Science.gov

Sample records for isotopic imaging study

  1. Identification of Isotopically Primitive Interplanetary Dust Particles: A NanoSIMS Isotopic Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, Christine; Stadermann, Frank J.; Bradley, John P.; Dai, Zurong; Bajt, Sasa; Giles, Graham; Lea, Alan S.

    2006-05-01

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O,S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in 15N, including the largest 15N enrichments ({approx}1300 ?) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in 15N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are 15N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two 15N-rich hotspots have correlated 13C anomalies. CN?/C? ratios suggest that most of the 15N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the 17O and 18O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions. These particles typically also contain numerous 15N-rich hotspots, occasional C

  2. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O, S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in {sup 15}N, including the largest {sup 15}N enrichments ({approx}1300 {per_thousand}) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in {sup 15}N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are {sup 15}N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots have correlated {sup 13}C anomalies. CN{sup -}/C{sup -} ratios suggest that most of the {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions. These

  3. Multi-isotope SPECT imaging of the 225Ac decay chain: feasibility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, A. K. H.; Ramogida, C. F.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, C.; Blinder, Stephan; Kunz, Peter; Sossi, Vesna; Schaffer, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Effective use of the {}225Ac decay chain in targeted internal radioimmunotherapy requires the retention of both {}225Ac and progeny isotopes at the target site. Imaging-based pharmacokinetic tests of these pharmaceuticals must therefore separately yet simultaneously image multiple isotopes that may not be colocalized despite being part of the same decay chain. This work presents feasibility studies demonstrating the ability of a microSPECT/CT scanner equipped with a high energy collimator to simultaneously image two components of the {}225Ac decay chain: {}221Fr (218 keV) and {}213Bi (440 keV). Image quality phantoms were used to assess the performance of two collimators for simultaneous {}221Fr and {}213Bi imaging in terms of contrast and noise. A hotrod resolution phantom containing clusters of thin rods with diameters ranging between 0.85 and 1.70 mm was used to assess resolution. To demonstrate ability to simultaneously image dynamic {}221Fr and {}213Bi activity distributions, a phantom containing a {}213Bi generator from {}225Ac was imaged. These tests were performed with two collimators, a high-energy ultra-high resolution (HEUHR) collimator and an ultra-high sensitivity (UHS) collimator. Values consistent with activity concentrations determined independently via gamma spectroscopy were observed in high activity regions of the images. In hotrod phantom images, the HEUHR collimator resolved all rods for both {}221Fr and {}213Bi images. With the UHS collimator, no rods were resolvable in {}213Bi images and only rods  ⩾1.3 mm were resolved in {}221Fr images. After eluting the {}213Bi generator, images accurately visualized the reestablishment of transient equilibrium of the {}225Ac decay chain. The feasibility of evaluating the pharmacokinetics of the {}225Ac decay chain in vivo has been demonstrated. This presented method requires the use of a high-performance high-energy collimator.

  4. Multi-isotope SPECT imaging of the 225Ac decay chain: feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Andrew K H; Ramogida, Caterina; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Cristina; Blinder, Stephan; Kunz, Peter; Sossi, Vesna; Schaffer, Paul

    2017-03-31

    Purpose: Effective use of the 225Ac decay chain in targeted internal radioimmunotherapy requires the retention of both 225Ac and progeny isotopes at the target site. Imaging-based pharmacokinetic tests of these pharmaceuticals must therefore separately yet simultaneously image multiple isotopes that may not be colocalized despite being part of the same decay chain. This work presents feasibility studies demonstrating the ability of a microSPECT/CT scanner equipped with a high energy collimator to simultaneously image two components of the 225Ac decay chain: 221Fr (218 keV) and 213Bi (440 keV). Methods: Image quality phantoms were used to assess the performance of two collimators for simultaneous 221Fr and 213Bi imaging in terms of contrast and noise. A hotrod resolution phantom containing clusters of thin rods with diameters ranging between 0.85 and 1.70 mm was used to assess resolution. To demonstrate ability to image dynamic 221Fr and 213Bi activity distributions, a phantom containing a 213Bi generator from 225Ac was imaged. These tests were performed with two collimators, a high-energy ultra-high resolution (HEUHR) collimator and an ultra-high sensitivity (UHS) collimator. Results: Values consistent with activity concentrations determined independently via gamma spectroscopy observed in high activity regions of the images. In hotrod phantom images, the HEUHR collimator resolved all rods for both 221Fr and 213Bi images. With the UHS collimator, no rods were resolvable in 213Bi images and only rods ≥1.3 mm were resolved in 221Fr images. After eluting the 213Bi generator, images accurately visualized the reestablishment of transient equilibrium of the 225Ac decay chain. Conclusion: A novel imaging method with potential to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of the 225

  5. Elemental and isotopic imaging to study biogeochemical functioning of intact soil micro-environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Carsten W.

    2017-04-01

    The complexity of soils extends from the ecosystem-scale to individual micro-aggregates, where nano-scale interactions between biota, organic matter (OM) and mineral particles are thought to control the long-term fate of soil carbon and nitrogen. It is known that such biogeochemical processes show disproportionally high reaction rates within nano- to micro-meter sized isolated zones ('hot spots') in comparison to surrounding areas. However, the majority of soil research is conducted on large bulk (> 1 g) samples, which are often significantly altered prior to analysis and analysed destructively. Thus it has previously been impossible to study elemental flows (e.g. C and N) between plants, microbes and soil in complex environments at the necessary spatial resolution within an intact soil system. By using nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) in concert with other imaging techniques (e.g. scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and micro computed tomography (µCT)), classic analyses (isotopic and elemental analysis) and biochemical methods (e.g. GC-MS) it is possible to exhibit a more complete picture of soil processes at the micro-scale. I will present exemplarily results about the fate and distribution of organic C and N in complex micro-scale soil structures for a range of intact soil systems. Elemental imaging was used to study initial soil formation as an increase in the structural connectivity of micro-aggregates. Element distribution will be presented as a key to detect functional spatial patterns and biogeochemical hot spots in macro-aggregate functioning and development. In addition isotopic imaging will be demonstrated as a key to trace the fate of plant derived OM in the intact rhizosphere from the root to microbiota and mineral soil particles. Especially the use of stable isotope enrichment (e.g. 13CO2, 15NH4+) in conjunction with NanoSIMS allows to directly trace the fate of OM or nutrients in soils at the relevant scale (e.g. assimilate C

  6. Three-dimensional imaging of the myocardium with isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    Three methods of imaging the three-dimensional distribution of isotopes in the myocardium are discussed. Three-dimensional imaging was examined using multiple Anger-camera views. Longitudinal tomographic images with compensation for blurring were studied. Transverse-section reconstruction using coincidence detection of annihilation gammas from positron emitting isotopes was investigated.

  7. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Matthew L; Lechene, Claude P

    2013-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans.

  8. [Phase imaging of isotopic ventriculographies: contribution to the study of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome].

    PubMed

    Aliot, E; Laurens, M H; Thouvenot, P; Brunotte, F; Prestat, M P; Zannad, F; Gilgenkrantz, J M; Robert, J

    1985-08-01

    This study compared the phase images of 12 normal subjects and 14 patients with right ventricular and 5 patients with left ventricular preexcitation. The phase images obtained from equilibrium radionuclide ventriculographies in the left anterior oblique portion with an ECG trigger: Fourier analysis was used to measure the phase and amplitude of the variations. In normal subjects the mean difference in phase was nearly zero: in 12 of the 14 patients with right ventricular preexcitation, right ventricular preceded left ventricular contraction (LV phase - RV phase = + 23 degrees); injection of Ajmaline normalised the ECG and suppressed the premature right ventricular contraction during right ventricular preexcitation (LV phase - RV phase = nearly zero), demonstrating a direct relationship between the abnormal depolarisation and abnormal contraction. In left sided Kent bundles, phase imaging did not seem to show significant premature ventricular contraction under basal conditions. Atrial pacing, which accentuated both left and right electrical preexcitation, increased the difference in ventricular phase. Finally, a satisfactory correlation was observed between the presumed locations of the accessory pathways and the zones of premature right and left ventricular contraction.

  9. Study of protein and RNA in dendritic spines using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Brismar, H; Aperia, A; Westin, L; Moy, J; Wang, M; Guillermier, C; Poczatek, C; Lechene, C

    2014-11-01

    The classical view of neuronal protein synthesis is that proteins are made in the cell body and then transported to their functional sites in the dendrites and the dendritic spines. Indirect evidence, however, suggests that protein synthesis can directly occur in the distal dendrites, far from the cell body. We are developing protocols for dual labeling of RNA and proteins using (15)N-uridine and (18)O- or (13)C-leucine pulse chase in cultured neurons to identify and localize both protein synthesis and fate of newly synthesized proteins. Pilot experiments show discrete localization of both RNA and newly synthesized proteins in dendrites, close to dendritic spines. We have for the first time directly imaged and measured the production of proteins at the subcellular level in the neuronal dendrites, close to the functional sites, the dendritic spines. This will open a powerful way to study neural growth and synapse plasticity in health and disease.

  10. Velocity map imaging study of the reaction dynamics of the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction: the isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huilin; Yang, Jiayue; Shuai, Quan; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Weiqing; Wu, Guorong; Dai, Dongxu; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Donghui; Yang, Xueming

    2014-04-03

    Following our previous study on the H + CD4 → HD + CD3 reaction [ Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2010 , 107 , 12782 ], the reaction of H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 at collision energies ranging from 0.72 to 1.99 eV is studied using crossed-beam and time-sliced velocity map ion imaging techniques. The product angular and translational energy distributions at four different collision energies were derived from the measured images. The excitation function was also measured from these images together with a careful calibration of the H atom beam intensities at different collision energies. All of these results are compared with those of the H + CD4 reaction to investigate the isotope effects. The isotope effects are all observed in the product angular distributions, the translational energy distributions, and the excitation function and further confirm the reaction mechanism proposed in the previous study on the H + CD4 reaction.

  11. Brain stem cell division and maintenance studied using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Enikolopov, G; Guillermier, C; Wang, M; Trakimas, L; Steinhauser, M; Lechene, C

    2014-11-01

    New neurons are continuously produced from neural stem cells in specific regions of the adult brain of animals and humans. In the hippocampus, a region crucial for cognitive function, neurogenesis responds to a multitude of extrinsic stimuli; emerging evidence indicates that it may be important for behavior, pathophysiology, brain repair, and response to drugs. We have developed an approach to identify and quantify the cellular targets of pro- and anti-neurogenic stimuli, based on reporter transgenic mouse lines in which neural stem and progenitor cells or their progeny are marked by fluorescent proteins. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using MIMS for studying adult neurogenesis.

  12. The Potential for Cerenkov luminescence imaging of alpha emitting isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, NL; Graves, EE

    2017-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) has been shown to have potential to image β+and β−emitting radioisotopes. This paper addresses the ability to use CLI to image 5 α-emitters that have therapeutic potential. While none of the α-particles have a sufficient velocity to directly produce Cerenkov light, all isotopes considered either have a second decay mode that produces Cerenkov or progeny that do. Monte Carlo studies show that 225Ac, 213Bi, and 212Bi can be easily imaged with CLI while 230U and 211At produce little light. Time effects are observed that must be taken into account when imaging these isotopes, which are not present with β±-emitters like 18F. PMID:22252144

  13. Combining airborne thermal infrared images, radium isotopes and radon to study Submarine Groundwater Discharge along the French Mediterranean coastline (Côte Bleue)}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejannin, Simon; Tamborski, Joseph; Souhaut, Marc; Radakovitch, Olivier; Claude, Christelle; Stieglitz, Thomas; Crispi, Olivier; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Conan, Pascal; Caparros, Jocelyne; Heimburger, Lars-Eric; Petrova, Macha; Le Roy, Emilie; Lacan, François; van Beek, Pieter

    2017-04-01

    Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD) is now recognized as an important vector for many chemical elements that may impact the quality of the coastal environment and marine ecosystems. Although these fluxes have been investigated in many places of the world, few studies have been conducted along the French Mediterranean coastline. In this study, we report airborne thermal infrared (TIR) images that allowed us to locate several freshwater inputs along the "Côte Bleue" located west of the city of Marseille. We used salinity, radon and radium isotopes to confirm that the TIR signal could be related to SGD. Radon was analyzed in situ along the coastline on board a rubber boat. The four radium isotopes (223Ra, 224Ra, 226Ra, 228Ra) were analyzed in samples collected in the coastal waters characterized by a strong TIR signal, as well as along transects conducted on board RV Antedon II between the coast and offshore (between 200 m and 8 km). We also analyzed nutrient (nitrates, phosphates and silicates) and mercury concentrations in the water samples. Radium isotopes were thus used to quantify SGD fluxes and to determine the fluxes of nutrients and mercury associated with SGD along this coastline.

  14. Quantitative image reconstruction for dual-isotope parathyroid SPECT/CT: phantom experiments and sample patient studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Chamoiseau, S.; Celler, A.

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the quantitative accuracy of the model-based dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (DI-SPECT) reconstructions that use Klein-Nishina expressions to estimate the scattered photon contributions to the projection data. Our objective was to examine the ability of the method to recover the absolute activities pertaining to both radiotracers: Tc-99m and I-123. We validated our method through a series of phantom experiments performed using a clinical hybrid SPECT/CT camera (Infinia Hawkeye, GE Healthcare). Different activity ratios and different attenuating media were used in these experiments to create cross-talk effects of varying severity, which can occur in clinical studies. Accurate model-based corrections for scatter and cross-talk with CT attenuation maps allowed for the recovery of the absolute activities from DI-SPECT/CT scans with errors that ranged 0-10% for both radiotracers. The unfavorable activity ratios increased the computational burden but practically did not affect the resulting accuracy. The visual analysis of parathyroid patient data demonstrated that our model-based processing improved adenoma/background contrast and enhanced localization of small or faint adenomas.

  15. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P.; Lewis, Jason S.; Grimm, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies. Methods In vitro phantom studies were used to validate the visible light emission observed from a range of radionuclides including the positron emitters 18F, 64Cu, 89Zr, and 124I; β-emitter 131I; and α-particle emitter 225Ac for potential use in CLI. The novel radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 89Zr-desferrioxamine B-[DFO-J591 for immuno-PET of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression was used to coregister and correlate the CLI signal observed with the immuno-PET images and biodistribution studies. Results Phantom studies confirmed that Cerenkov radiation can be observed from a range of positron-,β-, and α-emitting radionuclides using standard optical imaging devices. The change in light emission intensity versus time was concordant with radionuclide decay and was also found to correlate linearly with both the activity concentration and the measured PET signal (percentage injected dose per gram). In vivo studies conducted in male severe combined immune deficient mice bearing PSMA-positive, subcutaneous LNCaP tumors demonstrated that tumor-specific uptake of 89Zr-DFO-J591 could be visualized by both immuno-PET and CLI. Optical and immuno-PET signal intensities were found to increase over time from 24 to 96 h, and biodistribution studies were found to correlate well with both imaging modalities. Conclusion These studies represent the first, to our knowledge, quantitative assessment of CLI for measuring radiotracer uptake in vivo. Many radionuclides common to both nuclear

  16. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P; Lewis, Jason S; Grimm, Jan

    2010-07-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies. In vitro phantom studies were used to validate the visible light emission observed from a range of radionuclides including the positron emitters (18)F, (64)Cu, (89)Zr, and (124)I; beta-emitter (131)I; and alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac for potential use in CLI. The novel radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (89)Zr-desferrioxamine B [DFO]-J591 for immuno-PET of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression was used to coregister and correlate the CLI signal observed with the immuno-PET images and biodistribution studies. Phantom studies confirmed that Cerenkov radiation can be observed from a range of positron-, beta-, and alpha-emitting radionuclides using standard optical imaging devices. The change in light emission intensity versus time was concordant with radionuclide decay and was also found to correlate linearly with both the activity concentration and the measured PET signal (percentage injected dose per gram). In vivo studies conducted in male severe combined immune deficient mice bearing PSMA-positive, subcutaneous LNCaP tumors demonstrated that tumor-specific uptake of (89)Zr-DFO-J591 could be visualized by both immuno-PET and CLI. Optical and immuno-PET signal intensities were found to increase over time from 24 to 96 h, and biodistribution studies were found to correlate well with both imaging modalities. These studies represent the first, to our knowledge, quantitative assessment of CLI for measuring radiotracer uptake in vivo. Many radionuclides common to both nuclear

  17. Ion microscopic imaging of calcium transport in the intestinal tissue of vitamin D-deficient and vitamin D-replete chickens: A sup 44 Ca stable isotope study

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Fullmer, C.S.; Smith, C.A.; Wasserman, R.H.; Morrison, G.H. )

    1990-08-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium includes at least three definable steps; transfer across the microvillar membrane, movement through the cytosolic compartment, and energy-dependent extrusion into the lamina propria, Tracing the movement of calcium through the epithelium has been hampered by lack of suitable techniques and, in this study, advantage was taken of ion microscopy in conjunction with cryosectioning and use of the stable isotope 44Ca to visualize calcium in transit during the absorptive process. The effect of vitamin D, required for optimal calcium absorption, was investigated. Twenty millimolar 44Ca was injected into the duodenal lumen in situ of vitamin D-deficient and vitamin D-replete chickens. At 2.5, 5.0, and 20.0 min after injection, duodenal tissue was obtained and processed for ion microscopic imaging. At 2.5 min. 44Ca was seen to be concentrated in the region subjacent to the microvillar membrane in tissue from both groups. At 5.0 and 20.0 min, a similar pattern of localization was evident in D-deficient tissues. In D-replete tissues, the distribution of 44Ca became more homogenous, indicating that vitamin D increased the rate of transfer of Ca2+ from the apical to the basolateral membrane, a function previously ascribed to the vitamin D-induced calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D). Quantitative aspects of the calcium absorptive process were determined in parallel experiments with the radionuclide 47Ca. Complementary information on the localization of the naturally occurring isotopes of calcium (40Ca) and potassium (39K) is also described.

  18. Stable isotopic studies on chitin

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmelmann, A.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen stable isotope ratios of the poly-amino-sugar chitin isolated from exo-skeletons of 75 arthropod species collected in 59 locations were determined. The objectives were to understand the environmental, climatic, and biological influences on the isotope ratios and to develop a data base for interpreting isotope ratios of archaeological and fossil chitins. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in chitin isolates showed large variations which reflect intrinsic compositional and isotopic heterogeneities as well as differences caused by methods of preparation.

  19. Neutron capture radiography: a technique for isotopic labelling and analytical imaging with a few stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Thellier, Michel; Ripoll, Camille

    2006-06-19

    NCR (neutron capture radiography) may be used successfully for the imaging of one of the stable isotopes of a few chemical elements (especially 6Li and 10B, possibly also 14N, 17O, and others) and for labelling experiments using these stable isotopes. Other physical techniques compete with NCR. However, NCR can remain extremely useful in a certain number of cases, because it is usually more easily done and is less expensive than the other techniques.

  20. Quantitative imaging of inositol distribution in yeast using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Saiardi, A; Guillermier, C; Loss, O; Poczatek, J C; Lechene, C

    2014-11-01

    Despite the widely recognized importance of the several species of inositol polyphosphates in cell biology, inositol has not been successfully imaged and quantified inside cells using traditional spectrophotometry. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) technology, however, has facilitated direct imaging and measurement of cellular inositol. After pulsing cells with inositol labeled with the stable isotope Carbon-13 ((13)C), the label was detected in subcellular volumes by MIMS. The tridimensional localization of (13)C within the cell illustrated cellular distribution and local accumulation of inositol. In parallel, we performed control experiments with (13)C-Glucose to compare a different (13)C distribution pattern. Because many functions recently attributed to inositol polyphosphates are localized in the nucleus, we analyzed its relative nuclear concentration. We engineered yeast with human thymidine permease and viral thymidine kinase, then fed them with (15)N-thymidine. This permitted direct analysis of the nuclear DNA through the detection of the (15)N isotopic signal. We found practically no co-localization between inositol signal ((13)C-isotope) and nuclear signal ((15)N-isotope). The (13)C-tag (inositol) accumulation was highest at the plasma membrane and in cytoplasmic domains. In time-course labeling experiments performed with wild type yeast (WT) or modified yeast unable to synthesize inositol from glucose (ino1Δ), the half-time of labeled inositol accumulation was ~1 hour in WT and longer in ino1Δ. These studies should serve as a template to study metabolism and physiological role of inositol using genetically modified yeasts.

  1. Quantitative imaging of cells with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS)—Nanoautography with stable isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Greg; Glassner, Brian J.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2006-07-01

    We describe some technical aspects of the application of multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) to biological research, particularly the use of isotopic tags to localize and measure their incorporation into intracellular compartments. We touch on sample preparation, on image formation, on drift correction and on extraction of quantitative data from isotope ratio imaging. We insist on the wide variety of sample types that can be used, ranging from whole cells prepared directly on Si supports, to thin sections of cells and tissues on Si supports, to ultrathin TEM sections on carbon-coated grid. We attempt to dispel the myth of difficulties in sample preparation, which we view as a needless deterrent to the application of MIMS to the general biological community. We present protocols for the extraction of isotope ratio data from mass images. We illustrate the benefits of using sequential image plane acquisition followed by the application of an autocorrelation algorithm (nanotracking) to remove the effects of specimen drift. We insist on the advantages to display the isotope ratios as hue saturation intensity images.

  2. Regularized image reconstruction algorithms for dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging using a cross-tracer prior.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Cheng, Lishui; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Frey, Eric C

    2011-06-01

    In simultaneous dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging, data are simultaneously acquired to determine the distributions of two radioactive isotopes. The goal of this work was to develop penalized maximum likelihood (PML) algorithms for a novel cross-tracer prior that exploits the fact that the two images reconstructed from simultaneous dual-isotope MPS projection data are perfectly registered in space. We first formulated the simultaneous dual-isotope MPS reconstruction problem as a joint estimation problem. A cross-tracer prior that couples voxel values on both images was then proposed. We developed an iterative algorithm to reconstruct the MPS images that converges to the maximum a posteriori solution for this prior based on separable surrogate functions. To accelerate the convergence, we developed a fast algorithm for the cross-tracer prior based on the complete data OS-EM (COSEM) framework. The proposed algorithm was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to a single-tracer version of the prior that did not include the cross-tracer term. Quantitative evaluations included comparisons of mean and standard deviation images as well as assessment of image fidelity using the mean square error. We also evaluated the cross tracer prior using a three-class observer study with respect to the three-class MPS diagnostic task, i.e., classifying patients as having either no defect, reversible defect, or fixed defects. For this study, a comparison with conventional ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction with postfiltering was performed. The comparisons to the single-tracer prior demonstrated similar resolution for areas of the image with large intensity changes and reduced noise in uniform regions. The cross-tracer prior was also superior to the single-tracer version in terms of restoring image fidelity. Results of the three-class observer study showed that the proposed cross-tracer prior and the convergent algorithms improved the

  3. Isotopic studies in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, E. C., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of lunar soil samples returned by Apollo 11 and 12 flights are discussed. Isotopic studies of the rare gases from Apollo 11 flight lunar samples are presented. The lunar soil analyses indicated the following: (1) high concentrations of solar wind rare gases, (2) isotopic match between solar wind gases and gas components in gas-rich meteorites, and (3) rare gases attributable to spallation reactions induced in heavier nuclides by cosmic ray particles.

  4. High-resolution quantitative imaging of mammalian and bacterial cells using stable isotope mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lechene, Claude; Hillion, Francois; McMahon, Greg; Benson, Douglas; Kleinfeld, Alan M; Kampf, J Patrick; Distel, Daniel; Luyten, Yvette; Bonventre, Joseph; Hentschel, Dirk; Park, Kwon Moo; Ito, Susumu; Schwartz, Martin; Benichou, Gilles; Slodzian, Georges

    2006-01-01

    Background Secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an important tool for investigating isotopic composition in the chemical and materials sciences, but its use in biology has been limited by technical considerations. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS), which combines a new generation of SIMS instrument with sophisticated ion optics, labeling with stable isotopes, and quantitative image-analysis software, was developed to study biological materials. Results The new instrument allows the production of mass images of high lateral resolution (down to 33 nm), as well as the counting or imaging of several isotopes simultaneously. As MIMS can distinguish between ions of very similar mass, such as 12C15N- and 13C14N-, it enables the precise and reproducible measurement of isotope ratios, and thus of the levels of enrichment in specific isotopic labels, within volumes of less than a cubic micrometer. The sensitivity of MIMS is at least 1,000 times that of 14C autoradiography. The depth resolution can be smaller than 1 nm because only a few atomic layers are needed to create an atomic mass image. We illustrate the use of MIMS to image unlabeled mammalian cultured cells and tissue sections; to analyze fatty-acid transport in adipocyte lipid droplets using 13C-oleic acid; to examine nitrogen fixation in bacteria using 15N gaseous nitrogen; to measure levels of protein renewal in the cochlea and in post-ischemic kidney cells using 15N-leucine; to study DNA and RNA co-distribution and uridine incorporation in the nucleolus using 15N-uridine and 81Br of bromodeoxyuridine or 14C-thymidine; to reveal domains in cultured endothelial cells using the native isotopes 12C, 16O, 14N and 31P; and to track a few 15N-labeled donor spleen cells in the lymph nodes of the host mouse. Conclusion MIMS makes it possible for the first time to both image and quantify molecules labeled with stable or radioactive isotopes within subcellular compartments. PMID:17010211

  5. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C.; Reader, Andrew J.; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution

  6. The new frontiers of multimodality and multi-isotope imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnam Azad, Babak; Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2014-06-01

    Technological advances in imaging systems and the development of target specific imaging tracers has been rapidly growing over the past two decades. Recent progress in "all-in-one" imaging systems that allow for automated image coregistration has significantly added to the growth of this field. These developments include ultra high resolution PET and SPECT scanners that can be integrated with CT or MR resulting in PET/CT, SPECT/CT, SPECT/PET and PET/MRI scanners for simultaneous high resolution high sensitivity anatomical and functional imaging. These technological developments have also resulted in drastic enhancements in image quality and acquisition time while eliminating cross compatibility issues between modalities. Furthermore, the most cutting edge technology, though mostly preclinical, also allows for simultaneous multimodality multi-isotope image acquisition and image reconstruction based on radioisotope decay characteristics. These scientific advances, in conjunction with the explosion in the development of highly specific multimodality molecular imaging agents, may aid in realizing simultaneous imaging of multiple biological processes and pave the way towards more efficient diagnosis and improved patient care.

  7. Comparison of image quality of different iodine isotopes (I-123, I-124, and I-131).

    PubMed

    Rault, Erwann; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Van Holen, Roel; De Beenhouwer, Jan; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2007-06-01

    I-131 is a frequently used isotope for radionuclide therapy. This technique for cancer treatment requires a pre-therapeutic dosimetric study. The latter is usually performed (for this radionuclide) by directly imaging the uptake of the therapeutic radionuclide in the body or by replacing it by one of its isotopes, which are more suitable for imaging. This study aimed to compare the image quality that can be achieved by three iodine isotopes: I-131 and I-123 for single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and I-124 for positron emission tomography imaging. The imaging characteristics of each isotope were investigated by simulated data. Their spectrums, point-spread functions, and contrast-recovery curves were drawn and compared. I-131 was imaged with a high-energy all-purpose (HEAP) collimator, whereas two collimators were compared for I-123: low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) and medium energy (ME). No mechanical collimation was used for I-124. The influence of small high-energy peaks (>0.1%) on the main energy window contamination were evaluated. Furthermore, the effect of a scattering medium was investigated and the triple energy window (TEW) correction was used for spectral-based scatter correction. Results showed that I-123 gave the best results with a LEHR collimator when the scatter correction was applied. Without correction, the ME collimator reduced the effects of high-energy contamination. I-131 offered the worst results. This can be explained by the large amount of septal penetration from the photopeak and by the collimator, which gave a low spatial resolution. I-124 gave the best imaging properties owing to its electronic collimation (high sensitivity) and a short coincidence time window.

  8. Quantitative imaging of selenoprotein with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Tang, Shiow-Shih; Guillermier, Christelle; Wang, Mei; Poczatek, Joseph Collin; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Loscalzo, Joseph; Lechene, Claude

    2014-11-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) allows high resolution quantitative imaging of protein and nucleic acid synthesis at the level of a single cell using stable isotope labels. We employed MIMS to determine the compartmental localization of selenoproteins tagged with stable isotope selenium compounds in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC), and to compare the efficiency of labeling (to determine the ideal selenium source) from these compounds: [(82)Se]-selenite, [(77)Se]-seleno-methionine, and [(76)Se]-methyl-selenocysteine. We found that all three selenium sources appear to be localized in the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm in HAEC. Seleno-methionine appears to be a better source for (seleno)protein synthesis. For MIMS detection, we compared freeze-drying to thin layer vs. thin sectioning for sample preparation. MIMS provides a unique and novel way to dissect selenoprotein synthesis in cells.

  9. Study report on a double isotope method of calcium absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Some of the pros and cons of three methods to study gastrointestinal calcium absorption are briefly discussed. The methods are: (1) a balance study; (2) a single isotope method; and (3) a double isotope method. A procedure for the double isotope method is also included.

  10. Microturbulence study of the isotope effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bustos, A.; Bañón Navarro, A.; Görler, T.; Jenko, F.

    2015-01-15

    The influence of the ion mass on the dynamics of magnetized plasmas is an important challenge in fusion research. The discrepancies between the improvement of the magnetic confinement with the ion mass in tokamak experiments and diffusive turbulent transport predictions have remained unexplained for several decades. We refer to this phenomenon as the isotope effect. In this paper, we study this effect with gyrokinetic theory using the GENE code. We find several sets of plasma parameters that correspond to low wavenumber turbulence for which the isotope effect is present, although the intensity is smaller than the experimental observations. We also relate these results to the zonal flow intensity of the system, which is characterized by the average shear flow rate.

  11. O-Isotope Features of Chondrules from Recent SIMS Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenner, T. J.; Ushikubo, T.; Nakashima, D.; Schrader, D. L.; Weisberg, M. K.; Kimura, M.; Kita, N. T.

    2017-02-01

    We highlight results of recent chondrule O-isotope studies by SIMS: (1) primary and secondary features based on the level of isotope homogeneity, (2) comparing ranges of host and relict data among chondrites, (3) O-isotope vs. major element links.

  12. [Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in soil ecological studies].

    PubMed

    Tiunov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The development of stable isotope techniques is one of the main methodological advances in ecology of the last decades of the 20th century. Many biogeochemical processes are accompanied by changes in the ratio between stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen (12C/13C and 14N/15N), which allows different ecosystem components and different ecosystems to be distinguished by their isotopic composition. Analysis of isotopic composition makes it possible to trace matter and energy flows through biological systems and to evaluate the rate of many ecological processes. The main concepts and methods of stable isotope ecology and patterns of stable isotope fractionation during organic matter decomposition are considered with special emphasis on the fractionation of isotopes in food chains and the use of stable isotope studies of trophic relationships between soil animals in the field.

  13. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer

  14. Quantitative evaluation of scintillation camera imaging characteristics of isotopes used in liver radioembolization.

    PubMed

    Elschot, Mattijs; Nijsen, Johannes Franciscus Wilhelmus; Dam, Alida Johanna; de Jong, Hugo Wilhelmus Antonius Maria

    2011-01-01

    Scintillation camera imaging is used for treatment planning and post-treatment dosimetry in liver radioembolization (RE). In yttrium-90 (90Y) RE, scintigraphic images of technetium-99m (99mTc) are used for treatment planning, while 90Y Bremsstrahlung images are used for post-treatment dosimetry. In holmium-166 (166Ho) RE, scintigraphic images of 166Ho can be used for both treatment planning and post-treatment dosimetry. The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate and compare the imaging characteristics of these three isotopes, in order that imaging protocols can be optimized and RE studies with varying isotopes can be compared. Phantom experiments were performed in line with NEMA guidelines to assess the spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate linearity, and contrast recovery of 99mTc, 90Y and 166Ho. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain detailed information about the history of detected photons. The results showed that the use of a broad energy window and the high-energy collimator gave optimal combination of sensitivity, spatial resolution, and primary photon fraction for 90Y Bremsstrahlung imaging, although differences with the medium-energy collimator were small. For 166Ho, the high-energy collimator also slightly outperformed the medium-energy collimator. In comparison with 99mTc, the image quality of both 90Y and 166Ho is degraded by a lower spatial resolution, a lower sensitivity, and larger scatter and collimator penetration fractions. The quantitative evaluation of the scintillation camera characteristics presented in this study helps to optimize acquisition parameters and supports future analysis of clinical comparisons between RE studies.

  15. Quantitative Evaluation of Scintillation Camera Imaging Characteristics of Isotopes Used in Liver Radioembolization

    PubMed Central

    Elschot, Mattijs; Nijsen, Johannes Franciscus Wilhelmus; Dam, Alida Johanna; de Jong, Hugo Wilhelmus Antonius Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Scintillation camera imaging is used for treatment planning and post-treatment dosimetry in liver radioembolization (RE). In yttrium-90 (90Y) RE, scintigraphic images of technetium-99m (99mTc) are used for treatment planning, while 90Y Bremsstrahlung images are used for post-treatment dosimetry. In holmium-166 (166Ho) RE, scintigraphic images of 166Ho can be used for both treatment planning and post-treatment dosimetry. The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate and compare the imaging characteristics of these three isotopes, in order that imaging protocols can be optimized and RE studies with varying isotopes can be compared. Methodology/Principal Findings Phantom experiments were performed in line with NEMA guidelines to assess the spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate linearity, and contrast recovery of 99mTc, 90Y and 166Ho. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain detailed information about the history of detected photons. The results showed that the use of a broad energy window and the high-energy collimator gave optimal combination of sensitivity, spatial resolution, and primary photon fraction for 90Y Bremsstrahlung imaging, although differences with the medium-energy collimator were small. For 166Ho, the high-energy collimator also slightly outperformed the medium-energy collimator. In comparison with 99mTc, the image quality of both 90Y and 166Ho is degraded by a lower spatial resolution, a lower sensitivity, and larger scatter and collimator penetration fractions. Conclusions/Significance The quantitative evaluation of the scintillation camera characteristics presented in this study helps to optimize acquisition parameters and supports future analysis of clinical comparisons between RE studies. PMID:22073149

  16. Chemical Imaging and Stable Isotope Analysis of Atmospheric Particles by NanoSIMS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, B.; Harris, E. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Wiedemann, K. T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Tilgner, A.; Fomba, K. W.; Schneider, J.; Roth, A.; Gnauk, T.; Fahlbusch, B.; Mertes, S.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Gunthe, S. S.; Smith, M.; Artaxo, P. P.; Gilles, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L.; Moffet, R.; Weigand, M.; Martin, S. T.; Poeschl, U.; Andreae, M. O.; Hoppe, P.; Herrmann, H.; Borrmann, S.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical imaging analysis of the internal distribution of chemical compounds by a combination of SEM-EDX, and NanoSIMS allows investigating the physico-chemical properties and isotopic composition of individual aerosol particles. Stable sulphur isotope analysis provides insight into the sources, sinks and oxidation pathways of SO2 in the environment. Oxidation by OH radicals, O3 and H2O2 enriches the heavier isotope in the product sulphate, whereas oxidation by transition metal ions (TMI), hypohalites and hypohalous acids depletes the heavier isotope in the product sulphate. The isotope fractionation during SO2 oxidation by stabilized Criegee Intermediate radicals is unknown. We studied the relationship between aerosol chemical composition and predominant sulphate formation pathways in continental clouds in Central Europe and during the wet season in the Amazon rain forest. Sulphate formation in continental clouds in Central Europe was studied during HCCT-2010, a lagrangian-type field experiment, during which an orographic cloud was used as a natural flow-through reactor to study in-cloud aerosol processing (Harris et al. 2013). Sulphur isotopic compositions in SO2 and H2SO4 gas and particulate sulphate were measured and changes in the sulphur isotope composition of SO2 between the upwind and downwind measurement sites were used to determine the dominant SO2 chemical removal process occurring in the cloud. Changes in the isotopic composition of particulate sulphate revealed that transition metal catalysis pathway was the dominant SO2 oxidation pathway. This reaction occurred primarily on coarse mineral dust particles. Thus, sulphate produced due to in-cloud SO2 oxidation is removed relatively quickly from the atmosphere and has a minor climatic effect. The aerosol samples from the Amazonian rainforest, a pristine tropical environment, were collected during the rainy season. The samples were found to be dominated by SOA particles in the fine mode and primary

  17. A high-resolution study of isotopic compositions of precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeonghoon; Kim, Songyi; Han, Yeongcheol; Oh, Yoon Seok; Kim, Young-Hee; Kim, Hyerin; Ham, Ji-Young; Choi, Hye-Bin; Na, Un-Sung; Koh, Dong-Chan

    2015-04-01

    Isotopic compositions of precipitation have been used to understand moisture transport in the atmosphere and interactions between precipitation and groundwater. Isotopic compositions of speleothems and ice cores, so called, "paleoarchives", can be utilized to interpret climate of the past and global circulation models (GCMs), which are able to explain the paleoarchives, can be validated by the precipitation isotopes. The developments of stable isotope analyzers make high-resolution isotopic studies feasible and a high-resolution study of precipitation isotopes is needed. For this study, precipitation samples were collected for every 5 to 15 minutes, depending on precipitation rates, using an auto-sampler for precipitation isotopes near coastal area. The isotopic compositions of precipitation range from -5.7‰ (-40.1‰)) to -10.8‰ (-74.3‰)) for oxygen (hydrogen). The slope of δ18O-δD diagram for the whole period is 6.8, but that of each storm is 5.1, 4.2, 7.9 and 7.7, respectively. It indicates that evaporation occurred during the first two storms, while the latter two storms did not experience any evaporation. The isotopic fractionations of precipitation has significant implications for the water cycle and high-resolution data of precipitation isotopes will be needed for the future studies related to the precipitation isotopes.

  18. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  19. Chemical imaging of biological materials by NanoSIMS using isotopic and elemental labels

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P K; Fallon, S J; Pett-Ridge, J; Ghosal, S; Hutcheon, I D

    2006-04-10

    The NanoSIMS 50 combines unprecedented spatial resolution (as good as 50 nm) with ultra-high sensitivity (minimum detection limit of {approx}200 atoms). The NanoSIMS 50 incorporates an array of detectors, enabling simultaneous collection of 5 species originating from the same sputtered volume of a sample. The primary ion beam (Cs{sup +} or O{sup -}) can be scanned across the sample to produce quantitative secondary ion images. This capability for multiple isotope imaging with high spatial resolution provides a novel new approach to the study of biological materials. Studies can be made of sub-regions of tissues, mammalian cells, and bacteria. Major, minor and trace element distributions can be mapped on a submicron scale, growth and metabolism can be tracked using stable isotope labels, and biogenic origin can be determined based on composition. We have applied this technique extensively to mammalian and prokaryotic cells and bacterial spores. The NanoSIMS technology enables the researcher to interrogate the fate of molecules of interest within cells and organs through elemental and isotopic labeling. Biological applications at LLNL will be discussed.

  20. Dual Isotope SPECT Study With Epilepsy Patients Using Semiconductor SPECT System.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Atsuro; Sakurai, Kotarou; Kurita, Tsugiko; Takeuchi, Wataru; Toyonaga, Takuya; Hirata, Kenji; Kobashi, Keiji; Katoh, Chietsugu; Kubo, Naoki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2017-09-01

    We developed a prototype CdTe SPECT system with 4-pixel matched collimator for brain study. This system provides high-energy-resolution (6.6%), high-sensitivity (220 cps/MBq/head), and high-spatial-resolution images. The aim of this study was to evaluate dual-isotope study of CBF and central benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) images using Tc-ECD and I-IMZ with the new SPECT system in patients with epilepsy comparing with single-isotope study using the conventional scintillation gamma camera. This study included 13 patients with partial epilepsy. The BZR images were acquired at 3 hours after I-IMZ injection for 20 minutes. The images of IMZ were acquired with a conventional 3-head scintillation gamma camera. After BZR image acquisition with the conventional camera, Tc-ECD was injected, and CBF and BZR images were acquired simultaneously 5 minutes after ECD injection with the new SPECT system. The CBF images were also acquired with the conventional camera on separate days. The findings were visually analyzed, and 3D-SSP maximum Z scores of lesions were compared between the 2 studies. There were 47 abnormal lesions on BZR images and 60 abnormal lesions on CBF images in the single-isotope study with the conventional camera. Dual-isotope study with the new system showed concordant abnormal findings of 46 of 47 lesions on BZR and 54 of 60 lesions on CBF images with the single-isotope study with the conventional camera. There was high agreement between the 2 studies in both BZR and CBF findings (Cohen κ values = 0.96 for BZR and 0.78 for CBF). In semiquantitative analysis, maximum Z scores of dual-isotope study with the new system strongly correlated with those of single-isotope study with the conventional camera (BZR: r = 0.82, P < 0.05, CBF: r = 0.87, P < 0.05). Our new SPECT system permits dual-isotope study for pixel-by-pixel analysis of CBF and BZR information with the same pathophysiological condition in patients with epilepsy.

  1. In vivo characterization of the novel CD44v6-targeting Fab fragment AbD15179 for molecular imaging of squamous cell carcinoma: a dual-isotope study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck region (HNSCC) offer a diagnostic challenge due to difficulties to detect small tumours and metastases. Imaging methods available are not sufficient, and radio-immunodiagnostics could increase specificity and sensitivity of diagnostics. The objective of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the in vivo properties of the radiolabelled CD44v6-targeting fragment AbD15179 and to assess its utility as a targeting agent for radio-immunodiagnostics of CD44v6-expressing tumours. Methods The fully human CD44v6-targeting Fab fragment AbD15179 was labelled with 111In or 125I, as models for radionuclides suitable for imaging with SPECT or PET. Species specificity, antigen specificity and internalization properties were first assessed in vitro. In vivo specificity and biodistribution were then evaluated in tumour-bearing mice using a dual-tumour and dual-isotope setup. Results Both species-specific and antigen-specific binding of the conjugates were demonstrated in vitro, with no detectable internalization. The in vivo studies demonstrated specific tumour binding and favourable tumour targeting properties for both conjugates, albeit with higher tumour uptake, slower tumour dissociation, higher tumour-to-blood ratio and higher CD44v6 sensitivity for the 111In-labelled fragment. In contrast, the 125I-Fab demonstrated more favourable tumour-to-organ ratios for liver, spleen and kidneys. Conclusions We conclude that AbD15179 efficiently targets CD44v6-expressing squamous cell carcinoma xenografts, and particularly, the 111In-Fab displayed high and specific tumour uptake. CD44v6 emerges as a suitable target for radio-immunodiagnostics, and a fully human antibody fragment such as AbD15179 can enable further clinical imaging studies. PMID:24598405

  2. Metamorphic, microstructural and isotopic studies of mylonites

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.K.; Hewitt, D.A.; Simpson, C.; Rimstidt, J.D.; Sutter, J.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in tectono-thermal models of orogenic belts require that the timing of thrust stacking and its relationship to the thermal history be evaluated. Before measuring radiometric ages of mylonites in thrust zones, it is critical to document the size of texturally and mineralogically equilibrated domains. A constancy of partition coefficients for the major and minor elements of minerals in textural equilibrium would be consistent with trace elements and isotopic equilibrium. Preliminary studies along the Brevard zone show non-equilibrium assemblages even in the highest strain mylonites. Such disequilibrium prohibits the use of whole rock ages to estimate the last episode of deformation; mineral ages probably give better estimates. The authors anticipate using a variety of radiometric systems on minerals in the fault zones to decipher the ages of thrusting. Recent deep drilling in the Kola Peninsula has revealed the availability of large volumes of fluids in the 4.5 to 9 km interval with temperatures over 150/sup 0/C. The presence of such fluids in deep crustal environments should accelerate the rates of reactions, crack propagation, hydrolytic weakening, dynamic recrystallization and recovery processes. Accelerated hydration reactions could also provide zones for development of faults. Microstructural analysis of mylonites from successively deeper structural levels will indicate the predominant mode of deformation and will test the traditional view of increasing ductility with depth. Geochemical and stable isotope analyses of the mylonites may also reveal enrichment of metals from possible deep crustal fluids.

  3. [Experimental study on the Eu isotopic enrichment].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xue-ren; Zhong, Da; Mei, Gang-hua; Zhu, Xi-wen

    2002-10-01

    The polarized atomic beam has found many applications, such as in studying atomic scattering processes, producing polarized nucleus, verifying the parity principle, measuring surface parameters and enriching isotopes. In this paper, we mainly described the experiment of Eu isotope enrichment by means of magnetic deflection. According to the special inner energy level structure of Eu atom, we analyzed the theory of the polarized atomic beam and described the main experimental set-up. Using one coherent laser with the wavelength of 601.9 nm and sigma polarization, Eu153 atoms have been selectively optical pumped and polarized, so positive and negative polarized atomic beams could be produced. The polarized atomic beams have been focused and defocused after passing through the deflection by hex-magnet. Finally, some clear enrichmental signal has been obtained in way of hot-wire detection. During the process of the experiment, we carefully selected the optimized conditions, the Eu153 enrichment effect of 4% can be achieved using only one coherent laser.

  4. Dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2013-02-05

    A dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources includes a detector arrangement consists of three detectors downstream from the object under observation. The latter detector, which operates as a beam monitor, is an integrating detector that monitors the total beam power arriving at its surface. The first detector and the middle detector each include an integrating detector surrounding a foil. The foils of these two detectors are made of the same atomic material, but each foil is a different isotope, e.g., the first foil may comprise U235 and second foil may comprise U238. The integrating detectors surrounding these pieces of foil measure the total power scattered from the foil and can be similar in composition to the final beam monitor. Non-resonant photons will, after calibration, scatter equally from both foils.

  5. Quantifying cell division with deuterated water and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Matthew L; Guillermier, Christelle; Wang, Mei; Lechene, Claude P

    2014-11-01

    Cell division is commonly quantified by the administration of nucleotide labels that are incorporated by the nucleotide salvage pathway. A new approach uses precursors of the de novo nucleotide synthesis pathway, such as labeled water or glucose. Because such precursors are not specific for DNA synthesis, studies utilizing this approach have analyzed isolated genomic DNA to exclude nonspecific background labeling. We hypothesized that pulse-chase administration of stable isotope labeled water would result in sufficient nuclear labeling to enable discrimination of recently divided cells by quantitative ion microscopy. We administered deuterated (D)-water and (15)N-thymidine to mice concurrently, guided by the rationale that (15)N-thymidine incorporation would serve as a "gold standard" to identify dividing cells. We show both qualitatively and quantitatively that dividing cells in the small intestine ((15)N-labeled) demonstrate a discernable D-signal in the nucleus not observed in undivided cells ((15)N-unlabled). Correlation with (31)P(-) and (12)C(15)N(-):(12)C(14)N(-) images demonstrate preferential localization of (2)H labeling in regions of the nucleus with high DNA content as expected of labeling being incorporated during DNA synthesis and cell division. These data support the concept that stable isotope tagged precursors of the de novo nucleotide synthesis pathway can be used in concert with NanoSIMS to study cell division in vivo. A major implication of this study then is the possibility of using stable isotope tagged water and MIMS to study human cell turnover.

  6. Two-Dimensional Isotope Imaging of Radiation Shielded Materials Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Hayakawa, Takehito; Kii, Toshiteru; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Kikuzawa, Nobuhiro; Masuda, Kai; Kitatani, Fumito; Harada, Hideo

    2011-10-01

    A novel method for two-dimensional (2D) imaging of a specific isotope in a material, which is hidden by a thick radiation shield is presented. Nuclear resonance fluorescence and the laser Compton scattering are used in the present method. We measured γ-rays of 5512 keV from the nuclear resonance fluorescence of 208Pb at several points, and obtained a 2D image of isotope distribution.

  7. Stable Chlorine Isotope Study: Application to Early Solar System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mala,ira. M/; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2010-01-01

    A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each other [4], some authors have claimed that the Cl-37/Cl-35 ratio of geological samples obtained by TIMS technique are, in general, misleadingly too high and variable compared to those of IRMS [3]. For example, almost no differences of Cl isotope composition were observed among mantle materials and carbonaceous meteorites by [3]. On the other hand, according to more recent IRMS work [2], significant Cl isotope variations are confirmed for mantle materials. Therefore, additional careful investigation of Cl isotope analyses are now required to confirm real chlorine isotope variations for planetary materials including carbonaceous chondrites [5]. A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each

  8. Organic Analysis in the Miller Range 090657 CR2 Chondrite: Part 3 C and N Isotopic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Elsila, J. E.; Berger, E. L.; Burton, A. S.; Clemett, S. J.; Cao, T.

    2016-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of organic material, ranging from soluble discrete molecules to insoluble nanoglobules of macro-molecular carbon. The relationship between the soluble organic molecules, macromolecular organic material, and host minerals are poorly understood. Large H, C and N isotopic anomalies suggest some organic components formed in low-T interstellar or outer Solar System environments. The highest isotope anomalies occur in m-scale inclusions in the most primitive materials, such as cometary dust and the least altered carbonaceous chondrites. Often, the hosts of these isotopically anomalous 'hotspots' are discrete organic nanoglobules that probably formed in the outermost reaches of the protosolar disk or cold molecular cloud. Molecular and isotopic studies of meteoritic organic matter are aimed at identifying the chemical properties and formation processes of interstellar organic materials and the subsequent chemical evolutionary pathways in various Solar System environments. The combination of soluble and insoluble analyses with in situ and bulk studies provides powerful constraints on the origin and evolution of organic matter in the Solar System. Using macroscale extraction and analysis techniques as well as microscale in situ observations we have been studying both insoluble and soluble organic material in primitive astromaterial samples. Here, we present results of bulk C and N isotopic measurements and coordinated in situ C and N isotopic imaging and mineralogical and textural studies of carbonaceous materials in a Cr2 carbonaceous chondrite. In accompanying abstracts we discuss the morphology and distribution of carbonaceous components and soluble organic species of this meteorite.

  9. Dynamic dual-isotope molecular imaging elucidates principles for optimizing intrathecal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel A.; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Orcutt, Kelly D.; Silva, Matthew D.; Lobo, Merryl; Wellman, Tyler; Hoppin, Jack

    2016-01-01

    The intrathecal (IT) dosing route offers a seemingly obvious solution for delivering drugs directly to the central nervous system. However, gaps in understanding drug molecule behavior within the anatomically and kinetically unique environment of the mammalian IT space have impeded the establishment of pharmacokinetic principles for optimizing regional drug exposure along the neuraxis. Here, we have utilized high-resolution single-photon emission tomography with X-ray computed tomography to study the behavior of multiple molecular imaging tracers following an IT bolus injection, with supporting histology, autoradiography, block-face tomography, and MRI. Using simultaneous dual-isotope imaging, we demonstrate that the regional CNS tissue exposure of molecules with varying chemical properties is affected by IT space anatomy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, CSF clearance routes, and the location and volume of the injected bolus. These imaging approaches can be used across species to optimize the safety and efficacy of IT drug therapy for neurological disorders. PMID:27699254

  10. High-precision γ -ray spectroscopy of the cardiac PET imaging isotope Rb82 and its impact on dosimetry

    DOE PAGES

    Nino, M. N.; McCutchan, E. A.; Smith, S. V.; ...

    2016-02-01

    82Rb is a positron-emitting isotope used in cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) imaging which has been reported to deliver a significantly lower effective radiation dose than analogous imaging isotopes like 201Tl and 99mTc sestamibi. High-quality β-decay data are essential to accurately appraise the total dose received by the patients. A source of 82Sr was produced at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), transported to Argonne National Laboratory, and studied with the Gammasphere facility. Significant revisions have been made to the level scheme of 82Kr including 12 new levels, 50 new γ-ray transitions, and the determination of many new spin assignmentsmore » through angular correlations. Lastly, these new high-quality data allow a precise reappraisal of the β-decay strength function and thus the consequent dose received by patients.« less

  11. High-precision γ -ray spectroscopy of the cardiac PET imaging isotope 82Rb and its impact on dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, M. N.; McCutchan, E. A.; Smith, S. V.; Lister, C. J.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Muench, L.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Zhu, S.

    2016-02-01

    82Rb is a positron-emitting isotope used in cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) imaging which has been reported to deliver a significantly lower effective radiation dose than analogous imaging isotopes like 201Tl and 99 mTc sestamibi. High-quality β -decay data are essential to accurately appraise the total dose received by the patients. A source of 82Sr was produced at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), transported to Argonne National Laboratory, and studied with the Gammasphere facility. Significant revisions have been made to the level scheme of 82Kr including 12 new levels, 50 new γ -ray transitions, and the determination of many new spin assignments through angular correlations. These new high-quality data allow a precise reappraisal of the β -decay strength function and thus the consequent dose received by patients.

  12. Studies of enzyme mechanism using isotopic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.

    1987-01-01

    The isotope partitioning studies of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme reaction were examined with five transitory complexes including E:NAD, E:NAD:Mg, E:malate, E:Mg:malate, and E:NAD:malate. Three productive complexes, E:NAD, E:NAD:Mg, and E:Mg:malate, were obtained, suggesting a steady-state random mechanism. Data for trapping with E:/sup 14/C-NAD indicate a rapid equilibrium addition of Mg/sup 2 +/ prior to the addition of malate. Trapping with /sup 14/C-malate could only be obtained from the E:Mg/sup 2 +/:/sup 14/C-malate complex, while no trapping from E:/sup 14/C-malate was obtained under feasible experimental conditions. The equations for the isotope partitioning studies varying two substrates in the chase solution in an ordered terreactant reaction were derived, allowing a determination of the relative rates of substrate dissociation to the catalytic reaction for each of the productive transitory complexes. NAD and malate are released from the central complex at an identical rate, equal to the catalytic rate. The release of NAD from E:NAD and E:NAD:Mg complexes is 2- to 4-fold and 5- to 9-fold V/sub max//E/sub t/, respectively. The release of malate from the E:Mg:malate complex is 0.1- to 0.3-fold of V/sub max//E/sub t/. The individual rate constants for association and dissociation of the substrates, NAD and malate have been estimated.

