Science.gov

Sample records for isotopes centrifugal stretching

  1. Centrifugal stretching along the ground state band of Hf168

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, A.; Reese, M.; Ai, H.; Casten, R. F.; Dusling, K.; Fitzpatrick, C. R.; Gürdal, G.; Heinz, A.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Möller, O.; Petkov, P.; Pietralla, N.; Qian, J.; Rainovski, G.; Werner, V.

    2009-02-01

    The lifetimes of the Jπ=4+, 6+, 8+, and 10+ levels along the ground state band in Hf168 were measured by means of the recoil distance Doppler shift (RDDS) method using the New Yale Plunger Device (NYPD) and the SPEEDY detection array at Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Excited states in Hf168 were populated using the Sn124(Ti48,4n) fusion evaporation reaction. The new lifetime values are sufficiently precise to clearly prove the increase of quadrupole deformation as a function of angular momentum in the deformed nucleus Hf168. The data agree with the predictions from the geometrical confined β-soft (CBS) rotor model that involves centrifugal stretching in a soft potential.

  2. Centrifugal stretching along the ground state band of {sup 168}Hf

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, A.; Pietralla, N.; Reese, M.; Moeller, O.; Ai, H.; Casten, R. F.; Heinz, A.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Qian, J.; Werner, V.; Dusling, K.; Fitzpatrick, C. R.; Guerdal, G.; Petkov, P.; Rainovski, G.

    2009-02-15

    The lifetimes of the J{sup {pi}}=4{sup +}, 6{sup +}, 8{sup +}, and 10{sup +} levels along the ground state band in {sup 168}Hf were measured by means of the recoil distance Doppler shift (RDDS) method using the New Yale Plunger Device (NYPD) and the SPEEDY detection array at Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Excited states in {sup 168}Hf were populated using the {sup 124}Sn({sup 48}Ti,4n) fusion evaporation reaction. The new lifetime values are sufficiently precise to clearly prove the increase of quadrupole deformation as a function of angular momentum in the deformed nucleus {sup 168}Hf. The data agree with the predictions from the geometrical confined {beta}-soft (CBS) rotor model that involves centrifugal stretching in a soft potential.

  3. Centrifugal stretching from lifetime measurements in the 170Hf ground state band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. K.; Werner, V.; Terry, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Petkov, P.; Berant, Z.; Casperson, R. J.; Heinz, A.; Henning, G.; Lüttke, R.; Qian, J.; Shoraka, B.; Rainovski, G.; Williams, E.; Winkler, R.

    2013-04-01

    Centrifugal stretching in the deformed rare-earth nucleus 170Hf is investigated using high-precision lifetime measurements, performed with the New Yale Plunger Device at Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University. Excited states were populated in the fusion-evaporation reaction 124Sn(50Ti,4n)170Hf at a beam energy of 195 MeV. Recoil distance doppler shift data were recorded for the ground state band through the J=16+ level. The measured B(E2) values and transition quadrupole moments improve on existing data and show increasing β deformation in the ground state band of 170Hf. The results are compared to descriptions by a rigid rotor and by the confined β-soft rotor model.

  4. Stretching

    MedlinePlus

    ... benefits of stretching before working out. Traditional, or "static," stretching may lead to decreased muscle strength and performance. Consider doing dynamic stretches before and static stretching after a workout. Stretching still can be ...

  5. Stretching

    MedlinePlus

    ... activity, dynamic stretching allows for full range of motion of the joints. continue Stretching Stretching used to ... addition, stretching provides increased: flexibility joint range and motion blood flow to muscles Stretching has to be ...

  6. CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping mechanism for damping vibration forces occurring during the operation of a centrifuge is described. The vibration damping mechanism comprises a plurality of nested spaced cylindrical elements surrounding the rotating shaft of the centrifuge. Some of the elements are held substantially stationary while the others are held with respect to a pair of hearings spaced along the rotating shaft. A fluid is retained about the cylindrical elements.

  7. CENTRIFUGE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.; Urey, H.C.; Cohen, K.

    1960-08-01

    A high-speed centrifuge for the separation of gaseous isotopes is designed comprising a centrifugal pump mounted on the outlet of a centrifuge bowl and arranged to pump the heavy and light fractions out of the centrifuge bowl in two separate streams.

  8. Plasma centrifuge with vacuum arc discharge applied to the separation of stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbosco, Edson

    1989-09-01

    The results of a vacuum-arc plasma centrifuge experiment are described. A plasma centrifuge is an apparatus where a plasma column is produced due to the interaction of an electric current with an externally applied magnetic field, vector J x vector B. Among the applications of a rotating plasma, this work deals particularly with its utilization in an isotope enrichment device. The main characteristics of the plasma produced in this experiment are presented, with special attention to the plasma column rotation and the isotope enrichment. The analysis of the results is performed using a fluid model for a completely ionized rigid body rotating plasma column in steady state equilibrium. The main results are: (1) rotation frequency of the plasma column in the range 2 x (exp 4) to 3 x 10 (exp 5) rad/s; (2) enrichment of 10 to 30 pct for the magnesium isotopes, and 290 to 490 pct for the carbon-13 isotope; (3) rigid body rotation of the plasma column only for radii smaller than the characteristic radius of the plasma column, r(sub e); (4) linear dependence of the rotation frequency upon the magnetic field strength only for r is less than r(sub e); (5) existence of an optimum value of the magnetic field for maximum enrichment; and (6) dependence of the rotation frequency upon the inverse of the atomic mass.

  9. Sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy of CH2D radical in a slit supersonic jet: isotopic symmetry breaking in the CH stretching manifold.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Melanie A; Savage, Chandra; Dong, Feng; Sharp-Williams, Erin N; McCoy, Anne B; Nesbitt, David J

    2012-06-21

    First high-resolution infrared absorption spectra in the fundamental symmetric/asymmetric CH stretching region of isotopically substituted methyl radical, CH(2)D, are reported and analyzed. These studies become feasible in the difference frequency spectrometer due to (i) high density radical generation via dissociative electron attachment to CH(2)DI in a discharge, (ii) low rotational temperatures (23 K) from supersonic cooling in a slit expansion, (iii) long absorption path length (64 cm) along the slit axes, and (iv) near shot noise limited absorption sensitivity (5 × 10(-7)/√(Hz)). The spectra are fully rovibrationally resolved and fit to an asymmetric top rotational Hamiltonian to yield rotational/centrifugal constants and vibrational band origins. In addition, the slit expansion collisionally quenches the transverse velocity distribution along the laser probe direction, yielding sub-Doppler resolution of spin-rotation structure and even partial resolution of nuclear hyperfine structure for each rovibrational line. Global least-squares fits to the line shapes provide additional information on spin-rotation and nuclear hyperfine constants, which complement and clarify previous FTIR studies [K. Kawaguchi, Can. J. Phys. 79, 449 (2001)] of CH(2)D in the out-of-plane bending region. Finally, analysis of the spectral data from the full isotopomeric CH(m)D(3-m) series based on harmonically coupled Morse oscillators establishes a predictive framework for describing the manifold of planar stretching vibrations in this fundamental combustion radical.

  10. Boundary-value problem for a counterrotating electrical discharge in an axial magnetic field. [plasma centrifuge for isotope separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. H.; Wilhelm, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    An electrical discharge between two ring electrodes embedded in the mantle of a cylindrical chamber is considered, in which the plasma in the anode and cathode regions rotates in opposite directions under the influence of an external axial magnetic field. The associated boundary-value problem for the coupled partial differential equations describing the azimuthal velocity and radial current-density fields is solved in closed form. The velocity, current density, induced magnetic induction, and electric fields are presented for typical Hartmann numbers, magnetic Reynolds numbers, and geometry parameters. The discharge is shown to produce anodic and cathodic plasma sections rotating at speeds of the order 1,000,000 cm/sec for conventional magnetic field intensities. Possible application of the magnetoactive discharge as a plasma centrifuge for isotope separation is discussed.

  11. METHOD OF CENTRIFUGE OPERATION

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, K.

    1960-05-10

    A method of isotope separation is described in which two streams are flowed axially of, and countercurrently through, a cylindrical centrifuge bowl. Under the influence of a centrifugal field, the light fraction is concentrated in a stream flowing through the central portion of the bowl, whereas the heavy fraction is concentrated in a stream at the periphery thereof.

  12. Stretch Marks

    MedlinePlus

    ... like during puberty), that person may get fine lines on the body called stretch marks. Stretch marks happen when the skin is pulled by rapid growth or stretching. Although the skin is usually fairly elastic, when it's overstretched, the normal production of collagen (the major protein that makes up ...

  13. Centrifuge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sartory, Walter K.; Eveleigh, John W.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for operating a continuous flow blood separation centrifuge are provided. The hematocrit of the entrant whole blood is continuously maintained at an optimum constant value by the addition of plasma to the entrant blood. The hematocrit of the separated red cells is monitored to indicate the degree of separation taking place, thereby providing a basis for regulating the flow through the centrifuge.

  14. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-09

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  15. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, L.S.; Leonard, R.A.

    1993-10-19

    A method is described for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor. 6 figures.

  16. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Lorac S.; Leonard, Ralph A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor.

  17. Gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bogovalov, S.V.; Kislov, V.A.; Tronin, I.V.

    2015-03-10

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarisation and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modelling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  18. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants DJ or ΔJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Dror M.; Walker, Nicholas R.; Legon, Anthony C.

    2016-02-01

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ e or ΔJ e , the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ e or ΔJ e for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ 0 or ΔJ 0 for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ˜ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  19. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants D(J) or Δ(J).

    PubMed

    Bittner, Dror M; Walker, Nicholas R; Legon, Anthony C

    2016-02-21

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ (e) or ΔJ (e), the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ (e) or ΔJ (e) for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ (0) or ΔJ (0) for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ∼ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  20. Gas centrifuge purge method

    DOEpatents

    Theurich, Gordon R.

    1976-01-01

    1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

  1. Stretching Safely and Effectively

    MedlinePlus

    ... that stretching immediately before an event weakens hamstring strength. Instead of static stretching, try performing a "dynamic ... Acute effects of static vs. ballistic stretching on strength and muscular fatigue of ballet dancers and resistance- ...

  2. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  3. Get up and Stretch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crupi, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Daily stretching has many benefits for one's body. It can relieve stress and tension, it increases flexibility and it can help prevent injuries. There are many stretching exercises that a teacher can do with his or her students to help promote daily stretching routines. In this article, the author presents several stretching exercises and some…

  4. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  5. Liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-03-11

    The performance of liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning is examined for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste Program currently under study at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Centrifugation might have application for the separation of the LiF-BeF{sub 2} salt from heavier radioactive materials fission product and actinides in the separation of fission product from actinides, in the isotope separation of fission-product cesium before transmutation of the {sup 137}Cs and {sup 135}Cs, and in the removal of spallation product from the liquid lead target. It is found that useful chemical separations should be possible using existing materials for the centrifuge construction for all four cases with the actinide fraction in fission product perhaps as low as 1 part in 10{sup 7} and the fraction of {sup 137}CS in {sup 133}Cs being as low as a few parts in 10{sup 5}. A centrifuge cascade has the advantage that it can be assembled and operated as a completely closed system without a waste stream except that associated with maintenance or replacement of centrifuge components.

  6. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  7. Stretched Wire Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Gordon; /SLAC

    2005-09-06

    Stretched wires are beginning to play an important role in the alignment of accelerators and synchrotron light sources. Stretched wires are proposed for the alignment of the 130 meter long LCLS undulator. Wire position technology has reached sub-micron resolution yet analyses of perturbations to wire straightness are hard to find. This paper considers possible deviations of stretched wire from the simple 2-dimensional catenary form.

  8. The American Gas Centrifuge Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Dean

    2004-09-15

    The art of gas centrifugation was born in 1935 at the University of Virginia when Dr. Jesse Beams demonstrated experimentally the separation of chlorine isotopes using an ultra-high speed centrifuge. Dr. Beam’s experiment initiated work that created a rich history of scientific and engineering accomplishment in the United States in the art of isotope separation and even large scale biological separation by centrifugation. The early history of the gas centrifuge development was captured in a lecture and documented by Dr. Jesse Beams in 1975. Much of Dr. Beams lecture material is used in this paper up to the year 1960. Following work by Dr. Gernot Zippe at the University of Virginia between 1958 and 1960, the US government embarked on a centrifuge development program that ultimately led to the start of construction of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant in Piketon Ohio in the late 1970’s. The government program was abandoned in 1985 after investing in the construction of two of six planned process buildings, a complete supply chain for process and centrifuge parts, and the successful manufacture and brief operation of an initial complement of production machines that would have met 15 percent of the planned capacity of the constructed process buildings. A declining market for enriched uranium, a glut of uranium enrichment capacity worldwide, and the promise of a new laser based separation process factored in the decision to stop the government program. By the late 1990’s it had become evident that gas centrifugation held the best promise to produce enriched uranium at low cost. In1999, the United States Enrichment Corporation undertook an initiative to revive the best of the American centrifuge technology that had been abandoned fourteen years earlier. This is an exciting story and one that when complete will enable the United States to maintain its domestic supply and to be highly competitive in the world market for this important energy commodity. (auth)

  9. Centrifugal main fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.F.

    1986-08-26

    For a gas turbine power plant having a fuel supply and a fuel metering valve and variable geometry for the power plant including servo actuating mechanisms for the fuel metering valve and variable geometry, a fuel pumping system, is described to supply pressurized fuel for the servo actuating mechanisms and for the engine working fluid medium. The pumping system includes a centrifugal pump solely supplying the fuel to the fuel metering valve to be delivered to the power plant for its working fluid medium, a positive displacement pump in parallel with the centrifugal pump and solely to supply pressurized fuel to the servo actuating mechanisms for the fuel metering valve and for the variable geometry, and a boost pump means disposed in serial relationship with the positive displacement pump and the centrifugal pump for augmenting the pressure supplied by the positive displacement pump and the centrifugal pump during predetermined operating conditions of the power plant. The combined boost pump and centrifugal pump capability is sufficient to satisfy the vapor to liquid ratio requirements of the power during its entire operating envelope.

  10. Stretching: Does It Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  11. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  12. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  13. Geotechnical centrifuge under construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Modifications are underway at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in California to transform a centrifuge used in the Apollo space program to the largest geotechnical centrifuge in the free world. The centrifuge, to be finished in August and opened next January, following check out and tuning, will enable geoscientists to model stratigraphic features down to 275 m below the earth's surface. Scientists will be able to model processes that are coupled with body force loading, including earthquake response of earth structures and soil structure interaction; rubbled-bed behavior during in situ coal gasification or in oil shale in situ retorts; behavior of frozen soil; frost heave; behavior of offshore structures; wave-seabed interactions; explosive cratering; and blast-induced liquefaction.The centrifuge will have a load capacity of 900-g-tons (short); that is, it will be able to carry a net soil load of 3 short tons to a centripetal acceleration of 300 times the acceleration caused by gravity. Modified for a total cost of $2.4 million, the centrifuge will have an arm with a 7.6-m radius and a swinging platform or bucket at its end that will be able to carry a payload container measuring 2.1×2.1 m. An additional future input of $500,000 would enable the purchase of a larger bucket that could accommodate a load of up to 20 tons, according to Charles Babendreier, program director for geotechnical engineering at the National Science Foundation. Additional cooling for the motor would also be required. The centrifuge has the capability of accelerating the 20-ton load to 100 g.

  14. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  15. Enhancing Centrifugal Separation With Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Separation of biological cells by coil-planet centrifuge enhanced by electrophoresis. By itself, coil-planet centrifuge offers relatively gentle method of separating cells under low centrifugal force in physiological medium that keeps cells alive. With addition of voltage gradient to separation column of centrifuge, separation still gentle but faster and more complete. Since separation apparatus contains no rotary seal, probability of leakage, contamination, corrosion, and short circuits reduced.

  16. The Human Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jack J. W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Life on Earth has developed at unit gravity, 9.81 m/s2, which was a major factor especially when vertebrates emerged from water onto land in the late Devonian, some 375 million years ago. But how would nature have evolved on a larger planet? We are able to address this question simply in experiments using centrifuges. Based on these studies we have gained valuable insights in the physiological process in plants and animals. They adapt to a new steady state suitable for the high-g environments applied. Information on mammalian adaptations to hyper-g is interesting or may be even vital for human space exploration programs. It has been shown in long duration animal hypergravity studies, ranging from snails, rats to primates, that various structures like muscles, bones, neuro-vestibular, or the cardio-vascular system are affected. However, humans have never been exposed to a hyper-g environment for long durations. Centrifuge studies involving humans are mostly in the order of hours. The current work on human centrifuges are all focused on short arm systems to apply short periods of artificial gravity in support of long duration space missions in ISS or to Mars. In this paper we will address the possible usefulness of a large human centrifuge on Earth. In such a centrifuge a group of humans can be exposed to hypergravity for, in principle, an unlimited period of time like living on a larger planet. The input from a survey under scientists working in the field of gravitational physiology, but also other disciplines, will be discussed.

  17. Triceps stretch (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder. Hold for 10 to 20 seconds, then switch sides. Alternate method: raise your arm over your ... elbow. Hold for 10 to 20 seconds, then switch sides. You should feel either of these stretches ...

  18. Centrifugally decoupling touchdown bearings

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2014-06-24

    Centrifugally decoupling mechanical bearing systems provide thin tensioned metallic ribbons contained in a support structure. This assembly rotates around a stationary shaft being centered at low speeds by the action of the metal ribbons. Tension springs are connected on one end to the ribbons and on the other end to the support structure. The ribbons pass through slots in the inner ring of the support structure. The spring preloading thus insures contact (or near-contact) between the ribbons and the shaft at rotation speeds below the transition speed. Above this speed, however, the centrifugal force on the ribbons produces a tensile force on them that exceeds the spring tensile force so that the ribbons curve outward, effectively decoupling them from mechanical contact with the shaft. They still remain, however, in position to act as a touchdown bearing in case of abnormally high transverse accelerations.

  19. Centrifugal pump fuel system

    SciTech Connect

    McGlone, M.E.; Larkins, L.J.; Johnson, R.O.; Moeller, K.A.

    1993-06-22

    A centrifugal pump fuel system for an engine driven fuel pump for an aircraft gas turbine engine is described comprising: a centrifugal pump having at constant speed rising head/flow characteristic at low flows; a plumbing system receiving flow from the pump, and having at least one control valve located down stream of and defining a discrete volume of the plumbing system; a plumbing resonant frequency defined by the discrete volume, the geometry of the plumbing system, and the bulk modulus of the fuel; a pressure difference regulating valve located adjacent to the discharge of the pump, up stream of the vast majority of the discrete volume; and the frequency response of the regulating valve being significantly less than the frequency response of the plumbing system such that the response of the regulating valve is attenuated at the resonant frequency of the plumbing system.

  20. Centrifugal unbalance detection system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Reeves, George; Mets, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A system consisting of an accelerometer sensor attached to a centrifuge enclosure for sensing vibrations and outputting a signal in the form of a sine wave with an amplitude and frequency that is passed through a pre-amp to convert it to a voltage signal, a low pass filter for removing extraneous noise, an A/D converter and a processor and algorithm for operating on the signal, whereby the algorithm interprets the amplitude and frequency associated with the signal and once an amplitude threshold has been exceeded the algorithm begins to count cycles during a predetermined time period and if a given number of complete cycles exceeds the frequency threshold during the predetermined time period, the system shuts down the centrifuge.

  1. Centrifugal adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Tsao, Yow-Min D. (Inventor); Lee, Wenshan (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A gas-liquid separator uses a helical passageway to impart a spiral motion to a fluid passing therethrough. The centrifugal force generated by the spiraling motion urges the liquid component of the fluid radially outward which forces the gas component radially inward. The gas component is then separated through a gas-permeable, liquid-impervious membrane and discharged through a central passageway. A filter material captures target substances contained in the fluid.

  2. Oscillatory counter-centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shujing; Nadim, Ali

    2016-02-01

    In ordinary centrifugation, a suspended particle that is heavier than the displaced fluid migrates away from the rotation axis when the fluid-filled container rotates steadily about that axis. In contrast a particle that is lighter than the displaced fluid (e.g., a bubble) migrates toward the rotation axis in a centrifuge. In this paper, we show theoretically that if a fluid-filled container rotates in an oscillatory manner as a rigid body about an axis, at high enough oscillation frequencies, the sense of migration of suspended particles is reversed. That is, in that case particles denser than the fluid migrate inward, while those that are lighter than the fluid move outward. We term this unusual phenomenon "Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation" or OCC, for short. Through application of the method of averaging to the equations of motion, we derive a simple criterion to predict the occurrence of OCC. The analysis also reveals that the time-average of the Coriolis force in the radial direction is the term that is responsible for this effect. In addition, we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Rubinow-Keller lift force on particle trajectories and find that OCC persists even when these forces are active. The phenomenon awaits experimental verification.

  3. Gas Centrifuges and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, David

    2004-09-15

    Gas centrifuges have been an ideal enrichment method for a wide variety of countries. Many countries have built gas centrifuges to make enriched uranium for peaceful nuclear purposes. Other countries have secretly sought centrifuges to make highly enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. In more recent times, several countries have secretly sought or built gas centrifuges in regions of tension. The main countries that have been of interest in the last two decades have been Pakistan, Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. Currently, most attention is focused on Iran, Pakistan, and North Korea. These states did not have the indigenous abilities to make gas centrifuges, focusing instead on illicit and questionable foreign procurement. The presentation covered the following main sections: Spread of centrifuges through illicit procurement; Role of export controls in stopping proliferation; Increasing the transparency of gas centrifuge programs in non-nuclear weapon states; and, Verified dismantlement of gas centrifuge programs. Gas centrifuges are important providers of low enriched uranium for civil nuclear power reactors. They also pose special nuclear proliferation risks. We all have special responsibilities to prevent the spread of gas centrifuges into regions of tension and to mitigate the consequences of their spread into the Middle East, South Asia, and North Asia.

  4. Optimizing the separation performance of a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, H. G.

    1997-11-01

    Gas centrifuges were originally developed for the enrichment of U^235 from naturally occurring uranium for the purpose of providing fuel for nuclear power reactors and material for nuclear weapons. This required the separation of a binary mixture composed of U^235 and U^238. Since the end of the cold war, a surplus of enriched uranium exists on the world market, but many centrifuge plants exist in numerous countries. These circumstances together with the growing demand for stable isotopes for chemical and physical research and in medical science has led to the exploration of alternate applications of gas centrifuge technology. In order to acieve these multi-component separations, existing centrifuges must be modified or new centrifuges must be designed. In either case, it is important to have models of the internal flow fields to predict the separation performance and algorithms to seek the optimal operating conditions of the centrifuges. Here, we use the Onsager pancake model of the internal flow field, and we present an optimization strategy which exploits a similarity parameter in the pancake model. Numerical examples will be presented.

  5. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Stepan; Bradley G. Stevens; Melanie D. Hetland

    1999-10-01

    The overall project consists of several integrated research phases related to the applicability, continued development, demonstration, and commercialization of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration process. Work performed during this reporting period consisted of Phase 2 evaluation of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration technology and Phase 3, Technology Partnering. During Phase 1 testing conducted at the EERC using the SpinTek ST-IIL unit operating on a surrogate tank waste, a solids cake developed on the membrane surface. The solids cake was observed where linear membrane velocities were less than 17.5 ft/s and reduced the unobstructed membrane surface area up to 25%, reducing overall filtration performance. The primary goal of the Phase 2 research effort was to enhance filtration performance through the development and testing of alternative turbulence promoter designs. The turbulence promoters were designed to generate a shear force across the entire membrane surface sufficient to maintain a self-cleaning membrane capability and improve filtration efficiency and long-term performance. Specific Phase 2 research activities included the following: System modifications to accommodate an 11-in.-diameter, two-disk rotating membrane assembly; Development and fabrication of alternative turbulence promoter designs; Testing and evaluation of the existing and alternative turbulence promoters under selected operating conditions using a statistically designed test matrix; and Data reduction and analysis; The objective of Phase 3 research was to demonstrate the effectiveness of SpinTek's centrifugal membrane filtration as a pretreatment to remove suspended solids from a liquid waste upstream of 3M's WWL cartridge technology for the selective removal of technetium (Tc).

  6. Stretch That Budget!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John R.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses ways in which industrial education teachers can stretch their budgets, which include reducing waste to a minimum, keeping an accurate and up-to-date inventory, trading surplus or excess materials with neighboring schools, and planning programs more carefully. Money-saving tips concerned with metals, plastics, woods, and printing are also…

  7. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  8. National geotechnical centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, J. A.; Kunz, N.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    A high G-ton centrifuge, able to take a 2700 kg (6000 lb) payload up to 300 G, is described. The stability of dams and embankments, the bearing capacity of soil foundations, and the dynamic behavior of foundations due to vibration of machinery are examples of applications. A power rating of 6,000 kW (9,000 hp) was established for the motor. An acceptable maximum speed of 70 rpm was determined. A speed increase with a ratio of 1:3 is discussed. The isolated tension straps, the anti-spreader bar and the flexwall bucket, and safety precautions are also discussed.

  9. Centrifugal-reciprocating compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor is described which includes at least one pair of cylinders arranged in coaxial alignment and supported for angular displacement about a common axis of rotation normally disecting a common longitudinal axis of symmetry for the cylinders. The cylinders are characterized by ported closures located at the mutually remote ends thereof through which the cylinders are charged and discharged, and a pair of piston heads seated within the cylinders and supported for floating displacement in compressive strokes in response to unidirectional angular displacement imparted to the cylinders.

  10. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  11. Centrifugal precipitation chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoichiro; Qi, Lin

    2010-01-15

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography separates analytes according their solubility in ammonium sulfate (AS) solution and other precipitants. The separation column is made from a pair of long spiral channels partitioned with a semipermeable membrane. In a typical separation, concentrated ammonium sulfate is eluted through one channel while water is eluted through the other channel in the opposite direction. This countercurrent process forms an exponential AS concentration gradient through the water channel. Consequently, protein samples injected into the water channel is subjected to a steadily increasing AS concentration and at the critical AS concentration they are precipitated and deposited in the channel bed by the centrifugal force. Then the chromatographic separation is started by gradually reducing the AS concentration in the AS channel which lowers the AS gradient concentration in the water channel. This results in dissolution of deposited proteins which are again precipitated at an advanced critical point as they move through the channel. Consequently, proteins repeat precipitation and dissolution through a long channel and finally eluted out from the column in the order of their solubility in the AS solution. The present method has been successfully applied to a number of analytes including human serum proteins, recombinant ketosteroid isomerase, carotenoid cleavage enzymes, plasmid DNA, polysaccharide, polymerized pigments, PEG-protein conjugates, etc. The method is capable to single out the target species of proteins by affinity ligand or immunoaffinity separation.

  12. Stretching & Flexibility: An Interactive Encyclopedia of Stretching. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This CD-ROM offers 140 different stretches in full-motion video sequences. It focuses on the proper techniques for overall physical fitness, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 23 different sports (e.g., golf, running, soccer, skiing, climbing, football, and baseball). Topics include stretching for sports; stretching awareness and education…

  13. Centrifuge treatment of coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Kazak; V.Z. Kaidalov; L.F. Syrova; O.S. Miroshnichenko; A.S. Minakov

    2009-07-15

    New technology is required for the removal of water and heavy fractions from regular coal tar. Centrifuges offer the best option. Purification of coal tar by means of centrifuges at OAO NLMK permits the production of pitch coke or electrode pitch that complies with current standards.

  14. Unshrouded Centrifugal Turbopump Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prueger, George; Williams, Morgan; Chen, Wei; Paris, John; Stewart, Eric; Williams, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The ratio of rocket engine thrust to weight is a limiting constraint in placing more payload into orbit at a low cost. A key component of an engine's overall weight is the turbopump weight, Reducing the turbopump weight can result in significant engine weight reduction and hence, increased delivered payload. There are two main types of pumps: centrifugal and axial pumps. These types of pumps can be further sub-divided into those with shrouds and those without shrouds (unshrouded pumps). Centrifugal pumps can achieve the same pump discharge pressure as an axial pump and it requires fewer pump stages and lower pump weight than an axial pump. Also, with unshrouded centrifugal pumps (impeller), the number of stages and weight can be further reduced. However. there are several issues with regard to using an unshrouded impeller: 1) there is a pump performance penalty due to the front open face recirculation flow; 2) there is a potential pump axial thrust problem from the unbalanced front open face and the back shroud face; and, 3) since test data is very linu'ted for this configuration, there is uncertainty in the magnitude and phase of the rotordynamics forces due to the front impeller passage. The purpose of the paper is to discuss the design of an unshrouded impeller and to examine the design's hydrodynamic performance, axial thrust, and rotordynamics performance. The design methodology will also be discussed. This work will help provide some guidelines for unshrouded impeller design. In particular, the paper will discuss the design of three unshrouded impellers - one with 5 full and 5 partial blades (5+5). one with 6+6 blades and one with 8+8 blades. One of these designs will be selected for actual fabrication and flow test. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to help design and optimize the unshrouded impeller. The relative pump performance penalty is assessed by comparing the CFD results of the unshrouded impeller with the equivalent shrouded impeller for a

  15. Stretch-Oriented Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Klinedinst, D.; Feuz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Two thermoplastic polyimides - one amorphous, the other crystallizable -- were subjected to isothermal stretching just above their glass transition temperatures. Room-temperature strengths in the stretch direction were greatly improved and, moduli increased up to 3.6-fold. Optimum stretching conditions were determined.

  16. Rat growth during chronic centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Oyama, J.

    1978-01-01

    Female weanling rats were chronically centrifuged at 4.15 G with controls at terrestrial gravity. Samples were sacrificed for body composition studies at 0, 28, 63, 105 and 308 days of centrifugation. The centrifuged group approached a significantly lower mature body mass than the controls (251 and 318g) but the rate of approach was the same in both groups. Retirement to 1G on the 60th day resulted in complete recovery. Among individual components muscle, bone, skin, CNS, heart, kidneys, body water and body fat were changed in the centrifuged group. However, an analysis of the growth of individual components relative to growth of the total fat-free compartment revealed that only skin (which increased in mass) was responding to centrifugation per se.

  17. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  18. Immunoaffinity centrifugal precipitation chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lin; Ito, Yoichiro

    2007-06-01

    Purification of proteins based on immunoaffinity has been performed using a solid support coated with antibody against the target proteins. The method requires immobilizing the antibody onto the solid support using protein A or G, and has a risk of adsorptive loss of target proteins onto the solid support. Centrifugal precipitation chromatography has been successfully used to purify enzymes, such as ketosteroid isomerase and hyaluronidase without the use of solid support. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that immunoaffinity centrifugal precipitation chromatography is capable of isolating an antigen by exploiting antigen-antibody binding. The separation was initiated by filling both channels with 40% saturated ammonium sulfate (AS) of pH 4-4.5 followed by loading 20 microl of human plasma (National Institutes of Health blood bank) mixed with 2 mg of rabbit anti-HSA (human serum protein) antibody (Sigma). Then, the sample channel was eluted with water at 0.03 ml/min and AS channel with 40% AS solution of pH 4-4.5 at 1 ml/min until all non-binding components were eluted. Then, the releasing reagent (50% AS solution containing 0.5 M glycine and 10% ammonium hydroxide at pH 10) was introduced through the AS channel to release the target protein (HSA). The retained antibody was recovered by eluting the sample channel with water at 1 ml/min. A hollow fiber membrane device at the outlet (MicroKros, Spectrum, New Brunswick, NJ, USA) was provided on-line dialysis of the eluent before fractions were collected, so that the fractions could be analyzed by SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) without further dialysis. The current method does not require immobilizing the antibody onto a matrix, which is used by the conventional immunoaffinity chromatography. This method ensures full recovery of the antigen and antibody, and it may be applied to purification of other proteins.

  19. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  20. HOUSINGS AND MOUNTINGS FOR CENTRIFUGES

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-08-16

    A protective housing for a gas centrifuge comprises a slidable connection between flanges and framework portions for absorbing rotational energy in case of bursting of the rotor and a sealing means for sealing the rotor chamber.

  1. Centrifugal dryers keep pace with the market

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-03-15

    New plant design and upgrades create a shift in dewatering strategies. The article describes recent developments. Three major manufacturers supply centrifugal dryers - TEMA, Centrifugal & Mechanical Industries (CMI) and Ludowici. CMI introduced a line of vertical centrifugal dryers. TEMA improved the techniques by developing a horizontal vibratory centrifuge (HVC) which simplified maintenance. 3 figs., 1 photo.

  2. Microwave assisted centrifuge and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    Centrifuge samples may be exposed to microwave energy to heat the samples during centrifugation and to promote separation of the different components or constituents of the samples using a centrifuge device configured for generating microwave energy and directing the microwave energy at a sample located in the centrifuge.

  3. Variable-Speed Instrumented Centrifuges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, David K.; Brown, Allan H.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes conceptual pair of centrifuges, speed of which varied to produce range of artificial gravities in zero-gravity environment. Image and data recording and controlled temperature and gravity provided for 12 experiments. Microprocessor-controlled centrifuges include video cameras to record stop-motion images of experiments. Potential applications include studies of effect of gravity on growth and on production of hormones in corn seedlings, experiments with magnetic flotation to separate cells, and electrophoresis to separate large fragments of deoxyribonucleic acid.

  4. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  5. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    William A. Greene; Patricia A. Kirk; Richard Hayes; Joshua Riley

    2005-10-28

    SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, has engineered and developed a system for use within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. SpinTek II High Shear Rotary Membrane Filtration System is a unique compact crossflow membrane system that has large, demonstrable advantages in performance and cost compared to currently available systems: (1) High fluid shear prevents membrane fouling even with very high solids content; hazardous and radioactive components can be concentrated to the consistency of a pasty slurry without fouling. (2) Induced turbulence and shear across the membrane increases membrane flux by a factor of ten over existing systems and allows operation on fluids not otherwise treatable. (3) Innovative ceramic membrane and mechanical sealing technology eliminates compatibility problems with aggressive DOE waste streams. (4) System design allows rapid, simple disassembly for inspection or complete decontamination. (5) Produces colloidal- and suspended-solids-free filtrate without the addition of chemicals. The first phase of this project (PRDA maturity stage 5) completed the physical scale-up of the SpinTek unit and verified successful scale-up with surrogate materials. Given successful scale-up and DOE concurrence, the second phase of this project (PRDA maturity stage 6) will provide for the installation and

  6. Centrifuge-Based Fluidic Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoval, Jim; Jia, Guangyao; Kido, Horacio; Kim, Jitae; Kim, Nahui; Madou, Marc

    In this chapter centrifuge-based microfluidic platforms are reviewed and compared with other popular microfluidic propulsion methods. The underlying physical principles of centrifugal pumping in microfluidic systems are presented and the various centrifuge fluidic functions such as valving, decanting, calibration, mixing, metering, heating, sample splitting, and separation are introduced. Those fluidic functions have been combined with analytical measurements techniques such as optical imaging, absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to make the centrifugal platform a powerful solution for medical and clinical diagnostics and high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery. Applications of a compact disc (CD)-based centrifuge platform analyzed in this review include: two-point calibration of an optode-based ion sensor, an automated immunoassay platform, multiple parallel screening assays and cellular-based assays. The use of modified commercial CD drives for high-resolution optical imaging is discussed as well. From a broader perspective, we compare the technical barriers involved in applying microfluidics for sensing and diagnostic as opposed to applying such techniques to HTS. The latter poses less challenges and explains why HTS products based on a CD fluidic platform are already commercially available, while we might have to wait longer to see commercial CD-based diagnostics.

  7. Hemolysis in different centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Kawahito, K; Nosé, Y

    1997-04-01

    Different types of centrifugal pumps cause different amounts of hemolysis based on shear stress and blood exposure time. However, the hemolytic characteristics of centrifugal pumps in each clinical condition are not always clear. We compared the hemolytic characteristics of one cone-type centrifugal pump (Medtronic BioMedicus BP-80) and 2 impeller-type centrifugal pumps (Nikkiso HMS-12 and Terumo Capiox) under experimental conditions simulating their use in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) as well as their use as left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). The normalized indexes of hemolysis (NIHs; grams free plasma hemoglobin per 100 L blood pumped) during use as LVADs were not significantly different among the 3 pumps. The BP-80 pump produced almost 3-fold more hemolysis than the HMS-12 and Capiox pumps during CPB, 3- to 4-fold more hemolysis during ECMO, and 5.5-fold more hemolysis during PCPS. The 2 impeller-type centrifugal pumps will therefore cause less hemolysis under high flow, high pressure difference (as in CPB) and low flow, high pressure difference (as in ECMO and PCPS) conditions than the cone-type pump.

  8. Centrifugal slip casting of components

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlage, G.A.; Roeder, R.K.; Trumble, K.P.; Bowman, K.J.

    1996-05-01

    Research in layered and functionally gradient materials has emerged because of the increasing demand for high-performance engineering materials. Many techniques have been used to produce layered and functionally gradient components. Common examples include thermal spray processing, powder processing, chemical and physical vapor deposition, high-temperature or combustion synthesis, diffusion treatments, microwave processing and infiltration. Of these techniques, powder processing routes offer excellent microstructural control and product quality, and they are capable of producing large components. Centrifugal slip casting is a powder-processing technique combining the effects of slip casting and centrifugation. In slip casting, consolidation takes place as fluid is removed by the porous mold. Particles within the slip move with the suspending fluid until reaching the mold wall, at which point they are consolidated. In centrifugation, particles within the slip move through the fluid at a rate dependent upon the gravitational force and particle drag.

  9. To stretch or not to stretch: the role of stretching in injury prevention and performance.

    PubMed

    McHugh, M P; Cosgrave, C H

    2010-04-01

    Stretching is commonly practiced before sports participation; however, effects on subsequent performance and injury prevention are not well understood. There is an abundance of literature demonstrating that a single bout of stretching acutely impairs muscle strength, with a lesser effect on power. The extent to which these effects are apparent when stretching is combined with other aspects of a pre-participation warm-up, such as practice drills and low intensity dynamic exercises, is not known. With respect to the effect of pre-participation stretching on injury prevention a limited number of studies of varying quality have shown mixed results. A general consensus is that stretching in addition to warm-up does not affect the incidence of overuse injuries. There is evidence that pre-participation stretching reduces the incidence of muscle strains but there is clearly a need for further work. Future prospective randomized studies should use stretching interventions that are effective at decreasing passive resistance to stretch and assess effects on subsequent injury incidence in sports with a high prevalence of muscle strains.

  10. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-05-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  11. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-04-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  12. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  13. Dynamic stretching and golf swing performance.

    PubMed

    Moran, K A; McGrath, T; Marshall, B M; Wallace, E S

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of dynamic stretching, static stretching and no stretching, as part of a general warm-up, on golf swing performance with a five-iron. Measures of performance were taken 0 min, 5 min, 15 min and 30 min after stretching. Dynamic stretching produced significantly greater club head speeds than both static stretching (Delta=1.9m.s (-1); p=0.000) and no stretching (Delta=1.7 m.s (-1); p=0.000), and greater ball speeds than both static stretching (Delta=3.5m.s (-1); p=0.003) and no stretching (Delta=3.3m.s (-1); p=0.001). Dynamic stretching produced significantly straighter swing-paths than both static stretching (Delta=-0.61 degrees , p=0.000) and no stretching (Delta=-0.72 degrees , p=0.01). Dynamic stretching also produced more central impact points than the static stretch (Delta=0.7 cm, p=0.001). For the club face angle, there was no effect of either stretch or time. For all of the variables measured, there was no significant difference between the static stretch and no stretch conditions. All of the results were unaffected by the time of measurement after stretching. The results indicate that dynamic stretching should be used as part of a general warm-up in golf.

  14. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the status of the Centrifuge Facility being developed by ARC for flight on the International Space Station Alpha. The assessment includes technical status, schedules, budgets, project management, performance of facility relative to science requirements, and identifies risks and issues that need to be considered in future development activities.

  15. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Laurence R.

    1994-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility Project at ARC was reviewed by a code U team to determine appropriateness adequacy for the ISSA. This report represents the findings of one consultant to this team and concentrates on scientific and technical risks. This report supports continuation of the project to the next phase of development.

  16. Axial-Centrifugal Compressor Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    We also wish to thank Robert Langworthy of the Eustis Directorate for his timely assistance and constructive guidance. 3, INj TABLE OF CONTENTS Page...34 PREFACE 3 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS ..................... 7 LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 INTRODUCTIONB...Blow Test. 132 Axial IGV Blow Test . . . . . . . . ........... 141 PMIZ ?crn AM BLANK-NOT 1=43D TABLE OF CONTENTS - Continued Centrifugal Compressor

  17. Centrifugal pumps for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. E.; Farquhar, J.

    1974-01-01

    The use of centrifugal pumps for rocket engines is described in terms of general requirements of operational and planned systems. Hydrodynamic and mechanical design considerations and techniques and test procedures are summarized. Some of the pump development experiences, in terms of both problems and solutions, are highlighted.

  18. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    PubMed Central

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression maneuvers. After pressure equilibration cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics. PMID:25664452

  19. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  20. Strain softening in stretched DNA

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Binquan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2010-01-01

    The microscopic mechanics of DNA stretching was characterized using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. By employing an anisotropic pressure control method, realistic force-extension dependences of effectively infinite DNA molecules were obtained. A coexistence of B- and S-DNA domains was observed during the overstretching transition. The simulations revealed that strain softening may occur in the process of stretching torsionally constrained DNA. The latter observation was qualitatively reconciled with available experimental data using a random-field Ising model. PMID:18851334

  1. Design of a centrifugal blood pump: Heart Turcica Centrifugal.

    PubMed

    Demir, Onur; Biyikli, Emre; Lazoglu, Ismail; Kucukaksu, Suha

    2011-07-01

    A prototype of a new implantable centrifugal blood pump system named Heart Turcica Centrifugal (HTC) was developed as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) for the treatment of end-stage cardiac failure. In the development of HTC, effects of blade height and volute tongue profiles on the hydraulic and hemolytic performances of the pump were investigated. As a result, the prototype was manufactured using the best blade height and volute tongue profiles. Performance of the prototype model was experimentally evaluated in a closed-loop flow system using water as the medium. The hydraulic performance requirement of an LVAD (5 L/min flow rate against a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg) was attained at 2800 rpm rotational speed.

  2. Centrifugal separator devices, systems and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID; Law, Jack D [Pocatello, ID; Garn, Troy G [Idaho Falls, ID; Todd, Terry A [Aberdeen, ID; Macaluso, Lawrence L [Carson City, NV

    2012-03-20

    Centrifugal separator devices, systems and related methods are described. More particularly, fluid transfer connections for a centrifugal separator system having support assemblies with a movable member coupled to a connection tube and coupled to a fixed member, such that the movable member is constrained to movement along a fixed path relative to the fixed member are described. Also, centrifugal separator systems including such fluid transfer connections are described. Additionally, methods of installing, removing and/or replacing centrifugal separators from centrifugal separator systems are described.

  3. When to maintain centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Karassik, I.J.

    1993-04-01

    Centrifugal pumps comprise critical maintenance equipment. The rationale of when to maintain them relates to a spreading tendency to contain costs in the face of tight money. Plant managers are thus entitled to a thorough analysis of whether reduced expenditures truly lower costs or actually hinder maintenance and increase costs. Absence of such an analysis hides the fact that proper and timely maintenance has a double effect: it not only reduces power consumption but also extends equipment life, and thus reduces the frequency of labor and material expenditures for scheduled or crisis maintenance. Centrifugal pump maintenance can demonstrate well the validity of this observation. The paper discusses: restoring internal clearances; real cost of renewing clearances; and monitoring clearances and pump performance.

  4. Failure During Sheared Edge Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; van Tyne, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Failure during sheared edge stretching of sheet steels is a serious concern, especially in advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades. The shearing process produces a shear face and a zone of deformation behind the shear face, which is the shear-affected zone (SAZ). A failure during sheared edge stretching depends on prior deformation in the sheet, the shearing process, and the subsequent strain path in the SAZ during stretching. Data from laboratory hole expansion tests and hole extrusion tests for multiple lots of fourteen grades of steel were analyzed. The forming limit curve (FLC), regression equations, measurement uncertainty calculations, and difference calculations were used in the analyses. From these analyses, an assessment of the primary factors that contribute to the fracture during sheared edge stretching was made. It was found that the forming limit strain with consideration of strain path in the SAZ is a major factor that contributes to the failure of a sheared edge during stretching. Although metallurgical factors are important, they appear to play a somewhat lesser role.

  5. Electrokinetic Stretching of Tethered DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ferree, Sean; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2003-01-01

    During electrophoretic separations of DNA in a sieving medium, DNA molecules stretch from a compact coil into elongated conformations when encountering an obstacle and relax back to a coil upon release from the obstacle. These stretching dynamics are thought to play an important role in the separation mechanism. In this article we describe a silicon microfabricated device to measure the stretching of tethered DNA in electric fields. Upon application of an electric field, electro-osmosis generates bulk fluid flow in the device, and a protocol for eliminating this flow by attaching a polymer brush to all silicon oxide surfaces is shown to be effective. Data on the steady stretching of DNA in constant electric fields is presented. The data corroborate the approximate theory of hydrodynamic equivalence, indicating that DNA is not free-draining in the presence of both electric and nonelectric forces. Finally, these data provide the first quantitative test of a Stigter and Bustamante's detailed theory of electrophoretic stretching of DNA without adjustable parameters. The agreement between theory and experiment is good. PMID:14507716

  6. Development of Advanced Centrifugal Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.

    2009-09-30

    A CRADA project was performed between BNL and Flowserve, California, under the auspices of Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) with the DOE support. The purpose was to jointly support a team of Russian institutes led by Kurchatov Institute to develop technology to increase operating life of centrifugal pumps. The work was performed from March 1, 2002 to September 30, 2009. The project resulted in development and validation the total cost of the sub-contract with Kurchatov Institute was $700,000, with matching fund from the industrial partner, Flowserve. The technical objective of this project is to develop advanced centrifugal pumps for the power, petroleum, chemical and water services industries by increasing the reliability of pumping equipment without a corresponding increase in life cycle cost. This major market need can be served by developing centrifugal pumps that generate only modest forces on the mechanical system even when operating under significant off-design conditions. This project is focused towards understanding the origin of hydraulic forces (both radial and axial, steady and time-dependent) and to develop design options, which reduce these forces over a broad flow range. This focus will include the force generation due to cavitation inside the pump as the operating conditions extend to low suction pressures. The results of research will reduce the inception of cavitation that leads to surface erosion and to find passive method of reducing peaks in axial thrust during whole range of flow rates.

