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Sample records for isotopic imaging study

  1. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O, S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in {sup 15}N, including the largest {sup 15}N enrichments ({approx}1300 {per_thousand}) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in {sup 15}N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are {sup 15}N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots have correlated {sup 13}C anomalies. CN{sup -}/C{sup -} ratios suggest that most of the {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions. These

  2. Three-dimensional imaging of the myocardium with isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    Three methods of imaging the three-dimensional distribution of isotopes in the myocardium are discussed. Three-dimensional imaging was examined using multiple Anger-camera views. Longitudinal tomographic images with compensation for blurring were studied. Transverse-section reconstruction using coincidence detection of annihilation gammas from positron emitting isotopes was investigated.

  3. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Matthew L; Lechene, Claude P

    2013-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans.

  4. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans. PMID:23660233

  5. Enhanced cross-talk correction technique for simultaneous dual-isotope imaging: a TL-201/Tc-99m myocardial perfusion SPECT dog study.

    PubMed

    Knesaurek, K; Machac, J

    1997-12-01

    A newly developed cross-talk correction method for simultaneous dual-isotope SPECT imaging was tested in a canine model. The method is based on the assumption that the transformations, which modify the primary energy window images into the scatter images as viewed in the other energy windows, are known. These transformations were found by measuring the point spread functions (PSFs) in two different energy windows for both isotopes in water. The dual-isotope correction method is described by two convolution equations which were applied in frequency space. The equations take into account the different spatial distributions of the primary and scatter cross-talk photons. The new enhancement of the method was in applying restoration filters to the resulting corrected images. Three separate studies were acquired in our dog study: two single-isotope and one dual-isotope study. The single isotope images were used as references. The contrast between the left ventricle cavity (LVC) and the myocardium was used in transaxial and short-axis slices as a parameter to evaluate results of dual-isotope correction method with restoration. The change in contrast in the dual-isotope corrected images in both energy windows, i.e., Tc-99m primary window (140 keV) and Tl-201 primary window (70 keV), was significant. The only exception was for the short-axis Tc-99m window images. The corrected 140 keV dual-isotope short-axis slice had the contrast of 0.60 vs 0.58, which was the value in the noncorrected dual-isotope short-axis slice. For dual-isotope 140 keV transaxial slice, the contrast changed from 0.72 to 0.82 after correction. In comparison, for single-isotope Tc-99m 140 keV transaxial slice, contrast changed from 0.62 to 0.84 after restoration correction. There was less change in contrast in the short-axis Tc-99m 140 keV slice, i.e., from 0.56 to 0.61. In the Tl-201 primary window for the transaxial slices the improvement of contrast was from 0.38 to 0.64, and for short-axis slices

  6. Considerations for imaging Re-188 and Re-186 isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Eary, J.F.; Durack, L.; Williams, D.; Vanderheyden, J.L. )

    1990-12-01

    Re-186 and Re-188 have been suggested for radioimmunotherapy because of their energetic beta particles, imageable gamma photons, and chemical properties similar to technetium. Because of this potential, these isotopes were evaluated before in vivo imaging was attempted. It was found that low-abundance, high-energy gamma photons present in these rhenium isotopes require a medium-energy collimator to yield optimal image resolution and count rate, which are critical factors in the performance of preliminary imaging studies on patients for antibody imaging and therapy.

  7. Stable isotope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc dual-isotope cardiac SPECT imaging with model-based crosstalk compensation using canine studies

    PubMed Central

    Du, Y.; Links, J. M.; Becker, L.; DiPaula, A. F.; Frank, T.; Schuleri, K. H.; Lardo, A. C.; Frey, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc-Sestamibi dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging can reduce imaging time and produce perfectly registered rest/stress images. However, crosstalk from 99mTc into 201Tl images can significantly reduce 201Tl image quality. We have developed a model-based compensation (MBC) method to compensate for this crosstalk. The method has previously been validated with phantom and simulation studies. In this study, we evaluated the MBC method using a canine model. Methods Left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary artery stenoses were created in 50 adult mongrel dogs weighing 20–30 kg. The dogs were injected with 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 201Tl at rest, and a SPECT study acquired. Stress was induced by administering adenosine to the dog, followed by injection of 740 MBq (20 mCi) of 99mTc-Sestamibi at peak stress. A second SPECT study was performed with data acquired in both 201Tl and 99mTc energy windows to provide simultaneous dual-isotope projection data. The images were reconstructed using the ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction algorithm with compensation for attenuation, scatter and detector response. For simultaneously acquired 201Tl data, we also applied the MBC method to compensate for crosstalk contamination from 99mTc. Results Without compensation, 99mTc crosstalk increased the estimated 201Tl activity concentration in the rest images and reduced defect contrast. After MBC, the 201Tl images were in good agreement with the registered single isotope images and ex vivo count data. The ischemic (IS) to non-ischemic (NIS) region 201Tl activity concentration ratios were computed for single isotope and dual isotope studies. The correlation with ex vivo IS-NIS ratios was 0.815 after MBC, compared to the 0.495 from data without compensation. In addition, the regression line for the IS-NIS ratios with MBC was almost parallel to the line of identity with a slope of 0.93, compared to a slope of 0

  9. Isotope fractionation studies of molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, M. E.; de Laeter, J. R.; Varner, M. D.

    2007-08-01

    Mass spectrometric studies of the isotopic composition of molybdenum have become an active area of research in stable isotope geochemistry, biogeochemistry and cosmochemistry. The redox chemistry of Mo, together with its proclivity for covalent bonding, indicates its importance in isotope fractionation studies such as palaeoceanography. The measurement of the magnitude of isotope fractionation of Mo in natural systems is a challenging task, in that natural fractionation has to be carefully distinguished from chemical and instrumental isotope fractionation. An ion exchange chemical separation procedure has been developed with high efficiency and low blank, to ensure that the isobaric elements Zr and Ru are removed from the samples before mass spectrometric analysis. The isotope fractionation resulting from this procedure is 0.14[per mille sign] per u. The isotopic composition of Mo of a Laboratory Standard has been measured by positive and negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (P-TIMS and N-TIMS, respectively), to give an isotope fractionation of 6.4[per mille sign] and 0.5[per mille sign] per u, respectively, with respect to the absolute isotope abundances of Mo. In both cases the lighter isotopes are enhanced with respect to the heavier isotopes. An ascorbic acid activator has enabled the sensitivity of P-TIMS to be improved as compared to traditional methods. The same experiment was repeated using a multiple collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) to give an isotope fractionation of approximately 17.0[per mille sign] per u. In this case the heavier isotopes are enhanced with respect to the lighter isotopes. The strengths and weaknesses of these three mass spectrometric techniques are evaluated. We conclude that MC-ICP-MS is the optimum mass spectrometric method for accurately measuring the isotope fractionation of Mo in natural materials, provided chemical and instrumental isotope fractionation can be resolved from naturally

  10. Oxygen isotope studies and compilation of isotopic dates from Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Grootes, P.M.; Stuiver, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Quaternary Isotope Laboratory, alone or in collaboration with other investigators, is currently involved in a number of oxygen-isotope studies mainly in Antarctica. Studies of a drill core from the South Pole, seasonal oxygen-18 signals preserved in the Dominion Range, isotope dating of the Ross Ice Shelf, oxygen-18 profiles of the Siple Coast, McMurdo Ice Shelf sampling, and a data compilation of radiometric dates from Antarctica are discussed.

  11. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P.; Lewis, Jason S.; Grimm, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies. Methods In vitro phantom studies were used to validate the visible light emission observed from a range of radionuclides including the positron emitters 18F, 64Cu, 89Zr, and 124I; β-emitter 131I; and α-particle emitter 225Ac for potential use in CLI. The novel radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 89Zr-desferrioxamine B-[DFO-J591 for immuno-PET of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression was used to coregister and correlate the CLI signal observed with the immuno-PET images and biodistribution studies. Results Phantom studies confirmed that Cerenkov radiation can be observed from a range of positron-,β-, and α-emitting radionuclides using standard optical imaging devices. The change in light emission intensity versus time was concordant with radionuclide decay and was also found to correlate linearly with both the activity concentration and the measured PET signal (percentage injected dose per gram). In vivo studies conducted in male severe combined immune deficient mice bearing PSMA-positive, subcutaneous LNCaP tumors demonstrated that tumor-specific uptake of 89Zr-DFO-J591 could be visualized by both immuno-PET and CLI. Optical and immuno-PET signal intensities were found to increase over time from 24 to 96 h, and biodistribution studies were found to correlate well with both imaging modalities. Conclusion These studies represent the first, to our knowledge, quantitative assessment of CLI for measuring radiotracer uptake in vivo. Many radionuclides common to both nuclear

  12. Ion microscopic imaging of calcium transport in the intestinal tissue of vitamin D-deficient and vitamin D-replete chickens: A sup 44 Ca stable isotope study

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Fullmer, C.S.; Smith, C.A.; Wasserman, R.H.; Morrison, G.H. )

    1990-08-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium includes at least three definable steps; transfer across the microvillar membrane, movement through the cytosolic compartment, and energy-dependent extrusion into the lamina propria, Tracing the movement of calcium through the epithelium has been hampered by lack of suitable techniques and, in this study, advantage was taken of ion microscopy in conjunction with cryosectioning and use of the stable isotope 44Ca to visualize calcium in transit during the absorptive process. The effect of vitamin D, required for optimal calcium absorption, was investigated. Twenty millimolar 44Ca was injected into the duodenal lumen in situ of vitamin D-deficient and vitamin D-replete chickens. At 2.5, 5.0, and 20.0 min after injection, duodenal tissue was obtained and processed for ion microscopic imaging. At 2.5 min. 44Ca was seen to be concentrated in the region subjacent to the microvillar membrane in tissue from both groups. At 5.0 and 20.0 min, a similar pattern of localization was evident in D-deficient tissues. In D-replete tissues, the distribution of 44Ca became more homogenous, indicating that vitamin D increased the rate of transfer of Ca2+ from the apical to the basolateral membrane, a function previously ascribed to the vitamin D-induced calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D). Quantitative aspects of the calcium absorptive process were determined in parallel experiments with the radionuclide 47Ca. Complementary information on the localization of the naturally occurring isotopes of calcium (40Ca) and potassium (39K) is also described.

  13. Neutron capture radiography: a technique for isotopic labelling and analytical imaging with a few stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Thellier, Michel; Ripoll, Camille

    2006-06-19

    NCR (neutron capture radiography) may be used successfully for the imaging of one of the stable isotopes of a few chemical elements (especially 6Li and 10B, possibly also 14N, 17O, and others) and for labelling experiments using these stable isotopes. Other physical techniques compete with NCR. However, NCR can remain extremely useful in a certain number of cases, because it is usually more easily done and is less expensive than the other techniques.

  14. Production and in vivo imaging of (203)Pb as a surrogate isotope for in vivo (212)Pb internal absorbed dose studies.

    PubMed

    Máthé, Domokos; Szigeti, Krisztián; Hegedűs, Nikolett; Horváth, Ildikó; Veres, Dániel S; Kovács, Béla; Szűcs, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    (212)Pb is a clinically relevant therapeutic alpha emitter isotope. A surrogate, (203)Pb, if prepared with sufficiently high specific activity could be used to estimate (212)Pb in vivo absorbed doses. An improved production procedure of (203)Pb with a simple, new separation method and high specific radioactivity for imaging is reported. We determined the in-vivo biodistribution of (203)Pb in mice by SPECT/CT. This highlights application possibilities of (203)Pb for further in vivo and clinical uses (radiolabeled (212)Pb-peptide co-injection, dosimetry calculation).

  15. Regularized image reconstruction algorithms for dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging using a cross-tracer prior.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Cheng, Lishui; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Frey, Eric C

    2011-06-01

    In simultaneous dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging, data are simultaneously acquired to determine the distributions of two radioactive isotopes. The goal of this work was to develop penalized maximum likelihood (PML) algorithms for a novel cross-tracer prior that exploits the fact that the two images reconstructed from simultaneous dual-isotope MPS projection data are perfectly registered in space. We first formulated the simultaneous dual-isotope MPS reconstruction problem as a joint estimation problem. A cross-tracer prior that couples voxel values on both images was then proposed. We developed an iterative algorithm to reconstruct the MPS images that converges to the maximum a posteriori solution for this prior based on separable surrogate functions. To accelerate the convergence, we developed a fast algorithm for the cross-tracer prior based on the complete data OS-EM (COSEM) framework. The proposed algorithm was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to a single-tracer version of the prior that did not include the cross-tracer term. Quantitative evaluations included comparisons of mean and standard deviation images as well as assessment of image fidelity using the mean square error. We also evaluated the cross tracer prior using a three-class observer study with respect to the three-class MPS diagnostic task, i.e., classifying patients as having either no defect, reversible defect, or fixed defects. For this study, a comparison with conventional ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction with postfiltering was performed. The comparisons to the single-tracer prior demonstrated similar resolution for areas of the image with large intensity changes and reduced noise in uniform regions. The cross-tracer prior was also superior to the single-tracer version in terms of restoring image fidelity. Results of the three-class observer study showed that the proposed cross-tracer prior and the convergent algorithms improved the

  16. Isotopic studies in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, E. C., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of lunar soil samples returned by Apollo 11 and 12 flights are discussed. Isotopic studies of the rare gases from Apollo 11 flight lunar samples are presented. The lunar soil analyses indicated the following: (1) high concentrations of solar wind rare gases, (2) isotopic match between solar wind gases and gas components in gas-rich meteorites, and (3) rare gases attributable to spallation reactions induced in heavier nuclides by cosmic ray particles.

  17. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C.; Reader, Andrew J.; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution

  18. High-resolution quantitative imaging of mammalian and bacterial cells using stable isotope mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lechene, Claude; Hillion, Francois; McMahon, Greg; Benson, Douglas; Kleinfeld, Alan M; Kampf, J Patrick; Distel, Daniel; Luyten, Yvette; Bonventre, Joseph; Hentschel, Dirk; Park, Kwon Moo; Ito, Susumu; Schwartz, Martin; Benichou, Gilles; Slodzian, Georges

    2006-01-01

    Background Secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an important tool for investigating isotopic composition in the chemical and materials sciences, but its use in biology has been limited by technical considerations. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS), which combines a new generation of SIMS instrument with sophisticated ion optics, labeling with stable isotopes, and quantitative image-analysis software, was developed to study biological materials. Results The new instrument allows the production of mass images of high lateral resolution (down to 33 nm), as well as the counting or imaging of several isotopes simultaneously. As MIMS can distinguish between ions of very similar mass, such as 12C15N- and 13C14N-, it enables the precise and reproducible measurement of isotope ratios, and thus of the levels of enrichment in specific isotopic labels, within volumes of less than a cubic micrometer. The sensitivity of MIMS is at least 1,000 times that of 14C autoradiography. The depth resolution can be smaller than 1 nm because only a few atomic layers are needed to create an atomic mass image. We illustrate the use of MIMS to image unlabeled mammalian cultured cells and tissue sections; to analyze fatty-acid transport in adipocyte lipid droplets using 13C-oleic acid; to examine nitrogen fixation in bacteria using 15N gaseous nitrogen; to measure levels of protein renewal in the cochlea and in post-ischemic kidney cells using 15N-leucine; to study DNA and RNA co-distribution and uridine incorporation in the nucleolus using 15N-uridine and 81Br of bromodeoxyuridine or 14C-thymidine; to reveal domains in cultured endothelial cells using the native isotopes 12C, 16O, 14N and 31P; and to track a few 15N-labeled donor spleen cells in the lymph nodes of the host mouse. Conclusion MIMS makes it possible for the first time to both image and quantify molecules labeled with stable or radioactive isotopes within subcellular compartments. PMID:17010211

  19. Advanced diffusion studies with isotopically controlled materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, Hartmut A.; Silvestri, Hughes H.; Haller, Eugene E.

    2004-11-14

    The use of enriched stable isotopes combined with modern epitaxial deposition and depth profiling techniques enables the preparation of material heterostructures, highly appropriate for self- and foreign-atom diffusion experiments. Over the past decade we have performed diffusion studies with isotopically enriched elemental and compound semiconductors. In the present paper we highlight our recent results and demonstrate that the use of isotopically enriched materials ushered in a new era in the study of diffusion in solids which yields greater insight into the properties of native defects and their roles in diffusion. Our approach of studying atomic diffusion is not limited to semiconductors and can be applied also to other material systems. Current areas of our research concern the diffusion in the silicon-germanium alloys and glassy materials such as silicon dioxide and ion conducting silicate glasses.

  20. Tools and procedures for quantitative microbeam isotope ratio imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gillen, Greg; Bright, David

    2003-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate the use of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) combined with the Lispix image processing program (Bright 1995) to generate quantitative isotope ratio images from a test sample of a calcium-aluminum rich inclusion from the Allende meteorite that is known to contain discrete mineral grains with perturbed Mg isotopic ratios. Using 19.5 keV impact O- primary ion bombardment and detection of positive secondary ions, microbeam imaging SIMS has allowed us to identify, from the isotope ratio images, enrichments in the 26Mg/24Mg isotope ratio of approximately 5-15% in selected mineral grains. Using custom image processing software, each isotopic ratio image is corrected on an individual pixel basis for a number of factors including detector dead-time, mass bias effects, and isobaric interferences. We have developed procedures for correlating the isotopic images with polarized optical microscopy so that targeted mineral grains could be identified for further SIMS analysis. Finally, additional image processing tools have been developed to allow for pixel-by-pixel evaluation of the influence of detector dead-time and count rate errors on the isotopic ratio images and for correlation of the isotopic images with elemental distribution maps.

  1. Stable isotope imaging of biological samples with high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry and complementary techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, H.; Favaro, E.; Goulbourne, C. N.; Rakowska, P. D.; Hughes, G. M.; Ryadnov, M. G.; Fong, L.G.; Young, S. G.; Ferguson, D. J. P.; Harris, A. L.; Grovenor, C. R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotopes are ideal labels for studying biological processes because they have little or no effect on the biochemical properties of target molecules. The NanoSIMS is a tool that can image the distribution of stable isotope labels with up to 50 nm spatial resolution and with good quantitation. This combination of features has enabled several groups to undertake significant experiments on biological problems in the last decade. Combining the NanoSIMS with other imaging techniques also enables us to obtain not only chemical information but also the structural information needed to understand biological processes. This article describes the methodologies that we have developed to correlate atomic force microscopy and backscattered electron imaging with NanoSIMS experiments to illustrate the imaging of stable isotopes at molecular, cellular, and tissue scales. Our studies make it possible to address 3 biological problems: (1) the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with membranes; (2) glutamine metabolism in cancer cells; and (3) lipoprotein interactions in different tissues. PMID:24556558

  2. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include food sources for animals, water sources for plants, pollution sources...

  3. Study report on a double isotope method of calcium absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Some of the pros and cons of three methods to study gastrointestinal calcium absorption are briefly discussed. The methods are: (1) a balance study; (2) a single isotope method; and (3) a double isotope method. A procedure for the double isotope method is also included.

  4. Microturbulence study of the isotope effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bustos, A.; Bañón Navarro, A.; Görler, T.; Jenko, F.

    2015-01-15

    The influence of the ion mass on the dynamics of magnetized plasmas is an important challenge in fusion research. The discrepancies between the improvement of the magnetic confinement with the ion mass in tokamak experiments and diffusive turbulent transport predictions have remained unexplained for several decades. We refer to this phenomenon as the isotope effect. In this paper, we study this effect with gyrokinetic theory using the GENE code. We find several sets of plasma parameters that correspond to low wavenumber turbulence for which the isotope effect is present, although the intensity is smaller than the experimental observations. We also relate these results to the zonal flow intensity of the system, which is characterized by the average shear flow rate.

  5. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer

  6. Chemical imaging of biological materials by NanoSIMS using isotopic and elemental labels

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P K; Fallon, S J; Pett-Ridge, J; Ghosal, S; Hutcheon, I D

    2006-04-10

    The NanoSIMS 50 combines unprecedented spatial resolution (as good as 50 nm) with ultra-high sensitivity (minimum detection limit of {approx}200 atoms). The NanoSIMS 50 incorporates an array of detectors, enabling simultaneous collection of 5 species originating from the same sputtered volume of a sample. The primary ion beam (Cs{sup +} or O{sup -}) can be scanned across the sample to produce quantitative secondary ion images. This capability for multiple isotope imaging with high spatial resolution provides a novel new approach to the study of biological materials. Studies can be made of sub-regions of tissues, mammalian cells, and bacteria. Major, minor and trace element distributions can be mapped on a submicron scale, growth and metabolism can be tracked using stable isotope labels, and biogenic origin can be determined based on composition. We have applied this technique extensively to mammalian and prokaryotic cells and bacterial spores. The NanoSIMS technology enables the researcher to interrogate the fate of molecules of interest within cells and organs through elemental and isotopic labeling. Biological applications at LLNL will be discussed.

  7. Chemical Imaging and Stable Isotope Analysis of Atmospheric Particles by NanoSIMS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, B.; Harris, E. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Wiedemann, K. T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Tilgner, A.; Fomba, K. W.; Schneider, J.; Roth, A.; Gnauk, T.; Fahlbusch, B.; Mertes, S.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Gunthe, S. S.; Smith, M.; Artaxo, P. P.; Gilles, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L.; Moffet, R.; Weigand, M.; Martin, S. T.; Poeschl, U.; Andreae, M. O.; Hoppe, P.; Herrmann, H.; Borrmann, S.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical imaging analysis of the internal distribution of chemical compounds by a combination of SEM-EDX, and NanoSIMS allows investigating the physico-chemical properties and isotopic composition of individual aerosol particles. Stable sulphur isotope analysis provides insight into the sources, sinks and oxidation pathways of SO2 in the environment. Oxidation by OH radicals, O3 and H2O2 enriches the heavier isotope in the product sulphate, whereas oxidation by transition metal ions (TMI), hypohalites and hypohalous acids depletes the heavier isotope in the product sulphate. The isotope fractionation during SO2 oxidation by stabilized Criegee Intermediate radicals is unknown. We studied the relationship between aerosol chemical composition and predominant sulphate formation pathways in continental clouds in Central Europe and during the wet season in the Amazon rain forest. Sulphate formation in continental clouds in Central Europe was studied during HCCT-2010, a lagrangian-type field experiment, during which an orographic cloud was used as a natural flow-through reactor to study in-cloud aerosol processing (Harris et al. 2013). Sulphur isotopic compositions in SO2 and H2SO4 gas and particulate sulphate were measured and changes in the sulphur isotope composition of SO2 between the upwind and downwind measurement sites were used to determine the dominant SO2 chemical removal process occurring in the cloud. Changes in the isotopic composition of particulate sulphate revealed that transition metal catalysis pathway was the dominant SO2 oxidation pathway. This reaction occurred primarily on coarse mineral dust particles. Thus, sulphate produced due to in-cloud SO2 oxidation is removed relatively quickly from the atmosphere and has a minor climatic effect. The aerosol samples from the Amazonian rainforest, a pristine tropical environment, were collected during the rainy season. The samples were found to be dominated by SOA particles in the fine mode and primary

  8. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  9. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes 13C and 15N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK 1 kidney cells at mass 28 ( 13C15N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of 39K, 23Na and 40Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors.

  10. Dynamic dual-isotope molecular imaging elucidates principles for optimizing intrathecal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel A.; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Orcutt, Kelly D.; Silva, Matthew D.; Lobo, Merryl; Wellman, Tyler; Hoppin, Jack

    2016-01-01

    The intrathecal (IT) dosing route offers a seemingly obvious solution for delivering drugs directly to the central nervous system. However, gaps in understanding drug molecule behavior within the anatomically and kinetically unique environment of the mammalian IT space have impeded the establishment of pharmacokinetic principles for optimizing regional drug exposure along the neuraxis. Here, we have utilized high-resolution single-photon emission tomography with X-ray computed tomography to study the behavior of multiple molecular imaging tracers following an IT bolus injection, with supporting histology, autoradiography, block-face tomography, and MRI. Using simultaneous dual-isotope imaging, we demonstrate that the regional CNS tissue exposure of molecules with varying chemical properties is affected by IT space anatomy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, CSF clearance routes, and the location and volume of the injected bolus. These imaging approaches can be used across species to optimize the safety and efficacy of IT drug therapy for neurological disorders. PMID:27699254

  11. Dynamic dual-isotope molecular imaging elucidates principles for optimizing intrathecal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel A.; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Orcutt, Kelly D.; Silva, Matthew D.; Lobo, Merryl; Wellman, Tyler; Hoppin, Jack

    2016-01-01

    The intrathecal (IT) dosing route offers a seemingly obvious solution for delivering drugs directly to the central nervous system. However, gaps in understanding drug molecule behavior within the anatomically and kinetically unique environment of the mammalian IT space have impeded the establishment of pharmacokinetic principles for optimizing regional drug exposure along the neuraxis. Here, we have utilized high-resolution single-photon emission tomography with X-ray computed tomography to study the behavior of multiple molecular imaging tracers following an IT bolus injection, with supporting histology, autoradiography, block-face tomography, and MRI. Using simultaneous dual-isotope imaging, we demonstrate that the regional CNS tissue exposure of molecules with varying chemical properties is affected by IT space anatomy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, CSF clearance routes, and the location and volume of the injected bolus. These imaging approaches can be used across species to optimize the safety and efficacy of IT drug therapy for neurological disorders.

  12. Dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2013-02-05

    A dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources includes a detector arrangement consists of three detectors downstream from the object under observation. The latter detector, which operates as a beam monitor, is an integrating detector that monitors the total beam power arriving at its surface. The first detector and the middle detector each include an integrating detector surrounding a foil. The foils of these two detectors are made of the same atomic material, but each foil is a different isotope, e.g., the first foil may comprise U235 and second foil may comprise U238. The integrating detectors surrounding these pieces of foil measure the total power scattered from the foil and can be similar in composition to the final beam monitor. Non-resonant photons will, after calibration, scatter equally from both foils.

  13. Organic Analysis in the Miller Range 090657 CR2 Chondrite: Part 3 C and N Isotopic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Elsila, J. E.; Berger, E. L.; Burton, A. S.; Clemett, S. J.; Cao, T.

    2016-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of organic material, ranging from soluble discrete molecules to insoluble nanoglobules of macro-molecular carbon. The relationship between the soluble organic molecules, macromolecular organic material, and host minerals are poorly understood. Large H, C and N isotopic anomalies suggest some organic components formed in low-T interstellar or outer Solar System environments. The highest isotope anomalies occur in m-scale inclusions in the most primitive materials, such as cometary dust and the least altered carbonaceous chondrites. Often, the hosts of these isotopically anomalous 'hotspots' are discrete organic nanoglobules that probably formed in the outermost reaches of the protosolar disk or cold molecular cloud. Molecular and isotopic studies of meteoritic organic matter are aimed at identifying the chemical properties and formation processes of interstellar organic materials and the subsequent chemical evolutionary pathways in various Solar System environments. The combination of soluble and insoluble analyses with in situ and bulk studies provides powerful constraints on the origin and evolution of organic matter in the Solar System. Using macroscale extraction and analysis techniques as well as microscale in situ observations we have been studying both insoluble and soluble organic material in primitive astromaterial samples. Here, we present results of bulk C and N isotopic measurements and coordinated in situ C and N isotopic imaging and mineralogical and textural studies of carbonaceous materials in a Cr2 carbonaceous chondrite. In accompanying abstracts we discuss the morphology and distribution of carbonaceous components and soluble organic species of this meteorite.

  14. High-precision γ -ray spectroscopy of the cardiac PET imaging isotope 82Rb and its impact on dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, M. N.; McCutchan, E. A.; Smith, S. V.; Lister, C. J.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Muench, L.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Zhu, S.

    2016-02-01

    82Rb is a positron-emitting isotope used in cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) imaging which has been reported to deliver a significantly lower effective radiation dose than analogous imaging isotopes like 201Tl and 99 mTc sestamibi. High-quality β -decay data are essential to accurately appraise the total dose received by the patients. A source of 82Sr was produced at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), transported to Argonne National Laboratory, and studied with the Gammasphere facility. Significant revisions have been made to the level scheme of 82Kr including 12 new levels, 50 new γ -ray transitions, and the determination of many new spin assignments through angular correlations. These new high-quality data allow a precise reappraisal of the β -decay strength function and thus the consequent dose received by patients.

  15. Lead isotope studies of mare basalt 70017

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattinson, J. M.; Tilton, G. R.; Todt, W.; Chen, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium, thorium, and isotopic lead data for components of basalt 70017 are reported, and it is found that the whole rock, pyroxene, and ilmenite points in a concordia diagram plot along a chord intersecting the curve at 3.7 and 4.33 eons. The plagioclase data do not seem to lie on this line. The data for 70017 appear to plot along a distinctly different chord in a concordia diagram than do the data for 75055 and 75035, two other Apollo 17 mare basalts. The lead data are in accord with Sm-Nd results. A 3.7 eon crystallization age for 70017 would be consistent with the same kind of parentless lead that is indicated by previous studies of soils and soil breccias from stations at Taurus-Littrow. The Th/U ratio in ilmenite is 2.2, and the concentrations of these two elements are approximately twice those in pyroxene.

  16. Stable Chlorine Isotope Study: Application to Early Solar System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mala,ira. M/; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2010-01-01

    A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each other [4], some authors have claimed that the Cl-37/Cl-35 ratio of geological samples obtained by TIMS technique are, in general, misleadingly too high and variable compared to those of IRMS [3]. For example, almost no differences of Cl isotope composition were observed among mantle materials and carbonaceous meteorites by [3]. On the other hand, according to more recent IRMS work [2], significant Cl isotope variations are confirmed for mantle materials. Therefore, additional careful investigation of Cl isotope analyses are now required to confirm real chlorine isotope variations for planetary materials including carbonaceous chondrites [5]. A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each

  17. PET quantitation and imaging of the non-pure positron-emitting iodine isotope 124I.

    PubMed

    Herzog, H; Tellman, L; Qaim, S M; Spellerberg, S; Schmid, A; Coenen, H H

    2002-05-01

    A series of PET studies using phantoms is presented to characterize the imaging and quantitative performance of the positron-emitting iodine isotope 124I. Measurements were performed on the 2D-PET scanner GE 4096+ as well as on the Siemens PET scanner HRR+ operated in both 2D and 3D modes. No specific correction was applied for the gamma-rays emitted together with the positrons. As compared to 18F, in studies with 124I there is a small loss of image resolution and contrast, and an increase in background. The quantitative results varied between different scanners and various acquisition as well as reconstruction modes, with an average relative difference of -6 +/- 13% (mean+/-SD) in respect of the phantom radioactivity as measured with gamma-ray spectroscopy. We conclude that quantitation of a radiopharmaceutical labelled with 124I is feasible and may be improved by the development of specific corrections.

  18. Li Isotope Studies of Olivine in Mantle Xenoliths by SIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, D. R.; Hervig, R. L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    Variations in the ratio of the stable isotopes of Li are a potentially powerful tracer of processes in planetary and nebular environments [1]. Large differences in the 7Li/6Li ratio between the terrestrial upper mantle and various crustal materials make Li isotope composition a potentially powerful tracer of crustal recycling processes on Earth [2]. Recent SIMS studies of terrestrial mantle and Martian meteorite samples report intra-mineral Li isotope zoning [3-5]. Substantial Li isotope heterogeneity also exists within and between the components of chondritic meteorites [6,7]. Experimental studies of Li diffusion suggest the potential for rapid isotope exchange at elevated temperatures [8]. Large variations in 7Li, exceeding the range of unaltered basalts, occur in terrestrial mantle-derived xenoliths from individual localities [9]. The origins of these variations are not fully understood.

  19. Isotopic Forced-Diffusion Technique for Soil Respiration Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, G.; Nickerson, N. R.; Egan, J.; Risk, D. A.; Jacobson, G. A.; Cunningham, K. L.; Saad, N.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic ratio measurements of soil-respired CO2 can provide a wealth of insight into soil-level carbon-cycle processes that is not available using bulk CO2 emission measurements alone. Soil contains substantial amounts of carbon, and can contribute CO2 to the atmosphere through various respiration pathways. Isotopic analysis can distinguish autotrophic root and rhizosphere respiration from heterotrophic respiration due to the catabolism of soil organic matter (SOM). Because of this, researchers have shifted their efforts toward the use of natural abundance and tracer isotopic techniques in ecosystem respiration studies. However, recent experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that these traditional techniques yield biased estimates of the soil isotopic flux, largely owing to disturbances to the soil's natural diffusive regime. To help eliminate these biases, we have developed a new technique called Isotopic Forced-Diffusion (IsoFD). The Isotopic Forced-Diffusion technique integrates a Forced Diffusion dynamic chamber with a cavity ringdown spectrometer measuring d13C-CO2, which are operated together as an integrated system. The system produces real-time, high temporal resolution isotopic soil efflux data. Here, we will present the theory behind this technique, present laboratory data demonstrating the accuracy and precision of the technique in controlled environments and finally field data from two campaigns, showing the ability of the Iso-FD chamber to detect natural diurnal changes in isotopic signature as well as differentiate sources in C3-C4 transitional systems.

  20. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Isotopic Yttrium-90-Labeled Rare Earth Fluoride Nanocrystals for Multimodal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Paik, Taejong; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Mikitsh, John L; Friedberg, Joseph S; Pryma, Daniel A; Murray, Christopher B

    2015-09-22

    Isotopically labeled nanomaterials have recently attracted much attention in biomedical research, environmental health studies, and clinical medicine because radioactive probes allow the elucidation of in vitro and in vivo cellular transport mechanisms, as well as the unambiguous distribution and localization of nanomaterials in vivo. In addition, nanocrystal-based inorganic materials have a unique capability of customizing size, shape, and composition; with the potential to be designed as multimodal imaging probes. Size and shape of nanocrystals can directly influence interactions with biological systems, hence it is important to develop synthetic methods to design radiolabeled nanocrystals with precise control of size and shape. Here, we report size- and shape-controlled synthesis of rare earth fluoride nanocrystals doped with the β-emitting radioisotope yttrium-90 ((90)Y). Size and shape of nanocrystals are tailored via tight control of reaction parameters and the type of rare earth hosts (e.g., Gd or Y) employed. Radiolabeled nanocrystals are synthesized in high radiochemical yield and purity as well as excellent radiolabel stability in the face of surface modification with different polymeric ligands. We demonstrate the Cerenkov radioluminescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging capabilities of (90)Y-doped GdF3 nanoplates, which offer unique opportunities as a promising platform for multimodal imaging and targeted therapy.

  1. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Embryotoxicity of stable isotopes and use of stable isotopes in studies of teratogenetic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Spielmann, H.; Nau, H.

    1986-07-01

    Experiments on teratogenic effects of stable isotopes from our own and other laboratories are evaluated. In the first series of investigations, the enrichment of the stable isotope /sup 13/C derived from U-/sup 13/C-glucose was studied in mouse embryos at various stages of development, including limb buds in organ culture. Preimplantation mouse embryos incubated in vitro in /sup 13/C-enriched medium for 48 hours showed normal development during subsequent differentiation in vitro and also in vivo after embryo transfer to faster mothers. These embryos were 15% to 20% enriched in /sup 13/C. Administration of U-13-C-glucose to pregnant mice during organogenesis led to an increase of the absolute /sup 13/C content of the embryo for several days after the end of isotope administration, whereas the enrichment in maternal tissue decreased. No alterations of embryonic development were detected due to stable isotope enrichment. Development of cultured mouse limb buds was unaffected by incubation with 82 mol% U-/sup 13/C-glucose as judged from morphologic and biochemical criteria. The second part of the article describes the value of deuterium-labeled drugs as probes into the mechanism of activation of teratogenic metabolites. A comparison of the pharmacokinetics as well as the teratogenicity between cyclophosphamide and some specific deuterium-labeled analogues showed that the isotope effect observed can be related to a particular metabolic pathway crucial for teratogenic activation by this drug.

  3. 44Sc: An Attractive Isotope for Peptide-Based PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of integrin αvβ3 has been linked to tumor aggressiveness and metastasis in several cancer types. Because of its high affinity, peptides containing the arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) motif have been proven valuable vectors for noninvasive imaging of integrin αvβ3 expression and for targeted radionuclide therapy. In this study, we aim to develop a 44Sc-labeled RGD-based peptide for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of integrin αvβ3 expression in a preclinical cancer model. High quality 44Sc (t1/2, 3.97 h; β+ branching ratio, 94.3%) was produced inexpensively in a cyclotron, via proton irradiation of natural Ca metal targets, and separated by extraction chromatography. A dimeric cyclic-RGD peptide, (cRGD)2, was conjugated to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and radiolabeled with 44Sc in high yield (>90%) and specific activity (7.4 MBq/nmol). Serial PET imaging of mice bearing U87MG tumor xenografts showed elevated 44Sc-DOTA-(cRGD)2 uptake in the tumor tissue of 3.93 ± 1.19, 3.07 ± 1.17, and 3.00 ± 1.25 %ID/g at 0.5, 2, and 4 h postinjection, respectively (n = 3), which were validated by ex vivo biodistribution experiments. The integrin αvβ3 specificity of the tracer was corroborated, both in vitro and in vivo, by competitive cell binding and receptor blocking assays. These results parallel previously reported studies showing similar tumor targeting and pharmacokinetic profiles for dimeric cRGD peptides labeled with 64Cu or 68Ga. Our findings, together with the advantageous radionuclidic properties of 44Sc, capitalize on the relevance of this isotope as an attractive alternative isotope to more established radiometals for small molecule-based PET imaging, and as imaging surrogate of 47Sc in theranostic applications. PMID:25054618

  4. Preliminary study: isotopic safeguards techniques (IST) LMFBR fuel cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P. J.; Kroc, T. K.

    1980-06-01

    This memorandum presents the preliminary results of the effort to investigate the applicability of isotope correlation techniques (ICT), formulated for the LWR system, to the LMFBR fuel cycle. The detailed isotopic compositional changes with burnup developed for the CRBR was utilized as the reference case. This differs from the usual LMFBR design studies in that the core uranium is natural uranium rather than depleted. Nevertheless, the general isotopic behavior should not differ significantly and does allow an initial insight into the expected behavior of isotopic correlations for the LMFBR power systems such as: the U.K. PFR and reprocessing plant; the French Phenix and Superphenix; and the US reference conceptual design studies (CDS) of homogeneous and heterogeneous LMFBR systems as they are developed.

  5. Isotopic Studies of Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Dresel, P. Evan

    2007-11-01

    Processes of fluid flow and chemical transport through the vadose zone can be characterized through the isotopic systematics of natural soils, minerals, pore fluids and groundwater. In this contribution, we first review our research using measured isotopic variations, due both to natural and site related processes, of the elements H, O, N, Sr and U, to study the interconnection between vadose zone and groundwater contamination at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. We follow this brief review with a presentation of new data pertaining to vadose zone and groundwater contamination in the WMA T-TX-TY vicinity. Uranium (U) isotopic data for the C3832 core (WMA TX) indicates the involvement of processed natural U fuel, and links the observed U contamination to the nearby single shelled tank TX-104. The data also precludes contamination from an early 1970’s TX-107 leak. In the case of the C4104 core (WMA T), the U isotopic data indicates a mixture of processed natural and enriched U fuels consistent with the major leak from T-106 in 1973. Uranium and Strontium isotopic data for the cores also provides direct evidence for chemical interaction between high-pH waste fluid and sediment. Isotopic data for groundwater nitrate contamination in the vicinity of WMA-T strongly suggests high-level tank waste (most likely from T-106) as the source of very high 99Tc concentrations recently observed at the NE corner of WMAT.

  6. Imaging of Isotopically Enhanced Molecular Targeting Agents Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Quong, J N

    2004-02-19

    The goal of this project is to develop experimental and computational protocols to use SIMS to image the chemical composition of biological samples, focusing on optimizing sample preparation protocols and developing multivariate data analysis methods. Our results on sample preparation, molecular imaging, and multivariate analysis have been presented at several meeting abstracts (UCRL151797ABS, UCRL151797ABSREV1, UCRL151426ABS, UCRL201277, UCRL154757). A refereed paper describing our results for sample preparation and molecular imaging of various endogenous biomolecules as well as the mutagen PhIP has been accepted for publication (UCRL-JC-151797). We are also preparing two additional papers describing our multivariate analysis methods to analyze spectral data. As these papers have not been submitted, their content is included in this final report.

  7. Stable Isotope Applications in Hydrologic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, C.; Doctor, D. H.

    2003-12-01

    The topic of stream flow generation has received considerable attention over the last two decades, first in response to concern about "acid rain" and more recently in response to the increasingly serious contamination of surface and shallow groundwaters by anthropogenic contaminants. Many sensitive, low-alkalinity streams in North America and Europe are already acidified (see Chapter 9.10). Still more streams that are not yet chronically acidic may undergo acidic episodes in response to large rainstorms and/or spring snowmelt. These acidic events can seriously damage local ecosystems. Future climate changes may exacerbate the situation by affecting biogeochemical controls on the transport of water, nutrients, and other materials from land to freshwater ecosystems.New awareness of the potential danger to water supplies posed by the use of agricultural chemicals and urban industrial development has also focused attention on the nature of rainfall-runoff and recharge processes and the mobility of various solutes, especially nitrate and pesticides, in shallow systems. Dumping and spills of other potentially toxic materials are also of concern because these chemicals may eventually reach streams and other public water supplies. A better understanding of hydrologic flow paths and solute sources is required to determine the potential impact of contaminants on water supplies, develop management practices to preserve water quality, and devise remediation plans for sites that are already polluted.Isotope tracers have been extremely useful in providing new insights into hydrologic processes, because they integrate small-scale variability to give an effective indication of catchment-scale processes. The main purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of recent research into the use of naturally occurring stable isotopes to track the movement of water and solutes in hydrological systems where the waters are relatively fresh: soils, surface waters, and shallow

  8. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  9. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  10. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status. PMID:26747521

  11. Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Smith, R.L.; Miller, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) is a major constituent of many contaminated groundwaters, but its movement through aquifers is complex and poorly documented. In this study, processes affecting NH4+ movement in a treated wastewater plume were studied by a combination of techniques including large-scale monitoring of NH4+ distribution; isotopic analyses of coexisting aqueous NH4+, NO3-, N2, and sorbed NH 4+; and in situ natural gradient 15NH 4+ tracer tests with numerical simulations of 15NH4+, 15NO3-, and 15N2 breakthrough data. Combined results indicate that the main mass of NH4+ was moving downgradient at a rate about 0.25 times the groundwater velocity. Retardation factors and groundwater ages indicate that much of the NH4+ in the plume was recharged early in the history of the wastewater disposal. NO3- and excess N2 gas, which were related to each other by denitrification near the plume source, were moving downgradient more rapidly and were largely unrelated to coexisting NH 4+. The ??15N data indicate areas of the plume affected by nitrification (substantial isotope fractionation) and sorption (no isotope fractionation). There was no conclusive evidence for NH 4+-consuming reactions (nitrification or anammox) in the anoxic core of the plume. Nitrification occurred along the upper boundary of the plume but was limited by a low rate of transverse dispersive mixing of wastewater NH4+ and O2 from overlying uncontaminated groundwater. Without induced vertical mixing or displacement of plume water with oxic groundwater from upgradient sources, the main mass of NH4+ could reach a discharge area without substantial reaction long after the more mobile wastewater constituents are gone. Multiple approaches including in situ isotopic tracers and fractionation studies provided critical information about processes affecting NH4+ movement and N speciation.

  12. Study of neutron rich carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Electric quadrupole (E2) matrix elements are important quantities in nuclear structure. In particular they are sensitive to nuclear deformation, the decoupling of proton and neutron degrees of freedom, and are often affected by small components of the nuclear wave function. Neutron-rich carbon isotopes have attracted a great deal of attention recently, both experimentally and theoretically, with regards to the question of spatially extended (halo-like) and decoupled valence neutrons. For example, 19C and the drip-line nucleus 22C are proposed to have ground-state neutron halo structures. Electric quadrupole transition rates in 16C 18C and 20C are among the lowest found throughout the nuclear chart and this fact has been cited by some as evidence for a reduced coupling between the valence neutrons and the core nucleons. In this talk I will present the results from our experiments to measure the transition rates in 16,18,20C and discuss the evidence for a ``decoupling'' of valence neutrons from the core that goes beyond the usual shell model approach. Data will be compared to shell model and no-core (ab-initio) shell model calculations with NN and NN+NNN interactions.

  13. Study of the mechanism of diatom cell division by means of 29Si isotope tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audinot, J.-N.; Guignard, C.; Migeon, H.-N.; Hoffmann, L.

    2006-07-01

    Diatoms are delicate unicellular organisms enclosed in a silica frustule, that is made up of two valves. Multiplication of the diatoms occurs by ordinary mitotic cell division. During cell division each cell produces two daughter cells, each of them keeping one of the two valves of the mother cell and producing a new valve by absorbing the silicon present in the environment. The NanoSIMS 50 allows ion imaging to be performed on diatoms in order to determine the site of fixation of silicon. The aim of this study was to observe and compare the mechanism of the construction of the new valve after cell division. To this end, different types of diatoms have been transferred in a culture medium enriched with 29Si and after several days, the distribution of the different isotopes of silicon has been determined by NanoSIMS50 imaging. The construction of new valves has been observed and the isotopic ratio has been determined.

  14. Dynamical Studies of the Ozone Isotope Effect: a Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinke, R.; Grebenshchikov, S. Yu.; Ivanov, M. V.; Fleurat-Lessard, P.

    2006-05-01

    Dynamical studies of the recombination of O and O2 to form ozone are reviewed. The focus is the intriguing isotope dependence of the recombination rate coefficient as observed by Mauersberger and coworkers in the last decade. The key quantity for understanding of this dependence appears to be the difference of zero-point energies of the two fragmentation channels to which excited ozone can dissociate, i.e., X + YZ ← XYZ* → XY + Z, where X, Y, and Z stand for the three isotopes of oxygen. Besides the isotope dependence, the variation of the recombination rate coefficient with pressure and temperature is also addressed. Despite the numerous approaches of recent years, the recombination of ozone is far from being satisfactorily explained; there are still several essential questions to be solved by detailed theoretical analysis. We mainly discuss—and critically assess—the results of our own investigations of the ozone kinetics. The work of other research groups is also evaluated.

  15. Multicolor live-cell chemical imaging by isotopically edited alkyne vibrational palette.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhixing; Paley, Daniel W; Wei, Lu; Weisman, Andrew L; Friesner, Richard A; Nuckolls, Colin; Min, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Vibrational imaging such as Raman microscopy is a powerful technique for visualizing a variety of molecules in live cells and tissues with chemical contrast. Going beyond the conventional label-free modality, recent advance of coupling alkyne vibrational tags with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy paves the way for imaging a wide spectrum of alkyne-labeled small biomolecules with superb sensitivity, specificity, resolution, biocompatibility, and minimal perturbation. Unfortunately, the currently available alkyne tag only processes a single vibrational "color", which prohibits multiplex chemical imaging of small molecules in a way that is being routinely practiced in fluorescence microscopy. Herein we develop a three-color vibrational palette of alkyne tags using a (13)C-based isotopic editing strategy. We first synthesized (13)C isotopologues of EdU, a DNA metabolic reporter, by using the newly developed alkyne cross-metathesis reaction. Consistent with theoretical predictions, the mono-(13)C ((13)C≡(12)C) and bis-(13)C ((13)C≡(13)C) labeled alkyne isotopologues display Raman peaks that are red-shifted and spectrally resolved from the originally unlabeled ((12)C≡(12)C) alkynyl probe. We further demonstrated three-color chemical imaging of nascent DNA, RNA, and newly uptaken fatty-acid in live mammalian cells with a simultaneous treatment of three different isotopically edited alkynyl metabolic reporters. The alkyne vibrational palette presented here thus opens up multicolor imaging of small biomolecules, enlightening a new dimension of chemical imaging.

  16. The Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Paul J.; Trumbore, Susan; Swanston, Chris; Torn, Margaret; Jastrow, Julie; Parton, William A; Post, Wilfred M.; Froberg, Mats J; Hainsworth, Laura J; Kleber, Markus; Kramer, Christiane; Matamala-Paradeda, Roser; Garten, Jr, Charles T.

    2007-02-05

    A unique, large release of radiocarbon occurred near the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge, TN in July/August 1999. Measurements of 14C in tree ring cellulose throughout the ORR area demonstrate that the 1999 release was unprecedented in its uptake by vegetation. We are taking advantage of the whole-ecosystem isotopic label generated by this release to address five outstanding issues in the terrestrial carbon cycle: (1) partitioning of soil respiration between autotrophic and heterotrophic sources, and quantification of that partitioning seasonally and inter-annually, (2) partitioning of heterotrophic respiration sources between above-ground litter decomposition and below-ground root detritus decomposition, (3) identification of pathways leading from leaf and root detritus to long-term stabilization of soil organic matter, including the role of soil fauna, (4) the role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transport in distributing carbon within the soil profile, and, (5) the longevity and turnover time of fine roots. The first four issues are being addressed through a reciprocal litter transplant experiment set up at four sites on the ORR encompassing two soil types and two levels of 14C exposure in 1999. The fifth issue, longevity and turnover of fine roots, is being addressed by tracing the radiocarbon label through the fine root pool over time. With a combination of incubation, soil surface chamber and soil CO2 profiles, and continuous measurements of soil temperature and moisture controls, we are tracking changes in soil respiration partitioning over several years. The nature and source of organic matter pools that reside in soils for years to decades are being tracked with differently labeled root and surface litter, and experiments to exclude soil fauna have been initiated to elucidate their role in vertical transport. Periodic sampling of soils and soil solutions and the use of inert tracers, allow us to investigate the chemical nature and form of DOC and

  17. Very High Spatial Resolution Isotope and Elemental Imaging of Pre-Solar SiC Grains: Topographic and Imaging Artefacts that may lead to Apparent, but Spurious, Heterogeneity Within Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, I. C.; Clarke, A.; Henkel, T.; Moore, K. L.; McMahon, G.

    2016-08-01

    This study acquired high spatial resolution NanoSIMS elemental and isotopic imaging of pre-solar SiC grains, both of acid-residue grains and in situ in meteorite thin sections. Artefacts that can create spurious heterogeneity were studied.

  18. Hyperfine structure and isotope shift study in singly ionized lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wąsowicz, T. J.; Drozdowski, R.; Kwela, J.

    2005-12-01

    Hyperfine structure and isotope shifts in five optical transitions: 424.5 nm (6s^25f ^2textrm{F}_{7/2} 6s^26d^2 textrm{D}_{5/2}), 537.2 nm (6s^25f ^2textrm{F}_{7/2} 6s6p^2 ^4textrm{P}_{5/2}), 554.5 nm (6s^27d ^2textrm{D}_{5/2} 6s^27p ^2textrm{P}_{3/2}), 560.9 nm (6s^27p^2 textrm{P}_{3/2} 6s^27s ^2textrm{S}_{1/2}) and 666.0 nm (6s^27p ^2textrm{P}_{1/2} 6s^27s ^2textrm{S}_{1/2}) of Pb II have been measured. As a light source the discharge tube was used. The hyperfine structure measurements were performed using metallic isotope 207Pb. For isotope shifts measurements natural lead was used. The high resolution spectral apparatus consisted of a silver coated Fabry-Perot etalon and a grating spectrograph combined with a CCD camera used as a detector. In the analysis of the spectra a computer simulation technique was used. The hyperfine structure observations yielded the splitting constants A for seven levels of Pb II. The isotope shift studies enabled to separate the mass and the field shifts and to determine values of changes of the mean square nuclear charge radii.

  19. Thyroid imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, H.H.; LaFrance, N.D.; Chen, J.J.S.

    1987-06-01

    This is the second in a series of Continuing Education articles related to functional/quantitative imaging techniques. After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1) discuss the clinical applications of thyroid imaging; 2) understand the relationship of related thyroid tests; and 3) recognize the pitfalls and problems associated with this procedure.

  20. Venous obstruction in permanent pacemaker patients: an isotopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Pauletti, M.; Di Ricco, G.; Solfanelli, S.; Marini, C.; Contini, C.; Giuntini, C.

    1981-01-01

    Isotope venography was used to study the venous circulation proximal to the superior vena cava in two groups of pacemaker patients, one with a single endocavitary electrode and the other with multiple pacing catheters. A control group of patients without pacemakers was also studied. Numerous abnormalities were found, especially in the group with multiple electrodes. These findings suggest that venous obstruction is a common complication of endocardial pacing.

  1. Subcellular SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in human glioblastoma cells treated with a gadolinium containing MRI agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Duane R.; Lorey, Daniel R.; Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary radiotherapeutic modality for the treatment of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme. Recently, neutron capture therapy with gadolinium-157 has gained attention, and techniques for studying the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157 are needed. In this preliminary study, we have been able to image the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157, as well as the other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium, with SIMS ion microscopy. T98G human glioblastoma cells were treated for 24 h with 25 mg/ml of the metal ion complex diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid Gd(III) dihydrogen salt hydrate (Gd-DTPA). Gd-DTPA is a contrast enhancing agent used for MRI of brain tumors, blood-brain barrier impairment, diseases of the central nervous system, etc. A highly heterogeneous subcellular distribution was observed for gadolinium-157. The nuclei in each cell were distinctly lower in gadolinium-157 than in the cytoplasm. Even within the cytoplasm the gadolinium-157 was heterogeneously distributed. The other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium were imaged from the same cells and exhibited a subcellular distribution consistent with that observed for gadolinium-157. These observations indicate that SIMS ion microscopy may be a viable approach for subcellular studies of gadolinium containing neutron capture therapy drugs and may even play a major role in the development and validation of new gadolinium contrast enhancing agents for diagnostic MRI applications.

  2. Isotopically modified nanoparticles for enhanced detection in bioaccumulation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misra, S.K.; Dybowska, A.; Berhanu, D.; Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results on synthesis of isotopically enriched (99% 65Cu) copper oxide nanoparticles and its application in ecotoxicological studies. 65CuO nanoparticles were synthesized as spheres (7 nm) and rods (7 ?? 40 nm). Significant differences were observed between the reactivity and dissolution of spherical and rod shaped nanoparticles. The extreme sensitivity of the stable isotope tracing technique developed in this study allowed determining Cu uptake at exposure concentrations equivalent to background Cu concentrations in freshwater systems (0.2-30 ??g/L). Without a tracer, detection of newly accumulated Cu was impossible, even at exposure concentrations surpassing some of the most contaminated water systems (>1 mg/L). ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Probe studies of hydrogen isotopes in PLT, PDX, and TMX

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Recent studies of hydrogen isotopes incident on solid probes exposed to discharges in PLT, PDX and TMX are described. These experiments used nuclear reaction analysis to measure retained amounts of deuterium, SIMS depth profiling and a new technique based on the resistance change in carbon films caused by energetic particle bombardment. Methods are discussed whereby the energy and flux of the hydrogen incident on the samples can be determined.

  4. Applications of C and N stable isotopes to ecological and environmental studies in seagrass ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Lepoint, Gilles; Dauby, Patrick; Gobert, Sylvie

    2004-12-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen are increasingly used in marine ecosystems, for ecological and environmental studies. Here, we examine some applications of stable isotopes as ecological integrators or tracers in seagrass ecosystem studies. We focus on both the use of natural isotope abundance as food web integrators or environmental tracers and on the use of stable isotopes as experimental tools. As ecosystem integrators, stable isotopes have helped to elucidate the general structure of trophic webs in temperate, Mediterranean and tropical seagrass ecosystems. As environmental tracers, stable isotopes have proven their utility in sewage impact measuring and mapping. However, to make such environmental studies more comprehensible, future works on understanding of basic reasons for variations of N and C stable isotopes in seagrasses should be encouraged. At least, as experimental tracers, stable isotopes allow the study of many aspects of N and C cycles at the scale of a plant or at the scale of the seagrass ecosystem. PMID:15556172

  5. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS (URUGUAY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include pollution sources for air or water bodies, food sources for animals, ...

  6. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS (BRAZIL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include pollution sources for air or water bodies, food sources for animals, ...

  7. Mars Molecular and Isotopic Analysis Research Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Heidi L. K.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, the Martian atmosphere and surface constituents have become of great interest. The Viking in situ gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment contributed greatly to our knowledge of the composition of the Martian atmosphere. However, important questions remain such as the abundance of water on Mars. The Viking experiment employed solid reagents to enhance their carbon measurements. Techniques of chemical conversion using simple solid reagents have advanced considerably in the past 20 years. In this investigation we researched the advancements in techniques to reversibly adsorb and desorb water and focused on the techniques potentially useful for the temperatures and pressures on the Martian surface. During the granting period from June 15, 1998 to August 14, 1998, a literature study of the material appropriate for use in a chemical conversion device and the availability of these materials were undertaken. The focus of this investigation was searching for methods and materials potentially useful in enhancing the measurements of water. Three different methods were considered for the means to extract water from a given gas sample. These methods included adsorption in a desiccant, adsorption on a clean metal surface, and adsorption in a carbon molecular sieve or zeolite. Each method was evaluated with feasibility and reversibility in mind. By far the simplest and perhaps cheapest way to remove water from a gaseous sample is by means of a bulk desiccant. Desiccants are commercially available from many companies including those that supply chemicals. The main feature of a desiccant is its ability to rapidly bind or absorb water from the atmosphere. Calcium chloride, for example, is frequently incorporated into drying tubes by organic chemists when reactions require the absence of water. Other desiccants include sodium hydroxide, calcium hydride, and commercial products such as Drierite, available from Aldrich Chemical. The disadvantage to most desiccants is

  8. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  9. The hydrothermal stability of zircon: Preliminary experimental and isotopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.K.; Wayne, D.M.; Hewitt, D.A. )

    1992-09-01

    Experimental investigations of the stability of the U-Pb isotopic system in nonmetamict zircons show that appreciable losses of Pb and U can be induced at amphibolite-grade conditions (400 C to 600 C, 4 to 6 kb) in 2 M NaCl and 2% HNO[sub 3] solutions. The severity of U loss and, to a lesser extent Pb loss, varies with solution composition: in this case the 2 M NaCl solution induced more Pb and U loss than the 2% HNO[sub 3] solution at the same P-T conditions. Scanning electron microscopy of the run products also revealed a range of corrosion-related surface features, which suggests that some of the observed trends in Pb and U loss must be attributed to zircon dissolution. Backscattered electron (BSE) imaging of the run products further suggests that partial homogenization of chemical zoning patterns occurred during the experiments. Microprobe analyses of treated and untreated grain show that both populations have a similar range of Hf contents. Thus, the apparent loss of sharp, well-defined zoning features is most likely due to small-scale 'smearing out' of formerly sharp chemical gradients and is perhaps related to the annealing of lattice defects caused by alpha-recoil damage. Thus, experimentally induced U-Pb isotopic discordance in zircon is a complex function of zircon stability and annealing effects.

  10. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Sinem K.; Vogts, Angela; Kröhnert, Katharina; Hillion, François; Rizzoli, Silvio O; Wessels, Johannes T.

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic composition of different materials can be imaged by secondary ion mass spectrometry. In biology, this method is mainly used to study cellular metabolism and turnover, by pulsing the cells with marker molecules such as amino acids labelled with stable isotopes (15N, 13C). The incorporation of the markers is then imaged with a lateral resolution that can surpass 100 nm. However, secondary ion mass spectrometry cannot identify specific subcellular structures like organelles, and needs to be correlated with a second technique, such as fluorescence imaging. Here, we present a method based on stimulated emission depletion microscopy that provides correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy (COIN) images. We use this approach to study the protein turnover in different organelles from cultured hippocampal neurons. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy can be applied to a variety of biological samples, and should therefore enable the investigation of the isotopic composition of many organelles and subcellular structures. PMID:24718107

  11. Strontium isotope study, Pine Barrens, Long Island, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Geng; Hanson, G.N. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Twenty-four samples representing precipitation, through-fall, soil water, ground water, vegetation and soil were analyzed for strontium concentration and the [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratio. The Pine Barrens, which consists of forests and dense vegetation, covers approximately 300 square miles of the coastal plain of Long Island, New York. This study estimates the relative importance of atmospheric and weathering inputs of Sr to vegetation in this ecosystem. The values of the [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios and Sr concentration in the Pine Barrens are shown in the attached figure. Precipitation has Sr isotopic ratios that are close to that of sea water (0.7092). The Sr in through-fall is dominated by the Sr from the canopy foliage. The [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios of soil water and ground water increase with depth. The Sr isotopic ratio for a composite sample of pine (0.71181) is a mixture of atmosphere Sr and soil or ground waters. The Sr isotopic ratios and concentrations in pine suggest that plants are a major reservoir of Sr in the system.

  12. s-process studies - Xenon and krypton isotopic abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.; Ward, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    We propose an analysis of the s-process contributions to the isotopes of xenon and krypton. The object is to aid studies of the possibility that meteorites may contain gas that was carried in presolar grains that were grown in stellar ejecta and that were not degassed prior to incorporation into parent bodies. That model suggests routine interstellar fractionation of s-isotopes from r-isotopes owing to differential incorporation into dust. We show that a deficiency of s-process nuclei cannot yield details of Xe-X, but the gross similarities are strong enough to lead one to think that such a deficiency may play a role in a more complicated explanation. We predict the existence of an s-rich complement somewhere if fractional separation of this type has played a role in Xe-X. We show that the analogous decomposition of krypton is more uncertain, and we call for measurements of neutron-capture cross sections to alleviate these uncertainties.

  13. Digenean trematodes-marine mollusc relationships: a stable isotope study.

    PubMed

    Dubois, S Y; Savoye, N; Sauriau, P-G; Billy, I; Martinez, P; de Montaudouin, X

    2009-03-01

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of digenean trematode parasites and their marine mollusc hosts was investigated to describe the potential influence of parasites on their host and its different tissues, and to obtain further insight into their trophic relationships. Four parasite-host systems were studied: Labratrema minimus-Cerastoderma edule, Monorchis parvus-C. edule, Lepocreadiidae parasites-Nassarius reticulatus and Zoogonidae parasites-N. reticulatus. Among the 4 sampling occasions reported here and corresponding to the 4 parasite-host systems, isotopic shifts from pathologic (i.e. linked to disturbances in host metabolism) and mass-balance (i.e. linked to significant differences between host and parasite isotopic signatures) origins were observed only once. Both corresponded to delta 13C measurements of the L. minimus-C. edule system when the infestation load (percentage parasite dry weight compared to total flesh dry weight) was highest (9 to 25%, mean = 16%) over the sampling period. Overall, measurements indicate that digenean trematode parasitism induced low or no shifts in isotopic signatures of C. edule and N. reticulatus tissues. The 2 endoparasites L. minimus and M. parvus appeared to be slightly depleted in 13C compared to C. edule digestive gland and gonads, which were the most parasitized tissues. In contrast, no fractionation or low 15N trophic enrichments occurred in the parasites. These results highly contrast with the classical trophic enrichment reported in prey-predator systems but are in agreement with the scarce literature regarding other parasite-host systems. Our results indicate that (1) digenean trematodes mainly feed on digestive glands (the cockle tissue with which they are mainly associated) with a possible slight preference for lipids, and (2) fractionation due to parasite metabolism should be low due to abbreviated metabolic pathways and/or slight loss of materials through excretion, tegument diffusion and

  14. Isotopic Analysis of Fingernails as a USGS Open House Demonstration of the Use of Stable Isotopes in Foodweb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Choy, D.

    2011-12-01

    The USGS Isotope Tracers Project uses stable isotopes and tritium to add a unique dimension of chemical information to a wide range of environmental investigations. The use and application of isotopes is usually an unfamiliar and even esoteric topic to the general public. Therefore during three USGS open house events, as a public outreach effort, we demonstrated the use of stable isotopes by analyzing nitrogen and carbon isotopes from very small fragments of fingernail from willing participants. We titled the exhibit "You Are What You Eat". The results from all participants were plotted on a graph indicating the general influence of different food groups on the composition of body tissues as represented by fingernails. All participants were assigned a number and no personal-identification information was collected. A subset of participants provided us with an estimate of the number of days a week various foods were eaten and if they were vegetarians, vegans or non-vegetarians. Volunteers from our research group were on hand to explain and discuss fundamental concepts such as how foods attain their isotopic composition, the difference between C3 and C4 plants, the effects of assimilation, trophic enrichment, and the various uses of stable isotopes in environmental studies. The results of the fingernail analyses showed the variation of the range of isotopic compositions among about 400 people at each event, the distinct influence of C4 plants (mainly corn and cane sugar) on our carbon isotopic composition, and the isotopic differences between vegetarians and non vegetarians among other details (http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/projects/fingernails/). A poll of visitors attending the open house event in 2006 indicated that "You Are What You Eat" was among the most popular exhibits. Following the first two open house events we were contacted by a group of researchers from Brazil who had completed a very similar study. Our collaboration resulted in a publication in

  15. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2012-04-11

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  16. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    ScienceCinema

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  17. Elemental and isotopic imaging of biological samples using NanoSIMS.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Matt R; Clode, Peta L

    2014-01-01

    With its low detection limits and the ability to analyze most of the elements in the periodic table, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) represents one of the most versatile in situ analytical techniques available, and recent developments have resulted in significant advantages for the use of imaging mass spectrometry in biological and biomedical research. Increases in spatial resolution and sensitivity allow detailed interrogation of samples at relevant scales and chemical concentrations. Advances in dynamic SIMS, specifically with the advent of NanoSIMS, now allow the tracking of stable isotopes within biological systems at subcellular length scales, while static SIMS combines subcellular imaging with molecular identification. In this chapter, we present an introduction to the SIMS technique, with particular reference to NanoSIMS, and discuss its application in biological and biomedical research.