  13. Intramolecular Isotopic Studies: Chemical Enhancements and Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    As mass spectroscopic and NMR-based methods now appropriately flourish, chemical techniques should not be forgotten. First, the methods developed by pioneering intramolecular analysts can be reapplied to new samples. Second, they can be extended. The synthesis of intramolecular isotopic standards is particularly important and straightforward. It requires only that a chemical reaction has no secondary products. An example is provided by the addition of carbon dioxide to a Grignard reagent. The reaction proceeds with an isotope effect. The isotopic composition of the carboxyl group in the acid which is produced is thus not equal to that of the starting carbon dioxide but the unconsumed CO2 can be recovered and analyzed. A simple titration can show that all the rest of the CO2 is in the product acid. The isotopic composition of the carboxyl group can then be calculated by difference. The product is an intramolecular isotopic standard, an organic molecule in which the isotopic composition of a specific carbon position is known accurately. Both analysts and reviewers can thus gain invaluable confidence in the accuracy of instrumental results. A second example: the haloform reaction quantitatively degrades methyl ketones, producing a carboxylic acid which can be decarboxylated to determine the isotopic composition of the parent carbonyl and a haloform (CHI3, for example) that can be combusted to determine the isotopic composition of the methyl group. Ketones thus analyzed can be combined with Grignard reagents to yield carbon skeletons in which the isotopic compositions of internal and terminal -CH2- and -CH3 groups are known accurately. In general, analysts accustomed to demanding quantitative reactions should remember the power of mass balances and recognize that many organic-chemical reactions, while not quantitative, lack side products and can be driven to the total consumption of at least one reactant.

  14. Image segmentation for uranium isotopic analysis by SIMS: Combined adaptive thresholding and marker controlled watershed approach

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Zimmer, Mindy M.; Barrett, Christopher A.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-05-31

    A novel approach to particle identification and particle isotope ratio determination has been developed for nuclear safeguard applications. This particle search approach combines an adaptive thresholding algorithm and marker-controlled watershed segmentation (MCWS) transform, which improves the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) isotopic analysis of uranium containing particle populations for nuclear safeguards applications. The Niblack assisted MCWS approach (a.k.a. SEEKER) developed for this work has improved the identification of isotopically unique uranium particles under conditions that have historically presented significant challenges for SIMS image data processing techniques. Particles obtained from five NIST uranium certified reference materials (CRM U129A, U015, U150, U500 and U850) were successfully identified in regions of SIMS image data 1) where a high variability in image intensity existed, 2) where particles were touching or were in close proximity to one another and/or 3) where the magnitude of ion signal for a given region was count limited. Analysis of the isotopic distributions of uranium containing particles identified by SEEKER showed four distinct, accurately identified 235U enrichment distributions, corresponding to the NIST certified 235U/238U isotope ratios for CRM U129A/U015 (not statistically differentiated), U150, U500 and U850. Additionally, comparison of the minor uranium isotope (234U, 235U and 236U) atom percent values verified that, even in the absence of high precision isotope ratio measurements, SEEKER could be used to segment isotopically unique uranium particles from SIMS image data. Although demonstrated specifically for SIMS analysis of uranium containing particles for nuclear safeguards, SEEKER has application in addressing a broad set of image processing challenges.

  15. Li Isotope Studies of Olivine in Mantle Xenoliths by SIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, D. R.; Hervig, R. L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    Variations in the ratio of the stable isotopes of Li are a potentially powerful tracer of processes in planetary and nebular environments [1]. Large differences in the 7Li/6Li ratio between the terrestrial upper mantle and various crustal materials make Li isotope composition a potentially powerful tracer of crustal recycling processes on Earth [2]. Recent SIMS studies of terrestrial mantle and Martian meteorite samples report intra-mineral Li isotope zoning [3-5]. Substantial Li isotope heterogeneity also exists within and between the components of chondritic meteorites [6,7]. Experimental studies of Li diffusion suggest the potential for rapid isotope exchange at elevated temperatures [8]. Large variations in 7Li, exceeding the range of unaltered basalts, occur in terrestrial mantle-derived xenoliths from individual localities [9]. The origins of these variations are not fully understood.

  16. Isotopic Forced-Diffusion Technique for Soil Respiration Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, G.; Nickerson, N. R.; Egan, J.; Risk, D. A.; Jacobson, G. A.; Cunningham, K. L.; Saad, N.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic ratio measurements of soil-respired CO2 can provide a wealth of insight into soil-level carbon-cycle processes that is not available using bulk CO2 emission measurements alone. Soil contains substantial amounts of carbon, and can contribute CO2 to the atmosphere through various respiration pathways. Isotopic analysis can distinguish autotrophic root and rhizosphere respiration from heterotrophic respiration due to the catabolism of soil organic matter (SOM). Because of this, researchers have shifted their efforts toward the use of natural abundance and tracer isotopic techniques in ecosystem respiration studies. However, recent experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that these traditional techniques yield biased estimates of the soil isotopic flux, largely owing to disturbances to the soil's natural diffusive regime. To help eliminate these biases, we have developed a new technique called Isotopic Forced-Diffusion (IsoFD). The Isotopic Forced-Diffusion technique integrates a Forced Diffusion dynamic chamber with a cavity ringdown spectrometer measuring d13C-CO2, which are operated together as an integrated system. The system produces real-time, high temporal resolution isotopic soil efflux data. Here, we will present the theory behind this technique, present laboratory data demonstrating the accuracy and precision of the technique in controlled environments and finally field data from two campaigns, showing the ability of the Iso-FD chamber to detect natural diurnal changes in isotopic signature as well as differentiate sources in C3-C4 transitional systems.

  17. Potential use of environmental isotopes in pollutant migration studies.

    PubMed

    Miljević, Nada; Golobocanin, Dusan

    2007-06-01

    This article presents the use of natural abundance stable isotope (hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, chlorine) analysis data as a tool for providing important information about the origin of contaminants, the contribution of different sources to a multi-source plume, characterisation of their complex transport (rate and mechanisms) and for evaluating the success of contaminated site remediation. Isotopic signatures of contaminants are useful tracers of their sources, while isotopic fractionation can be used to quantitatively assess the progress of an environmental process such as biodegradation. This new isotopic approach is reliable and can offer more information than traditional techniques in pollutant migration studies, particularly after waste disposal. During biological degradation of any organic compound, molecules containing lighter isotopes are degraded, and the portion of heavier isotopes in the substrate is increased, identifying specific microbial roles in biogeochemical cycling. Since isotopic fractionation is proportional to degradation, depending on the type of contamination, a microbial degradation of 50% to 99% of the initial concentration can be quantified using isotope ratio measurements.

  18. Isotope tracers in oceanographic studies: some sticky wickets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GROUSSET, F. E.

    2001-12-01

    Trace elements and isotopes have found widespread applications in oceanography. In most cases, their use has led to a better understanding of many oceanic processes (viz., chemical inputs to the ocean, chemical fluxes through the water column, particulate- dissolved-matter exchanges, watermass circulation, etc), permitting the application of reliable models. Anomalies have been observed, however, in the data on some tracers of particulates that should be given more attention in future. For example, it is widely recognized that the Sr isotopic composition of detrital particles is grain-size dependant (Dasch, 1969), whereas their Nd isotopic composition would not vary with grain-size (Goldstein et al., 1984). Recent sudies of detrital grain-size fractions, however, reveal that Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes can be strongly grain-size dependant. Some of these same isotopes can be used to study dissolved phases. The isotopic composition of Nd associated with iron oxides deposited on surface sediment planktic foraminifers has been used as a watermass tracer (Palmer et al., 1985). In the northern Atlantic surface sediments, however, the Nd isotope composition of the foraminifers is in fact mostly controled by the isotopic composition of the ambient detrital particles that are partially dissolved into the intertitial waters, subsequently contaminating the foraminifers (Grousset et al., 1986). The original watermass fingerprint is thus partly obscured. Another example is provided by iron-manganese nodules. In the Pacific ocean, the temporal evolution of the Pb-isotope composition of three nodules located at different latitudes has been explained by their plate-tectonic latitudinal shift through time (Meynadier, 2000). In the same ocean, another study still in progress of two nodules from a unique box-core reveals two totally different temporal behaviors of their trace elements and isotopes (Bernard et al., in prep.). Such anomalies will be reviewed and discussed.

  19. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yunyan; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Dai, Jinxing; Katz, Barry; Zhang, Shuichang; Tang, Yongchun

    2011-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2 cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using δD values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the δ 13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that δD values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that δD values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane.

  1. Noninvasive imaging of protein metabolic labeling in single human cells using stable isotopes and Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Lenferink, Aufried; Otto, Cees

    2008-12-15

    We have combined nonresonant Raman microspectroscopy and spectral imaging with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to selectively detect the incorporation of deuterium-labeled phenylalanine, tyrosine, and methionine into proteins in intact, single HeLa cells. The C-D stretching vibrational bands in these amino acids are observed in the 2100-2300 cm(-1) spectral region that is devoid of vibrational contributions from other, nondeuterated intracellular constituents. We found that incubation with deuterated amino acids for 8 h in cell culture already led to clearly detectable isotope-related signals in Raman spectra of HeLa cells. As expected, the level of isotope incorporation into proteins increased with incubation time, reaching 55% for deuterated phenylalanine after 28 h. Raman spectral imaging of HeLa cells incubated with deuterium-labeled amino acids showed similar spatial distributions for both isotope-labeled and unlabeled proteins, as evidenced by Raman ratio imaging. The SILAC-Raman methodology presented here combines the strengths of stable isotopic labeling of cells with the nondestructive and quantitative nature of Raman chemical imaging and is likely to become a powerful tool in both cell biology applications and research on tissues or whole organisms.

  2. Embryotoxicity of stable isotopes and use of stable isotopes in studies of teratogenetic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Spielmann, H.; Nau, H.

    1986-07-01

    Experiments on teratogenic effects of stable isotopes from our own and other laboratories are evaluated. In the first series of investigations, the enrichment of the stable isotope /sup 13/C derived from U-/sup 13/C-glucose was studied in mouse embryos at various stages of development, including limb buds in organ culture. Preimplantation mouse embryos incubated in vitro in /sup 13/C-enriched medium for 48 hours showed normal development during subsequent differentiation in vitro and also in vivo after embryo transfer to faster mothers. These embryos were 15% to 20% enriched in /sup 13/C. Administration of U-13-C-glucose to pregnant mice during organogenesis led to an increase of the absolute /sup 13/C content of the embryo for several days after the end of isotope administration, whereas the enrichment in maternal tissue decreased. No alterations of embryonic development were detected due to stable isotope enrichment. Development of cultured mouse limb buds was unaffected by incubation with 82 mol% U-/sup 13/C-glucose as judged from morphologic and biochemical criteria. The second part of the article describes the value of deuterium-labeled drugs as probes into the mechanism of activation of teratogenic metabolites. A comparison of the pharmacokinetics as well as the teratogenicity between cyclophosphamide and some specific deuterium-labeled analogues showed that the isotope effect observed can be related to a particular metabolic pathway crucial for teratogenic activation by this drug.

  3. Lead isotope study of orogenic lherzolite massifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelin, Bruno; Allègre, Claude J.

    1988-12-01

    Orogenic lherzolites allow for almost "in-situ" observation of mantle isotopic heterogeneities on a restricted geographical scale, in contrast to basalts for which melting processes have averaged original mantle compositions over uncertain scales. Pb isotopes from whole rocks and clinopyroxenes from the massifs of Lherz (Pyrenees), Lanzo (Alps), Beni Bousera (Morocco) and Zabargad (Red Sea) show internal heterogeneities that encompass the entire range of variation observed in oceanic basalts. Some depleted lherzolites have a very unradiogenic composition similar to that of the most depleted ridge tholeiites. Pyroxenites from mafic layers generally have more radiogenic compositions, some of them comparable to the most radiogenic oceanic island results. The isotopic differences between lherzolites and pyroxenites vanish where layers are very closely spaced ( < 2 cm). In this case, the lherzolites may have equilibrated with the more Pb-rich pyroxenites through solid-state diffusion under mantle conditions. These results directly illustrate the smallest scales at which Pb isotopic heterogeneity may survive within the mantle. The genesis of these heterogeneities are discussed within the framework of the "marble cake" mantle model [1], where lherzolites are residues left over after oceanic crust extraction, whereas pyroxenites represent either basaltic or cumulate portions of the oceanic crust, reinjected by subduction and stretched by solid-state mixing during mantle convection. The Pb isotope data suggest that each massif was involved in several cycles of convective overturn, segregation and reinjection of the oceanic crust, during periods well over 1 Ga. If the upper mantle is made of interlayered radiogenic and unradiogenic layers, basalt heterogeneities may result from preferential melt-extraction from different layers depending on the degree of melting, as well as from large-scale, plume-related mantle heterogeneities. Orogenic lherzolites therefore allow direct

  4. Fluence dependent mixing of isotopic targets: a theoretical case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, J. J.; Conrad, U.; Urbassek, H. M.; Abril, I.; Gras-Martí, A.

    1992-04-01

    The collisional mixing of two isotopic species in a Ge sample by 5 keV Ar bombardment is studied theoretically. The evolution of the target isotope concentrations with fluence is calculated, by solving numerically the balance equation with the help of the TUI code. Its analytical input quantities for the atomic relocation under ion bombardment are checked against the predictions of a Monte Carlo computer simulation. In steady state, the light isotope is found to be depleted up to depths of around 90 Å, and enriched further inside. We compare the dependence of the preferential sputter enrichment on fluence with experimental data.

  5. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Isotopic Yttrium-90-Labeled Rare Earth Fluoride Nanocrystals for Multimodal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Paik, Taejong; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Mikitsh, John L; Friedberg, Joseph S; Pryma, Daniel A; Murray, Christopher B

    2015-09-22

    Isotopically labeled nanomaterials have recently attracted much attention in biomedical research, environmental health studies, and clinical medicine because radioactive probes allow the elucidation of in vitro and in vivo cellular transport mechanisms, as well as the unambiguous distribution and localization of nanomaterials in vivo. In addition, nanocrystal-based inorganic materials have a unique capability of customizing size, shape, and composition; with the potential to be designed as multimodal imaging probes. Size and shape of nanocrystals can directly influence interactions with biological systems, hence it is important to develop synthetic methods to design radiolabeled nanocrystals with precise control of size and shape. Here, we report size- and shape-controlled synthesis of rare earth fluoride nanocrystals doped with the β-emitting radioisotope yttrium-90 ((90)Y). Size and shape of nanocrystals are tailored via tight control of reaction parameters and the type of rare earth hosts (e.g., Gd or Y) employed. Radiolabeled nanocrystals are synthesized in high radiochemical yield and purity as well as excellent radiolabel stability in the face of surface modification with different polymeric ligands. We demonstrate the Cerenkov radioluminescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging capabilities of (90)Y-doped GdF3 nanoplates, which offer unique opportunities as a promising platform for multimodal imaging and targeted therapy.

  6. Isotopic Forced-Diffusion Technique for Soil Respiration Pathway Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickerson, Nick; Egan, Jocelyn; Risk, David; McArthur, Gordon; Cunningham, Kevin; Jacobson, Gloria; Saad, Nabil; Panetta, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Isotopic ratio measurements of soil-respired CO2 can provide a wealth of insight into soil-level carbon-cycle processes that is not available using bulk CO2 emissions measurements alone. Soil contains substantial amounts of carbon, and can contribute CO2to the atmosphere through various respiration pathways. Isotopic analysis can distinguish autotrophic root and rhizosphere respiration from heterotrophic respiration due to the catabolism of soil organic matter (SOM). Because of this, researchers have shifted their efforts toward the use of natural abundance and tracer isotopic techniques in ecosystem respiration studies. However, recent experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that these traditional techniques yield biased estimates of the soil isotopic flux, largely owing to disturbances to the soil's natural diffusive regime. To help eliminate theses biases, we have developed a new technique called Isotopic Forced-Diffusion (IsoFD). The Isotopic Forced-Diffusion technique integrates a Forced Diffusion dynamic chamber with a cavity ringdown spectrometer measuring δ13C-CO2, which are operated together as a closed, recycling system where the leakage and pressures through the system are properly managed. The system produces real-time, high temporal resolution isotopic soil efflux data. We will present the theory behind this technique and present preliminary laboratory and field data.

  7. A latitudinal study of oxygen isotopes within horsehair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, E.; Bronk Ramsey, C.; McConnell, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to explore the hypothesis that 'if oxygen isotope ratios deplete with decreasing temperature then a study of oxygen isotope ratios within horsehair from Oxfordshire to Iceland will show a latitudinal depletion gradient'. By looking at oxygen isotope values at different geographical positions, we can track the relationship with latitude and with different regional climate features. This will provide a firmer understanding of how to compare climate records from different locations. Additionally, a comparison of the horse breeds from this study to those analysed within previous studies will create an even better understanding of the intra-species variation within the δ18O values of horsehair. A total of 24 horses were sampled on the 7th March from Thordale Stud in Shetland, the Icelandic Food And Veterinary Authority in Iceland, the Exmoor Pony Centre in Exmoor and the Pigeon House Equestrian Centre in Oxfordshire. By starting the sampling process from the most recent growth at the follicle, the sampling date becomes a chronological marker, temporally fixing the first sample within a sequential set of data points extending for one year or longer, depending on the length of each individual hair. The samples were analysed for oxygen isotope values using an IRMS coupled within a Sercon HTEA. Preliminary results show a latitudinal gradient is evident on comparison between the locations, consistent with the findings of Darling and Talbot's study of fresh water isotopes in the British Isles (2003). These results support the hypothesis, showing that a study of oxygen isotope ratios within horse hair from Oxfordshire to Iceland showing a latitudinal depletion gradient, consistent with a depletion of oxygen isotope ratios due to decreasing temperatures. Darling, W. and Talbot, J. (2003). The O and H stable isotope composition of freshwaters in the British Isles. 1. Rainfall. Hydrol. Earth System Science, 7(2), pp.163-181.

  8. Comparison of the imaging performances for recently developed monolithic scintillators: CRY018 and CRY019 for dual isotope gamma ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polito, C.; Pani, R.; Trigila, C.; Cinti, M. N.; Fabbri, A.; Frantellizzi, V.; De Vincentis, G.; Pellegrini, R.; Pani, R.

    2017-01-01

    The growing interest for new scintillation crystals with outstanding imaging performances (i.e. resolution and efficiency) has suggested the study of recently discovered scintillators named CRY018 and CRY019. The crystals under investigation are monolithic and have shown enhanced characteristics both for gamma ray spectrometry and for Nuclear Medicine imaging applications such as the dual isotope imaging. Moreover, the non-hygroscopic nature and the absence of afterglow make these scintillators even more attractive for the potential improvement in a wide range of applications. These scintillation crystals show a high energy resolution in the energy range involved in Nuclear Medicine, allowing the discrimination between very close energy values. Moreover, in order to prove their suitability of being powerful imaging systems, the imaging performances like the position linearity and the intrinsic spatial resolution have been evaluated obtaining satisfactory results thanks to the implementation of an optimized algorithm for the images reconstruction.

  9. Isotope Tracers To Study the Environmental Fate and Bioaccumulation of Metal-Containing Engineered Nanoparticles: Techniques and Applications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongguang; Tan, Zhiqiang; Hu, Ligang; Yu, Sujuan; Liu, Jingfu; Jiang, Guibin

    2017-03-08

    The rapidly growing applicability of metal-containing engineered nanoparticles (MENPs) has made their environmental fate, biouptake, and transformation important research topics. However, considering the relatively low concentration of MENPs and the high concentration of background metals in the environment and in organisms, tracking the fate of MENPs in environment-related scenarios remains a challenge. Intrinsic labeling of MENPs with radioactive or stable isotopes is a useful tool for the highly sensitive and selective detection of MENPs in the environment and organisms, thus enabling tracing of their transformation, uptake, distribution, and clearance. In this review, we focus on radioactive/stable isotope labeling of MENPs for their environmental and biological tracing. We summarize the advantages of intrinsic radioactive/stable isotopes for MENP labeling and discuss the considerations in labeling isotope selection and preparation of labeled MENPs, as well as exposure routes and detection of labeled MENPs. In addition, current practice in the use of radioactive/stable isotope labeling of MENPs to study their environmental fate and bioaccumulation is reviewed. Future perspectives and potential applications are also discussed, including imaging techniques for radioactive- and stable-isotope-labeled MENPs, hyphenated multistable isotope tracers with speciation analysis, and isotope fractionation as a MENP tracer. It is expected that this critical review could provide the necessary background information to further advance the applications of isotope tracers to study the environmental fate and bioaccumulation of MENPs.

  10. 44Sc: An Attractive Isotope for Peptide-Based PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of integrin αvβ3 has been linked to tumor aggressiveness and metastasis in several cancer types. Because of its high affinity, peptides containing the arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) motif have been proven valuable vectors for noninvasive imaging of integrin αvβ3 expression and for targeted radionuclide therapy. In this study, we aim to develop a 44Sc-labeled RGD-based peptide for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of integrin αvβ3 expression in a preclinical cancer model. High quality 44Sc (t1/2, 3.97 h; β+ branching ratio, 94.3%) was produced inexpensively in a cyclotron, via proton irradiation of natural Ca metal targets, and separated by extraction chromatography. A dimeric cyclic-RGD peptide, (cRGD)2, was conjugated to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and radiolabeled with 44Sc in high yield (>90%) and specific activity (7.4 MBq/nmol). Serial PET imaging of mice bearing U87MG tumor xenografts showed elevated 44Sc-DOTA-(cRGD)2 uptake in the tumor tissue of 3.93 ± 1.19, 3.07 ± 1.17, and 3.00 ± 1.25 %ID/g at 0.5, 2, and 4 h postinjection, respectively (n = 3), which were validated by ex vivo biodistribution experiments. The integrin αvβ3 specificity of the tracer was corroborated, both in vitro and in vivo, by competitive cell binding and receptor blocking assays. These results parallel previously reported studies showing similar tumor targeting and pharmacokinetic profiles for dimeric cRGD peptides labeled with 64Cu or 68Ga. Our findings, together with the advantageous radionuclidic properties of 44Sc, capitalize on the relevance of this isotope as an attractive alternative isotope to more established radiometals for small molecule-based PET imaging, and as imaging surrogate of 47Sc in theranostic applications. PMID:25054618

  11. Isotope studies in the Caspian Sea.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, K; Rozanski, K; Povinec, P; Oregioni, B; Gastaud, J

    1999-09-30

    Oceanographic and isotopic investigations in the Caspian Sea and the analyses of the available data on the discharge to the sea and the observed sea level changes suggest that climatically caused changes of river inflow are the major cause of the sea level fluctuations over the last century. Hydrogen-3 and 3H-3He data indicate that the deep basins of the sea are rapidly ventilated, although the hydraulic turnover time of the sea is approximately 200 years. The concentration levels of the anthropogenic radionuclides 90Sr, 137Cs and 239,240Pu in the water column can be explained by global fallout and therefore, at the sampling sites visited, there were no signs of dumping of radioactive wastes. The anthropogenic radionuclide data support the idea of fast exchange of water masses in the Caspian Sea. The isotopic and oceanographic data collected during the cruises have shown potential to allow for a better understanding of the water circulation in the Caspian Sea.

  12. [Isotope nephrographic studies in benign gynecologic diseases].

    PubMed

    Lamm, D

    1977-01-01

    1014 patients with benigne gynaecological diseases (functional incontinence of urine with and without displacement, myoma of uterus, ovarian tumors, chronic salpingoophoritis) were examined by means of isotope nephrogram before gynaecological treatment was begun. A group of 156 patients was parallely examined by means of chromocystoscopy and intravenous urography. For judgement of the ING-curves we applicated an extra parameter--the drain value "A"--, through which it was possible to differenciate between emptying disturbances and functional urinary transport disorders. To obtain this value it is necessary to change the position of the patients during examination. Under these conditions approximately 95% of ING-findings conformed with those vaised by intravenous urography. Giving weight to these conditions, we recommend the application of ING in gynaecology as a screening method. Criteria for optimal usage of this method are mentioned.

  13. Stable Isotope Applications in Hydrologic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, C.; Doctor, D. H.

    2003-12-01

    The topic of stream flow generation has received considerable attention over the last two decades, first in response to concern about "acid rain" and more recently in response to the increasingly serious contamination of surface and shallow groundwaters by anthropogenic contaminants. Many sensitive, low-alkalinity streams in North America and Europe are already acidified (see Chapter 9.10). Still more streams that are not yet chronically acidic may undergo acidic episodes in response to large rainstorms and/or spring snowmelt. These acidic events can seriously damage local ecosystems. Future climate changes may exacerbate the situation by affecting biogeochemical controls on the transport of water, nutrients, and other materials from land to freshwater ecosystems.New awareness of the potential danger to water supplies posed by the use of agricultural chemicals and urban industrial development has also focused attention on the nature of rainfall-runoff and recharge processes and the mobility of various solutes, especially nitrate and pesticides, in shallow systems. Dumping and spills of other potentially toxic materials are also of concern because these chemicals may eventually reach streams and other public water supplies. A better understanding of hydrologic flow paths and solute sources is required to determine the potential impact of contaminants on water supplies, develop management practices to preserve water quality, and devise remediation plans for sites that are already polluted.Isotope tracers have been extremely useful in providing new insights into hydrologic processes, because they integrate small-scale variability to give an effective indication of catchment-scale processes. The main purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of recent research into the use of naturally occurring stable isotopes to track the movement of water and solutes in hydrological systems where the waters are relatively fresh: soils, surface waters, and shallow

  14. The study of infantile hydrocephalus with combined air and isotope ventriculography

    PubMed Central

    Front, Dov; Overbeek, Willem J.; Penning, Lourens

    1972-01-01

    A method for a combined air and isotope ventriculography is described. Twenty-nine infants with suspected hydrocephalus were studied. The merit of the combined study is the possibility of obtaining both anatomical and functional information. A very small amount of radioactivity—15 μc—was found to give satisfactory results. Patterns of cerebrospinal fluid flow in communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus and in cases of porencephalic cyst and complete obstruction of the lateral ventricles are described. Images PMID:4538083

  15. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  16. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  17. Characterization of extreme ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry for actinide trace analysis and nanoscale isotopic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Tyler; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Willingham, David; Naes, Benjamin E.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Zhu, Zihua; Chao, W.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to characterize Extreme Ultraviolet Time-of-Flight (EUV TOF) Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry for high spatial resolution elemental and isotopic analysis. We compare EUV TOF results with Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) to orient the EUV TOF method within the overall field of analytical mass spectrometry. Using the well-characterized NIST 61x glasses, we show that the EUV ionization approach produces relatively few molecular ion interferences in comparison to TOF SIMS. We demonstrate that the ratio of element ion to element oxide ion is adjustable with EUV laser pulse energy and that the EUV TOF instrument has a sample utilization efficiency of 0.014%. The EUV TOF system also achieves a lateral resolution of 80 nm and we demonstrate this lateral resolution with isotopic imaging of closely spaced particles or uranium isotopic standard materials.

  18. Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Smith, R.L.; Miller, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) is a major constituent of many contaminated groundwaters, but its movement through aquifers is complex and poorly documented. In this study, processes affecting NH4+ movement in a treated wastewater plume were studied by a combination of techniques including large-scale monitoring of NH4+ distribution; isotopic analyses of coexisting aqueous NH4+, NO3-, N2, and sorbed NH 4+; and in situ natural gradient 15NH 4+ tracer tests with numerical simulations of 15NH4+, 15NO3-, and 15N2 breakthrough data. Combined results indicate that the main mass of NH4+ was moving downgradient at a rate about 0.25 times the groundwater velocity. Retardation factors and groundwater ages indicate that much of the NH4+ in the plume was recharged early in the history of the wastewater disposal. NO3- and excess N2 gas, which were related to each other by denitrification near the plume source, were moving downgradient more rapidly and were largely unrelated to coexisting NH 4+. The ??15N data indicate areas of the plume affected by nitrification (substantial isotope fractionation) and sorption (no isotope fractionation). There was no conclusive evidence for NH 4+-consuming reactions (nitrification or anammox) in the anoxic core of the plume. Nitrification occurred along the upper boundary of the plume but was limited by a low rate of transverse dispersive mixing of wastewater NH4+ and O2 from overlying uncontaminated groundwater. Without induced vertical mixing or displacement of plume water with oxic groundwater from upgradient sources, the main mass of NH4+ could reach a discharge area without substantial reaction long after the more mobile wastewater constituents are gone. Multiple approaches including in situ isotopic tracers and fractionation studies provided critical information about processes affecting NH4+ movement and N speciation.

  19. Groundwater surface water interaction study using natural isotopes tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Kim, Yong Chul; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Kil Yong

    2015-04-01

    Tritium and stable isotopes are a component of the water molecule, they are the most conservative tracer for groundwater study. And also, radon is natural radioactive nuclide and well dissolved in groundwater. Therefore, these isotopes are used natural tracer for the study of surface water and groundwater interaction of water curtain greenhouse area. The study area used groundwater as a water curtain for warming tool of greenhouse during the winter, and is associated with issues of groundwater shortage while being subject to groundwater-river water interaction. During the winter time, these interactions were studied by using Rn-222, stable isotopes and H-3. These interaction was monitored in multi depth well and linear direction well of groundwater flow. And dam effect was also compared. Samples were collected monthly from October 2013 to April 2014. Radon and tritium were analyzed using Quantulus low background liquid scintillation counter and stable isotopes were analyzed using an IRIS (Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectroscopy ; L2120-i, Picarro). During the winter time, radon concentration was varied from 0.07 Bq/L to 8.9 Bq/L and different interaction was showed between dam. Surface water intrusion was severe at February and restored April when greenhouse warming was ended. The stable isotope results showed different trend with depth and ranged from -9.16 ‰ to -7.24 ‰ for δ 18O value, while the δD value was ranged from -57.86 ‰ to -50.98 ‰. The groundwater age as dated by H-3 was ranged 0.23 Bq/L - 0.59 Bq/L with an average value of 0.37 Bq/L.

  20. Oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    The oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water is studied to test the feasibility of using zeolites as low-temperature thermometers. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between natural analcime and water is determined at 300, 350, and 400 C, and at fluid pressures ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 kbar. Also, isotope ratios for the analcime framework, the channel water, and bulk water are obtained. The results suggest that the channel water is depleted in O-18 relative to bulk water by a constant value of about 5 percent, nearly independent of temperature. The analcime-water fractionation curve is presented, showing that the exchange has little effect on grain morphology and does not involve recrystallization. The exchange is faster than any other observed for a silicate. The exchange rates suggest that zeolites in active high-temperature geothermal areas are in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient fluids. It is concluded that calibrated zeolites may be excellent low-temperature oxygen isotope geothermometers.

  1. Oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    The oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water is studied to test the feasibility of using zeolites as low-temperature thermometers. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between natural analcime and water is determined at 300, 350, and 400 C, and at fluid pressures ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 kbar. Also, isotope ratios for the analcime framework, the channel water, and bulk water are obtained. The results suggest that the channel water is depleted in O-18 relative to bulk water by a constant value of about 5 percent, nearly independent of temperature. The analcime-water fractionation curve is presented, showing that the exchange has little effect on grain morphology and does not involve recrystallization. The exchange is faster than any other observed for a silicate. The exchange rates suggest that zeolites in active high-temperature geothermal areas are in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient fluids. It is concluded that calibrated zeolites may be excellent low-temperature oxygen isotope geothermometers.

  2. High resolution isotopic analysis of U-bearing particles via fusion of SIMS and EDS images

    SciTech Connect

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Fischer, Ashley E.; Willingham, David

    2016-01-01

    Image fusion of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) images and X-ray elemental maps from energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was performed to facilitate the isolation and re-analysis of isotopically unique U-bearing particles where the highest precision SIMS measurements are required. Image registration, image fusion and particle micromanipulation were performed on a subset of SIMS images obtained from a large area pre-screen of a particle distribution from a sample containing several certified reference materials (CRM) U129A, U015, U150, U500 and U850, as well as a standard reference material (SRM) 8704 (Buffalo River Sediment) to simulate particles collected on swipes during routine inspections of declared uranium enrichment facilities by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In total, fourteen particles, ranging in size from 5 – 15 µm, were isolated and re-analyzed by SIMS in multi-collector mode identifying nine particles of CRM U129A, one of U150, one of U500 and three of U850. These identifications were made within a few percent errors from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) certified atom percent values for 234U, 235U and 238U for the corresponding CRMs. This work represents the first use of image fusion to enhance the accuracy and precision of isotope ratio measurements for isotopically unique U-bearing particles for nuclear safeguards applications. Implementation of image fusion is essential for the identification of particles of interests that fall below the spatial resolution of the SIMS images.

  3. Application of helium isotopes to studies of ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, P.; Newton, R.; Winckler, G.; Lupton, J.; Jenkins, W.; Top, Z.; Roether, W.; Jean-Baptiste, P.

    2004-12-01

    Since the discovery of excess He-3 in the ocean by Clarke and Craig in the 1960's helium isotopes have been used in local, regional and global studies of circulation patterns and water mass transformation in the world ocean. From initial pilot studies through systematic exploration of these tracers during the GEOSECS (Geochemical Ocean Sections) program to the recent global survey as part of the WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) hydrographic program (WHP) we obtained more detailed information on the distribution of helium isotopes, as well as their sources and sinks in the ocean. This information can now be applied to construct global fields of helium isotopes and to extract unique information on the circulation patterns at different depth levels in the ocean, as well as on local and regional processes such as ventilation of water masses in deep water formation regions. Additionally, the data sets are now sufficiently large to be useful for validation of Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCM's). In this contribution we present examples of global helium isotope fields constructed from major programs such as GEOCECS, TTO (Transient Tracers in the Ocean), SAVE (South Atlantic Ventilation Experiment) and WOCE, as well as from individual ocean sections. We use the data to delineate circulation patterns in the major ocean basins at several depth levels, especially mid-depth waters. Additionally, we outline the use of helium isotopes in studies of ocean ventilation. Finally, we compare observed and simulated helium isotope fields to highlight OGCM capabilities and deficiencies to reproduce internal He-3 excesses in the ocean and the related ventilation processes.

  4. Isotopically-enriched gadolinium-157 oxysulfide scintillator screens for the high-resolution neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtik, Pavel; Lehmann, Eberhard H.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the production of isotopically-enriched gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screens for the high spatial-resolution neutron imaging. Approximately 10 g of 157Gd2O2S:Tb was produced in the form of fine powder (particle size approximately 2 μm). The level of 157Gd enrichment was above 88%. Approximately 2.5 μm thick 157Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were produced and tested for the absorption power and the light output. The results are compared to the reference screens based on natGd2O2S:Tb. The isotopically enriched screens provided increase by a factor of 3.8 and 3.6 for the absorption power and the light output, respectively. The potential of the scintillator screens based on 157Gd2O2S phosphor for the purpose of the (high-resolution) neutron imaging is discussed.

  5. Study of the mechanism of diatom cell division by means of 29Si isotope tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audinot, J.-N.; Guignard, C.; Migeon, H.-N.; Hoffmann, L.

    2006-07-01

    Diatoms are delicate unicellular organisms enclosed in a silica frustule, that is made up of two valves. Multiplication of the diatoms occurs by ordinary mitotic cell division. During cell division each cell produces two daughter cells, each of them keeping one of the two valves of the mother cell and producing a new valve by absorbing the silicon present in the environment. The NanoSIMS 50 allows ion imaging to be performed on diatoms in order to determine the site of fixation of silicon. The aim of this study was to observe and compare the mechanism of the construction of the new valve after cell division. To this end, different types of diatoms have been transferred in a culture medium enriched with 29Si and after several days, the distribution of the different isotopes of silicon has been determined by NanoSIMS50 imaging. The construction of new valves has been observed and the isotopic ratio has been determined.

  6. The Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Paul J.; Trumbore, Susan; Swanston, Chris; Torn, Margaret; Jastrow, Julie; Parton, William A; Post, Wilfred M.; Froberg, Mats J; Hainsworth, Laura J; Kleber, Markus; Kramer, Christiane; Matamala-Paradeda, Roser; Garten, Jr, Charles T.

    2007-02-05

    A unique, large release of radiocarbon occurred near the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge, TN in July/August 1999. Measurements of 14C in tree ring cellulose throughout the ORR area demonstrate that the 1999 release was unprecedented in its uptake by vegetation. We are taking advantage of the whole-ecosystem isotopic label generated by this release to address five outstanding issues in the terrestrial carbon cycle: (1) partitioning of soil respiration between autotrophic and heterotrophic sources, and quantification of that partitioning seasonally and inter-annually, (2) partitioning of heterotrophic respiration sources between above-ground litter decomposition and below-ground root detritus decomposition, (3) identification of pathways leading from leaf and root detritus to long-term stabilization of soil organic matter, including the role of soil fauna, (4) the role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transport in distributing carbon within the soil profile, and, (5) the longevity and turnover time of fine roots. The first four issues are being addressed through a reciprocal litter transplant experiment set up at four sites on the ORR encompassing two soil types and two levels of 14C exposure in 1999. The fifth issue, longevity and turnover of fine roots, is being addressed by tracing the radiocarbon label through the fine root pool over time. With a combination of incubation, soil surface chamber and soil CO2 profiles, and continuous measurements of soil temperature and moisture controls, we are tracking changes in soil respiration partitioning over several years. The nature and source of organic matter pools that reside in soils for years to decades are being tracked with differently labeled root and surface litter, and experiments to exclude soil fauna have been initiated to elucidate their role in vertical transport. Periodic sampling of soils and soil solutions and the use of inert tracers, allow us to investigate the chemical nature and form of DOC and

  7. [Imaging studies in arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Nowalany-Kozielska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Imaging studies play a very important role in the diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias. They are able to answer many questions relating to the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Not all types of arrhythmias require you to perform imaging studies. Diagnosis require above all: ventricular tachycardia and supraventricular tachycardia, ventricular extrasystoles requiring treatment, atrialfibrillation, individuals who are at genetically diseases leading to severe arrhythmia, patients before ablation procedures and cardioversion, arrhythmias in athletes and people performing specific professions (eg pilots). The primary non-invasive imaging technique for the diagnosis of arrhythmias is the ECHO, also safe in pregnant women. Other imaging studies should be performed in case of inability to obtain sufficient diagnostic information in ECHO, because of the cost, availability and worse side effects (class of recommendation IIaB by AHA/ACC/ESC). Among these studies is the study of magnetic resonance imaging "gold standard" for assessing the anatomy and function of the heart, allows the assessment of myocardial structure and can significantly supplement the information obtained in the study of ECHO, is also safe in pregnant women.

  8. Beta Decay Studies of Short Lived Barium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendall, Charles Skipwith

    The half-lives and relative intensities of several short lived neutron rich isotopes, with atomic numbers between 54 and 57, produced in the spontaneous fission of californium-252 were determined. This was accomplished from the study of the time variation of the K X-ray yields of these isotopes. A transport system which allowed us to study isotopes with half-lives less than 10 seconds was developed. Mass assignments were made by comparing the experimental values of the half-lives with known values. A beta K X-ray coincidence technique was used to obtain the barium beta spectrum in coincidence with lanthanum K X -rays. A Kurie plot was performed on the spectrum to determine the beta groups. The probable origin of each beta group was determined through a comparison of the relative intensities of the isotopes and beta groups. Four beta groups probably from the decay of Ba-145 were revealed. The end point energies of these beta groups are 3870 (+OR-) 432 keV, 2772 (+OR-) 112 keV, 1894 (+OR-) 58 keV, and 746 (+OR-) 38 keV. The three lowest energy groups have not been observed before.

  9. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  10. Venous obstruction in permanent pacemaker patients: an isotopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Pauletti, M.; Di Ricco, G.; Solfanelli, S.; Marini, C.; Contini, C.; Giuntini, C.

    1981-01-01

    Isotope venography was used to study the venous circulation proximal to the superior vena cava in two groups of pacemaker patients, one with a single endocavitary electrode and the other with multiple pacing catheters. A control group of patients without pacemakers was also studied. Numerous abnormalities were found, especially in the group with multiple electrodes. These findings suggest that venous obstruction is a common complication of endocardial pacing.

  11. Impact of kinetic isotope effects in isotopic studies of metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    Millard, Pierre; Portais, Jean-Charles; Mendes, Pedro

    2015-09-26

    Isotope labeling experiments (ILEs) are increasingly used to investigate the functioning of metabolic systems. Some enzymes are subject to kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) which modulate reaction rates depending on the isotopic composition of their substrate(s). KIEs may therefore affect both the propagation of isotopes through metabolic networks and their operation, and ultimately jeopardize the biological value of ILEs. However, the actual impact of KIEs on metabolism has never been investigated at the system level. First, we developed a framework which integrates KIEs into kinetic and isotopic models of metabolism, thereby accounting for their system-wide effects on metabolite concentrations, metabolic fluxes, and isotopic patterns. Then, we applied this framework to assess the impact of KIEs on the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli in the context of (13)C-ILEs, under different situations commonly encountered in laboratories. Results showed that the impact of KIEs strongly depends on the label input and on the variable considered but is significantly lower than expected intuitively from measurements on isolated enzymes. The global robustness of both the metabolic operation and isotopic patterns largely emerge from intrinsic properties of metabolic networks, such as the distribution of control across the network and bidirectional isotope exchange. These results demonstrate the necessity of investigating the impact of KIEs at the level of the entire system, contradict previous hypotheses that KIEs would have a strong effect on isotopic distributions and on flux determination, and strengthen the biological value of (13)C-ILEs. The proposed modeling framework is generic and can be used to investigate the impact of all the isotopic tracers ((2)H, (13)C, (15)N, (18)O, etc.) on different isotopic datasets and metabolic systems. By allowing the integration of isotopic and metabolomics data collected under stationary and/or non-stationary conditions, it may

  12. Broadband non-selective excitation of plutonium isotopes for isotope ratio measurements in resonance ionization mass spectrometry: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Sankari, M

    2012-10-15

    Making isotope ratio measurements with minimum isotope bias has always been a challenging task to mass spectrometrists, especially for the specific case of plutonium, owing to the strategic importance of the element. In order to use resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) as a tool for isotope ratio measurements, optimization of the various laser parameters and other atomic and system parameters is critical to minimize isotopic biases. Broadband simultaneous non-selective excitation of the isotopes of plutonium in the triple resonance excitation scheme with λ(1) = 420.77 nm, λ(2) = 847.28 nm, and λ(3) = 767.53 nm based on density matrix formalism has been theoretically computed for the determination of isotope ratios. The effects of the various laser parameters and other factors such as the atomization temperature and the dimensions of the atomic beam on the estimation of isotope ratios were studied. The effects of Doppler broadening, and time-dependent excitation parameters such as Rabi frequencies, ionization rate and the effect of non-Lorenztian lineshape have all been incorporated. The average laser powers and bandwidths for the three-excitation steps were evaluated for non-selective excitation. The laser intensity required to saturate the three-excitation steps were studied. The two-dimensional lineshape contour and its features were investigated, while the reversal of peak asymmetry of two-step and two-photon excitation peaks under these conditions is discussed. Optimized powers for the non-selective ionization of the three transitions were calculated as 545 mW, 150 mW and 545 mW and the laser bandwidth for all the three steps was ~20 GHz. The isotopic bias between the resonant and off-resonant isotope under the optimized conditions was no more than 9%, which is better than an earlier reported value. These optimized laser power and bandwidth conditions are better than in the earlier experimental work since these comprehensive calculations yield

  13. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS (URUGUAY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include pollution sources for air or water bodies, food sources for animals, ...

  14. Applications of C and N stable isotopes to ecological and environmental studies in seagrass ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Lepoint, Gilles; Dauby, Patrick; Gobert, Sylvie

    2004-12-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen are increasingly used in marine ecosystems, for ecological and environmental studies. Here, we examine some applications of stable isotopes as ecological integrators or tracers in seagrass ecosystem studies. We focus on both the use of natural isotope abundance as food web integrators or environmental tracers and on the use of stable isotopes as experimental tools. As ecosystem integrators, stable isotopes have helped to elucidate the general structure of trophic webs in temperate, Mediterranean and tropical seagrass ecosystems. As environmental tracers, stable isotopes have proven their utility in sewage impact measuring and mapping. However, to make such environmental studies more comprehensible, future works on understanding of basic reasons for variations of N and C stable isotopes in seagrasses should be encouraged. At least, as experimental tracers, stable isotopes allow the study of many aspects of N and C cycles at the scale of a plant or at the scale of the seagrass ecosystem.

  15. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS (URUGUAY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include pollution sources for air or water bodies, food sources for animals, ...

  16. Isotopically modified nanoparticles for enhanced detection in bioaccumulation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misra, S.K.; Dybowska, A.; Berhanu, D.; Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results on synthesis of isotopically enriched (99% 65Cu) copper oxide nanoparticles and its application in ecotoxicological studies. 65CuO nanoparticles were synthesized as spheres (7 nm) and rods (7 ?? 40 nm). Significant differences were observed between the reactivity and dissolution of spherical and rod shaped nanoparticles. The extreme sensitivity of the stable isotope tracing technique developed in this study allowed determining Cu uptake at exposure concentrations equivalent to background Cu concentrations in freshwater systems (0.2-30 ??g/L). Without a tracer, detection of newly accumulated Cu was impossible, even at exposure concentrations surpassing some of the most contaminated water systems (>1 mg/L). ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. Paleoclimate studies in Brazil using carbon isotopes in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessenda, Luiz C. R.; Valencia, E. P. E.; Aravena, R.; Telles, E. C. C.; Boulet, R.

    This chapter presents carbon isotope data of soil organic matter (SOM), collected in natural forest ecosystems in different sites from Brazil. The studied areas are located in Londrina (Southern part of the country), Piracicaba (Southeast), Salitre (Central) and Altamira (Northern). This study is part of the research program on tropical and sub-tropical soils in Brazil, of which the main objective is to use carbon isotopes to provide information on vegetation changes and their relationships with climatic changes during the Holocene. 14C data of charcoal samples, the humin fraction and soil organic matter (SOM) contents, indicate that the organic matter of this area is at least of Holocene age. 13C data in SOM indicate that C4 plants were the dominant vegetation in Londrina and Piracicaba during the early and middle Holocene, while C3 plants were the dominant vegetation in Altamira and probably a mixture of C3 and C4 plants occurred in Salitre during the Holocene.

  18. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Sinem K.; Vogts, Angela; Kröhnert, Katharina; Hillion, François; Rizzoli, Silvio O; Wessels, Johannes T.

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic composition of different materials can be imaged by secondary ion mass spectrometry. In biology, this method is mainly used to study cellular metabolism and turnover, by pulsing the cells with marker molecules such as amino acids labelled with stable isotopes (15N, 13C). The incorporation of the markers is then imaged with a lateral resolution that can surpass 100 nm. However, secondary ion mass spectrometry cannot identify specific subcellular structures like organelles, and needs to be correlated with a second technique, such as fluorescence imaging. Here, we present a method based on stimulated emission depletion microscopy that provides correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy (COIN) images. We use this approach to study the protein turnover in different organelles from cultured hippocampal neurons. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy can be applied to a variety of biological samples, and should therefore enable the investigation of the isotopic composition of many organelles and subcellular structures. PMID:24718107

  19. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    ScienceCinema

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  20. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2012-04-11

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  1. Heating Isotopically Labeled Bernal Stacked Graphene: A Raman Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Ek-Weis, Johan; Costa, Sara; Frank, Otakar; Kalbac, Martin

    2014-02-06

    One of the greatest issues of nanoelectronics today is how to control the heating of the components. Graphene is a promising material in this area, and it is essential to study its thermal properties. Here, the effect of heating a bilayer structure was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. In order to observe the effects on each individual layer, an isotopically labeled bilayer graphene was synthesized where the two layers were composed of different carbon isotopes. Therefore, the frequency of the phonons in the Raman spectra was shifted in relation to each other. This technique was used to investigate the influence of different stacking order. It was found that in bilayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the two layers behave very similarly for both Bernal stacking and randomly oriented structures, while for transferred samples, the layers act more independently. This highlights a significant dependence on the sample preparation procedure.

  2. Isotopic Analysis of Fingernails as a USGS Open House Demonstration of the Use of Stable Isotopes in Foodweb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Choy, D.

    2011-12-01

    The USGS Isotope Tracers Project uses stable isotopes and tritium to add a unique dimension of chemical information to a wide range of environmental investigations. The use and application of isotopes is usually an unfamiliar and even esoteric topic to the general public. Therefore during three USGS open house events, as a public outreach effort, we demonstrated the use of stable isotopes by analyzing nitrogen and carbon isotopes from very small fragments of fingernail from willing participants. We titled the exhibit "You Are What You Eat". The results from all participants were plotted on a graph indicating the general influence of different food groups on the composition of body tissues as represented by fingernails. All participants were assigned a number and no personal-identification information was collected. A subset of participants provided us with an estimate of the number of days a week various foods were eaten and if they were vegetarians, vegans or non-vegetarians. Volunteers from our research group were on hand to explain and discuss fundamental concepts such as how foods attain their isotopic composition, the difference between C3 and C4 plants, the effects of assimilation, trophic enrichment, and the various uses of stable isotopes in environmental studies. The results of the fingernail analyses showed the variation of the range of isotopic compositions among about 400 people at each event, the distinct influence of C4 plants (mainly corn and cane sugar) on our carbon isotopic composition, and the isotopic differences between vegetarians and non vegetarians among other details (http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/projects/fingernails/). A poll of visitors attending the open house event in 2006 indicated that "You Are What You Eat" was among the most popular exhibits. Following the first two open house events we were contacted by a group of researchers from Brazil who had completed a very similar study. Our collaboration resulted in a publication in

  3. Mars Molecular and Isotopic Analysis Research Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Heidi L. K.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, the Martian atmosphere and surface constituents have become of great interest. The Viking in situ gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment contributed greatly to our knowledge of the composition of the Martian atmosphere. However, important questions remain such as the abundance of water on Mars. The Viking experiment employed solid reagents to enhance their carbon measurements. Techniques of chemical conversion using simple solid reagents have advanced considerably in the past 20 years. In this investigation we researched the advancements in techniques to reversibly adsorb and desorb water and focused on the techniques potentially useful for the temperatures and pressures on the Martian surface. During the granting period from June 15, 1998 to August 14, 1998, a literature study of the material appropriate for use in a chemical conversion device and the availability of these materials were undertaken. The focus of this investigation was searching for methods and materials potentially useful in enhancing the measurements of water. Three different methods were considered for the means to extract water from a given gas sample. These methods included adsorption in a desiccant, adsorption on a clean metal surface, and adsorption in a carbon molecular sieve or zeolite. Each method was evaluated with feasibility and reversibility in mind. By far the simplest and perhaps cheapest way to remove water from a gaseous sample is by means of a bulk desiccant. Desiccants are commercially available from many companies including those that supply chemicals. The main feature of a desiccant is its ability to rapidly bind or absorb water from the atmosphere. Calcium chloride, for example, is frequently incorporated into drying tubes by organic chemists when reactions require the absence of water. Other desiccants include sodium hydroxide, calcium hydride, and commercial products such as Drierite, available from Aldrich Chemical. The disadvantage to most desiccants is

  4. Mars Molecular and Isotopic Analysis Research Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Heidi L. K.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, the Martian atmosphere and surface constituents have become of great interest. The Viking in situ gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment contributed greatly to our knowledge of the composition of the Martian atmosphere. However, important questions remain such as the abundance of water on Mars. The Viking experiment employed solid reagents to enhance their carbon measurements. Techniques of chemical conversion using simple solid reagents have advanced considerably in the past 20 years. In this investigation we researched the advancements in techniques to reversibly adsorb and desorb water and focused on the techniques potentially useful for the temperatures and pressures on the Martian surface. During the granting period from June 15, 1998 to August 14, 1998, a literature study of the material appropriate for use in a chemical conversion device and the availability of these materials were undertaken. The focus of this investigation was searching for methods and materials potentially useful in enhancing the measurements of water. Three different methods were considered for the means to extract water from a given gas sample. These methods included adsorption in a desiccant, adsorption on a clean metal surface, and adsorption in a carbon molecular sieve or zeolite. Each method was evaluated with feasibility and reversibility in mind. By far the simplest and perhaps cheapest way to remove water from a gaseous sample is by means of a bulk desiccant. Desiccants are commercially available from many companies including those that supply chemicals. The main feature of a desiccant is its ability to rapidly bind or absorb water from the atmosphere. Calcium chloride, for example, is frequently incorporated into drying tubes by organic chemists when reactions require the absence of water. Other desiccants include sodium hydroxide, calcium hydride, and commercial products such as Drierite, available from Aldrich Chemical. The disadvantage to most desiccants is

  5. A novel absolute quantitative imaging strategy of iron, copper and zinc in brain tissues by Isotope Dilution Laser Ablation ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liuxing; Wang, Jun; Li, Hongmei; Luo, Xinzheng; Li, Jiao

    2017-09-01

    Isotope Dilution Laser Ablation ICP-MS (ID-LA-ICP-MS), because of its impressive spatial resolution capacity and precise means for quantification, is one of the most promising tools for in-situ quantitative imaging of trace elements in biological samples. In the ID-LA-ICP-MS strategy for tissue section, the tissue must be maintained intact during the whole sample preparation process. Therefore, how to homogeneously distribute enriched isotope spike on tissue section and how to confirm isotope equilibration between sample and spike are two important challenges. In this study, we reported a novel quantitative imaging strategy for biological thin section based on ID-LA-ICP-MS. To distribute the enriched isotope spikes on tissue section homogeneously, a "border" was constructed to make spike droplet stay on the tissue for isotope exchange. Laser ablation and isotope exchange parameters were also investigated to obtain optimal ID-LA-ICP-MS conditions. The prepared homogeneous in-house standard was used to validate the ID-LA-ICP-MS approach and good agreement with the bulk analysis was achieved. On this basis, quantitative imaging of Fe, Cu and Zn in real mouse brain of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) were measured by the improved methodology. Assessment of the method for real sample was undertaken by comparison of the LA-ICP-MS data with that obtained by micro-XRF. Moreover, comparative analysis of elements distribution and immunohistochemical markers in AD mouse brain was also carried out. The similar distributional patterns demonstrated that the proposed methodology is potential to investigate the correlation of biomarker heterogeneity and elements distribution, and may be useful to understand such complex brain mechanisms in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of Cosmic Ray H and He Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picot-Clemente, Nicolas

    This proposal requests a support for analysis and interpretation of H and He isotope data from the last Antarctic balloon flight of the Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS-Polar II). The isotopes 2H and 3He in the cosmic radiation are mainly secondary products from the p-p and p-4He interactions of primary cosmic rays in the interstellar medium. Other reactions such as 4He - 4He and p-(Z>3) contribute to a lesser extent to the production of 2H and 3He, as well as antiprotons. In the past most isotope measurements have been limited by statistics and mass resolution. BESS-Polar II flew for 24.5 days over Antarctica in 2007-2008. It recorded 4.7 billion events, about 5 times events collected with the prior BESS-Polar I. The BESS-Polar II data offer a unique opportunity to identify and precisely measure H and He isotopes over a wide rigidity range, 0.5 GV to 4 GV. The BESS instrument has many outstanding hardware features, which enable precise measurements of cosmic-ray H, He, and their isotopes, in addition to antiparticles. Its long-duration-balloon flight drastically reduced statistical uncertainties, and it provides the most precise measurements of H and He isotope fluxes and secondary-to-primary ratios. The unprecedented precision of BESSPolar II measurements together with other cosmic-ray data, can strongly constrain propagation models and their parameters. It also facilitates a sensitive study of cosmicray time variations, which contribute to our understanding of local conditions in the Heliosphere as well as modeling of particle fluxes and plasma conditions in the nearEarth environment. The long duration of the BESS-Polar II flight and stability of its detectors enable the study of transient time variations of hydrogen and helium isotope fluxes. Measurements of 2H and 3He isotopes along with their main parents 1H and 4He provide important information on both the Galactic and heliospheric propagation of cosmic rays, as well as a

  7. Digenean trematodes-marine mollusc relationships: a stable isotope study.

    PubMed

    Dubois, S Y; Savoye, N; Sauriau, P-G; Billy, I; Martinez, P; de Montaudouin, X

    2009-03-09

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of digenean trematode parasites and their marine mollusc hosts was investigated to describe the potential influence of parasites on their host and its different tissues, and to obtain further insight into their trophic relationships. Four parasite-host systems were studied: Labratrema minimus-Cerastoderma edule, Monorchis parvus-C. edule, Lepocreadiidae parasites-Nassarius reticulatus and Zoogonidae parasites-N. reticulatus. Among the 4 sampling occasions reported here and corresponding to the 4 parasite-host systems, isotopic shifts from pathologic (i.e. linked to disturbances in host metabolism) and mass-balance (i.e. linked to significant differences between host and parasite isotopic signatures) origins were observed only once. Both corresponded to delta 13C measurements of the L. minimus-C. edule system when the infestation load (percentage parasite dry weight compared to total flesh dry weight) was highest (9 to 25%, mean = 16%) over the sampling period. Overall, measurements indicate that digenean trematode parasitism induced low or no shifts in isotopic signatures of C. edule and N. reticulatus tissues. The 2 endoparasites L. minimus and M. parvus appeared to be slightly depleted in 13C compared to C. edule digestive gland and gonads, which were the most parasitized tissues. In contrast, no fractionation or low 15N trophic enrichments occurred in the parasites. These results highly contrast with the classical trophic enrichment reported in prey-predator systems but are in agreement with the scarce literature regarding other parasite-host systems. Our results indicate that (1) digenean trematodes mainly feed on digestive glands (the cockle tissue with which they are mainly associated) with a possible slight preference for lipids, and (2) fractionation due to parasite metabolism should be low due to abbreviated metabolic pathways and/or slight loss of materials through excretion, tegument diffusion and

  8. s-process studies - Xenon and krypton isotopic abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.; Ward, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    We propose an analysis of the s-process contributions to the isotopes of xenon and krypton. The object is to aid studies of the possibility that meteorites may contain gas that was carried in presolar grains that were grown in stellar ejecta and that were not degassed prior to incorporation into parent bodies. That model suggests routine interstellar fractionation of s-isotopes from r-isotopes owing to differential incorporation into dust. We show that a deficiency of s-process nuclei cannot yield details of Xe-X, but the gross similarities are strong enough to lead one to think that such a deficiency may play a role in a more complicated explanation. We predict the existence of an s-rich complement somewhere if fractional separation of this type has played a role in Xe-X. We show that the analogous decomposition of krypton is more uncertain, and we call for measurements of neutron-capture cross sections to alleviate these uncertainties.

