01

    Shedding of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) by astronauts before, during, and after space shuttle missions was quantified. Of 1398 saliva specimens from 32 astronauts, 314 (23%) were positive for EBV DNA by PCR analysis. Of the saliva specimens collected before flight, 29% were positive for EBV DNA and of those collected during or after flight, 16% were EBV-positive. The number of EBV DNA copies from samples taken during the flight was 417+/-31, significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the number of copies from the preflight (40+/-1.7) and postflight (44+/-5) phases. Eighteen control subjects shed EBV DNA with a frequency of 3.7% and a copy number of 40+/-2 per ml saliva. Ten days before flight and on landing day, antibody titers to EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than baseline levels. On landing day, urinary level of cortiso1 and catecholamines, and plasma levels of substance P and other neuropeptides, were increased over their preflight value. Results suggested that stress associated with spaceflight decreases cellular immunity and thereby leads to increased viral reactivation.

  3. Vitreous Microparticle Shedding in Retinal Detachment: A Prospective Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Tumahai, Perle; Saas, Philippe; Ricouard, Fanny; Biichlé, Sabéha; Puyraveau, Marc; Laheurte, Caroline; Delbosc, Bernard; Saleh, Maher

    2016-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are membrane-derived vesicles measuring less than 1 μm in diameter. They are shed from nearly every activated or preapoptotic cell and may exhibit biologic activities in inflammation or apoptosis settings. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether MP shedding was higher in the vitreous of patients with retinal detachment (RD). This was a prospective, comparative study. Levels of vitreous MPs (including phosphatidylserine [PS]-expressing MPs, photoreceptor cell-derived MPs, and photoreceptor cell-derived MPs expressing PS) and soluble proinflammatory factors (i.e., monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and IL-6) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Samples were obtained from 49 eyes undergoing RD surgery and 41 control eyes. Vitreous levels of all the MPs studied were significantly increased in the RD group. Vitreous MP levels were correlated with levels of at least one proinflammatory factor depending on MP subsets. Concerning clinical parameters, vitreous PS-expressing MP and PS-expressing photoreceptor cell-derived MP levels were higher depending on the duration of RD at surgery, the detached retina surface, and the macula status and were found more sensitive than proinflammatory factors only for the duration of RD at surgery. Vitreous concentrations of MPs (mainly derived from photoreceptor cells) are higher after rhegmatogenous RD and found to be correlated with soluble proinflammatory factors.

  4. Longitudinal prevalence and faecal shedding of Chlamydia pecorum in sheep.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Jacobson, Caroline; Gardner, Graham; Carmichael, Ian; Campbell, Angus J D; Ryan, Una

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence and faecal shedding of Chlamydia spp. in sheep in Australia has not been well described. Two species-specific quantitative PCRs (qPCRs) targeting the chlamydial outer membrane protein cell surface antigen gene (ompA) were validated and used to determine the prevalence and faecal shedding of C. abortus and C. pecorum from faecal samples of lambs at three sampling times (weaning, post-weaning and pre-slaughter) from eight farms in South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Western Australia. A total of 3412 faecal samples were collected and screened from approximately 1189 lambs across the four states. C. abortus was not detected in any of the samples screened. The overall prevalence of C. pecorum was 1027/3412 (30.1%) and median bacterial concentrations at weaning, post-weaning and pre-slaughter were 1.8 × 10(7), 1.2 × 10(7) and 9.6 × 10(5)/g faeces, respectively. A subset of C. pecorum positive samples from each farm, (n = 48) was sequenced to confirm their identity. The present study demonstrates that C. pecorum is prevalent in Australian sheep, highlighting a need for further research on the impact of this bacterium on production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Flying, swimming, falling...: fluid-solid interactions with vortex shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelin, Sebastien; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2007-11-01

    The interaction between the motion of slender bodies and the fluid around them is at the center of several natural phenomenas. To move in fluids, insects and fishes need to deform their bodies in such a way that the resulting flow around them applies the required force on their body. Unsteady pressure effects are essential here to understand the coupling between the fluid and solid motions. We consider slender solid bodies with sharp edges. At intermediate Re, the boundary layers separate because of the presence of the edge and strong vortices are shed. A simplified 2D potential flow model is proposed here. Point vortices with monotonically increasing intensity are shed from the edges of the body to enforce the regularity of the flow on its boundary. The Brown-Michael equation describes the motion of these vortices and enforces the conservation of momentum for the fluid around the vortex. The potential flow is computed using conformal mapping or bounded vortex sheet representation for the solid body. Simple representations of locomotion mechanisms such as flapping flight are proposed using this model. The forces resulting from prescribed flapping motions of rigid airfoils and deformable thin bodies are computed. The question of the free motion of an elastic 1D body will also be discussed.