  7. Wrinkled flames and geometrical stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denet, Bruno; Joulin, Guy

    2011-07-01

    Localized wrinkles of thin premixed flames subject to hydrodynamic instability and geometrical stretch of uniform intensity (S) are studied. A stretch-affected nonlinear and nonlocal equation, derived from an inhomogeneous Michelson-Sivashinsky equation, is used as a starting point, and pole decompositions are used as a tool. Analytical and numerical descriptions of isolated (centered or multicrested) wrinkles with steady shapes (in a frame) and various amplitudes are provided; their number increases rapidly with 1/S>0. A large constant S>0 weakens or suppresses all localized wrinkles (the larger the wrinkles, the easier the suppression), whereas S<0 strengthens them; oscillations of S further restrict their existence domain. Self-similar evolutions of unstable many-crested patterns are obtained. A link between stretch, nonlinearity, and instability with the cutoff size of the wrinkles in turbulent flames is suggested. Open problems are evoked.

  8. Twinning of amphibian embryos by centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    In the frog Xenopus laevis, the dorsal structures of the embryonic body axis normally derive from the side of the egg opposite the side of sperm entry. However, if the uncleaved egg is inclined at lg or centrifuged in an inclined position, this topographic relationship is overridden: the egg makes its dorsal axial structures according to its orientation in the gravitational/centrifugal field, irrespective of the position of sperm entry. Certain conditions of centrifugation cause eggs to develop into conjoined twins with two sets of axial structures. A detailed analysis of twinning provided some insight into experimental axis orientation. First, as with single-axis embryos, both axes in twins are oriented according to the direction of centrifugation. One axis forms at the centripetal side of the egg and the other forms at the centrifugal side, even when the side of sperm entry is normal to the centrifugal force vector. Second, if eggs are centrifuged to give twins, but are inclined at lg to prevent post-centrifugation endoplasmic redistributions, only single-axis embryos develop. Thus, a second redistribution is required for high-frequency secondary axis formation. This can be accomplished by lg (as in the single centrifugations) or by a second centrifugation directed along the egg's animal-vegetal axis.

  9. A Purposeful Dynamic Stretching Routine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Craig; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stretching, which involves moving parts of the body and gradually increases range of motion, speed of movement, or both through controlled, sport-specific movements, has become the popular choice of pre-exercise warm-up. This type of warm-up has evolved to encompass several variations, but at its core is the principle theme that preparing…

  10. Iterated Stretching of Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Demekhin, Evgeny A.; Kalaidin, Evgeny

    1999-01-01

    We examine, with asymptotic analysis and numerical simulation, the iterated stretching dynamics of FENE and Oldroyd-B jets of initial radius r(sub 0), shear viscosity nu, Weissenberg number We, retardation number S, and capillary number Ca. The usual Rayleigh instability stretches the local uniaxial extensional flow region near a minimum in jet radius into a primary filament of radius [Ca(1 - S)/ We](sup 1/2)r(sub 0) between two beads. The strain-rate within the filament remains constant while its radius (elastic stress) decreases (increases) exponentially in time with a long elastic relaxation time 3We(r(sup 2, sub 0)/nu). Instabilities convected from the bead relieve the tension at the necks during this slow elastic drainage and trigger a filament recoil. Secondary filaments then form at the necks from the resulting stretching. This iterated stretching is predicted to occur successively to generate high-generation filaments of radius r(sub n), (r(sub n)/r(sub 0)) = square root of 2[r(sub n-1)/r(sub 0)](sup 3/2) until finite-extensibility effects set in.

  11. Three Fresh Exposures, Stretched Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been processed using a technique known as a decorrelation stretch to exaggerate the colors. The area in the image includes three holes created inside 'Endurance Crater' by Opportunity's rock abrasion tool between sols 143 and 148 (June 18 and June 23, 2004). Because color variations are so subtle in the pictured area, stretched images are useful for discriminating color differences that can alert scientists to compositional and textural variations. For example, without the exaggeration, no color difference would be discernable among the tailings left behind after the grinding of these holes, but in this stretched image, the tailings around 'London' (top) appear more red than those of the other holes ('Virginia,' middle, and 'Cobble Hill,' bottom). Scientists believe that is because the rock abrasion tool sliced through two 'blueberries,' or spherules (visible on the upper left and upper right sides of the circle). When the blades break up these spherules, composed of mostly gray hematite, the result is a bright red powder. In this image, you can see the rock layers that made the team want to grind holes in each identified layer. The top layer is yellowish red, the middle is yellowish green and the lower layer is green. Another advantage to viewing this stretched image is the clear detail of the distribution of the rock abrasion tool tailings (heading down-slope) and the differences in rock texture. This image was created using the 753-, 535- and 432-nanometer filters.

  12. CENTRIFUGES

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    Damping bearings for use on the shafts of an ultracentrifuge were designed which are capable of passing through critical angular speeds. The shaft extending from one end of the rotor is journaled in fixed-plain bearings mounted on annular resilient shock-absorbing elements to dampen small vibrations. The shaft at the other end of the rotor is journaled in two damper-bearing assemblies which are so spaced on the shaft that a vibration node can at no time exist at both bearing assemblies. These bearings are similar to the other bearings except that the bearing housings are slidably mounted on the supporting structure for movement transverse to the rotational axis of the rotor.

  13. Neuro-Motor Responses to Daily Centrifugation in Bed-Rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, Jeffery T.; Krnavek, Jody; Fisher, Elizibeth; Ford, George; Paloski, William H.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known from numerous space flight studies that exposure to micro-g produces both morphological and neural adaptations in the major postural muscles. However, the characteristics and mechanism of these changes, particularly when it may involve the central nervous system are not defined. Furthermore, it is not known what role unloading of the muscular system may have on central changes in sensorimotor function or if centrifugation along the +Gz direction (long body axis) can mitigate both the peripheral changes in muscle function and modification of the central changes in sensorimotor adaptation to the near weightless environment of space flight. The purpose of this specific effort was, therefore, to investigate the efficacy of artificial gravity (AG) as a method for maintaining sensorimotor function in micro-g. Eight male subjects were exposed to daily 1 hr centrifugation during a 21 day 6 degree head-down bed rest study. Seven controls were placed on the centrifuge without rotation. The radius and angular velocity of the centrifuge were adjusted such that each subject experienced a centripetal acceleration of 2.5g at the feet, and approximately 1.0g at the heart. Both the tendon (MSR) and functional stretch reflexes (FSR) were collected using an 80 lb. ft. servomotor controlled via position feedback to provide a dorsiflexion step input to elicit the MSR, and the same step input with a built in 3 sec hold to evoke the FSR. EMG data were obtained from the triceps surae. Supplementary torque, velocity and position data were collected with the EMG responses. All data were digitized and sampled at 4 kHz. Only the MSR data has been analyzed at this time, and preliminary results suggest that those subjects exposed to active centrifugation (treatment group) show only minor changes in MSR peak latency times, either as a function of time spent in bed rest or exposure to centrifugation, while the control subjects show delays in the MSR peak latencies that are

  14. Centrifugal separators and related devices and methods

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID; Law, Jack D [Pocatello, ID; Garn, Troy G [Idaho Falls, ID; Macaluso, Lawrence L [Carson City, NV; Todd, Terry A [Aberdeen, ID

    2012-03-06

    Centrifugal separators and related methods and devices are described. More particularly, centrifugal separators comprising a first fluid supply fitting configured to deliver fluid into a longitudinal fluid passage of a rotor shaft and a second fluid supply fitting sized and configured to sealingly couple with the first fluid supply fitting are described. Also, centrifugal separator systems comprising a manifold having a drain fitting and a cleaning fluid supply fitting are described, wherein the manifold is coupled to a movable member of a support assembly. Additionally, methods of cleaning centrifugal separators are described.

  15. Isotopically Modified Molybdenum: Production for Application in Nuclear Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. Yu.; Bonarev, A. K.; Sulaberidze, G. A.; Borisevich, V. D.; Kulikov, G. G.; Shmelev, A. N.

    The possibility to use the isotopically modified molybdenum as a constructive material for the fuel rods of light water and fast reactors is discussed. The calculations demonstrate that the isotopically modified molybdenum with an average neutron absorption cross-section comparable to that of zirconium can be obtained with the reasonable for practice cost by a cascade of gas centrifuges, specially designed for separation of non-uranium isotopes.

  16. Polymer network stretching during electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfeld, Israel; Arinstein, Arkadii; Fezzaa, Kamel; Rafailovich, Miriam; Zussman, Eyal

    2011-03-01

    Fast X-ray phase contrast imaging is used to observe the flow of a semi-dilute polyethylene oxide solution during electrospinning. Micron-size glass particles mixed in the polymer solution allow viewing of the jet flow field, and reveal a high-gradient flow that has both longitudinal and radial components that grow rapidly along the jet. The resulting hydrodynamic forces cause substantial longitudinal stretching and transversal contraction of the polymer network within the jet, as confirmed by random walk simulation and theoretical modeling. The polymer network therefore concentrates towards the jet center, and its conformation may transform from a free state to a fully-stretched state within a short distance from the jet start. We acknowledge the financial support of the United States - Israel Bi-National Science Foundation (grant 2006061).

  17. Jaw stretch reflexes in children.

    PubMed

    Finan, Donald S; Smith, Anne

    2005-07-01

    The substantial morphological transformations that occur during human development present the nervous system with a considerable challenge in terms of motor control. Variability of skilled motor performance is a hallmark of a developing system. In adults, the jaw stretch reflex contributes to the functional stability of the jaw. We have investigated the response properties of the jaw stretch reflex in two groups of young children and a group of young adults. Response latencies increased with development, and all age groups produced stimulus-magnitude-dependent increases in reflex gain and resulting biting force. Reflex gain was largest for the older children (9-10 years), yet net increases in resulting biting force were comparable across age groups. These data and earlier experiments suggest that oral sensorimotor pathways mature throughout childhood in concert with the continued acquisition of complex motor skills.

  18. Directly observed reversible shape changes and hemoglobin stratification during centrifugation of human and Amphiuma red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph F; Inoué, Shinya

    2006-02-21

    This paper describes changes that occur in human and Amphiuma red blood cells observed during centrifugation with a special microscope. Dilute suspensions of cells were layered, in a centrifuge chamber, above an osmotically matched dense solution, containing Nycodenz, Ficoll, or Percoll (Pharmacia) that formed a density gradient that allowed the cells to slowly settle to an equilibrium position. Biconcave human red blood cells moved downward at low forces with minimum wobble. The cells oriented vertically when the force field was increased and Hb sedimented as the lower part of each cell became bulged and assumed a "bag-like" shape. The upper centripetal portion of the cell became thinner and remained biconcave. These changes occurred rapidly and were completely reversible upon lowering the centrifugal force. Bag-shaped cells, upon touching red cells in rouleau, immediately reverted to biconcave disks as they flipped onto a stack. Amphiuma red cells displayed a different type of reversible stratification and deformation at high force fields. Here the cells became stretched, with the nucleus now moving centrifugally, the Hb moving centripetally, and the bottom of the cells becoming thinner and clear. Nevertheless, the distribution of the marginal bands at the cells' rim was unchanged. We conclude that centrifugation, per se, while changing a red cell's shape and the distribution of its intracellular constituents, does so in a completely reversible manner. Centrifugation of red cells harboring altered or missing structural elements could provide information on shape determinants that are still unexplained.

  19. Apparatus for centrifugal separation of coal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dickie, William; Cavallaro, Joseph A.; Killmeyer, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A gravimetric cell for centrifugal separation of fine coal by density has a cylindrical body and a butterfly valve or other apparatus for selectively sealing the body radially across the approximate center of the cylinder. A removable top is provided which seals the cylinder in the centrifuge and in unvented areas.

  20. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, N.E.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A uv-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  1. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Norman E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90.degree. and 180.degree. excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A UV-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  2. Centrifuges in gravitational physiology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Rodney W.; Davies, Phil; Fuller, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Data from space flight and ground based experiments have clearly demonstrated the importance of Earth gravity for normal physiological function in man and animals. Gravitational Physiology is concerned with the role and influence of gravity on physiological systems. Research in this field examines how we perceive and respond to gravity and the mechanisms underlying these responses. Inherent in our search for answers to these questions is the ability to alter gravity, which is not physically possible without leaving Earth. However, useful experimental paradigms have been to modify the perceived force of gravity by changing either the orientation of subjects to the gravity vector (i.e., postural changes) or by applying inertial forces to augment the magnitude of the gravity vector. The later technique has commonly been used by applying centripetal force via centrifugation.

  3. Centrifugal membrane filtration -- Task 9

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has teamed with SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, to demonstrate applications for the SpinTek technology within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. Membrane-screening tests were performed with the SpinTek STC-X4 static test cell filtration unit, using five ceramic membranes with different pore size and composition. Based on permeate flux, a 0.25-{micro}m TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was selected for detailed performance evaluation using the SpinTek ST-IIL centrifugal membrane filtration unit with a surrogate tank waste solution. An extended test run of 100 hr performed on a surrogate tank waste solution showed some deterioration in filtration performance, based on flux, apparently due to the buildup of solids near the inner portion of the membrane where relative membrane velocities were low. Continued testing of the system will focus on modifications to the shear pattern across the entire membrane surface to affect improved long-term performance.

  4. Modeling of UF{sub 6} enrichment with gas centrifuges for nuclear safeguards activities

    SciTech Connect

    Mercurio, G.; Peerani, P.; Richir, P.; Janssens, W.; Eklund, G.

    2012-09-26

    The physical modeling of uranium isotopes ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U) separation process by centrifugation of is a key aspect for predicting the nuclear fuel enrichment plant performances under surveillance by the Nuclear Safeguards Authorities. In this paper are illustrated some aspects of the modeling of fast centrifuges for UF{sub 6} gas enrichment and of a typical cascade enrichment plant with the Theoretical Centrifuge and Cascade Simulator (TCCS). The background theory for reproducing the flow field characteristics of a centrifuge is derived from the work of Cohen where the separation parameters are calculated using the solution of a differential enrichment equation. In our case we chose to solve the hydrodynamic equations for the motion of a compressible fluid in a centrifugal field using the Berman - Olander vertical velocity radial distribution and the solution was obtained using the Matlab software tool. The importance of a correct estimation of the centrifuge separation parameters at different flow regimes, lies in the possibility to estimate in a reliable way the U enrichment plant performances, once the separation external parameters are set (feed flow rate and feed, product and tails assays). Using the separation parameters of a single centrifuge allow to determine the performances of an entire cascade and, for this purpose; the software Simulink was used. The outputs of the calculation are the concentrations (assays) and the flow rates of the enriched (product) and depleted (tails) gas mixture. These models represent a valid additional tool, in order to verify the compliance of the U enrichment plant operator declarations with the 'on site' inspectors' measurements.

  5. Accurate quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants of CH3CP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Cludi, L.; Degli Esposti, C.

    2003-03-01

    1-Phosphapropyne has been produced in the gas phase by pyrolysis of a mixture of ethane and phosphorus trichloride. The ground state rotational spectra of the most abundant isotopomer and of the isotopic variants 13CH3CP and CH313CP have been investigated in the millimeter and submillimeter wave regions obtaining very accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants DJ and DJK and of the sextic distortion constants HJK and HKJ.

  6. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  7. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  8. Static deformation of a heavy spring due to gravity and centrifugal force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essén, Hanno; Nordmark, Arne

    2010-05-01

    The static equilibrium deformation of a heavy spring due to its own weight is calculated for two cases: first for a spring hanging in a constant gravitational field, and then for a spring which is at rest in a rotating system where it is stretched by the centrifugal force. Two different models are considered: first a discrete model assuming a finite number of point masses connected by springs of negligible weight, and then the continuum limit of this model. In the second case, the differential equation for the deformation is obtained by demanding that the potential energy is minimized. In this way a simple application of the variational calculus is obtained.

  9. Modeling of Centrifugal Force Field and the Effect on Filling and Solidification in Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Wenbin; Ma, Chunxue; Gu, Wanli

    2011-06-01

    Based on the steady flow in a tube, a mathematical model has been established for the consideration of centrifuging force field by combining the equations of continuity, conservation of momentum and general energy. Effects of centrifugal field on the filling and solidification are modeled by two accessional terms: centrifugal force and Chorios force. In addition, the transfer of heat by convection is considered to achieve a coupling calculation of velocity field and temperature field. The solution of pressure item is avoided by introducing the stream function ψ(x,y) and the eddy function ξ(x,y). Corresponding difference formats for the simultaneous equations of centrifugal filling, the accessional terms and the solidifying latent heat have been established by the finite difference technique. Furthermore, the centrifugal filling and solidification processes in a horizontal tube are summarized to interpret the mechanism by which internal defects are formed in centrifugal castings.

  10. Gas centrifuge with driving motor

    DOEpatents

    Dancy, Jr., William H.

    1976-01-01

    1. A centrifuge for separating gaseous constituents of different masses comprising a vertical tubular rotor, means for introducing a gas mixture of different masses into said rotor and means for removing at least one of the gas components from the rotor, a first bearing means supporting said rotor at one end for rotational movement, a support, a damping bearing mounted on said support, a shaft fixed to said rotor at the opposite end and mechanically connecting said rotor to said damping bearing, a cup-shaped tube of electrically conductive, non-magnetic material in coaxial relationship with said shaft, the open end of said tube extending away from said rotor and the closed end of said tube being directly secured to the adjacent end of the rotor, an annular core of magnetic material fixedly mounted on said support so as to be disposed within said tube and around said shaft, and a second annular magnetic core with coils arranged thereon to receive polyphase current to produce a rotating magnetic field traversing the circumference of said tube, fixedly mounted on said support so as to surround said tube, the size of said first annular core and said second annular core being such as to permit limited radial displacement of said shaft and said tube.

  11. Two-Stage Centrifugal Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, David

    2011-01-01

    Fan designs are often constrained by envelope, rotational speed, weight, and power. Aerodynamic performance and motor electrical performance are heavily influenced by rotational speed. The fan used in this work is at a practical limit for rotational speed due to motor performance characteristics, and there is no more space available in the packaging for a larger fan. The pressure rise requirements keep growing. The way to ordinarily accommodate a higher DP is to spin faster or grow the fan rotor diameter. The invention is to put two radially oriented stages on a single disk. Flow enters the first stage from the center; energy is imparted to the flow in the first stage blades, the flow is redirected some amount opposite to the direction of rotation in the fixed stators, and more energy is imparted to the flow in the second- stage blades. Without increasing either rotational speed or disk diameter, it is believed that as much as 50 percent more DP can be achieved with this design than with an ordinary, single-stage centrifugal design. This invention is useful primarily for fans having relatively low flow rates with relatively high pressure rise requirements.

  12. Optical detection strategies for centrifugal microfluidic platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Damien; O'Sullivan, Mary; Ducrée, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic systems have become one of the principal platforms for implementing bioanalytical assays, most notably for biomedical point-of-care diagnostics. These so-called 'lab-on-a-disc' systems primarily utilise the rotationally controlled centrifugal field in combination with capillary forces to automate a range of laboratory unit operations (LUOs) for sample preparation, such as metering, aliquoting, mixing and extraction for biofluids as well as sorting, isolation and counting of bioparticles. These centrifugal microfluidic LUOs have been regularly surveyed in the literature. However, even though absolutely essential to provide true sample-to-answer functionality of lab-on-a-disc platforms, systematic examination of associated, often optical, read-out technologies has been so far neglected. This review focusses on the history and state-of-the-art of optical read-out strategies for centrifugal microfluidic platforms, arising (commercial) application potential and future opportunities.

  13. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  14. Renal Response to Chronic Centrifugation in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wang, T. J.; Corbin, B. J.; Wade, C. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Previously reported effects of chronic centrifugation on renal function in mammals are contradictory. The present study was conducted as an effort to provide a comprehensive analysis of renal response to chronic centrifugation (12 days at +2 Gz). Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (210-230 g) were used: eight centrifuged (EC) and eight off centrifuge controls (OCC). During centrifugation EC had lower body weight and food consumption. EC showed a decrease (72%) in water intake for the first two days (T1 and T2) followed by significant increases from T4-T6. EC urine output increased two-fold over the first four days, returning to baseline by T9. EC urea excretion was elevated on T3 through T5. Creatinine, Na(+), K(+), and osmolar excretion were lower than OCC over the last four days of the study. Assuming constant plasma osmolarity and creatinine levels, EC free water clearance (C(sub H2O)) was elevated significantly on T4 when the peak urine output was exhibited. EC also had a greater C(sub H2O) over the last four days, associated with a significantly lower osmolar clearance and GFR. The initial diuresis exhibited during centrifugation can be attributed to a reduced water resorption and increased urea excretion. This diuresis was mediated independent of changes in GFR over the first eight days. However, differences in excretion seen after eight days of centrifugation are probably GFR mediated which would imply animals established a new homeostatic setpoint by that time. Centrifugation elicites an acute alteration in fluid homeostasis followed by adaptation within a week.

  15. Decorrelation Stretch Near Cerberus Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released July 25, 2004 On this image you can see two infrared frames of the same area on Mars. One of the images (in black and white) represents a single wavelength or band of the THEMIS IR instrument, while the other image (in false color) represents 3 different bands. The image with the various colors was created with a technique called Decorrelation Stretch (DCS). In this technique individual bands of the THEMIS IR instrument are stretched to better show compositional variations throughout the whole range. After the bands are stretched they are overlayed on one another and colors are assigned to each band. This makes up the colors in the image.

    As you can see, there is a difference in what is noticable in the single band IR image versus the false-colored one. On the color image the pink/magenta colors usually represent basaltic content, cyan often indicates the presence of water ice clouds, while green can represent dust.

    The bright purple and pink colors associated with the valley are due to basalt. There may be a thin veneer of dust present in the region (it was a dark colored region during the Viking mission in the 1970's) through which the basaltic material pokes out along the edges of the valley and the nearby knobby terrain.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 10.7, Longitude 163 East (197 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  16. Expression of polyalanine stretches induces mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Toriumi, Kazuya; Oma, Yoko; Kino, Yoshihiro; Futai, Eugene; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2008-05-15

    In recent years, several novel types of disorders have been characterized, including what have been termed polyalanine diseases, in which patients have expanded triplet repeats in specific genes, resulting in the translation of aberrantly elongated polyalanine stretches. In this study, we showed that yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-fused elongated polyalanine stretches localized exclusively to the cytoplasm and formed aggregates. Additionally, the polyalanine stretches themselves were toxic. We sought to identify proteins that bound directly to the polyalanine stretches, as factors that might be involved in triggering cell death. Many mitochondrial proteins were identified as polyalanine-binding proteins. We showed that one of the identified proteins, succinate dehydrogenase subunit A, was decreased in the mitochondria of cells expressing polyalanine stretches; as a result, succinate oxidative activity was decreased. Furthermore, the polyalanine stretches also associated directly with mitochondria. This suggests that polya-lanine stretches might directly induce cell death. Additionally, the mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced in cells expressing polyalanine stretches. We propose a novel mechanism by which polyalanine stretches may cause cytotoxicity through mitochondrial dysfunction. This may be a common mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of all polyalanine diseases.

  17. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    PubMed Central

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations – cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity. PMID:24875391

  18. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations—cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity.

  19. Kinematics analyses related to stretch-shortening cycle during soccer instep kicking after different acute stretching.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Mohammadkazemi, Reza; Sarafrazi, Soodeh; Riyahi-Malayeri, Shahin; Sotoodeh, Vahid

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static and dynamic stretching within a preexercise warm-up on angular velocity of knee joint, deepest knee flexion (DKF), and duration of eccentric and concentric contractions, which are relative to the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) during instep kicking in professional soccer players. The kicking motions of dominant legs were captured from 18 Olympic professional male soccer players (height: 180.38 ± 7.34 cm; weight: 69.77 ± 9.73 kg; age: 19.22 ± 1.83 years) using 4 digital video cameras at 50 Hz. There was a significant difference in the DKF after the dynamic stretching (-3.22 ± 3.10°) vs. static stretching (-0.18 ± 3.19°) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.001. Moreover, there was significant difference in eccentric duration after the dynamic stretching (0.006 ± 0.01 seconds) vs. static stretching (-0.003 ± 0.01 seconds) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.015. There was a significant difference in the concentric duration after the dynamic stretching (-0.007 ± 0.01 seconds) vs. static stretching (0.002 ± 0.01 seconds) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.001. There was also a significant difference in knee angular velocity after the dynamic stretching (4.08 ± 3.81 rad·s) vs. static stretching (-5.34 ± 4.40 rad·s) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.001. We concluded that dynamic stretching during warm-ups, as compared with static stretching, is probably the most effective way as preparation for the kinematics characteristics of soccer instep kick, which are relative to the SSC.

  20. DNA stretching on the wall surfaces in curved microchannels with different radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Wu, Fong-He; Tsai, Ming-Ju

    2014-08-01

    DNA molecule conformation dynamics and stretching were made on semi-circular surfaces with different radii (500 to 5,000 μm) in microchannels measuring 200 μm × 200 μm in cross section. Five different buffer solutions - 1× Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE), 1× Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE), 1× Tris-EDTA (TE), 1× Tris-phosphate-EDTA (TPE), and 1× Tris-buffered saline (TBS) solutions - were used with a variety of viscosity such as 40, 60, and 80 cP, with resultant 10-4 ≤ Re ≤ 10-3 and the corresponding 5 ≤ Wi ≤ 12. The test fluids were seeded with JOJO-1 tracer particles for flow visualization and driven through the test channels via a piezoelectric (PZT) micropump. Micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) measuring technique was applied for the centered-plane velocity distribution measurements. It is found that the radius effect on the stretch ratio of DNA dependence is significant. The stretch ratio becomes larger as the radius becomes small due to the larger centrifugal force. Consequently, the maximum stretch was found at the center of the channel with a radius of 500 μm.

  1. Stretching Impacts Inflammation Resolution in Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J; Colas, Romain A; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-07-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 min twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, 2 weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch versus no stretch for 48 h, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue.

  2. MHD Stability of Centrifugally Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Min

    2003-10-01

    Centrifugally confined plasmas utilize centrifugal forces from plasma rotation to augment magnetic confinement, as an alternative approach to fusion. One magnetic geometry is mirror-type, with rotation about the axis induced from a central, biased core conductor. The outward centrifugal forces from the rotation have a component along the field lines, thus confining ions to the center. The immediate concern, of course, is that the system could be flute unstable to the interchange. The antidote here is that the radial shear in the rotation could stabilize the flute. Our 2D simulations show, first, that plasma pressure is highly peaked at the center away from the mirror end coils. Next, 3D simulations show unequivocally that velocity shear is providing the stability. Further study indicates that the flute stability is sensitive to the density profile. A favorable density profile could be achieved by judiciously placing the particle source, also necessary for a steady state centrifuge. As flows approach the Alfven speed, electromagnetic modes could be involved. The latter is motivated by the question of whether magnetorotational instability, thought to be an angular momentum transporter in accretion disks, could be found in centrifugal plasmas, since all the ingredients are there. We show that the MRI as understood should be stable; however, a related astrophysical instability, the Parker instability, could arise. The Parker instability results in plasma accumulating in regions of bent field lines, further accentuating the bending.

  3. Centrifugal techniques for measuring saturated hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, John R.; Mello, Karen A.

    1991-01-01

    Centrifugal force is an alternative to large pressure gradients for the measurement of low values of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat). With a head of water above a porous medium in a centrifuge bucket, both constant-head and falling-head measurements are practical at forces up to at least 1800 times normal gravity. Darcy's law applied to the known centrifugal potential leads to simple formulas for Ksat that are analogous to those used in the standard gravity-driven constant- and falling-head methods. Both centrifugal methods were tested on several fine-textured samples of soil and ceramic with Ksat between about 10−10 and 10−9 m/s. The results were compared to falling-head gravity measurements. The comparison shows most measurements agreeing to within 20% for a given sample, much of the variation probably resulting from run-to-run changes in sample structure. The falling-head centrifuge method proved to be especially simple in design and operation and was more accurate than the constant-head method. With modified apparatus, Ksat measurements less than 10−10 m/s should be attainable.

  4. Mars Under the Microscope (stretched)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured on the 10th day, or sol, of the rover's mission by its microscopic imager, located on the instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This stretched color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover open and closed. The varying hints of orange suggest differences in mineral composition. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  5. Capillary stretching of elastic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Stone, Howard A.; Duprat, Camille

    2014-11-01

    Fibrous media consisting of constrained flexible fibers can be found in many engineered systems (membranes in filters, woven textile, matted paper). When such materials interact with a liquid, the presence of liquid/air interfaces induces capillary forces that deform the fibers. To model this interaction we study the behaviour of a finite volume of liquid deposited on two parallel flexible fibers clamped at both ends. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We show that the system undergoes various morphological changes as the interfiber distance, the elasticity and the tension of the fibers are varied. For a certain range of parameters, the liquid spreads along the fibers and pulls them together, leading to the ``zipping'' of the fibers. This capillary adhesion can then be enhanced or reduced by changing the tension within the fibers. We will show that balancing stretching and capillary forces allows the prediction of this transition as well as the conditions for which detachment of the fibers occurs. These results may be used to prevent the clogging of fibrous membranes or to optimize the capture of liquids.

  6. Effects of chronic centrifugation on mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janer, L.; Duke, J.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to excess gravity in vitro alters the developmental sequence in embryonic mouse limbs and palates (Duke, Janer and Campbell, 1984; Duke, 1983). The effects of excess gravity on in vivo mammalian development was investigated using a small animal centrifuge. Four-week old female mice exposed to excess gravities of 1.8-3.5 G for eight weeks weighed significantly less than controls. Mice were mated after five weeks of adaptation to excess G, and sacrificed either at gestational day 12 or 18. There were fewer pregnancies in the centrifuged group (4/36) than in controls (9/31), and crown rump lengths (CRL) of embryos developing in the centrifuge were less than CRLs of 1-G embryos. These results show that although immersed in amniotic fluid, embryos are responsive to Delta-G.

  7. Possible segregation caused by centrifugal titanium casting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Kanatani, M; Nakano, S; Miyakawa, O; Kobayashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The possibility of the segregation under solidification process using a centrifugal casting machine was investigated using an electron probe microanalyzer with elemental distribution map, line analysis and quantitative analysis. When a very small quantity of platinum was added to local molten titanium during the casting process, macroscopic segregation was observed under conditions of density difference of 0.1 g/cm3 at the most, confirming that the centrifugal force of the casting machine is extremely strong. When a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was cast, however, no macroscopic segregation was observed. The centrifugal force of the casting machine examined in the present study hardly results in the body-force segregation in this titanium alloy.

  8. 26. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Ironworks, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1879, 1881. View: Historical view, 1934, from T. T. Waterman collection, Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association. Once the molasses was separated from the sugar crystals it flowed through the spouts in the base of the centrifugals. The centrifugals' pulleys can be seen underneath the centrifugal. The centrifugal on the right has been reinforced with seven metal bands. The handles for the clutch mechanism are located above the centrifugal. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  9. Stretching micropatterned cells on a PDMS membrane.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-22

    Mechanical forces exerted on cells and/or tissues play a major role in numerous processes. We have developed a device to stretch cells plated on a PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS) membrane, compatible with imaging. This technique is reproducible and versatile. The PDMS membrane can be micropatterned in order to confine cells or tissues to a specific geometry. The first step is to print micropatterns onto the PDMS membrane with a deep UV technique. The PDMS membrane is then mounted on a mechanical stretcher. A chamber is bound on top of the membrane with biocompatible grease to allow gliding during the stretch. The cells are seeded and allowed to spread for several hours on the micropatterns. The sample can be stretched and unstretched multiple times with the use of a micrometric screw. It takes less than a minute to apply the stretch to its full extent (around 30%). The technique presented here does not include a motorized device, which is necessary for applying repeated stretch cycles quickly and/or computer controlled stretching, but this can be implemented. Stretching of cells or tissue can be of interest for questions related to cell forces, cell response to mechanical stress or tissue morphogenesis. This video presentation will show how to avoid typical problems that might arise when doing this type of seemingly simple experiment.

  10. Effects of Centrifuge Diameter and Operation on Rodent Adaptation to Chronic Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the responses of rats to centrifugation in a constant acceleration field (1.5 G). Centrifuge diameter (1.8m, 2.5m or 6.0m) and schedule of operation (Daily or weekly stop) varied between groups. Body mass, food consumption, water consumption and neurovestibular function were measured weekly. Body temperature and activity were continuously monitored using telemetry. A subset of subjects were videotaped (50 minutes per day) to allow for movement analysis. Exposure to a hyperdynamic field of this magnitude did cause the expected depression in the physiological variables monitored. Recovery was accomplished within a relatively rapid time frame; all variables returned to precentrifugation levels. In general, the magnitudes of the changes and the rate of recovery were similar at different centrifuge diameters and stopping frequency. There were cases, however, in which the magnitude of the response and/or the rate of recovery to a new steady-state were altered as a result of centrifuge diameter. In summary, these results indicate that stopping frequency has little, if any, effect on adaptation to chronic centrifugation. However, the angular velocity (omega), and therefore centrifuge diameter is an important consideration in the adaptation of an organism to chronic centrifugation.

  11. Effects of Centrifuge Diameter and Operation on Rodent Adaptation to Chronic Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the responses of rats to centrifugation in a constant acceleration field (1.5 G). Centrifuge diameter (1.8m, 2.5m or 6.0m) and schedule of operation (Daily or weekly stop) varied between groups. Body mass, food consumption, water consumption and neurovestibular function were measured weekly. Body temperature and activity were continuously monitored using telemetry. A subset of subjects were videotaped (50 minutes per day) to allow for movement analysis. Exposure to a hyperdynamic field of this magnitude did cause the expected depression in the physiological variables monitored. Recovery was accomplished within a relatively rapid time frame; all variables returned to precentrifugation levels. In general, the magnitudes of the changes and the rate of recovery were similar at different centrifuge diameters and stopping frequency. There were cases, however, in which the magnitude of the response and/or the rate of recovery to a new steady-state were altered as a result of centrifuge diameter. In summary, these results indicate that stopping frequency has little, if any, effect on adaptation to chronic centrifugation. However, the angular velocity (omega), and therefore centrifuge diameter is an important consideration in the adaptation of an organism to chronic centrifugation.

  12. Detection methods for centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Burger, Robert; Amato, Letizia; Boisen, Anja

    2016-02-15

    Centrifugal microfluidics has attracted much interest from academia as well as industry, since it potentially offers solutions for affordable, user-friendly and portable biosensing. A wide range of so-called fluidic unit operations, e.g. mixing, metering, liquid routing, and particle separation, have been developed and allow automation and integration of complex assay protocols in lab-on-a-disc systems. Besides liquid handling, the detection strategy for reading out the assay is crucial for developing a fully integrated system. In this review, we focus on biosensors and readout methods for the centrifugal microfluidics platform and cover optical as well as mechanical and electrical detection principles.

  13. Wave-Driven Rotation In Centrifugal Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-03-28

    Centrifugal mirrors use supersonic rotation to provide axial confinement and enhanced stability. Usually the rotation is produced using electrodes, but these electrodes have limited the rotation to the Alfven critical ionization velocity, which is too slow to be useful for fusion. Instead, the rotation could be produced using radio frequency waves. A fixed azimuthal ripple is a simple and efficient wave that could produce rotation by harnessing alpha particle energy. This is an extension of the alpha channeling effect. The alpha particle power and efficiency in a simulated devices is sufficient to produce rotation without external energy input. By eliminating the need for electrodes, this opens new opportunities for centrifugal traps.

  14. [Stretching--do current explanatory models suffice?].

    PubMed

    Freiwald, J; Engelhardt, M; Jäger, M; Gnewuch, A; Reuter, I; Wiemann, K; Starischka, S

    1998-06-01

    The opinion that mobility in the usual performance if the "straight leg raise" test for the evaluation of stretching techniques is subject to solety muscular limitations is critically appraised. With integration of recent results from molecular biological research and our own measurements, we can show that not only mechanical but also neurophysiological factors must be considered in the limitation of mobility. In the majority of the examined patients stretching of the ischiadic nerve seems to be responsible for restrictions in movement. The presented results cast doubt on the currently held assumptions and basic principles of stretching in therapy and sport.

  15. Stretching and injury prevention: an obscure relationship.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, Erik; Mahieu, Nele; Danneels, Lieven; McNair, Peter

    2004-01-01

    It is generally accepted that increasing the flexibility of a muscle-tendon unit promotes better performances and decreases the number of injuries. Stretching exercises are regularly included in warm-up and cooling-down exercises; however, contradictory findings have been reported in the literature. Several authors have suggested that stretching has a beneficial effect on injury prevention. In contrast, clinical evidence suggesting that stretching before exercise does not prevent injuries has also been reported. Apparently, no scientifically based prescription for stretching exercises exists and no conclusive statements can be made about the relationship of stretching and athletic injuries. Stretching recommendations are clouded by misconceptions and conflicting research reports. We believe that part of these contradictions can be explained by considering the type of sports activity in which an individual is participating. Sports involving bouncing and jumping activities with a high intensity of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) [e.g. soccer and football] require a muscle-tendon unit that is compliant enough to store and release the high amount of elastic energy that benefits performance in such sports. If the participants of these sports have an insufficient compliant muscle-tendon unit, the demands in energy absorption and release may rapidly exceed the capacity of the muscle-tendon unit. This may lead to an increased risk for injury of this structure. Consequently, the rationale for injury prevention in these sports is to increase the compliance of the muscle-tendon unit. Recent studies have shown that stretching programmes can significantly influence the viscosity of the tendon and make it significantly more compliant, and when a sport demands SSCs of high intensity, stretching may be important for injury prevention. This conjecture is in agreement with the available scientific clinical evidence from these types of sports activities. In contrast, when the type

  16. Stretching DNA with optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M D; Yin, H; Landick, R; Gelles, J; Block, S M

    1997-01-01

    Force-extension (F-x) relationships were measured for single molecules of DNA under a variety of buffer conditions, using an optical trapping interferometer modified to incorporate feedback control. One end of a single DNA molecule was fixed to a coverglass surface by means of a stalled RNA polymerase complex. The other end was linked to a microscopic bead, which was captured and held in an optical trap. The DNA was subsequently stretched by moving the coverglass with respect to the trap using a piezo-driven stage, while the position of the bead was recorded at nanometer-scale resolution. An electronic feedback circuit was activated to prevent bead movement beyond a preset clamping point by modulating the light intensity, altering the trap stiffness dynamically. This arrangement permits rapid determination of the F-x relationship for individual DNA molecules as short as -1 micron with unprecedented accuracy, subjected to both low (approximately 0.1 pN) and high (approximately 50 pN) loads: complete data sets are acquired in under a minute. Experimental F-x relationships were fit over much of their range by entropic elasticity theories based on worm-like chain models. Fits yielded a persistence length, Lp, of approximately 47 nm in a buffer containing 10 mM Na1. Multivalent cations, such as Mg2+ or spermidine 3+, reduced Lp to approximately 40 nm. Although multivalent ions shield most of the negative charges on the DNA backbone, they did not further reduce Lp significantly, suggesting that the intrinsic persistence length remains close to 40 nm. An elasticity theory incorporating both enthalpic and entropic contributions to stiffness fit the experimental results extremely well throughout the full range of extensions and returned an elastic modulus of approximately 1100 pN. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:9138579

  17. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups.

  18. Quantitative Microbial Ecology through Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Mau, Rebecca L.; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J.; Liu, Cindy M.; McHugh, Theresa A.; Marks, Jane C.; Morrissey, Ember M.; Price, Lance B.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria grow and transform elements at different rates, and as yet, quantifying this variation in the environment is difficult. Determining isotope enrichment with fine taxonomic resolution after exposure to isotope tracers could help, but there are few suitable techniques. We propose a modification to stable isotope probing (SIP) that enables the isotopic composition of DNA from individual bacterial taxa after exposure to isotope tracers to be determined. In our modification, after isopycnic centrifugation, DNA is collected in multiple density fractions, and each fraction is sequenced separately. Taxon-specific density curves are produced for labeled and nonlabeled treatments, from which the shift in density for each individual taxon in response to isotope labeling is calculated. Expressing each taxon's density shift relative to that taxon's density measured without isotope enrichment accounts for the influence of nucleic acid composition on density and isolates the influence of isotope tracer assimilation. The shift in density translates quantitatively to isotopic enrichment. Because this revision to SIP allows quantitative measurements of isotope enrichment, we propose to call it quantitative stable isotope probing (qSIP). We demonstrated qSIP using soil incubations, in which soil bacteria exhibited strong taxonomic variations in 18O and 13C composition after exposure to [18O]water or [13C]glucose. The addition of glucose increased the assimilation of 18O into DNA from [18O]water. However, the increase in 18O assimilation was greater than expected based on utilization of glucose-derived carbon alone, because the addition of glucose indirectly stimulated bacteria to utilize other substrates for growth. This example illustrates the benefit of a quantitative approach to stable isotope probing. PMID:26296731

  19. Vacuum chamber-free centrifuge with magnetic bearings.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol Hoon; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2013-09-01

    Centrifuges are devices that separate particles of different densities and sizes through the application of a centrifugal force. If a centrifuge could be operated under atmospheric conditions, all vacuum-related components such as the vacuum chamber, vacuum pump, diffusion pump, and sealing could be removed from a conventional centrifuge system. The design and manufacturing procedure for centrifuges could then be greatly simplified to facilitate the production of lightweight centrifuge systems of smaller volume. Furthermore, the maintenance costs incurred owing to wear and tear due to conventional ball bearings would be eliminated. In this study, we describe a novel vacuum chamber-free centrifuge supported by magnetic bearings. We demonstrate the feasibility of the vacuum chamber-free centrifuge by presenting experimental results that verify its high-speed support capability and motoring power capacity.

  20. Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Bond

    2006-07-01

    Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications by Jeff Eerkens (University of Missouri), Jay Kunze (Idaho State University), and Leonard Bond (Idaho National Laboratory) The principal isotope enrichment business in the world is the enrichment of uranium for commercial power reactor fuels. However, there are a number of other needs for separated isotopes. Some examples are: 1) Pure isotopic targets for irradiation to produce medical radioisotopes. 2) Pure isotopes for semiconductors. 3) Low neutron capture isotopes for various uses in nuclear reactors. 4) Isotopes for industrial tracer/identification applications. Examples of interest to medicine are targets to produce radio-isotopes such as S-33, Mo-98, Mo-100, W-186, Sn-112; while for MRI diagnostics, the non-radioactive Xe-129 isotope is wanted. For super-semiconductor applications some desired industrial isotopes are Si-28, Ga-69, Ge-74, Se-80, Te-128, etc. An example of a low cross section isotope for use in reactors is Zn-68 as a corrosion inhibitor material in nuclear reactor primary systems. Neutron activation of Ar isotopes is of interest in industrial tracer and diagnostic applications (e.g. oil-logging). . In the past few years there has been a sufficient supply of isotopes in common demand, because of huge Russian stockpiles produced with old electromagnetic and centrifuge separators previously used for uranium enrichment. Production of specialized isotopes in the USA has been largely accomplished using old ”calutrons” (electromagnetic separators) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These methods of separating isotopes are rather energy inefficient. Use of lasers for isotope separation has been considered for many decades. None of the proposed methods have attained sufficient proof of principal status to be economically attractive to pursue commercially. Some of the authors have succeeded in separating sulfur isotopes using a rather new and different method, known as condensation

  1. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  2. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  3. Research centrifuge accommodations on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arno, Roger D.; Horkachuk, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Life sciences research using plants and animals on the Space Station Freedom requires the ability to maintain live subjects in a safe and low stress environment for long durations at microgravity and at one g. The need for a centrifuge to achieve these accelerations is evident. Programmatic, technical, and cost considerations currently favor a 2.5 meter diameter centrifuge located either in the end cone of a Space Station Freedom node or in a separate module. A centrifuge facility could support a mix of rodent, plant, and small primate habitats. An automated cage extractor could be used to remove modular habitats in pairs without stopping the main rotor, minimizing the disruption to experiment protocols. The accommodation of such a centrifuge facility on the Space Station represents a significant demand on the crew time, power, data, volume, and logistics capability. It will contribute to a better understanding of the effects of space flight on humans, an understanding of plant growth in space for the eventual production of food, and an understanding of the role of gravity in biological processes.

  4. Predicting Droplet Formation on Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Jacob Alfred

    Centrifugal microfluidics is a widely known research tool for biological sample and water quality analysis. Currently, the standard equipment used for such diagnostic applications include slow, bulky machines controlled by multiple operators. These machines can be condensed into a smaller, faster benchtop sample-to-answer system. Sample processing is an important step taken to extract, isolate, and convert biological factors, such as nucleic acids or proteins, from a raw sample to an analyzable solution. Volume definition is one such step. The focus of this thesis is the development of a model predicting monodispersed droplet formation and the application of droplets as a technique for volume definition. First, a background of droplet microfluidic platforms is presented, along with current biological analysis technologies and the advantages of integrating such technologies onto microfluidic platforms. Second, background and theories of centrifugal microfluidics is given, followed by theories relevant to droplet emulsions. Third, fabrication techniques for centrifugal microfluidic designs are discussed. Finally, the development of a model for predicting droplet formation on the centrifugal microfluidic platform are presented for the rest of the thesis. Predicting droplet formation analytically based on the volumetric flow rates of the continuous and dispersed phases, the ratios of these two flow rates, and the interfacial tension between the continuous and dispersed phases presented many challenges, which will be discussed in this work. Experimental validation was completed using continuous phase solutions of different interfacial tensions. To conclude, prospective applications are discussed with expected challenges.