  9. s-process studies - Xenon and krypton isotopic abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.; Ward, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    We propose an analysis of the s-process contributions to the isotopes of xenon and krypton. The object is to aid studies of the possibility that meteorites may contain gas that was carried in presolar grains that were grown in stellar ejecta and that were not degassed prior to incorporation into parent bodies. That model suggests routine interstellar fractionation of s-isotopes from r-isotopes owing to differential incorporation into dust. We show that a deficiency of s-process nuclei cannot yield details of Xe-X, but the gross similarities are strong enough to lead one to think that such a deficiency may play a role in a more complicated explanation. We predict the existence of an s-rich complement somewhere if fractional separation of this type has played a role in Xe-X. We show that the analogous decomposition of krypton is more uncertain, and we call for measurements of neutron-capture cross sections to alleviate these uncertainties.

  10. Strontium isotope study, Pine Barrens, Long Island, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Geng; Hanson, G.N. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Twenty-four samples representing precipitation, through-fall, soil water, ground water, vegetation and soil were analyzed for strontium concentration and the [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratio. The Pine Barrens, which consists of forests and dense vegetation, covers approximately 300 square miles of the coastal plain of Long Island, New York. This study estimates the relative importance of atmospheric and weathering inputs of Sr to vegetation in this ecosystem. The values of the [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios and Sr concentration in the Pine Barrens are shown in the attached figure. Precipitation has Sr isotopic ratios that are close to that of sea water (0.7092). The Sr in through-fall is dominated by the Sr from the canopy foliage. The [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios of soil water and ground water increase with depth. The Sr isotopic ratio for a composite sample of pine (0.71181) is a mixture of atmosphere Sr and soil or ground waters. The Sr isotopic ratios and concentrations in pine suggest that plants are a major reservoir of Sr in the system.

  11. Visualization of 57Fe-Labeled Heme Isotopic Fine Structure and Localization of Regions of Erythroblast Maturation in Mouse Spleen by MALDI FTICR-MS Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihara, Makoto; Matsuo-Tezuka, Yukari; Noguchi-Sasaki, Mariko; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Shimonaka, Yasushi; Hirata, Michinori

    2017-08-01

    Epoetin beta pegol (continuous erythropoiesis receptor activator; C.E.R.A.), or methoxy-polyethylene glycol-modified epoetin beta, is a long-acting erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) that effectively maintains hemoglobin levels. It promotes proliferation of erythroid progenitor cells in hematopoietic organs and leads to increased reticulocyte and hemoglobin levels. However, the detailed erythropoietic effects of various ESAs on their target organs have yet to be clarified, and new approaches are needed to analyze tissue iron localization with structural information. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) techniques are widely used in basic pharmaceutical research. High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry (MS) imaging enables the spatial mapping and identification of biomolecules. In this study, mice administered with C.E.R.A. were fed a diet containing the stable iron isotope 57Fe. The 57Fe-heme+ isotopic fine structure peak (m/z 617.1772) was separated from the non-labeled heme+ isotopic peak (Δ0.0029) by FTICR-MS with a resolving power of more than 500,000. We optimized the platform to analyze the distribution of 57Fe-heme in the spleen using MALDI FTICR-MS imaging. The combination of the ultrahigh resolution power of FTICR-MS and a stable isotope labeling technique has the potential to be very effective in basic pharmaceutical research. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry reveals slow protein turnover in hair-cell stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duan-Sun; Piazza, Valeria; Perrin, Benjamin J; Rzadzinska, Agnieszka K; Poczatek, J Collin; Wang, Mei; Prosser, Haydn M; Ervasti, James M; Corey, David P; Lechene, Claude P

    2012-01-15

    Hair cells of the inner ear are not normally replaced during an animal's life, and must continually renew components of their various organelles. Among these are the stereocilia, each with a core of several hundred actin filaments that arise from their apical surfaces and that bear the mechanotransduction apparatus at their tips. Actin turnover in stereocilia has previously been studied by transfecting neonatal rat hair cells in culture with a β-actin-GFP fusion, and evidence was found that actin is replaced, from the top down, in 2-3 days. Overexpression of the actin-binding protein espin causes elongation of stereocilia within 12-24 hours, also suggesting rapid regulation of stereocilia lengths. Similarly, the mechanosensory 'tip links' are replaced in 5-10 hours after cleavage in chicken and mammalian hair cells. In contrast, turnover in chick stereocilia in vivo is much slower. It might be that only certain components of stereocilia turn over quickly, that rapid turnover occurs only in neonatal animals, only in culture, or only in response to a challenge like breakage or actin overexpression. Here we quantify protein turnover by feeding animals with a (15)N-labelled precursor amino acid and using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry to measure appearance of new protein. Surprisingly, in adult frogs and mice and in neonatal mice, in vivo and in vitro, the stereocilia were remarkably stable, incorporating newly synthesized protein at <10% per day. Only stereocilia tips had rapid turnover and no treadmilling was observed. Other methods confirmed this: in hair cells expressing β-actin-GFP we bleached fiducial lines across hair bundles, but they did not move in 6 days. When we stopped expression of β- or γ-actin with tamoxifen-inducible recombination, neither actin isoform left the stereocilia, except at the tips. Thus, rapid turnover in stereocilia occurs only at the tips and not by a treadmilling process.

  13. Experimental Studies of the Isotope Effect in High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Jürgen P.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * BACKGROUND * DEFINITIONS * CONNECTION WITH THEORY * OUTLINE * EXPERIMENTAL METHODS * SAMPLE PREPARATION * DETERMINATION OF ISOTOPIC SHIFTS * THE OXYGEN ISOTOPE EFFECT IN HIGH Tc CUPRATES * YBa2Cu3O7 AND RELATED SYSTEMS * Completely Isotope Exchanged * Partially and Selectively Isotope Exchanged * SUBSTITUTED YBa2Cu3O7 AND RELATED SYSTEMS * YBa2Cu4O8 * La2-xMxCuO4 (M = Sr, Ba) AND RELATED SYSTEMS * Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu OXIDES * (Nd1-xCex)2CuO4 * Tℓ BASED SYSTEMS * PARTIAL ISOTOPE EFFECTS FOR ELEMENTS OTHER THAN OXYGEN IN HIGH Tc CUPRATES * THE COPPER ISOTOPE EFFECT * ISOTOPE EFFECT FOR ELEMENTS OTHER THAN OXYGEN OR COPPER * THE OXYGEN ISOTOPE EFFECT IN RELATED SUPERCONDUCTORS * Ba-Pb-Bi OXIDE AND Ba-K-Bi OXIDE * FULLERENES * DISCUSSION * SUMMARY OF EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS * THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS * CONCLUSION * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  14. Elemental and isotopic imaging of biological samples using NanoSIMS.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Matt R; Clode, Peta L

    2014-01-01

    With its low detection limits and the ability to analyze most of the elements in the periodic table, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) represents one of the most versatile in situ analytical techniques available, and recent developments have resulted in significant advantages for the use of imaging mass spectrometry in biological and biomedical research. Increases in spatial resolution and sensitivity allow detailed interrogation of samples at relevant scales and chemical concentrations. Advances in dynamic SIMS, specifically with the advent of NanoSIMS, now allow the tracking of stable isotopes within biological systems at subcellular length scales, while static SIMS combines subcellular imaging with molecular identification. In this chapter, we present an introduction to the SIMS technique, with particular reference to NanoSIMS, and discuss its application in biological and biomedical research.

  15. Isotopic Tracers of Methane in Wetlands and Landfill Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanton, J.; Abichou, T.; Hater, G.

    2006-12-01

    Isotopic characterization is useful for determining variation in methane production mechanism and oxidation. In landfills, the quantity of methane oxidized is one of the largest uncertainties. The extent of methane oxidation can be constrained by measurements of methane within the production zone and captured escaping from the surface of the cover soil. The shift in d13C and dD of methane in these two pools is proportional to the degree of methane oxidation. This approach can be employed in wetlands and rice fields, but it is complicated by the greater complexities of gas transport processes which fractionation methane according to its isotopic composition. For determination of production mechanism, use of d13C is uncontroversial. However, there is disagreement between the results of field studies and laboratory incubation studies concerning the interpretation of dD of CH4. A compilation of field studies will be presented to help resolve this matter. Finally, the natural abundance of radiocarbon can be used to determine the sources of organic matter which fuel microbial respiration. Evidence of differences between wetland types will be presented.

  16. Study of Urban environmental quality through Isotopes δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sosa, E.; Mastachi-Loza, C.; Becerril-Piña, R.; Ramos-Salinas, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    Usually, trees with similar pH values on their bark develop epiphytes of similar species, the acidity to be a factor for growth. The aim of the study was evaluate the air quality through isotope δ13C in order to define the levels of environmental quality in the city of Queretaro, Mexico. In this work were collected at least 4 epiphytes positioned in trees of the species Prosopis Laevigata at 25 sites of Queretaro City. The samples were analyzed for trace elements with an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The collecting took place during dry period, in May and early rain June 2011 period, and on four sectors to identify the spatial distribution of pollution, using isotopic analysis of concentration of δ 13C. According with the results there are significant differences among the species in each of the sampled areas. The 5 February Avenue presented greater diversity and richness of δ13C, followed by those who were surveyed in the proximity of the UAQ and finally in the middle-east area. An average value of δ13C-17.92%, followed by those surveyed in the vicinity of the UAQ that correspond to sector I and II with an concentration of δ13C-17.55% and δ13C-17.22%, and finally the samples collected in trees scattered in the East-Sector II and IV with a value of δ13C-17.02% and δ13C-15.62%, respectively. Also were observed differences between the dry and wet period. It is likely that these results of δ 13C in moist period reflect the drag of the isotopes due to rain events that could mark a trend in the dilution of this element, however there is a trend in terms of abundance and composition of finding more impact in those species sampled in dry period, in May and early June 2011.

  17. Utilizing Stable Isotopes and Isotopic Anomalies to Study Early Solar System Formation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites contain a diversity of particle components, i.e., chondrules and calcium-, aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs), that have survived since the formation of the Solar System. The chemical and isotopic compositions of these materials provide a record of the conditions present in the protoplanetary disk where they formed and can aid our understanding of the processes and reservoirs in which solids formed in the solar nebula, an important step leading to the accretion of planetesimals. Isotopic anomalies associated with nucleosynthetic processes are observed in these discrete materials, and can be compared to astronomical observations and astrophysical formation models of stars and more recently proplyds. The existence and size of these isotopic anomalies are typically thought to reflect a significant state of isotopic heterogeneity in the earliest Solar System, likely left over from molecular cloud heterogeneities on the grain scale, but some could also be due to late stellar injection. The homogenization of these isotopic anomalies towards planetary values can be used to track the efficiency and timescales of disk wide mixing,

  18. Inelastic proton scattering of Sn isotopes studied with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The chain of semi-magic Sn nuclei, with many stable isotopes, has been a fertile ground for experimental and theoretical studies. Encompassing a major neutron shell from N = 50 to 82, the properties and structure of these nuclei provided important data for the development of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model. Recent experimental information on B(E2) for 106,108,110,112Sn came as a surprise as it indicated a larger collectivity than the predicted parabolic trend of quadrupole collectivity. These data, instead, show an unexpectedly flat trend even as the number of valence particles is reduced from 12 to 6. To fully understand how collectivity is evolving in these isotopes, 108,110,112Sn have been studied using thick-target, inelastic proton scattering with GRETINA tagging inelastic scattering events by detecting gamma-rays from the prompt decay of states excited in the reaction. We will present the trend of 2 + excitation cross-sections, the deduced quadrupole deformation parameters, and observations of other low-lying collective states. Comparison of these (p,p') quadrupole deformation parameters with B(E2) data will provide new insights into the relative importance of proton and neutron contributions to collectivity in these nuclei. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  19. Isotopic reconstruction of ancient human migrations: A comprehensive Sr isotope reference database for France and the first case study at Tumulus de Sables, south-western France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, M.; Boel, C.; Grün, R.; Armstrong, R.; Chancerel, A.; Maureille, B.; Courtaud, P.

    2012-04-01

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) can be used for the reconstruction of human and animal migrations across geologically different terrains. Sr isotope ratios in rocks are a product of age and composition and thus vary between geologic units. From the eroding environment Sr is transported into the soils, plants and rivers of a region. Humans and animals incorporate Sr from their diet into their bones and teeth, where it substitutes for calcium. Tooth enamel contains Sr isotope signatures acquired during childhood and is most resistant to weathering and overprinting, while the dentine is often diagenetically altered towards the local Sr signature. For the reconstruction of human and animal migrations the tooth enamel 87Sr/86Sr ratio is compared to the Sr isotope signature in the vicinity of the burial site and the surrounding area. This study focuses on the establishment of a comprehensive reference map of bioavailable 87Sr/86Sr ratios for France. In a next step we will compare human and animal teeth from key archaeological sites to this reference map to investigate mobility. So far, we have analysed plant and soil samples from ~200 locations across France including the Aquitaine basin, the western and northern parts of the Paris basin, as well as three transects through the Pyrenees Mountains. The isotope data, geologic background information (BRGM 1:1M), field images, and detailed method descriptions are available through our online database iRhum (http://rses.anu.edu.au/research/ee). This database can also be used in forensic studies and food sciences. As an archaeological case study teeth from 16 adult and 8 juvenile individuals were investigated from an early Bell Beaker (2500-2000 BC) site at Le Tumulus des Sables, south-west France (Gironde). The teeth were analysed for Sr isotope ratios using laser ablation ICP-MS. Four teeth were also analysed using solution ICP-MS, which showed a significant offset to the laser ablation results. This requires further

  20. Concrete under sulphate attack: an isotope study on sulphur sources.

    PubMed

    Mittermayr, Florian; Bauer, Christoph; Klammer, Dietmar; Böttcher, Michael E; Leis, Albrecht; Escher, Peter; Dietzel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The formation of secondary sulphate minerals such as thaumasite, ettringite and gypsum is a process causing severe damage to concrete constructions. A major key to understand the complex reactions, involving concrete deterioration is to decipher the cause of its appearance, including the sources of the involved elements. In the present study, sulphate attack on the concrete of two Austrian tunnels is investigated. The distribution of stable sulphur isotopes is successfully applied to decipher the source(s) of sulphur in the deteriorating sulphate-bearing minerals. Interestingly, δ(34)S values of sulphate in local groundwater and in the deteriorating minerals are mostly in the range from+14 to+27 ‰. These δ(34)S values match the isotope patterns of regional Permian and Triassic marine evaporites. Soot relicts from steam- and diesel-driven trains found in one of the tunnels show δ(34)S values from-3 to+5 ‰, and are therefore assumed to be of minor importance for sulphate attack on the concretes. In areas of pyrite-containing sedimentary rocks, the δ(34)S values of sulphate from damaged concrete range between-1 and+11 ‰. The latter range reflects the impact of sulphide oxidation on local groundwater sulphate.

  1. Isotope studies of dolomite formation under sedimentary conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clayton, R.N.; Jones, B.F.

    1968-01-01

    Measurements of stable isotope abundances of the carbonate portion of the sediment in Deep Springs Lake, California, indicate the presence of at least three phases: a magnesian calcite, a primary sedimentary dolomite, and a detrital dolomite. The former two have isotopic compositions consistent with precipitation at isotopic equilibrium from waters of the lake area. The measured isotopic fractionation factor between sedimentary dolomite and its interstitial water is 1.0351, which is outside the range possible for calcite-water. This indicates that the dolomite has formed by direct crystallization from solution and not from a caloite precursor without further isotope exchange. Isotopic and X-ray evidence does not support the contention of Peterson et al. (1966) that Deep Springs Lake dolomite crystals grow by means of a calcite-like surface layer. ?? 1968.

  2. Technical Note: A simple method for vaterite precipitation for isotopic studies: implications for bulk and clumped isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; John, C. M.

    2015-06-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) plays an important role in the natural environment as a major constituent of the skeleton and supporting structure of marine life and has high economic importance as an additive in food, chemicals and medical products. Anhydrous CaCO3 occurs in the three different polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, whereof calcite is the most abundant and best characterized mineral. In contrast, little is known about the rare polymorph vaterite, in particular with regard to the oxygen isotope fractionation between H2O and the mineral. Synthetic precipitation of vaterite in the laboratory typically involves rapid processes and isotopic non-equilibrium, which excludes isotope studies focused on the characterization of vaterite under equilibrium conditions. Here, we used a new experimental approach that enables vaterite mineral formation from an isotopically equilibrated solution. The solution consists of a ~0.007 mol L-1 CaCO3 solution that is saturated with NaCl at room temperature (up to 6.4 mol L-1). Vaterite precipitated as single phase or major phase (≥94%) in experiments performed between 23 and 91 °C. Only at 80 °C was vaterite a minor phase with a relative abundance of 27%. The high mineral yield per experiment of up to 235 mg relative to the initially dissolved CaCO3 amount of on average 360 mg enables an investigation of the oxygen isotope fractionation between the mineral and water, and the determination of clumped isotope values in vaterite.

  3. Isotope-Resolved and Charge-Sensitive Force Imaging Using Scanned Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Rastawicki, Dominik; Liu, Yang; Mar, Warren; Manoharan, Hari; Miglio, Anna; Melinte, Sorin; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; He, Lianhua; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Aihui

    Originally conceived as surface imaging instruments, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) and the atomic force microscope (AFM) were recently used to probe molecular chemical bonds with exquisite sensitivity. Remarkably, molecule-functionalized scanning tips can also provide direct access to the inelastic electron tunneling spectrum (IETS) of the terminal molecule. Here we report atomic manipulation experiments addressing carbon monoxide (CO) isotopes at low temperatures. The unique and quantifiable dependence of the CO vibrational modes offers insight into tip-controlled force and charge sensing of surface adsorbates, subsurface defects, and quantum nanostructures. The specific behavior of the monitored vibrational modes originates from the interplay of interaction forces between the top electrode--a scanned tip functionalized with a single molecule--and the atomic scale force field surrounding the target atomically-assembled nanostructure. We also present density functional theory (DFT) computations that have been performed in order to scrutinize and visualize the vibrational spectroscopic fingerprints and local force fields.

  4. Stress thallium-201/rest technetium-99m sequential dual-isotope high-speed myocardial perfusion imaging validation versus invasive coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Barone-Rochette, Gilles; Leclere, Mélanie; Calizzano, Alex; Vautrin, Estelle; Céline, Gallazzini-Crepin; Broisat, Alexis; Ghezzi, Catherine; Baguet, Jean Philippe; Machecourt, Jacques; Vanzetto, Gérald; Fagret, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) have made it possible to develop a dual-isotope protocol for high-speed acquisition with image quality and radiation delivery comparable to that obtained with conventional single isotope protocols. So far, no study has compared dual-isotope high-speed MPI to invasive coronary angiography (ICA) in a large cohort using a Cadmium-zinc-telluride SPECT system. Over a 1-year period (May 2011 to April 2012), 1366 patients underwent dual-isotope high-speed MPI. Patients with ICA within 3 months after dual-isotope high-speed MPI were included together with patients with a low likelihood of coronary artery disease (CAD) in order to assess normalcy rate. Global summed stress score (SSS) and summed rest score (SRS) were calculated, and ICA results were analyzed independently. The main end point was a patient-based assessment of the diagnostic performance of dual-isotope high-speed MPI in detecting or ruling out significant CAD (>70% reduction in lumen diameter). Inclusion criteria were fulfilled for 214 patients (143 men; age 60 ± 14 years; ICA, n = 104; low likelihood for CAD, n = 110). An exercise stress test was performed in 62% of patients and a pharmacological stress test was performed with either dipyridamole (32%) or dobutamine (6%). Average examination duration was 22.4 ± 4.5 minutes. Mean SSS, SRS, and SDS were 8.0 ± 4.9, 3.1 ± 4.3, and 5.0 ± 3.2, respectively. Prevalence of angiographic CAD was 75%. ICA detected stenosis in the left main trunk, left anterior descending artery, left circumflex artery, and right coronary artery in 4, 33, 31, and 42 patients, respectively. Sensitivity of dual-isotope high-speed MPI was 94%, normalcy rate was 92%, and accuracy was 83% for detecting CAD. Dual-isotope high-speed MPI is reliable at detecting or ruling out CAD. NCT01785589.

  5. Thyroid imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, H.H.; LaFrance, N.D.; Chen, J.J.S.

    1987-06-01

    This is the second in a series of Continuing Education articles related to functional/quantitative imaging techniques. After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1) discuss the clinical applications of thyroid imaging; 2) understand the relationship of related thyroid tests; and 3) recognize the pitfalls and problems associated with this procedure.

  6. Iron-Isotopic Fractionation Studies Using Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Zhang, C.; Barling, J.; Roe, J. E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of Fe biogeochemistry has stimulated interest in Fe isotope fractionation. Recent studies using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and a "double spike" demonstrate the existence of biogenic Fe isotope effects. Here, we assess the utility of multiple-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry(MC-ICP-MS) with a desolvating sample introduction system for Fe isotope studies, and present data on Fe biominerals produced by a thermophilic bacterium. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. The optimized evaluation of diabetic foot infection by dual isotope SPECT/CT imaging protocol.

    PubMed

    Heiba, Sherif I; Kolker, Dov; Mocherla, Bharat; Kapoor, Karan; Jiang, Manli; Son, Hongju; Rangaswamy, Balasubramanya; Kostakoglu, Lale; Savitch, Ina; DaCosta, Maria; Machac, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Sequential Tc-99m hydroxymethylene-diphosphonate (HDP) 3-phase bone (BS) and In-111 leukocyte scanning (WBCS) have been frequently used to evaluate the diabetic foot, as nonosteomyelitis BS uptake is repeatedly observed and osteomyelitis (OM) in WBCS is often uncertain without BS correlation. Additionally, both modalities are limited in lesion localization because of low resolution and lack of anatomic details. We investigated a method that combined BS/WBCS, and if needed, WBCS/bone marrow scanning (BMS) using SPECT/CT to accurately diagnose/localize infection in a practical protocol. Blood flow/pool images were obtained followed by WBC reinjection and next day dual isotope (DI) BS/WBCS planar and SPECT/CT. BMS/WBCS SPECT/CT (step 2 DI) was obtained on the following day when images were suspicious for mid/hindfoot OM. Diagnosis accuracy and confidence were judged for the various imaging combinations. Diagnosis was classified as OM, soft tissue infection (STI), both OM/STI, and other/no bony pathology by microbiology/pathology or follow-up. Distinction between various diagnostic categories and overall OM diagnostic accuracy in 213 patients were higher for DI than WBCS or BS alone, and for DI SPECT/CT than DI planar or SPECT only. Diagnostic confidence/lesion site was significantly higher for DI SPECT/CT than other comparative imaging methods. In a group of 97 patients with confirmed microbiologic/pathologic diagnosis, similar results were attained. Step 2 DI SPECT/CT performed in 67 patients further improved diagnostic accuracy/confidence. DI SPECT/CT is a highly accurate modality that considerably improves detection and discrimination of STI and OM while providing precise anatomic localization in the diabetic foot. This combined imaging technique promises to beneficially impact diabetic patient care. Copyright © 2010 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-12-31

    This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

  10. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  11. SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in tissue from Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis patients: Release of free Gd from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jerrold L.; Chandra, Subhash; Thakral, Charu; Abraham, Joshua M.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (GBMCA) have been linked to a new disease, Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF), with skin and systemic toxicity and death in certain patients with renal failure. Due to widespread use of GBMCA in diagnostic MRI, it is essential to study their excretion, metabolism, and target sites in cells and tissues. A CAMECA IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used for imaging Gd isotopes in relation to calcium distributions in histologic sections of human tissues. SIMS imaging revealed two types of Gd localization in skin biopsies of patients who received GBMCA. The Gd was present in micrometer size deposits in association with calcium, and in detectable amounts in a more diffuse cellular distribution. Only the Gd-containing deposits associated with Ca and P were detectable using SEM/EDS. As only insoluble deposits remain in the biopsy tissues after aqueous and organic solvent processing of the tissue, our observations support release of free Gd from the GBMCA and selective localization of insoluble Gd in the target tissue from patients with NSF. This study opens new novel applications of SIMS for characterization of the safety of GBMCA.

  12. Isotope Fractionation Studies in Prestellar Cores: The Case of Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is considered, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing, thus preserving the fractionation. In interstellar molecular clouds, ion-molecule chemistry continually cycles nitrogen between the two main reservoirs - N and N2 - leading to only minor N-15 enrichments. Charnley and Rodgers showed that depletion of CO removes oxygen from the gas and weakens this cycle such that significant N-15 fractionation can occur for N2 and other N-bearing species in such cores. Observations are being conducted at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths employing various facilities in order to both spatially and spectrally, resolve emission from these cores. A preliminary study to obtain the N-14/N-15 ratio in nitriles (HCN and HNC) was conducted at the Arizona Radio Observatory's 12m telescope on Kitt Peak, AZ. Spectra were obtained at high resolution (0.08 km/s) in order to resolve dynamic properties of each source as well as to resolve hyperfine structure present in certain isotopologues. This study included four dark cloud cores, observed to have varying levels of molecular depletion: L1521E, L1498, L1544, and L1521F. Previous studies of the N-14/N-15 ratio towards LI544 were obtained with N2H+ and NIH3, yielding ratios of 446 and >700, respectively. The discrepancy observed in these two measurements suggests a strong chemical dependence on the fractionation of nitrogen. Ratios (C,N, and D) obtained from isotopologues for a particular molecule are likely tracing the same chemical heritage and are directly comparable within a given source. Results and comparisons between the protostellar evolutionary state and isomer isotope fractionation as well as between other N-bearing species will be presented.

  13. Advances in the Study of Surface Water Stable Isotope on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, D.

    2016-12-01

    Advances in the Study of Surface Water Stable Isotopes on the Tibetan Plateau Di DAI, Jing GAO, Tandong YAO Institute of Tibetan PlateauResaech,Chinese Academy of Sciences,China Abstract: Water stable isotopes are ideal tools to study hydrologic processes. Because of the unique surface processes, Tibetan Plateau (TP) is a perfect geographic union to study regional hydrologic cycle. In this study, we reviewed recent advances of surface water (river and lake) stable isotopes studies on the TP and its surroundings, their relationships with precipitation stable isotopes, meteorological variables, geographic elements, regional hydrologic processes, and human activities. Furthermore, we summarized the common approaches and models used in spatiotemporal analysis of surface water isotopes. We expect to establish TP surface water isotope spatiotemporal distribution maps by combining the isotope data with the Geographic Information System (GIS) and geostatistical synthetical method. These maps can integrate regional hydrologic processes including glacier melt, precipitation, and river runoff. Moreover, these maps are basic input data for the isotope-enabled land-atmosphere models. Key Words: Tibetan Plateau (TP), surface water stable isotopes, spatiotemporal distribution spatial model

  14. USE OF STABLE ISOTOPES IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND FORENSIC GEOCHEMISTRY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes have been used for many decades in the petroleum industry, but the development of combined gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCIRMS) has led to a virtual explosion in application of this technique not only in petroleum explora...

  15. USE OF STABLE ISOTOPES IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND FORENSIC GEOCHEMISTRY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes have been used for many decades in the petroleum industry, but the development of combined gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCIRMS) has led to a virtual explosion in application of this technique not only in petroleum explora...

  16. Experiments to study cosmic ray isotopic composition up to Zr-40

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milliken, Barrett

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented of instruments and techniques being developed with improved mass resolution and large geometry factor for the study of isotopes. The Advanced Composition Explorer and the Large-Isotope Spectrometer for Astromag are presented as two experiment systems that can reduce statistical uncertainty for the iron isotopes to a small percentage. The instruments are capable of studying isotopes with values of Z of 30-40 by means of orbiting or lunar-based platforms when used for long-duration exposure.

  17. Isotopic and chemical studies of early crustal metasedimentary rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, Stein B.

    1988-01-01

    The aim, within the bounds of the Early Crustal Genesis Project, was the isotopic and chemical study of selected early crustal meta-sedimentary rocks. Western Australia was chosen as the first field area to examine, as the Yilgarn and Pilbara Blocks comprise one of the largest and most varied Precambrian terranes. Furthermore, the Western Gneiss Terrane (on the western flank of the Yilgarn Block) and the Pilbara Block are both non-greenstone in character; these types of terrane were relatively neglected, but are of great significance in the understanding of early crustal meta-sediments. The meta-sediments of aluminous or peraluminous character, commonly also enriched in Mg and/or Fe relative to the more common pelitic meta-sediments, and at many locations, deficient in one or more of the elements Ca, N, and K, were initially chosen.

  18. Decay studies of neutron deficient rare earth isotopes with OASIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilat, J.; Nitschke, J.M.; Wilmarth, P.A.; Vierinen, K.; Firestone, R.B.

    1987-09-01

    We report results on the decay of /sup 124/Pr, /sup 124,125/Ce, /sup 124,125/La, /sup 134-136/Eu, /sup 134-136/Sm, /sup 134-136/Pm, /sup 144/Ho, /sup 141,142,144/Dy, /sup 140,141,142,144/Tb, /sup 140-142/Gd, and /sup 140-142/Eu, produced by /sup 92/Mo(H.I.,xpyn) reactions at the Berkeley SuperHILAC, and studied with the OASIS on-line mass separator facility. Half-lives, delayed proton branching ratios, ..gamma..-ray energies and intensities, partial decay schemes and several J/sup ..pi../ assignments are presented. Level systematics of the even mass Nd and Sm isotopes and of the nu h/sub 11/2/ - nu s/sub 1/2/ isomers for N = 77 are discussed.

  19. Petrologic and oxygen isotopic study of ALH 85085-like chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, M.; Weisberg, M. K.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Ebihara, M.

    1994-07-01

    Four meteorites (PAT 91546, PCA 91328, PCA 91452, PCA 91467) petrologically similar to ALH 85085 chondrite have now been found. Previous studies of ALH 85085 showed it be a new kind of CR-related microchondrule-bearing chondrite, although one called it a sub-chondrite. The purpose of this study is to learn more about ALH 85085-like meteorites and their relationship to CR and CR-related (LEW 85332, Acfer 182, Bencubbin) chondrites. The methods used included petrology, INA bulk chemical analysis (PAT 91546, PCA 91467), and O isotopic analyses of the whole rocks and separated chondrules and dark inclusions (DIs) from PAT 91546. Since microchondrules and fragments are approximately 20 microns it was necessary to analyze composite samples for O; one was of approximately 100 chondrules, and another was of 5 DIs. Petrologically, the four meteorites are similar to ALH 85085, and there is no basis for determining if all of them, or any combinations, are paired. Mineralogically, olivine and pyroxene are highly magnesian FeNi metal generally has 3-10% Ni, and has a positive Ni-Co correlation similar to that in CR and CR-related chondrites. Refractory inclusions are similar in size to the chondrules and have the following assemblages: (1) hibonite-perovskite, (2) melilite-fassaite-forsterite, (3) grossite (Ca-dialuminate)-melilite-perovskite, (4) spinel-melilite, and (5) spinel-pyroxene aggregates. Chemically, INA analyses indicate that PAT 91546 and PCA 91467 are generally similar to ALH 85085. Oxygen isotopic analyses of the four whole-rock compositions fall along the CR mixing line as does ALH 85085; they are also close to LEW 85332, Acfer 182, and Bencubbin. This supports the concept that these are all CR-related chondrites. Even stronger support is found in the compositions of the chondrules and DIs in PAT 91546, which also plot on or near the CR line.

  20. [Isotopic studies on the regeneration of stapedial bone in otosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Konarska, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was determining the bone rebuilding activity in stapes and otosclerotic focus and comparison the relation between bone rebuilding activity with some clinical features such as the patient's sex and age, duration of the disease and the degree of hearing impairment. The study covered 98 patients aged from 18 to 68 years (X = 37 years) in whom, due to otosclerosis, stapedectomy was performed at the Clinic of Otolaryngology--PAM in Szczecin. The rebuilding activity was estimated in bone fragments having been removed during the operation, i.e. in 98 specimens of canal wall bone, 97 specimens of stapedial crura, 88 fragments from posterior and 18 fragments from anterior parts of footplate as well as in 15 otosclerotic foci, using isotopic method implementing a complex of pyrophosphate labelled with technetium Tc-99m. The degree of bone rebuilding activity was defined by the amount of absorbed isotopic index. The "control group" was made up of 9 cases, in which stapedectomy was carried out for therapeutical purpose in consequence of other ailments, namely: in 3 cases of congenital stapedial ankylosis, 5 cases of stapedial tympanosclerosis, and 1 case of Menier's disease. It has been disclosed that otosclerosis is an active pathological process, involving the bone of the entire stapes with the strongest manifestation in the disease focus. An essential fact was linked with the very low bone rebuilding activity in the stapedial footplate and crura in the "control group". The bone rebuilding activity in otosclerotic foci and footplate of stapes was somewhat higher in males than in females. It was the highest in patients whose disease duration was the longest. In general the bone rebuilding activity didn't influence the degree of hearing impairment.

  1. An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Natella; Kamyshny, Alexey; Halevy, Itay

    2014-05-01

    An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies Natella Mirzoyan1, Alexey Kamyshny Jr.2, Itay Halevy1 1Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel 2Geological and Environmental Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel Pyrite is one of the most abundant and widespread of the sulfide minerals with a central role in biogeochemical cycles of iron and sulfur. Due to its diverse roles in the natural and anthropogenic sulfur cycle, pyrite has been extensively studied in various experimental investigations of the kinetics of its dissolution and oxidation, the isotopic fractionations associated with these reactions, and the microbiological processes involved. Pretreatment of pyrite for removal of oxidation impurities to prevent experimental artifacts and inaccuracies is often practiced. While numerous pyrite-cleaning methods have been used in experiments, a common pyrite pretreatment method, often used to investigate pyrite chemistry by the isotopic fractionations associated with it, includes several rinses by HCl, acetone and deionized water. Elemental sulfur (S0) is a common product of incomplete pyrite oxidation. Removal of S0 is desirable to avoid experimental biases associated with its participation in pyrite transformations, but is more complicated than the removal of sulfate. Although rinsing with an organic solvent is in part aimed at removing S0, to the best of our knowledge, the extraction efficiency of S0 in existing protocols has not been assessed. We have developed and tested a new protocol for elemental sulfur removal from the surface of pyrite by ultrasonication with warm acetone. Our data demonstrate the presence of large fractions of S0 on untreated pyrite particle surfaces, of which only approximately 60% was removed by the commonly used pretreatment method. The new protocol described here was found to be more efficient at S0 removal than the commonly used method

  2. An isotopic biogeochemical study of the Green River oil shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collister, J. W.; Summons, R. E.; Lichtfouse, E.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-five different samples from three different sulfur cycles were examined in this stratigraphically oriented study of the Shell 22x-l well (U.S.G.S. C177 core) in the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Carbon isotopic compositions of constituents of Green River bitumens indicate mixing of three main components: products of primary photoautotrophs and their immediate consumers (delta approximately -30% vs PDB), products of methanotrophic bacteria (delta approximately -85%), and products of unknown bacteria (delta approximately -40%). For individual compounds synthesized by primary producers, delta-values ranged from -28 to -32%. 13C contents of individual primary products (beta-carotane, steranes, acyclic isoprenoids, tricyclic triterpenoids) were not closely correlated, suggesting diverse origins for these materials. 13C contents of numerous hopanoids were inversely related to sulfur abundance, indicating that they derived both from methanotrophs and from other bacteria, with abundances of methanotrophs depressed when sulfur was plentiful in the paleoenvironment. gamma-Cerane coeluted with 3 beta(CH3),17 alpha(H),21 beta(H)-hopane, but delta-values could be determined after deconvolution. gamma-Cerane (delta approximately -25%) probably derives from a eukaryotic heterotroph grazing on primary materials, the latter compound (delta approximately -90%) must derive from methanotrophic organisms. 13C contents of n-alkanes in bitumen differed markedly from those of paraffins generated pyrolytically. Isotopic and quantitative relationships suggest that alkanes released by pyrolysis derived from a resistant biopolymer of eukaryotic origin and that this was a dominant constituent of total organic carbon.

  3. An isotopic biogeochemical study of the Green River oil shale.

    PubMed

    Collister, J W; Summons, R E; Lichtfouse, E; Hayes, J M

    1992-12-01

    Thirty-five different samples from three different sulfur cycles were examined in this stratigraphically oriented study of the Shell 22x-l well (U.S.G.S. C177 core) in the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Carbon isotopic compositions of constituents of Green River bitumens indicate mixing of three main components: products of primary photoautotrophs and their immediate consumers (delta approximately -30% vs PDB), products of methanotrophic bacteria (delta approximately -85%), and products of unknown bacteria (delta approximately -40%). For individual compounds synthesized by primary producers, delta-values ranged from -28 to -32%. 13C contents of individual primary products (beta-carotane, steranes, acyclic isoprenoids, tricyclic triterpenoids) were not closely correlated, suggesting diverse origins for these materials. 13C contents of numerous hopanoids were inversely related to sulfur abundance, indicating that they derived both from methanotrophs and from other bacteria, with abundances of methanotrophs depressed when sulfur was plentiful in the paleoenvironment. gamma-Cerane coeluted with 3 beta(CH3),17 alpha(H),21 beta(H)-hopane, but delta-values could be determined after deconvolution. gamma-Cerane (delta approximately -25%) probably derives from a eukaryotic heterotroph grazing on primary materials, the latter compound (delta approximately -90%) must derive from methanotrophic organisms. 13C contents of n-alkanes in bitumen differed markedly from those of paraffins generated pyrolytically. Isotopic and quantitative relationships suggest that alkanes released by pyrolysis derived from a resistant biopolymer of eukaryotic origin and that this was a dominant constituent of total organic carbon.

  4. An isotopic biogeochemical study of the Green River oil shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collister, J. W.; Summons, R. E.; Lichtfouse, E.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-five different samples from three different sulfur cycles were examined in this stratigraphically oriented study of the Shell 22x-l well (U.S.G.S. C177 core) in the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Carbon isotopic compositions of constituents of Green River bitumens indicate mixing of three main components: products of primary photoautotrophs and their immediate consumers (delta approximately -30% vs PDB), products of methanotrophic bacteria (delta approximately -85%), and products of unknown bacteria (delta approximately -40%). For individual compounds synthesized by primary producers, delta-values ranged from -28 to -32%. 13C contents of individual primary products (beta-carotane, steranes, acyclic isoprenoids, tricyclic triterpenoids) were not closely correlated, suggesting diverse origins for these materials. 13C contents of numerous hopanoids were inversely related to sulfur abundance, indicating that they derived both from methanotrophs and from other bacteria, with abundances of methanotrophs depressed when sulfur was plentiful in the paleoenvironment. gamma-Cerane coeluted with 3 beta(CH3),17 alpha(H),21 beta(H)-hopane, but delta-values could be determined after deconvolution. gamma-Cerane (delta approximately -25%) probably derives from a eukaryotic heterotroph grazing on primary materials, the latter compound (delta approximately -90%) must derive from methanotrophic organisms. 13C contents of n-alkanes in bitumen differed markedly from those of paraffins generated pyrolytically. Isotopic and quantitative relationships suggest that alkanes released by pyrolysis derived from a resistant biopolymer of eukaryotic origin and that this was a dominant constituent of total organic carbon.

  5. [Application of stable isotopes in the study of whole-body protein metabolism].

    PubMed

    Tian, Ying; Yang, Xiaoguang; Piao, Jianhua

    2007-11-01

    Stable isotopes are non-radioactive, so they are safe and suitable for the study of human nutrition. In this paper, the principle and main methods of stable isotopic technique in the study of whole-body protein metabolism were introduced. Meanwhile, the advantages and disadvantages of different methods were discussed and the splanchnic metabolism of labeled amino acids was analyzed.

  6. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude and reduced {sup 13}C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  7. Coordinated Isotopic and TEM Studies of Presolar Graphites from Murchison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, T. K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Zinner, E.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2004-03-01

    TEM and NanoSIMS investigations of the same presolar Murchison KFC graphites revealed high Zr, Mo, and Ru content in refractory carbides within the graphites. Along with isotopically light carbon, these suggest a low-metallicity AGB source.

  8. Study of the isotopic features of Swan bands in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna Swamy, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown from a detailed statistical equilibrium calculation of the (C-12)(C-13) molecule that the interpretation of the observed intensities of Swan bands of the normal and the isotopic molecule of C2 in terms of the abundance ratio of C-12 and C-13 is a reasonable one. The synthetic profile of some isotopic features in the (0.0) Swan band is compared with the observed profiles for comet West.

  9. Optimization of Acquisition Parameters for Simultaneous ,^^201rm Tl; and ,^^99rm mrm Tc Dual-Isotope Myocardial Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Tung; Tsui, B. M. W.; Lalush, D. S.; Tocharoenchai, C.; Frey, E. C.

    2005-10-01

    In /sup 201/Tl//sup 99m/Tc dual-isotope simultaneous-acquisition (DISA) myocardial imaging, crosstalk due to Tc photons results in significant contamination of the Tl data. The objective of this work is to seek the acquisition parameters (i.e., energy window width and center) that have the optimal tradeoff between minimizing the crosstalk and maximizing the detection efficiency. The optimization criterion was based on maximizing an ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the myocardial defect detection task using single-isotope and DISA projection images acquired from a torso phantom. For single-isotope images, the optimal energy windows (width/center: 26 keV/75 keV and 28 keV/165 keV for /sup 201/Tl, 30 keV/142 keV for /sup 99m/Tc) are wider than typical windows. For DISA imaging, the optimal windows varied with the /sup 99m/Tc to /sup 201/Tl activity ratio and are thus likely to depend on the uptake ratio in each patient. Using the optimal ratio 2.25-2.75 (148 MBq /sup 201/Tl and 333-407 MBq /sup 99m/Tc) with the corresponding optimal windows (22 keV/72 keV, 24 keV/167 keV, and 24 keV/140 keV) gives /sup 201/Tl images with substantially increased SNRs as well as /sup 99m/Tc images with SNRs same as those of 370 MBq /sup 99m/Tc-only images. However, without the addition of crosstalk compensation, the use of the optimal activity and energy windows alone is likely not sufficient to restore the DISA Tl SNR to that of Tl-only image.

  10. Isotopic probes for chamber-based microphysics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, E. J.; Möhler, O.; Ebert, V.; Morong, C. P.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapor are an underutilized potential probe of processes of ice crystal nucleation and growth and cirrus cloud evolution. We discuss a new laser- based absorption spectroscopy instrument for measurement of gas-phase water isotopologues (H2O, HDO, and H218O) currently under construction for use at the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber in Karlsruhe, Germany, the largest such facility in the world and the only one suitable for isotopic measurements. We discuss proposed chamber experiments and show how isotopic measurements can help discriminate between many current hypotheses proposed to explain observed high supersaturation in cold cirrus, which include inactivation of aerosols by glassification, growth inhibition due to aerosol coating with organic material, ice in cubic rather than hexagonal phase, unexpectedly low temperature-dependent mass accommodation coefficients, and NAT deposition on ice. Chamber experiments offer several advantages over field sampling in the atmosphere from aircraft. First, the limitations of natural isotopic ratios (1:10000 for HDO:H2O) are not a constraint in controlled chamber experiments, because chamber water can be doped to reduce the difference between concentrations of common and rare isotopologues and allow increased measurement sensitivity. Second, different water sources can be isotopically labeled, allowing explicit measurement of fluxes. The combination allows the use of isotopic probes in novel ways for understanding microphysics in cold cirrus.

  11. COMPOUND-SPECIFIC ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF MTBE AND TBA FOR BIOREMEDIATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of stable isotope ratios to detect biodegradation for a number of chemical compounds including MTBE and TBA has been demonstrated in a number of laboratory or field studies. Chemical reactions tend to favor molecules with the lighter isotopic species (e.g., 12C, 1H), ...

  12. Experiments to study cosmic ray isotopic composition up to sub 40 Zr

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, B. )

    1990-03-20

    Instruments being currently developed for balloon-borne cosmic ray isotopic composition measurements should lead to instruments with the precise mass resolution and large geometry factor needed to study isotopes in the range 30{le}{ital Z}{le}40 with long duration exposure on a polar orbiting platform or on the moon.

  13. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: EXPANDING THE SCOPE OF MIXING MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One common application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include pollution sources for air or water bodies, food sources for an...

  14. Use of micrometeorological techniques to study the isotopic exchange in ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, E.; Wagner-Riddle, C.; Brown, S. E.; Stropes, K.

    2015-12-01

    The combination of micrometeorological techniques with high frequency concentration measurements of stable isotopes are a powerful tool to study the temporal dynamics of isotope signatures at the ecosystem level. The objective of this study was to study the isotopic composition of the net CO2 exchange (NEE) above and with corn and tall grass canopies. Profiles of stable isotopes of CO2 (12C-CO2, 13C-CO2 and 18O-CO2) were measured using tunable diode laser trace gas analyzers and multiport sampling systems in corn (12C-CO2 and 13C-CO2, only) and tall grass canopies. These measurements were combined with the flux gradient method and Lagrangian dispersion analysis to estimate the isotopic signatures of the net CO2 flux. The use of a gradient of a concentration threshold to screen half hourly period improved the estimates of flux signatures by the isotope flux ratio approach. The Langrangian dispersion analysis and the isotope flux ratio method estimates showed good agreement above the corn canopy, indicating that the former method can be a viable alternative to study the isotopic exchange within plant canopies. The 13CO2 composition of NEE showed a downward trend near the end of the growing season, which may be related to a reduction of autotrophic respiration in the soil.

  15. COMPOUND-SPECIFIC ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF MTBE AND TBA FOR BIOREMEDIATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of stable isotope ratios to detect biodegradation for a number of chemical compounds including MTBE and TBA has been demonstrated in a number of laboratory or field studies. Chemical reactions tend to favor molecules with the lighter isotopic species (e.g., 12C, 1H), ...

  16. Coordinated Chemical and Isotopic Studies of GEMS in IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2008-01-01

    Cometary IDPs contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula [1]. Following their accretion, these materials have remained relatively unaltered because of the lack of parent body hydrothermal alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these IDPs because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars [e.g. 2]. Amorphous silicates (in the form of GEMS grains) are a major component of cometary IDPs and so a major objective of this work is to elucidate their origins. In rare cases, GEMS grains have highly anomalous O isotopic compositions that establish their origins as circumstellar condensates [3]. Here we present data on a systematic study of the silicate components within a primitive IDP.

  17. Setup for polarized neutron imaging using in situ 3He cells at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CG-1D beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhiman, I.; Ziesche, Ralf; Wang, Tianhao; Bilheux, Hassina; Santodonato, Lou; Tong, X.; Jiang, C. Y.; Manke, Ingo; Treimer, Wolfgang; Chatterji, Tapan; Kardjilov, Nikolay

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we report a new setup for polarized neutron imaging at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor CG-1D beamline using an in situ 3He polarizer and analyzer. This development is very important for extending the capabilities of the imaging instrument at ORNL providing a polarized beam with a large field-of-view, which can be further used in combination with optical devices like Wolter optics, focusing guides, or other lenses for the development of microscope arrangement. Such a setup can be of advantage for the existing and future imaging beamlines at the pulsed neutron sources. The first proof-of-concept experiment is performed to study the ferromagnetic phase transition in the Fe3Pt sample. We also demonstrate that the polychromatic neutron beam in combination with in situ 3He cells can be used as the initial step for the rapid measurement and qualitative analysis of radiographs.

  18. Isotope effects of neodymium in different ligands exchange systems studied by ion exchange displacement chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ibrahim; Fawzy, Ahmed S.; Ahmad, Mohammad I.; Aly, Hisham F.; Nomura, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The isotope effects of neodymium in Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were studied by using ion exchange chromatography. The separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε’s, were calculated from the observed isotopic ratios at the front and rear boundaries of the neodymium adsorption band. The values of separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε’s, for the Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were compared with those of Nd-malate and Nd-citrate, which indicated that the isotope effects of neodymium as studied by the three ligands takes the following direction Malate > Citrate > Glycolate. This order agrees with the number of available sites for complexation of each ligand. The values of the plate height, HETP of Nd in Nd-ligand exchange systems were also calculated. PMID:25685410

  19. Isotope effects of neodymium in different ligands exchange systems studied by ion exchange displacement chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ibrahim; Fawzy, Ahmed S; Ahmad, Mohammad I; Aly, Hisham F; Nomura, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-03-01

    The isotope effects of neodymium in Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were studied by using ion exchange chromatography. The separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε's, were calculated from the observed isotopic ratios at the front and rear boundaries of the neodymium adsorption band. The values of separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε's, for the Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were compared with those of Nd-malate and Nd-citrate, which indicated that the isotope effects of neodymium as studied by the three ligands takes the following direction Malate > Citrate > Glycolate. This order agrees with the number of available sites for complexation of each ligand. The values of the plate height, HETP of Nd in Nd-ligand exchange systems were also calculated.

  20. Oxygen and iron isotope studies of magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mandernack, K.W.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Bullen, T.D.

    1999-01-01

    A series of carefully controlled laboratory studies was carried out to investigate oxygen and iron isotope fractionation during the intracellular production of magnetite (Fe3O4) by two different species of magnetotactic bacteria at temperatures between 4??and 35??C under microaerobic and anaerobic conditions. No detectable fractionation of iron isotopes in the bacterial magnetites was observed. However, oxygen isotope measurements indicated a temperature-dependent fractionation for Fe3O4 and water that is consistent with that observed for Fe3O4 produced extracellularly by thermophilic Fe3+-reducing bacteria. These results contrast with established fractionation curves estimated from either high-temperature experiments or theoretical calculations. With the fractionation curve established in this report, oxygen-18 isotope values of bacterial Fe3O4 may be useful in paleoenvironmental studies for determining the oxygen-18 isotope values of formation waters and for inferring paleotemperatures.

