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Sample records for isotopes centrifugal stretching

  1. Isotopic enrichment in a plasma centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Del Bosco, E.; Dallaqua, R.S.; Ludwig, G.O.; Bittencourt, J.A.

    1987-06-15

    High rotational velocity and centrifugal isotopic separation of carbon in a vacuum-arc plasma centrifuge are presented. Enrichments of up to 390% for /sup 13/C are measured at 6 cm radius with angular rotation frequencies in excess of 1.0 x 10/sup 5/ rad/s in an axial magnetic field of 0.12 T.

  2. Centrifugal stretching along the ground state band of Hf168

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, A.; Reese, M.; Ai, H.; Casten, R. F.; Dusling, K.; Fitzpatrick, C. R.; Gürdal, G.; Heinz, A.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Möller, O.; Petkov, P.; Pietralla, N.; Qian, J.; Rainovski, G.; Werner, V.

    2009-02-01

    The lifetimes of the Jπ=4+, 6+, 8+, and 10+ levels along the ground state band in Hf168 were measured by means of the recoil distance Doppler shift (RDDS) method using the New Yale Plunger Device (NYPD) and the SPEEDY detection array at Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Excited states in Hf168 were populated using the Sn124(Ti48,4n) fusion evaporation reaction. The new lifetime values are sufficiently precise to clearly prove the increase of quadrupole deformation as a function of angular momentum in the deformed nucleus Hf168. The data agree with the predictions from the geometrical confined β-soft (CBS) rotor model that involves centrifugal stretching in a soft potential.

  3. Centrifugal stretching along the ground state band of {sup 168}Hf

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, A.; Pietralla, N.; Reese, M.; Moeller, O.; Ai, H.; Casten, R. F.; Heinz, A.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Qian, J.; Werner, V.; Dusling, K.; Fitzpatrick, C. R.; Guerdal, G.; Petkov, P.; Rainovski, G.

    2009-02-15

    The lifetimes of the J{sup {pi}}=4{sup +}, 6{sup +}, 8{sup +}, and 10{sup +} levels along the ground state band in {sup 168}Hf were measured by means of the recoil distance Doppler shift (RDDS) method using the New Yale Plunger Device (NYPD) and the SPEEDY detection array at Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Excited states in {sup 168}Hf were populated using the {sup 124}Sn({sup 48}Ti,4n) fusion evaporation reaction. The new lifetime values are sufficiently precise to clearly prove the increase of quadrupole deformation as a function of angular momentum in the deformed nucleus {sup 168}Hf. The data agree with the predictions from the geometrical confined {beta}-soft (CBS) rotor model that involves centrifugal stretching in a soft potential.

  4. Centrifugal stretching from lifetime measurements in the 170Hf ground state band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. K.; Werner, V.; Terry, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Petkov, P.; Berant, Z.; Casperson, R. J.; Heinz, A.; Henning, G.; Lüttke, R.; Qian, J.; Shoraka, B.; Rainovski, G.; Williams, E.; Winkler, R.

    2013-04-01

    Centrifugal stretching in the deformed rare-earth nucleus 170Hf is investigated using high-precision lifetime measurements, performed with the New Yale Plunger Device at Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University. Excited states were populated in the fusion-evaporation reaction 124Sn(50Ti,4n)170Hf at a beam energy of 195 MeV. Recoil distance doppler shift data were recorded for the ground state band through the J=16+ level. The measured B(E2) values and transition quadrupole moments improve on existing data and show increasing β deformation in the ground state band of 170Hf. The results are compared to descriptions by a rigid rotor and by the confined β-soft rotor model.

  5. Stretching

    MedlinePlus

    ... benefits of stretching before working out. Traditional, or "static," stretching may lead to decreased muscle strength and performance. Consider doing dynamic stretches before and static stretching after a workout. Stretching still can be ...

  6. Stretching

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the activity, dynamic stretching allows for full range of motion of the joints. continue Stretching Stretching used to ... performance. In addition, stretching provides increased: flexibility joint range and motion blood flow to muscles Stretching has to be ...

  7. Analysis of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotopes and optimal feed position

    SciTech Connect

    Chuntong Ying; Hongjiang Wu; Mingsheng Zhou; Yuguang Nie; Guangjun Liu

    1997-10-01

    Analysis of the concentration distribution in a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures is different from that in a cascade for separation of two-component mixtures. This paper presents the governing equations for a multicomponent isotope separation cascade. Numerically predicted separation factors for the gas centrifuge cascade agree well with the experimental data. A theoretical optimal feed position is derived for a short square cascade for a two-component mixture in a close-separation case. The optimal feed position for a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent mixture is discussed.

  8. The plasma centrifuge (A compact, low cost, stable isotope separator)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Mark-I centrifuge assembly includes an electromagnet, a vacuum chamber, and a Nd:YAG laser. Three tasks have been completed: design, component order, and laboratory test cell preparation. Two task are being pursued: design plasma diagnostics/collection hardware/mass analyzers, and assemble Mark I centrifuge. Experiments with rotation of C plasmas will be conducted. 4 figs.

  9. CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping mechanism for damping vibration forces occurring during the operation of a centrifuge is described. The vibration damping mechanism comprises a plurality of nested spaced cylindrical elements surrounding the rotating shaft of the centrifuge. Some of the elements are held substantially stationary while the others are held with respect to a pair of hearings spaced along the rotating shaft. A fluid is retained about the cylindrical elements.

  10. Isotopic cataphoresis in a crossed-field plasma centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V.M.; Karchevskii, A.I.; Lukovnikov, A.I.; Potanin, E.P.

    1983-09-01

    The enrichment factor of an isotope mixture achievable by exploiting differences in the ionization of the isotopes is calculated. It is shown that cataphoretic separation becomes more important at low gas pressures and high electron temperatures.

  11. Development of special rotor for centrifugal separation of isotopes in solid pure metals.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masao; Sueyoshi, Masanori; Okayasu, Satoru; Hao, Ting; Esaka, Fumitaka; Osawa, Takahito; Iguchi, Yusuke; Mashimo, Tsutomu

    2009-08-01

    A prototype rotor with two grooves for the multistage centrifugal isotope separation in solid state was developed to test a new idea. This idea is based on the sedimentation of constitutional atoms in solid. In the performance test using indium specimen, it is verified that the developed rotor can receive all injected molten-indium droplets from an automatic raw-material feeding system even at the high rotational speed of 97,000 rpm without the loss of rotational stability, and the received indium specimens can be transferred in/between two grooves through the plastic flow under the influence of strong centrifugal force even in the solid state. The isotope ratio of centrifuged indium specimens was analyzed employing the secondary ion mass spectrometry, and it is confirmed that intended isotope separation by the centrifugation is realized in the solid state. The developed rotor can be used to perform the isotope separation on at least solid metals under the conditions of up to 400 degrees C in specimen temperature and 0.4x10(6)g in centrifugal force field.

  12. CENTRIFUGE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.; Urey, H.C.; Cohen, K.

    1960-08-01

    A high-speed centrifuge for the separation of gaseous isotopes is designed comprising a centrifugal pump mounted on the outlet of a centrifuge bowl and arranged to pump the heavy and light fractions out of the centrifuge bowl in two separate streams.

  13. Plasma centrifuge with vacuum arc discharge applied to the separation of stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbosco, Edson

    1989-09-01

    The results of a vacuum-arc plasma centrifuge experiment are described. A plasma centrifuge is an apparatus where a plasma column is produced due to the interaction of an electric current with an externally applied magnetic field, vector J x vector B. Among the applications of a rotating plasma, this work deals particularly with its utilization in an isotope enrichment device. The main characteristics of the plasma produced in this experiment are presented, with special attention to the plasma column rotation and the isotope enrichment. The analysis of the results is performed using a fluid model for a completely ionized rigid body rotating plasma column in steady state equilibrium. The main results are: (1) rotation frequency of the plasma column in the range 2 x (exp 4) to 3 x 10 (exp 5) rad/s; (2) enrichment of 10 to 30 pct for the magnesium isotopes, and 290 to 490 pct for the carbon-13 isotope; (3) rigid body rotation of the plasma column only for radii smaller than the characteristic radius of the plasma column, r(sub e); (4) linear dependence of the rotation frequency upon the magnetic field strength only for r is less than r(sub e); (5) existence of an optimum value of the magnetic field for maximum enrichment; and (6) dependence of the rotation frequency upon the inverse of the atomic mass.

  14. Centrifugal enrichment of zinc isotopes, their application in medicine and in increasing radiation safety in nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcheltsov, A. N.; Sosnin, L. Yu.; Shipilov, Yu. D.; Zaozersky, Yu. P.; Khamylov, V. K.; Pochekutova, T. S.

    2006-05-01

    This paper contains the results of our research on the complete cycle of centrifuge enrichment of all zinc isotopes. The centrifuge cascade that was used to obtain the world's first zinc isotope, 70Zn, with an enrichment of more than 99.3% in gram quantities, is described. As a result of this work, gram quantities of all highly enriched zinc isotopes and hundreds of grams of depleted zinc (in the form of ZnO) with concentrations of less than 0.5% 64Zn were obtained.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Non-Stationary Hydraulic Process Occurring in the Gas Centrifuge Cascade During the Separation of Multicomponent Isotope Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. A.; Ushakov, A. A.; Sovach, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    This article presents results of development of the mathematical model of nonstationary separation processes occurring in gas centrifuge cascades for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures. This model was used for the calculation parameters of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of germanium isotopes. Comparison of obtained values with results of other authors revealed that developed mathematical model is adequate to describe nonstationary separation processes in gas centrifuge cascades for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures.

  16. A rapid method for estimation of Pu-isotopes in urine samples using high volume centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Rao, D D; Dubla, Rupali; Yadav, J R

    2017-07-01

    The conventional radio-analytical technique used for estimation of Pu-isotopes in urine samples involves anion exchange/TEVA column separation followed by alpha spectrometry. This sequence of analysis consumes nearly 3-4 days for completion. Many a times excreta analysis results are required urgently, particularly under repeat and incidental/emergency situations. Therefore, there is need to reduce the analysis time for the estimation of Pu-isotopes in bioassay samples. This paper gives the details of standardization of a rapid method for estimation of Pu-isotopes in urine samples using multi-purpose centrifuge, TEVA resin followed by alpha spectrometry. The rapid method involves oxidation of urine samples, co-precipitation of plutonium along with calcium phosphate followed by sample preparation using high volume centrifuge and separation of Pu using TEVA resin. Pu-fraction was electrodeposited and activity estimated using (236)Pu tracer recovery by alpha spectrometry. Ten routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical tracer recovery was obtained in the range 47-88% with a mean and standard deviation of 64.4% and 11.3% respectively. With this newly standardized technique, the whole analytical procedure is completed within 9h (one working day hour). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy of CH2D radical in a slit supersonic jet: isotopic symmetry breaking in the CH stretching manifold.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Melanie A; Savage, Chandra; Dong, Feng; Sharp-Williams, Erin N; McCoy, Anne B; Nesbitt, David J

    2012-06-21

    First high-resolution infrared absorption spectra in the fundamental symmetric/asymmetric CH stretching region of isotopically substituted methyl radical, CH(2)D, are reported and analyzed. These studies become feasible in the difference frequency spectrometer due to (i) high density radical generation via dissociative electron attachment to CH(2)DI in a discharge, (ii) low rotational temperatures (23 K) from supersonic cooling in a slit expansion, (iii) long absorption path length (64 cm) along the slit axes, and (iv) near shot noise limited absorption sensitivity (5 × 10(-7)/√(Hz)). The spectra are fully rovibrationally resolved and fit to an asymmetric top rotational Hamiltonian to yield rotational/centrifugal constants and vibrational band origins. In addition, the slit expansion collisionally quenches the transverse velocity distribution along the laser probe direction, yielding sub-Doppler resolution of spin-rotation structure and even partial resolution of nuclear hyperfine structure for each rovibrational line. Global least-squares fits to the line shapes provide additional information on spin-rotation and nuclear hyperfine constants, which complement and clarify previous FTIR studies [K. Kawaguchi, Can. J. Phys. 79, 449 (2001)] of CH(2)D in the out-of-plane bending region. Finally, analysis of the spectral data from the full isotopomeric CH(m)D(3-m) series based on harmonically coupled Morse oscillators establishes a predictive framework for describing the manifold of planar stretching vibrations in this fundamental combustion radical.

  18. The plasma centrifuge: A compact, low cost, stable isotope separator. Phase 2 final technical report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, W.

    1996-09-05

    Enriched stable isotopes are required for production of radionuclides as well as for research and diagnostic uses. Science Research Laboratory (SRL) has developed a plasma centrifuge for moderate throughput of enriched stable isotopes, such as {sup 13}C, {sup 17}O, {sup 18}O, and {sup 203}Tl, for medical as well as other applications. Dwindling isotope stocks have restricted the use of enriched isotopes and their associated labeled organic molecules in medical imaging to very few research facilities because of high costs of isotope separation. With the introduction of the plasma centrifuge separator, the cost per separated gram of even rarely occurring isotopes ({le} 1% natural abundance) is potentially many times lower than with other separation technologies (cryogenic distillation and calutrons). The centrifuge is a simple, robust, pulsed electrical discharge device that has successfully demonstrated isotope separation of small (mg) quantities of {sup 26}Mg. Based on the results of the Phase 2 program, modest enhancements to the power supplies and cooling systems, a centrifuge separator will have high repetition rate (60 pps) and high duty cycle (60%) to produce in one month kilogram quantities of highly enriched stable isotopes. The centrifuge may be used in stand-alone operation or could be used as a high-throughput pre-separation stage with calutrons providing the final separation.

  19. Mathematical Model of Nonstationary Separation Processes Proceeding in the Cascade of Gas Centrifuges in the Process of Separation of Multicomponent Isotope Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. A.; Ushakov, A. A.; Sovach, V. P.

    2017-03-01

    We have developed and realized on software a mathematical model of the nonstationary separation processes proceeding in the cascades of gas centrifuges in the process of separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures. With the use of this model the parameters of the separation process of germanium isotopes have been calculated. It has been shown that the model adequately describes the nonstationary processes in the cascade and is suitable for calculating their parameters in the process of separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures.

  20. Numerical modelling of the flow and isotope separation in centrifuge Iguasu for different lengths of the rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Borman, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-06-08

    Numerical modelling and optimization of the gas flow and isotope separation in the Iguasu gas centrifuge (GC) for uranium enrichment have been performed for different lengths of the rotor. The calculations show that the specific separative power of the GC reduces with the length of the rotor. We show that the reduction of the specific separative power is connected with the growth of the pressure in the optimal regime and corresponding growth of temperature to prevent the working gas sublimation. The specific separative power remains constant with the growth of the rotor length provided that the temperature of the gas is taken to be constant.

  1. Numerical modelling of the flow and isotope separation in centrifuge Iguasu for different lengths of the rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Borman, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical modelling and optimization of the gas flow and isotope separation in the Iguasu gas centrifuge (GC) for uranium enrichment have been performed for different lengths of the rotor. The calculations show that the specific separative power of the GC reduces with the length of the rotor. We show that the reduction of the specific separative power is connected with the growth of the pressure in the optimal regime and corresponding growth of temperature to prevent the working gas sublimation. The specific separative power remains constant with the growth of the rotor length provided that the temperature of the gas is taken to be constant.

  2. Influence of uncertainties of isotopic composition of the reprocessed uranium on effectiveness of its enrichment in gas centrifuge cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. Yu; Mustafin, A. R.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Sulaberidze, G. A.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Gusev, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the uncertainties of the isotopic composition of the reprocessed uranium on its enrichment process in gas centrifuge cascades while diluting it by adding low-enriched uranium (LEU) and waste uranium. It is shown that changing the content of 232U and 236U isotopes in the initial reprocessed uranium within 15% (rel.) can significantly change natural uranium consumption and separative work (up to 2-3%). However, even in case of increase of these parameters is possible to find the ratio of diluents, where the cascade with three feed flows (depleted uranium, LEU and reprocessed uranium) will be more effective than ordinary separation cascade with one feed point for producing LEU from natural uranium.

  3. Boundary-value problem for a counterrotating electrical discharge in an axial magnetic field. [plasma centrifuge for isotope separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. H.; Wilhelm, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    An electrical discharge between two ring electrodes embedded in the mantle of a cylindrical chamber is considered, in which the plasma in the anode and cathode regions rotates in opposite directions under the influence of an external axial magnetic field. The associated boundary-value problem for the coupled partial differential equations describing the azimuthal velocity and radial current-density fields is solved in closed form. The velocity, current density, induced magnetic induction, and electric fields are presented for typical Hartmann numbers, magnetic Reynolds numbers, and geometry parameters. The discharge is shown to produce anodic and cathodic plasma sections rotating at speeds of the order 1,000,000 cm/sec for conventional magnetic field intensities. Possible application of the magnetoactive discharge as a plasma centrifuge for isotope separation is discussed.

  4. Boundary-value problem for a counterrotating electrical discharge in an axial magnetic field. [plasma centrifuge for isotope separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. H.; Wilhelm, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    An electrical discharge between two ring electrodes embedded in the mantle of a cylindrical chamber is considered, in which the plasma in the anode and cathode regions rotates in opposite directions under the influence of an external axial magnetic field. The associated boundary-value problem for the coupled partial differential equations describing the azimuthal velocity and radial current-density fields is solved in closed form. The velocity, current density, induced magnetic induction, and electric fields are presented for typical Hartmann numbers, magnetic Reynolds numbers, and geometry parameters. The discharge is shown to produce anodic and cathodic plasma sections rotating at speeds of the order 1,000,000 cm/sec for conventional magnetic field intensities. Possible application of the magnetoactive discharge as a plasma centrifuge for isotope separation is discussed.

  5. METHOD OF CENTRIFUGE OPERATION

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, K.

    1960-05-10

    A method of isotope separation is described in which two streams are flowed axially of, and countercurrently through, a cylindrical centrifuge bowl. Under the influence of a centrifugal field, the light fraction is concentrated in a stream flowing through the central portion of the bowl, whereas the heavy fraction is concentrated in a stream at the periphery thereof.

  6. The plasma centrifuge (A compact, low cost, stable isotope separator). Progress report, [September 15, 1991--September 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Mark-I centrifuge assembly includes an electromagnet, a vacuum chamber, and a Nd:YAG laser. Three tasks have been completed: design, component order, and laboratory test cell preparation. Two task are being pursued: design plasma diagnostics/collection hardware/mass analyzers, and assemble Mark I centrifuge. Experiments with rotation of C plasmas will be conducted. 4 figs.

  7. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  8. Waves in Strong Centrifugal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarization and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modeling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  9. Stretch Marks

    MedlinePlus

    ... like during puberty), that person may get fine lines on the body called stretch marks. Stretch marks happen when the skin is pulled by rapid growth or stretching. Although the skin is usually fairly elastic, when it's overstretched, the normal production of collagen (the major protein that makes up ...

  10. Centrifuge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sartory, Walter K.; Eveleigh, John W.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for operating a continuous flow blood separation centrifuge are provided. The hematocrit of the entrant whole blood is continuously maintained at an optimum constant value by the addition of plasma to the entrant blood. The hematocrit of the separated red cells is monitored to indicate the degree of separation taking place, thereby providing a basis for regulating the flow through the centrifuge.

  11. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-09

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  12. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-01

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  13. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, L.S.; Leonard, R.A.

    1993-10-19

    A method is described for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor. 6 figures.

  14. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Lorac S.; Leonard, Ralph A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor.

  15. Gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bogovalov, S.V.; Kislov, V.A.; Tronin, I.V.

    2015-03-10

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarisation and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modelling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  16. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants D(J) or Δ(J).

    PubMed

    Bittner, Dror M; Walker, Nicholas R; Legon, Anthony C

    2016-02-21

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ (e) or ΔJ (e), the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ (e) or ΔJ (e) for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ (0) or ΔJ (0) for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ∼ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  17. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants DJ or ΔJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Dror M.; Walker, Nicholas R.; Legon, Anthony C.

    2016-02-01

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ e or ΔJ e , the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ e or ΔJ e for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ 0 or ΔJ 0 for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ˜ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  18. Stretched Loops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-16

    When an active region rotated over to the edge of the sun, it presented us with a nice profile view of its elongated loops stretching and swaying above it (Mar. 8-9, 2017). These loops are actually charged particles (made visible in extreme ultraviolet light) swirling along the magnetic field lines of the active region. The video covers about 30 hours of activity. Also of note is a darker twisting mass of plasma to the left of the active region being pulled and spun about by magnetic forces. Video is available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21562

  19. Waves in a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    Impact of the pulsed braking force on the axial gas circulation and gas content in centrifuges for uranium isotope separation was investigated by the method of numerical simulation. Pulsed brake of the rotating gas by the momentum source results into generation of the waves which propagate along the rotor of the centrifuge. The waves almost doubles the axial circulation flux in the working camera in compare with the case of the steady state breaking force with the same average power in the model under the consideration. Flux through the hole in the bottom baffle on 15% exceeds the flux in the stationary case for the same pressure and temperature in the model. We argue that the waves reduce the pressure in the GC on the same 15%.

  20. Gas centrifuge purge method

    DOEpatents

    Theurich, Gordon R.

    1976-01-01

    1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

  1. Centrifugal reciprocating compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient compressor uses centrifugal force to compress gas. System incorporates two coupled dc motors, each driving separate centrifugal reciprocating-compressor assembly. Motors are synchronized to accelerate and decelerate alternately.

  2. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  3. Get up and Stretch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crupi, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Daily stretching has many benefits for one's body. It can relieve stress and tension, it increases flexibility and it can help prevent injuries. There are many stretching exercises that a teacher can do with his or her students to help promote daily stretching routines. In this article, the author presents several stretching exercises and some…

  4. Get up and Stretch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crupi, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Daily stretching has many benefits for one's body. It can relieve stress and tension, it increases flexibility and it can help prevent injuries. There are many stretching exercises that a teacher can do with his or her students to help promote daily stretching routines. In this article, the author presents several stretching exercises and some…

  5. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  6. A biological safety centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Hall, C V

    1975-04-01

    The Washington State Public Health Laboratories has devised a metho to capture and remove aerosols produced during centrifugation. The method to adapt any centrifuge having an enclosed chamber with an air intake hole in the lid, and an exhaust hole in the bottom of the chamber, is discussed.

  7. Liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-03-11

    The performance of liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning is examined for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste Program currently under study at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Centrifugation might have application for the separation of the LiF-BeF{sub 2} salt from heavier radioactive materials fission product and actinides in the separation of fission product from actinides, in the isotope separation of fission-product cesium before transmutation of the {sup 137}Cs and {sup 135}Cs, and in the removal of spallation product from the liquid lead target. It is found that useful chemical separations should be possible using existing materials for the centrifuge construction for all four cases with the actinide fraction in fission product perhaps as low as 1 part in 10{sup 7} and the fraction of {sup 137}CS in {sup 133}Cs being as low as a few parts in 10{sup 5}. A centrifuge cascade has the advantage that it can be assembled and operated as a completely closed system without a waste stream except that associated with maintenance or replacement of centrifuge components.

  8. Centrifuge for SLS-1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1981-01-16

    S81-25565 (Feb 1981) --- Expected to be a busy item of flight hardware on the Spacelab Life Sciences (SLS-1) mission is this low-gravity centrifuge. To be flown onboard Columbia for STS-40, the centrifuge is able to simulate several gravity levels (0.5 g, 1.0 g, 1.5 g. and 2.0 g). Blood samples, taken during the flight, will be placed in the centrifuge, fixed for post flight analysis and transferred to a freezer.

  9. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  10. The American Gas Centrifuge Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Dean

    2004-09-15

    The art of gas centrifugation was born in 1935 at the University of Virginia when Dr. Jesse Beams demonstrated experimentally the separation of chlorine isotopes using an ultra-high speed centrifuge. Dr. Beam’s experiment initiated work that created a rich history of scientific and engineering accomplishment in the United States in the art of isotope separation and even large scale biological separation by centrifugation. The early history of the gas centrifuge development was captured in a lecture and documented by Dr. Jesse Beams in 1975. Much of Dr. Beams lecture material is used in this paper up to the year 1960. Following work by Dr. Gernot Zippe at the University of Virginia between 1958 and 1960, the US government embarked on a centrifuge development program that ultimately led to the start of construction of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant in Piketon Ohio in the late 1970’s. The government program was abandoned in 1985 after investing in the construction of two of six planned process buildings, a complete supply chain for process and centrifuge parts, and the successful manufacture and brief operation of an initial complement of production machines that would have met 15 percent of the planned capacity of the constructed process buildings. A declining market for enriched uranium, a glut of uranium enrichment capacity worldwide, and the promise of a new laser based separation process factored in the decision to stop the government program. By the late 1990’s it had become evident that gas centrifugation held the best promise to produce enriched uranium at low cost. In1999, the United States Enrichment Corporation undertook an initiative to revive the best of the American centrifuge technology that had been abandoned fourteen years earlier. This is an exciting story and one that when complete will enable the United States to maintain its domestic supply and to be highly competitive in the world market for this important energy commodity. (auth)

  11. Centrifugal main fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.F.

    1986-08-26

    For a gas turbine power plant having a fuel supply and a fuel metering valve and variable geometry for the power plant including servo actuating mechanisms for the fuel metering valve and variable geometry, a fuel pumping system, is described to supply pressurized fuel for the servo actuating mechanisms and for the engine working fluid medium. The pumping system includes a centrifugal pump solely supplying the fuel to the fuel metering valve to be delivered to the power plant for its working fluid medium, a positive displacement pump in parallel with the centrifugal pump and solely to supply pressurized fuel to the servo actuating mechanisms for the fuel metering valve and for the variable geometry, and a boost pump means disposed in serial relationship with the positive displacement pump and the centrifugal pump for augmenting the pressure supplied by the positive displacement pump and the centrifugal pump during predetermined operating conditions of the power plant. The combined boost pump and centrifugal pump capability is sufficient to satisfy the vapor to liquid ratio requirements of the power during its entire operating envelope.

  12. Stretched Wire Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Gordon; /SLAC

    2005-09-06

    Stretched wires are beginning to play an important role in the alignment of accelerators and synchrotron light sources. Stretched wires are proposed for the alignment of the 130 meter long LCLS undulator. Wire position technology has reached sub-micron resolution yet analyses of perturbations to wire straightness are hard to find. This paper considers possible deviations of stretched wire from the simple 2-dimensional catenary form.

  13. Attack on centrifugal costs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.F.

    1986-03-01

    The Monsanto Chocolate Bayou plant has had an aggressive and successful energy conservation program. The combined efforts have resulted in a 80% reduction in unit energy consumption compared to 1972. The approach of using system audits to optimize fluid systems was developed. Since most of the fluid movers are centrifugal, the name Centrifugal Savings Task Force was adopted. There are three tools that are particularly valuable in optimizing fluid systems. First, a working level understanding of the Affinity Laws seems a must. In addition, the performance curves for the fluid movers is needed. The last need is accurate system field data. Systems effectively managed at the Chocolate Bayou plant were process air improvement, feed-water pressure reduction, combustion air blower turbine speed control, and cooling tower pressure reduction. Optimization of centrifugal systems is an often-overlooked opportunity for energy savings. The basic guidelines are to move only the fluid needed, and move it at as low a pressure as possible.

  14. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  15. Geotechnical centrifuge under construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Modifications are underway at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in California to transform a centrifuge used in the Apollo space program to the largest geotechnical centrifuge in the free world. The centrifuge, to be finished in August and opened next January, following check out and tuning, will enable geoscientists to model stratigraphic features down to 275 m below the earth's surface. Scientists will be able to model processes that are coupled with body force loading, including earthquake response of earth structures and soil structure interaction; rubbled-bed behavior during in situ coal gasification or in oil shale in situ retorts; behavior of frozen soil; frost heave; behavior of offshore structures; wave-seabed interactions; explosive cratering; and blast-induced liquefaction.The centrifuge will have a load capacity of 900-g-tons (short); that is, it will be able to carry a net soil load of 3 short tons to a centripetal acceleration of 300 times the acceleration caused by gravity. Modified for a total cost of $2.4 million, the centrifuge will have an arm with a 7.6-m radius and a swinging platform or bucket at its end that will be able to carry a payload container measuring 2.1×2.1 m. An additional future input of $500,000 would enable the purchase of a larger bucket that could accommodate a load of up to 20 tons, according to Charles Babendreier, program director for geotechnical engineering at the National Science Foundation. Additional cooling for the motor would also be required. The centrifuge has the capability of accelerating the 20-ton load to 100 g.

  16. Centrifugal projectile launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, F. S.

    1982-01-01

    The concept of a centrifugal projectile launcher as an alternative to both chemical and electromagnetic launchers for anti-tank and air defence systems is discussed. It is shown that centrifugal projectile launchers can provide reliable, efficient, compact systems that will accelerate projectiles to 2-3 km/s with energies up to one megajoule. State-of-the-art composite rotors can be modified to launch projectiles of tens of grams to the order of 1 km/s. A demonstration rotor with reasonable energy density can be designed to accelerate 60 gram projectiles to 3 km/s repetitively.

  17. Stretching: Does It Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  18. Stretching: Does It Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  19. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  20. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  1. Stretch Garment Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mihan, Richard; Ayres, Samuel

    1968-01-01

    A disease of the skin, not hitherto described, is caused by pressure or tension on the skin from the wearing of tight-fitting stretch garments such as “stretch bras,” “stretch girdles” and “stretch socks.” The condition is not due to chemical sensitization of fabrics, dyes or other additives but is of mechanical origin. The eruption may assume various clinical forms and may be characterized by a nondescript erythematous and eczematous appearance or may consist of an exaggeration, in the areas covered by the stretch garment, of already existing dermatosis such as lichen planus, psoriasis, acne vulgaris, discoid lupus erythematosus or atopic dermatitis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:5639939

  2. Lightweight Shield for Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luper, C.

    1982-01-01

    Centrifuge bowl composed of laminated aluminum offers required combination of high strength at reduced weight. Around outside wall of bowl core of 1/16 inch thick spun aluminum are wrapped two layers of aluminum, each also one-sixteenth inch thick. Layered structure prevents cracks from propagating through wall.

  3. Centrifuge pump selection

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, M.W.

    1985-12-01

    Selection of a centrifuge pump is addressed. The problem of assessing pump needs based on system design is broken down into a step-by-step approach. Topics included are designing the pump system, calculating such pressure NPSH, and building in a safety factor.

  4. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  5. Centrifugal Gas Compression Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fultun, Roy

    2002-11-01

    A centrifuged gas of kinetic, elastic hard spheres compresses isothermally and without flow of heat in a process that reverses free expansion. This theorem follows from stated assumptions via a collection of thought experiments, theorems and other supporting results, and it excludes application of the reversible mechanical adiabatic power law in this context. The existence of an isothermal adiabatic centrifugal compression process makes a three-process cycle possible using a fixed sample of the working gas. The three processes are: adiabatic mechanical expansion and cooling against a piston, isothermal adiabatic centrifugal compression back to the original volume, and isochoric temperature rise back to the original temperature due to an influx of heat. This cycle forms the basis for a Thomson perpetuum mobile that induces a loop of energy flow in an isolated system consisting of a heat bath connectable by a thermal path to the working gas, a mechanical extractor of the gas's internal energy, and a device that uses that mechanical energy and dissipates it as heat back into the heat bath. We present a simple experimental procedure to test the assertion that adiabatic centrifugal compression is isothermal. An energy budget for the cycle provides a criterion for breakeven in the conversion of heat to mechanical energy.

  6. Enhancing Centrifugal Separation With Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Separation of biological cells by coil-planet centrifuge enhanced by electrophoresis. By itself, coil-planet centrifuge offers relatively gentle method of separating cells under low centrifugal force in physiological medium that keeps cells alive. With addition of voltage gradient to separation column of centrifuge, separation still gentle but faster and more complete. Since separation apparatus contains no rotary seal, probability of leakage, contamination, corrosion, and short circuits reduced.

  7. The Human Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jack J. W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Life on Earth has developed at unit gravity, 9.81 m/s2, which was a major factor especially when vertebrates emerged from water onto land in the late Devonian, some 375 million years ago. But how would nature have evolved on a larger planet? We are able to address this question simply in experiments using centrifuges. Based on these studies we have gained valuable insights in the physiological process in plants and animals. They adapt to a new steady state suitable for the high-g environments applied. Information on mammalian adaptations to hyper-g is interesting or may be even vital for human space exploration programs. It has been shown in long duration animal hypergravity studies, ranging from snails, rats to primates, that various structures like muscles, bones, neuro-vestibular, or the cardio-vascular system are affected. However, humans have never been exposed to a hyper-g environment for long durations. Centrifuge studies involving humans are mostly in the order of hours. The current work on human centrifuges are all focused on short arm systems to apply short periods of artificial gravity in support of long duration space missions in ISS or to Mars. In this paper we will address the possible usefulness of a large human centrifuge on Earth. In such a centrifuge a group of humans can be exposed to hypergravity for, in principle, an unlimited period of time like living on a larger planet. The input from a survey under scientists working in the field of gravitational physiology, but also other disciplines, will be discussed.

  8. Centrifugal unbalance detection system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Reeves, George; Mets, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A system consisting of an accelerometer sensor attached to a centrifuge enclosure for sensing vibrations and outputting a signal in the form of a sine wave with an amplitude and frequency that is passed through a pre-amp to convert it to a voltage signal, a low pass filter for removing extraneous noise, an A/D converter and a processor and algorithm for operating on the signal, whereby the algorithm interprets the amplitude and frequency associated with the signal and once an amplitude threshold has been exceeded the algorithm begins to count cycles during a predetermined time period and if a given number of complete cycles exceeds the frequency threshold during the predetermined time period, the system shuts down the centrifuge.

  9. Centrifugally decoupling touchdown bearings

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2014-06-24

    Centrifugally decoupling mechanical bearing systems provide thin tensioned metallic ribbons contained in a support structure. This assembly rotates around a stationary shaft being centered at low speeds by the action of the metal ribbons. Tension springs are connected on one end to the ribbons and on the other end to the support structure. The ribbons pass through slots in the inner ring of the support structure. The spring preloading thus insures contact (or near-contact) between the ribbons and the shaft at rotation speeds below the transition speed. Above this speed, however, the centrifugal force on the ribbons produces a tensile force on them that exceeds the spring tensile force so that the ribbons curve outward, effectively decoupling them from mechanical contact with the shaft. They still remain, however, in position to act as a touchdown bearing in case of abnormally high transverse accelerations.

  10. Centrifugal pump fuel system

    SciTech Connect

    McGlone, M.E.; Larkins, L.J.; Johnson, R.O.; Moeller, K.A.

    1993-06-22

    A centrifugal pump fuel system for an engine driven fuel pump for an aircraft gas turbine engine is described comprising: a centrifugal pump having at constant speed rising head/flow characteristic at low flows; a plumbing system receiving flow from the pump, and having at least one control valve located down stream of and defining a discrete volume of the plumbing system; a plumbing resonant frequency defined by the discrete volume, the geometry of the plumbing system, and the bulk modulus of the fuel; a pressure difference regulating valve located adjacent to the discharge of the pump, up stream of the vast majority of the discrete volume; and the frequency response of the regulating valve being significantly less than the frequency response of the plumbing system such that the response of the regulating valve is attenuated at the resonant frequency of the plumbing system.

  11. Triceps stretch (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder. Hold for 10 to 20 seconds, then switch sides. Alternate method: raise your arm over your ... elbow. Hold for 10 to 20 seconds, then switch sides. You should feel either of these stretches ...

  12. Biocatalysis: Unmasked by stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2009-09-01

    The biocatalytic activity of enzyme-loaded responsive layer-by-layer films can be switched on and off by simple mechanical stretching. Soft materials could thus be used to trigger biochemical reactions under mechanical action, with potential therapeutic applications.

  13. Centrifugal Contactor Efficiency Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, Bruce Jay; Tillotson, Richard Dean; Grimes, Travis Shane

    2017-01-01

    The contactor efficiency of a 2-cm acrylic centrifugal contactor, fabricated by ANL using 3D printer technology was measured by comparing a contactor test run to 5-min batch contacts. The aqueous phase was ~ 3 ppm depleted uranium in 3 M HNO3, and the organic phase was 1 M DAAP/dodecane. Sampling during the contactor run showed that equilibrium was achieved within < 3 minutes. The contactor efficiency at equilibrium was 95% to 100 %, depending on flowrate.

  14. Pumps, Centrifugal and Reciprocating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-27

    reciprocating pumps. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Centrifugal pump Total discharge head Reciprocating pump Total suction head Head 16. SECURITY ... CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 40 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT B...Satisfy the needs of MIL-STD-4612. High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse ( HEMP ) Test Facility Satisfy the needs of MIL-STD-461. Rail Impact Test

  15. Centrifugal adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Tsao, Yow-Min D. (Inventor); Lee, Wenshan (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A gas-liquid separator uses a helical passageway to impart a spiral motion to a fluid passing therethrough. The centrifugal force generated by the spiraling motion urges the liquid component of the fluid radially outward which forces the gas component radially inward. The gas component is then separated through a gas-permeable, liquid-impervious membrane and discharged through a central passageway. A filter material captures target substances contained in the fluid.

  16. Gas Centrifuges and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, David

    2004-09-15

    Gas centrifuges have been an ideal enrichment method for a wide variety of countries. Many countries have built gas centrifuges to make enriched uranium for peaceful nuclear purposes. Other countries have secretly sought centrifuges to make highly enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. In more recent times, several countries have secretly sought or built gas centrifuges in regions of tension. The main countries that have been of interest in the last two decades have been Pakistan, Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. Currently, most attention is focused on Iran, Pakistan, and North Korea. These states did not have the indigenous abilities to make gas centrifuges, focusing instead on illicit and questionable foreign procurement. The presentation covered the following main sections: Spread of centrifuges through illicit procurement; Role of export controls in stopping proliferation; Increasing the transparency of gas centrifuge programs in non-nuclear weapon states; and, Verified dismantlement of gas centrifuge programs. Gas centrifuges are important providers of low enriched uranium for civil nuclear power reactors. They also pose special nuclear proliferation risks. We all have special responsibilities to prevent the spread of gas centrifuges into regions of tension and to mitigate the consequences of their spread into the Middle East, South Asia, and North Asia.

  17. Optimizing the separation performance of a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, H. G.

    1997-11-01

    Gas centrifuges were originally developed for the enrichment of U^235 from naturally occurring uranium for the purpose of providing fuel for nuclear power reactors and material for nuclear weapons. This required the separation of a binary mixture composed of U^235 and U^238. Since the end of the cold war, a surplus of enriched uranium exists on the world market, but many centrifuge plants exist in numerous countries. These circumstances together with the growing demand for stable isotopes for chemical and physical research and in medical science has led to the exploration of alternate applications of gas centrifuge technology. In order to acieve these multi-component separations, existing centrifuges must be modified or new centrifuges must be designed. In either case, it is important to have models of the internal flow fields to predict the separation performance and algorithms to seek the optimal operating conditions of the centrifuges. Here, we use the Onsager pancake model of the internal flow field, and we present an optimization strategy which exploits a similarity parameter in the pancake model. Numerical examples will be presented.

  18. Simulating the effect of centrifugal forces in rapidly rotating magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M. F.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Walker, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Centrifugal forces play an important role in the dynamics of rapidly rotating magnetospheres such as Jupiter and Saturn. For example, at Jupiter, centrifugal stresses are thought to be the dominant factor in driving the release of mass and energy from the system. It has also been proposed that the effects of rotation and field line stretching can explain local time asymmetries in the thickness of Jupiter's plasma sheet. Observations show that Jupiter's plasma sheet is thinnest in the post-midnight to dawn local time sectors, thickens as it rotates through the morning sector through noon, and becomes thickest near dusk. Kivelson and Southwood [2005] attributed the dusk side plasma sheet heating and thickening to centrifugal forces due to Jupiter's rapid rotation, suggesting that as a result of rotation, low energy particles gain parallel velocity as they move radially outward, and the resulting anisotropy makes the plasma sheet become unstable. We have developed a large-scale kinetic (LSK) simulation [Ashour-Abdalla et al., 1992] to test the key physical processes in this idea that rotation and field line stretching can produce an increase in net energy and particle anisotropy. In this simulation the Jovian magnetic field is represented by a simplified, axisymmetric version of the Khurana [1997] field, which we vary in time to reproduce the stretching that occurs as field lines rotate from noon to dusk. Here we will present the most recent results from this simulation project. Because we are testing only the key physical processes, our findings should help us understand the effects of rapid rotation and centrifugal stresses at both Jupiter and Saturn.

  19. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Stepan; Bradley G. Stevens; Melanie D. Hetland

    1999-10-01

    The overall project consists of several integrated research phases related to the applicability, continued development, demonstration, and commercialization of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration process. Work performed during this reporting period consisted of Phase 2 evaluation of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration technology and Phase 3, Technology Partnering. During Phase 1 testing conducted at the EERC using the SpinTek ST-IIL unit operating on a surrogate tank waste, a solids cake developed on the membrane surface. The solids cake was observed where linear membrane velocities were less than 17.5 ft/s and reduced the unobstructed membrane surface area up to 25%, reducing overall filtration performance. The primary goal of the Phase 2 research effort was to enhance filtration performance through the development and testing of alternative turbulence promoter designs. The turbulence promoters were designed to generate a shear force across the entire membrane surface sufficient to maintain a self-cleaning membrane capability and improve filtration efficiency and long-term performance. Specific Phase 2 research activities included the following: System modifications to accommodate an 11-in.-diameter, two-disk rotating membrane assembly; Development and fabrication of alternative turbulence promoter designs; Testing and evaluation of the existing and alternative turbulence promoters under selected operating conditions using a statistically designed test matrix; and Data reduction and analysis; The objective of Phase 3 research was to demonstrate the effectiveness of SpinTek's centrifugal membrane filtration as a pretreatment to remove suspended solids from a liquid waste upstream of 3M's WWL cartridge technology for the selective removal of technetium (Tc).

  20. National geotechnical centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, J. A.; Kunz, N.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    A high G-ton centrifuge, able to take a 2700 kg (6000 lb) payload up to 300 G, is described. The stability of dams and embankments, the bearing capacity of soil foundations, and the dynamic behavior of foundations due to vibration of machinery are examples of applications. A power rating of 6,000 kW (9,000 hp) was established for the motor. An acceptable maximum speed of 70 rpm was determined. A speed increase with a ratio of 1:3 is discussed. The isolated tension straps, the anti-spreader bar and the flexwall bucket, and safety precautions are also discussed.

  1. National geotechnical centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallam, J. A.; Kunz, N.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1982-05-01

    A high G-ton centrifuge, able to take a 2700 kg (6000 lb) payload up to 300 G, is described. The stability of dams and embankments, the bearing capacity of soil foundations, and the dynamic behavior of foundations due to vibration of machinery are examples of applications. A power rating of 6,000 kW (9,000 hp) was established for the motor. An acceptable maximum speed of 70 rpm was determined. A speed increase with a ratio of 1:3 is discussed. The isolated tension straps, the anti-spreader bar and the flexwall bucket, and safety precautions are also discussed.

  2. Pea Chaperones under Centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalaiev, Oleksandr

    2008-06-01

    Etiolated Pisum sativum seedlings were subjected to altered g-forces by centrifugation (3-14g). By using semiquantitative RT-PCR, we studied transcripts of pea genes coding for chaperones that are representatives of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) family. Four members from the different classes of sHsps: cytosolic Hsp17.7 and Hsp18.1 (class I and class II accordingly), chloroplast Hsp21 (class III) and endoplasmic reticulum Hsp22.7 (class IV) were investigated. We conclude that exposure to 3, 7, 10 and 14g for 1h did not affect the level of sHsp transcripts.

  3. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  4. Centrifugal-reciprocating compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor is described which includes at least one pair of cylinders arranged in coaxial alignment and supported for angular displacement about a common axis of rotation normally disecting a common longitudinal axis of symmetry for the cylinders. The cylinders are characterized by ported closures located at the mutually remote ends thereof through which the cylinders are charged and discharged, and a pair of piston heads seated within the cylinders and supported for floating displacement in compressive strokes in response to unidirectional angular displacement imparted to the cylinders.

  5. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  6. Centrifugal shot blast system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a demonstration of Concrete cleaning, Inc., modified centrifugal shot blast technology to remove the paint coating from concrete flooring. This demonstration is part of the Chicago Pile-5 (CP-5) Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) CP-5 Research Reactor. The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources can result in significant benefits, such as decreased cost and increased health and safety, as compared with baseline D and D technologies. Potential markets exist for the innovative centrifugal shot blast system at the following sites: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Los Alamos, Nevada, Oak Ridge Y-12 and K-25, Paducah, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion site, and the Savannah River Site. This information is based on a revision to the OST Linkage Tables dated August 4, 1997.

  7. Centrifugal precipitation chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoichiro; Qi, Lin

    2010-01-15

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography separates analytes according their solubility in ammonium sulfate (AS) solution and other precipitants. The separation column is made from a pair of long spiral channels partitioned with a semipermeable membrane. In a typical separation, concentrated ammonium sulfate is eluted through one channel while water is eluted through the other channel in the opposite direction. This countercurrent process forms an exponential AS concentration gradient through the water channel. Consequently, protein samples injected into the water channel is subjected to a steadily increasing AS concentration and at the critical AS concentration they are precipitated and deposited in the channel bed by the centrifugal force. Then the chromatographic separation is started by gradually reducing the AS concentration in the AS channel which lowers the AS gradient concentration in the water channel. This results in dissolution of deposited proteins which are again precipitated at an advanced critical point as they move through the channel. Consequently, proteins repeat precipitation and dissolution through a long channel and finally eluted out from the column in the order of their solubility in the AS solution. The present method has been successfully applied to a number of analytes including human serum proteins, recombinant ketosteroid isomerase, carotenoid cleavage enzymes, plasmid DNA, polysaccharide, polymerized pigments, PEG-protein conjugates, etc. The method is capable to single out the target species of proteins by affinity ligand or immunoaffinity separation.