  18. Elemental and isotopic imaging of biological samples using NanoSIMS.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Matt R; Clode, Peta L

    2014-01-01

    With its low detection limits and the ability to analyze most of the elements in the periodic table, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) represents one of the most versatile in situ analytical techniques available, and recent developments have resulted in significant advantages for the use of imaging mass spectrometry in biological and biomedical research. Increases in spatial resolution and sensitivity allow detailed interrogation of samples at relevant scales and chemical concentrations. Advances in dynamic SIMS, specifically with the advent of NanoSIMS, now allow the tracking of stable isotopes within biological systems at subcellular length scales, while static SIMS combines subcellular imaging with molecular identification. In this chapter, we present an introduction to the SIMS technique, with particular reference to NanoSIMS, and discuss its application in biological and biomedical research. PMID:24357388

  19. Stable carbon isotopes and the study of prehistoric human diet.

    PubMed

    Boutton, T W; Lynott, M J; Bumsted, M P

    1991-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of the stable carbon isotope composition (13C/12C or delta 13C) of bone collagen from human remains recovered at archaeological sites provides a direct chemical method for investigating dietary patterns of prehistoric human populations. This methodology is based on the facts that (1) different food items within the human diet have distinct delta 13C values, and (2) the delta 13C value of human bone collagen is determined by the delta 13C value of the diet. Studies of the development of subsistence patterns based on corn agriculture, one of the most significant developments in North American prehistory, can benefit from the use of stable carbon isotope techniques because corn has a high delta 13C value relative to other components of the human diet. Measurements of delta 13C of bone collagen from prehistoric human skeletal remains from southeastern Missouri and northeastern Arkansas indicate that intensive corn agriculture began in this region around A.D. 1000, that the incorporation of corn into the human diet was a rapid phenomenon, and that 35 to 77% of the human diet from A.D. 1000 to A.D. 1600 consisted of corn. Results from an isochronous population in southeastern South Dakota (A.D. 1400) suggest that 78 to 90% of the diet of this group consisted of corn, with no difference between males and females. Coupled with more traditional archaeological methods, stable carbon isotope analysis of bone collagen can significantly enhance reconstruction of dietary patterns of prehistoric humans.

  20. Study of Urban environmental quality through Isotopes δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sosa, E.; Mastachi-Loza, C.; Becerril-Piña, R.; Ramos-Salinas, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    Usually, trees with similar pH values on their bark develop epiphytes of similar species, the acidity to be a factor for growth. The aim of the study was evaluate the air quality through isotope δ13C in order to define the levels of environmental quality in the city of Queretaro, Mexico. In this work were collected at least 4 epiphytes positioned in trees of the species Prosopis Laevigata at 25 sites of Queretaro City. The samples were analyzed for trace elements with an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The collecting took place during dry period, in May and early rain June 2011 period, and on four sectors to identify the spatial distribution of pollution, using isotopic analysis of concentration of δ 13C. According with the results there are significant differences among the species in each of the sampled areas. The 5 February Avenue presented greater diversity and richness of δ13C, followed by those who were surveyed in the proximity of the UAQ and finally in the middle-east area. An average value of δ13C-17.92%, followed by those surveyed in the vicinity of the UAQ that correspond to sector I and II with an concentration of δ13C-17.55% and δ13C-17.22%, and finally the samples collected in trees scattered in the East-Sector II and IV with a value of δ13C-17.02% and δ13C-15.62%, respectively. Also were observed differences between the dry and wet period. It is likely that these results of δ 13C in moist period reflect the drag of the isotopes due to rain events that could mark a trend in the dilution of this element, however there is a trend in terms of abundance and composition of finding more impact in those species sampled in dry period, in May and early June 2011.

  1. Neutron-rich B isotopes studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kanada-En`yo, Y.; Horiuchi, H.

    1995-08-01

    Structure of odd-even B isotopes up to the neutron dripline is studied systematically with the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). The AMD method has already proved to be a powerful theoretical approach for the systematic study of nuclear structure in extensive region including exotic neutron-rich nuclei as well as ordinary nuclei. It is owing to its flexible nature free from any model assumptions such as the existence of clusters. The energies and other observed data of B isotopes are reproduced well. Especially very good reproduction of electromagnetic properties is obtained. The systematic behavior of the electromagnetic properties is explained in relation to the drastic change between clustering structure and shell-model-like structure. This explanation gives us an important indication that clustering structure in neutron-rich B nuclei is strongly suggested by the experimental data. It is shown that the structure change with increase of the neutron number is largely governed by the shell effect of neutron orbits. Exotic structure with new type of clustering is suggested to evolve in neutron-rich nuclei near the dripline.

  2. Inelastic proton scattering of Sn isotopes studied with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The chain of semi-magic Sn nuclei, with many stable isotopes, has been a fertile ground for experimental and theoretical studies. Encompassing a major neutron shell from N = 50 to 82, the properties and structure of these nuclei provided important data for the development of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model. Recent experimental information on B(E2) for 106,108,110,112Sn came as a surprise as it indicated a larger collectivity than the predicted parabolic trend of quadrupole collectivity. These data, instead, show an unexpectedly flat trend even as the number of valence particles is reduced from 12 to 6. To fully understand how collectivity is evolving in these isotopes, 108,110,112Sn have been studied using thick-target, inelastic proton scattering with GRETINA tagging inelastic scattering events by detecting gamma-rays from the prompt decay of states excited in the reaction. We will present the trend of 2 + excitation cross-sections, the deduced quadrupole deformation parameters, and observations of other low-lying collective states. Comparison of these (p,p') quadrupole deformation parameters with B(E2) data will provide new insights into the relative importance of proton and neutron contributions to collectivity in these nuclei. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  3. SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in tissue from Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis patients: Release of free Gd from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jerrold L.; Chandra, Subhash; Thakral, Charu; Abraham, Joshua M.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (GBMCA) have been linked to a new disease, Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF), with skin and systemic toxicity and death in certain patients with renal failure. Due to widespread use of GBMCA in diagnostic MRI, it is essential to study their excretion, metabolism, and target sites in cells and tissues. A CAMECA IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used for imaging Gd isotopes in relation to calcium distributions in histologic sections of human tissues. SIMS imaging revealed two types of Gd localization in skin biopsies of patients who received GBMCA. The Gd was present in micrometer size deposits in association with calcium, and in detectable amounts in a more diffuse cellular distribution. Only the Gd-containing deposits associated with Ca and P were detectable using SEM/EDS. As only insoluble deposits remain in the biopsy tissues after aqueous and organic solvent processing of the tissue, our observations support release of free Gd from the GBMCA and selective localization of insoluble Gd in the target tissue from patients with NSF. This study opens new novel applications of SIMS for characterization of the safety of GBMCA.

  4. Imaging study on acupuncture points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Liu, C. L.; Dang, R. S.; Ando, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Chen, H. S.; Ding, G. H.

    2009-09-01

    The topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using the synchrotron radiation based Dark Field Image (DFI) method. Four following acupuncture points were studied: Sanyinjiao, Neiguan, Zusanli and Tianshu. We have found that at acupuncture point regions there exists the accumulation of micro-vessels. The images taken in the surrounding tissue out of the acupuncture points do not show such kind of structure. It is the first time to reveal directly the specific structure of acupuncture points by X-ray imaging.

  5. Concrete under sulphate attack: an isotope study on sulphur sources.

    PubMed

    Mittermayr, Florian; Bauer, Christoph; Klammer, Dietmar; Böttcher, Michael E; Leis, Albrecht; Escher, Peter; Dietzel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The formation of secondary sulphate minerals such as thaumasite, ettringite and gypsum is a process causing severe damage to concrete constructions. A major key to understand the complex reactions, involving concrete deterioration is to decipher the cause of its appearance, including the sources of the involved elements. In the present study, sulphate attack on the concrete of two Austrian tunnels is investigated. The distribution of stable sulphur isotopes is successfully applied to decipher the source(s) of sulphur in the deteriorating sulphate-bearing minerals. Interestingly, δ(34)S values of sulphate in local groundwater and in the deteriorating minerals are mostly in the range from+14 to+27 ‰. These δ(34)S values match the isotope patterns of regional Permian and Triassic marine evaporites. Soot relicts from steam- and diesel-driven trains found in one of the tunnels show δ(34)S values from-3 to+5 ‰, and are therefore assumed to be of minor importance for sulphate attack on the concretes. In areas of pyrite-containing sedimentary rocks, the δ(34)S values of sulphate from damaged concrete range between-1 and+11 ‰. The latter range reflects the impact of sulphide oxidation on local groundwater sulphate.

  6. Concrete under sulphate attack: an isotope study on sulphur sources.

    PubMed

    Mittermayr, Florian; Bauer, Christoph; Klammer, Dietmar; Böttcher, Michael E; Leis, Albrecht; Escher, Peter; Dietzel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The formation of secondary sulphate minerals such as thaumasite, ettringite and gypsum is a process causing severe damage to concrete constructions. A major key to understand the complex reactions, involving concrete deterioration is to decipher the cause of its appearance, including the sources of the involved elements. In the present study, sulphate attack on the concrete of two Austrian tunnels is investigated. The distribution of stable sulphur isotopes is successfully applied to decipher the source(s) of sulphur in the deteriorating sulphate-bearing minerals. Interestingly, δ(34)S values of sulphate in local groundwater and in the deteriorating minerals are mostly in the range from+14 to+27 ‰. These δ(34)S values match the isotope patterns of regional Permian and Triassic marine evaporites. Soot relicts from steam- and diesel-driven trains found in one of the tunnels show δ(34)S values from-3 to+5 ‰, and are therefore assumed to be of minor importance for sulphate attack on the concretes. In areas of pyrite-containing sedimentary rocks, the δ(34)S values of sulphate from damaged concrete range between-1 and+11 ‰. The latter range reflects the impact of sulphide oxidation on local groundwater sulphate. PMID:22321257

  7. Isotopic reconstruction of ancient human migrations: A comprehensive Sr isotope reference database for France and the first case study at Tumulus de Sables, south-western France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, M.; Boel, C.; Grün, R.; Armstrong, R.; Chancerel, A.; Maureille, B.; Courtaud, P.

    2012-04-01

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) can be used for the reconstruction of human and animal migrations across geologically different terrains. Sr isotope ratios in rocks are a product of age and composition and thus vary between geologic units. From the eroding environment Sr is transported into the soils, plants and rivers of a region. Humans and animals incorporate Sr from their diet into their bones and teeth, where it substitutes for calcium. Tooth enamel contains Sr isotope signatures acquired during childhood and is most resistant to weathering and overprinting, while the dentine is often diagenetically altered towards the local Sr signature. For the reconstruction of human and animal migrations the tooth enamel 87Sr/86Sr ratio is compared to the Sr isotope signature in the vicinity of the burial site and the surrounding area. This study focuses on the establishment of a comprehensive reference map of bioavailable 87Sr/86Sr ratios for France. In a next step we will compare human and animal teeth from key archaeological sites to this reference map to investigate mobility. So far, we have analysed plant and soil samples from ~200 locations across France including the Aquitaine basin, the western and northern parts of the Paris basin, as well as three transects through the Pyrenees Mountains. The isotope data, geologic background information (BRGM 1:1M), field images, and detailed method descriptions are available through our online database iRhum (http://rses.anu.edu.au/research/ee). This database can also be used in forensic studies and food sciences. As an archaeological case study teeth from 16 adult and 8 juvenile individuals were investigated from an early Bell Beaker (2500-2000 BC) site at Le Tumulus des Sables, south-west France (Gironde). The teeth were analysed for Sr isotope ratios using laser ablation ICP-MS. Four teeth were also analysed using solution ICP-MS, which showed a significant offset to the laser ablation results. This requires further

  8. Isotope studies of dolomite formation under sedimentary conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clayton, R.N.; Jones, B.F.

    1968-01-01

    Measurements of stable isotope abundances of the carbonate portion of the sediment in Deep Springs Lake, California, indicate the presence of at least three phases: a magnesian calcite, a primary sedimentary dolomite, and a detrital dolomite. The former two have isotopic compositions consistent with precipitation at isotopic equilibrium from waters of the lake area. The measured isotopic fractionation factor between sedimentary dolomite and its interstitial water is 1.0351, which is outside the range possible for calcite-water. This indicates that the dolomite has formed by direct crystallization from solution and not from a caloite precursor without further isotope exchange. Isotopic and X-ray evidence does not support the contention of Peterson et al. (1966) that Deep Springs Lake dolomite crystals grow by means of a calcite-like surface layer. ?? 1968.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

  10. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-12-31

    This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

  11. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  12. Iron-Isotopic Fractionation Studies Using Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Zhang, C.; Barling, J.; Roe, J. E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of Fe biogeochemistry has stimulated interest in Fe isotope fractionation. Recent studies using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and a "double spike" demonstrate the existence of biogenic Fe isotope effects. Here, we assess the utility of multiple-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry(MC-ICP-MS) with a desolvating sample introduction system for Fe isotope studies, and present data on Fe biominerals produced by a thermophilic bacterium. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Technical Note: A simple method for vaterite precipitation for isotopic studies: implications for bulk and clumped isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; John, C. M.

    2015-06-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) plays an important role in the natural environment as a major constituent of the skeleton and supporting structure of marine life and has high economic importance as an additive in food, chemicals and medical products. Anhydrous CaCO3 occurs in the three different polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, whereof calcite is the most abundant and best characterized mineral. In contrast, little is known about the rare polymorph vaterite, in particular with regard to the oxygen isotope fractionation between H2O and the mineral. Synthetic precipitation of vaterite in the laboratory typically involves rapid processes and isotopic non-equilibrium, which excludes isotope studies focused on the characterization of vaterite under equilibrium conditions. Here, we used a new experimental approach that enables vaterite mineral formation from an isotopically equilibrated solution. The solution consists of a ~0.007 mol L-1 CaCO3 solution that is saturated with NaCl at room temperature (up to 6.4 mol L-1). Vaterite precipitated as single phase or major phase (≥94%) in experiments performed between 23 and 91 °C. Only at 80 °C was vaterite a minor phase with a relative abundance of 27%. The high mineral yield per experiment of up to 235 mg relative to the initially dissolved CaCO3 amount of on average 360 mg enables an investigation of the oxygen isotope fractionation between the mineral and water, and the determination of clumped isotope values in vaterite.

  14. Isotope Fractionation Studies in Prestellar Cores: The Case of Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is considered, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing, thus preserving the fractionation. In interstellar molecular clouds, ion-molecule chemistry continually cycles nitrogen between the two main reservoirs - N and N2 - leading to only minor N-15 enrichments. Charnley and Rodgers showed that depletion of CO removes oxygen from the gas and weakens this cycle such that significant N-15 fractionation can occur for N2 and other N-bearing species in such cores. Observations are being conducted at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths employing various facilities in order to both spatially and spectrally, resolve emission from these cores. A preliminary study to obtain the N-14/N-15 ratio in nitriles (HCN and HNC) was conducted at the Arizona Radio Observatory's 12m telescope on Kitt Peak, AZ. Spectra were obtained at high resolution (0.08 km/s) in order to resolve dynamic properties of each source as well as to resolve hyperfine structure present in certain isotopologues. This study included four dark cloud cores, observed to have varying levels of molecular depletion: L1521E, L1498, L1544, and L1521F. Previous studies of the N-14/N-15 ratio towards LI544 were obtained with N2H+ and NIH3, yielding ratios of 446 and >700, respectively. The discrepancy observed in these two measurements suggests a strong chemical dependence on the fractionation of nitrogen. Ratios (C,N, and D) obtained from isotopologues for a particular molecule are likely tracing the same chemical heritage and are directly comparable within a given source. Results and comparisons between the protostellar evolutionary state and isomer isotope fractionation as well as between other N-bearing species will be presented.

  15. The isotope altitude effect reflected in groundwater: a case study from Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Mezga, Kim; Urbanc, Janko; Cerar, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the stable isotope data of oxygen (δ(18)O) and hydrogen (δ(2)H) in groundwater from 83 sampling locations in Slovenia and their interpretation. The isotopic composition of water was monitored over 3 years (2009-2011), and each location was sampled twice. New findings on the isotopic composition of sampled groundwater are presented, and the data are also compared to past studies regarding the isotopic composition of precipitation, surface water, and groundwater in Slovenia. This study comprises: (1) the general characteristics of the isotopic composition of oxygen and hydrogen in groundwater in Slovenia, (2) the spatial distribution of oxygen isotope composition (δ(18)O) and d-excess in groundwater, (3) the groundwater isotope altitude effect, (4) the correlation between groundwater d-excess and the recharge area altitude of the sampling location, (5) the relation between hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in groundwater in comparison to the global precipitation isotope data, (6) the groundwater isotope effect of distance from the sea, and (7) the estimated relation between the mean temperature of recharge area and δ(18)O in groundwater.

  16. Isotopic and chemical studies of early crustal metasedimentary rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, Stein B.

    1988-01-01

    The aim, within the bounds of the Early Crustal Genesis Project, was the isotopic and chemical study of selected early crustal meta-sedimentary rocks. Western Australia was chosen as the first field area to examine, as the Yilgarn and Pilbara Blocks comprise one of the largest and most varied Precambrian terranes. Furthermore, the Western Gneiss Terrane (on the western flank of the Yilgarn Block) and the Pilbara Block are both non-greenstone in character; these types of terrane were relatively neglected, but are of great significance in the understanding of early crustal meta-sediments. The meta-sediments of aluminous or peraluminous character, commonly also enriched in Mg and/or Fe relative to the more common pelitic meta-sediments, and at many locations, deficient in one or more of the elements Ca, N, and K, were initially chosen.

  17. Decay studies of neutron deficient rare earth isotopes with OASIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilat, J.; Nitschke, J.M.; Wilmarth, P.A.; Vierinen, K.; Firestone, R.B.

    1987-09-01

    We report results on the decay of /sup 124/Pr, /sup 124,125/Ce, /sup 124,125/La, /sup 134-136/Eu, /sup 134-136/Sm, /sup 134-136/Pm, /sup 144/Ho, /sup 141,142,144/Dy, /sup 140,141,142,144/Tb, /sup 140-142/Gd, and /sup 140-142/Eu, produced by /sup 92/Mo(H.I.,xpyn) reactions at the Berkeley SuperHILAC, and studied with the OASIS on-line mass separator facility. Half-lives, delayed proton branching ratios, ..gamma..-ray energies and intensities, partial decay schemes and several J/sup ..pi../ assignments are presented. Level systematics of the even mass Nd and Sm isotopes and of the nu h/sub 11/2/ - nu s/sub 1/2/ isomers for N = 77 are discussed.

  18. A dynamic study of earthworm feeding ecology -using stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Briones; Bol; Sleep; Sampedro; Allen

    1999-07-01

    Changes in the specific diet of earthworms with time in relation to landuse changes and two different climates were studied by analysing (13)C and (15)N natural abundance in soils and animals. Soil samples from three depths (0-10, 10-20 and 20-30 cm) and earthworms were collected from two sites: Santiago (Northwest Spain) and North Wyke (Southwest England) both consisting of replicated long-term grasslands and recently converted to maize plots. Earthworms were hand-sorted in the field at the peak of the maize growth and after harvesting at both sites. In the Spanish plots, nine and eight earthworm species, all belonging to the three ecological categories (epigeic, anecic and endogeic), were found under maize and permanent pasture, whereas at the English site five and seven different species were, respectively, identified. At both sites (13)C isotopic values of the earthworm tissues reflected changes in diet from C(3) to C(4) with epigeic and epi/anecic worms in the maize plots showing one delta unit difference in relation to the ones found in the grassland plots. Anecic worms seemed to be less responsive to landuse changes. The higher (13)C values of the Spanish soils were also reflected in the earthworm tissues when compared with the English samples. (15)N values showed no clear relationship with the cropping treatments but were clearly related to the ecological grouping, with endogeic worms reaching the highest values whereas for the epigeic and epi/anecic species the lowest values were obtained. This finding was also previously recorded by other authors1 and suggests that, in the future, stable isotope techniques could also be a useful tool in taxonomic studies. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10407314

  19. Petrologic and oxygen isotopic study of ALH 85085-like chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, M.; Weisberg, M. K.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Ebihara, M.

    1994-07-01

    Four meteorites (PAT 91546, PCA 91328, PCA 91452, PCA 91467) petrologically similar to ALH 85085 chondrite have now been found. Previous studies of ALH 85085 showed it be a new kind of CR-related microchondrule-bearing chondrite, although one called it a sub-chondrite. The purpose of this study is to learn more about ALH 85085-like meteorites and their relationship to CR and CR-related (LEW 85332, Acfer 182, Bencubbin) chondrites. The methods used included petrology, INA bulk chemical analysis (PAT 91546, PCA 91467), and O isotopic analyses of the whole rocks and separated chondrules and dark inclusions (DIs) from PAT 91546. Since microchondrules and fragments are approximately 20 microns it was necessary to analyze composite samples for O; one was of approximately 100 chondrules, and another was of 5 DIs. Petrologically, the four meteorites are similar to ALH 85085, and there is no basis for determining if all of them, or any combinations, are paired. Mineralogically, olivine and pyroxene are highly magnesian FeNi metal generally has 3-10% Ni, and has a positive Ni-Co correlation similar to that in CR and CR-related chondrites. Refractory inclusions are similar in size to the chondrules and have the following assemblages: (1) hibonite-perovskite, (2) melilite-fassaite-forsterite, (3) grossite (Ca-dialuminate)-melilite-perovskite, (4) spinel-melilite, and (5) spinel-pyroxene aggregates. Chemically, INA analyses indicate that PAT 91546 and PCA 91467 are generally similar to ALH 85085. Oxygen isotopic analyses of the four whole-rock compositions fall along the CR mixing line as does ALH 85085; they are also close to LEW 85332, Acfer 182, and Bencubbin. This supports the concept that these are all CR-related chondrites. Even stronger support is found in the compositions of the chondrules and DIs in PAT 91546, which also plot on or near the CR line.

  20. USE OF STABLE ISOTOPES IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND FORENSIC GEOCHEMISTRY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes have been used for many decades in the petroleum industry, but the development of combined gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCIRMS) has led to a virtual explosion in application of this technique not only in petroleum explora...

  1. An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Natella; Kamyshny, Alexey; Halevy, Itay

    2014-05-01

    An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies Natella Mirzoyan1, Alexey Kamyshny Jr.2, Itay Halevy1 1Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel 2Geological and Environmental Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel Pyrite is one of the most abundant and widespread of the sulfide minerals with a central role in biogeochemical cycles of iron and sulfur. Due to its diverse roles in the natural and anthropogenic sulfur cycle, pyrite has been extensively studied in various experimental investigations of the kinetics of its dissolution and oxidation, the isotopic fractionations associated with these reactions, and the microbiological processes involved. Pretreatment of pyrite for removal of oxidation impurities to prevent experimental artifacts and inaccuracies is often practiced. While numerous pyrite-cleaning methods have been used in experiments, a common pyrite pretreatment method, often used to investigate pyrite chemistry by the isotopic fractionations associated with it, includes several rinses by HCl, acetone and deionized water. Elemental sulfur (S0) is a common product of incomplete pyrite oxidation. Removal of S0 is desirable to avoid experimental biases associated with its participation in pyrite transformations, but is more complicated than the removal of sulfate. Although rinsing with an organic solvent is in part aimed at removing S0, to the best of our knowledge, the extraction efficiency of S0 in existing protocols has not been assessed. We have developed and tested a new protocol for elemental sulfur removal from the surface of pyrite by ultrasonication with warm acetone. Our data demonstrate the presence of large fractions of S0 on untreated pyrite particle surfaces, of which only approximately 60% was removed by the commonly used pretreatment method. The new protocol described here was found to be more efficient at S0 removal than the commonly used method

  2. An isotopic biogeochemical study of the Green River oil shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collister, J. W.; Summons, R. E.; Lichtfouse, E.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-five different samples from three different sulfur cycles were examined in this stratigraphically oriented study of the Shell 22x-l well (U.S.G.S. C177 core) in the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Carbon isotopic compositions of constituents of Green River bitumens indicate mixing of three main components: products of primary photoautotrophs and their immediate consumers (delta approximately -30% vs PDB), products of methanotrophic bacteria (delta approximately -85%), and products of unknown bacteria (delta approximately -40%). For individual compounds synthesized by primary producers, delta-values ranged from -28 to -32%. 13C contents of individual primary products (beta-carotane, steranes, acyclic isoprenoids, tricyclic triterpenoids) were not closely correlated, suggesting diverse origins for these materials. 13C contents of numerous hopanoids were inversely related to sulfur abundance, indicating that they derived both from methanotrophs and from other bacteria, with abundances of methanotrophs depressed when sulfur was plentiful in the paleoenvironment. gamma-Cerane coeluted with 3 beta(CH3),17 alpha(H),21 beta(H)-hopane, but delta-values could be determined after deconvolution. gamma-Cerane (delta approximately -25%) probably derives from a eukaryotic heterotroph grazing on primary materials, the latter compound (delta approximately -90%) must derive from methanotrophic organisms. 13C contents of n-alkanes in bitumen differed markedly from those of paraffins generated pyrolytically. Isotopic and quantitative relationships suggest that alkanes released by pyrolysis derived from a resistant biopolymer of eukaryotic origin and that this was a dominant constituent of total organic carbon.

  3. An isotopic biogeochemical study of the Green River oil shale.

    PubMed

    Collister, J W; Summons, R E; Lichtfouse, E; Hayes, J M

    1992-12-01

    Thirty-five different samples from three different sulfur cycles were examined in this stratigraphically oriented study of the Shell 22x-l well (U.S.G.S. C177 core) in the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Carbon isotopic compositions of constituents of Green River bitumens indicate mixing of three main components: products of primary photoautotrophs and their immediate consumers (delta approximately -30% vs PDB), products of methanotrophic bacteria (delta approximately -85%), and products of unknown bacteria (delta approximately -40%). For individual compounds synthesized by primary producers, delta-values ranged from -28 to -32%. 13C contents of individual primary products (beta-carotane, steranes, acyclic isoprenoids, tricyclic triterpenoids) were not closely correlated, suggesting diverse origins for these materials. 13C contents of numerous hopanoids were inversely related to sulfur abundance, indicating that they derived both from methanotrophs and from other bacteria, with abundances of methanotrophs depressed when sulfur was plentiful in the paleoenvironment. gamma-Cerane coeluted with 3 beta(CH3),17 alpha(H),21 beta(H)-hopane, but delta-values could be determined after deconvolution. gamma-Cerane (delta approximately -25%) probably derives from a eukaryotic heterotroph grazing on primary materials, the latter compound (delta approximately -90%) must derive from methanotrophic organisms. 13C contents of n-alkanes in bitumen differed markedly from those of paraffins generated pyrolytically. Isotopic and quantitative relationships suggest that alkanes released by pyrolysis derived from a resistant biopolymer of eukaryotic origin and that this was a dominant constituent of total organic carbon. PMID:11540064

  4. Studies on image compression and image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayood, Khalid; Nori, Sekhar; Araj, A.

    1994-01-01

    During this six month period our works concentrated on three, somewhat different areas. We looked at and developed a number of error concealment schemes for use in a variety of video coding environments. This work is described in an accompanying (draft) Masters thesis. In the thesis we describe application of this techniques to the MPEG video coding scheme. We felt that the unique frame ordering approach used in the MPEG scheme would be a challenge to any error concealment/error recovery technique. We continued with our work in the vector quantization area. We have also developed a new type of vector quantizer, which we call a scan predictive vector quantization. The scan predictive VQ was tested on data processed at Goddard to approximate Landsat 7 HRMSI resolution and compared favorably with existing VQ techniques. A paper describing this work is included. The third area is concerned more with reconstruction than compression. While there is a variety of efficient lossless image compression schemes, they all have a common property that they use past data to encode future data. This is done either via taking differences, context modeling, or by building dictionaries. When encoding large images, this common property becomes a common flaw. When the user wishes to decode just a portion of the image, the requirement that the past history be available forces the decoding of a significantly larger portion of the image than desired by the user. Even with intelligent partitioning of the image dataset, the number of pixels decoded may be four times the number of pixels requested. We have developed an adaptive scanning strategy which can be used with any lossless compression scheme and which lowers the additional number of pixels to be decoded to about 7 percent of the number of pixels requested! A paper describing these results is included.

  5. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude and reduced {sup 13}C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  6. Live-cell vibrational imaging of choline metabolites by stimulated Raman scattering coupled with isotope-based metabolic labeling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fanghao; Wei, Lu; Zheng, Chaogu; Shen, Yihui

    2014-01-01

    Choline is a small molecule that occupies a key position in the biochemistry of all living organisms. Recent studies have strongly implicated choline metabolites in cancer, atherosclerosis and nervous system development. To detect choline and its metabolites, existing physical methods such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography, are often limited by the poor spatial resolution and substantial radiation dose. Fluorescence imaging, although with submicrometer resolution, requires introduction of bulky fluorophores and thus is difficult in labeling the small choline molecule. By combining the emerging bond-selective stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with metabolic incorporation of deuterated choline, herein we have achieved high resolution imaging of choline-containing metabolites in living mammalian cell lines, primary hippocampal neurons and multicellular organism C. elegans. Different subcellular distributions of choline metabolites are observed between cancer cells and non-cancer cells, which may reveal functional difference in the choline metabolism and lipid-mediated signaling events. In neurons, choline incorporation is visualized within both soma and neurites, where choline metabolites are more evenly distributed compared to the protein. Furthermore, choline localization is also observed in the pharynx region of C. elegans larvae, consistent with its organogenesis mechanism. These applications demonstrate the potential of isotope-based stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for future choline-related disease detection and development monitoring in vivo. PMID:24555181

  7. Lewis acid-assisted isotopic 18F-19F exchange in BODIPY dyes: facile generation of positron emission tomography/fluorescence dual modality agents for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanglong; Lin, Tzu-Pin; Li, Dan; Leamer, Lauren; Shan, Hong; Li, Zibo; Gabbaï, François P; Conti, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful technique for imaging biological pathways in vivo, particularly those that are key targets in disease processes. In contrast, fluorescence imaging has demonstrated to be a superior method for image-guided surgery, such as tumor removal. Although the integration of PET and optical imaging could provide an attractive strategy for patient management, there is a significant shortage of established platforms/methods for PET/optical probe construction. In this study, various reaction conditions were explored to develop a simple and fast method allowing for the introduction of [(18)F]-fluoride into BODIPY dyes. Through a systematic optimization of the reaction conditions, we found that BODIPY dyes, including commercial amine-reactive BODIPY succinimidyl esters, may be converted into their radioactive analogues in the matter of minutes via a (18)F-(19)F isotopic exchange reaction promoted by a Lewis acid such as SnCl4. An integrin-targeting RGD peptide was also conjugated with [(18)F]BODIPY® R6G , derived from the commercially available BODIPY® R6G fluorescent tag, to provide a [(18)F]-RGD conjugate in 82% yield. In vivo evaluation of this imaging probe showed a discernible tumor uptake in the U87MG xenograft model. The dual modality imaging properties of the probe was confirmed by ex vivo fluorescence and microPET imaging experiments. In summary, in the matter of minutes, BODIPY dyes were converted into their "hot" radioactive analogues via a (18)F-(19)F isotopic exchange reaction promoted by a Lewis acid. This approach, which can be applied to commercial BODIPY dyes, provides easy access to positron emission tomography/fluorescence dual modality imaging agents. PMID:23471211

  8. Surface studies of metals after interaction with hydrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, David Samuel

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to characterize surfaces of metals after interaction with hydrogen isotopes. Iron, which does not readily bond with hydrogen, and palladium, which strongly bonds with hydrogen, were studied. Observations of surfaces are used to determine the nature of their metamorphosis due to such exposures. An experimental study of pure iron foil (99.99%) exposed to a hot, dense hydrogen and argon gas mixture in a ballistic compressor yielded evidence for new structural and compositional changes of the metal due to the exposure. Atomic force microscope (AFM) studies demonstrated surfaces to be highly uneven, where height variations were often 2 mum for many micron-sized regions scanned. An iron foil exposed to argon gases alone revealed unique dendritic patterns but negligible height variations for micron-size scans. A cold rolled single crystal palladium cathode was electrolyzed in a solution of Dsb2O and 15% Hsb2SOsb4 by volume for 12 minutes. The cathode bent toward the anode during electrolysis. Examination of both concave and convex surfaces using the scanning electron microscope (SEM), scanning tunneling microscope (STM), and AFM revealed rimmed craters with faceted crystals inside and multi-textured surfaces. Also pairs of cold rolled polycrystalline palladium cathodes underwent electrolysis for six minutes or less, in Dsb2O and Hsb2O solutions, each solution containing 15% Hsb2SOsb4, by volume. Surface morphologies of the heavy water electrolyzed samples revealed asperities, craters, and nodules, and evidence of recrystallization and crystal planes. After 1.5 years, new AFM studies of the same Pd surfaces exposed to heavy water electrolyte exhibited loose, nanometer-sized particles. However, the surfaces of Pd cathodes exposed to light water electrolyte remained nearly identical to morphologies of foils not electrolyzed, and did not change with time. No surface asperities or loose grains were observed on the latter. Secondary ion mass

  9. Study of the isotopic features of Swan bands in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna Swamy, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown from a detailed statistical equilibrium calculation of the (C-12)(C-13) molecule that the interpretation of the observed intensities of Swan bands of the normal and the isotopic molecule of C2 in terms of the abundance ratio of C-12 and C-13 is a reasonable one. The synthetic profile of some isotopic features in the (0.0) Swan band is compared with the observed profiles for comet West.

  10. NOTE: Comparison of correction techniques for simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging: a dog study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knesaurek, Karin; Machac, Josef

    2000-11-01

    We compared two correction methods for simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Both approaches use the information from the third energy window placed between the photopeak windows of the 201Tl and 99mTc. The first approach, described by Moore et al, corrects only for the contribution of the 99mTc to the 201Tl primary 70 keV window. We developed the three-window transformation dual-isotope correction method, which is a simultaneous cross-talk correction. The two correction methods were compared in a simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc sestamibi cardiac dog study. Three separate acquisitions were performed in this dog study: two single-isotope and one dual-isotope acquisition. The 201Tl single-isotope images were used as references. The total number of counts, and the contrast between the left ventricular cavity (LVC) and the myocardium, were used in 70 keV short-axis slices as parameters for evaluating the results of the dual-isotope correction methods. Three consecutive short-axis slices were used to calculate averaged contrast and the averaged total number of counts. The total number of the counts was 667 000 ± 500 and 414 500 ± 400 counts for the dual-isotope (201Tl + 99mTc) and single-isotope (201Tl-only) 70 keV images, respectively. The corrected dual-isotope images had 514 700 ± 700 and 368 000 ± 600 counts for Moore's correction and our approach, respectively. Moore's method improved contrast in the dual-isotope 70 keV image to 0.14 ± 0.03 from 0.11 ± 0.02, which was the value in the 70 keV non-corrected dual-isotope image. Our method improved the same contrast to 0.22 ± 0.03. The contrast in the 201Tl single-isotope 70 keV image was 0.28 ± 0.02. Both methods improved the 70 keV dual-isotope images. However, our approach provided slightly better images than Moore's correction when compared with 201Tl-only 70 keV images.

  11. An isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea volcano area, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Janik, C.J.; Kauahikaua, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Isotope tracer methods were used to determine flow paths, recharge areas, and relative age for ground water in the Kilauea volcano area on the Island of Hawaii. Stable isotopes in rainfall show three distinct isotopic gradients with elevation, which are correlated with trade-wind, rain shadow, and high-elevation climatological patterns. Temporal variations in isotopic composition of precipitation are controlled more by the frequency of large storms than b.y seasonal temperature fluctuations. Consistency in results between two separate areas with rainfall caused by tradewinds and thermally-driven upslope airflow suggests that isotopic gradients with elevation may be similar on other islands in the tradewind belt, especially the other Hawaiian Islands, which have similar climatology and temperature lapse rates. Areal contrasts in ground-water stable isotopes and tritium indicate that the volcanic ri~ zones compartmentalize the regional ground-water system. Tritium levels in ground water within and downgradient of Kilauea's ri~ zones indicate relatively long residence times. Part of Kilauea's Southwest Ri~ Zone appears to act as a conduit for water from higher elevation, but there is no evidence for extensive down-ri~ flow in the lower East Ri~ Zone.

  12. Image correlation and sampling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Sedwick, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of analytical approaches for solving image correlation and image sampling of multispectral data is discussed. Relevant multispectral image statistics which are applicable to image correlation and sampling are identified. The general image statistics include intensity mean, variance, amplitude histogram, power spectral density function, and autocorrelation function. The translation problem associated with digital image registration and the analytical means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques are considered. General expressions for determining the reconstruction error for specific image sampling strategies are developed.

  13. Coordinated Chemical and Isotopic Studies of GEMS in IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2008-01-01

    Cometary IDPs contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula [1]. Following their accretion, these materials have remained relatively unaltered because of the lack of parent body hydrothermal alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these IDPs because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars [e.g. 2]. Amorphous silicates (in the form of GEMS grains) are a major component of cometary IDPs and so a major objective of this work is to elucidate their origins. In rare cases, GEMS grains have highly anomalous O isotopic compositions that establish their origins as circumstellar condensates [3]. Here we present data on a systematic study of the silicate components within a primitive IDP.

  14. COMPOUND-SPECIFIC ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF MTBE AND TBA FOR BIOREMEDIATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of stable isotope ratios to detect biodegradation for a number of chemical compounds including MTBE and TBA has been demonstrated in a number of laboratory or field studies. Chemical reactions tend to favor molecules with the lighter isotopic species (e.g., 12C, 1H), ...

  15. Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P. J.; Hartemann, Frederic V.; McNabb, Dennis P.; Pruet, Jason A.

    2009-07-21

    The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

  16. Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, C.D.; Miller, D.L.; Carson, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to be irradiated in the ACRR. The intent of DOE would be to provide a capability to satisfy the North American health care system demand for {sup 99}Mo, the parent of {sup 99m}Tc, in the event of an interruption in the current Canadian supply. {sup 99m}Tc is used in 70 to 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures in the US. The goal of the SNL/NM study effort is to determine the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and staffing necessary to meet the North American need for {sup 99}Mo and to identify and examine all issues with potential for environmental impact.

  17. Isotope effects of neodymium in different ligands exchange systems studied by ion exchange displacement chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ibrahim; Fawzy, Ahmed S; Ahmad, Mohammad I; Aly, Hisham F; Nomura, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-03-01

    The isotope effects of neodymium in Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were studied by using ion exchange chromatography. The separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε's, were calculated from the observed isotopic ratios at the front and rear boundaries of the neodymium adsorption band. The values of separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε's, for the Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were compared with those of Nd-malate and Nd-citrate, which indicated that the isotope effects of neodymium as studied by the three ligands takes the following direction Malate > Citrate > Glycolate. This order agrees with the number of available sites for complexation of each ligand. The values of the plate height, HETP of Nd in Nd-ligand exchange systems were also calculated.

  18. Oxygen and iron isotope studies of magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mandernack, K.W.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Bullen, T.D.

    1999-01-01

    A series of carefully controlled laboratory studies was carried out to investigate oxygen and iron isotope fractionation during the intracellular production of magnetite (Fe3O4) by two different species of magnetotactic bacteria at temperatures between 4??and 35??C under microaerobic and anaerobic conditions. No detectable fractionation of iron isotopes in the bacterial magnetites was observed. However, oxygen isotope measurements indicated a temperature-dependent fractionation for Fe3O4 and water that is consistent with that observed for Fe3O4 produced extracellularly by thermophilic Fe3+-reducing bacteria. These results contrast with established fractionation curves estimated from either high-temperature experiments or theoretical calculations. With the fractionation curve established in this report, oxygen-18 isotope values of bacterial Fe3O4 may be useful in paleoenvironmental studies for determining the oxygen-18 isotope values of formation waters and for inferring paleotemperatures.

  19. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  20. Sr isotopic tracer study of the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Lanphere, M.A.; Coleman, R.G.; Hopson, C.A.

    1981-04-10

    We have measured Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr isotopic compositions in 41 whole-rock samples and 12 mineral separates from units of the Samail ophiolite, including peridotite, gabbro, plagiogranite diabase dikes, and gabbro and websterite dikes within the metamorphic peridotite. Ten samples of cummulate gabbro from the Wadir Kadir section and nine samples from the Wadi Khafifah section have mean /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios and standard deviations of 0.70314 +- 0.00030 and 0.70306 +- 0.00034, respectively. The dispersion in Sr isotopic composition may reflect real heterogeneities in the magma source region. The average Sr isotopic composition of cumulate gabbro falls in the range of isotopic compositions of modern midocean ridge basalt. The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of noncumulate gabbro, plagiogranite, and diabase dikes range from 0.7034 to 0.7047, 0.7038 to 0.7046, and 0.7037 to 0.7061, respectively. These higher /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios are due to alteration of initial magmatic compositions by hydrothermal exchange with seawater. Mineral separates from dikes that cut harzburgite tectonite have Sr isotopic compositions which agree with that of cumulate gabbro. These data indicate that the cumulate gabbro and the different dikes were derived from partial melting of source regions that had similar long-term histories and chemical compositions.

  1. Sr isotopic tracer study of the Samail ophiolite, Oman.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Coleman, R.G.; Hopson, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr-isotopic compositions were measured in 41 whole-rock samples and 12 mineral separates from units of the Samail ophiolite, including peridotite, gabbro, plagiogranite, diabase dykes, and gabbro and websterite dykes within the metamorphic peridotite. Ten samples of cumulate gabbro from the Wadir Kadir section and nine samples from the Wadi Khafifah section have 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70314 + or - 0.00030 and 0.70306 + or - 0.00034, respectively. The dispersion in Sr- isotopic composition may reflect real heterogeneities in the magma source region. The average Sr-isotopic composition of cumulate gabbro falls in the range of isotopic compositions of modern MORB. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of noncumulate gabbro, plagiogranite, and diabase dykes range 0.7034-0.7047, 0.7038-0.7046 and 0.7037- 0.7061, respectively. These higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios are due to alteration of initial magmatic compositions by hydrothermal exchange with sea-water. Mineral separates from dykes that cut harzburgite tectonite have Sr-isotopic compositions which agree with that of cumulate gabbro. These data indicate that the cumulate gabbro and the different dykes were derived from partial melting of source regions that had similar long-term histories and chemical compositions.-T.R.

  2. Collectivity in the light xenon isotopes: A shell model study

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Sieja, K.; Poves, A.

    2010-12-15

    The lightest xenon isotopes are studied in the shell model framework, within a valence space that comprises all the orbits lying between the magic closures N=Z=50 and N=Z=82. The calculations produce collective deformed structures of triaxial nature that encompass nicely the known experimental data. Predictions are made for the (still unknown) N=Z nucleus {sup 108}Xe. The results are interpreted in terms of the competition between the quadrupole correlations enhanced by the pseudo-SU(3) structure of the positive parity orbits and the pairing correlations brought in by the 0h{sub 11/2} orbit. We also have studied the effect of the excitations from the {sup 100}Sn core on our predictions. We show that the backbending in this region is due to the alignment of two particles in the 0h{sub 11/2} orbit. In the N=Z case, one neutron and one proton align to J=11 and T=0. In {sup 110,112}Xe the alignment begins in the J=10, T=1 channel and it is dominantly of neutron-neutron type. Approaching the band termination the alignment of a neutron-proton pair to J=11 and T=0 takes over. In a more academic mood, we have studied the role of the isovector and isoscalar pairing correlations on the structure on the yrast bands of {sup 108,110}Xe and examined the possible existence of isovector and isoscalar pairing condensates in these N{approx}{approx}Z nuclei.

  3. New Capabilities for Studies Using Isotopes in the Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Pradeep K.; Alduchov, Oleg; Araguás, Luis Araguás; Dogramaci, Shawan; Katzlberger, Gernot; Kriz, Karel; Kulkarni, Kshitij M.; Kurttas, Türker; Newman, Brent D.; Pucher, Alexander

    2007-12-01

    The characterization and quantification of hydrological fluxes within components of the water cycle and across interfaces (e.g., atmosphere/land surface, aquifer/river, soil/plant) are critical for assessing and managing water resources and for understanding the impacts of climate change and variability on the hydrological cycle. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, and radioactive isotopes such as tritium and carbon-14, provide unique insights into hydrological and climatic processes at local, regional, and global scales, including the role of groundwater in rivers and lakes, groundwater recharge rates, and sources and recycling rates of atmospheric moisture [Aggarwal et al., 2005; Gat, 1996; Kendall and McDonnell, 1998]. Isotopes also provide critical insights into understanding feedbacks and interactions between physical and biological processes (e.g., ecohydrology).

  4. Experimental stand for studies of hydrogen isotopes permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Brad, S.; Stefanescu, I.; Stefan, L.; Lazar, A.; Vijulie, M.; Sofilca, N.; Bornea, A.; Vasut, F.; Zamfirache, M.; Bidica, N.; Postolache, C.; Matei, L.

    2008-07-15

    As a result of the high probability of hydrogen isotope permeation through materials used in high-temperature reactor operations, the interaction of hydrogen isotopes with metallic structural materials proposed to be used for fusion reactor designing is of great importance for safety considerations. Determining the parameters of the interaction between hydrogen isotopes and different materials, is therefore essential to accurately calculate recycling, outgassing, loading, permeation and hydrogen embrittlement. The permeation tests were made in collaboration with IFIN Bucuresti inside of a special glove-box to avail their radioactive protection expertise. This investigation programme is ongoing. In this paper we describe the permeation stand facility and the preliminary tests carried out to date. (authors)

  5. Lead isotopic studies of the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Pallister, J.S.

    1981-04-10

    The isotopic composition of Pb and the concentrations of U, Th, and Pb have been determined for samples from various lithologic units and massive sulfides of the Samail ophiolite. The observed /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb ratios range from 17.90 to 19.06, /sup 207/Pb//sup 204/Pb ratios from 15.43 to 15.63, and /sup 208/Pb//sup 204/Pb from 37.66 to 38.78. In Pb isotopic evolution diagrams, the initial Pb isotopic compositions of most of the samples from the Samail ophiolite plot within the field of oceanic basalt, clearly distinct from island arc data, and define some of the least radiogenic Pb observed from oceanic rocks. Lead data from the Samail are compatible with a model involving magma generation from an oceanic mantle source and formation of the ophiolite at an oceanic spreading center. U--Th--Pb isotopic systematics demonstrate that vertical heterogeneity in the oceanic crust can be created through differential concentration of U, Th, and Pb during crystal fractionation and alteration at, or near, the spreading ridge. Calcite form amygdules in the ophiolite basalt has similar Pb isotopic composition to the igneous rocks, suggesting precipitation of the calcite from seawater which contained Pb derived mostly from the oceanic crust. Lead isotopic data on Fe--Cu sulfides are also similar to the results from the igneous suite suggesting that the source of the sulfides is predominently from the oceanic crust. Lead data from serpentinized peridotite and a galena sample from below the ophiolite suggest that part of the serpentinization process and the formation of galena could involve addition of radiogenic Pb from either a continental source or from oceanic sediments.

  6. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  7. Imaging phased telescope array study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The problems encountered in obtaining a wide field-of-view with large, space-based direct imaging phased telescope arrays were considered. After defining some of the critical systems issues, previous relevant work in the literature was reviewed and summarized. An extensive list was made of potential error sources and the error sources were categorized in the form of an error budget tree including optical design errors, optical fabrication errors, assembly and alignment errors, and environmental errors. After choosing a top level image quality requirment as a goal, a preliminary tops-down error budget allocation was performed; then, based upon engineering experience, detailed analysis, or data from the literature, a bottoms-up error budget reallocation was performed in an attempt to achieve an equitable distribution of difficulty in satisfying the various allocations. This exercise provided a realistic allocation for residual off-axis optical design errors in the presence of state-of-the-art optical fabrication and alignment errors. Three different computational techniques were developed for computing the image degradation of phased telescope arrays due to aberrations of the individual telescopes. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses were then performed for a variety of subaperture configurations and telescope design parameters in an attempt to determine how the off-axis performance of a phased telescope array varies as the telescopes are scaled up in size. The Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) multipurpose telescope testbed (MMTT) configuration was analyzed in detail with regard to image degradation due to field curvature and distortion of the individual telescopes as they are scaled up in size.

  8. Systematic study of (α ,γ ) reactions for stable nickel isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.; Beard, M.; Spyrou, A.; Quinn, S. J.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; DeYoung, P. A.; Dombos, A. C.; Görres, J.; Kontos, A.; Long, A.; Moran, M. T.; Paul, N.; Pereira, J.; Robertson, D.; Smith, K.; Stech, E.; Talwar, R.; Tan, W. P.; Wiescher, M.

    2015-08-01

    A systematic measurement of the (α ,γ ) reaction for all the stable nickel isotopes has been performed using the γ -summing technique. For two of the isotopes, 60Ni and 61Ni, the α -capture cross sections have been experimentally measured for the first time. For 58,62,64Ni, the current measurement is in excellent agreement with earlier results found in the literature, and additionally extends the energy range of the measured cross sections up to 8.7 MeV. The data provided a tool for testing the cross section predictions of Hauser-Feshbach calculations. The experimental results were compared to the cross sections calculated with the talys 1.6 code and commonly used databases non-smoker and bruslib. For each of the investigated isotopes a combination of input parameter for talys was identified that best reproduces the experimental data, and recommended reaction rate has been calculated. Additionally, a set of inputs for Hauser-Feshbach calculations was given that, simultaneously for all the isotopes under consideration, reproduces the experimental data within the experimental uncertainties.

  9. Development of a Laser Probe for Argon Isotope Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConville, Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The first objective of this study was to develop a laser outgassing facility for argon isotope studies. Apart from the laser and construction of the laser sample port, existing vacuum and mass spectrometer systems were used. Laser performance and optimum operating conditions were investigated. The second objective was test and evaluate the laser extraction technique by studies of simple geological samples. Previous laser ^{40} Ar-^{39}Ar dating studies by other workers had not systematically established the basis or characteristics of the method. Results from laser and complementary stepped heating studies of the ^{40}Ar-^ {39}Ar dating standard hornblende, hb3gr; a phlogopite sample from the Palabora (Phalaborwa) Complex; and biotites in a thin section of the Hamlet Bjerg granite from East Greenland, verified that: (1) Laser extraction reproduced within experimental error the stepped heating ^{40}Ar-^ {39}Ar and K-Ar ages of simple samples. (2) The precision of the technique i.e. the amount of sample required to give reliable ages, was limited in the present experiments largely by the level of the blanks and backgrounds to 10-100 ug samples. (3) Sample outgassing appeared to be limited to the order of 10 um outside the physical size of the laser pit, consistent with other estimates of the spatial definition in the literature. This could be understood by thermal diffusion and the length of the laser pulse. (4) The efficiency of the laser pulse in melting and outgassing mineral samples was shown to be dependent on silicate latent heats and mineral absorption at the laser wavelength. In addition, the ^{40} Ar-^{39}Ar age of the geologically significant Palabora Complex was determined as (2053 +/- 5) Ma. Excess argon led to a discrepancy between the laser and stepped heating ages of biotite and muscovite, (405 +/- 5) Ma, and laser ages of feldspars (510 +/- 20) Ma in the Hamlet Bjerg granite. This illustrated

  10. A Gamma Ray Imaging Device for Small-Animal Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Robert; Bradley, Eric; Majewski, Stan; Saha, Margaret S.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Welsh, Robert E.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, modular nuclear imaging device for in vivo imaging of small animals is described. A segmented scintillator is coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier. This combination is used to view the living system under study with a variety of collimators employed to limit the angular acceptance. A personal computer is coupled to a CAMAC electronic system for event-by-event data acquisition and subsequent selective data analysis. The system has been designed to exploit the availability of a wide range of ligands tagged with the isotope 125I. It has most recently been employed for a study of the transport of the cocaine analog, RTI-55, to the brain of a mouse. Results of studies to date and options for future expansion of the system will be described.

  11. Mg isotope fractionation during calcite precipitation: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulnier, Ségolène; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Vigier, Nathalie; Chaussidon, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Experimental precipitations of calcite and other carbonate minerals were performed under various conditions of pH, temperature and solution Mg/Ca to determine the Mg partition coefficient and Mg isotope fractionation. Fifteen experiments were performed at pH ranging from 7.41 ± 0.07 to 8.51 ± 0.39, temperature ranging from 16.2 ± 0.7 to 26.5 ± 0.3 °C and Mg/Casolution ranging from 0.11 to 0.52 mol/mol. The apparent Mg partition coefficient between calcite and solution (DMg) spans a large range of values from 0.018 ± 0.014 to 0.15 ± 0.11 and carbonate Mg isotope fractionation (Δ26Mg) ranges from -2.53 ± 0.25‰ to -1.33 ± 0.14‰ and does not correlate with either pH or temperature. The range in DMg and Δ26Mg suggests non-equilibrium partitioning controlled by the processes of calcite growth, i.e. mixing between calcite grown at equilibrium and fluid inclusions, and entrapment of a surface Mg-rich calcite layer in isotopic equilibrium with the solution. The equilibrium Mg isotope fractionation between inorganic calcite and solution is estimated to be -2.13 ± 0.24‰. Additional Mg elemental and isotopic fractionations are observed to occur during biogenic formation of calcite due to variable removal of Mg by the organisms (high-Mg calcite corals, foraminifera) of seawater Mg from their calcification medium.

  12. Isotope labeling pattern study of central carbon metabolites using GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joon-Young; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Determination of fluxes by (13)C tracer experiments depends on monitoring the (13)C labeling pattern of metabolites during isotope experiments. In metabolome-based (13)C metabolic flux analysis, liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry or tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS or LC/MS/MS, respectively) has been mainly used as an analytical platform for isotope pattern studies of central carbon metabolites. However, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has several advantages over LC/MS, such as high sensitivity, low cost, ease of operation, and availability of mass spectra databases for comparison. In this study, analysis of isotope pattern for central carbon metabolites using GC/MS was demonstrated. First, a proper set of mass ions for central carbon metabolites was selected based on carbon backbone information and structural isomers of mass fragment ions. A total of 34 mass fragment ions was selected and used for the quantification of 25 central carbon metabolites. Then, to quantify isotope fractions, a natural mass isotopomer library for selected mass fragment ions was constructed and subtracted from isotopomer mass spectra data. The results revealed a surprisingly high abundance of partially labeled (13)C intermediates, such as 56.4% of fructose 6-phosphate and 47.6% of dihydroxyacetone phosphate at isotopic steady state, which were generated in the pentose phosphate pathway. Finally, dynamic changes of isotope fragments of central metabolites were monitored with a U-(13)C glucose stimulus response experiment in Kluyveromyces marxianus. With a comprehensive study of isotope patterns of central carbon metabolites using GC/MS, 25 central carbon metabolites and their isotopic fractions were successfully quantified. Dynamic and precise acquisition of isotope pattern can then be used in combination with proper kinetic models to calculate metabolic fluxes.

  13. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  14. Copper isotope effect in serum of cancer patients. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Télouk, Philippe; Puisieux, Alain; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Balter, Vincent; Bondanese, Victor P; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Clapisson, Gilles; Lamboux, Aline; Albarede, Francis

    2015-02-01

    The isotope effect describes mass-dependent variations of natural isotope abundances for a particular element. In this pilot study, we measured the (65)Cu/(63)Cu ratios in the serums of 20 breast and 8 colorectal cancer patients, which correspond to, respectively, 90 and 49 samples taken at different times with molecular biomarker documentation. Copper isotope compositions were determined by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). When compared with the literature data from a control group of 50 healthy blood donors, abundances of Cu isotopes predict mortality in the colorectal cancer group with a probability p = 0.018. For the breast cancer patients and the group of control women the probability goes down to p = 0.0006 and the AUC under the ROC curve is 0.75. Most patients considered in this preliminary study and with serum δ(65)Cu lower than the threshold value of -0.35‰ (per mil) did not survive. As a marker, a drop in δ(65)Cu precedes molecular biomarkers by several months. The observed decrease of δ(65)Cu in the serum of cancer patients is assigned to the extensive oxidative chelation of copper by cytosolic lactate. The potential of Cu isotope variability as a new diagnostic tool for breast and colorectal cancer seems strong. Shifts in Cu isotope compositions fingerprint cytosolic Cu chelation by lactate mono- and bidentates. This simple scheme provides a straightforward explanation for isotopically light Cu in the serum and isotopically heavy Cu in cancer cells: Cu(+) escaping chelation by lactate and excreted into the blood stream is isotopically light. Low δ(65)Cu values in serum therefore reveal the strength of lactate production by the Warburg effect.

  15. Copper isotope effect in serum of cancer patients. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Télouk, Philippe; Puisieux, Alain; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Balter, Vincent; Bondanese, Victor P; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Clapisson, Gilles; Lamboux, Aline; Albarede, Francis

    2015-02-01

    The isotope effect describes mass-dependent variations of natural isotope abundances for a particular element. In this pilot study, we measured the (65)Cu/(63)Cu ratios in the serums of 20 breast and 8 colorectal cancer patients, which correspond to, respectively, 90 and 49 samples taken at different times with molecular biomarker documentation. Copper isotope compositions were determined by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). When compared with the literature data from a control group of 50 healthy blood donors, abundances of Cu isotopes predict mortality in the colorectal cancer group with a probability p = 0.018. For the breast cancer patients and the group of control women the probability goes down to p = 0.0006 and the AUC under the ROC curve is 0.75. Most patients considered in this preliminary study and with serum δ(65)Cu lower than the threshold value of -0.35‰ (per mil) did not survive. As a marker, a drop in δ(65)Cu precedes molecular biomarkers by several months. The observed decrease of δ(65)Cu in the serum of cancer patients is assigned to the extensive oxidative chelation of copper by cytosolic lactate. The potential of Cu isotope variability as a new diagnostic tool for breast and colorectal cancer seems strong. Shifts in Cu isotope compositions fingerprint cytosolic Cu chelation by lactate mono- and bidentates. This simple scheme provides a straightforward explanation for isotopically light Cu in the serum and isotopically heavy Cu in cancer cells: Cu(+) escaping chelation by lactate and excreted into the blood stream is isotopically light. Low δ(65)Cu values in serum therefore reveal the strength of lactate production by the Warburg effect. PMID:25532497

  16. Rare-isotope and kinetic studies of Pt/SnO2 catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Wood, George M.; Schryer, David R.; Hess, Robert V.; Miller, Irvin M.; Kielin, Erik J.

    1990-01-01

    Closed-cycle pulsed CO2 laser operation requires the use of an efficient CO-O2 recombination catalyst for these dissociation products which otherwise would degrade the laser operation. The catalyst must not only operate at low temperatures but also must operate efficiently for long periods. In the case of the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) laser, an operational lifetime of 3 years is required. Additionally, in order to minimize atmospheric absorption and enhance aerosol scatter of laser radiation, the LAWS system will operate at 9.1 micrometers with an oxygen-18 isotope CO2 lasing medium. Consequently, the catalyst must not only operate at low temperatures but must also preserve the isotopic integrity of the rare-isotope composition in the recombination mode. Several years ago an investigation of commercially available and newly synthesized recombination catalysts for use in closed-cycle pulsed common and rare-isotope CO2 lasers was implemented at the NASA Langley Research Center. Since that time, mechanistic efforts utilizing both common and rare oxygen isotopes have been implemented and continue. Rare-isotope studies utilizing commercially available platinum-tin oxide catalyst have demonstrated that the catalyst contributes oxygen-16 to the product carbon dioxide thus rendering it unusable for rare-isotope applications. A technique has been developed for modification of the surface of the common-isotope catalyst to render it usable. Results of kinetic and isotope label studies using plug flow, recycle plug flow, and closed internal recycle plug flow reactor configuration modes are discussed.

  17. Study of CT-based positron range correction in high resolution 3D PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cal-González, J.; Herraiz, J. L.; España, S.; Vicente, E.; Herranz, E.; Desco, M.; Vaquero, J. J.; Udías, J. M.

    2011-08-01

    Positron range limits the spatial resolution of PET images and has a different effect for different isotopes and positron propagation materials. Therefore it is important to consider it during image reconstruction, in order to obtain optimal image quality. Positron range distributions for most common isotopes used in PET in different materials were computed using the Monte Carlo simulations with PeneloPET. The range profiles were introduced into the 3D OSEM image reconstruction software FIRST and employed to blur the image either in the forward projection or in the forward and backward projection. The blurring introduced takes into account the different materials in which the positron propagates. Information on these materials may be obtained, for instance, from a segmentation of a CT image. The results of introducing positron blurring in both forward and backward projection operations was compared to using it only during forward projection. Further, the effect of different shapes of positron range profile in the quality of the reconstructed images with positron range correction was studied. For high positron energy isotopes, the reconstructed images show significant improvement in spatial resolution when positron range is taken into account during reconstruction, compared to reconstructions without positron range modeling.

  18. Studies of neutron-deficient mendelevium isotopes at SHIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antalic, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Ackermann, D.; Heinz, S.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Šáro, Š.

    2010-01-01

    The radioactive decay of the isotopes 247Md , 246Md and their daughter products was investigated by means of α - α and α - γ coincidence spectroscopy. The isotopes were produced using the fusion reaction 40Ar + 209Bi. Decay schemes are suggested for 247Md and 243Es . A new isomeric state in 246Md with a half-life of ( 4.4±0.8 s was observed. Previous data of electron-capture delayed fission of 246Md and 242Es were confirmed. The probability for this decay branch in 246Md was measured to be P ECDF > 0.10 . The probability for electron-capture delayed fission in the case of 242Es was determined to be P ECDF = 0.013+0.012 -0.007.

  19. Lead isotopic studies of the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Pallister, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The isotopic composition of Pb and the concentrations of U, Th, and Pb are determined for samples from massive sulfides and lithologic units of the Samail ophiolite. It is shown that the magma that formed the ophiolite was probably derived from a depleted mantle, similar in Pb isotopic composition to the source area of mid-ocean ridge basalt. The gross geochemical characteristics of the mantle sources have remained almost unchanged for the last 100 million years. It is also shown that the U-Th-Pb systematics of the Samail formation indicate that local vertical heterogeneity in the oceanic crust can result from crystal fractionation and metasomatism at, and near, an oceanic spreading center.

  20. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in precambrian rocks.

    PubMed

    Oehler, D Z; Schopf, J W; Kvenvolden, K A

    1972-03-17

    Reduced carbon in early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa is isotopically similar (the average value of delta(13)C(PDB) is -28.7 per mil) to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts (Theespruit formation) is anomalously heavy (the average value of delta(13)C(PDB) is -16.5 per mil). This discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  1. Theoretical study of hyperfine structure constants of Ga isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. M.; Li, J. G.; Fritzsche, S.; Godefroid, M.; Chang, Z. W.; Dong, C. Z.

    2012-11-01

    The hyperfine structure constants for the ground 4s24p 2P°3/2 and lowest excited states 4s25s 2S1/2 of 71Ga are calculated using the GRASP2K package based on the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. Furthermore, the magnetic dipole (μ) and the electric quadrupole (Q) moments of the Ga isotopes from 67Ga to 81Ga are derived.

  2. Oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water: An experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, H.R.; Clayton, R.N. )

    1990-05-01

    The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between natural analcime ({approximately}100 {mu}m) and water has been determined at 300, 350, and 400{degree}C at fluid pressures ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 kbar. Isotope ratios were obtained for the analcime framework, the channel water, and bulk water. Analcimes from Surtsey (145{degree}C), DSDP Hole 417A (30 to 55{degree}C), and Guam (25{degree}C) were used to constrain the fractionation factors below 300{degree}C. Analcime channel water exchanged completely with external water in all runs. Although some retrograde exchange may have occurred during quenching, the results indicate that the channel water is depleted in {sup 18}O relative to bulk water by a constant value of {approximately}5{per thousand}, nearly independent of temperature. Analcime is the first hydrated mineral found to have water of hydration depleted in {sup 18}O. Analcime framework oxygen exchanged 80, 90, and 96% at 300{degree}C for 412 h, 350{degree}C for 178 h, and 400{degree}C for 120 h, respectively. Equilibrium {Delta}{sup 18}O ({per thousand}) are as follows: 2.9 (400{degree}C), 4.5 (350{degree}C), and 5.8 (300{degree}C) for the experimental runs and 12.2 (145{degree}C) and 24.2 to 28.2 (30-55{degree}C) for the empirical data. The analcime-water fractionation curve is within experimental error of that of calcite-water. The exchange had little effect on grain morphology and does not involve recrystallization. This is the fastest exchange observed for a silicate. The rapid exchange rates indicate that zeolites in active high-temperature geothermal areas are in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient fluids. Once calibrated, zeolites may be among the best low-temperature oxygen isotope geothermometers.

  3. Stable isotope studies of nephrite deposits from Fengtien, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, Tzen-Fu; Yeh, Hsueh-Wen; Lee, Chihming Wang

    1988-03-01

    Metasomatic nephrite deposits ( i.e., rodingites) occur between serpentinites and muscovite-quartz schist in the Fengtien area, eastern Taiwan. The δ 18O values of nephrite range from +4.5 to +5.3%. and the δD values, from -33 to -68%. The narrow range in the δ 18O values and wide variation in the δD values indicate low water/rock ratios and multiple origins of the ambient H 2O during nephrite formation. The ultimate sources of the ambient H 2O are largely sea water for the early nephrite and meteoric water for the late nephrite. The temperature of nephrite formation is 320-420°C: the estimated O-isotopic fractionation between nephrite (tremolite) and serpentine (antigorite) is 1.0 ± 0.2%. in this temperature range. Diopsidefels and epidotite are two other kinds of rodingite in the deposits. The δ 18O values of diopside from diopsidefels range from +3.7 to +4.5%., theδD values of clinozoisite from epidotite range from -31 to -34%. and the δ 18O value of one clinozoisite analyzed is +3.9%. These data suggest that most diopsidefels formed in isotopic equilibrium with nephrite and that clinozoisite was not in isotopic equilibrium with either nephrite or diopsidefels. O-isotope compositions of both nephrite and diopsidefels cannot give conclusive evidence of their parental rocks. Circumstantial evidence, however, implies that the nephrite is derived from serpentinite whereas diopsidefels formed from unaltered ultramafic rocks.

  4. Multi-scale study of the isotope effect in ISTTOK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Silva, C.; Figueiredo, H.; Pedrosa, M. A.; van Milligen, B. Ph.; Pereira, T.; Losada, U.; Hidalgo, C.