  6. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Christa E; Lim, So-Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T; Omange, Robert; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter T; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S; Estes, Jacob D; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G; Whitney, James B

    2016-12-01

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.

  7. Some effects of vortex shedding in grid-generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melina, Gianfrancesco; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Vassilicos, John Christos

    2015-11-01

    We perform hot-wire measurements in a wind tunnel downstream of different types of turbulence-generating grids: a regular grid (RG60), a fractal square grid (FSG17) and a single square grid (SSG). We characterize the flow highlighting similarities and differences between the grids and between the production and the decay regions of turbulence. We focus on the effects of vortex shedding from the bars of the grids. For this purpose we design a novel 3D configuration formed by the SSG and a set of four splitter plates detached from the grid. We show that, by placing the splitter plates, the peak of turbulence intensity on the centerline is reduced and its location is moved downstream. We compare data from the different turbulence generators and find that a reduction of vortex shedding energy correlates with an increase in the magnitudes of the skewness and flatness of the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the production region. The authors acknowledge support form the EU through the FP7 Marie Curie MULTISOLVE project (grant agreement No. 317269).

  8. A Mathematical Proof of the Vortex Shedding Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghosian, Michael; Cassel, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    A novel mechanism leading to vortex splitting and subsequent shedding that is valid for both inviscid or viscous flows and external, internal, or wall-bounded flows is described. The mechanism, termed the Vortex-Shedding Mechanism (VSM), is simple and intuitive, requiring only two coincident conditions in the flow: (1) the existence of a location with zero momentum and (2) the presence of a net force having a positive divergence. Previous simulations of various flows have demonstrated the VSM numerically. Here, we present a mathematical proof of the VSM that is shown to be both a necessary and sufficient condition for a vortex splitting event in any two-dimensional, incompressible flow. The proof includes relating the positive divergence of the net force, condition (2) above, with the second invariant of the velocity gradient tensor, i.e. the Q-criterion. It is shown that the Q-criterion is identical to the determinant of the Hessian matrix for the streamfunction. As a result, the second-partial-derivative test on this Hessian matrix can provide a qualitative description on the behavior of the streamfunction, and thus vortices or recirculation regions, near critical points. Supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01 DK90769).

  9. Vortex shedding within laminar separation bubbles forming over an airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Thomas M.; Yarusevych, Serhiy

    2017-05-01

    Vortex shedding within laminar separation bubbles forming over the suction side of a NACA 0018 airfoil is studied through a combination of high-speed flow visualization and boundary layer measurements. Wind tunnel experiments are performed at a chord-based Reynolds number of 100,000 and four angles of attack. The high-speed flow visualization is complemented by quantitative velocity and surface pressure measurements. The structures are shown to originate from the natural amplification of small-amplitude disturbances, and the shear layer roll-up is found to occur coherently across the span. However, significant cycle-to-cycle variations are observed in vortex characteristics, including shedding period and roll-up location. The formation of the roll-up vortices precedes the later stages of transition, during which these structures undergo significant deformations and breakdown to smaller scales. During this stage of flow development, vortex merging is also observed. The results provide new insight into the development of coherent structures in separation bubbles and their relation to the overall bubble dynamics and mean bubble topology.

  10. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D.; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T.; Omange, Robert; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter Thomas; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L.; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S.; Estes, Jacob D.; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G.; Whitney, James B.

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.

  11. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    DOE PAGES

    Osuna, Christa E.; Lim, So -Yon; Deleage, Claire; ...

    2016-10-03

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection wasmore » cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Finally, early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans.« less

  12. Two doses of parenterally administered split influenza virus vaccine elicited high serum IgG concentrations which effectively limited viral shedding upon challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Hovden, A-O; Cox, R J; Madhun, A; Haaheim, L R

    2005-10-01

    We have previously found that whole influenza virus vaccine induced a more rapid and stronger humoral response, particularly after the first dose of vaccine, than split virus vaccine in mice. In this study, we have evaluated the protective efficacy of whole and split influenza virus vaccines in mice using a nonlethal upper respiratory tract challenge model. We have also investigated the immunological correlates associated with no or very little viral shedding after viral challenge. Vaccination resulted in reduced viral shedding and shortened the duration of infection by at least 2 days. After one dose of vaccine, whole virus vaccine generally resulted in less viral shedding than split virus vaccine. In contrast, two doses of split virus vaccine, particularly the highest vaccine strengths of 15 and 30 microg HA, most effectively limited viral replication and these mice had high concentrations of prechallenge influenza-specific serum IgG. The vaccine formulation influenced the IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, and this IgG subclass profile was maintained upon challenge to some extent, although it did not influence the level of viral shedding. The concentration of postvaccination serum IgG showed an inverse relationship with the level of viral shedding after viral challenge. Therefore, serum IgG is an important factor in limiting viral replication in the upper respiratory tract upon challenge of an antigenically similar virus.