  8. Centrifuge treatment of coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Kazak; V.Z. Kaidalov; L.F. Syrova; O.S. Miroshnichenko; A.S. Minakov

    2009-07-15

    New technology is required for the removal of water and heavy fractions from regular coal tar. Centrifuges offer the best option. Purification of coal tar by means of centrifuges at OAO NLMK permits the production of pitch coke or electrode pitch that complies with current standards.

  9. Unshrouded Centrifugal Turbopump Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prueger, George; Williams, Morgan; Chen, Wei; Paris, John; Stewart, Eric; Williams, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The ratio of rocket engine thrust to weight is a limiting constraint in placing more payload into orbit at a low cost. A key component of an engine's overall weight is the turbopump weight, Reducing the turbopump weight can result in significant engine weight reduction and hence, increased delivered payload. There are two main types of pumps: centrifugal and axial pumps. These types of pumps can be further sub-divided into those with shrouds and those without shrouds (unshrouded pumps). Centrifugal pumps can achieve the same pump discharge pressure as an axial pump and it requires fewer pump stages and lower pump weight than an axial pump. Also, with unshrouded centrifugal pumps (impeller), the number of stages and weight can be further reduced. However. there are several issues with regard to using an unshrouded impeller: 1) there is a pump performance penalty due to the front open face recirculation flow; 2) there is a potential pump axial thrust problem from the unbalanced front open face and the back shroud face; and, 3) since test data is very linu'ted for this configuration, there is uncertainty in the magnitude and phase of the rotordynamics forces due to the front impeller passage. The purpose of the paper is to discuss the design of an unshrouded impeller and to examine the design's hydrodynamic performance, axial thrust, and rotordynamics performance. The design methodology will also be discussed. This work will help provide some guidelines for unshrouded impeller design. In particular, the paper will discuss the design of three unshrouded impellers - one with 5 full and 5 partial blades (5+5). one with 6+6 blades and one with 8+8 blades. One of these designs will be selected for actual fabrication and flow test. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to help design and optimize the unshrouded impeller. The relative pump performance penalty is assessed by comparing the CFD results of the unshrouded impeller with the equivalent shrouded impeller for a

  10. Rat growth during chronic centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Oyama, J.

    1978-01-01

    Female weanling rats were chronically centrifuged at 4.15 G with controls at terrestrial gravity. Samples were sacrificed for body composition studies at 0, 28, 63, 105 and 308 days of centrifugation. The centrifuged group approached a significantly lower mature body mass than the controls (251 and 318g) but the rate of approach was the same in both groups. Retirement to 1G on the 60th day resulted in complete recovery. Among individual components muscle, bone, skin, CNS, heart, kidneys, body water and body fat were changed in the centrifuged group. However, an analysis of the growth of individual components relative to growth of the total fat-free compartment revealed that only skin (which increased in mass) was responding to centrifugation per se.

  11. Rat growth during chronic centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Oyama, J.

    1978-01-01

    Female weanling rats were chronically centrifuged at 4.15 G with controls at terrestrial gravity. Samples were sacrificed for body composition studies at 0, 28, 63, 105 and 308 days of centrifugation. The centrifuged group approached a significantly lower mature body mass than the controls (251 and 318g) but the rate of approach was the same in both groups. Retirement to 1G on the 60th day resulted in complete recovery. Among individual components muscle, bone, skin, CNS, heart, kidneys, body water and body fat were changed in the centrifuged group. However, an analysis of the growth of individual components relative to growth of the total fat-free compartment revealed that only skin (which increased in mass) was responding to centrifugation per se.

  12. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  13. Immunoaffinity centrifugal precipitation chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lin; Ito, Yoichiro

    2007-06-01

    Purification of proteins based on immunoaffinity has been performed using a solid support coated with antibody against the target proteins. The method requires immobilizing the antibody onto the solid support using protein A or G, and has a risk of adsorptive loss of target proteins onto the solid support. Centrifugal precipitation chromatography has been successfully used to purify enzymes, such as ketosteroid isomerase and hyaluronidase without the use of solid support. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that immunoaffinity centrifugal precipitation chromatography is capable of isolating an antigen by exploiting antigen-antibody binding. The separation was initiated by filling both channels with 40% saturated ammonium sulfate (AS) of pH 4-4.5 followed by loading 20 microl of human plasma (National Institutes of Health blood bank) mixed with 2 mg of rabbit anti-HSA (human serum protein) antibody (Sigma). Then, the sample channel was eluted with water at 0.03 ml/min and AS channel with 40% AS solution of pH 4-4.5 at 1 ml/min until all non-binding components were eluted. Then, the releasing reagent (50% AS solution containing 0.5 M glycine and 10% ammonium hydroxide at pH 10) was introduced through the AS channel to release the target protein (HSA). The retained antibody was recovered by eluting the sample channel with water at 1 ml/min. A hollow fiber membrane device at the outlet (MicroKros, Spectrum, New Brunswick, NJ, USA) was provided on-line dialysis of the eluent before fractions were collected, so that the fractions could be analyzed by SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) without further dialysis. The current method does not require immobilizing the antibody onto a matrix, which is used by the conventional immunoaffinity chromatography. This method ensures full recovery of the antigen and antibody, and it may be applied to purification of other proteins.

  14. Stretching & Flexibility: An Interactive Encyclopedia of Stretching. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This CD-ROM offers 140 different stretches in full-motion video sequences. It focuses on the proper techniques for overall physical fitness, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 23 different sports (e.g., golf, running, soccer, skiing, climbing, football, and baseball). Topics include stretching for sports; stretching awareness and education…

  15. Stretching & Flexibility: An Interactive Encyclopedia of Stretching. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This CD-ROM offers 140 different stretches in full-motion video sequences. It focuses on the proper techniques for overall physical fitness, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 23 different sports (e.g., golf, running, soccer, skiing, climbing, football, and baseball). Topics include stretching for sports; stretching awareness and education…

  16. Stretched Inertial Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Seon, Thomas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Liquid jets often arise as short-lived bursting liquid flows. Cavitation or impact-driven jets, bursting champagne bubbles, shaped-charge jets, ballistospores or drop-on-demand inkjet printing are a few examples where liquid jets are suddenly released. The trademark of all these discharge jets is the property of being stretched, due to the quenching injection. the present theoretical and experimental investigation, the structure of the jet flow field will be unraveled experimentally for a few emblematic occurrences of discharge jets. Though the injection markedly depends on each flow configuration, the jet velocity field will be shown to be systematically and rapidly attracted to the universal stretching flow z/t. The emergence of this inertial attractor actually only relies on simple kinematic ingredients, and as such is fairly generic. The universality of the jet velocity structure will be discussed.

  17. Stretch-Oriented Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Klinedinst, D.; Feuz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Two thermoplastic polyimides - one amorphous, the other crystallizable -- were subjected to isothermal stretching just above their glass transition temperatures. Room-temperature strengths in the stretch direction were greatly improved and, moduli increased up to 3.6-fold. Optimum stretching conditions were determined.

  18. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  19. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  20. Centrifugal pump impeller

    SciTech Connect

    Lovisetto, P.

    1988-01-19

    An impeller for a centrifugal pump is described comprising: a rotatable impeller shaft; circumferentially spaced vanes mounted for rotation with the impeller shaft, the vanes extending outwardly relative to the impeller shaft and each including first and second axially-spaced edges; first and second axially-spaced cover members for vanes, the cover members being mounted for rotation with the impeller shaft and extending outwardly relative to the axial direction of the impeller shaft, the first cover member being disposed adjacent to the first edges of the vanes and the second cover member being disposed adjacent to the second edges of the vanes so as to provide an impeller chamber between the first and second cover members which is divided into subchambers by the vanes. One of the first and second cover members has a centrally disposed inlet opening therethrough for admitting fluid into the impeller chamber to then be conducted outwardly upon rotation of the impeller shaft; and the fist cover member being so constructed and mounted relative to the vanes that a portion thereof is free to flex axially away from respective portions of the first edges of the vanes in response to fluid pressure pulsations within the impeller chamber to temporarily increase the distance between the portion of the first cover and the respective portions of the first edges of the vanes.

  1. HOUSINGS AND MOUNTINGS FOR CENTRIFUGES

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-08-16

    A protective housing for a gas centrifuge comprises a slidable connection between flanges and framework portions for absorbing rotational energy in case of bursting of the rotor and a sealing means for sealing the rotor chamber.

  2. Centrifugal dryers keep pace with the market

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-03-15

    New plant design and upgrades create a shift in dewatering strategies. The article describes recent developments. Three major manufacturers supply centrifugal dryers - TEMA, Centrifugal & Mechanical Industries (CMI) and Ludowici. CMI introduced a line of vertical centrifugal dryers. TEMA improved the techniques by developing a horizontal vibratory centrifuge (HVC) which simplified maintenance. 3 figs., 1 photo.

  3. Microwave assisted centrifuge and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    Centrifuge samples may be exposed to microwave energy to heat the samples during centrifugation and to promote separation of the different components or constituents of the samples using a centrifuge device configured for generating microwave energy and directing the microwave energy at a sample located in the centrifuge.

  4. Variable-Speed Instrumented Centrifuges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, David K.; Brown, Allan H.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes conceptual pair of centrifuges, speed of which varied to produce range of artificial gravities in zero-gravity environment. Image and data recording and controlled temperature and gravity provided for 12 experiments. Microprocessor-controlled centrifuges include video cameras to record stop-motion images of experiments. Potential applications include studies of effect of gravity on growth and on production of hormones in corn seedlings, experiments with magnetic flotation to separate cells, and electrophoresis to separate large fragments of deoxyribonucleic acid.

  5. Variable-Speed Instrumented Centrifuges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, David K.; Brown, Allan H.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes conceptual pair of centrifuges, speed of which varied to produce range of artificial gravities in zero-gravity environment. Image and data recording and controlled temperature and gravity provided for 12 experiments. Microprocessor-controlled centrifuges include video cameras to record stop-motion images of experiments. Potential applications include studies of effect of gravity on growth and on production of hormones in corn seedlings, experiments with magnetic flotation to separate cells, and electrophoresis to separate large fragments of deoxyribonucleic acid.

  6. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  7. Stretching cells with DEAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, S.; Rosset, S.; Shea, H. R.

    2012-04-01

    Biological cells regulate their biochemical behavior in response to mechanical stress present in their organism. Most of the available cell cultures designed to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on cells are cm2 area, far too large to monitor single cell response or have a very low throughput. We have developed two sets of high throughput single cell stretcher devices based on dielectric elastomer microactuators to stretch groups of individual cells with various strain levels in a single experiment. The first device consists of an array of 100 μm x 200 μm actuators on a non-stretched PDMS membrane bonded to a Pyrex chip, showing up to 4.7% strain at the electric field of 96 V/μm. The second device contains an array of 100 μm x 100 μm actuators on a 160% uniaxially prestretched PDMS membrane suspended over a frame. 37% strain is recorded at the nominal electric field of 114 V/μm. The performance of these devices as a cell stretcher is assessed by comparing their static and dynamic behavior.

  8. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    William A. Greene; Patricia A. Kirk; Richard Hayes; Joshua Riley

    2005-10-28

    SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, has engineered and developed a system for use within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. SpinTek II High Shear Rotary Membrane Filtration System is a unique compact crossflow membrane system that has large, demonstrable advantages in performance and cost compared to currently available systems: (1) High fluid shear prevents membrane fouling even with very high solids content; hazardous and radioactive components can be concentrated to the consistency of a pasty slurry without fouling. (2) Induced turbulence and shear across the membrane increases membrane flux by a factor of ten over existing systems and allows operation on fluids not otherwise treatable. (3) Innovative ceramic membrane and mechanical sealing technology eliminates compatibility problems with aggressive DOE waste streams. (4) System design allows rapid, simple disassembly for inspection or complete decontamination. (5) Produces colloidal- and suspended-solids-free filtrate without the addition of chemicals. The first phase of this project (PRDA maturity stage 5) completed the physical scale-up of the SpinTek unit and verified successful scale-up with surrogate materials. Given successful scale-up and DOE concurrence, the second phase of this project (PRDA maturity stage 6) will provide for the installation and

  9. Perceived radial translation during centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Bos, Jelte E; Correia Grácio, Bruno J

    2015-01-01

    Linear acceleration generally gives rise to translation perception. Centripetal acceleration during centrifugation, however, has never been reported giving rise to a radial, inward translation perception. To study whether centrifugation can induce a radial translation perception in the absence of visual cues. To that end, we exposed 12 subjects to a centripetal acceleration with eyes closed. To avoid confounding with angular motion perception, subjects were fist rotated on-axis, and were shifted out fast and slow only after rotation sensation had vanished. They were asked for translation direction and velocity right after the shift-out, as well as after about 60 seconds of constant centrifugation. Independent of fast or slow shift-out, the vast statistically significant majority of trials yielded an inward radial translation perception, which velocity was constant after 60 seconds of constant centrifugation. We therefore conclude that during centrifugation, an inward radial translation perception does exist in humans, which perception reaches a constant, non-zero value during constant rotation, lasting for at least one minute. These results can be understood by high-pass filtering of otolith afferents to make a distinction between inertial and gravitational acceleration, followed by a mere integration over time to reach a constant velocity perception.

  10. Hydrodynamic drive of tubular centrifuges

    SciTech Connect

    Tsybul'nik, A.P.

    1986-07-01

    A drive has been developed for a tubular centrifuge having a 10 kW ASTs-10-504 high-frequency electric motor with a synchronous rotation speed of 15,000 rpm. Despite a few demerits, the drive met the basic production requirements; simplicity and reliability of design, admissable rotation speed, and explosion resistance. However, this drive for tubular centrifuges had to be abandoned because experimental prototypes of high-frequency motors were used for the industrial tests and lot production of such motors is not probable in the near future. Industrial tests of a new hydrodynamic drive were performed, and the schematic diagram is shown. The hydrodrive was tested during centrifuge operation with polyester lac. It was found that the hydodynamic drive is distinguished by operational reliability and easy serviceability, holds promise for increased centrifuge speed, ensures smooth start of the centrifuge and satisfactory stability of the rotor rotation speed in the steady regime, reliably protects the motor from overloading and is fully explosion-proof.

  11. Centrifuge-Based Fluidic Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoval, Jim; Jia, Guangyao; Kido, Horacio; Kim, Jitae; Kim, Nahui; Madou, Marc

    In this chapter centrifuge-based microfluidic platforms are reviewed and compared with other popular microfluidic propulsion methods. The underlying physical principles of centrifugal pumping in microfluidic systems are presented and the various centrifuge fluidic functions such as valving, decanting, calibration, mixing, metering, heating, sample splitting, and separation are introduced. Those fluidic functions have been combined with analytical measurements techniques such as optical imaging, absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to make the centrifugal platform a powerful solution for medical and clinical diagnostics and high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery. Applications of a compact disc (CD)-based centrifuge platform analyzed in this review include: two-point calibration of an optode-based ion sensor, an automated immunoassay platform, multiple parallel screening assays and cellular-based assays. The use of modified commercial CD drives for high-resolution optical imaging is discussed as well. From a broader perspective, we compare the technical barriers involved in applying microfluidics for sensing and diagnostic as opposed to applying such techniques to HTS. The latter poses less challenges and explains why HTS products based on a CD fluidic platform are already commercially available, while we might have to wait longer to see commercial CD-based diagnostics.

  12. Hemolysis in different centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Kawahito, K; Nosé, Y

    1997-04-01

    Different types of centrifugal pumps cause different amounts of hemolysis based on shear stress and blood exposure time. However, the hemolytic characteristics of centrifugal pumps in each clinical condition are not always clear. We compared the hemolytic characteristics of one cone-type centrifugal pump (Medtronic BioMedicus BP-80) and 2 impeller-type centrifugal pumps (Nikkiso HMS-12 and Terumo Capiox) under experimental conditions simulating their use in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) as well as their use as left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). The normalized indexes of hemolysis (NIHs; grams free plasma hemoglobin per 100 L blood pumped) during use as LVADs were not significantly different among the 3 pumps. The BP-80 pump produced almost 3-fold more hemolysis than the HMS-12 and Capiox pumps during CPB, 3- to 4-fold more hemolysis during ECMO, and 5.5-fold more hemolysis during PCPS. The 2 impeller-type centrifugal pumps will therefore cause less hemolysis under high flow, high pressure difference (as in CPB) and low flow, high pressure difference (as in ECMO and PCPS) conditions than the cone-type pump.

  13. Centrifugal slip casting of components

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlage, G.A.; Roeder, R.K.; Trumble, K.P.; Bowman, K.J.

    1996-05-01

    Research in layered and functionally gradient materials has emerged because of the increasing demand for high-performance engineering materials. Many techniques have been used to produce layered and functionally gradient components. Common examples include thermal spray processing, powder processing, chemical and physical vapor deposition, high-temperature or combustion synthesis, diffusion treatments, microwave processing and infiltration. Of these techniques, powder processing routes offer excellent microstructural control and product quality, and they are capable of producing large components. Centrifugal slip casting is a powder-processing technique combining the effects of slip casting and centrifugation. In slip casting, consolidation takes place as fluid is removed by the porous mold. Particles within the slip move with the suspending fluid until reaching the mold wall, at which point they are consolidated. In centrifugation, particles within the slip move through the fluid at a rate dependent upon the gravitational force and particle drag.

  14. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-05-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  15. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-04-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  16. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  17. Simple method of DNA stretching on glass substrate for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Guru P; Dhakal, Krishna P; Kim, Min Su; Lee, Hyunsoo; Guthold, Martin; Joseph, Vincent S; Hong, Jong-Dal; Kim, Jeongyong

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple method of stretching DNA to its full length, suitable for optical imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two competing forces on the DNA molecules, which are the electrostatic attraction between positively charged dye molecules (YOYO-1) intercalated into DNA and the negatively charged surface of glass substrate, and the centrifugal force of the rotating substrate, are mainly responsible for the effective stretching and the dispersion of single strands of DNA. The density of stretched DNA molecules could be controlled by the concentration of the dye-stained DNA solution. Stretching of single DNA molecules was confirmed by AFM imaging and the photoluminescence spectra of single DNA molecule stained with YOYO-1 were obtained, suggesting that our method is useful for spectroscopic analysis of DNA at the single molecule level.

  18. Centrifugal pumps for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. E.; Farquhar, J.

    1974-01-01

    The use of centrifugal pumps for rocket engines is described in terms of general requirements of operational and planned systems. Hydrodynamic and mechanical design considerations and techniques and test procedures are summarized. Some of the pump development experiences, in terms of both problems and solutions, are highlighted.

  19. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the status of the Centrifuge Facility being developed by ARC for flight on the International Space Station Alpha. The assessment includes technical status, schedules, budgets, project management, performance of facility relative to science requirements, and identifies risks and issues that need to be considered in future development activities.

  20. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Laurence R.

    1994-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility Project at ARC was reviewed by a code U team to determine appropriateness adequacy for the ISSA. This report represents the findings of one consultant to this team and concentrates on scientific and technical risks. This report supports continuation of the project to the next phase of development.

  1. To stretch or not to stretch: the role of stretching in injury prevention and performance.

    PubMed

    McHugh, M P; Cosgrave, C H

    2010-04-01

    Stretching is commonly practiced before sports participation; however, effects on subsequent performance and injury prevention are not well understood. There is an abundance of literature demonstrating that a single bout of stretching acutely impairs muscle strength, with a lesser effect on power. The extent to which these effects are apparent when stretching is combined with other aspects of a pre-participation warm-up, such as practice drills and low intensity dynamic exercises, is not known. With respect to the effect of pre-participation stretching on injury prevention a limited number of studies of varying quality have shown mixed results. A general consensus is that stretching in addition to warm-up does not affect the incidence of overuse injuries. There is evidence that pre-participation stretching reduces the incidence of muscle strains but there is clearly a need for further work. Future prospective randomized studies should use stretching interventions that are effective at decreasing passive resistance to stretch and assess effects on subsequent injury incidence in sports with a high prevalence of muscle strains.

  2. 77 FR 9273 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... COMMISSION USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct Transfer of Licenses In the Matter of USEC INC. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American... holder of materials licenses SNM-7003 and SNM-2011 for the American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility...

  3. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5350 Microsedimentation centrifuge. (a) Identification. A microsedimentation centrifuge is a...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5350 Microsedimentation centrifuge. (a) Identification. A microsedimentation centrifuge is a...

  5. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5350 Microsedimentation centrifuge. (a) Identification. A microsedimentation centrifuge is a...

  6. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5350 Microsedimentation centrifuge. (a) Identification. A microsedimentation centrifuge is a...

  7. Dynamic stretching and golf swing performance.

    PubMed

    Moran, K A; McGrath, T; Marshall, B M; Wallace, E S

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of dynamic stretching, static stretching and no stretching, as part of a general warm-up, on golf swing performance with a five-iron. Measures of performance were taken 0 min, 5 min, 15 min and 30 min after stretching. Dynamic stretching produced significantly greater club head speeds than both static stretching (Delta=1.9m.s (-1); p=0.000) and no stretching (Delta=1.7 m.s (-1); p=0.000), and greater ball speeds than both static stretching (Delta=3.5m.s (-1); p=0.003) and no stretching (Delta=3.3m.s (-1); p=0.001). Dynamic stretching produced significantly straighter swing-paths than both static stretching (Delta=-0.61 degrees , p=0.000) and no stretching (Delta=-0.72 degrees , p=0.01). Dynamic stretching also produced more central impact points than the static stretch (Delta=0.7 cm, p=0.001). For the club face angle, there was no effect of either stretch or time. For all of the variables measured, there was no significant difference between the static stretch and no stretch conditions. All of the results were unaffected by the time of measurement after stretching. The results indicate that dynamic stretching should be used as part of a general warm-up in golf.

  8. BSDB: the biomolecule stretching database

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Mateusz; Sułkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartłomiej S.; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    We describe the Biomolecule Stretching Data Base that has been recently set up at http://www.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. It provides information about mechanostability of proteins. Its core is based on simulations of stretching of 17 134 proteins within a structure-based model. The primary information is about the heights of the maximal force peaks, the force–displacement patterns, and the sequencing of the contact-rupturing events. We also summarize the possible types of the mechanical clamps, i.e. the motifs which are responsible for a protein's resistance to stretching. PMID:20929872

  9. Design of a centrifugal blood pump: Heart Turcica Centrifugal.

    PubMed

    Demir, Onur; Biyikli, Emre; Lazoglu, Ismail; Kucukaksu, Suha

    2011-07-01

    A prototype of a new implantable centrifugal blood pump system named Heart Turcica Centrifugal (HTC) was developed as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) for the treatment of end-stage cardiac failure. In the development of HTC, effects of blade height and volute tongue profiles on the hydraulic and hemolytic performances of the pump were investigated. As a result, the prototype was manufactured using the best blade height and volute tongue profiles. Performance of the prototype model was experimentally evaluated in a closed-loop flow system using water as the medium. The hydraulic performance requirement of an LVAD (5 L/min flow rate against a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg) was attained at 2800 rpm rotational speed.

  10. Centrifugal separator devices, systems and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID; Law, Jack D [Pocatello, ID; Garn, Troy G [Idaho Falls, ID; Todd, Terry A [Aberdeen, ID; Macaluso, Lawrence L [Carson City, NV

    2012-03-20

    Centrifugal separator devices, systems and related methods are described. More particularly, fluid transfer connections for a centrifugal separator system having support assemblies with a movable member coupled to a connection tube and coupled to a fixed member, such that the movable member is constrained to movement along a fixed path relative to the fixed member are described. Also, centrifugal separator systems including such fluid transfer connections are described. Additionally, methods of installing, removing and/or replacing centrifugal separators from centrifugal separator systems are described.

  11. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    PubMed Central

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression maneuvers. After pressure equilibration cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics. PMID:25664452

  12. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  13. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching.

    PubMed

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells' cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  14. Strain softening in stretched DNA

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Binquan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2010-01-01

    The microscopic mechanics of DNA stretching was characterized using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. By employing an anisotropic pressure control method, realistic force-extension dependences of effectively infinite DNA molecules were obtained. A coexistence of B- and S-DNA domains was observed during the overstretching transition. The simulations revealed that strain softening may occur in the process of stretching torsionally constrained DNA. The latter observation was qualitatively reconciled with available experimental data using a random-field Ising model. PMID:18851334

  15. Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Safeguards System Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Elayat, H A; O'Connell, W J; Boyer, B D

    2006-06-05

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in developing tools and methods for potential U.S. use in designing and evaluating safeguards systems used in enrichment facilities. This research focuses on analyzing the effectiveness of the safeguards in protecting against the range of safeguards concerns for enrichment plants, including diversion of attractive material and unauthorized modes of use. We developed an Extend simulation model for a generic medium-sized centrifuge enrichment plant. We modeled the material flow in normal operation, plant operational upset modes, and selected diversion scenarios, for selected safeguards systems. Simulation modeling is used to analyze both authorized and unauthorized use of a plant and the flow of safeguards information. Simulation tracks the movement of materials and isotopes, identifies the signatures of unauthorized use, tracks the flow and compilation of safeguards data, and evaluates the effectiveness of the safeguards system in detecting misuse signatures. The simulation model developed could be of use to the International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA, enabling the IAEA to observe and draw conclusions that uranium enrichment facilities are being used only within authorized limits for peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It will evaluate improved approaches to nonproliferation concerns, facilitating deployment of enhanced and cost-effective safeguards systems for an important part of the nuclear power fuel cycle.

  16. Impact testing with a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglietta, Jim; Olin, Malcolm; Venturi, Richard

    A test program intended to verify an aircraft wing armor protection system is described, focusing on testing methodologies, the centrifuge release system design, and aiming and system controls. Two armor impact tests were conducted which used a centrifuge to propel a large irregular projectile into a target surface. The first test was performed on the armor protected side of the simulated fuel tank. The impactor was deflected off the armored surface, damaging the armor slightly and causing a small leak in the tank. The impactor broke into three pieces. The second test was performed on the reverse side of the simulated fuel tank. The impactor penetrated the tank and remained lodged inside, causing a massive leak.

  17. Performance of a centrifugal phytotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, A.; Nishiura, Y.; Kiyota, M.; Murase, H.; Honami, N.; Aiga, I.

    1996-01-01

    It is possible to cultivate plants under an artificial gravity field generated by a centrifugal device in space. In order to determine an optimal magnitude of gravity, there is a need to investigate the relationship between plant growth and gravity, including not only reduced gravity but also gravity greater than 1G. A prototype centrifugal phytotron was designed and fabricated in order to investigate the relationship between plant growth and increased gravity. This device enables us to cultivate plants over the long term by controlling environmental conditions in the phytotron such as temperature, relative humidity, CO_2 concentration and light intensity. The results of our experiment indicate that plant seeds can germinate and grow even under an artificial gravity which changes sinusoidally from 2G to 4G.

  18. When to maintain centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Karassik, I.J.

    1993-04-01

    Centrifugal pumps comprise critical maintenance equipment. The rationale of when to maintain them relates to a spreading tendency to contain costs in the face of tight money. Plant managers are thus entitled to a thorough analysis of whether reduced expenditures truly lower costs or actually hinder maintenance and increase costs. Absence of such an analysis hides the fact that proper and timely maintenance has a double effect: it not only reduces power consumption but also extends equipment life, and thus reduces the frequency of labor and material expenditures for scheduled or crisis maintenance. Centrifugal pump maintenance can demonstrate well the validity of this observation. The paper discusses: restoring internal clearances; real cost of renewing clearances; and monitoring clearances and pump performance.

  19. Development of Advanced Centrifugal Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.

    2009-09-30

    A CRADA project was performed between BNL and Flowserve, California, under the auspices of Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) with the DOE support. The purpose was to jointly support a team of Russian institutes led by Kurchatov Institute to develop technology to increase operating life of centrifugal pumps. The work was performed from March 1, 2002 to September 30, 2009. The project resulted in development and validation the total cost of the sub-contract with Kurchatov Institute was $700,000, with matching fund from the industrial partner, Flowserve. The technical objective of this project is to develop advanced centrifugal pumps for the power, petroleum, chemical and water services industries by increasing the reliability of pumping equipment without a corresponding increase in life cycle cost. This major market need can be served by developing centrifugal pumps that generate only modest forces on the mechanical system even when operating under significant off-design conditions. This project is focused towards understanding the origin of hydraulic forces (both radial and axial, steady and time-dependent) and to develop design options, which reduce these forces over a broad flow range. This focus will include the force generation due to cavitation inside the pump as the operating conditions extend to low suction pressures. The results of research will reduce the inception of cavitation that leads to surface erosion and to find passive method of reducing peaks in axial thrust during whole range of flow rates.

  20. Human stretch reflex pathways reexamined

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Ş. Utku; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Sebik, Oğuz; Berna Ünver, M.; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Reflex responses of tibialis anterior motor units to stretch stimuli were investigated in human subjects. Three types of stretch stimuli were applied (tap-like, ramp-and-hold, and half-sine stretch). Stimulus-induced responses in single motor units were analyzed using the classical technique, which involved building average surface electromyogram (SEMG) and peristimulus time histograms (PSTH) from the discharge times of motor units and peristimulus frequencygrams (PSF) from the instantaneous discharge rates of single motor units. With the use of SEMG and PSTH, the tap-like stretch stimulus induced five separate reflex responses, on average. With the same single motor unit data, the PSF technique indicated that the tap stimulus induced only three reflex responses. Similar to the finding using the tap-like stretch stimuli, ramp-and-hold stimuli induced several peaks and troughs in the SEMG and PSTH. The PSF analyses displayed genuine increases in discharge rates underlying the peaks but not underlying the troughs. Half-sine stretch stimuli induced a long-lasting excitation followed by a long-lasting silent period in SEMG and PSTH. The increase in the discharge rate, however, lasted for the entire duration of the stimulus and continued during the silent period. The results are discussed in the light of the fact that the discharge rate of a motoneuron has a strong positive linear association with the effective synaptic current it receives and hence represents changes in the membrane potential more directly and accurately than the other indirect measures. This study suggests that the neuronal pathway of the human stretch reflex does not include inhibitory pathways. PMID:24225537

  1. Twinning of amphibian embryos by centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    In the frog Xenopus laevis, the dorsal structures of the embryonic body axis normally derive from the side of the egg opposite the side of sperm entry. However, if the uncleaved egg is inclined at lg or centrifuged in an inclined position, this topographic relationship is overridden: the egg makes its dorsal axial structures according to its orientation in the gravitational/centrifugal field, irrespective of the position of sperm entry. Certain conditions of centrifugation cause eggs to develop into conjoined twins with two sets of axial structures. A detailed analysis of twinning provided some insight into experimental axis orientation. First, as with single-axis embryos, both axes in twins are oriented according to the direction of centrifugation. One axis forms at the centripetal side of the egg and the other forms at the centrifugal side, even when the side of sperm entry is normal to the centrifugal force vector. Second, if eggs are centrifuged to give twins, but are inclined at lg to prevent post-centrifugation endoplasmic redistributions, only single-axis embryos develop. Thus, a second redistribution is required for high-frequency secondary axis formation. This can be accomplished by lg (as in the single centrifugations) or by a second centrifugation directed along the egg's animal-vegetal axis.

  2. Twinning of amphibian embryos by centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    In the frog Xenopus laevis, the dorsal structures of the embryonic body axis normally derive from the side of the egg opposite the side of sperm entry. However, if the uncleaved egg is inclined at lg or centrifuged in an inclined position, this topographic relationship is overridden: the egg makes its dorsal axial structures according to its orientation in the gravitational/centrifugal field, irrespective of the position of sperm entry. Certain conditions of centrifugation cause eggs to develop into conjoined twins with two sets of axial structures. A detailed analysis of twinning provided some insight into experimental axis orientation. First, as with single-axis embryos, both axes in twins are oriented according to the direction of centrifugation. One axis forms at the centripetal side of the egg and the other forms at the centrifugal side, even when the side of sperm entry is normal to the centrifugal force vector. Second, if eggs are centrifuged to give twins, but are inclined at lg to prevent post-centrifugation endoplasmic redistributions, only single-axis embryos develop. Thus, a second redistribution is required for high-frequency secondary axis formation. This can be accomplished by lg (as in the single centrifugations) or by a second centrifugation directed along the egg's animal-vegetal axis.

  3. Effects of centrifugal force and centrifugation time on the sedimentation of plant organelles.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, J; Hiraike, K

    1982-02-01

    The effect of centrifugal force and length of centrifugation time on the sedimentation of plant organelles was determined for corn (Zea mays L.) root homogenates. A centrifugal force of 6000g for at least 20 minutes was necessary to pellet 90% of the mitochondrial marker (cytochrome c oxidase). This initial centrifugation step is optimal for separating mitochondria from microsomes, since cross-contamination of endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane vesicles with mitochondria is minimized. Centrifugal forces of 8000g or 10,000g for 20 minutes and 13,000g for 15 minutes pellet 90% of the mitochondrial marker; however, these centrifugation conditions also sediment more plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum.

  4. Numerical modeling and optimization of the Iguassu gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borman, V. D.; Borisevich, V. D.; Tronin, V. N.; Tronin, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    The full procedure of the numerical calculation of the optimized parameters of the Iguassu gas centrifuge (GC) is under discussion. The procedure consists of a few steps. On the first step the problem of a hydrodynamical flow of the gas in the rotating rotor of the GC is solved numerically. On the second step the problem of diffusion of the binary mixture of isotopes is solved. The separation power of the gas centrifuge is calculated after that. On the last step the time consuming procedure of optimization of the GC is performed providing us the maximum of the separation power. The optimization is based on the BOBYQA method exploring the results of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamics and diffusion of the mixture of isotopes. Fast convergence of calculations is achieved due to exploring of a direct solver at the solution of the hydrodynamical and diffusion parts of the problem. Optimized separative power and optimal internal parameters of the Iguassu GC with 1 m rotor were calculated using the developed approach. Optimization procedure converges in 45 iterations taking 811 minutes.

  5. Failure During Sheared Edge Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; van Tyne, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Failure during sheared edge stretching of sheet steels is a serious concern, especially in advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades. The shearing process produces a shear face and a zone of deformation behind the shear face, which is the shear-affected zone (SAZ). A failure during sheared edge stretching depends on prior deformation in the sheet, the shearing process, and the subsequent strain path in the SAZ during stretching. Data from laboratory hole expansion tests and hole extrusion tests for multiple lots of fourteen grades of steel were analyzed. The forming limit curve (FLC), regression equations, measurement uncertainty calculations, and difference calculations were used in the analyses. From these analyses, an assessment of the primary factors that contribute to the fracture during sheared edge stretching was made. It was found that the forming limit strain with consideration of strain path in the SAZ is a major factor that contributes to the failure of a sheared edge during stretching. Although metallurgical factors are important, they appear to play a somewhat lesser role.

  6. Electrokinetic Stretching of Tethered DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ferree, Sean; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2003-01-01

    During electrophoretic separations of DNA in a sieving medium, DNA molecules stretch from a compact coil into elongated conformations when encountering an obstacle and relax back to a coil upon release from the obstacle. These stretching dynamics are thought to play an important role in the separation mechanism. In this article we describe a silicon microfabricated device to measure the stretching of tethered DNA in electric fields. Upon application of an electric field, electro-osmosis generates bulk fluid flow in the device, and a protocol for eliminating this flow by attaching a polymer brush to all silicon oxide surfaces is shown to be effective. Data on the steady stretching of DNA in constant electric fields is presented. The data corroborate the approximate theory of hydrodynamic equivalence, indicating that DNA is not free-draining in the presence of both electric and nonelectric forces. Finally, these data provide the first quantitative test of a Stigter and Bustamante's detailed theory of electrophoretic stretching of DNA without adjustable parameters. The agreement between theory and experiment is good. PMID:14507716

  7. Wrinkled flames and geometrical stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denet, Bruno; Joulin, Guy

    2011-07-01

    Localized wrinkles of thin premixed flames subject to hydrodynamic instability and geometrical stretch of uniform intensity (S) are studied. A stretch-affected nonlinear and nonlocal equation, derived from an inhomogeneous Michelson-Sivashinsky equation, is used as a starting point, and pole decompositions are used as a tool. Analytical and numerical descriptions of isolated (centered or multicrested) wrinkles with steady shapes (in a frame) and various amplitudes are provided; their number increases rapidly with 1/S>0. A large constant S>0 weakens or suppresses all localized wrinkles (the larger the wrinkles, the easier the suppression), whereas S<0 strengthens them; oscillations of S further restrict their existence domain. Self-similar evolutions of unstable many-crested patterns are obtained. A link between stretch, nonlinearity, and instability with the cutoff size of the wrinkles in turbulent flames is suggested. Open problems are evoked.

  8. CENTRIFUGES

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    Damping bearings for use on the shafts of an ultracentrifuge were designed which are capable of passing through critical angular speeds. The shaft extending from one end of the rotor is journaled in fixed-plain bearings mounted on annular resilient shock-absorbing elements to dampen small vibrations. The shaft at the other end of the rotor is journaled in two damper-bearing assemblies which are so spaced on the shaft that a vibration node can at no time exist at both bearing assemblies. These bearings are similar to the other bearings except that the bearing housings are slidably mounted on the supporting structure for movement transverse to the rotational axis of the rotor.

  9. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L. ); Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G. )

    1992-01-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  10. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L.; Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G.

    1992-11-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  11. Testing of pyrochemical centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, L.S.; Carls, E.L.; Basco, J.K.; Johnson, T.R.

    1996-08-01

    A centrifugal contactor that performs oxidation and reduction exchange reactions between molten metals and salts at 500 degrees Centigrade has been tested successfully at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The design is based on contactors for aqueous- organic systems operation near room temperature. In tests to demonstrate the performance of the pyrocontactor, cadmium and LICl- KCl eutectic salt were the immiscible solvent phases, and rare earths were the distributing solutes. The tests showed that the pyrocontactor mixed and separated the phases well, with stage efficiencies approaching 99% at rotor speeds near 2700 rpm. The contactor ran smoothly and reliably over the entire range of speeds that was tested.

  12. Centrifugal separators and related devices and methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID; Law, Jack D [Pocatello, ID; Garn, Troy G [Idaho Falls, ID; Macaluso, Lawrence L [Carson City, NV; Todd, Terry A [Aberdeen, ID

    2012-03-06

    Centrifugal separators and related methods and devices are described. More particularly, centrifugal separators comprising a first fluid supply fitting configured to deliver fluid into a longitudinal fluid passage of a rotor shaft and a second fluid supply fitting sized and configured to sealingly couple with the first fluid supply fitting are described. Also, centrifugal separator systems comprising a manifold having a drain fitting and a cleaning fluid supply fitting are described, wherein the manifold is coupled to a movable member of a support assembly. Additionally, methods of cleaning centrifugal separators are described.

  13. Neuro-Motor Responses to Daily Centrifugation in Bed-Rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, Jeffery T.; Krnavek, Jody; Fisher, Elizibeth; Ford, George; Paloski, William H.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known from numerous space flight studies that exposure to micro-g produces both morphological and neural adaptations in the major postural muscles. However, the characteristics and mechanism of these changes, particularly when it may involve the central nervous system are not defined. Furthermore, it is not known what role unloading of the muscular system may have on central changes in sensorimotor function or if centrifugation along the +Gz direction (long body axis) can mitigate both the peripheral changes in muscle function and modification of the central changes in sensorimotor adaptation to the near weightless environment of space flight. The purpose of this specific effort was, therefore, to investigate the efficacy of artificial gravity (AG) as a method for maintaining sensorimotor function in micro-g. Eight male subjects were exposed to daily 1 hr centrifugation during a 21 day 6 degree head-down bed rest study. Seven controls were placed on the centrifuge without rotation. The radius and angular velocity of the centrifuge were adjusted such that each subject experienced a centripetal acceleration of 2.5g at the feet, and approximately 1.0g at the heart. Both the tendon (MSR) and functional stretch reflexes (FSR) were collected using an 80 lb. ft. servomotor controlled via position feedback to provide a dorsiflexion step input to elicit the MSR, and the same step input with a built in 3 sec hold to evoke the FSR. EMG data were obtained from the triceps surae. Supplementary torque, velocity and position data were collected with the EMG responses. All data were digitized and sampled at 4 kHz. Only the MSR data has been analyzed at this time, and preliminary results suggest that those subjects exposed to active centrifugation (treatment group) show only minor changes in MSR peak latency times, either as a function of time spent in bed rest or exposure to centrifugation, while the control subjects show delays in the MSR peak latencies that are

  14. Neuro-Motor Responses to Daily Centrifugation in Bed-Rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, Jeffery T.; Krnavek, Jody; Fisher, Elizibeth; Ford, George; Paloski, William H.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known from numerous space flight studies that exposure to micro-g produces both morphological and neural adaptations in the major postural muscles. However, the characteristics and mechanism of these changes, particularly when it may involve the central nervous system are not defined. Furthermore, it is not known what role unloading of the muscular system may have on central changes in sensorimotor function or if centrifugation along the +Gz direction (long body axis) can mitigate both the peripheral changes in muscle function and modification of the central changes in sensorimotor adaptation to the near weightless environment of space flight. The purpose of this specific effort was, therefore, to investigate the efficacy of artificial gravity (AG) as a method for maintaining sensorimotor function in micro-g. Eight male subjects were exposed to daily 1 hr centrifugation during a 21 day 6 degree head-down bed rest study. Seven controls were placed on the centrifuge without rotation. The radius and angular velocity of the centrifuge were adjusted such that each subject experienced a centripetal acceleration of 2.5g at the feet, and approximately 1.0g at the heart. Both the tendon (MSR) and functional stretch reflexes (FSR) were collected using an 80 lb. ft. servomotor controlled via position feedback to provide a dorsiflexion step input to elicit the MSR, and the same step input with a built in 3 sec hold to evoke the FSR. EMG data were obtained from the triceps surae. Supplementary torque, velocity and position data were collected with the EMG responses. All data were digitized and sampled at 4 kHz. Only the MSR data has been analyzed at this time, and preliminary results suggest that those subjects exposed to active centrifugation (treatment group) show only minor changes in MSR peak latency times, either as a function of time spent in bed rest or exposure to centrifugation, while the control subjects show delays in the MSR peak latencies that are

  15. Solid deuterium centrifuge pellet injector

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pellet injectors are needed to fuel long pulse tokamak plasmas and other magnetic confinement devices. For this purpose, an apparatus has been developed that forms 1.3-mm-diam pellets of frozen deuterium at a rate of 40 pellets per second and accelerates them to a speed of 1 km/s. Pellets are formed by extruding a billet of solidified deuterium through a 1.3-mm-diam nozzle at a speed of 5 cm/s. The extruding deuterium is chopped with a razor knife, forming 1.3-mm right circular cylinders of solid deuterium. The pellets are accelerated by synchronously injecting them into a high speed rotating arbor containing a guide track, which carries them from a point near the center of rotation to the periphery. The pellets leave the wheel after 150/sup 0/ of rotation at double the tip speed. The centrifuge is formed in the shape of a centrifugal catenary and is constructed of high strength KEVLAR/epoxy composite. This arbon has been spin-tested to a tip speed of 1 km/s.

  16. Isotopically Modified Molybdenum: Production for Application in Nuclear Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. Yu.; Bonarev, A. K.; Sulaberidze, G. A.; Borisevich, V. D.; Kulikov, G. G.; Shmelev, A. N.

    The possibility to use the isotopically modified molybdenum as a constructive material for the fuel rods of light water and fast reactors is discussed. The calculations demonstrate that the isotopically modified molybdenum with an average neutron absorption cross-section comparable to that of zirconium can be obtained with the reasonable for practice cost by a cascade of gas centrifuges, specially designed for separation of non-uranium isotopes.

  17. Iterated Stretching of Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Demekhin, Evgeny A.; Kalaidin, Evgeny

    1999-01-01

    We examine, with asymptotic analysis and numerical simulation, the iterated stretching dynamics of FENE and Oldroyd-B jets of initial radius r(sub 0), shear viscosity nu, Weissenberg number We, retardation number S, and capillary number Ca. The usual Rayleigh instability stretches the local uniaxial extensional flow region near a minimum in jet radius into a primary filament of radius [Ca(1 - S)/ We](sup 1/2)r(sub 0) between two beads. The strain-rate within the filament remains constant while its radius (elastic stress) decreases (increases) exponentially in time with a long elastic relaxation time 3We(r(sup 2, sub 0)/nu). Instabilities convected from the bead relieve the tension at the necks during this slow elastic drainage and trigger a filament recoil. Secondary filaments then form at the necks from the resulting stretching. This iterated stretching is predicted to occur successively to generate high-generation filaments of radius r(sub n), (r(sub n)/r(sub 0)) = square root of 2[r(sub n-1)/r(sub 0)](sup 3/2) until finite-extensibility effects set in.

  18. Three Fresh Exposures, Stretched Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been processed using a technique known as a decorrelation stretch to exaggerate the colors. The area in the image includes three holes created inside 'Endurance Crater' by Opportunity's rock abrasion tool between sols 143 and 148 (June 18 and June 23, 2004). Because color variations are so subtle in the pictured area, stretched images are useful for discriminating color differences that can alert scientists to compositional and textural variations. For example, without the exaggeration, no color difference would be discernable among the tailings left behind after the grinding of these holes, but in this stretched image, the tailings around 'London' (top) appear more red than those of the other holes ('Virginia,' middle, and 'Cobble Hill,' bottom). Scientists believe that is because the rock abrasion tool sliced through two 'blueberries,' or spherules (visible on the upper left and upper right sides of the circle). When the blades break up these spherules, composed of mostly gray hematite, the result is a bright red powder. In this image, you can see the rock layers that made the team want to grind holes in each identified layer. The top layer is yellowish red, the middle is yellowish green and the lower layer is green. Another advantage to viewing this stretched image is the clear detail of the distribution of the rock abrasion tool tailings (heading down-slope) and the differences in rock texture. This image was created using the 753-, 535- and 432-nanometer filters.