  5. Centrifugal Pump Experiment for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderslice, Nicholas; Oberto, Richard; Marrero, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a Centrifugal Pump Experiment that provided an experiential learning experience to chemical engineering undergraduates at the University of Missouri in the spring of 2010 in the Unit Operations Laboratory course. Lab equipment was used by senior students with computer-based data and control technology. In…

  6. Extracting hydrocarbons from water using a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A. Yu.; Ilyina, A. A.; Chuikin, A. V.; Velikov, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    An original method for the solid-phase microextraction of hydrocarbons from water using a centrifuge is proposed. Comparative results from the chromatographic elution of substances after liquid-phase and solid-phase microextraction are presented. The percentage of the extraction of substances from aqueous solutions and the minimum detection limit for aromatic and aliphatic compounds are calculated.

  7. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  8. Centrifugal blood pumps for various clinical needs.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Seiji; Nosé, Yukihiko

    2002-11-01

    During the past 10 years, different types of blood pumps were developed to address various clinical needs. The Nikkiso centrifugal blood pump was developed for cardiopulmonary bypass application. This blood pump has been widely used in Japan in more than 20% of the cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. The Kyocera C1E3 Gryo pump was developed for short-term circulatory assistance and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation application for up to 2 weeks. This blood pump has been clinically used for up to 28 days without any blood clot formation. Through Phase I of the Japanese government New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) program, a chronically implanted centrifugal pump for left ventricular assistance was developed. This pump has already demonstrated its effectiveness, safety, and durability as a 2 year blood pump through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Currently, it is in the process of being converted from an experimental to a clinical device. Through Phase II of the NEDO program, a permanently implantable biventricular assist centrifugal blood pump system is under development. It has demonstrated that the previously mentioned left ventricular assist device blood pump is easily converted into a right ventricular assist pump by simply adding a spacer between the pump and the actuator. This communication discusses the historical development strategies for centrifugal blood pumps and their current status for different clinical needs.

  9. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  10. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  11. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  12. Evaluation of an improved centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Donovan, T E; White, L E

    1985-05-01

    A Type III gold alloy, a silver-palladium alloy, and a base metal alloy were cast in two different centrifugal casting machines. With the number of complete cast mesh squares as an indicator of castability, the Airspin casting machine produced superior castings with all three alloys. The base metal alloy produced the greatest number of complete squares with both casting machines.

  13. Pressure distribution in centrifugal dental casting.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, J P

    1978-02-01

    Equations are developed for liquid metal pressure in centrifugal dental casting, given the instantaneous rotational velocity, density, and certain dimensions of the casting machine and casting pattern. A "reference parabola" is introduced making the fluid pressure concept more understandable. A specially designed specimen demonstrates experimentally the reference parabola at freezing.

  14. Flow Pattern Characterization for a Centrifugal Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Efrén M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a model for characterizing the flow pattern of a centrifugal impeller attending to the severity of the reverse flow. The model assumes 1) a definition of an escaping particle as the one that flows in every operational point from the trailing edge towards the leading edge of the impeller blades, and 2) a characterization of flow where an operational point is said to have a theoretical flow pattern if it is not possible to establish a fully-reversed escaping particle on it. Therefore, the first part of the article is focused on defining an escaping particle for a centrifugal compressor. The model locates over the map of a centrifugal impeller the line that splits the map in two regions: the region on the right hand side, where a theoretical flow pattern can exist, and the region on the left, where a theoretical flow pattern cannot exist. Therefore, the locus of this line marks a frontier where the expected performance of the impeller cannot be sustained as high as expected. The second part of the article uses a high-performance commercial centrifugal impeller wheel for contrasting the model. A qualitative characterization of the surge line, conclusions and discussions are presented.

  15. APPLICATION ANALYSIS REPORT: RETECH PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the performance of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) and its applicability as a treatment for soils contaminated with organic and/or inorganic compounds. Both the technical and economic aspectsof the technology were examined. A...

  16. Mass Transfer in 12-CM Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chesna, J.C.

    2001-06-26

    One eight-stage unit (8-pack) of centrifugal contactors was tested in both extraction and stripping modes. Efficiencies approaching 100 percent were obtained in both modes. The contactors were operated successfully at a wide range of combined flow rates, including the HEF conditions. This report discusses the results of that test.

  17. Demonstrating the Stretch Reflex: A Mechanical Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batavia, Mitchell; McDonough, Andrew L.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the concept of stretch reflexes to students using a mechanical model. The model provides a dynamic multisensory experience using movement, light, and sound. Describes the construction design. (SAH)

  18. 76 FR 9613 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... use source and special nuclear material at the Lead Cascade at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant... operate a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility (the ACP) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion...

  19. Isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Rodney J.; Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated.

  20. Mechanisms of Sensorimotor Adaptation to Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.; Wood, S. J.; Kaufman, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    We postulate that centripetal acceleration induced by centrifugation can be used as an inflight sensorimotor countermeasure to retain and/or promote appropriate crewmember responses to sustained changes in gravito-inertial force conditions. Active voluntary motion is required to promote vestibular system conditioning, and both visual and graviceptor sensory feedback are critical for evaluating internal representations of spatial orientation. The goal of our investigation is to use centrifugation to develop an analog to the conflicting visual/gravito-inertial force environment experienced during space flight, and to use voluntary head movements during centrifugation to study mechanisms of adaptation to altered gravity environments. We address the following two hypotheses: (1) Discordant canal-otolith feedback during head movements in a hypergravity tilted environment will cause a reorganization of the spatial processing required for multisensory integration and motor control, resulting in decreased postural stability upon return to normal gravity environment. (2) Adaptation to this "gravito-inertial tilt distortion" will result in a negative after-effect, and readaptation will be expressed by return of postural stability to baseline conditions. During the third year of our grant we concentrated on examining changes in balance control following 90-180 min of centrifugation at 1.4 9. We also began a control study in which we exposed subjects to 90 min of sustained roll tilt in a static (non-rotating) chair. This allowed us to examine adaptation to roll tilt without the hypergravity induced by centrifugation. To these ends, we addressed the question: Is gravity an internal calibration reference for postural control? The remainder of this report is limited to presenting preliminary findings from this study.

  1. Centrifugal Modelling of Soil Structures. Part I. Centrifugal Modelling of Slope Failures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    centrifugal loading in multiples of earth’s gravitational acceleration Nd number of equipotential drops in a flow net Nf number of flow channels in a... straight line from point A to point B. It is valid for laminar flow , where v - discharge velocity, k - coefficient of permeability, i - hydraulic gradient...number) Soil mechanics, embankmen’: stability, sloPe Stability, centrifuge modelling, clay slopes, mine waste slltpes, sea clay, landslides, flow slides

  2. Comparison of two stretching methods and optimization of stretching protocol for the piriformis muscle.

    PubMed

    Gulledge, Brett M; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Levine, David; Tillman, Larry; Harrysson, Ola L A; Osborne, Jason A; Baxter, Blaise

    2014-02-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon diagnosis for a non-discogenic form of sciatica whose treatment has traditionally focused on stretching the piriformis muscle (PiM). Conventional stretches include hip flexion, adduction, and external rotation. Using three-dimensional modeling, we quantified the amount of (PiM) elongation resulting from two conventional stretches and we investigated by use of a computational model alternate stretching protocols that would optimize PiM stretching. Seven subjects underwent three CT scans: one supine, one with hip flexion, adduction, then external rotation (ADD stretch), and one with hip flexion, external rotation, then adduction (ExR stretch). Three-dimensional bone models were constructed from the CT scans. PiM elongation during these stretches, femoral neck inclination, femoral head anteversion, and trochanteric anteversion were measured. A computer program was developed to map PiM length over a range of hip joint positions and was validated against the measured scans. ExR and ADD stretches elongated the PiM similarly by approximately 12%. Femoral head and greater trochanter anteversion influenced PiM elongation. Placing the hip joints in 115° of hip flexion, 40° of external rotation and 25° of adduction or 120° of hip flexion, 50° of external rotation and 30° of adduction increased PiM elongation by 30-40% compared to conventional stretches (15.1 and 15.3% increases in PiM muscle length, respectively). ExR and ADD stretches elongate the PiM similarly and therefore may have similar clinical effectiveness. The optimized stretches led to larger increases in PiM length and may be more easily performed by some patients due to increased hip flexion.

  3. Simple method of DNA stretching on glass substrate for fluorescence image and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Guru P.; Dhakal, Krishna P.; Lee, Hyunsoo; Guthold, Martin; Joseph, Vincent S.; Hong, Jong-Dal; Kim, Jeongyong

    2013-05-01

    Study of biological molecule DNA has contributed to developing many breaking thoughts and wide applications in multidisciplinary fields, such as genomic, medical, sensing and forensic fields. Stretching of DNA molecules is an important supportive tool for AFM or spectroscopic studies of DNA in a single molecular level. In this article, we established a simple method of DNA stretching (to its full length) that occurred on a rotating negatively-charged surface of glass substrate. The isolation of a single DNA molecule was attained by the two competitive forces on DNA molecules, that is, the electrostatic attraction developed between the positively charged YOYO-1 stained DNA and the negatively charged substrate, and the centrifugal force of the rotating substrate, which separates the DNA aggregates into the single molecule. Density of stretched DNA molecules was controlled by selecting the specific parameters such as spinning time and rates, loading volume of DNA-dye complex solution etc. The atomic force microscopy image exhibited a single DNA molecule on the negatively-charged substrate in an isolated state. Further, the photoluminescence spectra of a single DNA molecule stained with YOYO-1 were achieved using the method developed in the present study, which is strongly believed to effectively support the spectroscopic analysis of DNA in a single molecular level.

  4. Does motor imagery enhance stretching and flexibility?

    PubMed

    Guillot, Aymeric; Tolleron, Coralie; Collet, Christian

    2010-02-01

    Although several studies have demonstrated that motor imagery can enhance learning processes and improve motor performance, little is known about its effect on stretching and flexibility. The increased active and passive range of motion reported in preliminary research has not been shown to be elicited by motor imagery training alone. We thus compared flexibility scores in 21 synchronized swimmers before and after a 5-week mental practice programme that included five stretching exercises in active and passive conditions. The imagery training programme resulted in selective increased flexibility, independently of the stretching method. Overall, the improvement in flexibility was greater in the imagery group than in the control group for the front split (F(1,18) = 4.9, P = 0.04), the hamstrings (F(1,18) = 5.2, P = 0.035), and the ankle stretching exercises (F(1,18) = 5.6, P = 0.03). There was no difference in shoulders and side-split flexibility (F(1,18) = 0.1, P = 0.73 and F(1,18) = 3.3, P = 0.08 respectively). Finally, there was no correlation between individual imagery ability and improvement in flexibility. Psychological and physiological effects of motor imagery could explain the increase in range of motion, suggesting that imagery enhances joint flexibility during both active and passive stretching.

  5. Movement and stretching imagery during flexibility training.

    PubMed

    Vergeer, Ineke; Roberts, Jenny

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of movement and stretching imagery on increases in flexibility. Thirty volunteers took part in a 4 week flexibility training programme. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) movement imagery, where participants imagined moving the limb they were stretching; (2) stretching imagery, where participants imagined the physiological processes involved in stretching the muscle; and (3) control, where participants did not engage in mental imagery. Active and passive range of motion around the hip was assessed before and after the programme. Participants provided specific ratings of vividness and comfort throughout the programme. Results showed significant increases in flexibility over time, but no differences between the three groups. A significant relationship was found, however, between improved flexibility and vividness ratings in the movement imagery group. Furthermore, both imagery groups scored significantly higher than the control group on levels of comfort, with the movement imagery group also scoring significantly higher than the stretching imagery group. We conclude that the imagery had stronger psychological than physiological effects, but that there is potential for enhancing physiological effects by maximizing imagery vividness, particularly for movement imagery.

  6. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    PubMed

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia.

  7. High stability design for new centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, H.; Katayama, K.; Morii, S.; Mouri, Y.; Umemura, S.; Ozawa, U.; Oda, T.

    1989-01-01

    It is essential that high-performance centrifugal compressors be free of subsynchronous vibrations. A new high-performance centrifugal compressor has been developed by applying the latest rotordynamics knowledge and design techniques: (1) To improve the system damping, a specially designed oil film seal was developed. This seal attained a damping ratio three times that of the conventional design. The oil film seal contains a special damper ring in the seal cartridge. (2) To reduce the destabilizing effect of the labyrinth seal, a special swirl canceler (anti-swirl nozzle) was applied to the balance piston seal. (3) To confirm the system damping margin, the dynamic simulation rotor model test and the full load test applied the vibration exciting test in actual load conditions.

  8. A centrifugal pump used as a turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, F.U.; Lasnier, F. )

    1990-06-01

    Due to the high cost of putting up conventional turbines for micro-hydropower installations, Inversin (1986) mentioned the use of pumps being run in reverse to function as turbines. Typical performance characteristics of a centrifugal pump running as a turbine are shown in a figure. Pump/turbine maximum efficiencies tend to occur over a wide range of capacity. This study is concerned with the use of non-conventional hydro equipment, locally and readily available for small rural electricity applications. Here, the operation of a small centrifugal pump, used as a turbine and coupled with a conventional car alternator, was investigated. The article reveals a method for evaluating not only this but other small generating systems for appropriateness to the conditions of the site.

  9. Spaceborne centrifugal relays for spacecraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzidane, Malika

    1991-01-01

    Acceleration using centrifugal relays is a recently discovered method for the acceleration of spaceborne payloads to high velocity at high thrust. Centrifugal relays are moving rotors which progressively accelerate reaction mass to higher velocities. One important engineering problem consists of accurately tracking the position of the projectiles and rotors and guiding each projectile exactly onto the appropriate guide tracks on each rotor. The topics of this research are the system kinematics and dynamics and the computerized guidance system which will allow the projectile to approach each rotor with exact timing with respect to the rotor rotation period and with very small errors in lateral positions. Kinematics studies include analysis of rotor and projectile positions versus time and projectile/rotor interactions. Guidance studies include a detailed description of the tracking mechanism (interrupt of optical beams) and the aiming mechanism (electromagnetic focusing) including the design of electromagnetic deflection coils and the switching circuitry.

  10. Optimum design for LRE centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zuchao; Zhang, Guoqian; Sun, Jiren

    1995-05-01

    We set up a mathematical model to predict low specific speed liquid rocket engine (LRE) centrifugal pump unit performance. Using the model in question, performance predictions were carried out for 10 types of LRE centrifugal pumps. Relative errors between experimental values and predicted values associated with efficiency and lift were all within 4%. Using the model in question, design optimization with efficiency as the target function was carried out on AM-7H and O pumps as well as AM-1R pumps and AM-50 pumps. Results clearly show that, with a presupposition of surety systems possessing high vapor corrosion characteristics, the efficiencies of these four types of pumps can be respectively raised 6.5%, 5.22%, 5.2%, and 4.41%.

  11. Mathematical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Minosyan, Ya.P.; Gerasimov, V.G.; Ryadno, A.A.; Solov'yev, Yu.G.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical description of centrifugal casting of long pipes in rapidly-rotating ingot molds is given. The effect of gravity force is neglected. A numerical solution is obtained for the solidification of a steel casting in a thermally insulated mold. The effect of the rate of metal pouring on the motion of the solidification interface is investigated. The disagreement with experimental data is less then 7 percent.

  12. Centrifugal shot blasting. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), the Facilities Closure and Demolition Projects Integrated Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) work plan calls for the removal of one inch (1 in) depth of concrete surface in areas where contamination with technetium-99 has been identified. This report describes a comparative demonstration between two concrete removal technologies: an innovative system using Centrifugal Shot Blasting (CSB) and a modified baseline technology called a rotary drum planer.

  13. Operating and maintenance guidelines for screenbowl centrifuges

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnig, W.S.R.; Bratton, R.; Luttrell, G.

    2009-01-15

    Plant dewatering circuits equipped with screenbowl centrifuges need to be well designed, properly operated, and adequately maintained to maximize the dewatering performance. The most important 'feed variables' are particle size, dry solids feed rate and slurry flow rate. The most important 'machine variables' include pool depth, rotational speed and gearbox ratio. The article discusses the effect of these parameters and offers some maintenance guidelines. The article was adapted from a paper presented at CoalPrep 2008. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Potential flow through centrifugal pumps and turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, E

    1941-01-01

    The methods of conformal transformation up to the present have been applied to the potential flows in the rotation of solid bodies only to a limited extent. This report deals with aspects of centrifugal pumps and turbines such as: the complex potential for rotation, potential for the flow due to the blade rotation, velocities at the blade tip, comparison with "infinite number of blades," and a variable number of blades.

  15. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2009-03-20

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the α channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  16. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation. PMID:22319684

  17. Femoral development in chronically centrifuged rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1977-01-01

    Groups of 30-d-old male and female rats were centrifuged at 2.00 G (RE, Rotation Experimental), 1.05 G (RC, Rotation Control) or exposed to the noise and wind of the centrifuge at 1.00 G (EC, Earth Control) for periods of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Measurements of their femurs indicated that exposure to centrifugation a) decreased femoral length in RE animals, b) increased femoral length in RC animals, c) reduced femoral diameter in RE and RC animals, d) increased L/D ratios in RC animals, e) decreased L/D ratios in RE animals, f) increased femur length/body weight in RE animals, g) decreased cortical thickness (CT) in RE animals, h) increased relative CT in RE animals, and decreased it in RC animals, i) accelerated ossification in RC femoral heads, j) thinned and distorted RE epiphyseal plates, and k) thickened condylar cartilage in RE females. The effects tended to be strongly sexually dimorphic, with females more severely affected by the stress than males.

  18. Avoid self-priming centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The self-priming horizontal centrifugal pump becomes known to its operator either as a good pump or a bad pump. The latter is usually replaced by another type of pump, even though a properly specified self-priming centrifugal pump might have been a good choice. Use of the guidelines described in this article are intended to help in the purchase and installation of a good pump. Self-priming centrifugal pumps are used for removing liquids from below grade sumps or pits that may also contain solids, fibers and/or muck. Alternate pumps for this service include submersible pumps, vertical turbine pumps and positive displacement pumps. These alternate pumps do not pass solid particles as large as self-priming pumps do without damage. Positive displacement pumps are not normally cost-effective when pumping liquid at rates in excess of 500 gallons per minute in low-head applications. Vertical and submersible pumps must be removed when cleaning of the pump is required. Self-priming pumps are easily cleaned by opening the access plates without moving the pump; and they cost less than the other types.

  19. Effects of scaling on centrifugal blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yew Wah; Chan, Weng Kong; Yu, S C M; Chua, Leok Poh

    2002-11-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of scaling on the performance of centrifugal blood pumps were conducted in a closed-loop test rig. For the prototype, eight different impellers of the same outer diameter of 25 mm were tested at 1,500, 2,000, and 2,500 revolutions per minute (rpm) using blood analog as fluid medium. This corresponds to Reynolds numbers (Re) of 25,900, 34,500, and 43,200, respectively. The results indicated that the nondimensional pump characteristic is a function of Re. This is understandable since the typical operating Re for centrifugal blood pumps is less than 100,000. Thus, the effects of scaling cannot be ignored for centrifugal blood pumps. Experiments on a 5x scaled-up model have also indicated that the scaled-up model is more efficient than the prototype model. Our results showed that in the range of Re tested, the nondimensional head versus flow curve is a function of Re to the power of approximately 0.25. It is observed that the nondimensional head versus flow is a function of diameter ratio to the power of 0.2.

  20. Research opportunities with the Centrifuge Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Glenn A.

    The Centrifuge Facility on Space Station Freedom will consist of a 2.5-meter diameter Centrifuge accommodating two concentric rings of habitats and providing variable g-forces between 0.01 g and 2.0 g; modular habitats providing housing and lifesupport for rats, mice, and plants; a habitat holding system providing power, water, airflow and other utilities to several modular habitats; and a life sciences glovebox, an isolated work volume accommodating simultaneous operations by at least two scientists and providing lighting, airflow, video and data access, and other experiment support functions. The centrifuge facility will enable long-duration animal and plant microgravity research not previously possible in the NASA flight research program. It will offer unprecedented opportunities for use of on-board 1-g control populations and statistically significant numbers of specimens. On orbit 1-g controls will allow separation of the effects of microgravity from other environmental factors. Its selectable-g and simultaneous multiple-g capabilities will enable studies of gravitational thresholds, the use of artificial gravity as a countermeasure to the effects of microgravity, and ready simulation of Lunar and Martian gravities.

  1. Research opportunities with the Centrifuge Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Glenn A.

    1992-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility on Space Station Freedom will consist of a 2.5-meter diameter Centrifuge accommodating two concentric rings of habitats and providing variable g-forces between 0.01 g and 2.0 g; modular habitats providing housing and lifesupport for rats, mice, and plants; a habitat holding system providing power, water, airflow and other utilities to several modular habitats; and a life sciences glovebox, an isolated work volume accommodating simultaneous operations by at least two scientists and providing lighting, airflow, video and data access, and other experiment support functions. The centrifuge facility will enable long-duration animal and plant microgravity research not previously possible in the NASA flight research program. It will offer unprecedented opportunities for use of on-board 1-g control populations and statistically significant numbers of specimens. On orbit 1-g controls will allow separation of the effects of microgravity from other environmental factors. Its selectable-g and simultaneous multiple-g capabilities will enable studies of gravitational thresholds, the use of artificial gravity as a countermeasure to the effects of microgravity, and ready simulation of Lunar and Martian gravities.

  2. Shallow water model for horizontal centrifugal casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boháček, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model was proposed to simulate the solidification process of an outer shell of work roll made by the horizontal centrifugal casting technique. Shallow water model was adopted to solve the 2D average flow dynamics of melt spreading and the average temperature distribution inside the centrifugal casting mould by considering the centrifugal force, Coriolis force, viscous force due to zero velocity on the mould wall, gravity, and energy transport by the flow. Additionally, a 1D sub-model was implemented to consider the heat transfer in the radial direction from the solidifying shell to the mould. The solidification front was tracked by fulfilling the Stefan condition. Radiative and convective heat losses were included from both, the free liquid surface and the outer wall of the mould. Several cases were simulated with the following assumed initial conditions: constant height of the liquid metal (10, 20, and 30 mm), uniform temperature of the free liquid surface (1755 K). The simulation results have shown that while the solidification front remained rather flat, the free surface was disturbed by waves. The amplitude of waves increased with the liquid height. Free surface waves diminished as the solidification proceeded.

  3. Compact, Automated Centrifugal Slide-Staining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Directional Acceleration Vector-Driven Displacement of Fluids (DAVD-DOF) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, would be a relatively compact, automated, centrifugally actuated system for staining blood smears and other microbiological samples on glass microscope slides in either a microgravitational or a normal Earth gravitational environment. The DAVD-DOF concept is a successor to the centrifuge-operated slide stainer (COSS) concept, which was reported in Slide-Staining System for Microgravity or Gravity (MSC-22949), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 64. The COSS includes reservoirs and a staining chamber that contains a microscope slide to which a biological sample is affixed. The staining chamber is sequentially filled with and drained of staining and related liquids from the reservoirs by use of a weighted plunger to force liquid from one reservoir to another at a constant level of hypergravity maintained in a standard swing-bucket centrifuge. In the DAVD-DOF system, a staining chamber containing a sample would also be sequentially filled and emptied, but with important differences. Instead of a simple microscope slide, one would use a special microscope slide on which would be fabricated a network of very small reservoirs and narrow channels connected to a staining chamber (see figure). Unlike in the COSS, displacement of liquid would be effected by use of the weight of the liquid itself, rather than the weight of a plunger.

  4. Centrifugal microfluidic platform for radiochemistry: potentialities for the chemical analysis of nuclear spent fuels.

    PubMed

    Bruchet, Anthony; Taniga, Vélan; Descroix, Stéphanie; Malaquin, Laurent; Goutelard, Florence; Mariet, Clarisse

    2013-11-15

    The use of a centrifugal microfluidic platform is for the first time reported as an alternative to classical chromatographic procedures for radiochemistry. The original design of the microfluidic platform has been thought to fasten and simplify the prototyping process with the use of a circular platform integrating four rectangular microchips made of thermoplastic. The microchips, dedicated to anion-exchange chromatographic separations, integrate a localized monolithic stationary phase as well as injection and collection reservoirs. The results presented here were obtained with a simplified simulated nuclear spent fuel sample composed of non-radioactive isotopes of Europium and Uranium, in proportion usually found for uranium oxide nuclear spent fuel. While keeping the analytical results consistent with the conventional procedure (extraction yield for Europium of ≈97%), the use of the centrifugal microfluidic platform allowed to reduce the volume of liquid needed by a factor of ≈250. Thanks to their unique "easy-to-use" features, centrifugal microfluidic platforms are potential successful candidates for the downscaling of chromatographic separation of radioactive samples (automation, multiplexing, easy integration in glove-boxes environment and low cost of maintenance).

  5. Stretched arc discharge in produced water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y I; Wright, K C; Kim, H S; Cho, D J; Rabinovich, A; Fridman, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost.

  6. Optical Data Compression in Time Stretch Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch imaging offers real-time image acquisition at millions of frames per second and subnanosecond shutter speed, and has enabled detection of rare cancer cells in blood with record throughput and specificity. An unintended consequence of high throughput image acquisition is the massive amount of digital data generated by the instrument. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of real-time optical image compression applied to time stretch imaging. By exploiting the sparsity of the image, we reduce the number of samples and the amount of data generated by the time stretch camera in our proof-of-concept experiments by about three times. Optical data compression addresses the big data predicament in such systems. PMID:25906244

  7. Proton tunneling: a decay channel of the O-H stretch mode in KTaO3.

    PubMed

    Spahr, E J; Wen, L; Stavola, M; Boatner, L A; Feldman, L C; Tolk, N H; Lüpke, G

    2009-02-20

    The vibrational lifetimes of the O-H and O-D stretch modes in the perovskite oxide KTaO3 are measured by pump-probe infrared spectroscopy. Both stretch modes are exceptionally long lived and exhibit a large "reverse" isotope effect, due to a phonon-assisted proton-tunneling process, which involves the O-Ta-O bending motion. The excited-state tunneling rate is found to be 7 orders of magnitude larger than from the ground state in the proton conducting oxide, BaCeO3 [Phys. Rev. B 60, R3713 (1999)].

  8. Overextended sarcomeres regain filament overlap following stretch.

    PubMed

    Panchangam, Appaji; Herzog, Walter

    2012-09-21

    Sarcomere overextension has been widely implicated in stretch-induced muscle injury. Yet, sarcomere overextensions are typically inferred based on indirect evidence obtained in muscle and fibre preparations, where individual sarcomeres cannot be observed during dynamic contractions. Therefore, it remains unclear whether sarcomere overextensions are permanent following injury-inducing stretch-shortening cycles, and thus, if they can explain stretch-induced force loss. We tested the hypothesis that overextended sarcomeres can regain filament overlap in isolated myofibrils from rabbit psoas muscles. Maximally activated myofibrils (n=13) were stretched from an average sarcomere length of 2.6±0.04μm by 0.9μm sarcomere(-1) at a speed of 0.1μm sarcomere(-1)s(-1) and immediately returned to the starting lengths at the same speed (sarcomere strain=34.1±2.3%). Myofibrils were then allowed to contract isometrically at the starting lengths (2.6μm) for ∼30s before relaxing. Force and individual sarcomere lengths were measured continuously. Out of the 182 sarcomeres, 35 sarcomeres were overextended at the peak of stretch, out of which 26 regained filament overlap in the shortening phase while 9 (∼5%) remained overextended. About 35% of the sarcomeres with initial lengths on the descending limb of the force-length relationship and ∼2% of the sarcomeres with shorter initial lengths were overextended. These findings provide first ever direct evidence that overextended sarcomeres can regain filament overlap in the shortening phase following stretch, and that the likelihood of overextension is higher for sarcomeres residing initially on the descending limb.

  9. Transuranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1985-12-01

    The needs of the research community for the production of transuranium isotopes, the quantities required, the continuity of production desired, and what a new steady state neutron source would have to provide to satisfy these needs are discussed. Examples of past frontier research which need these isotopes as well as an outline of the proposed Large Einsteinium Activation Program, LEAP, which requires roughly ten times the current production of /sup 254/Es are given. 15 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Isotopic chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, H.G.

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  11. Cloud Network Helps Stretch IT Dollars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Hilton

    2012-01-01

    No matter how many car washes or bake sales schools host to raise money, adding funds to their coffers is a recurring problem. This perpetual financial difficulty makes expansive technology purchases or changes seem like a pipe dream for school CIOs and has education technologists searching for ways to stretch money. In 2005, state K-12 school…

  12. [Rapid centrifugation assay standarization for dengue virus isolation].

    PubMed

    Palomino, Miryam; Gutierrez, Victoria; Salas, Ramses

    2010-03-01

    The plate centrifugation assay was standardized for dengue virus isolation from serum samples. C6/36-HT cells were used determining the optimal values for centrifugation spin speed, inoculum, sera dilution, and incubation time. Then, 22 positive serum samples with viral isolation and viral strains of the four reference dengue virus serotypes were tested simultaneously by the standardized plate centrifugation method and the conventional tube culture. The isolations were typified by indirect immunofluorescent test using monoclonal antibodies. The plate centrifugation method was optimized to 200 μL of inoculum, dilution of sera 1/20, centrifugation speed at 1600 rpm/30 min, and sensitivity of 95,5% after 5 days post-inoculation. We concluded that the plate centrifugation method increased dengue virus isolation, with a significant reduction of the time of isolation for dengue virus.

  13. The ν5 antisymmetric stretching mode of linear C7 revisited in high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, J.; Lutter, V.; Hardy, F.-X.; Schlemmer, S.; Giesen, T. F.

    2010-06-01

    The ν5 antisymmetric stretching mode of the linear carbon cluster C7 has been revisited using a sensitive high-resolution spectrometer, including an external-cavity quantum cascade laser covering the range of interest of 1894-1901 cm-1. 50 transitions of the ν5-band have been recorded and analyzed together with 45 transitions of the ν4-band measured by Neubauer-Guenther et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 014313 (2007)]. We determined the band centers, rotational and centrifugal constants very precisely. In addition, 29 hot band transitions have been measured and tentatively assigned to the ν5+ν11-ν11 hot band. A global fit of the hot bands ν5+ν11-ν11 and ν4+ν11-ν11 is presented. Derived l-type doubling constants allow for an experimental estimation of the ν11-band center.

  14. Laminar flow effects in the coil planet centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1984-01-01

    The coil planet centrifuge designed by Ito employs flow of a single liquid phase, through a rotating coiled tube in a centrifugal force field, to provide a separation of particles based on sedimentation rates. Mathematical solutions are derived for the linear differential equations governing particle behavior in the coil planet centrifuge device. These solutions are then applied as the basis of a model for optimizing particle separations.

  15. Modeling Platform Dynamics and Physiological Response to Short Arm Centrifugation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    parametric design study for a small radius centrifuge revealed such a centrifuge could fit on the NASA Space Shuttle and provide artificial gravity and...the heart are modelled as variable capacitances separated by one-way valves. The pulmonic and aortic valves are also modelled as one-way valves. The...1992 June. 10. Halstead, TW; Brown, AH; Fuller, CA; Oyama, J. Artificial gravity studies and design considerations for space station centrifuges

  16. Theory and experiments on centrifuge cratering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. M.; Holsapple, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Centrifuge experimental techniques provide possibilities for laboratory simulation of ground motion and cratering effects due to explosive loadings. The results of a similarity analysis for the thermomechanical response of a continuum show that increased gravity is a necessary condition for subscale testing when identical materials for both model and prototype are being used. The general similarity requirements for this type of subscale testing are examined both theoretically and experimentally. The similarity analysis is used to derive the necessary and sufficient requirements due to the general balance and jump equations and gives relations among all the scale factors for size, density, stress, body forces, internal energy, heat supply, heat conduction, heat of detonation, and time. Additional constraints due to specific choices of material constitutive equations are evaluated separately. The class of constitutive equations that add no further requirements is identified. For this class of materials, direct simulation of large-scale cratering events at small scale on the centrifuge is possible and independent of the actual constitutive equations. For a rate-independent soil it is shown that a small experiment at gravity g and energy E is similar to a large event at 1 G but with energy equal to g3E. Consequently, experiments at 500 G with 8 grams of explosives can be used to simulate a kiloton in the field. A series of centrifuge experiments was performed to validate the derived similarity requirements and to determine the practicality of applying the technique to dry granular soils having little or no cohesion. Ten shots using Ottawa sand at various gravities confirmed reproducibility of results in the centrifuge environment, provided information on particle size effects, and demonstrated the applicability of the derived similitude requirements. These experiments used 0.5-4 grams of pentaerythritol-tetranitrate (PETN) and 1.7 grams of lead-azide explosives. They

  17. Impeller blade design method for centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, W.; Kirschner, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The design of a centrifugal impeller with blades that are aerodynamically efficient, easy to manufacture, and mechanically sound is discussed. The blade design method described here satisfies the first two criteria and with a judicious choice of certain variables will also satisfy stress considerations. The blade shape is generated by specifying surface velocity distributions and consists of straight-line elements that connect points at hub and shroud. The method may be used to design radially elemented and backward-swept blades. The background, a brief account of the theory, and a sample design are described.

  18. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a mega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead, we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. This method was devised for optical mapping of DNA, specifically, DNA denaturation patterns. It may be useful also for other studies, e.g., DNA-protein interactions, specifically, their tension dependence. Generally, wherever long strands of DNA—e.g., native DNA extracted from human cells or bacteria—must be stretched with ease for inspection, this method applies.

  19. Autobalancing and FDIR for a space-based centrifuge prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward; Mah, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes centrifuge-related work performed at the Smart Systems Research Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center's Computational Sciences Division from 1995 through 2003. The goal is to develop an automated system that will sense an imbalance (both static and dynamic3) in a centrifuge and issue control commands to drive counterweights to eliminate the effects of the imbalance. This autobalancing development began when the ISS centrifuge design was not yet finalized, and was designed to work with the SSRL Centrifuge laboratory prototype, constructed in 1993-1995. Significant differences between that prototype and the current International Space Station (ISS) Centrifuge design are that: the spin axis for the SSRL Centrifuge prototype can translate freely in x and y, but not wobble, whereas the ISS centrifuge spin axis has 3 translational and two rotational degrees of freedom, supported by a vibration 34. The imbalance sensors are strained gauges both in the rotor and the stator, measuring the imbalance forces, whereas the ISS centrifuge uses eddy current displacement sensors to measure the displacements resulting from imbalance. High fidelity autobalancing and FDIR systems (for both counterweights and strain gauges) are developed and tested in MATLAB simulation, for the SSRL Centrifuge configuration. Hardware implementation of the autobalancing technology was begun in 1996, but was terminated due to lack of funding. The project lay dormant until 2001-2002 when the FDIR capability was added.

  20. Effects of centrifugation on gonadal and adrenocortical steroids in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakihana, R.; Butte, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Many endocrine systems are sensitive to external changes in the environment. Both the pituitary adrenal and pituitary gonadal systems are affected by stress including centrifugation stress. The effect of centrifugation on the pituitary gonadal and pituitary adrenocortical systems was examined by measuring the gonadal and adrenal steroids in the plasma and brain following different duration and intensity of centrifugation stress in rats. Two studies were completed and the results are presented. The second study was carried out to describe the developmental changes of brain, plasma and testicular testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in Sprague Dawley rats so that the effect of centrifugation stress on the pituitary gonadal syatem could be better evaluated in future studies.

  1. 77 FR 9273 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... American Centrifuge Operating, LLC (ACO), pursuant to Sections 161(b), 161(i), 161(o) and 184 of the Atomic... that due to uncertainty, it appears that the date for completion of activities associated with the sub... be completed. IV Accordingly, pursuant to Sections 161b, 161i, 161o, and 184 of the Atomic Energy...

  2. Development of a 3D circular microfluidic centrifuge for the separation of mixed particles by using their different centrifuge times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kim, D. I.; Kim, M. J.; Nguyen, X. D.; Park, D. H.; Go, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a circular microfluidic centrifuge with two inlets and two outlets to separate mixed microparticles with a specially designed sample injection hole. To separate the mixed particles, it uses a rotational flow, generated in a chamber by counter primary flows in the microchannels. The shape and sizes of the circular microfluidic centrifuge have been designed through numerical evaluation to have a large relative centrifugal force. The difference of centrifuge times of the mixed particles of 1 μm and 6 μm was determined to be 8.2 s at an inlet Reynolds number of 500 and a sample Reynolds number of 20. In the experiment, this was measured to be about 10 s. From the separation of the two polymer particles analogous to the representative sizes of platelets and red blood cells, the circular microfluidic centrifuge shows a potential to separate human blood cells size-selectively by using the difference of centrifuge times.

  3. Centrifugation of coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Weintraub, Murray; Weiss, Milton L.; Akhtar, Sayeed

    1980-06-01

    The application of the continuous solid bowl centrifuge to the removal of solids from coal liquefaction products was investigated. The centrifuge removed from 23 to 88% of the input ash from 8 to 73% of the input organic benzene insolubles while flow rates, viscosities, and dam heights were varied. Viscosity ..mu.., effluent liquid rate Q/sub e/, and Ambler's geometric parameter ..sigma.. were graphically correlated with attained separations. The separation was relatively insensitive to the variables, as a 50-fold increase in Q/sub e//..sigma.. corresponded to a decrease in ash removal only from 84% to 60% and to a decrease in organic solids removal only from 77% to 22%. Organic solids removal was poorer and more erratic than ash removal because of the lesser density differences and greater size variability of the organics. Ancillary studies demonstrated that coal liquefaction products may behave as a Bingham Plastic fluid, and that this results in an absolute limit on the attainable solids separation. Additional studies showed that little difference in density may exist between the organic solids and liquids, and that effects of aging may threaten the validity of viscosity measurements.

  4. Some aversive characteristics of centrifugally generated gravity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, F.

    1973-01-01

    The effective weight of rats was manipulated by centrifugation. Two effective weight levels were obtained. In three escape avoidance conditions a lever press produced a change from a base level of 2.1 g to a response level of 1.1 g. In a punishment condition a response produced a change from a 1.1 g level to a 2.1 g level and in an extinction condition responses had no effect on the 2.1 g effective weight level present. All changes took 30 sec and were maintained for an additional 10 sec before a return to base level was initiated. When responses occurred closer together than the 40 sec, they delayed the return to base level by 40 sec. This 40 sec interval is referred to as response-contingent-time. The response rate and amount of response-contingent-time served as the data. The results confirmed previous data that centrifugation is aversive. The results are interpreted as indicating that the aversiveness is attributable to the increase in effective weight, and that rats can discriminate the different angular velocity-radius of rotation combinations used.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Centrifugal Compressor Stabilization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    Results from a series of experiments to investigate techniques for extending the stable flow range of a centrifugal compressor are reported. The research was conducted in a high-speed centrifugal compressor at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The stabilizing effect of steadily flowing air-streams injected into the vaneless region of a vane-island diffuser through the shroud surface is described. Parametric variations of injection angle, injection flow rate, number of injectors, injector spacing, and injection versus bleed were investigated for a range of impeller speeds and tip clearances. Both the compressor discharge and an external source were used for the injection air supply. The stabilizing effect of flow obstructions created by tubes that were inserted into the diffuser vaneless space through the shroud was also investigated. Tube immersion into the vaneless space was varied in the flow obstruction experiments. Results from testing done at impeller design speed and tip clearance are presented. Surge margin improved by 1.7 points using injection air that was supplied from within the compressor. Externally supplied injection air was used to return the compressor to stable operation after being throttled into surge. The tubes, which were capped to prevent mass flux, provided 9.3 points of additional surge margin over the baseline surge margin of 11.7 points.

  6. Centrifugally Stimulated Exospheric Ion Escape at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Seki, K.; Terada, N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the transport of ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere magnetosphere of Mercury. We show that, because of small spatial scales, the centrifugal effect due to curvature of the E B drift paths can lead to significant particle energization in the parallel direction. We demonstrate that because of this effect, ions with initial speed smaller than the escape speed such as those produced via thermal desorption can overcome gravity and escape into the magnetosphere. The escape route of this low-energy exosphere originating material is largely controlled by the magnetospheric convection rate. This escape route spreads over a narrower range of altitudes when the convection rate increases. Bulk transport of low-energy planetary material thus occurs within a limited region of space once moderate magnetospheric convection is established. These results suggest that, via release of material otherwise gravitationally trapped, the E B related centrifugal acceleration is an important mechanism for the net supply of plasma to the magnetosphere of Mercury.

  7. Wave Augmented Diffusers for Centrifugal Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Skoch, Gary J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual device is introduced which would utilize unsteady wave motion to slow and turn flows in the diffuser section of a centrifugal compressor. The envisioned device would substantially reduce the size of conventional centrifugal diffusers by eliminating the relatively large ninety degree bend needed to turn the flow from the radial/tangential to the axial direction. The bend would be replaced by a wall and the flow would instead exit through a series of rotating ports located on a disk, adjacent to the diffuser hub, and fixed to the impeller shaft. The ports would generate both expansion and compression waves which would rapidly transition from the hub/shroud (axial) direction to the radial/tangential direction. The waves would in turn induce radial/tangential and axial flow. This paper presents a detailed description of the device. Simplified cycle analysis and performance results are presented which were obtained using a time accurate, quasi-one-dimensional CFD code with models for turning, port flow conditions, and losses due to wall shear stress. The results indicate that a periodic wave system can be established which yields diffuser performance comparable to a conventional diffuser. Discussion concerning feasibility, accuracy, and integration follow.

  8. Development of an implantable centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, A H; Pacella, J J; Trumble, D R; Clark, R E

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of centrifugal pumps for short-term (0-30 days) ventricular support has been widely reported and favorably compared with pulsatile systems. A small, durable, implantable centrifugal blood pump is being developed for medium-term use (up to 6 months). The pump is based on the Medtronic Hemadyne system that has existed in multiple forms over the past 30 years. The pump is approximately the size of a tennis ball, weighs 240 g, and is comprised of a 2.5 cm plastic impeller driven by a radially coupled brushless DC motor. In vitro hydraulic performance was recorded over a wide range of flow conditions on a mock circulatory loop. The pump generated 7 L/min flow against an afterload of 100 mmHg pressure, with a maximum power draw of 10.4 watts. Pulsatile flow was preserved when placed in conjunction with a simulated left ventricle. In vivo testing was performed in 10 healthy sheep for 10-292 hr. Heparin was used to facilitate cannulation, and no anticoagulation was administered after pump implantation. Blood chemistries reflecting hematologic, pulmonary, renal, and hepatic functions were recorded and demonstrated no adverse effects with normal pump operation. Complications were related to kinking of blood conduits and thrombus formation within the cannulae. These results are encouraging and warrant further studies to prove feasibility of this pump as a medium-term implantable ventricular assist device.

  9. ISOTOPE SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, C.G.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

  10. NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW ACROSS CANAL PRISM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW ACROSS CANAL PRISM TO TOWPATH BERM (LATER FILL ENCROACHING LEFT) NEAR CENTER OF THIS STRETCH; VIEW TO SOUTHWEST - Blackstone Canal Worcester-Millbury Segment, Eastern bank of Blackstone River, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  11. Power transmission mechanism equipped with fluid and centrifugal clutch

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, K.; Takeshita, S.; Fukunaga, T.

    1986-12-30

    This patent describes a power transmission mechanism equipped with a fluid coupling, an input shaft thereof interconnected to a power source being interconnected through the fluid coupling to an output shaft, and the output shaft being interconnected to a forward-rearward changeover mechanism including a speed changer. It is characterized in that the fluid coupling includes a shell, an impeller in the shell and a centrifugal clutch means in the shell for engaging the impeller and for driving the impeller when the shell is rotated by the input shaft at a speed above idle speed and for disengaging the impeller and the driving of the impeller when the shell is rotated by the input shaft at the idle speed. A turbine is included in the shell for standing idle in the shell when the centrifugal clutch means is disengaged and for drive by the impeller when the centrifugal clutch means is engaged and for driving the output shaft. The centrifugal clutch means comprises a support member fixed to the shell, a centrifugal shoe mounted on the support member for radial movement outwardly of the support member by centrifugal force and radial movement inwardly toward the support member. It also comprises spring means for moving the shoe inwardly toward the support member when the shell is rotated at idle speed, a cylindrical casing fixed to the impeller radially outward from the shoe and having an engaging surface for engagement by the centrifugal shoe when the shell is rotated at a speed above idle speed and the centrifugal shoe is moved radially outward by centrifugal force. The forward-rearward changeover mechanism, including the speed changer, is driven by the turbine when the centrifugal clutch means is engaged with the engaging surface and standing idle when the centrifugal clutch means is disengaged from the engaging surface and the turbine is standing idle.

  12. Vibrational overtone stretching transitions in sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Michael W. P.

    2006-10-01

    The CH stretching overtone transitions of the nerve agent sarin (O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) are of interest to the standoff detection of chemical warfare agents, as many of these transitions occur near regions where small, efficient, portable diode lasers (originally developed for use in the telecommunications industry) operate. However, the interpretation of experimental vibrational overtone spectra is often difficult, and the computational simulation of overtone transitions in a molecule is challenging. Presented herein are the simulated CH overtone stretching transitions in sarin. Spectral regions are simulated from overtone transition energies and intensities, both of which are calculated within the harmonically coupled anharmonic oscillator (HCAO) model. Data for HCAO calculations are obtained from ab initio calculations, without any recourse to experimental data.