  1. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and paleohydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3} precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth (due mainly to increased importance of respired CO{sub 2}), decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude (partially due to relatively more C-3 vegetation), and reduced {sup 13}C during spring (due again to higher rates of respiration, and reduced gas permeability of wet soils). These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  2. Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P. J.; Hartemann, Frederic V.; McNabb, Dennis P.; Pruet, Jason A.

    2009-07-21

    The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

  3. Evaluation Study for the Production of the Medical Isotope ^90Y, using a Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necsoiu, D.; Morgan, I. L.; Hupf, Homer; Armbruster, J.; Boyce, D.; El Bouanani, M.; McDaniel, F. D.

    2000-10-01

    The use of radioisotopes in therapy, medical imaging and laboratory tests is well-established worldwide. ^90Y is a very good therapeutic candidate for radioimmunotherapy applications. Traditionally, medical radioisotopes are produced using either nuclear reactors or proton accelerators. In this study, the medical isotope ^90Y has been produced using ^90Zr(n,p)^90Y nuclear reaction. Neutrons for the activation process were produced using ^natRh(p,xn) reaction with a 27 MeV proton beam from a cyclotron. Since ^90Y is a pure beta emitter, the gamma rays from the ^90Zr(n,2n)^89Zr reaction were used to quantify the incident neutron flux on the ^90Zr sample. Experimental results of the neutron production and ^90Y activity are presented.

  4. Follow the Carbon: Isotopic Labeling Studies of Early Earth Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Raea K.; Day, Douglas A.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the faint young Sun, early Earth might have been kept warm by an atmosphere containing the greenhouse gases CH4 and CO2 in mixing ratios higher than those found on Earth today. Laboratory and modeling studies suggest that an atmosphere containing these trace gases could lead to the formation of organic aerosol haze due to UV photochemistry. Chemical mechanisms proposed to explain haze formation rely on CH4 as the source of carbon and treat CO2 as a source of oxygen only, but this has not previously been verified experimentally. In the present work, we use isotopically labeled precursor gases and unit-mass resolution (UMR) and high-resolution (HR) aerosol mass spectrometry to examine the sources of carbon and oxygen to photochemical aerosol formed in a CH4/CO2/N2 atmosphere. UMR results suggest that CH4 contributes 70-100% of carbon in the aerosol, while HR results constrain the value from 94% to 100%. We also confirm that CO2 contributes approximately 10% of the total mass to the aerosol as oxygen. These results have implications for the geochemical interpretations of inclusions found in Archean rocks on Earth and for the astrobiological potential of other planetary atmospheres.

  5. Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, C.D.; Miller, D.L.; Carson, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to be irradiated in the ACRR. The intent of DOE would be to provide a capability to satisfy the North American health care system demand for {sup 99}Mo, the parent of {sup 99m}Tc, in the event of an interruption in the current Canadian supply. {sup 99m}Tc is used in 70 to 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures in the US. The goal of the SNL/NM study effort is to determine the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and staffing necessary to meet the North American need for {sup 99}Mo and to identify and examine all issues with potential for environmental impact.

  6. Follow the Carbon: Isotopic Labeling Studies of Early Earth Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Raea K; Day, Douglas A; Jimenez, Jose L; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the faint young Sun, early Earth might have been kept warm by an atmosphere containing the greenhouse gases CH4 and CO2 in mixing ratios higher than those found on Earth today. Laboratory and modeling studies suggest that an atmosphere containing these trace gases could lead to the formation of organic aerosol haze due to UV photochemistry. Chemical mechanisms proposed to explain haze formation rely on CH4 as the source of carbon and treat CO2 as a source of oxygen only, but this has not previously been verified experimentally. In the present work, we use isotopically labeled precursor gases and unit-mass resolution (UMR) and high-resolution (HR) aerosol mass spectrometry to examine the sources of carbon and oxygen to photochemical aerosol formed in a CH4/CO2/N2 atmosphere. UMR results suggest that CH4 contributes 70-100% of carbon in the aerosol, while HR results constrain the value from 94% to 100%. We also confirm that CO2 contributes approximately 10% of the total mass to the aerosol as oxygen. These results have implications for the geochemical interpretations of inclusions found in Archean rocks on Earth and for the astrobiological potential of other planetary atmospheres. Key Words: Atmosphere-Early Earth-Planetary atmospheres-Carbon dioxide-Methane. Astrobiology 16, 822-830.

  7. Isotopic study of oxygen diffusion in oxide coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Kren, Lawrence A.; Dever, Therese M.

    1989-01-01

    Diffusion of oxygen in thin films of silicon dioxide was studied using oxygen isotopically enriched in oxygen of atomic mass 18 (O-18). This subject is of interest because thin films of dielectrics such as SiO2 are proposed for use as a protective coatings for solar mirrors in low Earth orbit, which is a strongly oxidizing environment. Films of this material were prepared with a direct current magnetron using reactive sputtering techniques. To produce (O-18)- enriched SiO2, a standard 3.5-in.-diameter silicon wafer was reactively sputtered using (O-18)-enriched (95 percent) oxygen as the plasma feed gas. The films were characterized using Rutherford backscattering and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) to establish stoichiometry and purity. Subsequently, the films were exposed to an air-derived oxygen plasma in a standard laboratory plasma reactor for durations of up to 10 hr. The concentration ratio of O-16 as a function of depth was determined using SIMS profiling and compared to a baseline, nonplasma exposed sample. A value for the diffusivity of oxygen near the surface of these films was obtained and found to be about 10(-15)sq cm/sec.

  8. Sr isotopic tracer study of the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Lanphere, M.A.; Coleman, R.G.; Hopson, C.A.

    1981-04-10

    We have measured Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr isotopic compositions in 41 whole-rock samples and 12 mineral separates from units of the Samail ophiolite, including peridotite, gabbro, plagiogranite diabase dikes, and gabbro and websterite dikes within the metamorphic peridotite. Ten samples of cummulate gabbro from the Wadir Kadir section and nine samples from the Wadi Khafifah section have mean /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios and standard deviations of 0.70314 +- 0.00030 and 0.70306 +- 0.00034, respectively. The dispersion in Sr isotopic composition may reflect real heterogeneities in the magma source region. The average Sr isotopic composition of cumulate gabbro falls in the range of isotopic compositions of modern midocean ridge basalt. The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of noncumulate gabbro, plagiogranite, and diabase dikes range from 0.7034 to 0.7047, 0.7038 to 0.7046, and 0.7037 to 0.7061, respectively. These higher /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios are due to alteration of initial magmatic compositions by hydrothermal exchange with seawater. Mineral separates from dikes that cut harzburgite tectonite have Sr isotopic compositions which agree with that of cumulate gabbro. These data indicate that the cumulate gabbro and the different dikes were derived from partial melting of source regions that had similar long-term histories and chemical compositions.

  9. Sr isotopic tracer study of the Samail ophiolite, Oman.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Coleman, R.G.; Hopson, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr-isotopic compositions were measured in 41 whole-rock samples and 12 mineral separates from units of the Samail ophiolite, including peridotite, gabbro, plagiogranite, diabase dykes, and gabbro and websterite dykes within the metamorphic peridotite. Ten samples of cumulate gabbro from the Wadir Kadir section and nine samples from the Wadi Khafifah section have 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70314 + or - 0.00030 and 0.70306 + or - 0.00034, respectively. The dispersion in Sr- isotopic composition may reflect real heterogeneities in the magma source region. The average Sr-isotopic composition of cumulate gabbro falls in the range of isotopic compositions of modern MORB. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of noncumulate gabbro, plagiogranite, and diabase dykes range 0.7034-0.7047, 0.7038-0.7046 and 0.7037- 0.7061, respectively. These higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios are due to alteration of initial magmatic compositions by hydrothermal exchange with sea-water. Mineral separates from dykes that cut harzburgite tectonite have Sr-isotopic compositions which agree with that of cumulate gabbro. These data indicate that the cumulate gabbro and the different dykes were derived from partial melting of source regions that had similar long-term histories and chemical compositions.-T.R.

  10. Combining Solvent Isotope Effects with Substrate Isotope Effects in Mechanistic Studies of Alcohol and Amine Oxidation by Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin-and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. PMID:25448013

  11. Simultaneous hydrogen and heavier element isotopic ratio images with a scanning submicron ion probe and mass resolved polyatomic ions.

    PubMed

    Slodzian, Georges; Wu, Ting-Di; Bardin, Noémie; Duprat, Jean; Engrand, Cécile; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc

    2014-04-01

    In situ microanalysis of solid samples is often performed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with a submicron ion probe. The destructive nature of the method makes it mandatory to prevent information loss by using instruments combining efficient collection of secondary ions and a mass spectrometer with parallel detection capabilities. The NanoSIMS meets those requirements with a magnetic spectrometer but its mass selectivity has to be improved for accessing opportunities expected from polyatomic secondary ions. We show here that it is possible to perform D/H ratio measurement images using 12CD-/12CH-, 16OD-/16OH-, or 12C2D-/12C2H- ratios. These polyatomic species allow simultaneous recording of D/H ratios and isotopic compositions of heavier elements like 15N/14N (via 12C15N-/12C14N-) and they provide a powerful tool to select the phase of interest (e.g., mineral versus organics). We present high mass resolution spectra and an example of isotopic imaging where D/H ratios were obtained via the 12C2D-/12C2H- ratio with 12C2D- free from neighboring mass interferences. Using an advanced mass resolution protocol, a "conventional" mass resolving power of 25,000 can be achieved. Those results open many perspectives for isotopic imaging at a fine scale in biology, material science, geochemistry, and cosmochemistry.

  12. A high-resolution study of the isotopes of solar flare nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Individual isotopes of the elements He, C, N, O, Ne, and Mg with energies from 5 to 50 MeV per nucleon have been resolved in energetic flare particles during the September 23, 1978 solar flare event. In addition, an earlier determination of Ne-22/Ne-20 in this flare was improved on by extending the energy interval for isotope analysis. A significant difference between the isotopic composition of solar flare and solar wind neon is found, which is compared to similar evidence from studies of solar energetic particles implanted in lunar and meteoritic samples. Although limited by statistics, the measurements of He, C, N, O, and Mg isotopes are consistent with typical isotopic abundances found in other samples of solar system material. The ensemble of these results is used to test for the possibility of mass-dependent fractionation during solar flare acceleration and propagation.

  13. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  14. Experimental stand for studies of hydrogen isotopes permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Brad, S.; Stefanescu, I.; Stefan, L.; Lazar, A.; Vijulie, M.; Sofilca, N.; Bornea, A.; Vasut, F.; Zamfirache, M.; Bidica, N.; Postolache, C.; Matei, L.

    2008-07-15

    As a result of the high probability of hydrogen isotope permeation through materials used in high-temperature reactor operations, the interaction of hydrogen isotopes with metallic structural materials proposed to be used for fusion reactor designing is of great importance for safety considerations. Determining the parameters of the interaction between hydrogen isotopes and different materials, is therefore essential to accurately calculate recycling, outgassing, loading, permeation and hydrogen embrittlement. The permeation tests were made in collaboration with IFIN Bucuresti inside of a special glove-box to avail their radioactive protection expertise. This investigation programme is ongoing. In this paper we describe the permeation stand facility and the preliminary tests carried out to date. (authors)

  15. Lead isotopic studies of the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Pallister, J.S.

    1981-04-10

    The isotopic composition of Pb and the concentrations of U, Th, and Pb have been determined for samples from various lithologic units and massive sulfides of the Samail ophiolite. The observed /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb ratios range from 17.90 to 19.06, /sup 207/Pb//sup 204/Pb ratios from 15.43 to 15.63, and /sup 208/Pb//sup 204/Pb from 37.66 to 38.78. In Pb isotopic evolution diagrams, the initial Pb isotopic compositions of most of the samples from the Samail ophiolite plot within the field of oceanic basalt, clearly distinct from island arc data, and define some of the least radiogenic Pb observed from oceanic rocks. Lead data from the Samail are compatible with a model involving magma generation from an oceanic mantle source and formation of the ophiolite at an oceanic spreading center. U--Th--Pb isotopic systematics demonstrate that vertical heterogeneity in the oceanic crust can be created through differential concentration of U, Th, and Pb during crystal fractionation and alteration at, or near, the spreading ridge. Calcite form amygdules in the ophiolite basalt has similar Pb isotopic composition to the igneous rocks, suggesting precipitation of the calcite from seawater which contained Pb derived mostly from the oceanic crust. Lead isotopic data on Fe--Cu sulfides are also similar to the results from the igneous suite suggesting that the source of the sulfides is predominently from the oceanic crust. Lead data from serpentinized peridotite and a galena sample from below the ophiolite suggest that part of the serpentinization process and the formation of galena could involve addition of radiogenic Pb from either a continental source or from oceanic sediments.

  16. Imaging studies of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedner, Malcolm B., Jr.; Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III; Westpfahl, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The Joint Observatory for Cometary Research's (JOCR) historical mission has been to provide understanding of large-scale interactions between bright comets and solar wind using wide-angle (Schmidt) imagery and spacecraft data; in this pursuit the JOCR has excelled. The 16 inch Newtonian/Cassegrain telescope was upgraded to permit filtered, narrow-field charge coupled device (CCD) imaging of both bright and faint comets. Thus, the goal of obtaining narrow-band imagery of the near-nuclear region of bright comets was added to JOCR's original mission with emphasis on ionization processes and total gas production. A 300 mm lens/CCD system exists with 3 degree field of view (FOV) which uses comet filters; this system bridges the gap between the wide-field (8 x 10 deg) Schmidt plates and the several-arcmin. field of the 16 inch telescope. JOCR is located under dark skies on South Baldy Mountain (el. 10,600 ft.) near Socorro, NM, and is one of the last truly dark sites in the continental U.S.

  17. Collectivity in the light xenon isotopes: A shell model study

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Sieja, K.; Poves, A.

    2010-12-15

    The lightest xenon isotopes are studied in the shell model framework, within a valence space that comprises all the orbits lying between the magic closures N=Z=50 and N=Z=82. The calculations produce collective deformed structures of triaxial nature that encompass nicely the known experimental data. Predictions are made for the (still unknown) N=Z nucleus {sup 108}Xe. The results are interpreted in terms of the competition between the quadrupole correlations enhanced by the pseudo-SU(3) structure of the positive parity orbits and the pairing correlations brought in by the 0h{sub 11/2} orbit. We also have studied the effect of the excitations from the {sup 100}Sn core on our predictions. We show that the backbending in this region is due to the alignment of two particles in the 0h{sub 11/2} orbit. In the N=Z case, one neutron and one proton align to J=11 and T=0. In {sup 110,112}Xe the alignment begins in the J=10, T=1 channel and it is dominantly of neutron-neutron type. Approaching the band termination the alignment of a neutron-proton pair to J=11 and T=0 takes over. In a more academic mood, we have studied the role of the isovector and isoscalar pairing correlations on the structure on the yrast bands of {sup 108,110}Xe and examined the possible existence of isovector and isoscalar pairing condensates in these N{approx}{approx}Z nuclei.

  18. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  19. High-precision γ -ray spectroscopy of the cardiac PET imaging isotope Rb82 and its impact on dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Nino, M. N.; McCutchan, E. A.; Smith, S. V.; Lister, C. J.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Muench, L.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Zhu, S.

    2016-02-01

    82Rb is a positron-emitting isotope used in cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) imaging which has been reported to deliver a significantly lower effective radiation dose than analogous imaging isotopes like 201Tl and 99mTc sestamibi. High-quality β-decay data are essential to accurately appraise the total dose received by the patients. A source of 82Sr was produced at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), transported to Argonne National Laboratory, and studied with the Gammasphere facility. Significant revisions have been made to the level scheme of 82Kr including 12 new levels, 50 new γ-ray transitions, and the determination of many new spin assignments through angular correlations. Lastly, these new high-quality data allow a precise reappraisal of the β-decay strength function and thus the consequent dose received by patients.

  20. Sleep studies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    During a sleep study the sleep cycles and stages of sleep are monitored. Electrodes are placed to monitor continuous recordings of brain waves, electrical activity of muscles, eye movement, respiratory ...

  1. High flux isotope reactor cold source preconceptual design study report

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Bucholz, J.A.; Burnette, S.E.

    1995-12-01

    In February 1995, the deputy director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced Neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. The anticipated cold source will consist of a cryogenic LH{sub 2} moderator plug, a cryogenic pump system, a refrigerator that uses helium gas as a refrigerant, a heat exchanger to interface the refrigerant with the hydrogen loop, liquid hydrogen transfer lines, a gas handling system that includes vacuum lines, and an instrumentation and control system to provide constant system status monitoring and to maintain system stability. The scope of this project includes the development, design, safety analysis, procurement/fabrication, testing, and installation of all of the components necessary to produce a working cold source within an existing HFIR beam tube. This project will also include those activities necessary to transport the cold neutron beam to the front face of the present HFIR beam room. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and research and development (R and D), (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the preconceptual phase and establishes the concept feasibility. The information presented includes the project scope, the preliminary design requirements, the preliminary cost and schedule, the preliminary performance data, and an outline of the various plans for completing the project.

  2. NOTE: Comparison of correction techniques for simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging: a dog study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knesaurek, Karin; Machac, Josef

    2000-11-01

    We compared two correction methods for simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Both approaches use the information from the third energy window placed between the photopeak windows of the 201Tl and 99mTc. The first approach, described by Moore et al, corrects only for the contribution of the 99mTc to the 201Tl primary 70 keV window. We developed the three-window transformation dual-isotope correction method, which is a simultaneous cross-talk correction. The two correction methods were compared in a simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc sestamibi cardiac dog study. Three separate acquisitions were performed in this dog study: two single-isotope and one dual-isotope acquisition. The 201Tl single-isotope images were used as references. The total number of counts, and the contrast between the left ventricular cavity (LVC) and the myocardium, were used in 70 keV short-axis slices as parameters for evaluating the results of the dual-isotope correction methods. Three consecutive short-axis slices were used to calculate averaged contrast and the averaged total number of counts. The total number of the counts was 667 000 ± 500 and 414 500 ± 400 counts for the dual-isotope (201Tl + 99mTc) and single-isotope (201Tl-only) 70 keV images, respectively. The corrected dual-isotope images had 514 700 ± 700 and 368 000 ± 600 counts for Moore's correction and our approach, respectively. Moore's method improved contrast in the dual-isotope 70 keV image to 0.14 ± 0.03 from 0.11 ± 0.02, which was the value in the 70 keV non-corrected dual-isotope image. Our method improved the same contrast to 0.22 ± 0.03. The contrast in the 201Tl single-isotope 70 keV image was 0.28 ± 0.02. Both methods improved the 70 keV dual-isotope images. However, our approach provided slightly better images than Moore's correction when compared with 201Tl-only 70 keV images.

  3. The Hemlo gold deposit, Ontario: A geochemical and isotopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Eion M.; Hattori, Keiko

    1985-10-01

    The Hemlo deposit, near Marathon, Ontario, is one of the largest gold deposits in North America. It is stratiform within Archean metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary rocks. The main ore zone is composed of pyritic, sericitic schist, and massive barite. This is the first report of stratiform barite in the Archean of North America, but other occurrences have since been found west of Hemlo. The mineralization is substantially enriched in Au, Mo, Sb, Hg, Tl and V and lacks carbonate. Because of metamorphism and deformation of the body its genesis is uncertain. 87Sr /86Sr of .7017 for barite from the deposit is similar to that of the sedimentary barite west of Hemlo and to initial ratios of contemporaneous volcanic rocks. At the base of the main ore zone, barite with δ34 S of +8 to +12%. was deposited with ~0%. pyrite. Upward, both barite and pyrite get isotopically lighter, with minimum values for pyrite, to -17.5%, in non-baritic schist forming the upper part of the ore zone. In drill section, Au grades correlate with the isotopic composition of pyrite. This, and the association of fractionated sulphide with sulphate, suggests that Au, pyrite and barite were deposited contemporaneously. The linked, asymmetric distributions of S minerals and isotopic distributions, which are continuous from section to section, and the isotopic similarity of the Hemlo and western barites are consistent with a syngenetic depositional model. Two sources for the S minerals are considered. In the first, exogenous sulphate from a restricted basin were partially reduced in a geothermal system to form 34S-depleted sulphide. In the second, the sulphate and sulphide are of magmatic-hydrothermal origin. Sulphate and fractionated sulphide are uncommon in Archean rocks, but one or both occur with unusual frequency in major Archean gold deposits. Hydrothermal fluids of moderately high ƒ O 2, containing sulphate and permitting isotopic fractionation between oxidized and reduced S species, may have

  4. Imaging study on acupuncture points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Liu, C. L.; Dang, R. S.; Ando, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Chen, H. S.; Ding, G. H.

    2009-09-01

    The topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using the synchrotron radiation based Dark Field Image (DFI) method. Four following acupuncture points were studied: Sanyinjiao, Neiguan, Zusanli and Tianshu. We have found that at acupuncture point regions there exists the accumulation of micro-vessels. The images taken in the surrounding tissue out of the acupuncture points do not show such kind of structure. It is the first time to reveal directly the specific structure of acupuncture points by X-ray imaging.

  5. Development of a Laser Probe for Argon Isotope Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConville, Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The first objective of this study was to develop a laser outgassing facility for argon isotope studies. Apart from the laser and construction of the laser sample port, existing vacuum and mass spectrometer systems were used. Laser performance and optimum operating conditions were investigated. The second objective was test and evaluate the laser extraction technique by studies of simple geological samples. Previous laser ^{40} Ar-^{39}Ar dating studies by other workers had not systematically established the basis or characteristics of the method. Results from laser and complementary stepped heating studies of the ^{40}Ar-^ {39}Ar dating standard hornblende, hb3gr; a phlogopite sample from the Palabora (Phalaborwa) Complex; and biotites in a thin section of the Hamlet Bjerg granite from East Greenland, verified that: (1) Laser extraction reproduced within experimental error the stepped heating ^{40}Ar-^ {39}Ar and K-Ar ages of simple samples. (2) The precision of the technique i.e. the amount of sample required to give reliable ages, was limited in the present experiments largely by the level of the blanks and backgrounds to 10-100 ug samples. (3) Sample outgassing appeared to be limited to the order of 10 um outside the physical size of the laser pit, consistent with other estimates of the spatial definition in the literature. This could be understood by thermal diffusion and the length of the laser pulse. (4) The efficiency of the laser pulse in melting and outgassing mineral samples was shown to be dependent on silicate latent heats and mineral absorption at the laser wavelength. In addition, the ^{40} Ar-^{39}Ar age of the geologically significant Palabora Complex was determined as (2053 +/- 5) Ma. Excess argon led to a discrepancy between the laser and stepped heating ages of biotite and muscovite, (405 +/- 5) Ma, and laser ages of feldspars (510 +/- 20) Ma in the Hamlet Bjerg granite. This illustrated

  6. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  7. Community archiving of imaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Steven L.; Roys, Steven R.; Munjal, Sunita

    1996-05-01

    The quantity of image data created in a large radiology practice has long been a challenge for available archiving technology. Traditional methods ofarchiving the large quantity of films generated in radiology have relied on warehousing in remote sites, with courier delivery of film files for historical comparisons. A digital community archive, accessible via a wide area network, represents a feasible solution to the problem of archiving digital images from a busy practice. In addition, it affords a physician caring for a patient access to imaging studies performed at a variety ofhealthcare institutions without the need to repeat studies. Security problems include both network security issues in the WAN environment and access control for patient, physician and imaging center. The key obstacle to developing a community archive is currently political. Reluctance to participate in a community archive can be reduced by appropriate design of the access mechanisms.

  8. A hydrogen gas-water equilibration method produces accurate and precise stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements in nutrition studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to ...

  9. Phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy for primary liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ettinger, D.S.; Order, S.E.; Wharam, M.D.; Parker, M.K.; Klein, J.L.; Leichner, P.K.

    1982-02-01

    A phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy was performed in 18 patients with primary liver cancer; 14 were evaluable for toxicity. The patients received a dose of 37-157 millicuries of 131I-labeled antibody. The dose-limiting factor appears to be hematologic toxicity, especially thrombocytopenia. An objective antitumor effect was seen in six of nine patients who were evaluable for response. Present results suggest that further clinical studies with isotopic immunoglobulin are indicated.

  10. Rare-isotope and kinetic studies of Pt/SnO2 catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Wood, George M.; Schryer, David R.; Hess, Robert V.; Miller, Irvin M.; Kielin, Erik J.

    1990-01-01

    Closed-cycle pulsed CO2 laser operation requires the use of an efficient CO-O2 recombination catalyst for these dissociation products which otherwise would degrade the laser operation. The catalyst must not only operate at low temperatures but also must operate efficiently for long periods. In the case of the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) laser, an operational lifetime of 3 years is required. Additionally, in order to minimize atmospheric absorption and enhance aerosol scatter of laser radiation, the LAWS system will operate at 9.1 micrometers with an oxygen-18 isotope CO2 lasing medium. Consequently, the catalyst must not only operate at low temperatures but must also preserve the isotopic integrity of the rare-isotope composition in the recombination mode. Several years ago an investigation of commercially available and newly synthesized recombination catalysts for use in closed-cycle pulsed common and rare-isotope CO2 lasers was implemented at the NASA Langley Research Center. Since that time, mechanistic efforts utilizing both common and rare oxygen isotopes have been implemented and continue. Rare-isotope studies utilizing commercially available platinum-tin oxide catalyst have demonstrated that the catalyst contributes oxygen-16 to the product carbon dioxide thus rendering it unusable for rare-isotope applications. A technique has been developed for modification of the surface of the common-isotope catalyst to render it usable. Results of kinetic and isotope label studies using plug flow, recycle plug flow, and closed internal recycle plug flow reactor configuration modes are discussed.

  11. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope study on benthic foraminifera: Implication for microhabitat preferences and interspecies correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, Ajoy K.; Kumar, Shiv; Ray, Shilpi; Vishwakarma, G. K.; Gupta, Anil K.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Sain, Kalachand

    2017-07-01

    Stable isotopes of benthic foraminifera have widely been applied in micropalaeontological research to understand vital effects in foraminifera. Isotopic fractionations are mainly controlled by ontogeny, bottom/pore water chemistry, habitat preference, kinetic effect and respiration. Discontinuous abundance of a species for isotopic analysis has forced us to select multiple species from down-core samples. Thus standardisation factors are required to convert isotopic values of one species with respect to other species. The present study is pursued on isotopic values of different pairs of benthic foraminifera from the Krishna-Godavari basin and Peru offshore to understand habitat-wise isotopic variation and estimation of isotopic correction factors for the paired species ( Cibicides wuellerstorfi-Bulimina marginata, Ammonia spp.- Loxostomum amygdalaeformis and Bolivina seminuda-Nonionella auris). Infaunal species ( B. marginata, Ammonia spp. and N. auris) show a lighter carbon isotopic excursion with respect to the epifaunal to shallow infaunal forms ( C. wuellerstorfi, L. amygdalaeformis and B. seminuda). These lighter δ^{13} C values are related to utilisation of CO2 produced by anaerobic remineralisation of organic matter. However, enrichment of δ^{18} O for the deeper microhabitat (bearing lower pH and decreased {CO3}^{2-}) is only recorded in case of B. marginata. It is reverse in case of N. auris and related to utilisation of respiratory CO2 and internal dissolve inorganic carbon pool. Estimation of interspecies isotopic correction factors for the species pairs (δ^{13} C of C. wuellerstorfi- B. marginata, L. amygdalaeformis- Ammonia spp., N. auris- B. seminuda) and δ^{18} O of C. wuellerstorfi- B. marginata are statistically reliable and may be used in palaeoecological studies.

  12. Copper isotope effect in serum of cancer patients. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Télouk, Philippe; Puisieux, Alain; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Balter, Vincent; Bondanese, Victor P; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Clapisson, Gilles; Lamboux, Aline; Albarede, Francis

    2015-02-01

    The isotope effect describes mass-dependent variations of natural isotope abundances for a particular element. In this pilot study, we measured the (65)Cu/(63)Cu ratios in the serums of 20 breast and 8 colorectal cancer patients, which correspond to, respectively, 90 and 49 samples taken at different times with molecular biomarker documentation. Copper isotope compositions were determined by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). When compared with the literature data from a control group of 50 healthy blood donors, abundances of Cu isotopes predict mortality in the colorectal cancer group with a probability p = 0.018. For the breast cancer patients and the group of control women the probability goes down to p = 0.0006 and the AUC under the ROC curve is 0.75. Most patients considered in this preliminary study and with serum δ(65)Cu lower than the threshold value of -0.35‰ (per mil) did not survive. As a marker, a drop in δ(65)Cu precedes molecular biomarkers by several months. The observed decrease of δ(65)Cu in the serum of cancer patients is assigned to the extensive oxidative chelation of copper by cytosolic lactate. The potential of Cu isotope variability as a new diagnostic tool for breast and colorectal cancer seems strong. Shifts in Cu isotope compositions fingerprint cytosolic Cu chelation by lactate mono- and bidentates. This simple scheme provides a straightforward explanation for isotopically light Cu in the serum and isotopically heavy Cu in cancer cells: Cu(+) escaping chelation by lactate and excreted into the blood stream is isotopically light. Low δ(65)Cu values in serum therefore reveal the strength of lactate production by the Warburg effect.

  13. Isotope Analysis of Individual Aerosol Particles - a New Tool for Studying Heterogeneous Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterholler, B.; Hoppe, P.; Huth, J.; Andreae, M. O.; Foley, S.

    2006-12-01

    Sources of atmospheric sulfur and its oxidation pathways are studied by isotope analysis of sulfate particles. conventional gas mass spectrometry averages the isotopic compositions of millions of aerosol grains and, therefore, several different types of sulphur aerosol. The new Cameca NanoSIMS 50 ion microprobe technique permits isotope analyses of individual aerosol particles down to 0.5 μm diameter. Combining the chemical composition and isotopic signature of individual particles enables source apportionment of non-sea-salt (nss) sulfate and elucidating mixing processes between nss sulfate and sea-salt sulfate for each sample. Results from aerosol samples collected in Mace Head (Western Ireland) are presented. These samples represent different airmass types, such as clean marine boundary layer air, moderately polluted air and strongly polluted air transported from the continent. Fresh aerosol preserves the original isotopic signature of sea-salt and nss sulfate in separate particles, the latter being present predominantly in the form of ammonium sulfate. This enables us to identify oxidation of nss sulfate in deliquescent sea salt particles by means of their sulfur isotope ratio. Cloud processing however, leads to a complete homogenization as far as the sulfur isotopic signature is concerned.

  14. Parameterization of Pb X-ray contamination in simultaneous Tl-201 and Tc-99m dual-isotope imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Tung; Frey, E. C.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Tocharoenchai, C.; Baird, W. H.

    2002-06-01

    In simultaneous Tl-201 and Tc-99m dual isotope imaging, Pb X-rays are a significant source of contamination in the Tl image. In order to characterize this contamination, we simulated images of line sources in the Tc and Tl photopeak windows using an experimentally verified Monte Carlo program. The line sources were placed at various distances from the collimator face and emitted photons with energies from 88 to 140.5 keV. The Ph X-ray contamination line source response function in the Tl window was fitted well by a Gaussian plus an exponential function. The width of these two functions changed linearly with distance. Parameterization of the Ph X-ray response was done by simultaneously fitting the Ph X-ray response functions at various distances with fitting functions that were determined empirically to model the distance dependence of the Gaussian and exponential components of the Ph X-ray response. The parameterized model of Ph X-ray contamination is useful in developing methods to model Ph X-ray contamination in Tl-201 data by Tc-99m. This Ph X-ray contamination model can be used in iterative reconstruction-based cross-talk compensation for simultaneous Tc/Tl dual isotope imaging.

  15. Epilepsy Imaging Study Guideline Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, William D; Cross, J Helen; Duncan, John S; Stefan, Hermann; Theodore, William H

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of limited economic resources, as well as potential adverse effects of ‘over testing,’ has increased interest in ‘evidence-based’ assessment of new medical technology. This creates a particular problem for evaluation and treatment of epilepsy, increasingly dependent on advanced imaging and electrophysiology, since there is a marked paucity of epilepsy diagnostic and prognostic studies that meet rigorous standards for evidence classification. The lack of high quality data reflects fundamental weaknesses in many imaging studies but also limitations in the assumptions underlying evidence classification schemes as they relate to epilepsy, and to the practicalities of conducting adequately powered studies of rapidly evolving technologies. We review the limitations of current guidelines and propose elements for imaging studies that can contribute meaningfully to the epilepsy literature. PMID:21740417

  16. Studies of neutron-deficient mendelevium isotopes at SHIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antalic, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Ackermann, D.; Heinz, S.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Šáro, Š.

    2010-01-01

    The radioactive decay of the isotopes 247Md , 246Md and their daughter products was investigated by means of α - α and α - γ coincidence spectroscopy. The isotopes were produced using the fusion reaction 40Ar + 209Bi. Decay schemes are suggested for 247Md and 243Es . A new isomeric state in 246Md with a half-life of ( 4.4±0.8 s was observed. Previous data of electron-capture delayed fission of 246Md and 242Es were confirmed. The probability for this decay branch in 246Md was measured to be P ECDF > 0.10 . The probability for electron-capture delayed fission in the case of 242Es was determined to be P ECDF = 0.013+0.012 -0.007.

  17. Study of stable isotopes for highly deformed aquifers in the Hsinchu-Miaoli area, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsueh-Yu; Peng, Tsung-Ren; Liu, Tsung-Kwei; Wang, Chung-Ho; Huang, Chih-Chao

    2006-08-01

    This study was based on the analysis of isotopic compositions of hydrogen and oxygen in samples from precipitation, groundwater and stream water. In addition, parts of groundwater samples were dated by carbon-14 and tritium. These data are integrated to provide other views of the hydrologic cycle in the Hsinchu-Miaoli groundwater district. The groundwater district is principally composed of Pleistocene and Holocene aquifers. The Pleistocene aquifers are highly deformed by folding and faults into small sub-districts with areas of only tens of square kilometers. These aquifers are exclusively recharged by local precipitation. The Holocene aquifers cover narrow creek valleys, only tens of meters in thickness. The local meteoric water line (LMWL), constructed from rainfall samples in the Hsinchu Science Park, is described by the equation δD=8.02δ18O+10.16, which agrees with the global meteoric water line. In addition, the precipitation isotopic compositions can be categorized into two distinct end members: typhoon type and monsoon type. The groundwater isotopic compositions are perfectly located on an LMWL and can be considered a mixture of precipitations. Based on the mass balance of isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen, infiltration is more active in the rainy season with depleted isotopic compositions. The amount of infiltration during May-September is roughly estimated to comprise at least 55% of the whole year’s recharge. The isotopic compositions of stream water are expressed by a regression equation: δD=7.61δ18O+9.62, which is similar to the LMWL. Although precipitation isotopic compositions are depleted during summer time, the isotopic compositions contrarily show an enriched trend in the upstream area. This is explained by the opposite altitude effect on isotopic compositions for typhoon-related precipitations.

  18. Study of the charge radii of the stable lead isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Borchert, G.L.; Schult, O.W.B.; Speth, J.; Hansen, P.G.; Jonson, B.; Ravn, H.; McGrory, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Isotope shifts have been measured of the K/sub ..cap alpha..l/ x-ray lines emitted after photo ionization of /sup 204/Pb, /sup 206/Pb, /sup 207/Pb and /sup 208/Pb samples. The results are compared with theoretical values for delta < r/sup 2/> calculated with a microscopic model. The x-ray shift data are also compared with optical data and the nuclear parameters lambda derived from electron scattering results.

  19. Use of stable isotopes of selenium in human metabolic studies: development of analytical methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Janghorbani, M.; Ting, B.T.; Young, V.R.

    1981-12-01

    Use of stable isotopes of selenium in relation to enrichment of diets for studies of selenium absorption and metabolism in human subjects is discussed. A method based on radiochemical neutron activation analysis is described which allows accurate measurement of stable isotopes 74Se, 76Se, and 80Se in matrices (feces, plasma, red blood cells, and urine) of interest in metabolic studies. We show that these isotopes can routinely be measured with analytical precision and accuracy of 10% in samples of available size. This precision and accuracy is satisfactory for conduct of many nutritional experiments concerned with gastrointestinal absorption, plasma and red cell selenium turnover, and urinary excretion of the element, using an oral dose of 74Se. Original, experimental data are presented to illustrate the degree of enrichment of 74Se in feces, plasma, and urine after a single oral ingestion of 50 micrograms of the isotope with a breakfast meal in healthy young men.

  20. Sm-Nd Isotopic Studies of Ureilite Novo Urei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Goodrich, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Ureilites are ultramafic (harzburgitic) achondrites composed predominantly of olivine and pyroxenes, abundant carbon (graphites and shock-produced diamonds), some metal and sulfides. These rocks probably represent ultramafic mantles of differentiated parent asteroidal bodies. Age determinations of these rocks by Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd methods have been difficult because of their extremely low abundances of these parent-daughter elements. Nevertheless, Sm-Nd isochron ages were reported for Kenna, Goalpara, MET 78008 and PCA 82506 yielding ages of 3.74+/-0.02 Ga, approx.3.7 Ga, 4.09+/-0.08 Ga, 4.23+/-0.06 Ga, respectively [1-4]. These "young" Sm-Nd ages may represent secondary metasomatism events [1] related to impacts [5], as indicated by the similarly young Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing ages of 3.3-4.1 Ga for ureilites Kenna, Novo Urei and Havero [6]. Alternatively, it has been suggested that these rocks may have been contaminated with terrestrial crustal materials and the isochrons do not have any age significance [2,7]. Indications of old approx.4.56 Ga ages for ureilites were reported from the U-Pb and Sm-Nd model ages for MET 78008 [8]. More reliable evidences for old formation ages of ureilites were reported recently using the short-lived chronometers Hf-182-W-182, Al-26-Mg-26 and Mn-53-Cr-53. The deficits of 182W in ureilites suggest the metal-silicate segregation occurred very early, approx.1-2 Ma after CAI [9]. The Al-26-Mg-26 and Mn-53-Cr-53 studies for a feldspathic lithology [10] and the Mn-53-Cr-53 for olivine- and pyroxene-dominant lithologies [11] in ureilites revealed that they crystallized approx.5.4 Ma after CAI, i.e., at 4563.8+/-0.5 Ma relative to D.Orbigny. In this report, we present Sm-Nd isotopic data for a relatively fresh ureilite, Novo Urei, a rare ureilite fall (1886). We compare these data to Sm-Nd data for other ureilites, and discuss Novo Urei's petrogenesis

  1. Imaging Complex Protein Metabolism in Live Organisms by Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy with Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein metabolism, consisting of both synthesis and degradation, is highly complex, playing an indispensable regulatory role throughout physiological and pathological processes. Over recent decades, extensive efforts, using approaches such as autoradiography, mass spectrometry, and fluorescence microscopy, have been devoted to the study of protein metabolism. However, noninvasive and global visualization of protein metabolism has proven to be highly challenging, especially in live systems. Recently, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy coupled with metabolic labeling of deuterated amino acids (D-AAs) was demonstrated for use in imaging newly synthesized proteins in cultured cell lines. Herein, we significantly generalize this notion to develop a comprehensive labeling and imaging platform for live visualization of complex protein metabolism, including synthesis, degradation, and pulse–chase analysis of two temporally defined populations. First, the deuterium labeling efficiency was optimized, allowing time-lapse imaging of protein synthesis dynamics within individual live cells with high spatial–temporal resolution. Second, by tracking the methyl group (CH3) distribution attributed to pre-existing proteins, this platform also enables us to map protein degradation inside live cells. Third, using two subsets of structurally and spectroscopically distinct D-AAs, we achieved two-color pulse–chase imaging, as demonstrated by observing aggregate formation of mutant hungtingtin proteins. Finally, going beyond simple cell lines, we demonstrated the imaging ability of protein synthesis in brain tissues, zebrafish, and mice in vivo. Hence, the presented labeling and imaging platform would be a valuable tool to study complex protein metabolism with high sensitivity, resolution, and biocompatibility for a broad spectrum of systems ranging from cells to model animals and possibly to humans. PMID:25560305

  2. Imaging complex protein metabolism in live organisms by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lu; Shen, Yihui; Xu, Fang; Hu, Fanghao; Harrington, Jamie K; Targoff, Kimara L; Min, Wei

    2015-03-20

    Protein metabolism, consisting of both synthesis and degradation, is highly complex, playing an indispensable regulatory role throughout physiological and pathological processes. Over recent decades, extensive efforts, using approaches such as autoradiography, mass spectrometry, and fluorescence microscopy, have been devoted to the study of protein metabolism. However, noninvasive and global visualization of protein metabolism has proven to be highly challenging, especially in live systems. Recently, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy coupled with metabolic labeling of deuterated amino acids (D-AAs) was demonstrated for use in imaging newly synthesized proteins in cultured cell lines. Herein, we significantly generalize this notion to develop a comprehensive labeling and imaging platform for live visualization of complex protein metabolism, including synthesis, degradation, and pulse-chase analysis of two temporally defined populations. First, the deuterium labeling efficiency was optimized, allowing time-lapse imaging of protein synthesis dynamics within individual live cells with high spatial-temporal resolution. Second, by tracking the methyl group (CH3) distribution attributed to pre-existing proteins, this platform also enables us to map protein degradation inside live cells. Third, using two subsets of structurally and spectroscopically distinct D-AAs, we achieved two-color pulse-chase imaging, as demonstrated by observing aggregate formation of mutant hungtingtin proteins. Finally, going beyond simple cell lines, we demonstrated the imaging ability of protein synthesis in brain tissues, zebrafish, and mice in vivo. Hence, the presented labeling and imaging platform would be a valuable tool to study complex protein metabolism with high sensitivity, resolution, and biocompatibility for a broad spectrum of systems ranging from cells to model animals and possibly to humans.

  3. A preliminary study on isotopic evolution of ice by a melting experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. Y.; Lee, J.; Lee, W. S.; Han, Y.; Hur, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    that of the Global Meteoric Water Line (8) and the sublimation (7.7) suggested by Earman et al. (2006). We believe that isotopic exchange between liquid water and ice plays a crucial role in the variations of isotopes for the ice and its meltwater. We will modify a physically based 1-D model used in the previous studies to better understand the isotopic compositions of ice and its meltwater.

  4. Application of Three-Class ROC Analysis to Task-Based Image Quality Assessment of Simultaneous Dual-Isotope Myocardial Perfusion SPECT (MPS)

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Song, Xiyun; Frey, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac disease using dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) is based on the defect status in both stress and rest images, and can be modeled as a three-class task of classifying patients as having no, reversible, or fixed perfusion defects. Simultaneous acquisition protocols for dual-isotope MPS imaging have gained much interest due to their advantages including perfect registration of the 201Tl and 99mTc images in space and time, increased patient comfort, and higher clinical throughput. As a result of simultaneous acquisition, however, crosstalk contamination, where photons emitted by one isotope contribute to the image of the other isotope, degrades image quality. Minimizing the crosstalk is important in obtaining the best possible image quality. One way to minimize the crosstalk is to optimize the injected activity of the two isotopes by considering the three-class nature of the diagnostic problem. To effectively do so, we have previously developed a three-class receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis methodology that extends and unifies the decision theoretic, linear discriminant analysis, and psychophysical foundations of binary ROC analysis in a three-class paradigm. In this work, we applied the proposed three-class ROC methodology to the assessment of the image quality of simultaneous dual-isotope MPS imaging techniques and the determination of the optimal injected activity combination. In addition to this application, the rapid development of diagnostic imaging techniques has produced an increasing number of clinical diagnostic tasks that involve not only disease detection, but also disease characterization and are thus multiclass tasks. This paper provides a practical example of the application of the proposed three-class ROC analysis methodology to medical problems. PMID:18955172

  5. Preliminary report on the stable isotope imaging and characterization of surface and ground water resources in the southern Sacramento Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.; Campbell, K.R.

    1993-11-01

    This document contains information about the water resources in Sacramento. The project considers isotopic characterization of groundwater and the environmental effects of the misuse of water resources. In particular, the study looks at the effects extensive agriculture and the overdrafting of groundwater.

  6. Studies on image compression and image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayood, Khalid; Nori, Sekhar; Araj, A.

    1994-01-01

    During this six month period our works concentrated on three, somewhat different areas. We looked at and developed a number of error concealment schemes for use in a variety of video coding environments. This work is described in an accompanying (draft) Masters thesis. In the thesis we describe application of this techniques to the MPEG video coding scheme. We felt that the unique frame ordering approach used in the MPEG scheme would be a challenge to any error concealment/error recovery technique. We continued with our work in the vector quantization area. We have also developed a new type of vector quantizer, which we call a scan predictive vector quantization. The scan predictive VQ was tested on data processed at Goddard to approximate Landsat 7 HRMSI resolution and compared favorably with existing VQ techniques. A paper describing this work is included. The third area is concerned more with reconstruction than compression. While there is a variety of efficient lossless image compression schemes, they all have a common property that they use past data to encode future data. This is done either via taking differences, context modeling, or by building dictionaries. When encoding large images, this common property becomes a common flaw. When the user wishes to decode just a portion of the image, the requirement that the past history be available forces the decoding of a significantly larger portion of the image than desired by the user. Even with intelligent partitioning of the image dataset, the number of pixels decoded may be four times the number of pixels requested. We have developed an adaptive scanning strategy which can be used with any lossless compression scheme and which lowers the additional number of pixels to be decoded to about 7 percent of the number of pixels requested! A paper describing these results is included.

  7. Coordinated Chemical and Isotopic Imaging of Bells (CM2) Meteorite Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemett, S. J.; Messenger, S.; Naklamura-Messenger, K.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Meteoritic organic matter is a complex conglomeration of species formed in distinct environments and processes in circumstellar space, the interstellar medium, the Solar Nebula and asteroids. Consequently meteorites constitute a unique record of primordial organic chemical evolution. While bulk chemical analysis has provided a detailed description of the range and diversity of organic species present in carbonaceous chondrites, there is little information as to how these species are spatially distributed and their relationship to the host mineral matrix. The distribution of organic phases is nevertheless critical to understanding parent body processes. The CM and CI chondrites all display evidence of low temperature (< 350K) aqueous alteration that may have led to aqueous geochromatographic separation of organics and synthesis of new organics coupled to aqueous mineral alteration. Here we present the results of the first coordinated in situ isotopic and chemical mapping study of the Bells meteorite using a newly developed two-step laser mass spectrometer (mu-L(sup 2)MS) capable of measuring a broad range of organic compounds.

  8. The study of trace metal absoption using stable isotopes and mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennessey, P. V.; Lloyd-Kindstrand, L.; Hambidge, K. M.

    1991-12-01

    The absorption and excretion of zinc stable isotopes have been followed in more than 120 human subjects. The isotope enrichment determinations were made using a standard VG 7070E HF mass spectrometer. A fast atom gun (FAB) was used to form the ions from a dry residue on a pure silver probe tip. Isotope ratio measurements were found to have a precision of better than 2% (relative standard deviation) and required a sample size of 1-5 [mu]g. The average true absorption of zinc was found to be 73 ± 12% (2[sigma]) when the metal was taken in a fasting state. This absorption figure was corrected for tracer that had been absorbed and secreted into the gastrointestinal (GI) tract over the time course of the study. The average time for a majority of the stable isotope tracer to pass through the GI tract was 4.7 ± 1.9 (2[sigma]) days.

  9. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-30

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between "static" and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N-. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles.

  10. Combining solvent isotope effects with substrate isotope effects in mechanistic studies of alcohol and amine oxidation by enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin- and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  11. Application of Stable Isotope-Assisted Metabolomics for Cell Metabolism Studies

    PubMed Central

    You, Le; Zhang, Baichen; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2014-01-01

    The applications of stable isotopes in metabolomics have facilitated the study of cell metabolisms. Stable isotope-assisted metabolomics requires: (1) properly designed tracer experiments; (2) stringent sampling and quenching protocols to minimize isotopic alternations; (3) efficient metabolite separations; (4) high resolution mass spectrometry to resolve overlapping peaks and background noises; and (5) data analysis methods and databases to decipher isotopic clusters over a broad m/z range (mass-to-charge ratio). This paper overviews mass spectrometry based techniques for precise determination of metabolites and their isotopologues. It also discusses applications of isotopic approaches to track substrate utilization, identify unknown metabolites and their chemical formulas, measure metabolite concentrations, determine putative metabolic pathways, and investigate microbial community populations and their carbon assimilation patterns. In addition, 13C-metabolite fingerprinting and metabolic models can be integrated to quantify carbon fluxes (enzyme reaction rates). The fluxome, in combination with other “omics” analyses, may give systems-level insights into regulatory mechanisms underlying gene functions. More importantly, 13C-tracer experiments significantly improve the potential of low-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for broad-scope metabolism studies. We foresee the isotope-assisted metabolomics to be an indispensable tool in industrial biotechnology, environmental microbiology, and medical research. PMID:24957020

  12. Stable isotope methodology in the pharmacokinetic studies of androgenic steroids in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Y.; Baba, S. )

    1990-04-01

    The use of stable isotopically labeled steroids combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has found a broad application in pharmacologic studies. Initially, stable isotopically labeled steroids served as the ideal analytic internal standard for GC/MS analysis; however, their in vivo use has expanded and has proven to be a powerful pharmacokinetic tool. We have successfully used stable isotope methodology to study the pharmacokinetic/bioavailability of androgens. The primary advantage of the technique is that endogenous and exogenous steroids with the same basic structure can be differentiated by using stable isotopically labeled analogs. The method was used to examine the pharmacokinetics of testosterone and testosterone propionate, and to clarify the influence of endogenous testosterone. Another advantage of the isotope methods is that steroidal drugs can be administered concomitantly in two formulations (e.g., solution and solid dosage). A single set of blood samples serves to describe the time course of the formulations being compared. This stable isotope coadministration technique was used to estimate the relative bioavailability of 17 alpha-methyltestosterone. 35 references.

  13. Study of the Photon Strength Functions for Gadolinium Isotopes with the DANCE Array

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.

    2009-03-10

    The gadolinium isotopes are interesting for reactor applications as well as for medicine and astrophysics. The gadolinium isotopes have some of the largest neutron capture cross sections. As a consequence they are used in the control rod in reactor fuel assembly. From the basic science point of view, there are seven stable isotopes of gadolinium with varying degrees of deformation. Therefore they provide a good testing ground for the study of deformation dependent structure such as the scissors mode. Decay gamma rays following neutron capture on Gd isotopes are detected by the DANCE array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation and close packing of the detector array enable gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric properties of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a specific isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles gamma-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. Various photon strength function models are used for comparison with experimentally measured DANCE data and provide insight for understanding the statistical decay properties of deformed nuclei.

  14. Hydrogen isotope variability in prairie wetland systems: implications for studies of migratory connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Lauren E; Clark, Robert G; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes (delta2H) are often used to infer the origins of migratory animals based on the strong correlation between deuterium content of tissues and long-term patterns of precipitation. However, the extreme flood and drought dynamics of surface waters in prairie wetland systems could mask these expected correlations. We investigated H isotopic variability in an aquatic food web associated with Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) that rely heavily on wetland-derived aerial insects for food. We evaluated isotopic turnover and incorporation of environmental water into tissue, processes that could affect H isotopic composition. Wetland water and aquatic invertebrates showed intra- and interannual H isotopic variation mainly related to evaporation and the amount and timing of precipitation. Snails showed rapid turnover of tissue deuterium and a large contribution of environmental water to their tissues. Swallow feather deuterium (delta2Hf) was variable but did not clearly follow changes in any of the food web compartments measured. Instead, isotopic variability may have been driven by shifts in the type or relative amounts of grey consumed and types of wetlands used. Nevertheless, despite relatively high variance in delta2Hf, the majority of birds fell within the predicted range of delta2Hf for the study area, revealing that significant trophic averaging occurred. However, both (presumed) diet shifts and variable hydrological conditions have the potential to greatly increase variance that must be considered when assigning origins of migratory animals based on delta2H.

  15. Mechanistic studies of sesquiterpene cyclases based on their carbon isotope ratios at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenhua; Bartram, Stefan; Boland, Wilhelm

    2017-01-03

    During the process of terpene biosynthesis, C-C bond breaking and forming steps are subjected to kinetic carbon isotope effects, leading to distinct carbon isotopic signatures of the products. Accordingly, carbon isotopic signatures could be used to reveal the 'biosynthetic history' of the produced terpenoids. Five known sesquiterpene cyclases, regulating three different pathways, representing simple to complex biosynthetic sequences, were heterologously expressed and used for in vitro assays with farnesyl diphosphate as substrate. Compound specific isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements of the enzyme substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) and the products of all the five cyclases were performed. The calculated δ(13) C value for FDP, based on δ(13) C values and relative amounts of the products, was identical with its measured δ(13) C value, confirming the reliability of the approach and the precision of measurements. The different carbon isotope ratios of the products reflect the complexity of their structure and are correlated with the frequency of carbon-carbon bond forming and breaking steps on their individual biosynthetic pathways. Thus, the analysis of carbon isotopic signatures of terpenes at natural abundance can be used as a powerful tool in elucidation of associated biosynthetic mechanisms of terpene synthases and in future in vivo studies even without 'touching' the plant. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Study of the Photon Strength Functions for Gadolinium Isotopes with the DANCE Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.

    2009-03-01

    The gadolinium isotopes are interesting for reactor applications as well as for medicine and astrophysics. The gadolinium isotopes have some of the largest neutron capture cross sections. As a consequence they are used in the control rod in reactor fuel assembly. From the basic science point of view, there are seven stable isotopes of gadolinium with varying degrees of deformation. Therefore they provide a good testing ground for the study of deformation dependent structure such as the scissors mode. Decay gamma rays following neutron capture on Gd isotopes are detected by the DANCE array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation and close packing of the detector array enable gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric properties of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a specific isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles gamma-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. Various photon strength function models are used for comparison with experimentally measured DANCE data and provide insight for understanding the statistical decay properties of deformed nuclei.

  17. Study of Yb isotopes with the coherent state formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inci, I.

    2016-08-01

    Coherent state approach (CSA) is applied to the interacting boson model (IBM) in the rotational region. States of the N particle system are built up in a most general form as a function of the shape parameters β and γ. The parameter χ occurring in the quadrupole operator which determines the degree of the γ-softness is taken to be varying with the boson number. The excitation energy equations are formed by using the moment of inertia of a rotating system which is obtained from the solution of the cranking problem. For each isotope, the deformation parameter is found by minimizing the ground state energy equation. The results are used to fit the experimental excitation energy spectrum and the electric quadrupole transition ratios of Yb isotopes. It is found that CSA works well to predict the energy of the states up to L = 10. But the predictions about the electric quadrupole transitions are nearly 1.5 times greater than the experimental data.