  19. Three Fresh Exposures, Stretched Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been processed using a technique known as a decorrelation stretch to exaggerate the colors. The area in the image includes three holes created inside 'Endurance Crater' by Opportunity's rock abrasion tool between sols 143 and 148 (June 18 and June 23, 2004). Because color variations are so subtle in the pictured area, stretched images are useful for discriminating color differences that can alert scientists to compositional and textural variations. For example, without the exaggeration, no color difference would be discernable among the tailings left behind after the grinding of these holes, but in this stretched image, the tailings around 'London' (top) appear more red than those of the other holes ('Virginia,' middle, and 'Cobble Hill,' bottom). Scientists believe that is because the rock abrasion tool sliced through two 'blueberries,' or spherules (visible on the upper left and upper right sides of the circle). When the blades break up these spherules, composed of mostly gray hematite, the result is a bright red powder. In this image, you can see the rock layers that made the team want to grind holes in each identified layer. The top layer is yellowish red, the middle is yellowish green and the lower layer is green. Another advantage to viewing this stretched image is the clear detail of the distribution of the rock abrasion tool tailings (heading down-slope) and the differences in rock texture. This image was created using the 753-, 535- and 432-nanometer filters.

  20. A Purposeful Dynamic Stretching Routine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Craig; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stretching, which involves moving parts of the body and gradually increases range of motion, speed of movement, or both through controlled, sport-specific movements, has become the popular choice of pre-exercise warm-up. This type of warm-up has evolved to encompass several variations, but at its core is the principle theme that preparing…

  1. A Purposeful Dynamic Stretching Routine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Craig; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stretching, which involves moving parts of the body and gradually increases range of motion, speed of movement, or both through controlled, sport-specific movements, has become the popular choice of pre-exercise warm-up. This type of warm-up has evolved to encompass several variations, but at its core is the principle theme that preparing…

  2. Stable Isotope Enrichment Capabilities at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Egle, Brian; Aaron, W Scott; Hart, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Department of Energy Nuclear Physics Program have built a high-resolution Electromagnetic Isotope Separator (EMIS) as a prototype for reestablishing a US based enrichment capability for stable isotopes. ORNL has over 60 years of experience providing enriched stable isotopes and related technical services to the international accelerator target community, as well as medical, research, industrial, national security, and other communities. ORNL is investigating the combined use of electromagnetic and gas centrifuge isotope separation technologies to provide research quantities (milligram to several kilograms) of enriched stable isotopes. In preparation for implementing a larger scale production facility, a 10 mA high-resolution EMIS prototype has been built and tested. Initial testing of the device has simultaneously collected greater than 98% enriched samples of all the molybdenum isotopes from natural abundance feedstock.

  3. Bed Rest and Intermittent Centrifugation Effects on Human Balance and Neuromotor Reflexes.

    PubMed

    Paloski, William H; Reschke, Millard F; Feiveson, Alan H

    2017-09-01

    The effects of repeated centrifugation in association with head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest (BR) on the mediation of basic reflexes associated with the major postural muscles was investigated as a potential countermeasure for maintaining balance control and neuromotor reflex function. There were 15 male volunteers who were exposed to 21 d of 6° HDT-BR. Eight were treated with daily 1-h artificial gravity (AG) exposures aboard a short radius centrifuge that provided 1-g footward loading at heart level. The other seven served as HDT-BR control subjects. Balance control was assessed using a standard computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) protocol that was modified by adding low-frequency pitch-plane head movements. Neuromotor reflex function was assessed using tendon stretch reflexes (MSR) and functional stretch reflex (FSR) data collected from the triceps surae muscle group. CDP performance was degraded by HDT-BR in both groups (ranging from 24 to 26%), but was unaffected by AG. BR also degraded MSR and FSR functions in both groups, with increased peak reflex latencies between 1.5 and 1.95 ms, but AG maintained pre-BR latencies for the MSR subjects. AG exposure did not modify balance control from pre-BR responses, but did help prevent decrements in FSR latencies post-BR.Paloski WH, Reschke MF, Feiveson AH. Bed rest and intermittent centrifugation effects on human balance and neuromotor reflexes. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(9):812-818.

  4. Apparatus for centrifugal separation of coal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dickie, William; Cavallaro, Joseph A.; Killmeyer, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A gravimetric cell for centrifugal separation of fine coal by density has a cylindrical body and a butterfly valve or other apparatus for selectively sealing the body radially across the approximate center of the cylinder. A removable top is provided which seals the cylinder in the centrifuge and in unvented areas.

  5. Directly observed reversible shape changes and hemoglobin stratification during centrifugation of human and Amphiuma red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph F; Inoué, Shinya

    2006-02-21

    This paper describes changes that occur in human and Amphiuma red blood cells observed during centrifugation with a special microscope. Dilute suspensions of cells were layered, in a centrifuge chamber, above an osmotically matched dense solution, containing Nycodenz, Ficoll, or Percoll (Pharmacia) that formed a density gradient that allowed the cells to slowly settle to an equilibrium position. Biconcave human red blood cells moved downward at low forces with minimum wobble. The cells oriented vertically when the force field was increased and Hb sedimented as the lower part of each cell became bulged and assumed a "bag-like" shape. The upper centripetal portion of the cell became thinner and remained biconcave. These changes occurred rapidly and were completely reversible upon lowering the centrifugal force. Bag-shaped cells, upon touching red cells in rouleau, immediately reverted to biconcave disks as they flipped onto a stack. Amphiuma red cells displayed a different type of reversible stratification and deformation at high force fields. Here the cells became stretched, with the nucleus now moving centrifugally, the Hb moving centripetally, and the bottom of the cells becoming thinner and clear. Nevertheless, the distribution of the marginal bands at the cells' rim was unchanged. We conclude that centrifugation, per se, while changing a red cell's shape and the distribution of its intracellular constituents, does so in a completely reversible manner. Centrifugation of red cells harboring altered or missing structural elements could provide information on shape determinants that are still unexplained.

  6. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, N.E.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A uv-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  7. Sound generation in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitor, Till; Neise, Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    An experimental study is described to explore the dominant sound generation mechanisms of the spectral components governing the overall noise level of centrifugal compressors. At the design speed with supersonic flow conditions in the rotor blade channels, blade tone noise and buzz-saw noise are the main contributors. On the inlet, rotor-alone noise is the main source while rotor-stator interaction noise dominates on the outlet side in case of vaned outlet diffusers. Over a large range of rotor speeds with subsonic flow conditions, radial compressor noise is dominated by tip clearance noise which is produced by the secondary flow through the gap between rotor blade tips and the casing wall which in turn gives rise to the rotating instability phenomena observed earlier in axial-flow machines.

  8. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Norman E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90.degree. and 180.degree. excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A UV-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  9. Centrifuges in gravitational physiology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Rodney W.; Davies, Phil; Fuller, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Data from space flight and ground based experiments have clearly demonstrated the importance of Earth gravity for normal physiological function in man and animals. Gravitational Physiology is concerned with the role and influence of gravity on physiological systems. Research in this field examines how we perceive and respond to gravity and the mechanisms underlying these responses. Inherent in our search for answers to these questions is the ability to alter gravity, which is not physically possible without leaving Earth. However, useful experimental paradigms have been to modify the perceived force of gravity by changing either the orientation of subjects to the gravity vector (i.e., postural changes) or by applying inertial forces to augment the magnitude of the gravity vector. The later technique has commonly been used by applying centripetal force via centrifugation.

  10. Centrifugal membrane filtration -- Task 9

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has teamed with SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, to demonstrate applications for the SpinTek technology within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. Membrane-screening tests were performed with the SpinTek STC-X4 static test cell filtration unit, using five ceramic membranes with different pore size and composition. Based on permeate flux, a 0.25-{micro}m TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was selected for detailed performance evaluation using the SpinTek ST-IIL centrifugal membrane filtration unit with a surrogate tank waste solution. An extended test run of 100 hr performed on a surrogate tank waste solution showed some deterioration in filtration performance, based on flux, apparently due to the buildup of solids near the inner portion of the membrane where relative membrane velocities were low. Continued testing of the system will focus on modifications to the shear pattern across the entire membrane surface to affect improved long-term performance.

  11. Accurate quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants of CH3CP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Cludi, L.; Degli Esposti, C.

    2003-03-01

    1-Phosphapropyne has been produced in the gas phase by pyrolysis of a mixture of ethane and phosphorus trichloride. The ground state rotational spectra of the most abundant isotopomer and of the isotopic variants 13CH3CP and CH313CP have been investigated in the millimeter and submillimeter wave regions obtaining very accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants DJ and DJK and of the sextic distortion constants HJK and HKJ.

  12. Modeling of UF{sub 6} enrichment with gas centrifuges for nuclear safeguards activities

    SciTech Connect

    Mercurio, G.; Peerani, P.; Richir, P.; Janssens, W.; Eklund, G.

    2012-09-26

    The physical modeling of uranium isotopes ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U) separation process by centrifugation of is a key aspect for predicting the nuclear fuel enrichment plant performances under surveillance by the Nuclear Safeguards Authorities. In this paper are illustrated some aspects of the modeling of fast centrifuges for UF{sub 6} gas enrichment and of a typical cascade enrichment plant with the Theoretical Centrifuge and Cascade Simulator (TCCS). The background theory for reproducing the flow field characteristics of a centrifuge is derived from the work of Cohen where the separation parameters are calculated using the solution of a differential enrichment equation. In our case we chose to solve the hydrodynamic equations for the motion of a compressible fluid in a centrifugal field using the Berman - Olander vertical velocity radial distribution and the solution was obtained using the Matlab software tool. The importance of a correct estimation of the centrifuge separation parameters at different flow regimes, lies in the possibility to estimate in a reliable way the U enrichment plant performances, once the separation external parameters are set (feed flow rate and feed, product and tails assays). Using the separation parameters of a single centrifuge allow to determine the performances of an entire cascade and, for this purpose; the software Simulink was used. The outputs of the calculation are the concentrations (assays) and the flow rates of the enriched (product) and depleted (tails) gas mixture. These models represent a valid additional tool, in order to verify the compliance of the U enrichment plant operator declarations with the 'on site' inspectors' measurements.

  13. Modeling of UF6 enrichment with gas centrifuges for nuclear safeguards activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, G.; Peerani, P.; Richir, P.; Janssens, W.; Eklund, G.

    2012-09-01

    The physical modeling of uranium isotopes (235U, 238U) separation process by centrifugation of is a key aspect for predicting the nuclear fuel enrichment plant performances under surveillance by the Nuclear Safeguards Authorities. In this paper are illustrated some aspects of the modeling of fast centrifuges for UF6 gas enrichment and of a typical cascade enrichment plant with the Theoretical Centrifuge and Cascade Simulator (TCCS). The background theory for reproducing the flow field characteristics of a centrifuge is derived from the work of Cohen [1] where the separation parameters are calculated using the solution of a differential enrichment equation. In our case we chose to solve the hydrodynamic equations for the motion of a compressible fluid in a centrifugal field using the Berman - Olander vertical velocity radial distribution [2] and the solution was obtained using the Matlab software tool [3]. The importance of a correct estimation of the centrifuge separation parameters at different flow regimes, lies in the possibility to estimate in a reliable way the U enrichment plant performances, once the separation external parameters are set (feed flow rate and feed, product and tails assays)[4]. Using the separation parameters of a single centrifuge allow to determine the performances of an entire cascade and, for this purpose; the software Simulink [3] was used. The outputs of the calculation are the concentrations (assays) and the flow rates of the enriched (product) and depleted (tails) gas mixture. These models represent a valid additional tool, in order to verify the compliance of the U enrichment plant operator declarations with the "on site" inspectors' measurements.

  14. Time stretch and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Barland, Stéphane; Broderick, Neil; Turitsyn, Sergei K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2017-06-01

    Observing non-repetitive and statistically rare signals that occur on short timescales requires fast real-time measurements that exceed the speed, precision and record length of conventional digitizers. Photonic time stretch is a data acquisition method that overcomes the speed limitations of electronic digitizers and enables continuous ultrafast single-shot spectroscopy, imaging, reflectometry, terahertz and other measurements at refresh rates reaching billions of frames per second with non-stop recording spanning trillions of consecutive frames. The technology has opened a new frontier in measurement science unveiling transient phenomena in nonlinear dynamics such as optical rogue waves and soliton molecules, and in relativistic electron bunching. It has also created a new class of instruments that have been integrated with artificial intelligence for sensing and biomedical diagnostics. We review the fundamental principles and applications of this emerging field for continuous phase and amplitude characterization at extremely high repetition rates via time-stretch spectral interferometry.

  15. Jaw stretch reflexes in children.

    PubMed

    Finan, Donald S; Smith, Anne

    2005-07-01

    The substantial morphological transformations that occur during human development present the nervous system with a considerable challenge in terms of motor control. Variability of skilled motor performance is a hallmark of a developing system. In adults, the jaw stretch reflex contributes to the functional stability of the jaw. We have investigated the response properties of the jaw stretch reflex in two groups of young children and a group of young adults. Response latencies increased with development, and all age groups produced stimulus-magnitude-dependent increases in reflex gain and resulting biting force. Reflex gain was largest for the older children (9-10 years), yet net increases in resulting biting force were comparable across age groups. These data and earlier experiments suggest that oral sensorimotor pathways mature throughout childhood in concert with the continued acquisition of complex motor skills.

  16. Polymer network stretching during electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfeld, Israel; Arinstein, Arkadii; Fezzaa, Kamel; Rafailovich, Miriam; Zussman, Eyal

    2011-03-01

    Fast X-ray phase contrast imaging is used to observe the flow of a semi-dilute polyethylene oxide solution during electrospinning. Micron-size glass particles mixed in the polymer solution allow viewing of the jet flow field, and reveal a high-gradient flow that has both longitudinal and radial components that grow rapidly along the jet. The resulting hydrodynamic forces cause substantial longitudinal stretching and transversal contraction of the polymer network within the jet, as confirmed by random walk simulation and theoretical modeling. The polymer network therefore concentrates towards the jet center, and its conformation may transform from a free state to a fully-stretched state within a short distance from the jet start. We acknowledge the financial support of the United States - Israel Bi-National Science Foundation (grant 2006061).

  17. Prophylactic stretching does not reduce cramp susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kevin C; Harsen, James D; Long, Blaine C

    2017-08-10

    Some clinicians advocate stretching to prevent muscle cramps. It is unknown whether static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching increases cramp threshold frequency (TFc ), a quantitative measure of cramp susceptibility. Fifteen individuals completed this randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study. We measured passive hallux range of motion (ROM) and then performed 3 minutes of either static stretching, PNF stretching (hold-relax-with agonist contraction), or no stretching. ROM was reassessed and TFc was measured. PNF stretching increased hallux extension (pre-PNF 81 ± 11°, post-PNF 90 ± 10°; P < 0.05) but not hallux flexion (pre-PNF 40 ± 7°, post-PNF 40 ± 7°; P > 0.05). Static stretching increased hallux extension (pre-static 80 ± 11°, post-static 88 ± 9°; P < 0.05) but not hallux flexion (pre-static 38 ± 9°, post-static 39 ± 8°; P > 0.05). No ROM changes occurred with no stretching (P > 0.05). TFc was unaffected by stretching (no stretching 18 ± 7 Hz, PNF 16 ± 4 Hz, static 16 ± 5 Hz; P = 0.37). Static and PNF stretching increased hallux extension, but neither increased TFc . Acute stretching may not prevent muscle cramping. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. BSDB: the Biomolecule Stretching Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Sikora, Mateusz; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartlomiej

    2011-03-01

    Despite more than a decade of experiments on single biomolecule manipulation, mechanical properties of only several scores of proteins have been measured. A characteristic scale of the force of resistance to stretching, Fmax , has been found to range between ~ 10 and 480 pN. The Biomolecule Stretching Data Base (BSDB) described here provides information about expected values of Fmax for, currently, 17 134 proteins. The values and other characteristics of the unfolding proces, including the nature of identified mechanical clamps, are available at www://info.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. They have been obtained through simulations within a structure-based model which correlates satisfactorily with the available experimental data on stretching. BSDB also lists experimental data and results of the existing all-atom simulations. The database offers a Protein-Data-Bank-wide guide to mechano-stability of proteins. Its description is provided by a forthcoming Nucleic Acids Research paper. Supported by EC FUNMOL project FP7-NMP-2007-SMALL-1, and European Regional Development Fund: Innovative Economy (POIG.01.01.02-00-008/08).

  19. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  20. Isotopic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.

    1981-03-10

    Method and apparatus for separating isotopes in an isotopic mixture of atoms or molecules by increasing the mass differential among isotopic species. The mixture containing a particular isotope is selectively irradiated so as to selectively excite the isotope. This preferentially excited species is then reacted rapidly with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product containing the specific isotope, but having a mass different than the original species initially containing the particular isotope. The product and the remaining balance of the mixture is then caused to flow through a device which separates the product from the mixture based upon the increased mass differential.

  1. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  2. Modeling of Centrifugal Force Field and the Effect on Filling and Solidification in Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Wenbin; Ma, Chunxue; Gu, Wanli

    2011-06-01

    Based on the steady flow in a tube, a mathematical model has been established for the consideration of centrifuging force field by combining the equations of continuity, conservation of momentum and general energy. Effects of centrifugal field on the filling and solidification are modeled by two accessional terms: centrifugal force and Chorios force. In addition, the transfer of heat by convection is considered to achieve a coupling calculation of velocity field and temperature field. The solution of pressure item is avoided by introducing the stream function ψ(x,y) and the eddy function ξ(x,y). Corresponding difference formats for the simultaneous equations of centrifugal filling, the accessional terms and the solidifying latent heat have been established by the finite difference technique. Furthermore, the centrifugal filling and solidification processes in a horizontal tube are summarized to interpret the mechanism by which internal defects are formed in centrifugal castings.

  3. Effects of Centrifugal Force and Centrifugation Time on the Sedimentation of Plant Organelles 1

    PubMed Central

    Nagahashi, Jerry; Hiraike, Kathleen

    1982-01-01

    The effect of centrifugal force and length of centrifugation time on the sedimentation of plant organelles was determined for corn (Zea mays L.) root homogenates. A centrifugal force of 6000g for at least 20 minutes was necessary to pellet 90% of the mitochondrial marker (cytochrome c oxidase). This initial centrifugation step is optimal for separating mitochondria from microsomes, since cross-contamination of endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane vesicles with mitochondria is minimized. Centrifugal forces of 8000g or 10,000g for 20 minutes and 13,000g for 15 minutes pellet 90% of the mitochondrial marker; however, these centrifugation conditions also sediment more plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:16662245

  4. Static deformation of a heavy spring due to gravity and centrifugal force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essén, Hanno; Nordmark, Arne

    2010-05-01

    The static equilibrium deformation of a heavy spring due to its own weight is calculated for two cases: first for a spring hanging in a constant gravitational field, and then for a spring which is at rest in a rotating system where it is stretched by the centrifugal force. Two different models are considered: first a discrete model assuming a finite number of point masses connected by springs of negligible weight, and then the continuum limit of this model. In the second case, the differential equation for the deformation is obtained by demanding that the potential energy is minimized. In this way a simple application of the variational calculus is obtained.

  5. Gas centrifuge with driving motor

    DOEpatents

    Dancy, Jr., William H.

    1976-01-01

    1. A centrifuge for separating gaseous constituents of different masses comprising a vertical tubular rotor, means for introducing a gas mixture of different masses into said rotor and means for removing at least one of the gas components from the rotor, a first bearing means supporting said rotor at one end for rotational movement, a support, a damping bearing mounted on said support, a shaft fixed to said rotor at the opposite end and mechanically connecting said rotor to said damping bearing, a cup-shaped tube of electrically conductive, non-magnetic material in coaxial relationship with said shaft, the open end of said tube extending away from said rotor and the closed end of said tube being directly secured to the adjacent end of the rotor, an annular core of magnetic material fixedly mounted on said support so as to be disposed within said tube and around said shaft, and a second annular magnetic core with coils arranged thereon to receive polyphase current to produce a rotating magnetic field traversing the circumference of said tube, fixedly mounted on said support so as to surround said tube, the size of said first annular core and said second annular core being such as to permit limited radial displacement of said shaft and said tube.

  6. Two-Stage Centrifugal Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, David

    2011-01-01

    Fan designs are often constrained by envelope, rotational speed, weight, and power. Aerodynamic performance and motor electrical performance are heavily influenced by rotational speed. The fan used in this work is at a practical limit for rotational speed due to motor performance characteristics, and there is no more space available in the packaging for a larger fan. The pressure rise requirements keep growing. The way to ordinarily accommodate a higher DP is to spin faster or grow the fan rotor diameter. The invention is to put two radially oriented stages on a single disk. Flow enters the first stage from the center; energy is imparted to the flow in the first stage blades, the flow is redirected some amount opposite to the direction of rotation in the fixed stators, and more energy is imparted to the flow in the second- stage blades. Without increasing either rotational speed or disk diameter, it is believed that as much as 50 percent more DP can be achieved with this design than with an ordinary, single-stage centrifugal design. This invention is useful primarily for fans having relatively low flow rates with relatively high pressure rise requirements.

  7. ROTATIONAL INSTABILITIES AND CENTRIFUGAL HANGUP

    SciTech Connect

    K. NEW; J. CENTRELLA

    2000-12-01

    One interesting class of gravitational radiation sources includes rapidly rotating astrophysical objects that encounter dynamical instabilities. We have carried out a set of simulations of rotationally induced instabilities in differentially rotating polytropes. An n=1.5 polytrope with the Maclaurin rotation law will encounter the m=2 bar instability at T/{vert_bar}W{vert_bar} {ge} 0.27. Our results indicate that the remnant of this in-stability is a persistent bar-like structure that emits a long-lived gravitational radiation signal. Furthermore, dynamical instability is shown to occur in n=3.33 polytropes with the j-constant rotation law at T/{vert_bar}W{vert_bar} {ge} 0:14. In this case, the dominant mode of instability is m=1. Such instability may allow a centrifugally-hung core to begin collapsing to neutron star densities on a dynamical timescale. If it occurs in a supermassive star, it may produce gravitational radiation detectable by LISA.

  8. Safety aspects of gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium enrichment by gas centrifuge is a commercially proven, viable technology. Gas centrifuge enrichment plant operations pose hazards that are also found in other industries as well as unique hazards as a result of processing and handling uranium hexafluoride and the handling of enriched uranium. Hazards also found in other industries included those posed by the use of high-speed rotating equipment and equipment handling by use of heavy-duty cranes. Hazards from high-speed rotating equipment are associated with the operation of the gas centrifuges themselves and with the operation of the uranium hexafluoride compressors in the tail withdrawal system. These and related hazards are discussed. It is included that commercial gas centrifuge enrichment plants have been designed to operate safely.

  9. Centrifuge advances using HTS magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, F. N.; Flögel-Delor, U.; Rothfeld, R.; Wippich, D.; Riedel, T.

    2001-05-01

    Passive magnetic bearings are of increasing technical interest. We performed experiments with centrifugal rotors to analyze gyroscopic forces in terms imbalance, rotor elasticity and damping. Centrifuge rotors need to be operated soft and stable without whirling the sediments. In order to evaluate optimal parameters critical and resonance behaviors are investigated. Eccentricities up 2 mm are safely passed by accelerating test wheels. In a simple model we describe the effect of passing critical rotational speeds. Measurements of bearing properties and wheel performance are presented. We have constructed a first prototype centrifuge designed with a HTS double bearing which operates a titanium rotor safely up to 30 000 rpm. A 15 W Stirling cooler serves cryogenics of the YBCO stators. From the experiments design guidelines for centrifugal applications with HTS bearings are given.

  10. Optical detection strategies for centrifugal microfluidic platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Damien; O'Sullivan, Mary; Ducrée, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic systems have become one of the principal platforms for implementing bioanalytical assays, most notably for biomedical point-of-care diagnostics. These so-called 'lab-on-a-disc' systems primarily utilise the rotationally controlled centrifugal field in combination with capillary forces to automate a range of laboratory unit operations (LUOs) for sample preparation, such as metering, aliquoting, mixing and extraction for biofluids as well as sorting, isolation and counting of bioparticles. These centrifugal microfluidic LUOs have been regularly surveyed in the literature. However, even though absolutely essential to provide true sample-to-answer functionality of lab-on-a-disc platforms, systematic examination of associated, often optical, read-out technologies has been so far neglected. This review focusses on the history and state-of-the-art of optical read-out strategies for centrifugal microfluidic platforms, arising (commercial) application potential and future opportunities.

  11. Crew Training - Apollo 8 (Centrifuge) - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-11-05

    S68-53186 (1 Nov. 1968) --- Astronaut Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander, egresses the gondola in Building 29 after centrifuge training in the Manned Spacecraft Center's (MSC) Flight Acceleration Facility (FAF).

  12. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  13. Renal Response to Chronic Centrifugation in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wang, T. J.; Corbin, B. J.; Wade, C. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Previously reported effects of chronic centrifugation on renal function in mammals are contradictory. The present study was conducted as an effort to provide a comprehensive analysis of renal response to chronic centrifugation (12 days at +2 Gz). Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (210-230 g) were used: eight centrifuged (EC) and eight off centrifuge controls (OCC). During centrifugation EC had lower body weight and food consumption. EC showed a decrease (72%) in water intake for the first two days (T1 and T2) followed by significant increases from T4-T6. EC urine output increased two-fold over the first four days, returning to baseline by T9. EC urea excretion was elevated on T3 through T5. Creatinine, Na(+), K(+), and osmolar excretion were lower than OCC over the last four days of the study. Assuming constant plasma osmolarity and creatinine levels, EC free water clearance (C(sub H2O)) was elevated significantly on T4 when the peak urine output was exhibited. EC also had a greater C(sub H2O) over the last four days, associated with a significantly lower osmolar clearance and GFR. The initial diuresis exhibited during centrifugation can be attributed to a reduced water resorption and increased urea excretion. This diuresis was mediated independent of changes in GFR over the first eight days. However, differences in excretion seen after eight days of centrifugation are probably GFR mediated which would imply animals established a new homeostatic setpoint by that time. Centrifugation elicites an acute alteration in fluid homeostasis followed by adaptation within a week.

  14. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  15. Renal Response to Chronic Centrifugation in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wang, T. J.; Corbin, B. J.; Wade, C. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Previously reported effects of chronic centrifugation on renal function in mammals are contradictory. The present study was conducted as an effort to provide a comprehensive analysis of renal response to chronic centrifugation (12 days at +2 Gz). Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (210-230 g) were used: eight centrifuged (EC) and eight off centrifuge controls (OCC). During centrifugation EC had lower body weight and food consumption. EC showed a decrease (72%) in water intake for the first two days (T1 and T2) followed by significant increases from T4-T6. EC urine output increased two-fold over the first four days, returning to baseline by T9. EC urea excretion was elevated on T3 through T5. Creatinine, Na(+), K(+), and osmolar excretion were lower than OCC over the last four days of the study. Assuming constant plasma osmolarity and creatinine levels, EC free water clearance (C(sub H2O)) was elevated significantly on T4 when the peak urine output was exhibited. EC also had a greater C(sub H2O) over the last four days, associated with a significantly lower osmolar clearance and GFR. The initial diuresis exhibited during centrifugation can be attributed to a reduced water resorption and increased urea excretion. This diuresis was mediated independent of changes in GFR over the first eight days. However, differences in excretion seen after eight days of centrifugation are probably GFR mediated which would imply animals established a new homeostatic setpoint by that time. Centrifugation elicites an acute alteration in fluid homeostasis followed by adaptation within a week.

  16. Isolation of symbiotic dinoflagellates by centrifugal elutriation

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, A.E.; Quinn, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Centrifugal elutriation, a method combining centripetal liquid flow with centrifugal force, has been used to isolate symbiotic dinoflagellates from a cnidarian host. The elutriated cells were shown to be viable by photosynthetic incorporation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and low release of photosynthetic products into the incubation medium. The level of contamination by clinging debris was low and by host solids was negligible.

  17. Laser therapy of stretch marks.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, David H

    2002-01-01

    Striae distensae, better known as stretch marks, are a common disfiguring skin disorder of significant cosmetic concern. Many sources have reported the use of lasers to diminish the appearance of striae. Controlled clinical studies of the various treatment modalities available for striae are relatively uncommon, and much of the clinical data are anecdotal. The use of lasers alone or in combination with other therapeutic modalities can provide a safe and effective reduction in the appearance of both red and white striae distensae. Many of these therapies require special measures for darker skin phototypes. This article reviews the historical use of laser therapy for this disorder and discusses current therapeutic options.

  18. Electrostatic effects in DNA stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2006-10-01

    The response of a semiflexible polyelectrolyte chain to stretching in the regimes of moderate and weak screening is studied theoretically, with a special focus on DNA experiments. By using the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann description of electrostatic self-interactions of the chain, we explicitly demonstrate the applicability of the concept of effective charge to certain aspects of the problem. This charge can be extracted from the far-field asymptotic behavior of the electrostatic potential of the fully aligned chain. Surprisingly, in terms of the effective charge, the electrostatically renormalized persistence length can be formally described by the classical Odijk-Skolnick-Fixman formula, whose domain of applicability is normally limited to the linearized Debye-Hückel (DH) approximation. However, the short-scale behavior of the chain in the nonlinear regime deviates from the of DH-based result, even upon charge renormalization. This difference is revealed in the calculated stretching curves for strongly charged DNA. These results are in good agreement with recent experiments. In the limit of weak screening we predict the elastic response to have a distinctive two-stage character, with a peculiar intermediate “unstretchable” regime.

  19. Indentation of a stretched elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yue; Crosby, Alfred J.; Cai, Shengqiang

    2017-10-01

    Indentation has been intensively used to characterize mechanical properties of soft materials such as elastomers, gels, and soft biological tissues. In most indentation measurements, residual stress or stretch which can be commonly found in soft materials is ignored. In this article, we aim to quantitatively understand the effects of prestretches of an elastomer on its indentation measurement. Based on surface Green's function, we analytically derive the relationship between indentation force and indentation depth for a prestretched Neo-Hookean solid with a flat-ended cylindrical indenter as well as a spherical indenter. In addition, for a non-equal biaxially stretched elastomer, we obtain the equation determining the eccentricity of the elliptical contacting area between a spherical indenter and the elastomer. Our results clearly demonstrate that the effects of prestretches of an elastomer on its indentation measurement can be significant. To validate our analytical results, we further conduct correspondent finite element simulations of indentation of prestretched elastomers. The numerical results agree well with our analytical predictions.

  20. Decorrelation Stretch Near Cerberus Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released July 25, 2004 On this image you can see two infrared frames of the same area on Mars. One of the images (in black and white) represents a single wavelength or band of the THEMIS IR instrument, while the other image (in false color) represents 3 different bands. The image with the various colors was created with a technique called Decorrelation Stretch (DCS). In this technique individual bands of the THEMIS IR instrument are stretched to better show compositional variations throughout the whole range. After the bands are stretched they are overlayed on one another and colors are assigned to each band. This makes up the colors in the image.

    As you can see, there is a difference in what is noticable in the single band IR image versus the false-colored one. On the color image the pink/magenta colors usually represent basaltic content, cyan often indicates the presence of water ice clouds, while green can represent dust.

    The bright purple and pink colors associated with the valley are due to basalt. There may be a thin veneer of dust present in the region (it was a dark colored region during the Viking mission in the 1970's) through which the basaltic material pokes out along the edges of the valley and the nearby knobby terrain.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 10.7, Longitude 163 East (197 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  1. Expression of polyalanine stretches induces mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Toriumi, Kazuya; Oma, Yoko; Kino, Yoshihiro; Futai, Eugene; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2008-05-15

    In recent years, several novel types of disorders have been characterized, including what have been termed polyalanine diseases, in which patients have expanded triplet repeats in specific genes, resulting in the translation of aberrantly elongated polyalanine stretches. In this study, we showed that yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-fused elongated polyalanine stretches localized exclusively to the cytoplasm and formed aggregates. Additionally, the polyalanine stretches themselves were toxic. We sought to identify proteins that bound directly to the polyalanine stretches, as factors that might be involved in triggering cell death. Many mitochondrial proteins were identified as polyalanine-binding proteins. We showed that one of the identified proteins, succinate dehydrogenase subunit A, was decreased in the mitochondria of cells expressing polyalanine stretches; as a result, succinate oxidative activity was decreased. Furthermore, the polyalanine stretches also associated directly with mitochondria. This suggests that polya-lanine stretches might directly induce cell death. Additionally, the mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced in cells expressing polyalanine stretches. We propose a novel mechanism by which polyalanine stretches may cause cytotoxicity through mitochondrial dysfunction. This may be a common mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of all polyalanine diseases.

  2. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    PubMed Central

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations – cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity. PMID:24875391

  3. MHD Stability of Centrifugally Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Min

    2003-10-01

    Centrifugally confined plasmas utilize centrifugal forces from plasma rotation to augment magnetic confinement, as an alternative approach to fusion. One magnetic geometry is mirror-type, with rotation about the axis induced from a central, biased core conductor. The outward centrifugal forces from the rotation have a component along the field lines, thus confining ions to the center. The immediate concern, of course, is that the system could be flute unstable to the interchange. The antidote here is that the radial shear in the rotation could stabilize the flute. Our 2D simulations show, first, that plasma pressure is highly peaked at the center away from the mirror end coils. Next, 3D simulations show unequivocally that velocity shear is providing the stability. Further study indicates that the flute stability is sensitive to the density profile. A favorable density profile could be achieved by judiciously placing the particle source, also necessary for a steady state centrifuge. As flows approach the Alfven speed, electromagnetic modes could be involved. The latter is motivated by the question of whether magnetorotational instability, thought to be an angular momentum transporter in accretion disks, could be found in centrifugal plasmas, since all the ingredients are there. We show that the MRI as understood should be stable; however, a related astrophysical instability, the Parker instability, could arise. The Parker instability results in plasma accumulating in regions of bent field lines, further accentuating the bending.

  4. Centrifugal techniques for measuring saturated hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, John R.; Mello, Karen A.

    1991-01-01

    Centrifugal force is an alternative to large pressure gradients for the measurement of low values of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat). With a head of water above a porous medium in a centrifuge bucket, both constant-head and falling-head measurements are practical at forces up to at least 1800 times normal gravity. Darcy's law applied to the known centrifugal potential leads to simple formulas for Ksat that are analogous to those used in the standard gravity-driven constant- and falling-head methods. Both centrifugal methods were tested on several fine-textured samples of soil and ceramic with Ksat between about 10−10 and 10−9 m/s. The results were compared to falling-head gravity measurements. The comparison shows most measurements agreeing to within 20% for a given sample, much of the variation probably resulting from run-to-run changes in sample structure. The falling-head centrifuge method proved to be especially simple in design and operation and was more accurate than the constant-head method. With modified apparatus, Ksat measurements less than 10−10 m/s should be attainable.

  5. Kinematics analyses related to stretch-shortening cycle during soccer instep kicking after different acute stretching.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Mohammadkazemi, Reza; Sarafrazi, Soodeh; Riyahi-Malayeri, Shahin; Sotoodeh, Vahid

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static and dynamic stretching within a preexercise warm-up on angular velocity of knee joint, deepest knee flexion (DKF), and duration of eccentric and concentric contractions, which are relative to the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) during instep kicking in professional soccer players. The kicking motions of dominant legs were captured from 18 Olympic professional male soccer players (height: 180.38 ± 7.34 cm; weight: 69.77 ± 9.73 kg; age: 19.22 ± 1.83 years) using 4 digital video cameras at 50 Hz. There was a significant difference in the DKF after the dynamic stretching (-3.22 ± 3.10°) vs. static stretching (-0.18 ± 3.19°) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.001. Moreover, there was significant difference in eccentric duration after the dynamic stretching (0.006 ± 0.01 seconds) vs. static stretching (-0.003 ± 0.01 seconds) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.015. There was a significant difference in the concentric duration after the dynamic stretching (-0.007 ± 0.01 seconds) vs. static stretching (0.002 ± 0.01 seconds) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.001. There was also a significant difference in knee angular velocity after the dynamic stretching (4.08 ± 3.81 rad·s) vs. static stretching (-5.34 ± 4.40 rad·s) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.001. We concluded that dynamic stretching during warm-ups, as compared with static stretching, is probably the most effective way as preparation for the kinematics characteristics of soccer instep kick, which are relative to the SSC.

  6. DNA stretching on the wall surfaces in curved microchannels with different radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Wu, Fong-He; Tsai, Ming-Ju

    2014-08-01

    DNA molecule conformation dynamics and stretching were made on semi-circular surfaces with different radii (500 to 5,000 μm) in microchannels measuring 200 μm × 200 μm in cross section. Five different buffer solutions - 1× Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE), 1× Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE), 1× Tris-EDTA (TE), 1× Tris-phosphate-EDTA (TPE), and 1× Tris-buffered saline (TBS) solutions - were used with a variety of viscosity such as 40, 60, and 80 cP, with resultant 10-4 ≤ Re ≤ 10-3 and the corresponding 5 ≤ Wi ≤ 12. The test fluids were seeded with JOJO-1 tracer particles for flow visualization and driven through the test channels via a piezoelectric (PZT) micropump. Micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) measuring technique was applied for the centered-plane velocity distribution measurements. It is found that the radius effect on the stretch ratio of DNA dependence is significant. The stretch ratio becomes larger as the radius becomes small due to the larger centrifugal force. Consequently, the maximum stretch was found at the center of the channel with a radius of 500 μm.

  7. Possible segregation caused by centrifugal titanium casting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Kanatani, M; Nakano, S; Miyakawa, O; Kobayashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The possibility of the segregation under solidification process using a centrifugal casting machine was investigated using an electron probe microanalyzer with elemental distribution map, line analysis and quantitative analysis. When a very small quantity of platinum was added to local molten titanium during the casting process, macroscopic segregation was observed under conditions of density difference of 0.1 g/cm3 at the most, confirming that the centrifugal force of the casting machine is extremely strong. When a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was cast, however, no macroscopic segregation was observed. The centrifugal force of the casting machine examined in the present study hardly results in the body-force segregation in this titanium alloy.

  8. Effects of chronic centrifugation on mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janer, L.; Duke, J.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to excess gravity in vitro alters the developmental sequence in embryonic mouse limbs and palates (Duke, Janer and Campbell, 1984; Duke, 1983). The effects of excess gravity on in vivo mammalian development was investigated using a small animal centrifuge. Four-week old female mice exposed to excess gravities of 1.8-3.5 G for eight weeks weighed significantly less than controls. Mice were mated after five weeks of adaptation to excess G, and sacrificed either at gestational day 12 or 18. There were fewer pregnancies in the centrifuged group (4/36) than in controls (9/31), and crown rump lengths (CRL) of embryos developing in the centrifuge were less than CRLs of 1-G embryos. These results show that although immersed in amniotic fluid, embryos are responsive to Delta-G.

  9. Centrifugal compressor design for electrically assisted boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Yang, M.; Martinez-Botas, R. F.; Zhuge, W. L.; Qureshi, U.; Richards, B.

    2013-12-01

    Electrically assisted boost is a prominent method to solve the issues of transient lag in turbocharger and remains an optimized operation condition for a compressor due to decoupling from turbine. Usually a centrifugal compressor for gasoline engine boosting is operated at high rotational speed which is beyond the ability of an electric motor in market. In this paper a centrifugal compressor with rotational speed as 120k RPM and pressure ratio as 2.0 is specially developed for electrically assisted boost. A centrifugal compressor including the impeller, vaneless diffuser and the volute is designed by meanline method followed by 3D detailed design. Then CFD method is employed to predict as well as analyse the performance of the design compressor. The results show that the pressure ratio and efficiency at design point is 2.07 and 78% specifically.

  10. Effects of chronic centrifugation on mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janer, L.; Duke, J.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to excess gravity in vitro alters the developmental sequence in embryonic mouse limbs and palates (Duke, Janer and Campbell, 1984; Duke, 1983). The effects of excess gravity on in vivo mammalian development was investigated using a small animal centrifuge. Four-week old female mice exposed to excess gravities of 1.8-3.5 G for eight weeks weighed significantly less than controls. Mice were mated after five weeks of adaptation to excess G, and sacrificed either at gestational day 12 or 18. There were fewer pregnancies in the centrifuged group (4/36) than in controls (9/31), and crown rump lengths (CRL) of embryos developing in the centrifuge were less than CRLs of 1-G embryos. These results show that although immersed in amniotic fluid, embryos are responsive to Delta-G.

  11. 26. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Ironworks, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1879, 1881. View: Historical view, 1934, from T. T. Waterman collection, Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association. Once the molasses was separated from the sugar crystals it flowed through the spouts in the base of the centrifugals. The centrifugals' pulleys can be seen underneath the centrifugal. The centrifugal on the right has been reinforced with seven metal bands. The handles for the clutch mechanism are located above the centrifugal. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  12. Stretching Impacts Inflammation Resolution in Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J; Colas, Romain A; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-07-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 min twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, 2 weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch versus no stretch for 48 h, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue.

  13. STRETCHING IMPACTS INFLAMMATION RESOLUTION IN CONNECTIVE TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J.; Colas, Romain A.; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N.; Langevin, Helene M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 minutes twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, two weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch vs. no stretch for 48 hours, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue. PMID:26588184

  14. Effects of Centrifuge Diameter and Operation on Rodent Adaptation to Chronic Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the responses of rats to centrifugation in a constant acceleration field (1.5 G). Centrifuge diameter (1.8m, 2.5m or 6.0m) and schedule of operation (Daily or weekly stop) varied between groups. Body mass, food consumption, water consumption and neurovestibular function were measured weekly. Body temperature and activity were continuously monitored using telemetry. A subset of subjects were videotaped (50 minutes per day) to allow for movement analysis. Exposure to a hyperdynamic field of this magnitude did cause the expected depression in the physiological variables monitored. Recovery was accomplished within a relatively rapid time frame; all variables returned to precentrifugation levels. In general, the magnitudes of the changes and the rate of recovery were similar at different centrifuge diameters and stopping frequency. There were cases, however, in which the magnitude of the response and/or the rate of recovery to a new steady-state were altered as a result of centrifuge diameter. In summary, these results indicate that stopping frequency has little, if any, effect on adaptation to chronic centrifugation. However, the angular velocity (omega), and therefore centrifuge diameter is an important consideration in the adaptation of an organism to chronic centrifugation.

  15. Effects of Centrifuge Diameter and Operation on Rodent Adaptation to Chronic Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the responses of rats to centrifugation in a constant acceleration field (1.5 G). Centrifuge diameter (1.8m, 2.5m or 6.0m) and schedule of operation (Daily or weekly stop) varied between groups. Body mass, food consumption, water consumption and neurovestibular function were measured weekly. Body temperature and activity were continuously monitored using telemetry. A subset of subjects were videotaped (50 minutes per day) to allow for movement analysis. Exposure to a hyperdynamic field of this magnitude did cause the expected depression in the physiological variables monitored. Recovery was accomplished within a relatively rapid time frame; all variables returned to precentrifugation levels. In general, the magnitudes of the changes and the rate of recovery were similar at different centrifuge diameters and stopping frequency. There were cases, however, in which the magnitude of the response and/or the rate of recovery to a new steady-state were altered as a result of centrifuge diameter. In summary, these results indicate that stopping frequency has little, if any, effect on adaptation to chronic centrifugation. However, the angular velocity (omega), and therefore centrifuge diameter is an important consideration in the adaptation of an organism to chronic centrifugation.

  16. Critique of ``Centrifugal Gas Compression Cycle''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, John C.

    2002-11-01

    In a paper in this volume, "Centrifugal Gas Compression Cycle," a thermodynamic cycle is introduced that the author claims will convert heat from a reservoir at fixed temperature entirely into work. His analysis suffers from a fatal flaw that invalidates his conclusion, namely, a failure to correctly account for the work and heat flux involved in an isothermal centrifugal compression of a gas. We give a correct accounting here that demonstrates that this process is not simultaneously isothermal and adiabatic, as the author claims, but rather involves the evolution of heat. This invalidates the author's analysis.

  17. System analysis of plasma centrifuges and sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    System analyses of cylindrical plasma centrifuges are presented, for which the velocity field and electromagnetic fields are calculated. The effects of different electrode geometrics, induced magnetic fields, Hall-effect, and secondary flows are discussed. It is shown that speeds of 10000 m/sec can be achieved in plasma centrifuges, and that an efficient separation of U238 and U235 in uranium plasmas is feasible. The external boundary-value problem for the deposition of sputtering products is reduced to a Fredholm integral equation, which is solved analytically by means of the method of successive approximations.

  18. Centrifuge for separating helium from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Theyse, F.H.; Kelling, F.E.T.

    1980-01-08

    Ultra Centrifuge Nederland N.V.'s improved centrifuge for separating helium from natural gas comprises a hollow cylindrical rotor, designated as a separating drum, within a stationary housing. Natural gas liquids that condense under pressure in the separating drum pass through openings in the drum into the space between the drum and housing. In this space, a series of openings, or throttling restrictors, allows the liquids to expand and return to gas. The gaseous component that does not liquefy in the drum remains separate for drawing off.

  19. Wave-Driven Rotation In Centrifugal Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-03-28

    Centrifugal mirrors use supersonic rotation to provide axial confinement and enhanced stability. Usually the rotation is produced using electrodes, but these electrodes have limited the rotation to the Alfven critical ionization velocity, which is too slow to be useful for fusion. Instead, the rotation could be produced using radio frequency waves. A fixed azimuthal ripple is a simple and efficient wave that could produce rotation by harnessing alpha particle energy. This is an extension of the alpha channeling effect. The alpha particle power and efficiency in a simulated devices is sufficient to produce rotation without external energy input. By eliminating the need for electrodes, this opens new opportunities for centrifugal traps.