    2016-05-01

    The isotope effect, namely the isotope dependence of plasma confinement, is still one of the principal scientific conundrums facing the magnetic fusion community. We have investigated the impact of isotope mass on multi-scale mechanisms, including the characterization of radial correlation lengths (\\boldsymbol{L}{r} ) and long-range correlations (LRC) of plasma fluctuations using multi-array Langmuir probe system, in hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) plasmas in the ISTTOK tokamak. We found that when changing plasma composition from the H dominated to D dominated, the LRC amplitude increased markedly (10-30%) and the \\boldsymbol{L}{r} increased slightly (~10%). The particle confinement also improved by about 50%. The changes of LRC and \\boldsymbol{L}{r} are congruent with previous findings in the TEXTOR tokamak (Xu et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 265005). In addition, using biorthogonal decomposition, both geodesic acoustic modes and very low frequency (<5 kHz) coherent modes were found to be contributing to LRC.

  5. Sm-Nd Isotopic Studies of Ureilite Novo Urei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Goodrich, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Ureilites are ultramafic (harzburgitic) achondrites composed predominantly of olivine and pyroxenes, abundant carbon (graphites and shock-produced diamonds), some metal and sulfides. These rocks probably represent ultramafic mantles of differentiated parent asteroidal bodies. Age determinations of these rocks by Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd methods have been difficult because of their extremely low abundances of these parent-daughter elements. Nevertheless, Sm-Nd isochron ages were reported for Kenna, Goalpara, MET 78008 and PCA 82506 yielding ages of 3.74+/-0.02 Ga, approx.3.7 Ga, 4.09+/-0.08 Ga, 4.23+/-0.06 Ga, respectively [1-4]. These "young" Sm-Nd ages may represent secondary metasomatism events [1] related to impacts [5], as indicated by the similarly young Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing ages of 3.3-4.1 Ga for ureilites Kenna, Novo Urei and Havero [6]. Alternatively, it has been suggested that these rocks may have been contaminated with terrestrial crustal materials and the isochrons do not have any age significance [2,7]. Indications of old approx.4.56 Ga ages for ureilites were reported from the U-Pb and Sm-Nd model ages for MET 78008 [8]. More reliable evidences for old formation ages of ureilites were reported recently using the short-lived chronometers Hf-182-W-182, Al-26-Mg-26 and Mn-53-Cr-53. The deficits of 182W in ureilites suggest the metal-silicate segregation occurred very early, approx.1-2 Ma after CAI [9]. The Al-26-Mg-26 and Mn-53-Cr-53 studies for a feldspathic lithology [10] and the Mn-53-Cr-53 for olivine- and pyroxene-dominant lithologies [11] in ureilites revealed that they crystallized approx.5.4 Ma after CAI, i.e., at 4563.8+/-0.5 Ma relative to D.Orbigny. In this report, we present Sm-Nd isotopic data for a relatively fresh ureilite, Novo Urei, a rare ureilite fall (1886). We compare these data to Sm-Nd data for other ureilites, and discuss Novo Urei's petrogenesis

  6. Frame Your Images: Making Digital Images Accessible for Study & Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gepner, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Images, whether at the level of molecules, cells, organs, organisms, or environments, are at the core of many biological disciplines. Even with the contemporary emphasis on molecular analysis, biology has retained its traditional strong visual component. In courses that rely on the study of biological structure, the presentation of images for…

  7. Application of three-class ROC analysis to task-based image quality assessment of simultaneous dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS).

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Song, Xiyun; Frey, Eric C

    2008-11-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac disease using dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) is based on the defect status in both stress and rest images, and can be modeled as a three-class task of classifying patients as having no, reversible, or fixed perfusion defects. Simultaneous acquisition protocols for dual-isotope MPS imaging have gained much interest due to their advantages including perfect registration of the (201)Tl and (99m)Tc images in space and time, increased patient comfort, and higher clinical throughput. As a result of simultaneous acquisition, however, crosstalk contamination, where photons emitted by one isotope contribute to the image of the other isotope, degrades image quality. Minimizing the crosstalk is important in obtaining the best possible image quality. One way to minimize the crosstalk is to optimize the injected activity of the two isotopes by considering the three-class nature of the diagnostic problem. To effectively do so, we have previously developed a three-class receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis methodology that extends and unifies the decision theoretic, linear discriminant analysis, and psychophysical foundations of binary ROC analysis in a three-class paradigm. In this work, we applied the proposed three-class ROC methodology to the assessment of the image quality of simultaneous dual-isotope MPS imaging techniques and the determination of the optimal injected activity combination. In addition to this application, the rapid development of diagnostic imaging techniques has produced an increasing number of clinical diagnostic tasks that involve not only disease detection, but also disease characterization and are thus multiclass tasks. This paper provides a practical example of the application of the proposed three-class ROC analysis methodology to medical problems.

  8. Use of stable isotopes of selenium in human metabolic studies: development of analytical methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Janghorbani, M.; Ting, B.T.; Young, V.R.

    1981-12-01

    Use of stable isotopes of selenium in relation to enrichment of diets for studies of selenium absorption and metabolism in human subjects is discussed. A method based on radiochemical neutron activation analysis is described which allows accurate measurement of stable isotopes 74Se, 76Se, and 80Se in matrices (feces, plasma, red blood cells, and urine) of interest in metabolic studies. We show that these isotopes can routinely be measured with analytical precision and accuracy of 10% in samples of available size. This precision and accuracy is satisfactory for conduct of many nutritional experiments concerned with gastrointestinal absorption, plasma and red cell selenium turnover, and urinary excretion of the element, using an oral dose of 74Se. Original, experimental data are presented to illustrate the degree of enrichment of 74Se in feces, plasma, and urine after a single oral ingestion of 50 micrograms of the isotope with a breakfast meal in healthy young men.

  9. Coordinated Chemical and Isotopic Imaging of Bells (CM2) Meteorite Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemett, S. J.; Messenger, S.; Naklamura-Messenger, K.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Meteoritic organic matter is a complex conglomeration of species formed in distinct environments and processes in circumstellar space, the interstellar medium, the Solar Nebula and asteroids. Consequently meteorites constitute a unique record of primordial organic chemical evolution. While bulk chemical analysis has provided a detailed description of the range and diversity of organic species present in carbonaceous chondrites, there is little information as to how these species are spatially distributed and their relationship to the host mineral matrix. The distribution of organic phases is nevertheless critical to understanding parent body processes. The CM and CI chondrites all display evidence of low temperature (< 350K) aqueous alteration that may have led to aqueous geochromatographic separation of organics and synthesis of new organics coupled to aqueous mineral alteration. Here we present the results of the first coordinated in situ isotopic and chemical mapping study of the Bells meteorite using a newly developed two-step laser mass spectrometer (mu-L(sup 2)MS) capable of measuring a broad range of organic compounds.

  10. Preliminary report on the stable isotope imaging and characterization of surface and ground water resources in the southern Sacramento Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.; Campbell, K.R.

    1993-11-01

    This document contains information about the water resources in Sacramento. The project considers isotopic characterization of groundwater and the environmental effects of the misuse of water resources. In particular, the study looks at the effects extensive agriculture and the overdrafting of groundwater.

  11. The study of trace metal absoption using stable isotopes and mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennessey, P. V.; Lloyd-Kindstrand, L.; Hambidge, K. M.

    1991-12-01

    The absorption and excretion of zinc stable isotopes have been followed in more than 120 human subjects. The isotope enrichment determinations were made using a standard VG 7070E HF mass spectrometer. A fast atom gun (FAB) was used to form the ions from a dry residue on a pure silver probe tip. Isotope ratio measurements were found to have a precision of better than 2% (relative standard deviation) and required a sample size of 1-5 [mu]g. The average true absorption of zinc was found to be 73 ± 12% (2[sigma]) when the metal was taken in a fasting state. This absorption figure was corrected for tracer that had been absorbed and secreted into the gastrointestinal (GI) tract over the time course of the study. The average time for a majority of the stable isotope tracer to pass through the GI tract was 4.7 ± 1.9 (2[sigma]) days.

  12. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-30

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between "static" and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N-. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles.

  13. Landsat image data quality studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schueler, C. F.; Salomonson, V. V.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary results of the Landsat-4 Image Data Quality Analysis (LIDQA) program to characterize the data obtained using the Thematic Mapper (TM) instrument on board the Landsat-4 and Landsat-5 satellites are reported. TM design specifications were compared to the obtained data with respect to four criteria, including spatial resolution; geometric fidelity; information content; and image relativity to Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data. The overall performance of the TM was rated excellent despite minor instabilities and radiometric anomalies in the data. Spatial performance of the TM exceeded design specifications in terms of both image sharpness and geometric accuracy, and the image utility of the TM data was at least twice as high as MSS data. The separability of alfalfa and sugar beet fields in a TM image is demonstrated.

  14. Application of Stable Isotope-Assisted Metabolomics for Cell Metabolism Studies

    PubMed Central

    You, Le; Zhang, Baichen; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2014-01-01

    The applications of stable isotopes in metabolomics have facilitated the study of cell metabolisms. Stable isotope-assisted metabolomics requires: (1) properly designed tracer experiments; (2) stringent sampling and quenching protocols to minimize isotopic alternations; (3) efficient metabolite separations; (4) high resolution mass spectrometry to resolve overlapping peaks and background noises; and (5) data analysis methods and databases to decipher isotopic clusters over a broad m/z range (mass-to-charge ratio). This paper overviews mass spectrometry based techniques for precise determination of metabolites and their isotopologues. It also discusses applications of isotopic approaches to track substrate utilization, identify unknown metabolites and their chemical formulas, measure metabolite concentrations, determine putative metabolic pathways, and investigate microbial community populations and their carbon assimilation patterns. In addition, 13C-metabolite fingerprinting and metabolic models can be integrated to quantify carbon fluxes (enzyme reaction rates). The fluxome, in combination with other “omics” analyses, may give systems-level insights into regulatory mechanisms underlying gene functions. More importantly, 13C-tracer experiments significantly improve the potential of low-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for broad-scope metabolism studies. We foresee the isotope-assisted metabolomics to be an indispensable tool in industrial biotechnology, environmental microbiology, and medical research. PMID:24957020

  15. Combining solvent isotope effects with substrate isotope effects in mechanistic studies of alcohol and amine oxidation by enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin- and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  16. X-Ray Imaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, Susan K.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The space environment in which the Space Station Freedom and other space platforms will orbit is truly a hostile environment. For example, the currently estimated integral fluence for electrons above 1 Mev at 2000 nautical miles is above 2 x 1O(exp 10) electrons/sq cm/day and the proton integral fluence is above 1 x 10(exp 9) protons/sq cm/day. At the 200 - 400 nautical miles, which is more representative of the altitude which will provide the environment for the Space Station, each of these fluences will be proportionally less; however, the data indicates that the radiation environment will obviously have an effect on structural materials exposed to the environment for long durations. The effects of this combined environment is the issue which needs to be understood for the long term exposure of structures in space. At the same time, there will be substantial potential for collisions between the space platforms and space debris. The current NASA catalogue contains over 4500 objects floating in space which are not considered payloads. This debris can have significant effects on collision with orbiting spacecraft. In order to better understand the effect of these hostile phenomena on spacecraft, several types of studies are being performed to simulate at some level the effect of the environment. In particular the study of debris clouds produced by hypervelocity impact on the various surfaces anticipated on the Space Station is very important at this point in time. The need to assess the threat of such debris clouds on space structures is an on-going activity. The Space Debris Impact facility in Building 4612 provides a test facility to monitor the types of damage produced with hypervelocity impact. These facilities are used to simulate space environmental effects from energetic particles. Flash radiography or x-ray imaging has traditionally provided such information and as such has been an important tool for recording damage in situ with the event. The proper

  17. Application of stable isotope-labeled compounds in metabolism and in metabolism-mediated toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Mutlib, Abdul E

    2008-09-01

    Stable isotope-labeled compounds have been synthesized and utilized by scientists from various areas of biomedical research during the last several decades. Compounds labeled with stable isotopes, such as deuterium and carbon-13, have been used effectively by drug metabolism scientists and toxicologists to gain better understanding of drugs' disposition and their potential role in target organ toxicities. The combination of stable isotope-labeling techniques with mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which allows rapid acquisition and interpretation of data, has promoted greater use of these stable isotope-labeled compounds in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) studies. Examples of the use of stable isotope-labeled compounds in elucidating structures of metabolites and delineating complex metabolic pathways are presented in this review. The application of labeled compounds in mechanistic toxicity studies will be discussed by providing an example of how strategic placement of a deuterium atom in a drug molecule mitigated specific-specific renal toxicity. Other examples from the literature demonstrating the application of stable isotope-labeled compounds in understanding metabolism-mediated toxicities are presented. Furthermore, an example of how a stable isotope-labeled compound was utilized to better understand some of the gene changes in toxicogenomic studies is discussed. The interpretation of large sets of data produced from toxicogenomics studies can be a challenge. One approach that could be used to simplify interpretation of the data, especially from studies designed to link gene changes with the formation of reactive metabolites thought to be responsible for toxicities, is through the use of stable isotope-labeled compounds. This is a relatively unexplored territory and needs to be further investigated. The employment of analytical techniques, especially mass spectrometry and NMR, used in conjunction

  18. Image Attributes: A Study of Scientific Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunskill, Jeff; Jorgensen, Corinne

    2002-01-01

    Discusses advancements in imaging technology and increased user access to digital images, as well as efforts to develop adequate indexing and retrieval methods for image databases. Describes preliminary results of a study of undergraduates that explored the attributes naive subjects use to describe scientific diagrams. (Author/LRW)

  19. Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics Studies in Ex Vivo TIssue Slices

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    An important component of this methodology is to assess the role of the tumor microenvironment on tumor growth and survival. To tackle this problem, we have adapted the original approach of Warburg 1, by combining thin tissue slices with Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) to determine detailed metabolic activity of human tissues. SIRM enables the tracing of metabolic transformations of source molecules such as glucose or glutamine over defined time periods, and is a requirement for detailed pathway tracing and flux analysis. In our approach, we maintain freshly resected tissue slices (both cancerous and non- cancerous from the same organ of the same subject) in cell culture media, and treat with appropriate stable isotope-enriched nutrients, e.g. 13C6-glucose or 13C5, 15N2 -glutamine. These slices are viable for at least 24 h, and make it possible to eliminate systemic influence on the target tissue metabolism while maintaining the original 3D cellular architecture. It is therefore an excellent pre-clinical platform for assessing the effect of therapeutic agents on target tissue metabolism and their therapeutic efficacy on individual patients 2,3. PMID:27158639

  20. Positional isotope exchange studies on enzyme using NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.O.

    1987-01-01

    The isotopically enriched compounds, /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and /sup 18/O bridge-labeled pyrophosphate, synthesized previously in this laboratory, were used to investigate and measure the exchange vs. turnover of substrates and products from their central complexes in four selected enzyme systems. Using hi-field /sup 31/P NMR, we were able to differentiate between /sup 18/O labeled in the bridge vs. the non-bridge positions by virtue of the isotope shift upon the phosphorus nuclei. The bridge to non-bridge scrambling of the label was quantitated and the exchange vs. turnover ratios under a variety of conditions was determined. Using the substrate inhibitor carboxycreatinine, PIX experiments with /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and creatine kinase were conducted. It was shown that carboxycreatinine and creatine kinase promoted exchange of the /sup 18/O label as determined by NMR. We have concluded that carboxycreatinine is either a substrate that catalyzes very slow turnover or it catalyzes exchange by a dissociative (SN/sub 1//sub P/) type of mechanism

  1. Experimental and computer modeling studies of isotopically selective two-step laser photodissociation of small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zittel, P.F.

    1992-03-25

    The approach to laser isotope separation taken in this study is based on isotopically selective, two-step, laser photodissociation of small molecules. A primary goal of this study is the measurement of fundamental molecular processes which control the two-step, photodissociative isotope enrichment process. This objective has led to experimental measurements of uv photodissociation cross sections for vibrationally excited states of several small molecules, including the first cross section reported for any neutral molecule in a specific, excited vibrational state. A second goal of this study has been the laboratory demonstration of isotope enrichment for isotopes of practical interest and for processes with a potential for larger scale production. Where possible, efforts have focussed on the separation of middle isotopes, such as {sup 17}O and {sup 33}S, which are expensive and difficult to separate using other techniques. Considerable success has been achieved in demonstrating the enrichment of isotopes of bromine, carbon, oxygen and a third goal of this study has been the application of computer modeling to the two-step enrichment process. Experimental measurements define as many as possible of the critical photophysical and chemical parameters required by an ab initio computer model of the enrichment process. Progress toward these goals has been documented in detail in a variety of journal articles and technical reports. It is not the objective of this final report to discuss each aspect of the work done under this contract/grant in detail. A general overview of the program, touches briefly on each of the problems addressed by the study and provides references to more detailed discussions. 19 refs.

  2. Study of the Photon Strength Functions for Gadolinium Isotopes with the DANCE Array

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.

    2009-03-10

    The gadolinium isotopes are interesting for reactor applications as well as for medicine and astrophysics. The gadolinium isotopes have some of the largest neutron capture cross sections. As a consequence they are used in the control rod in reactor fuel assembly. From the basic science point of view, there are seven stable isotopes of gadolinium with varying degrees of deformation. Therefore they provide a good testing ground for the study of deformation dependent structure such as the scissors mode. Decay gamma rays following neutron capture on Gd isotopes are detected by the DANCE array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation and close packing of the detector array enable gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric properties of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a specific isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles gamma-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. Various photon strength function models are used for comparison with experimentally measured DANCE data and provide insight for understanding the statistical decay properties of deformed nuclei.

  3. Stable isotope identification of lead sources in preschool children--the Omaha Study.

    PubMed

    Angle, C R; Manton, W I; Stanek, K L

    1995-01-01

    The objective was to determine, from analysis of the naturally occurring stable isotopes of lead, the relative contribution of food, handdust, housedust, soil and air lead to the absorbed (urinary) lead and the blood lead of children living in a former smelter city. A longitudinal 12 month study was conducted of 21 children, 2 - 3 years of age, living in central Omaha, balanced for race, gender and socioeconomic status. Field clean samples were collected monthly of 24 hour duplicate diet, handwipe and urine, with quarterly blood lead, annual environmental lead, weekly air for total lead and 206Pb, 207Pb and 208Pb by thermal ionization/mass spectrometry with a 205Pb spike in a Class II laboratory. Despite residence in a smelter city each child had a unique isotopic ratio of handwipe, blood and urine lead, the latter being identical. There was no correlation of handwipe isotopic ratio with proximity to a lead emission source or to the decade of the housing stock. The isotopic ratio of the annual mean handwipe lead predicted 43% of the variance of the annual mean blood and urine lead ratio (r2 = .43; p = .001). Handwipe lead ratios correlated (p < or = .05) with those of the windowsills and air ducts. The mean isotopic ratios of blood and urine lead were lower than those of handwipe and food, consistent with a contribution by endogenous bone lead. Clean catch urine provides a noninvasive index of blood lead isotopic ratio in children, as in adults.

  4. Hydrogen isotope variability in prairie wetland systems: implications for studies of migratory connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Lauren E; Clark, Robert G; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes (delta2H) are often used to infer the origins of migratory animals based on the strong correlation between deuterium content of tissues and long-term patterns of precipitation. However, the extreme flood and drought dynamics of surface waters in prairie wetland systems could mask these expected correlations. We investigated H isotopic variability in an aquatic food web associated with Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) that rely heavily on wetland-derived aerial insects for food. We evaluated isotopic turnover and incorporation of environmental water into tissue, processes that could affect H isotopic composition. Wetland water and aquatic invertebrates showed intra- and interannual H isotopic variation mainly related to evaporation and the amount and timing of precipitation. Snails showed rapid turnover of tissue deuterium and a large contribution of environmental water to their tissues. Swallow feather deuterium (delta2Hf) was variable but did not clearly follow changes in any of the food web compartments measured. Instead, isotopic variability may have been driven by shifts in the type or relative amounts of grey consumed and types of wetlands used. Nevertheless, despite relatively high variance in delta2Hf, the majority of birds fell within the predicted range of delta2Hf for the study area, revealing that significant trophic averaging occurred. However, both (presumed) diet shifts and variable hydrological conditions have the potential to greatly increase variance that must be considered when assigning origins of migratory animals based on delta2H.

  5. Isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion study of skarns from Vesuvius

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilg, H.A.; Lima, A.; Somma, R.; Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Ayuso, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    We present new mineral chemistry, fluid inclusion, stable carbon and oxygen, as well as Pb, Sr, and Nd isotope data of Ca-Mg-silicate-rich ejecta (skarns) and associated cognate and xenolithic nodules from the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex, Italy. The typically zoned skarn ejecta consist mainly of diopsidic and hedenbergitic, sometimes "fassaitic" clinopyroxene, Mg-rich and Ti-poor phlogopite, F-bearing vesuvianite, wollastonite, gehlenite, meionite, forsterite, clinohumite, anorthite and Mg-poor calcite with accessory apatite, spinell, magnetite, perovskite, baddeleyite, and various REE-, U-, Th-, Zr- and Ti-rich minerals. Four major types of fluid inclusions were observed in wollastonite, vesuvianite, gehlenite, clinopyroxene and calcite: a) primary silicate melt inclusions (THOM = 1000-1050??C), b) CO2 ?? H2S-rich fluid inclusions (THOM = 20-31.3??C into the vapor phase), c) multiphase aqueous brine inclusions (THOM = 720-820??C) with mainly sylvite and halite daughter minerals, and d) complex chloride-carbonate-sulfate-fluoride-silicate-bearing saline-melt inclusions (THOM = 870-890??C). The last inclusion type shows evidence for immiscibility between several fluids (silicate melt - aqueous chloride-rich liquid - carbonate/sulfate melt?) during heating and cooling below 870??C. There is no evidence for fluid circulation below 700??C and participation of externally derived meteoric fluids in skarn formation. Skarns have considerably variable 206Pb/204Pb (19.047-19.202), 207Pb/204Pb (15.655-15.670), and 208Pb/204Pb (38.915-39.069) and relatively low 143Nd/144Nd (0.51211-0.51244) ratios. The carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of skarn calcites (??13CV-PDB = -5.4 to -1.1???; ??18OV-SMOW = 11.7 to 16.4???) indicate formation from a 18O- and 13C-enriched fluid. The isotope composition of skarns and the presence of silicate melt inclusion-bearing wollastonite nodules suggests assimilation of carbonate wall rocks by the alkaline magma at moderate depths (< 5

  6. Lead isotopes in Southern Ocean marine sediments: implications for paleoclimatic provenance and seawater studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, C. P.; Martin, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    major and trace elements. Preliminary results, along with those of parallel detrital studies, suggest Pb isotopes are a viable tool for paleoclimatic studies in areas of the Southern Ocean proximal to Antarctica, and our new data forms an important framework for future studies in the region.

  7. Advances in optical imaging for pharmacological studies

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Imaging approaches are an essential tool for following up over time representative parameters of in vivo models, providing useful information in pharmacological studies. Main advantages of optical imaging approaches compared to other imaging methods are their safety, straight-forward use and cost-effectiveness. A main drawback, however, is having to deal with the presence of high scattering and high absorption in living tissues. Depending on how these issues are addressed, three different modalities can be differentiated: planar imaging (including fluorescence and bioluminescence in vivo imaging), optical tomography, and optoacoustic approaches. In this review we describe the latest advances in optical in vivo imaging with pharmacological applications, with special focus on the development of new optical imaging probes in order to overcome the strong absorption introduced by different tissue components, especially hemoglobin, and the development of multimodal imaging systems in order to overcome the resolution limitations imposed by scattering. PMID:26441646

  8. Column experiment to study isotope fractionation of volatile organic contaminants in porous media under unsaturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeannottat, Simon; Hunkeler, Daniel; Breider, Florian

    2010-05-01

    Pollution by organic contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents is common in industrialized countries. The use of stable isotope analysis is increasingly recognized as a powerful technique for investigating the behaviour of organic or inorganic contaminants. Recently, compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has proven to be an effective tool to confirm and quantify in-situ biodegradation by indigenous microbial populations in groundwater.In contrast, only few studies have investigated the use of CSIA in the unsaturated zone. In the unsaturated zone, the main potential applications of CSIA include the assessment of biodegradation and the fingerprinting of different sources of petroleum hydrocarbon or chlorinated solvents vapours. However, it has to be taken into account that isotope ratios in the unsaturated zone can vary due to diffusion and volatilization in addition to biodegradation. For application of isotope methods in the unsaturated zone, it is crucial to quantify isotopic fractionation resulting from physico-chemical and transport processes. The study is focused on laboratory experiments that investigate the effect of vaporization and diffusion on isotope ratios. The effect of diffusion is carried out using a column experiment setup that can be considered to represent VOC transport from a floating NAPL towards the atmosphere. Furthermore, additional column and batch experiments will be conducted to better understand the effect of biodegradation. Volatilization is studied with an other experimental setup. In addition, a mathematical framework was developed to simulate the isotope evolution in the column study. Since the initial experiments aimed at investigating the effect of vaporization and diffusion only, the column is filled with dry quartz sand in order to avoid perturbations of concentration profiles by humidity or adsorption on organic matter. An activated sand will later be used for the biodegradation experiments. A

  9. Neodymium isotopic studies of Precambrian banded iron formations

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel-Klose, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The isotopic composition of Nd is reported for 11 different Precambrian BIFs and suggests a trend of increasingly positive epsilon/sub Nd/(T) values with age. This trend is interpreted to reflect isotopic variations in precambrian sea water. The Urucum and the Gunflint BIFs, both younger than 1.8 AE, yield negative epsilon/sub Nd/(T) values, between -4.6 and -1.1. The remaining BIFs, with ages between 1.85 and 3.4 AE, have predominantly positive values, between -0.7 and +4.0. The low UXSm/ UUNd ratio in BIFs is inconsistent with their REE being derived from rivers draining large proportions of greenstones. The positive, mantle-like values of BIFs older than 1.8 AE contrasts strongly with the negative, continental-like values of Phanerozoic sea water. Therefore, the REE budget of the oceans during most of the Precambrian was probably dominated by the hydrothermal circulation of sea water through MORBs and not by river waters, as today. A one order of magnitude higher hydrothermal contribution of Nd is suggested by the data for the Early Precambrian. This is most likely due to a higher hydrothermal water to river water flux ratio and/or a higher Nd concentration in hotter hydrothermal waters (>375 C) during this period. The large hydrothermal contribution of REE during the Early Precambrian can be explained best if the temperature of sea water fluxing through MORBs was higher than today. Experiments investigating the interaction between sea water and basalt have shown that the concentration of iron might have been about 20 times larger if the temperature of interaction was about 425 C. Such hot hydrothermal solutions could have been the most important source of iron in Precambrian BIFs.

  10. Microwave Imaging of Human Forearms: Pilot Study and Image Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Colin; Zakaria, Amer; Pistorius, Stephen; LoVetri, Joe

    2013-01-01

    We present a pilot study using a microwave tomography system in which we image the forearms of 5 adult male and female volunteers between the ages of 30 and 48. Microwave scattering data were collected at 0.8 to 1.2 GHz with 24 transmitting and receiving antennas located in a matching fluid of deionized water and table salt. Inversion of the microwave data was performed with a balanced version of the multiplicative-regularized contrast source inversion algorithm formulated using the finite-element method (FEM-CSI). T1-weighted MRI images of each volunteer's forearm were also collected in the same plane as the microwave scattering experiment. Initial “blind” imaging results from the utilized inversion algorithm show that the image quality is dependent on the thickness of the arm's peripheral adipose tissue layer; thicker layers of adipose tissue lead to poorer overall image quality. Due to the exible nature of the FEM-CSI algorithm used, prior information can be readily incorporated into the microwave imaging inversion process. We show that by introducing prior information into the FEM-CSI algorithm the internal anatomical features of all the arms are resolved, significantly improving the images. The prior information was estimated manually from the blind inversions using an ad hoc procedure. PMID:24023539

  11. Study on nuclear structures of Te isotopes beyond N = 82 shell closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pilsoo; Lee, Chun Sik; Moon, Chang-Bum; Eurica Ribf-87 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Tellurium which has two valence protons above the Z = 50 proton shell closure is well known for collective behavior in low-lying states. Therefore, Te isotopes are known to be a good test ground for studying nuclear collective modes but also the effect of neutron-proton interaction on the shell evolution with variation of neutron numbers owing to the valence protons above Z = 50 . For this reason Te isotopes always attract our attention, however, most available spectroscopic nuclear data of Te isotopes remains below N = 82 , and experimental data is severely limited above N = 82 . Meanwhile, recent study of 138Te by means of β- γ spectroscopy with fission fragments of 238U has provided us with new clues on excited states in 138Te, and the new experimental result has proposed new excited states that were unexpected in the previous theoretical studies. This study aims at understanding structural evolution in Te isotopes above N = 82 with respect to below N = 82 including the new data set available today. In this presentation we discuss the nuclear structures and effective interactions in Te isotopes above N = 82 based on the nuclear shell model and interacting boson approximations.

  12. The role of stable isotopes in human identification: a longitudinal study into the variability of isotopic signals in human hair and nails.

    PubMed

    Fraser, I; Meier-Augenstein, W; Kalin, R M

    2006-01-01

    Recent natural catastrophes with large-scale loss of life have demonstrated the need for a new technique to provide information for disaster victim identification when DNA methods fail to yield the identification of an individual, or in other situations where authorities need to determine the recent geographical life history of people. The latter may be in relation to the identification of individuals detained on suspicion of terrorism or in relation to people-trafficking or smuggling. One proposed solution is the use of stable isotope profiling (SIP) using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Exploiting the link between the isotopic signal of dietary components and the isotopic composition of body tissue, the aim of this study was to refine a non-invasive method of analysing human material such as scalp hair and fingernails using SIP and to assess the degree of natural variability in these profiles. Scalp hair and fingernail samples were collected from British and non-British volunteers at Queen's University Belfast every 2 weeks for a minimum of 8 months. Samples were analysed using IRMS to determine their isotopic composition for 13C, 15N, 2H and 18O. The results of this longitudinal study yielded information on the natural variability of the isotopic composition of these tissues. The data demonstrate the relatively low degree of natural variation in the 13C/15N isotopic abundance of scalp hair and fingernails whilst greater variations were recorded in the hydrogen and oxygen values of the same samples. The 15N and 18O values of nail are noticeably more variable than that of scalp hair from the same subject. A hypothesis explaining this trend is put forward based on the faster rate of formation of hair than of nails. This means that there is less time for the compounds forming hair to be affected by biochemical processes that could alter their isotopic signature.

  13. Charge coupled device image sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of a charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensors for use in spacecraft-borne imaging systems was conducted. The study resulted in design recommendations for two sensors, an approximately 500 times 500 element imaging device and a 1 times 190 element linear imaging device with a 190 times 121 buffer store. Emphasis was placed on the higher resolution, area-imaging sensor. The objectives of the proposed sensors are listed, results of the experiments are analyzed, and estimates of the device performance are presented. A summary of the major technical recommendations is included.

  14. Tracing paleofluid circulations using iron isotopes: A study of hematite and goethite concretions from the Navajo Sandstone (Utah, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busigny, Vincent; Dauphas, Nicolas

    2007-02-01

    Iron concentrations and isotopic compositions were measured in spherical hematite and goethite concretions, together with associated red (Fe-oxide coated) and white (bleached) sandstones from the Jurassic Navajo formation, Utah (USA). Earlier studies showed that, in the Navajo Sandstone, reducing fluids (presumably rich in hydrocarbons) mobilized Fe present as Fe-oxide coatings on detrital quartz grains. Dissolved Fe then precipitated as spherical concretions by interaction with oxidizing groundwater. Despite being depleted in Fe by ˜ 50%, the bleached sandstones have Fe isotopic compositions similar to adjacent red sandstones (˜ 0‰/amu relative to IRMM-014). This shows that dissolution of Fe-oxide did not produce significant isotope fractionation, in agreement with previous experimental studies of abiotic Fe-oxide dissolution. In contrast, the concretions are depleted in the heavy isotopes of iron by - 0.07 to - 0.68‰/amu. This is opposite to the expected fractionation for partial Fe oxidation, which tends to enrich the precipitate in the heavy isotopes. Several scenarios are considered for explaining the measured Fe isotopic compositions. Although diffusion might be an important process in controlling the growth of spherical concretions, the associated isotopic fractionation is negligible compared to the observed variations. Kinetic isotope fractionation during precipitation can be ruled out as well because no isotopic zonation is seen within indurated concretions and Fe isotope evidence supports the occurrence of dissolution-reprecipitation reactions consistent with equilibrium growth conditions. The Fe isotopic compositions of the concretions are best explained by evolution of the fluid composition through precipitation and/or adsorption of isotopically heavy Fe during fluid flow through the sandstone. This scenario is supported by a regional trend in the isotopic composition of Fe, showing that this element was transported in fluids over several

  15. Combined carbonate carbon isotopic and cellular ultrastructural studies of individual benthic foraminifera: Method description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jonathan B.; Bernhard, Joan M.; Curtis, Jason; Rathburn, Anthony E.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon isotopes of foraminiferal tests provide a widely used proxy for past oceanographic environmental conditions. This proxy can be calibrated using live specimens, which are reliably identified with observations of cell ultrastructure. Observations of ultrastructures can also be used for studies of biological characteristics such as diet and presence of symbionts. Combining biological and isotopic studies on individual foraminifera could provide novel information, but standard isotopic methods destroy ultrastructures by desiccating specimens and observations of ultrastructure require removal of carbonate tests, preventing isotope measurements. The approach described here preserves cellular ultrastructure during isotopic analyses by keeping the foraminifera in an aqueous buffer (Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS)). The technique was developed and standardized with 36 aliquots of NBS-19 standard of similar weight to foraminiferal tests (5 to 123 μg). Standard errors ranged from ± 0.06 to ± 0.85‰ and were caused by CO2 contaminants dissolved in the PBS. The technique was used to measure δ13C values of 96 foraminifera, 10 of which do not precipitate carbonate tests. Calcareous foraminiferal tests had corrected carbon isotope ratios of -8.5 to +3.2‰. This new technique allows comparisons of isotopic compositions of tests made by foraminifera known to be alive at the time of collection with their biological characteristics such as prey composition and presence or absence of putative symbionts. The approach may be applied to additional biomineralizing organisms such as planktonic foraminifera, pteropods, corals, and coccolithophores to elucidate certain biological controls on their paleoceanographic proxy signatures.

  16. Coordinated Oxygen Isotopic and Petrologic Studies of CAIS Record Varying Composition of Protosolar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Justin I.; Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, S. B.; Weber, P. K.; Grossman, L.; Ross, D. K.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2012-01-01

    Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) record the O-isotope composition of Solar nebular gas from which they grew [1]. High spatial resolution O-isotope measurements afforded by ion microprobe analysis across the rims and margin of CAIs reveal systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 and suggest formation from a diversity of nebular environments [2-4]. This heterogeneity has been explained by isotopic mixing between the O-16-rich Solar reservoir [6] and a second O-16-poor reservoir (probably nebular gas) with a "planetary-like" isotopic composition [e.g., 1, 6-7], but the mechanism and location(s) where these events occur within the protoplanetary disk remain uncertain. The orientation of large and systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 reported by [3] for a compact Type A CAI from the Efremovka reduced CV3 chondrite differs dramatically from reports by [4] of a similar CAI, A37 from the Allende oxidized CV3 chondrite. Both studies conclude that CAIs were exposed to distinct, nebular O-isotope reservoirs, implying the transfer of CAIs among different settings within the protoplanetary disk [4]. To test this hypothesis further and the extent of intra-CAI O-isotopic variation, a pristine compact Type A CAI, Ef-1 from Efremovka, and a Type B2 CAI, TS4 from Allende were studied. Our new results are equally intriguing because, collectively, O-isotopic zoning patterns in the CAIs indicate a progressive and cyclic record. The results imply that CAIs were commonly exposed to multiple environments of distinct gas during their formation. Numerical models help constrain conditions and duration of these events.

  17. Nuclear shape coexistence in Po isotopes: An interacting boson model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ramos, J. E.; Heyde, K.

    2015-09-01

    Background: The lead region, Po, Pb, Hg, and Pt, shows up the presence of coexisting structures having different deformation and corresponding to different particle-hole configurations in the shell-model language. Purpose: We intend to study the importance of configuration mixing in the understanding of the nuclear structure of even-even Po isotopes, where the shape coexistence phenomena are not clear enough. Method: We study in detail a long chain of polonium isotopes, Po-208190, using the interacting boson model with configuration mixing (IBM-CM). We fix the parameters of the Hamiltonians through a least-squares fit to the known energies and absolute B (E 2 ) transition rates of states up to 3 MeV. Results: We obtained the IBM-CM Hamiltonians and we calculate excitation energies, B (E 2 ) 's, electric quadrupole moments, nuclear radii and isotopic shifts, quadrupole shape invariants, wave functions, and deformations. Conclusions: We obtain a good agreement with the experimental data for all the studied observables and we conclude that shape coexistence phenomenon is hidden in Po isotopes, very much as in the case of the Pt isotopes.

  18. Importance of the Lu-Hf isotopic system in studies of planetary chronology and chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patchett, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Lu-176-Hf-176 isotope method and its applications in earth sciences are discussed with regard to planetary-evolution studies. From new data on basalts from oceanic islands, Hf-176/Hf-177 and Nd-143/Nd-144 are found to display a single linear isotopic variation in the suboceanic mantle, whereas considerable divergences occur in Hf-176/Hf-177-Sr-87/Sr-86 and Nd-143/Nd-144-Sr87/Sr-86 diagrams. With the acquisition of further Hf-Sr-Nd isotopic data, these discordant Sr-87/Sr-86 relationships may allow a distinction between processes such as mantle metasomatism, influence of sea-water altered material in the magma source, or recycling of sediments into the mantle. The best quality Hf isotope data are obtained from granitoid or zircons, and are most suitable for studying ancient terrestrial Hf isotopic variations. Lu-Hf is shown to be a viable method for dating ancient terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples, but is unlikely to find wide application in pure chronological studies because it offers little advantage over existing methods.

  19. Small-scale studies of roasted ore waste reveal extreme ranges of stable mercury isotope signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robin S.; Wiederhold, Jan G.; Jew, Adam D.; Brown, Gordon E.; Bourdon, Bernard; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2014-07-01

    Active and closed Hg mines are significant sources of Hg contamination to the environment, mainly due to large volumes of mine waste material disposed of on-site. The application of Hg isotopes as source tracer from such contaminated sites requires knowledge of the Hg isotope signatures of different materials potentially released to the environment. Previous work has shown that calcine, the waste residue of the on-site ore roasting process, can exhibit distinct Hg isotope signatures compared with the primary ore. Here, we report results from a detailed small-scale study of Hg isotope variations in calcine collected from the closed New Idria Hg mine, San Benito County, CA, USA. The calcine samples exhibited different internal layering features which were investigated using optical microscopy, micro X-ray fluorescence, micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μ-XAS), and stable Hg isotope analysis. Significant Fe, S, and Hg concentration gradients were found across the different internal layers. Isotopic analyses revealed an extreme variation with pronounced isotopic gradients across the internal layered features. Overall, δ202Hg (±0.10‰, 2 SD) describing mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) ranged from -5.96 to 14.49‰, which is by far the largest range of δ202Hg values reported for any environmental sample. In addition, Δ199Hg (±0.06‰, 2 SD) describing mass-independent fractionation (MIF) ranged from -0.17 to 0.21‰. The μ-XAS analyses suggested that cinnabar and metacinnabar are the dominant Hg-bearing phases in the calcine. Our results demonstrate that the incomplete roasting of HgS ores in Hg mines can cause extreme mass-dependent Hg isotope fractionations at the scale of individual calcine pieces with enrichments in both light and heavy Hg isotopes relative to the primary ore signatures. This finding has important implications for the application of Hg isotopes as potential source tracers for Hg released to the environment from closed Hg mines and

  20. Stable isotope-labeling studies in metabolomics: new insights into structure and dynamics of metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Barrett, Michael P; Breitling, Rainer; Creek, Darren J

    2014-01-01

    The rapid emergence of metabolomics has enabled system-wide measurements of metabolites in various organisms. However, advances in the mechanistic understanding of metabolic networks remain limited, as most metabolomics studies cannot routinely provide accurate metabolite identification, absolute quantification and flux measurement. Stable isotope labeling offers opportunities to overcome these limitations. Here we describe some current approaches to stable isotope-labeled metabolomics and provide examples of the significant impact that these studies have had on our understanding of cellular metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss recently developed software solutions for the analysis of stable isotope-labeled metabolomics data and propose the bioinformatics solutions that will pave the way for the broader application and optimal interpretation of system-scale labeling studies in metabolomics. PMID:24568354

  1. Isotopic and geochemical studies of fluid-rock interactions and the chemical evolution of the oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Derry, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of Sr and Nd, and the abundances of rare earth elements (REE) are used to study various types of fluid-rock interactions in the Earth's crust. The isotopic compositions of Sr and Nd and REE patterns in marine chemical sediments of Precambrian age are used to estimate the relative importance of continental weathering versus submarine hydrothermal activity in determining the chemical mass balance of the Precambrian oceans. Major and trace element abundances and Sr and Nd isotopes are used to quantify the degree of interaction of a carbonatite fluid-magmatic system with felsic crust, and to constrain the isotopic characteristics of the mantle source region. The isotopic composition of Sr is reported from a well characterized sequence of Upper Proterozoic carbonates from Svalbard and east Greenland. A simple model of carbonate recycling and isotopic mass balance calculations illustrate that sedimentary recycling can have a strong influence on Sr in the oceans. REE patterns from Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs) are very similar to modern metalliferous sediments, and imply that the overall REE pattern of Precambrian seawater was similar to today. The mantle-like {var epsilon}{sub Nd} values and positive Eu anomalies imply that the source of the REE in the BIFs was submarine hydrothermal activity. The implications of a large hydrothermal flux of reduced Fe on the redox controls of the Precambrian atmosphere are explored, and a testable hypothesis is developed. The mass balance of Eu in the oceans is affected by preferential scavenging at hydrothermal sites. Data from the Cherry Hill, CA mineralizing system imply a complex plumbing system and a long residence time for the water. Isotopic data from the Fen alkaline complex, Norway, define mixing trends between mantle derived magmas or magmatic fluids and old crust.

  2. Strontium Isotope Study of Coal Untilization By-products Interacting with Environmental Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Schroeder, Karl T; Brubaker, Tonya M

    2011-09-01

    Sequential leaching experiments on coal utilization by-products (CUB) were coupled with chemical and strontium (Sr) isotopic analyses to better understand the influence of coal type and combustion processes on CUB properties and the release of elements during interaction with environmental waters during disposal. Class C fly ash tended to release the highest quantity of minor and trace elements—including alkaline earth elements, sodium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, titanium, and zinc—during sequential extraction, with bottom ash yielding the lowest. Strontium isotope ratios ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) in bulk-CUB samples (total dissolution of CUB) are generally higher in class F ash than in class C ash. Bulk-CUB ratios appear to be controlled by the geologic source of the mineral matter in the feed coal, and by Sr added during desulfurization treatments. Leachates of the CUB generally have Sr isotope ratios that are different than the bulk value, demonstrating that Sr was not isotopically homogenized during combustion. Variations in the Sr isotopic composition of CUB leachates were correlated with mobility of several major and trace elements; the data suggest that arsenic and lead are held in phases that contain the more radiogenic (high-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) component. A changing Sr isotope ratio of CUB-interacting waters in a disposal environment could forecast the release of certain strongly bound elements of environmental concern. This study lays the groundwork for the application of Sr isotopes as an environmental tracer for CUB–water interaction.

  3. Isotope geochemistry and the study of habitability and life on other planets (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J.

    2010-12-01

    The question of life on other planets might be solved by a remarkable discovery — a martian coquina, or perhaps a tentacle print on a distant landscape. But, until this happens, evidence for life and, more generally, habitability will use indirect geochemical arguments such as isotope thermometers and biomarkers (molecular, isotopic, and elemental fingerprints of biology)., Understanding this evidence will also demand a quantitative planetary history based on isotopic dating. Laboratory study of samples derived from Mars or other solar-system bodies will be a focus of geochemical investigations aimed at such assessments. Examples of how this will be done can be found in studies of the Precambrian geologic record and Martian meteorites. Debates regarding environmental conditions and biogenicity of minerals and organic matter are common in the study of such materials. These controversies derive from simple but refractory problems with the geochemical principles we employ: Indicators of metabolism can be mimicked by abiologic reactions; paleo-environmental proxies generally require an understanding of related geochemical cycles (e.g., the isotopic budget of water); and, though many organic molecules are unambiguous biomarkers, diagenesis can transform them into compounds that resemble products of abiogenic organic synthesis. If planetary sample return is to produce definitive geochemical constraints on habitability and biology, we will require either luck or a new class of geochemical tools that explicitly address these problems. The spatial distribution of rare isotopes within molecular structures, including ‘clumping’ and position-specific isotope effects, offer new geochemical tools that could provide such solutions. For example, even a simple molecule like acetic acid (C2H4O2) has more than 200 distinct isotopic configurations when spatial distribution of isotopes is considered, and the proportions of these could reflect formation temperature, the nature of

  4. Stable isotope studies of nicotine kinetics and bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Benowitz, N.L.; Jacob, P. 3d.; Denaro, C.; Jenkins, R. )

    1991-03-01

    The stable isotope-labeled compound 3',3'-dideuteronicotine was used to investigate the disposition kinetics of nicotine in smokers, the systemic absorption of nicotine from cigarette smoke, and the bioavailability of nicotine ingested as oral capsules. Blood levels of labeled nicotine could be measured for 9 hours after a 30-minute intravenous infusion. Analysis of disposition kinetics in 10 healthy men revealed a multiexponential decline after the end of an infusion, with an elimination half-life averaging 203 minutes. This half-life was longer than that previously reported, indicating the presence of a shallow elimination phase. Plasma clearance averaged 14.6 ml/min/kg. The average intake of nicotine per cigarette was 2.29 mg. A cigarette smoke-monitoring system that directly measured particulate matter in smoke was evaluated in these subjects. Total particulate matter, number of puffs on the cigarette, total puff volume, and time of puffing correlated with the intake of nicotine from smoking. The oral bioavailability of nicotine averaged 44%. This bioavailability is higher than expected based on the systemic clearance of nicotine and suggests that there may be significant extrahepatic metabolism of nicotine.

  5. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes using actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer for U-Th studies; [sup 238]U-[sup 230]Th disequilibrium in recent lavas from Iceland; water-rock interaction from U-Th studies; resonance ionization mass spectrometry of Os and Ti isotopes; and self-diffusion of Mg.

  6. Syntrophic interactions and mechanisms underpinning anaerobic methane oxidation: targeted metaproteogenomics, single-cell protein detection and quantitative isotope imaging of microbial consortia

    SciTech Connect

    Orphan, Victoria Jeanne

    2014-11-26

    Syntrophy and mutualism play a central role in carbon and nutrient cycling by microorganisms. Yet, our ability to effectively study symbionts in culture has been hindered by the inherent interdependence of syntrophic associations, their dynamic behavior, and their frequent existence at thermodynamic limits. Now solutions to these challenges are emerging in the form of new methodologies. Developing strategies that establish links between the identity of microorganisms and their metabolic potential, as well as techniques that can probe metabolic networks on a scale that captures individual molecule exchange and processing, is at the forefront of microbial ecology. Understanding the interactions between microorganisms on this level, at a resolution previously intractable, will lead to our greater understanding of carbon turnover and microbial community resilience to environmental perturbations. In this project, we studied an enigmatic syntrophic association between uncultured methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria. This environmental archaeal-bacterial partnership represents a globally important sink for methane in anoxic environments. The specific goals of this project were organized into 3 major tasks designed to address questions relating to the ecophysiology of these syntrophic organisms under changing environmental conditions (e.g. different electron acceptors and nutrients), primarily through the development of microanalytical imaging methods which enable the visualization of the spatial distribution of the partners within aggregates, consumption and exchange of isotopically labeled substrates, and expression of targeted proteins identified via metaproteomics. The advanced tool set developed here to collect, correlate, and analyze these high resolution image and isotope-based datasets from methane-oxidizing consortia has the potential to be widely applicable for studying and modeling patterns of activity and interactions across a broad range of

  7. Design study of an ultra-compact superconducting cyclotron for isotope production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Vincent, J.

    2014-11-01

    A 12.5 MeV, 25 μA, proton compact superconducting cyclotron for medical isotope production has been designed and is currently in fabrication. The machine is initially aimed at producing 13N ammonia for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cardiology applications. With an ultra-compact size and cost-effective price point, this system will offer clinicians unprecedented access to the preferred radiopharmaceutical isotope for cardiac PET imaging. A systems approach that carefully balanced the subsystem requirements coupled to precise beam dynamics calculations was followed. The system is designed to irradiate a liquid target internal to the cyclotron and to minimize the need for radiation shielding. The main parameters of the cyclotron, its design, and principal steps of the development work are presented here.

  8. Isotope effect studies of the pyruvate-dependent histidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-08-09

    The decarboxylation of histidine by the pyruvate-dependent histidine decarboxylase of Lactobacillus 30 a shows a carbon isotope effect k/sup 12//k/sup 13/ = 1.0334 +/- 0.0005 and a nitrogen isotope effect k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9799 +/- 0.0006 at pH 4.8, 37/sup 0/C. The carbon isotope effect is slightly increased by deuteriation of the substrate and slightly decreased in D/sub 2/O. The observed nitrogen isotope effect indicates that the imine nitrogen in the substrate-Schiff base intermediate complex is ordinarily protonated, and the pH dependence of the carbon isotope effect indicates that both protonated and unprotonated forms of this intermediate are capable of undergoing decarboxylation. As with the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme, Schiff base formation and decarboxylation are jointly rate-limiting, with the intermediate histidine-pyruvate Schiff base showing a decarboxylation/Schiff base hydrolysis ratio of 0.5-1.0 at pH 4.8. The decarboxylation transition state is more reactant-like for the pyruvate-dependent enzyme than for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme. These studies find no particular energetic or catalytic advantage to the use of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate over covalently bound pyruvate in catalysis of the decarboxylation of histidine.

  9. Isotopic Studies of Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site,WA

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.N.; Conrad, M.E.; DePaolo, D.J.; Dresel, P.E.

    2006-11-01

    Processes of fluid flow and chemical transport through thevadose zone can be characterized through the isotopic systematics ofnatural soils, minerals, pore fluids and groundwater. In thiscontribution, we first review our research using measured isotopicvariations, due both to natural and site related processes, of theelements H, O, N, Sr and U, to study the interconnection between vadosezone and groundwater contamination at the Hanford Site in south-centralWashington. We follow this brief review with a presentation of new datapertaining to vadose zone and groundwater contamination in the WMAT-TX-TY vicinity. Uranium (U) isotopic data for the C3832 core (WMA TX)indicates the involvement of processed natural U fuel, and links theobserved U contamination to the nearby single shelled tank TX-104. Thedata also precludes contamination from an early 1970 s TX-107 leak. Inthe case of the C4104 core (WMA T), the U isotopic data indicates amixture of processed natural and enriched U fuels consistent with themajor leak from T-106 in 1973. Uranium and Strontium isotopic data forthe cores also provides direct evidence for chemical interaction betweenhigh-pH waste fluid and sediment. Isotopic data for groundwater nitratecontamination in the vicinity of WMA-T strongly suggests high-level tankwaste (most likely from T-106) as the source of very high 99Tcconcentrations recently observed at the NE corner of WMAT.

  10. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joël; Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S.; Jost, Rémy; Bhattacharya, S. K.

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [“Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry,” J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 18}O, and Δ{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from −40 to −74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying

  11. Automated image registration for FDOPA PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Yu, Dan-Chu; Melega, William; Barrio, Jorge R.; Phelps, Michael E.

    1996-12-01

    In this study, various image registration methods are investigated for their suitability for registration of L-6-[18F]-fluoro-DOPA (FDOPA) PET images. Five different optimization criteria including sum of absolute difference (SAD), mean square difference (MSD), cross-correlation coefficient (CC), standard deviation of pixel ratio (SDPR), and stochastic sign change (SSC) were implemented and Powell's algorithm was used to optimize the criteria. The optimization criteria were calculated either unidirectionally (i.e. only evaluating the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2) or bidirectionally (i.e. averaging the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2 and those for the sliced image 2 with the original image 1). Monkey FDOPA images taken at various known orientations were used to evaluate the accuracy of different methods. A set of human FDOPA dynamic images was used to investigate the ability of the methods for correcting subject movement. It was found that a large improvement in performance resulted when bidirectional rather than unidirectional criteria were used. Overall, the SAD, MSD and SDPR methods were found to be comparable in performance and were suitable for registering FDOPA images. The MSD method gave more adequate results for frame-to-frame image registration for correcting subject movement during a dynamic FDOPA study. The utility of the registration method is further demonstrated by registering FDOPA images in monkeys before and after amphetamine injection to reveal more clearly the changes in spatial distribution of FDOPA due to the drug intervention.

  12. Three-dimensional oxygen isotope imaging of convective fluid flow around the Big Bonanza, Comstock lode mining district, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, R.E.; Singleton, M.J.; Champion, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    Oxygen isotope analyses of propylitized andesites from the Con Virginia and California mines allow construction of a detailed, three-dimensional image of the isotopic surfaces produced by the convective fluid flows that deposited the famous Big Bonanza orebody. On a set of intersecting maps and sections, the δ18O isopleths clearly show the intricate and conformable relationship of the orebody to a deep, ~500 m gyre of meteoric-hydrothermal fluid that circulated along and above the Comstock fault, near the contact of the Davidson Granodiorite. The core of this gyre (δ18O = 0 to 3.8‰) encompasses the bonanza and is almost totally surrounded by rocks having much lower δ18O values (–1.0 to –4.4‰). This deep gyre may represent a convective longitudinal roll superimposed on a large unicellular meteoric-hydrothermal system, producing a complex flow field with both radial and longitudinal components that is consistent with experimentally observed patterns of fluid convection in permeable media.

  13. Re-introduction of a novel approach to the use of stable isotopes in pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Parr, Alan; Gupta, Manish; Montague, Timothy H; Hoke, Frank

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the scientific benefits of a novel approach in using stable isotopes to reduce the number of subjects needed to perform relative bioavailability and bioequivalence pharmacokinetic studies for formulations that are qualitatively and quantitatively the same and quality by design (QbD) pharmacokinetic studies. The stable isotope approach was investigated using simulations to determine the impact this approach would have on the estimation of variability and, subsequently, the sample size for a bioequivalence study. A biostudy was conducted in dogs in a two period crossover to explore the viability of the stable isotope approach. For a drug product with within-subject variability (CV(w)) of 50% and assuming a correlation of 0.95 between the enriched and non-enriched pharmacokinetics (PK), simulations showed that the variability can be reduced by 70% and the required sample size can be reduced by 90% while maintaining 90% power to demonstrate bioequivalence. The dog study showed a strong correlation (R(2), > 0.99) between the enriched and non-enriched area under the curve and maximum observed concentration, and a significant reduction in the variability (reduction in % coefficient of variation from 79.9% to 6.3%). Utilization of a stable isotope approach can markedly improve the efficiency and accuracy of bioavailability and bioequivalence studies particularly for highly variable drugs in formulations that are qualitatively and quantitatively the same and for studies designed for QbD investigations.

  14. Potential of Sr isotopic analysis in ceramic provenance studies: Characterisation of Chinese stonewares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Greig, Alan; Collerson, Kenneth D.; Zhuo, Zhen-Xi; Feng, Yue-Xin

    2005-11-01

    We compare the trace element and Sr isotopic compositions of stoneware bodies made in Yaozhou and Jizhou to characterise these Chinese archaeological ceramics and examine the potential of Sr isotopes in provenance studies. Element concentrations determined by ICP-MS achieve distinct characterisation for Jizhou samples due to their restricted variation, yet had limited success with Yaozhou wares because of their large variability. In contrast, 87Sr/86Sr ratios in Yaozhou samples have a very small variation and are all significantly lower than those of Jizhou samples, which show a large variation and cannot be well characterised with Sr isotopes. Geochemical interpretation reveals that 87Sr/86Sr ratios will have greater potential to characterise ceramics made of low Rb/Sr materials such as kaolin clay, yet will show larger variations in ceramics made of high Rb/Sr materials such as porcelain stone.

  15. Isotopic and REE studies of lunar basalt 12038 - Implications for petrogenesis of aluminous mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Wooden, J. L.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Bansal, B. M.

    1981-01-01

    Sr, Nd, and Sm isotopic studies of lunar basalt 12038, one of the so-called aluminous mare basalts, are reported. The evolution of the Sr and Nd isotopic compositions and the rare earth element (REE) abundances is successfully modeled within the framework of the model developed by Nyquist et al. (1977, 1979) for Apollo 12 olivine-pigeonite and ilmenite basalts. It is pointed out that the isotopic and trace element features of 12038 can by modeled as produced by partial melting of a cumulate mantle source which crystallized from a lunar magma ocean with a chondrite-normalized REE pattern of constant negative slope. Chondrite-normalized La/Yb is equal to 2.2 for this hypothetical magma ocean pattern.

  16. Isotopic Studies of O-O Bond Formation During Water Oxidation (SISGR)

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Justine P.

    2015-03-03

    Isotopic Studies of O-O Bond Formation During Water Oxidation (SISGR) Research during the project period focused primarily on mechanisms of water oxidation by structurally defined transition metal complexes. Competitive oxygen isotope fractionation of water, mediated by oxidized precursors or reduced catalysts together with ceric, Ce(IV), ammonium nitrate in aqueous media, afforded oxygen-18 kinetic isotope effects (O-18 KIEs). Measurement, calculation, and interpretation of O-18 KIEs, described in the accompanying report has important ramifications for the production of electricity and solar hydrogen (as fuel). The catalysis division of BES has acknowledged that understanding mechanisms of transition metal catalyzed water oxidation has major ramifications, potentially leading to transformation of the global economy and natural environment in years to come. Yet, because of program restructuring and decreased availability of funds, it was recommended that the Solar Photochemistry sub-division of BES would be a more appropriate parent program for support of continued research.

  17. Study of 242-248Cm isotopes in the projected shell model framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Saiqa; Devi, Rani; Khosa, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    The projected shell model framework is employed to study the band spectra in 242-248Cm isotopes. The present calculations reproduce the available experimental data on the yrast bands. Besides this, B(E2) transition probabilities of even-even Cm isotopes have also been calculated. The low spin states of yrast band are seen to arise purely from zero-quasi-particle (o-qp) intrinsic states whereas the high spin states have multi-quasi-particle structure. For the odd-neutron (odd-N) isotopes, the calculated results qualitatively reproduce the available data on ground and lowest excited state bands for 243,245Cm. However, for 247Cm the negative-parity ground state band is in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Isotopic studies of the late Archean plutonic rocks of the Wind River Range, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.; Hedge, C.E.; Worl, R.G.; Simmons, K.R.; Nkomo, I.T.; Wenner, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two late Archaean intrusive events were documented in the Wind River Range by isotopic studies of the Rb-Sr and U-Th-Pb systems in whole-rock samples and the U-Pb systematics for zircon. An age of approx 2630(20) m.y. for the Louis Lake batholith and apparent ages of 2504(40) to 2575(50) m.y. for the Bear Ears pluton were obtained. Post-magmatic hydrothermal events approximately Tertiary in age, lowered delta 18O values and disturbed parent-daughter relationships in most of the isotopic systems investigated. The two intrusive units apparently were derived from different protoliths. Initial isotopic ratios and petrochemistry for the Louis Lake batholith are consistent with an early Archaean trondhjemitic to tonalitic source. The protolith for the Bear Ears pluton must have been subjected to high-grade metamorphism that caused loss of Rb and U prior to magma generation. -L.C.H.

  19. Kinetic and metabolic isotope effects in coral skeletal carbon isotopes: A re-evaluation using experimental coral bleaching as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepf, Verena; Levas, Stephen J.; Rodrigues, Lisa J.; McBride, Michael O.; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D.; Matsui, Yohei; Warner, Mark E.; Hughes, Adam D.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2014-12-01

    Coral skeletal δ13C can be a paleo-climate proxy for light levels (i.e., cloud cover and seasonality) and for photosynthesis to respiration (P/R) ratios. The usefulness of coral δ13C as a proxy depends on metabolic isotope effects (related to changes in photosynthesis) being the dominant influence on skeletal δ13C. However, it is also influenced by kinetic isotope effects (related to calcification rate) which can overpower metabolic isotope effects and thus compromise the use of coral skeletal δ13C as a proxy. Heikoop et al. (2000) proposed a simple data correction to remove kinetic isotope effects from coral skeletal δ13C, as well as an equation to calculate P/R ratios from coral isotopes. However, despite having been used by other researchers, the data correction has never been directly tested, and isotope-based P/R ratios have never been compared to P/R ratios measured using respirometry. Experimental coral bleaching represents a unique environmental scenario to test this because bleaching produces large physiological responses that influence both metabolic and kinetic isotope effects in corals. Here, we tested the δ13C correction and the P/R calculation using three Pacific and three Caribbean coral species from controlled temperature-induced bleaching experiments where both the stable isotopes and the physiological variables that cause isotopic fractionation (i.e., photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification) were simultaneously measured. We show for the first time that the data correction proposed by Heikoop et al. (2000) does not effectively remove kinetic effects in the coral species studied here, and did not improve the metabolic signal of bleached and non-bleached corals. In addition, isotope-based P/R ratios were in poor agreement with measured P/R ratios, even when the data correction was applied. This suggests that additional factors influence δ13C and δ18O, which are not accounted for by the data correction. We therefore recommend that the

  20. Rare isotope studies involving catalytic oxidation of CO over platinum-tin oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Wood, George M., Jr.; Hess, Robert V.; Hoyt, Ronald F.

    1987-01-01

    Results of studies utilizing normal and rare oxygen isotopes in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over a platinum-tin oxide catalyst substrate are presented. Chemisorption of labeled carbon monoxide on the catalyst followed by thermal desorption yielded a carbon dioxide product with an oxygen-18 composition consistent with the formation of a carbonate-like intermediate in the chemisorption process. The efficacy of a method developed for the oxygen-18 labeling of the platinum-tin oxide catalyst surface for use in closed cycle pulsed care isotope carbon dioxide lasers is demonstrated for the equivalent of 10 to the 6th power pulses at 10 pulses per second.

  1. Study of asymmetric fission yield behavior from neutron-deficient Hg isotope

    SciTech Connect

    Perkasa, Y. S.; Waris, A. Kurniadi, R. Su'ud, Z.

    2014-09-30

    A study of asymmetric fission yield behavior from a neutron-deficient Hg isotope has been conducted. The fission yield calculation of the neutron-deficient Hg isotope using Brownian Metropolis shape had showed unusual result at decreasing energy. In this paper, this interesting feature will be validated by using nine degree of scission shapes parameterization from Brosa model that had been implemented in TALYS nuclear reaction code. This validation is intended to show agreement between both model and the experiment result. The expected result from these models considered to be different due to dynamical properties that implemented in both models.

  2. Study of shape transitions in N{approx}90 isotopes with beyond mean field calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Tomas R.; Egido, J. L.

    2009-01-28

    We study the spherical to prolate-deformed shape transition in {sup 144-158}Sm and {sup 146-160}Gd isotopes with modern calculations beyond the mean field with the Gogny D1S force. We compare the results with the shape-phase transition predicted by the collective Hamiltonian model and with the experimental data. Our calculations do not support the existence of a first order phase transition in these isotopic chains in the viewpoint of the Bohr Hamiltonian neither the interpretation of the nuclei N = 90 as critical points.

  3. An experimental study of the isotopic enrichment in Ar, Kr, and Xe when trapped in water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notesco, G.; Laufer, D.; Bar-Nun, A.; Owen, T.

    1999-01-01

    The isotopic enrichment of argon, krypton, and xenon, when trapped in water ice, was studied experimentally. The isotopes were found to be enriched according to their (m1/m2)1/2 ratio. These enrichment factors could be useful for comparison among the uncertain cosmic or solar isotopic ratios, the hopeful in situ cometary ratio, and those in Earth's atmosphere, in the context of cometary delivery of volatiles to Earth.