  18. Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics Studies in Ex Vivo TIssue Slices

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    An important component of this methodology is to assess the role of the tumor microenvironment on tumor growth and survival. To tackle this problem, we have adapted the original approach of Warburg 1, by combining thin tissue slices with Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) to determine detailed metabolic activity of human tissues. SIRM enables the tracing of metabolic transformations of source molecules such as glucose or glutamine over defined time periods, and is a requirement for detailed pathway tracing and flux analysis. In our approach, we maintain freshly resected tissue slices (both cancerous and non- cancerous from the same organ of the same subject) in cell culture media, and treat with appropriate stable isotope-enriched nutrients, e.g. 13C6-glucose or 13C5, 15N2 -glutamine. These slices are viable for at least 24 h, and make it possible to eliminate systemic influence on the target tissue metabolism while maintaining the original 3D cellular architecture. It is therefore an excellent pre-clinical platform for assessing the effect of therapeutic agents on target tissue metabolism and their therapeutic efficacy on individual patients 2,3. PMID:27158639

  19. Positional isotope exchange studies on enzyme using NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.O.

    1987-01-01

    The isotopically enriched compounds, /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and /sup 18/O bridge-labeled pyrophosphate, synthesized previously in this laboratory, were used to investigate and measure the exchange vs. turnover of substrates and products from their central complexes in four selected enzyme systems. Using hi-field /sup 31/P NMR, we were able to differentiate between /sup 18/O labeled in the bridge vs. the non-bridge positions by virtue of the isotope shift upon the phosphorus nuclei. The bridge to non-bridge scrambling of the label was quantitated and the exchange vs. turnover ratios under a variety of conditions was determined. Using the substrate inhibitor carboxycreatinine, PIX experiments with /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and creatine kinase were conducted. It was shown that carboxycreatinine and creatine kinase promoted exchange of the /sup 18/O label as determined by NMR. We have concluded that carboxycreatinine is either a substrate that catalyzes very slow turnover or it catalyzes exchange by a dissociative (SN/sub 1//sub P/) type of mechanism

  20. Column experiment to study isotope fractionation of volatile organic contaminants in porous media under unsaturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeannottat, Simon; Hunkeler, Daniel; Breider, Florian

    2010-05-01

    Pollution by organic contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents is common in industrialized countries. The use of stable isotope analysis is increasingly recognized as a powerful technique for investigating the behaviour of organic or inorganic contaminants. Recently, compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has proven to be an effective tool to confirm and quantify in-situ biodegradation by indigenous microbial populations in groundwater.In contrast, only few studies have investigated the use of CSIA in the unsaturated zone. In the unsaturated zone, the main potential applications of CSIA include the assessment of biodegradation and the fingerprinting of different sources of petroleum hydrocarbon or chlorinated solvents vapours. However, it has to be taken into account that isotope ratios in the unsaturated zone can vary due to diffusion and volatilization in addition to biodegradation. For application of isotope methods in the unsaturated zone, it is crucial to quantify isotopic fractionation resulting from physico-chemical and transport processes. The study is focused on laboratory experiments that investigate the effect of vaporization and diffusion on isotope ratios. The effect of diffusion is carried out using a column experiment setup that can be considered to represent VOC transport from a floating NAPL towards the atmosphere. Furthermore, additional column and batch experiments will be conducted to better understand the effect of biodegradation. Volatilization is studied with an other experimental setup. In addition, a mathematical framework was developed to simulate the isotope evolution in the column study. Since the initial experiments aimed at investigating the effect of vaporization and diffusion only, the column is filled with dry quartz sand in order to avoid perturbations of concentration profiles by humidity or adsorption on organic matter. An activated sand will later be used for the biodegradation experiments. A

  1. Image correlation and sampling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Sedwick, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of analytical approaches for solving image correlation and image sampling of multispectral data is discussed. Relevant multispectral image statistics which are applicable to image correlation and sampling are identified. The general image statistics include intensity mean, variance, amplitude histogram, power spectral density function, and autocorrelation function. The translation problem associated with digital image registration and the analytical means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques are considered. General expressions for determining the reconstruction error for specific image sampling strategies are developed.

  2. Isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion study of skarns from Vesuvius

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilg, H.A.; Lima, A.; Somma, R.; Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Ayuso, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    We present new mineral chemistry, fluid inclusion, stable carbon and oxygen, as well as Pb, Sr, and Nd isotope data of Ca-Mg-silicate-rich ejecta (skarns) and associated cognate and xenolithic nodules from the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex, Italy. The typically zoned skarn ejecta consist mainly of diopsidic and hedenbergitic, sometimes "fassaitic" clinopyroxene, Mg-rich and Ti-poor phlogopite, F-bearing vesuvianite, wollastonite, gehlenite, meionite, forsterite, clinohumite, anorthite and Mg-poor calcite with accessory apatite, spinell, magnetite, perovskite, baddeleyite, and various REE-, U-, Th-, Zr- and Ti-rich minerals. Four major types of fluid inclusions were observed in wollastonite, vesuvianite, gehlenite, clinopyroxene and calcite: a) primary silicate melt inclusions (THOM = 1000-1050??C), b) CO2 ?? H2S-rich fluid inclusions (THOM = 20-31.3??C into the vapor phase), c) multiphase aqueous brine inclusions (THOM = 720-820??C) with mainly sylvite and halite daughter minerals, and d) complex chloride-carbonate-sulfate-fluoride-silicate-bearing saline-melt inclusions (THOM = 870-890??C). The last inclusion type shows evidence for immiscibility between several fluids (silicate melt - aqueous chloride-rich liquid - carbonate/sulfate melt?) during heating and cooling below 870??C. There is no evidence for fluid circulation below 700??C and participation of externally derived meteoric fluids in skarn formation. Skarns have considerably variable 206Pb/204Pb (19.047-19.202), 207Pb/204Pb (15.655-15.670), and 208Pb/204Pb (38.915-39.069) and relatively low 143Nd/144Nd (0.51211-0.51244) ratios. The carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of skarn calcites (??13CV-PDB = -5.4 to -1.1???; ??18OV-SMOW = 11.7 to 16.4???) indicate formation from a 18O- and 13C-enriched fluid. The isotope composition of skarns and the presence of silicate melt inclusion-bearing wollastonite nodules suggests assimilation of carbonate wall rocks by the alkaline magma at moderate depths (< 5

  3. Microstructural study of irradiated isotopically tailored F82H steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakai, E.; Miwa, Y.; Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J. P.; Klueh, R. L.; Shiba, K.; Abiko, K.; Furuno, S.; Jitsukawa, S.

    2002-12-01

    The synergistic effect of displacement damage and hydrogen or helium atoms on microstructures in F82H steel irradiated at 250-400 °C to 2.8-51 dpa in HFIR has been examined using isotopes of 54Fe or 10B. Hydrogen atoms increased slightly the formation of dislocation loops and changed the Burgers vector for some parts of dislocation loops, and they also affected on the formation of cavity at 250 °C to 2.8 dpa. Helium atoms also influenced them at around 300 °C, and the effect of helium atoms was enhanced at 400 °C. Furthermore, the relations between microstructures and radiation-hardening or ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift in F82H steel were discussed. The cause of the shift increase of DBTT is thought to be due to the hardening of dislocation loops and the formation of α '-precipitates on dislocation loops.

  4. Potential of the compound specific isotope analysis of individual amino acid for studying past nitrogen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bohyung; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    The nitrogen isotope ratio of bulk sediment has been widely used for studying nitrogen cycle in the marine environment. However, since organic nitrogen in sediment is regarded as a mixture of organic matter, it is challenging to identify its exact sources. Recently, compound specific nitrogen isotope analysis of amino acid (CSIA AAs) has been introduced as a potential tool for complement of bulk nitrogen isotope since amino acid more directly reflects information on primary producer and trophic position. However, studies on CSIA of amino acid in sediments are scarce due to the complexities of the analytical method and relatively high analytica costl. In this study, we established a method of the CSIA AAs which is more suitable for the analysis of sediments and accessed if the CSIA AAs can be used for the study of past nitrogen cycle.

  5. Neodymium isotopic studies of Precambrian banded iron formations

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel-Klose, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The isotopic composition of Nd is reported for 11 different Precambrian BIFs and suggests a trend of increasingly positive epsilon/sub Nd/(T) values with age. This trend is interpreted to reflect isotopic variations in precambrian sea water. The Urucum and the Gunflint BIFs, both younger than 1.8 AE, yield negative epsilon/sub Nd/(T) values, between -4.6 and -1.1. The remaining BIFs, with ages between 1.85 and 3.4 AE, have predominantly positive values, between -0.7 and +4.0. The low UXSm/ UUNd ratio in BIFs is inconsistent with their REE being derived from rivers draining large proportions of greenstones. The positive, mantle-like values of BIFs older than 1.8 AE contrasts strongly with the negative, continental-like values of Phanerozoic sea water. Therefore, the REE budget of the oceans during most of the Precambrian was probably dominated by the hydrothermal circulation of sea water through MORBs and not by river waters, as today. A one order of magnitude higher hydrothermal contribution of Nd is suggested by the data for the Early Precambrian. This is most likely due to a higher hydrothermal water to river water flux ratio and/or a higher Nd concentration in hotter hydrothermal waters (>375 C) during this period. The large hydrothermal contribution of REE during the Early Precambrian can be explained best if the temperature of sea water fluxing through MORBs was higher than today. Experiments investigating the interaction between sea water and basalt have shown that the concentration of iron might have been about 20 times larger if the temperature of interaction was about 425 C. Such hot hydrothermal solutions could have been the most important source of iron in Precambrian BIFs.

  6. Hydrogen-isotope motion in scandium studied by ultrasonic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leisure, R.G. ); Schwarz, R.B.; Migliori, A. ); Torgeson, D.R. ); Svare, I. )

    1993-07-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy has been used to investigate ultrasonic attenuation in single crystals of Sc, ScH[sub 0.25], and ScD[sub 0.18] over the temperature range of 10--300 K for frequencies near 1 MHz. Ultrasonic-attenuation peaks were observed in the samples containing H or D with the maximum attenuation occurring near 25 K for ScH[sub 0.25] and near 50 K for ScD[sub 0.18]. The general features of the data suggest that the motion reflected in the ultrasonic attenuation is closely related to the low-temperature motion seen in nulcear-magnetic-resonance spin-lattice-relaxation measurements. The ultrasonic results were fit with a two-level-system (TLS) model involving tunneling between highly asymmetric sites. The relaxation of the TLS was found to consist of two parts: a weakly temperature-dependent part, probably due to coupling to electrons; and a much more strongly temperature-dependent part, attributed to multiple-phonon processes. The strongly temperature-dependent part was almost two orders of magnitude faster in ScH[sub 0.25] than in ScD[sub 0.18], in accordance with the idea that tunneling is involved in the motion. Surprisingly, the weakly temperature-dependent part was found to be about the same for the two isotopes. The asymmetries primarily responsible for coupling the TLS to the ultrasound are attributed to interactions between hydrogen ions that lie on adjacent [ital c] axes. The results are consistent with an isotope-independent strength for the coupling of the TLS to the ultrasound.

  7. Coordinated Oxygen Isotopic and Petrologic Studies of CAIS Record Varying Composition of Protosolar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Justin I.; Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, S. B.; Weber, P. K.; Grossman, L.; Ross, D. K.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2012-01-01

    Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) record the O-isotope composition of Solar nebular gas from which they grew [1]. High spatial resolution O-isotope measurements afforded by ion microprobe analysis across the rims and margin of CAIs reveal systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 and suggest formation from a diversity of nebular environments [2-4]. This heterogeneity has been explained by isotopic mixing between the O-16-rich Solar reservoir [6] and a second O-16-poor reservoir (probably nebular gas) with a "planetary-like" isotopic composition [e.g., 1, 6-7], but the mechanism and location(s) where these events occur within the protoplanetary disk remain uncertain. The orientation of large and systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 reported by [3] for a compact Type A CAI from the Efremovka reduced CV3 chondrite differs dramatically from reports by [4] of a similar CAI, A37 from the Allende oxidized CV3 chondrite. Both studies conclude that CAIs were exposed to distinct, nebular O-isotope reservoirs, implying the transfer of CAIs among different settings within the protoplanetary disk [4]. To test this hypothesis further and the extent of intra-CAI O-isotopic variation, a pristine compact Type A CAI, Ef-1 from Efremovka, and a Type B2 CAI, TS4 from Allende were studied. Our new results are equally intriguing because, collectively, O-isotopic zoning patterns in the CAIs indicate a progressive and cyclic record. The results imply that CAIs were commonly exposed to multiple environments of distinct gas during their formation. Numerical models help constrain conditions and duration of these events.

  8. Small-scale studies of roasted ore waste reveal extreme ranges of stable mercury isotope signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robin S.; Wiederhold, Jan G.; Jew, Adam D.; Brown, Gordon E.; Bourdon, Bernard; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2014-07-01

    Active and closed Hg mines are significant sources of Hg contamination to the environment, mainly due to large volumes of mine waste material disposed of on-site. The application of Hg isotopes as source tracer from such contaminated sites requires knowledge of the Hg isotope signatures of different materials potentially released to the environment. Previous work has shown that calcine, the waste residue of the on-site ore roasting process, can exhibit distinct Hg isotope signatures compared with the primary ore. Here, we report results from a detailed small-scale study of Hg isotope variations in calcine collected from the closed New Idria Hg mine, San Benito County, CA, USA. The calcine samples exhibited different internal layering features which were investigated using optical microscopy, micro X-ray fluorescence, micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μ-XAS), and stable Hg isotope analysis. Significant Fe, S, and Hg concentration gradients were found across the different internal layers. Isotopic analyses revealed an extreme variation with pronounced isotopic gradients across the internal layered features. Overall, δ202Hg (±0.10‰, 2 SD) describing mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) ranged from -5.96 to 14.49‰, which is by far the largest range of δ202Hg values reported for any environmental sample. In addition, Δ199Hg (±0.06‰, 2 SD) describing mass-independent fractionation (MIF) ranged from -0.17 to 0.21‰. The μ-XAS analyses suggested that cinnabar and metacinnabar are the dominant Hg-bearing phases in the calcine. Our results demonstrate that the incomplete roasting of HgS ores in Hg mines can cause extreme mass-dependent Hg isotope fractionations at the scale of individual calcine pieces with enrichments in both light and heavy Hg isotopes relative to the primary ore signatures. This finding has important implications for the application of Hg isotopes as potential source tracers for Hg released to the environment from closed Hg mines and

  9. Nuclear shape coexistence in Po isotopes: An interacting boson model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ramos, J. E.; Heyde, K.

    2015-09-01

    Background: The lead region, Po, Pb, Hg, and Pt, shows up the presence of coexisting structures having different deformation and corresponding to different particle-hole configurations in the shell-model language. Purpose: We intend to study the importance of configuration mixing in the understanding of the nuclear structure of even-even Po isotopes, where the shape coexistence phenomena are not clear enough. Method: We study in detail a long chain of polonium isotopes, Po-208190, using the interacting boson model with configuration mixing (IBM-CM). We fix the parameters of the Hamiltonians through a least-squares fit to the known energies and absolute B (E 2 ) transition rates of states up to 3 MeV. Results: We obtained the IBM-CM Hamiltonians and we calculate excitation energies, B (E 2 ) 's, electric quadrupole moments, nuclear radii and isotopic shifts, quadrupole shape invariants, wave functions, and deformations. Conclusions: We obtain a good agreement with the experimental data for all the studied observables and we conclude that shape coexistence phenomenon is hidden in Po isotopes, very much as in the case of the Pt isotopes.

  10. Importance of the Lu-Hf isotopic system in studies of planetary chronology and chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patchett, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Lu-176-Hf-176 isotope method and its applications in earth sciences are discussed with regard to planetary-evolution studies. From new data on basalts from oceanic islands, Hf-176/Hf-177 and Nd-143/Nd-144 are found to display a single linear isotopic variation in the suboceanic mantle, whereas considerable divergences occur in Hf-176/Hf-177-Sr-87/Sr-86 and Nd-143/Nd-144-Sr87/Sr-86 diagrams. With the acquisition of further Hf-Sr-Nd isotopic data, these discordant Sr-87/Sr-86 relationships may allow a distinction between processes such as mantle metasomatism, influence of sea-water altered material in the magma source, or recycling of sediments into the mantle. The best quality Hf isotope data are obtained from granitoid or zircons, and are most suitable for studying ancient terrestrial Hf isotopic variations. Lu-Hf is shown to be a viable method for dating ancient terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples, but is unlikely to find wide application in pure chronological studies because it offers little advantage over existing methods.

  11. Stable isotope-labeling studies in metabolomics: new insights into structure and dynamics of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Barrett, Michael P; Breitling, Rainer; Creek, Darren J

    2014-02-01

    The rapid emergence of metabolomics has enabled system-wide measurements of metabolites in various organisms. However, advances in the mechanistic understanding of metabolic networks remain limited, as most metabolomics studies cannot routinely provide accurate metabolite identification, absolute quantification and flux measurement. Stable isotope labeling offers opportunities to overcome these limitations. Here we describe some current approaches to stable isotope-labeled metabolomics and provide examples of the significant impact that these studies have had on our understanding of cellular metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss recently developed software solutions for the analysis of stable isotope-labeled metabolomics data and propose the bioinformatics solutions that will pave the way for the broader application and optimal interpretation of system-scale labeling studies in metabolomics.

  12. Stable isotope-labeling studies in metabolomics: new insights into structure and dynamics of metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Barrett, Michael P; Breitling, Rainer; Creek, Darren J

    2014-01-01

    The rapid emergence of metabolomics has enabled system-wide measurements of metabolites in various organisms. However, advances in the mechanistic understanding of metabolic networks remain limited, as most metabolomics studies cannot routinely provide accurate metabolite identification, absolute quantification and flux measurement. Stable isotope labeling offers opportunities to overcome these limitations. Here we describe some current approaches to stable isotope-labeled metabolomics and provide examples of the significant impact that these studies have had on our understanding of cellular metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss recently developed software solutions for the analysis of stable isotope-labeled metabolomics data and propose the bioinformatics solutions that will pave the way for the broader application and optimal interpretation of system-scale labeling studies in metabolomics. PMID:24568354

  13. The origin of chondritic macromolecular organic matter: a carbon and nitrogen isotope study.

    PubMed

    Alexander, C M; Russell, S S; Arden, J W; Ash, R D; Grady, M M; Pillinger, C T

    1998-07-01

    The N and C abundances and isotopic compositions of acid-insoluble carbonaceous material in thirteen primitive chondrites (five unequilibrated ordinary chondrites, three CM chondrites, three enstatite chondrites, a CI chondrite and a CR chondrite) have been measured by stepped combustion. While the range of C isotopic compositions observed is only delta 13C = 30%, the N isotopes range from delta 15N approximately -40 to 260%. After correction for metamorphism, presolar nanodiamonds appear to have made up a fairly constant 3-4 wt% of the insoluble C in all the chondrites studied. The apparently similar initial presolar nanodiamond to organic C ratios, and the correlations of elemental and isotopic compositions with metamorphic indicators in the ordinary and enstatite chondrites, suggest that the chondrites all accreted similar organic material. This original material probably most closely resembles that now found in Renazzo and Semarkona. These two meteorites have almost M-shaped N isotope release profiles that can be explained most simply by the super-position of two components, one with a composition between delta 15N = -20 and -40% and a narrow combustion interval, the other having a broader release profile and a composition of delta 15N approximately 260%. Although isotopically more subdued, the CI and the three CM chondrites all appear to show vestiges of this M-shaped profile. How and where the components in the acid-insoluble organics formed remains poorly constrained. The small variation in nanodiamond to organic C ratio between the chondrite groups limits the local synthesis of organic matter in the various chondrite formation regions to at most 30%. The most 15N-rich material probably formed in the interstellar medium, and the fraction of organic N in Renazzo in this material ranges from 40 to 70%. The isotopically light component may have formed in the solar system, but the limited range in nanodiamond to total organic C ratios in the chondrite groups is

  14. Isotopic and geochemical studies of fluid-rock interactions and the chemical evolution of the oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Derry, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of Sr and Nd, and the abundances of rare earth elements (REE) are used to study various types of fluid-rock interactions in the Earth's crust. The isotopic compositions of Sr and Nd and REE patterns in marine chemical sediments of Precambrian age are used to estimate the relative importance of continental weathering versus submarine hydrothermal activity in determining the chemical mass balance of the Precambrian oceans. Major and trace element abundances and Sr and Nd isotopes are used to quantify the degree of interaction of a carbonatite fluid-magmatic system with felsic crust, and to constrain the isotopic characteristics of the mantle source region. The isotopic composition of Sr is reported from a well characterized sequence of Upper Proterozoic carbonates from Svalbard and east Greenland. A simple model of carbonate recycling and isotopic mass balance calculations illustrate that sedimentary recycling can have a strong influence on Sr in the oceans. REE patterns from Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs) are very similar to modern metalliferous sediments, and imply that the overall REE pattern of Precambrian seawater was similar to today. The mantle-like {var epsilon}{sub Nd} values and positive Eu anomalies imply that the source of the REE in the BIFs was submarine hydrothermal activity. The implications of a large hydrothermal flux of reduced Fe on the redox controls of the Precambrian atmosphere are explored, and a testable hypothesis is developed. The mass balance of Eu in the oceans is affected by preferential scavenging at hydrothermal sites. Data from the Cherry Hill, CA mineralizing system imply a complex plumbing system and a long residence time for the water. Isotopic data from the Fen alkaline complex, Norway, define mixing trends between mantle derived magmas or magmatic fluids and old crust.

  15. Strontium isotope study of coal utilization by-products interacting with environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Schroeder, Karl T; Brubaker, Tonya M

    2012-01-01

    Sequential leaching experiments on coal utilization by-products (CUB) were coupled with chemical and strontium (Sr) isotopic analyses to better understand the influence of coal type and combustion processes on CUB properties and the release of elements during interaction with environmental waters during disposal. Class C fly ash tended to release the highest quantity of minor and trace elements-including alkaline earth elements, sodium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, titanium, and zinc-during sequential extraction, with bottom ash yielding the lowest. Strontium isotope ratios ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) in bulk-CUB samples (total dissolution of CUB) are generally higher in class F ash than in class C ash. Bulk-CUB ratios appear to be controlled by the geologic source of the mineral matter in the feed coal, and by Sr added during desulfurization treatments. Leachates of the CUB generally have Sr isotope ratios that are different than the bulk value, demonstrating that Sr was not isotopically homogenized during combustion. Variations in the Sr isotopic composition of CUB leachates were correlated with mobility of several major and trace elements; the data suggest that arsenic and lead are held in phases that contain the more radiogenic (high-(87)Sr/(86)Sr) component. A changing Sr isotope ratio of CUB-interacting waters in a disposal environment could forecast the release of certain strongly bound elements of environmental concern. This study lays the groundwork for the application of Sr isotopes as an environmental tracer for CUB-water interaction. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. Strontium Isotope Study of Coal Untilization By-products Interacting with Environmental Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Schroeder, Karl T; Brubaker, Tonya M

    2011-09-01

    Sequential leaching experiments on coal utilization by-products (CUB) were coupled with chemical and strontium (Sr) isotopic analyses to better understand the influence of coal type and combustion processes on CUB properties and the release of elements during interaction with environmental waters during disposal. Class C fly ash tended to release the highest quantity of minor and trace elements—including alkaline earth elements, sodium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, titanium, and zinc—during sequential extraction, with bottom ash yielding the lowest. Strontium isotope ratios ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) in bulk-CUB samples (total dissolution of CUB) are generally higher in class F ash than in class C ash. Bulk-CUB ratios appear to be controlled by the geologic source of the mineral matter in the feed coal, and by Sr added during desulfurization treatments. Leachates of the CUB generally have Sr isotope ratios that are different than the bulk value, demonstrating that Sr was not isotopically homogenized during combustion. Variations in the Sr isotopic composition of CUB leachates were correlated with mobility of several major and trace elements; the data suggest that arsenic and lead are held in phases that contain the more radiogenic (high-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) component. A changing Sr isotope ratio of CUB-interacting waters in a disposal environment could forecast the release of certain strongly bound elements of environmental concern. This study lays the groundwork for the application of Sr isotopes as an environmental tracer for CUB–water interaction.

  17. Isotope effect study of {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2}: Labeling in the anion

    SciTech Connect

    Kini, A.M.; Wang, H.H.; Schlueter, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    Since the initial discovery of organic superconductivity in 1979, a large number of organic superconductors have now been synthesized. However, the mechanism of electron-pairing in these novel superconductors has remained largely unresolved. Isotope effect studies constitute an important experimental tool for the investigation of whether or not the electron-pairing mechanism in organic superconductors is phonon-mediated, as in conventional superconductors. Recent isotope effect studies in the authors` laboratory, involving seven different isotopically labeled BEDT-TTF (or ET) derivatives, have demonstrated the following: (1) intramolecular phonon modes involving C{double_bond}C and C{single_bond}S stretching vibrations in the ET donor molecule are not the dominant mediators of electron-pairing, and (2) in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2}, there exist two competing isotope effects--a normal mass effect, i.e., lowering of {Tc} upon isotopic labeling, when the ET molecular mass is increased by concurrent {sup 13}C and {sup 34}S labeling, in addition to an inverse isotope effect upon deuterium labeling in ET. It is of great interest to investigate if there is an isotope effect when the charge-compensating anions, which are also located within the non-conducting layer in the superconducting cation-radical salts, are isotopically labeled. The existence of an isotope effect when the anions are labeled would be indicative of electron-pairing with the mediation of vibrational frequencies associated with the anions. In this paper, the authors present the results of the first isotope effect study in which isotopic labeling in the anion portion of {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} is carried out. The authors find no isotope effect when the carbon and nitrogen atoms of the thiocyanate groups in the anion are replaced with {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopes.

  18. How large is large: estimating ecologically meaningful isotopic differences in observational studies of wild animals.

    PubMed

    Authier, Matthieu; Dragon, Anne-Cécile; Cherel, Yves; Guinet, Christophe

    2012-12-15

    In ecological studies of wildlife movements and foraging, bio-logging and isotopic data are routinely collected and increasingly analyzed in tandem. Such analyses have two shortcomings: (1) small sample size linked with the number of telemetric tags that can be deployed, and (2) the observational nature of isotopic gradients. Wildlife ecologists are thus put in a statistical conundrum known as the small n, large p problem. Using shrinkage regression, which directly addresses the issue of accurately estimating effects from sparse data, we studied what counts as a biologically meaningful isotopic difference (a prerequisite to delineate isoscapes) in the southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina), a large and elusive marine predator. Seals foraging in Antarctic waters had a lower carbon isotopic value (by ≈ 2‰) than seals foraging either in the interfrontal zone or on the Kerguelen Plateau. The latter two foraging strategies were indistinguishable on the sole basis of δ(13) C values with our data. Shrinkage regression is a conservative statistical technique that has wide applicability in isotopic ecology to help separate robust biological signals from noise. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Isotope geochemistry and the study of habitability and life on other planets (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J.

    2010-12-01

    The question of life on other planets might be solved by a remarkable discovery — a martian coquina, or perhaps a tentacle print on a distant landscape. But, until this happens, evidence for life and, more generally, habitability will use indirect geochemical arguments such as isotope thermometers and biomarkers (molecular, isotopic, and elemental fingerprints of biology)., Understanding this evidence will also demand a quantitative planetary history based on isotopic dating. Laboratory study of samples derived from Mars or other solar-system bodies will be a focus of geochemical investigations aimed at such assessments. Examples of how this will be done can be found in studies of the Precambrian geologic record and Martian meteorites. Debates regarding environmental conditions and biogenicity of minerals and organic matter are common in the study of such materials. These controversies derive from simple but refractory problems with the geochemical principles we employ: Indicators of metabolism can be mimicked by abiologic reactions; paleo-environmental proxies generally require an understanding of related geochemical cycles (e.g., the isotopic budget of water); and, though many organic molecules are unambiguous biomarkers, diagenesis can transform them into compounds that resemble products of abiogenic organic synthesis. If planetary sample return is to produce definitive geochemical constraints on habitability and biology, we will require either luck or a new class of geochemical tools that explicitly address these problems. The spatial distribution of rare isotopes within molecular structures, including ‘clumping’ and position-specific isotope effects, offer new geochemical tools that could provide such solutions. For example, even a simple molecule like acetic acid (C2H4O2) has more than 200 distinct isotopic configurations when spatial distribution of isotopes is considered, and the proportions of these could reflect formation temperature, the nature of

  20. Isotopic Studies of Hydrogen and Deuterium Phase IV at Multi-Megabar Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoryanz, Eugene; Guillaume, Christophe; Scheler, Thomas; Howie, Ross

    2013-06-01

    The recent discovery of the mixed atomic and molecular phase IV of hydrogen (deuterium) is exemplary of how the studies of hydrogen at multi-megabar pressures is constitutive to the understanding of simple systems at extreme compressions. Through a series of high pressure Raman spectroscopic experiments we have conducted an isotopic comparison between hydrogen and deuterium in phase I. Isotopic studies not only reveal differences in phase stability, imposing constraints on the P-T phase diagram, but also provide strong evidence for structural phenomena, such as proton (deuteron) tunnelling. New data will be presented over a wide temperature range.

  1. Practical considerations in the use of stable isotope labelled compounds as tracers in clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G N; Pacy, P J; Ford, G C; Halliday, D

    1989-05-01

    Increasingly widespread usage of stable isotope tracers to aid clinical diagnosis and support basic research has stemmed from both advances in mass spectrometry and the availability of competitively priced labelled compounds. Stable isotopes have been used generally to investigate normal and abnormal metabolic pathways, to estimate energy expenditure and body composition and to quantitate substrate flux and oxidation rates. Despite the fact that the underlying principles relating to the use of stable isotopes for in vivo studies are straightforward, careful consideration must be given to all aspects of human studies. This review highlights some of these, including choice of label and tracer molecule, mode of tracer administration and sampling site, analytical instrumentation, interpretation of data and ethical constraints.

  2. Isotopic constraints on the deep crustal structure of Gondwana: case studies from Yemen and Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, M.

    2003-04-01

    The late Precambrian assembly of east and west Gondwana created a tectonic collage of oceanic arcs and micro-continental fragments over most of the exposed Arabian Shield. Sutures within this collage may be identified by ophiolitic remnants or elsewhere inferred by lithological packages such as characteristic arc volcanics. However, the significance of individual sutures, for example as intra-oceanic or oceanic-continental boundaries is often unclear. The present study utilises isotopic data (Pb and Nd) and geochronology (U-Pb zircon) on syn- and post-tectonic granitoids from two localities in the Arabian Shield in order to constrain the nature of their deep crustal source regions and, hence, the regional significance of sutures. In the southern part of the Shield in Saudi Arabia, the Nabitah fault zone (NFZ) separates rocks of the Tarib arc from those of the Tathlith terrane. Interpretation of the NFZ ranges from a simple fault to a southward extension of the Nabitah suture zone which, further north, is thought to represent the boundary between east and west Gondwana. New isotopic data from ca. 650 Ma granitoids either side of the NFZ reveal two ensimatic arcs with different isotopic characteristics, notably significantly lower ɛ{Nd}(t) and elevated 208Pb/204Pb to the east. These data suggest that the NFZ indeed represents a suture and major terrane boundary that may be the southward extension of the Nabitah suture. The Neoproterozoic Al Bayda arc terrane of central Yemen separates two terranes of continental affinity, the Neoproterozoic Abas and late Archean Al Mahfid. The Abas terrane was accreted to east Gondwana prior to final closure of the Pan African ocean, while the Al Mahfid terrane may be an integral part of east Gondana. Previous isotopic studies of these continental terranes has revealed highly distinctive isotopic signatures requiring a suture along the line of the Al Bayda arc, probably at ca. 760 Ma. Extensive metavolcanic rocks in the Al Bayda

  3. Kinetic and metabolic isotope effects in coral skeletal carbon isotopes: A re-evaluation using experimental coral bleaching as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepf, Verena; Levas, Stephen J.; Rodrigues, Lisa J.; McBride, Michael O.; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D.; Matsui, Yohei; Warner, Mark E.; Hughes, Adam D.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2014-12-01

    Coral skeletal δ13C can be a paleo-climate proxy for light levels (i.e., cloud cover and seasonality) and for photosynthesis to respiration (P/R) ratios. The usefulness of coral δ13C as a proxy depends on metabolic isotope effects (related to changes in photosynthesis) being the dominant influence on skeletal δ13C. However, it is also influenced by kinetic isotope effects (related to calcification rate) which can overpower metabolic isotope effects and thus compromise the use of coral skeletal δ13C as a proxy. Heikoop et al. (2000) proposed a simple data correction to remove kinetic isotope effects from coral skeletal δ13C, as well as an equation to calculate P/R ratios from coral isotopes. However, despite having been used by other researchers, the data correction has never been directly tested, and isotope-based P/R ratios have never been compared to P/R ratios measured using respirometry. Experimental coral bleaching represents a unique environmental scenario to test this because bleaching produces large physiological responses that influence both metabolic and kinetic isotope effects in corals. Here, we tested the δ13C correction and the P/R calculation using three Pacific and three Caribbean coral species from controlled temperature-induced bleaching experiments where both the stable isotopes and the physiological variables that cause isotopic fractionation (i.e., photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification) were simultaneously measured. We show for the first time that the data correction proposed by Heikoop et al. (2000) does not effectively remove kinetic effects in the coral species studied here, and did not improve the metabolic signal of bleached and non-bleached corals. In addition, isotope-based P/R ratios were in poor agreement with measured P/R ratios, even when the data correction was applied. This suggests that additional factors influence δ13C and δ18O, which are not accounted for by the data correction. We therefore recommend that the

  4. Molybdenum Isotopic Composition of the Archean Mantle As Inferred from Studies of Komatiites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greber, N. D.; Puchtel, I. S.; Nagler, T. F.; Mezger, K.

    2014-12-01

    Molybdenum isotopic composition has been shown to be a powerful tool in studies of planetary processes, e.g. estimating core formation temperatures [1,2]. However, Mo isotope compositions of terrestrial reservoirs are not well constrained. In order to better constrain the Mo isotopic composition of the early Earth's mantle, komatiites from four locations were analyzed for their Mo concentrations and isotopic compositions. Komatiites are particularly appropriate for this type of study because they formed by high degrees of partial melting of the mantle leading to a complete base metal sulfide removal from the residual mantle and the production of sulfur-undersaturated melts and thus a quantitative removal of Mo from the source into the melt. All samples, except for two strongly altered specimens specifically chosen to study the effects of secondary alteration, are very fresh having preserved most of their primary mineralogy. The Mo concentrations in komatiites range from 10 to 120 ng/g. Fresh komatiites have lighter δ98Mo (NIST SRM 3134 = 0.25‰, [3]) than altered samples. The estimated primary Mo isotope compositions of the studied komatiite melts range from 0.02 ± 0.16‰ to 0.19 ± 0.14‰ and are therefore indistinguishable within analytical uncertainty (2SD) from published values for chondritic meteorites (0.09 ± 0.04 ‰; 2SD; [2]) and lighter than the proposed average for Earth's continental crust (0.3 to 0.4‰ [4]). All data combined, although overlapping in errors, show a consistent trend of lighter δ98Mo and lower Mo concentrations in more melt-depleted mantle sources, indicating incompatible behaviour of Mo and preferential mobilization of heavy Mo isotopes during mantle melting. [1] Hin et al. (2013) EPSL, 379 [2] Burkhardt et al. (2014) EPSL, 391 [3] Nägler, et al. (2014) GGR, 38. [4] Voegelin et al. (2014) Lithos, 190-191.

  5. Isotopic Studies of Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site,WA

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.N.; Conrad, M.E.; DePaolo, D.J.; Dresel, P.E.

    2006-11-01

    Processes of fluid flow and chemical transport through thevadose zone can be characterized through the isotopic systematics ofnatural soils, minerals, pore fluids and groundwater. In thiscontribution, we first review our research using measured isotopicvariations, due both to natural and site related processes, of theelements H, O, N, Sr and U, to study the interconnection between vadosezone and groundwater contamination at the Hanford Site in south-centralWashington. We follow this brief review with a presentation of new datapertaining to vadose zone and groundwater contamination in the WMAT-TX-TY vicinity. Uranium (U) isotopic data for the C3832 core (WMA TX)indicates the involvement of processed natural U fuel, and links theobserved U contamination to the nearby single shelled tank TX-104. Thedata also precludes contamination from an early 1970 s TX-107 leak. Inthe case of the C4104 core (WMA T), the U isotopic data indicates amixture of processed natural and enriched U fuels consistent with themajor leak from T-106 in 1973. Uranium and Strontium isotopic data forthe cores also provides direct evidence for chemical interaction betweenhigh-pH waste fluid and sediment. Isotopic data for groundwater nitratecontamination in the vicinity of WMA-T strongly suggests high-level tankwaste (most likely from T-106) as the source of very high 99Tcconcentrations recently observed at the NE corner of WMAT.

  6. Isotope effect studies of the pyruvate-dependent histidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-08-09

    The decarboxylation of histidine by the pyruvate-dependent histidine decarboxylase of Lactobacillus 30 a shows a carbon isotope effect k/sup 12//k/sup 13/ = 1.0334 +/- 0.0005 and a nitrogen isotope effect k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9799 +/- 0.0006 at pH 4.8, 37/sup 0/C. The carbon isotope effect is slightly increased by deuteriation of the substrate and slightly decreased in D/sub 2/O. The observed nitrogen isotope effect indicates that the imine nitrogen in the substrate-Schiff base intermediate complex is ordinarily protonated, and the pH dependence of the carbon isotope effect indicates that both protonated and unprotonated forms of this intermediate are capable of undergoing decarboxylation. As with the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme, Schiff base formation and decarboxylation are jointly rate-limiting, with the intermediate histidine-pyruvate Schiff base showing a decarboxylation/Schiff base hydrolysis ratio of 0.5-1.0 at pH 4.8. The decarboxylation transition state is more reactant-like for the pyruvate-dependent enzyme than for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme. These studies find no particular energetic or catalytic advantage to the use of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate over covalently bound pyruvate in catalysis of the decarboxylation of histidine.

  7. Stable isotope studies of nicotine kinetics and bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Benowitz, N.L.; Jacob, P. 3d.; Denaro, C.; Jenkins, R. )

    1991-03-01

    The stable isotope-labeled compound 3',3'-dideuteronicotine was used to investigate the disposition kinetics of nicotine in smokers, the systemic absorption of nicotine from cigarette smoke, and the bioavailability of nicotine ingested as oral capsules. Blood levels of labeled nicotine could be measured for 9 hours after a 30-minute intravenous infusion. Analysis of disposition kinetics in 10 healthy men revealed a multiexponential decline after the end of an infusion, with an elimination half-life averaging 203 minutes. This half-life was longer than that previously reported, indicating the presence of a shallow elimination phase. Plasma clearance averaged 14.6 ml/min/kg. The average intake of nicotine per cigarette was 2.29 mg. A cigarette smoke-monitoring system that directly measured particulate matter in smoke was evaluated in these subjects. Total particulate matter, number of puffs on the cigarette, total puff volume, and time of puffing correlated with the intake of nicotine from smoking. The oral bioavailability of nicotine averaged 44%. This bioavailability is higher than expected based on the systemic clearance of nicotine and suggests that there may be significant extrahepatic metabolism of nicotine.

  8. Stable-isotope studies of groundwaters in southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Oxygen-18/16 and deuterium/hydrogen ratio measurements have been made on groundwaters sampled according to specific field criteria applied during pump tests of the Rustler Formation (the uppermost Permian evaporite unit) in Nash Draw, a solution-subsidence valley west of the WIPP site in the northern Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico. Comparison of these data with similar measurements on other groundwaters from the northern Delaware Basin indicates two nonoverlapping populations of meteoric groundwaters in delta-0-18/delta-D space. Most of the Rustler waters in Nash Draw and at the WIPP site and older waters from the eastern two-thirds of the Capitan Limestone constitute one population, while unconfined groundwaters originating as observable modern surface recharge to alluvium, the near-surface Rustler in southwestern Nash Draw, and the Capitan in the Guadalupe Mountains (Carlsbad Caverns) constitute the other. The isotopic distinction suggests that Rustler groundwater in most of Nash Draw and at the WIPP site is not receiving significant modern meteoric recharge. A likely explanation for this distinction is that meteoric recharge to most of the Rustler and Capitan took place in the geologic past under climate conditions significantly different from the present. 25 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Thermal Water's Isotope Geochemistry Study of Evros Area, NE Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elissavet, Dotsika; Paraskevi, Chantzi

    2016-10-01

    Thermal waters from Evros area were collected and subjected to chemical and isotopic analysis in order to understand all the physicochemical mechanisms (mixing, dilution, precipitating) that contribute to the shallow and deep geothermal water tables and determine the origin of these fluids as well as their mineralization. Physicochemical characteristics EC, T°C, pH was determined at the field. The ionic concentrations of samples indicate solutions with high salinity. Two chemical water types were arisen: Na-SO4 concerning low temperatures and shallow aquifers and Na- Cl concerning high temperatures and deeper geothermal circulation. The ratio Br/Cl definitely considered marine origin indicator is the same as the sea confirming the involvement of the seawater in the geothermal system. The marine component and water-rock interaction process under high temperatures seem to contribute to the mineralization of thermal waters. Moreover, water-rock interaction process is also responsible for the alternation of δ18O values. Geothermometers concluded to a middle enthalpy geothermal field.

  10. Studies of Isotopic Abundances through Gamma-Ray Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Roland

    2006-07-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray lines convey isotopic information from sites of nucleosynthesis and from their surrounding interstellar medium. With recent space-borne gamma-ray spectrometers of high resolution (INTEGRAL, RHESSI), new results have been obtained for 44Ti from the Cas A core-collapse supernova, from long-lived radioactive 26Al and 60Fe, and from positron annihilation in our Galaxy: 44Ti ejection from Cas A may be on the low side of previously-reported values, and/or at velocities >7000 km s-1. 26Al sources apparently share the Galactic rotation in the inner Galaxy, and thus allow to estimate a total mass of 26Al in the Galaxy of 2.8 Msolar from the measured flux. The 60Fe production in massive stars appears lower than predicted by standard models, as constrained by the recent, though marginal, 60Fe detections. Positron annihilation in the Galaxy shows a remarkable bulge component, which is difficult to understand in terms of nucleosynthetic production of the positrons.

  11. Design study of an ultra-compact superconducting cyclotron for isotope production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Vincent, J.

    2014-11-01

    A 12.5 MeV, 25 μA, proton compact superconducting cyclotron for medical isotope production has been designed and is currently in fabrication. The machine is initially aimed at producing 13N ammonia for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cardiology applications. With an ultra-compact size and cost-effective price point, this system will offer clinicians unprecedented access to the preferred radiopharmaceutical isotope for cardiac PET imaging. A systems approach that carefully balanced the subsystem requirements coupled to precise beam dynamics calculations was followed. The system is designed to irradiate a liquid target internal to the cyclotron and to minimize the need for radiation shielding. The main parameters of the cyclotron, its design, and principal steps of the development work are presented here.

  12. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes using actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer for U-Th studies; [sup 238]U-[sup 230]Th disequilibrium in recent lavas from Iceland; water-rock interaction from U-Th studies; resonance ionization mass spectrometry of Os and Ti isotopes; and self-diffusion of Mg.

  13. Imaging phased telescope array study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The problems encountered in obtaining a wide field-of-view with large, space-based direct imaging phased telescope arrays were considered. After defining some of the critical systems issues, previous relevant work in the literature was reviewed and summarized. An extensive list was made of potential error sources and the error sources were categorized in the form of an error budget tree including optical design errors, optical fabrication errors, assembly and alignment errors, and environmental errors. After choosing a top level image quality requirment as a goal, a preliminary tops-down error budget allocation was performed; then, based upon engineering experience, detailed analysis, or data from the literature, a bottoms-up error budget reallocation was performed in an attempt to achieve an equitable distribution of difficulty in satisfying the various allocations. This exercise provided a realistic allocation for residual off-axis optical design errors in the presence of state-of-the-art optical fabrication and alignment errors. Three different computational techniques were developed for computing the image degradation of phased telescope arrays due to aberrations of the individual telescopes. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses were then performed for a variety of subaperture configurations and telescope design parameters in an attempt to determine how the off-axis performance of a phased telescope array varies as the telescopes are scaled up in size. The Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) multipurpose telescope testbed (MMTT) configuration was analyzed in detail with regard to image degradation due to field curvature and distortion of the individual telescopes as they are scaled up in size.

  14. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joël; Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S.; Jost, Rémy; Bhattacharya, S. K.

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [“Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry,” J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 18}O, and Δ{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from −40 to −74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying

  15. Environmental Forensics : Compound Specific Isotope Analysis Of PAHs. Study Of A Former Coal Tar Plant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assal, A.; Doherty, R.; Dickson, K.; Kalin, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fingerprints of PAHs obtained by GC-IRMS have often been used in source apportionment studies. The use of PAHs in environmental forensics relies on the assumption that carbon isotopic fractionation caused by microbial degradation is less significant for these heavy molecular weight compounds than for lighter molecules such as chlorinated solvents or BTEX. Carbon isotopic fractionation of PAHs during degradation is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of CSIA of PAHs for environmental forensics applications at a complex (hydrogeology affected by tidal fluxes) former coal tar plant. In this work, soil samples from a tar works site were analyzed. The tar works operated on the site over a period of sixty years. A source apportionment study was first carried out based on 90 target PAHs quantified by GC-MS. These results were then compared to carbon isotope fingerprints. The separation of compounds of interest from co-extracted interfering peaks is a crucial prerequisite of CSIA by GC-IRMS. Hence, a sample preparation method which allowed the determination of precise carbon isotope signatures for up to 35 compounds per soil extract was developed, validated and applied to the samples previously analyzed by GC- MS. Although most soil samples were shown to be related to the point source tar contamination, PAHs ratios and principal component analysis of abundances highlighted some samples with unusual patterns, suggesting the input of a second source of contaminants. However, no statistically significant variation of the isotopic fingerprints of heavy molecular weight PAHs of these samples was observed. This was inconsistent with the first diagnosis. Since evidence was provided that most samples were only affected by a single source of contaminants, carbon isotopic fractionation was investigated in-situ. Importantly, naphthalene and 2- and 1- methylnaphthalenes isotopic fractionation was observed in a vertical

  16. An experimental study of the isotopic enrichment in Ar, Kr, and Xe when trapped in water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notesco, G.; Laufer, D.; Bar-Nun, A.; Owen, T.

    1999-01-01

    The isotopic enrichment of argon, krypton, and xenon, when trapped in water ice, was studied experimentally. The isotopes were found to be enriched according to their (m1/m2)1/2 ratio. These enrichment factors could be useful for comparison among the uncertain cosmic or solar isotopic ratios, the hopeful in situ cometary ratio, and those in Earth's atmosphere, in the context of cometary delivery of volatiles to Earth.

  17. An experimental study of the isotopic enrichment in Ar, Kr, and Xe when trapped in water ice.

    PubMed

    Notesco, G; Laufer, D; Bar-Nun, A; Owen, T

    1999-11-01

    The isotopic enrichment of argon, krypton, and xenon, when trapped in water ice, was studied experimentally. The isotopes were found to be enriched according to their (m1/m2)1/2 ratio. These enrichment factors could be useful for comparison among the uncertain cosmic or solar isotopic ratios, the hopeful in situ cometary ratio, and those in Earth's atmosphere, in the context of cometary delivery of volatiles to Earth.

  18. 124 Iodine: a longer-life positron emitter isotope-new opportunities in molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Notaristefano, Antonio; Restuccia, Antonino; Ferrari, Cristina; Rubini, Domenico; Altini, Corinna; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    (124)Iodine ((124)I) with its 4.2 d half-life is particularly attractive for in vivo detection and quantification of longer-term biological and physiological processes; the long half-life of (124)I is especially suited for prolonged time in vivo studies of high molecular weight compounds uptake. Numerous small molecules and larger compounds like proteins and antibodies have been successfully labeled with (124)I. Advances in radionuclide production allow the effective availability of sufficient quantities of (124)I on small biomedical cyclotrons for molecular imaging purposes. Radioiodination chemistry with (124)I relies on well-established radioiodine labeling methods, which consists mainly in nucleophilic and electrophilic substitution reactions. The physical characteristics of (124)I permit taking advantages of the higher PET image quality. The availability of new molecules that may be targeted with (124)I represents one of the more interesting reasons for the attention in nuclear medicine. We aim to discuss all iodine radioisotopes application focusing on (124)I, which seems to be the most promising for its half-life, radiation emissions, and stability, allowing several applications in oncological and nononcological fields.

  19. Isotopic Studies of O-O Bond Formation During Water Oxidation (SISGR)

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Justine P.

    2015-03-03

    Isotopic Studies of O-O Bond Formation During Water Oxidation (SISGR) Research during the project period focused primarily on mechanisms of water oxidation by structurally defined transition metal complexes. Competitive oxygen isotope fractionation of water, mediated by oxidized precursors or reduced catalysts together with ceric, Ce(IV), ammonium nitrate in aqueous media, afforded oxygen-18 kinetic isotope effects (O-18 KIEs). Measurement, calculation, and interpretation of O-18 KIEs, described in the accompanying report has important ramifications for the production of electricity and solar hydrogen (as fuel). The catalysis division of BES has acknowledged that understanding mechanisms of transition metal catalyzed water oxidation has major ramifications, potentially leading to transformation of the global economy and natural environment in years to come. Yet, because of program restructuring and decreased availability of funds, it was recommended that the Solar Photochemistry sub-division of BES would be a more appropriate parent program for support of continued research.

  20. Study of 242-248Cm isotopes in the projected shell model framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Saiqa; Devi, Rani; Khosa, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    The projected shell model framework is employed to study the band spectra in 242-248Cm isotopes. The present calculations reproduce the available experimental data on the yrast bands. Besides this, B(E2) transition probabilities of even-even Cm isotopes have also been calculated. The low spin states of yrast band are seen to arise purely from zero-quasi-particle (o-qp) intrinsic states whereas the high spin states have multi-quasi-particle structure. For the odd-neutron (odd-N) isotopes, the calculated results qualitatively reproduce the available data on ground and lowest excited state bands for 243,245Cm. However, for 247Cm the negative-parity ground state band is in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Feasibility study of plutonium isotopic analysis of resin beads by nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    We have initiated a feasibility study on the use of nondestructive low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy for plutonium isotopic analysis on resin beads. Seven resin bead samples were measured, with each sample containing an average of 9 ..mu..g of plutonium; the isotopic compositions of the samples varied over a wide range. The gamma-ray spectroscopy results, obtained from 4-h counting-time measurements, were compared with mass spectrometry results. The average ratios of gamma-ray spectroscopy to mass spectrometry were 1.014 +- 0.025 for /sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu, 0.996 +- 0.018 for /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu, and 0.980 +- 0.038 for /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu. The rapid, automated, and accurate nondestructive isotopic analysis of resin beads may be very useful to process technicians and International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Isotopic studies of the late Archean plutonic rocks of the Wind River Range, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.; Hedge, C.E.; Worl, R.G.; Simmons, K.R.; Nkomo, I.T.; Wenner, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two late Archaean intrusive events were documented in the Wind River Range by isotopic studies of the Rb-Sr and U-Th-Pb systems in whole-rock samples and the U-Pb systematics for zircon. An age of approx 2630(20) m.y. for the Louis Lake batholith and apparent ages of 2504(40) to 2575(50) m.y. for the Bear Ears pluton were obtained. Post-magmatic hydrothermal events approximately Tertiary in age, lowered delta 18O values and disturbed parent-daughter relationships in most of the isotopic systems investigated. The two intrusive units apparently were derived from different protoliths. Initial isotopic ratios and petrochemistry for the Louis Lake batholith are consistent with an early Archaean trondhjemitic to tonalitic source. The protolith for the Bear Ears pluton must have been subjected to high-grade metamorphism that caused loss of Rb and U prior to magma generation. -L.C.H.

  3. Numerical study of the isotope effect of underdoped high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Andrei; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2006-03-01

    We present a numerical study of the isotope effect on the angle resolved photoemission spectra (ARPES) in the undoped cuprates. By the systematic-error-free Diagrammatic Monte Carlo method, the Lehman spectral function of a single hole in the tt't''-J model in the regime of intermediate and strong couplings to optical phonons is calculated for normal and isotope substituted systems. We found that the isotope effect is strongly energy-momentum dependent, and is anomalously enhanced in the intermediate coupling regime while it approaches to that of the localized hole model in the strong coupling regime. We predict the strengths of effect as well as the fine details of the ARPES lineshape change. Implications to the doped case are also discussed.

  4. Study of shape transitions in N{approx}90 isotopes with beyond mean field calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Tomas R.; Egido, J. L.

    2009-01-28

    We study the spherical to prolate-deformed shape transition in {sup 144-158}Sm and {sup 146-160}Gd isotopes with modern calculations beyond the mean field with the Gogny D1S force. We compare the results with the shape-phase transition predicted by the collective Hamiltonian model and with the experimental data. Our calculations do not support the existence of a first order phase transition in these isotopic chains in the viewpoint of the Bohr Hamiltonian neither the interpretation of the nuclei N = 90 as critical points.

  5. Rare isotope studies involving catalytic oxidation of CO over platinum-tin oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Wood, George M., Jr.; Hess, Robert V.; Hoyt, Ronald F.

    1987-01-01

    Results of studies utilizing normal and rare oxygen isotopes in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over a platinum-tin oxide catalyst substrate are presented. Chemisorption of labeled carbon monoxide on the catalyst followed by thermal desorption yielded a carbon dioxide product with an oxygen-18 composition consistent with the formation of a carbonate-like intermediate in the chemisorption process. The efficacy of a method developed for the oxygen-18 labeling of the platinum-tin oxide catalyst surface for use in closed cycle pulsed care isotope carbon dioxide lasers is demonstrated for the equivalent of 10 to the 6th power pulses at 10 pulses per second.