  20. Detection methods for centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Burger, Robert; Amato, Letizia; Boisen, Anja

    2016-02-15

    Centrifugal microfluidics has attracted much interest from academia as well as industry, since it potentially offers solutions for affordable, user-friendly and portable biosensing. A wide range of so-called fluidic unit operations, e.g. mixing, metering, liquid routing, and particle separation, have been developed and allow automation and integration of complex assay protocols in lab-on-a-disc systems. Besides liquid handling, the detection strategy for reading out the assay is crucial for developing a fully integrated system. In this review, we focus on biosensors and readout methods for the centrifugal microfluidics platform and cover optical as well as mechanical and electrical detection principles.

  1. The concept of a plasma centrifuge with a high frequency rotating magnetic field and axial circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, V. D.; Potanin, E. P.

    2017-07-01

    The possibility of using a rotating magnetic field (RMF) in a plasma centrifuge (PC), with axial circulation to multiply the radial separation effect in an axial direction, is considered. For the first time, a traveling magnetic field (TMF) is proposed to drive an axial circulation flow in a PC. The longitudinal separation effect is calculated for a notional model, using specified operational parameters and the properties of a plasma, comprising an isotopic mixture of 20Ne-22Ne and generated by a high frequency discharge. The optimal intensity of a circulation flow, in which the longitudinal separation effect reaches its maximum value, is studied. The optimal parameters of the RMF and TMF for effective separation, as well as the centrifuge performance, are calculated.

  2. Quantitative Microbial Ecology through Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Mau, Rebecca L.; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J.; Liu, Cindy M.; McHugh, Theresa A.; Marks, Jane C.; Morrissey, Ember M.; Price, Lance B.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria grow and transform elements at different rates, and as yet, quantifying this variation in the environment is difficult. Determining isotope enrichment with fine taxonomic resolution after exposure to isotope tracers could help, but there are few suitable techniques. We propose a modification to stable isotope probing (SIP) that enables the isotopic composition of DNA from individual bacterial taxa after exposure to isotope tracers to be determined. In our modification, after isopycnic centrifugation, DNA is collected in multiple density fractions, and each fraction is sequenced separately. Taxon-specific density curves are produced for labeled and nonlabeled treatments, from which the shift in density for each individual taxon in response to isotope labeling is calculated. Expressing each taxon's density shift relative to that taxon's density measured without isotope enrichment accounts for the influence of nucleic acid composition on density and isolates the influence of isotope tracer assimilation. The shift in density translates quantitatively to isotopic enrichment. Because this revision to SIP allows quantitative measurements of isotope enrichment, we propose to call it quantitative stable isotope probing (qSIP). We demonstrated qSIP using soil incubations, in which soil bacteria exhibited strong taxonomic variations in 18O and 13C composition after exposure to [18O]water or [13C]glucose. The addition of glucose increased the assimilation of 18O into DNA from [18O]water. However, the increase in 18O assimilation was greater than expected based on utilization of glucose-derived carbon alone, because the addition of glucose indirectly stimulated bacteria to utilize other substrates for growth. This example illustrates the benefit of a quantitative approach to stable isotope probing. PMID:26296731

  3. Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Bond

    2006-07-01

    Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications by Jeff Eerkens (University of Missouri), Jay Kunze (Idaho State University), and Leonard Bond (Idaho National Laboratory) The principal isotope enrichment business in the world is the enrichment of uranium for commercial power reactor fuels. However, there are a number of other needs for separated isotopes. Some examples are: 1) Pure isotopic targets for irradiation to produce medical radioisotopes. 2) Pure isotopes for semiconductors. 3) Low neutron capture isotopes for various uses in nuclear reactors. 4) Isotopes for industrial tracer/identification applications. Examples of interest to medicine are targets to produce radio-isotopes such as S-33, Mo-98, Mo-100, W-186, Sn-112; while for MRI diagnostics, the non-radioactive Xe-129 isotope is wanted. For super-semiconductor applications some desired industrial isotopes are Si-28, Ga-69, Ge-74, Se-80, Te-128, etc. An example of a low cross section isotope for use in reactors is Zn-68 as a corrosion inhibitor material in nuclear reactor primary systems. Neutron activation of Ar isotopes is of interest in industrial tracer and diagnostic applications (e.g. oil-logging). . In the past few years there has been a sufficient supply of isotopes in common demand, because of huge Russian stockpiles produced with old electromagnetic and centrifuge separators previously used for uranium enrichment. Production of specialized isotopes in the USA has been largely accomplished using old ”calutrons” (electromagnetic separators) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These methods of separating isotopes are rather energy inefficient. Use of lasers for isotope separation has been considered for many decades. None of the proposed methods have attained sufficient proof of principal status to be economically attractive to pursue commercially. Some of the authors have succeeded in separating sulfur isotopes using a rather new and different method, known as condensation

  4. Mars Under the Microscope (stretched)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured on the 10th day, or sol, of the rover's mission by its microscopic imager, located on the instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This stretched color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover open and closed. The varying hints of orange suggest differences in mineral composition. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  5. Thermodynamic Anomalies in Stretched Water.

    PubMed

    Altabet, Y Elia; Singh, Rakesh S; Stillinger, Frank H; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2017-09-08

    Via molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water model, we study liquid water's anomalous behavior at large negative pressure produced through isochoric cooling. We find that isochores without a pressure minimum can display "reentrant" behavior whereby a system that cavitates upon cooling can then rehomogenize upon further cooling. This behavior is a consequence of the underlying density maximum along the spinodal, but its actual manifestation in simulations is strongly influenced by finite size effects. These observations suggest that water under strong hydrophilic confinement may display richer phase behavior than hitherto assumed. This also suggests that propensity toward cavitation does not always correlate with greater tension, contrary to the prevailing assumption for interpreting water stretching experiments. We also show that a maximum spinodal density in water results in a locus of maximum compressibility and a minimum speed of sound that are independent from any influence of a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP). However, we demonstrate that structural signatures of a Widom line, which likely emanates from an LLCP at elevated pressure, extend to large negative pressure, but such signatures are only observed upon sampling water's underlying potential energy landscape, rather than the thermalized metastable liquid.

  6. Capillary stretching of elastic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Stone, Howard A.; Duprat, Camille

    2014-11-01

    Fibrous media consisting of constrained flexible fibers can be found in many engineered systems (membranes in filters, woven textile, matted paper). When such materials interact with a liquid, the presence of liquid/air interfaces induces capillary forces that deform the fibers. To model this interaction we study the behaviour of a finite volume of liquid deposited on two parallel flexible fibers clamped at both ends. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We show that the system undergoes various morphological changes as the interfiber distance, the elasticity and the tension of the fibers are varied. For a certain range of parameters, the liquid spreads along the fibers and pulls them together, leading to the ``zipping'' of the fibers. This capillary adhesion can then be enhanced or reduced by changing the tension within the fibers. We will show that balancing stretching and capillary forces allows the prediction of this transition as well as the conditions for which detachment of the fibers occurs. These results may be used to prevent the clogging of fibrous membranes or to optimize the capture of liquids.

  7. Mars Under the Microscope (stretched)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured on the 10th day, or sol, of the rover's mission by its microscopic imager, located on the instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This stretched color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover open and closed. The varying hints of orange suggest differences in mineral composition. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  8. Stretch exercises increase tolerance to stretch in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Law, Roberta Y W; Harvey, Lisa A; Nicholas, Michael K; Tonkin, Lois; De Sousa, Maria; Finniss, Damien G

    2009-10-01

    Stretch is commonly prescribed as part of physical rehabilitation in pain management programs, yet little is known about its effectiveness. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate the effects of a 3-week stretch program on muscle extensibility and stretch tolerance in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. A within-subject design was used, with one leg of each participant randomly allocated to an experimental (stretch) condition and the other leg randomly allocated to a control (no-stretch) condition. Thirty adults with pain of musculoskeletal origin persisting for at least 3 months were recruited from patients enrolled in a multidisciplinary pain management program at a hospital in Sydney, Australia. The hamstring muscles of the experimental leg were stretched daily for 1 minute over 3 weeks; the control leg was not stretched. This intervention was embedded within a pain management program and supervised by physical therapists. Primary outcomes were muscle extensibility and stretch tolerance, which were reflected by passive hip flexion angles measured with standardized and nonstandardized torques, respectively. Initial measurements were taken before the first stretch on day 1, and final measurements were taken 1 to 2 days after the last stretch. A blinded assessor was used for testing. Stretch did not increase muscle extensibility (mean between-group difference in hip flexion was 1 degrees , 95% confidence interval=-2 degrees to 4 degrees ), but it did improve stretch tolerance (mean between-group difference in hip flexion was 8 degrees , 95% confidence interval=5 degrees to 10 degrees ). Three weeks of stretch increases tolerance to the discomfort associated with stretch but does not change muscle extensibility in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  9. Isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Rodney J.; Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated.

  10. Vacuum chamber-free centrifuge with magnetic bearings.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol Hoon; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2013-09-01

    Centrifuges are devices that separate particles of different densities and sizes through the application of a centrifugal force. If a centrifuge could be operated under atmospheric conditions, all vacuum-related components such as the vacuum chamber, vacuum pump, diffusion pump, and sealing could be removed from a conventional centrifuge system. The design and manufacturing procedure for centrifuges could then be greatly simplified to facilitate the production of lightweight centrifuge systems of smaller volume. Furthermore, the maintenance costs incurred owing to wear and tear due to conventional ball bearings would be eliminated. In this study, we describe a novel vacuum chamber-free centrifuge supported by magnetic bearings. We demonstrate the feasibility of the vacuum chamber-free centrifuge by presenting experimental results that verify its high-speed support capability and motoring power capacity.

  11. Astronaut Virgil Grissom - Training Prep - Centrifuge - Johnsonville, PA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-01-01

    B59-00586 (1959) --- Astronaut Virgil (Gus) Grissom is seen preparing for training in the centrifuge at Johnsville. A Navy corpsman attaches sensors to Grissom to monitor his body's reaction to the centrifuge. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Research centrifuge accommodations on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arno, Roger D.; Horkachuk, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Life sciences research using plants and animals on the Space Station Freedom requires the ability to maintain live subjects in a safe and low stress environment for long durations at microgravity and at one g. The need for a centrifuge to achieve these accelerations is evident. Programmatic, technical, and cost considerations currently favor a 2.5 meter diameter centrifuge located either in the end cone of a Space Station Freedom node or in a separate module. A centrifuge facility could support a mix of rodent, plant, and small primate habitats. An automated cage extractor could be used to remove modular habitats in pairs without stopping the main rotor, minimizing the disruption to experiment protocols. The accommodation of such a centrifuge facility on the Space Station represents a significant demand on the crew time, power, data, volume, and logistics capability. It will contribute to a better understanding of the effects of space flight on humans, an understanding of plant growth in space for the eventual production of food, and an understanding of the role of gravity in biological processes.

  13. Evaluation of an improved centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Donovan, T E; White, L E

    1985-05-01

    A Type III gold alloy, a silver-palladium alloy, and a base metal alloy were cast in two different centrifugal casting machines. With the number of complete cast mesh squares as an indicator of castability, the Airspin casting machine produced superior castings with all three alloys. The base metal alloy produced the greatest number of complete squares with both casting machines.

  14. Pressure distribution in centrifugal dental casting.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, J P

    1978-02-01

    Equations are developed for liquid metal pressure in centrifugal dental casting, given the instantaneous rotational velocity, density, and certain dimensions of the casting machine and casting pattern. A "reference parabola" is introduced making the fluid pressure concept more understandable. A specially designed specimen demonstrates experimentally the reference parabola at freezing.

  15. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  16. Centrifuge in space fluid flow visualization experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William A.; Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Dunbar, Bonnie J.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype flow visualization system is constructed to examine buoyancy driven flows during centrifugation in space. An axial density gradient is formed by imposing a thermal gradient between the two ends of the test cell. Numerical computations for this geometry showed that the Prandtl number plays a limited part in determining the flow.

  17. Mass Transfer in 12-CM Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chesna, J.C.

    2001-06-26

    One eight-stage unit (8-pack) of centrifugal contactors was tested in both extraction and stripping modes. Efficiencies approaching 100 percent were obtained in both modes. The contactors were operated successfully at a wide range of combined flow rates, including the HEF conditions. This report discusses the results of that test.

  18. Centrifugal Pump Experiment for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderslice, Nicholas; Oberto, Richard; Marrero, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a Centrifugal Pump Experiment that provided an experiential learning experience to chemical engineering undergraduates at the University of Missouri in the spring of 2010 in the Unit Operations Laboratory course. Lab equipment was used by senior students with computer-based data and control technology. In…

  19. APPLICATION ANALYSIS REPORT: RETECH PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the performance of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) and its applicability as a treatment for soils contaminated with organic and/or inorganic compounds. Both the technical and economic aspectsof the technology were examined. A...

  20. Predicting Droplet Formation on Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Jacob Alfred

    Centrifugal microfluidics is a widely known research tool for biological sample and water quality analysis. Currently, the standard equipment used for such diagnostic applications include slow, bulky machines controlled by multiple operators. These machines can be condensed into a smaller, faster benchtop sample-to-answer system. Sample processing is an important step taken to extract, isolate, and convert biological factors, such as nucleic acids or proteins, from a raw sample to an analyzable solution. Volume definition is one such step. The focus of this thesis is the development of a model predicting monodispersed droplet formation and the application of droplets as a technique for volume definition. First, a background of droplet microfluidic platforms is presented, along with current biological analysis technologies and the advantages of integrating such technologies onto microfluidic platforms. Second, background and theories of centrifugal microfluidics is given, followed by theories relevant to droplet emulsions. Third, fabrication techniques for centrifugal microfluidic designs are discussed. Finally, the development of a model for predicting droplet formation on the centrifugal microfluidic platform are presented for the rest of the thesis. Predicting droplet formation analytically based on the volumetric flow rates of the continuous and dispersed phases, the ratios of these two flow rates, and the interfacial tension between the continuous and dispersed phases presented many challenges, which will be discussed in this work. Experimental validation was completed using continuous phase solutions of different interfacial tensions. To conclude, prospective applications are discussed with expected challenges.

  1. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  2. Flow Pattern Characterization for a Centrifugal Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Efrén M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a model for characterizing the flow pattern of a centrifugal impeller attending to the severity of the reverse flow. The model assumes 1) a definition of an escaping particle as the one that flows in every operational point from the trailing edge towards the leading edge of the impeller blades, and 2) a characterization of flow where an operational point is said to have a theoretical flow pattern if it is not possible to establish a fully-reversed escaping particle on it. Therefore, the first part of the article is focused on defining an escaping particle for a centrifugal compressor. The model locates over the map of a centrifugal impeller the line that splits the map in two regions: the region on the right hand side, where a theoretical flow pattern can exist, and the region on the left, where a theoretical flow pattern cannot exist. Therefore, the locus of this line marks a frontier where the expected performance of the impeller cannot be sustained as high as expected. The second part of the article uses a high-performance commercial centrifugal impeller wheel for contrasting the model. A qualitative characterization of the surge line, conclusions and discussions are presented.

  3. Centrifugal Pump Experiment for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderslice, Nicholas; Oberto, Richard; Marrero, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a Centrifugal Pump Experiment that provided an experiential learning experience to chemical engineering undergraduates at the University of Missouri in the spring of 2010 in the Unit Operations Laboratory course. Lab equipment was used by senior students with computer-based data and control technology. In…

  4. Research centrifuge accommodations on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arno, Roger D.; Horkachuk, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Life sciences research using plants and animals on the Space Station Freedom requires the ability to maintain live subjects in a safe and low stress environment for long durations at microgravity and at one g. The need for a centrifuge to achieve these accelerations is evident. Programmatic, technical, and cost considerations currently favor a 2.5 meter diameter centrifuge located either in the end cone of a Space Station Freedom node or in a separate module. A centrifuge facility could support a mix of rodent, plant, and small primate habitats. An automated cage extractor could be used to remove modular habitats in pairs without stopping the main rotor, minimizing the disruption to experiment protocols. The accommodation of such a centrifuge facility on the Space Station represents a significant demand on the crew time, power, data, volume, and logistics capability. It will contribute to a better understanding of the effects of space flight on humans, an understanding of plant growth in space for the eventual production of food, and an understanding of the role of gravity in biological processes.

  5. SCHIRRA, WALTER, JR., ASTRONAUT - TRAINING - CENTRIFUGE - PA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-11-22

    G60-02461 (1960) --- Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr. prepares to enter gondola of centrifuge which is used to test gravitational stress on astronauts training for spaceflight. Schirra became the pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 8 (MA-8) six-orbit space mission. Photo credit: NASA

  6. Crew Training - Apollo 8 (Centrifuge) - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-11-06

    S68-53283 (1 Nov. 1968) --- The Apollo 8 prime crew is seen inside the gondola during centrifuge training in MSC's Flight Acceleration Facility, Building 29. Left to right, are astronauts William A. Anders, lunar module pilot, James A. Lovell Jr., command module pilot; and Frank Borman, commander. Photo credit: NASA

  7. Extracting hydrocarbons from water using a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A. Yu.; Ilyina, A. A.; Chuikin, A. V.; Velikov, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    An original method for the solid-phase microextraction of hydrocarbons from water using a centrifuge is proposed. Comparative results from the chromatographic elution of substances after liquid-phase and solid-phase microextraction are presented. The percentage of the extraction of substances from aqueous solutions and the minimum detection limit for aromatic and aliphatic compounds are calculated.

  8. APPLICATION ANALYSIS REPORT: RETECH PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the performance of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) and its applicability as a treatment for soils contaminated with organic and/or inorganic compounds. Both the technical and economic aspectsof the technology were examined. A...

  9. Engineering design of centrifugal casting machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusnowo, Roni; Gunara, Sophiadi

    2017-06-01

    Centrifugal casting is a metal casting process in which metal liquid is poured into a rotating mold at a specific temperature. Given round will generate a centrifugal force that will affect the outcome of the casting. Casting method is suitable in the manufacture of the casting cylinder to obtain better results. This research was performed to design a prototype machine by using the concept of centrifugal casting. The design method was a step-by-step systematic approach in the process of thinking to achieve the desired goal of realizing the idea and build bridges between idea and the product. Design process was commenced by the conceptual design phase and followed by the embodiment design stage and detailed design stage. With an engineering design process based on the method developed by G. E. Dieter, draft prototype of centrifugal casting machine with dimension of 550×450×400 mm, ¼ HP motor power, pulley and belt mechanism, diameter of 120-150mm, simultaneously with the characteristics of simple casting product, easy manufacture and maintenance, and relatively inexpensive, was generated.

  10. Centrifugal blood pumps for various clinical needs.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Seiji; Nosé, Yukihiko

    2002-11-01

    During the past 10 years, different types of blood pumps were developed to address various clinical needs. The Nikkiso centrifugal blood pump was developed for cardiopulmonary bypass application. This blood pump has been widely used in Japan in more than 20% of the cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. The Kyocera C1E3 Gryo pump was developed for short-term circulatory assistance and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation application for up to 2 weeks. This blood pump has been clinically used for up to 28 days without any blood clot formation. Through Phase I of the Japanese government New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) program, a chronically implanted centrifugal pump for left ventricular assistance was developed. This pump has already demonstrated its effectiveness, safety, and durability as a 2 year blood pump through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Currently, it is in the process of being converted from an experimental to a clinical device. Through Phase II of the NEDO program, a permanently implantable biventricular assist centrifugal blood pump system is under development. It has demonstrated that the previously mentioned left ventricular assist device blood pump is easily converted into a right ventricular assist pump by simply adding a spacer between the pump and the actuator. This communication discusses the historical development strategies for centrifugal blood pumps and their current status for different clinical needs.

  11. Creams for preventing stretch marks in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Young, G L; Jewell, D

    2000-01-01

    Many women develop stretch marks (striae gravidarum) during pregnancy. A number of creams have been used to remove these stretch marks. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of topical treatments to prevent the development of stretch marks. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register. In addition, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL/CCTR) was searched. Date of last search: April 1999. Randomised trials comparing active creams with placebo for the treatment of stretch marks in pregnant women. Trial quality was assessed and data were extracted independently by two reviewers. One study involving 100 women was included. Compared to placebo, treatment with a cream containing Centella asiatica extract, alpha tocopherol and collagen-elastin hydrolysates was associated with less women developing stretch marks (odds ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.17 to 0.99). One particular cream appears to help prevent the development of stretch marks in pregnancy, but only for women who had previously suffered stretch marks in pregnancy. There is no evidence of benefit for general use.

  12. Stretching micropatterned cells on a PDMS membrane.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-22

    Mechanical forces exerted on cells and/or tissues play a major role in numerous processes. We have developed a device to stretch cells plated on a PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS) membrane, compatible with imaging. This technique is reproducible and versatile. The PDMS membrane can be micropatterned in order to confine cells or tissues to a specific geometry. The first step is to print micropatterns onto the PDMS membrane with a deep UV technique. The PDMS membrane is then mounted on a mechanical stretcher. A chamber is bound on top of the membrane with biocompatible grease to allow gliding during the stretch. The cells are seeded and allowed to spread for several hours on the micropatterns. The sample can be stretched and unstretched multiple times with the use of a micrometric screw. It takes less than a minute to apply the stretch to its full extent (around 30%). The technique presented here does not include a motorized device, which is necessary for applying repeated stretch cycles quickly and/or computer controlled stretching, but this can be implemented. Stretching of cells or tissue can be of interest for questions related to cell forces, cell response to mechanical stress or tissue morphogenesis. This video presentation will show how to avoid typical problems that might arise when doing this type of seemingly simple experiment.

  13. Stretch induced hyperexcitability of mice callosal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Anthony; Stebbings, Kevin A.; Llano, Daniel A.; Saif, Taher

    2015-01-01

    Memory and learning are thought to result from changes in synaptic strength. Previous studies on synaptic physiology in brain slices have traditionally been focused on biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate with experiments on mouse brain slices that central nervous system plasticity is also sensitive to mechanical stretch. This is important, given the host of clinical conditions involving changes in mechanical tension on the brain, and the normal role that mechanical tension plays in brain development. A novel platform is developed to investigate neural responses to mechanical stretching. Flavoprotein autofluoresence (FA) imaging was employed for measuring neural activity. We observed that synaptic excitability substantially increases after a small (2.5%) stretch was held for 10 min and released. The increase is accumulative, i.e., multiple stretch cycles further increase the excitability. We also developed analytical tools to quantify the spatial spread and response strength. Results show that the spatial spread is less stable in slices undergoing the stretch-unstretch cycle. FA amplitude and activation rate decrease as excitability increases in stretch cases but not in electrically enhanced cases. These results collectively demonstrate that a small stretch in physiological range can modulate neural activities significantly, suggesting that mechanical events can be employed as a novel tool for the modulation of neural plasticity. PMID:26300729

  14. 76 FR 9613 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... use source and special nuclear material at the Lead Cascade at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant... operate a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility (the ACP) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion...

  15. Periodicity in the isotope chemistry of hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Bigeleisen, Jacob

    1981-01-01

    Periodicities and regularities are established among the deuterium to protium isotopic reduced partition function ratios, ln(s/s′)f, of 39 diatomic and 19 polyatomic hydrides. It is shown that ln(s/s′)f for diatomic hydrides can be correlated with the position in the periodic table of the element X in the hydride HX. A similar analysis is made for the contributions from X—H stretching motion in the polyatomic hydrides HnX. It is shown that the contributions from stretching motions to ln(s/s′)f in diatomic and polyatomic molecules are a linear function of the square root of the stretching force constants. The contributions from bending coordinates to ln(s/s′)f depend on both the molecular structure of the hydride and the bending force constant. Simple correlations are established for the bending contributions to ln(s/s′)f for the hydrides of the elements belonging to a common group in the periodic table. Four periodic rules of the isotope chemistry of hydrogen summarize and classify the data on the isotopic partition function ratios and the isotopic differences in free energies of formation of hydrides. PMID:16593077

  16. Mechanisms of Sensorimotor Adaptation to Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.; Wood, S. J.; Kaufman, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    We postulate that centripetal acceleration induced by centrifugation can be used as an inflight sensorimotor countermeasure to retain and/or promote appropriate crewmember responses to sustained changes in gravito-inertial force conditions. Active voluntary motion is required to promote vestibular system conditioning, and both visual and graviceptor sensory feedback are critical for evaluating internal representations of spatial orientation. The goal of our investigation is to use centrifugation to develop an analog to the conflicting visual/gravito-inertial force environment experienced during space flight, and to use voluntary head movements during centrifugation to study mechanisms of adaptation to altered gravity environments. We address the following two hypotheses: (1) Discordant canal-otolith feedback during head movements in a hypergravity tilted environment will cause a reorganization of the spatial processing required for multisensory integration and motor control, resulting in decreased postural stability upon return to normal gravity environment. (2) Adaptation to this "gravito-inertial tilt distortion" will result in a negative after-effect, and readaptation will be expressed by return of postural stability to baseline conditions. During the third year of our grant we concentrated on examining changes in balance control following 90-180 min of centrifugation at 1.4 9. We also began a control study in which we exposed subjects to 90 min of sustained roll tilt in a static (non-rotating) chair. This allowed us to examine adaptation to roll tilt without the hypergravity induced by centrifugation. To these ends, we addressed the question: Is gravity an internal calibration reference for postural control? The remainder of this report is limited to presenting preliminary findings from this study.

  17. Centrifugal Modelling of Soil Structures. Part I. Centrifugal Modelling of Slope Failures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    section of the clay itself, which was visible to the camera. This latter set of stripes was applied using a variety of trial materials: kaolin powder...investigated slope instability of open cast sulphur and manganese mine waste embankments in the Ukraine, over six years, using the centrifugal modelling...model MW21, and altering the model soil interface with f the centrifuge strongbox by introducing an underlayer of preconsolidated kaolin in two models

  18. Stretching and injury prevention: an obscure relationship.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, Erik; Mahieu, Nele; Danneels, Lieven; McNair, Peter

    2004-01-01

    It is generally accepted that increasing the flexibility of a muscle-tendon unit promotes better performances and decreases the number of injuries. Stretching exercises are regularly included in warm-up and cooling-down exercises; however, contradictory findings have been reported in the literature. Several authors have suggested that stretching has a beneficial effect on injury prevention. In contrast, clinical evidence suggesting that stretching before exercise does not prevent injuries has also been reported. Apparently, no scientifically based prescription for stretching exercises exists and no conclusive statements can be made about the relationship of stretching and athletic injuries. Stretching recommendations are clouded by misconceptions and conflicting research reports. We believe that part of these contradictions can be explained by considering the type of sports activity in which an individual is participating. Sports involving bouncing and jumping activities with a high intensity of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) [e.g. soccer and football] require a muscle-tendon unit that is compliant enough to store and release the high amount of elastic energy that benefits performance in such sports. If the participants of these sports have an insufficient compliant muscle-tendon unit, the demands in energy absorption and release may rapidly exceed the capacity of the muscle-tendon unit. This may lead to an increased risk for injury of this structure. Consequently, the rationale for injury prevention in these sports is to increase the compliance of the muscle-tendon unit. Recent studies have shown that stretching programmes can significantly influence the viscosity of the tendon and make it significantly more compliant, and when a sport demands SSCs of high intensity, stretching may be important for injury prevention. This conjecture is in agreement with the available scientific clinical evidence from these types of sports activities. In contrast, when the type

  19. [Stretching--do current explanatory models suffice?].

    PubMed

    Freiwald, J; Engelhardt, M; Jäger, M; Gnewuch, A; Reuter, I; Wiemann, K; Starischka, S

    1998-06-01

    The opinion that mobility in the usual performance if the "straight leg raise" test for the evaluation of stretching techniques is subject to solety muscular limitations is critically appraised. With integration of recent results from molecular biological research and our own measurements, we can show that not only mechanical but also neurophysiological factors must be considered in the limitation of mobility. In the majority of the examined patients stretching of the ischiadic nerve seems to be responsible for restrictions in movement. The presented results cast doubt on the currently held assumptions and basic principles of stretching in therapy and sport.

  20. Stretching DNA with optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M D; Yin, H; Landick, R; Gelles, J; Block, S M

    1997-01-01

    Force-extension (F-x) relationships were measured for single molecules of DNA under a variety of buffer conditions, using an optical trapping interferometer modified to incorporate feedback control. One end of a single DNA molecule was fixed to a coverglass surface by means of a stalled RNA polymerase complex. The other end was linked to a microscopic bead, which was captured and held in an optical trap. The DNA was subsequently stretched by moving the coverglass with respect to the trap using a piezo-driven stage, while the position of the bead was recorded at nanometer-scale resolution. An electronic feedback circuit was activated to prevent bead movement beyond a preset clamping point by modulating the light intensity, altering the trap stiffness dynamically. This arrangement permits rapid determination of the F-x relationship for individual DNA molecules as short as -1 micron with unprecedented accuracy, subjected to both low (approximately 0.1 pN) and high (approximately 50 pN) loads: complete data sets are acquired in under a minute. Experimental F-x relationships were fit over much of their range by entropic elasticity theories based on worm-like chain models. Fits yielded a persistence length, Lp, of approximately 47 nm in a buffer containing 10 mM Na1. Multivalent cations, such as Mg2+ or spermidine 3+, reduced Lp to approximately 40 nm. Although multivalent ions shield most of the negative charges on the DNA backbone, they did not further reduce Lp significantly, suggesting that the intrinsic persistence length remains close to 40 nm. An elasticity theory incorporating both enthalpic and entropic contributions to stiffness fit the experimental results extremely well throughout the full range of extensions and returned an elastic modulus of approximately 1100 pN. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:9138579

  1. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups.

  2. Isotope separation by laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Isotope separation processes operate on very small differences, given either by the Quotient of masses with the same number of electrons or by their mass difference. When separating isotopes of light elements in mass quantities, thermodynamic processes accounting for the quotient, either in diffusion, chemical reactivity or distillation are used. For heavy elements those quotients are very small. Therefore they need a large number of separation steps. Large plants with high energy consumption result from that. As uranium isotope separation is the most important industrial field, alternatives, taking account for the mass difference, as e.g. gas centrifuges, have been developed. They use only a fraction of the energy input, but need a very large number of machines, as the individual throughput is small. Since it was discovered, that molecules of high symmetry like Uranium-Hexafluoride as a deep-cooled gas stream can be ionized by multiple photon excitation, this process was studied in detail and in competition to the selective ionization of metal vapors, as already demonstrated with uranium. The paper reports about the principles of the laser excitation for both processes, the different laboratory scale and prototypical plants built, the difficulties with materials, as far as the metal vapor laser separation is concerned, and the difficulties experienced in the similarity in molecular spectra. An overview of the relative economic merits of the different processes and the auspices in a saturated market for uranium isotope separation, together with other potential markets for molecular laser separation, is contained in the conclusions.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Dependence of Separative Power of the Gas Centrifuge on the Length of Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Borman, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    Numerical modelling and optimization of the gas flow and isotope separation in the Iguasu gas centrifuge (GC) for uranium enrichment have been performed for different lengths of the rotor. The calculations show that the specific separative power of the GC reduces with the length of the rotor. We show that the reduction of the specific separative power is connected with the growth of the pressure in the optimal regime and corresponding growth of temperature to prevent the working gas sublimation. The specific separative power remains constant with the growth of the rotor length provided that the temperature of the rotor is taken to be constant.

  4. Investing in a Large Stretch Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, M.; Nealson, W.; Jay, G.; Buss, W.

    1986-01-01

    Press for forming large aluminum parts from plates provides substantial economies. Study assessed advantages and disadvantages of investing in large stretch-forming press, and also developed procurement specification for press.

  5. Demonstrating the Stretch Reflex: A Mechanical Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batavia, Mitchell; McDonough, Andrew L.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the concept of stretch reflexes to students using a mechanical model. The model provides a dynamic multisensory experience using movement, light, and sound. Describes the construction design. (SAH)

  6. Demonstrating the Stretch Reflex: A Mechanical Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batavia, Mitchell; McDonough, Andrew L.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the concept of stretch reflexes to students using a mechanical model. The model provides a dynamic multisensory experience using movement, light, and sound. Describes the construction design. (SAH)

  7. Distribution of fluids in the body of the centrifuged rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of exposure to an elevated g-level throughout the period of rapid growth is investigated in a comparison of a group of female Sprague-Dawley rats centrifuged as adults with other groups centrifuged for prolonged intervals starting shortly after weaning. The fluid-solid composition of total body, heart, liver, gut, skin, and muscle for both study groups is compared with that of a control group. None of the changes as a result of centrifugation were truly persistent. The only increases in mass associated with centrifugation and the only responses to centrifugation per se were observed in the skin values.

  8. Comparison of two stretching methods and optimization of stretching protocol for the piriformis muscle.

    PubMed

    Gulledge, Brett M; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Levine, David; Tillman, Larry; Harrysson, Ola L A; Osborne, Jason A; Baxter, Blaise

    2014-02-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon diagnosis for a non-discogenic form of sciatica whose treatment has traditionally focused on stretching the piriformis muscle (PiM). Conventional stretches include hip flexion, adduction, and external rotation. Using three-dimensional modeling, we quantified the amount of (PiM) elongation resulting from two conventional stretches and we investigated by use of a computational model alternate stretching protocols that would optimize PiM stretching. Seven subjects underwent three CT scans: one supine, one with hip flexion, adduction, then external rotation (ADD stretch), and one with hip flexion, external rotation, then adduction (ExR stretch). Three-dimensional bone models were constructed from the CT scans. PiM elongation during these stretches, femoral neck inclination, femoral head anteversion, and trochanteric anteversion were measured. A computer program was developed to map PiM length over a range of hip joint positions and was validated against the measured scans. ExR and ADD stretches elongated the PiM similarly by approximately 12%. Femoral head and greater trochanter anteversion influenced PiM elongation. Placing the hip joints in 115° of hip flexion, 40° of external rotation and 25° of adduction or 120° of hip flexion, 50° of external rotation and 30° of adduction increased PiM elongation by 30-40% compared to conventional stretches (15.1 and 15.3% increases in PiM muscle length, respectively). ExR and ADD stretches elongate the PiM similarly and therefore may have similar clinical effectiveness. The optimized stretches led to larger increases in PiM length and may be more easily performed by some patients due to increased hip flexion.

  9. Spaceborne centrifugal relays for spacecraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzidane, Malika

    1991-01-01

    Acceleration using centrifugal relays is a recently discovered method for the acceleration of spaceborne payloads to high velocity at high thrust. Centrifugal relays are moving rotors which progressively accelerate reaction mass to higher velocities. One important engineering problem consists of accurately tracking the position of the projectiles and rotors and guiding each projectile exactly onto the appropriate guide tracks on each rotor. The topics of this research are the system kinematics and dynamics and the computerized guidance system which will allow the projectile to approach each rotor with exact timing with respect to the rotor rotation period and with very small errors in lateral positions. Kinematics studies include analysis of rotor and projectile positions versus time and projectile/rotor interactions. Guidance studies include a detailed description of the tracking mechanism (interrupt of optical beams) and the aiming mechanism (electromagnetic focusing) including the design of electromagnetic deflection coils and the switching circuitry.

  10. Continuous centrifuge decelerator for polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Chervenkov, S; Wu, X; Bayerl, J; Rohlfes, A; Gantner, T; Zeppenfeld, M; Rempe, G

    2014-01-10

    Producing large samples of slow molecules from thermal-velocity ensembles is a formidable challenge. Here we employ a centrifugal force to produce a continuous molecular beam with a high flux at near-zero velocities. We demonstrate deceleration of three electrically guided molecular species, CH3F, CF3H, and CF3CCH, with input velocities of up to 200  m s(-1) to obtain beams with velocities below 15  m s(-1) and intensities of several 10(9)  mm(-2) s(-1). The centrifuge decelerator is easy to operate and can, in principle, slow down any guidable particle. It has the potential to become a standard technique for continuous deceleration of molecules.

  11. High stability design for new centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, H.; Katayama, K.; Morii, S.; Mouri, Y.; Umemura, S.; Ozawa, U.; Oda, T.

    1989-01-01

    It is essential that high-performance centrifugal compressors be free of subsynchronous vibrations. A new high-performance centrifugal compressor has been developed by applying the latest rotordynamics knowledge and design techniques: (1) To improve the system damping, a specially designed oil film seal was developed. This seal attained a damping ratio three times that of the conventional design. The oil film seal contains a special damper ring in the seal cartridge. (2) To reduce the destabilizing effect of the labyrinth seal, a special swirl canceler (anti-swirl nozzle) was applied to the balance piston seal. (3) To confirm the system damping margin, the dynamic simulation rotor model test and the full load test applied the vibration exciting test in actual load conditions.

  12. Dynamic centrifugal compressor model for system simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Khan, Jamil; Dougal, Roger A.

    A dynamic model of a centrifugal compressor capable of system simulation in the virtual test bed (VTB) computational environment is presented. The model is based on first principles, i.e. the dynamic performance including the losses is determined from the compressor geometry and not from the experimentally determined characteristic performance curves. In this study, the compressor losses, such as incidence and friction losses, etc., are mathematically modeled for developing compressor characteristics. For easy implementation in the VTB platform, the non-linear governing equations are discretized in resistive companion (RC) form. The developed simulation model can be applied to virtually any centrifugal compressor. By interfacing with a composite system, such as a Brayton cycle gas turbine, or a fuel cell, the compressor dynamic performance can be evaluated. The surge line for the compressor can also be determined from the simulation results. Furthermore, the model presented here provides a valuable tool for evaluating the system performance as a function of various operating parameters.

  13. A centrifugal pump used as a turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, F.U.; Lasnier, F. )

    1990-06-01

    Due to the high cost of putting up conventional turbines for micro-hydropower installations, Inversin (1986) mentioned the use of pumps being run in reverse to function as turbines. Typical performance characteristics of a centrifugal pump running as a turbine are shown in a figure. Pump/turbine maximum efficiencies tend to occur over a wide range of capacity. This study is concerned with the use of non-conventional hydro equipment, locally and readily available for small rural electricity applications. Here, the operation of a small centrifugal pump, used as a turbine and coupled with a conventional car alternator, was investigated. The article reveals a method for evaluating not only this but other small generating systems for appropriateness to the conditions of the site.

  14. Fractal structures in centrifugal flywheel governor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Xiao-Bo; Chu, Yan-Dong; Lu-Xu; Chang, Ying-Xiang; Zhang, Jian-Gang

    2017-09-01

    The global structure of nonlinear response of mechanical centrifugal governor, forming in two-dimensional parameter space, is studied in this paper. By using three kinds of phases, we describe how responses of periodicity, quasi-periodicity and chaos organize some self-similarity structures with parameters varying. For several parameter combinations, the regular vibration shows fractal characteristic, that is, the comb-shaped self-similarity structure is generated by alternating periodic response with intermittent chaos, and Arnold's tongues embedded in quasi-periodic response are organized according to Stern-Brocot tree. In particular, a new type of mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) is found in the periodic response. These unique structures reveal the natural connection of various responses between part and part, part and the whole in parameter space based on self-similarity of fractal. Meanwhile, the remarkable and unexpected results are to contribute a valid dynamic reference for practical applications with respect to mechanical centrifugal governor.

  15. Optimum design for LRE centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zuchao; Zhang, Guoqian; Sun, Jiren

    1995-05-01

    We set up a mathematical model to predict low specific speed liquid rocket engine (LRE) centrifugal pump unit performance. Using the model in question, performance predictions were carried out for 10 types of LRE centrifugal pumps. Relative errors between experimental values and predicted values associated with efficiency and lift were all within 4%. Using the model in question, design optimization with efficiency as the target function was carried out on AM-7H and O pumps as well as AM-1R pumps and AM-50 pumps. Results clearly show that, with a presupposition of surety systems possessing high vapor corrosion characteristics, the efficiencies of these four types of pumps can be respectively raised 6.5%, 5.22%, 5.2%, and 4.41%.

  16. Mathematical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Minosyan, Ya.P.; Gerasimov, V.G.; Ryadno, A.A.; Solov'yev, Yu.G.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical description of centrifugal casting of long pipes in rapidly-rotating ingot molds is given. The effect of gravity force is neglected. A numerical solution is obtained for the solidification of a steel casting in a thermally insulated mold. The effect of the rate of metal pouring on the motion of the solidification interface is investigated. The disagreement with experimental data is less then 7 percent.

  17. Operating and maintenance guidelines for screenbowl centrifuges

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnig, W.S.R.; Bratton, R.; Luttrell, G.

    2009-01-15

    Plant dewatering circuits equipped with screenbowl centrifuges need to be well designed, properly operated, and adequately maintained to maximize the dewatering performance. The most important 'feed variables' are particle size, dry solids feed rate and slurry flow rate. The most important 'machine variables' include pool depth, rotational speed and gearbox ratio. The article discusses the effect of these parameters and offers some maintenance guidelines. The article was adapted from a paper presented at CoalPrep 2008. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Axial forces in centrifugal compressor couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Ivanov, N. M.; Yun, V. K.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents the results of the theoretical and experimental investigation of axial forces arising in the toothed and plate couplings of centrifugal compressor shaft lines. Additional loads on the thrust bearing are considered that can develop in the toothed couplings as a result of coupled rotors misalignment. Design relationships to evaluate the level of axial forces and recommendations for their reduction in the operating conditions are given.

  19. Centrifugal shot blasting. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), the Facilities Closure and Demolition Projects Integrated Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) work plan calls for the removal of one inch (1 in) depth of concrete surface in areas where contamination with technetium-99 has been identified. This report describes a comparative demonstration between two concrete removal technologies: an innovative system using Centrifugal Shot Blasting (CSB) and a modified baseline technology called a rotary drum planer.

  20. Potential flow through centrifugal pumps and turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, E

    1941-01-01

    The methods of conformal transformation up to the present have been applied to the potential flows in the rotation of solid bodies only to a limited extent. This report deals with aspects of centrifugal pumps and turbines such as: the complex potential for rotation, potential for the flow due to the blade rotation, velocities at the blade tip, comparison with "infinite number of blades," and a variable number of blades.

  1. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2009-03-20

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the α channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  2. Simple method of DNA stretching on glass substrate for fluorescence image and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Guru P.; Dhakal, Krishna P.; Lee, Hyunsoo; Guthold, Martin; Joseph, Vincent S.; Hong, Jong-Dal; Kim, Jeongyong

    2013-05-01

    Study of biological molecule DNA has contributed to developing many breaking thoughts and wide applications in multidisciplinary fields, such as genomic, medical, sensing and forensic fields. Stretching of DNA molecules is an important supportive tool for AFM or spectroscopic studies of DNA in a single molecular level. In this article, we established a simple method of DNA stretching (to its full length) that occurred on a rotating negatively-charged surface of glass substrate. The isolation of a single DNA molecule was attained by the two competitive forces on DNA molecules, that is, the electrostatic attraction developed between the positively charged YOYO-1 stained DNA and the negatively charged substrate, and the centrifugal force of the rotating substrate, which separates the DNA aggregates into the single molecule. Density of stretched DNA molecules was controlled by selecting the specific parameters such as spinning time and rates, loading volume of DNA-dye complex solution etc. The atomic force microscopy image exhibited a single DNA molecule on the negatively-charged substrate in an isolated state. Further, the photoluminescence spectra of a single DNA molecule stained with YOYO-1 were achieved using the method developed in the present study, which is strongly believed to effectively support the spectroscopic analysis of DNA in a single molecular level.

  3. Shallow water model for horizontal centrifugal casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boháček, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model was proposed to simulate the solidification process of an outer shell of work roll made by the horizontal centrifugal casting technique. Shallow water model was adopted to solve the 2D average flow dynamics of melt spreading and the average temperature distribution inside the centrifugal casting mould by considering the centrifugal force, Coriolis force, viscous force due to zero velocity on the mould wall, gravity, and energy transport by the flow. Additionally, a 1D sub-model was implemented to consider the heat transfer in the radial direction from the solidifying shell to the mould. The solidification front was tracked by fulfilling the Stefan condition. Radiative and convective heat losses were included from both, the free liquid surface and the outer wall of the mould. Several cases were simulated with the following assumed initial conditions: constant height of the liquid metal (10, 20, and 30 mm), uniform temperature of the free liquid surface (1755 K). The simulation results have shown that while the solidification front remained rather flat, the free surface was disturbed by waves. The amplitude of waves increased with the liquid height. Free surface waves diminished as the solidification proceeded.

  4. In-vivo centrifugation of Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Tran, Susan L; Welte, Michael A

    2010-06-23

    A major strategy for purifying and isolating different types of intracellular organelles is to separate them from each other based on differences in buoyant density. However, when cells are disrupted prior to centrifugation, proteins and organelles in this non-native environment often inappropriately stick to each other. Here we describe a method to separate organelles by density in intact, living Drosophila embryos. Early embryos before cellularization are harvested from population cages, and their outer egg shells are removed by treatment with 50% bleach. Embryos are then transferred to a small agar plate and inserted, posterior end first, into small vertical holes in the agar. The plates containing embedded embryos are centrifuged for 30 min at 3000 g. The agar supports the embryos and keeps them in a defined orientation. Afterwards, the embryos are dug out of the agar with a blunt needle. Centrifugation separates major organelles into distinct layers, a stratification easily visible by bright-field microscopy. A number of fluorescent markers are available to confirm successful stratification in living embryos. Proteins associated with certain organelles will be enriched in a particular layer, demonstrating colocalization. Individual layers can be recovered for biochemical analysis or transplantation into donor eggs. This technique is applicable for organelle separation in other large cells, including the eggs and oocytes of diverse species.