  4. The diet-body offset in human nitrogen isotopic values: A controlled dietary study

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, TC; Kneale, CJ; Tasevska, N; Kuhnle, GGC

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The "trophic level enrichment" between diet and body results in an overall increase in nitrogen isotopic values as the food chain is ascended. Quantifying the diet–body Δ15N spacing has proved difficult, particularly for humans. The value is usually assumed to be +3–5‰ in the archaeological literature. We report here the first (to our knowledge) data from humans on isotopically known diets, comparing dietary intake and a body tissue sample, that of red blood cells. Samples were taken from 11 subjects on controlled diets for a 30-day period, where the controlled diets were designed to match each individual's habitual diet, thus reducing problems with short-term changes in diet causing isotopic changes in the body pool. The Δ15Ndiet-RBC was measured as +3.5‰. Using measured offsets from other studies, we estimate the human Δ15Ndiet-keratin as +5.0–5.3‰, which is in good agreement with values derived from the two other studies using individual diet records. We also estimate a value for Δ15Ndiet-collagen of ≍6‰, again in combination with measured offsets from other studies. This value is larger than usually assumed in palaeodietary studies, which suggests that the proportion of animal protein in prehistoric human diet may have often been overestimated in isotopic studies of palaeodiet. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23042579

  5. A Mass Spectrometry Study of Isotope Separation in the Laser Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suen, Timothy Wu

    Accurate quantification of isotope ratios is critical for both preventing the development of illicit weapons programs in nuclear safeguards and identifying the source of smuggled material in nuclear forensics. While isotope analysis has traditionally been performed by mass spectrometry, the need for in situ measurements has prompted the development of optical techniques, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). These optical measurements rely on laser ablation for direct solid sampling, but several past studies have suggested that the distribution of isotopes in the ablation plume is not uniform. This study seeks to characterize isotope separation in the laser plume through the use of orthogonal-acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A silver foil was ablated with a Nd:YAG at 355 nm at an energy of 50 muJ with a spot size of 71 mum, for a fluence of 1.3 J/cm2 and an irradiance of 250 MW/cm2. Flat-plate repellers were used to sample the plume, and a temporal profile of the ions was obtained by varying the time delay on the high-voltage pulse. A spatial profile along the axis of the plume was generated by changing the position of the sample, which yielded snapshots of the isotopic composition with time. In addition, the reflectron time-of-flight system was used as an energy filter in conjunction with the repellers to sample slices of the laser plasma orthogonal to the plume axis. Mass spectrometry of the plume revealed a fast ion distribution and a slow ion distribution. Measurements taken across the entire plume showed the fast 109Ag ions slightly ahead in both space and time, causing the 107Ag fraction to drop to 0.34 at 3 mus, 4 mm from the sample surface. Although measurements centered on the near side of the plume did not show isotope separation, the slow ions on the far side of the plume included much more 109Ag than 107Ag. In addition to examining the isotope content of the ablation

  6. Penn State's Visual Image User Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisciotta, Henry A.; Dooris, Michael J.; Frost, James; Halm, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Visual Image User Study (VIUS), an extensive needs assessment project at Penn State University, describes academic users of pictures and their perceptions. These findings outline the potential market for digital images and list the likely determinates of whether or not a system will be used. They also explain some key user requirements for…

  7. Laser-microprobe studies of rare gas isotopes in meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschbaum, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    A new rare gas mass spectrometer of high sensitivity coupled to a laser microprobe extraction system (constructed by the author) is described. The laser microprobe is applied to a long standing problem in cosmochemistry - determining the minerals which carry /sup 129/Xe from the decay of the extinct radioactive isotope /sup 129/I (this /sup 129/Xe is referred to as /sup 129/Xe/sub r/). The /sup 129/Xe/sub r//sup 127/I ratios and the inferred relative formation times of these minerals are also determined. In the Allende meteorite, sodalite (Na/sub 8/(Al/sub 6/Si/sub 6/O/sub 24/)Cl/sub 2/) has been verified to be the major carrier for /sup 129/Xe/sub r/ in fine-grained inclusions. Although the exact mineral phase responsible has not been identified a carrier other than sodalite is also present in matrix from Allende. The /sup 129/Xe/sub r/ of this carrier is physically correlated with trapped xenon in the matrix and has a chlorine/iodine ratio which is lower than the ratio in the fine-grained inclusions. The /sup 129/Xe/sub r///sup 127/I ratios for sodalite from the fine-grained inclusions, and matrix are similar - between 1.25 and 1.35 x 10/sup -4/. This implies an age for these samples within 2 million years of the Bjurbole meteorite (Bjurbole is commonly used as a standard for meteorite formation intervals). The /sup 129/Xe/sub r///sup 127/I ratio of the sample of the fine-grained inclusion in which sodalite was thermally decomposed by laboratory preheating, is 2.4 x 10/sup -4/ or 16 million years before Bjurbole. The alteration-product-free coarse-grained inclusion on the other hand showed a ratio of 3.15 x 10/sup -5/ or 35 million years after Bjurbole. These relative formation intervals are much longer than expected for nebular processes and hence are either due to parent body processes or heterogeneity of the /sup 129/I//sup 127/I ratio in the early solar system.

  8. Evaporation from the shallow Lake Massaciuccoli (Tuscany, Italy) studied using stable isotopes and evaporation pan data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baneschi, I.; Gonfiantini, R.; Guidi, M.

    2009-04-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope variations monitored in Lake Massaciuccoli (7 km2, 2 m deep, seasonally variable water level) during summer 2008, were compared with those observed in a Class A evaporation pan (diameter 120.6 cm, depth 25.4 cm) placed on the lake eastern shore. Air temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, solar radiation, water temperature in the lake and the pan were also measured. The pluviometer indicated that no precipitation occurred during the study period. The pan was initially filled with groundwater up to the level of 19.2 cm (219 L), depleted in heavy isotopes with respect to tha lake water. Sodium chloride was added up to the concentration of 1 g×L-1, which is assumed do not affect significantly the evaporation rate till the water volume is reduced to less than 10 %. The Cl- concentration was used to provide an estimation of the evaporated water fraction, in addition to the micrometer measuring the water level variations. The pan water was sampled every 2-3 days and Cl- and stable isotopes determined. The set of stable isotope and evaporation data enabled us to compute the parameters governing the evaporation process and the isotopic exchanges with the atmospheric moisture, according to the procedure proposed by Gonfiantini (1986). The values were applied to test three working hypotheses of water balance of Lake Massaciuccoli: (i) surface inflow and outflow of liquid water are negligible and only evaporation is important; (ii) the inflow is negligible and outflow and evaporation are both significant; (iii) the three terms of balance are all important but the losses by evaporation and outflow exceed inflow (as the lake water level was decreasing). Water exchanges with groundwater are considered negligible. The best agreement between lake and pan data was obtained with the second hypothesis, for which the fraction of water removed by evaporation was estimated to be about 40 % ot he total water losses. This residual

  9. Electron transfer within xanthine oxidase: A solvent kinetic isotope effect study

    SciTech Connect

    Hille, R. )

    1991-09-03

    Solvent kinetic isotope effect studies of electron transfer within xanthine oxidase have been performed, using a stopped-flow pH-jump technique to perturb the distribution of reducing equivalents within partially reduced enzyme and follow the kinetics of reequilibration spectrophotometrically. It is found that the rate constant for electron transfer between the flavin and one of the iron-sulfur centers of the enzyme observed when the pH is jumped from 10 to 6 decreases from 173 to 25 s{sup {minus}1} on going from HJ{sub 2}O to D{sub 2}O, giving an observed solvent kinetic isotope effect of 6.9. An effect of comparable magnitude is observed for the pH jump in the opposite direction, the rate constant decreasing form 395 to 56 s{sup {minus}1}. The solvent kinetic isotope effect on k{sub obs} is found to be directly proportional to the mole fraction of D{sub 2}O in the reaction mix for the pH jump in each direction, consistent with the effect arising from a single exchangeable proton. Calculations of the microscopic rate constants for electron transfer between the flavin and the iron-sulfur center indicate that the intrinsic solvent kinetic isotope effect for electron transfer from the neutral flavin semiquinone to the iron-sulfur center designated Fe/S I is substantially greater than for electron transfer in the opposite direction and that the observed solvent kinetic isotope effect is a weighted average of the intrinsic isotope effects for the forward and reverse microscopic electron-transfer steps. The results emphasize the importance of prototropic equilibria in the kinetic as well as thermodynamic behavior of xanthine oxidase and indicate that protonation/deprotonation of the isoalloxazine ring is concomitant with electron transfer in the xanthine oxidase system.

  10. Carbon stable-isotope tracking in breath for comparative studies of fuel use.

    PubMed

    Welch, Kenneth C; Péronnet, François; Hatch, Kent A; Voigt, Christian C; McCue, Marshall D

    2016-02-01

    Almost half a century ago, researchers demonstrated that the ratio of stable carbon isotopes in exhaled breath of rats and humans could reveal the oxidation of labeled substrates in vivo, opening a new chapter in the study of fuel use, the fate of ingested substrates, and aerobic metabolism. Until recently, the combined use of respirometry and stable-isotope tracer techniques had not been broadly employed to study fuel use in other animal groups. In this review, we summarize the history of this approach in human and animal research and define best practices that maximize its utility. We also summarize several case studies that use stable-isotope measurements of breath to explore the limits of aerobic metabolism and substrate turnover among several species and various physiological states. We highlight the importance of a comparative approach in revealing the profound effects that phylogeny, ecology, and behavior can have in shaping aerobic metabolism and energetics as well as the fundamental biological principles that underlie fuel use and metabolic function across taxa. New analytical equipment and refinement of methodology make the combined use of respirometry and stable-isotope tracer techniques simpler to perform, less costly, and more field ready than ever before.

  11. Automated data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope probing studies

    SciTech Connect

    Slysz, Gordon W.; Steinke, Laurey A.; Ward, David M.; Klatt, Christian G.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2014-01-27

    Protein stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. While most protein-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism, a key application will be in situ studies of microbial communities under conditions that result in small degrees of partial labeling. One hurdle restricting large scale in situ protein-SIP studies is the lack of algorithms and software for automated data processing of the massive data sets resulting from such studies. In response, we developed Stable Isotope Probing Protein Extraction Resources software (SIPPER) and applied it for large scale extraction and visualization of data from short term (3 h) protein-SIP experiments performed in situ on Yellowstone phototrophic bacterial mats. Several metrics incorporated into the software allow it to support exhaustive analysis of the complex composite isotopic envelope observed as a result of low amounts of partial label incorporation. SIPPER also enables the detection of labeled molecular species without the need for any prior identification.

  12. Atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite: an Fe isotope tracer study.

    PubMed

    Handler, Robert M; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2009-02-15

    The reaction of aqueous Fe(II) with Fe(III) oxides is a complex process, comprising sorption, electron transfer, and in some cases, reductive dissolution and transformation to secondary minerals. To better understand the dynamics of these reactions, we measured the extent and rate of Fe isotope exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite using a 57Fe isotope tracer approach. We observed near-complete exchange of Fe atoms between the aqueous phase and goethite nanorods over a 30-day time period. Despite direct isotopic evidence for extensive mixing between the aqueous and goethite Fe, no phase transformation was observed, nor did the size or shape of the goethite rods change appreciably. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images, however, appear to indicate that some recrystallization of the goethite particles may have occurred. Near-complete exchange of Fe between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite, coupled with negligible change in the goethite mineralogy and morphology, suggests a mechanism of coupled growth (via sorption and electron transfer) and dissolution at separate crystallographic goethite sites. We propose that sorption and dissolution sites are linked via conduction through the bulk crystal, as was recently demonstrated for hematite. Extensive mixing between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite, a relatively stable iron oxide, has significant implications for heavy metal sequestration and release (e.g., arsenic and uranium), as well as reduction of soil and groundwater contaminants.

  13. Online analysis of chlorine stable isotopes in chlorinated ethylenes: an inter-laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Anat; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Hunkeler, Daniel; Sakaguchi-Söder, Kaori; Laskov, Christine; Aravena, Ramon; Elsner, Martin

    2010-05-01

    In the last decade, compound-specific stable isotopes analysis of groundwater pollutants became an important tool to identify different sources of the same pollutant and for tracking natural attenuating processes in the sub-surface. It has been shown that trends in the isotopic composition of the target compounds can shed light on in-situ processes that are otherwise difficult to track. Analytical methods of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen were established and are by now frequently used for a variety of organic pollutants. Yet, the motivation of introducing analytical methods for new isotopes is emerging. This motivation is further enhanced, as advantages of using two or more stable isotopes for gaining better insight on degradation pathways are well accepted. One important element which demands the development of appropriate analytical methods is chlorine, which is found in various groups of organic pollutants, among them the chlorinated ethylenes. Chlorinated ethylenes are considered as high priority environmental pollutants, and the development of suitable chlorine isotope methods for this group of pollutants is highly desired. Ideally, stable isotope techniques should have the capability to determine the isotopic composition of and individual target compound in a non-pure mixture, without the requirement of a laborious off-line treatment. Indeed, in the last years two different concepts for on-line chlorine isotope analysis methods were introduced, by using either a standard quadrapole GC/MS (Sakaguchi-Söder et al., 2007) or by using a GC/IRMS (Shouakar-Stash et al., 2006). We present a comparison of the performances of two concepts, carried out in five different laboratories: Waterloo (GC/IRMS), Neuchâtel (GC/MS), Darmstadt (GC/MS), Tübingen (GC/MS) and Munich (GC/IRMS). This comparison was performed on pure trichloroethylene and dichloroethylene products of different manufactures, as well as trichloroethylene and dichloroethylene samples that were exposed to

  14. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  15. A Combined He and Os Isotopic Study of the HSDP-2 Core from Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. J.; Walker, R. J.; Depaolo, D. J.; Kurz, M. D.

    2004-12-01

    Combined osmium and helium isotope systematics of hotspot lavas have the potential to reveal information about the deep Earth. A high 3He/4He ratio may represent an undegassed reservoir, generally associated with the lower mantle. There are two Os isotopes that can be studied to help to further elucidate the problem. The decay of 187Re to 187Os is the more frequently cited system; however, in terms of lower mantle processes, the decay of 190Pt to 186Os may be extremely useful. Both of these Os isotopes are enriched in the core relative to chondritic values. In a previous study, Brandon et al. (1999) examined several Hawaiian volcanoes for both He and Os isotopes. A correlation was noted between the 3He/4He, 187Os/188Os and 186Os/188Os ratios. In terms of 3He/4He and 187Os/188Os space, the three commonly cited Hawaiian end-members (Kea, Koolau and Loihi members) were clearly defined. A strong positive correlation was also observed for 186Os/188Os versus 3He/4He. These correlations were interpreted as a possible signature of core-mantle interaction. There were some limitations to previous studies. Only 2-3 samples from each volcano were studied, with these samples generally being subaerially erupted. The He data utilized were often not for the same samples for which the Os data were collected (volcano averages for He were used on some samples). With the introduction of data from the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP-2), which drilled 2.84 km into the Mauna Kea volcanics (DePaolo et al., 2000), an extensive history of a single volcano can be observed (from the early submarine stages to the later subaerial rocks). In the current study a detailed Os isotopic analysis of several samples that span a large depth range of the HSDP-2 core, in conjunction with previously collected He isotopic data (Kurz et al., 2004), was conducted. The samples define a relatively narrow range of slightly suprachondritic 187Os/188Os ratios (0.12865-0.13056), despite having a large

  16. Influence of attenuation correction on transient left ventricular dilation in dual isotope myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Brodov, Yafim; Frenkel, Alex; Chouraqui, Pierre; Przewloka, Kinga; Rispler, Shmuel; Abadi, Sobhi; Keidar, Zohar

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of attenuation correction (AC) on left ventricular (LV) volumes and LV transient ischemic dilatation (TID) during dual-isotope single-photon emission computer tomographic (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Ninety-six patients (mean age 58 ± 11 years, 15% women, 38 patients completed exercise and 58 dipyridamole pharmacologic stress tests) assessed for known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent dual-isotope thallium-201 rest and technetium-99m sestamibi stress SPECT MPI with computed tomography-based AC. The TID ratio was calculated separately for non-AC and AC SPECT MPI studies as the ratio of the LV endocardial volume at stress divided by LV endocardial volume at rest. The mean and range of the gated LV ejection fraction during exercise and pharmacologic stress was 54 ± 12% (29% to 80%) and 58 ± 12% (27% to 80%), respectively. In the exercise stress group, the same mean LV endocardial volumes in non-AC and AC stress (76.4 ± 30 and 76.5 ± 28) and rest (66.3 ± 26 and 66.4 ± 24) studies were found (p = 0.90). There was no statistical difference between the mean exercise TID ratio in non-AC and AC studies (1.27 vs 1.31, respectively, p = 0.10). The same mean LV endocardial volumes in non-AC and AC in pharmacologic stress (79.9 ± 42 and 80 ± 41) and rest (71.4 ± 41 and 72.3 ± 37), respectively, were found (p = 0.50). There was no statistical difference between the mean dipyridamole TID ratio in non-AC and AC studies (1.20 vs 1.17, respectively, p = 0.10). In conclusion, LV volumes and TID indexes obtained on SPECT MPI with exercise or pharmacologic stress using dipyridamole are not affected by AC.

  17. Preliminary isotopic studies of fluids from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Rye, R.O.; Pearson, F.J.; Olson, E.R.; Nehring, N.L.; Whelan, J.F.; Huebner, M.A.; Coplen, T.B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary isotopic studies of Cerro Prieto geothermal fluids and earlier studies of Mexicali Valley ground waters suggest local recharge of the geothermal system from the area immediately to the west. Oxygen isotope exchange of water with reservoir rock minerals at temperatures increasing with depth has produced fluids with oxygen-18 contents increasing with depth, and pressure drawdown in the southeastern part of the field has allowed lower oxygen-18 fluids to invade the production aquifer from above. The contents of tritium and carbon-14 in the fluid suggest only that the age of the fluid is between 50 and 10,000 years. The isotopic compositions of carbon and sulfur are consistent with a magmatic origin of these elements but a mixed sedimentary-organic origin appears more likely for carbon and is also possible for sulfur. Investigations of the isotopic compositions of geothermal and cold ground waters continue and are being expanded as fluids become available and as separation and analysis methods are improved. ?? 1979.

  18. Image processing of angiograms: A pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, L. E.; Evans, R. A.; Roehm, J. O., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The technology transfer application this report describes is the result of a pilot study of image-processing methods applied to the image enhancement, coding, and analysis of arteriograms. Angiography is a subspecialty of radiology that employs the introduction of media with high X-ray absorption into arteries in order to study vessel pathology as well as to infer disease of the organs supplied by the vessel in question.

  19. Neonatal Respiratory Diseases in the Newborn Infant: Novel Insights from Stable Isotope Tracer Studies.

    PubMed

    Carnielli, Virgilio P; Giorgetti, Chiara; Simonato, Manuela; Vedovelli, Luca; Cogo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome is a common problem in preterm infants and the etiology is multifactorial. Lung underdevelopment, lung hypoplasia, abnormal lung water metabolism, inflammation, and pulmonary surfactant deficiency or disfunction play a variable role in the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome. High-quality exogenous surfactant replacement studies and studies on surfactant metabolism are available; however, the contribution of surfactant deficiency, alteration or dysfunction in selected neonatal lung conditions is not fully understood. In this article, we describe a series of studies made by applying stable isotope tracers to the study of surfactant metabolism and lung water. In a first set of studies, which we call 'endogenous studies', using stable isotope-labelled intravenous surfactant precursors, we showed the feasibility of measuring surfactant synthesis and kinetics in infants using several metabolic precursors including plasma glucose, plasma fatty acids and body water. In a second set of studies, named 'exogenous studies', using stable isotope-labelled phosphatidylcholine tracer given endotracheally, we could estimate surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholine pool size and half-life. Very recent studies are focusing on lung water and on the endogenous biosynthesis of the surfactant-specific proteins. Information obtained from these studies in infants will help to better tailor exogenous surfactant treatment in neonatal lung diseases.

  20. Neonatal Respiratory Diseases in the Newborn Infant: Novel Insights from Stable Isotope Tracer Studies.

    PubMed

    Carnielli, Virgilio P; Giorgetti, Chiara; Simonato, Manuela; Vedovelli, Luca; Cogo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome is a common problem in preterm infants and the etiology is multifactorial. Lung underdevelopment, lung hypoplasia, abnormal lung water metabolism, inflammation, and pulmonary surfactant deficiency or disfunction play a variable role in the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome. High-quality exogenous surfactant replacement studies and studies on surfactant metabolism are available; however, the contribution of surfactant deficiency, alteration or dysfunction in selected neonatal lung conditions is not fully understood. In this article, we describe a series of studies made by applying stable isotope tracers to the study of surfactant metabolism and lung water. In a first set of studies, which we call 'endogenous studies', using stable isotope-labelled intravenous surfactant precursors, we showed the feasibility of measuring surfactant synthesis and kinetics in infants using several metabolic precursors including plasma glucose, plasma fatty acids and body water. In a second set of studies, named 'exogenous studies', using stable isotope-labelled phosphatidylcholine tracer given endotracheally, we could estimate surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholine pool size and half-life. Very recent studies are focusing on lung water and on the endogenous biosynthesis of the surfactant-specific proteins. Information obtained from these studies in infants will help to better tailor exogenous surfactant treatment in neonatal lung diseases. PMID:27251153

  1. Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation during methane dependent sulfate reduction in high pressure continuous incubation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deusner, C.; Brunner, B.; Holler, T.; Widdel, F.; Ferdelman, T. G.

    2009-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction in marine sediments is an important sink in the global methane budget. However, many aspects of methane dependent sulfate reduction are not fully understood. We developed a novel high pressure biotechnical system to simulate marine conditions with high concentrations of dissolved gases, e.g. at gas seeps and gas hydrate systems. The system allows for batch, fed-batch and continuous gas-phase free incubation. We employ this system to study the kinetics and isotope fractionation during AOM at varying methane partial pressures up to 10 MPa. We present the results of long-term continuous and fed-batch incubations with highly active naturally enriched biomass from microbial mats from the Black Sea. During these experiments the methane partial pressure was increased stepwise from 0.1 to 10 MPa. The methane dependent sulfate reduction rate increased from 0.1 mmol/l/d to 3.5 mmol/l/d resulting from the increase in methane concentration and microbial growth. Sulfate reduction was negligible in the absence of methane. The sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction was strongly influenced by the concentration of dissolved methane. Sulfur isotope fractionation was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations. Relative to sulfate reduction rates, oxygen isotope exchange between sulfate and water was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations.

  2. Trees growing through impervious surfaces use shallower water sources: a stable isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J.; Ryu, Y.; Lee, D.

    2015-12-01

    Trees growing through impervious surfaces can give an impact on hydrological cycle in urban areas by increasing ground permeability. Even though depth and distribution of the root can substantially alter the hydrological cycle, only a few studies have dealt with rooting depth and water use of trees growing through impervious surfaces. We compared the water sources of trees growing through impervious and pervious surfaces using a non-destructive stable isotope approach. We measured oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions from stem water and other potential water sources before and during the wet season. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of stem water were measured, indicating that trees growing through the impervious surfaces used isotopically enriched water in both periods. An IsoSource model applied in the wet season showed that trees growing through impervious surfaces took most of their water from depths of around 20 cm, while the control trees took the greatest portion from a depth of 100 cm. Our results imply that urban trees growing through impervious surfaces might be vulnerable to drought and show the distinctive effect of urban plants on the redistribution of hydrological components.

  3. Geochemical and isotopic study of soils and waters from an Italian contaminated site: Agro Aversano (Campania)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, M.A.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Albanese, S.

    2011-01-01

    Lead isotope applications have been widely used in recent years in environmental studies conducted on different kinds of sampled media. In the present paper, Pb isotope ratios have been used to determine the sources of metal pollution in soils and waters in the Agro Aversano area. During three different sampling phases, a total of 113 surface soils (5-20. cm), 20 samples from 2 soil profiles (0-1. m), 11 stream waters and 4 groundwaters were collected. Major element concentrations in sampled media have been analyzed by the ICP-MS technique. Surface soils (20 samples), all soil profiles and all waters have been also analyzed for Pb isotope compositions by thermal ionization (TIMS). The geochemical data were assessed using statistic methods and cartographically elaborated in order to have a clear picture of the level of disturbance of the area. Pb isotopic data were studied to discriminate between anthropogenic and geologic sources. Our results show that As (5.6-25.6. mg/kg), Cu (9-677. mg/kg), Pb (22-193. mg/kg), Tl (0.53-3.62. mg/kg), V (26-142. mg/kg) and Zn (34-215. mg//kg) contents in analyzed soils, exceed the intervention limits fixed by the Italian Environmental Law for residential areas in some of the sampled sites, while intervention limit for industrial areas is exceeded only for Cu concentrations. Lead isotopic data, show that there is a high similarity between the ratios measured in the leached soil samples and those deriving from anthropic activities. This similarity with anthropogenic Pb is also evident in the ratios measured in both groundwater and stream water samples. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Chemical extraction of Nd isotopes from deep-sea sediments for Cenozoic and Cretaceous paleoceanographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. E.; Blair, S. W.; Kamenov, G. D.; Scher, H. D.; Bourbon, E.; Basak, C.; Newkirk, D.

    2009-12-01

    Nd isotopes preserved in deep sea sediments are now a common proxy for reconstructing past ocean circulation patterns. While studies on Holocene-Pleistocene time scales frequently use chemical extractions of Nd that target dispersed ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) coatings on the bulk sediment, studies on longer, Cenozoic time scales are generally limited to data from fossil fish teeth and Fe-Mn crusts due to concerns about diagenetic alteration of oxides over longer time scales and potential contamination of the extracted Nd. Fish teeth and Fe-Mn crusts are robust archives for Nd isotopes over these time scales; however, separation and preparation of the teeth is laborious, and not all deep sea samples contain sufficient teeth for analysis. In addition, Fe-Mn crusts accumulate very slowly, integrate the seawater isotopic signal over an extended period of time, and are difficult to date. This study evaluates the integrity of Nd isotopes that were chemically-extracted from Cenozoic to Cretaceous Ocean Drilling Program sediments by comparing these results to data from contemporaneous fish teeth. Nd was extracted from the > 63μm fraction of deep sea sediments following carbonate removal using a 2 hour leach in 0.02M hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HH) solution. All 94 paired samples of chemically-extracted and fossil fish tooth Nd produced isotopic values that agree within error. These samples include material from the Miocene to Eocene from sites in the north (Sites 647 and 982) and south Atlantic (Sites 689, 690 and 1090), as well as Cretaceous black shales from the tropical Atlantic (Sites 1258 and 1260). This detailed comparison illustrates that Nd extracted from bulk deep sea sediments, which is derived at least in part from dispersed Fe-Mn oxide coatings, represents a promising archive for Nd isotopes on longer time scales. This archive is widely available through time and space and the extraction procedure is relatively simple and rapid. The observed correlation between

  5. Application of stable isotope tracers in the study of exercise metabolism in children: a primer.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Anthony D; Timmons, Brian W

    2014-02-01

    Exercise metabolism in children has traditionally been assessed using the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) to determine the contributions of fat and carbohydrate to the exercise energy demands. Although easily measured, RER measurements have limitations. Other methods to assess metabolism such as the obtainment of a muscle biopsy and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy carry ethical and feasibility concerns, respectively, which limit their use in studies involving children. Stable isotopes, used routinely in studies involving adults, can also be applied in studies involving children in an ethical and feasible manner. Two common stable isotopes used in metabolic studies involving children include carbon-13 (¹³C) and nitrogen-15 (¹⁵N). ¹³C-glucose can be used to study carbohydrate metabolism and ¹⁵N-glycine can be used to assess protein metabolism. This article reviews the use of ¹³C-glucose and ¹⁵N-glycine to study exercise metabolism in children, considers some of the associated ethical aspects, explains the general methodology involved in administering these isotopes and the resources required, and describes studies involving children utilizing these methods. Finally, suggestions for future research are provided to encourage further use of these techniques.

  6. Water Stable Isotopes: Atmospheric Composition and Applications in Polar Ice Core Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouzel, J.

    2003-12-01

    large-scale properties. First, there is no clear relationship between δp and the temperature of the site in tropical and equatorial regions. There, δp is more significantly influenced by precipitation amount. Second (see Figure 2), δD and δ18O are linearly related to each other throughout the world with a slope of ˜8 and a deuterium excess (d=δD-8δ18O) of ˜10‰ (Craig, 1961; Dansgaard, 1964). Although there has been a lot of potential interest in characterizing modifications in precipitation patterns such as those linked with changes in moonsonal activity or in the El Niño Southern Oscillation, the first property has, up to now, only been exploited in a very limited number of studies. In contrast, the fact that the deuterium excess of a precipitation is influenced by the conditions prevailing in the oceanic moisture source region (temperature, relative humidity, and, to a lesser degree, wind speed) is now widely used to reconstruct the changes in the temperature of the evaporative source, Tw. (6K)Figure 2. Annual δD in precipitation versus annual δ18O in precipitation (after Jouzel et al., 1987a). A large variety of isotope paleodata is available. Isotope signatures are measured directly in ice cores, groundwaters, and fluid inclusions in speleothems, and indirectly in precipitated calcite, tree ring cellulose, and other organic materials, particularly those in lake sediments. Polar ice cores are particularly suited for paleoclimate reconstructions. First, δp and Ts are strongly correlated in these regions, as illustrated in Figure 3 for Greenland and Antarctica. Second, they give direct access to the precipitation with little postdepositional change at least when the signal can be averaged over a certain number of years. Third, they provide continuous and potentially very detailed sequences with the longest record covering the last 420 ka (thousands of years) at the Vostok site in Antarctica (and possibly even older periods in the recently drilled EPICA

  7. Stable isotopes and Digital Elevation Models to study nutrient inputs in high-Arctic lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calizza, Edoardo; Rossi, David; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Careddu, Giulio; Rossi, Loreto

    2016-04-01

    Ice cover, run-off from the watershed, aquatic and terrestrial primary productivity, guano deposition from birds are key factors controlling nutrient and organic matter inputs in high-Arctic lakes. All these factors are expected to be significantly affected by climate change. Quantifying these controls is a key baseline step to understand what combination of factors subtends the biological productivity in Arctic lakes and will drive their ecological response to environmental change. Basing on Digital Elevation Models, drainage maps, and C and N elemental content and stable isotope analysis in sediments, aquatic vegetation and a dominant macroinvertebrate species (Lepidurus arcticus Pallas 1973) belonging to Tvillingvatnet, Storvatnet and Kolhamna, three lakes located in North Spitsbergen (Svalbard), we propose an integrated approach for the analysis of (i) nutrient and organic matter inputs in lakes; (ii) the role of catchment hydro-geomorphology in determining inter-lake differences in the isotopic composition of sediments; (iii) effects of diverse nutrient inputs on the isotopic niche of Lepidurus arcticus. Given its high run-off and large catchment, organic deposits in Tvillingvatnet where dominated by terrestrial inputs, whereas inputs were mainly of aquatic origin in Storvatnet, a lowland lake with low potential run-off. In Kolhamna, organic deposits seem to be dominated by inputs from birds, which actually colonise the area. Isotopic signatures were similar between samples within each lake, representing precise tracers for studies on the effect of climate change on biogeochemical cycles in lakes. The isotopic niche of L. aricticus reflected differences in sediments between lakes, suggesting a bottom-up effect of hydro-geomorphology characterizing each lake on nutrients assimilated by this species. The presented approach proven to be an effective research pathway for the identification of factors subtending to nutrient and organic matter inputs and transfer

  8. Study of thermochemical sulfate reduction mechanism using compound specific sulfur isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshoulam, Alexander; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Said Ahmad, Ward; Deev, Andrei; Sessions, Alex L.; Tang, Yongchun; Adkins, Jess F.; Liu, Jinzhong; Gilhooly, William P.; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Amrani, Alon

    2016-09-01

    The sulfur isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of organic sulfur compounds (OSCs) during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) was studied using gold-tube pyrolysis experiments to simulate TSR. The reactants used included n-hexadecane (n-C16) as a model organic compound with sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur as the sulfur source. At the end of each experiment, the S-isotopic composition and concentration of remaining sulfate, H2S, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and 2-phenylthiophene (PT) were measured. The observed S-isotopic fractionations between sulfate and BT, DBT, and H2S in experimental simulations of TSR correlate well with a multi-stage model of the overall TSR process. Large kinetic isotope fractionations occur during the first, uncatalyzed stage of TSR, 12.4‰ for H2S and as much as 22.2‰ for BT. The fractionations decrease as the H2S concentration increases and the reaction enters the second, catalyzed stage. Once all of the oxidizable hydrocarbons have been consumed, sulfate reduction ceases and equilibrium partitioning then dictates the fractionation between H2S and sulfate (∼17‰). Experiments involving sparingly soluble CaSO4 show that during the second catalytic phase of TSR the rate of sulfate reduction exceeds that of sulfate dissolution. In this case, there is no apparent isotopic fractionation between source sulfate and generated H2S, as all of the available sulfate is effectively reduced at all reaction times. When CaSO4 is replaced with fully soluble Na2SO4, sulfate dissolution is no longer rate limiting and significant S-isotopic fractionation is observed. This supports the notion that CaSO4 dissolution can lead to the apparent lack of fractionation between H2S and sulfate produced by TSR in nature. The S-isotopic composition of individual OSCs record information related to geochemical reactions that cannot be discerned from the δ34S values obtained from bulk phases such as H2S, oil, and sulfate minerals, and

  9. Controlling for anthropogenically induced atmospheric variation in stable carbon isotope studies.

    PubMed

    Long, Eric S; Sweitzer, Richard A; Diefenbach, Duane R; Ben-David, Merav

    2005-11-01

    Increased use of stable isotope analysis to examine food-web dynamics, migration, transfer of nutrients, and behavior will likely result in expansion of stable isotope studies investigating human-induced global changes. Recent elevation of atmospheric CO2 concentration, related primarily to fossil fuel combustion, has reduced atmospheric CO2 delta13C (13C/12C), and this change in isotopic baseline has, in turn, reduced plant and animal tissue delta13C of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Such depletion in CO2 delta13C and its effects on tissue delta13C may introduce bias into delta13C investigations, and if this variation is not controlled, may confound interpretation of results obtained from tissue samples collected over a temporal span. To control for this source of variation, we used a high-precision record of atmospheric CO2 delta13C from ice cores and direct atmospheric measurements to model modern change in CO2 delta13C. From this model, we estimated a correction factor that controls for atmospheric change; this correction reduces bias associated with changes in atmospheric isotopic baseline and facilitates comparison of tissue delta13C collected over multiple years. To exemplify the importance of accounting for atmospheric CO2 delta13C depletion, we applied the correction to a dataset of collagen delta13C obtained from mountain lion (Puma concolor) bone samples collected in California between 1893 and 1995. Before correction, in three of four ecoregions collagen delta13C decreased significantly concurrent with depletion of atmospheric CO2 delta13C (n > or = 32, P < or = 0.01). Application of the correction to collagen delta13C data removed trends from regions demonstrating significant declines, and measurement error associated with the correction did not add substantial variation to adjusted estimates. Controlling for long-term atmospheric variation and correcting tissue samples for changes in isotopic baseline facilitate analysis of samples that span a

  10. Hydrogeological and isotopic study of surface water and groundwater in the Eastern Haouz Plain. Western Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mandour, Abdennabi; Rochdane, Samia; Reddy, Venkat; Himi, Mahjoub; Casas, Albert

    2014-05-01

    The Eastern Haouz area, characterized by a semi-arid climate, is part of the Haouz plain. The basin is built over a broad synclinal between the High Atlas and the Jebilets mountains. The compilation of geological, geophysical and hydrogeological data shows that this area is straddling two major basins of western Morocco. Map of the river system and the piezometric map show the same division line of surface water and groundwater. This division line oriented NNW-SSE is evidenced by the rise of the basement constituted by Paleozoic schists that outcrop near Tamelalt. Thus we can distinguish two main directions of groundwater flow feeding two watersheds (Tensift and Oum Rabiaa rivers) and two large reservoirs in the region of Marrakech. As a contribution to solve the water supply problem in the area, a hydrochemical study has been conducted, involving 40 groundwater samples for major ions and 20 stable isotope analyses. Hydrochemical results show the geological control on water quality. Samples from Paleozoic schists and Triassic sediments are relatively highly mineralisation and unsuitable for drinking as well as for irrigation. Conversely, groundwater from the alluvial plains is relatively less mineralised than other older geological formations; however, many of the samples are also non-potable. Apart of salinity problem, about 25% of the samples have higher nitrate content than the drinking water permissible limit. Stable isotope analysis show that groundwater recharge to the phreatic aquifer is controlled by local conditions. The small difference in the isotopic content of river water and a group of groundwater samples is interpreted as the evaporation effect during the recharge. On the other hand, the group of samples with relatively depleted stable isotopic content shows faster recharge conditions and less water-rock interaction. Finally, another group of samples is relatively enriched in stable isotope content and confirm an increase during the recharge

  11. Controlling for anthropogenically induced atmospheric variation in stable carbon isotope studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, E.S.; Sweitzer, R.A.; Diefenbach, D.R.; Ben-David, M.

    2005-01-01

    Increased use of stable isotope analysis to examine food-web dynamics, migration, transfer of nutrients, and behavior will likely result in expansion of stable isotope studies investigating human-induced global changes. Recent elevation of atmospheric CO2 concentration, related primarily to fossil fuel combustion, has reduced atmospheric CO2 ??13C (13C/12C), and this change in isotopic baseline has, in turn, reduced plant and animal tissue ??13C of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Such depletion in CO2 ??13C and its effects on tissue ??13C may introduce bias into ??13C investigations, and if this variation is not controlled, may confound interpretation of results obtained from tissue samples collected over a temporal span. To control for this source of variation, we used a high-precision record of atmospheric CO2 ??13C from ice cores and direct atmospheric measurements to model modern change in CO2 ??13C. From this model, we estimated a correction factor that controls for atmospheric change; this correction reduces bias associated with changes in atmospheric isotopic baseline and facilitates comparison of tissue ??13C collected over multiple years. To exemplify the importance of accounting for atmospheric CO2 ??13C depletion, we applied the correction to a dataset of collagen ??13C obtained from mountain lion (Puma concolor) bone samples collected in California between 1893 and 1995. Before correction, in three of four ecoregions collagen ??13C decreased significantly concurrent with depletion of atmospheric CO2 ??13C (n ??? 32, P ??? 0.01). Application of the correction to collagen ??13C data removed trends from regions demonstrating significant declines, and measurement error associated with the correction did not add substantial variation to adjusted estimates. Controlling for long-term atmospheric variation and correcting tissue samples for changes in isotopic baseline facilitate analysis of samples that span a large temporal range. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  12. Controlling for anthropogenically induced atmospheric variation in stable carbon isotope studies.

    PubMed

    Long, Eric S; Sweitzer, Richard A; Diefenbach, Duane R; Ben-David, Merav

    2005-11-01

    Increased use of stable isotope analysis to examine food-web dynamics, migration, transfer of nutrients, and behavior will likely result in expansion of stable isotope studies investigating human-induced global changes. Recent elevation of atmospheric CO2 concentration, related primarily to fossil fuel combustion, has reduced atmospheric CO2 delta13C (13C/12C), and this change in isotopic baseline has, in turn, reduced plant and animal tissue delta13C of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Such depletion in CO2 delta13C and its effects on tissue delta13C may introduce bias into delta13C investigations, and if this variation is not controlled, may confound interpretation of results obtained from tissue samples collected over a temporal span. To control for this source of variation, we used a high-precision record of atmospheric CO2 delta13C from ice cores and direct atmospheric measurements to model modern change in CO2 delta13C. From this model, we estimated a correction factor that controls for atmospheric change; this correction reduces bias associated with changes in atmospheric isotopic baseline and facilitates comparison of tissue delta13C collected over multiple years. To exemplify the importance of accounting for atmospheric CO2 delta13C depletion, we applied the correction to a dataset of collagen delta13C obtained from mountain lion (Puma concolor) bone samples collected in California between 1893 and 1995. Before correction, in three of four ecoregions collagen delta13C decreased significantly concurrent with depletion of atmospheric CO2 delta13C (n > or = 32, P < or = 0.01). Application of the correction to collagen delta13C data removed trends from regions demonstrating significant declines, and measurement error associated with the correction did not add substantial variation to adjusted estimates. Controlling for long-term atmospheric variation and correcting tissue samples for changes in isotopic baseline facilitate analysis of samples that span a

  13. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Phase II studies of the R4D Program on stream and watershed ecology reflect the accomplishments and accumulation of baseline information obtained during the past studies. Although our rough estimates indicate that nitrogen inputs to the watershed ba lance losses, the carbon fluxes suggest that they are not in equilibrium and that there is a net loss of carbon from the tundra ecosystem through respiration and transport out of the watershed via the stream system. Radiocarbon profiles of soil sections coupled with mass transport calculations revealed that peat accumulation has essentially ceased in the R4D watershed and appears to be in ablative loss. Thus the carbon flux measurements provide validation tests for the PLANTGRO and GAS-HYDRO models of the PHASE II studies. These findings are also important in the context of global CO[sub 2] increases from positive feedback mechanisms in peatlands associated with climatic warming in the subarctic regions.

  14. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-12-31

    The Phase II studies of the R4D Program on stream and watershed ecology reflect the accomplishments and accumulation of baseline information obtained during the past studies. Although our rough estimates indicate that nitrogen inputs to the watershed ba lance losses, the carbon fluxes suggest that they are not in equilibrium and that there is a net loss of carbon from the tundra ecosystem through respiration and transport out of the watershed via the stream system. Radiocarbon profiles of soil sections coupled with mass transport calculations revealed that peat accumulation has essentially ceased in the R4D watershed and appears to be in ablative loss. Thus the carbon flux measurements provide validation tests for the PLANTGRO and GAS-HYDRO models of the PHASE II studies. These findings are also important in the context of global CO{sub 2} increases from positive feedback mechanisms in peatlands associated with climatic warming in the subarctic regions.

  15. A Study of Imaging Interferometer Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Ronald J.

    2002-01-01

    Several new space science mission concepts under development at NASA-GSFC for astronomy are intended to carry out synthetic imaging using Michelson interferometers or direct (Fizeau) imaging with sparse apertures. Examples of these mission concepts include the Stellar Imager (SI), the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT), the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI). We have been developing computer-based simulators for these missions. These simulators are aimed at providing a quantitative evaluation of the imaging capabilities of the mission by modelling the performance on different realistic targets in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, and dynamic range. Both Fizeau and Michelson modes of operation can be considered. Our work is based on adapting a computer simulator called imSIM, which was initially written for the Space Interferometer Mission in order to simulate the imaging mode of new missions such as those listed. In a recent GSFC-funded study we have successfully written a preliminary version of a simulator SISIM for the Stellar Imager and carried out some preliminary studies with it. In a separately funded study we have also been applying these methods to SPECS/SPIRIT.

  16. The suitability of the dual isotope approach (δ13C and δ18O) in tree ring studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegwolf, Rolf; Saurer, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The use of stable isotopes, complementary to tree ring width data in tree ring research has proven to be a powerful tool in studying the impact of environmental parameters on tree physiology and growth. These three proxies are thus instrumental for climate reconstruction and improve the understanding of underlying causes of growth changes. In various cases, however, their use suggests non-plausible interpretations. Often the use of one isotope alone does not allow the detection of such "erroneous isotope responses". A careful analysis of these deviating results shows that either the validity of the carbon isotope discrimination concept is no longer true (Farquhar et al. 1982) or the assumptions for the leaf water enrichment model (Cernusak et al., 2003) are violated and thus both fractionation models are not applicable. In this presentation we discuss such cases when the known fractionation concepts fail and do not allow a correct interpretation of the isotope data. With the help of the dual isotope approach (Scheidegger et al.; 2000) it is demonstrated, how to detect and uncover the causes for such anomalous isotope data. The fractionation concepts and their combinations before the background of CO2 and H2O gas exchange are briefly explained and the specific use of the dual isotope approach for tree ring data analyses and interpretations are demonstrated. References: Cernusak, L. A., Arthur, D. J., Pate, J. S. and Farquhar, G. D.: Water relations link carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination to phloem sap sugar concentration in Eucalyptus globules, Plant Physiol., 131, 1544-1554, 2003. Farquhar, G. D., O'Leary, M. H. and Berry, J. A.: On the relationship between carbon isotope discrimination and the intercellular carbon dioxide concentration in leaves, Aust. J. Plant Physiol., 9, 121-137, 1982. Scheidegger, Y., Saurer, M., Bahn, M. and Siegwolf, R.: Linking stable oxygen and carbon isotopes with stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity: A conceptual model

  17. A hydrogen gas-water equilibration method produces accurate and precise stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements in nutrition studies.

    PubMed

    Wong, William W; Clarke, Lucinda L

    2012-11-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to hydrogen gas (H(2)) for mass spectrometric analysis are labor intensive, require special reagent, and involve memory effect and potential isotope fractionation. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy and precision of a platinum catalyzed H(2)-water equilibration method for stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements. Time to reach isotopic equilibrium, day-to-day and week-to-week reproducibility, accuracy, and precision of stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements by the H(2)-water equilibration method were assessed using a Thermo DELTA V Advantage continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. It took 3 h to reach isotopic equilibrium. The day-to-day and week-to-week measurements on water and urine samples with natural abundance and enriched levels of deuterium were highly reproducible. The method was accurate to within 2.8 (o)/oo and reproducible to within 4.0 (o)/oo based on analysis of international references. All the outcome variables, whether in urine samples collected in 10 doubly labeled water studies or plasma samples collected in 26 body water studies, did not differ from those obtained using the reference zinc reduction method. The method produced highly accurate estimation on ad libitum energy intakes, body composition, and water turnover rates. The method greatly reduces the analytical cost and could easily be adopted by laboratories equipped with a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer.

  18. A Hydrogen Gas-Water Equilibration Method Produces Accurate and Precise Stable Hydrogen Isotope Ratio Measurements in Nutrition Studies12

    PubMed Central

    Wong, William W.; Clarke, Lucinda L.

    2012-01-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to hydrogen gas (H2) for mass spectrometric analysis are labor intensive, require special reagent, and involve memory effect and potential isotope fractionation. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy and precision of a platinum catalyzed H2-water equilibration method for stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements. Time to reach isotopic equilibrium, day-to-day and week-to-week reproducibility, accuracy, and precision of stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements by the H2-water equilibration method were assessed using a Thermo DELTA V Advantage continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. It took 3 h to reach isotopic equilibrium. The day-to-day and week-to-week measurements on water and urine samples with natural abundance and enriched levels of deuterium were highly reproducible. The method was accurate to within 2.8 o/oo and reproducible to within 4.0 o/oo based on analysis of international references. All the outcome variables, whether in urine samples collected in 10 doubly labeled water studies or plasma samples collected in 26 body water studies, did not differ from those obtained using the reference zinc reduction method. The method produced highly accurate estimation on ad libitum energy intakes, body composition, and water turnover rates. The method greatly reduces the analytical cost and could easily be adopted by laboratories equipped with a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. PMID:23014490

  19. A preliminary study of iron isotope fractionation in marine invertebrates (chitons, Mollusca) in near-shore environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanuel, S.; Schuessler, J. A.; Vinther, J.; Matthews, A.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2014-10-01

    Chitons (Mollusca) are marine invertebrates that produce radulae (teeth or rasping tongues) containing high concentrations of biomineralized magnetite and other iron-bearing minerals. As Fe isotope signatures are influenced by redox processes and biological fractionation, Fe isotopes in chiton radulae might be expected to provide an effective tracer of ambient oceanic conditions and biogeochemical cycling. Here, in a pilot study to measure Fe isotopes in marine invertebrates, we examine Fe isotopes in modern marine chiton radulae collected from different locations in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans to assess the range of isotopic values, and to test whether or not the isotopic signatures reflect seawater values. Values of δ56Fe (relative to IRMM-014) in chiton teeth range from -1.90 to 0.00 ‰ (±0.05‰ (2σ) uncertainty in δ56Fe), probably reflecting a combination of geographical control and biological fractionation processes. Comparison with published local surface seawater Fe isotope data shows a consistent negative offset of chiton teeth Fe isotope compositions relative to seawater. Strikingly, two different species from the same locality in the North Pacific (Puget Sound, Washington, USA) have distinct isotopic signatures. Tonicella lineata, which feeds on red algae in the sublittoral zone, has a mean δ56Fe of -0.65 ± 0.26‰ (2σ, 3 specimens), while Mopalia muscosa, which feeds on both green and red algae in the eulittoral zone, shows lighter isotopic values with a mean δ56Fe of -1.47 ± 0.98‰ (2σ, 5 specimens). Three possible pathways are proposed to account for the different isotopic signatures: (i) physiologically controlled processes within the chitons that lead to species-dependent fractionation; (ii) diet-controlled variability due to different Fe isotope fractionation in the red and green algal food sources; and (iii) environmentally controlled fractionation that causes variation in the isotopic signatures of bioavailable Fe in the different

  20. Importance of the Lu-Hf isotopic system in studies of planetary chronology and chemical evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patchett, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The 176Lu-176Hf isotope method and its applications in earth sciences are discussed. Greater fractionation of Lu/Hf than Sm/Nd in planetary magmatic processes makes 176Hf 177Hf a powerful geochemical tracer. In general, proportional variations of 176Hf 177Hf exceed those of 143Nd l44Nd by factors of 1.5-3 in terrestrial and lunar materials. Lu-Hf studies therefore have a major contribution to make in understanding of terrestrial and other planetary evolution through time, and this is the principal importance of Lu-Hf. New data on basalts from oceanic islands show unequivocally that whereas considerable divergences occur in 176Hf 177Hf- 87Sr 86Sr and 143Nd l44Nd- 87Sr 86Sr diagrams, 176Hf 177Hf and 143Nd 144Nd display a single, linear isotopic variation in the suboceanic mantle. These discordant 87Sr 86Sr relationships may allow, with the acquisition of further Hf-Nd-Sr isotopic data, a distinction between processes such as mantle metasomatism, influence of seawater-altered material in the magma source, or recycling of sediments into the mantle. In order to evaluate the Hf-Nd isotopic correlation in terms of mantle fractionation history, there is a need for measurements of Hf distribution coefficients between silicate minerals and liquids, and specifically for a knowledge of Hf behavior in relation to rareearth elements. For studying ancient terrestrial Hf isotopic variations, the best quality Hf isotope data are obtained from granitoid rocks or zircons. New data show that very U-Pb discordant zircons may have upwardly-biased 176Hf 177Hf, but that at least concordant to slightly discordant zircons appear to be reliable carriers of initial 176Hf 177Hf. Until the controls on addition of radiogenic Hf to zircon are understood, combined zircon-whole rock studies are recommended. Lu-Hf has been demonstrated as a viable tool for dating of ancient terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples, but because it offers little advantage over existing methods, is unlikely to find

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of language.

    PubMed

    Small, Steven L; Burton, Martha W

    2002-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging of language builds on almost 150 years of study in neurology, psychology, linguistics, anatomy, and physiology. In recent years, there has been an explosion of research using functional imaging technology, especially positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to understand the relationship between brain mechanisms and language processing. These methods combine high-resolution anatomic images with measures of language-specific brain activity to reveal neural correlates of language processing. This article reviews some of what has been learned about the neuroanatomy of language from these imaging techniques. We first discuss the normal case, organizing the presentation according to the levels of language, encompassing words (lexicon), sound structure (phonemes), and sentences (syntax and semantics). Next, we delve into some unusual language processing circumstances, including second languages and sign languages. Finally, we discuss abnormal language processing, including developmental and acquired dyslexia and aphasia.

  2. Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry of Seabird Guano Fertilization: Results from Growth Chamber Studies with Maize (Zea Mays)

    PubMed Central

    Szpak, Paul; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Millaire, Jean-François; White, Christine D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stable isotope analysis is being utilized with increasing regularity to examine a wide range of issues (diet, habitat use, migration) in ecology, geology, archaeology, and related disciplines. A crucial component to these studies is a thorough understanding of the range and causes of baseline isotopic variation, which is relatively poorly understood for nitrogen (δ15N). Animal excrement is known to impact plant δ15N values, but the effects of seabird guano have not been systematically studied from an agricultural or horticultural standpoint. Methodology/Principal Findings This paper presents isotopic (δ13C and δ15N) and vital data for maize (Zea mays) fertilized with Peruvian seabird guano under controlled conditions. The level of 15N enrichment in fertilized plants is very large, with δ15N values ranging between 25.5 and 44.7‰ depending on the tissue and amount of fertilizer applied; comparatively, control plant δ15N values ranged between −0.3 and 5.7‰. Intraplant and temporal variability in δ15N values were large, particularly for the guano-fertilized plants, which can be attributed to changes in the availability of guano-derived N over time, and the reliance of stored vs. absorbed N. Plant δ13C values were not significantly impacted by guano fertilization. High concentrations of seabird guano inhibited maize germination and maize growth. Moreover, high levels of seabird guano greatly impacted the N metabolism of the plants, resulting in significantly higher tissue N content, particularly in the stalk. Conclusions/Significance The results presented in this study demonstrate the very large impact of seabird guano on maize δ15N values. The use of seabird guano as a fertilizer can thus be traced using stable isotope analysis in food chemistry applications (certification of organic inputs). Furthermore, the fertilization of maize with seabird guano creates an isotopic signature very similar to a high-trophic level marine resource, which must

  3. A carbon and nitrogen isotope study of carbonaceous vein material in ureilite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Arden, J. W.; Franchi, I. A.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The ureilite meteorite group is known to be rich in carbon in the form of graphite/diamond veins that are associated with planetary type noble gases. This paper reports preliminary data from a systematic study of the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of this carbonaceous vein material. A previous study focused on the whole rock signatures and reported that the carbon inventory appeared to be dominated by the graphitic/diamond intergrowths, whereas the nitrogen was clearly composed of several distinct components including one that was isotopically light, possibly associated with the carbonaceous material. Recent studies have demonstrated that diamonds in the solar system formed in many different environments. C and N measurements from ureilitic diamond made in a similar way would be a useful addition to this overall study. The methods used for isolating diamonds of possible presolar origin from primitive meteorites are equally applicable to the processing of carbon bearing components in the ureilite group so that their stable isotopic composition can be determined. Herein we discuss conjoint C and N stepped combustion measurements made on crushed whole rock ureilite samples that have been treated with 1M HCl/9M HF to dissolve silicate and free metal. In addition, two samples have been further treated with oxidizing acids to leave a diamond rich residue.

  4. Beam Loss Studies for Rare Isotope Driver Linacs Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T P; Kurennoy, S S; Billen, J H; Crandall, K R; Qiang, J; Ryne, R D; Mustapha, B; Ostroumov, P; Zhao, Q; York, and R. C.

    2008-03-26

    The Fortran 90 RIAPMTQ/IMPACT code package is a pair of linked beam-dynamics simulation codes that have been developed for end-to-end computer simulations of multiple-charge-state heavy-ion linacs for future exotic-beam facilities. These codes have multiple charge-state capability, and include space-charge forces. The simulations can extend from the low-energy beam-transport line after an ECR ion source to the end of the linac. The work has been performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and MSU. The code RIAPMTQ simulates the linac front-end beam dynamics including the LEBT, RFQ, and MEBT. The code IMPACT simulates the beam dynamics of the main superconducting linac. The codes have been benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The codes allow high-statistics runs on parallel supercomputing platforms, particularly at NERSC at LBNL, for studies of beam losses. The codes also run on desktop PC computers for low-statistics work. The code package is described in more detail in a recent publication [1] in the Proceedings of PAC07 (2007 US Particle Accelerator Conference). In this report we describe the main activities for the FY07 beam-loss studies project using this code package.

  5. Decay studies of the highly neutron-deficient indium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    An extension of the experimentally known nuclidic mass surface to nuclei far from the region of beta-stability is of fundamental interest in providing a better determination of the input parameters for the various nuclear mass formulae, allowing a more accurate prediction of the ultimate limits of nuclear stability. In addition, a study of the shape of the mass surface in the vicinity of the doubly-closed nuclide /sup 100/Sn provides initial information on the behavior of the shell closure to be expected when Z = N = 50. Experiments measuring the decay energies of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In by ..beta..-endpoint measurements are described with special attention focused on the development of a plastic scintillator ..beta..-telescope coupled to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer). An attempt to measure the ..beta..-endpoint energy of /sup 102/In is also briefly described. The experimentally determined decay energies and derived masses for /sup 103/ /sup 105/In are compared with the predictions of different mass models to identify which models are more successful in this region. Furthermore, the inclusion in these comparisons of the available data on the neutron-rich indium nuclei permits a systematic study of their ground state mass behavior as a function of the neutron number between the shell closures at N = 50 and N = 82. These analyses indicate that the binding energy of /sup 103/In is 1 MeV larger than predicted by the majority of the mass models. An examination of the Q/sub EC/ surface and the single- and two-neutron separation energies in the vicinity of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In is also performed to investigate further the deviation and other possible systematic variations in the mass surface in a model-independent way.

  6. Fundamental Symmetries and Interactions Studied with Radioactive Isotopes in Atom Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, H.W.

    2005-11-21

    The structure of certain nuclei and atoms allow one to study fundamental symmetries and interactions. In this review we consider the search for Time-Reversal invariance Violation (TRV). We consider two options: TRV in {beta} decay or the search for the forbidden Electric Dipole Moment (EDM). In both cases atomic trapping can be an appropriate tool. For {beta} decay radioactive isotopes are necessary, but also for EDM searches they appear to be useful.

  7. Biometric study using hyperspectral imaging during stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Sheela; Quoraishee, Shafik; Chan, Gabriel; Short, Kenneth R.

    2010-04-01

    To the casual observer, transient stress results in a variety of physiological changes that can be seen in the face. Although the conditions can be seen visibly, the conditions affect the emissivity and absorption properties of the skin, which imaging spectrometers, commonly referred to as Hyperspectral (HS) cameras, can quantify at every image pixel. The study reported on in this paper, using Hyperspectral cameras, provides a basis for continued study of HS imaging to eventually quantify biometric stress. This study was limited to the visible to near infrared (VNIR) spectral range. Signal processing tools and algorithms have been developed and are described for using HS face data from human subjects. The subjects were placed in psychologically stressful situations and the camera data were analyzed to detect stress through changes in dermal reflectance and emissivity. Results indicate that hyperspectral imaging may potentially serve as a non-invasive tool to measure changes in skin emissivity indicative of a stressful incident. Particular narrow spectral bands in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum seem especially important. Further studies need to be performed to determine the optimal spectral bands and to generalize the conclusions. The enormous information available in hyperspectral imaging needs further analysis and more spectral regions need to be exploited. Non-invasive stress detection is a prominent area of research with countless applications for both military and commercial use including border patrol, stand-off interrogation, access control, surveillance, and non-invasive and un-attended patient monitoring.

  8. Stable isotope studies. Final report, March 1, 1972--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, T.

    1992-10-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  9. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity

  10. Lunar Crustal History from Isotopic Studies of Lunar Anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, Laurence E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Bogard, D. D.; Yamaguchi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Anorthosites occur ubiquitously within the lunar crust at depths of approx.3-30 km in apparent confirmation of the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) hypothesis. [1]. We will present recent chronological studies of anorthosites [2] that are relevant both to the LMO hypothesis and also to the lunar cataclysm hypothesis. Old (approx.4.4 Ga) Sm-Nd ages have been determined for some Apollo 16 anorthosites, and primitive initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios have been measured for several, but well-defined Rb-Sr ages concordant with the Sm-Nd ages have not been determined until now. Lunar anorthosite 67075, a Feldspathic Fragmental Breccia (FFB) collected near the rim of North Ray Crater, has concordant Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr ages of 4.47+/-0.07 Ga and 4.49+/-0.07 Ga, respectively. Initial Nd-143/Nd-144 determined from the Sm-Nd isochron corresponds to E(sub Nd,CHUR) = 0.3+/-0.5 compared to a Chondritic Uniform Reservoir, or E(sub Nd,HEDPB) = -0.6+/-0.5 compared to the initial Nd-143/Nd-144 of the HED Parent Body [3]. Lunar anorthosites tend to have E(sub Nd) > 0 when compared to CHUR, apparently inconsistent with derivation from a single lunar magma ocean. Although E(sub Nd) < 0 for some anorthosites, if lunar initial Nd-143/Nd-144 is taken equal to HEDR for the HED parent body [3], enough variability remains among the anorthosite data alone to suggest that lunar anorthosites do not derive from a single source, i.e., they are not all products of the LMO. An anorthositic clast from desert meteorite Dhofar 908 has an Ar-39-Ar-40 age of 4.42+/-0.04 Ga, the same as the 4.36-4.41+/-0.035 Ga Ar-39-Ar-40 age of anorthositic clast Y-86032,116 in Antarctic meteorite Yamato- 86032 [3,4]. Conclusions: (i) Lunar anorthosites come from diverse sources. Orbital geochemical studies confirm variability in lunar crustal composition [1, 5]. We suggest that the variability extends to anorthosites alone as shown by the Sm-Nd data (Fig. 2) and the existence of magnesian anorthosites (MAN, [6]) and "An93 anorthosites

  11. Photon strength functions in Gd isotopes studied from radiative capture of resonance neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chyzh, A.; Couture, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; Krtička, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Vieira, D. J.; Walker, C.; Wu, C. Y.

    2014-04-01

    The experimental spectra of γ rays following radiative neutron capture on isolated resonances of stable 152,154-158Gd targets were measured by the DANCE calorimeter installed at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center in New Mexico, USA. These spectra were analyzed within the extreme statistical model to get new information on the photon strength functions. Special emphasis was put on study of the scissors vibrational mode present in these isotopes. Our data show that the scissors-mode resonances are built not only on the ground states but also on the excited levels of all studied Gd isotopes. The scissors mode strength observed in 157,159Gd products is significantly higher than in neighboring even-even nuclei 156,158Gd. Such a difference indicates the existence of an odd-even effect in the scissors mode strength. Moreover, there exists no universal parameter-free model of the electric dipole photon strength function describing the experimental data in all of the Gd isotopes studied. The results for the scissors mode are compared with the (γ, γ') data for the ground-state transitions and with the results from 3He-induced reactions.

  12. Feasibility study on the medical isotopes production with solution target using OSTR: (99)Mo and related isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Seung-Hyuk

    1999-11-01

    Molybdenum-99 (99Mo) is the parent nuclide of Technetium-99m (99mTc), a radioisotope which is widely used in nuclear medicine. 99Mo is produced from the fission of 235U or the irradiation of 98Mo. This study shows the feasibility of the using an 'aqueous homogeneous uranium solution target' for the production of a medical isotope, 99Mo. Some of the advantages that the solution target has over a solid target include the inherent reactor safety features offered by large negative temperature and power reactivity coefficients, the fabrication convenience, the straightforward extraction process, and a low volume of waste generated. To evaluate the core configuration and the production rate of 99Mo, a three-dimensional model of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) core was developed for use with the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) and then verified by comparing with the measured values. Two values are in good agreement within one percent in the keffective values calculated. Two types of solution targets are analyzed for the OSTR. The first one has the same outer-dimensions as an OSTR fuel element but is filled with a uranium solution. The other is the continuous flow target system (CFTS) like solution fuel reactors. Uranyl nitrate and uranyl sulfate solutions enriched to 20% or 93% are investigated as a target material without raising any safety concern to the OSTR operation. A seven-day irradiation of ten tube-type-93% enriched uranyl nitrate solution targets would produce 43% of the 99Mo required in the US for one week. The CFTS would generate 31% of the required 99Mo in a 7-day cycle. The conceptual chemical extraction processes for irradiated solution targets are developed. This work also includes an analysis of nuclear safety issues such as the radiolytic gas, thermal hydraulics, the waste, and the radiological impacts of an accident. The production of 99Mo in the OSTR with the uranium solution is technically feasible as demonstrated in this

  13. Isotopic study of mercury sources and transfer between a freshwater lake and adjacent forest food web.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sae Yun; Blum, Joel D; Nadelhoffer, Knute J; Timothy Dvonch, J; Tsui, Martin Tsz-Ki

    2015-11-01

    Studies of monomethylmercury (MMHg) sources and biogeochemical pathways have been extensive in aquatic ecosystems, but limited in forest ecosystems. Increasing evidence suggests that there is significant mercury (Hg) exchange between aquatic and forest ecosystems. We use Hg stable isotope ratios (δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg) to investigate the relative importance of MMHg sources and assess Hg transfer pathways between Douglas Lake and adjacent forests located at the University of Michigan Biological Station, USA. We characterize Hg isotopic compositions of basal resources and use linear regression of % MMHg versus δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg to estimate Hg isotope values for inorganic mercury (IHg) and MMHg in the aquatic and adjacent forest food webs. In the aquatic ecosystem, we found that lake sediment represents a mixture of IHg pools deposited via watershed runoff and precipitation. The δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg values estimated for IHg are consistent with other studies that measured forest floor in temperate forests. The Δ(199)Hg value estimated for MMHg in the aquatic food web indicates that MMHg is subjected to ~20% photochemical degradation prior to bioaccumulation. In the forest ecosystem, we found a significant negative relationship between total Hg and δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg of soil collected at multiple distances from the lakeshore and lake sediment. This suggests that IHg input from watershed runoff provides an important Hg transfer pathway between the forest and aquatic ecosystems. We measured Δ(199)Hg values for high trophic level insects and compared these insects at multiple distances perpendicular to the lake shoreline. The Δ(199)Hg values correspond to the % canopy cover suggesting that forest MMHg is subjected to varying extents of photochemical degradation and the extent may be controlled by sunlight. Our study demonstrates that the use of Hg isotopes adds important new insight into the relative importance of MMHg sources and complex Hg transfer

  14. Isotopic study of mercury sources and transfer between a freshwater lake and adjacent forest food web.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sae Yun; Blum, Joel D; Nadelhoffer, Knute J; Timothy Dvonch, J; Tsui, Martin Tsz-Ki

    2015-11-01

    Studies of monomethylmercury (MMHg) sources and biogeochemical pathways have been extensive in aquatic ecosystems, but limited in forest ecosystems. Increasing evidence suggests that there is significant mercury (Hg) exchange between aquatic and forest ecosystems. We use Hg stable isotope ratios (δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg) to investigate the relative importance of MMHg sources and assess Hg transfer pathways between Douglas Lake and adjacent forests located at the University of Michigan Biological Station, USA. We characterize Hg isotopic compositions of basal resources and use linear regression of % MMHg versus δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg to estimate Hg isotope values for inorganic mercury (IHg) and MMHg in the aquatic and adjacent forest food webs. In the aquatic ecosystem, we found that lake sediment represents a mixture of IHg pools deposited via watershed runoff and precipitation. The δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg values estimated for IHg are consistent with other studies that measured forest floor in temperate forests. The Δ(199)Hg value estimated for MMHg in the aquatic food web indicates that MMHg is subjected to ~20% photochemical degradation prior to bioaccumulation. In the forest ecosystem, we found a significant negative relationship between total Hg and δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg of soil collected at multiple distances from the lakeshore and lake sediment. This suggests that IHg input from watershed runoff provides an important Hg transfer pathway between the forest and aquatic ecosystems. We measured Δ(199)Hg values for high trophic level insects and compared these insects at multiple distances perpendicular to the lake shoreline. The Δ(199)Hg values correspond to the % canopy cover suggesting that forest MMHg is subjected to varying extents of photochemical degradation and the extent may be controlled by sunlight. Our study demonstrates that the use of Hg isotopes adds important new insight into the relative importance of MMHg sources and complex Hg transfer

  15. Insights into iron sources and pathways in the Amazon River provided by isotopic and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, Daniel Santos; Poitrasson, Franck; Boaventura, Geraldo Resende; Allard, Thierry; Vieira, Lucieth Cruz; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Mancini, Luiz; Seyler, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the weathering and transport mechanisms of Fe in the Amazon River. A particular emphasis was placed on Fe partitioning, speciation, and isotopic fractionation in the contrasting waters of the Solimões and Negro rivers and their mixing zone at the beginning of the Amazon River. Samples collected in the end-member rivers and thirteen sites distributed throughout the mixing zone were processed through frontal vacuum filtration and tangential-flow ultrafiltration to separate the different suspended solid fractions, i.e., particulate (P > 0.45 μm and P > 0.22 μm), colloidal (0.22 μm > C > 5 kDa) and truly dissolved elements (TD < 5 kDa). The Fe isotopic composition and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) species were measured on these different pore-sized fractions. The acidic and organo-Fe-rich waters of the Negro River displayed dissolved and colloidal fractions enriched in heavy isotopes (∼1.2‰, in δ57Fe values relative to IRMM-14), while the particulate fractions yielded light isotopic compositions of -0.344‰ for P > 0.22 μm and -0.104‰ for P > 0.45 μm fractions). The mineral particulate-rich waters of the Solimões River had dissolved and colloidal fractions with light isotopic composition (-0.532‰ and -0.176‰, respectively), whereas the particulate fractions yielded δ57Fe values close to those of the continental crust (i.e., -0.029‰ for P > 0.22 μm and 0.028‰ for P > 0.45 μm). Ten kilometers downstream from the Negro and Solimões junction, the concentrations of colloidal and dissolved Fe species deviate markedly from conservative mixing. A maximum Fe loss of 43 μg/L (i.e., 50% of the dissolved and colloidal Fe) is observed 110 km downstream from the rivers junction. The contrasting Negro and Solimões Rivers isotopic compositions along the pore-sized water fractions is attributable to the biogeochemical processes involving different types of upland soils and parental materials. For instance, the isotopic

  16. Troctolite 76535 - A study in the preservation of early isotopic records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffee, M.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Hudson, B.