  13. Stretched cell cycle model for proliferating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Mark R.; Kan, Andrey; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Marchingo, Julia M.; Wellard, Cameron J.; Markham, John F.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic variation in cell cycle time is a consistent feature of otherwise similar cells within a growing population. Classic studies concluded that the bulk of the variation occurs in the G1 phase, and many mathematical models assume a constant time for traversing the S/G2/M phases. By direct observation of transgenic fluorescent fusion proteins that report the onset of S phase, we establish that dividing B and T lymphocytes spend a near-fixed proportion of total division time in S/G2/M phases, and this proportion is correlated between sibling cells. This result is inconsistent with models that assume independent times for consecutive phases. Instead, we propose a stretching model for dividing lymphocytes where all parts of the cell cycle are proportional to total division time. Data fitting based on a stretched cell cycle model can significantly improve estimates of cell cycle parameters drawn from DNA labeling data used to monitor immune cell dynamics. PMID:24733943

  14. Stretching cells and delivering drugs with bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Li, Fenfang; Chon U, Chan; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we'll review our work on impulsive cell stretching using cavitation bubbles and magnetic microbubbles for drug delivery. For sufficient short times cells can sustain a much larger areal strain than the yield strain obtained from quasi-static stretching. Experiments with red blood cells show that even then the rupture of the cell is slow process; it is caused by diffusive swelling rather than mechanical violation of the plasma membrane. In the second part we'll discuss bubbles coated with magnetic and drug loaded particles. These bubbles offer an interesting vector for on demand delivery of drugs using mild ultrasound and magnetic fields. We report on basic experiments in microfluidic channels revealing the release of the agent during bubble oscillations and first in vivo validation with a mouse tumor model. Singapore National Research Foundations Competitive Research Program funding (NRF-CRP9-2011-04).

  15. The role of stretching in tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, E; Mahieu, N; Roosen, P; McNair, P

    2007-04-01

    The function of tendons can be classified into two categories: tensile force transmission, and storage and release of elastic energy during locomotion. The action of tendons in storing and releasing energy is mainly seen in sports activities with stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs). The more intense the SSC movements are (jumping-like activities), the more frequently tendon problems are observed. High SSC movements impose high loads on tendons. Consequently, tendons that frequently deal with high SSC motion require a high energy-absorbing capacity to store and release this large amount of elastic energy. As the elasticity of tendon structures is a leading factor in the amount of stored energy, prevention and rehabilitation programmes for tendon injuries should focus on increasing this tendon elasticity in athletes performing high SSC movements. Recently, it has been shown that ballistic stretching can significantly increase tendon elasticity. These findings have important clinical implications for treatment and prevention of tendon injuries.

  16. Modeling aftershocks as a stretched exponential relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-11-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Although other expressions have been proposed in recent decades to describe the temporal behavior of aftershocks, the number of model comparisons remains limited. After reviewing the aftershock models published from the late nineteenth century until today, I solely compare the power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential expressions defined in their simplest forms. By applying statistical methods recommended recently in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simple relaxation process, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.

  17. NASA/MSFC Large Stretch Press Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, M. W.; Nealson, W. P.; Jay, G. C.; Buss, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: A. assess and document the advantages/disadvantages of a government agency investment in a large stretch form press on the order of 5000 tons capacity (per jaw); B. develop a procurement specification for the press; and C. provide trade study data that will permit an optimum site location. Tasks were separated into four major elements: cost study, user survey, site selection, and press design/procurement specification.

  18. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  19. Dynamo theory, vorticity generation, and exponential stretching.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Susan; Vishik, Misha M.

    1991-08-01

    A discussion is given of the analogy between the dynamo equation for the generation of a magnetic field by the motion of an electrically conducting fluid and the equation for the evolution of vorticity of a viscous fluid. In both cases exponential stretching is an important feature of the underlying instability problem. For the "fast" dynamo problem, the existence of exponential stretching (i.e., the positivity of the Lyapunov exponent) somewhere in the flow is a necessary condition when the flow is smooth. An example is presented of a flow with exponential stretching (an Anosov flow) that supports fast dynamo action. A parallel treatment is described for the linearized Navier-Stokes equations for the motion of a viscous fluid. In this problem the analogous necessary condition for "fast vorticity generation" is the existence of some instability in the corresponding Euler (i.e., inviscid) equation. Dynamo theory methods give a second related result, namely a universal geometric estimate from below on the growth rate of a small perturbation in an inviscid fluid. This bound gives an effective sufficient condition for local instability for Eulers equations. In particular, it is proved that a steady flow with a hyperbolic stagnation point is unstable. The growth rate of an infinitesimal perturbation in a metric with derivatives depends on this metric. This dependence is completely described.

  20. Stretch Moduli of Ribonucleotide Embedded Short DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of DNA is essential to comprehending the dynamics of many cellular functions. DNA deformations are involved in many mechanisms when genetic information needs to be stored and used. In addition, recent studies have found that Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) are among the most common non-standard nucleotides present in DNA. The presences of rNMPs in DNA might cause mutation, fragility or genotoxicity of chromosome but how they influence the structure and mechanical properties of DNA remains unclear. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based single molecule spectroscopy, we measure the stretch moduli of double stranded DNAs (dsDNA) with 30 base pairs and 5 equally embedded rNMPs. The dsDNAs are anchored on gold substrate via thiol chemistry, while the AFM tip is used to pick up and stretch the dsDNA from its free end through biotin-streptavidin bonding. Our preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of rNMPs in dsDNA might significantly change its stretch modulus, which might be important in some biological processes.

  1. Sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    De Bustos, Alfredo; Cuadrado, Angeles; Jouve, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is widespread in eukaryotic genomes, in some cases making up more than 80% of the total. SSRs are a type of repetitive DNA formed by short motifs repeated in tandem arrays. In some species, SSRs may be organized into long stretches, usually associated with the constitutive heterochromatin. Variation in repeats can alter the expression of genes, and changes in the number of repeats have been linked to certain human diseases. Unfortunately, the molecular characterization of these repeats has been hampered by technical limitations related to cloning and sequencing. Indeed, most sequenced genomes contain gaps owing to repetitive DNA-related assembly difficulties. This paper reports an alternative method for sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA based on the combined use of 1) a linear vector to stabilize the cloning process, and 2) the use of exonuclease III for obtaining progressive deletions of SSR-rich fragments. This strategy allowed the sequencing of a fragment containing a stretch of 6.2 kb of continuous SSRs. To demonstrate that this procedure can sequence other kinds of repetitive DNA, it was used to examine a 4.5 kb fragment containing a cluster of 15 repeats of the 5S rRNA gene of barley. PMID:27819354

  2. High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.; Jongwook, Joo; Hardin, Larry W.; McCormick, Duane C.; Cousins, William T.; Lurie, Elizabeth A.; Shabbir, Aamir; Holley, Brian M.; Van Slooten, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The report "High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications" documents the work conducted at UTRC under the NRA Contract NNC08CB03C, with cost share 2/3 NASA, and 1/3 UTRC, that has been extended to 4.5 years. The purpose of this effort was to identify key technical barriers to advancing the state-of-the-art of small centrifugal compressor stages; to delineate the measurements required to provide insight into the flow physics of the technical barriers; to design, fabricate, install, and test a state-of-the-art research compressor that is representative of the rear stage of an axial-centrifugal aero-engine; and to acquire detailed aerodynamic performance and research quality data to clarify flow physics and to establish detailed data sets for future application. The design activity centered on meeting the goal set outlined in the NASA solicitation-the design target was to increase efficiency at higher work factor, while also reducing the maximum diameter of the stage. To fit within the existing Small Engine Components Test Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and to facilitate component re-use, certain key design parameters were fixed by UTRC, including impeller tip diameter, impeller rotational speed, and impeller inlet hub and shroud radii. This report describes the design effort of the High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage (HECC) and delineation of measurements, fabrication of the compressor, and the initial tests that were performed. A new High-Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage with a very challenging reduction in radius ratio was successfully designed, fabricated and installed at GRC. The testing was successful, with no mechanical problems and the running clearances were achieved without impeller rubs. Overall, measured pressure ratio of 4.68, work factor of 0.81, and at design exit corrected flow rate of 3 lbm/s met the target requirements. Polytropic efficiency of 85.5 percent and stall margin of 7.5 percent were

  3. Parameter Study of Melt Spun Polypropylene Fibers by Centrifugal Spinning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    including drawing, template synthesis, phase separation, self- assembly, and electrospinning . Most methods are only relevant on a laboratory scale...attention as an alternative to electrospinning , the most common nanofiber formation method. Fibers of low dielectric constants and insoluble polymers that...generally cannot be used in electrospinning can be produced through centrifugal spinning. The centrifugal spinning process has several key

  4. Coil planet centrifugation as a means for small particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    The coil planet centrifuge uses a centrifugal force field to provide separation of particles based on differences in sedimentation rates by flow through a rotating coiled tube. Three main separations are considered: (1) single phase fresh sheep and human erythrocytes, (2) single phase fixed heep and human erythrocytes, and (3) electrophoretically enhanced single phase fresh sheep and human erythrocytes.

  5. Centrifugal Barrel Finishing Of Turbine-Blade "Fir Trees"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.

    1990-01-01

    Modified centrifugal barrel-finishing machine imparts desired residual compressive stresses to "fir trees" of turbine blades. Centrifugal forces generate compressive stresses, which are transmitted to turbine blades through abrasive slurries in which suspended. Eliminates need for shot peening, rounding of edges and burrs caused by shot peening and, consequently, need for mass finishing operations to remove burrs. Improves surface finish of "fir trees".

  6. Large-scale and highly efficient synthesis of micro- and nano-fibers with controlled fiber morphology by centrifugal jet spinning for tissue regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Liyun; Pandit, Vaibhav; Elkin, Joshua; Denman, Tyler; Cooper, James A.; Kotha, Shiva P.

    2013-02-01

    PLLA fibrous tissue scaffolds with controlled fiber nanoscale surface roughness are fabricated with a novel centrifugal jet spinning process. The centrifugal jet spinning technique is a highly efficient synthesis method for micron- to nano-sized fibers with a production rate up to 0.5 g min-1. During the centrifugal jet spinning process, a polymer solution jet is stretched by the centrifugal force of a rotating chamber. By engineering the rheological properties of the polymer solution, solvent evaporation rate and centrifugal force that are applied on the solution jet, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) composite fibers with various diameters are fabricated. Viscosity measurements of polymer solutions allowed us to determine critical polymer chain entanglement limits that allow the generation of continuous fiber as opposed to beads or beaded fibers. Above a critical concentration at which polymer chains are partially or fully entangled, lower polymer concentrations and higher centrifugal forces resulted in thinner fibers. Etching of PVP from the PLLA-PVP composite fibers doped with increasing PVP concentrations yielded PLLA fibers with increasing nano-scale surface roughness and porosity, which increased the fiber hydrophilicity dramatically. Scanning electron micrographs of the etched composite fibers suggest that PVP and PLLA were co-contiguously phase separated within the composite fibers during spinning and nano-scale roughness features were created after the partial etching of PVP. To study the tissue regeneration efficacy of the engineered PLLA fiber matrix, human dermal fibroblasts are used to simulate partial skin graft. Fibers with increased PLLA surface roughness and porosity demonstrated a trend towards higher cell attachment and proliferation.PLLA fibrous tissue scaffolds with controlled fiber nanoscale surface roughness are fabricated with a novel centrifugal jet spinning process. The centrifugal jet spinning technique is a

  7. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Del P.; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Behm, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key points The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. PMID:24149890

  8. Bubble Eliminator Based on Centrifugal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The fluid bubble eliminator (FBE) is a device that removes gas bubbles from a flowing liquid. The FBE contains no moving parts and does not require any power input beyond that needed to pump the liquid. In the FBE, the buoyant force for separating the gas from the liquid is provided by a radial pressure gradient associated with a centrifugal flow of the liquid and any entrained bubbles. A device based on a similar principle is described in Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System (MSC- 22863), which appears on page 48 of this issue. The FBE was originally intended for use in filtering bubbles out of a liquid flowing relatively slowly in a bioreactor system in microgravity. Versions that operate in normal Earth gravitation at greater flow speeds may also be feasible. The FBE (see figure) is constructed as a cartridge that includes two concentric cylinders with flanges at the ends. The outer cylinder is an impermeable housing; the inner cylinder comprises a gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane covering a perforated inner tube. Multiple spiral disks that collectively constitute a spiral ramp are mounted in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The liquid enters the FBE through an end flange, flows in the annular space between the cylinders, and leaves through the opposite end flange. The spiral disks channel the liquid into a spiral flow, the circumferential component of which gives rise to the desired centrifugal effect. The resulting radial pressure gradient forces the bubbles radially inward; that is, toward the inner cylinder. At the inner cylinder, the gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane allows the bubbles to enter the perforated inner tube while keeping the liquid in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The gas thus collected can be vented via an endflange connection to the inner tube. The centripetal acceleration (and thus the radial pressure gradient) is approximately proportional to the square of the flow speed and

  9. Supersonic rotation in the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, Sarah

    The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) has been built to study the confinement of supersonically-rotating plasmas and velocity shear stabilization of MHD instabilities. Theory predicts improved stability and confinement when a strong radial electric field is introduced into a magnetic-mirror geometry. The resulting radial currents establish a stable highly sheared plasma rotating at supersonic velocities in the azimuthal direction under the influence of J x B forces. This arrangement leads to increased confinement because the supersonic rotation creates an artificial radial gravity which draws the plasma away from the mirrors, closing the mirror loss cone. The large vφ shear stabilizes the plasma and enforces laminar flow. Based on these concepts, we have designed and constructed a machine to produce supersonically rotating highly-ionized plasmas. It typically does this by introducing a radial voltage of 7 kV in a magnetic-mirror geometry, 2 kG at the midplane and 19 kG at each mirror. MCX has completed its main construction phase and is acquiring data, here analyzed primarily in terms of a circuit model which infers plasma characteristics from the radial voltage across the plasma and the total radial current. The theory and simulations supporting the MCX centrifugal confinement scheme are presented here with the data and analysis from its first nine months of operation, including a description of basic plasma characteristics and evidence for both stability and confinement. Theory simulation, and initial experimental data all indicate that this centrifugal confinement scheme provides good stability and confinement at the temperatures and densities under study, as well as at the larger temperatures, fields, and dimensions expected for a fusion reactor. In particular, spectroscopic and circuit-model data indicate rotational velocities in MCX of up to 100 km/s, ion temperatures of approximately 30 eV, and ion densities upwards of 1020m-3. These parameters give

  10. Centrifugal regulator for control of deployment rates of deployable elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermalle, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements, design, and performance of a centrifugal regulator aimed at limiting deployment rates of deployable elements are discussed. The overall mechanism is comprised of four distinct functional parts in a machined housing: (1) the centrifugal brake device, which checks the payout of a deployment cable; (2) the reducing gear, which produces the spin rate necesary for the braking device; (3) the payout device, which allows the unwinding of the cable; and (4) the locking device, which prevents untimely unwinding. The centrifugal regulator is set into operation by a threshold tension of the cable which unlocks the mechanism and allows unwinding. The pulley of the windout device drives the centrifugal brake with the help of the reducing gear. The centrifugal force pushes aside weights that produce friction of the studs in a cylindrical housing. The mechanism behaved well at qualification temperature and vibrations.

  11. Infiltration of fibrous preform in the centrifugal force field

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshinori; Shirayanagi, Itaru; Sakai, Yoshibumi; Tozawa, Yasuhisa

    1994-12-31

    The pressure to infiltrate molten aluminum into alumina short fiber preform was generated by centrifugal force, and the start pressure for the infiltration was measured. The fundamental equation of infiltration phenomenon was derived from the equation of the conservation of momentum of fluid flow in the porous media in the centrifugal force field. One-dimensional solution of the equation was obtained to discuss the characteristics of fluid flow in a centrifugal force field. It was made clear that centrifugal force is effective as a motive force to infiltrate molten metal into fibrous preform, the pressure distribution of molten metal in the preform is different from that predicted by D`Arcy`s law and the infiltration is enhanced by centrifugal force.

  12. Development of Centrifugal Contactor with High Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, Nobuo; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Ogino, Hideki; Kase, Takeshi; Koizumi, Tsutomu

    2007-07-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), an innovative centrifugal contactor system has been developed for a future reprocessing plant. It was confirmed that it had a higher extraction capacity through the uranium test already. But it was necessary that it had the higher mechanical reliability to be applied in a reprocessing plant. In this study, two types of driving units that use a ball bearing or a magnetic bearing have been developed for it. It was confirmed that they had enough abilities trough endurance tests. The driving unit with ball bearing could be operated continuously for 5000 hours that was equal to a term of an annual operation. It was found that it could be operated for a year without maintenance. JAEA will continue to improve them and select more advantageous one on the basis of economy and lifetime in near future. (authors)

  13. Implantable centrifugal pump with hybrid magnetic bearings.

    PubMed

    Bearnson, G B; Olsen, D B; Khanwilkar, P S; Long, J W; Sinnott, M; Kumar, A; Allaire, P E; Baloh, M; Decker, J

    1998-01-01

    Test methods and results of in vitro assessment of a centrifugal pump with a magnetically suspended impeller are provided. In vitro blood tests have been completed with a resulting normalized milligram index of hemolysis (NmIH) of 12.4 +/- 4.1, indicating that hemolysis is not a problem. Hydraulic characterization of the system with water has shown that a nominal pumping condition of 6 L/min at 100 mmHg was met at 2,200 rpm. Maximum clinically usable cardiac output is predicted be 10 L/min. The magnetic bearing supported impeller did not contact the housing and was shown to be stable under a variety of pumping conditions. The driving motor efficiency is 75% at the nominal condition. Finally, a description of the clinical version of the pump under development is provided.

  14. Centrifugal governor for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, M.

    1986-09-23

    A centrifugal governor is described for use with an internal combustion engine which consists of: a control rack for regulating the quantity of fuel to be supplied to the engine; flyweights radially displaceable in response to the rotational speed of the engine; a tension lever pivotable through an angle dependent upon the amount of radial displacement of the flyweights; an idling spring for urging the tension lever against radially outward displacement of the flyweights; a torque cam having a cam surface determining a fuel increment to be applied at the start of the engine; a sensor lever having one end engaged by the control rack, and another end adapted to engage with the cam surface of the torque cam; a cancelling spring interposed between the torque cam and the tension lever; a control lever; a floating lever interlocking with the control lever; and spring force adjusting means arranged at one end of the idling spring.

  15. A modeling study of a centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, P.; Shapiro, H.N.

    1998-12-31

    A centrifugal compressor, which is part of a chlorofluorocarbon R-114 chiller installation, was investigated, operating with a new refrigerant, hydrofluorocarbon R-236ea, a proposed alternative to R-114. A large set of R-236ea operating data, as well as a limited amount of R-114 data, were available for this study. A relatively simple analytical compressor model was developed to describe compressor performance. The model was built upon a thorough literature search, experimental data, and some compressor design parameters. Two original empirical relations were developed, providing a new approach to the compressor modeling. The model was developed in a format that would permit it to be easily incorporated into a complete chiller simulation. The model was found to improve somewhat on the quantitative and physical aspects of a compressor model of the same format found in the literature. It was found that the compressor model is specific to the particular refrigerant.

  16. Closed continuous-flow centrifuge rotor

    DOEpatents

    Breillatt, Jr., Julian P.; Remenyik, Carl J.; Sartory, Walter K.; Thacker, Louis H.; Penland, William Z.

    1976-01-01

    A blood separation centrifuge rotor having a generally parabolic core disposed concentrically and spaced apart within a housing having a similarly shaped cavity. Blood is introduced through a central inlet and into a central passageway enlarged downwardly to decrease the velocity of the entrant blood. Septa are disposed inside the central passageway to induce rotation of the entrant blood. A separation chamber is defined between the core and the housing wherein the whole blood is separated into red cell, white cell, and plasma zones. The zones are separated by annular splitter blades disposed within the separation chamber. The separated components are continuously removed through conduits communicating through a face seal to the outside of the rotor.

  17. [Hemodynamic analysis of a centrifugal blood pump].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Li, Qilei; Xu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper built the mathematical model of a centrifugal blood pump, which was designed by ourselves, combined it with that of the human cardiovascular system and simulated the coupling system using Matlab. Then we set up the experiment platform, linked the blood pump to mock human cardiovascular system in case of three-stage heart failure, and measured aortic pressure and flow under different speed. The comparison between experiment results and simulation results not only indicates the coupling model is correct and the blood pump works well, but also shows that with the increase of blood pump speed, the pulsation of aortic pressure and flow will be reduced, this situation will affect the structure and function of blood vessels.

  18. Numerical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical simulation model for the horizontal centrifugal pipe casting process was developed with the commercial simulation package Flow3D. It considers - additionally to mass, energy and momentum conservation equations and free surface tracking - the fast radial and slower horizontal movement of the mold. The iron inflow is not steady state but time dependent. Of special importance is the friction between the liquid and the mold in connection with the viscosity and turbulence of the iron. Experiments with the mold at controlled revolution speeds were carried out using a high-speed camera. From these experiments friction coefficients for the description of the interaction between mold and melt were obtained. With the simulation model, the influence of typical process parameters (e.g. melts inflow, mold movement, melt temperature, cooling media) on the wall thickness of the pipes can be studied. The comparison to results of pipes from production shows a good agreement between simulation and reality.

  19. Rotordynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, R.; Arndt, N.; Caughey, T. K.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The asymmetric flow around an impeller in a volute exerts a force upon the impeller. To study the rotordynamic force on an impeller which is vibrating around its machine axis of rotation, the impeller, mounted on a dynamometer, is made to whirl in a circular orbit within the volute. The measured force is expressed as the sum of a steady radial force and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the impeller. These forces were measured in separate tests on a centrifugal pump with radically increased shroud clearance, a two-dimensional impeller, and an impeller with an inducer, the impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine). In each case, a destabilizing force was observed over a region of positive whirl.

  20. Experimental Characterization of Stretch-Bending Formability of AHSS Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitting, Daniela; Ofenheimer, Aldo; Pauli, Heinrich; Till, Edwin T.

    2011-05-01

    Deformation conditions of combined stretching and bending are known to enhance material formability compared to forming conditions without bending (e.g. in-plane stretching). These phenomena can be observed for most conventional steel grades but is even more pronounced for Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) sheets. Consequently, there is an urgent need in industry to quantify the phenomena of enhanced material formability due to bending effects. In this work new stretch-bend test setups are presented which can be used in addition to the conventional Angular Stretch Bend Test to systematically investigate the influence of various stretch-bending deformation conditions on the formability of AHSS sheets.

  1. Reciprocating flow-based centrifugal microfluidics mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Zoval, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Proper mixing of reagents is of paramount importance for an efficient chemical reaction. While on a large scale there are many good solutions for quantitative mixing of reagents, as of today, efficient and inexpensive fluid mixing in the nanoliter and microliter volume range is still a challenge. Complete, i.e., quantitative mixing is of special importance in any small-scale analytical application because the scarcity of analytes and the low volume of the reagents demand efficient utilization of all available reaction components. In this paper we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a novel centrifugal force-based unit for fast mixing of fluids in the nanoliter to microliter volume range. The device consists of a number of chambers (including two loading chambers, one pressure chamber, and one mixing chamber) that are connected through a network of microchannels, and is made by bonding a slab of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to a glass slide. The PDMS slab was cast using a SU-8 master mold fabricated by a two-level photolithography process. This microfluidic mixer exploits centrifugal force and pneumatic pressure to reciprocate the flow of fluid samples in order to minimize the amount of sample and the time of mixing. The process of mixing was monitored by utilizing the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. A time series of high resolution images of the mixing chamber were analyzed for the spatial distribution of light intensities as the two fluids (suspension of red fluorescent particles and water) mixed. Histograms of the fluorescent emissions within the mixing chamber during different stages of the mixing process were created to quantify the level of mixing of the mixing fluids. The results suggest that quantitative mixing was achieved in less than 3 min. This device can be employed as a stand alone mixing unit or may be integrated into a disk-based microfluidic system where, in addition to mixing, several other sample preparation steps may be

  2. Method and centrifugal apparatus for slurry testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tuzson, J.J.

    1984-04-17

    In accordance with the centrifugal erosion testing method of the invention, a material specimen is rotated with a flat surface facing the direction of rotation and a narrow stream of an abrasive particle slurry is concurrently flowed at a preselected rate in a radial direction across the flat surface, the rotating step being at sufficiently high angular velocity to urge the abrasive particles by Coriolis acceleration into a compacted mass against the flat surface and erode material therefrom by scouring type action as the particles flow radially outward. The rotating and flowing steps are continued for a sufficient preselected duration to erode material to a measurable depth, and the depth to which the flat surface is worn by the abrasive particles is measured as an indication of the erosion resistance of the specimen material. The centrifugal slurry erosion testing apparatus includes a rotatable cylindrical vessel into the interior of which the abrasive slurry is fed and a specimen holder extending radially from the vessel having a cavity for receiving the specimen and a radial slurry flow passage communicating with the interior of the vessel. One of the radial passage longitudinal walls is defined by the flat surface of the specimen. Preferably the specimen holder comprises mating semicylindrical halves one of which has a specimen-receiving cavity in its abutting surface and the other has a narrow rectangular-in-cross section groove in its abutting surface which communicates with the interior of the vessel and together with the flat surface of the specimen defines the radial slurry flow passage. The mating semicylindrical halves are enclosed by a sleeve having an annular rim disposed interiorly of the vessel to prevent radially outward movement of the specimen holder.

  3. Does residual force enhancement increase with increasing stretch magnitudes?

    PubMed

    Hisey, Brandon; Leonard, Tim R; Herzog, Walter

    2009-07-22

    It is generally accepted that force enhancement in skeletal muscles increases with increasing stretch magnitudes. However, this property has not been tested across supra-physiological stretch magnitudes and different muscle lengths, thus it is not known whether this is a generic property of skeletal muscle, or merely a property that holds for small stretch magnitudes within the physiological range. Six cat soleus muscles were actively stretched with magnitudes varying from 3 to 24 mm at three different parts of the force-length relationship to test the hypothesis that force enhancement increases with increasing stretch magnitude, independent of muscle length. Residual force enhancement increased consistently with stretch amplitudes on the descending limb of the force-length relationship up to a threshold value, after which it reached a plateau. Force enhancement did not increase with stretch amplitude on the ascending limb of the force-length relationship. Passive force enhancement was observed for all test conditions, and paralleled the behavior of the residual force enhancement. Force enhancement increased with stretch magnitude when stretching occurred at lengths where there was natural passive force within the muscle. These results suggest that force enhancement does not increase unconditionally with increasing stretch magnitude, as is generally accepted, and that increasing force enhancement with stretch appears to be tightly linked to that part of the force-length relationship where there is naturally occurring passive force.

  4. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19-21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity.

  5. Secondary structure of double-stranded DNA under stretching: Elucidation of the stretched form

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloum, M.; Muller, P.; Beker, A-F.

    2011-03-15

    Almost two decades ago, measurements of force versus extension on isolated double-stranded DNA molecules revealed a force plateau. This unusual stretching phenomenon in DNA suggests that the long molecules may be extended from the usual B form into a new conformation. Different models have been proposed to describe the nature of DNA in its stretched form, S-DNA. Using atomic force microscopy combined with a molecular combing method, we identified the structure of {lambda}-phage DNA for different stretching values. We provide strong evidence for the existence of a first-order transition between B form and S form. Beyond a certain extension of the natural length, DNA molecules adopt a new double-helix conformation characterized by a diameter of 1.2 nm and a helical pitch of18 nm.

  6. Acute effects of dynamic stretching, static stretching, and light aerobic activity on muscular performance in women.

    PubMed

    Curry, Brad S; Chengkalath, Devendra; Crouch, Gordon J; Romance, Michelle; Manns, Patricia J

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three warm-up protocols--static stretching, dynamic stretching, and light aerobic activity--on selected measures of range of motion and power in untrained females and to investigate the sustained effects at 5 and 30 minutes after warm-up. A total of 24 healthy females (ages 23-29 years) attended one familiarization session and three test sessions on nonconsecutive days within 2 weeks. A within-subject design protocol with the testing investigators blinded to the subjects' warm-up was followed. Each session started with 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling followed by pretest baseline measures. Another 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling was completed and followed by one of the three randomly selected warm-up interventions (static stretching, dynamic stretching, or light aerobic activity). The following posttest outcome measures were collected 5 and 30 minutes following the intervention: modified Thomas test, countermovement jump, and isometric time to peak force knee extension measured by dynamometer. Analysis of the data revealed significant time effects on range of motion and countermovement jump changes. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between the warm-up conditions on any of the variables. The variation in responses to warm-up conditions emphasizes the unique nature of individual reactions to different warm-ups; however, there was a tendency for warm-ups with an active component to have beneficial effects. The data suggests dynamic stretching has greater applicability to enhance performance on power outcomes compared to static stretching.

  7. Nav channel mechanosensitivity: activation and inactivation accelerate reversibly with stretch.

    PubMed

    Morris, Catherine E; Juranka, Peter F

    2007-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are modulated by many bilayer mechanical amphiphiles, but whether, like other voltage-gated channels (Kv, HCN, Cav), they respond to physical bilayer deformations is unknown. We expressed human heart Nav1.5 pore alpha-subunit in oocytes (where, unlike alphaNav1.4, alphaNav1.5 exhibits normal kinetics) and measured small macroscopic currents in cell-attached patches. Pipette pressure was used to reversibly stretch the membrane for comparison of I(Na)(t) before, during, and after stretch. At all voltages, and in a dose-dependent fashion, stretch accelerated the I(Na)(t) time course. The sign of membrane curvature was not relevant. Typical stretch stimuli reversibly accelerated both activation and inactivation by approximately 1.4-fold; normalization of peak I(Na)(t) followed by temporal scaling ( approximately 1.30- to 1.85-fold) resulted in full overlap of the stretch/no-stretch traces. Evidently the rate-limiting outward voltage sensor motion in the Nav1.5 activation path (as in Kv1) accelerated with stretch. Stretch-accelerated inactivation occurred even with activation saturated, so an independently stretch-modulated inactivation transition is also a possibility. Since Nav1.5 channel-stretch modulation was both reliable and reversible, and required stretch stimuli no more intense than what typically activates putative mechanotransducer channels (e.g., stretch-activated TRPC1-based currents), Nav channels join the ranks of putative mechanotransducers. It is noteworthy that at voltages near the activation threshold, moderate stretch increased the peak I(Na) amplitude approximately 1.5-fold. It will be important to determine whether stretch-modulated Nav current contributes to cardiac arrhythmias, to mechanosensory responses in interstitial cells of Cajal, to touch receptor responses, and to neuropathic (i.e., hypermechanosensitive) and/or normal pain reception.

  8. Efficacy of static stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretch on hamstrings length after a single session.

    PubMed

    O'Hora, John; Cartwright, Abigail; Wade, Clive D; Hough, Alan D; Shum, Gary L K

    2011-06-01

    A number of studies have investigated the efficacy of several repetitions of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (PNF) and static stretching (SS). However, there is limited research comparing the effects of a single bout of these stretching maneuvers. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a single bout of a therapist-applied 30-second SS vs. a single bout of therapist-applied 6-second hamstring (agonist) contract PNF. Forty-five healthy subjects between the ages of 21 and 35 were randomly allocated to 1 of the 2 stretching groups or a control group, in which no stretching was received. The flexibility of the hamstring was determined by a range of passive knee extension, measured using a universal goniometer, with the subject in the supine position and the hip at 90° flexion, before and after intervention. A significant increase in knee extension was found for both intervention groups after a single stretch (SS group = 7.53°, p < 0.01 and PNF group = 11.80°, p < 0.01). Both interventions resulted in a significantly greater increase in knee extension when compared to the control group (p < 0.01). The PNF group demonstrated significantly greater gains in knee extension compared to the SS group (mean difference 4.27°, p < 0.01). It can be concluded that a therapist applied SS or PNF results in a significant increase in hamstring flexibility. A hamstring (agonist) contract PNF is more effective than an SS in a single stretching session. These findings are important to physiotherapists or trainers working in clinical and sporting environments. Where in the past therapists may have spent time conducting multiple repetitions of a PNF and an SS, a single bout of either technique may be considered just as effective. A key component of the study methodology was the exclusion of a warm-up period before stretching. Therefore, the findings of efficacy of a single PNF are of particular relevance in sporting environments and busy clinical

  9. Isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rash of new controversy has emerged around the subject of mass-independent isotope fractionation effects, particularly in the case of the oxygen isotopes. To be sure, the controversy has been around for awhile, but it has been given new impetus by the results of a recent study by Mark H. Thiemens and John E. Heidenreich III of the University of California, San Diego (Science, March 4, 1983).Gustav Arrhenius has been trying to convince the planetary science community that chemical effects in isotope fractionation processes could explain observations in meteorites that appear to be outside of the traditionally understood mass-dependent fractionations (G. Arrhenius, J . L. McCrumb, and N. F. Friedman, Astrophys. Space Sci, 65, 297, 1974). Robert Clayton had made the basic observations of oxygen in carbonaceous chondrites that the slope of the δ17 versus δ18 line was 1 instead of the slope of ½ characteristic of terrestrial rocks and lunar samples (Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 28, 501, 1978). The mass-independent effects were ascribed to the apparent contribution of an ancient presolar system component of O16.

  10. Convective stretching and applications to mantle mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conjeepurm Subramanian, Natarajan

    In this dissertation I have developed a method to quantify the stretching and orientation of infinitesimal strain ellipsoids in three-dimensional, incompressible, and unsteady flow fields. The method is used to study the mixing properties of various mantle-like flows. Chapter 1 provides a introduction to the dissertation. In Chapter 2, I discuss the mixing properties of a three-dimensional, unsteady flow in which the time dependence and three-dimensionality of the flow can be varied independently. It is found that the time dependance of the flow is a more important control on mixing. In Chapter 3, I discuss the mixing properties in a plate-driven model of mantle convection which generates both toroidal, and poloidal components in the velocity field. It is found that as the toroidal energy in the flow is increased to match the poloidal energy, the mixing becomes more homogeneous. Computing the frequency-size distribution of the stretching experienced by the heterogeneities it is found that the marble cake structure is the most likely structure for the upper mantle. In Chapter 4, I discuss the mixing properties of iso-viscous, steady, thermal convection models at infinite Prandtl number. It is found that the strain rate in these models scales uniformly as Ra-0.55. The strain rate scaling law was used to compute the mixing time in the models. The mixing time for these models was computed as ˜ 410 My for whole mantle convection and ˜ 25 My for layered mantle convection for Ra = 1x108 and ˜ 1.4 By and ˜ 100 My for Ra = 1 x 107. As in the previous chapter, the frequency size distribution corresponding to the stretching values indicates a marble cake structure for the upper mantle. In Chapter 5, I conclude the dissertation.

  11. On prediction of OH stretching frequencies in intramolecularly hydrogen bonded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2012-06-01

    OH stretching frequencies are investigated for a series of non-tautomerizing systems with intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Effective OH stretching wavenumbers are predicted by the application of empirical correlation procedures based on the results of B3LYP/6-31G(d) theoretical calculations in the harmonic and PT2 anharmonic approximations, as well as on experimental NMR parameters, i.e., proton chemical shifts (δH) and two-bond deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts (2ΔCOD). The procedures are applied in a discussion of the spectra of 2,6-dihydroxy-4-methylbenzaldehyde and 8-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide. The spectrum of the former displays a broad, composite band between 3500 and 2500 cm-1 which can be assigned to overlapping monomer and dimer contributions. In the latter case, the results support a reassignment of the OH stretching band of 8-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide; the reassignment is supported by correlation with the IR spectra of a series of substituted derivatives.

  12. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  13. Uni-Directional Cell Stretching Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L. (Inventor); Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to an apparatus and method for applying various degrees of linear, mechanical loads on mammalian tissues, and in particular, for effecting linear stretching of tissue and simulating changes in hydrostatic pressures encountered during tissue contraction in vivo. The apparatus is useful for the study of mechanical loading in human tissue, and specifically, for permitting the evaluation of the effects of mechanical loading of skeletal or cardiac tissue and of the effects of removal of mechanical loading due to inactivity or the like, and the subsequent reapplication of load to these tissues.

  14. Venus Chasmata: A Lithospheric Stretching Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    An outstanding problem for Venus is the characterization of its style of global tectonics, an issue intimately related to the dominant mechanism of lithospheric heat loss. Among the most spectacular and extensive of the major tectonic features on Venus are the chasmata, deep linear valleys generally interpreted to be the products of lithospheric extension and rifting. Systems of chasmata and related features can be traced along several tectonic zones up to 20,000 km in linear extent. A lithospheric stretching model was developed to explain the topographic characteristics of Venus chasmata and to constrain the physical properties of the Venus crust and lithosphere.

  15. Finite stretching of an annular plate.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biricikoglu, V.; Kalnins, A.

    1971-01-01

    The problem of the finite stretching of an annular plate which is bonded to a rigid inclusion at its inner edge is considered. The material is assumed to be isotropic and incompressible with a Mooney-type constitutive law. It is shown that the inclusion of the effect of the transverse normal strain leads to a rapid variation in thickness which is confined to a narrow edge zone. The explicit solutions to the boundary layer equations, which govern the behavior of the plate near the edges, are presented.

  16. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  17. To Stretch and Search for Better Ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2000-06-01

    There's a lot to do to get each issue of this Journal ready for publication, and there's a lot that can go awry during that process. We the editorial staff do our utmost to make certain that each issue is the best it can possibly be, but, of necessity, a lot of our effort is focused on solving problems, correcting errors, and avoiding pitfalls. It is not surprising that we sometimes lose sight of the bigger picture--all of the things that came out as well as or better than we hoped they would. Therefore it gives us great pleasure when a reader applauds (and thereby rewards) our efforts. One such communication inspired this editorial.

    I have appreciated the extra effort put forward by the staff to make the Journal really come alive. The high quality of the Journal serves as an incentive to chemical educators to stretch and search for better ways to inspire our students.
    I fervently hope that we do encourage you "to stretch and search for better ways", not only to inspire students but in everything you do. Stretching and searching for better ways is what life, science, chemistry, and teaching are all about, and it is a wonderfully stimulating and exciting way to approach anything and everything. Sometimes, though, one's ability to stretch is akin to that of a rubber band exposed too long to sunlight. Change becomes a threat or a burden instead of an opportunity. This often happens in one area but not others, as in the case of someone doing original research but whose lecture notes are yellow with age, or someone who experiments with new teaching approaches but neglects the latest chemical discoveries. Whatever its manifestation, failure to stretch and search for better ways is a great loss, both for the individual directly involved and for others. Fortunately there are many who continually stretch and search, often in conjunction with JCE. For example, some time ago the Chair of the Board of Publication, Jerry Bell, challenged Journal

  18. Tropic Responses of Phycomyces Sporangiophores to Gravitational and Centrifugal Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, David S.

    1961-01-01

    A low-speed centrifuge was used to study the tropic responses of Phycomyces sporangiophores in darkness to the stimulus of combined gravitational and centrifugal forces. If this stimulus is constant the response is a relatively slow tropic reaction, which persists for up to 12 hours. The response is accelerated by increasing the magnitude of the gravitational-centrifugal force. A wholly different tropic response, the transient response, is elicited by an abrupt change in the gravitational-centrifugal stimulus. The transient response has a duration of only about 6 min. but is characterized by a high bending speed (about 5°/min.). An analysis of the distribution of the transient response along the growing zone shows that the active phase of the response has a distribution similar to that of the light sensitivity for the light-growth and phototropic responses. Experiments in which sporangiophores are centrifuged in an inert dense fluid indicate that the sensory mechanism of the transient response is closely related to the physical deformation of the growing zone caused by the action of the gravitational-centrifugal force on the sporangiophore as a whole. However, the response to a steady gravitational-centrifugal force is most likely not connected with this deformation, but is probably triggered by the shifting of regions or particles of differing density relative to one another inside the cell. PMID:13721903

  19. Centrifugal Casting Features/Metallurgical Characterization of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chirita, G.; Soares, D.; Cruz, D.; Silva, F. S.; Stefanescu, I.

    2008-02-15

    This paper deals with the study of centrifugal effects on aluminium castings under high G values. Most of the studies in this domain (FGMs obtained by centrifugal casting) deal with functionally graded composites reinforced with a solid phase such as silicon particles or others. However, in this study it will be shown that unreinforced aluminium alloys may be significantly influenced by the centrifugal effect and that functionally graded castings are also obtained. It has been observed that the centrifugal effect may increase in some alloys, depending on the relative position in the castings, the rupture strength by approx. 50%, and rupture strain by about 300%, as compared to the gravity casting technique. The Young's modulus may also increase by about 20%. It has also been reported that in vertical centrifugal castings there are mainly three aspects that affect the components thus obtained, namely: fluid dynamics; vibration (inherent to the system); and centrifugal force. These features have a different effect on the castings depending on the aluminium alloy. In this paper, an analysis of the most important effects of the centrifugal casting process on metallurgical features is conducted. A solidification characterization at several points along the mould will be made in order to have an accurate idea of both the fluid dynamics inside the mould during the casting and the solidification behavior in different parts of the component. These two analyses will be related to the metallurgical properties (phase distribution; SDAS; eutectic silicon content and shape, pores density and shape) along the component and mainly along the direction of the centrifugal pressure. A comparison between castings obtained by both centrifugal casting technique and gravity casting technique is made for reference (gravity casting)

  20. Levator Ani Muscle Stretch Induced by Simulated Vaginal Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Kuo-Cheng; Mooney, Brian; DeLancey, John O. L.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a three-dimensional computer model to predict levator ani muscle stretch during vaginal birth. METHODS: Serial magnetic resonance images from a healthy nulliparous 34-year-old woman, published anatomic data, and engineering graphics software were used to construct a structural model of the levator ani muscles along with related passive tissues. The model was used to quantify pelvic floor muscle stretch induced during the second stage of labor as a model fetal head progressively engaged and then stretched the iliococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles. RESULTS: The largest tissue strain reached a stretch ratio (tissue length under stretch/original tissue length) of 3.26 in medial pubococcygeus muscle, the shortest, most medial and ventral levator ani muscle. Regions of the ileococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles reached maximal stretch ratios of 2.73, 2.50, and 2.28, respectively. Tissue stretch ratios were proportional to fetal head size: For example, increasing fetal head diameter by 9% increased medial pubococcygeus stretch by the same amount. CONCLUSION: The medial pubococcygeus muscles undergo the largest stretch of any levator ani muscles during vaginal birth. They are therefore at the greatest risk for stretch-related injury. PMID:14704241

  1. Polarized actin structural dynamics in response to cyclic uniaxial stretch

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lawrence; Helmke, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) alignment to directional flow or stretch supports anti-inflammatory functions, but mechanisms controlling polarized structural adaptation in response to physical cues remain unclear. This study aimed to determine whether factors associated with early actin edge ruffling implicated in cell polarization are prerequisite for stress fiber (SF) reorientation in response to cyclic uniaxial stretch. Time-lapse analysis of EGFP-actin in confluent ECs showed that onset of either cyclic uniaxial or equibiaxial stretch caused a non-directional increase in edge ruffling. Edge activity was concentrated in a direction perpendicular to the stretch axis after 60 min, consistent with the direction of SF alignment. Rho-kinase inhibition caused reorientation of both stretch-induced edge ruffling and SF alignment parallel to the stretch axis. Arp2/3 inhibition attenuated stretch-induced cell elongation and disrupted polarized edge dynamics and microtubule organizing center reorientation, but it had no effect on the extent of SF reorientation. Disrupting localization of p21-activated kinase (PAK) did not prevent stretch-induced SF reorientation, suggesting that this Rac effector is not critical in regulating stretch-induced cytoskeletal remodeling. Overall, these results suggest that directional edge ruffling is not a primary mechanism that guides SF reorientation in response to stretch; the two events are coincident but not causal. PMID:25821527

  2. Ocular counterrolling induced by centrifugation during orbital space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, S. T.; Clement, G.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    During the 1998 Neurolab mission (STS-90), four astronauts were exposed to interaural centripetal accelerations (Gy centrifugation) of 0.5 g and 1 g during rotation on a centrifuge, both on Earth and during orbital space flight. Subjects were oriented either left-ear out or right-ear out, facing or back to motion. Binocular eye movements were measured in three dimensions using a video technique. On Earth, tangential centrifugation that produces 1 g of interaural linear acceleration combines with gravity to tilt the gravitoinertial acceleration (GIA) vector 45 degrees in the roll plane relative to the head vertical, generating a summed vector of 1.4 g. Before flight, this elicited mean ocular counterrolling (OCR) of 5.7 degrees. Due to the relative absence of gravity during flight, there was no linear acceleration along the dorsoventral axis of the head. As a result, during in-flight centrifugation, gravitoinertial acceleration was strictly aligned with the centripetal acceleration along the interaural axis. There was a small but significant decrease (mean 10%) in the magnitude of OCR in space (5.1 degrees). The magnitude of OCR during postflight 1 g centrifugation was not significantly different from preflight OCR (5.9 degrees). Findings were similar for 0.5 g centrifugation, but the OCR magnitude was approximately 60% of that induced by centrifugation at 1 g. OCR during pre- and postflight static tilt was not significantly different and was always less than OCR elicited by centrifugation of Earth for an equivalent interaural linear acceleration. In contrast, there was no difference between the OCR generated by in-flight centrifugation and by static tilt on Earth at equivalent interaural linear accelerations. These data support the following conclusions: (1) OCR is generated predominantly in response to interaural linear acceleration; (2) the increased OCR during centrifugation on Earth is a response to the head dorsoventral 1 g linear acceleration component, which

  3. Centrifugal pumps: which suction specific speeds are acceptable

    SciTech Connect

    Hallam, J.L.