  5. Research opportunities with the Centrifuge Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Glenn A.

    1992-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility on Space Station Freedom will consist of a 2.5-meter diameter Centrifuge accommodating two concentric rings of habitats and providing variable g-forces between 0.01 g and 2.0 g; modular habitats providing housing and lifesupport for rats, mice, and plants; a habitat holding system providing power, water, airflow and other utilities to several modular habitats; and a life sciences glovebox, an isolated work volume accommodating simultaneous operations by at least two scientists and providing lighting, airflow, video and data access, and other experiment support functions. The centrifuge facility will enable long-duration animal and plant microgravity research not previously possible in the NASA flight research program. It will offer unprecedented opportunities for use of on-board 1-g control populations and statistically significant numbers of specimens. On orbit 1-g controls will allow separation of the effects of microgravity from other environmental factors. Its selectable-g and simultaneous multiple-g capabilities will enable studies of gravitational thresholds, the use of artificial gravity as a countermeasure to the effects of microgravity, and ready simulation of Lunar and Martian gravities.

  6. Research opportunities with the Centrifuge Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Glenn A.

    The Centrifuge Facility on Space Station Freedom will consist of a 2.5-meter diameter Centrifuge accommodating two concentric rings of habitats and providing variable g-forces between 0.01 g and 2.0 g; modular habitats providing housing and lifesupport for rats, mice, and plants; a habitat holding system providing power, water, airflow and other utilities to several modular habitats; and a life sciences glovebox, an isolated work volume accommodating simultaneous operations by at least two scientists and providing lighting, airflow, video and data access, and other experiment support functions. The centrifuge facility will enable long-duration animal and plant microgravity research not previously possible in the NASA flight research program. It will offer unprecedented opportunities for use of on-board 1-g control populations and statistically significant numbers of specimens. On orbit 1-g controls will allow separation of the effects of microgravity from other environmental factors. Its selectable-g and simultaneous multiple-g capabilities will enable studies of gravitational thresholds, the use of artificial gravity as a countermeasure to the effects of microgravity, and ready simulation of Lunar and Martian gravities.

  7. Compact, Automated Centrifugal Slide-Staining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Directional Acceleration Vector-Driven Displacement of Fluids (DAVD-DOF) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, would be a relatively compact, automated, centrifugally actuated system for staining blood smears and other microbiological samples on glass microscope slides in either a microgravitational or a normal Earth gravitational environment. The DAVD-DOF concept is a successor to the centrifuge-operated slide stainer (COSS) concept, which was reported in Slide-Staining System for Microgravity or Gravity (MSC-22949), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 64. The COSS includes reservoirs and a staining chamber that contains a microscope slide to which a biological sample is affixed. The staining chamber is sequentially filled with and drained of staining and related liquids from the reservoirs by use of a weighted plunger to force liquid from one reservoir to another at a constant level of hypergravity maintained in a standard swing-bucket centrifuge. In the DAVD-DOF system, a staining chamber containing a sample would also be sequentially filled and emptied, but with important differences. Instead of a simple microscope slide, one would use a special microscope slide on which would be fabricated a network of very small reservoirs and narrow channels connected to a staining chamber (see figure). Unlike in the COSS, displacement of liquid would be effected by use of the weight of the liquid itself, rather than the weight of a plunger.

  8. Avoid self-priming centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The self-priming horizontal centrifugal pump becomes known to its operator either as a good pump or a bad pump. The latter is usually replaced by another type of pump, even though a properly specified self-priming centrifugal pump might have been a good choice. Use of the guidelines described in this article are intended to help in the purchase and installation of a good pump. Self-priming centrifugal pumps are used for removing liquids from below grade sumps or pits that may also contain solids, fibers and/or muck. Alternate pumps for this service include submersible pumps, vertical turbine pumps and positive displacement pumps. These alternate pumps do not pass solid particles as large as self-priming pumps do without damage. Positive displacement pumps are not normally cost-effective when pumping liquid at rates in excess of 500 gallons per minute in low-head applications. Vertical and submersible pumps must be removed when cleaning of the pump is required. Self-priming pumps are easily cleaned by opening the access plates without moving the pump; and they cost less than the other types.

  9. Effects of scaling on centrifugal blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yew Wah; Chan, Weng Kong; Yu, S C M; Chua, Leok Poh

    2002-11-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of scaling on the performance of centrifugal blood pumps were conducted in a closed-loop test rig. For the prototype, eight different impellers of the same outer diameter of 25 mm were tested at 1,500, 2,000, and 2,500 revolutions per minute (rpm) using blood analog as fluid medium. This corresponds to Reynolds numbers (Re) of 25,900, 34,500, and 43,200, respectively. The results indicated that the nondimensional pump characteristic is a function of Re. This is understandable since the typical operating Re for centrifugal blood pumps is less than 100,000. Thus, the effects of scaling cannot be ignored for centrifugal blood pumps. Experiments on a 5x scaled-up model have also indicated that the scaled-up model is more efficient than the prototype model. Our results showed that in the range of Re tested, the nondimensional head versus flow curve is a function of Re to the power of approximately 0.25. It is observed that the nondimensional head versus flow is a function of diameter ratio to the power of 0.2.

  10. Femoral development in chronically centrifuged rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1977-01-01

    Groups of 30-d-old male and female rats were centrifuged at 2.00 G (RE, Rotation Experimental), 1.05 G (RC, Rotation Control) or exposed to the noise and wind of the centrifuge at 1.00 G (EC, Earth Control) for periods of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Measurements of their femurs indicated that exposure to centrifugation a) decreased femoral length in RE animals, b) increased femoral length in RC animals, c) reduced femoral diameter in RE and RC animals, d) increased L/D ratios in RC animals, e) decreased L/D ratios in RE animals, f) increased femur length/body weight in RE animals, g) decreased cortical thickness (CT) in RE animals, h) increased relative CT in RE animals, and decreased it in RC animals, i) accelerated ossification in RC femoral heads, j) thinned and distorted RE epiphyseal plates, and k) thickened condylar cartilage in RE females. The effects tended to be strongly sexually dimorphic, with females more severely affected by the stress than males.

  11. Centrifugal microfluidic platform for radiochemistry: potentialities for the chemical analysis of nuclear spent fuels.

    PubMed

    Bruchet, Anthony; Taniga, Vélan; Descroix, Stéphanie; Malaquin, Laurent; Goutelard, Florence; Mariet, Clarisse

    2013-11-15

    The use of a centrifugal microfluidic platform is for the first time reported as an alternative to classical chromatographic procedures for radiochemistry. The original design of the microfluidic platform has been thought to fasten and simplify the prototyping process with the use of a circular platform integrating four rectangular microchips made of thermoplastic. The microchips, dedicated to anion-exchange chromatographic separations, integrate a localized monolithic stationary phase as well as injection and collection reservoirs. The results presented here were obtained with a simplified simulated nuclear spent fuel sample composed of non-radioactive isotopes of Europium and Uranium, in proportion usually found for uranium oxide nuclear spent fuel. While keeping the analytical results consistent with the conventional procedure (extraction yield for Europium of ≈97%), the use of the centrifugal microfluidic platform allowed to reduce the volume of liquid needed by a factor of ≈250. Thanks to their unique "easy-to-use" features, centrifugal microfluidic platforms are potential successful candidates for the downscaling of chromatographic separation of radioactive samples (automation, multiplexing, easy integration in glove-boxes environment and low cost of maintenance).

  12. Effect of relative centrifugal force and centrifugation time on sedimentation of mycobacteria in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, S; March, S B

    1986-03-01

    Optimum relative centrifugal force (RCF) and centrifugation time to concentrate mycobacteria in clinical specimens were determined by processing split samples of sputa and urines containing mycobacteria with combinations of different RCFs and centrifugation times. Although individual test results showed considerable variation in the recovery rates of mycobacteria in the sediment, the data indicated that higher recovery rates occurred as centrifugation speed and time were increased. With a 15- to 20-min centrifugation time, on the average, 67 to 71% of mycobacteria were recovered at an RCF of 2,074 X g, and 76 to 80% were recovered at 3,005 or 3,895 X g at maximum radius. The remainder of mycobacteria was mostly recovered from the supernatant, but culturing of supernatant was not profitable. Increasing RCF had a negligible effect on acid-fast bacillus smear sensitivity. The smear sensitivity for about 25,000 clinical specimens processed with an RCF of 3,800 X g for 20 min was 71% compared with 69% as determined for over 30,000 specimens processed in a similar manner but an RCF of 2,000 X g. An RCF of 3,000 X g applied for 15 min, or an RCF of about 2,000 to 2,500 X g applied for 20 min, is considered adequate to concentrate mycobacteria in clinical specimens.

  13. Effect of relative centrifugal force and centrifugation time on sedimentation of mycobacteria in clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, S; March, S B

    1986-01-01

    Optimum relative centrifugal force (RCF) and centrifugation time to concentrate mycobacteria in clinical specimens were determined by processing split samples of sputa and urines containing mycobacteria with combinations of different RCFs and centrifugation times. Although individual test results showed considerable variation in the recovery rates of mycobacteria in the sediment, the data indicated that higher recovery rates occurred as centrifugation speed and time were increased. With a 15- to 20-min centrifugation time, on the average, 67 to 71% of mycobacteria were recovered at an RCF of 2,074 X g, and 76 to 80% were recovered at 3,005 or 3,895 X g at maximum radius. The remainder of mycobacteria was mostly recovered from the supernatant, but culturing of supernatant was not profitable. Increasing RCF had a negligible effect on acid-fast bacillus smear sensitivity. The smear sensitivity for about 25,000 clinical specimens processed with an RCF of 3,800 X g for 20 min was 71% compared with 69% as determined for over 30,000 specimens processed in a similar manner but an RCF of 2,000 X g. An RCF of 3,000 X g applied for 15 min, or an RCF of about 2,000 to 2,500 X g applied for 20 min, is considered adequate to concentrate mycobacteria in clinical specimens. PMID:3082926

  14. Design of a new membrane stretching device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yiran

    Cell stretching device has been applied into the lab use for many years to help researchers study about the behavior of cells during the stretching process. Because the cell responses to the different mechanical stimuli, especially in the case of disease, the cell stretching device is a necessary tool to study the cell behavior in a controlled environment. However existing devices have limitations, such as too big to fit the culture chamber, unable to be observed during the stretching process and too expensive to fabricate. In this thesis, a new cell stretcher is designed to resolve these limitations. Many typical cell stretching devices only work under simple conditions. For instance they can only apply the strain on the cell in uniaxial or equibiaxial directions. On the other hand the environment of cells' survival is varying. Many new cell stretchers have been developed, which have the same property that cells can be stretched via the radical deformation of the elastomeric membrane. The aim of this new design is to create a cell stretching device that fits in general lab conditions. This device is designed to fit on a microscope to observe, as well as in the incubator. In addition, two small step motors are used to control the strain, adjust the frequency, and maintain the stability precisely. Problems such as the culture media leakage and the membrane breakage are solved by the usage of multiple materials for both the cell stretcher and the membrane. Based on the experimental results, this device can satisfy the requirements of target users with a reduced manufacturing cost. In the future, an auto-focus tracking function will be developed to allow real time observation of the cells' behavior.

  15. Transuranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1985-12-01

    The needs of the research community for the production of transuranium isotopes, the quantities required, the continuity of production desired, and what a new steady state neutron source would have to provide to satisfy these needs are discussed. Examples of past frontier research which need these isotopes as well as an outline of the proposed Large Einsteinium Activation Program, LEAP, which requires roughly ten times the current production of /sup 254/Es are given. 15 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Isotopic Paleoclimatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, R.

    Paleotemperature scales were calculated by H. C. Urey and others in the 1950s to assess past temperatures, and later work using the stable isotopes of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon employed standards such as Peedee belemnite (PDB) and Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW). Subsequently, subjects as diverse as ice volume and paleotemperatures, oceanic ice and sediment cores, Pleistocene/Holocene climatic changes, and isotope chronostratigraphy extending back to the Precambrian were investigated.

  17. Isotopic chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, H.G.

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  18. Kinetically limited differential centrifugation as an inexpensive and readily available alternative to centrifugal elutriation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jinwang; Lee, Byung-Doo; Polo-Parada, Luis; Sengupta, Shramik

    2012-08-01

    When separating two species with similar densities but differing sedimentation velocities (because of differences in size), centrifugal elutriation is generally the method of choice. However, a major drawback to this approach is the requirement for specialized equipment. Here, we present a new method that achieves similar separations using standard benchtop centrifuges by loading the seperands as a layer on top of a dense buffer of a specified length, and running the benchtop centrifugation process for a calculated amount of time, thereby ensuring that all faster moving species are collected at the bottom, while all slower moving species remain in the buffer. We demonstrate the use of our procedure to isolate bacteria from blood culture broth (a mixture of bacterial growth media, blood, and bacteria).

  19. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    PubMed

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia.

  20. Movement and stretching imagery during flexibility training.

    PubMed

    Vergeer, Ineke; Roberts, Jenny

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of movement and stretching imagery on increases in flexibility. Thirty volunteers took part in a 4 week flexibility training programme. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) movement imagery, where participants imagined moving the limb they were stretching; (2) stretching imagery, where participants imagined the physiological processes involved in stretching the muscle; and (3) control, where participants did not engage in mental imagery. Active and passive range of motion around the hip was assessed before and after the programme. Participants provided specific ratings of vividness and comfort throughout the programme. Results showed significant increases in flexibility over time, but no differences between the three groups. A significant relationship was found, however, between improved flexibility and vividness ratings in the movement imagery group. Furthermore, both imagery groups scored significantly higher than the control group on levels of comfort, with the movement imagery group also scoring significantly higher than the stretching imagery group. We conclude that the imagery had stronger psychological than physiological effects, but that there is potential for enhancing physiological effects by maximizing imagery vividness, particularly for movement imagery.

  1. Does motor imagery enhance stretching and flexibility?

    PubMed

    Guillot, Aymeric; Tolleron, Coralie; Collet, Christian

    2010-02-01

    Although several studies have demonstrated that motor imagery can enhance learning processes and improve motor performance, little is known about its effect on stretching and flexibility. The increased active and passive range of motion reported in preliminary research has not been shown to be elicited by motor imagery training alone. We thus compared flexibility scores in 21 synchronized swimmers before and after a 5-week mental practice programme that included five stretching exercises in active and passive conditions. The imagery training programme resulted in selective increased flexibility, independently of the stretching method. Overall, the improvement in flexibility was greater in the imagery group than in the control group for the front split (F(1,18) = 4.9, P = 0.04), the hamstrings (F(1,18) = 5.2, P = 0.035), and the ankle stretching exercises (F(1,18) = 5.6, P = 0.03). There was no difference in shoulders and side-split flexibility (F(1,18) = 0.1, P = 0.73 and F(1,18) = 3.3, P = 0.08 respectively). Finally, there was no correlation between individual imagery ability and improvement in flexibility. Psychological and physiological effects of motor imagery could explain the increase in range of motion, suggesting that imagery enhances joint flexibility during both active and passive stretching.

  2. Proton tunneling: a decay channel of the O-H stretch mode in KTaO3.

    PubMed

    Spahr, E J; Wen, L; Stavola, M; Boatner, L A; Feldman, L C; Tolk, N H; Lüpke, G

    2009-02-20

    The vibrational lifetimes of the O-H and O-D stretch modes in the perovskite oxide KTaO3 are measured by pump-probe infrared spectroscopy. Both stretch modes are exceptionally long lived and exhibit a large "reverse" isotope effect, due to a phonon-assisted proton-tunneling process, which involves the O-Ta-O bending motion. The excited-state tunneling rate is found to be 7 orders of magnitude larger than from the ground state in the proton conducting oxide, BaCeO3 [Phys. Rev. B 60, R3713 (1999)].

  3. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation. PMID:22319684

  4. Optical Data Compression in Time Stretch Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch imaging offers real-time image acquisition at millions of frames per second and subnanosecond shutter speed, and has enabled detection of rare cancer cells in blood with record throughput and specificity. An unintended consequence of high throughput image acquisition is the massive amount of digital data generated by the instrument. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of real-time optical image compression applied to time stretch imaging. By exploiting the sparsity of the image, we reduce the number of samples and the amount of data generated by the time stretch camera in our proof-of-concept experiments by about three times. Optical data compression addresses the big data predicament in such systems. PMID:25906244

  5. Binary-phase compression of stretched pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Nairat, Muath; Dantus, Marcos

    2017-10-01

    Pulse stretching and compression are essential for the energy scale-up of ultrafast lasers. Here, we consider a radical approach using spectral binary phases, containing only two values (0 and π) for stretching and compressing laser pulses. We numerically explore different strategies and present results for pulse compression of factors up to a million back to the transform limit and experimentally obtain results for pulse compression of a factor of one hundred, in close agreement with numerical calculations. Imperfections resulting from binary-phase compression are addressed by considering cross-polarized wave generation filtering, and show that this approach leads to compressed pulses with contrast ratios greater than ten orders of magnitude. This new concept of binary-phase stretching and compression, if implemented in a multi-layer optic, could eliminate the need for traditional pulse stretchers and more importantly expensive compressors.

  6. Stretched arc discharge in produced water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y I; Wright, K C; Kim, H S; Cho, D J; Rabinovich, A; Fridman, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost.

  7. System performance analysis of stretched membrane heliostats

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J V; Murphy, L M; Short, W; Wendelin, T

    1985-12-01

    The optical performance of both focused and unfocused stretched membrane heliostats was examined in the context of the overall cost and performance of central receiver systems. The sensitivity of optical performance to variations in design parameters such as the system size (capacity), delivery temperature, heliostat size, and heliostat surface quality was also examined. The results support the conclusion that focused stretched membrane systems provide an economically attractive alternative to current glass/metal heliostats over essentially the entire range of design parameters studied. In addition, unfocused stretched membrane heliostats may be attractive for a somewhat more limited range of applications, which would include the larger plant sizes (e.g., 450 MW) and lower delivery temperatures (e.g., 450/sup 0/C), or situations in which the heliostat size could economically be reduced.

  8. Homologous pairing in stretched supercoiled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Strick, T. R.; Croquette, V.; Bensimon, D.

    1998-01-01

    By using elastic measurements on single DNA molecules, we show that stretching a negatively supercoiled DNA activates homologous pairing in physiological conditions. These experiments indicate that a stretched unwound DNA locally denatures to alleviate the force-driven increase in torsional stress. This is detected by hybridization with 1 kb of homologous single-stranded DNA probes. The stretching force involved (≈2 pN) is small compared with those typically developed by molecular motors, suggesting that this process may be relevant to DNA processing in vivo. We used this technique to monitor the progressive denaturation of DNA as it is unwound and found that distinct, stable denaturation bubbles formed, beginning in A+T-rich regions. PMID:9724746

  9. Live Cell Imaging during Mechanical Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Rápalo, Gabriel; Herwig, Josh D.; Hewitt, Robert; Wilhelm, Kristina R.; Waters, Christopher M.; Roan, Esra

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant interest in understanding how cells and tissues respond to mechanical stimuli, but current approaches are limited in their capability for measuring responses in real time in live cells or viable tissue. A protocol was developed with the use of a cell actuator to distend live cells grown on or tissues attached to an elastic substrate while imaging with confocal and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Preliminary studies show that tonic stretching of human bronchial epithelial cells caused a significant increase in the production of mitochondrial superoxide. Moreover, using this protocol, alveolar epithelial cells were stretched and imaged, which showed direct damage to the epithelial cells by overdistention simulating one form of lung injury in vitro. A protocol to conduct AFM nano-indentation on stretched cells is also provided. PMID:26325607

  10. Overextended sarcomeres regain filament overlap following stretch.

    PubMed

    Panchangam, Appaji; Herzog, Walter

    2012-09-21

    Sarcomere overextension has been widely implicated in stretch-induced muscle injury. Yet, sarcomere overextensions are typically inferred based on indirect evidence obtained in muscle and fibre preparations, where individual sarcomeres cannot be observed during dynamic contractions. Therefore, it remains unclear whether sarcomere overextensions are permanent following injury-inducing stretch-shortening cycles, and thus, if they can explain stretch-induced force loss. We tested the hypothesis that overextended sarcomeres can regain filament overlap in isolated myofibrils from rabbit psoas muscles. Maximally activated myofibrils (n=13) were stretched from an average sarcomere length of 2.6±0.04μm by 0.9μm sarcomere(-1) at a speed of 0.1μm sarcomere(-1)s(-1) and immediately returned to the starting lengths at the same speed (sarcomere strain=34.1±2.3%). Myofibrils were then allowed to contract isometrically at the starting lengths (2.6μm) for ∼30s before relaxing. Force and individual sarcomere lengths were measured continuously. Out of the 182 sarcomeres, 35 sarcomeres were overextended at the peak of stretch, out of which 26 regained filament overlap in the shortening phase while 9 (∼5%) remained overextended. About 35% of the sarcomeres with initial lengths on the descending limb of the force-length relationship and ∼2% of the sarcomeres with shorter initial lengths were overextended. These findings provide first ever direct evidence that overextended sarcomeres can regain filament overlap in the shortening phase following stretch, and that the likelihood of overextension is higher for sarcomeres residing initially on the descending limb.

  11. Subjective stress factors in centrifuge training for military aircrews.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Chun; Wang, Jenhung; Li, Shih-Chin

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates stress-influence factors perceived by military aircrews undergoing centrifuge training, which lowers the incidence of G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) for the crews of high-performance combat aircrafts. We used questionnaires to assess the subjective stress-influence factors of crews undergoing centrifuge training. Professionals in aviation physiology identified attributes measuring the perceived stress induced by centrifuge training, which were segmented into three constructs by factor analysis, theory lecture, centrifuge equipment, and physical fitness. Considerable interpenetration was discernible between these factors and military rank, age, length of service, flight hours accrued, and type of aircraft piloted. Identifying and quantifying the perceived stressors experienced in human-use centrifuge training enables aviators, astronauts, and air forces of the world to determine which constructs perceptibly increase or alleviate the perceived stress undergone by trainees when partaking in centrifuge training. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  12. [Rapid centrifugation assay standarization for dengue virus isolation].

    PubMed

    Palomino, Miryam; Gutierrez, Victoria; Salas, Ramses

    2010-03-01

    The plate centrifugation assay was standardized for dengue virus isolation from serum samples. C6/36-HT cells were used determining the optimal values for centrifugation spin speed, inoculum, sera dilution, and incubation time. Then, 22 positive serum samples with viral isolation and viral strains of the four reference dengue virus serotypes were tested simultaneously by the standardized plate centrifugation method and the conventional tube culture. The isolations were typified by indirect immunofluorescent test using monoclonal antibodies. The plate centrifugation method was optimized to 200 μL of inoculum, dilution of sera 1/20, centrifugation speed at 1600 rpm/30 min, and sensitivity of 95,5% after 5 days post-inoculation. We concluded that the plate centrifugation method increased dengue virus isolation, with a significant reduction of the time of isolation for dengue virus.

  13. Monitoring the centrifugal recovery of recombinant protein inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Middelberg, A P; O'Neill, B K

    1991-04-01

    The industrial processing of proteins expressed as insoluble inclusion bodies employs a reasonably standard sequence of unit operations. One of these is centrifugation, which serves to concentrate the inclusion bodies after disruption of the host microorganism, and also separates the inclusion bodies from other cellular debris. Monitoring the performance of the centrifuge is essential if excessive product and hence financial loss is to be avoided and a reasonable separation obtained. The analytical disc centrifuge may be used to monitor the centrifugation. This instrument returns the sample size distribution with high resolution and without fouling. By obtaining size distributions of the centrifuge feed, supernatant and concentrate, the fractional collection efficiency of the centrifuge may be determined as a function of the Stokes diameter, and a mass balance constructed.

  14. Altered surface character of stretched condom latex.

    PubMed

    Jay, G D; Drummond, E; Lane, B

    1992-02-01

    A new type of imperfection in condom latex, present during moderate stretching, was observed by low magnification scanning electron microscopy. The normally smooth surface of relaxed natural latex was transformed into an accordion-like arrangement of ripples in addition to tears. A corollary experiment with Alcian blue dye placed into both stretched and unstretched condoms leaked no dye. These surface features are consistent with latex acting as a molecular barrier. The tears may represent areas of lowered mechanical resistance and raise questions concerning quality control.

  15. Effects of Prolonged Centrifugation on Orthostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Malcolm M..; Hargens, A. R.; Yates, B. J.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A feasibility study conducted on the Ames 20-G Human Centrifuge examined how well humans can maintain orthostatic tolerance during and after prolonged exposures to hypergravity. Three adult males lived for periods of 22 hours in the centrifuge while it was at rest (1.00 G), and while it rotated at 9.38 RPM to provide 1.25 G-total at the mean radius of 7.62 m. Two participants also experienced 22-hour habitation sessions at 11.46 RPM, which provided 1.50 G-total. Both before and after each habitation session, the participants were given gradual onset rate (GOR) acceleration profiles at 0.067 G/sec to determine their Gz tolerance. In addition, cardiovascular responses were compared while subjects were supine, siting, and standing at various times during the habitation (stand test), and cardiovascular responsiveness was determined using a lower body negative pressure tilt table (LBNPTT) at the beginning of the experiment and after each session. Post-Pre changes in G tolerance were -0.33 (mean) +/- 0.11 (std. error) Gz for habitation at 1.00 G, -0.02 +/- 0.12 Gz for habitation at 1.25 G, and +0.41 +/- 0.13 Gz for habitation at 1.50 G. Performance on the stand test generally improved with duration of habitation in hypergravity. Our results suggest that habitation in a confined chamber at 1.00 G reduces G tolerance and leads to lowered LBNPTT tolerance. Exposure to increased G in the centrifuge leads to enhanced performance on the stand test, and to increased GOR acceleration tolerance, but only when fluid balance is maintained; when motion sickness and negative fluid balance were observed, G tolerance was reduced. The data indicate that enhanced G tolerance can result from prolonged exposure to hypergravity, but that these changes are complex and depend on multiple underlying physiological processes.

  16. Hydrology of Bishop Creek, California: An Isotopic Analysis

    Treesearch

    Michael L. Space; John W. Hess; Stanley D. Smith

    1989-01-01

    Five power generation plants along an eleven kilometer stretch divert Bishop Creek water for hydro-electric power. Stream diversion may be adversely affecting the riparian vegetation. Stable isotopic analysis is employed to determine surface water/ground-water interactions along the creek. surface water originates primarily from three headwater lakes. Discharge into...

  17. Laminar flow effects in the coil planet centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1984-01-01

    The coil planet centrifuge designed by Ito employs flow of a single liquid phase, through a rotating coiled tube in a centrifugal force field, to provide a separation of particles based on sedimentation rates. Mathematical solutions are derived for the linear differential equations governing particle behavior in the coil planet centrifuge device. These solutions are then applied as the basis of a model for optimizing particle separations.

  18. The total containment of a batch-type zonal centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Webb, N L; Richards, B M; Gooders, A P

    1975-09-01

    A batch-type zonal centrifuge has been modified and totally contained for use with biologically hazardous materials. A sealed cabinet encloses the centrifuge and the ancilliary equipment. It is operated with a flow of filtered air when the zonal system is on, decontaminated with ethylene oxide, and maintained at a negative pressure throughout. The centrifuge subsystems can be drained, flushed, and decontaminated with ethylene oxide before an engineer services the machine. The sample handling system within the cabinet is remotely controlled.

  19. Laminar flow effects in the coil planet centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1984-01-01

    The coil planet centrifuge designed by Ito employs flow of a single liquid phase, through a rotating coiled tube in a centrifugal force field, to provide a separation of particles based on sedimentation rates. Mathematical solutions are derived for the linear differential equations governing particle behavior in the coil planet centrifuge device. These solutions are then applied as the basis of a model for optimizing particle separations.

  20. Modeling Platform Dynamics and Physiological Response to Short Arm Centrifugation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    parametric design study for a small radius centrifuge revealed such a centrifuge could fit on the NASA Space Shuttle and provide artificial gravity and...the heart are modelled as variable capacitances separated by one-way valves. The pulmonic and aortic valves are also modelled as one-way valves. The...1992 June. 10. Halstead, TW; Brown, AH; Fuller, CA; Oyama, J. Artificial gravity studies and design considerations for space station centrifuges

  1. Theory and experiments on centrifuge cratering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. M.; Holsapple, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Centrifuge experimental techniques provide possibilities for laboratory simulation of ground motion and cratering effects due to explosive loadings. The results of a similarity analysis for the thermomechanical response of a continuum show that increased gravity is a necessary condition for subscale testing when identical materials for both model and prototype are being used. The general similarity requirements for this type of subscale testing are examined both theoretically and experimentally. The similarity analysis is used to derive the necessary and sufficient requirements due to the general balance and jump equations and gives relations among all the scale factors for size, density, stress, body forces, internal energy, heat supply, heat conduction, heat of detonation, and time. Additional constraints due to specific choices of material constitutive equations are evaluated separately. The class of constitutive equations that add no further requirements is identified. For this class of materials, direct simulation of large-scale cratering events at small scale on the centrifuge is possible and independent of the actual constitutive equations. For a rate-independent soil it is shown that a small experiment at gravity g and energy E is similar to a large event at 1 G but with energy equal to g3E. Consequently, experiments at 500 G with 8 grams of explosives can be used to simulate a kiloton in the field. A series of centrifuge experiments was performed to validate the derived similarity requirements and to determine the practicality of applying the technique to dry granular soils having little or no cohesion. Ten shots using Ottawa sand at various gravities confirmed reproducibility of results in the centrifuge environment, provided information on particle size effects, and demonstrated the applicability of the derived similitude requirements. These experiments used 0.5-4 grams of pentaerythritol-tetranitrate (PETN) and 1.7 grams of lead-azide explosives. They

  2. Impeller blade design method for centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, W.; Kirschner, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The design of a centrifugal impeller with blades that are aerodynamically efficient, easy to manufacture, and mechanically sound is discussed. The blade design method described here satisfies the first two criteria and with a judicious choice of certain variables will also satisfy stress considerations. The blade shape is generated by specifying surface velocity distributions and consists of straight-line elements that connect points at hub and shroud. The method may be used to design radially elemented and backward-swept blades. The background, a brief account of the theory, and a sample design are described.

  3. Anion-exchange displacement centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maciuk, Alexandre; Renault, Jean-Hugues; Margraff, Rodolphe; Trébuchet, Philippe; Zèches-Hanrot, Monique; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc

    2004-11-01

    Ion-exchange displacement chromatography has been adapted to centrifugal partition chromatography. The use of an ionic liquid, benzalkonium chloride, as a strong anion-exchanger has proven to be efficient for the preparative separation of phenolic acid regioisomers. Multigram quantities of a mixture of three hydroxycinnamic acid isomers were separated using iodide as a displacer. The displacement process was characterized by a trapezoidal profile of analyte concentration in the eluate with narrow transition zones. By taking advantage of the partition rules involved in support-free liquid-liquid chromatography, a numerical separation model is proposed as a tool for preliminary process validation and further optimization.

  4. Rotational spectroscopy with an optical centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Alexander A; Hepburn, John W; Milner, Valery

    2014-03-07

    We demonstrate a new spectroscopic method for studying electronic transitions in molecules with extremely broad range of angular momentum. We employ an optical centrifuge to create narrow rotational wave packets in the ground electronic state of (16)O2. Using the technique of resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization, we record the spectrum of multiple ro-vibrational transitions between X(3)Σg(-) and C(3)Πg electronic manifolds of oxygen. Direct control of rotational excitation, extending to rotational quantum numbers as high as N ≳ 120, enables us to interpret the complex structure of rotational spectra of C(3)Πg beyond thermally accessible levels.

  5. Design and prototyping of micro centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuki, Shimpei; Minorikawa, Gaku; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Asaga, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Naoki; Ohta, Yutaka; Outa, Eisuke

    2003-02-01

    In order to establish the design methodology of ultra micro centrifugal compressor, which is the most important component of ultra micro gas turbine unit, a 10 times of the final target size model was designed, prototyped and tested. The problems to be solved for downsizing were examined and 2-dimensional impeller was chosen as the first model due to its productivity. The conventional 1D prediction method, CFD and the inverse design were attempted. The prototyped compressor was driven by using a turbocharger and the performance characteristics were measured.

  6. Autobalancing and FDIR for a space-based centrifuge prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward; Mah, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes centrifuge-related work performed at the Smart Systems Research Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center's Computational Sciences Division from 1995 through 2003. The goal is to develop an automated system that will sense an imbalance (both static and dynamic3) in a centrifuge and issue control commands to drive counterweights to eliminate the effects of the imbalance. This autobalancing development began when the ISS centrifuge design was not yet finalized, and was designed to work with the SSRL Centrifuge laboratory prototype, constructed in 1993-1995. Significant differences between that prototype and the current International Space Station (ISS) Centrifuge design are that: the spin axis for the SSRL Centrifuge prototype can translate freely in x and y, but not wobble, whereas the ISS centrifuge spin axis has 3 translational and two rotational degrees of freedom, supported by a vibration 34. The imbalance sensors are strained gauges both in the rotor and the stator, measuring the imbalance forces, whereas the ISS centrifuge uses eddy current displacement sensors to measure the displacements resulting from imbalance. High fidelity autobalancing and FDIR systems (for both counterweights and strain gauges) are developed and tested in MATLAB simulation, for the SSRL Centrifuge configuration. Hardware implementation of the autobalancing technology was begun in 1996, but was terminated due to lack of funding. The project lay dormant until 2001-2002 when the FDIR capability was added.

  7. Effects of centrifugation on gonadal and adrenocortical steroids in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakihana, R.; Butte, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Many endocrine systems are sensitive to external changes in the environment. Both the pituitary adrenal and pituitary gonadal systems are affected by stress including centrifugation stress. The effect of centrifugation on the pituitary gonadal and pituitary adrenocortical systems was examined by measuring the gonadal and adrenal steroids in the plasma and brain following different duration and intensity of centrifugation stress in rats. Two studies were completed and the results are presented. The second study was carried out to describe the developmental changes of brain, plasma and testicular testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in Sprague Dawley rats so that the effect of centrifugation stress on the pituitary gonadal syatem could be better evaluated in future studies.

  8. Development of a 3D circular microfluidic centrifuge for the separation of mixed particles by using their different centrifuge times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kim, D. I.; Kim, M. J.; Nguyen, X. D.; Park, D. H.; Go, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a circular microfluidic centrifuge with two inlets and two outlets to separate mixed microparticles with a specially designed sample injection hole. To separate the mixed particles, it uses a rotational flow, generated in a chamber by counter primary flows in the microchannels. The shape and sizes of the circular microfluidic centrifuge have been designed through numerical evaluation to have a large relative centrifugal force. The difference of centrifuge times of the mixed particles of 1 μm and 6 μm was determined to be 8.2 s at an inlet Reynolds number of 500 and a sample Reynolds number of 20. In the experiment, this was measured to be about 10 s. From the separation of the two polymer particles analogous to the representative sizes of platelets and red blood cells, the circular microfluidic centrifuge shows a potential to separate human blood cells size-selectively by using the difference of centrifuge times.

  9. ISOTOPE SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, C.G.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

  10. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a Mbp-long fragment of DNA that is flow-stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field-of-view. Instead we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. Fitted parameters agree well with simplified expressions, where the DNA is modeled as a cylinder in a parallel flow.

  11. Models of Stretch-Activated Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Trayanova, Natalia A.; Constantino, Jason; Gurev, Viatcheslav

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important components of mechano-electric coupling is stretch-activated channels, sarcolemmel channels that open upon mechanical stimuli. Uncovering the mechanisms by which stretch-activated channels contribute to ventricular arrhythmogenesis under a variety of pathological conditions is hampered by the lack of experimental methodologies that can record the three-dimensional electromechanical activity simultaneously at high spatiotemporal resolution. Computer modeling provides such an opportunity. This goal of this review is to illustrate the utility of sophisticated, physiologically realistic, whole heart computer simulations in determining the role of mechano-electric coupling in ventricular arrhythmogeneisis. We first present the various ways by which stretch-activated channels have been modeled and demonstrate how these channels affect cardiac electrophysiological properties. Next, we employ an electrophysiological model of the rabbit ventricles to understand how so-called commotio cordis, the mechanical impact to the pre-cordial region of the heart, can initiate ventricular tachycardia via the recruitment of stretch-activated channels. Using the same model, we also provide mechanistic insight to the termination of arrhythmias by precordial thump under normal and globally-ischemic conditions. Lastly, we employ a novel anatomically-realistic dynamic 3D coupled electromechanical model of the rabbit ventricles to gain insight into the role of electromechanical dysfunction in arrhythmogenesis during acute regional ischemia. PMID:20638670

  12. Cloud Network Helps Stretch IT Dollars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Hilton

    2012-01-01

    No matter how many car washes or bake sales schools host to raise money, adding funds to their coffers is a recurring problem. This perpetual financial difficulty makes expansive technology purchases or changes seem like a pipe dream for school CIOs and has education technologists searching for ways to stretch money. In 2005, state K-12 school…

  13. Cloud Network Helps Stretch IT Dollars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Hilton

    2012-01-01

    No matter how many car washes or bake sales schools host to raise money, adding funds to their coffers is a recurring problem. This perpetual financial difficulty makes expansive technology purchases or changes seem like a pipe dream for school CIOs and has education technologists searching for ways to stretch money. In 2005, state K-12 school…

  14. The ν5 antisymmetric stretching mode of linear C7 revisited in high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, J.; Lutter, V.; Hardy, F.-X.; Schlemmer, S.; Giesen, T. F.

    2010-06-01

    The ν5 antisymmetric stretching mode of the linear carbon cluster C7 has been revisited using a sensitive high-resolution spectrometer, including an external-cavity quantum cascade laser covering the range of interest of 1894-1901 cm-1. 50 transitions of the ν5-band have been recorded and analyzed together with 45 transitions of the ν4-band measured by Neubauer-Guenther et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 014313 (2007)]. We determined the band centers, rotational and centrifugal constants very precisely. In addition, 29 hot band transitions have been measured and tentatively assigned to the ν5+ν11-ν11 hot band. A global fit of the hot bands ν5+ν11-ν11 and ν4+ν11-ν11 is presented. Derived l-type doubling constants allow for an experimental estimation of the ν11-band center.

  15. Twisting microfluidics in a planetary centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Shoya; Hayakawa, Masayuki; Onoe, Hiroaki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2017-03-15

    This paper reports a twisting microfluidic method utilising a centrifuge-based fluid extruding system in a planetary centrifuge which simultaneously generates an orbital rotation and an axial spin. In this method, fluid extrusion from a micro-scale capillary to an 'open-space' solution or air enables release of the fluid from the capillary-based microchannel, which physically means that there is a release of fluids from a confined low-Reynolds-number environment to an open non-low-Reynolds-number environment. As a result, the extruded fluids are separated from the axial spin of the capillary, and the difference in the angular rates of the axial spin between the capillary and the extruded fluids produces the 'twisting' of the fluid. In this study, we achieve control of the twist of highly viscous fluids, and we construct a simple physical model for the fluid twist. In addition, we demonstrate the formation of twisted hydrogel microstructures (stripe-patterned microbeads and multi-helical microfibres) with control over the stripe pattern and the helical pitch length. We believe that this method will enable the generation of more sophisticated microstructures which cannot easily be formed by usual channel-based microfluidic devices. This method can also provide advanced control of microfluids, as in the case of rapid mixing of highly viscous fluids. This method can contribute to a wide range of applications in materials science, biophysics, biomedical science, and microengineering in the future.

  16. Design, Development and Analysis of Centrifugal Blower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloni, Beena Devendra; Channiwala, Salim Abbasbhai; Harsha, Sugnanam Naga Ramannath

    2017-05-01

    Centrifugal blowers are widely used turbomachines equipment in all kinds of modern and domestic life. Manufacturing of blowers seldom follow an optimum design solution for individual blower. Although centrifugal blowers are developed as highly efficient machines, design is still based on various empirical and semi empirical rules proposed by fan designers. There are different methodologies used to design the impeller and other components of blowers. The objective of present study is to study explicit design methodologies and tracing unified design to get better design point performance. This unified design methodology is based more on fundamental concepts and minimum assumptions. Parametric study is also carried out for the effect of design parameters on pressure ratio and their interdependency in the design. The code is developed based on a unified design using C programming. Numerical analysis is carried out to check the flow parameters inside the blower. Two blowers, one based on the present design and other on industrial design, are developed with a standard OEM blower manufacturing unit. A comparison of both designs is done based on experimental performance analysis as per IS standard. The results suggest better efficiency and more flow rate for the same pressure head in case of the present design compared with industrial one.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Centrifugal Compressor Stabilization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    Results from a series of experiments to investigate techniques for extending the stable flow range of a centrifugal compressor are reported. The research was conducted in a high-speed centrifugal compressor at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The stabilizing effect of steadily flowing air-streams injected into the vaneless region of a vane-island diffuser through the shroud surface is described. Parametric variations of injection angle, injection flow rate, number of injectors, injector spacing, and injection versus bleed were investigated for a range of impeller speeds and tip clearances. Both the compressor discharge and an external source were used for the injection air supply. The stabilizing effect of flow obstructions created by tubes that were inserted into the diffuser vaneless space through the shroud was also investigated. Tube immersion into the vaneless space was varied in the flow obstruction experiments. Results from testing done at impeller design speed and tip clearance are presented. Surge margin improved by 1.7 points using injection air that was supplied from within the compressor. Externally supplied injection air was used to return the compressor to stable operation after being throttled into surge. The tubes, which were capped to prevent mass flux, provided 9.3 points of additional surge margin over the baseline surge margin of 11.7 points.

  18. Centrifugally Stimulated Exospheric Ion Escape at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Seki, K.; Terada, N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the transport of ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere magnetosphere of Mercury. We show that, because of small spatial scales, the centrifugal effect due to curvature of the E B drift paths can lead to significant particle energization in the parallel direction. We demonstrate that because of this effect, ions with initial speed smaller than the escape speed such as those produced via thermal desorption can overcome gravity and escape into the magnetosphere. The escape route of this low-energy exosphere originating material is largely controlled by the magnetospheric convection rate. This escape route spreads over a narrower range of altitudes when the convection rate increases. Bulk transport of low-energy planetary material thus occurs within a limited region of space once moderate magnetospheric convection is established. These results suggest that, via release of material otherwise gravitationally trapped, the E B related centrifugal acceleration is an important mechanism for the net supply of plasma to the magnetosphere of Mercury.

  19. Development of an implantable centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, A H; Pacella, J J; Trumble, D R; Clark, R E

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of centrifugal pumps for short-term (0-30 days) ventricular support has been widely reported and favorably compared with pulsatile systems. A small, durable, implantable centrifugal blood pump is being developed for medium-term use (up to 6 months). The pump is based on the Medtronic Hemadyne system that has existed in multiple forms over the past 30 years. The pump is approximately the size of a tennis ball, weighs 240 g, and is comprised of a 2.5 cm plastic impeller driven by a radially coupled brushless DC motor. In vitro hydraulic performance was recorded over a wide range of flow conditions on a mock circulatory loop. The pump generated 7 L/min flow against an afterload of 100 mmHg pressure, with a maximum power draw of 10.4 watts. Pulsatile flow was preserved when placed in conjunction with a simulated left ventricle. In vivo testing was performed in 10 healthy sheep for 10-292 hr. Heparin was used to facilitate cannulation, and no anticoagulation was administered after pump implantation. Blood chemistries reflecting hematologic, pulmonary, renal, and hepatic functions were recorded and demonstrated no adverse effects with normal pump operation. Complications were related to kinking of blood conduits and thrombus formation within the cannulae. These results are encouraging and warrant further studies to prove feasibility of this pump as a medium-term implantable ventricular assist device.

  20. Wave Augmented Diffusers for Centrifugal Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Skoch, Gary J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual device is introduced which would utilize unsteady wave motion to slow and turn flows in the diffuser section of a centrifugal compressor. The envisioned device would substantially reduce the size of conventional centrifugal diffusers by eliminating the relatively large ninety degree bend needed to turn the flow from the radial/tangential to the axial direction. The bend would be replaced by a wall and the flow would instead exit through a series of rotating ports located on a disk, adjacent to the diffuser hub, and fixed to the impeller shaft. The ports would generate both expansion and compression waves which would rapidly transition from the hub/shroud (axial) direction to the radial/tangential direction. The waves would in turn induce radial/tangential and axial flow. This paper presents a detailed description of the device. Simplified cycle analysis and performance results are presented which were obtained using a time accurate, quasi-one-dimensional CFD code with models for turning, port flow conditions, and losses due to wall shear stress. The results indicate that a periodic wave system can be established which yields diffuser performance comparable to a conventional diffuser. Discussion concerning feasibility, accuracy, and integration follow.

  1. Centrifugation of coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Weintraub, Murray; Weiss, Milton L.; Akhtar, Sayeed

    1980-06-01

    The application of the continuous solid bowl centrifuge to the removal of solids from coal liquefaction products was investigated. The centrifuge removed from 23 to 88% of the input ash from 8 to 73% of the input organic benzene insolubles while flow rates, viscosities, and dam heights were varied. Viscosity ..mu.., effluent liquid rate Q/sub e/, and Ambler's geometric parameter ..sigma.. were graphically correlated with attained separations. The separation was relatively insensitive to the variables, as a 50-fold increase in Q/sub e//..sigma.. corresponded to a decrease in ash removal only from 84% to 60% and to a decrease in organic solids removal only from 77% to 22%. Organic solids removal was poorer and more erratic than ash removal because of the lesser density differences and greater size variability of the organics. Ancillary studies demonstrated that coal liquefaction products may behave as a Bingham Plastic fluid, and that this results in an absolute limit on the attainable solids separation. Additional studies showed that little difference in density may exist between the organic solids and liquids, and that effects of aging may threaten the validity of viscosity measurements.

  2. Some aversive characteristics of centrifugally generated gravity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, F.