    1982-01-01

    The lunar rock considered in the present investigation is a coarse-grained troctolite granulite containing about 58(vol)% plagioclase, 37% olivine, 4% pyroxene, and less than 1% accessory phases with a texture which indicates formation as a cumulate at depths between 10 and 30 km followed by an extended period of slow cooling. A description is presented of noble gas studies of separated minerals from 76535. The quantity of fission xenon from the in situ decay of Pu-244 provides further evidence for different, mineral-specific, isotopic closure times. The presented data shows that 76535 loses its surface-correlated xenon component upon disaggregation. No other xenon component is lost. The presence of solar gases in 76535 would seem to argue in favor of the external acquisition of the parentless extinct isotope effects and consequently favor 'thermal diffusion' and 'adsorption' over local redistribution models.

  17. Stable isotope study of fluid inclusions in fluorite from Idaho: implications for continental climates during the Eocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, R.R.; Rye, R.O.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic studies of fluid inclusions from meteoric water-dominated epithermal ore deposits offer a unique opportunity to study paleoclimates because the fluids can provide direct samples of ancient waters. Fluorite-hosted fluid inclusions from the Eocene (51-50 Ma) epithermal deposits of the Bayhorse mining district, have low salinities and low to moderate homogenization temperatures indicating meteoric origins for the fluids. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data on inclusion fluids are almost identical to those of modern meteoric waters in the area. The equivalence of the isotope composition of the Eocene inclusion fluids and modern meteoric waters indicates that the Eocene climatic conditions were similar to those today. -from Authors

  18. A radiogenic isotope tracer study of transatlantic dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumar, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S.J.G.; Garrison, V.H.; Williams, E.; Andreae, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that long-range transport of African desert dusts across the Atlantic Ocean occurs, delivering key nutrients and contributing to fertilization of the Amazon rainforest. Here we utilize radiogenic isotope tracers – Sr, Nd and Pb – to derive the provenance, local or remote, and pathways of dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean. Atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter was collected in 2008 on quartz fibre filters, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean at three different locations: in Mali (12.6°N, 8.0°W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3°N, 60.5°W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7°N, 64.6°W; 27 m a.s.l.). Both the labile phase, representative of the anthropogenic signal, and the refractory detrital silicate fraction were analysed. Dust deposits and soils from around the sampling sites were measured as well to assess the potential contribution from local sources to the mineral dust collected. The contribution from anthropogenic sources of Pb was predominant in the labile, leachate phase. The overall similarity in Pb isotope signatures found in the leachates is attributed to a common African source of anthropogenic Pb, with minor inputs from other sources, such as from Central and South America. The Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in the silicate fraction were found to be systematically more radiogenic than those in the corresponding labile phases. In contrast, Nd and Sr isotopic compositions from Mali, Tobago, and the Virgin Islands are virtually identical in both leachates and residues. Comparison with existing literature data on Saharan and Sahelian sources constrains the origin of summer dust transported to the Caribbean to mainly originate from the Sahel region, with some contribution from northern Saharan sources. The source regions derived from the isotope data are consistent with 7-day back-trajectory analyses, demonstrating the usefulness of radiogenic isotopes in tracing dust provenance and

  19. The CG-1D neutron imaging beamline at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Santodonato, Louis J; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Bailey, William Barton; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Nguyen, Phong T; Tremsin, Anton S; Selby, Douglas L; Walker, Lakeisha MH

    2015-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate has installed a neutron imaging beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold guide hall. CG-1D is one of the three instruments that make up the CG1 instrument suite. The beamline optics and detector have recently been upgraded to meet the needs of the neutron imaging community (better smoothing of guide system artifacts, higher flux or spatial resolution). These upgrades comprise a new diffuser/aperture system, two new detectors, a He-filled flight tube and silicon (Si) windows. Shielding inside the flight tube, beam scrapers and a beam stop ensure that biological dose is less than 50 Sv/hr outside of the radiation boundary. A set of diffusers and apertures (pinhole geometry) has been installed at the exit of the guide system to allow motorized L/D variation. Samples sit on a translation/rotation stage for alignment and tomography purposes. Detectors for the CG-1D beamline are (1) an ANDOR DW936 charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a field of view of approximately 7 cm x 7 cm and ~ 80 microns spatial resolution and 1 frame per second time resolution, (2) a new Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detector with a 2.8 cm x 2.8 cm field of view and 55 microns spatial resolution, and 5 s timing capability. 6LiF/ZnS scintillators of thickness varying from 50 to 200 microns are being used at this facility. An overview of the beamline upgrade and preliminary data is presented here.

  20. Studying the Permian cross-section (Volga region) using chemical and isotopic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareev, Bulat; Georgii, Batalin; Nurgaliev, Danis; Nurgalieva, Nuriya

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a study of international important site: the cross-section of Permian system's Urzhumian Stage in the ravine "Pechischy". Outcrop is located on the right bank of the Volga River (about 10 km West of Kazan). It has local, regional and planetary correlation features and also footprints of different geographical scale events. The main objective in the research is the deep study of sediments using chemical and isotopic investigations. XRF spectrometer was used for chemical investigations of samples. Chemistry of carbonates and clastic rocks includes the analysis of chemical elements, compounds, petrochemical (lithogeochemical) modules for the interpretation of the genesis of lithotypes. For the review of the geochemistry of stable isotopes of carbon (oxygen) we used IRMS. The main objective is the nature of the isotope fractionation issues, to addressing the issues of stratigraphy and paleogeography. The measurements have shown the variability of chemical parameters in cross-section. It gives us opportunity to see small changes in sedimentation and recognize the factors that influence to the process. The work was carried out according to the Russian Government's Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University, supported by the grant provided to the Kazan State University for performing the state program in the field of scientific research.

  1. A study of stable isotopic variations of Antarctic snow by albedo differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeonghoon; Han, Yeongcheol; Ham, Ji-Young; Kim, Young-Hee; Kim, Songyi; Kim, Hyerin; Na, Un-Sung

    2015-04-01

    Snow's albedo can be decreased if there are any impurities on the snow surface other than snow itself. Due to the decrease of albedo of snow, melting rates of surface snow can be enhanced, which is very crucial in climate change and hydrogeology in many parts of the world. Anthropogenic black carbons caused by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuel affect on snow and tephra particles generated by geologic volcanic activities reduce snow albedo. In this study, we investigated isotopic compositions between snow covered by tephra particles and clean snow. Isotopic compositions of snow with tephra statistically shows more enriched than those of clean snow (p<0.02). This can be explained by the fact that snow becomes enriched in 18O or D relative to meltwater as melting rates are increased. In addition, the slopes of the linear regression between oxygen and hydrogen for snow with tephra and clean snow are 6.7 and 8, respectively, and the latter is similar to that of the global meteoric water line of 8. Therefore, we can conclude that snow impurities control the isotopic compositions of snow, which is very crucial in the study of climate change and hydrogeology. To quantitatively explain these observations, melting experiments and numerical approaches are required.

  2. Final Progress Report: Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Bounds, John Alan; Brumby, Steven P.; Prasad, Lakshman; Sullivan, John P.

    2012-04-30

    This is the final report of the project titled, 'Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes,' PMIS project number LA10-HUMANID-PD03. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). It summarizes work performed over the FY10 time period. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). Human analysts begin analyzing a spectrum based on features in the spectrum - lines and shapes that are present in a given spectrum. The proposed work was to carry out a feasibility study that will pick out all gamma ray peaks and other features such as Compton edges, bremsstrahlung, presence/absence of shielding and presence of neutrons and escape peaks. Ultimately success of this feasibility study will allow us to collectively explain identified features and form a realistic scenario that produced a given spectrum in the future. We wanted to develop and demonstrate machine learning algorithms that will qualitatively enhance the automated identification capabilities of portable radiological sensors that are currently being used in the field.

  3. Quantum Dynamics Study of the Isotopic Effect on Capture Reactions: HD, D2 + CH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Time-dependent wave-packet-propagation calculations are reported for the isotopic reactions, HD + CH3 and D2 + CH3, in six degrees of freedom and for zero total angular momentum. Initial state selected reaction probabilities for different initial rotational-vibrational states are presented in this study. This study shows that excitations of the HD(D2) enhances the reactivities; whereas the excitations of the CH3 umbrella mode have the opposite effects. This is consistent with the reaction of H2 + CH3. The comparison of these three isotopic reactions also shows the isotopic effects in the initial-state-selected reaction probabilities. The cumulative reaction probabilities (CRP) are obtained by summing over initial-state-selected reaction probabilities. The energy-shift approximation to account for the contribution of degrees of freedom missing in the six dimensionality calculation is employed to obtain approximate full-dimensional CRPs. The rate constant comparison shows H2 + CH3 reaction has the biggest reactivity, then HD + CH3, and D2 + CH3 has the smallest.

  4. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies of living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, E.

    1999-05-10

    This dissertation focuses on the development of methods for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies in living systems using inductively coupled plasma single and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers. Sub-nanogram per gram levels of molybdenum (Mo) from human blood plasma are isolated by the use of anion exchange alumina microcolumns. Million-fold more concentrated spectral and matrix interferences such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, etc. in the blood constituents are removed from the analyte. The recovery of Mo from the alumina column is 82 {+-} 5% (n = 5). Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) is utilized for the quantitative ultra-trace concentration determination of Mo in bovine and human blood samples. The average Mo concentration in reference bovine serum determined by this method is 10.2 {+-} 0.4 ng/g, while the certified value is 11.5 {+-} 1.1 ng/g (95% confidence interval). The Mo concentration of one pool of human blood plasma from two healthy male donors is 0.5 {+-} 0.1 ng/g. The inductively coupled plasma twin quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-TQMS) is used to measure the carbon isotope ratio from non-volatile organic compounds and bio-organic molecules to assess the ability as an alternative analytical method to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-combustion-IRMS). Trytophan, myoglobin, and {beta}-cyclodextrin are chosen for the study, initial observation of spectral interference of {sup 13}C{sup +} with {sup 12}C{sup 1}H{sup +} comes from the incomplete dissociation of myoglobin and/or {beta}-cyclodextrin.

  5. Herschel Studies of Circumstellar Volatile Isotopes: Supporting Observations from the Ground and SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, Stefanie

    The long standing question of ''What are the origin, evolution, and fate of our Universe and/or Galaxy?" has puzzled humankind for centuries. One approach to answering this question is to gain further understanding of stellar evolution, since stars are fundamental in galaxy development and evolution. A compilation of stellar composition can reveal the age, dynamics, and possibly the evolution of a galaxy. Stars are the factories of heavy elements, including carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, that are fundamental in chemical complexity associated with planetary systems. Primitive materials have revealed a component of “atypical” isotopic signatures of these fundamental elements denoting a possible stellar origin. Understanding the processes by which these elements derive are essential for astrophysics on cosmochemical, galactic, stellar, and planetary scales. We propose to perform a comprehensive program of radioastronomical and infrared observations in circumstellar envelopes to definitively measure C, N, and O isotope ratios and test current models of photo-selective isotope fractionation vs. nucleosynthetically determined values. These data augment current programs underway with the Herschel Space Observatory. The broad implications for this study include fundamental values necessary for furthering our current understanding of stellar nucleosynthesis, circumstellar chemistry, Galactic chemical evolution, and the origin of presolar grains found in primitive materials. We will focus on isotopologues of species formed in thermochemical equilibrium and trace the natal, nucleosynthetic isotope ratio. We will survey a sample of evolved stars with varying degrees of nuclear processing, evolutionary states, and envelope chemistry (e.g. oxygen-rich vs. carbon-rich). The isotope ratios of 12C/13C, 14N/15N, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O will be obtained and compared to previous studies conducted on species now considered to be affected by chemical effects in the circumstellar shell

  6. Bibliography of geologic studies using imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Articles concerning imaging studies on the geomorphology, mineralogy, and topology of various landforms are reported. One hundred and ninety citations are listed and an index by National Technical Information service citation number is included. Several illustrations of L-band radar imagery are presented.

  7. DoE optimization of a mercury isotope ratio determination method for environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Berni, Alex; Baschieri, Carlo; Covelli, Stefano; Emili, Andrea; Marchetti, Andrea; Manzini, Daniela; Berto, Daniela; Rampazzo, Federico

    2016-05-15

    By using the experimental design (DoE) technique, we optimized an analytical method for the determination of mercury isotope ratios by means of cold-vapor multicollector ICP-MS (CV-MC-ICP-MS) to provide absolute Hg isotopic ratio measurements with a suitable internal precision. By running 32 experiments, the influence of mercury and thallium internal standard concentrations, total measuring time and sample flow rate was evaluated. Method was optimized varying Hg concentration between 2 and 20 ng g(-1). The model finds out some correlations within the parameters affect the measurements precision and predicts suitable sample measurement precisions for Hg concentrations from 5 ng g(-1) Hg upwards. The method was successfully applied to samples of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) coming from the Marano and Grado lagoon (NE Italy), a coastal environment affected by long term mercury contamination mainly due to mining activity. Results show different extents of both mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) phenomena in clams according to their size and sampling sites in the lagoon. The method is fit for determinations on real samples, allowing for the use of Hg isotopic ratios to study mercury biogeochemical cycles in complex ecosystems. PMID:26992509

  8. Isotopic studies of mariposite-bearing rocks from the south- central Mother Lode, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, R.W.; Dodge, F.C.W.; Silberman, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    Gold-bearing vein formation in the Mother Lode belt of the study area apparently occurred during the Early Cretaceous between 127 and 108 m.y. B.P. The hydrothermal fluids that carried the gold precipitated quartz and mariposite at approx 320oC, similar to the T of precipitation of gold-bearing quartz veins in the Allegheny district. The O- and H-isotopic composition calculated for the fluid indicate that it was similar to formation water or was metamorphic in origin. If the carbonate in the veins was in isotopic equilibrium with this same fluid, it apparently precipitated at a higher T of approx 400oC. The Sr in the carbonate is much less radiogenic than that in any known marine carbonate, but is similar in isotopic composition to that in metamorphosed mafic volcanic rocks of the general region. These mafic rocks could have been the source for the Sr in the hydrothermal veins. This observation supports the contention that the gold-mariposite-quartz-carbonate rocks were formed as an alteration product of serpentinite and other mafic igneous rocks.-A.P.

  9. A molecular and isotopic study of the organic matter from the Paris Basin, France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtfouse, E.; Albrecht, P.; Behar, F.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen Liassic sedimentary rocks of increasing depth and three petroleums from the Paris Basin were studied for 13C/12C isotopic compositions and biological markers, including steranes, sterenes, methylphenanthrenes, methylanthracenes, and triaromatic steroids. The isotopic compositions of n-alkanes from mature sedimentary rocks and petroleums fall in a narrow range (2%), except for the deepest Hettangian rock and the Trias petroleum, for which the short-chain n-alkanes are enriched and depleted in 13C, respectively. Most of the molecular parameters increase over the 2000-2500 m depth range, reflecting the transformation of the organic matter at the onset of petroleum generation. In this zone, carbonate content and carbon isotopic composition of carbonates, as well as molecular parameters, are distinct for the Toarcian and Hettangian source rocks and suggest a migration of organic matter from these two formations. Two novel molecular parameters were defined for this task: one using methyltriaromatic steroids from organic extracts; the other using 1-methylphenanthrene and 2-methylanthracene from kerogen pyrolysates. The anomalous high maturity of the Dogger petroleum relative to the maturity-depth trend of the source rocks is used to estimate the minimal vertical distance of migration of the organic matter from the source rock to the reservoir.

  10. A molecular and isotopic study of the organic matter from the Paris Basin, France.

    PubMed

    Lichtfouse, E; Albrecht, P; Behar, F; Hayes, J M

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen Liassic sedimentary rocks of increasing depth and three petroleums from the Paris Basin were studied for 13C/12C isotopic compositions and biological markers, including steranes, sterenes, methylphenanthrenes, methylanthracenes, and triaromatic steroids. The isotopic compositions of n-alkanes from mature sedimentary rocks and petroleums fall in a narrow range (2%), except for the deepest Hettangian rock and the Trias petroleum, for which the short-chain n-alkanes are enriched and depleted in 13C, respectively. Most of the molecular parameters increase over the 2000-2500 m depth range, reflecting the transformation of the organic matter at the onset of petroleum generation. In this zone, carbonate content and carbon isotopic composition of carbonates, as well as molecular parameters, are distinct for the Toarcian and Hettangian source rocks and suggest a migration of organic matter from these two formations. Two novel molecular parameters were defined for this task: one using methyltriaromatic steroids from organic extracts; the other using 1-methylphenanthrene and 2-methylanthracene from kerogen pyrolysates. The anomalous high maturity of the Dogger petroleum relative to the maturity-depth trend of the source rocks is used to estimate the minimal vertical distance of migration of the organic matter from the source rock to the reservoir.

  11. Re-Os isotopic study of the Muskox intrusion, NWT, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, J.; Hulbert, L.; Pearson, G.; Nowell, G.

    2003-04-01

    The 1270±4Ma Muskox intrusion is one of the largest layered intrusions in the world and is the intrusive centre the giant Mackenzie-Coppermine-Muskox igneous event, widely attributed to the presence of a mantle plume beneath the north western Canadian Shield during the middle Proterozoic. We have made a detailed Re-Os isotope study of the Muskox intrusion with the aim of constraining the origin and potential triggers for precious metal mineralization in layered intrusions, assessing the role of magma recharge versus crustal assimilation and sulphide participation during mineralization. In the process of understanding these factors, direct inference can be made on the source characteristics of the reservoirs involved during magma genesis, and which feed major continental magmatism events. Re-Os isotopic analyses have been performed on 32 well characterised samples from drill core which samples the entire stratigraphy of the Muskox intrusion. Initial 187Os/188Os span a very restricted range for the ultramafic portion of the intrusion, with γOs +3 to +5.5 relative to chondrite. These values are not indicative of crustal assimilation. Os isotopic ratios also show significant shifts at platinum group element enriched horizons. Common Os concentrations show close correlation with major element indices whilst Re concentrations are less systematic and anomalously low in the ultramafic horizons, especially those which have suffered intense fluid alteration. Re-Os isotopic data will also be presented on the keel dyke feeder to the Muskox intrusion and the contemporaneous, voluminous Coppermine volcanics including an andesite glass flow.

  12. Study of Pb sources by Pb isotope ratios in the airborne PM(10) of Zaragoza, Spain.

    PubMed

    Teresa de la Cruz, María; Laborda, Francisco; Callén, María Soledad; López, José Manuel; Mastral, Ana María

    2009-11-01

    Lead is a toxic trace element which produces harmful effects on human health, even at low concentrations, and it can be useful as ambient pollution tracer because the relative abundance of its four stable isotopes (204, 206, 207 and 208) depends on the emission source. This study was focused on the lead concentrations and isotope ratios in the PM10 of Zaragoza, in order to determine the main Pb pollution sources and to check whether the influence of the prohibition of leaded fuel was worthwhile. Two sampling campaigns from 2001 until 2004, the first one in which leaded gasoline was still effective and the second one with the phase-out, were carried out by using a high-volume air sampler able to trap the particulate matter equal to or less than 10 microm (PM10) on Teflon-coated fibre glass filters. Firstly, the Pb concentrations for the two sampling campaigns were analysed by inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). No statistically significant decrease in the Pb average concentration was obtained from the first to the second sampling. Enrichment factors showed that anthropogenic sources were prevalent during both samplings, in particular during 2001-2002. Afterwards, only those samples with higher concentrations than the limit of quantification of Pb were analysed to determine the lead isotopic composition by inductively-coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS). To apply this analytical technique successfully, it was necessary to optimize the parameters affecting the measurement accuracy and precision. Differences were found regarding the lead isotope ratios for both periods finding that anthropogenic sources related to industrial processes were reflected on both campaigns. The gasoline contribution for the first campaign was 23% whereas for the second sampling this contribution was negligible, corroborating the success of the lead policies on the quality of the environment.

  13. Isotopic Evidence for Microbial Activity in Crystalline Bedrock Fractures - a Case Study from Olkiluoto, SW Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlstedt, E. K.; Karhu, J.; Pitkänen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in the geochemical environment in crystalline bedrock fractures were investigated using the stable isotopes of C, O and S in fracture filling minerals as tracers. Of special interest were the possible changes which may occur in the subsurface at low temperatures. Especially, the influence of microbial activity was recognized as a catalyst for inducing changes in the geochemical environment. The study site is the Olkiluoto island located on the western coast of Finland, planned to host a geological repository for nuclear waste. Fracture surfaces were investigated to recognize the latest mineralizations at the site. These fillings were comprised of thin plates or small euhedral crystals of calcite and pyrite. The carbon and sulfur isotope compositions of calcite and pyrite were measured from bulk material by conventional IRMS, and in situ by secondary ion mass spectrometry. A notable feature of the late-stage fillings was high variabilities in the δ13C values of calcite and the δ34S values of pyrite, which ranged from -53.8 ‰ to +31.6 ‰ and from -50.4 ‰ to +77.7 ‰, respectively. Based on the isotopic compositions of the fillings, several features in the past hydrogeochemical environment could be recognized. The isotopic composition of the fracture fillings indicate an environment which was stratified with respect to depth. Characteristic features include bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) occurring at depths <111 m (bsl), and a methanogenetic environment at depths >50 m. It appears that methanic conditions were replaced by sulfate reduction at depths >50 m likely due to infiltration of SO42--rich brackish waters. Sulfate reducing bacteria used mainly surface derived organic carbon as electron donors. Some indication of minor methanotrophic activity was recognized in anomalously low δ13C values of calcite, down to -53.8 ‰, at the depth range of 34-54 m. This methanotrophic activity may have been related to bacteria using CH4 as an electron donor in

  14. Microwave imaging diagnostics for plasma fluctuation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian

    Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) and Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) combined systems are being investigated by the UC Davis Plasma Diagnostic Group (PDG), in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) researchers, Drs. E. Mazzucato, H.K. Park and T. Munsat, as well as researchers from the FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen,the Netherlands. The goal is to develop the plasma diagnostic systems based on the imaging technology developed in the UC Davis PDG group, for the study of plasma micro-turbulence, which is extremely important for the understanding of anomalous transport behavior of magnetically confined plasmas such as in tokamaks. This dissertation work provides the design of the optical systems, the design of the electronics, the testing of the antenna array and the data analysis of TEXTOR ECEI/MIR combined systems.

  15. Detail isotopic stratigraphy of snowpack - case study from Julian Alps (Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreča, P.; Brenčič, M.; Sinjur, I.; Sokratov, S.

    2012-04-01

    In temperate humid catchments the storage of precipitation in snowpack, and the subsequent melting, both highly variable in space and time, substantially impacts the water cycle. Recent climate warming and changes in atmospheric circulation patterns have resulted in reductions in the duration of the snow cover season, the amount of water stored in the snowpack, as well as a widespread trend toward earlier melt. Comparison of water balance for periods 1961-90 and 1971-2000 showed that in Slovenia average precipitation amount remained the same in both periods while runoff decreased and the evaporation increased recently. The area of Julian Alps (NW Slovenia) represents the upper catchment area of river Sava. The area is locally characterised as one with the highest annual precipitation amount in Europe, rapid runoffs and low evaporation. Snow cover is regular, starts to accumulate in late autumn and lasts more than 100 days, at the upper tree line usually more than 150 days. Due to positive air temperature trend snow cover period is changing and consequently the discharge regime is affected. Spatial and temporal variability of snow, as well as snow cover contribution to the water balance in Julian Alps remains poorly investigated. Isotopes of O and H have been used to study snow deposition and the subsequent alteration of snowpack and its influence on runoff. Despite their potential, environmental isotopes were only rarely used in investigations of water cycle in mountain areas of Slovenia in the past. To improve the knowledge on snowpack isotope characteristics and processes in it, and consequently to enable better understanding of water balance with emphasize on recharge of important Slovene aquifers, in 2011 at selected site in the area of Triglav National Park (Planina Javornik) the first isotope research of snowpack has been started. We performed detail sampling of snowpack at two locations with different canopy structures (e.g. clearing and forest stand

  16. Carnivore specific bone bioapatite and collagen carbon isotope fractionations: Case studies of modern and fossil grey wolf populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Dobbs, K.; Wheatley, P. V.; Koch, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    -tissue differences we measured for wolves are applicable to future isotopic studies of consumers with purely carnivorous diets. For example, we collected bone bioapatite and collagen carbon isotope data from late Pleistocene grey wolf fossils from eastern Beringia (Fairbanks, Alaska), and used the modern inter-tissue difference presented here to verify bioapatite preservation. We then compared the wolves to herbivores (horse and caribou) from the same locality, and found the difference in their bone bioapatite carbon isotope values corresponded to the modern carnivore-herbivore trophic spacing given above. We therefore were able to conclude that horse and caribou were part of Beringian wolf diet.

  17. Distribution of carbon isotopes in amino acids of protein fraction of micro-organisms as a means of studying the mechanisms of their biosynthesis in the cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A.A.

    1986-04-10

    The intramolecular distribution of carbon isotopes in the amino acids of the protein fraction of a number of photosynthesizing microorganisms was analyzed using the previously proposed model of carbon isotope fractionation in the cell. A correlation was found between the distributions of the isotopes in the amino acids and the pathways and sequence of their synthesis in the cell cycle. The feasibility of using the isotopic distributions of metabolites for a study of the temporal organization of metabolism in the cell is illustrated.

  18. Laser Spectroscopic Study on Oxygen Isotope Effects in Ozone Surface Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, Marco; Boursier, Corinne; Elandaloussi, Hadj; Te, Yao; Jeseck, Pascal; Rouille, Christian; Zanon-Willette, Thomas; Janssen, Christof

    2016-04-01

    The isotope kinetics of ozone formation in the Chapman reaction [1] O + O2 + M → O3 + M (1) provides the primary example for a chemically induced oxygen isotope anomaly and is associated with large [2] and mass independent [3] oxygen isotope enrichments in the product molecule, linked to a symmetry selection in the ozone formation kinetics [4-5]. The isotopic composition of ozone and its transfer to other molecules is a powerful tracer in the atmospheric and biogeochemical sciences [6] and serves as a primary model for a possible explanation of the oxygen isotopic heterogeneity in the Solar system [7-8]. Recently, the isotope fractionation in the photolytic decomposition process O3 + hν → O2 + O (2) using visible light has been studied in detail [9-10]. Much less is currently known about the isotope fractionation in the dry deposition or in the gas phase thermal decomposition of ozone O3 + M → O2 + O +M. (3) Here we report on first spectroscopic studies of non-photolytic ozone decomposition using a cw-quantum cascade laser at 9.5 μm. The concentration of individual ozone isotopomers (16O3,16O16O17O, and 16O17O16O) in a teflon coated reaction cell is followed in real time at temperatures between 25 and 150 °C. Observed ozone decay rates depend on homogeneous (reaction (3)) processes in the gas phase and on heterogeneous reactions on the wall. A preliminary analysis reveals agreement with currently recommended ozone decay rates in the gas phase and the absence of a large symmetry selection in the surface decomposition process, indicating the absence of a mass independent fractionation effect. This result is in agreement with previous mass spectrometer (MS) studies on heterogeneous ozone formation on pyrex [11], but contradicts an earlier MS study [12] on ozone surface decomposition on pyrex and quartz. Implications for atmospheric chemistry will be discussed. [1] Morton, J., Barnes, J., Schueler, B. and Mauersberger, K. J. Geophys. Res. 95, 901 - 907 (1990

  19. Biochemical and physiological bases for the use of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in environmental and ecological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Ogawa, Nanako O.; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Wada, Eitaro

    2015-12-01

    We review the biochemical and physiological bases of the use of carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions as an approach for environmental and ecological studies. Biochemical processes commonly observed in the biosphere, including the decarboxylation and deamination of amino acids, are the key factors in this isotopic approach. The principles drawn from the isotopic distributions disentangle the complex dynamics of the biosphere and allow the interactions between the geosphere and biosphere to be analyzed in detail. We also summarize two recently examined topics with new datasets: the isotopic compositions of individual biosynthetic products (chlorophylls and amino acids) and those of animal organs for further pursuing the basis of the methodology. As a tool for investigating complex systems, compound-specific isotopic analysis compensates the intrinsic disadvantages of bulk isotopic signatures. Chlorophylls provide information about the particular processes of various photoautotrophs, whereas amino acids provide a precise measure of the trophic positions of heterotrophs. The isotopic distributions of carbon and nitrogen in a single organism as well as in the whole biosphere are strongly regulated, so that their major components such as amino acids are coordinated appropriately rather than controlled separately.

  20. A combined radio- and stable-isotopic study of a California coastal aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; Baskaran, Mark; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Edwards, Brian D.; Land, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Stable and radioactive tracers were utilized in concert to characterize geochemical processes in a complex coastal groundwater system and to provide constraints on the kinetics of rock/water interactions. Groundwater samples from wells within the Dominguez Gap region of Los Angeles County, California were analyzed for a suite of major cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+) and anions (Cl−, SO42−), silica, alkalinity, select trace elements (Ba, B, Sr), dissolved oxygen, stable isotopes of hydrogen (δD), oxygen (δ18O), dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC), and radioactive isotopes (3H, 222Rn and 223,224,226,228Ra). In the study area, groundwater may consist of a complex mixture of native groundwater, intruded seawater, non-native injected water, and oil-field brine water. In some wells, Cl− concentrations attained seawater-like values and in conjunction with isotopically heavier δ18O values, these tracers provide information on the extent of seawater intrusion and/or mixing with oil-field brines. Groundwater 3H above 1 tritium unit (TU) was observed only in a few select wells close to the Dominguez Gap area and most other well groundwater was aged pre-1952. Based on an initial 14C value for the study site of 90 percent modern carbon (pmc), groundwater age estimates likely extend beyond 20 kyr before present and confirm deep circulation of some native groundwater through multiple aquifers. Enriched values of groundwater δ13CDIC in the absence of SO42− imply enhanced anaerobic microbial methanogenesis. While secular equilibrium was observed for 234U/238U (activity ratios ~1) in host matrices, strong isotopic fractionation in these groundwater samples can be used to obtain information of adsorption/desorption kinetics. Calculated Ra residence times are short, and the associated desorption rate constant is about three orders of magnitude slower than that of the adsorption rate constant. Combined stable- and radio-isotopic results provide unique insights into aquifer

  1. Stable isotope distribution in precipitation in Romania and its relevance for palaeoclimatic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perşoiu, Aurel; Nagavciuc, Viorica; Bădăluţă, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    A surge of recent studies in Romania have targeted various aspects of palaeoclimate (based on stable isotopes in ice, speleothems, tree rings), mineral water origin, wine and other juices provenance. However, while much needed, these studies lack a stable isotope in precipitation background, with only two LMWL's being published so far. In this paper we discuss the links between the stable isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18O and δ2H), climate (air temperature, precipitation amount and large scale circulation) and their relevance for the palaeocllimatic interpretation of stable isotope values in cave ice, cryogenic calcite and tree rings from different sites in Romania. Most of the precipitation in Romania is delivered by the Westerlies, bringing moisture from the North Atlantic; however, their influence is greatly reduced in the eastern half of the country where local evaporative sources play an important role in the precipitation balance. The SW is dominated by water masses from the Mediterranean Sea, while the SE corner clearly draws most of the moisture from the Black Sea and strongly depleted North Atlantic vapor masses. In 2012, Romania experienced the worst draught in 60 years, possibly due to a northward shift of the jest stream associated to blocking conditions in summer, which led to a more northern penetration of the Mediterranean-derived air masses, as well increased precipitation of re-evaporated waters. We have further analyzed cave drip water (δ18O and δ2H), cryogenic cave calcite (δ18O and δ13C) and tree rings (δ18O and δ13C) from selected sites across NW Romania, where the water isotopes in precipitation showed the best (and easiest to understand, given the climatic conditions in 2012) correlation with climatic parameters. Our results that 1) δ18O and δ2H in cave ice are a good proxy for late summer through early winter air temperature; 2) δ13C in cryogenic cave calcite are possible indicators of soil humidity and 3) δ18O in pine

  2. The mechanism of oxygen isotopic fractionation during fungal denitrification - A pure culture study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrage-Moennig, Nicole; Rohe, Lena; Anderson, Traute-Heidi; Braker, Gesche; Flessa, Heinz; Giesemann, Annette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) from soil denitrification originates from bacteria and - to an unknown extent - also from fungi. During fungal denitrification, oxygen (O) exchange takes place between H2O and intermediates of the denitrification process as in bacterial exchange[1,2]. However, information about enzymes involved in fungal O exchanges and the associated fractionation effects is lacking. The objectives of this study were to estimate the O fractionation and O exchange during the fungal denitrifying steps using a conceptual model[2] adapted from concepts for bacterial denitrification[3], implementing controls of O exchange proposed by Aerssens, et al.[4] and using fractionation models by Snider et al.[5] Six different pure fungal cultures (five Hypocreales, one Sordariales) known to be capable of denitrification were incubated under anaerobic conditions, either with nitrite or nitrate. Gas samples were analyzed for N2O concentration and its isotopic signatures (SP, average δ15N, δ18O). To investigate O exchange, both treatments were also established with 18O-labelled water as a tracer in the medium. The Hypocreales strains showed O exchange mainly at NO2- reductase (Nir) with NO2- as electron acceptor and no additional O exchange at NO3- reductase (Nar) with NO3- as electron acceptor. The only Hypocreales species having higher O exchange with NO3- than with NO2- also showed O exchange at Nar. The Sordariales species tested seems capable of O exchange at NO reductase (Nor) additionally to O exchange at Nir with NO2-. The data will help to better interpret stable isotope values of N2O from soils. .[1] D. M. Kool, N. Wrage, O. Oenema, J. Dolfing, J. W. Van Groenigen. Oxygen exchange between (de)nitrification intermediates and H2O and its implications for source determination of NO?3- and N2O: a review. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec. 2007, 21, 3569. [2] L. Rohe, T.-H. Anderson, B. Braker, H. Flessa, A. Giesemann, N. Wrage-Mönnig, R. Well. Fungal Oxygen Exchange between

  3. Deformation in the neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes: Radioactive decay scheme studies in the neodymium, promethium, and samarium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Breitenbach, J.B.

    1993-12-31

    Several experiments were performed at the UNISOR isotope separator facility at HHIRF at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes. Data for the decay chain {sup 133}Sm {yields} {sup 133}Pm {yields} {sup 133}Nd was obtained, consisting of multiscaled spectra of {gamma} rays, X rays, and conversion electrons, as well as {gamma}{gamma}t, X{gamma}t, e{gamma}t and eXt coincidences. Gamma rays associated with the decay of {sup 133}Sm and {sup 133}Pm were observed for the first time. The decay of a new low-spin (1/2) isomeric state, with a half life of about 70 sec was established for {sup 133}Nd. The level schemes for {sup 133}Nd and {sup 133}Pr were constructed. An M3 and two E1 isomers are established in {sup 133}Nd and an E3 isomer is confirmed in {sup 133}Pr. The energy level systematics for the nuclear region bounded by Z {ge} 58 and N {le} 78 is discussed. Theoretical interpretations are based on the particle-plus-triaxial rotor model calculations. In the framework of these calculations, the {beta}{sub 2} deformation is moderate for these nuclei ({beta}{sub 2} {approx} 0.20-0.25). A sudden onset of strong deformation is not observed, in contrast with the theoretical predictions by Leander and Moeller [Lea82].

  4. Isotope Tracer Studies of Diffusion in Sillicates and of Geological Transport Processes Using Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, Gerald J

    2008-07-31

    The objectives were directed toward understanding the transport of chemical species in nature, with particular emphasis on aqueous transport in solution, in colloids, and on particles. Major improvements in measuring ultra-low concentrations of rare elements were achieved. We focused on two areas of studies: (1) Field, laboratory, and theoretical studies of the transport and deposition of U, Th isotopes and their daughter products in natural systems; and (2) Study of calcium isotope fractionation effects in marine carbonates and in carbonates precipitated in the laboratory, under controlled temperature, pH, and rates of precipitation. A major study of isotopic fractionation of Ca during calcite growth from solution has been completed and published. It was found that the isotopic shifts widely reported in the literature and attributed to biological processes are in fact due to a small equilibrium fractionation factor that is suppressed by supersaturation of the solution. These effects were demonstrated in the laboratory and with consideration of the solution conditions in natural systems, where [Ca{sup 2+}] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] + [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. The controlling rate is not the diffusion of Ca, as was earlier proposed, but rather the rate of supply of [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] ions to the interface. This now opens the issues of isotopic fractionation of many elements to a more physical-chemical approach. The isotopic composition of Ca {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) in calcite crystals has been determined relative to that in the parent solutions by TIMS using a double spike. Solutions were exposed to an atmosphere of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, provided by the decomposition of (NH4)2CO3. Alkalinity, pH, and concentrations of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, and CO{sub 2} in solution were determined. The procedures permitted us to determine {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) over a range of pH conditions, with the associated ranges of alkalinity. Two solutions with

  5. Study of SGD along the French Mediterranean coastline using airborne TIR images and in situ analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, Pieter; Stieglitz, Thomas; Souhaut, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Although submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) has been investigated in many places of the world, very few studies were conducted along the French coastline of the Mediterranean Sea. Almost no information is available on the fluxes of water and chemical elements associated with these SGD and on their potential impact on the geochemical cycling and ecosystems of the coastal zones. In this work, we combined the use of airborne thermal infrared (TIR) images with in situ analyses of salinity, temperature, radon and radium isotopes to study SGD at various sites along the French Mediterranean coastline and in coastal lagoons. These analyses allowed us to detect SGD sites and to quantify SGD fluxes (that include both the fluxes of fresh groundwater and recirculated seawater). In particular, we will show how the Ra isotopes determined in the La Palme lagoon were used to estimate i) the residence time of waters in the lagoon and ii) SGD fluxes.

  6. Cosmic ray isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    The isotopic composition of cosmic rays is studied in order to develop the relationship between cosmic rays and stellar processes. Cross section and model calculations are reported on isotopes of H, He, Be, Al and Fe. Satellite instrument measuring techniques separate only the isotopes of the lighter elements.

  7. A stable carbon isotope and biological marker study of Polish bituminous coals and carbonaceous shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kotarba, M.J.; Clayton, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Biological marker and carbon isotopic compositions of coals and carbonaceous shales from the Upper Carboniferous strata of the Upper Silesian (USCB), Lower Silesian (LSCB), and Lublin (LCB) coal basins were determined to assess depositional conditions and sources of the organic matter. n-Alkane, sterane, and isoprenoid distribution, and carbon isotope ratios are consistent with an origin from higher plants. In some cases, pristane/phytane (Pr/Ph) ratios of carbonaceous shales (roof and floor shales) are < 1.0, while the associated coals have high ratios (??? 1.0). This suggests that reducing conditions prevailed during deposition of the shales, but a period of oxidizing conditions accompanied deposition of the coals. Steranes present in coal extracts are dominated by the 14??(H)17??(H)20R C29 stereoisomers, typical, but not conclusive, of higher plant origin. Carbonaceous shales exhibit a wider range of sterane composition, suggesting local, significant input of algal organic matter. Significant amounts of benzohopanes and gammacerane are present in some coals. Although benzohopanes are present at least in small amounts in samples from many different environments, they have been reported to occur most commonly in marine environments. The present study seems to provide the first example where benzohopanes have been reported in significant amounts in terrestrial organic matter. Gammacerane is abundant in rocks or sediments deposited in carbonate or highly saline marine environments. The finding of high gammacerane concentrations in the coals expands the depositional settings in which it has been observed and questions its utility as an independent indicator of hypersaline carbonate environments. Stable carbon isotope composition of coals, and type III kerogen in carbonaceous shales as well as correlation of stable carbon isotope composition of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons in carbonaceous shales from both the USCB and the LSCB indicate terrigenous origin

  8. Digital Image Distribution: A Study of Costs and Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besser, Howard

    1999-01-01

    Describes a study that examined an experimental multi-site image distribution scheme among museums and universities in California, The Museum Educational Site Licensing Project, whose content was primarily digital images and metadata. Discusses barriers to using digital images; digital image distribution; comparing digital images to analog slide…

  9. Self-diffusion of polycrystalline ice Ih under confining pressure: Hydrogen isotope analysis using 2-D Raman imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Naoki; Kubo, Tomoaki; Durham, William B.; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Ichiko

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a high-resolution technique based on micro Raman spectroscopy to measure hydrogen isotope diffusion profiles in ice Ih. The calibration curve for quantitative analysis of deuterium in ice Ih was constructed using micro Raman spectroscopy. Diffusion experiments using diffusion couples composed of dense polycrystalline H2O and D2O ice were carried out under a gas confining pressure of 100 MPa (to suppress micro-fracturing and pore formation) at temperatures from 235 K to 245 K and diffusion times from 0.2 to 94 hours. Two-dimensional deuterium profiles across the diffusion couples were determined by Raman imaging. The location of small spots of frost from room air could be detected from the shapes of the Raman bands of OH and OD stretching modes, which change because of the effect of the molar ratio of deuterium on the molecular coupling interaction. We emphasize the validity for screening the impurities utilizing the coupling interaction. Some recrystallization and grain boundary migration occurred in recovered diffusion couples, but analysis of two-dimensional diffusion profiles of regions not affected by grain boundary migration allowed us to measure a volume diffusivity for ice at 100 MPa of (2.8 ± 0.4) ×10-3exp[ -57.0±15.4kJ/mol/RT ] m2 /s (R is the gas constant, T is temperature). Based on ambient pressure diffusivity measurements by others, this value indicates a high (negative) activation volume for volume diffusivity of -29.5 cm3/mol or more. We can also constrain the value of grain boundary diffusivity in ice at 100 MPa to be <104 that of volume diffusivity.

  10. A study of the kinetic isotope effects of elimination reactions involving isotopically engendered chirality: An ab initio study of the E2 elimination reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Braden, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    A new method of determining kinetic isotope effects (KIE) has been developed based upon optical rotation of isotopically engendered chiral compounds. This method can not only measure primary (1{degree}) KIE but also secondary (2{degree}) KIE which are not possible by mass spectral techniques. The mechanisms of the Hoffman, Cope, and E2 elimination reactions were studied using the optical rotation method to determine the 1{degree} and 2{degree} KIE. The syn 1{degree} KIE of (1S,2S)-N-n-butyl-N,N-dimethylcyclooctyl ammonium iodide-2d{sub 1} by a Hoffmann elimination (syn 1{degree} k{sub H}/k{sub D} = 1.40) or E2 elimination (syn 1{degree} d{sub H}/k{sub D} = 3.28) were measured for the formation of E-cyclooctene via a early transition state. Primary and secondary KIE provided evidence for a late transition state for the Cope elimination of syn (2R,3R)-3-amino-N,N,6,6-tetramethylbicyclo (3.1.1)heptane-N-oxide-2d{sub 1} (syn 1{degree} k{sub H}/k{sub D} = 2.22) and the anti-(2S,3R)-3-amino-N,N,6,6-tetramethylbicyclo (3.1.1) heptane-N-oxide-2d{sub 1} (2{degree} k{sub H}/k{sub D}) = 1.061. The mechanism of the E2 elimination of the corresponding bicyclic ammonium iodides and the bicyclic chlorides and bromides were also studied using 1{degree} and 2{degree} KIE determined by the optical rotation method. A study of the anionic oxy-Cope rearrangement using divinyl carbonols revealed that a chair transition state is more favorable that an boat revealed that a chair transition state is more favorable than a boat transition state. A theoretical study of the anti E2 elimination of HF from ethyl fluoride with hydride and cyanide anion and HCl from ethyl chloride with hydride ion provided evidence that the four electron three molecular orbital interactions are involved. These interactions help contribute to phase cancellation in the molecular orbitals leading to the transition state.

  11. Oxygen isotope study of the Long Valley magma system, California: isotope thermometry and convection in large silicic magma bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindeman, Ilya; Valley, John

    2002-07-01

    Products of voluminous pyroclastic eruptions with eruptive draw-down of several kilometers provide a snap-shot view of batholith-scale magma chambers, and quench pre-eruptive isotopic fractionations (i.e., temperatures) between minerals. We report analyses of oxygen isotope ratio in individual quartz phenocrysts and concentrates of magnetite, pyroxene, and zircon from individual pumice clasts of ignimbrite and fall units of caldera-forming 0.76 Ma Bishop Tuff (BT), pre-caldera Glass Mountain (2.1-0.78 Ma), and post-caldera rhyolites (0.65-0.04 Ma) to characterize the long-lived, batholith-scale magma chamber beneath Long Valley Caldera in California. Values of δ18O show a subtle 1‰ decrease from the oldest Glass Mountain lavas to the youngest post-caldera rhyolites. Older Glass Mountain lavas exhibit larger ( 1‰) variability of δ18O(quartz). The youngest domes of Glass Mountain are similar to BT in δ18O(quartz) values and reflect convective homogenization during formation of BT magma chamber surrounded by extremely heterogeneous country rocks (ranging from 2 to +29‰). Oxygen isotope thermometry of BT confirms a temperature gradient between "Late" (815 °C) and "Early" (715 °C) BT. The δ18O(quartz) values of "Early" and "Late" BT are +8.33 and 8.21‰, consistent with a constant δ18O(melt)=7.8+/-0.1‰ and 100 °C temperature difference. Zircon-melt saturation equilibria gives a similar temperature range. Values of δ18O(quartz) for different stratigraphic units of BT, and in pumice clasts ranging in pre-eruptive depths from 6 to 11 km (based on melt inclusions), and document vertical and lateral homogeneity of δ18O(melt). Worldwide, five other large-volume rhyolites, Lava Creek, Lower Bandelier, Fish Canyon, Cerro Galan, and Toba, exhibit equal δ18O(melt) values of earlier and later erupted portions in each of the these climactic caldera-forming eruptions. We interpret the large-scale δ18O homogeneity of BT and other large magma chambers as evidence

  12. Experimental studies of the 249Bk + 48Ca reaction including decay properties and excitation function for isotopes of element 117, and discovery of the new isotope 277Mt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Alexander, C.; Binder, J.; Boll, R. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Ezold, J.; Felker, K.; Gostic, J. M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Henderson, R. A.; Itkis, M. G.; Miernik, K.; Miller, D.; Moody, K. J.; Polyakov, A. N.; Ramayya, A. V.; Roberto, J. B.; Ryabinin, M. A.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shumeiko, M. V.; Stoyer, M. A.; Stoyer, N. J.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Voinov, A. A.; Vostokin, G. K.

    2013-05-01

    Studies of superheavy nuclei produced in the 249Bk + 48Ca reaction were performed using the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator. The cross section for the production of 293117 and 294117 isotopes was measured at five excitation energies of the 297117 compound nucleus ranging from 30 to 48 MeV and yielding maximum values of 1.1-0.6+1.2 pb for the 3n and 2.4-1.4+3.3 pb for the 4n reaction channels. Alpha emission from 281Rg competing with spontaneous fission (α/SF decay probability 1:9) was observed for the first time leading to the identification of the new isotope 277Mt (TSF≈5 ms). The measured decay properties are in good agreement with those expected based on the properties of neighboring even-Z and odd-Z nuclei. The α energies and half-lives of odd-Z isotopes observed in the 293117 and 294117 decay chains together with results obtained for lower-Z superheavy nuclei demonstrate enhanced stability with increasing neutron number toward the predicted new magic number N=184.

  13. ForCent Model Development and Testing using the Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS) Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parton, William; Hanson, Paul J; Swanston, Chris; Torn, Margaret S.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Riley, William J.; Kelly, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The ForCent forest ecosystem model was developed by making major revisions to the DayCent model including: (1) adding a humus organic pool, (2) incorporating a detailed root growth model, and (3) including plant phenological growth patterns. Observed plant production and soil respiration data from 1993 to 2000 were used to demonstrate that the ForCent model could accurately simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory deciduous forest. A comparison of ForCent versus observed soil pool 14C signature (? 14C) data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study 14C experiment (1999-2006) shows that the model correctly simulates the temporal dynamics of the 14C label as it moved from the surface litter and roots into the mineral soil organic matter pools. ForCent model validation was performed by comparing the observed Enriched Background Isotope Study experimental data with simulated live and dead root biomass ? 14C data, and with soil respiration ? 14C (mineral soil, humus layer, leaf litter layer, and total soil respiration) data. Results show that the model correctly simulates the impact of the Enriched Background Isotope Study 14C experimental treatments on soil respiration ? 14C values for the different soil organic matter pools. Model results suggest that a two-pool root growth model correctly represents root carbon dynamics and inputs to the soil. The model fitting process and sensitivity analysis exposed uncertainty in our estimates of the fraction of mineral soil in the slow and passive pools, dissolved organic carbon flux out of the litter layer into the mineral soil, and mixing of the humus layer into the mineral soil layer.

  14. ForCent model development and testing using the Enriched Background Isotope Study experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parton, W.J.; Hanson, P. J.; Swanston, C.; Torn, M.; Trumbore, S. E.; Riley, W.; Kelly, R.

    2010-10-01

    The ForCent forest ecosystem model was developed by making major revisions to the DayCent model including: (1) adding a humus organic pool, (2) incorporating a detailed root growth model, and (3) including plant phenological growth patterns. Observed plant production and soil respiration data from 1993 to 2000 were used to demonstrate that the ForCent model could accurately simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory deciduous forest. A comparison of ForCent versus observed soil pool {sup 14}C signature ({Delta} {sup 14}C) data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experiment (1999-2006) shows that the model correctly simulates the temporal dynamics of the {sup 14}C label as it moved from the surface litter and roots into the mineral soil organic matter pools. ForCent model validation was performed by comparing the observed Enriched Background Isotope Study experimental data with simulated live and dead root biomass {Delta} {sup 14}C data, and with soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C (mineral soil, humus layer, leaf litter layer, and total soil respiration) data. Results show that the model correctly simulates the impact of the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experimental treatments on soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C values for the different soil organic matter pools. Model results suggest that a two-pool root growth model correctly represents root carbon dynamics and inputs to the soil. The model fitting process and sensitivity analysis exposed uncertainty in our estimates of the fraction of mineral soil in the slow and passive pools, dissolved organic carbon flux out of the litter layer into the mineral soil, and mixing of the humus layer into the mineral soil layer.

  15. NOTE Contrast enhancement of EPID images via difference imaging: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairn, T.; Khoei, S.; Markwell, T. S.; Fielding, A. L.; Trapp, J. V.

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the feasibility of difference imaging for improving the contrast of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images is investigated. The difference imaging technique consists of the acquisition of two EPID images (with and without the placement of an additional layer of attenuating medium on the surface of the EPID) and the subtraction of one of these images from the other. The resulting difference image shows improved contrast, compared to a standard EPID image, since it is generated by lower-energy photons. Results of this study show that, firstly, this method can produce images exhibiting greater contrast than is seen in standard megavoltage EPID images and secondly, the optimal thickness of attenuating material for producing a maximum contrast enhancement may vary with phantom thickness and composition. Further studies of the possibilities and limitations of the difference imaging technique, and the physics behind it, are therefore recommended.

  16. Trap-assisted studies of odd, neutron-rich isotopes from Tc to Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpeta, J.; Jokinen, A.; Penttilä, H.; Płochocki, A.; Rissanen, J.; Urban, W.; Äystö, J.

    2014-01-01

    We review the present and future of trap-assisted structure studies of odd, neutron-rich Tc, Ru, Rh and Pd isotopes at the limits of present experimental techniques. These nuclei of refractory elements are produced in light-particle induced fission and filtered by their mass number with the IGISOL mass separator. Further mass separation with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap system provides a clean, monoisotopic beam perfectly suited for precise nuclear spectroscopy. Connecting the IGISOL and the JYFLTRAP facilities to the recently installed MCC30/15 cyclotron opens new prospects for post-trap spectroscopy of very exotic, neutron-rich nuclei.

  17. [Applications of stable isotope analysis in the trophic ecology studies of cephalopods].

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Kai; Gong, Yi; Chen, Xin-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Cephalopods play an important role in marine food webs, however, knowledge about their complex life history, especially their feeding ecology, remains limited. With the rapidly increasing use of stable isotope analysis (SIA) in ecology, it becomes a powerful tool and complement of traditional methods for investigating the trophic ecology and migration patterns of invertebrates. Here, after summarizing the current methods for trophic ecology investigation of cephalopods, applications of SIA in studying the trophic ecology of cephalopods were reviewed, including the key issues such as standardization of available tissues for SIA analyzing, diet shift and migration patterns of cephalopods, with the aim of advancing its application in the biology of cephalopods in the future.

  18. A study of the cyclotron gas-stopping concept for the production of rare isotope beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, M.; Savard, G.; Physics; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-11-11

    The proposed cyclotron gas-stopping scheme for the efficient thermalization of intense rare isotope beams is examined. Simulations expand on previous studies and expose many complications of such an apparatus arising from physical effects not accounted for properly in previous work. The previously proposed cyclotron gas-stopper geometry is found to have a near null efficiency, but extended simulations suggest that a device with a much larger pole gap could achieve a stopping efficiency approaching roughly 90% and at least a 10 times larger acceptance. However, some of the advantages that were incorrectly predicted in previous simulations for high intensity operation of this device are compromised.

  19. Preliminary studies of groundwater flow and migration of uranium isotopes around the Oklo natural reactors (Gabon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulhoat, Pierre; Gallien, Jean Paul; Louvat, Didier; Moulin, Valérie; l'Henoret, Pascal; Guérin, Roland; Ledoux, Emmanuel; Gurban, Ioana; Smellie, John A. T.; Winberg, Anders

    1996-02-01

    In specific zones of the Oklo uranium deposit, critically was naturally reached 2 Ga ago. This site thus provides a unique opportunity to show whether the stable nuclear reaction end-products have remained or not in the vicinity of the reactor zones after the termination of nuclear reactions. In addition, the evaluation of the stability of the uraninite matrix over very long periods of time provides information on the possible long-term stability of waste forms such as spent fuel. The Commission of the European Communities initiated in 1991 the Oklo Natural Analogue Programme, a part of which is devoted to present-day migration studies. The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) supports this programme, with special interest in the Bangombe reactor, a shallow reaction zone possibly affected by surficial alteration processes. The Oklo study comprises hydrogeology, groundwater chemistry, isotopic analyses (environmental isotopes, U series, 235U/ 238U), and modelling. Two sites are being thoroughly investigated: the less perturbed OK84 reactor zone in Okelobondo (200 m south from Oklo) and the Bangombe reactor zone, 30 km south of Oklo. We focus our study on uranium migration from these reactor zones, using tracers such as the 235U/ 238U isotope ratio. After preliminary field campaigns, a conceptual model was constructed, both for Okelobondo and Bangombe. For this purpose, groundwaters have been characterised for three years in different areas around Oklo: Okelobondo groundwaters in mines and boreholes and surface waters, and Bangombe, both in boreholes and surface waters. Detailed investigations were then conducted in order to validate our conceptual models, and finally to enabling us to model U migration from the reaction zones, and to evaluate the performance assessment of deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes. After the presentation of regional and local geology and hydrogeology, we give a complete description and interpretation of

  20. 2H Stable Isotope Analysis of Tooth Enamel: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holobinko, Anastasia; Kemp, Helen; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Prowse, Tracy; Ford, Susan

    2010-05-01

    Stable isotope analysis of biogenic tissues such as tooth enamel and bone mineral has become a well recognized and increasingly important method for determining provenance of human remains, and has been used successfully in bioarchaeological studies as well as forensic investigations (Lee-Thorp, 2008; Meier-Augenstein and Fraser, 2008). Particularly, 18O and 2H stable isotopes are well established proxies as environmental indicators of climate (temperature) and source water and are therefore considered as indicators of geographic life trajectories of animals and humans (Hobson et al., 2004; Schwarcz and Walker, 2006). While methodology for 2H analysis of human hair, fingernails, and bone collagen is currently used to determine geographic origin and identify possible migration patterns, studies involving the analysis of 2H in tooth enamel appear to be nonexistent in the scientific literature. The apparent lack of research in this area is believed to have two main reasons. (1) Compared to the mineral calcium hydroxylapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, in tooth enamel forming bio-apatite carbonate ions replace some of the hydroxyl ions at a rate of one CO32 replacing two OH, yet published figures for the degree of substitution vary (Wopenka and Pasteris, 2005). (2) Most probably due to the aforementioned no published protocols exist for sample preparation and analytical method to obtain δ2H-values from the hydroxyl fraction of tooth enamel. This dilemma has been addressed through a pilot study to establish feasibility of 2H stable isotope analysis of ground tooth enamel by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) coupled on-line to a high-temperature conversion elemental analyzer (TC/EA). An array of archaeological and modern teeth has been analyzed under different experimental conditions, and results from this pilot study are being presented. References: Lee-Thorp, J.A. (2008) Archaeometry, 50, 925-950 Meier-Augenstein, W. and Fraser, I. (2008) Science & Justice

  1. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2001-12-21

    Semiconductor bulk crystals and multilayer structures with controlled isotopic composition have attracted much scientific and technical interest in the past few years. Isotopic composition affects a large number of physical properties, including phonon energies and lifetimes, bandgaps, the thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient and spin-related effects. Isotope superlattices are ideal media for self-diffusion studies. In combination with neutron transmutation doping, isotope control offers a novel approach to metal-insulator transition studies. Spintronics, quantum computing and nanoparticle science are emerging fields using isotope control.

  2. Oxygen and chlorine isotopic fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation: laboratory results and implications for forensics and natural attenuation studies.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Neil C; Böhlke, John Karl; Beloso, Abelardo D; Streger, Sheryl H; Heraty, Linnea J; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2007-04-15

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant having both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in a given sample of perchlorate may be used to distinguish its source(s). Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the extent of biodegradation of perchlorate, which is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant in groundwater. For this approach to be useful, however, the kinetic isotopic fractionations of O and Cl during perchlorate biodegradation must first be determined as a function of environmental variables such as temperature and bacterial species. A laboratory study was performed in which the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial strains (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10 degrees C and 22 degrees C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely reduced by both strains within 280 h at 22 degrees C and 615 h at 10 degrees C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were epsilon(18)O = -36.6 to -29.0% per hundred and epsilon(37)Cl = -14.5 to -11.5% per hundred, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. An experiment using (18)O-enriched water (delta(18)O = +198% per hundred) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in the isotopically normal water (delta(18)O = -8.1% per hundred) used in the other experiments, indicating negligible isotope exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio epsilon(18)O/epsilon(37)Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 +/- 0.04. These data indicate that isotope ratio analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (epsilon(18)O/ epsilon(37)Cl) also has significant implications for forensic studies. PMID:17533841

  3. Oxygen and chlorine isotopic fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation: Laboratory results and implications for forensics and natural attenuation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturchio, N.C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Beloso, A.D.; Streger, S.H.; Heraty, L.J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant having both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in a given sample of perchlorate may be used to distinguish its source(s). Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the extent of biodegradation of perchlorate, which is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant in groundwater. For this approach to be useful, however, the kinetic isotopic fractionations of O and Cl during perchlorate biodegradation must first be determined as a function of environmental variables such as temperature and bacterial species. A laboratory study was performed in which the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial strains (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10??C and 22??C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely reduced by both strains within 280 h at 22??C and 615 h at 10??C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were ??18O = -36.6 to -29.0??? and ??37Cl = -14.5 to -11.5???, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. An experiment using 18O-enriched water (??18O = +198???) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in the isotopically normal water (??18O = -8.1???) used in the other experiments, indicating negligible isotope exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio ??18O/??37Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 ?? 0.04. These data indicate that isotope ratio analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (??18O/??37Cl) also has significant implications for forensic studies. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  4. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  5. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO sub 2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Isotope Trace Studies of Diffusion in Silicates and of Geological Transport Processes Using Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. G. J. Wasserburg

    2001-01-19

    Over the past year we have competed two studies of Os concentration and isotopic composition in rivers from the Himalayan uplift and in hydrothermal fluids from the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Both of these studies have been published. We have completed a study of paleo-climate in Soreq Cave, Israel, and have expanded our studies of the transport of U-Th through riverine and estuarine environments. We are completing two studies of weathering and transport in the vadose in two very different environments--one a tropical regime with a deep laterite profile and the other a northern arboreal forest with only a thin weathering zone. We have begun a new study of U-Th in aquifers with low water velocity.

  7. How Trees Interact with Their Hydrologic Environment: a Stable Isotope Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierke, C.; Newton, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Sacramento Mountains of southeast New Mexico serve as the primary recharge area to adjacent regional aquifers, including the Roswell Artesian Basin, the Tularosa Basin and the Salt Basin. Under pressures of population growth and climate change, land and water managers are interested in identifying land management and forest restoration methods that may increase local and regional groundwater recharge in the high mountains. The Sacramento Mountain Watershed Study is designed to assess the effects of tree thinning in mountain watersheds as an effective method of increasing groundwater recharge. The project employs a soil water balance to quantify the partitioning of local precipitation before and after tree thinning. This study was designed to determine the role that trees play in the hydrologic cycle by using the stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to identify tree water sources. The study is being conducted in a 1st order watershed with no perennial outflow stream where vegetation is dominated by Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga Menziesii). Ridges are capped with San Andres Limestone while lower slopes and the valley bottom are underlain by the Yeso Formation which is composed of sandstones, mudstones and interbedded carbonate layers. The area has thin soils covering shallow fractured bedrock or epikarst features. Some of the fractures within the epikarst zone provide direct conduits to the larger groundwater system while others are isolated rendering the reservoir inactive. From March 2011 to February 2012, we collected soil and twig samples from which water was extracted by cryogenic vacuum distillation. Soil water was also sampled with passive capillary samplers (PCAPS). The isotopic composition of bulk soil water appears to be controlled by evaporation of snowmelt stored within the soil matrix. The isotopic composition of soil water sampled by wick samplers reflects mixing of non-evaporated rainfall with evaporated bulk soil water. As the monsoon season

  8. A theoretical study of the isotope effects on the fluorescence excitation spectrum of 5-aminotropolone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, Juan J.; Moreno, Miquel; Lluch, José M.

    1998-05-01

    A combined ab initio+nuclear dynamics study is performed to theoretically analyze the intramolecular H-atom transfer process in 5-aminotropolone in both the ground (S0) and first excited (S1) singlet electronic states. A complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method is used to optimize the geometries. Energies are then corrected through the second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. These results are used to build up reduced bidimensional energy surfaces so that the nuclear wave functions for the nuclear motions in both electronic states are obtained. In particular we have analyzed the six isotopomers that result from deuteration of the amino and hydroxy groups of 5-aminotropolone. It is found that for symmetric structures (-OH/-NH2, -OH/-ND2, -OD/-NH2, and -OD/-ND2), the two lowest vibrational levels in both S0 and S1 appear as a quasidegenerated tunneling doublet. The tunneling splitting in S0 is much lower so that the doublet at the origin, seen in the fluorescence excitation spectra of 5-aminotropolone, can be entirely assigned to the S1 state. In agreement with the experimental findings, this splitting greatly diminishes when the transferring hydrogen is substituted by a deuterium, whereas deuteration of the amino group produces only a modest decrease of such a splitting. A quite different result is found for the nonsymmetric isotopically substituted structures (-OH/-NHD and -OD/-NHD), as the isotope induced asymmetry, combined with the high energy barrier in the S0 potential energy surface, leads to a complete localization of the two lowest vibrational wave functions in S0. On the other hand, for S1 the asymmetry and energy barriers are low enough so that an important degree of delocalization of the two lowest vibrational wave functions is found. These results are again in agreement with the presence of an isotope induced quartet in the fluorescence excitation spectra of these species.