  6. Study of asymmetric fission yield behavior from neutron-deficient Hg isotope

    SciTech Connect

    Perkasa, Y. S.; Waris, A. Kurniadi, R. Su'ud, Z.

    2014-09-30

    A study of asymmetric fission yield behavior from a neutron-deficient Hg isotope has been conducted. The fission yield calculation of the neutron-deficient Hg isotope using Brownian Metropolis shape had showed unusual result at decreasing energy. In this paper, this interesting feature will be validated by using nine degree of scission shapes parameterization from Brosa model that had been implemented in TALYS nuclear reaction code. This validation is intended to show agreement between both model and the experiment result. The expected result from these models considered to be different due to dynamical properties that implemented in both models.

  7. Syntrophic interactions and mechanisms underpinning anaerobic methane oxidation: targeted metaproteogenomics, single-cell protein detection and quantitative isotope imaging of microbial consortia

    SciTech Connect

    Orphan, Victoria Jeanne

    2014-11-26

    Syntrophy and mutualism play a central role in carbon and nutrient cycling by microorganisms. Yet, our ability to effectively study symbionts in culture has been hindered by the inherent interdependence of syntrophic associations, their dynamic behavior, and their frequent existence at thermodynamic limits. Now solutions to these challenges are emerging in the form of new methodologies. Developing strategies that establish links between the identity of microorganisms and their metabolic potential, as well as techniques that can probe metabolic networks on a scale that captures individual molecule exchange and processing, is at the forefront of microbial ecology. Understanding the interactions between microorganisms on this level, at a resolution previously intractable, will lead to our greater understanding of carbon turnover and microbial community resilience to environmental perturbations. In this project, we studied an enigmatic syntrophic association between uncultured methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria. This environmental archaeal-bacterial partnership represents a globally important sink for methane in anoxic environments. The specific goals of this project were organized into 3 major tasks designed to address questions relating to the ecophysiology of these syntrophic organisms under changing environmental conditions (e.g. different electron acceptors and nutrients), primarily through the development of microanalytical imaging methods which enable the visualization of the spatial distribution of the partners within aggregates, consumption and exchange of isotopically labeled substrates, and expression of targeted proteins identified via metaproteomics. The advanced tool set developed here to collect, correlate, and analyze these high resolution image and isotope-based datasets from methane-oxidizing consortia has the potential to be widely applicable for studying and modeling patterns of activity and interactions across a broad range of

  8. Re-introduction of a novel approach to the use of stable isotopes in pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Parr, Alan; Gupta, Manish; Montague, Timothy H; Hoke, Frank

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the scientific benefits of a novel approach in using stable isotopes to reduce the number of subjects needed to perform relative bioavailability and bioequivalence pharmacokinetic studies for formulations that are qualitatively and quantitatively the same and quality by design (QbD) pharmacokinetic studies. The stable isotope approach was investigated using simulations to determine the impact this approach would have on the estimation of variability and, subsequently, the sample size for a bioequivalence study. A biostudy was conducted in dogs in a two period crossover to explore the viability of the stable isotope approach. For a drug product with within-subject variability (CV(w)) of 50% and assuming a correlation of 0.95 between the enriched and non-enriched pharmacokinetics (PK), simulations showed that the variability can be reduced by 70% and the required sample size can be reduced by 90% while maintaining 90% power to demonstrate bioequivalence. The dog study showed a strong correlation (R(2), > 0.99) between the enriched and non-enriched area under the curve and maximum observed concentration, and a significant reduction in the variability (reduction in % coefficient of variation from 79.9% to 6.3%). Utilization of a stable isotope approach can markedly improve the efficiency and accuracy of bioavailability and bioequivalence studies particularly for highly variable drugs in formulations that are qualitatively and quantitatively the same and for studies designed for QbD investigations.

  9. Three-dimensional oxygen isotope imaging of convective fluid flow around the Big Bonanza, Comstock lode mining district, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, R.E.; Singleton, M.J.; Champion, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    Oxygen isotope analyses of propylitized andesites from the Con Virginia and California mines allow construction of a detailed, three-dimensional image of the isotopic surfaces produced by the convective fluid flows that deposited the famous Big Bonanza orebody. On a set of intersecting maps and sections, the δ18O isopleths clearly show the intricate and conformable relationship of the orebody to a deep, ~500 m gyre of meteoric-hydrothermal fluid that circulated along and above the Comstock fault, near the contact of the Davidson Granodiorite. The core of this gyre (δ18O = 0 to 3.8‰) encompasses the bonanza and is almost totally surrounded by rocks having much lower δ18O values (–1.0 to –4.4‰). This deep gyre may represent a convective longitudinal roll superimposed on a large unicellular meteoric-hydrothermal system, producing a complex flow field with both radial and longitudinal components that is consistent with experimentally observed patterns of fluid convection in permeable media.

  10. A Mass Spectrometry Study of Isotope Separation in the Laser Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suen, Timothy Wu

    Accurate quantification of isotope ratios is critical for both preventing the development of illicit weapons programs in nuclear safeguards and identifying the source of smuggled material in nuclear forensics. While isotope analysis has traditionally been performed by mass spectrometry, the need for in situ measurements has prompted the development of optical techniques, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). These optical measurements rely on laser ablation for direct solid sampling, but several past studies have suggested that the distribution of isotopes in the ablation plume is not uniform. This study seeks to characterize isotope separation in the laser plume through the use of orthogonal-acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A silver foil was ablated with a Nd:YAG at 355 nm at an energy of 50 muJ with a spot size of 71 mum, for a fluence of 1.3 J/cm2 and an irradiance of 250 MW/cm2. Flat-plate repellers were used to sample the plume, and a temporal profile of the ions was obtained by varying the time delay on the high-voltage pulse. A spatial profile along the axis of the plume was generated by changing the position of the sample, which yielded snapshots of the isotopic composition with time. In addition, the reflectron time-of-flight system was used as an energy filter in conjunction with the repellers to sample slices of the laser plasma orthogonal to the plume axis. Mass spectrometry of the plume revealed a fast ion distribution and a slow ion distribution. Measurements taken across the entire plume showed the fast 109Ag ions slightly ahead in both space and time, causing the 107Ag fraction to drop to 0.34 at 3 mus, 4 mm from the sample surface. Although measurements centered on the near side of the plume did not show isotope separation, the slow ions on the far side of the plume included much more 109Ag than 107Ag. In addition to examining the isotope content of the ablation

  11. Studying fermionic ghost imaging with independent photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbin; Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Hui; Li, Fu-li; Xu, Zhuo

    2016-12-01

    Ghost imaging with thermal fermions is calculated based on two-particle interference in Feynman's path integral theory. It is found that ghost imaging with thermal fermions can be simulated by ghost imaging with thermal bosons and classical particles. Photons in pseudothermal light are employed to experimentally study fermionic ghost imaging. Ghost imaging with thermal bosons and fermions is discussed based on the point-to-point (spot) correlation between the object and image planes. The employed method offers an efficient guidance for future ghost imaging with real thermal fermions, which may also be generalized to study other second-order interference phenomena with fermions.

  12. The diet-body offset in human nitrogen isotopic values: A controlled dietary study

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, TC; Kneale, CJ; Tasevska, N; Kuhnle, GGC

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The "trophic level enrichment" between diet and body results in an overall increase in nitrogen isotopic values as the food chain is ascended. Quantifying the diet–body Δ15N spacing has proved difficult, particularly for humans. The value is usually assumed to be +3–5‰ in the archaeological literature. We report here the first (to our knowledge) data from humans on isotopically known diets, comparing dietary intake and a body tissue sample, that of red blood cells. Samples were taken from 11 subjects on controlled diets for a 30-day period, where the controlled diets were designed to match each individual's habitual diet, thus reducing problems with short-term changes in diet causing isotopic changes in the body pool. The Δ15Ndiet-RBC was measured as +3.5‰. Using measured offsets from other studies, we estimate the human Δ15Ndiet-keratin as +5.0–5.3‰, which is in good agreement with values derived from the two other studies using individual diet records. We also estimate a value for Δ15Ndiet-collagen of ≍6‰, again in combination with measured offsets from other studies. This value is larger than usually assumed in palaeodietary studies, which suggests that the proportion of animal protein in prehistoric human diet may have often been overestimated in isotopic studies of palaeodiet. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23042579

  13. The diet-body offset in human nitrogen isotopic values: a controlled dietary study.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, T C; Kneale, C J; Tasevska, N; Kuhnle, G G C

    2012-11-01

    The "trophic level enrichment" between diet and body results in an overall increase in nitrogen isotopic values as the food chain is ascended. Quantifying the diet-body Δ(15) N spacing has proved difficult, particularly for humans. The value is usually assumed to be +3-5‰ in the archaeological literature. We report here the first (to our knowledge) data from humans on isotopically known diets, comparing dietary intake and a body tissue sample, that of red blood cells. Samples were taken from 11 subjects on controlled diets for a 30-day period, where the controlled diets were designed to match each individual's habitual diet, thus reducing problems with short-term changes in diet causing isotopic changes in the body pool. The Δ(15) N(diet-RBC) was measured as +3.5‰. Using measured offsets from other studies, we estimate the human Δ(15) N(diet-keratin) as +5.0-5.3‰, which is in good agreement with values derived from the two other studies using individual diet records. We also estimate a value for Δ(15) N(diet-collagen) of ≈6‰, again in combination with measured offsets from other studies. This value is larger than usually assumed in palaeodietary studies, which suggests that the proportion of animal protein in prehistoric human diet may have often been overestimated in isotopic studies of palaeodiet.

  14. MAST - A mass spectrometer telescope for studies of the isotopic composition of solar, anomalous, and galactic cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Walter R.; Cummings, Alan C.; Cummings, Jay R.; Garrard, Thomas L.; Kecman, Branislav; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Selesnick, Richard S.; Stone, Edward C.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1993-01-01

    The Mass Spectrometer Telescope (MAST) on SAMPEX is designed to provide high resolution measurements of the isotopic composition of energetic nuclei from He to Ni (Z = 2 to 28) over the energy range from about 10 to several hundred MeV/nuc. During large solar flares MAST will measure the isotopic abundances of solar energetic particles to determine directly the composition of the solar corona, while during solar quiet times MAST will study the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic rays. In addition, MAST will measure the isotopic composition of both interplanetary and trapped fluxes of anomalous cosmic rays, believed to be a sample of the nearby interstellar medium.

  15. High-precision mass spectrometric analysis using stable isotopes in studies of children.

    PubMed

    Schierbeek, Henk; van den Akker, Chris H P; Fay, Laurent B; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2012-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes combined with mass spectrometry (MS) provides insight into metabolic processes within the body. Herein, an overview on the relevance of stable isotope methodology in pediatric research is presented. Applications for the use of stable isotopes with MS cover carbohydrate, fat, and amino acid metabolism as well as body composition, energy expenditure, and the synthesis of specific peptides and proteins, such as glutathione and albumin. The main focus of these studies is on the interactions between nutrients and the endogenous metabolism within the body and how these factors affect the health of a growing infant. Considering that the early imprinting of metabolic processes hugely impacts metabolism (and thus functional outcome) later in life, research in this area is important and is advancing rapidly. The major fluxes on a metabolic level are the synthesis and breakdown rates. They can be quantified using kinetic tracer analysis and mathematical modeling. Organic MS and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) are the two most mature techniques for the isotopic analysis of compounds. Introduction of the samples is usually done by coupling gas chromatography (GC) to either IRMS or MS because it is the most robust technique for specific isotopic analysis of volatile compounds. In addition, liquid chromatography (LC) is now being used more often as a tool for sample introduction of both volatile and non-volatile compounds into IRMS or MS for (13)C isotopic analyses at natural abundances and for (13)C-labeled enriched compounds. The availability of samples is often limited in pediatric patients. Therefore, sample size restriction is important when developing new methods. Also, the availability of stable isotope-labeled substrates is necessary for measurements of the kinetics and concentrations in metabolic studies, which can be a limiting factor. During the last decade, the availability of these substrates has increased. Furthermore, improvements

  16. Tracking Urban Air Deterioration in San Francisco: Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Study of Weedy Plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colman, A. S.; Wessells, A.; Swaine, M. E.; Fogel, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen have long been used as indicators of ecosystem structure and nutrient cycling in natural and anthropogenically disturbed terrestrial ecosytems. However, relatively few of these studies have targeted urban environments, where nitrogen and CO2 emissions dramatically impact atmospheric composition. Here we present the results of carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of herbaceous plants growing in and around San Francisco. These plants were collected mainly as part of a public outreach walking tour of San Francisco ("The Weed Walk - Concrete Jungle") sponsored by the San Francisco Exploratorium. In all cases, the plants were sampled in areas with negligible forest canopy. A consortium of species was collected at each of several distinct sites to examine the localized and regional impact of automobile traffic and proximity to the ocean on isotopic compositions of carbon and nitrogen. δ 13C measurements trend towards relatively light values in the range of --26 to --36 permil. In comparison, the leaves from similar types of herbaceous species in relatively unpolluted and unforested environments typically have δ 13C values in the range of --22 to --28 permil. The observed light carbon isotopic compositions potentially reflect input of isotopically light CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning, boosting atmospheric CO2 concentrations to >10 % above background. δ 15N values range from +4 to +9 permil. This is substantially offset from the --4 to +1 permil values that typify vegetation in regions where nitrogen oxides from fossil fuel combustion dominate the nitrogen inputs. The nitrogen isotope compositions might suggest nitrogen contributions from a marine source (typically +6 permil).

  17. Comparisons of phosphorothioate with phosphate transfer reactions for a monoester, diester, and triester: isotope effect studies.

    PubMed

    Catrina, Irina E; Hengge, Alvan C

    2003-06-25

    Phosphorothioate esters are sometimes used as surrogates for phosphate ester substrates in studies of enzymatic phosphoryl transfer reactions. To gain better understanding of the comparative inherent chemistry of the two types of esters, we have measured equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects for several phosphorothioate esters of p-nitrophenol (pNPPT) and compared the results with data from phosphate esters. The primary (18)O isotope effect at the phenolic group ((18)k(bridge)), the secondary nitrogen-15 isotope effect ((15)k) in the nitro group, and (for the monoester and diester) the secondary oxygen-18 isotope effect ((18)k(nonbridge)) in the phosphoryl oxygens were measured. The equilibrium isotope effect (EIE) (18)k(nonbridge) for the deprotonation of the monoanion of pNPPT is 1.015 +/- 0.002, very similar to values previously reported for phosphate monoesters. The EIEs for complexation of Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) with the dianion pNPPT(2-) were both unity. The mechanism of the aqueous hydrolysis of the monoanion and dianion of pNPPT, the diester ethyl pNPPT, and the triester dimethyl pNPPT was probed using heavy atom kinetic isotope effects. The results were compared with the data reported for analogous phosphate monoester, diester, and triester reactions. The results suggest that leaving group bond fission in the transition state of reactions of the monoester pNPPT is more advanced than for its phosphate counterpart pNPP, while alkaline hydrolysis of the phosphorothioate diester and triester exhibits somewhat less advanced bond fission than that of their phosphate ester counterparts.

  18. Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Aquatic Primary Producers: Implications for Food Web Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondula, K. L.; Pace, M. L.; Cole, J. J.; Batt, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen in the organic matter of aquatic plants has a lower relative abundance of the deuterium isotope in comparison to hydrogen in the surrounding water due to a series of fractionation processes including photosynthesis and the biosynthesis of lipids. Expected differences between the deuterium values of different types of plant tissue have been used to observe terrestrial contributions to aquatic food webs and to discriminate organic matter sources in 3-isotope studies with more precision than in 2-isotope studies, however some values used in these studies are derived from an estimated fractionation value (ɛ) between water and plant tissue. We found significant differences in fractionation values between different groups of aquatic plants sampled from three system types: lakes, river, and coastal lagoon. Fractionation values between water and plant tissue of macrophytes and marine macroalgae were more similar to those of terrestrial plants and distinctly different than those of benthic microalgae and phytoplankton. Incorporating the variability in fractionation values between plant types will improve models and experimental designs used in isotopic food web studies for aquatic systems.

  19. Advances in the application of amino acid nitrogen isotopic analysis in ecological and biogeochemical studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino acids (CSIA-AA) has emerged in the last decade as a powerful approach for tracing the origins and fate of nitrogen in ecological and biogeochemical studies. This approach is based on the empirical knowledge that source AAs (i.e., phenylalanine), fractiona...

  20. Stable carbon isotope study of the prairie-forest transition soil in Louisiana

    Treesearch

    Asfaw Bekele; Wayne H. Hudnall

    2003-01-01

    The calcareous prairies of Louisiana are among the most endangered and the least understood ecosystems in North America. The major threat to this ecosystem is the invasion of woody plants,-primarily eastern red cedar Uunipems virginiana L.). We studied the verbcal profile of soil organic C (SOC) and the stable carbon isotope (613C) from soil organic matter (SOM) to...

  1. Selenium redox cycling during weathering of Se-rich shales: A selenium isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian-Ming; Johnson, Thomas M.; Clark, Scott K.; Zhu, Xiang-Kun; Wang, Xiang-Li

    2014-02-01

    Selenium isotopes are becoming an important paleoenvironmental proxy. However, few studies have focused on the behavior of Se isotopes during oxidative weathering. In this paper, a comprehensive set of Se isotopic composition and concentration data were collected from the weathering profiles of Se-rich shales of the Permian Maokou Formation in Yutangba and Shadi, China to investigate Se isotopic fractionation and Se enrichment during weathering processes. The δ82/76Se in fresh shales (148 ± 118 mg/kg Se, 1SD, n = 40) from Shadi and Yutangba drill cores varies from -1.69‰ to 1.74‰ with an average of 0.40 ± 0.71‰ (1SD, n = 40), consistent with the range in other Phanerozoic shales, suggesting that Se isotopes are not strongly fractionated during Se sequestration in the primary sedimentary environment. However, the strongly weathered Se-rich shales from Shadi and Yutangba profiles are isotopically lighter with average δ82/76Se values of -1.96 ± 1.08‰ (1SD, n = 5) and -1.08 ± 1.83‰ (1SD, n = 23), respectively. These data suggest that Se isotopes can be fractionated during oxidation and reduction processes associated with weathering, with heavier isotopes removed preferentially during oxidative weathering of shales. Such a shift, if found to be a global phenomenon, would have implications for models of the global Se cycle and interpretation of Se isotope data from past biogeochemical regimes. Locally altered shales exposed in a quarry at Yutangba are extremely enriched in Se with 1642 ± 1505 mg/kg (1SD, n = 45), approximately 10 times greater than that in unaltered drill core samples. These rocks display very strong variation in δ82/76Se over short distances, with a single 60 cm transect showing the most strongly negative and positive δ82/76Se values (-14.20‰ to +11.37‰) observed to date in natural samples. This suggests that Se has undergone multiple cycles of oxidation, mobilization, and re-reduction, resulting in a Se-rich redox front that has

  2. Pb isotopic study on soils from Domizio-Flegreo Littoral area, Napoli, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grezzi, G.; Ayuso, R. A.; Lima, A.; Albanese, S.; de Vivo, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Domizio - Flegreo Littoral area, together with the Agro Aversano area, are part of a Site of National Interest for pollution assessment. This area is located along the north coastal zone of the Campania region (Italy) and has an extension of about 855 Km2. We analyzed soils for heavy metal content in order to study and discriminate the impact of natural and anthropogenic sources. We collected 292 soil surface samples (5-15 cm depth) and produced maps showing the distribution of heavy metals in the soils. On the basis of the geographic distribution of heavy metals, 9 soil profiles were also collected for detailed examination (1 meter from surface). From each soil profile, we collected 10 soil samples (1/10 cm) in the urban and suburban areas of the littoral area. Also, we collected 8 groundwater samples likely associated with the soils. Pb isotope compositions of these soils and waters help to constrain the impact of anthropogenic and natural components on the soil profiles. Possible anthropogenic end-members include pesticides used in the area. Lead isotope compositions of soils known to contain anomalously high values of heavy metals were measured in order to determine the sources of the Pb and, by inference, sources of other metals that are likely to share similar geochemical behaviour in the surface environment (e.g., As). Acid-leach compositions of the soils represent Pb that is adsorbed to mineral surfaces, whereas residue compositions may reflect bedrock. Labile Pb (acid-leach fractions) from the soils shows a range in compositions of 207Pb/206Pb = 0.8275 to 0.8486, and 208Pb/206Pb = 2.0488 to 2.0873. The isotope values vary and decrease with depth. The Pb isotope ratios obtained on groundwater samples range from about 207Pb/206Pb = 0.8516 to 0.8636, 208Pb/206Pb = 2.0706 to 2.1064. The Pb isotope ratios in the soil profiles and groundwater are generally consistent with multiple sources that include anthropogenic Pb. Surface soil samples from Giugliano

  3. Bronze Age volcanic event recorded in stalagmites by combined isotope and trace element studies.

    PubMed

    Siklósy, Zoltán; Demény, Attila; Vennemann, Torsten W; Pilet, Sebastien; Kramers, Jan; Leél-Ossy, Szabolcs; Bondár, Mária; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Hegner, Ernst

    2009-03-01

    Stable isotope analyses of speleothems (carbonate deposits formed in caves) have been widely used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions. Recent improvements in geochemical techniques have enabled us to analyze climate-influenced deposits at high temporal resolution so that hitherto unrecognized environmental conditions may be identified. Stable H, C and O isotope analyses on carbonate and inclusion water have been combined with multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) age dating and laser-ablation ICP-MS trace element analyses on a stalagmite from southern Hungary. The study reveals significant changes in chemical and isotopic compositions of the speleothem between approx. 3800 and 3500 years BP ('Before Present') indicating coupled changes in the temperature and precipitation regime under which the speleothem formed. Stable isotopic and trace element correlations within this time period correlate with similar studies of stalagmites of comparable age from the Alpine-Mediterranean region. Our studies suggest that traces of deposition of volcanic dust, possibly related to the Thera eruption of Santorini (Greece) ca. 1650 BC (approximately 3650 BP), and environmental changes can be detected at a distance of several thousand kilometers. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Automated data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope probing studies

    SciTech Connect

    Slysz, Gordon W.; Steinke, Laurey A.; Ward, David M.; Klatt, Christian G.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2014-01-27

    Protein stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. While most protein-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism, a key application will be in situ studies of microbial communities under conditions that result in small degrees of partial labeling. One hurdle restricting large scale in situ protein-SIP studies is the lack of algorithms and software for automated data processing of the massive data sets resulting from such studies. In response, we developed Stable Isotope Probing Protein Extraction Resources software (SIPPER) and applied it for large scale extraction and visualization of data from short term (3 h) protein-SIP experiments performed in situ on Yellowstone phototrophic bacterial mats. Several metrics incorporated into the software allow it to support exhaustive analysis of the complex composite isotopic envelope observed as a result of low amounts of partial label incorporation. SIPPER also enables the detection of labeled molecular species without the need for any prior identification.

  5. Automated data extraction from in situ protein-stable isotope probing studies.

    PubMed

    Slysz, Gordon W; Steinke, Laurey; Ward, David M; Klatt, Christian G; Clauss, Therese R W; Purvine, Samuel O; Payne, Samuel H; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2014-03-07

    Protein-stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. While most protein-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism(s), a key application will be in situ studies of microbial communities for short periods of time under natural conditions that result in small degrees of partial labeling. One hurdle restricting large-scale in situ protein-SIP studies is the lack of algorithms and software for automated data processing of the massive data sets resulting from such studies. In response, we developed Stable Isotope Probing Protein Extraction Resources software (SIPPER) and applied it for large-scale extraction and visualization of data from short-term (3 h) protein-SIP experiments performed in situ on phototrophic bacterial mats isolated from Yellowstone National Park. Several metrics incorporated into the software allow it to support exhaustive analysis of the complex composite isotopic envelope observed as a result of low amounts of partial label incorporation. SIPPER also enables the detection of labeled molecular species without the need for any prior identification.

  6. Online analysis of chlorine stable isotopes in chlorinated ethylenes: an inter-laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Anat; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Hunkeler, Daniel; Sakaguchi-Söder, Kaori; Laskov, Christine; Aravena, Ramon; Elsner, Martin

    2010-05-01

    In the last decade, compound-specific stable isotopes analysis of groundwater pollutants became an important tool to identify different sources of the same pollutant and for tracking natural attenuating processes in the sub-surface. It has been shown that trends in the isotopic composition of the target compounds can shed light on in-situ processes that are otherwise difficult to track. Analytical methods of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen were established and are by now frequently used for a variety of organic pollutants. Yet, the motivation of introducing analytical methods for new isotopes is emerging. This motivation is further enhanced, as advantages of using two or more stable isotopes for gaining better insight on degradation pathways are well accepted. One important element which demands the development of appropriate analytical methods is chlorine, which is found in various groups of organic pollutants, among them the chlorinated ethylenes. Chlorinated ethylenes are considered as high priority environmental pollutants, and the development of suitable chlorine isotope methods for this group of pollutants is highly desired. Ideally, stable isotope techniques should have the capability to determine the isotopic composition of and individual target compound in a non-pure mixture, without the requirement of a laborious off-line treatment. Indeed, in the last years two different concepts for on-line chlorine isotope analysis methods were introduced, by using either a standard quadrapole GC/MS (Sakaguchi-Söder et al., 2007) or by using a GC/IRMS (Shouakar-Stash et al., 2006). We present a comparison of the performances of two concepts, carried out in five different laboratories: Waterloo (GC/IRMS), Neuchâtel (GC/MS), Darmstadt (GC/MS), Tübingen (GC/MS) and Munich (GC/IRMS). This comparison was performed on pure trichloroethylene and dichloroethylene products of different manufactures, as well as trichloroethylene and dichloroethylene samples that were exposed to

  7. Directing Traffic in the Rhizosphere: Using Isotopes and Imaging to Track Root-Microbe-Mineral Interactions in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; Neurath, R.; Whitman, T.; Zhang, P.; Yuan, T.; Zhou, J.; Nico, P. S.; Lipton, A.; Weber, P. K.; Firestone, M.

    2016-12-01

    Stimulated by exudates and root decay, rhizosphere organisms control the critical pathways that move C from root tissues to mineral surfaces, and ultimately regulate how soil C is sequestered and stabilized. Yet we have a poor understanding of how roots affect the molecular ecology of microbial decomposers, and how this affects rates of organic matter breakdown or long-term OM association with minerals. In an isotope-enabled incubation experiment, we studied SOM-mineral interactions and the colonization of fresh minerals by soil microbes asking: (1) How does mineralogy impact SOM association? (2) who is there (which microbial taxa), (3) what chemical form the C is in, and (4) where C is associated within the soil physical environment. We followed the fate of 13C-labeled plant-derived C in Avena barbata (wild oat) California grassland soil microcosms incubated with three minerals representing a spectrum of structure and reactivity: quartz, kaolinite, and ferrihydrite-coated quartz. These minerals (isolated in mesh bags to exclude plant roots but not microorganisms) were extracted and measured for total C and 13C atom% after 1, 2, and 2.5 months incubation. We used sequencing of 16S and ITS2 genes and qPCR to characterize the microbial communities colonizing the minerals. At plant senescence, quartz had the least mineral-bound C and ferrihydrite the most. Ferrihydrite and kaolinite also accumulated more plant-derived C. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and 13C-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy analysis of the mineral-associated SOM indicated differences in the SOM composition with mineralogy. Bacterial and fungal communities associated with different minerals differed, with more arbuscular mycorrhial fungi found on ferrihydrite and quartz. Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) imaging of these minerals suggested that fungal hyphae moved C directly from roots to mineral surfaces. Additionally, mineral-associated microbes had an enriched

  8. Aragonite-Calcite Inversion During Biogenic Carbonate Sampling: Considerations for Interpreting Isotopic Measurements in Paleoclimate Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, A. J.; Swart, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    As aragonite is the metastable polymorph of calcium carbonate, it lends itself to monotropic inversion to the more stable polymorph, calcite. This inversion is possible through an increase in the temperature and pressure conditions to which the sample is exposed and, although first noted nearly a century ago, has been primarily discussed in the context of sample roasting prior to analyses in paleoclimatological studies. Over the last several decades, however, researchers have found evidence to suggest that the friction associated with the sampling of biogenic carbonates via milling/drilling also induces inversion. Furthermore, this inversion may be associated with a shift in measured oxygen isotopic values and ultimately have significant implications for the interpretation of paleoclimatic reconstructions. Despite this, the isotopic heterogeneity of biogenic aragonite skeletons makes the effects of inversion challenging to test and the subject remains underrepresented in the literature. Here we present a first order study into the effects of milling on both the mineralogy and isotopic compositions measured in sclerosponges, corals, and molluscs. X-Ray diffraction analysis of samples hand ground with a mortar and pestle reveal 100% aragonitic skeletons. Conversely, samples milled with a computerized micromill show measurable inversion to calcite. On average, percent inversion of aragonite to calcite for individual specimens was 15% for sclerosponges, 16% for corals, and 9% for molluscs. Isotopic data from these specimens show that the higher the percentage of aragonite inverted to calcite, the more depleted the measured oxygen isotopic values. In the largest of the datasets (sclerosponges), it is evident that the range of oxygen isotope values from milled samples (-0.02 to +0.84%) exceeds the range in values for those samples which were hand ground and showed no inversion (+0.53 to +0.90%). This, coupled with the strong correlation between the two variables

  9. Comprehensive Isotopic and Elemental Analysis of a Multi-Oxide Glass By Multicollector ICP-MS in Isotope Substitution Studies

    SciTech Connect

    v, Mitroshkov; JV, Ryan

    2016-04-07

    Multicollector ICP-MS was used to comprehensively analyze different types of isotopically-modified glass created in order to investigate the processes of glass corrosion in the water. The analytical methods were developed for the analyses of synthesized, isotopically-modified solid glass and the release of glass constituents upon contact with deionized water. To validate the methods, results from an acid digestion sample of the Analytical Reference Glass (ARG) showed good agreement when compared to data from multiple prior analyses on the same glass [Smith-1]. In this paper, we present the results of this comprehensive analysis from the acid digestion of six types of isotopically-modified glass and the release of glass constituents into water corrosion after one year of aqueous corrosion.

  10. Fish fins as non-lethal surrogates for muscle tissues in freshwater food web studies using stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Hette Tronquart, Nicolas; Mazeas, Laurent; Reuilly-Manenti, Liana; Zahm, Amandine; Belliard, Jérôme

    2012-07-30

    Dorsal white muscle is the standard tissue analysed in fish trophic studies using stable isotope analyses. However, sampling white muscle often implies the sacrifice of fish. Thus, we examined whether the non-lethal sampling of fin tissue can substitute muscle sampling in food web studies. Analysing muscle and fin δ(15)N and δ(13)C values of 466 European freshwater fish (14 species) with an elemental analyser coupled with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer, we compared the isotope values of the two tissues. Correlations between fin and muscle isotope ratios were examined for all fish together and specifically for 12 species. We further proposed four methods of assessing muscle from fin isotope ratios and estimated the errors made using these muscle surrogates. Despite significant differences between isotope values of the two tissues, fin and muscle isotopic signals are strongly correlated. Muscle values, estimated with raw fin isotope ratios (1st method), induce an error of ca. 1‰ for both isotopes. In comparison, specific (2nd method) or general (3rd method) correlations provide meaningful corrections of fin isotope ratios (errors <0.6‰). On the other hand, relationships, established for Australian tropical fish, only give poor muscle estimates (errors >0.8‰). There is little chance that a global model can be created. However, the 2nd and 3rd methods of estimating muscle values from fin isotope ratios should provide an acceptable level of error for the studies of European freshwater food web. We thus recommend that future studies use fin tissue as a non-lethal surrogate for muscle. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A Combined He and Os Isotopic Study of the HSDP-2 Core from Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. J.; Walker, R. J.; Depaolo, D. J.; Kurz, M. D.

    2004-12-01

    Combined osmium and helium isotope systematics of hotspot lavas have the potential to reveal information about the deep Earth. A high 3He/4He ratio may represent an undegassed reservoir, generally associated with the lower mantle. There are two Os isotopes that can be studied to help to further elucidate the problem. The decay of 187Re to 187Os is the more frequently cited system; however, in terms of lower mantle processes, the decay of 190Pt to 186Os may be extremely useful. Both of these Os isotopes are enriched in the core relative to chondritic values. In a previous study, Brandon et al. (1999) examined several Hawaiian volcanoes for both He and Os isotopes. A correlation was noted between the 3He/4He, 187Os/188Os and 186Os/188Os ratios. In terms of 3He/4He and 187Os/188Os space, the three commonly cited Hawaiian end-members (Kea, Koolau and Loihi members) were clearly defined. A strong positive correlation was also observed for 186Os/188Os versus 3He/4He. These correlations were interpreted as a possible signature of core-mantle interaction. There were some limitations to previous studies. Only 2-3 samples from each volcano were studied, with these samples generally being subaerially erupted. The He data utilized were often not for the same samples for which the Os data were collected (volcano averages for He were used on some samples). With the introduction of data from the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP-2), which drilled 2.84 km into the Mauna Kea volcanics (DePaolo et al., 2000), an extensive history of a single volcano can be observed (from the early submarine stages to the later subaerial rocks). In the current study a detailed Os isotopic analysis of several samples that span a large depth range of the HSDP-2 core, in conjunction with previously collected He isotopic data (Kurz et al., 2004), was conducted. The samples define a relatively narrow range of slightly suprachondritic 187Os/188Os ratios (0.12865-0.13056), despite having a large

  12. [Isotope angiocardiography: amelioration of the measurement of ejection fraction by a new treatment of the image].

    PubMed

    Widmann, T; Righetti, A; de Lorgeril, M; Soulier, B; Brandon, G; Fournet, P C

    1981-11-07

    Some of the limitations affecting radioisotopic images are their insufficient resolution, structure boundaries and accurate subtraction of background noise. In order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio the images of the recorded heart cycles are treated by the Karhunen-Loeve transformation. Edge detection is based on compression of the image to a bitmap at a chosen level and following of all bits set to one by a pointer. The outlines of the structures as determined by edge tracking are used to define the regions of interest within the enhanced images. Background subtraction applies the principle of interpolative background subtraction by computing an individual background for each point in an irregular region of interest. The resultant images are used to calculate an index of cardiac efficiency which shows high correlation (r = 0.92) with the ejection fraction of contrast biplane left ventricular angiography.

  13. LUCIS: lung cancer imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Harders, Stefan Walbom

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary nodules are of high clinical importance, as they may prove to be an early manifestation of lung cancer. Pulmonary nodules are small, focal opacities that may be solitary or multiple. A solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) is a single, small (= 30 mm in diameter) radiographic opacity. Larger opacities are called masses and are often malignant. As imaging techniques improve and more nodules are detected, the optimal management of SPNs remains unclear. Current strategies include tissue sampling or CT follow-up. The aim of this PhD was to examine current non-invasive methods used to characterise pulmonary nodules and masses in patients with suspected lung cancer and to stage NSCLC. In doing so, this PhD helps to validate the existing methods used to diagnose and stage lung cancer correctly and, hopefully, aids in the development of new methods. In the first study, 213 participants with pulmonary nodules on CT were examined with an additional HRCT. In this study, it was concluded that HRCT of a solitary pulmonary nodule, assessed using attenuation and morphological criteria is a fast, widely available and effective method for diagnosing lung cancer correctly, and especially for ruling out cancer. In the second study, 168 patients with pulmonary lesions on CT were examined with an additional F-18-FDG PET/CT. It was concluded that when used early in the work-up of the lesions, CT raised the prevalence of lung cancer in the population to the point at which further diagnostic imaging examination could be considered redundant. Standard contrast-enhanced CT seems better suited to identify patients with lung cancer than to rule out cancer. Finally, the overall diagnostic accuracy as well as the classification probabilities and predictive values of the two modalities were not significantly different. The reproducibility of the above results was substantial. In the third study, 59 patients with pulmonary nodules or masses on chest radiography were examined with an

  14. Theoretical study of neutrino scattering off the stable even Mo isotopes at low and intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasi, K. G.; Ydrefors, E.; Kosmas, T. S.

    2011-10-01

    A systematic study of the cross sections of neutral-current neutrino scattering off the stable even Mo isotopes (mass number A=92,94,96,98,100), at low and intermediate neutrino energies ( E⩽130 MeV), is presented and discussed. The required wave functions for the initial (ground state) and all accessible final nuclear states are constructed in the context of the quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) and tested against data on the low-lying energy spectra of the isotopes in question. The individual contributions coming from the polar-vector and axial-vector components of the hadronic current for the coherent and incoherent channels of each isotope are investigated. The studied Mo isotopes are contents of the detector of the MOON experiment operating at Japan with a hybrid aim to search for neutrinoless double beta decay events and to detect low- and intermediate-energy astrophysical neutrinos (solar, supernova, geo-neutrinos), and also of the NEMO neutrinoless double beta decay detector in Modane at France. For such purposes our cross section calculations are of significant importance.

  15. Isotope studies of hydrogen and oxygen in ground ice-experiences with the equilibration technique.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H; Schönicke, L; Wand, U; Hubberten, H W; Friedrichsen, H

    2000-01-01

    Equilibration technique suitable for a large amount of samples is described for hydrogen and oxygen isotope analyses of ground ice, especially ice wedges, including the sampling strategy and the analytical procedure as well as the calibration of the Finnigan MAT Delta-S mass spectrometer in June, 1999. Since for future analyses of ice wedges, a higher sampling resolution with limited sample volume is required, the limit of the equilibration technique for small water sample sizes of between 0.05 and 5 ml was checked. For water samples smaller than 1 ml, corresponding to a molar ratio [H2O]/[H2] of smaller than 0.994, a balance correction has to be applied. The experimental errors due to partial evaporation during evacuation, the balance calculation of the isotope equilibration process, the linearity as well as memory effects of the mass spectrometer for samples with large differences in delta18O and deltaD are tackled in this paper. In the polar regions of Northern Siberia without Late Pleistocene and Holocene glaciation, ground ice is used as an archive for paleoclimate studies. First results of stable isotope measurements on ice wedges clearly show a shift towards heavier isotopes and thus warmer winter temperatures as well as a change in the source of the precipitation between Late Pleistocene and Holocene. These results indicate the high potential of ground ice for paleoclimate studies.

  16. Measuring technique for thermal ionisation mass spectrometry of human tracer kinetic study with stable cerium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Teresa; Höllriegl, Vera; Giussani, Augusto; Oeh, Uwe

    2011-06-01

    Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) method has been developed for the simultaneous detection of different cerium isotopes in biological samples (i.e., blood and urine) at very low concentrations. The work has been done in the frame of a biokinetic study, where different stable cerium isotopes have been administered orally and intravenously as tracers to the human body. In order to develop an appropriate detection method for the tracers in the biological samples, an optimum sample preparation technique has been set and adapted to the specific requirements of the analysis technique used, i.e., TIMS. For sample evaporation and ionisation, the double tantalum filament technique showed the best results. The ions produced were simultaneously collected on a secondary electron multiplier so that the isotopic ratios of the cerium isotopes in the biological samples could be measured. The technique has been optimised for the determination of cerium down to 1 ng loaded on the evaporation filament corresponding to cerium concentrations of down to 1 ng ml(-1) in the blood or urine samples. It has been shown that the technique is reliable in application and enables studies on cerium metabolism and biokinetics in humans without employing radioactive tracers.

  17. Frame Your Images: Making Digital Images Accessible for Study & Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gepner, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Images, whether at the level of molecules, cells, organs, organisms, or environments, are at the core of many biological disciplines. Even with the contemporary emphasis on molecular analysis, biology has retained its traditional strong visual component. In courses that rely on the study of biological structure, the presentation of images for…

  18. Frame Your Images: Making Digital Images Accessible for Study & Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gepner, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Images, whether at the level of molecules, cells, organs, organisms, or environments, are at the core of many biological disciplines. Even with the contemporary emphasis on molecular analysis, biology has retained its traditional strong visual component. In courses that rely on the study of biological structure, the presentation of images for…

  19. Detection of immunolabels with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    PubMed

    Thiery-Lavenant, G; Guillermier, C; Wang, M; Lechene, C

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a method that combines the use of stable isotopes, MIMS and antibody. We began with using well-established antibodies, anti-actin and anti-synaptophysin, in mouse intestinal cells. We extended the method to an immunogold assay to specifically localize Ribeye, a major protein component of retina synaptic ribbons, or to localize a synaptic vesicle-containing protein, synaptophysin. Both are localized in presynaptic nerve terminal of photoreceptors cells in retina. Our results show that by MIMS analysis of the Au signal we can directly identify antibodies tagged with non amplified 1.4 nm gold nanoparticles. They also demonstrate that the gold nanoparticle-tagged antibodies do not dilute the (15)N/(14)N signal used for measuring protein turnover. Thus we can simultaneously and directly use MIMS to measure protein turnover and to identify cell type or specific protein.

  20. Using Beads and Divided Containers to Study Kinetic and Equilibrium Isotope Effects in the Laboratory and in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Brewer, Emily R.; Martinez, Keri A.; Fitzjarrald, Tamara J.

    The purpose of this laboratory experiment is to study fundamental concepts of kinetics and equilibria and the isotope effects associated with both of these concepts. The concepts of isotopes in introductory and general chemistry courses are typically used within the contexts of atomic weights and radioactivity. Kinetic and equilibrium isotope…

  1. Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Ratios Predict Intake of Sweeteners in a Yup’ik Study Population12

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Sarah H.; Kristal, Alan R.; Bersamin, Andrea; Hopkins, Scarlett E.; Boyer, Bert B.; O’Brien, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    The carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) is elevated in corn- and cane sugar-based foods and has recently shown associations with sweetener intake in multiple U.S. populations. However, a high carbon isotope ratio is not specific to corn- and sugar cane-based sweeteners, as other foods, including meats and fish, also have elevated δ13C. This study examines whether the inclusion of a second marker, the nitrogen isotope ratio (δ15N), can control for confounding dietary effects on δ13C and improve the validity of isotopic markers of sweetener intake. The study participants are from the Yup’ik population of southwest Alaska and consume large and variable amounts of fish and marine mammals known to have elevated carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Sixty-eight participants completed 4 weekly 24-h recalls followed by a blood draw. RBC δ13C and δ15N were used to predict sweetener intake, including total sugars, added sugars, and sugar-sweetened beverages. A model including both δ13C and δ15N explained more than 3 times as much of the variation in sweetener intake than did a model using only δ13C. Because carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios are simultaneously determined in a single, high-throughput analysis, this dual isotope marker provides a simple method to improve the validity of stable isotope markers of sweetener intake with no additional cost. We anticipate that this multi-isotope approach will have utility in any population where a stable isotope biomarker is elevated in several food groups and there are appropriate “covariate” isotopes to control for intake of foods not of research interest. PMID:23256142

  2. Neonatal Respiratory Diseases in the Newborn Infant: Novel Insights from Stable Isotope Tracer Studies.

    PubMed

    Carnielli, Virgilio P; Giorgetti, Chiara; Simonato, Manuela; Vedovelli, Luca; Cogo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome is a common problem in preterm infants and the etiology is multifactorial. Lung underdevelopment, lung hypoplasia, abnormal lung water metabolism, inflammation, and pulmonary surfactant deficiency or disfunction play a variable role in the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome. High-quality exogenous surfactant replacement studies and studies on surfactant metabolism are available; however, the contribution of surfactant deficiency, alteration or dysfunction in selected neonatal lung conditions is not fully understood. In this article, we describe a series of studies made by applying stable isotope tracers to the study of surfactant metabolism and lung water. In a first set of studies, which we call 'endogenous studies', using stable isotope-labelled intravenous surfactant precursors, we showed the feasibility of measuring surfactant synthesis and kinetics in infants using several metabolic precursors including plasma glucose, plasma fatty acids and body water. In a second set of studies, named 'exogenous studies', using stable isotope-labelled phosphatidylcholine tracer given endotracheally, we could estimate surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholine pool size and half-life. Very recent studies are focusing on lung water and on the endogenous biosynthesis of the surfactant-specific proteins. Information obtained from these studies in infants will help to better tailor exogenous surfactant treatment in neonatal lung diseases.

  3. Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation during methane dependent sulfate reduction in high pressure continuous incubation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deusner, C.; Brunner, B.; Holler, T.; Widdel, F.; Ferdelman, T. G.

    2009-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction in marine sediments is an important sink in the global methane budget. However, many aspects of methane dependent sulfate reduction are not fully understood. We developed a novel high pressure biotechnical system to simulate marine conditions with high concentrations of dissolved gases, e.g. at gas seeps and gas hydrate systems. The system allows for batch, fed-batch and continuous gas-phase free incubation. We employ this system to study the kinetics and isotope fractionation during AOM at varying methane partial pressures up to 10 MPa. We present the results of long-term continuous and fed-batch incubations with highly active naturally enriched biomass from microbial mats from the Black Sea. During these experiments the methane partial pressure was increased stepwise from 0.1 to 10 MPa. The methane dependent sulfate reduction rate increased from 0.1 mmol/l/d to 3.5 mmol/l/d resulting from the increase in methane concentration and microbial growth. Sulfate reduction was negligible in the absence of methane. The sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction was strongly influenced by the concentration of dissolved methane. Sulfur isotope fractionation was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations. Relative to sulfate reduction rates, oxygen isotope exchange between sulfate and water was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations.

  4. Trees growing through impervious surfaces use shallower water sources: a stable isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J.; Ryu, Y.; Lee, D.

    2015-12-01

    Trees growing through impervious surfaces can give an impact on hydrological cycle in urban areas by increasing ground permeability. Even though depth and distribution of the root can substantially alter the hydrological cycle, only a few studies have dealt with rooting depth and water use of trees growing through impervious surfaces. We compared the water sources of trees growing through impervious and pervious surfaces using a non-destructive stable isotope approach. We measured oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions from stem water and other potential water sources before and during the wet season. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of stem water were measured, indicating that trees growing through the impervious surfaces used isotopically enriched water in both periods. An IsoSource model applied in the wet season showed that trees growing through impervious surfaces took most of their water from depths of around 20 cm, while the control trees took the greatest portion from a depth of 100 cm. Our results imply that urban trees growing through impervious surfaces might be vulnerable to drought and show the distinctive effect of urban plants on the redistribution of hydrological components.

  5. Carbon allocation in plants and ecosystems - insights from stable isotope studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessler, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    Trees are large global stores of carbon (C) that will be impacted by increased carbon dioxide levels and climate change. However, at present we cannot properly predict the carbon balance of forests in future as we lack knowledge on how plant physiological processes, the transfer of carbon within the plant, carbon storage, and remobilization in the plant tissues as well as the release of carbon from the roots to the soil interact with environmental drivers and ecosystem-scale processes. This paper will summarise how stable isotope techniques can give new insights in the fate of newly assimilated C in plants and ecosystems on time scales from hours to seasons and it will include studies either characterizing temporal and spatial variation in the natural abundance of carbon and oxygen isotopes or applying isotopically enriched tracers. It comprises the assessment of the mechanisms of C partitioning among specific metabolic pathways, between plant organs and into various ecosystem C pools with different residence times. Moreover stable isotopes are highly suitable tools to characterise the role of the phloem, which is the central long-distance conveyer distributing C from source to sinks and thus plays a central role in linking sites and structures of storage, growth and other metabolic activities. A deeper understanding of these processes and their interaction with environmental drivers is critical for predicting how trees and ecosystems will respond to coming global environmental changes, including increased temperature, altered precipitation, and elevated carbon dioxide concentrations.

  6. Theoretical study on isotope and temperature effect in hydronium ion using ab initio path integral simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Masanori; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2004-09-01

    We have applied the ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulation to study hydronium ion and its isotopes, which are the simplest systems for hydrated proton and deuteron. In this simulation, all the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom are treated fully quantum mechanically, while the potential energies of the respective atomic configurations are calculated "on the fly" using ab initio quantum chemical approach. With the careful treatment of the ab initio electronic structure calculation by relevant choices in electron correlation level and basis set, this scheme is theoretically quite rigorous except for Born-Oppenheimer approximation. This accurate calculation allows a close insight into the structural shifts for the isotopes of hydronium ion by taking account of both quantum mechanical and thermal effects. In fact, the calculation is shown to be successful to quantitatively extract the geometrical isotope effect with respect to the Walden inversion. It is also shown that this leads to the isotope effect on the electronic structure as well as the thermochemical properties.

  7. Theoretical study of electronic properties and isotope effects in the UV absorption spectrum of disulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarka, Karolis; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Kondorskiy, Alexey; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2017-05-01

    The electronic structures of triplet S2 ground and excited states are studied by ab initio molecular orbital and configuration interaction calculation. Potential energy curves correlated with S(3P) + S(3P) and S(3P) + S(1D) at the dissociation limit are evaluated, and electronic terms for a total of 11 states are assigned. Transition dipole moments, as a function of internuclear distance, are determined for two allowed transitions to 13Πu and 13 Σu- excited states. Furthermore, the total absorption cross-sections are computed to estimate isotope-fractionation constants, ɛ , for four most common isotopologues: 32S32S, 32S33S, 32S34S, and 32S36S by quantum close-coupling (R-matrix) expansion approach. Zero-point energy based constants ɛZPE are estimated as well to compare with the obtained isotope effects. Three-isotope plots are shown to express mass-independent fractionation effect; large isotopic effects were found on 36S and 33S in 230-240 nm range, and only on 36S in 240-267 nm range.

  8. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Chemical extraction of Nd isotopes from deep-sea sediments for Cenozoic and Cretaceous paleoceanographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. E.; Blair, S. W.; Kamenov, G. D.; Scher, H. D.; Bourbon, E.; Basak, C.; Newkirk, D.

    2009-12-01

    Nd isotopes preserved in deep sea sediments are now a common proxy for reconstructing past ocean circulation patterns. While studies on Holocene-Pleistocene time scales frequently use chemical extractions of Nd that target dispersed ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) coatings on the bulk sediment, studies on longer, Cenozoic time scales are generally limited to data from fossil fish teeth and Fe-Mn crusts due to concerns about diagenetic alteration of oxides over longer time scales and potential contamination of the extracted Nd. Fish teeth and Fe-Mn crusts are robust archives for Nd isotopes over these time scales; however, separation and preparation of the teeth is laborious, and not all deep sea samples contain sufficient teeth for analysis. In addition, Fe-Mn crusts accumulate very slowly, integrate the seawater isotopic signal over an extended period of time, and are difficult to date. This study evaluates the integrity of Nd isotopes that were chemically-extracted from Cenozoic to Cretaceous Ocean Drilling Program sediments by comparing these results to data from contemporaneous fish teeth. Nd was extracted from the > 63μm fraction of deep sea sediments following carbonate removal using a 2 hour leach in 0.02M hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HH) solution. All 94 paired samples of chemically-extracted and fossil fish tooth Nd produced isotopic values that agree within error. These samples include material from the Miocene to Eocene from sites in the north (Sites 647 and 982) and south Atlantic (Sites 689, 690 and 1090), as well as Cretaceous black shales from the tropical Atlantic (Sites 1258 and 1260). This detailed comparison illustrates that Nd extracted from bulk deep sea sediments, which is derived at least in part from dispersed Fe-Mn oxide coatings, represents a promising archive for Nd isotopes on longer time scales. This archive is widely available through time and space and the extraction procedure is relatively simple and rapid. The observed correlation between

  10. Geochemical and isotopic study of soils and waters from an Italian contaminated site: Agro Aversano (Campania)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, M.A.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Albanese, S.