    1973-01-01

    The effective weight of rats was manipulated by centrifugation. Two effective weight levels were obtained. In three escape avoidance conditions a lever press produced a change from a base level of 2.1 g to a response level of 1.1 g. In a punishment condition a response produced a change from a 1.1 g level to a 2.1 g level and in an extinction condition responses had no effect on the 2.1 g effective weight level present. All changes took 30 sec and were maintained for an additional 10 sec before a return to base level was initiated. When responses occurred closer together than the 40 sec, they delayed the return to base level by 40 sec. This 40 sec interval is referred to as response-contingent-time. The response rate and amount of response-contingent-time served as the data. The results confirmed previous data that centrifugation is aversive. The results are interpreted as indicating that the aversiveness is attributable to the increase in effective weight, and that rats can discriminate the different angular velocity-radius of rotation combinations used.

  3. Centrifugal acceleration of the polar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Ho, C. W.; Scarbro, H. D.; Wilson, G. R.; Moore, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of parallel ion acceleration associated with convection was first applied to energization of test particle polar ions by Cladis (1986). However, this effect is typically neglected in 'self-consistent' models of polar plasma outflow, apart from the fluid simulation by Swift (1990). Here we include approximations for this acceleration, which we broadly characterize as centrifugal in nature, in our time-dependent, semikinetic model of polar plasma outflow and describe the effects on the bulk parameter profiles and distribution functions of H+ and O+. For meridional convection across the pole the approximate parallel force along a polar magnetic field line may be written as F(sub cent, pole) = 1.5m(E(sub i))/B(sub i))squared (r(squared)/r(sup 3)(sub i)) where m is ion mass, r is geometric distance; and E(sub i), B(sub i) and r(sub i) refer to the electric and magnetic field magnitudes and geocentric distance at the ionosphere, respectively. For purely longitudinal convection along a constant L shell the parallel force is F(cent. long) = F(sub cent, pole)(1 - (r/(r(sub i)L))(sup 3/2)/(1 - 3r/(4 r(sub i)L))(sup 5/2). For high latitudes the difference between these two cases is relatively unimportant below approximately 5 R(sub E). We find that the steady state O+ bulk velocities and parallel temperatures strongly increase and decrease, respectively, with convection strength. In particular, the bulk velocities increase from near 0 km/s at 4000 km altitude to approximately 10 km/s at 5 R(sub E) geocentric distance for 50-mV/m ionospheric convection electric field. However, the centrifugal effect on the steady O+ density profiles depends on the exobase ion and electron temperatures: for low-base temperatures (T(sub i) = T(sub e) = 3000 K) the O+ density at high altitudes increases greatly with convection, while for higher base temperatures (T(sub i) = 5000 K, T(sub e) = 9000 K), the high-altitude O+ density decreases somewhat as convection is enhanced. The

  4. Power transmission mechanism equipped with fluid and centrifugal clutch

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, K.; Takeshita, S.; Fukunaga, T.

    1986-12-30

    This patent describes a power transmission mechanism equipped with a fluid coupling, an input shaft thereof interconnected to a power source being interconnected through the fluid coupling to an output shaft, and the output shaft being interconnected to a forward-rearward changeover mechanism including a speed changer. It is characterized in that the fluid coupling includes a shell, an impeller in the shell and a centrifugal clutch means in the shell for engaging the impeller and for driving the impeller when the shell is rotated by the input shaft at a speed above idle speed and for disengaging the impeller and the driving of the impeller when the shell is rotated by the input shaft at the idle speed. A turbine is included in the shell for standing idle in the shell when the centrifugal clutch means is disengaged and for drive by the impeller when the centrifugal clutch means is engaged and for driving the output shaft. The centrifugal clutch means comprises a support member fixed to the shell, a centrifugal shoe mounted on the support member for radial movement outwardly of the support member by centrifugal force and radial movement inwardly toward the support member. It also comprises spring means for moving the shoe inwardly toward the support member when the shell is rotated at idle speed, a cylindrical casing fixed to the impeller radially outward from the shoe and having an engaging surface for engagement by the centrifugal shoe when the shell is rotated at a speed above idle speed and the centrifugal shoe is moved radially outward by centrifugal force. The forward-rearward changeover mechanism, including the speed changer, is driven by the turbine when the centrifugal clutch means is engaged with the engaging surface and standing idle when the centrifugal clutch means is disengaged from the engaging surface and the turbine is standing idle.

  5. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a mega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead, we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. This method was devised for optical mapping of DNA, specifically, DNA denaturation patterns. It may be useful also for other studies, e.g., DNA-protein interactions, specifically, their tension dependence. Generally, wherever long strands of DNA—e.g., native DNA extracted from human cells or bacteria—must be stretched with ease for inspection, this method applies.

  6. High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.; Jongwook, Joo; Hardin, Larry W.; McCormick, Duane C.; Cousins, William T.; Lurie, Elizabeth A.; Shabbir, Aamir; Holley, Brian M.; Van Slooten, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The report "High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications" documents the work conducted at UTRC under the NRA Contract NNC08CB03C, with cost share 2/3 NASA, and 1/3 UTRC, that has been extended to 4.5 years. The purpose of this effort was to identify key technical barriers to advancing the state-of-the-art of small centrifugal compressor stages; to delineate the measurements required to provide insight into the flow physics of the technical barriers; to design, fabricate, install, and test a state-of-the-art research compressor that is representative of the rear stage of an axial-centrifugal aero-engine; and to acquire detailed aerodynamic performance and research quality data to clarify flow physics and to establish detailed data sets for future application. The design activity centered on meeting the goal set outlined in the NASA solicitation-the design target was to increase efficiency at higher work factor, while also reducing the maximum diameter of the stage. To fit within the existing Small Engine Components Test Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and to facilitate component re-use, certain key design parameters were fixed by UTRC, including impeller tip diameter, impeller rotational speed, and impeller inlet hub and shroud radii. This report describes the design effort of the High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage (HECC) and delineation of measurements, fabrication of the compressor, and the initial tests that were performed. A new High-Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage with a very challenging reduction in radius ratio was successfully designed, fabricated and installed at GRC. The testing was successful, with no mechanical problems and the running clearances were achieved without impeller rubs. Overall, measured pressure ratio of 4.68, work factor of 0.81, and at design exit corrected flow rate of 3 lbm/s met the target requirements. Polytropic efficiency of 85.5 percent and stall margin of 7.5 percent were

  7. Centrifugal Barrel Finishing Of Turbine-Blade "Fir Trees"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.

    1990-01-01

    Modified centrifugal barrel-finishing machine imparts desired residual compressive stresses to "fir trees" of turbine blades. Centrifugal forces generate compressive stresses, which are transmitted to turbine blades through abrasive slurries in which suspended. Eliminates need for shot peening, rounding of edges and burrs caused by shot peening and, consequently, need for mass finishing operations to remove burrs. Improves surface finish of "fir trees".

  8. Centrifugal Barrel Finishing Of Turbine-Blade "Fir Trees"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.

    1990-01-01

    Modified centrifugal barrel-finishing machine imparts desired residual compressive stresses to "fir trees" of turbine blades. Centrifugal forces generate compressive stresses, which are transmitted to turbine blades through abrasive slurries in which suspended. Eliminates need for shot peening, rounding of edges and burrs caused by shot peening and, consequently, need for mass finishing operations to remove burrs. Improves surface finish of "fir trees".

  9. View of new centrifuge at Flight Acceleration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    View of the new centrifuge at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), located in the Flight Acceleration Facility, bldg 29. The 50-ft. arm can swing the three man gondola to create g-forces astronauts will experience during controlled flight and during reentry. The centrifuge was designed primarily for training Apollo astronauts.

  10. 14 CFR 35.35 - Centrifugal load tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Centrifugal load tests. 35.35 Section 35.35 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.35 Centrifugal load tests. The applicant must demonstrate...

  11. 14 CFR 35.35 - Centrifugal load tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Centrifugal load tests. 35.35 Section 35.35 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.35 Centrifugal load tests. The applicant must demonstrate...

  12. 14 CFR 35.35 - Centrifugal load tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Centrifugal load tests. 35.35 Section 35.35 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.35 Centrifugal load tests. The applicant must demonstrate...

  13. Damping of Sound Waves in Strong Centrifugal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    A method for numerical calculation of the sound wave damping and dispersion law in a strong centrifugal field of the order of 106 g is considered. The damping is defined from the width of the resonance peak for different wave vectors. In the strong centrifugal field damping of the sound waves essentially exceeds the damping in the quiescent gas.

  14. Coil planet centrifugation as a means for small particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    The coil planet centrifuge uses a centrifugal force field to provide separation of particles based on differences in sedimentation rates by flow through a rotating coiled tube. Three main separations are considered: (1) single phase fresh sheep and human erythrocytes, (2) single phase fixed heep and human erythrocytes, and (3) electrophoretically enhanced single phase fresh sheep and human erythrocytes.

  15. Purification of mitochondria by sucrose step density gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Clayton, David A; Shadel, Gerald S

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial fractions isolated from tissue culture cells or tissue such as liver after differential centrifugation can be purified further by density gradient centrifugation. Here we describe the use of sucrose for this purpose because it is commonly used and inexpensive and the resulting mitochondria preparations are useful for many purposes. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Parameter Study of Melt Spun Polypropylene Fibers by Centrifugal Spinning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    including drawing, template synthesis, phase separation, self- assembly, and electrospinning . Most methods are only relevant on a laboratory scale...attention as an alternative to electrospinning , the most common nanofiber formation method. Fibers of low dielectric constants and insoluble polymers that...generally cannot be used in electrospinning can be produced through centrifugal spinning. The centrifugal spinning process has several key

  17. Centrifugal Blower for Personal Air Ventilation System (PAVS) - Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    To) May 2007 – November 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CENTRIFUGAL BLOWER FOR PERSONAL AIR VENTILATION SYSTEM (PAVS) – PHASE I 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Contract. A Personal Air Ventilation System (PAVS) blower was designed beginning with an analytical design based on aerodynamic similarity. A radial...18    1 CENTRIFUGAL BLOWER FOR THE PERSONAL AIR VENTILATION SYSTEM (PAVS) – PHASE I 1

  18. Supersonic rotation in the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, Sarah

    The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) has been built to study the confinement of supersonically-rotating plasmas and velocity shear stabilization of MHD instabilities. Theory predicts improved stability and confinement when a strong radial electric field is introduced into a magnetic-mirror geometry. The resulting radial currents establish a stable highly sheared plasma rotating at supersonic velocities in the azimuthal direction under the influence of J x B forces. This arrangement leads to increased confinement because the supersonic rotation creates an artificial radial gravity which draws the plasma away from the mirrors, closing the mirror loss cone. The large vφ shear stabilizes the plasma and enforces laminar flow. Based on these concepts, we have designed and constructed a machine to produce supersonically rotating highly-ionized plasmas. It typically does this by introducing a radial voltage of 7 kV in a magnetic-mirror geometry, 2 kG at the midplane and 19 kG at each mirror. MCX has completed its main construction phase and is acquiring data, here analyzed primarily in terms of a circuit model which infers plasma characteristics from the radial voltage across the plasma and the total radial current. The theory and simulations supporting the MCX centrifugal confinement scheme are presented here with the data and analysis from its first nine months of operation, including a description of basic plasma characteristics and evidence for both stability and confinement. Theory simulation, and initial experimental data all indicate that this centrifugal confinement scheme provides good stability and confinement at the temperatures and densities under study, as well as at the larger temperatures, fields, and dimensions expected for a fusion reactor. In particular, spectroscopic and circuit-model data indicate rotational velocities in MCX of up to 100 km/s, ion temperatures of approximately 30 eV, and ion densities upwards of 1020m-3. These parameters give

  19. Bubble Eliminator Based on Centrifugal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The fluid bubble eliminator (FBE) is a device that removes gas bubbles from a flowing liquid. The FBE contains no moving parts and does not require any power input beyond that needed to pump the liquid. In the FBE, the buoyant force for separating the gas from the liquid is provided by a radial pressure gradient associated with a centrifugal flow of the liquid and any entrained bubbles. A device based on a similar principle is described in Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System (MSC- 22863), which appears on page 48 of this issue. The FBE was originally intended for use in filtering bubbles out of a liquid flowing relatively slowly in a bioreactor system in microgravity. Versions that operate in normal Earth gravitation at greater flow speeds may also be feasible. The FBE (see figure) is constructed as a cartridge that includes two concentric cylinders with flanges at the ends. The outer cylinder is an impermeable housing; the inner cylinder comprises a gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane covering a perforated inner tube. Multiple spiral disks that collectively constitute a spiral ramp are mounted in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The liquid enters the FBE through an end flange, flows in the annular space between the cylinders, and leaves through the opposite end flange. The spiral disks channel the liquid into a spiral flow, the circumferential component of which gives rise to the desired centrifugal effect. The resulting radial pressure gradient forces the bubbles radially inward; that is, toward the inner cylinder. At the inner cylinder, the gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane allows the bubbles to enter the perforated inner tube while keeping the liquid in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The gas thus collected can be vented via an endflange connection to the inner tube. The centripetal acceleration (and thus the radial pressure gradient) is approximately proportional to the square of the flow speed and

  20. NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW ACROSS CANAL PRISM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW ACROSS CANAL PRISM TO TOWPATH BERM (LATER FILL ENCROACHING LEFT) NEAR CENTER OF THIS STRETCH; VIEW TO SOUTHWEST - Blackstone Canal Worcester-Millbury Segment, Eastern bank of Blackstone River, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  1. Infiltration of fibrous preform in the centrifugal force field

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshinori; Shirayanagi, Itaru; Sakai, Yoshibumi; Tozawa, Yasuhisa

    1994-12-31

    The pressure to infiltrate molten aluminum into alumina short fiber preform was generated by centrifugal force, and the start pressure for the infiltration was measured. The fundamental equation of infiltration phenomenon was derived from the equation of the conservation of momentum of fluid flow in the porous media in the centrifugal force field. One-dimensional solution of the equation was obtained to discuss the characteristics of fluid flow in a centrifugal force field. It was made clear that centrifugal force is effective as a motive force to infiltrate molten metal into fibrous preform, the pressure distribution of molten metal in the preform is different from that predicted by D`Arcy`s law and the infiltration is enhanced by centrifugal force.

  2. Effect of science laboratory centrifuge of space station environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Searby, Nancy

    1990-01-01

    It is argued that it is essential to have a centrifuge operating during manned space station operations. Background information and a rationale for the research centrifuge are given. It is argued that we must provide a controlled acceleration environment for comparison with microgravity studies. The lack of control groups in previous studies throws into question whether the obseved effects were the result of microgravity or not. The centrifuge could be used to provide a 1-g environment to supply specimens free of launch effects for long-term studies. With the centrifuge, the specimens could be immediately transferred to microgravity without undergoing gradual acclimation. Also, the effects of artificial gravity on humans could be investigated. It is also argued that the presence of the centrifuge on the space station will not cause undo vibrations or other disturbing effects.

  3. Measuring and balancing dynamic unbalance of precision centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yafei; Huo, Xin

    2008-10-01

    A precision centrifuge is used to test and calibrate accelerometer model parameters. Its dynamic unbalance may cause the perturbation of the centrifuge to deteriorate the test and calibration accuracy of an accelerometer. By analyzing the causes of dynamic unbalance, the influences on precision centrifuge from static unbalance and couple unbalance are developed. It is considered measuring and balancing of static unbalance is a key to resolving a dynamic unbalance problem of precision centrifuge with a disk in structure. Measuring means and calculating formulas of static unbalance amount are given, and balancing principle and method are provided. The correctness and effectiveness of this method are confirmed by experiments on a device under tuning, thereby the accurate and high-effective measuring and balancing method of dynamic unbalance of this precision centrifuge was provided.

  4. Centrifugal regulator for control of deployment rates of deployable elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermalle, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements, design, and performance of a centrifugal regulator aimed at limiting deployment rates of deployable elements are discussed. The overall mechanism is comprised of four distinct functional parts in a machined housing: (1) the centrifugal brake device, which checks the payout of a deployment cable; (2) the reducing gear, which produces the spin rate necesary for the braking device; (3) the payout device, which allows the unwinding of the cable; and (4) the locking device, which prevents untimely unwinding. The centrifugal regulator is set into operation by a threshold tension of the cable which unlocks the mechanism and allows unwinding. The pulley of the windout device drives the centrifugal brake with the help of the reducing gear. The centrifugal force pushes aside weights that produce friction of the studs in a cylindrical housing. The mechanism behaved well at qualification temperature and vibrations.

  5. Laser isotope separation: Uranium. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and assessment of laser separation of uranium isotopes, compounds, oxides, and alloys. Topics include uranium enrichment plants, isotope enriched materials, gaseous diffusion, centrifuge enrichment, reliability and safety, and atomic vapor separation. Citations also discuss commercial enrichment, market trends, licensing, international competition, and waste management. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  6. Closed continuous-flow centrifuge rotor

    DOEpatents

    Breillatt, Jr., Julian P.; Remenyik, Carl J.; Sartory, Walter K.; Thacker, Louis H.; Penland, William Z.

    1976-01-01

    A blood separation centrifuge rotor having a generally parabolic core disposed concentrically and spaced apart within a housing having a similarly shaped cavity. Blood is introduced through a central inlet and into a central passageway enlarged downwardly to decrease the velocity of the entrant blood. Septa are disposed inside the central passageway to induce rotation of the entrant blood. A separation chamber is defined between the core and the housing wherein the whole blood is separated into red cell, white cell, and plasma zones. The zones are separated by annular splitter blades disposed within the separation chamber. The separated components are continuously removed through conduits communicating through a face seal to the outside of the rotor.

  7. Numerical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical simulation model for the horizontal centrifugal pipe casting process was developed with the commercial simulation package Flow3D. It considers - additionally to mass, energy and momentum conservation equations and free surface tracking - the fast radial and slower horizontal movement of the mold. The iron inflow is not steady state but time dependent. Of special importance is the friction between the liquid and the mold in connection with the viscosity and turbulence of the iron. Experiments with the mold at controlled revolution speeds were carried out using a high-speed camera. From these experiments friction coefficients for the description of the interaction between mold and melt were obtained. With the simulation model, the influence of typical process parameters (e.g. melts inflow, mold movement, melt temperature, cooling media) on the wall thickness of the pipes can be studied. The comparison to results of pipes from production shows a good agreement between simulation and reality.

  8. A modeling study of a centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, P.; Shapiro, H.N.

    1998-12-31

    A centrifugal compressor, which is part of a chlorofluorocarbon R-114 chiller installation, was investigated, operating with a new refrigerant, hydrofluorocarbon R-236ea, a proposed alternative to R-114. A large set of R-236ea operating data, as well as a limited amount of R-114 data, were available for this study. A relatively simple analytical compressor model was developed to describe compressor performance. The model was built upon a thorough literature search, experimental data, and some compressor design parameters. Two original empirical relations were developed, providing a new approach to the compressor modeling. The model was developed in a format that would permit it to be easily incorporated into a complete chiller simulation. The model was found to improve somewhat on the quantitative and physical aspects of a compressor model of the same format found in the literature. It was found that the compressor model is specific to the particular refrigerant.

  9. [Hemodynamic analysis of a centrifugal blood pump].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Li, Qilei; Xu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper built the mathematical model of a centrifugal blood pump, which was designed by ourselves, combined it with that of the human cardiovascular system and simulated the coupling system using Matlab. Then we set up the experiment platform, linked the blood pump to mock human cardiovascular system in case of three-stage heart failure, and measured aortic pressure and flow under different speed. The comparison between experiment results and simulation results not only indicates the coupling model is correct and the blood pump works well, but also shows that with the increase of blood pump speed, the pulsation of aortic pressure and flow will be reduced, this situation will affect the structure and function of blood vessels.

  10. Implantable centrifugal pump with hybrid magnetic bearings.

    PubMed

    Bearnson, G B; Olsen, D B; Khanwilkar, P S; Long, J W; Sinnott, M; Kumar, A; Allaire, P E; Baloh, M; Decker, J

    1998-01-01

    Test methods and results of in vitro assessment of a centrifugal pump with a magnetically suspended impeller are provided. In vitro blood tests have been completed with a resulting normalized milligram index of hemolysis (NmIH) of 12.4 +/- 4.1, indicating that hemolysis is not a problem. Hydraulic characterization of the system with water has shown that a nominal pumping condition of 6 L/min at 100 mmHg was met at 2,200 rpm. Maximum clinically usable cardiac output is predicted be 10 L/min. The magnetic bearing supported impeller did not contact the housing and was shown to be stable under a variety of pumping conditions. The driving motor efficiency is 75% at the nominal condition. Finally, a description of the clinical version of the pump under development is provided.

  11. Rotordynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, R.; Arndt, N.; Caughey, T. K.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The asymmetric flow around an impeller in a volute exerts a force upon the impeller. To study the rotordynamic force on an impeller which is vibrating around its machine axis of rotation, the impeller, mounted on a dynamometer, is made to whirl in a circular orbit within the volute. The measured force is expressed as the sum of a steady radial force and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the impeller. These forces were measured in separate tests on a centrifugal pump with radically increased shroud clearance, a two-dimensional impeller, and an impeller with an inducer, the impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine). In each case, a destabilizing force was observed over a region of positive whirl.

  12. Rotordynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, R.; Arndt, N.; Caughey, T. K.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The asymmetric flow around an impeller in a volute exerts a force upon the impeller. To study the rotordynamic force on an impeller which is vibrating around its machine axis of rotation, the impeller, mounted on a dynamometer, is made to whirl in a circular orbit within the volute. The measured force is expressed as the sum of a steady radial force and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the impeller. These forces were measured in separate tests on a centrifugal pump with radically increased shroud clearance, a two-dimensional impeller, and an impeller with an inducer, the impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine). In each case, a destabilizing force was observed over a region of positive whirl.

  13. Head pulsations in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, V. S.; Sotnyk, M. I.; Moskalenko, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    This article investigated the factors, which affect to the character of the head pulsations of a centrifugal pump. We investigated the dependence of the shape and depth of these pulsations from the operation mode of the pump. Was determined, that the head pulsations at the outlet of the impeller (pulsations on the blade passing frequency) cause head pulsations at the outlet of the pump, that have the same frequency, but differ in shape and depth. These pulsations depend on the design features of the flow-through part of the pump (from the ratio of hydraulic losses on the friction and losses on the vortex formation). A feature of the researches that were conducted is also the using of not only hydraulic but also electric modeling methods. It allows determining the values of the components of hydraulic losses.

  14. Centrifugal governor for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, M.

    1986-09-23

    A centrifugal governor is described for use with an internal combustion engine which consists of: a control rack for regulating the quantity of fuel to be supplied to the engine; flyweights radially displaceable in response to the rotational speed of the engine; a tension lever pivotable through an angle dependent upon the amount of radial displacement of the flyweights; an idling spring for urging the tension lever against radially outward displacement of the flyweights; a torque cam having a cam surface determining a fuel increment to be applied at the start of the engine; a sensor lever having one end engaged by the control rack, and another end adapted to engage with the cam surface of the torque cam; a cancelling spring interposed between the torque cam and the tension lever; a control lever; a floating lever interlocking with the control lever; and spring force adjusting means arranged at one end of the idling spring.

  15. Development of Centrifugal Contactor with High Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, Nobuo; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Ogino, Hideki; Kase, Takeshi; Koizumi, Tsutomu

    2007-07-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), an innovative centrifugal contactor system has been developed for a future reprocessing plant. It was confirmed that it had a higher extraction capacity through the uranium test already. But it was necessary that it had the higher mechanical reliability to be applied in a reprocessing plant. In this study, two types of driving units that use a ball bearing or a magnetic bearing have been developed for it. It was confirmed that they had enough abilities trough endurance tests. The driving unit with ball bearing could be operated continuously for 5000 hours that was equal to a term of an annual operation. It was found that it could be operated for a year without maintenance. JAEA will continue to improve them and select more advantageous one on the basis of economy and lifetime in near future. (authors)

  16. Reciprocating flow-based centrifugal microfluidics mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Zoval, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Proper mixing of reagents is of paramount importance for an efficient chemical reaction. While on a large scale there are many good solutions for quantitative mixing of reagents, as of today, efficient and inexpensive fluid mixing in the nanoliter and microliter volume range is still a challenge. Complete, i.e., quantitative mixing is of special importance in any small-scale analytical application because the scarcity of analytes and the low volume of the reagents demand efficient utilization of all available reaction components. In this paper we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a novel centrifugal force-based unit for fast mixing of fluids in the nanoliter to microliter volume range. The device consists of a number of chambers (including two loading chambers, one pressure chamber, and one mixing chamber) that are connected through a network of microchannels, and is made by bonding a slab of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to a glass slide. The PDMS slab was cast using a SU-8 master mold fabricated by a two-level photolithography process. This microfluidic mixer exploits centrifugal force and pneumatic pressure to reciprocate the flow of fluid samples in order to minimize the amount of sample and the time of mixing. The process of mixing was monitored by utilizing the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. A time series of high resolution images of the mixing chamber were analyzed for the spatial distribution of light intensities as the two fluids (suspension of red fluorescent particles and water) mixed. Histograms of the fluorescent emissions within the mixing chamber during different stages of the mixing process were created to quantify the level of mixing of the mixing fluids. The results suggest that quantitative mixing was achieved in less than 3 min. This device can be employed as a stand alone mixing unit or may be integrated into a disk-based microfluidic system where, in addition to mixing, several other sample preparation steps may be

  17. Method and centrifugal apparatus for slurry testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tuzson, J.J.

    1984-04-17

    In accordance with the centrifugal erosion testing method of the invention, a material specimen is rotated with a flat surface facing the direction of rotation and a narrow stream of an abrasive particle slurry is concurrently flowed at a preselected rate in a radial direction across the flat surface, the rotating step being at sufficiently high angular velocity to urge the abrasive particles by Coriolis acceleration into a compacted mass against the flat surface and erode material therefrom by scouring type action as the particles flow radially outward. The rotating and flowing steps are continued for a sufficient preselected duration to erode material to a measurable depth, and the depth to which the flat surface is worn by the abrasive particles is measured as an indication of the erosion resistance of the specimen material. The centrifugal slurry erosion testing apparatus includes a rotatable cylindrical vessel into the interior of which the abrasive slurry is fed and a specimen holder extending radially from the vessel having a cavity for receiving the specimen and a radial slurry flow passage communicating with the interior of the vessel. One of the radial passage longitudinal walls is defined by the flat surface of the specimen. Preferably the specimen holder comprises mating semicylindrical halves one of which has a specimen-receiving cavity in its abutting surface and the other has a narrow rectangular-in-cross section groove in its abutting surface which communicates with the interior of the vessel and together with the flat surface of the specimen defines the radial slurry flow passage. The mating semicylindrical halves are enclosed by a sleeve having an annular rim disposed interiorly of the vessel to prevent radially outward movement of the specimen holder.

  18. Multiphase flow modeling in centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Adelmann, S; Schwienheer, C; Schembecker, G

    2011-09-09

    The separation efficiency in Centrifugal Partition Chromatography (CPC) depends on selection of a suitable biphasic solvent system (distribution ratio, selectivity factor, sample solubility) and is influenced by hydrodynamics in the chambers. Especially the stationary phase retention, the interfacial area for mass transfer and the flow pattern (backmixing) are important parameters. Their relationship with physical properties, operating parameters and chamber geometry is not completely understood and predictions are hardly possible. Experimental flow visualization is expensive and two-dimensional only. Therefore we simulated the flow pattern using a volume-of-fluid (VOF) method, which was implemented in OpenFOAM®. For the three-dimensional simulation of a rotating FCPC®-chamber, gravitational centrifugal and Coriolis forces were added to the conservation equation. For experimental validation the flow pattern of different solvent systems was visualized with an optical measurement system. The amount of mobile phase in a chamber was calculated from gray scale values of videos recorded by an image processing routine in ImageJ®. To visualize the flow of the stationary phase polyethylene particles were used to perform a qualitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis. We found a good agreement between flow patterns and velocity profiles of experiments and simulations. By using the model we found that increasing the chamber depth leads to higher specific interfacial area. Additionally a circular flow in the stationary phase was identified that lowers the interfacial area because it pushes the jet of mobile phase to the chamber wall. The Coriolis force alone gives the impulse for this behavior. As a result the model is easier to handle than experiments and allows 3D prediction of hydrodynamics in the chamber. Additionally it can be used for optimizing geometry and operating parameters for given physical properties of solvent systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B

  19. Reciprocating flow-based centrifugal microfluidics mixer.

    PubMed

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Zoval, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Proper mixing of reagents is of paramount importance for an efficient chemical reaction. While on a large scale there are many good solutions for quantitative mixing of reagents, as of today, efficient and inexpensive fluid mixing in the nanoliter and microliter volume range is still a challenge. Complete, i.e., quantitative mixing is of special importance in any small-scale analytical application because the scarcity of analytes and the low volume of the reagents demand efficient utilization of all available reaction components. In this paper we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a novel centrifugal force-based unit for fast mixing of fluids in the nanoliter to microliter volume range. The device consists of a number of chambers (including two loading chambers, one pressure chamber, and one mixing chamber) that are connected through a network of microchannels, and is made by bonding a slab of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to a glass slide. The PDMS slab was cast using a SU-8 master mold fabricated by a two-level photolithography process. This microfluidic mixer exploits centrifugal force and pneumatic pressure to reciprocate the flow of fluid samples in order to minimize the amount of sample and the time of mixing. The process of mixing was monitored by utilizing the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. A time series of high resolution images of the mixing chamber were analyzed for the spatial distribution of light intensities as the two fluids (suspension of red fluorescent particles and water) mixed. Histograms of the fluorescent emissions within the mixing chamber during different stages of the mixing process were created to quantify the level of mixing of the mixing fluids. The results suggest that quantitative mixing was achieved in less than 3 min. This device can be employed as a stand alone mixing unit or may be integrated into a disk-based microfluidic system where, in addition to mixing, several other sample preparation steps may be

  20. Isotopic enrichment of Zn particles by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix Pozzi, Marcelo N.; Guidali, Gonzalo; Fernández, Mauricio; Zubillaga, Erica; Rinaldi, Carlos A.

    2017-07-01

    The use of Zn in nuclear reactors reduces the amount of 60Co generated as a consequence of the natural activation of Co. On the other hand, isotopically enriched Zn can be used as a tracer in biological systems. At the present, the enrichment of Zn is obtained using gaseous compounds of the metal by centrifugal force. In this paper, we present a method based on laser ablation of metallic targets of Zn with a Nd-YAG nanosecond laser to produce isotopically enriched Zn particles. Also, the effect of the wavelength irradiation laser on the enrichment factor was studied and a procedure is proposed to collect the different enrichment fractions yield.

  1. Modeling aftershocks as a stretched exponential relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-11-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Although other expressions have been proposed in recent decades to describe the temporal behavior of aftershocks, the number of model comparisons remains limited. After reviewing the aftershock models published from the late nineteenth century until today, I solely compare the power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential expressions defined in their simplest forms. By applying statistical methods recommended recently in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simple relaxation process, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.

  2. The role of stretching in tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, E; Mahieu, N; Roosen, P; McNair, P

    2007-04-01

    The function of tendons can be classified into two categories: tensile force transmission, and storage and release of elastic energy during locomotion. The action of tendons in storing and releasing energy is mainly seen in sports activities with stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs). The more intense the SSC movements are (jumping-like activities), the more frequently tendon problems are observed. High SSC movements impose high loads on tendons. Consequently, tendons that frequently deal with high SSC motion require a high energy-absorbing capacity to store and release this large amount of elastic energy. As the elasticity of tendon structures is a leading factor in the amount of stored energy, prevention and rehabilitation programmes for tendon injuries should focus on increasing this tendon elasticity in athletes performing high SSC movements. Recently, it has been shown that ballistic stretching can significantly increase tendon elasticity. These findings have important clinical implications for treatment and prevention of tendon injuries.

  3. Stretched cell cycle model for proliferating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Mark R.; Kan, Andrey; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Marchingo, Julia M.; Wellard, Cameron J.; Markham, John F.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic variation in cell cycle time is a consistent feature of otherwise similar cells within a growing population. Classic studies concluded that the bulk of the variation occurs in the G1 phase, and many mathematical models assume a constant time for traversing the S/G2/M phases. By direct observation of transgenic fluorescent fusion proteins that report the onset of S phase, we establish that dividing B and T lymphocytes spend a near-fixed proportion of total division time in S/G2/M phases, and this proportion is correlated between sibling cells. This result is inconsistent with models that assume independent times for consecutive phases. Instead, we propose a stretching model for dividing lymphocytes where all parts of the cell cycle are proportional to total division time. Data fitting based on a stretched cell cycle model can significantly improve estimates of cell cycle parameters drawn from DNA labeling data used to monitor immune cell dynamics. PMID:24733943

  4. Stretching cells and delivering drugs with bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Li, Fenfang; Chon U, Chan; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we'll review our work on impulsive cell stretching using cavitation bubbles and magnetic microbubbles for drug delivery. For sufficient short times cells can sustain a much larger areal strain than the yield strain obtained from quasi-static stretching. Experiments with red blood cells show that even then the rupture of the cell is slow process; it is caused by diffusive swelling rather than mechanical violation of the plasma membrane. In the second part we'll discuss bubbles coated with magnetic and drug loaded particles. These bubbles offer an interesting vector for on demand delivery of drugs using mild ultrasound and magnetic fields. We report on basic experiments in microfluidic channels revealing the release of the agent during bubble oscillations and first in vivo validation with a mouse tumor model. Singapore National Research Foundations Competitive Research Program funding (NRF-CRP9-2011-04).

  5. Vibrational overtone stretching transitions in sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Michael W. P.

    2006-10-01

    The CH stretching overtone transitions of the nerve agent sarin (O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) are of interest to the standoff detection of chemical warfare agents, as many of these transitions occur near regions where small, efficient, portable diode lasers (originally developed for use in the telecommunications industry) operate. However, the interpretation of experimental vibrational overtone spectra is often difficult, and the computational simulation of overtone transitions in a molecule is challenging. Presented herein are the simulated CH overtone stretching transitions in sarin. Spectral regions are simulated from overtone transition energies and intensities, both of which are calculated within the harmonically coupled anharmonic oscillator (HCAO) model. Data for HCAO calculations are obtained from ab initio calculations, without any recourse to experimental data.

  6. Asymptotic Symmetries of Spacelike Stretched ADS Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojević, Milutin; Cvetković, Branislav

    We study asymptotic symmetries in the spacelike stretched AdS sector of topologically massive gravity. The Poisson bracket algebra of the canonical generators is shown to be centrally extended semi-direct sum of the Virasoro and u(1) Kac-Moody algebra. By using the Sugawara construction, we prove that the asymptotic symmetry coincides with the conformal symmetry, described by two independent Virasoro algebras with central charges.

  7. Image enhancement by local histogram stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alparslan, E.; Fuatince, Mr.

    1981-05-01

    An image enhancement algorithm that makes use of local histogram stretching is introduced. This algorithm yields considerable improvements in human observation of details in an image, compared to straightforward histogram equalization and a number of other enhancement techniques. The algorithm is especially suitable for producing hard copies of images on electrostatic plotters with limited gray levels, as shown in applications to the Girl's image and a Landsat image.

  8. NASA/MSFC Large Stretch Press Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, M. W.; Nealson, W. P.; Jay, G. C.; Buss, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: A. assess and document the advantages/disadvantages of a government agency investment in a large stretch form press on the order of 5000 tons capacity (per jaw); B. develop a procurement specification for the press; and C. provide trade study data that will permit an optimum site location. Tasks were separated into four major elements: cost study, user survey, site selection, and press design/procurement specification.

  9. Isotopically Enriched Films and Nanostructures by Ultrafast Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Pronko

    2004-12-13

    This project involved a systematic study to apply newly discovered isotopic enrichment effects in laser ablation plumes to the fabrication of isotopically engineered thin films, superlattices, and nanostructures. The approach to this program involved using ultrafast lasers as a method for generating ablated plasmas that have preferentially structured isotopic content in the body of the ablation plasma plumes. In examining these results we have attempted to interpret the observations in terms of a plasma centrifuge process that is driven by the internal electro-magnetic fields of the plasma itself. The research plan involved studying the following phenomena in regard to the ablation plume and the isotopic mass distribution within it: (1) Test basic equations of steady state centrifugal motion in the ablation plasma. (2) Investigate angular distribution of ions in the ablation plasmas. (3) Examine interactions of plasma ions with self-generated magnetic fields. (3) Investigate ion to neutral ratios in the ablation plasmas. (5) Test concepts of plasma pumping. (6) Fabricate isotopically enriched nanostructures.

  10. Laser treatment of stretch marks: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Leonardo; Piccinetti, A. L.; Monache, G. D.; Botta, G.; Mancini, S.

    2000-06-01

    The best treatment of these stretch mark is still unknown. Some authors proposed the treatment with flash-lamp-pumped dye laser 585 nm, with fluence over 8 J/cm2. Reviewing our experiences on no-surgical effects of lasers in the various phases of the wound healing, including the re- epithelization, we would like to apply the no-surgical laser therapy treating the stretch marks of breast, abdomen and lumbo-sacral region. The goal is to inhibit the fibrous tissue metabolism, encouraging the destruction of the collagen fibers with inflammatory mechanism, and increasing the reconstitution of the superficial dermis layers. We treated five cases of stretch marks in women 22-35 years old, since May 1999, with a cycle of applications of double lasers, 511 and 577 nm, with energy of 20 Joule for spot, respecting the maximum thermal relaxation times of the skin. We waited two weeks interval between the applications. Results obtained after five applications are very positive, and we are encouraged to continue this experimentation.

  11. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  12. Stretch Moduli of Ribonucleotide Embedded Short DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of DNA is essential to comprehending the dynamics of many cellular functions. DNA deformations are involved in many mechanisms when genetic information needs to be stored and used. In addition, recent studies have found that Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) are among the most common non-standard nucleotides present in DNA. The presences of rNMPs in DNA might cause mutation, fragility or genotoxicity of chromosome but how they influence the structure and mechanical properties of DNA remains unclear. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based single molecule spectroscopy, we measure the stretch moduli of double stranded DNAs (dsDNA) with 30 base pairs and 5 equally embedded rNMPs. The dsDNAs are anchored on gold substrate via thiol chemistry, while the AFM tip is used to pick up and stretch the dsDNA from its free end through biotin-streptavidin bonding. Our preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of rNMPs in dsDNA might significantly change its stretch modulus, which might be important in some biological processes.

  13. Dynamo theory, vorticity generation, and exponential stretching.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Susan; Vishik, Misha M.

    1991-08-01

    A discussion is given of the analogy between the dynamo equation for the generation of a magnetic field by the motion of an electrically conducting fluid and the equation for the evolution of vorticity of a viscous fluid. In both cases exponential stretching is an important feature of the underlying instability problem. For the "fast" dynamo problem, the existence of exponential stretching (i.e., the positivity of the Lyapunov exponent) somewhere in the flow is a necessary condition when the flow is smooth. An example is presented of a flow with exponential stretching (an Anosov flow) that supports fast dynamo action. A parallel treatment is described for the linearized Navier-Stokes equations for the motion of a viscous fluid. In this problem the analogous necessary condition for "fast vorticity generation" is the existence of some instability in the corresponding Euler (i.e., inviscid) equation. Dynamo theory methods give a second related result, namely a universal geometric estimate from below on the growth rate of a small perturbation in an inviscid fluid. This bound gives an effective sufficient condition for local instability for Eulers equations. In particular, it is proved that a steady flow with a hyperbolic stagnation point is unstable. The growth rate of an infinitesimal perturbation in a metric with derivatives depends on this metric. This dependence is completely described.

  14. Sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    De Bustos, Alfredo; Cuadrado, Angeles; Jouve, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is widespread in eukaryotic genomes, in some cases making up more than 80% of the total. SSRs are a type of repetitive DNA formed by short motifs repeated in tandem arrays. In some species, SSRs may be organized into long stretches, usually associated with the constitutive heterochromatin. Variation in repeats can alter the expression of genes, and changes in the number of repeats have been linked to certain human diseases. Unfortunately, the molecular characterization of these repeats has been hampered by technical limitations related to cloning and sequencing. Indeed, most sequenced genomes contain gaps owing to repetitive DNA-related assembly difficulties. This paper reports an alternative method for sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA based on the combined use of 1) a linear vector to stabilize the cloning process, and 2) the use of exonuclease III for obtaining progressive deletions of SSR-rich fragments. This strategy allowed the sequencing of a fragment containing a stretch of 6.2 kb of continuous SSRs. To demonstrate that this procedure can sequence other kinds of repetitive DNA, it was used to examine a 4.5 kb fragment containing a cluster of 15 repeats of the 5S rRNA gene of barley. PMID:27819354

  15. Isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rash of new controversy has emerged around the subject of mass-independent isotope fractionation effects, particularly in the case of the oxygen isotopes. To be sure, the controversy has been around for awhile, but it has been given new impetus by the results of a recent study by Mark H. Thiemens and John E. Heidenreich III of the University of California, San Diego (Science, March 4, 1983).Gustav Arrhenius has been trying to convince the planetary science community that chemical effects in isotope fractionation processes could explain observations in meteorites that appear to be outside of the traditionally understood mass-dependent fractionations (G. Arrhenius, J . L. McCrumb, and N. F. Friedman, Astrophys. Space Sci, 65, 297, 1974). Robert Clayton had made the basic observations of oxygen in carbonaceous chondrites that the slope of the δ17 versus δ18 line was 1 instead of the slope of ½ characteristic of terrestrial rocks and lunar samples (Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 28, 501, 1978). The mass-independent effects were ascribed to the apparent contribution of an ancient presolar system component of O16.

  16. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Del P.; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Behm, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key points The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. PMID:24149890

  17. Chromium stable isotope fractionation during adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, A.; Johnson, T.; Bullen, T.

    2003-04-01

    Chromium is a common anthropogenic contaminant in ground water. It is redox-active; the two common valences in natural waters are Cr(VI), which is highly soluble and toxic, and Cr(III), which is relatively insoluble. Redox reactions control Cr mobility in aqueous solutions with Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) controlling the attenuation of Cr in groundwater. Our previous study demonstrated that abiotic Cr(VI) reduction causes an isotope fractionation of -3.5 permil (53Cr/52Cr) and isotopes can therefore be used to calculate the extent of reduction. In the present study, experiments were conducted to measure Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) sorption on Al203. Sorption of Cr(VI) could be important as a small isotope fractionation may get amplified along the edges of a Cr(VI) contaminated plume. A previous study demonstrated a similar process with Fe isotopes on anion exchange resin. Initial solutions of 200 mg/l Cr(VI) (as K2Cr2O7) and 0.1 mM KCl were made up. Sufficient solid Al203 was added to achieve 50% sorption. After equilibration, the solution was extracted by centrifuging and filtering with a 0.2 micron filter. Al203 was then added again to result in a further 50% sorption of the remaining Cr(VI). This process was repeated 10 times to amplify any isotopic fractionation between dissolved and adsorbed Cr(VI). The instantaneous stable isotope fractionation was calculated based on the δ 53Cr values of the initial and final Cr(VI) solutions. The results show that the stable isotope values measured in the solutions after the ten steps were within the uncertainty of the isotope value of the initial solution. Therefore, no significant stable isotope fractionation occurred. We are presently conducting experiments with goethite and expect similar results. Therefore, any fractionation of chromium stable isotopes observed in contaminant plumes are a result of processes other than adsorption (i.e., reduction).

  18. Centrifuge separation effect on bacterial indicator reduction in dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zong; Carroll, Zachary S; Long, Sharon C; Roa-Espinosa, Aicardo; Runge, Troy

    2017-04-15

    Centrifugation is a commonly applied separation method for manure processing on large farms to separate solids and nutrients. Pathogen reduction is also an important consideration for managing manure. Appropriate treatment reduces risks from pathogen exposure when manure is used as soil amendments or the processed liquid stream is recycled to flush the barn. This study investigated the effects of centrifugation and polymer addition on bacterial indicator removal from the liquid fraction of manure slurries. Farm samples were taken from a manure centrifuge processing system. There were negligible changes of quantified pathogen indicator concentrations in the low-solids centrate compared to the influent slurry. To study if possible improvements could be made to the system, lab scale experiments were performed investigating a range of g-forces and flocculating polymer addition. The results demonstrated that polymer addition had a negligible effect on the indicator bacteria levels when centrifuged at high g forces. However, the higher g force centrifugation was capable of reducing bacterial indicator levels up to two-log10 in the liquid stream of the manure, although at speeds higher than typical centrifuge operations currently used for manure processing applications. This study suggests manure centrifuge equipment could be redesigned to provide pathogen reduction to meet emerging issues, such as zoonotic pathogen control. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The electrocardiographic response to high +Gz centrifuge training.

    PubMed

    Whinnery, J E

    1990-08-01

    The electrocardiographic (ECG) responses of 59 asymptomatic, healthy flight surgeons to the acceleration profiles included in current U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy high-G centrifuge training programs are documented. ECG dysrhythmias were frequently observed during exposure to both gradual and rapid onset training profiles. Short self-limited episodes of ventricular tachycardia occurred in 5 subjects. Advanced Lown grade ventricular ectopy occurred in 13 subjects. The type of cardiac ectopy and the frequency of occurrence for each of the training profiles is described. The results suggest that significant ectopy frequently occurs during exposure of healthy, asymptomatic individuals to centrifuge training profiles. Since aircrew are expected to undergo high +Gz as part of their usual flying duties, ECG monitoring during high-G centrifuge training has not universally been a required part of the training exposures. Aircrew have not always accepted ECG monitoring during centrifuge training, fearing detection of certain cardiac dysrhythmias, which current aeromedical standards consider disqualifying for continued flying duties without clinical aeromedical evaluation. Based on the results of this study, and previous documentation of the occurrence of significant +Gz-induced cardiac dysrhythmias (both in flight and on the centrifuge), ECG monitoring might be considered appropriate to ensure optimum medical safety during high-G centrifuge training. The current inconsistency between 1) not monitoring ECG because of the aeromedical standards for flying qualification relating to the ECG response to +Gz stress, and 2) the need to monitor ECG to assure optimum safety during centrifuge training, deserves resolution.