  9. Cryogenic Carbonate Formation on Mars: Clues from Stable Isotope Variations Seen in Experimental Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Fu, Qi; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Discoveries of large deposits of sedimentary materials on the planet Mars by landers and orbiters have confirmed the widely held hypothesis that water has played a crucial role in the development of the martian surface. Recent studies have indicated that both water ice and liquid water may have been present and in the case of water ice perhaps is still present on or near the surface of Mars. However, there remains much controversy about the prevailing atmospheric conditions and climate of Mars during its history and whether liquid water existed on the martian surface simply during discrete geological events or whether this water was present over relatively much longer geologic time periods. The recent identification of Ca-rich carbonate by the Phoenix lander as well as its measurement of the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 has shown the importance of understanding the carbonates on Mars as an important sink of atmospheric carbon. This work compliments that of our past experiments where we produced cryogenic calcite in open containers, as analogs for terrestrial aufeis formation, and as a means for evaluating the fractionation of C-13 in CO2 during bicarbonate freezing [13]. Unlike our previous experiments in which carbonates were grown in ambient laboratory condition in open containers (atmospheric pressure and composition), this work attempts to quantify the amount of delta C-13 enrichment possible in both fluids and secondary carbonates formed from freezing of bicarbonate fluids under martian-like atmospheric conditions. Morphologic textures of produced carbonates in these experiments are also examined under SEM in order to identify the effect that the cryogenic freezing process has on the mineral's mineralogy. Understanding the role of kinetic isotope fractionation during formation of carbonates under martian-like conditions will aid in our ability to quantify the isotopic composition of the carbonate sink furthering our ability to model the climate

  10. Tracing amino acid exchange during host-pathogen interaction by combined stable-isotope time-resolved Raman spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Boitor, Radu A.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the temporal and spatial interchange of the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) between human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) and tachyzoites of the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is combined with Raman micro-spectroscopy to selectively monitor the incorporation of deuterium-labelled Phe into proteins in individual live tachyzoites. Our results show a very rapid uptake of L-Phe(D8) by the intracellular growing parasite. T. gondii tachyzoites are capable of extracting L-Phe(D8) from host cells as soon as it invades the cell. L-Phe(D8) from the host cell completely replaces the L-Phe within T. gondii tachyzoites 7-9 hours after infection. A quantitative model based on Raman spectra allowed an estimation of the exchange rate of Phe as 0.5-1.6 × 104 molecules/s. On the other hand, extracellular tachyzoites were not able to consume L-Phe(D8) after 24 hours of infection. These findings further our understanding of the amino acid trafficking between host cells and this strictly intracellular parasite. In particular, this study highlights new aspects of the metabolism of amino acid Phe operative during the interaction between T. gondii and its host cell.

  11. Tracing amino acid exchange during host-pathogen interaction by combined stable-isotope time-resolved Raman spectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Boitor, Radu A.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the temporal and spatial interchange of the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) between human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) and tachyzoites of the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is combined with Raman micro-spectroscopy to selectively monitor the incorporation of deuterium-labelled Phe into proteins in individual live tachyzoites. Our results show a very rapid uptake of l-Phe(D8) by the intracellular growing parasite. T. gondii tachyzoites are capable of extracting l-Phe(D8) from host cells as soon as it invades the cell. l-Phe(D8) from the host cell completely replaces the l-Phe within T. gondii tachyzoites 7–9 hours after infection. A quantitative model based on Raman spectra allowed an estimation of the exchange rate of Phe as 0.5–1.6 × 104 molecules/s. On the other hand, extracellular tachyzoites were not able to consume l-Phe(D8) after 24 hours of infection. These findings further our understanding of the amino acid trafficking between host cells and this strictly intracellular parasite. In particular, this study highlights new aspects of the metabolism of amino acid Phe operative during the interaction between T. gondii and its host cell. PMID:26857158

  12. Tracing amino acid exchange during host-pathogen interaction by combined stable-isotope time-resolved Raman spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Boitor, Radu A.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the temporal and spatial interchange of the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) between human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) and tachyzoites of the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is combined with Raman micro-spectroscopy to selectively monitor the incorporation of deuterium-labelled Phe into proteins in individual live tachyzoites. Our results show a very rapid uptake of L-Phe(D8) by the intracellular growing parasite. T. gondii tachyzoites are capable of extracting L-Phe(D8) from host cells as soon as it invades the cell. L-Phe(D8) from the host cell completely replaces the L-Phe within T. gondii tachyzoites 7–9 hours after infection. A quantitative model based on Raman spectra allowed an estimation of the exchange rate of Phe as 0.5–1.6 × 104 molecules/s. On the other hand, extracellular tachyzoites were not able to consume L-Phe(D8) after 24 hours of infection. These findings further our understanding of the amino acid trafficking between host cells and this strictly intracellular parasite. In particular, this study highlights new aspects of the metabolism of amino acid Phe operative during the interaction between T. gondii and its host cell.

  13. Experimental and computer modeling studies of isotopically selective two-step laser photodissociation of small molecules. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zittel, P.F.

    1992-03-25

    The approach to laser isotope separation taken in this study is based on isotopically selective, two-step, laser photodissociation of small molecules. A primary goal of this study is the measurement of fundamental molecular processes which control the two-step, photodissociative isotope enrichment process. This objective has led to experimental measurements of uv photodissociation cross sections for vibrationally excited states of several small molecules, including the first cross section reported for any neutral molecule in a specific, excited vibrational state. A second goal of this study has been the laboratory demonstration of isotope enrichment for isotopes of practical interest and for processes with a potential for larger scale production. Where possible, efforts have focussed on the separation of middle isotopes, such as {sup 17}O and {sup 33}S, which are expensive and difficult to separate using other techniques. Considerable success has been achieved in demonstrating the enrichment of isotopes of bromine, carbon, oxygen and a third goal of this study has been the application of computer modeling to the two-step enrichment process. Experimental measurements define as many as possible of the critical photophysical and chemical parameters required by an ab initio computer model of the enrichment process. Progress toward these goals has been documented in detail in a variety of journal articles and technical reports. It is not the objective of this final report to discuss each aspect of the work done under this contract/grant in detail. A general overview of the program, touches briefly on each of the problems addressed by the study and provides references to more detailed discussions. 19 refs.

  14. Nitrogen isotope tracers of high-temperature fluid-rock interactions: Case study of the Catalina Schist, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, Gray E.

    1997-09-01

    Nitrogen isotope data for metasomatized rocks, veins, and pegmatites in the Catalina Schist subduction zone metamorphic complex allow futher characterization of complex, high-P/T metasomatic proceses and evaluation of the scales of isotopic equilibration and fluid transport during subduction-zone metamorphism. Throughout the Catalina Schist, N resides predominantly as NH 4+ in white mica, which occurs in nearly all bulk compositions (i.e., metasedimentary, metamafic and, to a lesser extent, metaultramafic mélange) at all grades. Within each metamorphic unit of the Catalina Schist (ranging in grade from lawsonite-albite to amphibolite facies), δ 15N values of mica in metasomatized metamafic and metaultramafic rocks are consistent with the metasomatic addition of N from nearby, devolatilizing metasedimentary rocks into the initially N-poor mafic and ultramafic rocks. Within each unit, uniformity of mica δ 15N in metasomatized rocks relative to the δ 15N of metasedimentary rocks in the same unit implies mixing of N from nearby, heterogeneous metasedimentary sources, perhaps producing fluids with unifrom δ 15N at up to the kilometer scale. However, the trend in δ 15N of metasedimentary sources, with increasing metamorphic grade is inconsistent with larger scale up-temperature transfer of fluid (in this case, N 2-bearing) in the Catalina Schist paleosubduction zone; such flow (at scales of up to tens of kilometers) has been inferred through previous oxygen isotope study. Nitrogen isotope compositions are instead believed to have been controlled at a more local scale than the O isotope systematics, due to the more rock-dominated fluid-rock mass balance for N. The δ 15N of muscovite in leucosomes and pegmatites in amphibolite-grade metasedimentary exposures matches that of muscovite in metasedimentary hosts, implying minimal N-isotope fractionation during migmatization processes and possible transfer of metasedimentary N-isotope signatures in silicate melts. These

  15. Infrared Imaging System for Studying Brain Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick; Mintz, Frederick; Gunapala, Sarath

    2007-01-01

    A proposed special-purpose infrared imaging system would be a compact, portable, less-expensive alternative to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) systems heretofore used to study brain function. Whereas a typical fMRI system fills a large room, and must be magnetically isolated, this system would fit into a bicycle helmet. The system would include an assembly that would be mounted inside the padding in a modified bicycle helmet or other suitable headgear. The assembly would include newly designed infrared photodetectors and data-acquisition circuits on integrated-circuit chips on low-thermal-conductivity supports in evacuated housings (see figure) arranged in multiple rows and columns that would define image coordinates. Each housing would be spring-loaded against the wearer s head. The chips would be cooled by a small Stirling Engine mounted contiguous to, but thermally isolated from, the portions of the assembly in thermal contact with the wearer s head. Flexible wires or cables for transmitting data from the aforementioned chips would be routed to an integrated, multichannel transmitter and thence through the top of the assembly to a patch antenna on the outside of the helmet. The multiple streams of data from the infrared-detector chips would be sent to a remote site, where they would be processed, by software, into a three-dimensional display of evoked potentials that would represent firing neuronal bundles and thereby indicate locations of neuronal activity associated with mental or physical activity. The 3D images will be analogous to current fMRI images. The data would also be made available, in real-time, for comparison with data in local or internationally accessible relational databases that already exist in universities and research centers. Hence, this system could be used in research on, and for the diagnosis of response from the wearer s brain to physiological, psychological, and environmental changes in real time. The images would also be

  16. Developments towards in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy studies of actinium isotopes at LISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeder, S.; Bastin, B.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Delahaye, P.; Ferrer, R.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Ghys, L.; Gaffney, L. P.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Luton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martinez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Traykov, E.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2016-06-01

    To study exotic nuclides at the borders of stability with laser ionization and spectroscopy techniques, highest efficiencies in combination with a high spectral resolution are required. These usually opposing requirements are reconciled by applying the in-gas-laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) technique in the supersonic gas jet produced by a de Laval nozzle installed at the exit of the stopping gas cell. Carrying out laser ionization in the low-temperature and low density supersonic gas jet eliminates pressure broadening, which will significantly improve the spectral resolution. This article presents the required modifications at the Leuven Isotope Separator On-Line (LISOL) facility that are needed for the first on-line studies of in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy. Different geometries for the gas outlet and extraction ion guides have been tested for their performance regarding the acceptance of laser ionized species as well as for their differential pumping capacities. The specifications and performance of the temporarily installed high repetition rate laser system, including a narrow bandwidth injection-locked Ti:sapphire laser, are discussed and first preliminary results on neutron-deficient actinium isotopes are presented indicating the high capability of this novel technique.

  17. Potential of Opuntia ficus-indica for air pollution biomonitoring: a lead isotopic study.

    PubMed

    El Hayek, Eliane; El Samrani, Antoine; Lartiges, Bruno; Kazpard, Veronique; Benoit, Mathieu; Munoz, Marguerite

    2015-11-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica (Ofi) is a long-domesticated cactus that is widespread throughout arid and semiarid regions. Ofi is grown for both its fruits and edible cladodes, which are flattened photosynthetic stems. Young cladodes develop from mother cladodes, thus forming series of cladodes of different ages. Therefore, successive cladodes may hold some potential for biomonitoring over several years the local atmospheric pollution. In this study, cladodes, roots, dust deposited onto the cladodes, and soil samples were collected in the vicinity of three heavily polluted sites, i.e., a fertilizer industry, the road side of a highway, and mine tailings. The lead content was analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) was used to characterize the cladode surfaces and the nature of dust deposit, and the lead isotopes were analyzed to identify the origin of Pb. The results show that (i) Ofi readily bioaccumulates Pb, (ii) the lead isotopic composition of cladodes evidences a foliar pathway of lead into Ofi and identifies the relative contributions of local Pb sources, and (iii) an evolution of air quality is recorded with successive cladodes, which makes Ofi a potential biomonitor to be used in environmental and health studies.

  18. He-Ne-Ar isotope studies of mafic volcanic rocks and mantle xenoliths from the East African Rift System - contrasting isotope signals in different rift branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldorsson, S. A.; Hilton, D. R.; Scarsi, P.; Abebe, T.; Massi, K. M.; Barry, P. H.; Fischer, T. P.; de Moor, J.; Rudnick, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Helium isotope studies of the East African Rift System (EARS) suggest the involvement of a deep mantle plume(s) beneath the northern (Ethiopian) segment [1-3]. The highest 3He/4He (RA) signatures found to date show a close association with the greatest magma volumes erupted since the Early Cenozoic in the region. While the helium isotope characteristics are well established in the Ethiopia-Afar region, Ne and Ar systematics remain poorly constrained. Using a combined He-Ne-Ar isotope approach, our aim is to determine the regional extent of the influence of the Afar plume and to distinguish between subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) and/or a possible second mantle plume sources located to the south of the Turkana Depression. Xenoliths and mafic lavas from N-Tanzania display a limited range in He isotopes (5-7 RA) with exceptions at Arusha (7.8RA) and Labait (8.7RA), through 7.1-8.7 RA in N-Kenya and S-Ethiopia, to 14.3 RA in the Main Ethiopian Rift and Afar, spanning nearly the entire range of previously reported values. The mean 3He/4He ratio from of lavas and xenoliths from N-Tanzania is remarkably close to the global average of 6.1±0.9 (RA) for continental xenoliths and basalts, thought to represent the SCLM [4]. Thus far, only MORB-like values of 7.3-8.3 RA have been found in volcanics of the Western rift. Initial Ne isotope data reveal the presence of a solar-like Ne component in xenoliths from the Ethiopia-Afar region, with extrapolated 21Ne/22Neex ratios of 0.0365 (assuming Ne-B = 12.5). This trend overlaps that of the Loihi-Kilauea line (L-K). Interestingly, a xenolith from N-Tanzania has a 21Ne/22Neex ratio of 0.0415, falling on a trajectory intermediate between MORB and L-K. The highest 40Ar/36Ar ratio obtained on phenocrysts/xenoliths to date is 1510. The generally low 3He/4He ratios of N-Tanzania likely result from different mixing proportions of asthenospheric sources with lithospheric material, the latter having developed lower 3He/4He ratios

  19. Study on Over-Sampling for Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kigawa, Seiichiro; Sullivan, Pamela C.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the potential improvement of the effective ground resolution of MTSAT (Multi-functional Transport Satellite) Imager. The IFOV (Instantaneous Field of View) of MTSAT Imager is 4 km for infrared and 1 km visible. A combination of some images acquired by the MTSAT Imager could generate 2 km-latticed infrared images. Furthermore, it is possible to generate an effective 2 km IFOV image by the enhancement of the 2 km-latticed image using Digital Signal Processing. This report also mentions the on-orbit demonstration of this concept.

  20. Charge-coupled device image sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design specifications and predicted performance characteristics of a Charge-Coupled Device Area Imager and a Charge-Coupled Device Linear Imager are presented. The Imagers recommended are intended for use in space-borne imaging systems and therefore would meet the requirements for the intended application. A unique overlapping metal electrode structure and a buried channel structure are described. Reasons for the particular imager designs are discussed.

  1. Purification and stable isotope labeling of the calcium- and integrin-binding protein 1 for structural and functional NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Vogel, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    The Calcium- and Integrin-Binding protein 1 (CIB1) has been identified as an important regulatory Ca(2+)-binding protein that is involved in various cellular functions. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a powerful approach to study the structure, dynamics, and interactions of CIB1 and related proteins. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy combined with various selective isotope labeling strategies has proven to be successful in the structure determination of CIB1. Moreover, the same approach allowed the detection of conformational changes when the protein binds different metal ions, and it facilitated the study of the interaction of CIB1 with the cytoplasmic domain of the human integrin αIIb subunit. In this protocol, we describe the purification and isotope labeling strategies for productive NMR studies of CIB1. The same isotope labeling strategies can be implemented to study numerous related regulatory calcium-binding proteins.

  2. An Isotope Dependent Study of the Quasiparticle Dynamics in High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzara, Alessandra

    2005-03-01

    The effect of oxygen isotope substitution on the electronic properties of double layer Bi2212 high temperature superconductor is studied by means of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This new approach allows us to unambiguously and directly extract information on the role and the nature of the electron-lattice interaction in these highly correlated materials. Data as a function of temperature, momentum and doping are presented. The isotope-induced changes of the electron spectral function together with their energy, momentum, and temperature dependences, as well as the local nature of the electron-lattice interaction are discussed. A dynamic spin-Peierls picture [1,2], where the singlet pairing of the electrons and the electron-lattice coupling mutually enhance each other is presented. This work was done in collaboration with G. --H. Gweon, T. Sasagawa, H. Takagi and D. H. Lee. This work was supported by DOE, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098, NSF Grant No. DMR-0349361 and Sloan Foundation. [1] G. H. Gweon et al. Nature 430, 187 (2004) [2] A. Seidel et al. cond-mat/0408665 (2004)

  3. An N-TIMS Br Isotopic Study of Australian Playa Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. F.

    2013-12-01

    Bromine possesses a chemistry broadly comparable to that of Cl and F, however its heavier mass and lower abundance results in slightly different behaviours in geochemical cycling. For example it is disproportionately enriched in sea water with respect to Cl. Br can be considered to be a 'hydrophile' element, and hence its behaviour is in governed by that of water. It possesses two isotopes 79Br (50.686%) and 81Br (49.314%). This study has developed new chemical extraction, and most significantly, new mass spectrometric protocols for Br isotopes for evaporites and waters using N-TIMS methodologies. Existing CF-IRMS methodologies offer internal precision of ~0.3‰ (1SD, [1]), whereas N-TIMS measurements of laboratory HBr and seawater standards produce external reproducibility of <0.05‰ (1SD) over an 24 month period with internal precision typically <0.03‰ (1SD) on single analyses. Australian playa lakes record variations of >5‰, comparable to that of the whole solar system. Regionality is implied on this preliminary data set whereby Lake Gairdner, which is sourced from a single, arid region lithology, is displaced from other, multi lithological sourced lakes from the same climatic zone. [1] Shouaker-Stash et al., Anal. Chem, 77; p4027-4033, 2005.

  4. Inferences of paleoenvironment from petrographic, chemical and stable-isotope studies of calcretes and fracture calcites

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Whelan, J.F.

    1994-03-01

    Past research has indicated a genetic connection between calcite formed in calcretes at the surface of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and calcites deposited in underlying fractures of the unsaturated zone. This common genesis suggests that paleoenvironmental information, as well as the timing and pathways of past recharge episodes, might be obtained from studies of the deposits in both the calcretes and the unsaturated fractures. Chemical and isotopic modification of calcite-precipitating fluids appears to begin at the surface, largely under the influence of plant roots and their decay products. Chemical characteristics of the deeper calcites are either initiated or largely defined within the first few meters of fluid migration into the unsaturated tuffs beneath the calcretes. However, petrographic and isotopic data indicate a very unique low-{delta}{sup 13}C microenvironment that is localized at the upper surfaces of the calcretes. These surfaces form an interface in the soil horizon where infiltration may pond above the underlying carbonate ``plug.`` In order to decipher the chemistry and petrology of past recharge events, it is important to first understand microenvironments such as this that contribute to mineral precipitation/dissolution events in the pedogenic environment.

  5. High-pressure neutron diffraction study on H D isotope effects in brucite

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Juske; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F; Tulk, Christopher A; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Polyakov, Dr. V. B.

    2010-01-01

    A neutron powder diffraction study of hydrogenated and deuterated brucite was conducted at ambient temperature and at pressures up to 9 GPa, using a Paris Edinburgh high-pressure cell at the WAND instrument of the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor. The two materials were synthesized by the same method and companion measurements of neutron diffraction were conducted under the same conditions. Our refinement results show that the lattice-parameters of the a axis, parallel to the sheets of Mg O octahedra, decrease only slightly with pressure with no effect of H D substitution. However, the c axis of Mg(OD)2 is shorter and may exhibit greater compressibility with pressure than that of Mg(OH)2. Consequently, the unit-cell volume of deuterated brucite is slightly, but systematically smaller than that of hydrogenated brucite. When fitted to a third-order Birch Murnaghan equation in terms of the normalized unit-cell volume, values of the bulk modulus for hydrogenated and deuterated brucite (K0 = 39.0 2.8 and 40.4 1.3 GPa, respectively) are, however, indistinguishable from each other within the experimental errors. The measured effect of H D substitution on the unit-cell volume also demonstrates that brucite (and other hydrous minerals) preferentially incorporate deuterium over hydrogen under pressure, suggesting that the distribution of hydrogen isotopes in deep-earth conditions may differ significantly from that in near-surface environments.

  6. The zooplankton food web under East Antarctic pack ice - A stable isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhongnan; Swadling, Kerrie M.; Meiners, Klaus M.; Kawaguchi, So; Virtue, Patti

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how sea ice serves zooplankton species during the food-limited season is crucial information to evaluate the potential responses of pelagic food webs to changes in sea-ice conditions in the Southern Ocean. Stable isotope analyses (13C/12C and 15N/14N) were used to compare the dietary preferences and trophic relationships of major zooplankton species under pack ice during two winter-spring transitions (2007 and 2012). During sampling, furcilia of Euphausia superba demonstrated dietary plasticity between years, herbivory when feeding on sea-ice biota, and with a more heterotrophic diet when feeding from both the sea ice and the water column. Carbon isotope signatures suggested that the pteropod Limacina helicina, small copepods Oithona spp., ostracods and amphipods relied heavily on sea-ice biota. Post larval E. superba and omnivorous krill Thysanoessa macrura consumed both water column and ice biota, but further investigations are needed to estimate the contribution from each source. Large copepods and chaetognaths overwintered on a water column-based diet. Our study suggests that warm and permeable sea ice is more likely to provide food for zooplankton species under the ice than the colder ice.

  7. Re-Os isotope studies of Mindanao adakites: Implications for sources of metals and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreher, Scott T.; MacPherson, Colin G.; Pearson, D. Graham; Davidson, Jon P.

    2005-12-01

    Whether the downgoing slab in modern subduction zones is able to melt is an important unresolved aspect of plate tectonics. Rare arc lavas with high Sr/Y ratios and low Y and heavy rare earth element concentrations, called adakites, are often attributed to melting of young subducted crust in subduction zones. Osmium isotopic data obtained for 13 adakite samples from Mindanao, Philippines, conflict with the slab-melting model. Ten of the samples have unradiogenic 187Os/188Os ratios inconsistent with partial melting of the ca. 50 Ma Philippine Sea lithosphere subducting beneath Mindanao. The Os isotope signatures are similar to those of young mid-oceanic-ridge basalts and normal arc rocks, consistent with a mantle source. In addition to implications for mass transfer in subduction zones, the apparent association of adakites with Cu-Au deposits makes understanding their origin, and that of the associated metals, economically interesting. This study suggests that a reevaluation is required of the slab-melting hypothesis in general, and that the metals associated with the Mindanao adakites come from the mantle.

  8. APQ-102 imaging radar digital image quality study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. R.; Estes, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    A modified APQ-102 sidelooking radar collected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data which was digitized and recorded on wideband magnetic tape. These tapes were then ground processed into computer compatible tapes (CCT's). The CCT's may then be processed into high resolution radar images by software on the CYBER computer.

  9. Imaging studies in patients with spinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate an a priori threshold for advanced imaging in patients with spinal pain. Design Patients with spinal pain in any region for 6 to 52 weeks were assessed to determine if radiologic studies beyond x-ray scans were indicated, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and radionuclide bone scans. An a priori threshold was set before MRI, CT, or bone scans would be considered. Those who did not have MRI, CT, or bone scans ordered were followed for at least 1 year to determine if any of them went on to be diagnosed with a more serious spinal disorder (eg, infection, fracture, spondylitis, tumour, neurologic compression). Setting Four large primary care clinics in Edmonton, Alta. Participants A total of 1003 consecutively presenting patients with symptoms suspected to be related to the spine (for a duration of generally 6 to 52 weeks) who had not already undergone advanced imaging and did not have a diagnosis of nonbenign back pain. Main outcome measures Number of cases of nonbenign spinal disorder in participants who underwent advanced imaging and participants who did not undergo advanced imaging (ie, did not have any red flags). Results There were 399 women (39.8%) and 604 men (60.2%). The mean (SD) age of the group was 47.2 (14.6) years. The mean (SD) duration of symptoms was 15.1 (8.6) weeks. Of the 1003 participants, 110 met an a priori threshold for undergoing at least 1 of MRI, CT, or bone scan. In these 110 participants, there were newly diagnosed cases of radiculopathy (n = 12), including a case of cauda equina syndrome; spondyloarthropathy (n = 6); occult fracture (n = 2); solitary metastasis (n = 1); epidural lipomatosis (n = 1); osteomyelitis (n = 1), and retroperitoneal hematoma (n = 1), each of which was considered likely to be the cause of the patient’s spinal symptoms. The remaining 893 participants were followed for at least 1 year and none showed evidence of a nonbenign cause of his or her

  10. An isotopic study of biogeochemical relationships between carbonates and organic carbon in the Greenhorn Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Popp, Brian N.; Takigiku, Ray; Johnson, Marcus W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of total carbonate, inoceramid carbonate, micritic carbonate, secondary cements, total organic carbon, and geoporphyrins have been measured in 76 different beds within a 17-m interval of a core through the Greenhorn Formation, an interbedded limestone and calcareous shale unit of Cretaceous age from the Western Interior Seaway of North America. Results are considered in terms of variations in the processes of primary production and in secondary processes. It is shown that the porphyrin isotopic record reflects primary isotopic variations more closely than the TOC isotopic record and that, in these sediments, TOC is enriched in C-13 relative to its primary precursor by 0.6 to 2.8 percent. This enrichment is attributed to isotope effects within the consumer foodweb and is associated with respiratory heterotrophy. Variation in this secondary enrichment are correlated with variations in the isotopic composition of marine carbonate.

  11. Carbon Isotopic Studies of Assimilated and Ecosystem Respired CO2 in a Southeastern Pine Forest. Final Report and Conference Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Conte, Maureen H

    2008-04-10

    Carbon dioxide is the major “greenhouse” gas responsible for global warming. Southeastern pine forests appear to be among the largest terrestrial sinks of carbon dioxide in the US. This collaborative study specifically addressed the isotopic signatures of the large fluxes of carbon taken up by photosynthesis and given off by respiration in this ecosystem. By measuring these isotopic signatures at the ecosystem level, we have provided data that will help to more accurately quantify the magnitude of carbon fluxes on the regional scale and how these fluxes vary in response to climatic parameters such as rainfall and air temperature. The focus of the MBL subcontract was to evaluate how processes operating at the physiological and ecosystem scales affects the resultant isotopic signature of plant waxes that are emitted as aerosols into the convective boundary layer. These wax aerosols provide a large-spatial scale integrative signal of isotopic discrimination of atmospheric carbon dioxide by terrestrial photosynthesis (Conte and Weber 2002). The ecosystem studies have greatly expanded of knowledge of wax biosynthetic controls on their isootpic signature The wax aerosol data products produced under this grant are directly applicable as input for global carbon modeling studies that use variations in the concentration and carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide to quantify the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of carbon uptake on the global scale.

  12. Fully integrated surface-subsurface flow modelling of groundwater-lake interaction in an esker aquifer: Model verification with stable isotopes and airborne thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-aho, Pertti; Rossi, Pekka M.; Isokangas, Elina; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-03-01

    Water resources management is moving towards integration, where groundwater (GW), surface water (SW) and related aquatic ecosystems are considered one management unit. Because of this paradigm shift, more information and new tools are needed to understand the ecologically relevant fluxes (water, heat, solutes) at the GW-SW interface. This study estimated the magnitude, temporal variability and spatial distribution of water fluxes at the GW-SW interface using a fully integrated hydrological modelling code (HydroGeoSphere). The model domain comprised a hydrologically complex esker aquifer in Northern Finland with interconnected lakes, streams and wetlands. The model was calibrated in steady state for soil hydraulic conductivity and anisotropy and it reproduced the hydraulic head and stream baseflow distribution throughout the aquifer in both transient and steady state modes. In a novel analysis, model outputs were compared with the locations and magnitude of GW discharge to lakes estimated using field techniques. Spatial occurrence of GW-lake interaction was interpreted from airborne thermal infrared imaging. The observed GW inflow locations coincided well with model nodes showing positive exchange flux between surface and subsurface domains. Order of magnitude of simulated GW inflow to lakes showed good agreement with flux values calculated with a stable water isotope technique. Finally, time series of GW inflow, extracted as model output, showed moderate annual variability and demonstrated different interannual inflow changes in seepage and drainage lakes of the aquifer. Overall, this study demonstrated the ability of a fully integrated numerical model to reproduce observed GW-SW exchange processes in a complex unconfined aquifer system. The model-based estimates obtained for GW influx magnitude and spatial distribution, along with information on GW quality can be used to estimate ecologically relevant fluxes in future water resources management.

  13. Sulfur isotope study of the Velardeña skarn (Zn-Pb), Durango, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, A.

    2012-04-01

    Sulfur isotope study of the Velardeña skarn (Zn-Pb), Durango, Mexico Abigail Jimenez-Franco1*, Pura Alfonso Abella2, Carles Canet3, Eduardo González-Partida4 1 Posgrado en Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegación Coyoacán, 04510 México D.F., Mexico 2 Departament d'Enginyeria Minera i Recursos Naturals, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av de Les Bases de Manresa 61-73, 08242 Manresa. 3Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegación Coyoacán, 04510 México D.F., Mexico 4Centro de Geociencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Juriquilla, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, 76230 Santiago de Querétaro, Qro., Mexico The Velardeña mining district is located in north-eastern part of the state of Durango, in northern of Mexico. The ore deposit is a lead-zinc, garnet-rich skarn developed at the contact between granite porphyry dikes (Eocene) and well-laminated limestones with interbedded chert (Albian-Cenomanian). A study of sulfur isotopes has been carried out in various sulfide minerals of the ores of Velardeña, in order to: (a) constrain the possible sources of sulfur and, therefore, better understand the sulfide mineralizing processes, and (b) to estimate the temperature of the ore-forming stage of the skarn. Sulfur isotope analyses were performed in 21 pure fractions of sulfide minerals of the ore mineralization (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and galena). The mineral separation was performed using a series of sieves, and the purity of the samples was verified under a binocular microscope. Isotopic analyses were done on a Finnigan MAT Delta C flow elemental analyzer coupled to a TC-EA, according with the method of Giesemann et al. (1974). The δ34S values of the analyzed sulfides range mostly between -0.6 and +2.6 ‰ (relative to the CDT standard). These values are indicative of a magmatic source of sulfur. A single analysis falls

  14. Using stable isotopes to resolve transit times and travel routes of river water: a case study from southern Finland.

    PubMed

    Niinikoski, Paula I A; Hendriksson, Nina M; Karhu, Juha A

    2016-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of two rivers, the Vantaanjoki River and the Kokemäenjoki River, in southern and southwestern Finland was studied to resolve the transit times and travel routes of the river water in the two different catchments. The Kokemäenjoki River is dominated by great lake basins whereas the Vantaanjoki River has been reported having a significant groundwater component. The mean residence time of the young surface flow component could be resolved by sine function fitting onto the annual fluctuations of the isotopic signal, and the amount of base flow was estimated by using the isotopic composition of the river and groundwater. In this study, we found that the methods work for simple two component catchments. In more complex cases with three different components mixing, the solution becomes increasingly difficult and requires more study. PMID:26745444

  15. Changes in the lead isotopic composition of blood, diet and air in Australia over a decade: Globalization and implications for future isotopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gulson, Brian . E-mail: bgulson@gse.mq.edu.au; Mizon, Karen; Korsch, Michael; Taylor, Alan

    2006-01-15

    Source apportionment in biological or environmental samples using the lead isotope method, where there are diverse sources of lead, relies on a significant difference between the isotopic composition in the target media and the sources. Because of the unique isotopic composition of Australian lead, source apportionment has been relatively successful in the past. Over the period of a decade, the {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratio for Australian (mainly female) adults has shown an increase from a geometric mean of 16.8-17.3. Associated with this increase, there has been a decrease in mean blood lead concentration from 4.7 to 2.3 {mu}g/dL, or about 5% per year, similar to that observed in other countries. Lead in air, which up until 2000 was derived largely from the continued use of leaded gasoline, showed an overall increase in the {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratio during 1993-2000 from 16.5 to 17.2. Since 1998 the levels of lead in air were less than 0.2 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and would contribute negligibly to blood lead. Over the 10-year period, the {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratio in diet, based mainly on quarterly 6-day duplicate diets, increased from 16.9 to 18.3. The lead concentration in diet showed a small decrease from 8.7 to 6.4 {mu}g Pb/kg although the daily intake increased markedly from 7.4 to 13.9 {mu}g Pb/day during the latter part of the decade probably reflecting differences in demographics. The changes in blood lead from sources such as lead in bone or soil or dust is not dominant because of the low {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratios in these media. Unless there are other sources not identified and analysed for these adults, it would appear that in spite of our earlier conclusions to the contrary, diet does make an overall contribution to blood lead, and this is certainly the case for specific individuals. Certain population groups from south Asia, south-east Asia, the Middle East and Europe (e.g. UK) are unsuitable for some studies as their isotopic ratios in blood are

  16. Helium isotope study of geothermal features in Chile with field and laboratory data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dobson, Patrick

    2013-02-11

    Helium isotope and stable isotope data from the El Tatio, Tinginguirica, Chillan, and Tolhuaca geothermal systems, Chile. Data from this submission are discussed in: Dobson, P.F., Kennedy, B.M., Reich, M., Sanchez, P., and Morata, D. (2013) Effects of volcanism, crustal thickness, and large scale faulting on the He isotope signatures of geothermal systems in Chile. Proceedings, 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Feb. 11-13, 2013

  17. A Hypothesis-Testing Framework for Studies Investigating Ontogenetic Niche Shifts Using Stable Isotope Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag-Peyer, Caroline M.; Yeager, Lauren A.; Araújo, Márcio S.; Layman, Craig A.

    2011-01-01

    Ontogenetic niche shifts occur across diverse taxonomic groups, and can have critical implications for population dynamics, community structure, and ecosystem function. In this study, we provide a hypothesis-testing framework combining univariate and multivariate analyses to examine ontogenetic niche shifts using stable isotope ratios. This framework is based on three distinct ontogenetic niche shift scenarios, i.e., (1) no niche shift, (2) niche expansion/reduction, and (3) discrete niche shift between size classes. We developed criteria for identifying each scenario, as based on three important resource use characteristics, i.e., niche width, niche position, and niche overlap. We provide an empirical example for each ontogenetic niche shift scenario, illustrating differences in resource use characteristics among different organisms. The present framework provides a foundation for future studies on ontogenetic niche shifts, and also can be applied to examine resource variability among other population sub-groupings (e.g., by sex or phenotype). PMID:22073265

  18. Isotope studies to determine dry deposition of sulfate to deciduous and coniferous trees: Final draft

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted at two locations near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, with radioactive /sup 35/S (87 day half-life) to examine the cycling behavior of sulfur in yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), red maple (Acer rubrum), and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) trees. Some findings pertain to methods development for estimating dry deposition of sulfur to forest canopies and the magnitude of sulfur emissions from natural sources (Task II). We will determine through field studies, the internal cycling, storage, and biogenic emission of sulfur, as traced by /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, in environments impacted by atmospheric sulfate deposition; and will determine through isotope dilution studies, the contribution of foliar leaching and dry deposition to net throughfall (NTF) sulfate concentrations beneath deciduous and coniferous trees in such environments. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The Magnetosphere Imager Mission Concept Definition Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Herrmann, M.; Alexander, Reggie; Beabout, Brent; Blevins, Harold; Bridge, Scott; Burruss, Glenda; Buzbee, Tom; Carrington, Connie; Chandler, Holly; Chu, Phillip; Chubb, Steve; Cushman, Paul; DeSanctis, Carmine; Edge, Ted; Freestone, Todd; French, Ray; Gallagher, Dennis; Hajos, Greg; Herr, Joel

    1997-01-01

    For three decades, magnetospheric field and plasma measurements have been made by diverse instruments flown on spacecraft in many different orbits, widely separated in space and time, and under various solar and magnetospheric conditions. Scientists have used this information to piece together an intricate, yet incomplete view of the magnetosphere. A simultaneous global view, using various light wavelengths and energetic neutral atoms, could reveal exciting new data and help explain complex magnetospheric processes, thus providing us with a clear picture of this region of space. The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for defining the Magnetosphere Imager mission which will study this region of space. A core instrument complement of three imagers (with the potential addition of one or more mission enhancing instrument) will fly in an elliptical polar Earth orbit with an apogee of 44,600 kilometers and a perigee of 4,800 km. This report will address the mission objectives, spacecraft design concepts, and the results of the MSFC concept definition study.

  20. Isotope effect studies of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent histidine decarboxylase from Morganella morganii

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-08-09

    The pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent histidine decarboxylase from Morganella morganii shows a nitrogen isotope effect k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9770 +/- 0.0021, a carbon isotope effect k/sup 12//k/sup 13/ = 1.0308 +/- 0.0006, and a carbon isotope effect for L-(..cap alpha..-/sup 2/H)histidine of 1.0333 +/- 0.0001 at pH 6.3, 37/sup 0/C. These results indicate that the overall decarboxylation rate is limited jointly by the rate of Schiff base interchange and by the rate of decarboxylation. Although the observed isotope effects are quite different from those for the analogous glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli, the intrinsic isotope effects for the two enzymes are essentially the same. The difference in observed isotope effects occurs because of a roughly twofold difference in the partitioning of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-substrate Schiff base between decarboxylation and Schiff base interchange. The observed nitrogen isotope effect requires that the imine nitrogen in this Schiff base is protonated. Comparison of carbon isotope effects for deuteriated and undeuteriated substrates reveals that the deuterium isotope effect on the decarboxylation step is about 1.20; thus, in the transition state for the decarboxylation step, the carbon-carbon bond is about two-thirds broken.

  1. Animal imaging studies of potential brain damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatley, S. J.; Vazquez, M. E.; Rice, O.

    To date, animal studies have not been able to predict the likelihood of problems in human neurological health due to HZE particle exposure during space missions outside the Earth's magnetosphere. In ongoing studies in mice, we have demonstrated that cocaine stimulated locomotor activity is reduced by a moderate dose (120 cGy) of 1 GeV 56Fe particles. We postulate that imaging experiments in animals may provide more sensitive and earlier indicators of damage due to HZE particles than behavioral tests. Since the small size of the mouse brain is not well suited to the spatial resolution offered by microPET, we are now repeating some of our studies in a rat model. We anticipate that this will enable us to identify imaging correlates of behavioral endpoints. A specific hypothesis of our studies is that changes in the metabolic rate for glucose in striatum of animals will be correlated with alterations in locomotor activity. We will also evaluate whether the neuroprotective drug L-deprenyl reduces the effect of radiation on locomotor activity. In addition, we will conduct microPET studies of brain monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B in rats before and at various times after irradiation with HZE particles. The hypothesis is that monoamine oxidase A, which is located in nerve terminals, will be unchanged or decreased after irradiation, while monoamine oxidase B, which is located in glial cells, will be increased after irradiation. Neurochemical effects that could be measured using PET could in principle be applied in astronauts, in terms of detecting and monitoring subtle neurological damage that might have occurred during long space missions. More speculative uses of PET are in screening candidates for prolonged space missions (for example, for adequate reserve in critical brain circuits) and in optimizing medications to treat impairments after missions.

  2. Sulfur and oxygen isotope study of sulfate reduction in experiments with natural populations from Fællestrand, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquhar, James; Canfield, Don E.; Masterson, Andrew; Bao, Huiming; Johnston, David

    2008-06-01

    This study investigates the sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionations of dissimilatory sulfate reduction and works to reconcile the relationships between the oxygen and sulfur isotopic and elemental systems. We report results of experiments with natural populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria using sediment and seawater from a marine lagoon at Fællestrand on the northern shore of the island of Fyn, Denmark. The experiments yielded relatively large magnitude sulfur isotope fractionations for dissimilatory sulfate reduction (up to approximately 45‰ for 34S/32S) with higher δ18O accompanying higher δ34S, similar to that observed in previous studies. The seawater used in the experiments was spiked by addition of 17O-labeled water and the 17O content of residual sulfate was found to depend on the fraction of sulfate reduced in the experiments. The 17O data provides evidence for recycling of sulfur from metabolic intermediates and for an 18O/16O fractionation of ∼25-30‰ for dissimilatory sulfate reduction. The close correlation between the 17O data and the sulfur isotope data suggests that isotopic exchange between cell water and external water (reactor water) was rapid under experimental conditions. The molar ratio of oxygen exchange to sulfate reduction was found to be about 2.5. This value is slightly lower than observed in studies of natural ecosystems [e.g., Wortmann U. G., Chernyavsky B., Bernasconi S. M., Brunner B., Böttcher M. E. and Swart P. K. (2007) Oxygen isotope biogeochemistry of pore water sulfate in the deep biosphere: dominance of isotope exchange reactions with ambient water during microbial sulfate reduction (ODP Site 1130). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta71, 4221-4232]. Using recent models of sulfur isotope fractionations we find that our combined sulfur and oxygen isotopic data places constraints on the proportion of sulfate recycled to the medium (78-96%), the proportion of sulfur intermediate sulfite that was recycled by way of APS to sulfate

  3. Study of water mixing in the coastal waters of the western Taiwan Strait based on radium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Men, Wu; Jiang, Yuwu; Liu, Guangshan; Wang, Fenfen; Zhang, Yusheng

    2016-02-01

    Radium is considered to be a useful tracer for studying the physical processes of seawater. In this work, three naturally occurring radium isotopes, (224)Raex, (226)Ra and (228)Ra, were measured in the coastal zone of the western Taiwan Strait during the summer seasons. Based on the distributions of the three radium isotopes and the salinity, we conclude that the water mixing pattern in the study area in summer consists of diluted water flowing from the Jiulong River to the open sea towards the east and southeast, and open sea seawater flowing inward from south to north. The submarine ground water discharges in the estuarine region, as suggested by the radium and salinity data. The residence times of the Jiulong River estuary, ranging from 7 to 49 d, were estimated using the radium isotope pairs (224)Raex and (226)Ra.

  4. Study of water mixing in the coastal waters of the western Taiwan Strait based on radium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Men, Wu; Jiang, Yuwu; Liu, Guangshan; Wang, Fenfen; Zhang, Yusheng

    2016-02-01

    Radium is considered to be a useful tracer for studying the physical processes of seawater. In this work, three naturally occurring radium isotopes, (224)Raex, (226)Ra and (228)Ra, were measured in the coastal zone of the western Taiwan Strait during the summer seasons. Based on the distributions of the three radium isotopes and the salinity, we conclude that the water mixing pattern in the study area in summer consists of diluted water flowing from the Jiulong River to the open sea towards the east and southeast, and open sea seawater flowing inward from south to north. The submarine ground water discharges in the estuarine region, as suggested by the radium and salinity data. The residence times of the Jiulong River estuary, ranging from 7 to 49 d, were estimated using the radium isotope pairs (224)Raex and (226)Ra. PMID:26630036

  5. Lunar Science Conference, 6th, Houston, Tex., March 17-21, 1975, Proceedings. Volume 2 - Chemical and isotopic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical compositions of lunar rocks and soils are examined, taking into account sulfur abundances and distributions in mare basalts and their source magmas, lithophile trace and major elements in Apollo 16 and 17 lunar samples, the role of vaporization processes in lunar rock formation, chemical studies of the lunar regolith with emphasis on zirconium and hafnium, a model for the lunar anorthositic gabbro, and trace-element chemistry and reducing capacity of size fractions from the Apollo 16 regolith. Other topics considered are related to lunar chronology, volatile meteoritic elements, isotopic studies, light element geochemistry, and agglutinates and regolith processes. Attention is given to meteoritic material in four terrestrial meteorite craters, the state of meteoritic material on the moon, volatile elements in Allende inclusions, oxygen isotope fractionation in Apollo 17 rocks, cosmogenic isotope production in Apollo deep-core samples, and the effects of exposure conditions on cosmic-ray records in lunar rocks.

  6. Quantitative study of coherent pairing modes with two-neutron transfer: Sn isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potel, G.; Idini, A.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2013-05-01

    Pairing rotations and pairing vibrations are collective modes associated with a field, the pair field, which changes the number of particles by two. Consequently, they can be studied at profit with the help of two-particle transfer reactions in superfluid and in normal nuclei, respectively. The advent of exotic beams has opened, for the first time, the possibility to carry out such studies in medium heavy nuclei, within the same isotopic chain. The case studied in the present paper is that of the Sn isotopes [essentially from closed (Z=N=50) to closed (Z=50, N=82) shells]. The static and dynamic off-diagonal, long-range order phase coherence in gauge space displayed by pairing rotations and vibrations, respectively, leads to coherent states which behave almost classically. Consequently, these modes are amenable to an accurate nuclear structure description in terms of simple models containing the right physics, in particular, BCS plus quasiparticle random-phase approximation and Hartree-Fock mean field plus random-phase approximation, respectively. The associated two-nucleon transfer spectroscopic amplitudes predicted by such model calculations can thus be viewed as essentially “exact.” This fact, together with the availability of optical potentials for the different real and virtual channels involved in the reactions considered, namely A+2Sn+p, A+1Sn+d, and ASn+t, allows for the calculation of the associated absolute cross sections without, arguably, free parameters. The numerical predictions of the absolute differential cross sections, obtained making use of the above-mentioned nuclear structure and optical potential inputs, within the framework of second-order distorted-wave Born approximation, taking into account simultaneous, successive, and nonorthogonality contributions, provide, within experimental errors in general, and below 10% uncertainty in particular, an overall account of the experimental findings for all of the measured A+2Sn

  7. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes using actinide elements. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1992-12-31

    The following are reported: high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer for U-Th studies; {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th disequilibrium in recent lavas from Iceland; water-rock interaction from U-Th studies; resonance ionization mass spectrometry of Os and Ti isotopes; and self-diffusion of Mg.

  8. Tracking amino acid's uptake into the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii by stable-isotope labelling and Raman spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    The capacity of pathogens to acquire nutrients from their host cells is one of the most fundamental aspects of infection biology. Hence, measuring the patterns of nutrients' uptake by pathogens is essential for understanding the interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells. In this study, we optimized a technique that allows fast and non-destructive measurement of the amino acid Phenylalanine (Phe) acquired by the trophozoite stage of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii (A. castellanii) as they engage with individual human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19). ARPE-19 host cells were pre-saturated with Deuterated Phe (L-Phe(D8)) to replace the native substrate Phe (L-Phe). The uptake of L-Phe(D8) by A. castellanii trophozoites was measured by Raman microspectroscopy. This approach allowed us to characterize the uptake patterns of this essential amino acid into A. castellanii trophozoites at a single cell level. At 24 hours post infection (PI) A. castellanii trophozoites are capable of salvaging L-Phe(D8) from host cells. The uptake pattern was time-dependent during the first 24 hours of infection and complete substitution with L-Phe(D8) in all parasites was detected at 48 hours PI. On the other hand, isolated A. castellanii trachyzoites (grown without host cells) did not show significant uptake for L-Phe(D8) from the media; only achieved an uptake ratio of 16-18% of L-Phe(D8) from the culture medium after 24 hours. These findings demonstrate the potential of combining Raman microspectroscopy and stable isotope labelling approaches to elucidate the role of metabolism in mediating A. castellanii interaction with host cells.

  9. Preliminary design study of an alternate heat source assembly for a Brayton isotope power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strumpf, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for a study of the preliminary design of an alternate heat source assembly (HSA) intended for use in the Brayton isotope power system (BIPS). The BIPS converts thermal energy emitted by a radioactive heat source into electrical energy by means of a closed Brayton cycle. A heat source heat exchanger configuration was selected and optimized. The design consists of a 10 turn helically wound Hastelloy X tube. Thermal analyses were performed for various operating conditions to ensure that post impact containment shell (PICS) temperatures remain within specified limits. These limits are essentially satisfied for all modes of operation except for the emergency cooling system for which the PICS temperatures are too high. Neon was found to be the best choice for a fill gas for auxiliary cooling system operation. Low cycle fatigue life, natural frequency, and dynamic loading requirements can be met with minor modifications to the existing HSA.

  10. The Itataia phosphate-uranium deposit (Ceará, Brazil) new petrographic, geochemistry and isotope studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veríssimo, César Ulisses Vieira; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Parente, Clóvis Vaz; Oliveira, Claudinei Gouveia de; Cavalcanti, José Adilson Dias; Nogueira Neto, José de Araújo

    2016-10-01

    The Itataia phosphate-uranium deposit is located in Santa Quitéria, in central Ceará State, northeastern Brazil. Mineralization has occurred in different stages and involves quartz leaching (episyenitization), brecciation and microcrystalline phase formation of concretionary apatite. The last constitutes the main mineral of Itatiaia uranium ore, namely collophane. Collophanite ore occurs in massive bodies, lenses, breccia zones, veins or episyenite in marble layers, calc-silicate rocks and gneisses of the Itataia Group. There are two accepted theories on the origin of the earliest mineralization phase of Itataia ore: syngenetic (primary) - where the ore is derived from a continental source and then deposited in marine and coastal environments; and epigenetic (secondary) - whereby the fluids are of magmatic, metamorphic and meteoric origin. The characterization of pre- or post-deformational mineralization is controversial, since the features of the ore are interpreted as deformation. This investigation conducted isotopic studies and chemical analyses of minerals in marbles and calc-silicate rocks of the Alcantil and Barrigas Formations (Itataia Group), as well as petrographic and structural studies. Analysis of the thin sections shows at least three phosphate mineral phases associated with uranium mineralizaton: (1) A prismatic fluorapatite phase associated with chess-board albite, arfvedsonite and ferro-eckermannite; (2) a second fluorapatite phase with fibrous radial or colloform habits that replaces calcium carbonate in marble, especially along fractures, with minerals such as quartz, chlorite and zeolite also identified in calc-silicate rocks; and (3) an younger phosphate phase of botryoidal apatite (fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite) related with clay minerals and probably others calcium and aluminum phosphates. Detailed isotopic analysis carried out perpendicularly to the mineralized levels and veins in the marble revealed significant variation in isotopic

  11. Cold source moderator vessel development for the High Flux Isotope Reactor: Thermal-hydraulic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.; Wendel, M.W.

    1998-07-01

    A project is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to design, test, and install a cold neutron source facility in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This new cold source employs supercritical hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures both as the medium for neutron moderation and as the working fluid for removal of internally-generated nuclear heating. The competing design goals of minimizing moderator vessel mass and providing adequate structural integrity for the vessel motivated the requirement of detailed multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses of the moderator vessel as a critical design subtask. This paper provides a summary review of the HFIR cold source moderator vessel design and a description of the thermal-hydraulic studies that were carried out to support the vessel development.

  12. CO2 production by impact in carbonates? An ATEM and stable isotope (C,O) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, I.; Agrinier, P.; Guyot, F.; Ildefonse, PH.; Javoy, M.; Schaerer, U.; Hornemann, U.; Deutsch, A.

    1993-01-01

    Carbonates may have been a common target for large impacts on the Earth and possible related CO2 outgassing would have important consequences for the composition of the atmosphere. To estimate volatile release during such impacts, isotopic ratios (C-13/C-12 and O-18/O-16) were determined on highly shocked carbonate samples in combination with SEM and analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) investigations. The study was performed on both naturally and experimentally shocked rocks, i.e. 50-60 GPa shocked limestone-dolomite fragments from the Haughton impact crater (Canada), and carbonates shocked in shock recovery experiments. For the experiments, unshocked carbonates consisting of mixture of dolomite and calcite from the Haughton area were used. Naturally shocked samples were collected in the polymict breccia near the center of the Haughton crater.

  13. The Dengli (H3.8) Complex Breccia: Petrological and Isotopic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, M. A.; Assonov, S. S.; Kononkova, N. N.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-07-01

    The Dengli meteorite was found in the Karakum desert in July 1976. Previous studies [1] have shown that the meteorite is a complex chondritic breccia containing unusual components of achondritic affinity. In order to understand the origin of the breccia, we studied its mineralogy, petrology, and isotopic composition of noble gases. In addition, in cooperation with Dr. J. N. Goswami, we are now studying minerals in achondritic clasts using an ion microprobe. The Dengli meteorite has a distinct chondritic texture and consists of chondrules and chondrule fragments embedded into a fine-grained matrix. Equilibrated and unequilibrated populations were found among the chondrules, the latter of which are characterized by normal or inverse Mg-Fe zoning. Olivine (Fa19.6, N = 52, C.V. = 19.3) and pyroxene (Fs18.2, N = 27, C.V. = 17.0) displays large compositional variations. Based on textural and chemical characteristics, Dengli can be classified as an H3.8 chondrite. Two objects with unique compositions were identified. One has a round shape and consists of silica, orthopyroxene (Fs18.1 Wo6.2), clinopyroxene (Fs17.6 Wo27.6), and feldspar (An76.2 Ab23.2). The other object is an angular clast, which is composed of olivine (Fa17.2), Al-rich clinopyroxene (Fs6.3 Wo46.8), and feldspar (An44.7 Ab54.7). The presence of clinopyroxene and Ca-rich feldspar in these objects indicates their similarity with an achondritic material. The Ar, Kr, and Xe contents measured in Dengli are very close to those in other ordinary chondrites of petrological types 3 through 5 [2]. The Xe and Kr isotopic compositions at any temperature step differ from those of solar Xe and Kr. High ^38Ar concentrations were found. The exposure age was estimated to be 7.6 Ma, which is close to the average (6.3 +/- 0.2 Ma) exposure age of 350 H chondrites. The Dengli K/Ar age, 3.73 +/- 0.10 Ga, is close to K/Ar ages of the majority of H chondrites. Thus, Dengli is depleted in noble gases as compared to regolith

  14. Isotope labelling to study molecular fragmentation during the dielectric barrier discharge wet reforming of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoro-Damas, Antonio M.; Gómez-Ramírez, Ana; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustín R.; Cotrino, José

    2016-09-01

    Isotope labelling is used to study the wet plasma reforming of methane in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor using D2O and CH4 as reactants. Besides the formation of CO and hydrogen as main products, different partitions of H and D atoms are found in the hydrogen (i.e., H2, HD, D2), methane (i.e., CH4, CH3D and CH2D2) and water (D2O, DHO) molecules detected by mass spectrometry as outlet gases of the plasma process. The effect of operating parameters such as applied current, residence time and the addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture is correlated with the H/D distribution in these molecules, the overall reaction yield and the energetic efficiency of the process. The results prove the plasma formation of intermediate excited species that rendering water and methane instead of CO and hydrogen greatly contribute to decrease the overall energy efficiency of the reforming process.

  15. Study of evaluation of groundwater in Gadilam basin using hydrogeochemical and isotope data.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Mohan Viswanathan; Chidambaram, S; Shahul Hameed, A; Srinivasamoorthy, K

    2010-09-01

    Gadilam river basin has gained its importance due to the presence of Neyveli Lignite open cast mines and other industrial complexes. It is also due to extensive depressurization of Cuddalore aquifer, and bore wells for New Veeranam Scheme are constructed downstream of the basin. Geochemical indicators of groundwater were used to identify the chemical processes that control hydrogeochemistry. Chemical parameters of groundwater such as pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), calcium (Ca(+)), magnesium (Mg(+)), bicarbonate (HCO(-)(3)), sulfate (SO(-)(4)), phosphate (PO(-)(4)), and silica (H(4)SiO(4)) were determined. Interpretation of hydrogeochemical data suggests that leaching of ions followed by weathering and anthropogenic impact controls the chemistry of the groundwater. Isotopic study reveals that recharge from meteoric source in sedimentary terrain and rock-water interaction with significant evaporation prevails in hard rock region.

  16. PET IMAGING STUDIES IN DRUG ABUSE RESEARCH.

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Ding, Y.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J.

    2001-01-29

    . This will be followed by highlights of PET studies of the acute effects of the psychostimulant drugs cocaine and methylphenidate (ritalin) and studies of the chronic effects of cocaine and of tobacco smoke on the human brain. This chapter concludes with the description of a study which uses brain imaging coupled with a specific pharmacological challenge to address the age-old question of why some people who experiment with drugs become addicted while others do not.

  17. A Combined Molecular and Isotopic Study of Anoxygenic Photosynthesis in Meromictic Lakes of the Northwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. H., IV; Gilhooly, W., III; Crane, E. J., III; Steinman, B.; Shelton, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur isotope fractionations within the chemocline can be an indication of green and purple sulfur photosynthetic activity. This isotopic signal is, however, small and variable, on the order of +2-6‰ (Zerkle et al. 2009). It is therefore advantageous to investigate the environmental and ecological effects on this signal so that these influences can be taken into account when estimating the contribution of anoxygenic phototrophs to the sulfur cycle in aquatic environments. This project aims to investigate the ways in which anoxygenic phototroph community structure and lake water geochemistry impact the sulfur isotope fractionation expressed during anoxygenic photosynthesis in meromictic lakes. During the summer of 2013, water column profile analysis of six lakes in the Pacific Northwest (located in eastern Washington and western Montana) were conducted to assess photosynthetically available radiation, salinity, pH, temperature, dissolved solids, and specific conductivity. Water column samples were obtained to determine the sulfur isotopic composition of dissolved sulfate and sulfide, major ion and sulfide concentrations. Microbial samples were also collected for genetic sequencing. Initial results found green (e.g., Chlorobiaceae sp.) and purple (e.g., Lamprocystis purpurea) bacteria at the same depth in one of the study lakes. These data, in addition to the same suite of samples collected in the summer of 2014, provide insight into relationships between the isotopic composition of sulfur (in H2S, S0, and SO4), lake water chemistry, and the presence or absence of green and purple sulfur bacteria.

  18. Study on multispectral imaging detection and recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Wang; Na, Ding; Gao, Jiaobo; Yu, Hu; Jun, Wu; Li, Junna; Zheng, Yawei; Fei, Gao; Sun, Kefeng

    2009-07-01

    Multispectral imaging detecting technology use target radiation character in spectral spatial distribution and relation between spectral and image to detect target and remote sensing measure. Its speciality is multi channel, narrow bandwidth, large amount of information, high accuracy. The ability of detecting target in environment of clutter, camouflage, concealment and beguilement is improved. At present, spectral imaging technology in the range of multispectral and hyperspectral develop greatly. The multispectral imaging equipment of unmanned aerial vehicle can be used in mine detection, information, surveillance and reconnaissance. Spectral imaging spectrometer operating in MWIR and LWIR has already been applied in the field of remote sensing and military in the advanced country. The paper presents the technology of multispectral imaging. It can enhance the reflectance, scatter and radiation character of the artificial targets among nature background. The targets among complex background and camouflage/stealth targets can be effectively identified. The experiment results and the data of spectral imaging is obtained.

  19. Technology study of quantum remote sensing imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen; Lin, Xuling; Yang, Song; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    According to remote sensing science and technology development and application requirements, quantum remote sensing is proposed. First on the background of quantum remote sensing, quantum remote sensing theory, information mechanism, imaging experiments and prototype principle prototype research situation, related research at home and abroad are briefly introduced. Then we expounds compress operator of the quantum remote sensing radiation field and the basic principles of single-mode compression operator, quantum quantum light field of remote sensing image compression experiment preparation and optical imaging, the quantum remote sensing imaging principle prototype, Quantum remote sensing spaceborne active imaging technology is brought forward, mainly including quantum remote sensing spaceborne active imaging system composition and working principle, preparation and injection compression light active imaging device and quantum noise amplification device. Finally, the summary of quantum remote sensing research in the past 15 years work and future development are introduced.

  20. A data processing pipeline for mammalian proteome dynamics studies using stable isotope metabolic labeling.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shenheng; Price, John C; Prusiner, Stanley B; Ghaemmaghami, Sina; Burlingame, Alma L

    2011-12-01

    In a recent study, in vivo metabolic labeling using (15)N traced the rate of label incorporation among more than 1700 proteins simultaneously and enabled the determination of individual protein turnover rate constants over a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude (Price, J. C., Guan, S., Burlingame, A., Prusiner, S. B., and Ghaemmaghami, S. (2010) Analysis of proteome dynamics in the mouse brain. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 107, 14508-14513). These studies of protein dynamics provide a deeper understanding of healthy development and well-being of complex organisms, as well as the possible causes and progression of disease. In addition to a fully labeled food source and appropriate mass spectrometry platform, an essential and enabling component of such large scale investigations is a robust data processing and analysis pipeline, which is capable of the reduction of large sets of liquid chromatography tandem MS raw data files into the desired protein turnover rate constants. The data processing pipeline described in this contribution is comprised of a suite of software modules required for the workflow that fulfills such requirements. This software platform includes established software tools such as a mass spectrometry database search engine together with several additional, novel data processing modules specifically developed for (15)N metabolic labeling. These fulfill the following functions: (1) cross-extraction of (15)N-containing ion intensities from raw data files at varying biosynthetic incorporation times, (2) computation of peptide (15)N isotopic incorporation distributions, and (3) aggregation of relative isotope abundance curves for multiple peptides into single protein curves. In addition, processing parameter optimization and noise reduction procedures were found to be necessary in the processing modules in order to reduce propagation of errors in the long chain of the processing steps of the entire workflow. PMID:21937731

  1. An NMR Study of Isotope Effect on Keto-Enol Tautomerization: A Physical Organic Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, D.; Chechik, V.

    2004-01-01

    Isotope substitution often affects the rate of an organic reaction and can be used to reveal the underlying mechanism. A series of experiments that use (super 1)H NMR to determine primary and secondary isotope effects, activation parameters, and the regioselectivity of butanone enolization are described.

  2. Lead isotope systematics in Polytrichum formosum: An example from a biomonitoring field study with mosses

    SciTech Connect

    Kunert, M.; Friese, K.; Weckert, V.; Markert, B.

    1999-10-15

    With the aid of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), {sup 206/207}Pb isotope ratios were determined in 34 moss samples (Polytrichum formosum) taken from the Hoerner Bruch area near Osnabrueck (FRG) in the years 1987--1996. The goal was to distinguish different sources of atmospheric lead pollution by the investigation of lead isotope ratios. Reproducibility tests were carried out to ensure the reliability of analyzing Pb isotope ratios in moss samples by means of quadrupole ICP-MS. The reproducibility of the isotope ratios for one digested sample and the day-to-day reproducibility were determined. In all the moss samples analyzed, relative standard deviations of < 0.26% for five replicate measurements of one digested sample were achieved for the {sup 206/207}Pb isotope ratios. On the basis of the {sup 206/207}Pb isotope ratio, it was possible to establish that the sources of man-made atmospheric inputs of lead have changed over the 10-year period investigated. In the moss samples analyzed, the {sup 206/207}Pb isotope ratio was found to have risen significantly from 1.131 in 1987 to 1.154 in 1996. This increase in the {sup 206/207}Pb isotope ratio can be attributed to a reduction of atmospheric inputs of lead from petrol.

  3. SIMS Oxygen Isotope Study of Chondrules in the Least Metamorphosed CV3 Chondrite Kaba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertwig, A.; Defouilloy, C.; Kita, N. T.

    2016-08-01

    High-precision SIMS oxygen three isotope analyses of chondrules in Kaba CV3 show that most chondrules are internally homogeneous in oxygen isotopes and dominated by high Mg# (≥98) and Δ17O from –6‰ to –4‰.

  4. Li isotope geochemical study on weathering of granite in Longnan, Jiangxi Province, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Xu, Z.; Zhao, T.; Yu, C.; Zhou, L.

    2015-12-01

    Li isotopes have been demonstrated to be a powerful tool in silicate weathering research from the continental scale to that of catchments and weathering profiles. In this study, we focus on Li isotopic behavior during granite weathering and pedogenic processes. Study profiles are developed on a granite intrusion in Longnan, South China, under a subtropical monsoon climate. Two soil profiles (JLN-S4 on the ridgetop and JLN-S3 on the midslope; both 120cm deep) and one weathering profiles (JLN-S1 on the toe slope; 1100cm deep) along a hill slope were selected to represent the granite weathering process in near surface condition. Bulk samples of these profiles were analyzed for major element and Li content, and δ7Li value. CIA (chemical index of alteration) values were determined. The uppermost soil profile (JLN-S4) samples have CIA values between 97.6 and 98.3, with δ7Li values from -2.50 to -3.90‰; JLN-S3 profile samples have lower CIA values varing from 94.4 to 96.1 and δ7Li values from -0.73‰ to -1.55‰. The weathering profile JLN-S1 at the toe slope has a generally increasing CIA values (in the range of 57.8~92.4) upward in the profile. The δ7Li values variation with CIA in JLN-S1, shows a two staged relationship: δ7Li increasing from -14.92‰ to 0.66‰ when CIA increases from 57.8 to 74.6 as the first stage (from the bottom to 370cm depth), and no obvious relationship between CIA andδ7Li(-4.74~3.62‰) was observed in the second stage (CIA higher than 74.6, 370cm depth above). Li contents in JLN-S4 vary between 3.84 and 15.03 μg/g, in JLN-S3 between 1.43~8.03 μg/g, and in JLN-S1 between 6.95~22.27μg/g. In the first stage defined by δ7Li and CIA relationship, Li contents decrease with increasing CIA. However, in the second stage, Li abundance decreases upward at the beginning and turns into an increacing tendency (at 175cm depth) to the surface. Two granite bedrock samples have δ7Li value of -0.23 and 0.39‰, and Li contents of 38.58 and 34

  5. Carbon Isotopes of Alkanes in Hydrothermal Abiotic Organic Synthesis Processes at High Temperatures and Pressures: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Observation of methane in the Martian atmosphere has been reported by different detection techniques [1-4]. With more evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction in Martian history [5-7], abiotic formation by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) synthesis during serpentization reactions may be one possible process responsible for methane generation on Mars [8, 9]. While the experimental studies performed to date leave little doubt that chemical reactions exist for the abiotic synthesis of organic compounds by mineral surface-catalyzed reactions [10-12], little is known about the reaction pathways by which CO2 and/or CO are reduced under hydrothermal conditions. Carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements of alkanes have been used as an effective tool to constrain the origin and reaction pathways of hydrocarbon formation. Alkanes generated by thermal breakdown of high molecular weight organic compounds have carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures completely distinct from those formed abiotically [13-15]. Recent experimental studies, however, showed that different abiogenic hydrocarbon formation processes (e.g., polymerization vs. depolymerization) may have different carbon and hydrogen isotopic patterns [16]. Results from previous experiments studying decomposition of higher molecular weight organic compounds (lignite) also suggested that pressure could be a crucial factor affecting fractionation of carbon isotopes [17]. Under high pressure conditions, no experimental data are available describing fractionation of carbon isotope during mineral catalyzed FTT synthesis. Thus, hydrothermal experiments present an excellent opportunity to provide the requisite carbon isotope data. Such data can also be used to identify reaction pathways of abiotic organic synthesis under experimental conditions.