  13. Oxygen isotope geospeedometry by SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonamici, C. E.; Valley, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Geospeedometry, a discipline closely related and complimentary to thermochronology, exploits the phenomenon of diffusion in order to extract rate and duration information for segments of a rock's thermal history. Geospeedometry data, when anchored in absolute time by geochronologic data, allow for the construction of detailed temperature-time paths for specific terranes and geologic processes. We highlight the developing field of SIMS-based oxygen isotope geospeedometry with an application from granulites of the Adirondack Mountains (New York) and discuss potential future applications based on a recently updated and expanded modeling tool, the Fast Grain Boundary diffusion program (FGB; Eiler et al. 1994). Equilibrium oxygen isotope ratios in minerals are a function of temperature and bulk rock composition. In dynamic systems, intragrain oxygen isotope zoning can develop in response to geologic events that affect the thermal state of a rock and/or induce recrystallization, especially tectonic deformation and fluid infiltration. As an example, titanite grains from late-Grenville shear zones in the northwestern Adirondack Mountains exhibit a range of δ18O zoning patterns that record post-peak metamorphic cooling, episodic fluid infiltration, and deformation-facilitated recrystallization. Many titanite grains preserve smooth, core-to-rim decreasing, diffusional δ18O profiles, which are amenable to diffusion modeling. FGB models that best fit the measured δ18O profiles indicate cooling from ~700-500°C in just 2-5 m.y., a rapid thermal change signaling the final gravitational collapse of the late-Grenville orogen. Titanite can also be utilized as a U-Pb chronometer, and comparison of δ18O and U-Pb age zoning patterns within the Adirondack titanites pins the episode of rapid cooling inferred from the δ18O record to some time between 1054 and 1047 Ma. The expanded capabilities of FGB also allow for evaluation of a range of heating-cooling histories for the

  14. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, J.

    1991-06-18

    A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus. 2 figures.

  15. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Jakob

    1991-01-01

    A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

  16. HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, R.W.

    1958-08-12

    The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

  17. Oxygen isotopes implanted in the LDEF spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxton, J. M.; Lyon, I. C.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.; Vanlierde, P.; Gilmour, J. D.; Turner, G.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to study oxygen implanted in the surface of copper from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Oxidation that occurred in orbit shows a characteristic oxygen isotope composition, depleted in O-18. The measured depletion is comparable to the predicted depletion (45 percent) based on a model of the gravitational separation of the oxygen isotopes. The anomalous oxygen was contained within 10nm of the surface. Tray E10 was calculated to have received 5.14 x 10(exp 21) atoms of oxygen cm(sup -2) during the LDEF mission and so there is sufficient anomalous implanted oxygen present in the surface to obtain a reliable isotopic profile.

  18. Houses and Sheds in Australia: An Exploration of the Genesis and Growth of Neighbourhood Houses and Men's Sheds in Community Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golding, Barry; Kimberley, Helen; Foley, Annette; Brown, Mike

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews research into the genesis and spread of both neighbourhood houses and learning centres in Victoria and community-based men's sheds in Australia to identify some similarities and differences. Our article asks questions about the gendered communities of practice that underpin houses for women on the one hand, and sheds for men…

  19. The Role of Collaborative Learning on Training and Development Practices within the Australian Men's Shed Movement: A Study of Five Men's Sheds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Jillian; Southcombe, Amie; Bartram, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the role and impact of collaborative learning on training and development practices in Australian Men's Sheds. We use a case study approach, underpinned by Peters and Armstrong's theoretical framework of collaborative learning in adult education, to investigate five Men's Sheds. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with…

  20. The Role of Collaborative Learning on Training and Development Practices within the Australian Men's Shed Movement: A Study of Five Men's Sheds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Jillian; Southcombe, Amie; Bartram, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the role and impact of collaborative learning on training and development practices in Australian Men's Sheds. We use a case study approach, underpinned by Peters and Armstrong's theoretical framework of collaborative learning in adult education, to investigate five Men's Sheds. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with…