    1982-04-01

    Suction specific speed is an important consideration when purchasing or analyzing centrifugal pumps. There is a direct correlation between this parameter, pump reliability and maintenance expenses. This article demonstrates that in a large Gulf Coast oil refinery, centrifugal pumps with a suction specific speed greater than 11,000 failed at a frequency nearly twice that of centrifugal pumps with suction specific speed less than 11,000. This study consisted primarily of hydrocarbon pumps with an average horsepower of 150 hp. Results may vary some from those found if high energy water pumps are studied. 5 refs.

  4. Centrifugal Size-Separation Sieve for Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Dreyer, Christopher (Inventor); Riedel, Edward (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A centrifugal sieve and method utilizes centrifugal force in rapidly-rotated cylindrical or conical screens as the primary body force contributing to size segregation. Within the centrifugal acceleration field, vibration and/or shearing flows are induced to facilitate size segregation and eventual separation of the fines from the coarse material. Inside a rotating cylindrical or conical screen, a separately-rotated screw auger blade can be used to transport material along the rotating cylinder or conical wall and to induce shearing in the material.

  5. 27. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, Unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Ironworks, Honolulu Hawaii, 1879, 1881. View: Historical view, 1934, from T.T. Waterman collection, Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association. With the inner basket of the centrifugal revolving at 1200 rpm molasses flew outward from the granulated sugar, through the holes in the brass lining, and into the stationary outer basket. The molasses drained through the spout at the right and into molasses storage pits below the floor. The centrifugals were underdriven with a belt connected to the pulley beneath the basket. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  6. Increased mitogenic response in lymphocytes from chronically centrifuged mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Otfried; Hunzinger, E.; Cogoli, Augusto; Bechler, B.; Lee, J.; Moore, J.; Duke, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects upon the mitogenic response of splenic lymphocytes when exposing mice to prolonged hypergravity conditions (3.5 G for 1 year) were studied. Cultures of splenic lymphocytes isolated from both centrifuged and control (1 G) animals were stimulated with Concanavalin A and the response measured using both morphological and biochemical means. Lymphocytes obtained from centrifuged mice exhibited much higher activation rates (as measured by the incorporation of H-3 thymidine) and larger cell aggregates consisting of more lymphoblasts and mitotic figures than those observed in non centrifuged control animals. Isolated splenic lymphocytes thus appear to have been conditioned by hypergravity state.

  7. Impaired stretch modulation in potentially lethal cardiac sodium channel mutants.

    PubMed

    Banderali, Umberto; Juranka, Peter F; Clark, Robert B; Giles, Wayne R; Morris, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    The presence of two slowly inactivating mutants of the cardiac sodium channel (hNa(V)1.5), R1623Q and R1626P, associate with sporadic Long-QT3 (LQT3) syndrome, and may contribute to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or lethal ventricular disturbances. Cardiac mechanoelectric feedback is considered a factor in such sporadic arrhythmias. Since stretch and shear forces modulate hNa(V)1.5 gating, detailed electrophysiological study of LQT-Na(V)1.5 mutant channel alpha subunit(s) might provide insights. We compared recombinant R1623Q and WT currents in control vs. stretched membrane of cell-attached patches of Xenopus oocytes. Macroscopic current was monitored before, during, and after stretch induced by pipette suction. In either mutant Na(+) channel, peak current at small depolarizations could be more than doubled by stretch. As in WT, R1623Q showed reversible and stretch intensity dependent acceleration of current onset and decay at all voltages, with kinetic coupling between these two processes retained during stretch. These two Na(V)1.5 channel alpha subunits differed in the absolute extent of kinetic acceleration for a given stretch intensity; over a range of intensities, R1623Q inactivation speed increased significantly less than did WT. The LQT3 mutant R1626P also retained its kinetic coupling during stretch. Whereas WT stretch-difference currents (I(Na)(V,t) without stretch minus I(Na)(V,t) with stretch) were mostly inhibitory (equivalent to outward current), they were substantially (R1623Q) or entirely (R1626P) excitatory for the LQT3 mutants. If stretch-modulated Na(V)1.5 current (i.e., brief excitation followed by accelerated current decay) routinely contributes to cardiac mechanoelectric feedback, then during hemodynamic load variations, the abnormal stretch-modulated components of R1623Q and R1626P current could be pro-arrhythmic.

  8. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of chromatin stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, Frank; Lankas, Filip; Caudron, Maïwen; Langowski, Jörg

    2006-04-01

    We present Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the stretching of a single 30nm chromatin fiber. The model approximates the DNA by a flexible polymer chain with Debye-Hückel electrostatics and uses a two-angle zigzag model for the geometry of the linker DNA connecting the nucleosomes. The latter are represented by flat disks interacting via an attractive Gay-Berne potential. Our results show that the stiffness of the chromatin fiber strongly depends on the linker DNA length. Furthermore, changing the twisting angle between nucleosomes from 90° to 130° increases the stiffness significantly. An increase in the opening angle from 22° to 34° leads to softer fibers for small linker lengths. We observe that fibers containing a linker histone at each nucleosome are stiffer compared to those without the linker histone. The simulated persistence lengths and elastic moduli agree with experimental data. Finally, we show that the chromatin fiber does not behave as an isotropic elastic rod, but its rigidity depends on the direction of deformation: Chromatin is much more resistant to stretching than to bending.

  10. Stretched Exponential relaxation in pure Se glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Ravindren, S.; Boolchand, P.

    A universal feature of glasses is the stretched exponential relaxation, f (t) = exp[ - t / τ ] β . The model of diffusion of excitations to randomly distributed traps in a glass by Phillips1 yields the stretched exponent β = d[d +2] where d, the effective dimensionality. We have measured the enthalpy of relaxation ΔHnr (tw) at Tg of Se glass in modulated DSC experiments as glasses age at 300K and find β = 0.43(2) for tw in the 0

  11. Stretching DNA by a Constant Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Yuko

    2005-03-01

    We consider the problem of stretching DNA by a constant field, such as an electric field or a hydrodynamic flow field. We obtain analytical expressions for the elongation of DNA under both weak and strong applied fields, in two and three dimensions. In the weak field limit we consider the effect of self-avoidance, which leads to a 9-fold enhancement of the average end-to-end distance over the result obtained when self-avoidance is ignored in two dimensions, and 3-fold increase in three dimensions. In the strong stretching regime we obtain the exact force-extension relation by mapping the problem to the Schrödinger equation for a simple harmonic oscillator in a time dependent potential. We use our theoretical results to comment on the experiment of Maier et al. ootnotetextB. Maier, U. Seifert, and J. O. Rä'dler, Europhys. Lett., 60, 622 (2002). on DNA adsorbed on a lipid bilayer in the presence of an in-plane electric field. In particular, we find that their estimate for the effective charge density of the DNA molecule, made on the basis of an approximate theory, requires significant corrections in light of our calculations. This work was supported by the NSF through grants DMR-9984471 and DMR-0403997. JK is a Cottrell Scholar of Research Corporation.

  12. Stretch sensors for human body motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Ben; Gisby, Todd; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Sensing motion of the human body is a difficult task. From an engineers' perspective people are soft highly mobile objects that move in and out of complex environments. As well as the technical challenge of sensing, concepts such as comfort, social intrusion, usability, and aesthetics are paramount in determining whether someone will adopt a sensing solution or not. At the same time the demands for human body motion sensing are growing fast. Athletes want feedback on posture and technique, consumers need new ways to interact with augmented reality devices, and healthcare providers wish to track recovery of a patient. Dielectric elastomer stretch sensors are ideal for bridging this gap. They are soft, flexible, and precise. They are low power, lightweight, and can be easily mounted on the body or embedded into clothing. From a commercialisation point of view stretch sensing is easier than actuation or generation - such sensors can be low voltage and integrated with conventional microelectronics. This paper takes a birds-eye view of the use of these sensors to measure human body motion. A holistic description of sensor operation and guidelines for sensor design will be presented to help technologists and developers in the space.

  13. Centrifuge modeling of initial subduction and back-arc extension: suggested tectonics of seawards migration of the Hellenic Trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mart, Y.; Aharonov, E.; Mulugeta, G.; Tentler, T.

    2003-04-01

    We report the results of centrifuge experiments simulating the early stages of the co-occurrence of subduction, of initial development arcuate thrust faulting at convergent ocean-continent boundaries, and of growth of back-arc basins, where the principal force affecting the model is enhanced gravity in a centrifuge spinning at 500g. Our basic series of models consisted of 3 units simulating the asthenosphere and the overlying oceanic and continental lithospheres, where densities and viscosity were reduced to scale, to match the increased gravity. We presumed that the "oceanic lithosphere" was old and cold, similar in density to the "asthenosphere", while the "continental lithosphere" was much lighter. After some 30 minutes of enhanced gravity acceleration in the centrifuge the "oceanic lithosphere" was thrust under the "continental lithosphere", displacing the "asthenosphere", while the continental slab was not only overthrust, but also stretched "seawards". Application of lubrication along a small section of the contact zone between the "lithospheres" produced arcuate "seaward" migration of the thrust plane, forming a dynamic structural arc, along which the "oceanic" slab subducted and the "continental" - stretched and extended. In a second series of centrifuge experiments we used a 5-layer model, where both "lithospheres" comprised ductile and brittle layers. We prepared the "ductile oceanic lithosphere" to be lighter than the "asthenosphere" but denser than the "ductile continental lithosphere" to test the dynamic affect of the enhanced gravity on the modeled subduction under such constraints. In these experiments subduction occurred as well, and the simulated oceanic lithosphere was thrust under the simulated continental lithosphere, pushing down, but not penetrating, the denser "asthenosphere". The amount of thrusting and overlap between the slabs was found to depend on the rate of friction. Reduced friction through the application of lubricants led the

  14. Investigation of Flow in a Centrifugal Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Karl

    1946-01-01

    The investigation of the flow in a centrifugal pump indicated that the flow patterns in frictional fluid are fundamentally different from those in frictionless fluid. In particular, the dead air space adhering to the section side undoubtedly causes a reduction of the theoretically possible delivery head. The velocity distribution over a parallel circle is also subjected to a noticeable change as a result of the incomplete filling of the passages. The relative velocity on the pressure side of the vane, which for passages completely filled with active flow would differ little from zero even at comparatively lower than normal delivery volume, is increased, so that no rapid reverse flow occurs on the pressure side of the vane even for smaller delivery volume. It was established, further, that the flow ceases to be stationary for very small quantities of water. The inflow to the impeller can be regarded as radial for the operating range an question. The velocity triangles at the exit are subjected to a significant alteration in shape ae a result of the increased peripheral velocity, which may be of particular importance in the determination of the guide vane entrance angle.

  15. Centrifugal governor for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, M.

    1986-08-12

    A centrifugal governor is described for use with an internal combustion engine, comprising: a control rack for regulating the quantity of fuel to be supplied to the engine; flyweights radially displaceable in response to the rotational speed of the engine; a tension lever pivotable about a stationary fulcrum in response to the radial displacement of the flyweights; a torque cam having a cam surface determining a fuel increment to be applied at the start of the engine; a sensor lever having one end engaged by the control rack and another end disposed for engagement with the cam surface of the torque cam, the sensor lever being adapted to engage with the cam surface of the torque cam when the engine is in a starting condition, to cause displacement of the control rack into a fuel increasing position for the start of the engine; and spring means interposed between the torque cam and the tension lever and urging the torque cam with a force dependent upon the angularity of the tension lever in a direction of disengaging the sensor lever from the cam surface of the torque cam; the spring means comprising first and second springs, one of the first and second springs being formed of a thermosensitive material having a smaller spring constant at a low temperature below a predetermined value, and a larger spring constant at a temperature above the predetermined value; and the first and second springs of the spring means comprising coiled springs disposed concentrically with each other.

  16. Centrifugal governor for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkoshi, M.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a centrifugal governor for use with an internal combustion engine, comprising: a control rack for regulating the quantity of fuel to be supplied to the engine; flyweights radially displaceable in response to the rotational speed of the engine; a tension lever pivotable through an angle dependent upon the amount of radial displacement of the flyweights; a torque cam pivotable about and relative to a fulcrum shaft thereof and having a cam surface including a cam surface portion determining a fuel increment to be applied at the start of the engine; a sensor lever having one end engaged by the control rack; the sensor lever having another end disposed to engage with the cam surface portion of the torque cam when the engine is in a starting condition, to permit displacement of the control rack into a fuel increasing position for the start of the engine; and a cancelling spring interposed between the torque cam and the tension lever and urging the torque cam with a force dependent upon the angularity of the tension lever to cause pivoting of the torque cam about the fulcrum shaft thereof in a direction of disengaging the sensor lever from the cam surface portion of the torque cam. The improvement is described comprising biasing means for forcibly pivotally displacing, immediately before operation of a starter of the engine, the torque cam in one direction against the urging force of the cancelling spring to a predetermined position.

  17. Fluid dynamic noise in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, D. G.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-08-01

    Pressure distributions and frequency spectra have been obtained in a centrifugal pump having flow rates between the design point and near shut-down. The pump was comprised of a radial flow impeller with four backswept blades and a single volute. Measurements were obtained at the design flow rate and at off-design conditions to advance understanding of noise generation, to quantify the contribution of tonal, narrowband and broadband components to the overall noise and to develop strategies for suppressing fluid dynamic noise by flow control and active control. Fluid dynamic noise was generated by the unsteady conditions encountered by the impeller blade. Unsteady conditions originated from non-uniformities at the inlet and the impeller outlet at design and off-design conditions. Inlet flow non-uniformity was induced by separation regions. Flow separations are inherent in turbomachinery because of growth of the boundary layer and the disturbance effect of the rotating impeller. Flow non-uniformity at the impeller outlet stemmed from inlet flow non-uniformities in the inlet, from propagation of pressure waves in a vaneless diffuser, and from scroll effects.

  18. Wave Augmented Diffuser for Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J. (Inventor); Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A wave augmented diffuser for a centrifugal compressor surrounds the outlet of an impeller that rotates on a drive shaft having an axis of rotation. The impeller brings flow in in an axial direction and imparts kinetic energy to the flow discharging it in radial and tangential directions. The flow is discharged into a plurality of circumferentially disposed wave chambers. The wave chambers are periodically opened and closed by a rotary valve such that the flow through the diffuser is unsteady. The valve includes a plurality of valve openings that are periodically brought into and out of fluid communication with the wave chambers. When the wave chambers are closed, a reflected compression wave moves upstream towards the diffuser bringing the flow into the wave chamber to rest. This action recovers the kinetic energy from the flow and limits any boundary layer growth. The flow is then discharged in an axial direction through an opening in the valve plate when the valve plate is rotated to an open position. The diffuser thus efficiently raises the static pressure of the fluid and discharges an axially directed flow at a radius that is predominantly below the maximum radius of the diffuser.

  19. High efficiency, variable geometry, centrifugal cryogenic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Forsha, M.D.; Nichols, K.E.; Beale, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    A centrifugal cryogenic pump has been developed which has a basic design that is rugged and reliable with variable speed and variable geometry features that achieve high pump efficiency over a wide range of head-flow conditions. The pump uses a sealless design and rolling element bearings to achieve high reliability and the ruggedness to withstand liquid-vapor slugging. The pump can meet a wide range of variable head, off-design flow requirements and maintain design point efficiency by adjusting the pump speed. The pump also has features that allow the impeller and diffuser blade heights to be adjusted. The adjustable height blades were intended to enhance the pump efficiency when it is operating at constant head, off-design flow rates. For small pumps, the adjustable height blades are not recommended. For larger pumps, they could provide off-design efficiency improvements. This pump was developed for supercritical helium service, but the design is well suited to any cryogenic application where high efficiency is required over a wide range of head-flow conditions.

  20. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression. PMID:27574457

  1. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study's methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC.

  2. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study’s methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC. PMID:27390425

  3. 18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and control panel, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  4. 16. View northwest of Arctic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View northwest of Arctic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and control panel, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  5. A multiplexed immunoassay system based upon reciprocating centrifugal microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Peytavi, Régis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Micic, Miodrag; Felgner, Philip L.; Madou, Marc J.

    2011-06-01

    A novel, centrifugal disk-based micro-total analysis system (μTAS) for low cost and high throughput semi-automated immunoassay processing was developed. A key innovation in the disposable immunoassay disk design is in a fluidic structure that enables very efficient micro-mixing based on a reciprocating mechanism in which centrifugal acceleration acting upon a liquid element first generates and stores pneumatic energy that is then released by a reduction of the centrifugal acceleration, resulting in a reversal of direction of flow of the liquid. Through an alternating sequence of high and low centrifugal acceleration, the system reciprocates the flow of liquid within the disk to maximize incubation/hybridization efficiency between antibodies and antigen macromolecules during the incubation/hybridization stage of the assay. The described reciprocating mechanism results in a reduction in processing time and reagent consumption by one order of magnitude.

  6. 3. Interior view of centrifugal pump house showing pumps and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Interior view of centrifugal pump house showing pumps and engines, looking W. - Laurel Valley Sugar Plantation, Drainage Plant, 2 Miles South of Thibodaux on State Route 308, Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, LA

  7. 2. View of centrifugal pump house sitting at edge of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of centrifugal pump house sitting at edge of drainage canal, looking E. - Laurel Valley Sugar Plantation, Drainage Plant, 2 Miles South of Thibodaux on State Route 308, Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, LA

  8. 23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULICOPERATED VALVE FOR LATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. TEMPORARY CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. NOTE CHAPMAN HYDRAULIC-OPERATED VALVE FOR LATER CONNECTION OF ENGINE PUMP ENG TO DISCHARGE HEADER. - Lakeview Pumping Station, Clarendon & Montrose Avenues, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  9. Manufacture of hollow ingots using centrifugal casting machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeshchikov, A. G.; Greneva, T. S.; Baidachenko, V. I.; Berezin, V. I.

    2010-12-01

    Centrifugal machines are proposed for the foundry created at the Almalyk Mining and Smelting Factory in order to produce hollow ingots of a liquid metal made by remelting of consumable electrodes in a refractory accumulating crucible.

  10. 25. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugals, 1879, 1881. Manufacturer, Unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Iron Works, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1879, 1881. View: After sugar was granulated and cooled it had to be dried and drained, completely separating the sugar crystals from the molasses. Revolving at 1200 rpm the inner basket drove the molasses outward into the stationary outer basket leaving dried sugar behind. The steam engine counter-shaft at the left was belt driven and belts running from the counter-shaft pulleys to the centrifugals' base-pulleys provided the necessary power. Part of the clutch system which moved the belt from a moving to a stationary pulley, thus turning the centrifugals on and off, is seen in Between the counter-shaft and the centrifugals. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  11. 19. LOWER OIL ROOM DIABLO POWERHOUSE: SHARPLES OIL CENTRIFUGE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. LOWER OIL ROOM DIABLO POWERHOUSE: SHARPLES OIL CENTRIFUGE AND OIL TANK, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Diablo Powerhouse, On Skagit River, 6.1 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  12. Looking Southeast at Precipitation System, Steam Dryer and Centrifuge in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Southeast at Precipitation System, Steam Dryer and Centrifuge in Red Room within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  13. A multiplexed immunoassay system based upon reciprocating centrifugal microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Peytavi, Régis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Micic, Miodrag; Felgner, Philip L.; Madou, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    A novel, centrifugal disk-based micro-total analysis system (μTAS) for low cost and high throughput semi-automated immunoassay processing was developed. A key innovation in the disposable immunoassay disk design is in a fluidic structure that enables very efficient micro-mixing based on a reciprocating mechanism in which centrifugal acceleration acting upon a liquid element first generates and stores pneumatic energy that is then released by a reduction of the centrifugal acceleration, resulting in a reversal of direction of flow of the liquid. Through an alternating sequence of high and low centrifugal acceleration, the system reciprocates the flow of liquid within the disk to maximize incubation/hybridization efficiency between antibodies and antigen macromolecules during the incubation/hybridization stage of the assay. The described reciprocating mechanism results in a reduction in processing time and reagent consumption by one order of magnitude. PMID:21721711

  14. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: RETECH'S PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the Retech, Inc. Plasma Centrifugal Furnace (PCF) was conducted under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The furnace uses heat gen...

  15. 14. CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, NEW HAVEN YARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, NEW HAVEN YARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  16. 15. FRONT VIEW, DETAIL, CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. FRONT VIEW, DETAIL, CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, NEW HAVEN YARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  17. 8. FLOOR 1: TENTERING GEAR FOR SOUTH STONES, CENTRIFUGAL GOVERNOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. FLOOR 1: TENTERING GEAR FOR SOUTH STONES, CENTRIFUGAL GOVERNOR MOUNTED ON STONE SPINDLE, VERY SHORT STEELYARD - Windmill at Water Mill, Montauk Highway & Halsey Lane, Water Mill, Suffolk County, NY

  18. Centrifuge Facility for the International Space Station Alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Catherine C.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1994-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility planned for the International Space Station Alpha has under-one considerable redesign over the past year, primarily because the Station is now viewed as a 10 year mission rather than a 30 year mission and because of the need to simply the design to meet budget constraints and a 2000 launch date. The basic elements of the Centrifuge Facility remain the same, i.e., a 2.5 m diameter centrifuge, a micro-g holding unit, plant and animal habitats, a glovebox and a service unit. The centrifuge will still provide the full range of artificial gravity from 0.01 a to 2 - as originally planned; however, the extractor to permit withdrawal of habitats from the centrifuge without stopping the centrifuge has been eliminated. The specimen habitats have also been simplified and are derived from other NASA programs. The Plant Research Unit being developed by the Gravitational Biology Facility will be used to house plants in the Centrifuge Facility. Although not as ambitious as the Centrifuge Facility plant habitat, it will provide much better environmental control and lighting than the current Shuttle based Plant Growth Facility. Similarly, rodents will be housed in the Advanced Animal Habitat being developed for the Shuttle program. The Centrifuge Facility and ISSA will provide the opportunity to perform repeatable, high quality science. The long duration increments available on the Station will permit multigeneration studies on both plants and animals which have not previously been possible. The Centrifuge Facility will accommodate sufficient number of specimens to permit statistically significant sampling of specimens to investigate the time course of adaptation to altered gravity environments. The centrifuge will for the first time permit investigators to use gravity itself as a tool to investigate fundamental processes, to investigate the intensity and duration of gravity to maintain normal structure and function, to separate the effects of micro-g from

  19. Early modification of stretch reflex in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bergui, M; Paglia, G; Lopiano, L; Quattrocolo, G; Bergamini, L; Bergamasco, B

    1993-07-01

    We stretched quadriceps femoris in healthy subjects and in patients with a recent diagnosis of PD in order to assess whether modifications of the long-latency component of the stretch reflex is an early event in the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). We found a modified mechanical and electromyographic (EMG) behavior in stretching relaxed muscles of patients while voluntary activation greatly reduced differences between normal and Parkinsonian subjects, suggesting that a lower threshold of the response is an early sign in PD.

  20. Effects of three different stretching techniques on vertical jumping performance.

    PubMed

    Kirmizigil, Berkiye; Ozcaldiran, Bahtiyar; Colakoglu, Muzaffer

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate 3 different flexibility techniques: (a) ballistic stretching (BS), (b) proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (PNF) + BS, and (c) PNF + static stretching (SS) on vertical jump (VJ) performance and to determine the most appropriate stretching method during warm-up period before explosive force disciplines. One hundred voluntary male athletes participated in this study. All subjects performed aerobic warm-up (5-minute jog) followed by BS (5 seconds for each stretching exercise), PNF + BS (PNF performed followed by 5 seconds of BS), and PNF + SS (PNF performed followed by 30 seconds of SS) treatment protocol, respectively in the same day. Each stretching treatment was applied for 4 sets bilaterally. In all stretching treatments, lumbar extensor, gluteus maximus, and hamstring muscles were stretched with a single stretching exercise. After a 2-minute brief rest period, participants performed 3 trials of VJ test followed by one of the treatment protocols. Vertical jump performance was evaluated by countermovement jump (CMJ). Participants were divided into 3 groups according to their flexibility and prejump performances after warm-up. For each individual group and the whole group, after all treatments, differences in CMJ values were obtained (p ≤ 0.05). Ballistic stretching increased the VJ performance in the groups with low and average flexibility, poor prejumping performance, and also in the whole group (p ≤ 0.05). Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching + BS affected VJ performance in the group of participants with high flexibility (p ≤ 0.05). Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation + SS decreased VJ performance in groups of participants with high flexibility, moderate, and high prejumping performance and in whole group (p ≤ 0.05). Ballistic stretching method increased VJ height, therefore seems to be more suitable than PNF + SS and PNF + BS before events that rely on explosive power as a part

  1. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms: advanced unit operations and applications.

    PubMed

    Strohmeier, O; Keller, M; Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-10-07

    Centrifugal microfluidics has evolved into a mature technology. Several major diagnostic companies either have products on the market or are currently evaluating centrifugal microfluidics for product development. The fields of application are widespread and include clinical chemistry, immunodiagnostics and protein analysis, cell handling, molecular diagnostics, as well as food, water, and soil analysis. Nevertheless, new fluidic functions and applications that expand the possibilities of centrifugal microfluidics are being introduced at a high pace. In this review, we first present an up-to-date comprehensive overview of centrifugal microfluidic unit operations. Then, we introduce the term "process chain" to review how these unit operations can be combined for the automation of laboratory workflows. Such aggregation of basic functionalities enables efficient fluidic design at a higher level of integration. Furthermore, we analyze how novel, ground-breaking unit operations may foster the integration of more complex applications. Among these are the storage of pneumatic energy to realize complex switching sequences or to pump liquids radially inward, as well as the complete pre-storage and release of reagents. In this context, centrifugal microfluidics provides major advantages over other microfluidic actuation principles: the pulse-free inertial liquid propulsion provided by centrifugal microfluidics allows for closed fluidic systems that are free of any interfaces to external pumps. Processed volumes are easily scalable from nanoliters to milliliters. Volume forces can be adjusted by rotation and thus, even for very small volumes, surface forces may easily be overcome in the centrifugal gravity field which enables the efficient separation of nanoliter volumes from channels, chambers or sensor matrixes as well as the removal of any disturbing bubbles. In summary, centrifugal microfluidics takes advantage of a comprehensive set of fluidic unit operations such as

  2. Preferred orientation of BSCCO via centrifugal slip casting

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlage, G.; Roeder, R.; Trumble, K.; Bowman, K. ); Li, S.; McElfresh, M. )

    1994-04-01

    Due to the highly anisotropic properties of BSCCO superconductors, the bulk properties of these materials can be greatly affected by preferential orientation. Substantial [ital c]-axis orientation normal to the desired direction of current flow has been demonstrated by centrifugally slip casting lead-doped BSCCO-2223. The strong preferred orientation developed in the centrifugally slip-cast material demonstrates high critical current potential.

  3. Enhancement of multispectral thermal infrared images - Decorrelation contrast stretching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Decorrelation contrast stretching is an effective method for displaying information from multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images. The technique involves transformation of the data to principle components ('decorrelation'), independent contrast 'stretching' of data from the new 'decorrelated' image bands, and retransformation of the stretched data back to the approximate original axes, based on the inverse of the principle component rotation. The enhancement is robust in that colors of the same scene components are similar in enhanced images of similar scenes, or the same scene imaged at different times. Decorrelation contrast stretching is reviewed in the context of other enhancements applied to TIR images.

  4. Synchronization of Mammalian Cells and Nuclei by Centrifugal Elutriation.

    PubMed

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2017-01-01

    Synchronized populations of large numbers of cells can be obtained by centrifugal elutriation on the basis of sedimentation properties of small round particles, with minimal perturbation of cellular functions. The physical characteristics of cell size and sedimentation velocity are operative in the technique of centrifugal elutriation also known as counterstreaming centrifugation. The elutriator is an advanced device for increasing the sedimentation rate to yield enhanced resolution of cell separation. A random population of cells is introduced into the elutriation chamber of an elutriator rotor running in a specially designed centrifuge. By increasing step-by-step the flow rate of the elutriation fluid, successive populations of relatively homogeneous cell size can be removed from the elutriation chamber and used as synchronized subpopulations. For cell synchronization by centrifugal elutriation, early log S phase cell populations are most suitable where most of the cells are in G1 and S phase (>80 %). Apoptotic cells can be found in the early elutriation fractions belonging to the sub-Go window. Protocols for the synchronization of nuclei of murine pre-B cells and high-resolution centrifugal elutriation of CHO cells are given. The verification of purity and cell cycle positions of cells in elutriated fractions includes the measurement of DNA synthesis by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and DNA content by propidium iodide flow cytometry.

  5. Improved g-level calculations for coil planet centrifuges.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Remco N A M; König, Carola S

    2011-09-09

    Calculation of the g-level is often used to compare CCC centrifuges, either against each other or to allow for comparison with other centrifugal techniques. This study shows the limitations of calculating the g-level in the traditional way. Traditional g-level calculations produce a constant value which does not accurately reflect the dynamics of the coil planet centrifuge. This work has led to a new equation which can be used to determine the improved non-dimensional values. The new equations describe the fluctuating radial and tangential g-level associated with CCC centrifuges and the mean radial g-level value. The latter has been found to be significantly different than that determined by the traditional equation. This new equation will give a better understanding of forces experienced by sample components and allows for more accurate comparison between centrifuges. Although the new equation is far better than the traditional equation for comparing different types of centrifuges, other factors such as the mixing regime may need to be considered to improve the comparison further.

  6. The slide centrifuge gram stain as a urine screening method.

    PubMed

    Olson, M L; Shanholtzer, C J; Willard, K E; Peterson, L R

    1991-10-01

    A slide centrifuge Gram stain procedure was performed to screen for bacteriuria 4161 urine specimens submitted in urine preservative tubes for routine culture. For slide centrifuge Gram staining, each urine sample was mixed well. Thereafter, 0.2 mL of each sample was placed, using a pipette, into a slide centrifuge chamber and centrifuged at 2,000 rpm for 5 minutes. The slides were heat fixed, Gram stained, and read by laboratory personnel who scanned 12 consecutive oil-immersion fields using a set pattern. The presence of the same organism in six or more fields was defined as a positive urine screen. Urine samples were cultured using a 0.001-mL loop and a comparison of culture growth with slide centrifuge screening was made. When growth of 100,000 or more colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) was the reference for comparison, the screen had a sensitivity rate of 98%, a specificity rate of 90%, a negative predictive value of 99%, and a positive predictive value of 65%. When a lower colony count of 10,000 or more CFU/mL was the reference for comparison, the screen had a sensitivity rate of 88%, a specificity rate of 95%, a negative predictive value of 96%, and a positive predictive value of 84%. The slide centrifuge Gram stain is a very sensitive screening method to detect bacteriuria in an adult male population.

  7. Force fluctuations in stretching a tethered polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Anoop; Vemparala, Satyavani; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    The recently proposed fluctuation relation in unfolding forces [Phys. Rev. E1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.84.060101 84, 060101(R) (2011)] is reexamined taking into account the explicit time dependence of the force distribution. The stretching of a tethered Rouse polymer is exactly solved and the ratio of the probabilities of positive to negative forces is shown to be an exponential in force. Extensive steered molecular dynamics simulations of unfolding of deca alanine peptide confirm the form of fluctuation relation proposed earlier, but with explicit correct time dependence of unfolding forces taken into account. From exact calculations and simulations, a linear dependence of the constant in the exponential of the fluctuation relation on average unfolding forces and inverse temperature is proposed.

  8. Constellation Stretch Goals: Review of Industry Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, John

    2006-01-01

    Many good ideas received based on industry experience: a) Shuttle operations; b) Commercial aircraft production; c) NASA's historical way of doing business; d) Military and commercial programs. Aerospace performed preliminary analysis: a) Potential savings; b) Cost of implementation; c) Performance or other impact/penalties; d) Roadblocks; e) Unintended consequences; f) Bottom line. Significant work ahead for a "Stretch Goal"to become a good, documented requirement: 1) As a group, the relative "value" of goals are uneven; 2) Focused analysis on each goal is required: a) Need to ensure that a new requirement produces the desired consequence; b) It is not certain that some goals will not create problems elsewhere. 3) Individual implementation path needs to be studied: a) Best place to insert requirement (what level, which document); b) Appropriate wording for the requirement. Many goals reflect "best practices" based on lessons learned and may have value beyond near-term CxP requirements process.

  9. Stretched Lens Array Photovoltaic Concentrator Technology Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Solar arrays have been and continue to be the mainstay in providing power to nearly all commercial and government spacecraft. Light from the Sun is directly converted into electrical energy using solar cells. One way to reduce the cost of future space power systems is by minimizing the size and number of expensive solar cells by focusing the sunlight onto smaller cells using concentrator optics. The stretched lens array (SLA) is a unique concept that uses arched Fresnel lens concentrators to focus sunlight onto a line of high-efficiency solar cells located directly beneath. The SLA concept is based on the Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET) design that was used on NASA's New Millennium Deep Space 1 mission. The highly successful asteroid/comet rendezvous mission (1998 to 2001) demonstrated the performance and long-term durability of the SCARLET/SLA solar array design and set the foundation for further improvements to optimize its performance.

  10. Aerothermodynamic properties of stretched flames in enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, D. A.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    Flames are stretched by being pulled along their frontal surface by the flow field in which they reside. Their trajectories tend to approach particle paths, acquiring eventually the role of contact boundaries, -interfaces between the burnt and unburnt medium that may broaden solely as a consequence of diffusion. Fundamental properties of flow fields governing such flames are determined here on the basis of the zero Mach number model, providng a rational method of approach to the computational analysis of combustion fields in enclosures where, besides the aerodynamic properties flow, the thermodynamic process of compression must be taken into account. To illustrate its application, the method is used to reveal the mechanism of formation of a tulip-shape flame in a rectangular enclosure under nonturbulent flow conditions.

  11. Buckling and stretching of thin viscous sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kiely, Doireann; Breward, Chris; Griffiths, Ian; Howell, Peter; Lange, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Thin glass sheets are used in smartphone, battery and semiconductor technology, and may be manufactured by producing a relatively thick glass slab and subsequently redrawing it to a required thickness. The resulting sheets commonly possess undesired centerline ripples and thick edges. We present a mathematical model in which a viscous sheet undergoes redraw in the direction of gravity, and show that, in a sufficiently strong gravitational field, buckling is driven by compression in a region near the bottom of the sheet, and limited by viscous resistance to stretching of the sheet. We use asymptotic analysis in the thin-sheet, low-Reynolds-number limit to determine the centerline profile and growth rate of such a viscous sheet.

  12. Understanding the Relative Flexibility of RNA and DNA Duplexes: Stretching and Twist-Stretch Coupling.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Shi, Ya-Zhou; Wu, Yuan-Yan; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2017-03-28

    The flexibility of double-stranded (ds) RNA and dsDNA is crucial for their biological functions. Recent experiments have shown that the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA can be distinctively different in the aspects of stretching and twist-stretch coupling. Although various studies have been performed to understand the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA, there is still a lack of deep understanding of the distinctive differences in the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA helices as pertains to their stretching and twist-stretch coupling. In this work, we have explored the relative flexibility in stretching and twist-stretch coupling between dsRNA and dsDNA by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated stretch modulus and twist-stretch coupling are in good accordance with the existing experiments. Our analyses show that the differences in stretching and twist-stretch coupling between dsRNA and dsDNA helices are mainly attributed to their different (A- and B-form) helical structures. Stronger basepair inclination and slide in dsRNA is responsible for the apparently weaker stretching rigidity versus that of dsDNA, and the opposite twist-stretch coupling for dsRNA and dsDNA is also attributed to the stronger basepair inclination in dsRNA than in dsDNA. Our calculated macroscopic elastic parameters and microscopic analyses are tested and validated by different force fields for both dsRNA and dsDNA.

  13. Fabrication of Al/Diamond Particles Functionally Graded Materials by Centrifugal Sintered-Casting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimi; Shibuya, Masafumi; Sato, Hisashi

    2013-03-01

    The continuous graded structure of functionally graded materials (FGMs) can be created under a centrifugal force. Centrifugal sintered-casting (CSC) method, proposed by the authors, is one of the fabrication methods of FGM under centrifugal force. This method is a combination of the centrifugal sintering method and centrifugal casting method. In this study, Al/diamond particle FGM was fabricated by the proposed method.

  14. Cerebral Hypoperfusion Precedes Nausea During Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Schlegel, Todd T.; Black, F. Owen; Wood, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Nausea and motion sickness are important operational concerns for aviators and astronauts. Understanding underlying mechanisms associated with motion sickness may lead to new treatments. The goal of this work was to determine if cerebral blood flow changes precede the development of nausea in motion sick susceptible subjects. Cerebral flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres) and end-tidal CO2 were measured while subjects were rotated on a centrifuge (250 degrees/sec). Following 5 min of rotation, subjects were translated 0.504 m off-center, creating a +lGx centripetal acceleration in the nasal-occipital plane. Ten subjects completed the protocol without symptoms while 5 developed nausea (4 while 6ff-center and 1 while rotating on-center). Prior to nausea, subjects had significant increases in blood pressure (+13plus or minus 3 mmHg, P less than 0.05) and cerebrovascular resistance (+46 plus or minus 17%, P less than 0.05) and decreases in cerebral flow velocity both in the second (-13 plus or minus 4%) and last minute (-22 plus or minus 5%) before symptoms (P less than 0.05). In comparison, controls demonstrated no change in blood pressure or cerebrovascular resistance in the last minute of off-center rotation and only a 7 plus or minus 2% decrease in cerebral flow velocity. All subjects had significant hypocapnia (-3.8 plus or minus 0.4 mmHg, P less than 0.05), however this hypocapnia could not fully explain the cerebral hypoperfusion associated with the development of nausea. These data indicate that reductions in cerebral blood flow precede the development of nausea. Further work is necessary to determine what role cerebral hypoperfusion plays in motion sickness and whether cerebral hypoperfusion can be used to predict the development of nausea in susceptible individuals.

  15. Effects of stretching on upper-body muscular performance.

    PubMed

    Torres, Earlando M; Kraemer, William J; Vingren, Jakob L; Volek, Jeff S; Hatfield, Disa L; Spiering, Barry A; Ho, Jen Yu; Fragala, Maren S; Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Häkkinen, Keijo; Maresh, Carl M

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the influence of upper-body static stretching and dynamic stretching on upper-body muscular performance. Eleven healthy men, who were National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I track and field athletes (age, 19.6 +/- 1.7 years; body mass, 93.7 +/- 13.8 kg; height, 183.6 +/- 4.6 cm; bench press 1 repetition maximum [1RM], 106.2 +/- 23.0 kg), participated in this study. Over 4 sessions, subjects participated in 4 different stretching protocols (i.e., no stretching, static stretching, dynamic stretching, and combined static and dynamic stretching) in a balanced randomized order followed by 4 tests: 30% of 1 RM bench throw, isometric bench press, overhead medicine ball throw, and lateral medicine ball throw. Depending on the exercise, test peak power (Pmax), peak force (Fmax), peak acceleration (Amax), peak velocity (Vmax), and peak displacement (Dmax) were measured. There were no differences among stretch trials for Pmax, Fmax, Amax, Vmax, or Dmax for the bench throw or for Fmax for the isometric bench press. For the overhead medicine ball throw, there were no differences among stretch trials for Vmax or Dmax. For the lateral medicine ball throw, there was no difference in Vmax among stretch trials; however, Dmax was significantly larger (p stretching on upper-body muscular performance in young adult male athletes, regardless of stretch mode, potentially due to the amount of rest used after stretching before the performances. Since throwing performance was largely unaffected by static or dynamic upper-body stretching, athletes competing in the field events could perform upper-body stretching, if enough time were allowed before the performance. However, prior studies on lower-body musculature have demonstrated dramatic negative effects on speed and power. Therefore, it is

  16. Effect of participants' static stretching knowledge or deception on the responses to prolonged stretching.

    PubMed

    Janes, W C Ian; Snow, Brandon B G; Watkins, Caisie E; Noseworthy, Elecia A L; Reid, Jonathan C; Behm, David G

    2016-10-01

    Much of the static stretching (SS) literature reports performance impairments with prolonged SS. However, it has been acknowledged that a limitation of these studies is participants' knowledge or bias. Since many participants have knowledge of the literature, their performance may be subconsciously influenced by expectations. Hence, the objective of this study was to examine the effect of stretching knowledge or deception on subsequent force output following SS. Two groups of male participants who were either aware (BIASED: 14) or unaware (DECEPTION: 14) of the SS literature participated. Unaware participants were misinformed that SS increases force production. Testing involved maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) of the quadriceps and hamstrings at pre-, post-, and 5 min post-intervention (three 30-s passive hamstring stretches to the point of discomfort with 30-s rest intervals) or control. While the DECEPTION group displayed impaired knee flexion force (p = 0.04; 3.6% and 10.4%) following hamstrings SS, there was no significant impairment with the BIASED (-1.1% and +0.9%) group. Both groups exhibited hamstrings F200 (force produced in the first 200 ms) impairments following SS. Whereas BIASED participants exhibited an overall decrease (p < 0.05; 1.8% and 4.2%) in knee extension MVC, DECEPTION participants showed (p = 0.005; 8.8% and 5.1%) force increases. The quadriceps F200 was not significantly affected with the BIASED group but overall there were 4.5% and 8.7% F200 impairments at 1 and 5 min post-intervention (p = 0.05) with the DECEPTION group. Thus while deception resulted in enhanced quadriceps muscle force output, there was no knowledge or deception advantage when stretching the hamstrings.

  17. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B.

    2017-01-01

    The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail, and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component. PMID:28298835

  18. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B

    2017-01-01

    The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail, and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component.

  19. A Stretching Device for High Resolution Live-Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lawrence; Mathieu, Pattie S.; Helmke, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Several custom-built and commercially available devices are available to investigate cellular responses to substrate strain. However, analysis of structural dynamics by microscopy in living cells during stretch is not readily feasible. We describe a novel stretch device optimized for high-resolution live-cell imaging. The unit assembles onto standard inverted microscopes and applies constant magnitude or cyclic stretch at physiological magnitudes to cultured cells on elastic membranes. Interchangeable modular indenters enable delivery of equibiaxial and uniaxial stretch profiles. Strain analysis performed by tracking fluorescent microspheres adhered onto the substrate demonstrated reproducible application of stretch profiles. In endothelial cells transiently expressing EGFP-vimentin and paxillin-DsRed2 and subjected to constant magnitude equibiaxial stretch, the 2-D strain tensor demonstrated efficient transmission through the extracellular matrix and focal adhesions. Decreased transmission to the intermediate filament network was measured, and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of maximum stretch magnitude revealed discrete sites of strain focusing. Spatial correlation of vimentin and paxillin displacement vectors provided an estimate of the extent of mechanical coupling between the structures. Interestingly, switching the spatial profile of substrate strain reveals that actin-mediated edge ruffling is not desensitized to repeated mechano-stimulation. These initial observations show that the stretch device is compatible with live-cell microscopy and is a novel tool for measuring dynamic structural remodeling under mechanical strain. PMID:20195762

  20. Does Postexercise Static Stretching Alleviate Delayed Muscle Soreness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buroker, Katherine C.; Schwane, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Because many experts recommend stretching after exercise to relieve muscle soreness, 23 subjects performed a 30-minute step test to induce delayed muscle soreness. There was neither temporary relief of pain immediately after stretching nor a reduction in pain during the 3-day postexercise period. (Author/SM)

  1. The history dependence of force production in mammalian skeletal muscle following stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles.

    PubMed

    Herzog, W; Leonard, T R

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the history dependence of force production during and following stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles in mammalian skeletal muscle. Thirty-three different isometric, stretch, shortening, stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch experiments were preformed in cat soleus (n=8) using previously established methods. Stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles are not commutative with respect to the isometric forces following the length changes. Whereas force depression following shortening is virtually unaffected by previous stretching of the muscle, force enhancement following stretch depends in a dose-dependent manner on the amount of muscle shortening preceding the stretch. The history dependence of isometric force following shortening-stretch cycles can conveniently be modelled using an elastic (compressive and tensile) element that engages at the length of muscle activation. Such an "elastic" mechanism has been proposed by Edman and Tsuchiya (1996) (Edman, K.A. P., Tsuchiya, T., 1996. Strain of passive elements during force enhancement by stretch in frog mucle fibres. Journal of Physiology 490. 1, 191-205) based on experimental observations, and has been implemented theoretically in a rheological model of muscle (Forcinito et al., 1997) (Forcinito, M., Epstein, M., Herzog, W., 1997. Theoretical considerations on myofibril stiffness. Biophysics Journal 72, 1278-1286). The history dependence of isometric force following stretch-shortening cycles appears independent of the stretch preceding the shortening, except perhaps, if stretching occurs at very high speeds (i.e. 6-10 times fibre length per second). The results of this study are hard to reconcile with the two major mechanisms associated with history dependence of force production: sarcomere length non-uniformity (Edman et al., 1993) and stress-induced cross-bridge inhibition (Maréchal and Plaghki, 1979) (Maréchal, G., Plaghki, L., 1979. The deficit of

  2. Method for separating isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-10-21

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

  3. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-17

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

  4. Bruxism: Is There an Indication for Muscle-Stretching Exercises?

    PubMed

    Gouw, Simone; de Wijer, Anton; Creugers, Nico Hj; Kalaykova, Stanimira I

    Bruxism is a common phenomenon involving repetitive activation of the masticatory muscles. Muscle-stretching exercises are a recommended part of several international guidelines for musculoskeletal disorders and may be effective in management of the jaw muscle activity that gives rise to bruxism. However, most studies of muscle-stretching exercises have mainly focused on their influence on performance (eg, range of motion, coordination, and muscle strength) of the limb or trunk muscles of healthy individuals or individuals with sports-related injuries. Very few have investigated stretching of the human masticatory muscles and none muscle-stretching exercises in the management of (sleep) bruxism. This article reviews the literature on muscle-stretching exercises and their potential role in the management of sleep bruxism or its consequences in the musculoskeletal system.