  6. An image assessment study of image acceptability of the Galileo low gain antenna mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, S. L.; Haines, R. F.; Grant, T.; Gold, Yaron; Cheung, Kar-Ming

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California on the image acceptability of the Galileo Low Gain Antenna mission. The primary objective of the study is to determine the impact of the Integer Cosine Transform (ICT) compression algorithm on Galilean images of atmospheric bodies, moons, asteroids and Jupiter's rings. The approach involved fifteen volunteer subjects representing twelve institutions involved with the Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment. Four different experiment specific quantization tables (q-table) and various compression stepsizes (q-factor) to achieve different compression ratios were used. It then determined the acceptability of the compressed monochromatic astronomical images as evaluated by Galileo SSI mission scientists. Fourteen different images were evaluated. Each observer viewed two versions of the same image side by side on a high resolution monitor, each was compressed using a different quantization stepsize. They were requested to select which image had the highest overall quality to support them in carrying out their visual evaluations of image content. Then they rated both images using a scale from one to five on its judged degree of usefulness. Up to four pre-selected types of images were presented with and without noise to each subject based upon results of a previously administered survey of their image preferences. Fourteen different images in seven image groups were studied. The results showed that: (1) acceptable compression ratios vary widely with the type of images; (2) noisy images detract greatly from image acceptability and acceptable compression ratios; and (3) atmospheric images of Jupiter seem to have higher compression ratios of 4 to 5 times that of some clear surface satellite images.

  7. Sulfur isotope study of a modern intertidal environment, and the interpretation of ancient sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. A.

    1982-05-01

    Extensive sulfur isotope distribution data for sulfides precipitated in an intertidal environment show no distinctive features when compared with isotope values for other marine, sedimentary sulfides. The fractionation ranges from α = 1.030 to α = 1.048. The pattern is characteristic for a system essentially open to sulfate, and isotope analyses of interstitial sulfates are corroborative. A population of sulfate-reducing bacteria of the order of 10 9 organisms per cc of interstitial water is indicated. Seasonal variation of the isotope distribution reflects a transient sulfide composition and a bacterial population in which the fractionation effect is indirectly controlled by temperature. The data presented for this modern shallow water environment are at variance with an earlier assessment of isotopic distributions in ancient sulfides which linked shallow water environments with limited fractionation (α ⩽ 1.025) in a closed system.

  8. Stable isotopes of transition and post-transition metals as tracers in environmental studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, Tomas D.; Baskaran, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The transition and post-transition metals, which include the elements in Groups 3–12 of the Periodic Table, have a broad range of geological and biological roles as well as industrial applications and thus are widespread in the environment. Interdisciplinary research over the past decade has resulted in a broad understanding of the isotope systematics of this important group of elements and revealed largely unexpected variability in isotope composition for natural materials. Significant kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation has been observed for redox sensitive metals such as iron, chromium, copper, molybdenum and mercury, and for metals that are not redox sensitive in nature such as cadmium and zinc. In the environmental sciences, the isotopes are increasingly being used to understand important issues such as tracing of metal contaminant sources and fates, unraveling metal redox cycles, deciphering metal nutrient pathways and cycles, and developing isotope biosignatures that can indicate the role of biological activity in ancient and modern planetary systems.

  9. Laboratory studies of carbon kinetic isotope effects on the production mechanism of particulate phenolic compounds formed by toluene photooxidation: a tool to constrain reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Irei, Satoshi; Rudolph, Jochen; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by photooxidation of isotope-label-free toluene. SOA generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 m(3) indoor smog chamber was collected on filters, which were extracted with acetonitrile for compound-specific analysis. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined using a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5-6‰ compared to the initial isotope ratio of toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4-nitrophenol remained identical to that of toluene. On the basis of the reaction mechanisms proposed in previous reports, stable carbon isotope ratios of these products were calculated. By comparing the observed isotope ratios with the predicted isotope ratios, we explored possible production pathways for the particulate phenolic compounds.

  10. Laboratory studies of carbon kinetic isotope effects on the production mechanism of particulate phenolic compounds formed by toluene photooxidation: a tool to constrain reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Irei, Satoshi; Rudolph, Jochen; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by photooxidation of isotope-label-free toluene. SOA generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 m(3) indoor smog chamber was collected on filters, which were extracted with acetonitrile for compound-specific analysis. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined using a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5-6‰ compared to the initial isotope ratio of toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4-nitrophenol remained identical to that of toluene. On the basis of the reaction mechanisms proposed in previous reports, stable carbon isotope ratios of these products were calculated. By comparing the observed isotope ratios with the predicted isotope ratios, we explored possible production pathways for the particulate phenolic compounds. PMID:25490235

  11. You are not always what we think you eat. Selective assimilation across multiple whole-stream isotopic tracer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, W. K.; Collins, S. M.; Hamilton, S. K.; Tank, J. L.; Johnson, S.; Webster, J. R.; Simon, K. S.; Whiles, M. R.; Rantala, H. M.; McDowell, W. H.; Peterson, S. D.; Riis, T.; Crenshaw, C. L.; Thomas, S. A.; Kristensen, P. B.; Cheever, B. M.; Flecker, A. S.; Griffiths, N. A.; Crowl, T.; Rosi-Marshall, E. J.; El-Sabaawi, R.; Martí, E.

    2014-10-01

    Analyses of 21 15N stable isotope tracer experiments, designed to examine food web dynamics in streams around the world, indicated that the isotopic composition of food resources assimilated by primary consumers (mostly invertebrates) poorly reflected the presumed food sources. Modeling indicated that consumers assimilated only 33–50% of the N available in sampled food sources such as decomposing leaves, epilithon, and fine particulate detritus over feeding periods of weeks or more. Thus, common methods of sampling food sources consumed by animals in streams do not sufficiently reflect the pool of N they assimilate. Lastly, Isotope tracer studies, combined with modeling and food separation techniques, can improve estimation of N pools in food sources that are assimilated by consumers.

  12. You are not always what we think you eat. Selective assimilation across multiple whole-stream isotopic tracer studies

    DOE PAGES

    Dodds, W. K.; Collins, S. M.; Hamilton, S. K.; Tank, J. L.; Johnson, S.; Webster, J. R.; Simon, K. S.; Whiles, M. R.; Rantala, H. M.; McDowell, W. H.; et al

    2014-10-01

    Analyses of 21 15N stable isotope tracer experiments, designed to examine food web dynamics in streams around the world, indicated that the isotopic composition of food resources assimilated by primary consumers (mostly invertebrates) poorly reflected the presumed food sources. Modeling indicated that consumers assimilated only 33–50% of the N available in sampled food sources such as decomposing leaves, epilithon, and fine particulate detritus over feeding periods of weeks or more. Thus, common methods of sampling food sources consumed by animals in streams do not sufficiently reflect the pool of N they assimilate. Lastly, Isotope tracer studies, combined with modeling andmore » food separation techniques, can improve estimation of N pools in food sources that are assimilated by consumers.« less

  13. Stratospheric ozone isotope enrichment studied by submillimeter-wave heterodyne radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Y.; Urban, J.; Takahashi, K.; JEM/SMILES Science-Team,

    2002-05-01

    Since the discovery of the heavy isotope enrichment of ozone formation in the stratosphere in 1981, considerable progress has been made in understanding the processes that control the isotope enrichment by using mass spectrometry, spectrometric techniques, laboratory measurements, and so on. The detection limit of the mass spectrometers is enough to discuss these isotope enrichments, but symmetric and asymmetric ozone isotopes cannot be distinguished. It is important to observe symmetric and asymmetric ozone isotopes separately with enough accuracy to understand the mechanism of the ozone isotope enrichment for the ozone formation chemistry. Measurements of the ozone isotopes using a new technology of he superconducting submillimeter-wave limb emission spectrometer (SMILES) have been proposed. The instrument is planned to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) at the International Space Station. The SMILES instrument is planned to be launched in 2006. The SMILES instrument measures thermal emissions from ozone isotopes as well as ozone-depletion-related molecules such as ClO, HCl, HO2, HNO3 and BrO in the frequency bands at 624.32-626.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz. Overview of this experiment, such as new techniques for a high-sensitive sounding, measurement coverage, measurement frequency, is described. The scientific objective of the SMILES experiment, including a brief review on the controversial problem of stratospheric ozone isotope anomaly, is presented. The error analysis of the SMILES measurement is evaluated by using the SMILES simulator for all 5 isotopes of normal ozone, asymmetric-17-ozone, asymmetric-18-ozone, symmetric-17-ozone, symmetric-18-ozone. The evaluation suggests that the global distributions of symmetric-17-ozone, asymmetric-18-ozone, symmetric-17-ozone, as well as normal ozone can be obtained from the single profile, with the errors of less than about 1 % between 20 and 40 km with the partial column about 5 km.

  14. Using multi-scale stable isotopes analyses to study the microbial processes of soil organic matter stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, P.; Remusat, L.; Zeller, B.; Bode, S.; Brewer, E.; Boeckx, P. F.; Derrien, D.

    2012-12-01

    Soil microorganisms are increasingly recognized as important drivers for the stabilization of soil organic matter (OM) with soil assemblages, but the way they act remains not fully explored. Here, we used a multi-scale approach to investigate the attachment of microbial products with soil organo-mineral assemblages. A surface acidic Cambisol was amended with 13C15N labeled glycine and leaf fragments prior to sequential density separation of plant debris, aggregates and non-aggregates mineral grains with little OM attached. Labels were tracked using elemental analyzer coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS), liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to IRMS and nano-scale secondary ions MS (NanoSIMS). After 8h of glycine incubation, the comparison between γ-irradiated and non-sterile soils revealed that more than 90% and 85% of the stabilized glycine-derived 13C and 15N were found in microbial products, with a higher occurrence in aggregates than in plant debris and mineral grains. NanoSIMS images showed that these stabilized microbial products are principally not confined to the microbial cells, but evenly spread at the surface of the mineral-attached OM as extracellular products. After calibration, the comparison of their C/N ratios with the C/N ratios of the corresponding soil particles suggested that the microbial products are stabilized through physico-chemical interactions most likely mediated by the reactivity of the underlying minerals. Unlike NanoSIMS, LC-IRMS analyses allow the tracing of 13C tracers within microbial biomasses using amino sugars as biomarkers. After 3 months of incubation, freshly produced amino sugars deriving from the readily accessible glycine and finely ground leaf fragments clearly peaked in microbial aggregates and plant debris, respectively. Differences in distributions indicated that bacteria and fungi both grow where the resource is, but accumulate in microbial aggregates. These results suggested either a higher

  15. HPLC/ICP-MS in combination with "reverse" online isotope dilution in drug metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Meermann, Björn; Hulstaert, Anne; Laenen, Aline; Van Looveren, Cis; Vliegen, Maarten; Cuyckens, Filip; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2012-03-01

    During the development of a new drug compound, its metabolism needs to be unraveled. For quantification of the metabolites formed, the drug under investigation is traditionally synthesized with a radiolabel ((14)C or (3)H) and the metabolites present in different matrixes (blood, urine, feces) upon drug administration are determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to radiodetection. This approach allows for quantification of the metabolites formed and enables a straightforward distinction between exogenous (i.e., drug-related) and endogenous species (as only the radiolabeled species are detected). However, in some cases, the use of a radiolabeled compound in human in vivo studies is not advisible, e.g., for drug compounds or their metabolites showing a long plasma or tissue half-life. In cases where the candidate drug molecule contains an element detectable by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), HPLC/ICP-MS is a promising alternative approach. However, the method lacks specificity when a distinction between drug-related species and endogenous compounds containing the same target element needs to be accomplished. As a result, we have developed an HPLC/ICP-MS-based method combined with "reverse" online isotope dilution ("reverse" online ID) for metabolite quantification. The methodology was evaluated by the analysis of feces samples from rats dosed with a (81)Br-labeled drug compound. The method allows for both (i) valid quantification of the drug metabolites and (ii) distinction among endogenous, exogenous, and "mixed" species, based on their isotopic "fingerprint". A good repeatability (relative standard deviation of 4.2%) and limit of detection (0.35 mg of drug compound L(-1) of feces extract), of the same order of magnitude as those observed for "normal" online ID HPLC/ICP-MS and HPLC/radiodetection, were achieved.

  16. Methodologies for extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon for stable carbon isotope studies : evaluation and alternatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassan, Afifa Afifi

    1982-01-01

    The gas evolution and the strontium carbonate precipitation techniques to extract dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for stable carbon isotope analysis were investigated. Theoretical considerations, involving thermodynamic calculations and computer simulation pointed out several possible sources of error in delta carbon-13 measurements of the DIC and demonstrated the need for experimental evaluation of the magnitude of the error. An alternative analytical technique, equilibration with out-gassed vapor phase, is proposed. The experimental studies revealed that delta carbon-13 of the DIC extracted from a 0.01 molar NaHC03 solution by both techniques agreed within 0.1 per mil with the delta carbon-13 of the DIC extracted by the precipitation technique, and an increase of only 0.27 per mil in that extracted by the gas evolution technique. The efficiency of extraction of DIC decreased with sulfate concentration in the precipitation technique but was independent of sulfate concentration in the gas evolution technique. Both the precipitation and gas evolution technique were found to be satisfactory for extraction of DIC from different kinds of natural water for stable carbon isotope analysis, provided appropriate precautions are observed in handling the samples. For example, it was found that diffusion of atmospheric carbon dioxide does alter the delta carbon-13 of the samples contained in polyethylene bottles; filtration and drying in the air change the delta carbon-13 of the samples contained in polyethylene bottles; filtration and drying in the air change the delta carbon-13 of the precipitation technique; hot manganese dioxide purification changes the delta carbon-13 of carbon dioxide. (USGS)

  17. Collective vibrational effects in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins studied by isotopic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Johansson, C.; Christensen, D. H.; Hvidt, S.; Flink, J.; Høime Hansen, S.; Poulsen, F.

    2000-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the fast dynamics of simple liquid amides and proteins. Raman spectra in the visible region of liquid amides are obtained with a triple additive scanning monochromator, whereas FT-Raman technique is used in the near-IR region in order to avoid fluorescence from impurities in the proteins. Raman spectra are shown in the amide-I region of HCONHCH 3 ( N-methylformamide with all isotopes in their natural abundance), H 13CONHCH 3, HC 18ONHCH 3, human growth hormone, frog tropomyosin and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 including C-13 and N-15 enriched samples of the latter. Resonance energy transfer (RET) between amide molecules gives rise to a non-coincidence effect of the anisotropic and the isotropic components of the amide-I band. This effect influences the band position in mixtures of liquid amide isotopomers. A further spectral feature caused by collective vibrational modes in the hydrogen bonded liquid amides is named coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). The result of this effect is that only one band is found in mixtures of isotopomers where bands at different frequencies are observed for each of the isotopomers. A similar effect may account for the observation of protein amide-I bands with frequencies dependent only on the secondary structure of the protein and not on the amino acid residues. RET and CBMI are due to a collectivity of vibrational modes in different amide molecules. This collectivity may be related to a cooperativity of hydrogen bonds. A low-frequency band around 100 cm -1 is observed in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins. Isotopic substitution shows that the mode corresponding to this band involves displacements of atoms in hydrogen bonds. This mode may drive a breaking of the hydrogen bond.

  18. High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction Study on H-D Isotope Effects in Brucite

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Juske; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; dos Santos, Antonio M.; Tulk, Christopher A; Polyakov, Dr. Veniamin B

    2010-01-01

    A neutron powder diffraction study of hydrogenated and deuterated brucite was conducted at ambient temperature and at pressures to 9 GPa, using a Paris-Edinburgh high-pressure cell at the WAND instrument of ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor. The two materials were synthesized by the same method and companion measurements of neutron diffraction were conducted under the same conditions. Our refinement results show that the lattice-parameters of the a axis, parallel to the sheets of Mg-O octahedra, decreases only slightly with pressure with no effect of H-D substitution. However, the c axis of Mg(OD)2 is shorter and decreases more rapidly than that of Mg(OH)2 with increasing pressure. Consequently, the unit-cell volume of deuterated brucite is slightly, but systematically smaller than that of normal brucite, which were fitted to third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation: K0=41.46 0.52 and 39.04 0.30 GPa for Mg(OH)2 and Mg(OD)2, respectively with a fixed K0 value of 10. Our results suggest that H-D substitution of brucite and other hydrous minerals with H-bonding likely influences their structural and dynamic properties under pressure, including the position of hydrogen atoms. The measured effect of H-D substitution on the unit-cell volume also demonstrates that brucite (and other hydrous minerals) preferentially incorporate deuterium over hydrogen under pressure, suggesting that the distribution of hydrogen isotopes in deep-earth conditions may differ significantly from that in near-surface environments.

  19. Constraining dolomitization by Mg isotopes: A case study from partially dolomitized limestones of the middle Cambrian Xuzhuang Formation, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Shen, Bing; Lang, Xian-Guo; Huang, Kang-Jun; Chen, Ji-Tao; Yan, Zhen; Tang, Wen-bo; Ke, Shan; Ma, Hao-Ran; Li, Fang-Bing

    2016-03-01

    The "dolomite problem" refers to the rare dolomite formation in modern oceans that is in sharp contrast to the widespread ancient dolostone in rock record, as well as failure of laboratory inorganic dolomite precipitation at near Earth-surface temperature. Novel Mg isotope systematics provides a promising tool in resolving the "dolomite problem". Here, we develop a protocol to place constraints on the dolomitization process by using Mg isotopes. In this study, we measured Mg isotopic compositions (δ26Mg) of two batches of partially dolomitized limestone samples from the middle Cambrian Xuzhuang Formation in North China. δ26Mg varies between -0.55‰ and -3.18‰, and shows a negative linear correlation with 1>/[Mg>], suggesting that δ26Mg can be described by a binary mixing between the calcite and dolomite components. Mg isotopic composition of the dolomite component (δ26Mgdol) for the lower sample set that is collected from a 4 m stratigraphic interval containing three high-frequency ribbon rock-packstone cycles is -1.6‰, while δ26Mgdol for the upper sample set (from a thick sequence of ribbon rock) is significantly higher (-0.3‰). However, neither mineralogical and elemental compositions, carbon and oxygen isotopes, nor crystal morphologies of dolomite provides diagnostic criteria to differentiate these two batches of samples. δ26Mgdol of the Xuzhuang limestone is simulated by the Advective Flow (AF) and the Diffusion-Advection-Reaction (DAR) models. The AF model assumes that Mg is transported by advective fluid flows, while the DAR model simulates a contemporaneous seawater dolomitization process, in which Mg is delivered by diffusion. The AF modeling result indicates that δ26Mg of the dolomitization fluid is +0.4‰ and +1.7‰ for the lower and upper sample sets, respectively. These values are significantly higher than modern and Cenozoic seawater Mg isotopic composition, suggesting that the dolomitization fluid is not contemporaneous seawater. The

  20. Image Retrieval: Theoretical Analysis and Empirical User Studies on Accessing Information in Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    Discusses indexing and retrieval for effective searches of digitized images. Reports on an empirical study about criteria for analysis and indexing digitized images, and the different types of user queries done in newspaper image archives in Denmark. Concludes that it is necessary that the indexing represent both a factual and an expressional…

  1. Study on simulation of low light level images and photon images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Yu, Xin; Chen, Yi-nan

    2008-03-01

    This paper concentrates on images formation simulation under low light level condition (10 -6images and system entire noise and simulate a deblurred image intensified by photon imaging system recently constructed under low light level condition. The influence of scene luminance and photon imaging system optical errors on the simulation is introduced. Then the system entire noise is appended to low light level images by a novel noise analysis and generation method based on experimental study method. The second part of this paper deals with simulation of photon images. Because of randomicity of photon images, roulette wheel selection is utilized to confirm the grey level of stochastic signal photon image and noise photon image is generated by poissson stochastic process pixel by pixel. The final photon image is acquired by synthesizing the two images. The simulation presented in this paper provides an economical and convenient method to investigate the detection ability of photon imaging system and image reconstruction algorithm under low light level condition and photon limited condition.

  2. Ultrasonic flow imaging system: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S.H.; Lawrence, W.P.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

    1991-09-01

    This report examines the feasibility and potential problems in developing a real-time ultrasonic flow imaging instrument for on-line monitoring of mixed-phased flows such as coal slurries. State-of-the-art ultrasonic imaging techniques are assessed for this application. Reflection and diffraction tomographies are proposed for further development, including image-reconstruction algorithms and parallel processing systems. A conventional ultrasonic C-scan technique is used to demonstrate the feasibility of imaging the particle motion in a solid/water flow. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Gen-2 Hand-Held Optical Imager towards Cancer Imaging: Reflectance and Transillumination Phantom Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jean; Roman, Manuela; Hall, Michael; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2012-01-01

    Hand-held near-infrared (NIR) optical imagers are developed by various researchers towards non-invasive clinical breast imaging. Unlike these existing imagers that can perform only reflectance imaging, a generation-2 (Gen-2) hand-held optical imager has been recently developed to perform both reflectance and transillumination imaging. The unique forked design of the hand-held probe head(s) allows for reflectance imaging (as in ultrasound) and transillumination or compressed imaging (as in X-ray mammography). Phantom studies were performed to demonstrate two-dimensional (2D) target detection via reflectance and transillumination imaging at various target depths (1–5 cm deep) and using simultaneous multiple point illumination approach. It was observed that 0.45 cc targets were detected up to 5 cm deep during transillumination, but limited to 2.5 cm deep during reflectance imaging. Additionally, implementing appropriate data post-processing techniques along with a polynomial fitting approach, to plot 2D surface contours of the detected signal, yields distinct target detectability and localization. The ability of the gen-2 imager to perform both reflectance and transillumination imaging allows its direct comparison to ultrasound and X-ray mammography results, respectively, in future clinical breast imaging studies. PMID:22438743

  4. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (Gamma 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAS) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SO...

  5. PRODUCTION AND TRANSPORT OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN A CONTAMINATED VADOSE ZONE: A STABLE AND RADIOACTIVE CARBON ISOTOPE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of soil gas compositions and stable and radioactive carbon isotopes in the vadose zone above an alluvial aquifer were conducted at an organic solvent disposal site in southeast Phoenix, AZ. The study investigated the source and movement of carbon dioxide above a plume of...

  6. Cu isotopic signature in blood serum of liver transplant patients: a follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Lauwens, Sara; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is life-threatening and liver transplantation (LTx) is the definitive treatment with good outcomes. Given the essential role of hepatocytes in Cu homeostasis, the potential of the serum Cu isotopic composition for monitoring a patient’s condition post-LTx was evaluated. For this purpose, high-precision Cu isotopic analysis of blood serum of ESLD patients pre- and post-LTx was accomplished via multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The Cu isotopic composition of the ESLD patients was fractionated in favour of the lighter isotope (by about −0.50‰). Post-LTx, a generalized normalization of the Cu isotopic composition was observed for the patients with normal liver function, while it remained light when this condition was not reached. A strong decrease in the δ65Cu value a longer term post-LTx seems to indicate the recurrence of liver failure or cancer. The observed trend in favour of the heavier Cu isotopic composition post-LTx seems to be related with the restored biosynthetic capacity of the liver, the restored hepatic metabolism and/or the restored biliary secretion pathways. Thus, Cu isotopic analysis could be a valuable tool for the follow-up of liver transplant patients and for establishing the potential recurrence of liver failure. PMID:27468898

  7. Cu isotopic signature in blood serum of liver transplant patients: a follow-up study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauwens, Sara; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; van Vlierberghe, Hans; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-07-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is life-threatening and liver transplantation (LTx) is the definitive treatment with good outcomes. Given the essential role of hepatocytes in Cu homeostasis, the potential of the serum Cu isotopic composition for monitoring a patient’s condition post-LTx was evaluated. For this purpose, high-precision Cu isotopic analysis of blood serum of ESLD patients pre- and post-LTx was accomplished via multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The Cu isotopic composition of the ESLD patients was fractionated in favour of the lighter isotope (by about ‑0.50‰). Post-LTx, a generalized normalization of the Cu isotopic composition was observed for the patients with normal liver function, while it remained light when this condition was not reached. A strong decrease in the δ65Cu value a longer term post-LTx seems to indicate the recurrence of liver failure or cancer. The observed trend in favour of the heavier Cu isotopic composition post-LTx seems to be related with the restored biosynthetic capacity of the liver, the restored hepatic metabolism and/or the restored biliary secretion pathways. Thus, Cu isotopic analysis could be a valuable tool for the follow-up of liver transplant patients and for establishing the potential recurrence of liver failure.

  8. An experimental study on isotope fractionation in a mesoporous silica-water system with implications for vadose-zone hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying; Horita, Juske

    2016-07-01

    Soil water dynamics within a thick vadose (unsaturated) zone is a key component in the hydrologic cycle in arid regions. In isotopic studies of soil water, the isotopic composition of adsorbed/pore-condensed water within soils has been assumed to be identical to that of bulk liquid water. To test this critical assumption, we have conducted laboratory experiments on equilibrium isotope fractionation between adsorbed/condensed water in mesoporous silica (average pore diameter 15 nm) and the vapor at relative pressures p/po = 0.3-1.0 along the adsorption-desorption isotherm at 30 °C. The isotope fractionation factors between condensed water in the silica pores and the vapor, α(2H) and α(18O), are smaller than those between liquid and vapor of bulk water (1.074 and 1.0088, respectively, at 30 °C). The α(2H) and α(18O) values progressively decrease from 1.064 and 1.0083 at p/po = 1 to 1.024 and 1.0044 at p/po = 0.27 for hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, respectively, establishing trends very similar to the isotherm curves. Empirical formulas relating α(2H) and α(18O) to the proportions of filled pores (f) are developed. Our experimental results challenge the long-held assumption that the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors for the soil water-vapor are identical to those of liquid water-vapor system with potential implications for arid-zone and global water cycles, including paleoclimate proxies in arid regions.

  9. Application Of Stable Isotope Analysis To Study Temporal Changes In Foraging Ecology In A Highly Endangered Amphibian

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, J. Hayley

    2013-01-01

    study illustrates the feasibility of stable isotope analysis in identifying preferred prey species that can be used to guide conservation management of both wild and captive food sources for endangered species. PMID:23341920

  10. Isotope-Labeled Amyloids via Synthesis, Expression, and Chemical Ligation for Use in FTIR, 2D IR, and NMR Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqi O; Grechko, Maksim; Moran, Sean D; Zanni, Martin T

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides protocols for isotope-labeling the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) involved in type II diabetes and γD-crystallin involved in cataract formation. Because isotope labeling improves the structural resolution, these protocols are useful for experiments using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), two-dimensional infrared (2D IR), and NMR spectroscopies. Our research group specializes in using 2D IR spectroscopy and isotope labeling. 2D IR spectroscopy provides structural information by measuring solvation from 2D diagonal lineshapes and vibrational couplings from cross peaks. Infrared spectroscopy can be used to study kinetics, membrane proteins, and aggregated proteins. Isotope labeling provides greater certainty in the spectral assignment, which enables new structural insights that are difficult to obtain with other methods. For amylin, we provide a protocol for (13)C/(18)O labeling backbone carbonyls at one or more desired amino acids in order to obtain residue-specific structural resolution. We also provide a protocol for expressing and purifying amylin from E. coli, which enables uniform (13)C or (13)C/(15)N labeling. Uniform labeling is useful for measuring the monomer infrared spectrum in an amyloid oligomer or fiber as well as amyloid protein bound to another polypeptide or protein, such as a chaperone or an inhibitor. In addition, our expression protocol results in 2-2.5 mg of amylin peptide per 1 L cell culture, which is a high enough yield to straightforwardly obtain the 2-10 mg needed for high resolution and solid-state NMR experiments. Finally, we provide a protocol to isotope-label either of the two domains of γD-crystallin using expressed protein ligation. Domain labeling makes it possible to resolve the structures of the two halves of the protein in FTIR and 2D IR spectra. With modifications, these strategies and protocols for isotope labeling can be applied to other amyloid polypeptides and proteins.

  11. Study on strontium isotope abundance-ratio measurements by using a 13-MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ki; Jang, Han; Lee, Goung-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The Rb-Sr dating method is used in dating Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks. This method measures the 87Rb and the 87Sr concentrations by using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) [J. Hefne et al., Inter. J. Phys. Sci. 3(1), 28 (2008)]. In addition, it calculates the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio to increase the reliability of Rb-Sr dating. In this study, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was measured by using a 13-MeV proton accelerator. Proton kinetic energies are in the range of tens of megaelectronvolts, and protons have large absorption cross-sections for ( p, n) reactions with most substances. After absorbing a proton with such a high kinetic energy, an element is converted into a nuclide with its atomic number increased by one via nuclear transmutation. These nuclides usually have short half-lives and return to the original state through radioactive decay. When a strontium sample is irradiated with protons, nuclear transmutation occurs; thus, the strontium isotope present in the sample changes to a yttrium isotope, which is an activated radioisotope. Based on this, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was calculated by analyzing the gamma-rays emitted by each yttrium isotope. The KIRAMS-13 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Center of Chosun University, where 13-MeV protons can be extracted, was utilized in our experiment. The 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio was computed for samples irradiated with these protons, and the result was similar to the isotope ratio for the Standard Reference Material, i.e., 98.2 ± 3.4%. As part of the analysis, proton activation analyses were performed using 13-MeV protons, and the experimental results of this research suggest a possible approach for measuring the strontium-isotope abundance ratio of samples.

  12. Isotopic studies of Mg, Fe, Mo, Ru and W in Fremdlinge from Allende refractory inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheon, Ian D.; Armstrong, John T.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the first isotopic measurements, made with an ion microprobe, of Mg, Fe, Mo, Ru, and W in Fremdlinge and refractory metal nuggets from Allende meteorite. No non-mass-dependent deviations exceeding 1 percent from normal solar isotopic abundances were found for any of the elements analyzed, despite the unusual mineralogy of Fremdlinge and the extreme enrichment in refractory siderophile elements. It is concluded that the chemical, petrologic, and isotopic data on Fremdlinge are most plausibly interpreted in terms of the origin of Fremdlinge within the solar nebula.

  13. Cenozoic marine geochemistry of thallium deduced from isotopic studies of ferromanganese crusts and pelagic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehkamper, M.; Frank, M.; Hein, J.R.; Halliday, A.

    2004-01-01

    Cenozoic records of Tl isotope compositions recorded by ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts have been obtained. Such records are of interest because recent growth surfaces of Fe-Mn crusts display a nearly constant Tl isotope fractionation relative to seawater. The time-series data are complemented by results for bulk samples and leachates of various marine sediments. Oxic pelagic sediments and anoxic marine deposits can be distinguished by their Tl isotope compositions. Both pelagic clays and biogenic oozes are typically characterized by ??205Tl greater than +2.5, whereas anoxic sediments have ??205Tl of less than -1.5 (??205Tl is the deviation of the 205Tl/203Tl isotope ratio of a sample from NIST SRM 997 Tl in parts per 104). Leaching experiments indicate that the high ??205Tl values of oxic sediments probably reflect authigenic Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides. Time-resolved Tl isotope compositions were obtained from six Fe-Mn crusts from the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans and a number of observations indicate that these records were not biased by diagenetic alteration. Over the last 25 Myr, the data do not show isotopic variations that significantly exceed the range of Tl isotope compositions observed for surface layers of Fe-Mn crusts distributed globally (??205 Tl=+12.8??1.2). This indicates that variations in deep-ocean temperature were not recorded by Tl isotopes. The results most likely reflect a constant Tl isotope composition for seawater. The growth layers of three Fe-Mn crusts that are older than 25 Ma show a systematic increase of ??205Tl with decreasing age, from about +6 at 60-50 Ma to about +12 at 25 Ma. These trends are thought to be due to variations in the Tl isotope composition of seawater, which requires that the oceans of the early Cenozoic either had smaller output fluxes or received larger input fluxes of Tl with low ??205Tl. Larger inputs of isotopically light Tl may have been supplied by benthic fluxes from reducing sediments, rivers, and/or volcanic

  14. Microscopic study of low-lying yrast spectra in 100429108 Mo isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Neeru; Bharti, Arun; Khosa, S. K.

    2002-10-01

    Variation-after-projection (VAP) calculations in conjunction with Hartree-Bogoliubov (HB) ansatz have been carried out for A=100-108 molybdenum (Mo) isotopes. In this framework, the yrast spectra with J_{max}(pi) ≥ 10(+) , B(E2) transition probabilities, quadrupole (bt_2) and hexadecapole (bt_4) deformation parameters, moment of inertia (I) and square of cranking frequency (om(2)) for even-even Mo isotopes have been obtained. The results of the calculation give an indication that it is important to include the hexadecapole-hexadecapole component of the two-body interaction for obtaining various nuclear structure quantities in these Mo isotopes.

  15. A study on determination of potentially hazardous plutonium isotopes in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    2013-01-01

    Due to the lack of stable plutonium isotopes, and the high mobility as well as long half-life, plutonium is considered one of the most important radioelement in safety assessment of environmental radioactivity and nuclear waste management. A number of analytical methods have been developed over the past decades for determination of plutonium in environmental samples. The article discusses different analytical techniques and presents the results of plutonium isotopes determination by alpha spectrometry and accelerator mass spectrometry in environmental samples. The concentrations of plutonium isotopes in analyzed samples indicates its measurement is of great importance for environmental and safety assessment, especially in contaminated areas.

  16. Study of hydrogen isotopes super permeation through vanadium membrane on 'Prometheus' setup

    SciTech Connect

    Musyaev, R. K.; Yukhimchuk, A. A.; Lebedev, B. S.; Busnyuk, A. O.; Notkin, M. E.; Samartsev, A. A.; Livshits, A. I.

    2008-07-15

    To develop the membrane pumping technology by means of superpermeable membranes at RFNC-VNIIEF in the 'Prometheus' setup, the experiments on superpermeation of hydrogen isotopes through metal membranes were carried out. The experimental results on superpermeation of thermal atoms of hydrogen isotopes including tritium through a cylindrical vanadium membrane are presented. The possibility of effective pumping, compression and recuperation of hydrogen isotopes by means of superpermeable membrane was demonstrated. The evaluation of membrane pumping rates and asymmetry degree of pure vanadium membrane was given. The work was performed under the ISTC-2854 project. (authors)

  17. Lessons learned from 25+ years of piggybacking environmental isotope studies onto large-scale federal and state water quality monitoring programs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Young, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Isotopes are a potentially powerful component of monitoring and assessment programs aimed at quantifying and mitigating alterations to environments from human activities. Locations exhibiting unusually high rates of biogeochemical cycling or elevated pollution levels usually have distinctive isotopic compositions that are suggestive or diagnostic of the reactions and pollution sources. Isotopes can be more effective at identifying hot spots and hot moments than concentrations alone because isotopic ratios may change even when concentrations do not. Hence, isotopes facilitate the identification of hot spots and moments that otherwise would not be apparent, thereby providing a valuable addition to standard chemical and hydrological mass balance methods. In addition, isotopic techniques have proved useful for tracing sources and sinks of various pollutants in large river basins, wetlands, and airsheds. Many of these studies have been conducted at the regional to national scale by building on existing large-scale water, air, and ecological monitoring programs managed by federal and state agencies, and demonstrate the usefulness of isotopes as a complement to standard chemical and hydrological mass balance methods. This presentation presents an overview of how a multi-isotope approach can be used to interpret spatial patterns and temporal changes in pollution sources, biogeochemical processes, and ecosystem function in large watersheds, at the regional to national scale. Examples from several of our recent and ongoing studies in the San Joaquin, Sacramento, and Mississippi Rivers are presented. From the insights developed using (1) a multi-isotope approach (emphasizing nitrate, seston, and water isotopes) used in conjunction with detailed hydrologic and chemical data collected from both mainstem and tributary sites as part of annual or multi-year studies; (2) varied sampling strategies including fixed site, synoptic, Lagrangian, and diel approaches; (3) different types

  18. Isotopic discrimination between food and blood and feathers of captive penguins: implications for dietary studies in the wild.

    PubMed

    Cherel, Yves; Hobson, Keith A; Hassani, Sami

    2005-01-01

    Using measurements of naturally occurring stable isotopes to reconstruct diets or source of feeding requires quantifying isotopic discrimination factors or the relationships between isotope ratios in food and in consumer tissues. Diet-tissue discrimination factors of carbon ((13)C/(12)C, or delta (13)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N, or delta (15)N) isotopes in whole blood and feathers, representing noninvasive sampling techniques, were examined using three species of captive penguins (king Aptenodytes patagonicus, gentoo Pygoscelis papua, and rockhopper Eudyptes chrysocome penguins) fed known diets. King and rockhopper penguins raised on a constant diet of herring and capelin, respectively, had tissues enriched in (15)N compared to fish, with discrimination factors being higher in feathers than in blood. These data, together with previous works, allowed us to calculate average discrimination factors for (15)N between whole lipid-free prey and blood and feathers of piscivorous birds; they amount to +2.7 per thousand and +4.2 per thousand, respectively. Both fish species were segregated by their delta (13)C and delta (15)N values, and importantly, lipid-free fish muscle tissue was consistently depleted in (13)C and enriched in (15)N compared to whole lipid-free fish. This finding has important implications because previous studies usually base dietary reconstructions on muscle of prey rather than on whole prey items consumed by the predator. We tested the effect of these differences using mass balance calculations to the quantification of food sources of gentoo penguins that had a mixed diet. Modeling indicated correct estimates when using the isotopic signature of whole fish (muscle) and the discrimination factors between whole fish (muscle) and penguin blood. Conversely, the use of isotopic signatures of muscle together with discrimination factors between whole fish and blood (or the reverse) leads to spurious estimates in food proportions. Consequently, great care

  19. Multi-isotope labelling (13C, 18O, 2H) for studying organic matter cycling within plant-soil systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, M. S.; Abiven, S.; Schmidt, M. W. I.; Siegwolf, R. T. W.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon cycling has become of major interest for the understanding and mitigation of global climatic change. Terrestrial ecosystems have a large carbon sequestration potential, but many processes and fluxes of organic matter (OM) cycling within the plant-soil system are not yet well understood [1]. The dynamics of OM cycling within the plant soil-system are determined by environmental parameters, as well as chemical quality of OM input. A well-known technique to study OM dynamics is to label OM inputs with stable isotopes (e.g 13C). Changes in OM quality in the plant and in the soil can be assessed by compound specific isotopic analysis [2]. These techniques give a precise insight of the OM composition, but are laborious and expensive. Here we suggest a new multi-isotope labelling technique using stable 13C in combination with stable 18O and 2H isotopes, which provides information on OM quality by simple bulk material analysis. The method is based on the creation of an isotopic van Krevelen diagram, which is used to describe different compound groups by plotting the atomic ratios of O/C vs. H/C [3]. We could show that new assimilates can be labelled with 13C, 18O and 2H by adding the stable isotopes (continuously) in the gaseous phase (CO2 and water vapour) to the plants atmosphere. The label has been traced within the bulk material of different compartments of the plant-soil system (e.g. leaves, stems, roots, bulk soil). Our first results showed that after 2, 8 and 14 days of labelling the 18O/13C(new) ratio was notably different in leaf, stem and root tissue (0.0024, 0.0011 and 0.0007, respectively), suggesting a change in OM quality towards more C-rich compounds. d2H analysis will follow and an isotopic van Krevelen diagram will be produced (18O/13C(new) vs. 2H/13C(new)) to describe the changes in OM quality. The new multi-isotope labelling approach represent a powerful tool to address open questions in plant and soil research such as the allocation of organic

  20. Flickr's Potential as an Academic Image Resource: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Emma; Stuart, David; Thelwall, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Many web 2.0 sites are extremely popular and contain vast amounts of content, but how much of this content is useful in academia? This exploratory paper investigates the potential use of the popular web 2.0 image site Flickr as an academic image resource. The study identified images tagged with any one of 12 subject names derived from recognized…

  1. Application of isotope dilution mass spectrometry: determination of ochratoxin A in the Canadian Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Tam, J; Pantazopoulos, P; Scott, P M; Moisey, J; Dabeka, R W; Richard, I D K

    2011-06-01

    Analytical methods are generally developed and optimized for specific commodities. Total Diet Studies, representing typical food products 'as consumed', pose an analytical challenge since every food product is different. In order to address this technical challenge, a selective and sensitive analytical method was developed suitable for the quantitation of ochratoxin A (OTA) in Canadian Total Diet Study composites. The method uses an acidified solvent extraction, an immunoaffinity column (IAC) for clean-up, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for identification and quantification, and a uniformly stable isotope-labelled OTA (U-[(13)C(20)]-OTA) as an internal recovery standard. Results are corrected for this standard. The method is accurate (101% average recovery) and precise (5.5% relative standard deviation (RSD)) based on 17 duplicate analysis of various food products over 2 years. A total of 140 diet composites were analysed for OTA as part of the Canadian Total Diet Study. Samples were collected at retail level from two Canadian cities, Quebec City and Calgary, in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The results indicate that 73% (102/140) of the samples had detectable levels of OTA, with some of the highest levels of OTA contamination found in the Canadian bread supply.

  2. Application of isotope dilution mass spectrometry: determination of ochratoxin A in the Canadian Total Diet Study

    PubMed Central

    Tam, J.; Pantazopoulos, P.; Scott, P.M.; Moisey, J.; Dabeka, R.W.; Richard, I.D.K.

    2011-01-01

    Analytical methods are generally developed and optimized for specific commodities. Total Diet Studies, representing typical food products ‘as consumed’, pose an analytical challenge since every food product is different. In order to address this technical challenge, a selective and sensitive analytical method was developed suitable for the quantitation of ochratoxin A (OTA) in Canadian Total Diet Study composites. The method uses an acidified solvent extraction, an immunoaffinity column (IAC) for clean-up, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for identification and quantification, and a uniformly stable isotope-labelled OTA (U-[13C20]-OTA) as an internal recovery standard. Results are corrected for this standard. The method is accurate (101% average recovery) and precise (5.5% relative standard deviation (RSD)) based on 17 duplicate analysis of various food products over 2 years. A total of 140 diet composites were analysed for OTA as part of the Canadian Total Diet Study. Samples were collected at retail level from two Canadian cities, Quebec City and Calgary, in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The results indicate that 73% (102/140) of the samples had detectable levels of OTA, with some of the highest levels of OTA contamination found in the Canadian bread supply. PMID:21623499

  3. Lead (Pb) isotopic fingerprinting and its applications in lead pollution studies in China: a review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Yuanan

    2010-05-01

    As the most widely scattered toxic metal in the world, the sources of lead (Pb) observed in contamination investigation are often difficult to identify. This review presents an overview of the principles, analysis, and applications of Pb isotopic fingerprinting in tracing the origins and transport pathways of Pb in the environment. It also summarizes the history and current status of lead pollution in China, and illustrates the power of Pb isotopic fingerprinting with examples of its recent applications in investigating the effectiveness of leaded gasoline phase-out on atmospheric lead pollution, and the sources of Pb found in various environmental media (plants, sediments, and aquatic organisms) in China. The limitations of Pb isotopic fingerprinting technique are discussed and a perspective on its development is also presented. Further methodological developments and more widespread instrument availability are expected to make isotopic fingerprinting one of the key tools in lead pollution investigation.

  4. Spectroscopy of actinium-215 and (p,t) studies of the stable palladium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Ryan

    2009-12-01

    The study of both the microscopic and macroscopic structural evolution of the atomic nucleus is presented in this work. The excited states of the N = 126 isotone 215Ac were investigated at WNSL using the gas-filled recoil separator SASSYER. Recoil-decay tagging of the gamma rays corresponding to the decay of 215Ac after production via a fusion-evaporation reaction was made possible by using the redesigned SASSYER focal plane apparatus, including the addition of a pair of DSSDs and the multi-wire avalanche counter MACY. A number of transitions feeding the 29/2+ isomeric state corresponding to the ( ph49/2 )⊗(pii13/2) configuration were observed and tentatively assigned as decays from the high-spin 35/2 +, 39/2+, and 41/2+ states. Additionally, the decay from the low-lying 13/2+ state, corresponding to a pii13/2 quasiparticle excitation, was observed at 859 keV. This excitation energy is consistent with the systematics of the lighter N = 126 isotones suggesting a decrease in the energy gap between the pih9/2 and pi i13/2 orbitals. High-resolution (p,t) spectroscopy of the stable, even-even Palladium isotopes was performed in the search for signatures of quantum phase transitional behavior. A total of 54 previously unidentified 0+, 2 +, and 4+ states below an excitation energy of 3.5 MeV were discovered in this experiment. No enhancement of the 0+ level density, a signature of first-order phase transitions in nuclei, was observed in the studied isotopes. A theoretical description of the population strengths of excited 0+ states in two-nucleon transfer reactions was investigated within the framework of the IBM. These studies reveal that an enhanced population strength is not exclusive to regions of shape-coexistence but rather is a measure of the magnitude of the "change of structure" from the initial to residual nucleus.

  5. Production of isotopically-labeled standards from a uniformly labeled precursor for quantitative volatile metabolomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cortés, Pilar; Brenna, J. Thomas; Sacks, Gavin L.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal accuracy and precision in small molecule profiling by mass spectrometry generally requires isotopically labeled standards chemically representative of all compounds of interest. However, preparation of mixed standards from commercially available pure compounds is often prohibitively expensive and time consuming, and many labeled compounds are not available in pure form. We used a single prototype uniformly labeled [U-13C]-compound to generate [U-13C]-volatile standards for use in subsequent experimental profiling studies. [U-13C]-α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3, ALA) was thermally oxidized to produce labeled lipid degradation volatiles which were subsequently characterized qualitatively and quantitatively. Twenty-five [U-13C]-labeled volatiles were identified by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-TOF-MS) by comparison of spectra with unlabeled volatiles. Using 250 μL starting sample, labeled volatiles were quantified by a reverse isotope dilution procedure. Using the [U-13C]-labeled standards, limits of detection comparable to or better than previous HS-SPME reports were achieved, 0.010–1.04 ng/g. The performance of the [U-13C]-volatile standards was evaluated using a commodity soybean oil (CSO) oxidized at 60°C from 0 to 15 d. Relative responses of n-decane, an unlabeled internal standard otherwise absent from the mixture, and [U-13C]-oxidation products changed by up to 8-fold as the CSO matrix was oxidized, demonstrating that reliance on a single standard in volatile profiling studies yields inaccurate results due to changing matrix effects. The [U-13C]-standard mixture was used to quantify 25 volatiles in oxidized CSO and low-ALA soybean oil with an average relative standard deviation of 8.5%. Extension of this approach to other labeled substrates, e.g., [U-13C]-sugars and amino acids, for profiling studies should be feasible and can dramatically improve quantitative results compared to

  6. A Br Isotopic Study of Australian Arid Playa Lakes and halophyte vegetation as a monitor of Br transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    Bromine possesses a chemistry broadly comparable to that of Cl and F, however its heavier mass and lower abundance results in slightly different behaviours in geochemical cycling. For example it is disproportionately enriched in sea water with respect to Cl. Br can be considered to be a "hydrophile" element, and hence its behaviour is in governed by that of water. It possesses two isotopes 79Br (50.686%) and 81Br (49.314%). This study has developed new chemical extraction, and most significantly, new mass spectrometric protocols for Br isotopes on silicates, evaporites and waters using N-TIMS methodologies. Existing CF-IRMS methodologies offer internal precision of ~0.3‰ (1SD, [1]), whereas N-TIMS measurements of laboratory HBr and seawater standards produce external reproducibility of <0.07‰ (1SD) over an 18 month period with internal precision typically <0.06‰ (1SD) on single analyses. This study presents the first high precision, N-TIMS isotopic data on playa lake evaporites, recording a >5‰ variation in solar system 81Br/79Br. Also presented is data from the analysis of the halophylic saltbush (sp Atriplex) adjacent to the lakes to constrain biological fractionation of Br isotopes. Variations of ~4‰ are observed between the lakes with a comparable shift for the leaves of the saltbush. [1] Shouaker-Stash et al., Anal. Chem, 77; p4027-4033, 2005.

  7. Stable Isotopes of Carbon Monoxide in an Urban Environment: A Study at Indianapolis, IN as part of the INFLUX Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimont, I.; Petrenko, V. V.; Turnbull, J. C.; Place, P.; White, J. W. C.; Karion, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a new system capable of measuring stable isotopes of carbon monoxide (CO) in small atmospheric samples. Measurements at 3 tall tower sites in Indianapolis, IN, USA have been ongoing since July 2013 as part of the INdianapolis FLUX (INFLUX) project. These three towers consist of an upwind, or background site, a site in the urban center, and a site on the downwind edge of the city. The tower collections are discrete, one hour integrated samples taken using NOAA's Portable Flask Package system. These sites have been measured for CO mole fraction, 13CO, and C18O approximately 6 times per month. We present a time series of data from these three sites, as well as a source analysis of the CO produced during the winter months (the winter data allow the use of several simplifying assumptions). We have identified mobile (vehicular) fossil fuel emissions as the only clearly significant wintertime source of CO, and quantified the stable isotopic signature of that source. We also present data from a traffic study done in March of 2015. A vehicle-based collection system was used for this study, and both continuous CO mole fraction and discrete CO mole fraction, 13CO, and C18O measurements were made. The results for CO stable isotopes are consistent with the vehicular emission CO isotopic signatures inferred from the tower samples.

  8. Lead isotope studies of the Guerrero composite terrane, west-central Mexico: implications for ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potra, Adriana; Macfarlane, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    New thermal ionization mass spectrometry and multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry Pb isotope analyses of three Cenozoic ores from the La Verde porphyry copper deposit located in the Zihuatanejo-Huetamo subterrane of the Guerrero composite terrane are presented and the metal sources are evaluated. Lead isotope ratios of 3 Cenozoic ores from the El Malacate and La Esmeralda porphyry copper deposits located in the Zihuatanejo-Huetamo subterrane and of 14 ores from the Zimapan and La Negra skarn deposits from the adjoining Sierra Madre terrane are also presented to look for systematic differences in the lead isotope trends and ore metal sources among the proposed exotic tectonostratigraphic terranes of southern Mexico. Comparison among the isotopic signatures of ores from the Sierra Madre terrane and distinct subterranes of the Guerrero terrane supports the idea that there is no direct correlation between the distinct suspect terranes of Mexico and the isotopic signatures of the associated Cenozoic ores. Rather, these Pb isotope patterns are interpreted to reflect increasing crustal contribution to mantle-derived magmas as the arc advanced eastward onto a progressively thicker continental crust. The lead isotope trend observed in Cenozoic ores is not recognized in the ores from Mesozoic volcanogenic massive sulfide and sedimentary exhalative deposits. The Mesozoic ores formed prior to the amalgamation of the Guerrero composite terrane to the continental margin, which took place during the Late Cretaceous, in intraoceanic island arc and intracontinental marginal basin settings, while the Tertiary deposits formed after this event in a continental arc setting. Lead isotope ratios of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic ores appear to reflect these differences in tectonic setting of ore formation. Most Pb isotope values of ores from the La Verde deposit (206Pb/204Pb = 18.674-18.719) are less radiogenic than those of the host igneous rocks, but plot within the

  9. Stabile Chlorine Isotope Study of Martian Shergottites and Nakhlites; Whole Rock and Acid Leachates and Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    We have established a precise analytical technique for stable chlorine isotope measurements of tiny planetary materials by TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) [1], for which the results are basically consistent with the IRMS tech-nique (gas source mass spectrometry) [2,3,4]. We present here results for Martian shergottites and nakhlites; whole rocks, HNO3-leachates and residues, and discuss the chlorine isotope evolution of planetary Mars.

  10. {alpha} decay studies of very neutron-deficient francium and radium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Uusitalo, J.; Leino, M.; Enqvist, T.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Keenan, A.; Kettunen, H.; Koivisto, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Scholey, C.; Eskola, K.

    2005-02-01

    Very neutron-deficient francium and radium isotopes have been produced in fusion evaporation reactions using {sup 63}Cu and {sup 65}Cu ions on {sup 141}Pr targets and {sup 36}Ar ions on {sup 170}Yb targets. The gas-filled recoil separator RITU was employed to collect the fusion products and to separate them from the scattered beam. The activities were implanted into a position-sensitive silicon detector after passing through a gas-counter system. The isotopes were identified using spatial and time correlations between the implants and decays. Two new {alpha} decaying radium isotopes, {sup 201}Ra and {sup 202}Ra, were identified. The {alpha} decay energy and half-life of {sup 203}Ra were measured with improved precision. The {alpha} decay properties measured for the francium isotopes {sup 201}Fr,{sup 202}Fr,{sup 203}Fr, and {sup 204}Fr were confirmed, in many cases with improved precision. For the first time, a ({pi}s{sub 1/2}{sup -1})1/2{sup +} proton intruder state was identified in francium isotopes, namely in {sup 201}Fr and tentatively in {sup 203}Fr. The measured decay properties for the neutron-deficient odd-mass Fr isotopes suggest an onset of substantial deformation at N=112.

  11. Provenancing of unidentified corpses by stable isotope techniques - presentation of case studies.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Christine; Rossmann, Andreas; Graw, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope methods can be used to determine the provenance of unidentified corpses. Body tissue materials such as teeth, bone, hair and nail taken from mortal remains provide information of different time periods of an individuals' life from childhood to death. Tissues of newborns contain provenance information of different time periods during pregnancy of the child's mother. The results of stable isotope analyses of body residues of two adults and a newborn found in Germany between 2010 and 2012 are presented. To determine the geographic origin and movements of unknown individuals, stable isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and sulphur were analysed in hair and bone collagen samples. Amino acid composition and, as a consequence, δ2H, δ13C, δ15N, and δ34S values in human keratin and bone collagen are different. Consequently correction factors were determined to compare isotopic data of bone collagen with those of an extensive worldwide reference hair collection. The isotopic signatures in hair and in bone collagen samples were compared to geographical groups of reference hair samples by canonical discriminant analysis. The results served as the basis for providing provenance constraints for the unidentified persons as requested by the police and prosecution. Ultimately the individuals were identified; hence the isotopic provenance interpretations can be critically evaluated and are shown to be successful.

  12. Isotope Fractionation of chlorine in Aqueous System: One Study on Anion-Exchange Chromatography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musashi, M.; Oi, T.; Eggenkamp, H.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2001-05-01

    Stable chlorine isotopes such as 37Cl and 35Cl have been paid attention as useful tool identifying the source, and monitoring the transport process and natural fate of chlorinated organic pollutants in air and groundwater. However, it is not established yet whether any isotope effects accompany biodegradation or reductive dehalogenation of the pollutants (Clark and Fritz, 1997). Here we first present an experimental determination of isotope fractionation factor of chlorine in aqueous system by using anion-exchange chromatographic technique. Into the Cl-free anion exchange resin (Muromac, OH- form) packed in a 30 cm long pyrex glass column and controlled temperature at 25 oC, hydrochloric solution was fed with controlling the flow rate constant. Effluent from the column was recovered by an automatic fraction collector and prepared for Cl isotope analysis. The Cl isotope ratio (δ 37Cl vs. SMOC) was measured by IR-MS at the Utrecht University with precision of 0.06 per-mil. Magnitude of the factor obtained was 1.00035 at 25 oC. The result indicates that the lighter isotope (35Cl) was preferably fractionated into the resin phase, while the heavier one (37Cl) was enriched into the aqueous phase. This trend suggests that molecular structure of hydrolysis with Cl in aqueous phase may be more stable than that of Cl ionically bonding with the resin. This result may offer physico-chemical insights into behavior and fate of the pollutants.

  13. Isotopic hysteresis in detrital cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rate studies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenbring, J.; Gasparini, N. M.; Crosby, B. T.; Brocard, G. Y.; Belmont, P.

    2013-12-01

    In equilibrium landscapes, the concentration of beryllium-10 (10Be) from fluvially transported material is expected to quantitatively reflect basin-wide denudation rates. No isotopic time-dependent path is considered because the concentrations reflect an integrated measurement over a sufficiently long period of time to be static. However, the responses of landscapes to changing conditions are often addressed with cosmogenic nuclides in transient landscapes to identify and quantify the primary topographic and climatic controls on erosion. With the advent of techniques that allow event-scale measurement of cosmogenic nuclide concentrations over the course of a flood wave, in the case of meteoric 10Be, or over the course of an uplift wave, in the case of in situ-produced 10Be, we can now evaluate the how the isotope changes and what the 'mean' denudation rate from a single time means. Meteoric 10Be concentrations can be extracted from, and measured in, milligram-sized sediment samples. This attribute enables us to measure suspended sediment through a hydrograph. Here, we give a case study in an agricultural setting. The meteoric 10Be concentration in river sediment changes with the source areas of the fine sediment and fluxes of material supplied to the stream. The average concentration from the couplet of the rising and falling limbs of the hydrograph can differ from the concentration of the sediment that is preserved in depo-centers. Using traditional in situ-produced 10Be, the timescale of the perturbation must be sufficiently long to change the isotopic composition of the bedload, but also for the landscape to respond to the forcing factor. Here, we give an example from a transient landscape where a wave of uplift moves through the basin and a wave of incision follows in its wake. In this setting, 10Be from detrital quartz is derived from both the incising, adjusting lowland and the unadjusted, relict upland, and the integrated 10Be concentrations still provide a

  14. Isotopic studies of rare gases in terrestrial samples and natural nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This project is concerned with research in rare gas mass spectrometry. Using a two-pronged attack, we study fluids using a system (RARGA) designed for fluid analysis in bulk which is sometimes deployed in the field and a laser microprobe mass spectrometer for fluid inclusion studies. In 1991 the RARGA project continued monitoring helium isotope variations associated with renewed seismic activity in Long Valley Caldera and expanded our geothermal data base to include Lassen National Park. An important objective, continuing in 1992, is to understand better the reasons for somewhat elevated {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios in regions where there is no contemporary volcanism which could produce the effect by addition of mantle helium. To this end, 1991 saw continued efforts to understand variations in composition between fluids and associated reservoir rocks and extended the data base to include fluids from the Gulf of Mexico. Our DOE work in calibrating a sensitive laser microprobe mass spectrometer for noble gases in fluid inclusions continues with successful returns particularly in calibrating neutron irradiated samples for tracing halogen ratios. In connection with observations of neutron-produced noble gas nuclides in granites, we have begun comparing measurements with calculations for both thermal and epithermal neutrons. We submitted a third paper on noble gases in diamonds, concentrating on observed effects of {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, and fission xenon implantation from nuclear processes in adjacent material in the matrix rock. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Isotopic studies of rare gases in terrestrial samples and natural nucleosynthesis. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This project is concerned with research in rare gas mass spectrometry. Using a two-pronged attack, we study fluids using a system (RARGA) designed for fluid analysis in bulk which is sometimes deployed in the field and a laser microprobe mass spectrometer for fluid inclusion studies. In 1991 the RARGA project continued monitoring helium isotope variations associated with renewed seismic activity in Long Valley Caldera and expanded our geothermal data base to include Lassen National Park. An important objective, continuing in 1992, is to understand better the reasons for somewhat elevated {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios in regions where there is no contemporary volcanism which could produce the effect by addition of mantle helium. To this end, 1991 saw continued efforts to understand variations in composition between fluids and associated reservoir rocks and extended the data base to include fluids from the Gulf of Mexico. Our DOE work in calibrating a sensitive laser microprobe mass spectrometer for noble gases in fluid inclusions continues with successful returns particularly in calibrating neutron irradiated samples for tracing halogen ratios. In connection with observations of neutron-produced noble gas nuclides in granites, we have begun comparing measurements with calculations for both thermal and epithermal neutrons. We submitted a third paper on noble gases in diamonds, concentrating on observed effects of {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, and fission xenon implantation from nuclear processes in adjacent material in the matrix rock. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Stable isotopic studies of H,C,N,O and S in samples of Martian origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1988-01-01

    The present day geochemical cycles of volatile elements through the various reservoirs on Earth are largely understood within the context of the planet's standing as a geologically and biologically evolved body. In terrestrial studies stable isotope measurements of light elements (H, C, N, O and S) can be utilized to obtain insight into the conditions prevailing during formation of rocks of various types. Perhaps the most important problem which could be addressed by light element studies of the sorts of specimen likely to be available from remote automatic sampling, would be the role of volatiles during evolution. Of fundamental importance here is the question of whether Mars was volatile rich or volatile poor. The only way to fully comprehend the effects of volatile cycling through the mantle crust and regolith atmosphere polar cap system of Mars, is by analyses of appropriate returned samples. In order to interpret the record of geological activity in Martian samples it will be necessary to understand how the past, or present, surface environment may have acted to disturb the primary characteristics of the rocks.

  17. Tricycanomethanide ion: an infrared, Raman, and tunneling spectroscopy study including isotopic substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Hipps, K.W.; Aplin, A.T.

    1985-12-05

    The tricyanomethanide ion (TCM), C(CN)/sub 3//sup -/, and its isotopomers, C(CN)/sub 2/(/sup 13/CN)/sup -/ and C(CN)/sub 2/(C/sup 15/N)/sup -/, were studied experimentally by Raman, IR, and tunneling spectroscopy in the frequency range from about 80 to 4000 cm/sup -1/. The primary focus of the present paper is on the ion and its K salt, but Co and Mn complex data are also reported. An 11-parameter empirical force field provided a 2-cm/sup -1/ standard deviation fit to all the normal modes of the ion. While many of the assignments agree with those of previous studies (done without isotopic substitution), there are a few differences. In particular, the inactive a/sub 2/'mode is definitively assigned through the use of tunneling spectroscopy. Ab initio calculations were performed at the 4-31G SCF level to determine the geometry and 11 of the quadratic force constants of the ion. The calculated geometry is in good agreement with that of the KTCM salt, but the calculated force constants are about 25% too large. 36 references, 6 figures, 5 tables.

  18. Terahertz pulsed imaging study of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagoz, Burcu; Altan, Hakan; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç

    2015-07-01

    Current diagnostic techniques in dentistry rely predominantly on X-rays to monitor dental caries. Terahertz Pulsed Imaging (TPI) has great potential for medical applications since it is a nondestructive imaging method. It does not cause any ionization hazard on biological samples due to low energy of THz radiation. Even though it is strongly absorbed by water which exhibits very unique chemical and physical properties that contribute to strong interaction with THz radiation, teeth can still be investigated in three dimensions. Recent investigations suggest that this method can be used in the early identification of dental diseases and imperfections in the tooth structure without the hazards of using techniques which rely on x-rays. We constructed a continuous wave (CW) and time-domain reflection mode raster scan THz imaging system that enables us to investigate various teeth samples in two or three dimensions. The samples comprised of either slices of individual tooth samples or rows of teeth embedded in wax, and the imaging was done by scanning the sample across the focus of the THz beam. 2D images were generated by acquiring the intensity of the THz radiation at each pixel, while 3D images were generated by collecting the amplitude of the reflected signal at each pixel. After analyzing the measurements in both the spatial and frequency domains, the results suggest that the THz pulse is sensitive to variations in the structure of the samples that suggest that this method can be useful in detecting the presence of caries.

  19. Stable nitrogen isotope studies of the pelagic food web on the Atlantic shelf of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, Antonio; Alvarez-Ossorio, M. Teresa; Cunha, M. Emilia; Garrido, Susana; Peleteiro, J. Benito; Porteiro, Carmela; Valdés, Luis; Varela, Manuel

    2007-08-01

    The structure and variability of pelagic food webs along the north and northwestern shelf of the Iberian Peninsula were analysed using natural abundance of nitrogen stable isotopes of plankton and pelagic consumers. Plankton composition was mainly studied in size-fractionated samples, but also the isotopic signatures of three copepod species, as representative of primary consumers, were considered. Several fish species were included as planktivorous consumers, with special attention to sardine ( Sardina pilchardus). Finally, top pelagic consumers were represented by the common dolphin ( Delphinus delphis). The relationship between trophic position and body size implies large variability in the ratio of predator to prey sizes, likely because widespread omnivory and plankton consumption by relatively large predators. Planktivorous species share a common trophic position, suggesting potential competition for food, and low nitrogen isotope enrichment between prey and consumers suggest nutrient limitation and recycling at the base of the food web. Both experimental and field evidences indicate that the muscle of sardine integrates fish diet over seasonal periods and reflects the composition of plankton from large shelf areas. The low mobility of sardines during periods of low population size is consistent with differential isotopic signatures found in shelf zones characterised by upwelling nutrient inputs.

  20. Neodymium and strontium isotopic study of Australasian tektites - New constraints on the provenance and age of target materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Koeberl, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of Australasian tectites (including two flanged Australian tectites, two low-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites, and three high-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites) and the Nd, Sm, Sr, and Rb concentrations were investigated by isotope-dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry, and the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotope systematics were used to study the characteristics of the parental material. It is shown that the Nd and Sr isotopic data provide evidence that all Australasian tektites were derived from a single sedimentary formation with a narrow range of stratigraphic ages close to 170 Ma. It is suggested that all of the Australasian tektites were derived from a single impact event and that the australites represent the upper part of a melt sheet ejected at high velocity, whereas the indochinites represent melts formed at a lower level in the target material distributed closer to the area of the impact.

  1. An intercomparison study of isotopic ozone profiles from the ACE-FTS, JEM-SMILES, and Odin-SMR instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A.; Walker, K. A.; Suzuki, M.; Kasai, Y.; Shiotani, M.; Urban, J.; Bernath, P. F.; Manney, G. L.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of various atmospheric isotopologue species are a valuable source of information, as they can improve our current understanding of the atmosphere. For example, isotopic signatures in atmospheric profiles can be used to investigate atmospheric dynamical processes, while differences in the isotopic composition of atmospheric trace gases can be traced to effects due to their sources and sinks. This study focuses on the intercomparison of three satellite missions that provide measurements of isotopic species. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) aboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT (launched in August 2003) was designed to investigate the composition of the upper troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere. ACE-FTS utilizes solar occultation to measure temperature, pressure, and vertical profiles of over thirty chemical species, including isotopologue profiles for; O3, H2O, CH4, N2O, CO, CO2 and NO. Global coverage for each species is obtained approximately over one year and with a vertical resolution of typically 3-4 km. ACE-FTS O3 isotopologue volume mixing ratio profiles are firstly compared to data measured by the Superconducting Sub-Millimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES), onboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS), and the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR) aboard the Swedish Odin satellite. Secondly, we intercompare the isotopic fractionation profiles for each ozone isotopologue product measured by the three instruments to further ascertain a level of confidence in the measurements.

  2. Mercury Isotope Study of Sources and Exposure Pathways of Methylmercury in Estuarine Food Webs in the Northeastern U.S.