  20. Gravitropism in Phycomyces: threshold determination on a clinostat centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Galland, Paul; Finger, Heike; Wallacher, Yvonne

    2004-06-01

    The absolute sensitivity of sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus to centrifugal acceleration was determined on a clinostat centrifuge. The centrifuge provides centrifugal accelerations ranging from 10(-4) to 6 x g. The rotor of the centrifuge, which accommodates 96 culture vials with single sporangiophores, is clinostatted, that is, turning "head over", at slow speed (1 rev min(-1)) while it is running. The negative gravitropism of sporangiophores is characterized by two components: a polar angle, which is measured in the plane of bending, and an aiming-error angle, which indicates the deviation of the plane of bending from the vector of the centrifugal acceleration. Dose-response curves were generated for both angles with centrifugations lasting 3, 5, and 8 h. The threshold for the polar angle depends on the presence of statoliths, so-called octahedral protein crystals in the vacuoles. The albino strain C171 carAcarR (with crystals) has a threshold near 10(-2) x g while the albino strain C2 carAgeo-3 (without crystals) has a threshold of about 2 x 10(-1) x g. The threshold for the aiming error angle is ill defined and is between 10(-2) and 10(-1) x g. The threshold for the polar angle of the wild type NRRL 1555 (with crystals) is near 8 x 10(-2) x g.

  1. Tropic Responses of Phycomyces Sporangiophores to Gravitational and Centrifugal Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, David S.

    1961-01-01

    A low-speed centrifuge was used to study the tropic responses of Phycomyces sporangiophores in darkness to the stimulus of combined gravitational and centrifugal forces. If this stimulus is constant the response is a relatively slow tropic reaction, which persists for up to 12 hours. The response is accelerated by increasing the magnitude of the gravitational-centrifugal force. A wholly different tropic response, the transient response, is elicited by an abrupt change in the gravitational-centrifugal stimulus. The transient response has a duration of only about 6 min. but is characterized by a high bending speed (about 5°/min.). An analysis of the distribution of the transient response along the growing zone shows that the active phase of the response has a distribution similar to that of the light sensitivity for the light-growth and phototropic responses. Experiments in which sporangiophores are centrifuged in an inert dense fluid indicate that the sensory mechanism of the transient response is closely related to the physical deformation of the growing zone caused by the action of the gravitational-centrifugal force on the sporangiophore as a whole. However, the response to a steady gravitational-centrifugal force is most likely not connected with this deformation, but is probably triggered by the shifting of regions or particles of differing density relative to one another inside the cell. PMID:13721903

  2. Experimental Characterization of Stretch-Bending Formability of AHSS Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitting, Daniela; Ofenheimer, Aldo; Pauli, Heinrich; Till, Edwin T.

    2011-05-01

    Deformation conditions of combined stretching and bending are known to enhance material formability compared to forming conditions without bending (e.g. in-plane stretching). These phenomena can be observed for most conventional steel grades but is even more pronounced for Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) sheets. Consequently, there is an urgent need in industry to quantify the phenomena of enhanced material formability due to bending effects. In this work new stretch-bend test setups are presented which can be used in addition to the conventional Angular Stretch Bend Test to systematically investigate the influence of various stretch-bending deformation conditions on the formability of AHSS sheets.

  3. Centrifugal Casting Features/Metallurgical Characterization of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chirita, G.; Soares, D.; Cruz, D.; Silva, F. S.; Stefanescu, I.

    2008-02-15

    This paper deals with the study of centrifugal effects on aluminium castings under high G values. Most of the studies in this domain (FGMs obtained by centrifugal casting) deal with functionally graded composites reinforced with a solid phase such as silicon particles or others. However, in this study it will be shown that unreinforced aluminium alloys may be significantly influenced by the centrifugal effect and that functionally graded castings are also obtained. It has been observed that the centrifugal effect may increase in some alloys, depending on the relative position in the castings, the rupture strength by approx. 50%, and rupture strain by about 300%, as compared to the gravity casting technique. The Young's modulus may also increase by about 20%. It has also been reported that in vertical centrifugal castings there are mainly three aspects that affect the components thus obtained, namely: fluid dynamics; vibration (inherent to the system); and centrifugal force. These features have a different effect on the castings depending on the aluminium alloy. In this paper, an analysis of the most important effects of the centrifugal casting process on metallurgical features is conducted. A solidification characterization at several points along the mould will be made in order to have an accurate idea of both the fluid dynamics inside the mould during the casting and the solidification behavior in different parts of the component. These two analyses will be related to the metallurgical properties (phase distribution; SDAS; eutectic silicon content and shape, pores density and shape) along the component and mainly along the direction of the centrifugal pressure. A comparison between castings obtained by both centrifugal casting technique and gravity casting technique is made for reference (gravity casting)

  4. Does residual force enhancement increase with increasing stretch magnitudes?

    PubMed

    Hisey, Brandon; Leonard, Tim R; Herzog, Walter

    2009-07-22

    It is generally accepted that force enhancement in skeletal muscles increases with increasing stretch magnitudes. However, this property has not been tested across supra-physiological stretch magnitudes and different muscle lengths, thus it is not known whether this is a generic property of skeletal muscle, or merely a property that holds for small stretch magnitudes within the physiological range. Six cat soleus muscles were actively stretched with magnitudes varying from 3 to 24 mm at three different parts of the force-length relationship to test the hypothesis that force enhancement increases with increasing stretch magnitude, independent of muscle length. Residual force enhancement increased consistently with stretch amplitudes on the descending limb of the force-length relationship up to a threshold value, after which it reached a plateau. Force enhancement did not increase with stretch amplitude on the ascending limb of the force-length relationship. Passive force enhancement was observed for all test conditions, and paralleled the behavior of the residual force enhancement. Force enhancement increased with stretch magnitude when stretching occurred at lengths where there was natural passive force within the muscle. These results suggest that force enhancement does not increase unconditionally with increasing stretch magnitude, as is generally accepted, and that increasing force enhancement with stretch appears to be tightly linked to that part of the force-length relationship where there is naturally occurring passive force.

  5. Magnetron sputtering of copper on thermosensitive polymer materials of the gas centrifuge rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, V.; Senchenkov, S.; Titov, D.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetron sputtering is the well-known and widely-used deposition technique for coating versatile high-quality and well-adhered films. However, the technology has some limitations, caused by high temperatures on the coating surface. The paper is devoted to the experimental development of a process of magnetron sputtering of copper on a surface coated with a thermosensitive polymer made of carbon fiber with epoxide binder. This process is applied for balancing a rotor of a gas centrifuge for isotope separation. The optimum operating parameters of the process are found and discussed. They were in quantitative agreement with data obtained by means of non-stationary modeling based on a global description of plasma in the typical geometry of the magnetron discharges obtained in independent research. The structure of the resulting layer is investigated.

  6. Centrifugal Spinning and Its Energy Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lu

    -/micro-fiber production method to substitute electrospinning in industrial production. Recently, centrifugal spinning has gained researchers' attention. The centrifugal spinning method avoids the use of high voltage supply and can work with concentrated solutions, and most importantly, it can increase the production rate of nano-/micro-fibers to at least two orders or magnitude higher than that of electrospinning. This novel fiber fabrication approach is mostly used in tissue engineering field, and it can be potentially applied in preparing electrodes for SIBs and EDLCs. In the present work, we firstly study the influence of solution intrinsic properties and operational parameters using polyacrylonitrile as an example, and establish the processing-structure relationships for this spinning technique. We then use this novel spinning method to prepare porous carbon nanofibers (PCNFs), SnO2 microfibers and lithium-substituted sodium layered transition metal oxide fibers and use them as electrodes for EDLCs and SIBs. The as-prepared PCNFs, SnO2 microfibers and lithiumsubstituted sodium layered transition metal oxide fibers exhibit good electrochemical performance. It is therefore demonstrated that centrifugal spinning can be a promising nano- /micro-fiber preparation approach for mass production of electrode materials used in energy storage applications.

  7. Monodisperse Multidimensional Nanostructures via Centrifugal Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yu Jin

    Anisotropic nanomaterials, including zero-dimensional metallic nanoparticles (MNPs), one-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and two-dimensional few-layer black phosphorous (FL-P) exhibit interesting structure-dependent properties that could be exploited in biomedicine, plasmonics, and optoelectronics. In this thesis, centrifugation sorting of these nanomaterials is utilized for structure refinement, investigation of structure-dependent optical response, and applications in biomedical imaging and plasmonics. Nobel NMPs show unique shape- and size-dependent optical properties. Controlled synthetic methods are developed to manipulate the structure of these NMPs, but intrinsically produce dispersions of polydisperse NPs with various shape and size, and synthetic byproducts. Here, we describe a facile strategy for separating small (edge length <100 nm) faceted gold NPs: rhombic dodecahedra (RD) and obtuse triangular bipyramids (BPs), which form simultaneously during synthesis but are hard to separate via commercial filters. By utilizing centrifugation of the as-synthesized mixture in a shallow density gradient centrifugation (DGC), we are able to isolate a high purity of BPs (>80%) and subsequently achieve a 2.5 fold enhancement in refractive index sensitivity, comparable to the unsorted mixture. This shallow DGC approach is robust and reliable, and therefore can be applied to other metal nanostructures for concomitant improvements in plasmonic properties and applications. Using the identical separation strategy in the previous study, we are able to enrich gold nanostars as a function of branch number. In particular, we explore different variants of density gradient media to ensure compatibility with the star shape and colloid stability. We determine that sucrose is compatible with nanostars stability and surface functionalizaton. The refined population of gold stars are functionalized with Gd(III)-DNA to act as MRI contrast agents, and thus enables us

  8. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19-21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity.

  9. Centrifugal Size-Separation Sieve for Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Dreyer, Christopher (Inventor); Riedel, Edward (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A centrifugal sieve and method utilizes centrifugal force in rapidly-rotated cylindrical or conical screens as the primary body force contributing to size segregation. Within the centrifugal acceleration field, vibration and/or shearing flows are induced to facilitate size segregation and eventual separation of the fines from the coarse material. Inside a rotating cylindrical or conical screen, a separately-rotated screw auger blade can be used to transport material along the rotating cylinder or conical wall and to induce shearing in the material.

  10. Increased mitogenic response in lymphocytes from chronically centrifuged mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Otfried; Hunzinger, E.; Cogoli, Augusto; Bechler, B.; Lee, J.; Moore, J.; Duke, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects upon the mitogenic response of splenic lymphocytes when exposing mice to prolonged hypergravity conditions (3.5 G for 1 year) were studied. Cultures of splenic lymphocytes isolated from both centrifuged and control (1 G) animals were stimulated with Concanavalin A and the response measured using both morphological and biochemical means. Lymphocytes obtained from centrifuged mice exhibited much higher activation rates (as measured by the incorporation of H-3 thymidine) and larger cell aggregates consisting of more lymphoblasts and mitotic figures than those observed in non centrifuged control animals. Isolated splenic lymphocytes thus appear to have been conditioned by hypergravity state.

  11. 27. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, Unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Ironworks, Honolulu Hawaii, 1879, 1881. View: Historical view, 1934, from T.T. Waterman collection, Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association. With the inner basket of the centrifugal revolving at 1200 rpm molasses flew outward from the granulated sugar, through the holes in the brass lining, and into the stationary outer basket. The molasses drained through the spout at the right and into molasses storage pits below the floor. The centrifugals were underdriven with a belt connected to the pulley beneath the basket. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  12. Magnetically driven solid sample preparation for centrifugal microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Duford, David A; Peng, Dan D; Salin, Eric D

    2009-06-01

    A prototype for solid sample preparation on centrifugal microfluidic devices has been designed and characterized. The system uses NdFeB magnets in both the centrifugal device and a fixed base. As the centrifugal device rotates, the magnets move and spin in their chambers creating a pulverizing mechanical motion. This technique was successfully applied to the dissolution of potassium ferricyanide (K(3)[Fe(CN)(6)]), a hard colored crystal. A 0.10 g sample was completely dissolved in 3 s in 1.0 mL of water while rotating at 1000 rpm. This is a 300-fold improvement over static dissolution.

  13. Ocular counterrolling induced by centrifugation during orbital space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, S. T.; Clement, G.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    During the 1998 Neurolab mission (STS-90), four astronauts were exposed to interaural centripetal accelerations (Gy centrifugation) of 0.5 g and 1 g during rotation on a centrifuge, both on Earth and during orbital space flight. Subjects were oriented either left-ear out or right-ear out, facing or back to motion. Binocular eye movements were measured in three dimensions using a video technique. On Earth, tangential centrifugation that produces 1 g of interaural linear acceleration combines with gravity to tilt the gravitoinertial acceleration (GIA) vector 45 degrees in the roll plane relative to the head vertical, generating a summed vector of 1.4 g. Before flight, this elicited mean ocular counterrolling (OCR) of 5.7 degrees. Due to the relative absence of gravity during flight, there was no linear acceleration along the dorsoventral axis of the head. As a result, during in-flight centrifugation, gravitoinertial acceleration was strictly aligned with the centripetal acceleration along the interaural axis. There was a small but significant decrease (mean 10%) in the magnitude of OCR in space (5.1 degrees). The magnitude of OCR during postflight 1 g centrifugation was not significantly different from preflight OCR (5.9 degrees). Findings were similar for 0.5 g centrifugation, but the OCR magnitude was approximately 60% of that induced by centrifugation at 1 g. OCR during pre- and postflight static tilt was not significantly different and was always less than OCR elicited by centrifugation of Earth for an equivalent interaural linear acceleration. In contrast, there was no difference between the OCR generated by in-flight centrifugation and by static tilt on Earth at equivalent interaural linear accelerations. These data support the following conclusions: (1) OCR is generated predominantly in response to interaural linear acceleration; (2) the increased OCR during centrifugation on Earth is a response to the head dorsoventral 1 g linear acceleration component, which

  14. Ocular counterrolling induced by centrifugation during orbital space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, S. T.; Clement, G.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    During the 1998 Neurolab mission (STS-90), four astronauts were exposed to interaural centripetal accelerations (Gy centrifugation) of 0.5 g and 1 g during rotation on a centrifuge, both on Earth and during orbital space flight. Subjects were oriented either left-ear out or right-ear out, facing or back to motion. Binocular eye movements were measured in three dimensions using a video technique. On Earth, tangential centrifugation that produces 1 g of interaural linear acceleration combines with gravity to tilt the gravitoinertial acceleration (GIA) vector 45 degrees in the roll plane relative to the head vertical, generating a summed vector of 1.4 g. Before flight, this elicited mean ocular counterrolling (OCR) of 5.7 degrees. Due to the relative absence of gravity during flight, there was no linear acceleration along the dorsoventral axis of the head. As a result, during in-flight centrifugation, gravitoinertial acceleration was strictly aligned with the centripetal acceleration along the interaural axis. There was a small but significant decrease (mean 10%) in the magnitude of OCR in space (5.1 degrees). The magnitude of OCR during postflight 1 g centrifugation was not significantly different from preflight OCR (5.9 degrees). Findings were similar for 0.5 g centrifugation, but the OCR magnitude was approximately 60% of that induced by centrifugation at 1 g. OCR during pre- and postflight static tilt was not significantly different and was always less than OCR elicited by centrifugation of Earth for an equivalent interaural linear acceleration. In contrast, there was no difference between the OCR generated by in-flight centrifugation and by static tilt on Earth at equivalent interaural linear accelerations. These data support the following conclusions: (1) OCR is generated predominantly in response to interaural linear acceleration; (2) the increased OCR during centrifugation on Earth is a response to the head dorsoventral 1 g linear acceleration component, which

  15. Centrifugal pumps: which suction specific speeds are acceptable

    SciTech Connect

    Hallam, J.L.

    1982-04-01

    Suction specific speed is an important consideration when purchasing or analyzing centrifugal pumps. There is a direct correlation between this parameter, pump reliability and maintenance expenses. This article demonstrates that in a large Gulf Coast oil refinery, centrifugal pumps with a suction specific speed greater than 11,000 failed at a frequency nearly twice that of centrifugal pumps with suction specific speed less than 11,000. This study consisted primarily of hydrocarbon pumps with an average horsepower of 150 hp. Results may vary some from those found if high energy water pumps are studied. 5 refs.

  16. Increased mitogenic response in lymphocytes from chronically centrifuged mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Otfried; Hunzinger, E.; Cogoli, Augusto; Bechler, B.; Lee, J.; Moore, J.; Duke, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects upon the mitogenic response of splenic lymphocytes when exposing mice to prolonged hypergravity conditions (3.5 G for 1 year) were studied. Cultures of splenic lymphocytes isolated from both centrifuged and control (1 G) animals were stimulated with Concanavalin A and the response measured using both morphological and biochemical means. Lymphocytes obtained from centrifuged mice exhibited much higher activation rates (as measured by the incorporation of H-3 thymidine) and larger cell aggregates consisting of more lymphoblasts and mitotic figures than those observed in non centrifuged control animals. Isolated splenic lymphocytes thus appear to have been conditioned by hypergravity state.

  17. Secondary structure of double-stranded DNA under stretching: Elucidation of the stretched form

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloum, M.; Muller, P.; Beker, A-F.

    2011-03-15

    Almost two decades ago, measurements of force versus extension on isolated double-stranded DNA molecules revealed a force plateau. This unusual stretching phenomenon in DNA suggests that the long molecules may be extended from the usual B form into a new conformation. Different models have been proposed to describe the nature of DNA in its stretched form, S-DNA. Using atomic force microscopy combined with a molecular combing method, we identified the structure of {lambda}-phage DNA for different stretching values. We provide strong evidence for the existence of a first-order transition between B form and S form. Beyond a certain extension of the natural length, DNA molecules adopt a new double-helix conformation characterized by a diameter of 1.2 nm and a helical pitch of18 nm.

  18. Anomalous Centrifugal Distortion in NH_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Pirali, Olivier; Coudert, L. H.

    2017-06-01

    The NH2 radical spectrum, first observed by Herzberg and Ramsay, is dominated by a strong Renner-Teller effect giving rise to two electronic states: the bent X ^{2}B_1 ground state and the quasi-linear A ^{2}A_1 excited state. The NH2 radical has been the subject of numerous high-resolution investigations and its electronic and ro-vibrational transitions have been measured. Using synchrotron radiation, new rotational transitions have been recently recorded and a value of the rotational quantum number N as large as 26 could be reached. In the X ^{2}B_1 ground state, the NH2 radical behaves like a triatomic molecule displaying spin-rotation splittings. Due to the lightness of the molecule, a strong coupling between the overall rotation and the bending mode arises whose effects increase with N and lead to the anomalous centrifugal distortion evidenced in the new measurements.^d In this talk the Bending-Rotation approach developed to account for the anomalous centrifugal distortion of the water molecule is modified to include spin-rotation coupling and applied to the fitting of high-resolution data pertaining to the ground electronic state of NH2. A preliminary line position analysis of the available data^{c,d} allowed us to account for 1681 transitions with a unitless standard deviation of 1.2. New transitions could also be assigned in the spectrum recorded by Martin-Drumel et al.^d In the talk, the results obtained with the new theoretical approach will be compared to those retrieved with a Watson-type Hamiltonian and the effects of the vibronic coupling between the ground X ^{2}B_1 and the excited A ^{2}A_1 electronic state will be discussed. Herzberg and Ramsay, J. Chem. Phys. 20 (1952) 347 Dressler and Ramsay, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 25 (1959) 553 Hadj Bachir, Huet, Destombes, and Vervloet, J. Molec. Spectrosc. 193 (1999) 326 McKellar, Vervloet, Burkholder, and Howard, J. Molec. Spectrosc. 142 (1990) 319 Morino and Kawaguchi, J. Molec. Spectrosc. 182 (1997) 428

  19. Characterization of instability initiation in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, William Charles

    On a compressor performance map, the region of unstable operation is bounded by the surge line. As operation in this unstable region can be detrimental to the integrity of the machine, a surge margin is maintained. The proximity of the surge line to the compressor maximum pressure rise makes a reduction in the required surge margin desirable. Prior to establishing a strategy for designing a compressor with reduced surge margin, an understanding of the instability initiation process must be attained. The determination of the role that rotating stall plays in surge initiation of high speed compressors is of particular interest. Toward this end, a series of experiments at both low and high speed were undertaken to characterize centrifugal compressor rotating stall. Utilizing spatial arrays of inlet microphones and impeller mounted microphones, the origin of the low speed compressor rotating stall is found to be a separation zone near the impeller midchord that propagates at the stall frequency. This disturbance grows as the compressor is destabilized. The impeller flowfield during rotating stall has also been measured using PIV. The inducer region shows no separation at midspan. A region of zero relative velocity is located during the stall cycle at 70% impeller meridional chord. The investigation of the high-speed centrifugal compressor has identified two distinct rotating stall modes, a one mode and a nine mode. Both are located at or near the diffuser. Examination of the component performance reveals that the one mode is associated with mild or deep surge cycles while the nine mode exists independently and serves as a blockage, reducing diffuser performance. Rotating stall is observed between surge cycles, similar to axial compressor results. A surge chamber diffuser is employed and produces a 1% increase in maximum stable pressure coefficient. The surge chamber reduces the magnitude of the rotating stall by 60%. Speed transients at constant throttle settings are

  20. Human plantarflexor stiffness to multiple single-stretch trials.

    PubMed

    Blanpied, P; Smidt, G L

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of different stretch velocities, different rates of pre-stretch force development, and different pre-stretch muscle lengths on the intrinsic stiffness exhibited by the quasi-statically contracting active human plantarflexors during multiple single-stretch trials at 20-60% of maximum isometric contraction. Subjects were positioned prone, with the knee flexed 1.57 rad(90 degrees), shank stabilized, and foot secured in a hard plastic orthotic. Slowly increasing isometric plantarflexion force was produced until the plantarflexors were stretched by a rapid 0.2 rad (12 degrees) dorsiflexion movement. Plantarflexion forces and ankle positions were determined during these stretches as well as during resting stretches when the muscle was inactive. Resting forces were subtracted from the active trials, forces converted to torques, and stiffnesses determined for the first 62 ms of the stretch. The slope of the stiffness vs pre-stretch torque relationship averaged 4.30 +/- 0.34 Nm rad-1 Nm-1. Little difference was found between stiffness determined through the single-stretch method and the results of previous studies employing different mechanical inputs. Differences in stiffnesses with different stretching velocities were caused by computational artifact rather than by differences in intrinsic muscular reaction. Faster rates of pre-stretch force increase prior to the stretch resulted in slightly lower stiffnesses. Different pre-stretch muscle lengths apparently did not result in different stiffnesses. The shape of the torque vs displacement curve was remarkably insensitive to the planned manipulations of the testing conditions, responding in a stereotypical manner.

  1. Nav channel mechanosensitivity: activation and inactivation accelerate reversibly with stretch.

    PubMed

    Morris, Catherine E; Juranka, Peter F

    2007-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are modulated by many bilayer mechanical amphiphiles, but whether, like other voltage-gated channels (Kv, HCN, Cav), they respond to physical bilayer deformations is unknown. We expressed human heart Nav1.5 pore alpha-subunit in oocytes (where, unlike alphaNav1.4, alphaNav1.5 exhibits normal kinetics) and measured small macroscopic currents in cell-attached patches. Pipette pressure was used to reversibly stretch the membrane for comparison of I(Na)(t) before, during, and after stretch. At all voltages, and in a dose-dependent fashion, stretch accelerated the I(Na)(t) time course. The sign of membrane curvature was not relevant. Typical stretch stimuli reversibly accelerated both activation and inactivation by approximately 1.4-fold; normalization of peak I(Na)(t) followed by temporal scaling ( approximately 1.30- to 1.85-fold) resulted in full overlap of the stretch/no-stretch traces. Evidently the rate-limiting outward voltage sensor motion in the Nav1.5 activation path (as in Kv1) accelerated with stretch. Stretch-accelerated inactivation occurred even with activation saturated, so an independently stretch-modulated inactivation transition is also a possibility. Since Nav1.5 channel-stretch modulation was both reliable and reversible, and required stretch stimuli no more intense than what typically activates putative mechanotransducer channels (e.g., stretch-activated TRPC1-based currents), Nav channels join the ranks of putative mechanotransducers. It is noteworthy that at voltages near the activation threshold, moderate stretch increased the peak I(Na) amplitude approximately 1.5-fold. It will be important to determine whether stretch-modulated Nav current contributes to cardiac arrhythmias, to mechanosensory responses in interstitial cells of Cajal, to touch receptor responses, and to neuropathic (i.e., hypermechanosensitive) and/or normal pain reception.

  2. Acute effects of dynamic stretching, static stretching, and light aerobic activity on muscular performance in women.

    PubMed

    Curry, Brad S; Chengkalath, Devendra; Crouch, Gordon J; Romance, Michelle; Manns, Patricia J

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three warm-up protocols--static stretching, dynamic stretching, and light aerobic activity--on selected measures of range of motion and power in untrained females and to investigate the sustained effects at 5 and 30 minutes after warm-up. A total of 24 healthy females (ages 23-29 years) attended one familiarization session and three test sessions on nonconsecutive days within 2 weeks. A within-subject design protocol with the testing investigators blinded to the subjects' warm-up was followed. Each session started with 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling followed by pretest baseline measures. Another 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling was completed and followed by one of the three randomly selected warm-up interventions (static stretching, dynamic stretching, or light aerobic activity). The following posttest outcome measures were collected 5 and 30 minutes following the intervention: modified Thomas test, countermovement jump, and isometric time to peak force knee extension measured by dynamometer. Analysis of the data revealed significant time effects on range of motion and countermovement jump changes. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between the warm-up conditions on any of the variables. The variation in responses to warm-up conditions emphasizes the unique nature of individual reactions to different warm-ups; however, there was a tendency for warm-ups with an active component to have beneficial effects. The data suggests dynamic stretching has greater applicability to enhance performance on power outcomes compared to static stretching.

  3. On prediction of OH stretching frequencies in intramolecularly hydrogen bonded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2012-06-01

    OH stretching frequencies are investigated for a series of non-tautomerizing systems with intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Effective OH stretching wavenumbers are predicted by the application of empirical correlation procedures based on the results of B3LYP/6-31G(d) theoretical calculations in the harmonic and PT2 anharmonic approximations, as well as on experimental NMR parameters, i.e., proton chemical shifts (δH) and two-bond deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts (2ΔCOD). The procedures are applied in a discussion of the spectra of 2,6-dihydroxy-4-methylbenzaldehyde and 8-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide. The spectrum of the former displays a broad, composite band between 3500 and 2500 cm-1 which can be assigned to overlapping monomer and dimer contributions. In the latter case, the results support a reassignment of the OH stretching band of 8-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide; the reassignment is supported by correlation with the IR spectra of a series of substituted derivatives.

  4. Efficacy of static stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretch on hamstrings length after a single session.

    PubMed

    O'Hora, John; Cartwright, Abigail; Wade, Clive D; Hough, Alan D; Shum, Gary L K

    2011-06-01

    A number of studies have investigated the efficacy of several repetitions of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (PNF) and static stretching (SS). However, there is limited research comparing the effects of a single bout of these stretching maneuvers. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a single bout of a therapist-applied 30-second SS vs. a single bout of therapist-applied 6-second hamstring (agonist) contract PNF. Forty-five healthy subjects between the ages of 21 and 35 were randomly allocated to 1 of the 2 stretching groups or a control group, in which no stretching was received. The flexibility of the hamstring was determined by a range of passive knee extension, measured using a universal goniometer, with the subject in the supine position and the hip at 90° flexion, before and after intervention. A significant increase in knee extension was found for both intervention groups after a single stretch (SS group = 7.53°, p < 0.01 and PNF group = 11.80°, p < 0.01). Both interventions resulted in a significantly greater increase in knee extension when compared to the control group (p < 0.01). The PNF group demonstrated significantly greater gains in knee extension compared to the SS group (mean difference 4.27°, p < 0.01). It can be concluded that a therapist applied SS or PNF results in a significant increase in hamstring flexibility. A hamstring (agonist) contract PNF is more effective than an SS in a single stretching session. These findings are important to physiotherapists or trainers working in clinical and sporting environments. Where in the past therapists may have spent time conducting multiple repetitions of a PNF and an SS, a single bout of either technique may be considered just as effective. A key component of the study methodology was the exclusion of a warm-up period before stretching. Therefore, the findings of efficacy of a single PNF are of particular relevance in sporting environments and busy clinical

  5. Heavy snow: IR spectroscopy of isotope mixed crystalline water ice.

    PubMed

    Wong, Andy; Shi, Liang; Auchettl, Rebecca; McNaughton, Don; Appadoo, Dominique R T; Robertson, Evan G

    2016-02-14

    Mid-infrared spectra have been measured for crystalline water ice aerosols of widely varied H/D isotopic composition. Particles with diameters ranging from 10-200 nm were generated via rapid collisional cooling with a cold buffer gas over a range of temperatures from 7-200 K. In near isotopically pure ices, the νL band position is slightly red-shifted with increasing temperature whilst in the ν2 region apparently anomalous shifts in peak maxima are explained by the contribution of a broad 2νL band of H2O and a 3νL band of D2O together with ν2 intensity that is particularly weak in low temperature crystalline ice. The hydrogen bonded OH (or OD) oscillator bands of near pure H2O (or D2O) ices are blue-shifted with temperature, with a gradient very similar to that of the corresponding band in isotope diluted samples, HOD in D2O (or H2O). It implies that this observed temperature trend is predominantly due to the intrinsic change in local hydride stretch potential energy, rather than to changes in intermolecular coupling. However, it is also observed that the narrow hydride stretch bands of an isotope diluted sample rapidly develop sub-band structure as the oscillator concentration increases, evidence of strong intermolecular coupling and a high degree of delocalisation. Anomalous blue-shifts in the OD stretch profile as D2O concentration grows is attributable to Fermi resonance with 2ν2 of D2O, in much closer proximity than the corresponding H2O levels. Theoretical results from a mixed quantum/classical approach are used to validate these findings in the hydride stretching region. Theory qualitatively reproduces the experimental trends as a function of temperature and isotopic variance.

  6. Centrifuge modeling of initial subduction and back-arc extension: suggested tectonics of seawards migration of the Hellenic Trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mart, Y.; Aharonov, E.; Mulugeta, G.; Tentler, T.

    2003-04-01

    We report the results of centrifuge experiments simulating the early stages of the co-occurrence of subduction, of initial development arcuate thrust faulting at convergent ocean-continent boundaries, and of growth of back-arc basins, where the principal force affecting the model is enhanced gravity in a centrifuge spinning at 500g. Our basic series of models consisted of 3 units simulating the asthenosphere and the overlying oceanic and continental lithospheres, where densities and viscosity were reduced to scale, to match the increased gravity. We presumed that the "oceanic lithosphere" was old and cold, similar in density to the "asthenosphere", while the "continental lithosphere" was much lighter. After some 30 minutes of enhanced gravity acceleration in the centrifuge the "oceanic lithosphere" was thrust under the "continental lithosphere", displacing the "asthenosphere", while the continental slab was not only overthrust, but also stretched "seawards". Application of lubrication along a small section of the contact zone between the "lithospheres" produced arcuate "seaward" migration of the thrust plane, forming a dynamic structural arc, along which the "oceanic" slab subducted and the "continental" - stretched and extended. In a second series of centrifuge experiments we used a 5-layer model, where both "lithospheres" comprised ductile and brittle layers. We prepared the "ductile oceanic lithosphere" to be lighter than the "asthenosphere" but denser than the "ductile continental lithosphere" to test the dynamic affect of the enhanced gravity on the modeled subduction under such constraints. In these experiments subduction occurred as well, and the simulated oceanic lithosphere was thrust under the simulated continental lithosphere, pushing down, but not penetrating, the denser "asthenosphere". The amount of thrusting and overlap between the slabs was found to depend on the rate of friction. Reduced friction through the application of lubricants led the

  7. Convective stretching and applications to mantle mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conjeepurm Subramanian, Natarajan

    In this dissertation I have developed a method to quantify the stretching and orientation of infinitesimal strain ellipsoids in three-dimensional, incompressible, and unsteady flow fields. The method is used to study the mixing properties of various mantle-like flows. Chapter 1 provides a introduction to the dissertation. In Chapter 2, I discuss the mixing properties of a three-dimensional, unsteady flow in which the time dependence and three-dimensionality of the flow can be varied independently. It is found that the time dependance of the flow is a more important control on mixing. In Chapter 3, I discuss the mixing properties in a plate-driven model of mantle convection which generates both toroidal, and poloidal components in the velocity field. It is found that as the toroidal energy in the flow is increased to match the poloidal energy, the mixing becomes more homogeneous. Computing the frequency-size distribution of the stretching experienced by the heterogeneities it is found that the marble cake structure is the most likely structure for the upper mantle. In Chapter 4, I discuss the mixing properties of iso-viscous, steady, thermal convection models at infinite Prandtl number. It is found that the strain rate in these models scales uniformly as Ra-0.55. The strain rate scaling law was used to compute the mixing time in the models. The mixing time for these models was computed as ˜ 410 My for whole mantle convection and ˜ 25 My for layered mantle convection for Ra = 1x108 and ˜ 1.4 By and ˜ 100 My for Ra = 1 x 107. As in the previous chapter, the frequency size distribution corresponding to the stretching values indicates a marble cake structure for the upper mantle. In Chapter 5, I conclude the dissertation.

  8. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  9. Venus Chasmata: A Lithospheric Stretching Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    An outstanding problem for Venus is the characterization of its style of global tectonics, an issue intimately related to the dominant mechanism of lithospheric heat loss. Among the most spectacular and extensive of the major tectonic features on Venus are the chasmata, deep linear valleys generally interpreted to be the products of lithospheric extension and rifting. Systems of chasmata and related features can be traced along several tectonic zones up to 20,000 km in linear extent. A lithospheric stretching model was developed to explain the topographic characteristics of Venus chasmata and to constrain the physical properties of the Venus crust and lithosphere.

  10. Finite stretching of an annular plate.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biricikoglu, V.; Kalnins, A.

    1971-01-01

    The problem of the finite stretching of an annular plate which is bonded to a rigid inclusion at its inner edge is considered. The material is assumed to be isotropic and incompressible with a Mooney-type constitutive law. It is shown that the inclusion of the effect of the transverse normal strain leads to a rapid variation in thickness which is confined to a narrow edge zone. The explicit solutions to the boundary layer equations, which govern the behavior of the plate near the edges, are presented.

  11. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  12. Uni-Directional Cell Stretching Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L. (Inventor); Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to an apparatus and method for applying various degrees of linear, mechanical loads on mammalian tissues, and in particular, for effecting linear stretching of tissue and simulating changes in hydrostatic pressures encountered during tissue contraction in vivo. The apparatus is useful for the study of mechanical loading in human tissue, and specifically, for permitting the evaluation of the effects of mechanical loading of skeletal or cardiac tissue and of the effects of removal of mechanical loading due to inactivity or the like, and the subsequent reapplication of load to these tissues.

  13. To Stretch and Search for Better Ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2000-06-01

    There's a lot to do to get each issue of this Journal ready for publication, and there's a lot that can go awry during that process. We the editorial staff do our utmost to make certain that each issue is the best it can possibly be, but, of necessity, a lot of our effort is focused on solving problems, correcting errors, and avoiding pitfalls. It is not surprising that we sometimes lose sight of the bigger picture--all of the things that came out as well as or better than we hoped they would. Therefore it gives us great pleasure when a reader applauds (and thereby rewards) our efforts. One such communication inspired this editorial.

    I have appreciated the extra effort put forward by the staff to make the Journal really come alive. The high quality of the Journal serves as an incentive to chemical educators to stretch and search for better ways to inspire our students.
    I fervently hope that we do encourage you "to stretch and search for better ways", not only to inspire students but in everything you do. Stretching and searching for better ways is what life, science, chemistry, and teaching are all about, and it is a wonderfully stimulating and exciting way to approach anything and everything. Sometimes, though, one's ability to stretch is akin to that of a rubber band exposed too long to sunlight. Change becomes a threat or a burden instead of an opportunity. This often happens in one area but not others, as in the case of someone doing original research but whose lecture notes are yellow with age, or someone who experiments with new teaching approaches but neglects the latest chemical discoveries. Whatever its manifestation, failure to stretch and search for better ways is a great loss, both for the individual directly involved and for others. Fortunately there are many who continually stretch and search, often in conjunction with JCE. For example, some time ago the Chair of the Board of Publication, Jerry Bell, challenged Journal

  14. Fluid dynamic noise in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, D. G.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-08-01

    Pressure distributions and frequency spectra have been obtained in a centrifugal pump having flow rates between the design point and near shut-down. The pump was comprised of a radial flow impeller with four backswept blades and a single volute. Measurements were obtained at the design flow rate and at off-design conditions to advance understanding of noise generation, to quantify the contribution of tonal, narrowband and broadband components to the overall noise and to develop strategies for suppressing fluid dynamic noise by flow control and active control. Fluid dynamic noise was generated by the unsteady conditions encountered by the impeller blade. Unsteady conditions originated from non-uniformities at the inlet and the impeller outlet at design and off-design conditions. Inlet flow non-uniformity was induced by separation regions. Flow separations are inherent in turbomachinery because of growth of the boundary layer and the disturbance effect of the rotating impeller. Flow non-uniformity at the impeller outlet stemmed from inlet flow non-uniformities in the inlet, from propagation of pressure waves in a vaneless diffuser, and from scroll effects.

  15. Wave Augmented Diffuser for Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J. (Inventor); Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A wave augmented diffuser for a centrifugal compressor surrounds the outlet of an impeller that rotates on a drive shaft having an axis of rotation. The impeller brings flow in in an axial direction and imparts kinetic energy to the flow discharging it in radial and tangential directions. The flow is discharged into a plurality of circumferentially disposed wave chambers. The wave chambers are periodically opened and closed by a rotary valve such that the flow through the diffuser is unsteady. The valve includes a plurality of valve openings that are periodically brought into and out of fluid communication with the wave chambers. When the wave chambers are closed, a reflected compression wave moves upstream towards the diffuser bringing the flow into the wave chamber to rest. This action recovers the kinetic energy from the flow and limits any boundary layer growth. The flow is then discharged in an axial direction through an opening in the valve plate when the valve plate is rotated to an open position. The diffuser thus efficiently raises the static pressure of the fluid and discharges an axially directed flow at a radius that is predominantly below the maximum radius of the diffuser.

  16. More quantum centrifugal effect in rotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazeau, J.-P.; Koide, T.; Murenzi, R.

    2017-06-01

    The behaviour of quantum systems in non-inertial frames is revisited from the point of view of affine coherent state (ACS) quantization. We restrict our approach to the one-particle dynamics confined in a rotating plane about a fixed axis. This plane is considered as punctured due to the existence of the rotation center, which is viewed as a singularity. The corresponding phase space is the affine group of the plane and the ACS quantization enables us to quantize the system by respecting the affine symmetry of the true phase space. Our formulation predicts the appearance of an additional quantum centrifugal term, besides the usual angular-momentum one, which prevents the particle to reach the singular rotation center. Moreover it helps us to understand why two different non-inertial Schrödinger equations are obtained in previous works. The validity of our equation can be confirmed experimentally by observing the harmonic oscillator bound states and the critical angular velocity for their existence.

  17. Investigation of Flow in a Centrifugal Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Karl

    1946-01-01

    The investigation of the flow in a centrifugal pump indicated that the flow patterns in frictional fluid are fundamentally different from those in frictionless fluid. In particular, the dead air space adhering to the section side undoubtedly causes a reduction of the theoretically possible delivery head. The velocity distribution over a parallel circle is also subjected to a noticeable change as a result of the incomplete filling of the passages. The relative velocity on the pressure side of the vane, which for passages completely filled with active flow would differ little from zero even at comparatively lower than normal delivery volume, is increased, so that no rapid reverse flow occurs on the pressure side of the vane even for smaller delivery volume. It was established, further, that the flow ceases to be stationary for very small quantities of water. The inflow to the impeller can be regarded as radial for the operating range an question. The velocity triangles at the exit are subjected to a significant alteration in shape ae a result of the increased peripheral velocity, which may be of particular importance in the determination of the guide vane entrance angle.

  18. Dermatoscopic features of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-09-01

    No data exist on the dermatoscopic findings in central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA). We sought to establish the spectrum of dermatoscopic features and their frequency in CCCA. We retrospectively evaluated 153 nonpolarized dermatoscopic images obtained from 51 women with histologically proven CCCA and established a list of 12 dermatoscopic features that were independently scored for each image. Controls included 30 dermatoscopic images from histologically proven cases of scarring traction alopecia and discoid lupus erythematosus. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis assessed the specificity and sensitivity; Cohen kappa statistics assessed the agreement. Dermatoscopic pathologic correlations were performed on the horizontal sections of 41 of the 51 specimens, which were obtained with dermatoscopy-guided biopsy procedures. Peripilar white gray halo around the emergence of hairs was observed in 94% of patients and was highly specific and sensitive for CCCA in all clinical stages. It corresponds on pathology to the lamellar fibrosis surrounding the outer root sheath. This was a retrospective study. The presence of a peripilar white halo is a dermatoscopic feature that suggests the diagnosis of CCCA in African American patients with mild central thinning, and it is an optimal site from which to obtain a biopsy specimen. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Centrifugal acceleration in the isotropic photon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtadze, G. G.; Berezhiani, V. I.; Osmanov, Z.

    In this paper, we study centrifugal acceleration of particles moving along a prescribed rotating curved trajectories. We consider the physical system embedded in an isotropic photon field and study the influence of the photon drag force on the acceleration process. For this purpose, we study three major configurations of the field lines: the straight line, the Archimede spiral and the dipolar field line configuration. By analyzing dynamics of particles sliding along the field lines in the equatorial plane, we have found several interesting features of motion. In particular, it has been shown that for rectilinear field lines, the particles reach the light cylinder (area where the linear velocity of rotation exactly equals the speed of light) zone relatively slowly for bigger drag forces. Considering the Archimedes’ spiral, we have found that in cases when the field lines lag behind the rotation, the particles achieve the force-free regime of dynamics regardless of the drag force. Unlike this scenario, when the spiral is oriented in an opposite direction, the particles do not reach the force free regime, but tend to stable equilibrium locations.

  20. High efficiency, variable geometry, centrifugal cryogenic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Forsha, M.D.; Nichols, K.E.; Beale, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    A centrifugal cryogenic pump has been developed which has a basic design that is rugged and reliable with variable speed and variable geometry features that achieve high pump efficiency over a wide range of head-flow conditions. The pump uses a sealless design and rolling element bearings to achieve high reliability and the ruggedness to withstand liquid-vapor slugging. The pump can meet a wide range of variable head, off-design flow requirements and maintain design point efficiency by adjusting the pump speed. The pump also has features that allow the impeller and diffuser blade heights to be adjusted. The adjustable height blades were intended to enhance the pump efficiency when it is operating at constant head, off-design flow rates. For small pumps, the adjustable height blades are not recommended. For larger pumps, they could provide off-design efficiency improvements. This pump was developed for supercritical helium service, but the design is well suited to any cryogenic application where high efficiency is required over a wide range of head-flow conditions.

  1. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression. PMID:27574457

  2. Centrifugal governor for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkoshi, M.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a centrifugal governor for use with an internal combustion engine, comprising: a control rack for regulating the quantity of fuel to be supplied to the engine; flyweights radially displaceable in response to the rotational speed of the engine; a tension lever pivotable through an angle dependent upon the amount of radial displacement of the flyweights; a torque cam pivotable about and relative to a fulcrum shaft thereof and having a cam surface including a cam surface portion determining a fuel increment to be applied at the start of the engine; a sensor lever having one end engaged by the control rack; the sensor lever having another end disposed to engage with the cam surface portion of the torque cam when the engine is in a starting condition, to permit displacement of the control rack into a fuel increasing position for the start of the engine; and a cancelling spring interposed between the torque cam and the tension lever and urging the torque cam with a force dependent upon the angularity of the tension lever to cause pivoting of the torque cam about the fulcrum shaft thereof in a direction of disengaging the sensor lever from the cam surface portion of the torque cam. The improvement is described comprising biasing means for forcibly pivotally displacing, immediately before operation of a starter of the engine, the torque cam in one direction against the urging force of the cancelling spring to a predetermined position.

  3. Centrifugal governor for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, M.

    1986-08-12

    A centrifugal governor is described for use with an internal combustion engine, comprising: a control rack for regulating the quantity of fuel to be supplied to the engine; flyweights radially displaceable in response to the rotational speed of the engine; a tension lever pivotable about a stationary fulcrum in response to the radial displacement of the flyweights; a torque cam having a cam surface determining a fuel increment to be applied at the start of the engine; a sensor lever having one end engaged by the control rack and another end disposed for engagement with the cam surface of the torque cam, the sensor lever being adapted to engage with the cam surface of the torque cam when the engine is in a starting condition, to cause displacement of the control rack into a fuel increasing position for the start of the engine; and spring means interposed between the torque cam and the tension lever and urging the torque cam with a force dependent upon the angularity of the tension lever in a direction of disengaging the sensor lever from the cam surface of the torque cam; the spring means comprising first and second springs, one of the first and second springs being formed of a thermosensitive material having a smaller spring constant at a low temperature below a predetermined value, and a larger spring constant at a temperature above the predetermined value; and the first and second springs of the spring means comprising coiled springs disposed concentrically with each other.

  4. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: RETECH'S PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) was conducted under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The furnace uses heat gen...

  5. Manufacture of hollow ingots using centrifugal casting machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeshchikov, A. G.; Greneva, T. S.; Baidachenko, V. I.; Berezin, V. I.