  5. Flows induced by exponential stretching and shearing plate motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Boundary-layer solutions for the flow induced by an exponentially stretching surface also sheared in its own plane are given. Prior to this study no similarity solutions have been reported for flows generated by exponentially sheared surfaces concomitant with surface stretching in any form. The method of solution is self-similarity. The results found here are intimately related to those of Magyari and Keller ["Heat and mass transfer in the boundary layers on an exponentially stretching continuous surface," J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 32, 577-585 (1999)] who studied the motion and heat transfer induced by an exponentially stretching plate. In addition to two particular cases reported here, a third situation is found where an exponentially stretching surface admits a concomitant arbitrary streamwise shearing motion.

  6. Flow of viscous fluid along a nonlinearly stretching curved surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanni, K. M.; Asghar, S.; Jalil, M.; Okechi, N. F.

    This paper focuses on the flow of viscous fluid over a curved surface stretching with nonlinear power-law velocity. The boundary layer equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations using suitable non-dimensional transformations. These equations are solved numerically using shooting and Runge-Kutta (RK) methods. The impact of non-dimensional radius of curvature and power-law indices on the velocity field, the pressure and the skin friction coefficient are investigated. The results deduced for linear stretching are compared with the published work to validate the numerical procedure. The important findings are: (a) Slight variation of the curvature of the stretching sheet increases the velocity and the skin friction coefficient significantly. (b) The nonlinearity of the stretching velocity increases the skin friction. (c) The results for linear stretching and the flat surface are the special cases of this problem.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Process Conditions in Injection Stretch Blow Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomeia, Y.; Menary, G.; Armstrong, C. G.

    2007-04-01

    Various processing parameters influence the final product properties in the stretch blow moulding process. These properties are highly dependent on the balance between the stretching of the polymer and blowing times as well as the level of the pressure inside the bottle. A data acquisition system capable of accurately measuring the process conditions within an industrial environment is discussed. Experimental work has been conducted on an industrial stretch blow moulding machine by means of replacing the original stretch rod with one that contains a force cell and a pressure transducer. Correlation between the stretching force, displacement of the rod and the pressure inside the bottle give a better understanding of the process and should allow a more precise final element simulation of the process to be developed.

  8. Stretching and injury prevention in football: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Marko D; Ostojic, Sergej M

    2011-04-01

    Stretching exercises are regularly recommended as a part of football-training sessions and in preparation for competition. There is little sound empirical evidence, however, to substantiate the role of stretching exercises and consequently increased flexibility on injury prevention in football. Furthermore, in the last decade or so, fundamental research has shed some light on the biomechanical adaptation of the muscle-tendon unit following different stretching protocols, improving knowledge about the topic and enabling better understanding of the stretching-injury relationship. The purpose of this review is to examine the literature on the role of stretching and/or increased flexibility on injury prevention in football, with presented results analyzed in the context of the up-to-date basic science research evidence.

  9. Dielectrophoretic Stretching of DNA Tethered to a Fiber Tip

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S.; Li, Jiali

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under AC electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, AC frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the dielectrophoretic force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules. PMID:25741602

  10. Pre-exercise stretching does not impact upon running economy.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Philip R; Walker, Adrian

    2007-11-01

    Pre-exercise stretching has been widely reported to reduce performance in tasks requiring maximal or near-maximal force or torque. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different pre-exercise stretching routines on running economy. Seven competitive male middle and long-distance runners (mean +/- SD) age: 32.5 +/- 7.7 years; height: 175.0 +/- 8.8 cm; mass: 67.8 +/- 8.6 kg; V(.-)O2max: 66.8 +/- 7.0 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) volunteered to participate in this study. Each participant completed 4 different pre-exercise conditions: (a) a control condition, (b) static stretching, (c) progressive static stretching, and (d) dynamic stretching. Each stretching routine consisted of 2 x 30-second stretches for each of 5 exercises. Dependent variables measured were sit and reach test before and after each pre-exercise routine, running economy (ml x kg(-1) x km(-1)), and steady-state oxygen uptake (ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)), which were measured during the final 3 minutes of a 10-minute run below lactate threshold. All 3 stretching routines resulted in an increase in the range of movement (p = 0.008). There was no change in either running economy (p = 0.915) or steady-state V(.-)O2 (p = 0.943). The lack of change in running economy was most likely because it was assessed after a period of submaximal running, which may have masked any effects from the stretching protocols. Previously reported reductions in performance have been attributed to reduced motor unit activation, presumably IIX. In this study, these motor units were likely not to have been recruited; this may explain the unimpaired performance. This study suggests that pre-exercise stretching has no impact upon running economy or submaximal exercise oxygen cost.

  11. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, K.S.

    1975-10-03

    A photochromatographic method for isotope separation is described. An isotopically mixed molecular species is adsorbed on an adsorptive surface, and the adsorbed molecules are irradiated with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thus separate them from the undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes. (BLM)

  12. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    1977-01-01

    An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

  13. A Multi-Isotope Procedure for Simultaneously Estimating the Volume of Body Fluid Compartments of Swine.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    U Reproduction of this document in whole or in part is prohibited except with the permission of the Commander, Letterman Army Institute of Research...30 to 70 ml) of porcine blood y placed in a beaker alon with an accurately measured dose of I- bovine albumin or Na 2SO . The blood and isotope were...centrifuged at 12,000 g for 5 minutes. The remaining blood was centrifuged at 29? g for 10 minute plasma was collected and the activity of I- bovine

  14. [The analytical setting of rotary speed of centrifuge rotor and centrifugation time in chemical, biochemical and microbiological practice].

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, K V

    2012-08-01

    The researchers happen to face with suspensions in their chemical, biochemical and microbiological practice. The suspensions are the disperse systems with solid dispersed phase and liquid dispersion medium and with dispersed phase particle size > 100 nm (10-7 m). Quite often the necessity occurs to separate solid particles from liquid. To use for this purpose the precipitation in gravitation field can make the process to progress too long. In this respect an effective mode is the precipitation in the field of centrifugal forces--the centrifugation. The rotary speed of centrifuge rotor and centrifugation time can be set analytically using regularities of general dynamics and hydrodynamics. To this effect, should be written and transformed the equation of First and Second Newton Laws for suspension particle being in the field of centrifugal forces and forces of resistance of liquid and vessel wall. The force of liquid resistance depends on particle motion condition in liquid. To determine the regimen the Archimedes and Reynolds numerical dimensionless criteria are to be applied. The article demonstrates the results of these transformations as analytical inverse ratio dependence of centrifugation time from rotary speed. The calculation of series of "rate-time" data permits to choose the optimal data pair on the assumption of centrifuge capacity and practical reasonability. The results of calculations are validated by actual experimental data hence the physical mathematical apparatus can be considered as effective one. The setting progress depends both from parameter (Reynolds criterion) and data series calculation. So, the most convenient way to apply this operation is the programming approach. The article proposes to use the program Microsoft Excel and VBA programming language for this purpose. The possibility to download the file from Internet to use it for fast solution is proposed.

  15. A fuzzy controlled three-phase centrifuge for waste separation

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W.J.; Smith, R.E.; Miller, N.

    1998-02-01

    The three-phase centrifuge technology discussed in this paper was developed by Neal Miller, president of Centech, Inc. The three-phase centrifuge is an excellent device for cleaning up oil field and refinery wastes which are typically composed of hydrocarbons, water, and solids. The technology is unique. It turns the waste into salable oil, reusable water, and landfill-able solids. No secondary waste is produced. The problem is that only the inventor can set up and run the equipment well enough to provide an optimal cleanup. Demand for this device has far exceeded a one man operation. There is now a need for several centrifuges to be operated at different locations at the same time. This has produced a demand for an intelligent control system, one that could replace a highly skilled operator, or at least supplement the skills of a less experienced operator. The control problem is ideally suited to fuzzy logic, since the centrifuge is a highly complicated machine operated entirely by the skill and experience of the operator. A fuzzy control system was designed for and used with the centrifuge.

  16. Exosome enrichment of human serum using multiple cycles of centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongkwon; Tan, Zhijing; Lubman, David M

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we compared the use of repeated cycles of centrifugation at conventional speeds for enrichment of exosomes from human serum compared to the use of ultracentrifugation (UC). After removal of cells and cell debris, a speed of 110 000 × g or 40 000 × g was used for the UC or centrifugation enrichment process, respectively. The enriched exosomes were analyzed using the bicinchoninic acid assay, 1D gel separation, transmission electron microscopy, Western blotting, and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis. It was found that a five-cycle repetition of UC or centrifugation is necessary for successful removal of nonexosomal proteins in the enrichment of exosomes from human serum. More significantly, 5× centrifugation enrichment was found to provide similar or better performance than 5× UC enrichment in terms of enriched exosome protein amount, Western blot band intensity for detection of CD-63, and numbers of identified exosome-related proteins and cluster of differentiation (CD) proteins. A total of 478 proteins were identified in the LC-MS/MS analyses of exosome proteins obtained from 5× UCs and 5× centrifugations including many important CD membrane proteins. The presence of previously reported exosome-related proteins including key exosome protein markers demonstrates the utility of this method for analysis of proteins in human serum.

  17. Development of a Feeder for Uninterrupted Centrifugation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Vasques, Marilyn F.; Gundo, Daniel P.; Griffith, Jon B.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A specialized paste diet feeder was developed in support of a hypergravity (2G) centrifuge study. The centrifuge study was to be compared to a previously flown Russian Cosmos spaceflight so experimental parameters of the 14 day spaceflight had to be duplicated. In order to duplicate at hyper G an experiment that took place in weightlessness, all other conditions must be as identical as possible. Stopping the centrifuge to provide maintenance for the animals causes unacceptable changes in experimental research results. Thus the experimental protocol required the delivery of a designated amount of paste diet at regular intervals for a two week period without stopping the centrifuge. A centrifuge and a stationary control cage, each containing 10 laboratory rats, were fitted with feeders that were calibrated to provide 140 plus or minus 2g of paste diet every 6 hours. This paper describes development of the feeder design and results of its operation over the two week experiment. The design philosophy and details of the feeder system are provided with recommendations for future such devices.

  18. Centrifuges and Their Application for Biological Experiments in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckmann, Enno

    2012-12-01

    The need for an in-orbit 1×g control originated from the fact that Space radiation or other environmental factors of Space flight could not be excluded as cause for the effects on biological systems that were mainly interpreted as effects of the weightlessness environment. Indeed, in many experiments the 1×g reference centrifuge on board revealed the same data as the 1×g controls on ground, proving the lack of gravity was causing the results. In other cases, the reference centrifuge data were intermediate or clearly different to the ground data which was either due to interrupted 1×g conditions on board or to other, sometimes not well understood factors. This triggered also the development of sophisticated hardware allowing the start, i.e. the transition from 1×g to 0×g, or the termination of the experiment without stopping the centrifuge. Recently developed facilities provide also a complete life support system on the centrifuge rotor. Besides the in-flight 1×g control, acceleration experiments required a centrifuge for determination of threshold values in orbit.

  19. Centrifugation Effects on Estrous Cycling, Mating Success and Pregnancy Outcome in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.; Rushing, Linda S.; Tou, Janet; Wade, Charles E.; Baer, Lisa A.

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of 2-g centrifugation on estrous cycling, mating success and pregnancy outcome in rats. Sexually mature female and male rats were assigned to either 2-g centrifuge or non-centrifuge conditions, and to non-breeding or breeding conditions. In non-breeding females, estrous cycles were analyzed by examining vaginal cytology before and for 35 days during centrifugation. Breeding females were time-mated following 7 days of adaptation to centrifugation. Following adaptation to centrifugation, estrous cycle duration over a five-cycle period was similar in centrifuged and non-centrifuged females. Identical numbers of centrifuged and non-centrifuged females conceived, however centrifuged females took four-times longer than controls to achieve conception. Births occurred at the normal gestational length. Pup birth weight and postnatal survival were p<0.05 reduced in centrifuged as compared to non-centrifuged groups. In conclusion, 2-g centrifugation had no effect on estrous cycle length or the probably of becoming pregnant but delayed conception and diminished pregnancy outcome.

  20. Centrifugation effects on estrous cycle, mating success and pregnancy outcome in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronca, April E.; Rushing, Linda; Tou, Janet; Wade, Charles E.; Baer, Lisa A.

    2005-08-01

    We analyzed the effects of 2-g centrifugation on estrous cycling, mating success and pregnancy outcome in rats. Sexually mature female and male rats were assigned to either 2-g centrifuge or non-centrifuge conditions, and to non-breeding or breeding conditions. In non-breeding females, estrous cycles were analyzed by examining vaginal cytology before and for 35 days during centrifugation. Breeding females were time-mated following 7 days of adaptation to centrifugation. Following adaptation to centrifugation, estrous cycle duration over a five-cycle period was similar in centrifuged and non-centrifuged females. Identical numbers of centrifuged and non-centrifuged females conceived, however centrifuged females took four-times longer than controls to achieve conception. Births occurred at the normal gestational length. Pup birth weight and postnatal survival were p<0.05 reduced in centrifuged as compared to non-centrifuged groups. In conclusion, 2-g centrifugation had no effect on estrus cycle length or the probably of becoming pregnant but delayed conception and diminished pregnancy outcome.

  1. Single, stretched membrane, structural module experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.L.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes tests done on stretched-membrane heliostats used to reflect solar radiation onto a central receiver. The tests were used to validate prior analysis and mathematical models developed to describe module performance. The modules tested were three meters in diameter and had reflective polymer film laminated to the membrane. The frames were supported at three points equally spaced around the ring. Three modules were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended at the bottom support, two were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended from the upper mounts, and one was rigidly attached with its weight suspended at the bottom mount. By varying the membrane tension we could simulate a uniform wind loading normal to the mirror's surface. A video camera 15+ meters away from the mirror recorded the virtual image of a target grid as reflected by the mirrors' surface. The image was digitized and stored on a microcomputer. Using the law of reflection and analytic geometry, we computed the surface slopes of a sampling of points on the surface. The dominant module response was consistent with prior SERI analyses. The simple analytical model is quite adequate for designing and sizing single-membrane modules if the initial imperfections and their amplification are appropriately controlled. To avoid potential problems resulting from the fundamentally n = 2 deformation phenomena, we advise using either relatively stiffer ring frames or more than three support points.

  2. Stretched Lens Array Squarerigger (SLASR) Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark; McDanal, A.J.; Howell, Joe; Lollar, Louis; Carrington, Connie; Hoppe, David; Piszczor, Michael; Suszuki, Nantel; Eskenazi, Michael; Aiken, Dan; Fulton, Michael; Brandhorst, Henry; Schuller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Since April 2005, our team has been underway on a competitively awarded program sponsored by NASA s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to develop, refine, and mature the unique solar array technology known as Stretched Lens Array SquareRigger (SLASR). SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, including the following: Areal Power Density = 300 W/m2 (2005) - 400 W/m2 (2008 Target) Specific Power = 300 W/kg (2005) - 500 W/kg (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Stowed Power = 80 kW/cu m (2005) - 120 kW/m3 (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Scalable Array Capacity = 100 s of W s to 100 s of kW s Super-Insulated Small Cell Circuit = High-Voltage (300-600 V) Operation at Low Mass Penalty Super-Shielded Small Cell Circuit = Excellent Radiation Hardness at Low Mass Penalty 85% Cell Area Savings = 75% Lower Array Cost per Watt than One-Sun Array Modular, Scalable, & Mass-Producible at MW s per Year Using Existing Processes and Capacities

  3. Global stability of gravitationally stretched capillary jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Rubio, Mariano; Sevilla, Alejandro; Gordillo, José Manuel

    2013-11-01

    We analyze the global linear stability of capillary jets stretched by gravity both experimentally and theoretically, extending the work by Sauter & Buggisch (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 533, 2005, pp. 237-257). Our results reveal the essential stabilizing role played by the axial curvature of the jet, the latter effect being especially relevant for injectors with a large diameter. The theoretical description, based on the one-dimensional mass and momentum equations retaining the exact expression for the interfacial curvature, accurately predicts the onset of jet self-excited oscillations experimentally observed for wide ranges of liquid viscosity and injector diameter. The marginal self-sustained oscillations observed in the experiments are shown to correspond to the excitation of the leading global mode of the jet. The model developed in the present work shows better agreement with the experimental jetting-dripping transition events than those available in the literature, thus allowing us to conclude that, surprisingly, the size of the steady threads produced at a given distance from the exit can be reduced by increasing the nozzle diameter. The proposed formulation allows to describe the inviscid limit, and experiments are being performed to study this distinguished case. Supported by Spanish MINECO under projects DPI 2011-28356-C03-01 and DPI 2011-28356-C03-02.

  4. Structural evolution of fold-thrust structures in analog models deformed in a large geotechnical centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Todd E.; Dixon, John M.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the structural evolution of fault-propagation folds and fold-thrust systems with scaled analog modeling carried out using the 5.5 m radius geotechnical centrifuge at C-CORE, St. John's NL. The experiments presented here are the first of their kind, scaled ten times larger than predecessors and deformed using a custom rig with load monitoring and displacement control. Plane-layered models approximately 1 m long and representing 50 km sections are shortened horizontally under an enhanced gravity field of 160 g. The large model scale allows for a proportionally large number of bedding laminations that act as strain markers. This allows detailed analysis of strain partitioning and interplay, both at the scale of a fold-thrust system and the individual fold-thrust structure. Layer-parallel shortening ("LPS") and rotation of fault-bounded blocks are revealed by mapping contraction fault populations and bedding-contraction fault intersection angles. Low-angle contraction faulting and LPS are found to be dominant at early stages of development and rotation of fault-bounded blocks occurs during progressive folding of the hanging-wall panel during fault-propagation folding. Displacement-distance data obtained from major thrusts in the model show relative stretch values, and consequently fault slip/propagation ratios, that are similar to natural structures.

  5. Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

  6. Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation: Effects of History and Lift Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadim, Ali

    2014-11-01

    This work is co-authored with my doctoral student Shujing Xu and is dedicated to the memory of my doctoral advisor Howard Brenner who enjoyed thought experiments related to rotating systems. Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation refers to our theoretical discovery that within a liquid-filled container that rotates in an oscillatory manner about a fixed axis as a rigid body, a suspended particle can be made to migrate on average in the direction opposite to that of ordinary centrifugation. That is, a heavy (or light) particle can move toward (or away from) the rotation axis, when the frequency of oscillations is high enough. In this work we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Saffman lift force on particle trajectories and find that the counter-centrifugation phenomenon persists even when these forces are active.

  7. Space Station Centrifuge: A Requirement for Life Science Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Arthur H.; Fuller, Charles A.; Johnson, Catherine C.; Winget, Charles M.

    1992-01-01

    A centrifuge with the largest diameter that can be accommodated on Space Station Freedom is required to conduct life science research in the microgravity environment of space. (This was one of the findings of a group of life scientists convened at the University of California, Davis, by Ames Research Center.) The centrifuge will be used as a research tool to understand how gravity affects biological processes; to provide an on-orbit one-g control; and to assess the efficacy of using artificial gravity to counteract the deleterious biological effect of space flight. The rationale for the recommendation and examples of using ground-based centrifugation for animal and plant acceleration studies are presented. Included are four appendixes and an extensive bibliography of hypergravity studies.

  8. Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1994-02-15

    A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation. 4 figures.

  9. Operation effectiveness of wells by enhancing the electric- centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyatikov, P. N.; Kozyrev, I. N.; Deeva, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    We present the method to improve the operation effectiveness of wells by enhancing the electric-centrifugal pump. Some of the best ways to extend the electric-centrifugal pumps operating lifetime is using today's techniques as well as additional protective equipment as a part of the electric-centrifugal pump. In paper it is shown that high corrosiveness of formation fluid (a multi-component medium composed of oil, produced water, free and dissolved gases) is a major cause of failures of downhole equipment. Coil tubing is the most efficient technology to deal with this problem. The experience of coil tubing operations has proved that high-quality bottom hole cleaning saving the cost of operation due to a decreased failure rate of pumps associated with ejection of mechanical impurity.

  10. Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation.

  11. Design Optimization of a Centrifugal Fan with Splitter Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Man-Woong; Kim, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Kwang-Yong

    2015-05-01

    Multi-objective optimization of a centrifugal fan with additionally installed splitter blades was performed to simultaneously maximize the efficiency and pressure rise using three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and hybrid multi-objective evolutionary algorithm. Two design variables defining the location of splitter, and the height ratio between inlet and outlet of impeller were selected for the optimization. In addition, the aerodynamic characteristics of the centrifugal fan were investigated with the variation of design variables in the design space. Latin hypercube sampling was used to select the training points, and response surface approximation models were constructed as surrogate models of the objective functions. With the optimization, both the efficiency and pressure rise of the centrifugal fan with splitter blades were improved considerably compared to the reference model.

  12. Solvent-free cleaning using a centrifugal cryogenic pellet accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, J.R.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    An advanced centrifuge that accelerates frozen CO{sub 2} pellets to high speeds for surface cleaning and paint removal is being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The centrifuge-based accelerator was designed, fabricated, and tested under a program sponsored by the Warner Robins Air Logistics Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia. In comparison to the more conventional compressed air ``sandblast`` pellet accelerators, the centrifugal accelerator system can achieve higher pellet speeds, has precise speed control, and is more than ten times as energy efficient. Furthermore, the use of frozen CO{sub 2} pellets instead of conventional metal, plastic, sand, or other abrasive materials that remain solid at room temperature, minimizes the waste stream. This apparatus has been used to demonstrate cleaning of various surfaces, including removal of paint, oxide coatings, metal coatings, organic coatings, and oil and grease coatings from a variety of surfaces. The design and operation of the apparatus is discussed.

  13. Passively Shunted Piezoelectric Damping of Centrifugally-Loaded Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Min, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center have been investigating shunted piezoelectric circuits as potential damping treatments for turbomachinery rotor blades. This effort seeks to determine the effects of centrifugal loading on passively-shunted piezoelectric - damped plates. Passive shunt circuit parameters are optimized for the plate's third bending mode. Tests are performed both non-spinning and in the Dynamic Spin Facility to verify the analysis, and to determine the effectiveness of the damping under centrifugal loading. Results show that a resistive shunt circuit will reduce resonant vibration for this configuration. However, a tuned shunt circuit will be required to achieve the desired damping level. The analysis and testing address several issues with passive shunt circuit implementation in a rotating system, including piezoelectric material integrity under centrifugal loading, shunt circuit implementation, and tip mode damping.

  14. Is there really a diagnostically useful relationship between the carbon-oxygen stretching frequencies in metal carboxylate complexes and their coordination mode?

    PubMed

    Martínez, David; Motevalli, Majid; Watkinson, Michael

    2010-01-14

    An investigation into the relationship between the asymmetric and symmetric stretching modes of ancillary carboxylate ligands and their mode of binding in a family of manganese(III) complexes of tetradentate N(2)O(2) Schiff base ligands, which includes comparison of an (18)O isotopically labelled derivative, has been undertaken. The results suggest that caution should be employed in using this technique to assign the binding mode of the carboxylate ligands in these complexes despite its very extensive use in the literature.

  15. Carbon isotope controlled molecular switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Brian K.

    Single molecules represent one fundamental limit to the downscaling of electronics. As a prototype element for carbon-based nanoscale science and technology, the detailed behavior of carbon monoxide (CO) on the copper surface Cu(111) has been investigated. These investigations span from individual carbon isotope resolution, to single molecules, to compact clusters assembled by molecular manipulation via a homemade scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Sub-nanoscale devices, composed of only a few molecules, which exploit both lone CO properties and molecule-molecule interaction, have been designed and assembled. The devices function as bi-stable switches and can serve as classical bits with densities > 50 Tbits/cm2. Operated in the nuclear mass sensitive regime, each switch can also function as a molecular "centrifuge" capable of identifying the isotope of a single carbon atom in real-time. A model, based on electron-vibron couping and inelastic tunneling, has been developed and explains the dynamic behavior of the switch. The interaction between pairs of switches was also explored and it was found that their behavior ranges from completely independent to strongly coupled. Larger nanostructures, which were composed of many sub-switches organized to leverage the fully coupled interaction, link two spatially separated "bits" on the surface. Such a linked system can set or read a state non-locally, which is equivalent to bidirectional information transfer. The linked system has also exhibited logic functionality. These experiments demonstrate scalable molecular cells for information storage, and for information processing through cellular automata logic schemes.

  16. Derivation of stretched exponential tap density equations of granular powders.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tian

    2015-04-21

    The tap density of granular powders was found to be better fitted with the stretched exponential law. In our previous work, the stretched exponential tap density equations were derived with the rate process theory and free volume concept, under the assumption that the particle packing rate during the tapping process obeys the stretched Arrhenius equation, which, however, has an empirical origin. In this article, the above assumption is eliminated and attempts are made to obtain the stretched exponential tap density equations from very fundamental bases. In a vertical tapping process, the probability of particles attaining certain energy states is assumed to obey the Boltzmann distribution and particles traveling from one site to another are assumed to follow a very common memoryless random exponential law. The stretched exponential tap density equations are thus derived and all parameters acquire clear physical meanings. The most important parameter, the stretched exponential, is demonstrated to correlate with the interparticle forces: a small value may indicate a strong adhesive or cohesive interaction. Therefore, the stretched exponential could be a better indicator for powder flowability correlated with particle interactions as well.

  17. Cyclical stretch induces structural changes in atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Anne Margreet; Maass, Alexander H; Oberdorf-Maass, Silke U; De Boer, Rudolf A; Van Gilst, Wiek H; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2013-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) often occurs in the presence of an underlying disease. These underlying diseases cause atrial remodelling, which make the atria more susceptible to AF. Stretch is an important mediator in the remodelling process. The aim of this study was to develop an atrial cell culture model mimicking remodelling due to atrial pressure overload. Neonatal rat atrial cardiomyocytes (NRAM) were cultured and subjected to cyclical stretch on elastic membranes. Stretching with 1 Hz and 15% elongation for 30 min. resulted in increased expression of immediate early genes and phosphorylation of Erk and p38. A 24-hr stretch period resulted in hypertrophy-related changes including increased cell diameter, reinduction of the foetal gene program and cell death. No evidence of apoptosis was observed. Expression of atrial natriuretic peptide, brain natriuretic peptide and growth differentiation factor-15 was increased, and calcineurin signalling was activated. Expression of several potassium channels was decreased, suggesting electrical remodelling. Atrial stretch-induced change in skeletal α-actin expression was inhibited by pravastatin, but not by eplerenone or losartan. Stretch of NRAM results in elevation of stress markers, changes related to hypertrophy and dedifferentiation, electrical remodelling and cell death. This model can contribute to investigating the mechanisms involved in the remodelling process caused by stretch and to the testing of pharmaceutical agents.

  18. Stretch-activated pathways and left ventricular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Force, Thomas; Michael, Ashour; Kilter, Heiko; Haq, Syed

    2002-12-01

    Stretch of cardiomyocytes in vivo occurs in response to a number of stimuli, including pressure or volume overload, but it is most clearly seen following relatively large, acute myocardial infarctions. It is in this setting that stretch is most clearly related to the pathogenesis of heart failure. Stretch of the remote, noninfacted myocardium leads to the activation of a large number of cellular signal transduction pathways, which sets into motion a series of what are designed to be compensatory responses to the increased wall stress on the surviving myocardium. Herein, we will discuss the cellular pathways activated by cell stretch, which appear to trigger the initial steps in the pathogenesis of ventricular dilatation following myocardial infarction. We will discuss what is known of the "stretch sensors," which convert the mechanical stimulus into molecular signals. I will then introduce the specific cellular signaling pathways activated by stretch and discuss the evidence for their involvement in remodeling. Since many of these pathways will be covered in more detail in specific sections to follow, this will serve as an introduction to stretch-activated signaling. Finally, we will briefly examine later phases of the response, including advanced heart failure. The goal is to identify molecular modulators that might serve as targets for pharmacologic or molecular intervention.

  19. No difference in pre- and postexercise stretching on flexibility.

    PubMed

    Beedle, Barry B; Leydig, Summer N; Carnucci, Jennifer M

    2007-08-01

    According to the American College of Sports Medicine (1), there is limited information about when to stretch during an exercise session. The purpose of this study was to determine if the placement of static stretching, either before or after a workout, would affect flexibility in the hip, knee, and ankle. Thirty college-age men (n = 12) and women (n = 18) volunteered to participate. Nine were highly trained, 13 were moderately trained, and 8 were sedentary. Subjects participated in both treatments, which were randomly assigned and were 48-72 hours apart. In one treatment, subjects warmed-up first by walking on a treadmill for 5 minutes at approximately 50% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, and then performed 3 static stretches: quadriceps, hamstrings, and calf muscles. Each stretch was held 3 times, 15 seconds each. Next, flexibility measurements were determined for the hip, hamstrings, and ankle using a goniometer. The other treatment consisted of performing 20 minutes of walking or jogging at a moderate intensity, then the same stretching exercises were performed and the same flexibility measurements were taken. Reliability coefficients ranged from 0.90-0.96. There were no significant differences in any of the flexibility measurements except for hip flexibility, which approached significance (p = 0.06) and therefore favored stretching after the workout. The placement of stretching, before or after a workout, does not make a difference in its effect on flexibility.

  20. Calf stretching in non-weight bearing versus weight bearing.

    PubMed

    Dinh, N V; Freeman, H; Granger, J; Wong, S; Johanson, M

    2011-03-01

    Limited ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF PROM) has been associated with lower extremity overuse injuries. Therefore, clinicians often prescribe stretching exercises to increase ankle DF PROM. However, there is limited evidence to indicate if any particular gastrocnemius stretching exercise results in greater improvement in DF PROM. The aim of this study was to determine if gastrocnemius stretching in non-weight bearing (NWB) or weight bearing (WB) results in a greater increase of ankle DF PROM. 28 healthy volunteers, aged 18-55 years, who exhibited less than 10 degrees of ankle DF PROM completed the study. Participants were randomized into 2 stretching groups: NWB and WB. Both groups completed a 3-week home gastrocnemius stretching program, consisting of 5 repetitions held for 30 s each, 2 times daily. Participants' ankle DF PROM was measured with a blinded standard goniometer in NWB and WB positions before and after participation in a 3-week home gastrocnemius stretching program. Two 3-way mixed model ANOVAs demonstrated no significant difference in ankle DF PROM between the NWB and WB groups for either the NWB measurement condition (p=0.49) or WB measurement condition (p=0.86). Gastrocnemius stretching exercises performed in NWB or WB were equally effective in increasing ankle DF PROM.

  1. Control of centrifugal blood pump based on the motor current.

    PubMed

    Iijima, T; Inamoto, T; Nogawa, M; Takatani, S

    1997-07-01

    In this study, centrifugal pump performance was examined in a mock circulatory loop to derive an automatic pump rotational speed (rpm) control method. The pivot bearing supported sealless centrifugal pump was placed in the left ventricular apex to aorta bypass mode. The pneumatic pulsatile ventricle was used to simulate the natural ventricle. To simulate the suction effect in the ventricle, a collapsible rubber tube was placed in the inflow port of the centrifugal pump in series with the apex of the simulated ventricle. Experimentally, the centrifugal pump speed (rpm) was gradually increased to simulate the suction effect. The pump flow through the centrifugal pump measured by an electromagnetic flowmeter, the aortic pressure, and the motor current were continuously digitized at 100 Hz and stored in a personal computer. The analysis of the cross-spectral density between the pump flow and motor current waveforms revealed that 2 waveforms were highly correlated at the frequency range between 0 and 4 Hz, with the coherence and phase angles being close to 1.0 and 0 degree, respectively. The fast Fourier transform analysis of the motor current indicated that the second harmonic component of the motor current power density increased with the occurrence of the suction effect in the circuit. The ratio of the fundamental to the second harmonic component decreased less than 1.3 as the suction effect developed in the circuit. It is possible to detect and prevent the suction effect of the centrifugal blood pump in the natural ventricle through analysis of the motor current waveform.

  2. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Perry L; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Re(λ)=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  3. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Reλ=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  4. Centrifugal inertia effects in two-phase face seal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, P.; Hughes, W. F.; Beeler, R. M.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified, semianalytical model has been developed to analyze the effect of centrifugal inertia in two-phase face seals. The model is based on the assumption of isothermal flow through the seal, but at an elevated temperature, and takes into account heat transfer and boiling. Using this model, seal performance curves are obtained with water as the working fluid. It is shown that the centrifugal inertia of the fluid reduces the load-carrying capacity dramatically at high speeds and that operational instability exists under certain conditions. While an all-liquid seal may be starved at speeds higher than a 'critical' value, leakage always occurs under boiling conditions.

  5. Apparatus and method for centrifugation and robotic manipulation of samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vellinger, John C. (Inventor); Ormsby, Rachel A. (Inventor); Kennedy, David J. (Inventor); Thomas, Nathan A. (Inventor); Shulthise, Leo A. (Inventor); Kurk, Michael A. (Inventor); Metz, George W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A device for centrifugation and robotic manipulation of specimen samples, including incubating eggs, and uses thereof are provided. The device may advantageously be used for the incubation of avian, reptilian or any type of vertebrate eggs. The apparatus comprises a mechanism for holding samples individually, rotating them individually, rotating them on a centrifuge collectively, injecting them individually with a fixative or other chemical reagent, and maintaining them at controlled temperature, relative humidity and atmospheric composition. The device is applicable to experiments involving entities other than eggs, such as invertebrate specimens, plants, microorganisms and molecular systems.

  6. The effect of gas fraction on centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z. T.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, L. F.; Ning, C.; Xie, S. F.; Liu, Z. C.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the multiphase flow field in M125 centrifugal pump, three-dimensional modeling was used for internal flow through three-dimensional software Pro/E. Then based on SST turbulence model combining with Rayleigh-Plesset cavitation model, and structured grid to simulate the hydraulic characteristics of volute and impeller within different gas conditions. The velocity, pressure and gas volume fraction distributions of the interior flow field of volute and impeller were obtained and analyzed, which revealed the effect of gas fractions on the flow characteristic of the centrifugal pump.

  7. The use of centrifugation to study early Drosophila embryogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, M. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    By the end of 10th nuclear cycle, the somatic nuclei of the Drosophila embryo have migrated to the periphery of the egg. Centrifugation of embryos did not result in the displacement of these nuclei, since cytoskeletal elements anchor them to the cortex. But, mild centrifugal forces displace the centrally located, nascent yolk nuclei. If this increased sensitivity to hypergravity occurs before the beginning of nuclear differentiation during cycle 8, when the nascent yolk and somatic nuclei physically separate, then it would mark the earliest functional difference between these two lineages.

  8. 24. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Centrifugal inner basket, 1879. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Centrifugal inner basket, 1879. Manufacturer, unknown. Supplied by Honolulu Iron Works, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1879. View: After sugar was granulated and cooled it was dried and drained, completely separating the sugar crystals from the molasses, in the centrifugal. Revolving at 1200 rpm the sugar charge was forced outward with the molasses flying through the holes in the brass lining. Dried sugar was left behind in the inner basket and was dug out by hand. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  9. Multiplexed single-molecule force spectroscopy using a centrifuge

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darren; Ward, Andrew; Halvorsen, Ken; Wong, Wesley P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a miniature centrifuge force microscope (CFM) that repurposes a benchtop centrifuge for high-throughput single-molecule experiments with high-resolution particle tracking, a large force range, temperature control and simple push-button operation. Incorporating DNA nanoswitches to enable repeated interrogation by force of single molecular pairs, we demonstrate increased throughput, reliability and the ability to characterize population heterogeneity. We perform spatiotemporally multiplexed experiments to collect 1,863 bond rupture statistics from 538 traceable molecular pairs in a single experiment, and show that 2 populations of DNA zippers can be distinguished using per-molecule statistics to reduce noise. PMID:26984516

  10. On the characteristics of centrifugal-reciprocating machines. [cryogenic coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    A method of compressing helium gas for cryogenic coolers is presented which uses centrifugal force to reduce the forces on the connecting rod and crankshaft in the usual reciprocating compressor. This is achieved by rotating the piston-cylinder assembly at a speed sufficient for the centrifugal force on the piston to overcome the compressional force due to the working fluid. The rotating assembly is dynamically braked in order to recharge the working space with fluid. The intake stroke consists of decelerating the rotating piston-cylinder assembly and the exhaust stroke consists of accelerating the assembly.

  11. Deep eutectic solvents in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Roehrer, Simon; Bezold, Franziska; García, Eva Marra; Minceva, Mirjana

    2016-02-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were evaluated as solvents in centrifugal partition chromatography, a liquid-liquid chromatography separation technology. To this end, the partition coefficients of ten natural compounds of different hydrophobicity were determined in non-aqueous biphasic systems containing DES. The influence of the composition of DESs and the presence of water in the biphasic system on the partition coefficient were also examined. In addition, several process relevant physical properties of the biphasic system, such as the density and viscosity of the phases, were measured. A mixture of three to four hydrophobic compounds was successfully separated in a centrifugal partition extractor using a heptane/ethanol/DES biphasic system.

  12. Secondary Containment Design for a High Speed Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, K.W.

    1999-03-01

    Secondary containment for high speed rotating machinery, such as a centrifuge, is extremely important for operating personnel safety. Containment techniques can be very costly, ungainly and time consuming to construct. A novel containment concept is introduced which is fabricated out of modular sections of polycarbonate glazed into a Unistrut metal frame. A containment study for a high speed centrifuge is performed which includes the development of parameters for secondary containment design. The Unistrut/polycarbonate shield framing concept is presented including design details and proof testing procedures. The economical fabrication and modularity of the design indicates a usefulness for this shielding system in a wide variety of containment scenarios.

  13. Optimal Stretching in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevins, Thomas D.; Kelley, Douglas H.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate growth of the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in chaotic, time-varying flows. In slow flows, reacted regions tend to lie near vortex edges, whereas fast flows restrict reacted regions to vortex cores. We show that reacted regions travel toward vortex centers faster as flow speed increases, but nonreactive scalars do not. For either slow or fast flows, reaction is promoted by the same optimal range of the local advective stretching, but stronger stretching causes reaction blowout and can hinder reaction from spreading. We hypothesize that optimal stretching and blowout occur in many advection-diffusion-reaction systems, perhaps creating ecological niches for phytoplankton in the ocean.

  14. Optimal Stretching in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion Systems.

    PubMed

    Nevins, Thomas D; Kelley, Douglas H

    2016-10-14

    We investigate growth of the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in chaotic, time-varying flows. In slow flows, reacted regions tend to lie near vortex edges, whereas fast flows restrict reacted regions to vortex cores. We show that reacted regions travel toward vortex centers faster as flow speed increases, but nonreactive scalars do not. For either slow or fast flows, reaction is promoted by the same optimal range of the local advective stretching, but stronger stretching causes reaction blowout and can hinder reaction from spreading. We hypothesize that optimal stretching and blowout occur in many advection-diffusion-reaction systems, perhaps creating ecological niches for phytoplankton in the ocean.

  15. Characterizing the stretch-flangeability of hot rolled multiphase steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, N.; Butcher, C.; Worswick, M.; Gao, J.

    2013-12-16

    Hole expansion tests are commonly used to characterize the edge stretching limit of a material. Traditionally, a conical punch is used to expand a punched hole until a through-thickness crack appears. However, many automotive stretch flanging operations involve in-plane edge stretching that is best captured with a flat punch. In this paper, hole expansion tests were carried out on two different hot-rolled multiphase steels using both flat and conical punches. The fracture mechanisms for both punch types were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  16. Experimental and Theoretical Study on Circular Disk Particles Suspended in Centrifugal and Non-Centrifugal Force Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Torii, Shuichi; Watanabe, Yoshimi; Tanaka, Satoyuki; Yano, Toshiaki; Iino, Naoko

    2008-02-15

    Theoretical and experimental studies are performed on suspension particle motion in Centrifugal and Non-Centrifugal Force Environment, i.e., in both an axially rotating drum and a stable liquid tank. The particle velocity of circular disks is measured by PTV (Particle Tracking Velocimetry) method and is predicted by BBO (Basset-Boussinesq-Ossen) equation. It is found that (1) as time progresses, one side of the disk in the axially rotating drum is attracted toward the drum wall and its velocity is affected by the rotating speed, (2) when the particle moves in the Stokes' regime, its velocity is linearly increased with the distance from the center of the drum, (3) in contrast, the autorotation of the disk occurs in the non-centrifugal force field, and (4) the corresponding drag coefficient in the low Reynolds number region is in good agreement with the theoretical value of the sphere.

  17. Microstructural evolution of PET under stretching and during stretch blow moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Martine; Billon, Noëlle

    2007-04-01

    Strain induced crystallisation of PET designed for stretch blow molding is studied combining well-controlled tensile tests and free blowing on a stretch blow prototype. Microstructure evolution is followed by WAXS and SAXS. Observations on blown parts clearly show that the microstructure can differ along the bottle and from processing conditions to another. Difference can be observed on crystalline orientation, periodic arrangement at the level of lamellae and long period. Range of long period, 8.5 to 13 nm is in agreement with literature. In certain case lamellar organisation disappears. Despite of high level of strain and evidence for strain hardening to occur during blowing no perfect crystalline pattern is observed, except in very thick zones. Interrupted tensile tests followed by quenching demonstrates that strain hardening is not correlated to prefect crystallisation. Microstructure clearly depends on the three parameters: temperature, strain rate and strain. It is concluded that strain hardening is mainly controlled by first stages of crystallisation and that actual crystallisation occurs during a following relaxation step. This later is then highly dependent upon cooling step.

  18. The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX): Centrifugal Confinement and Velocity Shear Stabilization of Plasmas in Shaped Open Magnetic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, Adil; Ellis, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) Project has investigated the concepts of centrifugal plasma confinement and stabilization of instabilities by velocity shear. The basic requirement is supersonic plasma rotation about a shaped, open magnetic field. Overall, the MCX Project attained three primary goals that were set out at the start of the project. First, supersonic rotation at Mach number upto 2.5 was obtained. Second, turbulence from flute interchange modes was found considerably reduced from conventional. Third, plasma pressure was contained along the field, as evidenced by density drops of x10 from the center to the mirror throats.

  19. Coupling of CH stretching and bending vibrations in trihalomethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.S.; Green, W.H. Jr.; Cheng, C.; Moore, C.B.

    1987-06-01

    The vibrational spectra of HCCl/sub 3/, HCF/sub 3/, HCCl/sub 2/F, and HCClF/sub 2/ have been measured in the vapor from the CH stretching fundamental through to the fifth overtone (i.e., v/sub 1/ = 6, where v/sub 1/ is the number of quanta in the CH stretching mode), using FTIR and photoacoustic spectrometers. Instead of a single strong CH overtone progression, additional strong bands attributable to Fermi-resonant combination tones are prominent in the spectra. The CH stretch is found to be most strongly coupled to the CH bending mode and much less strongly coupled to the heavy atom motions. The resolved band structures are analyzed in the following paper to give quantitative stretch--bend coupling constants for these CH oscillators.

  20. Guidelines for Stretch Flanging Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram, S.; Chintamani, J.

    2005-08-05

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are currently being considered for use in closure and structural panels in the automotive industry because of their high potential for affordable weight reduction and improved performance. AHSS such as dual phase steels are currently being used in some vehicle platforms. From a manufacturing perspective, stretch flanging during stamping is an important deformation mode requiring careful consideration of geometry and the die process. This paper presents some geometric and process guidelines for stretch flanging AHSS. Hole expansion experiments were conducted to determine the failure limit for a sheared edge condition. Effects of punching clearance, prestrain and prior strain path on hole expansion were explored in these experiments. In addition, dynamic explicit FE calculations using LS-DYNA were also conducted for a typical stretch flange by varying some key geometric parameters. The experimental and FEA results were then analyzed to yield process and geometric guidelines to enable successful stretch flanging of AHSS.

  1. The weak fundamental NH-stretching transition in amines.

    PubMed

    Schrøder, Sidsel D; Hansen, Anne S; Wallberg, Jens H; Nielsen, Anne R; Du, Lin; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2017-02-15

    Absolute intensities of NH-stretching fundamental and overtone transitions of gas phase aniline, methylamine, ethylamine, cyclopropylamine, methylethylamine, diethylamine and pyrrolidine have been measured with long path length conventional absorption spectroscopy. To support the assignments of NH-stretching transitions, transition frequencies and intensities were calculated with the local mode model using ab initio calculated local mode parameters and dipole moment functions obtained at the CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 level of theory. For aniline, the absolute intensities of the NH-stretching transitions show the typical decrease of approximately an order of magnitude for each successive vibrational excitation. For methylamine, ethylamine, cyclopropylamine, methylethylamine, diethylamine and pyrrolidine, the observed absolute intensities of the fundamental NH-stretching transition is weak and of similar strength or even weaker than the corresponding first overtone transition. Characteristic for the amines with a normal fundamental intensity is a conjugated double bond next to the amine group.

  2. Development of Internal Fine Structure in Stretched Rubber Vulcanizates

    SciTech Connect

    M Tosaka; S Toki; J Che; L Rong; B Hsiao

    2011-12-31

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) pattern and tensile stress during relaxation of stretched rubber vulcanizates (synthetic polyisoprene) were measured simultaneously at room temperature and at 0 C. The samples were quickly stretched to the prefixed strain and then allowed to relax for 1 h. In every SAXS pattern, the intensity distribution was elongated along the equator, indicating the formation of structures elongated in the stretching direction. The so-called two-spots pattern corresponding to the long period of stacked lamellar crystals did not appear even when the critical strain to induce crystallization was exceeded. On the other hand, even below the critical strain, additional development of equatorial streaks was detected in the differential SAXS patterns. This result suggests the growth of the density fluctuation elongated in the stretching direction, which is not directly related to strain-induced crystallization.