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We measured mercury (Hg) isotope ratios in sediments and various estuarine organisms (green crab, blue mussel, killifish, eider) to investigate methylmercury (MMHg) sources and exposure pathways in five Northeast coast (U.S.) estuaries. The mass independent Hg isotopic compositions (MIF; Δ199Hg) of the sediments were linearly correlated with the sediment 1/Hg concentrations (Δ199Hg: r2 = 0.77, p < 0.05), but the mass dependent isotope compositions (MDF; δ202Hg) were not (r2 = 0.26, p = 0.16), reflecting inputs of anthropogenic Hg sources with varying δ202Hg. The estuarine organisms all display positive Δ199Hg values (0.21 to 0.98 ‰) indicating that MMHg is photodegraded to varying degrees (5–12%) prior to entry into the food web. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg values of most organisms can be explained by a mixture of MMHg and inorganic Hg from sediments. At one contaminated site mussels have anomalously high δ202Hg, indicating exposure to a second pool of MMHg, compared to sediment, crabs and fish. Eiders have similar Δ199Hg as killifish but much higher δ202Hg, suggesting that there is an internal fractionation of δ202Hg in birds. Our study shows that Hg isotopes can be used to identify multiple anthropogenic inorganic Hg and MMHg sources and determine the degree of photodegradation of MMHg in estuarine food webs. PMID:25116221

  3. A stable isotope study of the Garda lake, northern Italy: Its hydrological balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longinelli, A.; Stenni, B.; Genoni, L.; Flora, O.; Defrancesco, C.; Pellegrini, G.

    2008-10-01

    SummaryDiscontinuous measurements of the isotopic composition of surface water samples of the Garda lake carried out between 1998 and 2006 showed almost constant δ18O, δD and d-excess values through time. During 2006 and 2007 monthly vertical profiles of water samples were collected in the northernmost section of the lake, not far from the main inflow (Sarca river) to check whether there was any detectable influence from this inflowing river and whether there was a vertical isotopic stratification of the lake water. The isotopic measurement of water samples from the vertical profiles yielded isotopic values which were almost equal to those obtained from surface waters showing no detectable effect of the inflowing river water and no isotopic vertical stratification. The attempt to evaluate the evaporation rate of lake water by means of current models was totally unsuccessful. Despite the marked summer warming of the surface layer no isotopic fractionation related to evaporation processes could be detected. This anomalous behaviour may be related to the large amount of spring and summer precipitation characteristic of this area. The water balance of the lake calculated according to the amount of the inflowing water (Sarca river water plus rain water on the lake plus 20% of the precipitations on the whole catchment basin) and to the amount of outflowing water (Mincio river) showed a large imbalance, the river outflow alone resulting on average, during the last decade, at least double the inflow. To explain this imbalance of the lake, a large recharge by concealed groundwater is suggested: its isotopic composition should be quite close to the mean isotopic composition of precipitations over that area. This would be in agreement with the almost constant isotopic composition of both surface and deep waters and with the lack of vertical isotopic stratification. A few measurements of the tritium concentration carried out on lake water show values that are considerably

  4. A lead isotopic study of the Stillwater Complex, Montana: constraints on crustal contamination and source regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wooden, J.L.; Czamanske, G.K.; Zientek, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses of the Pb isotopic compositions of plagioclase from 23 samples covering the stratigraphic thickness of the Stillwater Complex indicate a narrow range of apparent initial isotopic compositions (206Pb/ 204Pb=13.95; 207Pb/204Pb=14.95-15.01; 208Pb/204Pb=33.6). The uniformity of our data is in contrast to, but not necessarily contradictory to, other recent investigations which give indications that the complex formed by repeated injection of magmas with at least two distinct compositions that were presumably derived from different source regions. Samples from the Basal series of the complex have consistently higher 207Pb/204Pb ratios, suggesting either minor contamination from adjacent country rocks or a slight distinction between parental magmas. Apparent initial Pb isotopic compositions of the complex are very radiogenic compared to Late Archean model-mantle values, but are nearly identical to initial Pb isotopic compositions found for the the adjacent, slightly older (2.73-2.79 Ga), Late Archean crustal suite in the Beartooth Mountains. Contamination of magmas parental to the Stillwater Complex by the Late Archean crustal suite is rejected for two reasons: (1) Th and U concentrations in Stillwater rocks and plagioclase are very low (about 0.08 and 0.02 ppm respectively), yet Th/U ratios are uniform at about 4, in contrast to the highly variable (2-26) but often high Th/U ratios found for the Late Archean crustal complex; (2) it seems improbable that any contamination process would have adjusted the isotopic compositions of the diverse magmas entering the Stillwater chamber to near-identical values. The preferred hypothesis to explain the Pb isotopic data for the Stillwater Complex and the associated Late Archean crustal suite involves a major Late Archean crust-forming event that resulted in a compositionally complex crust/mantle system with relatively homogeneous and unusual Pb isotopic compositions. The parental magmas of the Stillwater Complex were

  5. Isotopically engineered semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, E. E.

    1995-04-01

    Scientific interest, technological promise, and increased availability of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This review of mostly recent activities begins with an introduction to some past classical experiments which have been performed on isotopically controlled semiconductors. A review of the natural isotopic composition of the relevant elements follows. Some materials aspects resulting in part from the high costs of enriched isotopes are discussed next. Raman spectroscopy studies with a number of isotopically pure and deliberately mixed Ge bulk crystals show that the Brillouin-zone-center optical phonons are not localized. Their lifetime is almost independent of isotopic disorder, leading to homogeneous Raman line broadening. Studies with short period isotope superlattices consisting of alternating layers of n atomic planes of 70Ge and 74Ge reveal a host of zone-center phonons due to Brillouin-zone folding. At n≳40 one observes two phonon lines at frequencies corresponding to the bulk values of the two isotopes. In natural diamond, isotope scattering of the low-energy phonons, which are responsible for the thermal conductivity, is very strongly affected by small isotope disorder. Isotopically pure 12C diamond crystals exhibit thermal conductivities as high as 410 W cm-1 K-1 at 104 K, leading to projected values of over 2000 W cm-1 K-1 near 80 K. The changes in phonon properties with isotopic composition also weakly affect the electronic band structures and the lattice constants. The latter isotope dependence is most relevant for future standards of length based on crystal lattice constants. Capture of thermal neutrons by isotope nuclei followed by nuclear decay produces new elements, resulting in a very large number of possibilities for isotope selective doping of semiconductors. This neutron transmutation of isotope nuclei, already used

  6. Tree STEM Reconstruction Using Vertical Fisheye Images: a Preliminary Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berveglieri, A.; Tommaselli, A. M. G.

    2016-06-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to assess a tree stem reconstruction technique with panoramic images taken with fisheye lenses. The concept is similar to the Structure from Motion (SfM) technique, but the acquisition and data preparation rely on fisheye cameras to generate a vertical image sequence with height variations of the camera station. Each vertical image is rectified to four vertical planes, producing horizontal lateral views. The stems in the lateral view are rectified to the same scale in the image sequence to facilitate image matching. Using bundle adjustment, the stems are reconstructed, enabling later measurement and extraction of several attributes. The 3D reconstruction was performed with the proposed technique and compared with SfM. The preliminary results showed that the stems were correctly reconstructed by using the lateral virtual images generated from the vertical fisheye images and with the advantage of using fewer images and taken from one single station.

  7. A Stable Isotope Study of Fluid-Rock Interactions in the Saddlebag Lake Roof Pendant, Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lojasiewicz, I.; Hartman, S. M.; Holk, G. J.; Paterson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Saddlebag Lake Pendant (SLP) is a ~ 100 km2 zone of Ordovician-Cretaceous metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks just east of the 95-85 Ma Tuolumne Intrusive Complex (TIC) in the Sierra Nevada of central California. Western SLP and adjacent parts of TIC are affected by the Steelhead Lake Shear Zone (SLSZ), with leucogranitic dikes, abundant qz-tm veins, ductile epidote-chlorite alteration, and massive qz veins. While TIC shows uniform stable isotope values, isotope studies of other Sierra Nevada pendants evidence diversity of fluid sources: Jurassic seawater, Cretaceous magmatic fluids, metamorphic fluids, and meteoric-hydrothermal fluids. We conducted a stable isotope study of 49 samples from units across the SLSZ, focusing on the shear zone. Unlike other pendants, both δ18 O and δD values from SLSZ showed great variability, and most samples were not in isotopic equilibrium. Overall, δ18 O mineral values ranged from -1.5‰(plag) to +15.8‰(bt); mineral δD values ranged from -140‰(tm) to -67‰(bt). TIC δ18 O was +7.8 to +10.0 (plag) and +4.8 to +9.2 (tm), normal magmatic values, and δD were -105 to -75. Paleozoic and Triassic metasedimentary units had most qz δ18 O from +11.3 to +15.8, so within metamorphic range, and δD from -100 to -72 (ep and tm). Jurassic metasedimentary units (Sawmill) and Triassic metavolcanics (Koip) had largest isotopic variability: δ18 O qz from +8.1 to +14.8, plag from -1.1 to +11.8, but ep and tm between +1.3 and +9.3 and δD between -108 and -81. All lower (submagmatic) isotopic values were from a wider, possibly transtensional, part of the SLSZ, transected by Sawmill Canyon. Although TIC and many of the Paleozoic units do not show isotopic evidence for alteration, the Koip and Sawmill units were likely infiltrated by later magmatic waters, and then subjected to very localized meteoric water infiltration in the area surrounding Sawmill Canyon.

  8. Food web dynamics in the Scotia Sea in summer: A stable isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowasser, G.; Atkinson, A.; McGill, R. A. R.; Phillips, R. A.; Collins, M. A.; Pond, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The pelagic food web of the Scotia Sea was studied by analysing natural abundances of nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes of primary producers and pelagic consumers, sampled from the seasonal ice edge in the south to the Antarctic Polar Front in the north. The analysis covered, within a single mid-summer period, particulate organic matter (POM) and 38 taxa, ranging from suspension feeding copepods and salps to omnivorous euphausiids, pelagic fish and higher, land-based predators including fur seals, penguins and flying birds. Spatial variation in δ 15N of POM correlated well with nutrient availability and primary productivity. Latitudinal differences in δ 13C of POM were closely linked to variations in temperature, nutrients and productivity depending on the frontal region sampled. This translated to equivalent (although smaller) regional δ 13C differences among higher trophic levels. The trophic positions of species based on isotope values broadly agreed with previously published dietary data with three important exceptions. First, the carnivorous amphipod Themisto gaudichaudii had anomalously low δ 15N values. Second, Euphausia superba had δ 15N values that were also surprisingly low, considering the abundant literature suggesting its omnivory. Third, the copepod Rhincalanus gigas, considered a suspension feeder, had unexpectedly high δ 15N values rather more in keeping with omnivorous feeding. The consumer δ 15N values ranged from 1.2‰ (min.) measured in Salpa thompsoni (designated here as trophic level (TL) 2 across all regions) to 15.2‰ (max.) measured in white-chinned petrels ( Procellaria aequinoctialis, calculated as TL5 relative to the TL2 of salps). Excluding seabirds, the resulting food chain length of 3.7 TL (above POM at TL1) was lower than in most other Southern Ocean and temperate marine pelagic ecosystems. The majority (60%) of vertebrate predators occupied only 1-1.5 trophic levels above the herbivorous suspension feeders such as krill

  9. Helium isotope studies in the Mojave Desert, California: Implications for groundwater chronology and regional seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, J.T.; Hilton, David R.; Izbicki, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    We report helium isotope and concentration results for groundwaters from the western Mojave River Basin (MRB), 130 km east of Los Angeles, CA. The basin lies adjacent to the NW-SE trending San Andreas Fault (SAF) system. Samples were collected along two groundwater flowpaths that originate in the San Gabriel Mountains and discharge to the Mojave River located ???32 km to the northeast. Additional groundwater samples were collected from Mojave River Deposits underlying the Mojave River. The primary objective of this study is to identify and quantify crustal and mantle helium contributions to the regional groundwater system. A total of 27 groundwaters, sampled previously for chemistry and isotope systematics (including 14C activity) have measured helium concentrations that increase along flowpaths from 9.9??10-8 to 1.0??10-4 cm3 STP g-1 H2O. Concomitantly, 3He/4He ratios decrease from 0.84RA to 0.11RA (RA equals the 3He/4He ratio in air=1.4??10-6). We did not record 3He/4He ratios equivalent to crustal-production values (???0.02RA) in any sample. Dissolved helium concentrations were resolved into components associated with solubility equilibration, air entrainment, mantle-derivation, in-situ production within the aquifer, and extraneous crustal fluxes. All samples contained the first four components, but only older samples had the superimposed effects of helium derived from a crustal flux. The radiogenic He component has chronological significance, and good concordance between 4He and 14C ages for younger groundwaters (<25,000 year) demonstrates the integrity of the 4 He-chronometer in this setting. Helium-rich waters could also be dated with the 4He technique, but only by first isolating the whole crustal flux (3-10??10-6 cm3 STP cm-2 year-1). Mantle-derived 3He (3Hem) is present in all MRB samples irrespective of distance from the SAF. However, regional-aquifer groundwaters near the terminus of the flowpath have a significantly greater content of mantle-derived 3He

  10. Isotopic analysis and multi tracer tests to study groundwater circulation in a landslide in Southern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pera, Sebastian; Marzocchi, Roberto; Bronzini, Simona

    2014-05-01

    Understanding groundwater circulation in landslides is often necessary to assess their dynamics and forecast movements. Fontana landslide is placed in Canton Ticino, its main body is constituted by gneiss, that is covered by moraine and other deposits related to the mass movements like debris flows and, rock fall. Gneiss that originally has low hydraulic conductivity increases their aquifer properties due to weathering and fracture presence. In fact several springs are present in across the landslide some of them having discharge up to 1 m3 S-1. To study groundwater circulation in the landslide body, a multi tracer test was designed and water samples taken. 3 tracers (Naphtionate, Sulphorhodamine B and Uranine) were injected underground. Injection mass was calculated by using EHTD (EPA, 2003), 2 field fluorimeters were placed in springs considered to be the main water discharge of the system for continuous monitoring. Other springs with smaller discharge scattered along the landslide body were monitored by using charcoal bags. Water samples also were taken for chemical and stable isotopes analysis. The tracers' presence was also monitored in the river crossing the area collecting surface flow from snowmelt and springs. Even if the landslide has a small area, isotopic composition of water from springs shows clear differences. All samples plot close to the local meteoric water line, and an altitude effect is visible. Chemical composition is relatively uniform however some differences can also be seen. Concerning tracers the only that arrived at monitored points was uranine, and it was detected in the charcoal bags. Considering tracer concentration in ppm, in the charcoal and travel times to restitution points was possible to have conceptual model for groundwater flow across the landslide. Circulation is rapid and recharge controlled by snowmelt in spring and precipitation in late spring to autumn. Snow accumulates at the top of the landslide where an elongated

  11. Real-time kidney ultrasound image segmentation: a prospective study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, S.; Frenoux, E.; Osorio, A.

    2009-02-01

    Segmentation of ultrasound kidney images represents a challenge due to low quality data. Speckle, shadows, signal dropout and low contrast make segmentation a harsh task. In addition, kidney ultrasound imaging presents a great variability concerning the organ's shape on the image. This characteristic makes learning methods hard to use. The aim of this study is to develop a real time kidney ultrasound image segmentation method usable during surgical operations such as punctures. To deal with real time constraints, we decided to focus on region based methods and particularly split and merge algorithm. In this prospective study, the selection of the interesting area in the initial image is made by the physician, drawing a coarse bounding box around the organ. A pre-processing phase is first performed to correct image's artefacts. This phase is composed of three major steps. First, an image specification is made between the image to segment and a reference one. Then, a Haar wavelet filtering method is applied on the resulting image and finally an anisotropic diffusion filter is applied to smooth the result. Then, a split and merge algorithm is applied on the resulting image. Both split and merge criteria are based on regions statistics. Our method has been successfully applied on a set of 22 clinical images coming from 10 different patients and presenting different points of view regarding kidney's shape. We obtained very good results, for an average computational time of 8.5 seconds per image.

  12. Phonon coherence in isotopic silicon superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Frieling, R.; Radek, M.; Eon, S.; Bracht, H.; Wolf, D. E.

    2014-09-29

    Recent experimental and theoretical investigations have confirmed that a reduction in thermal conductivity of silicon is achieved by isotopic silicon superlattices. In the present study, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed to identify the isotope doping and isotope layer ordering with minimum thermal conductivity. Furthermore, the impact of isotopic intermixing at the superlattice interfaces on phonon transport is investigated. Our results reveal that the coherence of phonons in isotopic Si superlattices is prevented if interfacial mixing of isotopes is considered.

  13. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope systematics of Lake Baikal, Siberia: Implications for paleoclimate studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, R.R.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1998-01-01

    We interpret oxygen and hydrogen isotope data for water samples from Lake Baikal, Siberia, its tributaries and other local rivers, and local precipitation in terms of the known water budget for the modem lake in order to gain insight into past limnological and climatic processes that influenced the lake. Lake Baikal is remarkably uniform in its isotopic composition (??18O = -15.8 ?? 0.2???; ??D = -123 ?? 2???) and lies slightly to the right of the global meteoric water line, which suggests significant evaporation. Water is supplied to the lake by over 300 rivers and streams. The oxygen isotope values (??18O) of the rivers in the Baikal catchment range from -13.4 to -21.2???. The hydrogen isotope values (??D) for the same area range from -103 to -156???. Both these ranges generally conform to the global meteoric water line. The weighted average isotopic composition of input to the lake (rivers plus precipitation) is -15.2??? for ??18O and -116??? for ??D, values higher than those of the modem lake. Therefore, the isotopic composition of the modem lake cannot be related to the modem input through simple evaporation. Instead, modeling of the isotopic mass balance of the lake suggests that inputs (precipitation and influx from rivers) and outputs (evaporation and outflow) are not at a steady-state equilibrium under current climate conditions. We found previous input to the lake had lower ??18O and ??D values than modem input, which reflects cooler climates in the past compared with modern conditions. Under constant climate conditions, steady-state conditions are not expected to be reached by the lake for at least 700 yr because of its large size and the long residence time of water in the lake.

  14. Segmented images and 3D images for studying the anatomical structures in MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Sook; Chung, Min Suk; Cho, Jae Hyun

    2004-05-01

    For identifying the pathological findings in MRIs, the anatomical structures in MRIs should be identified in advance. For studying the anatomical structures in MRIs, an education al tool that includes the horizontal, coronal, sagittal MRIs of entire body, corresponding segmented images, 3D images, and browsing software is necessary. Such an educational tool, however, is hard to obtain. Therefore, in this research, such an educational tool which helps medical students and doctors study the anatomical structures in MRIs was made as follows. A healthy, young Korean male adult with standard body shape was selected. Six hundred thirteen horizontal MRIs of the entire body were scanned and inputted to the personal computer. Sixty anatomical structures in the horizontal MRIs were segmented to make horizontal segmented images. Coronal, sagittal MRIs and coronal, sagittal segmented images were made. 3D images of anatomical structures in the segmented images were reconstructed by surface rendering method. Browsing software of the MRIs, segmented images, and 3D images was composed. This educational tool that includes horizontal, coronal, sagittal MRIs of entire body, corresponding segmented images, 3D images, and browsing software is expected to help medical students and doctors study anatomical structures in MRIs.

  15. Effect of parent body evolution on equilibrium and kinetic isotope fractionation: a combined Ni and Fe isotope study of iron and stony-iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernonozhkin, Stepan M.; Goderis, Steven; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; Claeys, Philippe; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Various iron and stony-iron meteorites have been characterized for their Ni and Fe isotopic compositions using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) after sample digestion and chromatographic separation of the target elements in an attempt to further constrain the planetary differentiation processes that shifted these isotope ratios and to shed light on the formational history and evolution of selected achondrite parent body asteroids. Emphasis was placed on spatially resolved isotopic analysis of iron meteorites, known to be inhomogeneous at the μm to mm scale, and on the isotopic characterization of adjacent metal and silicate phases in main group pallasites (PMG), mesosiderites, and the IIE and IAB complex silicate-bearing iron meteorites. In a 3-isotope plot of 60/58Ni versus62/58Ni, the slope of the best-fitting straight line through the laterally resolved Ni isotope ratio data for iron meteorites reveals kinetically controlled isotope fractionation (βexper = 1.981 ± 0.039, 1 SD), predominantly resulting from sub-solidus diffusion (with the fractionation exponent β connecting the isotope fractionation factors, as α62/58 =α60/58β). The observed relation between δ56/54Fe and Ir concentration in the metal fractions of PMGs and in IIIAB iron meteorites indicates a dependence of the bulk Fe isotopic composition on the fractional crystallization of an asteroidal metal core. No such fractional crystallization trends were found for the corresponding Ni isotope ratios or for other iron meteorite groups, such as the IIABs. In the case of the IIE and IAB silicate-bearing iron meteorites, the Fe and Ni isotopic signatures potentially reflect the influence of impact processes, as the degree of diffusion-controlled Ni isotope fractionation is closer to that of Fe compared to what is observed for magmatic iron meteorite types. Between the metal and olivine counterparts of pallasites, the Fe and Ni isotopic compositions show clearly

  16. A lead isotope distribution study in swine tissue using ICP-MS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, T.W.; Wiedmeyer, Ray H.; Brown, L.D.; Casteel, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    In the United States lead is an ubiquitous environmental pollutant that is a serious human health hazard, especially for women of childbearing age, developing fetuses, and young children. Information concerning the uptake and distribution of lead to maternal and fetal tissues during pregnancy is poorly documented. A study was designed using domestic swine and lead isotope enrichment methodology to focus on maternal absorption and distribution of lead into bone and soft tissues, including the fetal compartment, under varying conditions of oral lead exposure and during altered physiological states (pregnant vs unbred). Total lead levels and Pb207/Pb206 ratios in bone (femur and vertebra), blood, and soft tissues (liver, kidney, brain) were determined by ICP-MS. Lead in fetal tissues derived from maternal bone could be differentiated from that derived from exogenous dosing. Unbred swine absorbed much less lead than pregnant females receiving the same dose. The accuracy and precision of ICP-MS at the instrumental level and for the entire method (sample collection, digestion, and analysis) were evaluated for both Pb207/Pb206 ratios and total lead. Several changes were suggested in method design to improve both instrumental and total method precision.

  17. Geology and stable isotope studies of the Carlin gold deposit, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Radtke, A.S.; Rye, R.O.; Dickson, F.W.

    1980-08-01

    This paper presents the results of studies on the geology, fluid inclusions, and stable isotope geochemistry of the Carlin deposit, the largest disseminated replacement gold deposit in carbonate rocks discovered to date in the western United States. The deposit is in secs. 13 and 14, T. 35 N., R. 50 E., in the Tuscarora Mountains in northern Eureka County, Nevada. Since 1965, the Carlin mine has produced over 4 million troy ounces of gold. The Carlin deposit is the principal example of a group of deposits that have many geologic, mineralogic, and geochemical features in common. These deposits are characteristically fine-grained replacements of silty carbonate rocks by silica and minor pyrite, and they contain gold and an associated group of heavy elements, including mercury, arsenic, antimony, and thallium, dispersed in ore and at lower concentrations in altered rocks. The deposits are of middle or late Tertiary age and everywhere are shallow seated. Every deposit is spatialy related to strong normal faults, some of which are occupied by preore dikes; some of the normal faults served as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Apparently the deposits formed by a hydrothermal system that circulated in response to thermal anomalies associated with Tertiary igneous and tectonic activity, possibly without any deeper seated contribution from the igneous rocks. The striking similarities among Carlin-type deposits in the western United States strongly suggest that some general set of processes has operated repeatedly in various places.

  18. Sulfur isotope studies of the Stillwater Complex and associated rocks, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zientek, M.L.; Ripley, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    The stillwater Complex in south-central Montana is a late Archean layered, ultramafic to mafic intrusion emplaced into middle to late Archean metagraywacke, metashale, and iron-formation. Sulfide minerals are concentrated near the base of the intrusion in some chromitite layers, podiform pegmatoids, discontinuous discordant pods or pipes, and numerous thin, stratiform layers. This investigation focuses on the isotopic composition of sulfur in metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. Stillwater-associated sills and dikes, sulfide accumulations near the base of the complex, and platinum-group element-enriched sulfide mineralization that constitutes the J-M reef and the Picket Pin deposit. The ??34S values for 233 samples analyzed in this study have a mean of 0.4 per mil, a standard deviation of 1.7, and a maximum and minimum of -3.8 and 7.8 per mil, respectively. Despite the very narrow range of values, analysis of variance calculations confirms that the data comprise three statistically distinct groups. -from Authors

  19. In-gas-cell laser ionization studies of plutonium isotopes at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjalainen, I.; Moore, I. D.; Kron, T.; Raeder, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Tomita, H.; Trautmann, N.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    In-gas-cell resonance laser ionization has been performed on long-lived isotopes of Pu at the IGISOL facility, Jyväskylä. This initiates a new programme of research towards high-resolution optical spectroscopy of heavy actinide elements which can be produced in sufficient quantities at research reactors and transported to facilities elsewhere. In this work a new gas cell has been constructed for fast extraction of laser-ionized elements. Samples of 238-240,242Pu and 244Pu have been evaporated from Ta filaments, laser ionized, mass separated and delivered to the collinear laser spectroscopy station. Here we report on the performance of the gas cell through studies of the mass spectra obtained in helium and argon, before and after the radiofrequency quadrupole cooler-buncher. This provides valuable insight into the gas phase chemistry exhibited by Pu, which has been additionally supported by measurements of ion time profiles. The resulting monoatomic yields are sufficient for collinear laser spectroscopy. A gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis of the Pu samples shows a good agreement with the assay provided by the Mainz Nuclear Chemistry department.

  20. Measurement of alpha-induced reaction cross sections on erbium isotopes for γ process studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Török, Zs.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gyürky, Gy.; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Rauscher, T.

    2014-05-02

    The cross sections of the {sup 162}Er(α,γ){sup 166}Yb and {sup 162,164,166}Er(α,n){sup 165,167,169}Yb reactions have been measured at MTA Atomki. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured between E{sub c.m.} = 11.21 MeV and E{sub c.m.} = 16.09 MeV just above the astrophysically relevant energy region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at T{sub 9} = 3 GK). The {sup 162}Er(α,n){sup 165}Yb, {sup 164}Er(α,n){sup 167}Yb and {sup 166}Er(α,n){sup 169}Yb reactions were studied between E{sub c.m.} = 12.19 and 16.09 MeV, E{sub c.m.} = 13.17 and 16.59 MeV and E{sub c.m.} = 12.68 and 17.08 MeV, respectively. The aim of this work is to provide experimental data for modeling the γ process which is thought to be responsible for the production of the proton-rich isotopes heavier than iron.

  1. Further study of α-decay in heavy isotopic chains considering the isospin effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-06-01

    We have enhanced the deformed density-dependent cluster model to improve the quantitative description of α-decay in heavy even-even nuclei with 84≤slant Z≤slant 92. To preliminarily introduce the isospin effect into α-decay, the neutron excess term is added in the establishment of the crucial α-core potential. The proton and neutron density distributions are respectively considered in different parameterized formulas by combining them with available experimental data of both the charge radius and the neutron skin thickness. The calculated α-decay half-lives are found to be in somewhat better agreement with the experimental data as compared with our previous results. Strikingly, it is noted that the relatively large deviation between theory and experiment, along the tail of the isotopic chain, is obviously reduced and smoother. This may indicate the necessity of considering the isospin effect in α-decay, especially for extremely neutron-rich nuclei, which appears to be essential for the extended study of heaviest nuclei as well.

  2. Formic acid dehydrogenation with bioinspired iridium complexes: a kinetic isotope effect study and mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Hui; Xu, Shaoan; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2014-07-01

    Highly efficient hydrogen generation from dehydrogenation of formic acid is achieved by using bioinspired iridium complexes that have hydroxyl groups at the ortho positions of the bipyridine or bipyrimidine ligand (i.e., OH in the second coordination sphere of the metal center). In particular, [Ir(Cp*)(TH4BPM)(H2 O)]SO4 (TH4BPM: 2,2',6,6'-tetrahydroxyl-4,4'-bipyrimidine; Cp*: pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) has a high turnover frequency of 39 500 h(-1) at 80 °C in a 1 M aqueous solution of HCO2 H/HCO2 Na and produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide without carbon monoxide contamination. The deuterium kinetic isotope effect study clearly indicates a different rate-determining step for complexes with hydroxyl groups at different positions of the ligands. The rate-limiting step is β-hydrogen elimination from the iridium-formate intermediate for complexes with hydroxyl groups at ortho positions, owing to a proton relay (i.e., pendent-base effect), which lowers the energy barrier of hydrogen generation. In contrast, the reaction of iridium hydride with a proton to liberate hydrogen is demonstrated to be the rate-determining step for complexes that do not have hydroxyl groups at the ortho positions.

  3. SELECTED STUDIES OF PAST OPERATIONS AT THE ORNL HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Primm, Trent

    2010-01-01

    In response to on-going programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, two topics related to past operations of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) are being reviewed and include determining whether HFIR fuel can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) and determining whether HFIR beryllium reflectors are discharged as transuranic (TRU) waste. The LEU conversion and TRU waste studies are being performed in accordance with the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program and the Integrated Facility Disposition Project, respectively. While assessing data/analysis needs for LEU conversion such as the fuel cycle length and power needed to maintain the current level of reactor performance, a reduction of about 8% (~200 MWD) in the end-of-cycle exposure for HFIR fuel was observed over the lifetime of the reactor (43 years). The SCALE 6.0 computational system was used to evaluate discharged beryllium reflectors and it was discovered if the reflectors are procured according to the current HFIR standard, discharged reflectors would not be TRU waste, but the removable reflector (closest to core) would become TRU waste approximately 40 years after discharge. However, beryllium reflectors have been fabricated with a greater uranium content than that stipulated in the standard and these reflectors would be discharged as TRU waste.

  4. Mean field study of structural changes in Pt isotopes with the Gogny interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Guzman, R.; Sarriguren, P.; Robledo, L. M.; Garcia-Ramos, J. E.

    2010-02-15

    The evolution of the nuclear shapes along the triaxial landscape is studied in the Pt isotopic chain using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation based on the Gogny interaction. In addition to the parametrization D1S, the new incarnations D1N and D1M of this force are also included in our analysis to assess to which extent the predictions are independent of details of the effective interaction. The considered range of neutron numbers 88<=N<=126 includes prolate, triaxial, oblate, and spherical ground-state shapes and serves as a detailed comparison of the predictions obtained with the new sets D1N and D1M against the ones provided by the standard parametrization Gogny-D1S in a region of the nuclear landscape for which experimental and theoretical fingerprints of shape transitions have been found. Structural evolution along the Pt chain is discussed in terms of the deformation dependence of single-particle energies.

  5. Quantification of biotransformation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in a biostimulation study: Added value via stable carbon isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschorn, Sarah K.; Grostern, Ariel; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Edwards, Elizabeth A.; MacKinnon, Leah; Repta, Cory; Major, David W.; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2007-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis of chlorinated aliphatic compounds was performed at an in situ biostimulation pilot test area (PTA) at a site where 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) and trichloroethene (TCE) were present in groundwater. Chlorinated products of TCE reductive dechlorination ( cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC)) were present at concentrations of 17.5 to 126.4 μmol/L. Ethene, a potential degradation product of both 1,2-DCA dihaloelimination and TCE reductive dechlorination was also present in the PTA. Emulsified soybean oil and lactate were added as electron donors to stimulate anaerobic dechlorination in the PTA. Stable carbon isotope analysis provided evidence that dechlorination was occurring in the PTA during biostimulation, and a means of monitoring changes in dechlorination efficiency over the 183 day monitoring period. Stable carbon isotope analysis was also used to determine if ethene production in the PTA was due to dechlorination of TCE, 1,2-DCA, or both. Fractionation factors ( α) were determined in the laboratory during anaerobic biotransformation of 1,2-DCA via a dihaloelimination reaction in four separate enrichment cultures. These α values (as well as the previously published ranges of α for the dechlorination of TCE, cDCE and 1,2-DCA) were used, along with isotopic values measured during the pilot test, to derive quantitative estimates of biotransformation during the pilot test. Dechlorination was found to account for 10.7 to 35.9%, 21.9 to 74.9%, and 54.4 to 67.8% of 1,2-DCA, TCE and cDCE concentration loss respectively in the PTA. Stable carbon isotope analysis indicates that dechlorination of 1,2-DCA, TCE and cDCE were all significant processes during the pilot test, while ethene production during the pilot test was dominated by 1,2-DCA dihaloelimination. This study demonstrates how stable carbon isotope analysis can provide more conservative estimates of the extent of biotransformation than do conventional protocols. In

  6. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  7. Pulsed 86Sr-labeling and NanoSIMS imaging to study coral biomineralization at ultra-structural length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahmi, C.; Domart-Coulon, I.; Rougée, L.; Pyle, D. G.; Stolarski, J.; Mahoney, J. J.; Richmond, R. H.; Ostrander, G. K.; Meibom, A.

    2012-09-01

    A method to label marine biocarbonates is developed based on a concentration enrichment of a minor stable isotope of a trace element that is a natural component of seawater, resulting in the formation of biocarbonate with corresponding isotopic enrichments. This biocarbonate is subsequently imaged with a NanoSIMS ion microprobe to visualize the locations of the isotopic marker on sub-micrometric length scales, permitting resolution of all ultra-structural details. In this study, a scleractinian coral, Pocillopora damicornis, was labeled 3 times with 86Sr-enhanced seawater for a period of 48 h with 5 days under normal seawater conditions separating each labeling event. Two non-specific cellular stress biomarkers, glutathione-S-transferase activity and porphyrin concentration plus carbonic anhydrase, an enzymatic marker involved in the physiology of carbonate biomineralization, as well as unchanged levels of zooxanthellae photosynthesis efficiency indicate that coral physiological processes are not affected by the 86Sr-enhancement. NanoSIMS images of the 86Sr/44Ca ratio in skeleton formed during the experiment allow for a determination of the average extension rate of the two major ultra-structural components of the coral skeleton: Rapid Accretion Deposits are found to form on average about 4.5 times faster than Thickening Deposits. The method opens up new horizons in the study of biocarbonate formation because it holds the potential to observe growth of calcareous structures such as skeletons, shells, tests, spines formed by a wide range of organisms under essentially unperturbed physiological conditions.

  8. Stable oxyten and carbon isotope study of recent sediments and cements, Lee Stocking island, Bahamas: Organic vs. inorganic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Falls, W.F.; Williams, D.F.; Kendall, C.G.St.C.; Dill, R.F. )

    1990-05-01

    Stable isotope analyses of modern carbonates from the tidal inlet along the north end of Lee Stocking Island indicate a strong correlation of both carbon and oxygen isotope values with grain size. Carbonate samples used in this study include the soft, recently formed outer surface of several large columnar stromatolites, bedded muds from within the tidal channel, and marine hardgrounds from the shallow shoals adjacent to the channel. All samples are predominantly aragonite and were divided into mud-, silt-, and sand-size particles and bleached of organics prior to isotopic analysis. The range in isotopic values for all carbonate samples is 3.3 to 4.6 {per thousand} for {delta}{sup 13}C and {minus}0.3 to {minus}1.4{per thousand} for {delta}{sup 18}O. The {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C values of the mud-size aragonite from all of these samples are depleted relative to the silt- and sand-size ooids and peloids and have isotope values lighter than 1.4{per thousand} for {delta}{sup 13}C and 0.8{per thousand} for {delta}{sup 18}O. The {delta}{sup 13}C values for green calcerous algae from the restricted platform behind Lee Stocking are similar to values for the stromatolite mud. {delta}{sup 13}C values for the hardground and channel-based muds are intermediate between the {delta}{sup 13}C values for the calcareous algae, and coarse-grained sediment. These data suggest that the green calcareous algae which fluorish in the restricted platform, are a significant source of aragonite mud in and around the channel but are not the only source.

  9. Evaluation of sampling resolution in coral stable isotope records: A case study using records from New Caledonia and Tarawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Terrence M.; Taylor, Frederick W.; Crowley, Thomas J.; Link, Suzanne M.

    1996-10-01

    We have generated a 40-year-long, monthly stable isotope record from a Porites lutea coral collected offshore of Amedee, New Caledonia (22°S, 167°E) to investigate the relation between sampling resolution in coral isotope studies and retrieval of sea-surface environmental information. We interpret the high correlation between our oxygen isotope record and a twenty-year long sea-surface temperature record at the monthly timescale (r=0.88) to indicate that our coral isotope record is an accurate monitor of environmental conditions offshore of Amedee. The character of the signal and the percent variance explained in the record at the annual band, at the quasi-biennial oscillation band ((QBO) 2.0-2.4 years), and at the El Nino-Southern Oscillation band ((ENSO) 3-8 years) changes little in response to a reduction in sampling density from monthly to bimonthly to quarterly. Similar results have been obtained in a reanalysis of a coral isotope record from Tarawa, Kiribati. Our results indicate that a significant amount of the information obtained from high-density sampling can also be retrieved from lower-density sampling. In particular, bimonthly sampling yields virtually no drop-off in variance explained, and quarterly sampling is satisfactory for resolving interannual and decadal-scale trends in time series. The proposed sampling approach may enable a more rapid filling in of numerous spatial holes in coral sampling sites needed for reconstruction of long-term decadal-scale variations in climate.

  10. A stable isotope study of fossil mammal remains from the Paglicci cave, Southern Italy. N and C as palaeoenvironmental indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacumin, P.; Bocherens, H.; Delgado Huertas, A.; Mariotti, A.; Longinelli, A.

    1997-04-01

    A set of 102 tooth and bone samples of Pleistocene age (32,600-13,300 yr BP) belonging to the species Cervus elaphus, Bos primigenius and Equus caballus and coming from the Paglicci cave (Southern Italy) was studied for the carbon (δ 13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) isotopic composition of bone and dentine collage and for the carbon (δ 13C c) isotopic composition of tooth enamel carbonate. The amount of collagen extracted from bone and tooth samples (mg/g) was rather variable, representing approximately only 0.5-15% of the collagen present in a fresh bone. However, the loss of an important fraction of the original collagen during diagenesis did not change the in vivo isotopic composition. In general, when the δ 13C of both collagen and carbonate and the δ 15N of collagen obtained from each level for the three species are compared, wild ox shows the most increased values, deer the most decreased values and horse shows intermediate results. These differences are probably related to distinct diets or to differences in their physiological behaviour. However, the isotopic results suggest that the three species considered lived in an open environment with a diet based on C 3 plants. The stratigraphic sequence of light and heavy nitrogen isotope values between 19,000 and 15,000 may be related to shifts from arid to humid conditions, while the overall trend shown by δ 13C toward lighter values may be related to a progressive development of a forest habitat.

  11. A Large Scale Isotopic and Geochemical study of the Oak Ridges Moraine: Insight into Flow, Sustainability and Vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicci, L.; Henkemans, E.; Frape, S.; Gerber, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Oak Ridges Moraine (ORM), a 160 km long ridge of sand, silt and gravel deposits north of Lake Ontario, is recognized as a regionally significant groundwater recharge area because it is responsible for the recharge of aquifers which provide drinking water for hundreds of thousands of residents north of Toronto and provides baseflow to the headwaters of hundreds of streams. Groundwater protection and management is a vital matter for the entire region. Understanding the complex flow system is complicated by the regional geology, which includes till aquifers and aquitards, eroded tunnel channels and bedrock valleys. Fritz et al. (1987) extensive isotopic study of both precipitation and groundwater allowed for the mapping of δ18O values across Canada. Changing temperatures and humidity conditions impact δ18O, δ2H and deuterium excess in recharging groundwater (Rozanski et al. 1993). Global climate change, as well as more localized impacts from industrialization and urbanization will cause changes in the trends described by Fritz et al. (1987).This study utilizes isotopes tracers; δ2H, δ18O and tritium. Tritium tracer studies employ anthropogenic inputs from 1950s nuclear weapon testing and modern nuclear power generation fall out. The presence of tritium and its decay over time provides another clear indicator of infiltration of younger water into older systems and can provide evidence of the vulnerability of an aquifer to anthropogenic contamination. Stable isotopic results throughout the study clearly divide into four groundwater types. A small but distinct group of samples have no measurable tritium and their depleted oxygen isotopic signature suggests recharge under post-glacial conditions. Another group of samples show significant deuterium excess (18 to 22%) yet can occur in the deep aquifers indicating the preservation of a climatic signal even at depth. A minority of samples are recharged from waters having undergone evaporative processes and represent

  12. Lessons from image perception studies for the design of medical imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David L.; Jabri, Kadri N.; Manjeshwar, Ravindra M.; Srinivas, Yogesh; Salem, Kyle A.

    2000-06-01

    Our laboratory uses image perception studies to optimize the acquisition and processing of image sequences from x-ray fluoroscopy and interventional MRI (iMRI) both of which are used to guide complex minimally invasive treatments of cancer and vascular disease. Fluoroscopy consists of high frame rate, quantum-limited image sequences. Since it accounts for over half of the diagnostic population x-ray dose, we attempt to reduce dose by optimizing image acquisition and filtering. We quantify image quality using human detection experiments and modeling. Human spatio-temporal processing greatly affects results. For example, spatial noise reduction filtering is significantly more effective on image sequences than on single image frames where it gives relatively little improvement due to the deleterious effect of spatial noise correlation. At CWRU, we use iMRI to guide a radio-frequency probe used for the thermal ablation of cancer. Improving the speed and accuracy of insertion to the target will reduce patient risk and discomfort. We are investigating keyhole imaging whereby one updates only a portion of the Fourier domain at each time step, producing a fast, approximate image sequence. To optimize the very large number of techniques and parameters, we use a perceptual difference model that quantifies the degrading effects introduced by fast MR imaging, including the blurring of interventional devices. Preliminary studies show that a perpendicular frequency encoding direction provides superior image quality in the region of interest compared to other keyhole stripe orientations. Together these two applications illustrate that image perception studies can impact the design of medical imaging systems.

  13. Light stable isotope study of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrs D.T.; Bowman, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    The isotopic composition of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon has been determined for regional cold springs, thermal fluids, and rocks and minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area. The geothermal system has developed within plutonic granitic rocks and amphibolite facies gneiss, relying upon fracture-controlled permeability for the migration of the thermal fluids. Probably originating as meteoric waters in the upper elevations of the Mineral Mountains, the thermal waters sampled in the production wells display an oxygen isotopic shift of at least +1.2. Depletions of delta /sup 18/O in wole rock, K-feldspar, and biotite have a positive correlation with alteration intensity. W/R mass ratios, calculated from the isotopic shifts of rock and water, range up to 3.0 in a producing horizon of one well, although the K-feldspar has experienced only 30% exchange with the thermal waters. While veinlet quartz has equilibrated with the thermal waters, the /sup 18/O values of K-mica clay, an alteration product of plagioclase, mimic the isotopic composition of K-feldspar and whole rock. This suggests that locally small W/R ratios enable plagioclase to influence its alteration products by isotopic exchange.

  14. EOS image data processing system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, J.; Honikman, T.; Mcmahon, E.; Miller, E.; Pietrzak, L.; Yorsz, W.

    1973-01-01

    The Image Processing System (IPS) requirements and configuration are defined for NASA-sponsored advanced technology Earth Observatory System (EOS). The scope included investigation and definition of IPS operational, functional, and product requirements considering overall system constraints and interfaces (sensor, etc.) The scope also included investigation of the technical feasibility and definition of a point design reflecting system requirements. The design phase required a survey of present and projected technology related to general and special-purpose processors, high-density digital tape recorders, and image recorders.

  15. Olympus Imaging Fraud Scandal: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Dennis; Madrigal, Marion; Jackson, Maura

    2014-01-01

    This case examines the two decade long tobashi scheme by Olympus Imaging Executives to hide $1.7 billion in losses. In the 1980s, a soaring yen and falling dollar caused bottom line income problems for many Japanese companies. Some companies sought to offset the declining revenue with zaiteku, a form of speculative investment. While early…

  16. Brain Imaging Studies of Developmental Stuttering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingham, Roger J.

    2001-01-01

    A review of research on brain imaging of developmental stuttering concludes that findings increasingly point to a failure of normal temporal lobe activation during speech that may either contribute to (or is the result of) a breakdown in the sequencing of processing among premotor regions implicated in phonologic planning. (Contains references.)…

  17. Variation in strontium isotope ratios of archaeological fauna in the Midwestern United States: a preliminary study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, Kristin M.; Curry, B. Brandon; Johnson, Thomas M.; Fullagar, Paul D.; Emerson, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Strontium isotope values (87Sr/86Sr) in bone and tooth enamel have been used increasingly to identify non-local individuals within prehistoric human populations worldwide. Archaeological research in the Midwestern United States has increasingly highlighted the role of population movement in affecting interregional cultural change. However, the comparatively low level of geologic variation in the Midwestern United States might suggest a corresponding low level of strontium variation, and calls into question the sensitivity of strontium isotopes to identify non-local individuals in this region. Using strontium isotopes of archaeological fauna, we explore the degree of variability in strontium ratios across this region. Our results demonstrate measurable variation in strontium ratios and indicate the potential of strontium analysis for addressing questions of origin and population movement in the Midwestern United States.

  18. Efficient and selective isotopic labeling of hemes to facilitate the study of multiheme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, Bruno M.; Tien, Ming; Rivera, Mario; Shi, Liang; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2012-04-02

    Specific isotopic labeling of hemes provides a unique opportunity to characterize the structure and function of heme-proteins. Unfortunately, present day methods do not allow efficient labeling in high yields of multiheme cytochromes c, which are of great biotechnological interest. Here, a method for production of recombinant multiheme cytochromes c in Escherichia coli with isotopically labeled hemes is reported. A small tetraheme cytochrome of 12 kDa from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to demonstrate the method, achieving a production of 4 mg of pure protein per liter. This method achieves, in a single step, efficient expression and incorporation of hemes isotopically labeled in specific atom positions adequate for spectroscopic characterization of these complex heme proteins. It is, furthermore, of general application to heme proteins opening new possibilities in the characterization of this important class of proteins.

  19. Isotope-Encoded Carboxyl Group Footprinting for Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Conformational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    We report an isotope-encoding method coupled with carboxyl-group footprinting to monitor protein conformational changes. The carboxyl groups of aspartic/glutamic acids and of the C-terminus of proteins can serve as reporters for protein conformational changes when labeled with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) mediated by carbodiimide. In the new development, isotope-encoded "heavy" and "light" GEE are used to label separately the two states of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) from cyanobacteria. Two samples are mixed (1:1 ratio) and analyzed by a single LC-MS/MS experiment. The differences in labeling extent between the two states are represented by the ratio of the "heavy" and "light" peptides, providing information about protein conformational changes. Combining isotope-encoded MS quantitative analysis and carboxyl-group footprinting reduces the time of MS analysis and improves the sensitivity of GEE and other footprinting.

  20. Metal isotope and density functional study of the tetracarboxylatodicopper(II) core vibrations.

    PubMed

    Drozdzewski, Piotr; Brozyna, Anna

    2005-11-01

    Vibrational spectra of tetrakis(acetato)diaquadicopper(II) complex have been deeply examined in order to provide a detailed description of dynamics of [Cu(2)O(8)C(4)] core being a typical structural unit of most copper(II) carboxylates. Low frequency bands related to significant motions of metal atoms were detected by metal isotope substitution. Observed spectra and isotope shifts were reproduced in DFT calculations. For clear presentation of computed normal vibrations, a D(4h) symmetry approximation was successfully applied. Basing on observed isotope shifts and calculation results, all skeletal vibrations have been analyzed including normal mode with the largest Cu...Cu stretching amplitude assigned to Raman band at 178 cm(-1).

  1. Temporal and spatial variability in stable isotope compositions of a freshwater mussel: Implications for biomonitoring and ecological studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gustafson, L.; Showers, W.; Kwak, T.; Levine, J.; Stoskopf, M.

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotopes can be used to elucidate ecological relationships in community and trophic studies. Findings are calibrated against baselines, e.g. from a producer or primary consumer, assumed to act as a reference to the isotopic context created by spatio-temporal attributes such as geography, climate, nutrient, and energy sources. The ability of an organism to accurately represent a community base depends on how, and over what time-scale, it assimilates ambient materials. Freshwater mussels have served as references for trophic studies of freshwater communities and as indicators of change in nutrient pollution load or source. Their suitability as reference animals has not yet been fully explored, however. We conducted a series of studies examining the suitability of freshwater mussels as isotopic baselines, using their ability to reflect variation in ambient nutrient loads as a case scenario. (1) We analyzed bivalve foot tissue ??15N and ??13C from 22 stream reaches in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, USA to show that compositions varied substantially among locations. Site mean bivalve ??13C values correlated with site ambient particulate organic matter (POM) ??13C values, and site mean bivalve ??15N values correlated with site ambient water dissolved ??15N-NO3 values. (2) Similarity of results among sample types demonstrated that the minimally invasive hemolymph sample is a suitable substitute for foot tissue in ??15N analyses, and that small sample sizes generate means representative of a larger population. Both findings can help minimize the impact of sampling on imperiled freshwater mussel populations. (3) In a bivalve transplantation study we showed that hemolymph ??15N compositions responded to a shift in ambient dissolved ??15N-NO3, although slowly. The tissue turnover time for bivalve hemolymph was 113 days. We conclude that bivalves serve best as biomonitors of chronic, rather than acute, fluctuations in stream nutrient loads, and provide initial

  2. Application of stable carbon isotopes in long term mesocosm studies for carbon cycle investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an effective greenhouse gas. The Oceans absorb ca. 30% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions and thereby partly attenuate deleterious climate effects. A consequence of the oceanic CO2 uptake is a decreased seawater pH and planktonic community shifts. The quantification of the anthropogenic perturbation was investigated through stable carbon isotope analysis in three "long term" mesocosm experiments (Sweden 2013, Gran Canaria 2014, Norway 2015) which reproduced near natural ecosystem conditions under both controlled and modified future CO2 level (up to 2000 ppm) scenarios. Parallel measurements of the stable isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) dissolved organic carbon (δ13CDOC) and particulate carbon (δ13CTPC) both from the mesocosms water column and sediment traps showed similar trends in all the three experiments. A CO2 response was noticeable in the isotopic dataset, but increased CO2 levels had only a subtle effect on the concentrations of the dissolved and particulate organic carbon pool. Distinctive δ13C signatures of the particulate carbon pool both in the water column and the sediments were detectable for the different CO2 treatments and they were strongly correlated with the δ13CDIC signatures but not with the δ13CDOC pool. The validity of the isotopic data was verified by cross-analyses of multiple substances of known isotopic signatures on a GasBench, Elemental Analyser (EA) and on an in-house TOC-IRMS setup for the analysis of δ13CDIC, δ13CTPC and δ13CDOC, respectively. Results from these mesocosm experiments proved the stable carbon isotope approach to be an effective tool for quantifying the uptake and carbon transfer among the various compartments of the marine carbon system.

  3. Accumulation of tetrahedral intermediates in cholinesterase catalysis: a secondary isotope effect study.

    PubMed

    Tormos, Jose R; Wiley, Kenneth L; Wang, Yi; Fournier, Didier; Masson, Patrick; Nachon, Florian; Quinn, Daniel M

    2010-12-22

    In a previous communication, kinetic β-deuterium secondary isotope effects were reported that support a mechanism for substrate-activated turnover of acetylthiocholine by human butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) wherein the accumulating reactant state is a tetrahedral intermediate ( Tormos , J. R. ; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005 , 127 , 14538 - 14539 ). In this contribution additional isotope effect experiments are described with acetyl-labeled acetylthiocholines (CL(3)COSCH(2)CH(2)N(+)Me(3); L = H or D) that also support accumulation of the tetrahedral intermediate in Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase (DmAChE) catalysis. In contrast to the aforementioned BuChE-catalyzed reaction, for this reaction the dependence of initial rates on substrate concentration is marked by pronounced substrate inhibition at high substrate concentrations. Moreover, kinetic β-deuterium secondary isotope effects for turnover of acetylthiocholine depended on substrate concentration, and gave the following: (D3)k(cat)/K(m) = 0.95 ± 0.03, (D3)k(cat) = 1.12 ± 0.02 and (D3)βk(cat) = 0.97 ± 0.04. The inverse isotope effect on k(cat)/K(m) is consistent with conversion of the sp(2)-hybridized substrate carbonyl in the E + A reactant state into a quasi-tetrahedral transition state in the acylation stage of catalysis, whereas the markedly normal isotope effect on k(cat) is consistent with hybridization change from sp(3) toward sp(2) as the reactant state for deacylation is converted into the subsequent transition state. Transition states for Drosophila melanogaster AChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine were further characterized by measuring solvent isotope effects and determining proton inventories. These experiments indicated that the transition state for rate-determining decomposition of the tetrahedral intermediate is stabilized by multiple protonic interactions. Finally, a simple model is proposed for the contribution that tetrahedral intermediate stabilization provides to

  4. Multiple stable oxygen isotopic studies of atmospheric sulfate: A new quantitative way to understand sulfate formation processes in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles Chi-Woo

    2000-11-01

    Sulfate is an important trace species in the Earth's atmosphere because of its roles in numerous atmospheric processes. In addition to its inherent light-scattering properties, sulfate can serve as cloud condensation nucleus (CCN), affecting cloud formation as well as microphysical properties of clouds. Consequently, atmospheric sulfate species influence the global radiative energy balance. Sulfate is known to increase acidity of rainwater with negative consequences in both natural and urban environments. In addition, aerosol sulfate (<=2.5 μm) is respirable and poses a threat to human health as a potential carrier of toxic pollutants through the respiratory tract. Despite intense investigative effort, uncertainty regarding the relative significance of gas and aqueous phase oxidation pathways still remains. Acquisition of such information is important because the lifetime and transport of S(IV) species and sulfate aerosols are influenced by the oxidative pathways. In addition, sulfate formation processes affect the aerosol size distribution, which ultimately influences radiative properties of atmospheric aerosols. Therefore, the budgetary information of the sulfur cycle, as well as the radiative effects of sulfate on global climate variation, can be attained from better quantitative understanding of in situ sulfate formation processes in the atmosphere. Multiple stable oxygen isotopic studies of atmospheric sulfate are presented as a new tool to better comprehend the atmospheric sulfate formation processes. Coupled with isotopic studies, 35S radioactivity measurements have been utilized to assess contribution of sulfate from high altitude air masses. Atmospheric sulfate (aerosols and rainwater) samples have been collected from diverse environments. Laboratory experiments of gas and aqueous phase S(IV) oxidation by various oxidants, as well as biomass burning experiments, have also been conducted. The main isotopic results from these studies are as follows: (1

  5. Paleoclimatic Study of the West Pacific Warm Pool using Oxygen Isotope Variations in a Stalagmite from Guam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. W.; Hardt, B. F.; Partin, J. W.; Banner, J. L.; Jenson, J. W.; Sinclair, D. J.; Taylor, F.

    2011-12-01

    The West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) is a region of the Pacific with mean seasonal sea surface temperatures > 28°C, and is a major driver of global climate. While the past ˜150 years have been instrumented and conditions have been recorded, it is unclear how much of the changes observed are due to anthropogenic effects or natural variability. In addition, this time frame may not include events that are natural but infrequent. This study investigates climate of the WPWP using oxygen isotope variations in speleothem calcite as a proxy for changes in rainfall on the island of Guam. The temperature effect on oxygen isotope ratios is relatively small in the tropics when compared to the effects of rainfall at Guam, and speleothem oxygen isotope ratios are more likely to vary in response to changes in storm tracks or rainfall amount. Previous research in the area has shown a correlation (r2 of .57) between rainfall amount and stable isotopic composition. The speleothem sample "Stumpy" being used for this study was collected in 2005 from Jinapsan Cave on Guam (13° 38' N, 144° 53' E), where annual rainfall is connected to the state of the WPWP. Samples were milled at 1 millimeter resolution, representing an average resolution of 50 years per sample. U-series analyses show that the 33-cm-long Stumpy grew from ˜18,000 ka up to present day. Oxygen isotope values range from -9.4 to -4.5 per mille, and exhibit oscillations of approximately 0.5 per mille. At 27 cm, the record shows a 3.8 per mille shift to higher values, coincident with the occurrence of a dark brown growth layer. This shift may represent a change in rainfall across a growth hiatus. The range in oxygen isotope values of 4.9 per mille in Stumpy corresponds to a difference in rainfall of 350 +/- 74 mm/month, based on previous study of rainfall in the modern system.

  6. Coupled-channels study of fine structure in the {alpha} decay of platinum isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2011-09-15

    The fine structure observed in the {alpha} decay of deformed platinum isotopes is investigated using the recently developed five-channel formalism, based on the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions. The internal effect of daughter states is taken into account in dealing with the interaction matrix and the {alpha}-cluster formation. The available experimental data concerning {alpha}-decay half-lives and fine structures are reproduced. Some predictions are made especially for the {alpha} decay of neutron-rich isotopes, which could guide future experiments.

  7. Experimental Study on Isotope Fractionation of Soil water in Arid Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horita, J.; Lin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Soil water dynamics within a thick vadose (unsaturated) zone is a key component in the hydrologic cycle in arid regions. The partitioning of precipitation and soil water into fluxes of percolation to the subsurface, surface runoff and evapotranspiration at the land-atmosphere-vegetation interface is accompanied by characteristic δ2H and δ18O values of water. The isotopic composition of the transpiration flux is very similar to soil water, since the uptake by plant roots is usually not associated with isotope fractionation. The isotopic composition of evaporation flux from unsaturated soils, which becomes an important flux in arid regions, has extensively been modeled by the Craig-Gordon model with the assumption that equilibrium isotopic fractionation between adsorbed/pored condensed water within soils and water vapor is identical to that between bulk liquid water and vapor. To test this critical assumption, we have conducted laboratory experiments on equilibrium isotope fractionation between adsorbed water in mesoporous silica (15nm pore, as soil analog) and the vapor. Firstly, the adsorption/desorption isotherms of H2O and N2 in the silica are determined at 30°C and liq-N2 temperature, respectively, and large hysteresis loops were observed. Secondly, the isotope fractionation factors between condensed water in the silica pores and the vapor (18αsilica water-vapor and 2αsilica water-vapor for oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, respectively) were determined at 30°C along the adsorption curve from near saturation pressure (p/po=1). We found that 18αsilica water-vapor values are smaller than that between free liquid-vapor (1.0088) and progressively decreased from1.0083 at p/po= 0.9 to 1.0054 at p/po=0.5, establishing a trend very similar to the isotherm curve. The corresponding 2αsilica water-vapor values are also smaller than that of free liquid-vapor system (1.0740) and decreased from 1.0651 at p/po=0.9 to 1.0295 at p/po=0.5. Our experimental results challenge

  8. Multiple Scattering Effects in de/dx-E Instruments for Isotopic Composition Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    The development of cosmic ray telescopes to separate individual isotopes of heavy elements using the dE/dx-vs.-E technique depends on the incorporation of precise trajectory sensing elements into these systems. In typical implementations the particle trajectory is derived from a set of position measurements made prior to a particle's entering the first energy loss detector. The use of the trajectory obtained in this way to correct energy loss signals for the actual pathlengths through the detectors depends on the assumption that the particle trajectory is a straight line. In order to resolve iron isotopes the angles of incidence, theta the particle track must be known rather accurately.

  9. Temperature Dependence of the Kinetic Isotope Effects in Thymidylate Synthase. A Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Natalia; Ferrer, Silvia; Martí, Sergio; Garcia-Viloca, Mireia; Kohen, Amnon; Moliner, Vicent

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the temperature dependence of primary kinetic isotope effects (KIE) has been used as indicator for the physical nature of enzyme catalyzed H-transfer reactions. An interactive study where experimental data and calculations examine the same chemical transformation is a critical means to interpret more properly temperature dependence of KIEs. Here, the rate limiting step of the thymidylate synthase catalyzed reaction has been studied by means of hybrid Quantum Mechanics/ Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) simulations in the theoretical framework of the ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (EA-VTST/MT) combined with Grote-Hynes theory. The KIEs were calculated across the same temperature range examined experimentally, revealing a temperature independent behaviour, in agreement with experimental findings. The calculations show that the H-transfer proceeds with ca. 91 % by tunneling in the case of protium and ca. 80% when the transferred protium is replaced by tritium. Dynamic recrossing coefficients are almost invariant with temperature and in all cases far from unity, showing significant coupling between protein motions and the reaction coordinate. In particular, the relative movement of a conserved arginine (Arg166 in E. coli) promotes the departure of a conserved cysteine (Cys146 in E. coli) from the dUMP by polarizing the thioether bond thus facilitating this bond breaking that takes place concomitantly with the hydride transfer. These promoting vibrations of the enzyme, which represent some of the dimensions of the real reaction coordinate, would limit the search through configurational space to efficiently find those decreasing both barrier height and width, thereby enhancing the probability of H-transfer by either tunneling (through barrier) or classical (over-the-barrier) mechanisms. In other words, the thermal fluctuations that are coupled to the reaction coordinate, together with transition state

  10. An in situ approach to detect tree root ecology: linking ground-penetrating radar imaging to isotope-derived water acquisition zones.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Marney E; Anglaaere, Luke C N

    2013-05-01

    Tree root distribution and activity are determinants of belowground competition. However, studying root response to environmental and management conditions remains logistically challenging. Methodologically, nondestructive in situ tree root ecology analysis has lagged. In this study, we tested a nondestructive approach to determine tree coarse root architecture and function of a perennial tree crop, Theobroma cacao L., at two edaphically contrasting sites (sandstone and phyllite-granite derived soils) in Ghana, West Africa. We detected coarse root vertical distribution using ground-penetrating radar and root activity via soil water acquisition using isotopic matching of δ(18)O plant and soil signatures. Coarse roots were detected to a depth of 50 cm, however, intraspecifc coarse root vertical distribution was modified by edaphic conditions. Soil δ(18)O isotopic signature declined with depth, providing conditions for plant-soil δ(18)O isotopic matching. This pattern held only under sandstone conditions where water acquisition zones were identifiably narrow in the 10-20 cm depth but broader under phyllite-granite conditions, presumably due to resource patchiness. Detected coarse root count by depth and measured fine root density were strongly correlated as were detected coarse root count and identified water acquisition zones, thus validating root detection capability of ground-penetrating radar, but exclusively on sandstone soils. This approach was able to characterize trends between intraspecific root architecture and edaphic-dependent resource availability, however, limited by site conditions. This study successfully demonstrates a new approach for in situ root studies that moves beyond invasive point sampling to nondestructive detection of root architecture and function. We discuss the transfer of such an approach to answer root ecology questions in various tree-based landscapes. PMID:23762519

  11. An in situ approach to detect tree root ecology: linking ground-penetrating radar imaging to isotope-derived water acquisition zones.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Marney E; Anglaaere, Luke C N

    2013-05-01

    Tree root distribution and activity are determinants of belowground competition. However, studying root response to environmental and management conditions remains logistically challenging. Methodologically, nondestructive in situ tree root ecology analysis has lagged. In this study, we tested a nondestructive approach to determine tree coarse root architecture and function of a perennial tree crop, Theobroma cacao L., at two edaphically contrasting sites (sandstone and phyllite-granite derived soils) in Ghana, West Africa. We detected coarse root vertical distribution using ground-penetrating radar and root activity via soil water acquisition using isotopic matching of δ(18)O plant and soil signatures. Coarse roots were detected to a depth of 50 cm, however, intraspecifc coarse root vertical distribution was modified by edaphic conditions. Soil δ(18)O isotopic signature declined with depth, providing conditions for plant-soil δ(18)O isotopic matching. This pattern held only under sandstone conditions where water acquisition zones were identifiably narrow in the 10-20 cm depth but broader under phyllite-granite conditions, presumably due to resource patchiness. Detected coarse root count by depth and measured fine root density were strongly correlated as were detected coarse root count and identified water acquisition zones, thus validating root detection capability of ground-penetrating radar, but exclusively on sandstone soils. This approach was able to characterize trends between intraspecific root architecture and edaphic-dependent resource availability, however, limited by site conditions. This study successfully demonstrates a new approach for in situ root studies that moves beyond invasive point sampling to nondestructive detection of root architecture and function. We discuss the transfer of such an approach to answer root ecology questions in various tree-based landscapes.

  12. Experimental study of the Mg and Sr isotopic evolution of seawater interacting with basalt between 150 and 300 ° C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Martin; Pearce, Christopher R.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    The chemical exchange of material between seawater and the oceanic crust plays a major role in marine geochemical cycles [1]. Isotopic signatures provide an important means of tracing elemental transfer in hydrothermal environments, yet only a limited amount of experimental data on the extent of isotopic fractionation under these conditions is currently available. This study consequently investigated the extent of δ26/24Mg and 87Sr/86Sr isotopic variation during a seawater-basalt interaction experiments at 150, 250 and 290 ° C. A suite of closed system experiments were run for several months at each temperature under saturated water pressure, using either crystalline or glassy basalt as the starting material and a water/rock ratio of 10 or 25. Our results demonstrate that the dissolution of basaltic material in hydrothermal environments occurs at the same time as the precipitation of alteration minerals (mainly smectite and anhydrite), which is consistent with results from similar studies in the past (e.g. [2]). As expected, the rate of reaction using crystalline basalt was slower than with basaltic glass, and both sample types reacted faster at higher temperatures. The 87Sr/86Sr composition of the experimental fluids decreased from the initial seawater value (0.70916) towards the lower basaltic signature during the experiments (0.70317), demonstrating the progressive release of Sr during basalt dissolution. Magnesium was steadily removed from the fluid via the precipitation of clay minerals, with the residual fluids having progressively lighter δ26/24Mg compositions. The mean Mg isotope fractionation factor (αsolid‑solution) observed at 250 oC was 1.0005±0.0002, supporting low-temperature evidence that clay minerals preferentially incorporate isotopically heavy magnesium [3]. These experiments provide quantitative information on the extent of Mg isotopic fractionation between fluids and secondary silicate minerals in hydrothermal systems, and demonstrate

  13. Experimental study of the Mg and Sr isotopic evolution of seawater interacting with basalt between 150 and 300 ° C.