    2010-12-01

    Centrifugal machines are proposed for the foundry created at the Almalyk Mining and Smelting Factory in order to produce hollow ingots of a liquid metal made by remelting of consumable electrodes in a refractory accumulating crucible.

  6. Centrifuge modeling of LNAPL transport in partially saturated sand

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, G.; Allersma, H.G.B.; Selvadurai, A.P.S.

    1999-12-01

    Model tests were performed at the Geotechnical Centrifuge Facility of Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, to examine the mechanics of light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) movement in a partially saturated porous granular medium. The experiment simulated a 2D spill of LNAPL in an unsaturated sand prepared at two values of porosity. The duration of the centrifuge model tests corresponded to a prototype equivalent of 110 days. The choice of modeling a 2D flow together with the use of a transparent container enabled direct visual observation of the experiments. Scaling laws developed in connection with other centrifuge modeling studies were used to support the test results. Tests were conducted at two different centrifuge accelerations to verify, by means of the modeling of models technique, the similitude between the different experiments. The paper presents details of the experimental methodologies and the measuring techniques used to evaluate the final distribution of water and LNAPL content in the soils.

  7. 19. LOWER OIL ROOM DIABLO POWERHOUSE: SHARPLES OIL CENTRIFUGE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. LOWER OIL ROOM DIABLO POWERHOUSE: SHARPLES OIL CENTRIFUGE AND OIL TANK, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Diablo Powerhouse, On Skagit River, 6.1 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  8. A multiplexed immunoassay system based upon reciprocating centrifugal microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Peytavi, Régis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Micic, Miodrag; Felgner, Philip L.; Madou, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    A novel, centrifugal disk-based micro-total analysis system (μTAS) for low cost and high throughput semi-automated immunoassay processing was developed. A key innovation in the disposable immunoassay disk design is in a fluidic structure that enables very efficient micro-mixing based on a reciprocating mechanism in which centrifugal acceleration acting upon a liquid element first generates and stores pneumatic energy that is then released by a reduction of the centrifugal acceleration, resulting in a reversal of direction of flow of the liquid. Through an alternating sequence of high and low centrifugal acceleration, the system reciprocates the flow of liquid within the disk to maximize incubation/hybridization efficiency between antibodies and antigen macromolecules during the incubation/hybridization stage of the assay. The described reciprocating mechanism results in a reduction in processing time and reagent consumption by one order of magnitude. PMID:21721711

  9. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: RETECH'S PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) was conducted under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The furnace uses heat gen...

  10. Looking Southeast at Precipitation System, Steam Dryer and Centrifuge in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Southeast at Precipitation System, Steam Dryer and Centrifuge in Red Room within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  11. Convective instabilities in liquid centrifugation for nuclear wastes separation

    SciTech Connect

    Camassa, R.

    1995-10-01

    The separation of fission products from liquid solutions using centrifugal forces may prove an effective alternative to chemical processing in cases where radioactive materials necessitate minimal mixed-waste products or when allowing access to sophisticated chemical processing is undesirable. This investigation is a part of the effort to establish the feasibility of using liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste separation in the Accelerator Driven Energy Production (ADEP) program. A number of fundatmental issues in liquid centrifugation with radioactive elements need to be addressed in order to validate the approach and provide design criteria for experimental liquid salt (LiF and BeF{sub 2}) centrifuge. The author concentrates on one such issue, the possible onset of convective instabilities which could inhibit separation.

  12. DEM simulation of granular flows in a centrifugal acceleration field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Peng, Chong; Wu, Wei

    2017-04-01

    The main purpose of mass-flow experimental models is abstracting distinctive features of natural granular flows, and allow its systematic study in the laboratory. In this process, particle size, space, time, and stress scales must be considered for the proper representation of specific phenomena [5]. One of the most challenging tasks in small scale models, is matching the range of stresses and strains among the particle and fluid media observed in a field event. Centrifuge modelling offers an alternative to upscale all gravity-driven processes, and it has been recently employed in the simulation of granular flows [1, 2, 3, 6, 7]. Centrifuge scaling principles are presented in Ref. [4], collecting a wide spectrum of static and dynamic models. However, for the case of kinematic processes, the non-uniformity of the centrifugal acceleration field plays a major role (i.e., Coriolis and inertial effects). In this work, we discuss a general formulation for the centrifugal acceleration field, implemented in a discrete element model framework (DEM), and validated with centrifuge experimental results. Conventional DEM simulations relate the volumetric forces as a function of the gravitational force Gp = mpg. However, in the local coordinate system of a rotating centrifuge model, the cylindrical centrifugal acceleration field needs to be included. In this rotating system, the centrifugal acceleration of a particle depends on the rotating speed of the centrifuge, as well as the position and speed of the particle in the rotating model. Therefore, we obtain the formulation of centrifugal acceleration field by coordinate transformation. The numerical model is validated with a series of centrifuge experiments of monodispersed glass beads, flowing down an inclined plane at different acceleration levels and slope angles. Further discussion leads to the numerical parameterization necessary for simulating equivalent granular flows under an augmented acceleration field. The premise of

  13. 2. View of centrifugal pump house sitting at edge of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of centrifugal pump house sitting at edge of drainage canal, looking E. - Laurel Valley Sugar Plantation, Drainage Plant, 2 Miles South of Thibodaux on State Route 308, Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, LA

  14. 23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULICOPERATED VALVE FOR LATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULIC-OPERATED VALVE FOR LATER CONNECTION OF ENGINE PUMP ENG TO DISCHARGE HEADER. - Lakeview Pumping Station, Clarendon & Montrose Avenues, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  15. 3. Interior view of centrifugal pump house showing pumps and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Interior view of centrifugal pump house showing pumps and engines, looking W. - Laurel Valley Sugar Plantation, Drainage Plant, 2 Miles South of Thibodaux on State Route 308, Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, LA

  16. A multiplexed immunoassay system based upon reciprocating centrifugal microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Peytavi, Régis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Micic, Miodrag; Felgner, Philip L.; Madou, Marc J.

    2011-06-01

    A novel, centrifugal disk-based micro-total analysis system (μTAS) for low cost and high throughput semi-automated immunoassay processing was developed. A key innovation in the disposable immunoassay disk design is in a fluidic structure that enables very efficient micro-mixing based on a reciprocating mechanism in which centrifugal acceleration acting upon a liquid element first generates and stores pneumatic energy that is then released by a reduction of the centrifugal acceleration, resulting in a reversal of direction of flow of the liquid. Through an alternating sequence of high and low centrifugal acceleration, the system reciprocates the flow of liquid within the disk to maximize incubation/hybridization efficiency between antibodies and antigen macromolecules during the incubation/hybridization stage of the assay. The described reciprocating mechanism results in a reduction in processing time and reagent consumption by one order of magnitude.

  17. Centrifugally spun starch-based fibers from amylopectin rich starches.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianglong; Chen, Huanhuan; Yang, Bin

    2016-02-10

    Centrifugal spinning and electrospinning have proved to be effective techniques for fabricating micro-to-nanofibers. However, starches of amylopectin content above 65% cannot be fabricated to fiber by electrospinning. This paper is focus on the centrifugal spinnability of amylopectin rich starches. We investigated the amylopectin content of starches by Dual-wavelength colorimetry, studied the rheological properties of starch dopes to determine entanglement concentration (ce) by rotary rheometer. Results indicated that amylopectin rich native corn and potato starches, which with amylopectin content higher than 65%, were suitable for centrifugal spinning to micro-to-nanofibers. Additionally, starch-based fibers were successfully fabricated from the amylose rich corn starch as well. Rheological studies showed that the entanglement concentration (ce) of starch solution was crucial for successful centrifugal spinning. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 8. FLOOR 1: TENTERING GEAR FOR SOUTH STONES, CENTRIFUGAL GOVERNOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. FLOOR 1: TENTERING GEAR FOR SOUTH STONES, CENTRIFUGAL GOVERNOR MOUNTED ON STONE SPINDLE, VERY SHORT STEELYARD - Windmill at Water Mill, Montauk Highway & Halsey Lane, Water Mill, Suffolk County, NY

  19. 18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and control panel, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  20. 16. View northwest of Arctic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View northwest of Arctic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and control panel, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  1. 14. CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, NEW HAVEN YARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, NEW HAVEN YARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  2. 15. FRONT VIEW, DETAIL, CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. FRONT VIEW, DETAIL, CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, NEW HAVEN YARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  3. 25. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, Unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Iron Works, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1879, 1881. View: After sugar was granulated and cooled it had to be dried and drained, completely separating the sugar crystals from the molasses. Revolving at 1200 rpm the inner basket drove the molasses outward into the stationary outer basket leaving dried sugar behind. The steam engine counter-shaft at the left was belt driven and belts running from the counter-shaft pulleys to the centrifugals' base-pulleys provided the necessary power. Part of the clutch system which moved the belt from a moving to a stationary pulley, thus turning the centrifugals on and off, is seen in Between the counter-shaft and the centrifugals. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  4. Centrifuge Facility for the International Space Station Alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Catherine C.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1994-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility planned for the International Space Station Alpha has under-one considerable redesign over the past year, primarily because the Station is now viewed as a 10 year mission rather than a 30 year mission and because of the need to simply the design to meet budget constraints and a 2000 launch date. The basic elements of the Centrifuge Facility remain the same, i.e., a 2.5 m diameter centrifuge, a micro-g holding unit, plant and animal habitats, a glovebox and a service unit. The centrifuge will still provide the full range of artificial gravity from 0.01 a to 2 - as originally planned; however, the extractor to permit withdrawal of habitats from the centrifuge without stopping the centrifuge has been eliminated. The specimen habitats have also been simplified and are derived from other NASA programs. The Plant Research Unit being developed by the Gravitational Biology Facility will be used to house plants in the Centrifuge Facility. Although not as ambitious as the Centrifuge Facility plant habitat, it will provide much better environmental control and lighting than the current Shuttle based Plant Growth Facility. Similarly, rodents will be housed in the Advanced Animal Habitat being developed for the Shuttle program. The Centrifuge Facility and ISSA will provide the opportunity to perform repeatable, high quality science. The long duration increments available on the Station will permit multigeneration studies on both plants and animals which have not previously been possible. The Centrifuge Facility will accommodate sufficient number of specimens to permit statistically significant sampling of specimens to investigate the time course of adaptation to altered gravity environments. The centrifuge will for the first time permit investigators to use gravity itself as a tool to investigate fundamental processes, to investigate the intensity and duration of gravity to maintain normal structure and function, to separate the effects of micro-g from

  5. Centrifuge Facility for the International Space Station Alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Catherine C.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1994-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility planned for the International Space Station Alpha has under-one considerable redesign over the past year, primarily because the Station is now viewed as a 10 year mission rather than a 30 year mission and because of the need to simply the design to meet budget constraints and a 2000 launch date. The basic elements of the Centrifuge Facility remain the same, i.e., a 2.5 m diameter centrifuge, a micro-g holding unit, plant and animal habitats, a glovebox and a service unit. The centrifuge will still provide the full range of artificial gravity from 0.01 a to 2 - as originally planned; however, the extractor to permit withdrawal of habitats from the centrifuge without stopping the centrifuge has been eliminated. The specimen habitats have also been simplified and are derived from other NASA programs. The Plant Research Unit being developed by the Gravitational Biology Facility will be used to house plants in the Centrifuge Facility. Although not as ambitious as the Centrifuge Facility plant habitat, it will provide much better environmental control and lighting than the current Shuttle based Plant Growth Facility. Similarly, rodents will be housed in the Advanced Animal Habitat being developed for the Shuttle program. The Centrifuge Facility and ISSA will provide the opportunity to perform repeatable, high quality science. The long duration increments available on the Station will permit multigeneration studies on both plants and animals which have not previously been possible. The Centrifuge Facility will accommodate sufficient number of specimens to permit statistically significant sampling of specimens to investigate the time course of adaptation to altered gravity environments. The centrifuge will for the first time permit investigators to use gravity itself as a tool to investigate fundamental processes, to investigate the intensity and duration of gravity to maintain normal structure and function, to separate the effects of micro-g from

  6. Polarized actin structural dynamics in response to cyclic uniaxial stretch

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lawrence; Helmke, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) alignment to directional flow or stretch supports anti-inflammatory functions, but mechanisms controlling polarized structural adaptation in response to physical cues remain unclear. This study aimed to determine whether factors associated with early actin edge ruffling implicated in cell polarization are prerequisite for stress fiber (SF) reorientation in response to cyclic uniaxial stretch. Time-lapse analysis of EGFP-actin in confluent ECs showed that onset of either cyclic uniaxial or equibiaxial stretch caused a non-directional increase in edge ruffling. Edge activity was concentrated in a direction perpendicular to the stretch axis after 60 min, consistent with the direction of SF alignment. Rho-kinase inhibition caused reorientation of both stretch-induced edge ruffling and SF alignment parallel to the stretch axis. Arp2/3 inhibition attenuated stretch-induced cell elongation and disrupted polarized edge dynamics and microtubule organizing center reorientation, but it had no effect on the extent of SF reorientation. Disrupting localization of p21-activated kinase (PAK) did not prevent stretch-induced SF reorientation, suggesting that this Rac effector is not critical in regulating stretch-induced cytoskeletal remodeling. Overall, these results suggest that directional edge ruffling is not a primary mechanism that guides SF reorientation in response to stretch; the two events are coincident but not causal. PMID:25821527

  7. Levator Ani Muscle Stretch Induced by Simulated Vaginal Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Kuo-Cheng; Mooney, Brian; DeLancey, John O. L.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a three-dimensional computer model to predict levator ani muscle stretch during vaginal birth. METHODS: Serial magnetic resonance images from a healthy nulliparous 34-year-old woman, published anatomic data, and engineering graphics software were used to construct a structural model of the levator ani muscles along with related passive tissues. The model was used to quantify pelvic floor muscle stretch induced during the second stage of labor as a model fetal head progressively engaged and then stretched the iliococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles. RESULTS: The largest tissue strain reached a stretch ratio (tissue length under stretch/original tissue length) of 3.26 in medial pubococcygeus muscle, the shortest, most medial and ventral levator ani muscle. Regions of the ileococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles reached maximal stretch ratios of 2.73, 2.50, and 2.28, respectively. Tissue stretch ratios were proportional to fetal head size: For example, increasing fetal head diameter by 9% increased medial pubococcygeus stretch by the same amount. CONCLUSION: The medial pubococcygeus muscles undergo the largest stretch of any levator ani muscles during vaginal birth. They are therefore at the greatest risk for stretch-related injury. PMID:14704241

  8. Preferred orientation of BSCCO via centrifugal slip casting

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlage, G.; Roeder, R.; Trumble, K.; Bowman, K. ); Li, S.; McElfresh, M. )

    1994-04-01

    Due to the highly anisotropic properties of BSCCO superconductors, the bulk properties of these materials can be greatly affected by preferential orientation. Substantial [ital c]-axis orientation normal to the desired direction of current flow has been demonstrated by centrifugally slip casting lead-doped BSCCO-2223. The strong preferred orientation developed in the centrifugally slip-cast material demonstrates high critical current potential.

  9. Transport modes during crystal growth in a centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William A.; Wilcox, William R.; Carlson, Frederick; Chait, Arnon; Regel', Liia L.

    1992-01-01

    Flow modes arising under average acceleration in centrifugal crystal growth, the gradient of acceleration, and the Coriolis force are investigated using a fully nonlinear three-dimensional numerical model for a centrifugal crystal growth experiment. The analysis focuses on an examination of the quasi-steady state flow modes. The importance of the gradient acceleration is determined by the value of a new nondimensional number, Ad.

  10. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms: advanced unit operations and applications.

    PubMed

    Strohmeier, O; Keller, M; Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-10-07

    Centrifugal microfluidics has evolved into a mature technology. Several major diagnostic companies either have products on the market or are currently evaluating centrifugal microfluidics for product development. The fields of application are widespread and include clinical chemistry, immunodiagnostics and protein analysis, cell handling, molecular diagnostics, as well as food, water, and soil analysis. Nevertheless, new fluidic functions and applications that expand the possibilities of centrifugal microfluidics are being introduced at a high pace. In this review, we first present an up-to-date comprehensive overview of centrifugal microfluidic unit operations. Then, we introduce the term "process chain" to review how these unit operations can be combined for the automation of laboratory workflows. Such aggregation of basic functionalities enables efficient fluidic design at a higher level of integration. Furthermore, we analyze how novel, ground-breaking unit operations may foster the integration of more complex applications. Among these are the storage of pneumatic energy to realize complex switching sequences or to pump liquids radially inward, as well as the complete pre-storage and release of reagents. In this context, centrifugal microfluidics provides major advantages over other microfluidic actuation principles: the pulse-free inertial liquid propulsion provided by centrifugal microfluidics allows for closed fluidic systems that are free of any interfaces to external pumps. Processed volumes are easily scalable from nanoliters to milliliters. Volume forces can be adjusted by rotation and thus, even for very small volumes, surface forces may easily be overcome in the centrifugal gravity field which enables the efficient separation of nanoliter volumes from channels, chambers or sensor matrixes as well as the removal of any disturbing bubbles. In summary, centrifugal microfluidics takes advantage of a comprehensive set of fluidic unit operations such as

  11. The vacancies formation and agglomeration under centrifugal force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzba, Bartek

    2017-10-01

    In this paper the vacancies formation and agglomeration under centrifugal force - sedimentation will be analyzed. The evolutionary algorithm for diffusion and vacancy evolution will be shown. The model predicts the location of vacancies agglomeration during the sedimentation process - the most probably place of voids formation. The computed results will be compared with experiments in Cu-brass diffusion couple. The influence of the centrifugal force on the vacancies migration will be presented.

  12. Impaired stretch modulation in potentially lethal cardiac sodium channel mutants.

    PubMed

    Banderali, Umberto; Juranka, Peter F; Clark, Robert B; Giles, Wayne R; Morris, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    The presence of two slowly inactivating mutants of the cardiac sodium channel (hNa(V)1.5), R1623Q and R1626P, associate with sporadic Long-QT3 (LQT3) syndrome, and may contribute to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or lethal ventricular disturbances. Cardiac mechanoelectric feedback is considered a factor in such sporadic arrhythmias. Since stretch and shear forces modulate hNa(V)1.5 gating, detailed electrophysiological study of LQT-Na(V)1.5 mutant channel alpha subunit(s) might provide insights. We compared recombinant R1623Q and WT currents in control vs. stretched membrane of cell-attached patches of Xenopus oocytes. Macroscopic current was monitored before, during, and after stretch induced by pipette suction. In either mutant Na(+) channel, peak current at small depolarizations could be more than doubled by stretch. As in WT, R1623Q showed reversible and stretch intensity dependent acceleration of current onset and decay at all voltages, with kinetic coupling between these two processes retained during stretch. These two Na(V)1.5 channel alpha subunits differed in the absolute extent of kinetic acceleration for a given stretch intensity; over a range of intensities, R1623Q inactivation speed increased significantly less than did WT. The LQT3 mutant R1626P also retained its kinetic coupling during stretch. Whereas WT stretch-difference currents (I(Na)(V,t) without stretch minus I(Na)(V,t) with stretch) were mostly inhibitory (equivalent to outward current), they were substantially (R1623Q) or entirely (R1626P) excitatory for the LQT3 mutants. If stretch-modulated Na(V)1.5 current (i.e., brief excitation followed by accelerated current decay) routinely contributes to cardiac mechanoelectric feedback, then during hemodynamic load variations, the abnormal stretch-modulated components of R1623Q and R1626P current could be pro-arrhythmic.

  13. Factors affecting yield and survival of cells when suspensions are subjected to centrifugation. Influence of centrifugal acceleration, time of centrifugation, and length of the suspension column in quasi-homogeneous centrifugal fields.

    PubMed

    Katkov, I I; Mazur, P

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the centrifugation of cell suspensions are to obtain the maximum yield of cells with minimum adverse effects of centrifugation. In the case of mechanically sensitive cells such as mouse sperm, the two goals are somewhat contradictory in that g-forces sufficient to achieve high yields are damaging, and g-forces that yield high viability produce low yields. This paper mathematically analyzes the factors contributing to each goal. The total yield of pelleted cells is determined by the sedimentation rate governed by Stokes' Law, and depends on the relative centrifugal force, centrifugation time, size and shape of the cells, density of the cells and medium, viscosity of the medium, and the length of the column of suspension. Because in the situation analyzed the column is short relative to the rotor radius, the analysis considers the centrifugal field to be quasi-homogeneous. The assumption is that cells are not damaged during sedimentation, but that they become injured at an exponential rate once they are pelleted, a rate that will depend on the specific cell type. The behavior is modeled by the solution of coupled differential equations. The predictions of the analysis are in good agreement with experimental data on the centrifugation of mouse sperm.

  14. Synchronization of mammalian cells and nuclei by centrifugal elutriation.

    PubMed

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2011-01-01

    Synchronized populations of large numbers of cells can be obtained by centrifugal elutriation on the basis of sedimentation properties of small round particles, with minimal perturbation of cellular functions. The physical characteristics of cell size and sedimentation velocity are operative in the technique of centrifugal elutriation also known as counterstreaming centrifugation. The elutriator is an advanced device for increasing the sedimentation rate to yield enhanced resolution of cell separation. A random population of cells is introduced into the elutriation chamber of an elutriator rotor running in a specially designed centrifuge. By increasing step by step the flow rate of the elutriation fluid, successive populations of relatively homogeneous cell size can be removed from the elutriation chamber and used as synchronized subpopulations. For cell synchronization by centrifugal elutriation early log S phase cell populations are most suitable where most of the cells are in G1 and S phase (>80%). Protocols for the synchronization of nuclei of murine pre-B cells and high-resolution centrifugal elutriation of CHO cells are given. The verification of purity and cell cycle positions of cells in elutriated fractions includes the measurement of DNA synthesis by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and DNA content by propidium iodide flow cytometry.

  15. The slide centrifuge gram stain as a urine screening method.

    PubMed

    Olson, M L; Shanholtzer, C J; Willard, K E; Peterson, L R

    1991-10-01

    A slide centrifuge Gram stain procedure was performed to screen for bacteriuria 4161 urine specimens submitted in urine preservative tubes for routine culture. For slide centrifuge Gram staining, each urine sample was mixed well. Thereafter, 0.2 mL of each sample was placed, using a pipette, into a slide centrifuge chamber and centrifuged at 2,000 rpm for 5 minutes. The slides were heat fixed, Gram stained, and read by laboratory personnel who scanned 12 consecutive oil-immersion fields using a set pattern. The presence of the same organism in six or more fields was defined as a positive urine screen. Urine samples were cultured using a 0.001-mL loop and a comparison of culture growth with slide centrifuge screening was made. When growth of 100,000 or more colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) was the reference for comparison, the screen had a sensitivity rate of 98%, a specificity rate of 90%, a negative predictive value of 99%, and a positive predictive value of 65%. When a lower colony count of 10,000 or more CFU/mL was the reference for comparison, the screen had a sensitivity rate of 88%, a specificity rate of 95%, a negative predictive value of 96%, and a positive predictive value of 84%. The slide centrifuge Gram stain is a very sensitive screening method to detect bacteriuria in an adult male population.

  16. Synchronization of Mammalian Cells and Nuclei by Centrifugal Elutriation.

    PubMed

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2017-01-01

    Synchronized populations of large numbers of cells can be obtained by centrifugal elutriation on the basis of sedimentation properties of small round particles, with minimal perturbation of cellular functions. The physical characteristics of cell size and sedimentation velocity are operative in the technique of centrifugal elutriation also known as counterstreaming centrifugation. The elutriator is an advanced device for increasing the sedimentation rate to yield enhanced resolution of cell separation. A random population of cells is introduced into the elutriation chamber of an elutriator rotor running in a specially designed centrifuge. By increasing step-by-step the flow rate of the elutriation fluid, successive populations of relatively homogeneous cell size can be removed from the elutriation chamber and used as synchronized subpopulations. For cell synchronization by centrifugal elutriation, early log S phase cell populations are most suitable where most of the cells are in G1 and S phase (>80 %). Apoptotic cells can be found in the early elutriation fractions belonging to the sub-Go window. Protocols for the synchronization of nuclei of murine pre-B cells and high-resolution centrifugal elutriation of CHO cells are given. The verification of purity and cell cycle positions of cells in elutriated fractions includes the measurement of DNA synthesis by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and DNA content by propidium iodide flow cytometry.

  17. Improved g-level calculations for coil planet centrifuges.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Remco N A M; König, Carola S

    2011-09-09

    Calculation of the g-level is often used to compare CCC centrifuges, either against each other or to allow for comparison with other centrifugal techniques. This study shows the limitations of calculating the g-level in the traditional way. Traditional g-level calculations produce a constant value which does not accurately reflect the dynamics of the coil planet centrifuge. This work has led to a new equation which can be used to determine the improved non-dimensional values. The new equations describe the fluctuating radial and tangential g-level associated with CCC centrifuges and the mean radial g-level value. The latter has been found to be significantly different than that determined by the traditional equation. This new equation will give a better understanding of forces experienced by sample components and allows for more accurate comparison between centrifuges. Although the new equation is far better than the traditional equation for comparing different types of centrifuges, other factors such as the mixing regime may need to be considered to improve the comparison further.

  18. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  19. Twist-stretch profiles of DNA chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoli, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Helical molecules change their twist number under the effect of a mechanical load. We study the twist-stretch relation for a set of short DNA molecules modeled by a mesoscopic Hamiltonian. Finite temperature path integral techniques are applied to generate a large ensemble of possible configurations for the base pairs of the sequence. The model also accounts for the bending and twisting fluctuations between adjacent base pairs along the molecules stack. Simulating a broad range of twisting conformation, we compute the helix structural parameters by averaging over the ensemble of base pairs configurations. The method selects, for any applied force, the average twist angle which minimizes the molecule’s free energy. It is found that the chains generally over-twist under an applied stretching and the over-twisting is physically associated to the contraction of the average helix diameter, i.e. to the damping of the base pair fluctuations. Instead, assuming that the maximum amplitude of the bending fluctuations may decrease against the external load, the DNA molecule first over-twists for weak applied forces and then untwists above a characteristic force value. Our results are discussed in relation to available experimental information albeit for kilo-base long molecules.

  20. Stretched Exponential relaxation in pure Se glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Ravindren, S.; Boolchand, P.

    A universal feature of glasses is the stretched exponential relaxation, f (t) = exp[ - t / τ ] β . The model of diffusion of excitations to randomly distributed traps in a glass by Phillips1 yields the stretched exponent β = d[d +2] where d, the effective dimensionality. We have measured the enthalpy of relaxation ΔHnr (tw) at Tg of Se glass in modulated DSC experiments as glasses age at 300K and find β = 0.43(2) for tw in the 0

  1. Stretching DNA by a Constant Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Yuko

    2005-03-01

    We consider the problem of stretching DNA by a constant field, such as an electric field or a hydrodynamic flow field. We obtain analytical expressions for the elongation of DNA under both weak and strong applied fields, in two and three dimensions. In the weak field limit we consider the effect of self-avoidance, which leads to a 9-fold enhancement of the average end-to-end distance over the result obtained when self-avoidance is ignored in two dimensions, and 3-fold increase in three dimensions. In the strong stretching regime we obtain the exact force-extension relation by mapping the problem to the Schrödinger equation for a simple harmonic oscillator in a time dependent potential. We use our theoretical results to comment on the experiment of Maier et al. ootnotetextB. Maier, U. Seifert, and J. O. Rä'dler, Europhys. Lett., 60, 622 (2002). on DNA adsorbed on a lipid bilayer in the presence of an in-plane electric field. In particular, we find that their estimate for the effective charge density of the DNA molecule, made on the basis of an approximate theory, requires significant corrections in light of our calculations. This work was supported by the NSF through grants DMR-9984471 and DMR-0403997. JK is a Cottrell Scholar of Research Corporation.

  2. Stretch sensors for human body motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Ben; Gisby, Todd; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Sensing motion of the human body is a difficult task. From an engineers' perspective people are soft highly mobile objects that move in and out of complex environments. As well as the technical challenge of sensing, concepts such as comfort, social intrusion, usability, and aesthetics are paramount in determining whether someone will adopt a sensing solution or not. At the same time the demands for human body motion sensing are growing fast. Athletes want feedback on posture and technique, consumers need new ways to interact with augmented reality devices, and healthcare providers wish to track recovery of a patient. Dielectric elastomer stretch sensors are ideal for bridging this gap. They are soft, flexible, and precise. They are low power, lightweight, and can be easily mounted on the body or embedded into clothing. From a commercialisation point of view stretch sensing is easier than actuation or generation - such sensors can be low voltage and integrated with conventional microelectronics. This paper takes a birds-eye view of the use of these sensors to measure human body motion. A holistic description of sensor operation and guidelines for sensor design will be presented to help technologists and developers in the space.

  3. Breakup and atomization of a stretching crown.

    PubMed

    Roisman, Ilia V; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Kyriopoulos, Olympia; Stephan, Peter; Tropea, Cam

    2007-08-01

    This study is devoted to experimental and theoretical investigation of splash produced by spray impact onto a smooth, rigid target under microgravity conditions. In particular, the formation of a film by the deposited liquid, the propagation and breakup of uprising sheets created by drop impacts, and the creation of secondary droplets have been observed. Three scenarios of splash have been identified during the experiments: (i) cusp formation and jetting due to the rim transverse instability, (ii) sheet destruction and the consequent rapid axisymmetric capillary breakup of a free rim, and (iii) the rim merging. Experimental data for various geometrical parameters of splash have been collected. Next, in order to predict the typical length scales of the interjet distance, a linear stability analysis of the rim in relation to transverse disturbances has been performed. The influence of the sheet stretching has been investigated and shown to be significant. The experimentally measured average values of the interjet distances agree well with the theoretical predictions. The sheet stretching is responsible for the appearance of the relatively long interjet distances.

  4. Breakup and atomization of a stretching crown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roisman, Ilia V.; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Kyriopoulos, Olympia; Stephan, Peter; Tropea, Cam

    2007-08-01

    This study is devoted to experimental and theoretical investigation of splash produced by spray impact onto a smooth, rigid target under microgravity conditions. In particular, the formation of a film by the deposited liquid, the propagation and breakup of uprising sheets created by drop impacts, and the creation of secondary droplets have been observed. Three scenarios of splash have been identified during the experiments: (i) cusp formation and jetting due to the rim transverse instability, (ii) sheet destruction and the consequent rapid axisymmetric capillary breakup of a free rim, and (iii) the rim merging. Experimental data for various geometrical parameters of splash have been collected. Next, in order to predict the typical length scales of the interjet distance, a linear stability analysis of the rim in relation to transverse disturbances has been performed. The influence of the sheet stretching has been investigated and shown to be significant. The experimentally measured average values of the interjet distances agree well with the theoretical predictions. The sheet stretching is responsible for the appearance of the relatively long interjet distances.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of chromatin stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, Frank; Lankas, Filip; Caudron, Maïwen; Langowski, Jörg

    2006-04-01

    We present Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the stretching of a single 30nm chromatin fiber. The model approximates the DNA by a flexible polymer chain with Debye-Hückel electrostatics and uses a two-angle zigzag model for the geometry of the linker DNA connecting the nucleosomes. The latter are represented by flat disks interacting via an attractive Gay-Berne potential. Our results show that the stiffness of the chromatin fiber strongly depends on the linker DNA length. Furthermore, changing the twisting angle between nucleosomes from 90° to 130° increases the stiffness significantly. An increase in the opening angle from 22° to 34° leads to softer fibers for small linker lengths. We observe that fibers containing a linker histone at each nucleosome are stiffer compared to those without the linker histone. The simulated persistence lengths and elastic moduli agree with experimental data. Finally, we show that the chromatin fiber does not behave as an isotropic elastic rod, but its rigidity depends on the direction of deformation: Chromatin is much more resistant to stretching than to bending.

  6. A direct and rapid leaf water extraction method for isotopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Peters, L I; Yakir, D

    2008-09-01

    Isotopic measurements of leaf water have provided insights into a range of ecophysiological and biogeochemical processes, but require an extraction step which often constitutes the major analytical bottleneck in large-scale studies. Current standard procedures for leaf water analysis are based on cryogenic vacuum or azeotrophic distillation, and are laborious, require sophisticated distillation lines and the use of toxic materials. We report a rapid technique based on centrifugation/filtration of leaf samples pulverised in their original sampling tubes, using a specifically adapted, simple apparatus. The leaf water extracts produced are suitable for isotopic analysis via pyrolysis gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (PYR/GC/IRMS). The new method was validated against cryogenic vacuum distillation and showed an overall accuracy of +/-0.5 per thousand (nine grouped comparisons, n = 110) over a range of 21 per thousand. Effects due to the presence of soluble carbohydrates were near the detection limits for most samples analysed, and these effects could be corrected for (the extracted soluble organics could also be used for isotopic analysis). The extraction time for a routine eight-sample subset was reduced from 4 h (cryogenic distillation) to 45 min, limited only by the size of the centrifuge(s) used. This method provides a rapid, low-cost and reliable alternative to conventional vacuum and other distillation methods that can alleviate current restrictions on ecosystem- and global-scale studies that require high-throughput leaf water isotopic analysis. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A wireless centrifuge force microscope (CFM) enables multiplexed single-molecule experiments in a commercial centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Tony; Patel, Dhruv S.; Halvorsen, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The centrifuge force microscope (CFM) was recently introduced as a platform for massively parallel single-molecule manipulation and analysis. Here we developed a low-cost and self-contained CFM module that works directly within a commercial centrifuge, greatly improving accessibility and ease of use. Our instrument incorporates research grade video microscopy, a power source, a computer, and wireless transmission capability to simultaneously monitor many individually tethered microspheres. We validated the instrument by performing single-molecule force shearing of short DNA duplexes. For a 7 bp duplex, we observed over 1000 dissociation events due to force dependent shearing from 2 pN to 12 pN with dissociation times in the range of 10-100 s. We extended the measurement to a 10 bp duplex, applying a 12 pN force clamp and directly observing single-molecule dissociation over an 85 min experiment. Our new CFM module facilitates simple and inexpensive experiments that dramatically improve access to single-molecule analysis.

  8. A wireless centrifuge force microscope (CFM) enables multiplexed single-molecule experiments in a commercial centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tony; Patel, Dhruv S; Halvorsen, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The centrifuge force microscope (CFM) was recently introduced as a platform for massively parallel single-molecule manipulation and analysis. Here we developed a low-cost and self-contained CFM module that works directly within a commercial centrifuge, greatly improving accessibility and ease of use. Our instrument incorporates research grade video microscopy, a power source, a computer, and wireless transmission capability to simultaneously monitor many individually tethered microspheres. We validated the instrument by performing single-molecule force shearing of short DNA duplexes. For a 7 bp duplex, we observed over 1000 dissociation events due to force dependent shearing from 2 pN to 12 pN with dissociation times in the range of 10-100 s. We extended the measurement to a 10 bp duplex, applying a 12 pN force clamp and directly observing single-molecule dissociation over an 85 min experiment. Our new CFM module facilitates simple and inexpensive experiments that dramatically improve access to single-molecule analysis.

  9. Centrifugal Lithography: Self-Shaping of Polymer Microstructures Encapsulating Biopharmaceutics by Centrifuging Polymer Drops.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huisuk; Kim, Suyong; Kang, Geonwoo; Lahiji, Shayan F; Jang, Mingyu; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Jae-Myung; Cho, Sang-Nae; Jung, Hyungil

    2017-07-13

    Polymeric microstructures encapsulating biopharmaceutics must be fabricated in a controlled environment to preserve the biological activity. There is increasing demand for simple methods designed to preserve the biological activity by utilizing the natural properties of polymers. Here, the paper shows that centrifugal lithography (CL) can be used for the fabrication of such microstructures in a single centrifugation, by engineering the self-shaping properties of hyaluronic acid (HA). In this method, HA drops are self-shaped into hourglass-microstructures to produce two dissolving microneedles (DMN), which facilitate transdermal delivery via implantation on the skin. In addition, tuberculin purified protein derivatives are encapsulated into HA DMNs under refrigerated conditions (4 °C) during CL. Therefore, the tuberculin skin test (TST) with the DMNs indicates minimal damage, as opposed to the case of TST with traditional hypodermic needles. These findings on the fabrication of polymeric microstructures with biopharmaceutics may trigger the development of various biomedical devices and therapies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Cerebral Hypoperfusion Precedes Nausea During Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Schlegel, Todd T.; Black, F. Owen; Wood, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Nausea and motion sickness are important operational concerns for aviators and astronauts. Understanding underlying mechanisms associated with motion sickness may lead to new treatments. The goal of this work was to determine if cerebral blood flow changes precede the development of nausea in motion sick susceptible subjects. Cerebral flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres) and end-tidal CO2 were measured while subjects were rotated on a centrifuge (250 degrees/sec). Following 5 min of rotation, subjects were translated 0.504 m off-center, creating a +lGx centripetal acceleration in the nasal-occipital plane. Ten subjects completed the protocol without symptoms while 5 developed nausea (4 while 6ff-center and 1 while rotating on-center). Prior to nausea, subjects had significant increases in blood pressure (+13plus or minus 3 mmHg, P less than 0.05) and cerebrovascular resistance (+46 plus or minus 17%, P less than 0.05) and decreases in cerebral flow velocity both in the second (-13 plus or minus 4%) and last minute (-22 plus or minus 5%) before symptoms (P less than 0.05). In comparison, controls demonstrated no change in blood pressure or cerebrovascular resistance in the last minute of off-center rotation and only a 7 plus or minus 2% decrease in cerebral flow velocity. All subjects had significant hypocapnia (-3.8 plus or minus 0.4 mmHg, P less than 0.05), however this hypocapnia could not fully explain the cerebral hypoperfusion associated with the development of nausea. These data indicate that reductions in cerebral blood flow precede the development of nausea. Further work is necessary to determine what role cerebral hypoperfusion plays in motion sickness and whether cerebral hypoperfusion can be used to predict the development of nausea in susceptible individuals.

  11. Fabrication of Al/Diamond Particles Functionally Graded Materials by Centrifugal Sintered-Casting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimi; Shibuya, Masafumi; Sato, Hisashi

    2013-03-01

    The continuous graded structure of functionally graded materials (FGMs) can be created under a centrifugal force. Centrifugal sintered-casting (CSC) method, proposed by the authors, is one of the fabrication methods of FGM under centrifugal force. This method is a combination of the centrifugal sintering method and centrifugal casting method. In this study, Al/diamond particle FGM was fabricated by the proposed method.

  12. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study's methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC.

  13. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study’s methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC. PMID:27390425

  14. Effects of three different stretching techniques on vertical jumping performance.

    PubMed

    Kirmizigil, Berkiye; Ozcaldiran, Bahtiyar; Colakoglu, Muzaffer

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate 3 different flexibility techniques: (a) ballistic stretching (BS), (b) proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (PNF) + BS, and (c) PNF + static stretching (SS) on vertical jump (VJ) performance and to determine the most appropriate stretching method during warm-up period before explosive force disciplines. One hundred voluntary male athletes participated in this study. All subjects performed aerobic warm-up (5-minute jog) followed by BS (5 seconds for each stretching exercise), PNF + BS (PNF performed followed by 5 seconds of BS), and PNF + SS (PNF performed followed by 30 seconds of SS) treatment protocol, respectively in the same day. Each stretching treatment was applied for 4 sets bilaterally. In all stretching treatments, lumbar extensor, gluteus maximus, and hamstring muscles were stretched with a single stretching exercise. After a 2-minute brief rest period, participants performed 3 trials of VJ test followed by one of the treatment protocols. Vertical jump performance was evaluated by countermovement jump (CMJ). Participants were divided into 3 groups according to their flexibility and prejump performances after warm-up. For each individual group and the whole group, after all treatments, differences in CMJ values were obtained (p ≤ 0.05). Ballistic stretching increased the VJ performance in the groups with low and average flexibility, poor prejumping performance, and also in the whole group (p ≤ 0.05). Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching + BS affected VJ performance in the group of participants with high flexibility (p ≤ 0.05). Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation + SS decreased VJ performance in groups of participants with high flexibility, moderate, and high prejumping performance and in whole group (p ≤ 0.05). Ballistic stretching method increased VJ height, therefore seems to be more suitable than PNF + SS and PNF + BS before events that rely on explosive power as a part

  15. Early modification of stretch reflex in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bergui, M; Paglia, G; Lopiano, L; Quattrocolo, G; Bergamini, L; Bergamasco, B

    1993-07-01

    We stretched quadriceps femoris in healthy subjects and in patients with a recent diagnosis of PD in order to assess whether modifications of the long-latency component of the stretch reflex is an early event in the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). We found a modified mechanical and electromyographic (EMG) behavior in stretching relaxed muscles of patients while voluntary activation greatly reduced differences between normal and Parkinsonian subjects, suggesting that a lower threshold of the response is an early sign in PD.

  16. Method for separating isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-10-21

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

  17. Cerebrovascular dysfunction following subfailure axial stretch.

    PubMed

    Bell, E David; Donato, Anthony J; Monson, Kenneth L

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral blood vessels are vital to maintaining the health of the brain. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) commonly results in autoregulatory dysfunction and associated failure of cerebral vessels to maintain homeostasis in the brain. While post-injury changes to brain biochemistry are known to contribute to this dysfunction, tissue deformation may also directly alter vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) function. As a first step toward understanding stretch-induced dysfunction, this study investigates the effect of overstretch on the contractile behavior of SMCs in middle cerebral arteries (MCAs). We hypothesized that vessel function is altered above a threshold of stretch and strain rate. Twenty-four MCAs from Sprague Dawley rats were tested. Following development of basal SMC tone, vessels were subjected to increasing levels of isosmotic extracellular potassium (K(+)). Samples were then subjected to an axial overstretch of either 1.2*λIV or 1.3*λIV at strain rates of 0.2 or 20s(-1). Following overstretch, SMC contractile behavior was measured again, both immediately and 60min after overstretch. Control vessels were subjected to the same protocol but without overstretch. SMC contractile behavior was characterized using both percent contraction (%C) relative to the fully dilated inner diameter and the K(+) dose required to evoke the half maximal contractile response (EC50). Control vessels exhibited increased sensitivity to K(+) in successive characterization tests, so all effects were quantified relative to the time-matched control response. Samples exhibited the typical biphasic response to extracellular K(+), dilating and contracting in response to small and large K(+) concentrations, respectively. As hypothesized, axial overstretch altered SMC contractile behavior, as seen in a decrease in %C for sub-maximal contractile K(+) doses (p<0.05) and an increase in EC50 (p<0.01), but only for the test group stretched rapidly to 1.3*λIV. While the change in %C was only

  18. High-Pressure Balloon-Assisted Stretching of the Coracohumeral Ligament to Determine the Optimal Stretching Positions: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Baek, Sora; Lee, Kyu Jin; Kim, Keewon; Han, Seung-Ho; Lee, U-Young; Lee, Kun-Jai; Chung, Sun Gun

    2016-10-01

    The coracohumeral ligament (CHL) is a thick capsular structure and markedly thickened when affected by adhesive capsulitis. Therapeutic stretching is the most commonly applied treatment for adhesive capsulitis, but optimal stretching postures for maximal therapeutic effects on the CHL have not been fully investigated. To investigate the most effective stretching direction for the CHL by measuring the stretching intensity in 5 different directions and to determine whether the stretching intervention resulted in loosening of the ligament by comparing the changes of CHL tightness before and after stretching. Biomechanical cadaver study. Academic institution cadaver laboratory. Nine fresh frozen cadaveric shoulders. A high-pressure balloon catheter inserted under the CHL and intraballoon pressure was measured, to evaluate CHL tightness without ligament damage as well as to augment and monitor stretching intensity. To find the optimal stretching direction, the glenohumeral joint was stretched from the neutral position into 5 directions sequentially under pressure-monitoring: flexion, extension [EX], external rotation [ER], EX+ER, and EX+ER+adduction [AD] directions. CHL tightness was determined by a surrogate parameter, the additional pressure created by the overlying CHL. The pressure increase (ΔPstr) by a specific directional stretch was considered as the stretching intensity. ΔPstr by the 5 directions were mean (standard deviation) values of 0.03 ± 0.07 atm, 0.87 ± 1.31 atm, 1.13 ± 1.36 atm, 1.49 ± 1.32 atm, and 2.10 ± 1.70 atm, respectively, revealing the highest ΔPstr by the EX+ER+AD stretch (P < .05). The balloon pressure by the overlying CHL was decreased from 0.45 ± 0.35 atm to 0.18 ± 0.14 atm (P = .012) before and after the stretching manipulation. EX+ER+AD of the glenohumeral joint resulted in the greatest increase in balloon pressure, implying that it could be the most effective stretching direction. A series of stretching manipulations assisted

  19. Enhancement of multispectral thermal infrared images - Decorrelation contrast stretching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Decorrelation contrast stretching is an effective method for displaying information from multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images. The technique involves transformation of the data to principle components ('decorrelation'), independent contrast 'stretching' of data from the new 'decorrelated' image bands, and retransformation of the stretched data back to the approximate original axes, based on the inverse of the principle component rotation. The enhancement is robust in that colors of the same scene components are similar in enhanced images of similar scenes, or the same scene imaged at different times. Decorrelation contrast stretching is reviewed in the context of other enhancements applied to TIR images.

  20. "Stretch-back" in scalp reductions for male pattern baldness.

    PubMed

    Nordström, R E

    1984-03-01

    "Stretch-back" is a phenomenon which to a considerable extent reduces the benefits of scalp excisions for reduction of male pattern baldness. Tattoo marks placed on the scalp have revealed that about one-third to one-half the effect of the excision of the bald area of the scalp is lost postoperatively. Most of this stretch-back occurs during the first 8 postoperative weeks and is completed at 12 weeks. Most of the stretch-back originates from the wound area. It is important to be aware of the stretch-back for correct planning of the surgical program and for being able to predict the final result.