    2011-01-01

    Lead isotope applications have been widely used in recent years in environmental studies conducted on different kinds of sampled media. In the present paper, Pb isotope ratios have been used to determine the sources of metal pollution in soils and waters in the Agro Aversano area. During three different sampling phases, a total of 113 surface soils (5-20. cm), 20 samples from 2 soil profiles (0-1. m), 11 stream waters and 4 groundwaters were collected. Major element concentrations in sampled media have been analyzed by the ICP-MS technique. Surface soils (20 samples), all soil profiles and all waters have been also analyzed for Pb isotope compositions by thermal ionization (TIMS). The geochemical data were assessed using statistic methods and cartographically elaborated in order to have a clear picture of the level of disturbance of the area. Pb isotopic data were studied to discriminate between anthropogenic and geologic sources. Our results show that As (5.6-25.6. mg/kg), Cu (9-677. mg/kg), Pb (22-193. mg/kg), Tl (0.53-3.62. mg/kg), V (26-142. mg/kg) and Zn (34-215. mg//kg) contents in analyzed soils, exceed the intervention limits fixed by the Italian Environmental Law for residential areas in some of the sampled sites, while intervention limit for industrial areas is exceeded only for Cu concentrations. Lead isotopic data, show that there is a high similarity between the ratios measured in the leached soil samples and those deriving from anthropic activities. This similarity with anthropogenic Pb is also evident in the ratios measured in both groundwater and stream water samples. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  11. The suitability of the dual isotope approach (δ13C and δ18O) in tree ring studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegwolf, Rolf; Saurer, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The use of stable isotopes, complementary to tree ring width data in tree ring research has proven to be a powerful tool in studying the impact of environmental parameters on tree physiology and growth. These three proxies are thus instrumental for climate reconstruction and improve the understanding of underlying causes of growth changes. In various cases, however, their use suggests non-plausible interpretations. Often the use of one isotope alone does not allow the detection of such "erroneous isotope responses". A careful analysis of these deviating results shows that either the validity of the carbon isotope discrimination concept is no longer true (Farquhar et al. 1982) or the assumptions for the leaf water enrichment model (Cernusak et al., 2003) are violated and thus both fractionation models are not applicable. In this presentation we discuss such cases when the known fractionation concepts fail and do not allow a correct interpretation of the isotope data. With the help of the dual isotope approach (Scheidegger et al.; 2000) it is demonstrated, how to detect and uncover the causes for such anomalous isotope data. The fractionation concepts and their combinations before the background of CO2 and H2O gas exchange are briefly explained and the specific use of the dual isotope approach for tree ring data analyses and interpretations are demonstrated. References: Cernusak, L. A., Arthur, D. J., Pate, J. S. and Farquhar, G. D.: Water relations link carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination to phloem sap sugar concentration in Eucalyptus globules, Plant Physiol., 131, 1544-1554, 2003. Farquhar, G. D., O'Leary, M. H. and Berry, J. A.: On the relationship between carbon isotope discrimination and the intercellular carbon dioxide concentration in leaves, Aust. J. Plant Physiol., 9, 121-137, 1982. Scheidegger, Y., Saurer, M., Bahn, M. and Siegwolf, R.: Linking stable oxygen and carbon isotopes with stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity: A conceptual model

  12. Study of thermochemical sulfate reduction mechanism using compound specific sulfur isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshoulam, Alexander; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Said Ahmad, Ward; Deev, Andrei; Sessions, Alex L.; Tang, Yongchun; Adkins, Jess F.; Liu, Jinzhong; Gilhooly, William P.; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Amrani, Alon

    2016-09-01

    The sulfur isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of organic sulfur compounds (OSCs) during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) was studied using gold-tube pyrolysis experiments to simulate TSR. The reactants used included n-hexadecane (n-C16) as a model organic compound with sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur as the sulfur source. At the end of each experiment, the S-isotopic composition and concentration of remaining sulfate, H2S, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and 2-phenylthiophene (PT) were measured. The observed S-isotopic fractionations between sulfate and BT, DBT, and H2S in experimental simulations of TSR correlate well with a multi-stage model of the overall TSR process. Large kinetic isotope fractionations occur during the first, uncatalyzed stage of TSR, 12.4‰ for H2S and as much as 22.2‰ for BT. The fractionations decrease as the H2S concentration increases and the reaction enters the second, catalyzed stage. Once all of the oxidizable hydrocarbons have been consumed, sulfate reduction ceases and equilibrium partitioning then dictates the fractionation between H2S and sulfate (∼17‰). Experiments involving sparingly soluble CaSO4 show that during the second catalytic phase of TSR the rate of sulfate reduction exceeds that of sulfate dissolution. In this case, there is no apparent isotopic fractionation between source sulfate and generated H2S, as all of the available sulfate is effectively reduced at all reaction times. When CaSO4 is replaced with fully soluble Na2SO4, sulfate dissolution is no longer rate limiting and significant S-isotopic fractionation is observed. This supports the notion that CaSO4 dissolution can lead to the apparent lack of fractionation between H2S and sulfate produced by TSR in nature. The S-isotopic composition of individual OSCs record information related to geochemical reactions that cannot be discerned from the δ34S values obtained from bulk phases such as H2S, oil, and sulfate minerals, and

  13. Hydrodynamic influence on reservoir sustainability in semi-arid climate: A physicochemical and environmental isotopic study.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Rawaa; Kazpard, Véronique; El Samrani, Antoine G; Amacha, Nabil; Saad, Zeinab; Chou, Lei

    2017-07-15

    Water scarcity and increasing water demand require the development of water management plans such as establishing artificial lakes and dams. Plans to meet water needs are faced by uprising challenges to improve water quality and to ensure the sustainability of hydro-projects. Environmental isotopes coupled to water physicochemical characteristics were investigated over a biennial cycle to assess both geomorphological and environmental impacts on the water quality of a reservoir situated in an intensively used agricultural watershed under a Mediterranean semi-arid climate. The particularity of the semi-arid climate and the diverse topography generate a continental and orographic rain effect on the isotopic composition of precipitation and the water recharged sources. The studied reservoir responds quickly to land-use activities and climatic changes as reflected by temporal and spatial variations of water chemistry and isotopic composition. Increasing changes in precipitation rate and dry periods significantly modified the water isotopic composition in the reservoir. During the first year, hydrogen (δD) and oxygen (δ(18)O) isotopes are depleted by 6 and 2‰ between dry and wet season, respectively. While a shift of -2‰ for δD and -1‰ for δ(18)O was detected during the second annual cycle. Environmental isotopic compositions demonstrate for the first time the occurrence of groundwater inflow to the central (Cz) and dam (Dz) zones of the Qaraaoun reservoir. The Cz and Dz can be considered as open water bodies subjected to dilution by groundwater inflow, which induces vertical mixing and reverse isotopic stratification of the water column. In the contrary, the river mouth zone acts as a closed system without groundwater intrusion, where heavy water accumulates and may act as a sink for contaminants during dry season. Groundwater influx acts as a dilution factor that renews the hypolimnion, and minimizes the perturbations induced by both internal

  14. Characterising Arctic Wetland Methane Emissions - Isotope studies from the ground to tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R. E.; France, J. L.; Lowry, D.; Lanoiselle, M.; Skiba, U.; Drewer, J.; Aurela, M.; Crill, P. M.; Bauguitte, S.; O'Shea, S.; Allen, G.; Gallagher, M. W.; Cain, M.; Warwick, N. J.; Pyle, J. A.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2013-12-01

    Many methane sources have distinct isotopic signatures and hence atmospheric measurements can be used to apportion emissions from different source categories (wetlands, gas leaks, biomass burning etc). However within source categories there are often temporal and geographic variations in the emitted signature. Production, transport and oxidation of methane from wetlands before emission to the atmosphere can vary according to the trophic status, temperature, water table and vegetation type. The δ13C signature of produced methane depends on the distribution of and the ratio of methane from acetate dissimilation and CO2 reduction. The signature of methane released to the atmosphere will also depend on the transport pathway and the amount of oxidation that has occurred. Flux and isotopic signature from one chamber to the next and from one region to another are highly variable. This study presents measurements from the MAMM campaigns of 2012 and 2013 which incorporated ground and aircraft sampling of methane across northern Scandinavia for isotopic analysis. On the ground isotopic signature was measured in chambers at Sodankylä (Finland) and Abisko (Sweden) and diurnal measurements were made within five wetland areas. Concurrent tower and aircraft measurements considered emissions over a larger region. Wetland emissions dominate the methane source measured over the European Arctic in the summer. In the July 2012 aircraft campaign elevated methane concentrations were measured in the low altitude samples over land with an isotopic source signature (δ13C) of -72 × 4 ‰, comparable to the isotopic signature of -71 × 2 ‰ measured on the ground in emissions from wetlands. The isotopic composition of methane measured over the same area in an aircraft campaign in March 2012 was significantly more enriched in 13C at -53 ‰. High latitude wetland methane emissions tend to be more depleted in 13C than those from wetlands further south. Fluxes are highly seasonal with

  15. Bulk Diffusion and Isotopic Fractionation of Lithium in Olivine: an Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singletary, S.; Bell, D. R.

    2007-12-01

    Lithium is the lightest of the lithophile elements, with high solid-state diffusivity (e.g. Giletti and Shanahan, 1997). Recent studies in synthetic and natural systems suggest that isotopic fractionation of lithium accompanies diffusion (Richter et al., 2003; Lundstrom et al., 2005; Beck et al., 2006; Teng et al., 2007; Jeffcoate et al., 2007). Lithium isotope variations therefore have the potential to constrain time scales of geological processes. We have performed a series of experiments to quantitatively assess the bulk diffusion of lithium in olivine and the degree of isotopic fractionation that can occur during diffusive transport. Single crystals of San Carlos olivine were surrounded by LiF and then held at temperature (800°C to 1000°C) for variable lengths of times (up to 20 hours at 800°C and as short as 2 hours at 1000°C). Measurements of the lithium concentration and isotopic composition of the experimental charges were conducted using the Cameca IMS 3f at Arizona State University. The lowest temperature experiments show no discernable diffusion of lithium into the olivine crystal, while in the highest temperature experiment, up to 650 ppm lithium is incorporated into the olivine. The lithium content in all experiments above 1000°C decreases smoothly from the crystal rim to the core; indicating diffusive transport of Li into the crystal. Lithium concentrations in the crystal cores range from background in the lowest temperature experiment, to ~100 ppm in the highest temperature experiment. Rim values, in contrast, vary from 650 ppm in the high temperature experiments to core concentrations in the low temperature experiment. All experiments in which diffusive transport into the olivine crystal occurred also display a fractionation of 6Li from 7Li. In the most extreme case, a variation of 50‰ in δ7Li was observed across the diffusion profile, which was generated in just under 2 hours. As lithium content decreases toward the crystal center, the δ7

  16. Stable isotopes and Digital Elevation Models to study nutrient inputs in high-Arctic lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calizza, Edoardo; Rossi, David; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Careddu, Giulio; Rossi, Loreto

    2016-04-01

    Ice cover, run-off from the watershed, aquatic and terrestrial primary productivity, guano deposition from birds are key factors controlling nutrient and organic matter inputs in high-Arctic lakes. All these factors are expected to be significantly affected by climate change. Quantifying these controls is a key baseline step to understand what combination of factors subtends the biological productivity in Arctic lakes and will drive their ecological response to environmental change. Basing on Digital Elevation Models, drainage maps, and C and N elemental content and stable isotope analysis in sediments, aquatic vegetation and a dominant macroinvertebrate species (Lepidurus arcticus Pallas 1973) belonging to Tvillingvatnet, Storvatnet and Kolhamna, three lakes located in North Spitsbergen (Svalbard), we propose an integrated approach for the analysis of (i) nutrient and organic matter inputs in lakes; (ii) the role of catchment hydro-geomorphology in determining inter-lake differences in the isotopic composition of sediments; (iii) effects of diverse nutrient inputs on the isotopic niche of Lepidurus arcticus. Given its high run-off and large catchment, organic deposits in Tvillingvatnet where dominated by terrestrial inputs, whereas inputs were mainly of aquatic origin in Storvatnet, a lowland lake with low potential run-off. In Kolhamna, organic deposits seem to be dominated by inputs from birds, which actually colonise the area. Isotopic signatures were similar between samples within each lake, representing precise tracers for studies on the effect of climate change on biogeochemical cycles in lakes. The isotopic niche of L. aricticus reflected differences in sediments between lakes, suggesting a bottom-up effect of hydro-geomorphology characterizing each lake on nutrients assimilated by this species. The presented approach proven to be an effective research pathway for the identification of factors subtending to nutrient and organic matter inputs and transfer

  17. Landsat image data quality studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schueler, C. F.; Salomonson, V. V.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary results of the Landsat-4 Image Data Quality Analysis (LIDQA) program to characterize the data obtained using the Thematic Mapper (TM) instrument on board the Landsat-4 and Landsat-5 satellites are reported. TM design specifications were compared to the obtained data with respect to four criteria, including spatial resolution; geometric fidelity; information content; and image relativity to Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data. The overall performance of the TM was rated excellent despite minor instabilities and radiometric anomalies in the data. Spatial performance of the TM exceeded design specifications in terms of both image sharpness and geometric accuracy, and the image utility of the TM data was at least twice as high as MSS data. The separability of alfalfa and sugar beet fields in a TM image is demonstrated.

  18. Landsat image data quality studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schueler, C. F.; Salomonson, V. V.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary results of the Landsat-4 Image Data Quality Analysis (LIDQA) program to characterize the data obtained using the Thematic Mapper (TM) instrument on board the Landsat-4 and Landsat-5 satellites are reported. TM design specifications were compared to the obtained data with respect to four criteria, including spatial resolution; geometric fidelity; information content; and image relativity to Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data. The overall performance of the TM was rated excellent despite minor instabilities and radiometric anomalies in the data. Spatial performance of the TM exceeded design specifications in terms of both image sharpness and geometric accuracy, and the image utility of the TM data was at least twice as high as MSS data. The separability of alfalfa and sugar beet fields in a TM image is demonstrated.

  19. A preliminary study of iron isotope fractionation in marine invertebrates (chitons, Mollusca) in near-shore environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanuel, S.; Schuessler, J. A.; Vinther, J.; Matthews, A.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2014-10-01

    Chitons (Mollusca) are marine invertebrates that produce radulae (teeth or rasping tongues) containing high concentrations of biomineralized magnetite and other iron-bearing minerals. As Fe isotope signatures are influenced by redox processes and biological fractionation, Fe isotopes in chiton radulae might be expected to provide an effective tracer of ambient oceanic conditions and biogeochemical cycling. Here, in a pilot study to measure Fe isotopes in marine invertebrates, we examine Fe isotopes in modern marine chiton radulae collected from different locations in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans to assess the range of isotopic values, and to test whether or not the isotopic signatures reflect seawater values. Values of δ56Fe (relative to IRMM-014) in chiton teeth range from -1.90 to 0.00 ‰ (±0.05‰ (2σ) uncertainty in δ56Fe), probably reflecting a combination of geographical control and biological fractionation processes. Comparison with published local surface seawater Fe isotope data shows a consistent negative offset of chiton teeth Fe isotope compositions relative to seawater. Strikingly, two different species from the same locality in the North Pacific (Puget Sound, Washington, USA) have distinct isotopic signatures. Tonicella lineata, which feeds on red algae in the sublittoral zone, has a mean δ56Fe of -0.65 ± 0.26‰ (2σ, 3 specimens), while Mopalia muscosa, which feeds on both green and red algae in the eulittoral zone, shows lighter isotopic values with a mean δ56Fe of -1.47 ± 0.98‰ (2σ, 5 specimens). Three possible pathways are proposed to account for the different isotopic signatures: (i) physiologically controlled processes within the chitons that lead to species-dependent fractionation; (ii) diet-controlled variability due to different Fe isotope fractionation in the red and green algal food sources; and (iii) environmentally controlled fractionation that causes variation in the isotopic signatures of bioavailable Fe in the different

  20. Controlling for anthropogenically induced atmospheric variation in stable carbon isotope studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, E.S.; Sweitzer, R.A.; Diefenbach, D.R.; Ben-David, M.

    2005-01-01

    Increased use of stable isotope analysis to examine food-web dynamics, migration, transfer of nutrients, and behavior will likely result in expansion of stable isotope studies investigating human-induced global changes. Recent elevation of atmospheric CO2 concentration, related primarily to fossil fuel combustion, has reduced atmospheric CO2 ??13C (13C/12C), and this change in isotopic baseline has, in turn, reduced plant and animal tissue ??13C of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Such depletion in CO2 ??13C and its effects on tissue ??13C may introduce bias into ??13C investigations, and if this variation is not controlled, may confound interpretation of results obtained from tissue samples collected over a temporal span. To control for this source of variation, we used a high-precision record of atmospheric CO2 ??13C from ice cores and direct atmospheric measurements to model modern change in CO2 ??13C. From this model, we estimated a correction factor that controls for atmospheric change; this correction reduces bias associated with changes in atmospheric isotopic baseline and facilitates comparison of tissue ??13C collected over multiple years. To exemplify the importance of accounting for atmospheric CO2 ??13C depletion, we applied the correction to a dataset of collagen ??13C obtained from mountain lion (Puma concolor) bone samples collected in California between 1893 and 1995. Before correction, in three of four ecoregions collagen ??13C decreased significantly concurrent with depletion of atmospheric CO2 ??13C (n ??? 32, P ??? 0.01). Application of the correction to collagen ??13C data removed trends from regions demonstrating significant declines, and measurement error associated with the correction did not add substantial variation to adjusted estimates. Controlling for long-term atmospheric variation and correcting tissue samples for changes in isotopic baseline facilitate analysis of samples that span a large temporal range. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  1. Holocene paleotemperature signals based on polar firn water isotope diffusion studies from two Greenland ice cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, Vasileios; Terkelsen Holme, Christian; Møllesøe Vinther, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Polar ice cores provide a wealth of paleoclimatic information that is characterised by high temporal resolution and continuity, with water isotopic ratios of polar precipitation (δ18O, δD) being one of the most prominent proxies for past temperatures. In particular, ice cores from Greenland, record the series of abrupt stadial - interstadial transitions during the last Glacial, pinpointing in time, abrupt temperature transitions adjoined by similar accumulation trends. While the signal to noise ratio of the isotopic signal clearly allows the observation of sizable climate changes during the Glacial, the situation differs considerably when one looks into the Holocene. With the exception of the 8.2ky event, the signal to noise ratio of δ18O over the Holocene is extremely low, suggesting negligible temperature changes during this period. This is contrary to signals obtained by other proxies from marine and terrestrial records from high latitudes. In this study we bypass the discussion that deals with the various processes that can negatively affect paleotemperature reconstructions based on the δ18O proxy from ice cores. Based on two ultra-high resolution and high precision isotopic records covering the last 20,000 years from the NorthGRIP and NEEM ice cores we make use of the available spectral information to infer polar firn paleotemperatures using a coupled densification - firn water isotope diffusion model. The processes involved in the densification of firn and the diffusion of water isotopes that takes place after deposition and until the pore close-off are temperature-dependent and do not present the limitations of the normal δ18O thermometer. We show here how this approach reveals significant temperature changes over the Holocene. We compare the signals of the two records and pay particular attention to the indications of a mid-Holocene climatic shift towards colder temperatures that is apparent in both temperature reconstructions.

  2. Controlling for anthropogenically induced atmospheric variation in stable carbon isotope studies.

    PubMed

    Long, Eric S; Sweitzer, Richard A; Diefenbach, Duane R; Ben-David, Merav

    2005-11-01

    Increased use of stable isotope analysis to examine food-web dynamics, migration, transfer of nutrients, and behavior will likely result in expansion of stable isotope studies investigating human-induced global changes. Recent elevation of atmospheric CO2 concentration, related primarily to fossil fuel combustion, has reduced atmospheric CO2 delta13C (13C/12C), and this change in isotopic baseline has, in turn, reduced plant and animal tissue delta13C of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Such depletion in CO2 delta13C and its effects on tissue delta13C may introduce bias into delta13C investigations, and if this variation is not controlled, may confound interpretation of results obtained from tissue samples collected over a temporal span. To control for this source of variation, we used a high-precision record of atmospheric CO2 delta13C from ice cores and direct atmospheric measurements to model modern change in CO2 delta13C. From this model, we estimated a correction factor that controls for atmospheric change; this correction reduces bias associated with changes in atmospheric isotopic baseline and facilitates comparison of tissue delta13C collected over multiple years. To exemplify the importance of accounting for atmospheric CO2 delta13C depletion, we applied the correction to a dataset of collagen delta13C obtained from mountain lion (Puma concolor) bone samples collected in California between 1893 and 1995. Before correction, in three of four ecoregions collagen delta13C decreased significantly concurrent with depletion of atmospheric CO2 delta13C (n > or = 32, P < or = 0.01). Application of the correction to collagen delta13C data removed trends from regions demonstrating significant declines, and measurement error associated with the correction did not add substantial variation to adjusted estimates. Controlling for long-term atmospheric variation and correcting tissue samples for changes in isotopic baseline facilitate analysis of samples that span a

  3. An integrated biomarker, isotopic and palaeoenvironmental study through the Late Permian event at Lusitaniadalen, Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabbefeld, Birgit; Grice, Kliti; Twitchett, Richard J.; Summons, Roger E.; Hays, Lindsay; Böttcher, Michael E.; Asif, Muhammad

    2010-03-01

    The largest extinction of the Phanerozoic occurred near the Permian/Triassic (P/Tr) boundary some 252 Ma ago. Several scenarios and drivers have been proposed for this event. Here we report for the first time an integrated study comprising sedimentological data, biomarker distributions/abundances and selected stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes along with bulk isotopes (δ 34S pyrite, δ 13C carb, δ 13C org) for a Late Permian section from Lusitaniadalen, Spitsbergen, Norway. Sedimentological and geochemical data support a marine transgression and collapse of the marine ecosystem in the Late Permian. Strong evidence for waxing and waning of photic zone euxinia throughout the Late Permian is provided by Chlorobiaceae-derived biomarkers (including δ 13C data) and δ 34S pyrite, implying multiple phases of H 2S outgassing and potentially several pulses of extinction. A rapid decrease in abundance of various land-plant biomarkers prior to the marine collapse event indicates a dramatic decline of land-plants during the Late Permian and/or increasing distance from palaeoshoreline as a consequence of sea level rise. Changes in δD of selected biomarkers also suggest a change in source of organic matter (OM) or sea level rise. We also found biomarker and isotopic evidence for a phytoplanktonic bloom triggered by eutrophication as a consequence of the marine collapse. Compound specific isotope analyses (CSIA) of algal and land-plant-derived biomarkers, as well as δ 13C of carbonate and bulk OM provide strong evidence for synchronous changes in δ 13C of marine and atmospheric CO 2, attributed to a 13C-depleted source. The source could be associated with isotopically depleted methane released from the melting of gas clathrates and/or from respired OM, due to collapse of the marine ecosystem.

  4. Theoretical study of band structure of odd-mass 115,117I isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhanvir; Kumar, Amit; Sharma, Chetan; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun

    2016-05-01

    By using the microscopic approach of Projected Shell Model (PSM), negative-parity band structures of odd mass neutron-rich 115,117I nuclei have been studied with the deformed single-particle states generated by the standard Nilsson potential. For these isotopes, the band structures have been analyzed in terms of quasi-particles configurations. The phenomenon of back bending in moment of inertia is also studied in the present work.

  5. 35Cl NQR study of geometric isotope effect in hydrogen bonded chlorooctanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanowska-Fraçzek, M.

    1994-05-01

    35Cl NQR spectroscopy was applied to study the geometric isotope effect in a wide range of 2 : 1 salts of chloroacetic, trichloroacetic and difluorochloroacetic acids. The NQR results were correlated with IR spectroscopic studies, which provided information on the potential shape for proton motion. The NQR results were discussed on the basis of a variational correlated ground state wave function theory of a single hydrogen bond.

  6. Theoretical study of band structure of odd-mass {sup 115,117}I isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dhanvir Kumar, Amit Sharma, Chetan; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun

    2016-05-06

    By using the microscopic approach of Projected Shell Model (PSM), negative-parity band structures of odd mass neutron-rich {sup 115,117}I nuclei have been studied with the deformed single-particle states generated by the standard Nilsson potential. For these isotopes, the band structures have been analyzed in terms of quasi-particles configurations. The phenomenon of back bending in moment of inertia is also studied in the present work.

  7. X-Ray Imaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, Susan K.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The space environment in which the Space Station Freedom and other space platforms will orbit is truly a hostile environment. For example, the currently estimated integral fluence for electrons above 1 Mev at 2000 nautical miles is above 2 x 1O(exp 10) electrons/sq cm/day and the proton integral fluence is above 1 x 10(exp 9) protons/sq cm/day. At the 200 - 400 nautical miles, which is more representative of the altitude which will provide the environment for the Space Station, each of these fluences will be proportionally less; however, the data indicates that the radiation environment will obviously have an effect on structural materials exposed to the environment for long durations. The effects of this combined environment is the issue which needs to be understood for the long term exposure of structures in space. At the same time, there will be substantial potential for collisions between the space platforms and space debris. The current NASA catalogue contains over 4500 objects floating in space which are not considered payloads. This debris can have significant effects on collision with orbiting spacecraft. In order to better understand the effect of these hostile phenomena on spacecraft, several types of studies are being performed to simulate at some level the effect of the environment. In particular the study of debris clouds produced by hypervelocity impact on the various surfaces anticipated on the Space Station is very important at this point in time. The need to assess the threat of such debris clouds on space structures is an on-going activity. The Space Debris Impact facility in Building 4612 provides a test facility to monitor the types of damage produced with hypervelocity impact. These facilities are used to simulate space environmental effects from energetic particles. Flash radiography or x-ray imaging has traditionally provided such information and as such has been an important tool for recording damage in situ with the event. The proper

  8. Image Attributes: A Study of Scientific Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunskill, Jeff; Jorgensen, Corinne

    2002-01-01

    Discusses advancements in imaging technology and increased user access to digital images, as well as efforts to develop adequate indexing and retrieval methods for image databases. Describes preliminary results of a study of undergraduates that explored the attributes naive subjects use to describe scientific diagrams. (Author/LRW)

  9. Image Attributes: A Study of Scientific Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunskill, Jeff; Jorgensen, Corinne

    2002-01-01

    Discusses advancements in imaging technology and increased user access to digital images, as well as efforts to develop adequate indexing and retrieval methods for image databases. Describes preliminary results of a study of undergraduates that explored the attributes naive subjects use to describe scientific diagrams. (Author/LRW)

  10. Variation in nitrate isotopic signatures in sewage for source apportionment with urbanization: a case study in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xian, Chaofan; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Li, Yanmin; Xiao, Yang; Ren, Yufen

    2016-11-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) pollution is a severe problem in urban aquatic systems especially within megacity undergoing rapid urbanization, and mostly, sewage is supposed as the prevailing NO3(-) source. A dual isotope approach (δ (15)N-NO3(-) and δ (18)O-NO3(-)) was applied to explore the variation in NO3(-) isotopic signatures in sewage processed by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Beijing from 2014 to 2015. We found that the raw and treated sewage owned the different NO3(-) isotopic signatures, including δ (15)N from 1.1 to 24.7 ‰ and δ (18)O from 1.6 to 22.8 ‰ in raw sewage, as well as δ (15)N from 6.1 to 22.8 ‰ and δ (18)O from 1.6 to 13.2 ‰ in treated effluents. The WWTP processing would result in the enrichment of NO3(-) isotopic compositions in discharged effluents with NO3(-) concentrations increasing. Besides, advanced sewage treatment technology with more pollutant N reduction may raise the heavier NO3(-) isotopic compositions further. The NO3(-) isotope value ranges of urban sewage and manure should be separated, and the seasonal and tighter NO3(-) isotope value ranges are supposed to improve the accuracy of source apportionment. The NO3(-) isotope value ranges conducted in this study might provide useful information for tracing NO3(-) sources towards the implementation of efficient water pollution control in Beijing.

  11. Importance of the Lu-Hf isotopic system in studies of planetary chronology and chemical evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patchett, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The 176Lu-176Hf isotope method and its applications in earth sciences are discussed. Greater fractionation of Lu/Hf than Sm/Nd in planetary magmatic processes makes 176Hf 177Hf a powerful geochemical tracer. In general, proportional variations of 176Hf 177Hf exceed those of 143Nd l44Nd by factors of 1.5-3 in terrestrial and lunar materials. Lu-Hf studies therefore have a major contribution to make in understanding of terrestrial and other planetary evolution through time, and this is the principal importance of Lu-Hf. New data on basalts from oceanic islands show unequivocally that whereas considerable divergences occur in 176Hf 177Hf- 87Sr 86Sr and 143Nd l44Nd- 87Sr 86Sr diagrams, 176Hf 177Hf and 143Nd 144Nd display a single, linear isotopic variation in the suboceanic mantle. These discordant 87Sr 86Sr relationships may allow, with the acquisition of further Hf-Nd-Sr isotopic data, a distinction between processes such as mantle metasomatism, influence of seawater-altered material in the magma source, or recycling of sediments into the mantle. In order to evaluate the Hf-Nd isotopic correlation in terms of mantle fractionation history, there is a need for measurements of Hf distribution coefficients between silicate minerals and liquids, and specifically for a knowledge of Hf behavior in relation to rareearth elements. For studying ancient terrestrial Hf isotopic variations, the best quality Hf isotope data are obtained from granitoid rocks or zircons. New data show that very U-Pb discordant zircons may have upwardly-biased 176Hf 177Hf, but that at least concordant to slightly discordant zircons appear to be reliable carriers of initial 176Hf 177Hf. Until the controls on addition of radiogenic Hf to zircon are understood, combined zircon-whole rock studies are recommended. Lu-Hf has been demonstrated as a viable tool for dating of ancient terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples, but because it offers little advantage over existing methods, is unlikely to find

  12. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity

  13. Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry of Seabird Guano Fertilization: Results from Growth Chamber Studies with Maize (Zea Mays)

    PubMed Central

    Szpak, Paul; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Millaire, Jean-François; White, Christine D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stable isotope analysis is being utilized with increasing regularity to examine a wide range of issues (diet, habitat use, migration) in ecology, geology, archaeology, and related disciplines. A crucial component to these studies is a thorough understanding of the range and causes of baseline isotopic variation, which is relatively poorly understood for nitrogen (δ15N). Animal excrement is known to impact plant δ15N values, but the effects of seabird guano have not been systematically studied from an agricultural or horticultural standpoint. Methodology/Principal Findings This paper presents isotopic (δ13C and δ15N) and vital data for maize (Zea mays) fertilized with Peruvian seabird guano under controlled conditions. The level of 15N enrichment in fertilized plants is very large, with δ15N values ranging between 25.5 and 44.7‰ depending on the tissue and amount of fertilizer applied; comparatively, control plant δ15N values ranged between −0.3 and 5.7‰. Intraplant and temporal variability in δ15N values were large, particularly for the guano-fertilized plants, which can be attributed to changes in the availability of guano-derived N over time, and the reliance of stored vs. absorbed N. Plant δ13C values were not significantly impacted by guano fertilization. High concentrations of seabird guano inhibited maize germination and maize growth. Moreover, high levels of seabird guano greatly impacted the N metabolism of the plants, resulting in significantly higher tissue N content, particularly in the stalk. Conclusions/Significance The results presented in this study demonstrate the very large impact of seabird guano on maize δ15N values. The use of seabird guano as a fertilizer can thus be traced using stable isotope analysis in food chemistry applications (certification of organic inputs). Furthermore, the fertilization of maize with seabird guano creates an isotopic signature very similar to a high-trophic level marine resource, which must

  14. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Phase II studies of the R4D Program on stream and watershed ecology reflect the accomplishments and accumulation of baseline information obtained during the past studies. Although our rough estimates indicate that nitrogen inputs to the watershed ba lance losses, the carbon fluxes suggest that they are not in equilibrium and that there is a net loss of carbon from the tundra ecosystem through respiration and transport out of the watershed via the stream system. Radiocarbon profiles of soil sections coupled with mass transport calculations revealed that peat accumulation has essentially ceased in the R4D watershed and appears to be in ablative loss. Thus the carbon flux measurements provide validation tests for the PLANTGRO and GAS-HYDRO models of the PHASE II studies. These findings are also important in the context of global CO[sub 2] increases from positive feedback mechanisms in peatlands associated with climatic warming in the subarctic regions.

  15. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-12-31

    The Phase II studies of the R4D Program on stream and watershed ecology reflect the accomplishments and accumulation of baseline information obtained during the past studies. Although our rough estimates indicate that nitrogen inputs to the watershed ba lance losses, the carbon fluxes suggest that they are not in equilibrium and that there is a net loss of carbon from the tundra ecosystem through respiration and transport out of the watershed via the stream system. Radiocarbon profiles of soil sections coupled with mass transport calculations revealed that peat accumulation has essentially ceased in the R4D watershed and appears to be in ablative loss. Thus the carbon flux measurements provide validation tests for the PLANTGRO and GAS-HYDRO models of the PHASE II studies. These findings are also important in the context of global CO{sub 2} increases from positive feedback mechanisms in peatlands associated with climatic warming in the subarctic regions.

  16. Systematic study of heavy cluster emission from 210-226Ra isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Sahadevan, Sabina; Priyanka, B.; Unnikrishnan, M. S.

    2012-05-01

    The half lives for various clusters lying in the cold reaction valleys of 210-226Ra isotopes are computed using our Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). The computed half lives of 4He and 14C clusters from 210-226Ra isotopes are in good agreement with experimental data. Half lives are also computed using the universal formula for cluster decay (UNIV) of Poenaru et al., and are found to be in agreement with CPPM values. Our study reveals the role of doubly magic 208Pb daughter in cluster decay process. Geiger-Nuttall plots for all clusters up to 62Fe are studied and are found to be linear with different slopes and intercepts. 12,14C emission from 220Ra; 14C emission from 222,224Ra; 14C and 20O emission from 226Ra are found to be most favourable for measurement and this observation will serve as a guide to the future experiments.

  17. Sr isotopic characteristics in two small watersheds draining typical silicate and carbonate rocks: implication for the studies on seawater Sr isotopic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. H.; Zheng, H. B.; Yang, J. D.

    2013-06-01

    We systematically investigated Sr isotopic characteristics of small silicate watershed - the tributary Xishui River of the Yangtze River, and small carbonate watershed - the tributary Guijiang River of the Pearl River. The results show that the Xishui River has relatively high Sr concentrations (0.468-1.70 μmol L-1 in summer and 1.30-3.17 μmol L-1 in winter, respectively) and low 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.708686-0.709148 in summer and 0.708515-0.709305 in winter), which is similar to the characteristics of carbonate weathering. The Guijiang River has low Sr concentrations (0.124-1.098 μmol L-1) and high 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.710558-0.724605), being characterized by silicate weathering. In the Xishui River catchment, chemical weathering rates in summer are far higher than those in winter, indicating significant influence of climate regime. However, slight differences of 87Sr/86Sr ratios between summer and winter show that influence of climate on Sr isotope is uncertainty owing to very similar Sr isotope values in silicate and carbonate bedrocks. As 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Xishui River are lower than those in seawater, they will decrease 87Sr/86Sr ratio of seawater after transported into oceans. Previous studies also showed that some basaltic watersheds with extremely high chemical weathering rates reduced the seawater Sr isotope ratios. In other words, river catchments with high silicate weathering rates do not certainly transport highly radiogenic Sr into oceans. Therefore, it may be questionable that using the variations of seawater 87Sr/86Sr ratio to indicate the continental silicate weathering intensity. In the Guijiang River catchment, 87Sr/86Sr ratios of carbonate rocks and other sources (rainwater, domestic and industrial waste water, and agricultural fertilizer) are lower than 0.71. In comparison, some non-carbonate components, such as, sand rocks, mud rocks, shales, have relatively high Sr isotopic compositions. Moreover, granites accounted for only 5% of the

  18. A carbon and nitrogen isotope study of carbonaceous vein material in ureilite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Arden, J. W.; Franchi, I. A.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The ureilite meteorite group is known to be rich in carbon in the form of graphite/diamond veins that are associated with planetary type noble gases. This paper reports preliminary data from a systematic study of the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of this carbonaceous vein material. A previous study focused on the whole rock signatures and reported that the carbon inventory appeared to be dominated by the graphitic/diamond intergrowths, whereas the nitrogen was clearly composed of several distinct components including one that was isotopically light, possibly associated with the carbonaceous material. Recent studies have demonstrated that diamonds in the solar system formed in many different environments. C and N measurements from ureilitic diamond made in a similar way would be a useful addition to this overall study. The methods used for isolating diamonds of possible presolar origin from primitive meteorites are equally applicable to the processing of carbon bearing components in the ureilite group so that their stable isotopic composition can be determined. Herein we discuss conjoint C and N stepped combustion measurements made on crushed whole rock ureilite samples that have been treated with 1M HCl/9M HF to dissolve silicate and free metal. In addition, two samples have been further treated with oxidizing acids to leave a diamond rich residue.

  19. The MOON-1 detector construction and the study of backgrounds from radioactive isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogama, T.; Nakamura, H.; Ejiri, H.; Fushimi, K.; Ichihara, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Hazama, R.; Umehara, S.; Yoshida, S.; Sakiuchi, T.; Hai, V. H.; Sugaya, Y.; Moon Collaboration

    2006-05-01

    MOON is a multilayer system of plastic scintillators and 100Mo films for 100Mo 0νββ decays. A prototype detector MOON-1 was built with 6 layers of plastic scintillators and 142g of 100Mo films for background (BG), energy and position resolution studies of the MOON detector. No serious BG from natural radioactive isotopes (RI) for 0νββ detection was found.

  20. The nitrogen isotopic composition in soils and plants: Its use in environmental studies (A Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, M. I.

    2009-12-01

    The results of studying the isotopic composition of the nitrogen in soils and plants and its use for characterizing the nitrogen cycle in ecosystems, the transformation of nitrogen compounds in soils, the sources of nitrogen nutrition for plants, and the assessment of the symbiotic nitrogen fixation’s contribution to the nitrogen budget of ecosystems were considered for a wide variety of natural and agricultural ecosystems.

  1. The use of stable isotopes in the study of human pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Charidemou, Evelina; Ashmore, Tom; Griffin, Julian L

    2017-07-20

    The growing prevalence of metabolic diseases including fatty liver disease and Type 2 diabetes has increased the emphasis on understanding metabolism at the mechanistic level and how it is perturbed in disease. Metabolomics is a continually expanding field that seeks to measure metabolites in biological systems during a physiological stimulus or a genetic alteration. Typically, metabolomics studies provide total pool sizes of metabolites rather than dynamic flux measurements. More recently there has been a resurgence in approaches that use stable isotopes (e.g. (2)H and (13)C) for the unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalised metabolic networks in humans to determine underlying mechanisms. This is known as metabolic flux analysis and enables the capture of a dynamic picture of the metabolome and its interactions with the genome and proteome. In this review, we describe current approaches using stable isotope labelling in the field of metabolomics and provide examples of studies that led to an improved understanding of glucose, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism in humans, particularly in relation to metabolic disease. Examples include the use of stable isotopes of glucose to study tumour bioenergetics as well as brain metabolism during traumatic brain injury. Lipid tracers have also been used to measure non-esterified fatty acid production whilst amino acid tracers have been used to study the rate of protein digestion on whole body postprandial protein metabolism. In addition, we illustrate the use of stable isotopes for measuring flux in human physiology by providing examples of breath tests to measure insulin resistance and gastric emptying rates. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Geochemical and isotopic study of the aquifers of the littoral plain of Benin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odeloui, Diane; Celle-Jeanton, Hélène; Huneau, Frédéric; Alasanne, Abdoukarim; Boukari, Moussa; Mama, Daouda; Lavastre, Véronique

    2013-04-01

    The study area is located in the Southern part of the coastal sedimentary basin of Benin. This basin contains four aquifers among which the aquifers of the Quaternary and of the Continental Terminal which are concerned by the present study. These aquifers are intensely used for the drinking water supply of about two million inhabitants in the cities of Cotonou, Porto Novo, Ouidah and their surroundings. At present, a degradation of the quality of groundwaters coming from the aquifers of the Quaternary and of Continental Terminal is observed that is connected to ground occupation and to the intensive pumping, having for consequence the progression of the marine intrusion in these aquifers. The present work aims at studying the hydrogeochemical and isotopic behaviour of these two aquifers. The methodological approach consists in the measurements of the physico-chemical parameters, as well as the stable isotope signature of the groundwater in order to appreciate groundwater quality and origin. Results show that groundwaters of the aquifers of the Quaternary and of the Continental Terminal are highly mineralized and show Na-Cl or Ca-HCO3 water types. The main processes affecting the mineralization of waters are, among others, the mixture with salty and brackish waters from the Atlantic Ocean or from the littoral lagoons, dissolution of carbonate minerals and cationic exchanges. The isotopic study indicates that groundwater is recharged by local rainfalls; some samples of the Quaternary aquifer show a mixture with the sea water, which is in good agreement with the geochemical results. Both aquifers tend to show the same isotopic signature suggesting a relatively good hydraulic continuity within the reservoir and confirming geological investigations made through drillings.

  3. Feasibility study on the medical isotopes production with solution target using OSTR: (99)Mo and related isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Seung-Hyuk

    1999-11-01

    Molybdenum-99 (99Mo) is the parent nuclide of Technetium-99m (99mTc), a radioisotope which is widely used in nuclear medicine. 99Mo is produced from the fission of 235U or the irradiation of 98Mo. This study shows the feasibility of the using an 'aqueous homogeneous uranium solution target' for the production of a medical isotope, 99Mo. Some of the advantages that the solution target has over a solid target include the inherent reactor safety features offered by large negative temperature and power reactivity coefficients, the fabrication convenience, the straightforward extraction process, and a low volume of waste generated. To evaluate the core configuration and the production rate of 99Mo, a three-dimensional model of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) core was developed for use with the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) and then verified by comparing with the measured values. Two values are in good agreement within one percent in the keffective values calculated. Two types of solution targets are analyzed for the OSTR. The first one has the same outer-dimensions as an OSTR fuel element but is filled with a uranium solution. The other is the continuous flow target system (CFTS) like solution fuel reactors. Uranyl nitrate and uranyl sulfate solutions enriched to 20% or 93% are investigated as a target material without raising any safety concern to the OSTR operation. A seven-day irradiation of ten tube-type-93% enriched uranyl nitrate solution targets would produce 43% of the 99Mo required in the US for one week. The CFTS would generate 31% of the required 99Mo in a 7-day cycle. The conceptual chemical extraction processes for irradiated solution targets are developed. This work also includes an analysis of nuclear safety issues such as the radiolytic gas, thermal hydraulics, the waste, and the radiological impacts of an accident. The production of 99Mo in the OSTR with the uranium solution is technically feasible as demonstrated in this

  4. Cosmic ray isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    The isotopic composition of cosmic rays is studied in order to develop the relationship between cosmic rays and stellar processes. Cross section and model calculations are reported on isotopes of H, He, Be, Al and Fe. Satellite instrument measuring techniques separate only the isotopes of the lighter elements.

  5. Insights into iron sources and pathways in the Amazon River provided by isotopic and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, Daniel Santos; Poitrasson, Franck; Boaventura, Geraldo Resende; Allard, Thierry; Vieira, Lucieth Cruz; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Mancini, Luiz; Seyler, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the weathering and transport mechanisms of Fe in the Amazon River. A particular emphasis was placed on Fe partitioning, speciation, and isotopic fractionation in the contrasting waters of the Solimões and Negro rivers and their mixing zone at the beginning of the Amazon River. Samples collected in the end-member rivers and thirteen sites distributed throughout the mixing zone were processed through frontal vacuum filtration and tangential-flow ultrafiltration to separate the different suspended solid fractions, i.e., particulate (P > 0.45 μm and P > 0.22 μm), colloidal (0.22 μm > C > 5 kDa) and truly dissolved elements (TD < 5 kDa). The Fe isotopic composition and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) species were measured on these different pore-sized fractions. The acidic and organo-Fe-rich waters of the Negro River displayed dissolved and colloidal fractions enriched in heavy isotopes (∼1.2‰, in δ57Fe values relative to IRMM-14), while the particulate fractions yielded light isotopic compositions of -0.344‰ for P > 0.22 μm and -0.104‰ for P > 0.45 μm fractions). The mineral particulate-rich waters of the Solimões River had dissolved and colloidal fractions with light isotopic composition (-0.532‰ and -0.176‰, respectively), whereas the particulate fractions yielded δ57Fe values close to those of the continental crust (i.e., -0.029‰ for P > 0.22 μm and 0.028‰ for P > 0.45 μm). Ten kilometers downstream from the Negro and Solimões junction, the concentrations of colloidal and dissolved Fe species deviate markedly from conservative mixing. A maximum Fe loss of 43 μg/L (i.e., 50% of the dissolved and colloidal Fe) is observed 110 km downstream from the rivers junction. The contrasting Negro and Solimões Rivers isotopic compositions along the pore-sized water fractions is attributable to the biogeochemical processes involving different types of upland soils and parental materials. For instance, the isotopic

  6. Silicon isotope fractionation in rice and cucumber plants over a life cycle: Laboratory studies at different external silicon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Wu, Lianghuan; Li, Xiaoyan; Sun, Li; Gao, Jianfei; Ding, Tiping

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the variations of silicon isotopes in terrestrial higher plants can be helpful toward elucidating the global biogeochemical silicon cycle. We studied silicon isotope fractionation in rice and cucumber plants over their entire life cycles. These two different silicon-absorbing plants were grown hydroponically at different external silicon concentrations. The ranges of δ30Si values in rice were -1.89‰ to 1.69‰, -1.81‰ to 1.96‰, and -2.08‰ to 2.02‰ at 0.17 mM, 1.70 mM, and 8.50 mM silicon concentrations, respectively. The ranges of δ30Si values in cucumber were -1.38‰ to 1.21‰, -1.33‰ to 1.26‰, and -1.62‰ to 1.40‰ at 0.085 mM, 0.17 mM, and 1.70 mM external silicon concentrations, respectively. A general increasing trend in δ30Si values from lower to upper plant parts reflected the preferential incorporation of lighter silicon isotopes from transpired water to biogenic opal. Furthermore, the active uptake mechanism regulated by several transporters might have also played an important role in the preferential transport of heavy silicon isotopes into aboveground plant parts. This suggested that silicon isotope fractionation in both rice and cucumber was a Rayleigh-like process. The data on δ30Si values for the whole plants and nutrient solutions indicated that biologically mediated silicon isotope fractionation occurred during silicon uptake by roots. At lower external silicon concentrations, heavy silicon isotopes entered plants more readily than light silicon isotopes. Conversely, at higher external silicon concentrations, light silicon isotopes entered plants more readily than heavy silicon isotopes.

  7. An isotopic biogeochemical study of Neoproterozoic and Early Cambrian sediments from the Centralian Superbasin, Australia.

    PubMed

    Logan, G A; Summons, R E; Hayes, J M

    1997-01-01

    Organic matter from Neoproterozoic and Early Cambrian sediments of the Amadeus and Officer basins of the Centralian Superbasin, Australia, has been studied for biomarker distributions and the carbon isotopic compositions of kerogen and individual hydrocarbons. These sediments represent both shallow and deep water marine facies in the older sections and marine and saline lacustrine carbonate deposits in the Cambrian. Hydrocarbon biomarker patterns were found to be quite consistent with the known sedimentary environments and provide valuable insights into the biogeochemical changes which accompanied the transition from a microbially-dominated ocean to the early stages of metazoan radiation. In particular, carbon isotopic data for n-alkyl and isoprenoid lipids presented here, and in earlier studies, showed a reversal in carbon isotopic ordering between the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. By comparison with the delta 13C of kerogen, n-alkyl lipids from deep-water Proterozoic sediments were enriched in 13C and appear to be derived mainly from heterotrophs whilst open marine Phanerozoic counterparts are 13C depleted and evidently derived mainly from autotrophs. Data from the samples studied here are consistent with a model invoking a change in the redox structure of the ocean, possibly aided by the innovation of faecal pellets.

  8. Photon strength functions in Gd isotopes studied from radiative capture of resonance neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chyzh, A.; Couture, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; Krtička, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Vieira, D. J.; Walker, C.; Wu, C. Y.

    2014-04-01

    The experimental spectra of γ rays following radiative neutron capture on isolated resonances of stable 152,154-158Gd targets were measured by the DANCE calorimeter installed at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center in New Mexico, USA. These spectra were analyzed within the extreme statistical model to get new information on the photon strength functions. Special emphasis was put on study of the scissors vibrational mode present in these isotopes. Our data show that the scissors-mode resonances are built not only on the ground states but also on the excited levels of all studied Gd isotopes. The scissors mode strength observed in 157,159Gd products is significantly higher than in neighboring even-even nuclei 156,158Gd. Such a difference indicates the existence of an odd-even effect in the scissors mode strength. Moreover, there exists no universal parameter-free model of the electric dipole photon strength function describing the experimental data in all of the Gd isotopes studied. The results for the scissors mode are compared with the (γ, γ') data for the ground-state transitions and with the results from 3He-induced reactions.

  9. [Possibility of pulmonary circulation study with nongaseous radioactive isotopes].

    PubMed

    Carratu', L

    1978-12-01

    This paper deales with the applications of radionuclides to the study of human pulmonary circulation for better knowledge of some morphological and dinamic functional aspects. At this time the methods used are divided in three groups in respect to the purpose. - Methods for static investigations of pulmonary perfusion, by scintigraphy with radioalbum aggregates. - Methods for dynamic investigation, general radiocardiography and selective right radiocardiography with radioalbum macroaggregates. - Methods for morpho-functional investigation, especially Isotopoangiocardiopneumography using gamma-camera and Tc99mO4. Here are treated the fields of applications, the purpose and the limits of these methods, used in a large number of and acquired pulmonary vascular diseases.

  10. Ion beam production and study of radioactive isotopes with the laser ion source at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosseev, Valentin; Chrysalidis, Katerina; Day Goodacre, Thomas; Marsh, Bruce; Rothe, Sebastian; Seiffert, Christoph; Wendt, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    At ISOLDE the majority of radioactive ion beams are produced using the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS). This ion source is based on resonant excitation of atomic transitions by wavelength tunable laser radiation. Since its installation at the ISOLDE facility in 1994, the RILIS laser setup has been developed into a versatile remotely operated laser system comprising state-of-the-art solid state and dye lasers capable of generating multiple high quality laser beams at any wavelength in the range of 210-950 nm. A continuous programme of atomic ionization scheme development at CERN and at other laboratories has gradually increased the number of RILIS-ionized elements. At present, isotopes of 40 different elements have been selectively laser-ionized by the ISOLDE RILIS. Studies related to the optimization of the laser-atom interaction environment have yielded new laser ion source types: the laser ion source and trap and the versatile arc discharge and laser ion source. Depending on the specific experimental requirements for beam purity or versatility to switch between different ionization mechanisms, these may offer a favourable alternative to the standard hot metal cavity configuration. In addition to its main purpose of ion beam production, the RILIS is used for laser spectroscopy of radioisotopes. In an ongoing experimental campaign the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of long isotopic chains have been measured by the extremely sensitive in-source laser spectroscopy method. The studies performed in the lead region were focused on nuclear deformation and shape coexistence effects around the closed proton shell Z = 82. The paper describes the functional principles of the RILIS, the current status of the laser system and demonstrated capabilities for the production of different ion beams including the high-resolution studies of short-lived isotopes and other applications of RILIS lasers for ISOLDE experiments. This article belongs to the Focus on

  11. Isotopic study of mercury sources and transfer between a freshwater lake and adjacent forest food web.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sae Yun; Blum, Joel D; Nadelhoffer, Knute J; Timothy Dvonch, J; Tsui, Martin Tsz-Ki

    2015-11-01

    Studies of monomethylmercury (MMHg) sources and biogeochemical pathways have been extensive in aquatic ecosystems, but limited in forest ecosystems. Increasing evidence suggests that there is significant mercury (Hg) exchange between aquatic and forest ecosystems. We use Hg stable isotope ratios (δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg) to investigate the relative importance of MMHg sources and assess Hg transfer pathways between Douglas Lake and adjacent forests located at the University of Michigan Biological Station, USA. We characterize Hg isotopic compositions of basal resources and use linear regression of % MMHg versus δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg to estimate Hg isotope values for inorganic mercury (IHg) and MMHg in the aquatic and adjacent forest food webs. In the aquatic ecosystem, we found that lake sediment represents a mixture of IHg pools deposited via watershed runoff and precipitation. The δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg values estimated for IHg are consistent with other studies that measured forest floor in temperate forests. The Δ(199)Hg value estimated for MMHg in the aquatic food web indicates that MMHg is subjected to ~20% photochemical degradation prior to bioaccumulation. In the forest ecosystem, we found a significant negative relationship between total Hg and δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg of soil collected at multiple distances from the lakeshore and lake sediment. This suggests that IHg input from watershed runoff provides an important Hg transfer pathway between the forest and aquatic ecosystems. We measured Δ(199)Hg values for high trophic level insects and compared these insects at multiple distances perpendicular to the lake shoreline. The Δ(199)Hg values correspond to the % canopy cover suggesting that forest MMHg is subjected to varying extents of photochemical degradation and the extent may be controlled by sunlight. Our study demonstrates that the use of Hg isotopes adds important new insight into the relative importance of MMHg sources and complex Hg transfer

  12. Stable isotope study of fluid inclusions in fluorite from Idaho: implications for continental climates during the Eocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, R.R.; Rye, R.O.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic studies of fluid inclusions from meteoric water-dominated epithermal ore deposits offer a unique opportunity to study paleoclimates because the fluids can provide direct samples of ancient waters. Fluorite-hosted fluid inclusions from the Eocene (51-50 Ma) epithermal deposits of the Bayhorse mining district, have low salinities and low to moderate homogenization temperatures indicating meteoric origins for the fluids. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data on inclusion fluids are almost identical to those of modern meteoric waters in the area. The equivalence of the isotope composition of the Eocene inclusion fluids and modern meteoric waters indicates that the Eocene climatic conditions were similar to those today. -from Authors

  13. Precipitation stable isotope analysis for exploring temporal characteristics of tropical cyclones: A case study in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, K. P.; Klaus, J.

    2016-12-01

    Hurricanes (or typhoons) play an important role in tropical and subtropical synoptic climates. Although increasing global temperatures in the 20th and 21st centuries are proposed to be linked to changing characteristics of hurricanes, results from previous studies are contradictory and changing environmental conditions affecting hurricanes are somewhat poorly conceptualised. In this investigation, stable precipitation isotope data are used to explore how hurricane properties change with variations of monsoon and regional climate patterns (e.g. the El Niño-Southern Oscillations). As a case study, a new approach using precipitation isotopes to analyse Hong Kong tropical cyclone time series is proposed. First, the variance of precipitation stable isotopes is decomposed to understand the influence of monsoons, southern oscillations and other regional climate conditions on Hong Kong precipitation isotopic signatures. Then, using decomposed precipitation isotope results, a frequency analysis of tropical hurricanes is performed to identify climatic controls and quantify their effects. Results from this study are expected to be valuable because they will provide an example which illustrates how local isotope data can be linked to the regional climate patterns. A framework to investigate Asian tropical cyclone change using stable precipitation isotopes is also proposed.

  14. Trypsin is the Primary Mechanism by which the 18O Isotopic Label is Lost in Quantitative Proteomic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Orlando, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Labeling with 18O is currently one of the most commonly used methods for incorporating a stable isotopic label into samples for comparative proteomic studies. In this approach, isotopic labeling involves the enzymatic digestion, typically performed with trypsin, of a protein population in 18O water, which incorporates the stable isotope into the C-termini of the newly formed peptides. Although trypsin is often used to facilitate isotopic incorporation after digestion, it is typically overlooked that this same mechanism can lead to isotopic loss even under conditions such as low pH where it is assumed that trypsin is inactive. To examine the role trypsin plays in isotopic loss, several experiments were performed on the rate of de-labeling under conditions relevant to multidimensional proteomic experiments. Results from these studies demonstrate that enzyme facilitated exchange of 18O in the peptide with 16O in the aqueous solvent was the major process by which the label is removed from the peptides, even under conditions of low pH and temperature where trypsin is thought to be inactive. This study brings the rapid, tryptic facilitated exchange to the attention of laboratories using this scheme in order to prevent inaccuracies in quantitative labeling due to loss of the isotopic label. PMID:17046705

  15. Decay studies of the highly neutron-deficient indium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    An extension of the experimentally known nuclidic mass surface to nuclei far from the region of beta-stability is of fundamental interest in providing a better determination of the input parameters for the various nuclear mass formulae, allowing a more accurate prediction of the ultimate limits of nuclear stability. In addition, a study of the shape of the mass surface in the vicinity of the doubly-closed nuclide /sup 100/Sn provides initial information on the behavior of the shell closure to be expected when Z = N = 50. Experiments measuring the decay energies of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In by ..beta..-endpoint measurements are described with special attention focused on the development of a plastic scintillator ..beta..-telescope coupled to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer). An attempt to measure the ..beta..-endpoint energy of /sup 102/In is also briefly described. The experimentally determined decay energies and derived masses for /sup 103/ /sup 105/In are compared with the predictions of different mass models to identify which models are more successful in this region. Furthermore, the inclusion in these comparisons of the available data on the neutron-rich indium nuclei permits a systematic study of their ground state mass behavior as a function of the neutron number between the shell closures at N = 50 and N = 82. These analyses indicate that the binding energy of /sup 103/In is 1 MeV larger than predicted by the majority of the mass models. An examination of the Q/sub EC/ surface and the single- and two-neutron separation energies in the vicinity of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In is also performed to investigate further the deviation and other possible systematic variations in the mass surface in a model-independent way.