  3. The weak fundamental NH-stretching transition in amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrøder, Sidsel D.; Hansen, Anne S.; Wallberg, Jens H.; Nielsen, Anne R.; Du, Lin; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2017-02-01

    Absolute intensities of NH-stretching fundamental and overtone transitions of gas phase aniline, methylamine, ethylamine, cyclopropylamine, methylethylamine, diethylamine and pyrrolidine have been measured with long path length conventional absorption spectroscopy. To support the assignments of NH-stretching transitions, transition frequencies and intensities were calculated with the local mode model using ab initio calculated local mode parameters and dipole moment functions obtained at the CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 level of theory. For aniline, the absolute intensities of the NH-stretching transitions show the typical decrease of approximately an order of magnitude for each successive vibrational excitation. For methylamine, ethylamine, cyclopropylamine, methylethylamine, diethylamine and pyrrolidine, the observed absolute intensities of the fundamental NH-stretching transition is weak and of similar strength or even weaker than the corresponding first overtone transition. Characteristic for the amines with a normal fundamental intensity is a conjugated double bond next to the amine group.

  4. Guidelines for Stretch Flanging Advanced High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, S.; Chintamani, J.

    2005-08-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are currently being considered for use in closure and structural panels in the automotive industry because of their high potential for affordable weight reduction and improved performance. AHSS such as dual phase steels are currently being used in some vehicle platforms. From a manufacturing perspective, stretch flanging during stamping is an important deformation mode requiring careful consideration of geometry and the die process. This paper presents some geometric and process guidelines for stretch flanging AHSS. Hole expansion experiments were conducted to determine the failure limit for a sheared edge condition. Effects of punching clearance, prestrain and prior strain path on hole expansion were explored in these experiments. In addition, dynamic explicit FE calculations using LS-DYNA were also conducted for a typical stretch flange by varying some key geometric parameters. The experimental and FEA results were then analyzed to yield process and geometric guidelines to enable successful stretch flanging of AHSS.

  5. Stiffness Corrections for the Vibration Frequency of a Stretched Wire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, H. G.; Durie, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the need of introducing corrections due to wire stiffness arising from end constraints and wire axis distribution curvature in the measurement of ac electrical frequency by exciting transverse standing waves in a stretched steel wire. (SL)

  6. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PITS CENTER, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PIT IN BACKGROUND, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Myoelectric silence following unopposed passive stretch in normal man.

    PubMed

    Angel, R W; Waxman, S G; Kocsis, J D

    1980-08-01

    The response to unopposed passive muscle stretch applied during sustained contraction was studied in normal man. When the subject did not resist the stretching force, the initial response was a brief cessation of EMG activity in the elongated muscle. The myoelectric silence was observed repeatedly in muscles of the upper and lower limbs. The response to passive stretch is discussed in relation to the lengthening reaction and the inverse myotatic reflex. The silent period observed under these experimental conditions is unlikely to be caused by Renshaw inhibition, a pause in spindle afferent discharge, or activity of the group II afferent reflex pathway. Possible mechanisms include autogenetic inhibition and a stretch-evoked decrease of fusimotor activity.

  9. Optimal stretching of fluid for enhancing reaction growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevins, Thomas; Kelley, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    When a biological or chemical scalar grows in flowing fluid, the resulting reacted region is dependent on both the details of the flow, and the reaction kinetics. We simultaneously film reaction state and flow in a laboratory model of reactive mixing in order to examine reactive mixing in physical, time-dependent flows. Using the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, we find an optimal stretching range in which the flow enhances reaction, but larger stretching causes reaction blowout. We observe the transition from flow mostly helping to mostly blowout is not associated with the transition to turbulence, and that stretching fields (closely related to finite-time Lyapunov exponents) inside the optimal range appear to have a large effect on reaction growth rate locally. We also present estimates of the optimal stretching for BZ, and hypothesize that it is a feature exclusive to excitable reactions.

  10. Effects of centrifugation stress on pituitary-gonadal function in male rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, G. D.; Smith, E. R.; Damassa, D. A.; Davidson, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of centrifugation for various lengths of time on circulating levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone in male rats were investigated. In a chronic 52-day experiment, centrifugation at 4.1 G significantly reduced LH and testosterone levels for the entire period. Centrifugation at 2.3 G had less effect inasmuch as LH levels were not significantly decreased and testosterone levels were significantly reduced only during the first few days of centrifugation. In more acute experiments, centrifugation at 4.1 G for 4 h resulted in reduced testosterone levels, whereas centrifugation for 15 min did not significantly alter the hormone levels. These results indicate that centrifugation can decrease circulating LH and testosterone levels if the gravitational force is of sufficient magnitude and is maintained for a period of hours. Chronic centrifugation may also inhibit the acute excitatory response of LH to handling and ether stress.

  11. A New Tool to Assess the Perception of Stretching Intensity.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandro R; Vaz, João R; Gomes, Luis; Silvestre, Rui; Hilário, Edgar; Cordeiro, Nuno; Carnide, Filomena; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a valid and reliable scale to assess the perception of stretching intensity below and above the maximal range of motion. Experiments were conducted through a passive leg extension angle-torque assessment to healthy population (n = 90). In the study's first phase, the visual, numerical, and description of the stretching intensity scale (SIS) components were developed. The visual analog scale (VAS) score, absolute magnitude estimation (AME) score, and verbal stretching intensity symptom descriptors were assessed for different stretching intensities. In the second phase, the SIS was tested for validity, reliability, scale production, and estimation properties as well as responsiveness to stretching. In the first phase, a high correlation was found between SIS score and range of motion (ROM), as well as SIS and torque in both submaximal (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.89-0.99, r = 0.88-0.99) and supramaximal (ICC = 0.75-0.86, r = 0.68-0.88) stretching intensities. The AME and VAS scores fitted well in an exponential model for submaximal stretching intensities (y = 14.829e, ICC = 0.97 [0.83-0.99], r = 0.98), and in a linear model for supramaximal stretching intensities (y = 0.7667x - 25.751, ICC = 0.97 [0.89-0.99], r = 0.9594). For the second phase, a high correlation was found between SIS score and ROM (r = 0.70-0.76, ICC = 0.76-0.85), as well as SIS and torque (r = 0.62-0.88, ICC = 0.57-0.85). The interday reliability was high to produce (r = 0.70, ICC = 0.70 [0.50-0.83]) or estimate (r = 0.89, ICC = 0.89 [0.82-0.93]) stretching intensities. The acute stretching effects on ROM and passive torque were detectable using the SIS. It is expected a high application in assessing the stretch intensity using the SIS in future studies and practical interventions.

  12. Image stretching on a curved surface to improve satellite gridding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    A method for substantially reducing gridding errors due to satellite roll, pitch and yaw is given. A gimbal-mounted curved screen, scaled to 1:7,500,000, is used to stretch the satellite image whereby visible landmarks coincide with a projected map outline. The resulting rms position errors averaged 10.7 km as compared with 25.6 and 34.9 km for two samples of satellite imagery upon which image stretching was not performed.

  13. STATIC STRETCHING DOES NOT REDUCE VARIABILITY, JUMP AND SPEED PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Luís Manuel Pinto Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Background Stretching is often part of the warm-up routine prior to athletic participation; however, controversial evidence exists on the effects of stretching on countermovement jump (CMJ) and sprint performance. Additionally, analysis of variability between repeated tasks is useful for monitoring players, to analyze factors that could affect the performance, and to guide clinical decisions for training strategies. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether static stretching (SS) prior to CMJ and 20-meter (20-m) sprint would affect performance, and to investigate whether SS affects an athlete's ability to perform these tasks consistently. Methods Twenty-two trained healthy athletes (23.2 ± 5.0 years) attended, randomly, two testing sessions, separated by 48 hours. At session one, all participants underwent 10 minutes of dynamic running warm-up followed by the experimental tasks (three CMJ and three 20-m sprint), whereas five minutes of stretching was added after the warm-up routine at session two. All participants performed the same experimental tasks in both sessions. The stretching protocol consisted of five stretching exercises for each lower limb. Results The paired-samples t-test revealed no significant differences between the stretching protocol condition and no stretching condition for the 20-m sprint (t(21)=.920; p=.368) and CMJ (t(21)=.709; p=.486). There were no significant differences in trial-by-trial variability on 20-m sprint (t(21)=1.934; p=.067) and CMJ scores (t(21)=.793; p=.437) as result of SS. Conclusion The SS protocol did not modify jumping and running ability in trained healthy athletes. The SS prior to training or competition may not cause detrimental effects to athletic performance. Level of evidence Level III, Nonrandomized controlled trial. PMID:27104057

  14. Stretching of a plane with a lattice of cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Yu. M.

    2016-06-01

    An exact analytical solution of the problem in elasticity theory about stretching of a plane with an infinite lattice of rectilinear cuts has been obtained. The analysis is based on G.V. Kolosov's formulas associating the stress components with two regular functions of a complex variable. The obtained solution revealed the original effects of stretching stress screening and localization of compressive stresses between cuts.

  15. Stretch-induced VEGF expression in the heart.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Hampton, T; Morgan, J P; Simons, M

    1997-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell mitogen involved in vascular development and angiogenesis. Recently we have observed increased VEGF expression in the normal myocardium after myocardial infarction in a rat heart. This study was designed to explore the mechanism responsible for this increase in VEGF expression. Induction of myocardial stretch in an isolated perfused Langendorff preparation by inflation of an intraventricular balloon to an end-diastolic load of 35 mmHg for 30 min resulted in a nearly sixfold increase in VEGF message level not only in the chamber subjected to stretch (left ventricle) but also in the unstretched right ventricle, thus raising the possibility of a soluble factor mediating stretch- induced induction of VEGF expression. This was further confirmed by demonstrating that coronary venous effluent collected from the stretched heart and used to perfuse isolated hearts in which no balloon was present was able to induce VEGF expression in these normal hearts. Inhibition of TGF-beta activity using a neutralizing antibody, but not antagonists/inhibitors of endothelin and angiotensin II, eliminated stretch-induced increase in VEGF expression. Staurosporine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, also blocked stretch-induced increase of VEGF expression. Measurement of TGF-beta concentration in the perfusate demonstrated increased amounts of the cytokine after myocardial stretch, and addition of TGF-beta protein to the perfusion buffer resulted in increased VEGF expression in control hearts. These results suggest that stretch-induced increase of VEGF expression in the heart is mediated at least in part by TGF-beta. PMID:9202052

  16. Geotechnical Centrifuge Experiments to Evaluate Piping in Foundation Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Catalogue of scaling laws and similitude questions in geotechnical centrifuge modeling. IJPMG International Journal of Physical Modeling in...Technology. Sellmeijer, J. B., and M. A. Koenders. 1991. A mathematical model for piping. Applied Mathematical Modeling 15(11-12):646–651. van Beek, V

  17. Design of a piezoelectric shaker for centrifuge testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canclini, J. G.; Henderson, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The design of a prototype piezoelectric shaker and its development to date is described. Although certain design problems remain to be solved, the piezoelectric system shows promise for adaptation to a larger payload system, such as the proposed geotechnical centrifuge at the Ames Research Center.

  18. Fluid forces on rotating centrifugal impeller with whirling motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, H.; Ohashi, H.

    1980-01-01

    Fluid forces on a centrifugal impeller, whose rotating axis whirls with a constant speed, were calculated by using unsteady potential theory. Calculations were performed for various values of whirl speed, number of impeller blades and angle of blades. Specific examples as well as significant results are given.

  19. Quasi-steady centrifuge method for unsaturated hydraulic properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caputo, M.C.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    [1] We have developed the quasi-steady centrifuge (QSC) method as a variation of the steady state centrifuge method that can be implemented simply and inexpensively with greater versatility in terms of sample size and other features. It achieves these advantages by somewhat relaxing the criterion for steadiness of flow through the sample. This compromise entails an increase in measurement uncertainty but to a degree that is tolerable in most applications. We have tested this new approach with an easily constructed apparatus to establish a quasi-steady flow of water in unsaturated porous rock samples spinning in a centrifuge, obtaining measurements of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and water retention that agree with results of other methods. The QSC method is adaptable to essentially any centrifuge suitable for hydrogeologic applications, over a wide range of sizes and operating speeds. The simplified apparatus and greater adaptability of this method expands the potential for exploring situations that are common in nature but have been the subject of few laboratory investigations. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Prediction of performance of centrifugal pumps during starts under pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1969-01-01

    Method which calculates start-up characteristics of centrifugal pumps reveals a capacity to predict pressure drop characteristics of pumps with vaned diffusers. Calculations are based on pump geometry, design-point flow, speed, and pressure rise, and the pump characteristic within range of approximately ten percent of the design-point flow.

  1. Latex micro-balloon pumping in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Aeinehvand, Mohammad Mahdi; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Kazemzadeh, Amin; Madou, Marc

    2014-03-07

    Centrifugal microfluidic platforms have emerged as point-of-care diagnostic tools. However, the unidirectional nature of the centrifugal force limits the available space for multi-step processes on a single microfluidic disc. To overcome this limitation, a passive pneumatic pumping method actuated at high rotational speeds has been previously proposed to pump liquid against the centrifugal force. In this paper, a novel micro-balloon pumping method that relies on elastic energy stored in a latex membrane is introduced. It operates at low rotational speeds and pumps a larger volume of liquid towards the centre of the disc. Two different micro-balloon pumping mechanisms have been designed to study the pump performance at a range of rotational frequencies from 0 to 1500 rpm. The behaviour of the micro-balloon pump on the centrifugal microfluidic platforms has been theoretically analysed and compared with the experimental data. The experimental data show that the developed pumping method dramatically decreases the required rotational speed to pump liquid compared to the previously developed pneumatic pumping methods. It also shows that within a range of rotational speed, a desirable volume of liquid can be stored and pumped by adjusting the size of the micro-balloon.

  2. Measurements of the rotordynamic shroud forces for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the rotordynamic shroud forces on a centrifugal pump impeller. The measurements were done for various whirl/impeller speed ratios and for different flow rates. A destabilizing tangential force was measured for small positive whirl ratios and this force decreased with increasing flow rate.

  3. Pasteurization of grapefruit juice using a centrifugal ultraviolet light irradiator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pharmaceutical industry uses UV irradiators to inactivate viruses in liquids without heat. The penetration depth of UV in some liquids, such as serum plasma, can be short. To overcome this, very thin films may be produced by centrifugal force, small diameter tubing, or other means. Many liquid f...

  4. Liquid egg white pasteurization using a centrifugal UV irradiator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies are lacking on UV nonthermal pasteurization of liquid egg white (LEW). The objective of this study was to inactivate Escherichia coli using a UV irradiator that centrifugally formed a thin film of LEW on the inside of a rotating cylinder. The LEW was inoculated with E. coli K12 to approximat...

  5. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: THE PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE RETECH, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The plasma centrifugal furnace is a thermal technology which uses the heat generated from a plasma torch to decontaminate metal and organic contaminated waste. This is accomplished by melting metal-bearing solids and, in the process, thermally destroying organic contaminants. The...

  6. Numerical Simulation and Cold Modeling experiments on Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthiprasad, Kestur Sadashivaiah; Murali, Mysore Seetharam; Mukunda, Pudukottah Gopaliengar; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2011-02-01

    In a centrifugal casting process, the fluid flow eventually determines the quality and characteristics of the final product. It is difficult to study the fluid behavior here because of the opaque nature of melt and mold. In the current investigation, numerical simulations of the flow field and visualization experiments on cold models have been carried out for a centrifugal casting system using horizontal molds and fluids of different viscosities to study the effect of different process variables on the flow pattern. The effects of the thickness of the cylindrical fluid annulus formed inside the mold and the effects of fluid viscosity, diameter, and rotational speed of the mold on the hollow fluid cylinder formation process have been investigated. The numerical simulation results are compared with corresponding data obtained from the cold modeling experiments. The influence of rotational speed in a real-life centrifugal casting system has also been studied using an aluminum-silicon alloy. Cylinders of different thicknesses are cast at different rotational speeds, and the flow patterns observed visually in the actual castings are found to be similar to those recorded in the corresponding cold modeling experiments. Reasonable agreement is observed between the results of numerical simulation and the results of cold modeling experiments with different fluids. The visualization study on the hollow cylinders produced in an actual centrifugal casting process also confirm the conclusions arrived at from the cold modeling experiments and numerical simulation in a qualitative sense.

  7. Pasteurization of Grapefruit Juice using a Centrifugal Ultraviolet Light Device

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pharmaceutical industry uses UV devices to nonthermally inactivate viruses in liquids. To overcome the low penetration depth of UV in some liquids, such as serum plasma, thin films are formed by centrifugal force. Liquid foods also have low UV penetration depths. Studies are lacking on nontherma...

  8. Application of antioxidants and centrifugation for cryopreservation of boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yi, Kangle; Chen, Chao; Hou, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xu

    2012-06-01

    Although cryopreserved boar semen has been available since 1975, a major breakthrough in commercial application has not yet occurred due to the high susceptibility of boar spermatozoa to damage during cryopreservation and the complicated process required for deep freezing. In recent years, the application of antioxidants during the cryopreservation of boar semen has been the subject of considerable research aimed at improving the quality of post-thaw semen. Centrifugation is necessary before using cryopreservation protocols for freezing boar spermatozoa. Studies of the effect of different centrifugation regimens on boar sperm recovery, yield and cryosurvival have made significant contributions. Therefore this review elucidates results of recent applications of various antioxidants and centrifugation regimens used in efforts to improve cryopreservation of boar spermatozoa. This review is intended to enhance understanding of the roles of these antioxidants and centrifugation regimens with respect to mechanisms that increase resistance to cryodamage of boar spermatozoa. In addition, the discussion addresses the need for developing an objective evaluation of effectiveness and estimating the prospect of application of new techniques for the cryopreservation of boar semen and its use in artificial insemination.

  9. Ocular torsion before and after 1 hour centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Groen, E; De Graaf, B; Bles, W; Bos, J E

    1996-01-01

    To assess a possible otolith contribution to effects observed following prolonged exposure to hypergravity, we used video oculography to measure ocular torsion during static and dynamic conditions of lateral body tilt (roll) before and after 1 h of centrifugation with a Gx-load of 3 G. Static tilt (from 0 to 57 degrees to either side) showed a 10% decrease in otolith-induced ocular torsion after centrifugation. This implies a reduced gain of the otolith function. The dynamic condition consisted of sinusoidal body roll (frequency 0.25 Hz, amplitude 45 degrees) about an earth horizontal and about an earth vertical axis (respectively, "with" and "without" otolith stimulation). Before centrifugation the gain of the slow component velocity (SCV) was significantly lower "with" otolith stimulation than "without" otolith stimulation. Apparently, the contribution of the otoliths counteracts the ocular torsion response generated by the semicircular canals. Therefore, the observed increase in SCV gain in the condition "with" otolith stimulation after centrifugation, seems in correspondence with the decreased otolith gain in the static condition.

  10. Demonstration of Reduced Gas Pressure in a Centrifugal Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Fred; Wild, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a simple demonstration that shows the change in molecular density and the reduction in pressure of air in a centrifugal field. Uses two circular disks with the same radius and rotating with the same angular velocity, in loose mutual contact, around their symmetry axis. (GA)

  11. Effect of chronic centrifugation on body composition in the rat.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Bull, L. S.; Oyama, J.

    1972-01-01

    Two groups of adult female rats were chronically centrifuged for 60 days (2.76 G, 4.15 G, controls at 1.00 G). Live weights of centrifugal rats decreased about 20 g (6%) per Delta 1 G above control. This weight loss comprised reductions in both body fat and fat-free body weight (FFBW) as determined by body-composition studies on eight rats per group killed at the end of centrifugation. Of nine components constituting the FFBW, only skeletal muscle, liver, and heart changed significantly in weight. Chemical composition showed reductions (compared with controls) in the fat fraction of most components and increases in the water fraction of liver and gut. Identical measurements were made on the remaining eight rats per group killed 43 days after return to 1 G. Neither centrifuged group had reached the control body-weight level at this time. No statistically significant effect of previous G level was found in any of the body-composition parameters. The possible involvment of physiological regulation was considered.

  12. Return to Flying Duties Following Centrifuge or Vibration Exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Clarke, Jonathan; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In an effort to determine the human performance limits for vibration in spacecraft being developed by NASA, astronauts were evaluated during a simulated launch profile in a centrifuge/vibration environment and separate vibration-only simulation. Current USAF and Army standards for return to flight following centrifuge exposures require 12-24 hours to pass before a crewmember may return to flying duties. There are no standards on vibration exposures and return to flying duties. Based on direct observation and provocative neurological testing of the astronauts, a new standard for return to flying duties following centrifuge and/or vibration exposures was established. Methods: 13 astronaut participants were exposed to simulated launch profiles in a + 3.5 Gx bias centrifuge/vibration environment and separately on a vibration table at the NASA-Ames Research Center. Each subject had complete neurological evaluations pre- and post-exposure for the centrifuge/vibration runs with the NASA neurological function rating scale (NFRS). Subjects who participated in the vibration-only exposures had video oculography performed with provocative maneuvers in addition to the NFRS. NFRS evaluations occurred immediately following each exposure and at 1 hour post-run. Astronauts who remained symptomatic at 1 hour had repeat NFRS performed at 1 hour intervals until the crewmember was asymptomatic. Results: Astronauts in the centrifuge/vibration study averaged a 3-5 point increase in NFRS scores immediately following exposure but returned to baseline 3 hours post-run. Subjects exposed to the vibration-only simulation had a 1-3 point increase following exposure and returned to baseline within 1-2 hours. Pre- and post- vibration exposure video oculography did not reveal any persistent ocular findings with provocative testing 1 hour post-exposure. Discussion: Based on direct observations and objective measurement of neurological function in astronauts following simulated launch

  13. On the determination of laminar flame speeds from stretched flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. K.; Law, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of stretch on the determination of the laminar flame speed are experimentally studied by using the positively-stretched stagnation flame and negatively-stretched bunsen flame, and by using lean and rich mixtures of methane, propane, butane, and hydrogen with air whose effective Lewis numbers are either greater or less than unity. Results demonstrate that flame speed determination can be influenced by stretch through two factors: (1) Preferential diffusion which tends to increase or decrease the flame temperature and burning rate depending on the effective Lewis number, and (2) Flow divergence which causes the flame speed to assume higher values when evaluated at the upstream boundary of the preheat zone instead of the reaction zone. Recent data on flame speed including the present ones are then examined from the unified viewpoint of flame stretch, leading to satisfactory resolution of the discrepancies between them. The present study also proposes a methodology of determining the laminar flame speeds by using the stagnation flame and linearly extrapolating the data to zero stretch rate.

  14. Stretch activation and nonlinear elasticity of muscle cross-bridges.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, N; Thornhill, R A

    1996-01-01

    When active insect fibrillar flight muscle is stretched, its ATPase rate increases and it develops "negative viscosity," which allows it to perform oscillatory work. We use a six-state model for the cross-bridge cycle to show that such "stretch activation" may arise naturally as a nonlinear property of a cross-bridge interacting with a single attachment site on a thin filament. Attachment is treated as a thermally activated process in which elastic energy must be supplied to stretch or compress the cross-bridge spring. We find that stretch activation occurs at filament displacements where, before the power stroke, the spring is initially in compression rather than in tension. In that case, pulling the filaments relieves the initial compression and reduces the elastic energy required for attachment. The result is that the attachment rate is enhanced by stretching. The model also displays the "delayed tension" effect observed in length-step experiments. When the muscle is stretched suddenly, the power stroke responds very quickly, but there is a time lag before dissociation at the end of the cycle catches up with the increased attachment rate. This lag is responsible for the delayed tension and hence also for the negative viscosity. PMID:8744318

  15. Pectoral stretching program for women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, T S; Kilbreath, S L; Refshauge, K M; Pendlebury, S C; Beith, J M; Lee, M J

    2007-05-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy commonly cause adverse musculoskeletal problems, particularly loss of strength and range of motion, in the upper quadrant of breast cancer patients. Few well-designed studies have investigated whether these impairments can be prevented. Stretching is an effective technique for increasing range of motion, hence the aim of this study was to investigate whether a stretching program reduced acute musculoskeletal impairments in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. Sixty-four women were recruited prior to commencement of radiotherapy following breast cancer surgery. Participants were randomised to either a control or stretch group. Participants in both groups were reviewed by the physical therapist on a weekly basis for approximately 6 weeks, and were given general information about skin care and lymphedema. The control group received no advice about exercise. The stretch group received instruction on low-load, prolonged pectoral stretches, which were to be performed daily and were checked at weekly visits. Shoulder range of motion, strength, arm circumference, and quality of life measurements were taken prior to, and at completion of radiotherapy, and at 7 months after radiotherapy. There was no difference in any outcome between groups. Breast symptoms increased for both groups during radiotherapy, without loss of strength or range of movement. The incidence of lymphedema during the study was low for both groups and did not differ between groups. The pectoral stretching program did not influence the outcomes measured because the symptoms reported by patients were not a consequence of contracture.

  16. Optimization of dielectrophoretic DNA stretching in microfabricated devices

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyung Eun; Burns, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    We have found that the surface and bulk solution properties in a microfabricated device affect the degree and probability of electrostretching of DNA molecules. Using lambda phage DNA, we found that significantly hydrophilic surfaces between the electrodes decreases the efficiency of stretching. Surfaces treated with higher silane (trimethyl chlorosilane) concentrations performed better presumably due to the decreased non-specific adsorption of DNA on these surfaces compared to their more hydrophilic counterparts. The shape and dimensions of the electrodes also affected the efficiency of stretching. Both lift-off and metal etching methods produced electrodes with random microscopic peaks along the electrode’s edge and were poorly suited for stretching. Annealing the electrodes (450°C for 10 min) removed most of these peaks and allowed for more controlled stretching to be obtained. We also found that thin electrodes (65nm) gave close to a 90% success rate of DNA stretching but stretching with thick electrodes (350nm) produced only a 20% success rate. PMID:16642979

  17. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    DOEpatents

    Spevack, J.S.

    1957-04-01

    An isotope concentration process is described which consists of exchanging, at two or more different temperature stages, two isotopes of an element between substances that are physically separate from each other and each of which is capable of containing either of the isotopes, and withdrawing from a point between at least two of the temperatare stages one of the substances containing an increased concentration of the desired isotope.

  18. Cosmic ray isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    The isotopic composition of cosmic rays is studied in order to develop the relationship between cosmic rays and stellar processes. Cross section and model calculations are reported on isotopes of H, He, Be, Al and Fe. Satellite instrument measuring techniques separate only the isotopes of the lighter elements.

  19. Isotope reference materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of the same isotopically homogeneous sample by any laboratory worldwide should yield the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty. International distribution of light element isotopic reference materials by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology enable laboratories to achieve this goal.

  20. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    PubMed Central

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  1. Diverse Representations of Olfactory Information in Centrifugal Feedback Projections

    PubMed Central

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Tarabrina, Anna; Kizer, Erin; Callaway, Edward M.; Gage, Fred H.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2016-01-01

    Although feedback or centrifugal projections from higher processing centers of the brain to peripheral regions have long been known to play essential functional roles, the anatomical organization of these connections remains largely unknown. Using a virus-based retrograde labeling strategy and 3D whole-brain reconstruction methods, we mapped the spatial organization of centrifugal projections from two olfactory cortical areas, the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) and the piriform cortex, to the granule cell layer of the main olfactory bulb in the mouse. Both regions are major recipients of information from the bulb and are the largest sources of feedback to the bulb, collectively constituting circuits essential for olfactory coding and olfactory behavior. We found that, although ipsilateral inputs from the AON were uniformly distributed, feedback from the contralateral AON had a strong ventral bias. In addition, we observed that centrifugally projecting neurons were spatially clustered in the piriform cortex, in contrast to the distributed feedforward axonal inputs that these cells receive from the principal neurons of the bulb. Therefore, information carried from the bulb to higher processing structures by anatomically stereotypic projections is likely relayed back to the bulb by organizationally distinct feedback projections that may reflect different coding strategies and therefore different functional roles. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Principles of anatomical organization, sometimes instantiated as “maps” in the mammalian brain, have provided key insights into the structure and function of circuits in sensory systems. Generally, these characterizations focus on projections from early sensory processing areas to higher processing structures despite considerable evidence that feedback or centrifugal projections often constitute major conduits of information flow. Our results identify structure in the organization of centrifugal feedback projections to the

  2. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  3. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  4. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  5. 77 FR 65360 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status (Centrifugal and Submersible Pumps); Auburn, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status (Centrifugal and Submersible Pumps... subzone at the centrifugal and submersible pump manufacturing and warehousing facilities of Xylem Water... activity related to the manufacturing of centrifugal and submersible pumps and related controllers at...

  6. Cycle-powered short radius (1.9M) centrifuge: exercise vs. passive acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Gundo, D. P.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Mulenburg, G. M.; Marchman, N.; Looft-Wilson, R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    A human-powered short-arm centrifuge is described. This centrifuge could be used during spaceflight to provide +Gz acceleration while subjects performed exercise, thus supplying two forms of weightlessness countermeasures. Results from a study of cardiovascular responses while using the centrifuge are presented.

  7. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  8. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  9. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  10. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  11. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. A blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use is a device used only to separate blood...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix - Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC Manufacturing Operations Where the Standards Are..., Table 5 Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC... casting—CR/HS 3,4 A vent system that moves heated air through the mold 27 lb/ton. 8. Centrifugal...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix - Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC Manufacturing Operations Where the Standards Are..., Table 5 Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC... casting—CR/HS 3,4 A vent system that moves heated air through the mold 27 lb/ton. 8. Centrifugal...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix - Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC Manufacturing Operations Where the Standards Are..., Subpt. WWWW, Table 5 Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and... casting—CR/HS 3,4 A vent system that moves heated air through the mold 27 lb/ton. 8. Centrifugal...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix - Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC Manufacturing Operations Where the Standards Are..., Subpt. WWWW, Table 5 Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and... casting—CR/HS 3,4 A vent system that moves heated air through the mold 27 lb/ton. 8. Centrifugal...

  16. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  17. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  18. Effect of stretching-induced changes in hydrodynamic screening on coil-stretch hysteresis of unentangled polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Sasmal, Chandi; Nguyen, Duc At; Sridhar, Tam; Prakash, J. Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Extensional rheometry and Brownian dynamics simulations of flexible polymer solutions confirm predictions based on blob concepts that coil-stretch hysteresis in extensional flows increases with concentration, reaching a maximum at the critical overlap concentration c* before progressively vanishing in the semidilute regime. These observations demonstrate that chain stretching strengthens intermolecular hydrodynamic screening in dilute solutions, but weakens it in semidilute solutions. Flow can thus strongly modify the concentration dependence of viscoelastic properties of polymer solutions.

  19. Lead isotope study of orogenic lherzolite massifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelin, Bruno; Allègre, Claude J.

    1988-12-01

    Orogenic lherzolites allow for almost "in-situ" observation of mantle isotopic heterogeneities on a restricted geographical scale, in contrast to basalts for which melting processes have averaged original mantle compositions over uncertain scales. Pb isotopes from whole rocks and clinopyroxenes from the massifs of Lherz (Pyrenees), Lanzo (Alps), Beni Bousera (Morocco) and Zabargad (Red Sea) show internal heterogeneities that encompass the entire range of variation observed in oceanic basalts. Some depleted lherzolites have a very unradiogenic composition similar to that of the most depleted ridge tholeiites. Pyroxenites from mafic layers generally have more radiogenic compositions, some of them comparable to the most radiogenic oceanic island results. The isotopic differences between lherzolites and pyroxenites vanish where layers are very closely spaced ( < 2 cm). In this case, the lherzolites may have equilibrated with the more Pb-rich pyroxenites through solid-state diffusion under mantle conditions. These results directly illustrate the smallest scales at which Pb isotopic heterogeneity may survive within the mantle. The genesis of these heterogeneities are discussed within the framework of the "marble cake" mantle model [1], where lherzolites are residues left over after oceanic crust extraction, whereas pyroxenites represent either basaltic or cumulate portions of the oceanic crust, reinjected by subduction and stretched by solid-state mixing during mantle convection. The Pb isotope data suggest that each massif was involved in several cycles of convective overturn, segregation and reinjection of the oceanic crust, during periods well over 1 Ga. If the upper mantle is made of interlayered radiogenic and unradiogenic layers, basalt heterogeneities may result from preferential melt-extraction from different layers depending on the degree of melting, as well as from large-scale, plume-related mantle heterogeneities. Orogenic lherzolites therefore allow direct

  20. Stretched-State Excitations with the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Luis Alberto Casimiro

    Neutron time-of-fight spectra were obtained for the ^{14}C(p,n) ^{14}N, ^{18 }O(p,n)^{18}F, and ^{30}Si(p,n) ^{30}P reactions at 135 MeV with the beam-swinger system at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Excitation-energy spectra and the differential cross sections for the observed excitations in these reactions were extracted over the momentum transfer range from 0 to 2.7 fm^{-1}. The primary goal of this work was to obtain the strengths and distributions for the "stretched" states. The identification of these states was based on comparisons of the theoretical differential cross sections, performed in a DWIA formalism, with the experimental cross sections. Isospin assignments were based primarily on comparisons of the measured (p,n) and (e,e^') spectroscopic strengths. Candidate (pid_ {5/2},nu{rm p}_sp {3/2}{-1}), J^ pi = 4 ^- T = 0, 1 and 2, 1 hbaromega states, were identified at E_{x} = 8.5, 13.8, 19.5, and 26.7 MeV in the ^{14}C(p,n) ^{14}N reaction, and the corresponding isovector strengths were extracted. The observed 4^--state excitation energies and the strengths are in good agreement with the analog T = 1 and 2, 4^--states observed in the (e,e^') reaction. Large -basis shell-model calculations were found to predict reasonably well the excitation energies; however, these calculations overpredict the strength by a factor of 2, for the T = 1 and 2 components. In the ^{18}O(p,n) ^{18}F reaction at 135 MeV, (pi d_{5/2},nu {rm d}_sp{5/2}{-1 }) 5^+ T = 0 0hbaromega strength was observed, concentrated in a single state, at E_{x} = 1.1 MeV, with 75% of the extreme-single-particle-model (ESPM) strength, in good agreement with a shell-model calculation. No 6^- 1hbaromega strength was observed in this reaction. Candidate (pi {rm d}_{5/2},nu p _sp{3/2}{-1}) J ^pi = 4^- T = 0, 1 and 2, 1hbaromega states, were identified at E_{x} = 3.9, 9.4, 10.2, 11.4, 12.0, 14.4, 15.3, 17.3, 18.0, 19.7, 21.4, and 23.4 MeV. The observed 4^- T = 2 state excitation energies and

  1. Generation of Radixenon Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Pitts, W. K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Reeder, Paul L.; Thomas, Charles W.

    2003-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed an automated system for separating Xe from air and can detect the following radioxenon isotopes, 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, and 135Xe. This report details the techniques used to generate the various radioxenon isotopes that are used for the calibration of the detector as well as other isotopes that have the potential to interfere with the fission produced radioxenon isotopes. Fission production is covered first using highly enriched uranium followed by a description and results from an experiment to produce radioxenon isotopes from neutron activation of ambient xenon.

  2. ISOTOPE CONVERSION DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of tbe type utilizing a liquid fuel and designed to convert a non-thermally fissionable isotope to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A tank containing a reactive composition of a thermally fissionable isotope dispersed in a liquid moderator is disposed within an outer tank containing a slurry of a non-thermally fissionable isotope convertible to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A control rod is used to control the chain reaction in the reactive composition and means are provided for circulating and cooling the reactive composition and slurry in separate circuits.

  3. Ocular Counter-Rolling During Centrifugation and Static Tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Bernard; Clement, Gilles; Moore, Steven; Curthoys, Ian; Dai, Mingjia; Koizuka, Izumi; Kubo, Takeshi; Raphan, Theodore

    2003-01-01

    Activation of the gravity sensors in the inner ear-the otoliths-generates reflexes that act to maintain posture and gaze. Ocular counter-rolling (OCR) is an example of such a reflex. When the head is tilted to the side, the eyes rotate around the line of sight in the opposite direction (i.e., counter-rolling). While turning comers, undergoing centrifugation, or making side-to-side tilting head movements, the OCR reflex orients the eyes towards the sum of the accelerations from body movements and gravity. Deconditioning of otolith-mediated reflexes following adaptation to microgravity has been proposed as the basis of many of the postural, locomotor, and gaze control problems experienced by returning astronauts. Evidence suggests that OCR is reduced postflight in about 75% of astronauts tested; but the data are sparse, primarily due to difficulties in recording rotational eye movements. During the Neurolab mission, a short-arm human centrifuge was flown that generated sustained sideways accelerations of 0.5-G and one-G to the head and upper body. This produces OCR; and so for the first time, the responses to sustained centrifugation could be studied without the influence of Earth's gravity on the results. This allowed us to determine the relative importance of sideways and vertical acceleration in the generation of OCR. This also provided the first test of the effects of exposure to artificial gravity in space on postflight otolith-ocular reflexes. There was little difference between the responses to centrifugation in microgravity and on Earth. In both conditions, the induced OCR was roughly proportional to the applied acceleration, with the OCR magnitude during 0.5-G centrifugation approximately 60% of that generated during one-G centrifugation. The overall mean OCR from the four payload crewmembers in response to one-G of sideways acceleration was 5.7 plus or minus 1.1 degree (mean and SD) on Earth. Inflight one-G centrifugation generated 5.7 plus or minus 1

  4. Stretching Skeletal Muscle: Chronic Muscle Lengthening through Sarcomerogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zöllner, Alexander M.; Abilez, Oscar J.; Böl, Markus; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle responds to passive overstretch through sarcomerogenesis, the creation and serial deposition of new sarcomere units. Sarcomerogenesis is critical to muscle function: It gradually re-positions the muscle back into its optimal operating regime. Animal models of immobilization, limb lengthening, and tendon transfer have provided significant insight into muscle adaptation in vivo. Yet, to date, there is no mathematical model that allows us to predict how skeletal muscle adapts to mechanical stretch in silico. Here we propose a novel mechanistic model for chronic longitudinal muscle growth in response to passive mechanical stretch. We characterize growth through a single scalar-valued internal variable, the serial sarcomere number. Sarcomerogenesis, the evolution of this variable, is driven by the elastic mechanical stretch. To analyze realistic three-dimensional muscle geometries, we embed our model into a nonlinear finite element framework. In a chronic limb lengthening study with a muscle stretch of 1.14, the model predicts an acute sarcomere lengthening from 3.09m to 3.51m, and a chronic gradual return to the initial sarcomere length within two weeks. Compared to the experiment, the acute model error was 0.00% by design of the model; the chronic model error was 2.13%, which lies within the rage of the experimental standard deviation. Our model explains, from a mechanistic point of view, why gradual multi-step muscle lengthening is less invasive than single-step lengthening. It also explains regional variations in sarcomere length, shorter close to and longer away from the muscle-tendon interface. Once calibrated with a richer data set, our model may help surgeons to prevent muscle overstretch and make informed decisions about optimal stretch increments, stretch timing, and stretch amplitudes. We anticipate our study to open new avenues in orthopedic and reconstructive surgery and enhance treatment for patients with ill proportioned limbs, tendon

  5. Mechanical stretch triggers rapid epithelial cell division through Piezo1.

    PubMed

    Gudipaty, S A; Lindblom, J; Loftus, P D; Redd, M J; Edes, K; Davey, C F; Krishnegowda, V; Rosenblatt, J

    2017-03-02

    Despite acting as a barrier for the organs they encase, epithelial cells turn over at some of the fastest rates in the body. However, epithelial cell division must be tightly linked to cell death to preserve barrier function and prevent tumour formation. How does the number of dying cells match those dividing to maintain constant numbers? When epithelial cells become too crowded, they activate the stretch-activated channel Piezo1 to trigger extrusion of cells that later die. However, it is unclear how epithelial cell division is controlled to balance cell death at the steady state. Here we show that mammalian epithelial cell division occurs in regions of low cell density where cells are stretched. By experimentally stretching epithelia, we find that mechanical stretch itself rapidly stimulates cell division through activation of the Piezo1 channel. To stimulate cell division, stretch triggers cells that are paused in early G2 phase to activate calcium-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, thereby activating the cyclin B transcription that is necessary to drive cells into mitosis. Although both epithelial cell division and cell extrusion require Piezo1 at the steady state, the type of mechanical force controls the outcome: stretch induces cell division, whereas crowding induces extrusion. How Piezo1-dependent calcium transients activate two opposing processes may depend on where and how Piezo1 is activated, as it accumulates in different subcellular sites with increasing cell density. In sparse epithelial regions in which cells divide, Piezo1 localizes to the plasma membrane and cytoplasm, whereas in dense regions in which cells extrude, it forms large cytoplasmic aggregates. Because Piezo1 senses both mechanical crowding and stretch, it may act as a homeostatic sensor to control epithelial cell numbers, triggering extrusion and apoptosis in crowded regions and cell division in sparse regions.

  6. Stretching Fibroblasts Remodels Fibronectin and Alters Cancer Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Mingfang; Brewer, Bryson M.; Yang, Lijie; Franco Coronel, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu

    2015-02-01

    Most investigations of cancer-stroma interactions have focused on biochemical signaling effects, with much less attention being paid to biophysical factors. In this study, we investigated the role of mechanical stimuli on human prostatic fibroblasts using a microfluidic platform that was adapted for our experiments and further developed for both repeatable performance among multiple assays and for compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy. Results show that mechanical stretching of normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) alters the structure of secreted fibronectin. Specifically, unstretched NAFs deposit and assemble fibronectin in a random, mesh-like arrangement, while stretched NAFs produce matrix with a more organized, linearly aligned structure. Moreover, the stretched NAFs exhibited an enhanced capability for directing co-cultured cancer cell migration in a persistent manner. Furthermore, we show that stretching NAFs triggers complex biochemical signaling events through the observation of increased expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). A comparison of these behaviors with those of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) indicates that the observed phenotypes of stretched NAFs are similar to those associated with CAFs, suggesting that mechanical stress is a critical factor in NAF activation and CAF genesis.

  7. Buoyant Low Stretch Diffusion Flames Beneath Cylindrical PMMA Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; Tien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    A unique new way to study low gravity flames in normal gravity has been developed. To study flame structure and extinction characteristics in low stretch environments, a normal gravity low-stretch diffusion flame is generated using a cylindrical PMMA sample of varying large radii. Burning rates, visible flame thickness, visible flame standoff distance, temperature profiles in the solid and gas, and radiative loss from the system were measured. A transition from the blowoff side of the flammability map to the quenching side of the flammability map is observed at approximately 6-7/ sec, as determined by curvefits to the non-monotonic trends in peak temperatures, solid and gas-phase temperature gradients, and non-dimensional standoff distances. A surface energy balance reveals that the fraction of heat transfer from the flame that is lost to in-depth conduction and surface radiation increases with decreasing stretch until quenching extinction is observed. This is primarily due to decreased heat transfer from the flame, while the magnitude of the losses remains the same. A unique local extinction flamelet phenomena and associated pre-extinction oscillations are observed at very low stretch. An ultimate quenching extinction limit is found at low stretch with sufficiently high induced heat losses.

  8. Effects of contract-relax vs static stretching on stretch-induced strength loss and length-tension relationship.

    PubMed

    Balle, S S; Magnusson, S P; McHugh, M P

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of contract-relax stretching (CRS) vs static stretching (SS) on strength loss and the length-tension relationship. We hypothesized that there would be a greater muscle length-specific effect of CRS vs SS. Isometric hamstring strength was measured in 20 healthy people at four knee joint angles (90°, 70°, 50°, 30°) before and after stretching. One leg received SS, the contralateral received CRS. Both stretching techniques resulted in significant strength loss, which was most apparent at short muscle lengths [SS: P = 0.025; stretching × angle P < 0.001; 11.7% at 90° P < 0.01; 5.6% at 70° nonsignificant (ns); 1.3% at 50° ns; -3.7% at 30° ns. CRS: P < 0.001; stretching × angle P < 0.001; 17.7% at 90°, 13.4% at 70°, 11.4% at 50°, all P < 0.01, 4.3% at 30° ns]. The overall stretch-induced strength loss was greater (P = 0.015) after CRS (11.7%) vs SS (3.7%). The muscle length effect on strength loss was not different between CRS and SS (stretching × angle × stretching technique P = 0.43). Contrary to the hypothesis, CRS did not result in a greater shift in the length-tension relationship, and in fact, resulted in greater overall strength loss compared with SS. These results support the use of SS for stretching the hamstrings.

  9. Stretch induced endothelin-1 secretion by adult rat astrocytes involves calcium influx via stretch-activated ion channels (SACs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrow, Lyle W.; Suchyna, Thomas M.; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Endothelin-1 expression by adult rat astrocytes correlates with cell proliferation. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 is inhibited by GsMtx-4, a specific inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+} permeant SACs. {yields} The less specific SAC inhibitor streptomycin also inhibits ET-1 secretion. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 production depends on a calcium influx. {yields} SAC pharmacology may provide a new class of therapeutic agents for CNS pathology. -- Abstract: The expression of endothelins (ETs) and ET-receptors is often upregulated in brain pathology. ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, also inhibits the expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters and is mitogenic for astrocytes, glioma cells, neurons, and brain capillary endothelia. We have previously shown that mechanical stress stimulates ET-1 production by adult rat astrocytes. We now show in adult astrocytes that ET-1 production is driven by calcium influx through stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the ET-1 production correlates with cell proliferation. Mechanical stimulation using biaxial stretch (<20%) of a rubber substrate increased ET-1 secretion, and 4 {mu}M GsMTx-4 (a specific inhibitor of SACs) inhibited secretion by 30%. GsMTx-4 did not alter basal ET-1 levels in the absence of stretch. Decreasing the calcium influx by lowering extracellular calcium also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion without effecting ET-1 secretion in unstretched controls. Furthermore, inhibiting SACs with the less specific inhibitor streptomycin also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion. The data can be explained with a simple model in which ET-1 secretion depends on an internal Ca{sup 2+} threshold. This coupling of mechanical stress to the astrocyte endothelin system through SACs has treatment implications, since all pathology deforms the surrounding parenchyma.

  10. The simulation and performance of a centrifugal chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, W. L.; Chen, F. C.; Hwang, B. C.

    A computer simulation model was developed to analyze the performance of a water-cooled centrifugal chiller. The model is based on a heat pump thermodynamic cycle and empirical correlations for the performance of the system components. The system simulated is composed of a variable-speed centrifugal compressor with a hot-gas bypass option for capacity control, two shell-and-tube heat exchangers, and an expansion device. The model was validated and calibrated against the experimental test results of a 125-ton chiller. The performance of a similar chiller system at various operating conditions and design modifications was analyzed. System performance comparisons were made between a baseline case, cases with high-performance heat exchanger tubes and compressor motor, and various variable-speed compressor operating strategies. It was found that significant performance improvement can be realized by using variable-speed drive and on-demand control strategy.

  11. Analysis of the reliability of submersible centrifugal electric pumping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shilyaev, V.A.; Solodovnikov, G.G.; Vikhman, R.G.; Koshelev, V.A.; Zhitina, G.S.; Chirkova, N.I.

    1987-01-01

    A modern submersible centrifugal electric pumping system (SCEPS) for oil production consists of a submersible part which includes a centrifugal pump, an electric motor, a hydroprotection arrangement, a cable line, and an aboveground part that includes a control station and a transformer. The author discusses the mean service life of the submersible part of the SCEPS as the most important parameter of reliability of the SCEPS. The effect of the operating factors is assessed by calculating the mean service life of the submersible part of the typical SCEPS, making allowance for failures resulting from all causes. The mean operating time until failure of the submersible part of the new SCEPS due to design and technological error was determined.

  12. Core temperature of tailless rats exposed to centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, C. B.; Oyama, J.

    1984-01-01

    The role of the tail in the altered thermoregulation of rats during acute exposure to hypergravity was investigated, using groups of rats of two ages: 55 days (young) and 138 days (old). Rectal and foot temperature changes were measured in intact and tailless rats subjected to 1 h centrifugation of 2.8 G, with preceding (1 h) and following (1-3 h) 1 G periods. At 22 C, the loss of body heat from the tail per se does not measurably contribute to the hypothermia induced by hypergravity. However, the heat loss from the feet was greater in the tailless rats than in the intact rats from the young group of animals, although there was no significant difference between the tailless and intact rats in the old animal group. It is concluded that the inhibition of heat production is a significant factor in the hypothermia of centrifuged tailless rats, as it has been previously shown to be in the intact animals.

  13. Optimization of centrifugal pump cavitation performance based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. C.; Zhu, Z. T.; Ning, C.; Zhao, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to further improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump, slots on impeller blade near inlet were studied and six groups of hydraulic model were designed. Base on cavitating flow feature inside a centrifugal pump, bubble growth and implosion are calculated from the Rayleigh-Plesset equation which describes the dynamic behavior of spherical bubble and RNG κ-epsilon model was employed to simulate and analyze the internal two-phase flow of the model pump under the same conditions. The simulation results show that slots on blade near inlet could improve the cavitation performance and cavitation performance improvement of the second group was more obvious. Under the same conditions, the pressure on the back of blade near inlet was higher than the pressure on the back of unmodified blade near inlet, and energy distribution in the flow channel between the two blades was more uniform with a small change of head.

  14. Analysis of cantilever NEMS in centrifugal-fluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen-Nia, Mohsen; Abadian, Fateme; Abadian, Naeime; Dehkordi, Keivan Mosaiebi; Keivani, Maryam; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-07-01

    Electromechanical nanocantilevers are promising for using as sensors/detectors in centrifugal-fluidic systems. For this application, the presence of angular speed and electrolyte environment should be considered in the theoretical analysis. Herein, the pull-in instability of the nanocantilever incorporating the effects of angular velocity and liquid media is investigated using a size-dependent continuum theory. Using d’Alembert principle, the angular speed is transformed into an equivalent centrifugal force. The electrochemical and dispersion forces are incorporated considering the corrections due to the presence of electrolyte media. Two different approaches, i.e., the Rayleigh-Ritz method (RRM) and proposing a lumped parameter model (LPM), were applied to analyze the system. The models are validated with the results presented in literature. Impacts of the angular velocity, electrolyte media, dispersion forces, and size effect on the instability characteristics of the nanocantilever are discussed.

  15. Probing biomechanical properties with a centrifugal force quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Webster, Aaron; Vollmer, Frank; Sato, Yuki

    2014-10-21

    Application of force on biomolecules has been instrumental in understanding biofunctional behaviour from single molecules to complex collections of cells. Current approaches, for example, those based on atomic force microscopy or magnetic or optical tweezers, are powerful but limited in their applicability as integrated biosensors. Here we describe a new force-based biosensing technique based on the quartz crystal microbalance. By applying centrifugal forces to a sample, we show it is possible to repeatedly and non-destructively interrogate its mechanical properties in situ and in real time. We employ this platform for the studies of micron-sized particles, viscoelastic monolayers of DNA and particles tethered to the quartz crystal microbalance surface by DNA. Our results indicate that, for certain types of samples on quartz crystal balances, application of centrifugal force both enhances sensitivity and reveals additional mechanical and viscoelastic properties.

  16. Reverse-Tangent Injection in a Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    Injection of working fluid into a centrifugal compressor in the reverse tangent direction has been invented as a way of preventing flow instabilities (stall and surge) or restoring stability when stall or surge has already commenced. The invention applies, in particular, to a centrifugal compressor, the diffuser of which contains vanes that divide the flow into channels oriented partly radially and partly tangentially. In reverse-tangent injection, a stream or jet of the working fluid (the fluid that is compressed) is injected into the vaneless annular region between the blades of the impeller and the vanes of the diffuser. As used here, "reverse" signifies that the injected flow opposes (and thereby reduces) the tangential component of the velocity of the impeller discharge. At the same time, the injected jet acts to increase the radial component of the velocity of the impeller discharge.

  17. Improved Monodispersity of Plasmonic Nanoantennas via Centrifugal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Timothy P.; Henry, A.I.; Van Duyne, Richard P.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2011-02-03

    Noble metal nanoparticle clusters underlie a variety of plasmonic devices and measurements including surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Because of the strong dependence of plasmonic properties on nanoparticle cluster aggregation state, the elimination of non-SERS-active structures and the refinement of the nanoparticle cluster population are critical to realizing uniform and reproducible structures for plasmonic nanoantenna applications such as SERS-based sensors. In this Letter, we report a centrifugal sorting technique for gold core/silica shell nanoparticles that host SERS reporter molecules at the gold/silica interface. The relatively massive nanoparticle clusters are sorted by sedimentation coefficient via centrifugation in a high-viscosity density gradient medium, iodixanol, which yields solutions that contain a preponderance of one aggregation state and a diminished monomer population, as determined by transmission electron microscopy, extinction spectroscopy, and SERS. A quantitative analysis of the nanoparticle sedimentation coefficients is presented, thus allowing this approach to be predictably generalized to other nanoparticle systems.

  18. Hemocompatibility of a hydrodynamic levitation centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Kosaka, Ryo; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Kato, Takahisa; Sano, Takeshi; Okubo, Takeshi; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Shigeta, Osamu; Tsutsui, Tatsuo

    2007-01-01

    A noncontact type centrifugal pump without any complicated control or sensing modules has been developed as a long-term implantable artificial heart. Centrifugal pumps with impellers levitated by original hydrodynamic bearings were designed and have been modified through numerical analyses and in vitro tests. The hemolysis level was reduced by changing the pressure distribution around the impeller and subsequently expanding the bearing gap. Thrombus formation in the bearing was examined with in vitro thrombogenesis tests and was reduced by changing the groove shapes to increase the bearing-gap flow to 3% of the external flow. Unnecessary vortices around the vanes were also eliminated by changing the number of vanes from four to six.

  19. Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    ABSTRACT Essentially all spinal cord injured patients receive stretching therapies beginning within the first few weeks post-injury. Despite this fact...that stretching for short periods of time (4-5 weeks ) allows substantial recovery to occur once stretching is stopped, and both acute and chronic...4hours after one stretching session and then on Friday afternoon 3-4hours after the final stretching session of the week (the lowest scores). As seen

  20. Acute effects of different stretching durations on passive torque, mobility, and isometric muscle force.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Shingo; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Iwata, Masahiro; Banno, Yasuhiro; Asai, Yuji; Tsuchida, Wakako; Inoue, Takayuki

    2013-12-01

    Static stretching is widely applied in various disciplines. However, the acute effects of different durations of stretching are unclear. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the acute effects of different stretching durations on muscle function and flexibility, and provide an insight into the optimal duration of static stretching. This randomized crossover trial included 24 healthy students (17 men and 7 women) who stretched their right hamstrings for durations of 20, 60, 180, and 300 seconds in a random order. The following outcomes were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer as markers of lower-limb function and flexibility: static passive torque (SPT), dynamic passive torque (DPT), stiffness, straight leg raise (SLR), and isometric muscle force. Static passive torque was significantly decreased after all stretching durations (p < 0.05). Static passive torque was significantly lower after 60, 180, and 300 seconds of stretching compared with that after 20-second stretching, and stiffness decreased significantly after 180- and 300-second stretching (p < 0.05). In addition, DPT and stiffness were significantly lower after 300 seconds than after 20-second stretching (p < 0.05), and SLR increased significantly after all stretching durations (p < 0.05). Straight leg raise was higher after 180- and 300-second stretching than after 20-second stretching and higher after 300-second stretching than after 60-second stretching (p < 0.05). Isometric muscle force significantly decreased after all stretching durations (p < 0.05). Therefore, increased duration of stretching is associated with a decrease in SPT but an increase in SLR. Over 180 seconds of stretching was required to decrease DPT and stiffness, but isometric muscle force decreased regardless of the stretching duration. In conclusion, these results indicate that longer durations of stretching are needed to provide better flexibility.

  1. A Large Radius Human Centrifuge: The Human Hypergravity Havitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2008-06-01

    Life on Earth has developed at unit gravity, 9.81 m/s2, but how would plants and animals have evolved on a larger planet, i.e. larger than Earth? We are able to address this question simply by studies using centrifuges. In the past decades numerous experiments have been performed on cells, plants and animals grown for longer durations, even multi generations, under hypergravity conditions. Based on these studies we have gained interesting insights in the physiological process of these systems when exposed to artificial gravity. Animals and plants adapt themselves to this new high-g environment. Information of adaptation to hyper-g in mammals is interesting, or maybe even proof vital, for future human space flight programs especially in light of long duration missions to Moon and Mars. We know from long duration animal studies that numerous physiological processes and structures like muscles, bones, neuro-vestibular, or the cardiovascular system are affected. However, humans have never been exposed to a hyper-g environment for long durations. Human studies are mostly in the order of hours at most. Current work on human centrifuges is all focused on short arm systems to apply artificial gravity in long duration space missions. In this paper we want to address the possible usefulness of a large radius human centrifuge on Earth, or even on Moon or Mars, for both basic research and possible applications. In such a centrifuge a group of humans may be exposed to hypergravity for, in principle, an unlimited period of time.

  2. Comparative hemolysis study of clinically available centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Naito, K; Suenaga, E; Cao, Z L; Suda, H; Ueno, T; Natsuaki, M; Itoh, T

    1996-06-01

    Centrifugal pumps have become important devices for cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory assistance. Five types of centrifugal pumps are clinically available in Japan. To evaluate the blood trauma caused by centrifugal pumps, a comparative hemolysis study was performed under identical conditions. In vitro hemolysis test circuits were constructed to operate the BioMedicus BP-80 (Medtronic, BioMedicus), Sarns Delphin (Sarns/3M Healthcare), Isoflow (St. Jude Medical [SJM]), HPM-15 (Nikkiso), and Capiox CX-SP45 (Terumo). The hemolysis test loop consisted of two 1.5 m lengths of polyvinyl chloride tubing with a 3/8-inch internal diameter, a reservoir with a sampling port, and a pump head. All pumps were set to flow at 6 L/min against the total pressure head of 120 mm Hg. Experiments were conducted simultaneously for 6 h at room temperature (21 degrees C) with fresh bovine blood. Blood samples for plasma-free hemoglobin testing were taken, and the change in temperature at the pump outlet port was measured during the experiment. The mean pump rotational speeds were 1,570, 1,374, 1,438, 1,944, and 1,296 rpm, and the normalized indexes of hemolysis were 0.00070, 0.00745, 0.00096, 0.00066, 0.00090 g/100 L for the BP-80, Sarns, SJM, Nikkiso, and Terumo pumps, respectively. The change in temperature at the pump outlet port was the least for the Nikkiso pump (1.8 degrees C) and the most with the SJM pump (3.8 degrees C). This study showed that there is no relationship between the pump rotational speed (rpm) and the normalized index of hemolysis in 5 types of centrifugal pumps. The pump design and number of impellers could be more notable factors in blood damage.

  3. At 1050 Gallery, Block 12, two centrifugal pumps, Buffalo Pumps, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    At 1050 Gallery, Block 12, two centrifugal pumps, Buffalo Pumps, Buffalo, NY, driven by Allis Chalmers motors (size 3 HSO, head 230, 120 cpm, 1750, rpm, Impulse dia. 15) installed in the 1960s and used for water-cooling system for 230-kv cable; the cables have been removed and the pumps are not currently used. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  4. Liquid rocket engine centrifugal flow turbopumps. [design criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Design criteria and recommended practices are discussed for the following configurations selected from the design sequence of a liquid rocket engine centrifugal flow turbopump: (1) pump performance including speed, efficiency, and flow range; (2) impeller; (3) housing; and (4) thrust balance system. Hydrodynamic, structural, and mechanical problems are addressed for the achievement of required pump performance within the constraints imposed by the engine/turbopump system. Materials and fabrication specifications are also discussed.

  5. Conditions to obtain reliable high strength alumina via centrifugal casting

    SciTech Connect

    Huisman, W.; Graule, T.; Gauckler, L.J.

    1995-09-01

    Electrostatically stabilized alumina suspensions with high solids content of up to 58 vol% were consolidated into near-net-shape parts via centrifugal casting. High density green bodies showed excellent sintering kinetics leading to {ge} 99.5% of theoretical density (TD) at lowered temperatures compared to isostatic pressing. Four point bend strengths of 540 MPa with Weibull moduli of up to 24 were achieved using commercial {alpha}-alurnina powders.

  6. Laser tracker TSPI uncertainty quantification via centrifuge trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Edward; Paez, Thomas; Brown, Timothy; Miller, Timothy

    2009-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories currently utilizes two laser tracking systems to provide time-space-position-information (TSPI) and high speed digital imaging of test units under flight. These laser trackers have been in operation for decades under the premise of theoretical accuracies based on system design and operator estimates. Advances in optical imaging and atmospheric tracking technology have enabled opportunities to provide more precise six degree of freedom measurements from these trackers. Applying these technologies to the laser trackers requires quantified understanding of their current errors and uncertainty. It was well understood that an assortment of variables contributed to laser tracker uncertainty but the magnitude of these contributions was not quantified and documented. A series of experiments was performed at Sandia National Laboratories large centrifuge complex to quantify TSPI uncertainties of Sandia National Laboratories laser tracker III. The centrifuge was used to provide repeatable and economical test unit trajectories of a test-unit to use for TSPI comparison and uncertainty analysis. On a centrifuge, testunits undergo a known trajectory continuously with a known angular velocity. Each revolution may represent an independent test, which may be repeated many times over for magnitudes of data practical for statistical analysis. Previously these tests were performed at Sandia's rocket sled track facility but were found to be costly with challenges in the measurement ground truth TSPI. The centrifuge along with on-board measurement equipment was used to provide known ground truth position of test units. This paper discusses the experimental design and techniques used to arrive at measures of laser tracker error and uncertainty.

  7. Centrifugal Blower for Personal Air Ventilation System (PAVS) - Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    axial blower design was chosen to achieve the highest possible efficiency within the size constraints of the system. The blower is able to deliver 10...of the blower were used to minimize losses and increase efficiency through adjustments of the specific blower geometry. CFD outputs included the...functionality. 15. SUBJECT TERMS COOLING SBIR REPORTS AXIAL FLOW FANS OFF THE SHELF EQUIPMENT BLOWERS LIGHTWEIGHT CENTRIFUGAL FORCE

  8. Human Disorientation as a Factor in Spacecraft Centrifuge Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    from the rotation of the 58 J.L. Meriam and L.G. Kraige, Engineering Mechanics Vol. 2: Dynamics, 2nd Edition, New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1986...McGraw-Hill, 1983, p. 39 60 Meriam and Kraige, Dynamics, p. 350 61 Wells and Slusher, p. 64 102 centrifuge). This force appears as either an...64 Milsum, p. 187 65 Meriam and Kraige, Dynamics, p. 630 66 Meriam and Kraige, Engineering Mechanics Vol. 1

  9. Radial stretch reveals distinct populations of mechanosensitive mammalian somatosensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Martha R. C.; Bautista, Diana M.; Wu, Karin; Haeberle, Henry; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Julius, David

    2008-01-01

    Primary afferent somatosensory neurons mediate our sense of touch in response to changes in ambient pressure. Molecules that detect and transduce thermal stimuli have been recently identified, but mechanisms underlying mechanosensation, particularly in vertebrate organisms, remain enigmatic. Traditionally, mechanically evoked responses in somatosensory neurons have been assessed one cell at a time by recording membrane currents in response to application of focal pressure, suction, or osmotic challenge. Here, we used radial stretch in combination with live-cell calcium imaging to gain a broad overview of mechanosensitive neuronal subpopulations. We found that different stretch intensities activate distinct subsets of sensory neurons as defined by size, molecular markers, or pharmacological attributes. In all subsets, stretch-evoked responses required extracellular calcium, indicating that mechanical force triggers calcium influx. This approach extends the repertoire of stimulus paradigms that can be used to examine mechanotransduction in mammalian sensory neurons, facilitating future physiological and pharmacological studies. PMID:19060212

  10. Stretching Behavior of Red Blood Cells at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this work, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that a simple viscoelastic model captures the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 1000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  11. Critical dynamics of vesicle stretching transition in elongational flow.

    PubMed

    Kantsler, Vasiliy; Segre, Enrico; Steinberg, Victor

    2008-07-25

    We present results on the stretching of single tubular vesicles in an elongation flow toward dumbbell shapes, and on their relaxation. A critical strain rate epsilonc exists; for strain rates epsilonstretching. Such feature is similar to that found in continuous phase transitions and to the critical effects recently observed for polymer molecules near the coil-stretch transition in elongation flow.

  12. Sketch-n-Stretch: sketching animations using cutouts.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Eisung; Choy, Yoon-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Sketch-n-Stretch lets novices quickly and easily create 2D animations. The system has a seamless two-layer drawing interface that supports cutouts using a whiteboard metaphor. Cutout animations serve as building blocks to help users construct sophisticated animations. While manipulating cutout animations, users can draw and write text to create effects-such as articulated figures, multiple motions, and image objects-that have been difficult with previous sketching approaches. An intuitive timeline interface employs visually integrated motion cues and supports several traditional animation effects. Novices positively evaluated Sketch-n-Stretch's effectiveness in creating object motions, compared to an existing sketching tool. They also used its advanced features to animate complete stories. This video demonstrates the Sketch-n-Stretch tool for making sketch-based animations.

  13. Transcription upregulation via force-induced direct stretching of chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Arash; Zhang, Yuejin; Wei, Fuxiang; Sun, Jian; Jia, Qiong; Zhou, Wenwen; Singh, Rishi; Khanna, Nimish; Belmont, Andrew S.; Wang, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical forces play critical roles in the function of living cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of how forces influence nuclear events remain elusive. Here, we show that chromatin deformation as well as force-induced transcription of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bacterial-chromosome dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) transgene can be visualized in a living cell by using three-dimensional magnetic twisting cytometry to apply local stresses on the cell surface via an Arg-Gly-Asp-coated magnetic bead. Chromatin stretching depended on loading direction. DHFR transcription upregulation was sensitive to load direction and proportional to the magnitude of chromatin stretching. Disrupting filamentous actin or inhibiting actomyosin contraction abrogated or attenuated force-induced DHFR transcription, whereas activating endogenous contraction upregulated force-induced DHFR transcription. Our findings suggest that local stresses applied to integrins propagate from the tensed actin cytoskeleton to the LINC complex and then through lamina-chromatin interactions to directly stretch chromatin and upregulate transcription.

  14. Effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Brown, Lee E; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; Wistocki, David R; Davis, Gregory S; Naimo, Marshall A; Zito, Gina A; Wilson, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    It is previously demonstrated that static stretching was associated with a decrease in running economy and distance run during a 30-minute time trial in trained runners. Recently, the detrimental effects of static stretching on economy were found to be limited to the first few minutes of an endurance bout. However, economy remains to be studied for its direct effects on performance during shorter endurance events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance, electromyography (EMG), ground contact time (GCT), and flexibility. Ten trained male distance runners aged 24 ± 5 years with an average VO2max of 64.9 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1 were recruited. Subjects reported to the laboratory on 3 separate days interspersed by 72 hours. On day 1, anthropometrics and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max were determined on a motor-driven treadmill. On days 2 and 3, subjects performed a 5-minute treadmill warm-up and either performed a series of 6 lower-body stretches for three 30-second repetitions or sat still for 10 minutes. Time to complete a 1-mile run under stretching and nonstretching conditions took place in randomized order. For the performance run, subjects were instructed to run as fast as possible at a set incline of 5% until a distance of 1 mile was completed. Flexibility from the sit and reach test, EMG, GCT, and performance, determined by time to complete the 1-mile run, were recorded after each condition. Time to complete the run was significantly less (6:51 ± 0:28 minutes) in the nonstretching condition as compared with the stretching condition (7:04 ± 0:32 minutes). A significant condition-by-time interaction for muscle activation existed, with no change in the nonstretching condition (pre 91.3 ± 11.6 mV to post 92.2 ± 12.9 mV) but increased in the stretching condition (pre 91.0 ± 11.6 mV to post 105.3 ± 12.9 mV). A significant condition-by-time interaction for GCT was also present, with no changes in

  15. Stretching to prevent musculoskeletal injuries. An approach to workplace wellness.

    PubMed

    Gartley, Rosanna M; Prosser, J Lynn

    2011-06-01

    A pre-shift stretching protocol to reduce employee injuries was initiated at a beverage company and a tin mill in the northeastern United States. The primary goal of this study was to determine the effects of a pre-shift stretching program on work-related musculoskeletal injuries. A secondary goal was to evaluate daily participation compliance during the 90-day program. Data on employee injuries during the stretching program were collected and compared to injury events during the same time period 1 year earlier. Comparison to injury events of the total eligible population during the study time frame was also included. Results of this pilot program in terms of injury rate reduction and participant compliance are promising. Study results may be useful for employers considering implementing similar programs and also suggest the need for further study in this area.

  16. Effectiveness of a neck stretching intervention on nurses' primary headaches.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Ying; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the effects of a neck stretching exercise intervention on nurses' primary headaches. Using a pretest and posttest two-group design, a total of 60 female staff nurses employed by a medical center in Taiwan were selected by convenience sampling. Participants in the experimental group (N=30) practiced neck stretching exercises while experiencing headaches. The participants in the control group (N=30) managed their headaches as usual. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on headache intensity at baseline, and at 30 minutes and 1 hour after intervention. Decrease in headache intensity of the experimental group was significantly larger than that of the control group. Neck stretching exercises is an effective method for treating primary headaches.

  17. Simple assembly of long nanowires through substrate stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jianjin; Mohieddin Abukhdeir, Nasser; Goldthorpe, Irene A.

    2015-12-01

    Although nanowire (NW) alignment has been previously investigated, minimizing limitations such as process complexity and NW breakage, as well as quantifying the quality of alignment, have not been sufficiently addressed. A simple, low cost, large-area, and versatile alignment method is reported that is applicable for NWs either grown on a substrate or synthesized in solution. Metal and semiconductor NWs with average lengths of up to 16 μm are aligned through the stretching of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films, which compared to other stretching methods results in superior alignment because of the large stretching ratio of PVA. Poly[oxy(methyl-1,2-ethanediyl)] is employed as lubricant to prevent NW breakage. To quantify NW alignment, a simple and effective image processing method is presented. The alignment process results in an order parameter (S) of NW alignment as high as 0.97.

  18. Prenatal centrifugation: A model for fetal programming of adult weight?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Lisa A.; Rushing, Linda; Wade, Charles E.; Ronca, April E.

    2005-08-01

    'Fetal programming' is a newly emerging field that is revealing astounding insights into the prenatal origins of adult disease, including metabolic, endocrine, and cardiovascular pathophysiology. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that rat pups conceived, gestated and born at 2-g have significantly reduced birth weights and increased adult body weights as compared to 1-g controls. Offspring were produced by mating young adult male and female rats that were adapted to 2-g centrifugation. Female rats underwent conception, pregnancy and birth at 2-g. Newborn pups in the 2-g condition were removed from the centrifuge and fostered to non-manipulated, newly parturient dams maintained at 1-g. Comparisons were made with 1-g stationary controls, also cross- fostered at birth. As compared to 1-g controls, birth weights of pups gestated and born at 2-g were significantly reduced. Pup body weights were significantly reduced until Postnatal day (P)12. Beginning on P63, body weights of 2-g-gestated offspring exceeded those of 1-g controls by 7-10%. Thus, prenatal rearing at 2-g restricts neonatal growth and increases adult body weight. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that 2-g centrifugation alters the intrauterine milieu, thereby inducing persistent changes in adult phenotype.

  19. Massively Parallel Single-Molecule Manipulation Using Centrifugal Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley; Halvorsen, Ken

    2011-03-01

    Precise manipulation of single molecules has led to remarkable insights in physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, two issues that have impeded the widespread adoption of these techniques are equipment cost and the laborious nature of making measurements one molecule at a time. To meet these challenges, we have developed an approach that enables massively parallel single- molecule force measurements using centrifugal force. This approach is realized in the centrifuge force microscope, an instrument in which objects in an orbiting sample are subjected to a calibration-free, macroscopically uniform force- field while their micro-to-nanoscopic motions are observed. We demonstrate high- throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy with this technique by performing thousands of rupture experiments in parallel, characterizing force-dependent unbinding kinetics of an antibody-antigen pair in minutes rather than days. Currently, we are taking steps to integrate high-resolution detection, fluorescence, temperature control and a greater dynamic range in force. With significant benefits in efficiency, cost, simplicity, and versatility, single-molecule centrifugation has the potential to expand single-molecule experimentation to a wider range of researchers and experimental systems.

  20. Low-molecular weight plasma proteome analysis using centrifugal ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Greening, David W; Simpson, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    The low-molecular weight fraction (LMF) of the human plasma proteome is an invaluable source of biological information, especially in the context of identifying plasma-based biomarkers of disease. This protocol outlines a standardized procedure for the rapid/reproducible LMF profiling of human plasma samples using centrifugal ultrafiltration fractionation, followed by 1D-SDS-PAGE separation and nano-LC-MS/MS. Ultrafiltration is a convective process that uses anisotropic semipermeable membranes to separate macromolecular species on the basis of size. We have optimized centrifugal ultrafiltration for plasma fractionation with respect to buffer and solvent composition, centrifugal force, duration and temperature to facilitate >95% recovery, and enrichment of low-M (r) components from human plasma. Using this protocol, >260 unique peptides can be identified from a single plasma profiling experiment using 100 μL of plasma (Greening and Simpson, J Proteomics 73:637-648, 2010). The efficacy of this method is demonstrated by the identification, for the first time, of several plasma proteins (e.g., protein KIAA0649 (Q9Y4D3), rheumatoid factor D5, serine protease inhibitor A3, and transmembrane adapter protein PAG) previously not reported in extant high-confidence Human Proteome Organization Plasma Proteome Project datasets.

  1. Stress analysis of bolted joints under centrifugal force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Makoto; Iizuka, Motonobu; Nakae, Shigeki; Mori, Takeshi; Koyama, Takayuki

    2014-06-01

    Our objective is to develop a long-life rotary machine for synchronous generators and motors. To do this, it is necessary to design a high-strength bolted joint, which is responsible for fixing a salient pole on a rotor shaft. While the rotary machine is in operation, not only centrifugal force but also moment are loaded on a bolted joint, because a point of load is eccentric to a centre of a bolt. We tried to apply the theory proposed in VDI2230-Blatt1 to evaluate the bolted joint under eccentric force, estimate limited centrifugal force, which is the cause of partial separation between the pole and the rotor shaft, and then evaluate additional tension of a bolt after the partial separation has occurred. We analyzed the bolted joint by FEM, and defined load introduction factor in that case. Additionally, we investigated the effect of the variation of bolt preload on the partial separation. We did a full scale experiment with a prototype rotor to reveal the variation of bolt preload against tightening torque. After that, we verified limited centrifugal force and the strength of the bolted joint by the VDI2230-Blatt1 theory and FEM considering the variation of bolt preload. Finally, we could design a high-strength bolted joint verified by the theoretical study and FEM analysis.

  2. Modelling of horizontal centrifugal casting of work roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhian; Song, Nannan; Tol, Rob Val; Luan, Yikun; Li, Dianzhong

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model to simulate horizontal centrifugal roll castings is presented in this paper. In order to simulate the flow fluid and solidification of horizontal centrifugal roll casting correctly, the model uses a body fitted mesh technique to represent the geometry. This new method maps a plate layer mesh to a circular mesh. The smooth body fitted mesh method gives more accurate calculation results for cylindrical geometries. A velocity depending on the angular velocity and inner radius of the mould is set up as a velocity boundary condition. The fluid flow coupled with heat transfer and solidification in a rapidly rotating roll is simulated. A gravity free falling method is applied as a pouring condition. A moveable pouring system is also used in the simulations. High speed steel is used to produce the work roll. Two different gating positions and a moveable gating system are simulated in this paper. Results show that the position of pouring system has a significant influence on the temperature distribution. The temperature distribution at a fixed central pouring system is more favourable than the distribution from a side pouring system. A moving gating system method is a better way to obtain a uniform temperature field in centrifugal casting and offers an alternative for existing techniques.

  3. Centrifuge: rapid and sensitive classification of metagenomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Breitwieser, Florian P.

    2016-01-01

    Centrifuge is a novel microbial classification engine that enables rapid, accurate, and sensitive labeling of reads and quantification of species on desktop computers. The system uses an indexing scheme based on the Burrows-Wheeler transform (BWT) and the Ferragina-Manzini (FM) index, optimized specifically for the metagenomic classification problem. Centrifuge requires a relatively small index (4.2 GB for 4078 bacterial and 200 archaeal genomes) and classifies sequences at very high speed, allowing it to process the millions of reads from a typical high-throughput DNA sequencing run within a few minutes. Together, these advances enable timely and accurate analysis of large metagenomics data sets on conventional desktop computers. Because of its space-optimized indexing schemes, Centrifuge also makes it possible to index the entire NCBI nonredundant nucleotide sequence database (a total of 109 billion bases) with an index size of 69 GB, in contrast to k-mer-based indexing schemes, which require far more extensive space. PMID:27852649

  4. Assessment and mitigation of DNA loss utilizing centrifugal filtration devices.

    PubMed

    Doran, Ashley E; Foran, David R

    2014-11-01

    Maximizing DNA recovery during its isolation can be vital in forensic casework, particularly when DNA yields are expected to be low, such as from touch samples. Many forensic laboratories utilize centrifugal filtration devices to purify and concentrate the DNA; however, DNA loss has been reported when using them. In this study, all centrifugal filtration devices tested caused substantial DNA loss, affecting low molecular weight DNA (PCR product) somewhat more than high molecular weight DNA. Strategies for mitigating DNA loss were then examined, including pre-treatment with glucose, glycogen, silicone (RainX(®)), bovine serum albumin, yeast RNA, or high molecular weight DNA. The length of pre-treatment and UV irradiation of pre-treatment reagents were also investigated. Pre-treatments with glucose and glycogen resulted in little or no improvement in DNA recovery, and most or all DNA was lost after silicone pre-treatment. Devices pre-treated with BSA produced irregular and uninterpretable quantitative PCR amplification curves for the DNA and internal PCR control. On the other hand, nucleic acid pre-treatments greatly improved recovery of all DNAs. Pre-treatment time and its UV irradiation did not influence DNA recovery. Overall, the results show that centrifugal filtration devices trap DNA, yet their proper pre-treatment can circumvent that loss, which is critical in the case of low copy forensic DNA samples.

  5. Effect of centrifugal forces on dimensional error of bored shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsuaga, M.; de Lacalle, L. N. López; Lobato, R.; Urbikain, G.; Campa, F.

    2012-04-01

    Boring operations of deep holes with a slender boring bar are often hindered by the precision because of their low static stiffness and high deformations. Because of that, it is not possible to remove much larger depths of cuts than the nose radius of the tool, unlike the case of turning and face milling operations, and consequently, the relationship between the cutting force distribution, tool geometry, feed rate and depth of cut becomes non-linear and complex. This problem gets worse when working with a rotating boring head where apart from the cutting forces and the variation of the inclination angle because of shape boring, the bar and head are affected by de centrifugal forces. The centrifugal forces, and therefore the centrifugal deflection, will vary as a function of the rotating speed, boring bar mass distribution and variable radial position of the bar in shape boring. Taking in to account all this effects, a load and deformation model was created. This model has been experimentally validated to use as a corrector factor of the radial position of the U axis in the boring head.

  6. Centrifugal Microfluidic System for Nucleic Acid Amplification and Detection

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Baogang; Peng, Niancai; Li, Lei; Li, Zheng; Hu, Fei; Zhang, Zengming; Wang, Chaohui

    2015-01-01

    We report here the development of a rapid PCR microfluidic system comprising a double-shaft turntable and centrifugal-based disc that rapidly drives the PCR mixture between chambers set at different temperatures, and the bidirectional flow improved the space utilization of the disc. Three heating resistors and thermistors maintained uniform, specific temperatures for the denaturation, annealing, and extension steps of the PCR. Infrared imaging showed that there was little thermal interference between reaction chambers; the system enabled the cycle number and reaction time of each step to be independently adjusted. To validate the function and efficiency of the centrifugal microfluidic system, a 350-base pair target gene from the hepatitis B virus was amplified and quantitated by fluorescence detection. By optimizing the cycling parameters, the reaction time was reduced to 32 min as compared to 120 min for a commercial PCR machine. DNA samples with concentrations ranging from 10 to 106 copies/mL could be quantitatively analyzed using this system. This centrifugal-based microfluidic platform is a useful system and possesses industrialization potential that can be used for portable diagnostics. PMID:26556354

  7. The acute effects of dynamic and ballistic stretching on vertical jump height, force, and power.

    PubMed

    Jaggers, Jason R; Swank, Ann M; Frost, Karen L; Lee, Chong D

    2008-11-01

    Stretching before performance is a common practice among athletes in hopes of increasing performance and reducing the risk of injury. However, cumulative results indicate a negative impact of static stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on performance; thus, there is a need for evaluating other stretching strategies for effective warm-up. The purpose of this study was to compare the differences between two sets of ballistic stretching and two sets of a dynamic stretching routine on vertical jump performance. Twenty healthy male and female college students between the ages of 22 and 34 (24.8 +/- 3 years) volunteered to participate in this study. All subjects completed three individual testing sessions on three nonconsecutive days. On each day, the subjects completed one of three treatments (no stretch, ballistic stretch, and dynamic stretch). Intraclass reliability was determined using the data obtained from each subject. A paired samples t-test revealed no significant difference in jump height, force, or power when comparing no stretch with ballistic stretch. A significant difference was found on jump power when comparing no stretch with dynamic stretch, but no significant difference was found for jump height or force. Statistics showed a very high reliability when measuring jump height, force, and power using the Kistler Quattro Jump force plate. It seems that neither dynamic stretching nor ballistic stretching will result in an increase in vertical jump height or force. However, dynamic stretching elicited gains in jump power poststretch.

  8. EMG and peak force responses to PNF stretching and the relationship between stretching-induced force deficits and bilateral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Asim

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of an interaction between stretching induced deficit (SFD) and bilateral deficits (BLD) during maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion under PNF stretch and no-stretch conditions through measurement of EMG and force production. [Subjects and Methods] Ten physically active male Caucasian students (age, 24.1±2.38 years; body mass, 79.48±11.40 kg; height, 174.15±0.8 cm) volunteered to participate in this study. EMG and force measurements of the subjects were recorded during either unilateral or bilateral 3-second maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion (MVC) against a force transducer. The paired sample t-test was used to examine the significance of differences among several conditions. Pearson product-moment correlation was used to evaluate the associations between different parameters. [Results] Stretching-induced deficits correlated with bilateral deficits in both force (r=0.85) and iEMG (r=0.89). PNF stretching caused significant decrements in the bilateral and unilateral conditions for both the right and left sides. [Conclusion] Since both force and iEMG decreases were observed in most measurements; it suggests there is a neural mechanism behinnd both the BLD and the SFD. PMID:25931696

  9. Structure of low-stretch methane nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bai; Ibarreta, Alfonso F.; Sung, Chih-Jen; T'ien, James S.

    2007-04-15

    The present study experimentally and numerically investigates the structure associated with extremely low-stretch ({proportional_to}2 s{sup -1}) gaseous nonpremixed flames. The study of low-stretch flames aims to improve our fundamental understanding of the flame radiation effects on flame response and extinction limits. Low-stretch flames are also relevant to fire safety in reduced-gravity environments and to large buoyant fires, where localized areas of low stretch are attainable. In this work, ultra-low-stretch flames are established in normal gravity by bottom burning of a methane/nitrogen mixture discharged from a porous spherically symmetric burner of large radius of curvature. The large thickness of the resulting nonpremixed flame allows detailed mapping of the flame structure. Several advanced nonintrusive optical diagnostics are used to study the flame structure. Gas phase temperatures are measured by Raman scattering, while the burner surface temperatures are obtained by IR imaging. In addition, OH-PLIF and chemiluminescence imaging techniques are used to help characterize the extent of the flame reaction zone. These experimental results allow direct comparison with a quasi-one-dimensional numerical model including detailed chemistry, thermodynamic/transport properties, and radiation treatment. In addition, the radiative interactions between the flame and porous burner (modeled as a gray surface) are accounted for in the present model. The numerical modeling is demonstrated to be able to simulate the low-stretch flame structure. Using the current model, the extinction limits under different conditions are also examined. The computational results are consistent with experimental observations. (author)

  10. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    PubMed Central

    Sloot, Lizeth H.; van den Noort, Josien C.; van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163–191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  11. Magnetohydrodynamics stagnation point flow towards a stretching vertical sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, A.; Nazar, R.; Pop, I.

    2006-03-01

    The analysis of steady two-dimensional stagnation point flow of an incompressible viscous and electrically conducting fluid, subject to a transverse uniform magnetic field, over a vertical stretching sheet is investigated when the sheet is stretched in its own plane with a velocity and a temperature proportional to the distance from the stagnation point. It is shown that the basic partial differential equations reduce to similarity equations. This is followed by a direct numerical solution of the resulting boundary value problem using a very efficient finite-difference method. Discussions are made to trace among them the physically realistic solution. Tables 5, Figs 13, Refs 17.

  12. Stretched Exponential Relaxation of Glasses at Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yingtian; Wang, Mengyi; Zhang, Dawei; Wang, Bu; Sant, Gaurav; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-10-16

    The question of whether glass continues to relax at low temperature is of fundamental and practical interest. Here, we report a novel atomistic simulation method allowing us to directly access the long-term dynamics of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that the potential energy relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay, with a stretching exponent β=3/5, as predicted by Phillips's diffusion-trap model. Interestingly, volume relaxation is also found. However, it is not correlated to the energy relaxation, but it is rather a manifestation of the mixed alkali effect.

  13. Stretched-exponential Doppler spectra in underwater acoustic communication channels.

    PubMed

    van Walree, P A; Jenserud, T; Otnes, R

    2010-11-01

    The theory of underwater sound interacting with the sea surface predicts a Gaussian-spread frequency spectrum in the case of a large Rayleigh parameter. However, recent channel soundings reveal more sharply peaked spectra with heavier tails. The measured Doppler spread increases with the frequency and differs between multipath arrivals. The overall Doppler spectrum of a broadband waveform is the sum of the spectra of all constituent paths and frequencies, and is phenomenologically described by a stretched or compressed exponential. The stretched exponential also fits well to the broadband spectrum of a single propagation path, and narrowband spectra summed over all paths.

  14. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, J.

    1991-06-18

    A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus. 2 figures.

  15. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Jakob

    1991-01-01

    A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

  16. HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, R.W.

    1958-08-12

    The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

  17. Microstructures of Al-Al3Ti functionally graded materials fabricated by centrifugal solid-particle method and centrifugal in situ method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimi; Zhou, Qi; Sato, Hisashi; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Inamura, Tomonari

    2017-01-01

    Methods of fabrication by centrifugal casting for functionally graded materials (FGMs) can be classified into two categories on the basis of the relationship between the process temperature and the liquidus temperature of a master alloy. They are the centrifugal solid-particle method and centrifugal in situ method, which could be carried out at process temperatures lower and higher than the liquidus temperature of the master alloy, respectively. In a previous study, it was found that the microstructures of Al-Al3Ti FGMs fabricated by the centrifugal in situ method processed at 1600 °C were different from those fabricated by the centrifugal solid-particle method processed at 800 °C. Although it is expected that the FGMs fabricated by the centrifugal in situ method processed at approximately the liquidus temperature should show extraordinary microstructures, those microstructures have not been observed. In this study, the microstructures of Al-Al3Ti FGMs fabricated at 1000 °C (centrifugal solid-particle method) and 1200 °C (centrifugal in situ method) were investigated.

  18. Water Drainage from Unsaturated Soils in a Centrifuge Permeameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas, G.; McCartney, J.; Zhang, M.

    2013-12-01

    This study involves an analysis of water drainage from an initially saturated silt layer in a centrifuge permeameter to evaluate the hydraulic properties of the soil layer in unsaturated conditions up to the point where the water phase becomes discontinuous. These properties include the soil water retention curve (SWRC) and the hydraulic conductivity function (HCF). The hydraulic properties of unsaturated silt are used in soil-atmosphere interaction models that take into account the role of infiltration and evaporation of water from soils due to atmospheric interaction. These models are often applied in slope stability analyses, landfill cover design, aquifer recharge analyses, and agricultural engineering. The hydraulic properties are also relevant to recent research concerning geothermal heating and cooling, as they can be used to assess the insulating effects of soil around underground heat exchangers. This study employs a high-speed geotechnical centrifuge to increase the self-weight of a compacted silt specimen atop a filter plate. Under a centrifuge acceleration of N times earth's gravity, the concept of geometric similitude indicates that the water flow process in a small-scale soil layer will be similar to those in a soil layer in the field that is N times thicker. The centrifuge acceleration also results in an increase in the hydraulic gradient across the silt specimen, which causes water to flow out of the pores following Darcy's law. The drainage test was performed until the rate of liquid water flow out of the soil layer slowed to a negligible level, which corresponds to the transition point at which further water flow can only occur due to water vapor diffusion following Fick's law. The data from the drainage test in the centrifuge were used to determine the SWRC and HCF at different depths in the silt specimen, which compared well with similar properties defined using other laboratory tests. The transition point at which liquid water flow stopped (and

  19. Vibrational Spectroscopy of the CCl[subscript 4] v[subscript 1] Mode: Theoretical Prediction of Isotopic Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaynor, James D.; Wetterer, Anna M.; Cochran, Rea M.; Valente, Edward J.; Mayer, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful experimental technique, yet it is often missing from the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory curriculum. Tetrachloromethane (CCl[subscript 4]) is the ideal molecule for an introductory vibrational spectroscopy experiment and the symmetric stretch vibration contains fine structure due to isotopic variations…

  20. Extraction of soil solution by drainage centrifugation-effects of centrifugal force and time of centrifugation on soil moisture recovery and solute concentration in soil moisture of loess subsoils.

    PubMed

    Fraters, Dico; Boom, Gerard J F L; Boumans, Leo J M; de Weerd, Henk; Wolters, Monique

    2017-02-01

    The solute concentration in the subsoil beneath the root zone is an important parameter for leaching assessment. Drainage centrifugation is considered a simple and straightforward method of determining soil solution chemistry. Although several studies have been carried out to determine whether this method is robust, hardly any results are available for loess subsoils. To study the effect of centrifugation conditions on soil moisture recovery and solute concentration, we sampled the subsoil (1.5-3.0 m depth) at commercial farms in the loess region of the Netherlands. The effect of time (20, 35, 60, 120 and 240 min) on recovery was studied at two levels of the relative centrifugal force (733 and 6597g). The effect of force on recovery was studied by centrifugation for 35 min at 117, 264, 733, 2932, 6597 and 14,191g. All soil moisture samples were chemically analysed. This study shows that drainage centrifugation offers a robust, reproducible and standardised way for determining solute concentrations in mobile soil moisture in silt loam subsoils. The centrifugal force, rather than centrifugation time, has a major effect on recovery. The maximum recovery for silt loams at field capacity is about 40%. Concentrations of most solutes are fairly constant with an increasing recovery, as most solutes, including nitrate, did not show a change in concentration with an increasing recovery.