  16. A radiogenic isotope tracer study of transatlantic dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumar, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S.J.G.; Garrison, V.H.; Williams, E.; Andreae, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that long-range transport of African desert dusts across the Atlantic Ocean occurs, delivering key nutrients and contributing to fertilization of the Amazon rainforest. Here we utilize radiogenic isotope tracers – Sr, Nd and Pb – to derive the provenance, local or remote, and pathways of dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean. Atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter was collected in 2008 on quartz fibre filters, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean at three different locations: in Mali (12.6°N, 8.0°W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3°N, 60.5°W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7°N, 64.6°W; 27 m a.s.l.). Both the labile phase, representative of the anthropogenic signal, and the refractory detrital silicate fraction were analysed. Dust deposits and soils from around the sampling sites were measured as well to assess the potential contribution from local sources to the mineral dust collected. The contribution from anthropogenic sources of Pb was predominant in the labile, leachate phase. The overall similarity in Pb isotope signatures found in the leachates is attributed to a common African source of anthropogenic Pb, with minor inputs from other sources, such as from Central and South America. The Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in the silicate fraction were found to be systematically more radiogenic than those in the corresponding labile phases. In contrast, Nd and Sr isotopic compositions from Mali, Tobago, and the Virgin Islands are virtually identical in both leachates and residues. Comparison with existing literature data on Saharan and Sahelian sources constrains the origin of summer dust transported to the Caribbean to mainly originate from the Sahel region, with some contribution from northern Saharan sources. The source regions derived from the isotope data are consistent with 7-day back-trajectory analyses, demonstrating the usefulness of radiogenic isotopes in tracing dust provenance and

  17. A radiogenic isotope tracer study of transatlantic dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S. J. G.; Garrison, V. H.; Williams, E.; Andreae, M. O.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that long-range transport of African desert dusts across the Atlantic Ocean occurs, delivering key nutrients and contributing to fertilization of the Amazon rainforest. Here we utilize radiogenic isotope tracers - Sr, Nd and Pb - to derive the provenance, local or remote, and pathways of dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean. Atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter was collected in 2008 on quartz fibre filters, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean at three different locations: in Mali (12.6°N, 8.0°W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3°N, 60.5°W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7°N, 64.6°W; 27 m a.s.l.). Both the labile phase, representative of the anthropogenic signal, and the refractory detrital silicate fraction were analysed. Dust deposits and soils from around the sampling sites were measured as well to assess the potential contribution from local sources to the mineral dust collected. The contribution from anthropogenic sources of Pb was predominant in the labile, leachate phase. The overall similarity in Pb isotope signatures found in the leachates is attributed to a common African source of anthropogenic Pb, with minor inputs from other sources, such as from Central and South America. The Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in the silicate fraction were found to be systematically more radiogenic than those in the corresponding labile phases. In contrast, Nd and Sr isotopic compositions from Mali, Tobago, and the Virgin Islands are virtually identical in both leachates and residues. Comparison with existing literature data on Saharan and Sahelian sources constrains the origin of summer dust transported to the Caribbean to mainly originate from the Sahel region, with some contribution from northern Saharan sources. The source regions derived from the isotope data are consistent with 7-day back-trajectory analyses, demonstrating the usefulness of radiogenic isotopes in tracing dust provenance and

  18. Isotope effect studies of the chemical mechanism of pig heart NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.B.; Cleland, W.W.

    1988-04-19

    The catalytic mechanism of porcine heart NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase has been investigated by use of the variation of deuterium and /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effects with pH. The observed /sup 13/C isotope effect on VK for isocitrate increases from 1.0038 at neutral pH to a limiting value of 1.040 at low pH. The limiting /sup 13/C isotope effect with deuteriated isocitrate at low pH is 1.016. This decrease in /sup 13/(VK/sub Ic/) upon deuteriation indicates a stepwise mechanism for the oxidation and decarboxylation of isocitrate. This predicts a deuterium isotope effect on VK of 2.9, but /sup D/(VK) at low pH only increases to a maximum of 1.08. The pK seen in the /sup 13/(VK/sub Ic/) pH profile for isocitrate if 4.5. This pK is displaced 1.2 pH units from the true pK of the acidbase functionality of 5.7 seen in the pK/sub i/ profile for oxalylglycine. From this displacement, catalysis is estimated to be 16 times faster than substrate dissociation. By use of the pH-dependent partitioning ratio of the reaction intermediate oxalosuccinate between decarboxylation to 2-ketoglutarate and reduction to isocitrate, the forward commitment to catalysis for decarboxylation was determined to be 7.3 at pH 5.4 and 3.2 at pH 5.0. This gives in intrinsic /sup 13/C isotope effect for decarboxylation of 1.050. The product of oxidative decarboxylation of 3-hydroxyisocitrate by NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase is 2-hydroxy-3-ketoglutarate. This results from enzymatic protonation of the cis-enediol intermediate at C/sub 2/ rather than C/sub 3/ (as seen with isocitrate and 3-fluoroisocitrate). 2-Hydroxy-3-ketoglutarate further decarboxylates in solution to 2-hydroxy-3-ketobutyrate, which further decarboxylates to acetol. This makes 3-hydroxyisocitrate unsuitable for /sup 13/C isotope effect studies.

  19. Isotopic effects of nitrate photochemistry in snow: A field study at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, T. A.; Erbland, J.; Savarino, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is the end product of NOx (NO+NO2) oxidation in the atmosphere and one of the most abundant anions present in the Antarctic snow pack. The comprehensive isotopic composition of nitrate (δ18O, Δ17O and δ15N) obtained from deep ice-cores may provide valuable information regarding the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and could provide constraints on the global NOx budget. Nitrogen stable isotope ratios are typically thought to trace NOx sources while oxygen isotope ratios convey quantitative information regarding the oxidation pathways leading to nitrate formation. However, nitrate deposited at low accumulation sites in Polar Regions such as Dome C, Antarctica, is exposed to post depositional processes that modify its original isotopic composition. Among these processes, photolysis has been identified as the most significant mechanism leading to large nitrate mass loss and isotopic fractionation. Emission of NOx and OH from photolysis of nitrate, as well as formation of by-products such as HONO, can have a significant impact on the overlying boundary layer chemistry of polar regions. The quantitative effect of photolysis on the isotopic signature of nitrate is presently not well constrained and previous experimental and modelling studies have resulted in differing conclusions regarding the role of photolysis in the post processing of nitrate deposited to snow. In order to quantify the effect of photolysis on the isotopic composition of nitrate in snow, we have conducted a field study at Dome C, Antarctica. In this study, two snow sampling fields (1m wide, 2m long and 0.5m deep) within close proximity of each other were studied for the effect of UV light using a plexi glass filter experiment. The two fields were filled with wind blown snow at the beginning of December 2011 and then covered with plexi glass sheets. One of these sheets was equipped with a UV filter. Sampling was conducted every 10 days at a 2-5 cm depth resolution during the period

  20. Isotope-edited proton NMR study on the structure of a pepsin/inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Erickson, J.W.; Abad-Zapatero, C.

    1988-11-01

    A general approach is illustrated for providing detailed structural information on large enzyme/inhibitor complexes using NMR spectroscopy. The method involves the use of isotopically labeled ligands to simplify two-dimensional NOE spectra of large molecular complexes by isotope-editing techniques. With this approach, the backbone and side-chain conformations (at the P/sub 2/ and P/sub 3/ sites) of a tightly bound inhibitor of porcine pepsin have bene determined. In addition, structural information on the active site of pepsin has been obtained. Due to the sequence homology between porcine pepsin and human renin, this structural information may prove useful for modeling renin/inhibitor complexes with the ultimate goal of designing more effective renin inhibitors. Moreover, this general approach can be applied to study other biological systems of interest such as other enzyme/inhibitor complexes, ligands bound to soluble receptors, and enzyme/substrate interactions.

  1. Lunar Crustal History from Isotopic Studies of Lunar Anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, Laurence E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Bogard, D. D.; Yamaguchi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Anorthosites occur ubiquitously within the lunar crust at depths of approx.3-30 km in apparent confirmation of the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) hypothesis. [1]. We will present recent chronological studies of anorthosites [2] that are relevant both to the LMO hypothesis and also to the lunar cataclysm hypothesis. Old (approx.4.4 Ga) Sm-Nd ages have been determined for some Apollo 16 anorthosites, and primitive initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios have been measured for several, but well-defined Rb-Sr ages concordant with the Sm-Nd ages have not been determined until now. Lunar anorthosite 67075, a Feldspathic Fragmental Breccia (FFB) collected near the rim of North Ray Crater, has concordant Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr ages of 4.47+/-0.07 Ga and 4.49+/-0.07 Ga, respectively. Initial Nd-143/Nd-144 determined from the Sm-Nd isochron corresponds to E(sub Nd,CHUR) = 0.3+/-0.5 compared to a Chondritic Uniform Reservoir, or E(sub Nd,HEDPB) = -0.6+/-0.5 compared to the initial Nd-143/Nd-144 of the HED Parent Body [3]. Lunar anorthosites tend to have E(sub Nd) > 0 when compared to CHUR, apparently inconsistent with derivation from a single lunar magma ocean. Although E(sub Nd) < 0 for some anorthosites, if lunar initial Nd-143/Nd-144 is taken equal to HEDR for the HED parent body [3], enough variability remains among the anorthosite data alone to suggest that lunar anorthosites do not derive from a single source, i.e., they are not all products of the LMO. An anorthositic clast from desert meteorite Dhofar 908 has an Ar-39-Ar-40 age of 4.42+/-0.04 Ga, the same as the 4.36-4.41+/-0.035 Ga Ar-39-Ar-40 age of anorthositic clast Y-86032,116 in Antarctic meteorite Yamato- 86032 [3,4]. Conclusions: (i) Lunar anorthosites come from diverse sources. Orbital geochemical studies confirm variability in lunar crustal composition [1, 5]. We suggest that the variability extends to anorthosites alone as shown by the Sm-Nd data (Fig. 2) and the existence of magnesian anorthosites (MAN, [6]) and "An93 anorthosites

  2. Quantum Dynamics Study of the Isotopic Effect on Capture Reactions: HD, D2 + CH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Time-dependent wave-packet-propagation calculations are reported for the isotopic reactions, HD + CH3 and D2 + CH3, in six degrees of freedom and for zero total angular momentum. Initial state selected reaction probabilities for different initial rotational-vibrational states are presented in this study. This study shows that excitations of the HD(D2) enhances the reactivities; whereas the excitations of the CH3 umbrella mode have the opposite effects. This is consistent with the reaction of H2 + CH3. The comparison of these three isotopic reactions also shows the isotopic effects in the initial-state-selected reaction probabilities. The cumulative reaction probabilities (CRP) are obtained by summing over initial-state-selected reaction probabilities. The energy-shift approximation to account for the contribution of degrees of freedom missing in the six dimensionality calculation is employed to obtain approximate full-dimensional CRPs. The rate constant comparison shows H2 + CH3 reaction has the biggest reactivity, then HD + CH3, and D2 + CH3 has the smallest.

  3. Studying the Permian cross-section (Volga region) using chemical and isotopic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareev, Bulat; Georgii, Batalin; Nurgaliev, Danis; Nurgalieva, Nuriya

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a study of international important site: the cross-section of Permian system's Urzhumian Stage in the ravine "Pechischy". Outcrop is located on the right bank of the Volga River (about 10 km West of Kazan). It has local, regional and planetary correlation features and also footprints of different geographical scale events. The main objective in the research is the deep study of sediments using chemical and isotopic investigations. XRF spectrometer was used for chemical investigations of samples. Chemistry of carbonates and clastic rocks includes the analysis of chemical elements, compounds, petrochemical (lithogeochemical) modules for the interpretation of the genesis of lithotypes. For the review of the geochemistry of stable isotopes of carbon (oxygen) we used IRMS. The main objective is the nature of the isotope fractionation issues, to addressing the issues of stratigraphy and paleogeography. The measurements have shown the variability of chemical parameters in cross-section. It gives us opportunity to see small changes in sedimentation and recognize the factors that influence to the process. The work was carried out according to the Russian Government's Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University, supported by the grant provided to the Kazan State University for performing the state program in the field of scientific research.

  4. Final Progress Report: Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Bounds, John Alan; Brumby, Steven P.; Prasad, Lakshman; Sullivan, John P.

    2012-04-30

    This is the final report of the project titled, 'Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes,' PMIS project number LA10-HUMANID-PD03. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). It summarizes work performed over the FY10 time period. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). Human analysts begin analyzing a spectrum based on features in the spectrum - lines and shapes that are present in a given spectrum. The proposed work was to carry out a feasibility study that will pick out all gamma ray peaks and other features such as Compton edges, bremsstrahlung, presence/absence of shielding and presence of neutrons and escape peaks. Ultimately success of this feasibility study will allow us to collectively explain identified features and form a realistic scenario that produced a given spectrum in the future. We wanted to develop and demonstrate machine learning algorithms that will qualitatively enhance the automated identification capabilities of portable radiological sensors that are currently being used in the field.

  5. Studying the Permian Cross-section (Volga Region) Using Chemical and Isotopic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareev, B. I.; Batalin, G. A.; Nurgalieva, N. G.; Nourgaliev, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a study of international important site: the cross-section of Permian system's Urzhumian Stagein the ravine "Pechischy". Outcrop is located on the right bank of the Volga River (about 10 km West of Kazan). Ithas local, regional and planetary correlation features and also footprints of different geographical scale events.The main objective in the research is the deep study of sediments using chemical and isotopic investigations. XRFspectrometer was used for chemical investigations of samples. Chemistry of carbonates and clastic rocks includesthe analysis of chemical elements, compounds, petrochemical (lithogeochemical) modules for the interpretationof the genesis of lithotypes. For the review of the geochemistry of stable isotopes of carbon (oxygen) we usedIRMS. The main objective is the nature of the isotope fractionation issues, to addressing the issues of stratigraphyand paleogeography.The measurements have shown the variability of chemical parameters in cross-section. It gives us opportunity tosee small changes in sedimentation and recognize the factors that influence to the process.The work was carried out according to the Russian Government's Program of Competitive Growth of KazanFederal University, supported by the grant provided to the Kazan State University for performing the state programin the field of scientific research.

  6. Diet and mobility in Early Medieval Bavaria: a study of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Hakenbeck, Susanne; McManus, Ellen; Geisler, Hans; Grupe, Gisela; O'Connell, Tamsin

    2010-10-01

    This study investigates patterns of mobility in Early Medieval Bavaria through a combined study of diet and associated burial practice. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were analyzed in human bone samples from the Late Roman cemetery of Klettham and from the Early Medieval cemeteries of Altenerding and Straubing-Bajuwarenstrasse. For dietary comparison, samples of faunal bone from one Late Roman and three Early Medieval settlement sites were also analyzed. The results indicate that the average diet was in keeping with a landlocked environment and fairly limited availability of freshwater or marine resources. The diet appears not to have changed significantly from the Late Roman to the Early Medieval period. However, in the population of Altenerding, there were significant differences in the diet of men and women, supporting a hypothesis of greater mobility among women. Furthermore, the isotopic evidence from dietary outliers is supported by "foreign" grave goods and practices, such as artificial skull modification. These results reveal the potential of carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis for questions regarding migration and mobility.

  7. A study of stable isotopic variations of Antarctic snow by albedo differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeonghoon; Han, Yeongcheol; Ham, Ji-Young; Kim, Young-Hee; Kim, Songyi; Kim, Hyerin; Na, Un-Sung

    2015-04-01

    Snow's albedo can be decreased if there are any impurities on the snow surface other than snow itself. Due to the decrease of albedo of snow, melting rates of surface snow can be enhanced, which is very crucial in climate change and hydrogeology in many parts of the world. Anthropogenic black carbons caused by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuel affect on snow and tephra particles generated by geologic volcanic activities reduce snow albedo. In this study, we investigated isotopic compositions between snow covered by tephra particles and clean snow. Isotopic compositions of snow with tephra statistically shows more enriched than those of clean snow (p<0.02). This can be explained by the fact that snow becomes enriched in 18O or D relative to meltwater as melting rates are increased. In addition, the slopes of the linear regression between oxygen and hydrogen for snow with tephra and clean snow are 6.7 and 8, respectively, and the latter is similar to that of the global meteoric water line of 8. Therefore, we can conclude that snow impurities control the isotopic compositions of snow, which is very crucial in the study of climate change and hydrogeology. To quantitatively explain these observations, melting experiments and numerical approaches are required.

  8. Triple Oxygen and Clumped Isotopes in Synthetic and Natural Carbonates: Implications for Paleoclimate and Paleohydrology Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, A. H.; Rangarajan, R.; Liang, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    Conventional oxygen isotope (δ18O) has widely been used for paleoclimate studies. However, multiple influencing factors such as temperature, precipitation and kinetic effects during carbonate precipitation complicate the interpretation of δ18O data sometimes. Triple oxygen isotope (Δ17O) in carbonates could be sensitive to kinetic effect occur during its precipitation in water. Carbonates may also record the Δ17O signature of the parent waters, providing a basis in the natural carbonates for identifying kinetic processes such as rapid degassing at lower relative humidity inside a cave during speleothem deposition. Clumped isotopes (Δ47) in carbonates give the formation temperatures of the carbonates if precipitated under isotopic equilibrium. The first goal of the study is to explore the applicability of Δ17O for paleohydrolocial studies. The second is to reconstruct paleotemperature with suitable natural carbonates using Δ47values. This is a rare paleoclimate study utilizing two sophisticated new tools. CO2 produced from carbonates by acid digestion was used for both Δ47 and Δ17O analysis. Purified CO2 samples were directly introduced into the Mass spectrometer (MAT 253) for clumped isotope analysis [1] and CO2-O2 exchange method in presence of platinum for Δ17O analysis [2,3]. We measured Δ47 and Δ17O values in synthetic carbonates precipitated at different temperatures (10-90 oC) and Δ17O values in the water from which the carbonate precipitated. We observed consistent Δ47 values in the carbonates while Δ17O were found to vary. Probably a proper slope (between δ18O and δ17O) selection for carbonates would give consistent results. We also measured Δ47 and Δ17O in modern and well dated speleothems from Chinese and Indian caves to study the paleohydrology and paleotemperature. Δ47 and Δ17O were also measured in modern natural carbonate depositions such as corals, foraminifer and marbles to explore their potentials for paleoclimate studies

  9. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies of living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, Elise

    1999-05-10

    This dissertation focuses on the development of methods for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies in living systems using inductively coupled plasma single and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers. Sub-nanogram per gram levels of molybdenum (Mo) from human blood plasma are isolated by the use of anion exchange alumina microcolumns. Million-fold more concentrated spectral and matrix interferences such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, etc. in the blood constituents are removed from the analyte. The recovery of Mo from the alumina column is 82 ± 5% (n = 5). Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) is utilized for the quantitative ultra-trace concentration determination of Mo in bovine and human blood samples. The average Mo concentration in reference bovine serum determined by this method is 10.2 ± 0.4 ng/g, while the certified value is 11.5 ± 1.1 ng/g (95% confidence interval). The Mo concentration of one pool of human blood plasma from two healthy male donors is 0.5 ± 0.1 ng/g. The inductively coupled plasma twin quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-TQMS) is used to measure the carbon isotope ratio from non-volatile organic compounds and bio-organic molecules to assess the ability as an alternative analytical method to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-combustion-IRMS). Trytophan, myoglobin, and β-cyclodextrin are chosen for the study, initial observation of spectral interference of 13C+ with 12C 1H+ comes from the incomplete dissociation of myoglobin and/or β-cyclodextrin.

  10. Estimating Niche Width Using Stable Isotopes in the Face of Habitat Variability: A Modelling Case Study in the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David O.; Buhl, Jerome; Lee, Raymond W.; Simpson, Stephen J.; Holmes, Sebastian P.

    2012-01-01

    Distributions of stable isotopes have been used to infer an organism's trophic niche width, the ‘isotopic niche’, and examine resource partitioning. Spatial variation in the isotopic composition of prey may however confound the interpretation of isotopic signatures especially when foragers exploit resources across numerous locations. In this study the isotopic compositions from marine assemblages are modelled to determine the role of variation in the signature of prey items and the effect of dietary breadth and foraging strategies on predator signatures. Outputs from the models reveal that isotopic niche widths can be greater for populations of dietary specialists rather than for generalists, which contravenes what is generally accepted in the literature. When a range of different mixing models are applied to determine if the conversion from δ to p-space can be used to improve model accuracy, predator signature variation is increased rather than model precision. Furthermore the mixing models applied failed to correctly identify dietary specialists and/or to accurately estimate diet contributions that may identify resource partitioning. The results presented illustrate the need to collect sufficiently large sample sizes, in excess of what is collected under most current studies, across the complete distribution of a species and its prey, before attempts to use stable isotopes to make inferences about niche width can be made. PMID:22876280

  11. Estimating niche width using stable isotopes in the face of habitat variability: a modelling case study in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Cummings, David O; Buhl, Jerome; Lee, Raymond W; Simpson, Stephen J; Holmes, Sebastian P

    2012-01-01

    Distributions of stable isotopes have been used to infer an organism's trophic niche width, the 'isotopic niche', and examine resource partitioning. Spatial variation in the isotopic composition of prey may however confound the interpretation of isotopic signatures especially when foragers exploit resources across numerous locations. In this study the isotopic compositions from marine assemblages are modelled to determine the role of variation in the signature of prey items and the effect of dietary breadth and foraging strategies on predator signatures. Outputs from the models reveal that isotopic niche widths can be greater for populations of dietary specialists rather than for generalists, which contravenes what is generally accepted in the literature. When a range of different mixing models are applied to determine if the conversion from δ to p-space can be used to improve model accuracy, predator signature variation is increased rather than model precision. Furthermore the mixing models applied failed to correctly identify dietary specialists and/or to accurately estimate diet contributions that may identify resource partitioning. The results presented illustrate the need to collect sufficiently large sample sizes, in excess of what is collected under most current studies, across the complete distribution of a species and its prey, before attempts to use stable isotopes to make inferences about niche width can be made.

  12. Image spectroscopy and stable isotopes elucidate functional dissimilarity between native and nonnative plant species in the aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria J; Hestir, Erin L; Khanna, Shruti; Ustin, Susan L

    2012-02-01

    • Nonnative species may change ecosystem functionality at the expense of native species. Here, we examine the similarity of functional traits of native and nonnative submersed aquatic plants (SAP) in an aquatic ecosystem. • We used field and airborne imaging spectroscopy and isotope ratios of SAP species in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California (USA) to assess species identification, chlorophyll (Chl) concentration, and differences in photosynthetic efficiency. • Spectral separability between species occurs primarily in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions, which is associated with morphological and physiological differences. Nonnatives had significantly higher Chl, carotene, and anthocyanin concentrations than natives and had significantly higher photochemical reflectance index (PRI) and δ(13) C values. • Results show nonnative SAPs are functionally dissimilar to native SAPs, having wider leaf blades and greater leaf area, dense and evenly distributed vertical canopies, and higher pigment concentrations. Results suggest that nonnatives also use a facultative C(4) -like photosynthetic pathway, allowing efficient photosynthesis in high-light and low-light environments. Differences in plant functionality indicate that nonnative SAPs have a competitive advantage over native SAPs as a result of growth form and greater light-use efficiency that promotes growth under different light conditions, traits affecting system-wide species distributions and community composition. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. LaBr3:Ce small FOV gamma camera with excellent energy resolution for multi-isotope imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Fabbri, A.; Cinti, M. N.; Orlandi, C.; Pellegrini, R.; Scafè, R.; Artibani, M.

    2015-06-01

    The simultaneous administration of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with more than one radioisotope is becoming of increasing interest in clinical practice. Because the photon energies of the utilized radioisotopes could be very close (less than 15% difference), a gamma camera with adequate energy resolution is required. The availability of scintillation crystals with high light yield, as lanthanum tri-bromide (LaBr3:Ce), is particularly appealing for these applications. In this work, a new small field of view gamma camera prototype is presented, based on a planar LaBr3:Ce scintillation crystal with surfaces treatment typical of spectrometric devices, in order to enhance energy resolution performances. The crystal has round shape and has been optically coupled with a position sensitive photomultiplier tube with high quantum efficiency. The presented gamma camera shows outstanding energy resolution results in the investigated energy range (32-662 keV). These relevant performances have been obtained through the application of uniformity correction on the raw data, necessary due to the presence of position sensitive phototube, characterized by a spread of anodic gain values. In spite of position linearity degradation at crystal edges, due to reflective treatment of surfaces, intrinsic spatial resolution values are satisfactory on the useful field of view.The characterization of the presented gamma camera, based on a continuous LaBr3:Ce scintillation crystal with reflective surfaces, indicates good performances in multi-isotope imaging due to the excellent energy resolution results, also in comparison with similar detectors.

  14. The CG-1D neutron imaging beamline at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Santodonato, Louis J; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Bailey, William Barton; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Nguyen, Phong T; Tremsin, Anton S; Selby, Douglas L; Walker, Lakeisha MH

    2015-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate has installed a neutron imaging beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold guide hall. CG-1D is one of the three instruments that make up the CG1 instrument suite. The beamline optics and detector have recently been upgraded to meet the needs of the neutron imaging community (better smoothing of guide system artifacts, higher flux or spatial resolution). These upgrades comprise a new diffuser/aperture system, two new detectors, a He-filled flight tube and silicon (Si) windows. Shielding inside the flight tube, beam scrapers and a beam stop ensure that biological dose is less than 50 Sv/hr outside of the radiation boundary. A set of diffusers and apertures (pinhole geometry) has been installed at the exit of the guide system to allow motorized L/D variation. Samples sit on a translation/rotation stage for alignment and tomography purposes. Detectors for the CG-1D beamline are (1) an ANDOR DW936 charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a field of view of approximately 7 cm x 7 cm and ~ 80 microns spatial resolution and 1 frame per second time resolution, (2) a new Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detector with a 2.8 cm x 2.8 cm field of view and 55 microns spatial resolution, and 5 s timing capability. 6LiF/ZnS scintillators of thickness varying from 50 to 200 microns are being used at this facility. An overview of the beamline upgrade and preliminary data is presented here.

  15. The CG-1D Neutron Imaging Beamline at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santodonato, Lou; Bilheux, Hassina; Bailey, Barton; Bilheux, Jean; Nguyen, Phong; Tremsin, Anton; Selby, Doug; Walker, Lakeisha

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate has installed a neutron imaging beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold guide hall. CG-1D is one of the three instruments that make up the CG1 instrument suite. The beamline optics and detector have recently been upgraded to meet the needs of the neutron imaging community (better ;smoothing; of guide system artifacts, higher flux or spatial resolution). These upgrades comprise a new diffuser/aperture system, two new detectors, a He-filled flight tube and silicon (Si) windows. Shielding inside the flight tube, beam scrapers and a beam stop ensure that biological dose is less than 50 μSv/hr outside of the radiation boundary. A set of diffusers and apertures (pinhole geometry) has been installed at the exit of the guide system to allow motorized L/D variation. Samples sit on a translation/rotation stage for alignment and tomography purposes. Detectors for the CG-1D beamline are (1) an ANDOR DW936 charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a field of view of approximately 7 cm x 7 cm and ∼ 80 microns spatial resolution and 1 frame per second time resolution, (2) a new Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detector with a 2.8 cm x 2.8 cm field of view and 55 microns spatial resolution, and 5 μs timing capability. 6LiF/ZnS scintillators of thickness varying from 50 to 200 microns are being used at this facility. An overview of the beamline upgrade and preliminary data is presented here.

  16. Carnivore specific bone bioapatite and collagen carbon isotope fractionations: Case studies of modern and fossil grey wolf populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Dobbs, K.; Wheatley, P. V.; Koch, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    -tissue differences we measured for wolves are applicable to future isotopic studies of consumers with purely carnivorous diets. For example, we collected bone bioapatite and collagen carbon isotope data from late Pleistocene grey wolf fossils from eastern Beringia (Fairbanks, Alaska), and used the modern inter-tissue difference presented here to verify bioapatite preservation. We then compared the wolves to herbivores (horse and caribou) from the same locality, and found the difference in their bone bioapatite carbon isotope values corresponded to the modern carnivore-herbivore trophic spacing given above. We therefore were able to conclude that horse and caribou were part of Beringian wolf diet.

  17. Distribution of carbon isotopes in amino acids of protein fraction of micro-organisms as a means of studying the mechanisms of their biosynthesis in the cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A.A.

    1986-04-10

    The intramolecular distribution of carbon isotopes in the amino acids of the protein fraction of a number of photosynthesizing microorganisms was analyzed using the previously proposed model of carbon isotope fractionation in the cell. A correlation was found between the distributions of the isotopes in the amino acids and the pathways and sequence of their synthesis in the cell cycle. The feasibility of using the isotopic distributions of metabolites for a study of the temporal organization of metabolism in the cell is illustrated.

  18. Isotopic Evidence for Microbial Activity in Crystalline Bedrock Fractures - a Case Study from Olkiluoto, SW Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlstedt, E. K.; Karhu, J.; Pitkänen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in the geochemical environment in crystalline bedrock fractures were investigated using the stable isotopes of C, O and S in fracture filling minerals as tracers. Of special interest were the possible changes which may occur in the subsurface at low temperatures. Especially, the influence of microbial activity was recognized as a catalyst for inducing changes in the geochemical environment. The study site is the Olkiluoto island located on the western coast of Finland, planned to host a geological repository for nuclear waste. Fracture surfaces were investigated to recognize the latest mineralizations at the site. These fillings were comprised of thin plates or small euhedral crystals of calcite and pyrite. The carbon and sulfur isotope compositions of calcite and pyrite were measured from bulk material by conventional IRMS, and in situ by secondary ion mass spectrometry. A notable feature of the late-stage fillings was high variabilities in the δ13C values of calcite and the δ34S values of pyrite, which ranged from -53.8 ‰ to +31.6 ‰ and from -50.4 ‰ to +77.7 ‰, respectively. Based on the isotopic compositions of the fillings, several features in the past hydrogeochemical environment could be recognized. The isotopic composition of the fracture fillings indicate an environment which was stratified with respect to depth. Characteristic features include bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) occurring at depths <111 m (bsl), and a methanogenetic environment at depths >50 m. It appears that methanic conditions were replaced by sulfate reduction at depths >50 m likely due to infiltration of SO42--rich brackish waters. Sulfate reducing bacteria used mainly surface derived organic carbon as electron donors. Some indication of minor methanotrophic activity was recognized in anomalously low δ13C values of calcite, down to -53.8 ‰, at the depth range of 34-54 m. This methanotrophic activity may have been related to bacteria using CH4 as an electron donor in

  19. Carbon fluxes in natural plankton communities under elevated CO2 levels: a stable isotope labeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kluijver, A.; Soetaert, K.; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U.; Bellerby, R. G. J.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2010-05-01

    The potential impact of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) on carbon fluxes in natural plankton communities was investigated during the 2005 PeECE III mesocosm study in Bergen, Norway. Triplicate mesocosms, in which a phytoplankton bloom was induced by nutrient addition, were incubated with 1×(~350 μatm), 2×(~700 μatm), and 3× present day CO2(~1050 μatm) levels for 3 weeks. 13C labeled bicarbonate was added to all mesocosms to follow the transfer of carbon from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into phytoplankton and subsequently heterotrophic bacteria, zooplankton, and settling particles. Isotope ratios of polar lipid fatty acids (PLFA) were used to infer the biomass and production of phytoplankton and bacteria. Phytoplankton PLFA were enriched within one day after label addition, while it took another 3 days before bacteria showed substantial enrichment. Group-specific primary production measurements revealed that coccolithophores grew faster than green algae and diatoms. Elevated CO2 had a significant positive effect on post-bloom biomass of green algae, diatoms, and bacteria. A simple model based on measured isotope ratios of phytoplankton and bacteria revealed that CO2 had no significant effect on the carbon transfer efficiency from phytoplankton to bacteria. There was no indication of enhanced settling based on isotope mixing models during the phytoplankton bloom. Our results suggest that CO2 effects are most pronounced in the post-bloom phase, under nutrient limitation.

  20. Detailed study of the neutral-current neutrino-nucleus scattering off the stable Mo isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ydrefors, E.; Balasi, K. G.; Kosmas, T. S.; Suhonen, J.

    2012-12-01

    For neutrino detection and for various applications in astrophysics the knowledge of the nuclear responses to astrophysical neutrinos is crucial. Recent studies of neutrino interactions with the 100Mo nucleus and the other stable molybdenum isotopes are important for the planned MOON (Mo Observatory of Neutrinos) detector. To this aim, in the present work we perform detailed nuclear structure calculations for the neutral-current neutrino-nucleus scattering off the stable molybdenum isotopes. We focus on the differential and total neutrino-nucleus cross sections as well as on flux averaged cross sections to various supernova neutrino spectra. We also propose a more efficient method for the computations of the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. By employing this method we extend our previous calculations for the odd isotopes (95Mo and 97Mo) where also couplings to high-lying QRPA (quasiparticle random-phase approximation) phonons are included in the quasiparticle-phonon basis. It is established in this work that the inclusion of high-lying QRPA excitations are essential for the description of the neutrino-nucleus scattering off open-shell odd-mass nuclei.

  1. Isotope fractionation of sandy-soil water during evaporation - an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Wen-Bo; Han, Liang-Feng; Tan, Hong-Bing; Wang, Shuai

    2017-06-01

    Soil samples containing water with known stable isotopic compositions were prepared. The soil water was recovered by using vacuum/heat distillation. The experiments were held under different conditions to control rates of water evaporation and water recovery. Recoveries, δ(18)O and δ(2)H values of the soil water were determined. Analyses of the data using a Rayleigh distillation model indicate that under the experimental conditions only loosely bound water is extractable in cases where the recovery is smaller than 100 %. Due to isotopic exchange between vapour and remaining water in the micro channels or capillaries of the soil matrix, isotopic fractionation may take place under near-equilibrium conditions. This causes the observed relationship between δ(2)H and δ(18)O of the extracted water samples to have a slope close to 8. The results of this study may indicate that, in arid zones when soil that initially contains water dries out, the slope of the relationship between δ(2)H and δ(18)O values should be close to 8. Thus, a smaller slope, as observed by some groundwater and soil water samples in arid zones, may be caused by evaporation of water before the water has entered the unsaturated zone.

  2. A molecular and isotopic study of the organic matter from the Paris Basin, France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtfouse, E.; Albrecht, P.; Behar, F.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen Liassic sedimentary rocks of increasing depth and three petroleums from the Paris Basin were studied for 13C/12C isotopic compositions and biological markers, including steranes, sterenes, methylphenanthrenes, methylanthracenes, and triaromatic steroids. The isotopic compositions of n-alkanes from mature sedimentary rocks and petroleums fall in a narrow range (2%), except for the deepest Hettangian rock and the Trias petroleum, for which the short-chain n-alkanes are enriched and depleted in 13C, respectively. Most of the molecular parameters increase over the 2000-2500 m depth range, reflecting the transformation of the organic matter at the onset of petroleum generation. In this zone, carbonate content and carbon isotopic composition of carbonates, as well as molecular parameters, are distinct for the Toarcian and Hettangian source rocks and suggest a migration of organic matter from these two formations. Two novel molecular parameters were defined for this task: one using methyltriaromatic steroids from organic extracts; the other using 1-methylphenanthrene and 2-methylanthracene from kerogen pyrolysates. The anomalous high maturity of the Dogger petroleum relative to the maturity-depth trend of the source rocks is used to estimate the minimal vertical distance of migration of the organic matter from the source rock to the reservoir.

  3. Identifying the groundwater basin boundaries, using environmental isotopes: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiroğlu, Muhterem

    2017-06-01

    Groundwater, which is renewable under current climatic conditions separately from other natural sources, in fact is a finite resource in terms of quality and fossil groundwater. Researchers have long emphasized the necessity of exploiting, operating, conserving and managing groundwater in an efficient and sustainable manner with an integrated water management approach. The management of groundwater needs reliable information about changes on groundwater quantity and quality. Environmental isotopes are the most important tools to provide this support. No matter which method we use to calculate the groundwater budget and flow equations, we need to determine boundary conditions or the physical boundaries of the domain. The Groundwater divide line or basin boundaries that separate the two adjacent basin recharge areas from each other must be drawn correctly to be successful in defining complex groundwater basin boundary conditions. Environmental isotope data, as well as other methods provide support for determining recharge areas of the aquifers, especially for karst aquifers, residence time and interconnections between aquifer systems. This study demonstrates the use of environmental isotope data to interpret and correct groundwater basin boundaries giving as an example the Yeniçıkrı basin within the main Sakarya basin.

  4. A molecular and isotopic study of the organic matter from the Paris Basin, France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtfouse, E.; Albrecht, P.; Behar, F.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen Liassic sedimentary rocks of increasing depth and three petroleums from the Paris Basin were studied for 13C/12C isotopic compositions and biological markers, including steranes, sterenes, methylphenanthrenes, methylanthracenes, and triaromatic steroids. The isotopic compositions of n-alkanes from mature sedimentary rocks and petroleums fall in a narrow range (2%), except for the deepest Hettangian rock and the Trias petroleum, for which the short-chain n-alkanes are enriched and depleted in 13C, respectively. Most of the molecular parameters increase over the 2000-2500 m depth range, reflecting the transformation of the organic matter at the onset of petroleum generation. In this zone, carbonate content and carbon isotopic composition of carbonates, as well as molecular parameters, are distinct for the Toarcian and Hettangian source rocks and suggest a migration of organic matter from these two formations. Two novel molecular parameters were defined for this task: one using methyltriaromatic steroids from organic extracts; the other using 1-methylphenanthrene and 2-methylanthracene from kerogen pyrolysates. The anomalous high maturity of the Dogger petroleum relative to the maturity-depth trend of the source rocks is used to estimate the minimal vertical distance of migration of the organic matter from the source rock to the reservoir.

  5. DoE optimization of a mercury isotope ratio determination method for environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Berni, Alex; Baschieri, Carlo; Covelli, Stefano; Emili, Andrea; Marchetti, Andrea; Manzini, Daniela; Berto, Daniela; Rampazzo, Federico

    2016-05-15

    By using the experimental design (DoE) technique, we optimized an analytical method for the determination of mercury isotope ratios by means of cold-vapor multicollector ICP-MS (CV-MC-ICP-MS) to provide absolute Hg isotopic ratio measurements with a suitable internal precision. By running 32 experiments, the influence of mercury and thallium internal standard concentrations, total measuring time and sample flow rate was evaluated. Method was optimized varying Hg concentration between 2 and 20 ng g(-1). The model finds out some correlations within the parameters affect the measurements precision and predicts suitable sample measurement precisions for Hg concentrations from 5 ng g(-1) Hg upwards. The method was successfully applied to samples of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) coming from the Marano and Grado lagoon (NE Italy), a coastal environment affected by long term mercury contamination mainly due to mining activity. Results show different extents of both mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) phenomena in clams according to their size and sampling sites in the lagoon. The method is fit for determinations on real samples, allowing for the use of Hg isotopic ratios to study mercury biogeochemical cycles in complex ecosystems.

  6. Preparation of electrodeless discharge lamps for emission studies of uranium isotopes at trace level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, G. K.; Verma, R.; Verma, M. K.; Raman, V. A.; Joshi, A. R.; Deo, M. N.; Gantayet, L. M.; Tiwari, A. K.; Ramakumar, K. L.; Kumar, Navin

    2010-12-01

    A simplified method for preparation of electrodeless discharge lamp for uranium isotopes with specific concerns for 232U is described. Micro-gram quantities of solid uranium oxides and aqueous solution of uranium nitrate have been used as a starting material for in situ synthesis of uranium tetraiodide. High temperature iodination reaction is carried out in the presence of inert gas neon. By careful design, the preparation time and surface area of quartz reaction tubes have been reduced considerably. The latter decreases the level of contamination which has a direct bearing on the operational lifetime of the lamps. Incorporation of steps to purify the product from an unwanted material improved the stability of the lamps. The procedure provides a safe and convenient way of handling 232U in particular but can be extended in general to any actinides having radioactivity similar to that of freshly separated 232U. Characteristic emission of uranium isotopes have been recorded by Fourier Transform Spectrometer to show the satisfactory operation of the lamps as well as their usage for studying emission spectra of the specific isotope.

  7. Accounting for isotopic clustering in Fourier transform mass spectrometry data analysis for clinical diagnostic studies.

    PubMed

    Kakourou, Alexia; Vach, Werner; Nicolardi, Simone; van der Burgt, Yuri; Mertens, Bart

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry based clinical proteomics has emerged as a powerful tool for high-throughput protein profiling and biomarker discovery. Recent improvements in mass spectrometry technology have boosted the potential of proteomic studies in biomedical research. However, the complexity of the proteomic expression introduces new statistical challenges in summarizing and analyzing the acquired data. Statistical methods for optimally processing proteomic data are currently a growing field of research. In this paper we present simple, yet appropriate methods to preprocess, summarize and analyze high-throughput MALDI-FTICR mass spectrometry data, collected in a case-control fashion, while dealing with the statistical challenges that accompany such data. The known statistical properties of the isotopic distribution of the peptide molecules are used to preprocess the spectra and translate the proteomic expression into a condensed data set. Information on either the intensity level or the shape of the identified isotopic clusters is used to derive summary measures on which diagnostic rules for disease status allocation will be based. Results indicate that both the shape of the identified isotopic clusters and the overall intensity level carry information on the class outcome and can be used to predict the presence or absence of the disease.

  8. Identifying the groundwater basin boundaries, using environmental isotopes: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiroğlu, Muhterem

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater, which is renewable under current climatic conditions separately from other natural sources, in fact is a finite resource in terms of quality and fossil groundwater. Researchers have long emphasized the necessity of exploiting, operating, conserving and managing groundwater in an efficient and sustainable manner with an integrated water management approach. The management of groundwater needs reliable information about changes on groundwater quantity and quality. Environmental isotopes are the most important tools to provide this support. No matter which method we use to calculate the groundwater budget and flow equations, we need to determine boundary conditions or the physical boundaries of the domain. The Groundwater divide line or basin boundaries that separate the two adjacent basin recharge areas from each other must be drawn correctly to be successful in defining complex groundwater basin boundary conditions. Environmental isotope data, as well as other methods provide support for determining recharge areas of the aquifers, especially for karst aquifers, residence time and interconnections between aquifer systems. This study demonstrates the use of environmental isotope data to interpret and correct groundwater basin boundaries giving as an example the Yeniçıkrı basin within the main Sakarya basin.

  9. Isotopic studies of mariposite-bearing rocks from the south- central Mother Lode, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, R.W.; Dodge, F.C.W.; Silberman, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    Gold-bearing vein formation in the Mother Lode belt of the study area apparently occurred during the Early Cretaceous between 127 and 108 m.y. B.P. The hydrothermal fluids that carried the gold precipitated quartz and mariposite at approx 320oC, similar to the T of precipitation of gold-bearing quartz veins in the Allegheny district. The O- and H-isotopic composition calculated for the fluid indicate that it was similar to formation water or was metamorphic in origin. If the carbonate in the veins was in isotopic equilibrium with this same fluid, it apparently precipitated at a higher T of approx 400oC. The Sr in the carbonate is much less radiogenic than that in any known marine carbonate, but is similar in isotopic composition to that in metamorphosed mafic volcanic rocks of the general region. These mafic rocks could have been the source for the Sr in the hydrothermal veins. This observation supports the contention that the gold-mariposite-quartz-carbonate rocks were formed as an alteration product of serpentinite and other mafic igneous rocks.-A.P.

  10. Detail isotopic stratigraphy of snowpack - case study from Julian Alps (Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreča, P.; Brenčič, M.; Sinjur, I.; Sokratov, S.

    2012-04-01

    In temperate humid catchments the storage of precipitation in snowpack, and the subsequent melting, both highly variable in space and time, substantially impacts the water cycle. Recent climate warming and changes in atmospheric circulation patterns have resulted in reductions in the duration of the snow cover season, the amount of water stored in the snowpack, as well as a widespread trend toward earlier melt. Comparison of water balance for periods 1961-90 and 1971-2000 showed that in Slovenia average precipitation amount remained the same in both periods while runoff decreased and the evaporation increased recently. The area of Julian Alps (NW Slovenia) represents the upper catchment area of river Sava. The area is locally characterised as one with the highest annual precipitation amount in Europe, rapid runoffs and low evaporation. Snow cover is regular, starts to accumulate in late autumn and lasts more than 100 days, at the upper tree line usually more than 150 days. Due to positive air temperature trend snow cover period is changing and consequently the discharge regime is affected. Spatial and temporal variability of snow, as well as snow cover contribution to the water balance in Julian Alps remains poorly investigated. Isotopes of O and H have been used to study snow deposition and the subsequent alteration of snowpack and its influence on runoff. Despite their potential, environmental isotopes were only rarely used in investigations of water cycle in mountain areas of Slovenia in the past. To improve the knowledge on snowpack isotope characteristics and processes in it, and consequently to enable better understanding of water balance with emphasize on recharge of important Slovene aquifers, in 2011 at selected site in the area of Triglav National Park (Planina Javornik) the first isotope research of snowpack has been started. We performed detail sampling of snowpack at two locations with different canopy structures (e.g. clearing and forest stand

  11. Biochemical and physiological bases for the use of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in environmental and ecological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Ogawa, Nanako O.; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Wada, Eitaro

    2015-12-01

    We review the biochemical and physiological bases of the use of carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions as an approach for environmental and ecological studies. Biochemical processes commonly observed in the biosphere, including the decarboxylation and deamination of amino acids, are the key factors in this isotopic approach. The principles drawn from the isotopic distributions disentangle the complex dynamics of the biosphere and allow the interactions between the geosphere and biosphere to be analyzed in detail. We also summarize two recently examined topics with new datasets: the isotopic compositions of individual biosynthetic products (chlorophylls and amino acids) and those of animal organs for further pursuing the basis of the methodology. As a tool for investigating complex systems, compound-specific isotopic analysis compensates the intrinsic disadvantages of bulk isotopic signatures. Chlorophylls provide information about the particular processes of various photoautotrophs, whereas amino acids provide a precise measure of the trophic positions of heterotrophs. The isotopic distributions of carbon and nitrogen in a single organism as well as in the whole biosphere are strongly regulated, so that their major components such as amino acids are coordinated appropriately rather than controlled separately.

  12. Deformation in the neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes: Radioactive decay scheme studies in the neodymium, promethium, and samarium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Breitenbach, J.B.

    1993-12-31

    Several experiments were performed at the UNISOR isotope separator facility at HHIRF at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes. Data for the decay chain {sup 133}Sm {yields} {sup 133}Pm {yields} {sup 133}Nd was obtained, consisting of multiscaled spectra of {gamma} rays, X rays, and conversion electrons, as well as {gamma}{gamma}t, X{gamma}t, e{gamma}t and eXt coincidences. Gamma rays associated with the decay of {sup 133}Sm and {sup 133}Pm were observed for the first time. The decay of a new low-spin (1/2) isomeric state, with a half life of about 70 sec was established for {sup 133}Nd. The level schemes for {sup 133}Nd and {sup 133}Pr were constructed. An M3 and two E1 isomers are established in {sup 133}Nd and an E3 isomer is confirmed in {sup 133}Pr. The energy level systematics for the nuclear region bounded by Z {ge} 58 and N {le} 78 is discussed. Theoretical interpretations are based on the particle-plus-triaxial rotor model calculations. In the framework of these calculations, the {beta}{sub 2} deformation is moderate for these nuclei ({beta}{sub 2} {approx} 0.20-0.25). A sudden onset of strong deformation is not observed, in contrast with the theoretical predictions by Leander and Moeller [Lea82].

  13. DENSITY EFFECT OF SOLIDIFIED HYDROGEN ISOTOPE PARTICLES ON PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS OF HE II FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2008-03-16

    Solid H{sub 2}, D{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} particles can be generated in He II by solidifying directly from the gas phase. Here we compare these three different particles as tracers for tracking He II forced flow in a horizontal channel using the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique. Slip velocity measurements show that all generated particles are in the micron size range. Steady state velocity fields of the forced flow of He II within a square cross-section channel are measured. By comparing the results obtained from different tracers, we show that the slip velocity caused by non-neutral buoyancy of these particles does not affect the measured velocity profiles of He II forced flow.

  14. Laser Spectroscopic Study on Oxygen Isotope Effects in Ozone Surface Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, Marco; Boursier, Corinne; Elandaloussi, Hadj; Te, Yao; Jeseck, Pascal; Rouille, Christian; Zanon-Willette, Thomas; Janssen, Christof

    2016-04-01

    The isotope kinetics of ozone formation in the Chapman reaction [1] O + O2 + M → O3 + M (1) provides the primary example for a chemically induced oxygen isotope anomaly and is associated with large [2] and mass independent [3] oxygen isotope enrichments in the product molecule, linked to a symmetry selection in the ozone formation kinetics [4-5]. The isotopic composition of ozone and its transfer to other molecules is a powerful tracer in the atmospheric and biogeochemical sciences [6] and serves as a primary model for a possible explanation of the oxygen isotopic heterogeneity in the Solar system [7-8]. Recently, the isotope fractionation in the photolytic decomposition process O3 + hν → O2 + O (2) using visible light has been studied in detail [9-10]. Much less is currently known about the isotope fractionation in the dry deposition or in the gas phase thermal decomposition of ozone O3 + M → O2 + O +M. (3) Here we report on first spectroscopic studies of non-photolytic ozone decomposition using a cw-quantum cascade laser at 9.5 μm. The concentration of individual ozone isotopomers (16O3,16O16O17O, and 16O17O16O) in a teflon coated reaction cell is followed in real time at temperatures between 25 and 150 °C. Observed ozone decay rates depend on homogeneous (reaction (3)) processes in the gas phase and on heterogeneous reactions on the wall. A preliminary analysis reveals agreement with currently recommended ozone decay rates in the gas phase and the absence of a large symmetry selection in the surface decomposition process, indicating the absence of a mass independent fractionation effect. This result is in agreement with previous mass spectrometer (MS) studies on heterogeneous ozone formation on pyrex [11], but contradicts an earlier MS study [12] on ozone surface decomposition on pyrex and quartz. Implications for atmospheric chemistry will be discussed. [1] Morton, J., Barnes, J., Schueler, B. and Mauersberger, K. J. Geophys. Res. 95, 901 - 907 (1990

  15. Stable isotope distribution in precipitation in Romania and its relevance for palaeoclimatic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perşoiu, Aurel; Nagavciuc, Viorica; Bădăluţă, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    A surge of recent studies in Romania have targeted various aspects of palaeoclimate (based on stable isotopes in ice, speleothems, tree rings), mineral water origin, wine and other juices provenance. However, while much needed, these studies lack a stable isotope in precipitation background, with only two LMWL's being published so far. In this paper we discuss the links between the stable isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18O and δ2H), climate (air temperature, precipitation amount and large scale circulation) and their relevance for the palaeocllimatic interpretation of stable isotope values in cave ice, cryogenic calcite and tree rings from different sites in Romania. Most of the precipitation in Romania is delivered by the Westerlies, bringing moisture from the North Atlantic; however, their influence is greatly reduced in the eastern half of the country where local evaporative sources play an important role in the precipitation balance. The SW is dominated by water masses from the Mediterranean Sea, while the SE corner clearly draws most of the moisture from the Black Sea and strongly depleted North Atlantic vapor masses. In 2012, Romania experienced the worst draught in 60 years, possibly due to a northward shift of the jest stream associated to blocking conditions in summer, which led to a more northern penetration of the Mediterranean-derived air masses, as well increased precipitation of re-evaporated waters. We have further analyzed cave drip water (δ18O and δ2H), cryogenic cave calcite (δ18O and δ13C) and tree rings (δ18O and δ13C) from selected sites across NW Romania, where the water isotopes in precipitation showed the best (and easiest to understand, given the climatic conditions in 2012) correlation with climatic parameters. Our results that 1) δ18O and δ2H in cave ice are a good proxy for late summer through early winter air temperature; 2) δ13C in cryogenic cave calcite are possible indicators of soil humidity and 3) δ18O in pine

  16. A combined radio- and stable-isotopic study of a California coastal aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; Baskaran, Mark; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Edwards, Brian D.; Land, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Stable and radioactive tracers were utilized in concert to characterize geochemical processes in a complex coastal groundwater system and to provide constraints on the kinetics of rock/water interactions. Groundwater samples from wells within the Dominguez Gap region of Los Angeles County, California were analyzed for a suite of major cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+) and anions (Cl−, SO42−), silica, alkalinity, select trace elements (Ba, B, Sr), dissolved oxygen, stable isotopes of hydrogen (δD), oxygen (δ18O), dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC), and radioactive isotopes (3H, 222Rn and 223,224,226,228Ra). In the study area, groundwater may consist of a complex mixture of native groundwater, intruded seawater, non-native injected water, and oil-field brine water. In some wells, Cl− concentrations attained seawater-like values and in conjunction with isotopically heavier δ18O values, these tracers provide information on the extent of seawater intrusion and/or mixing with oil-field brines. Groundwater 3H above 1 tritium unit (TU) was observed only in a few select wells close to the Dominguez Gap area and most other well groundwater was aged pre-1952. Based on an initial 14C value for the study site of 90 percent modern carbon (pmc), groundwater age estimates likely extend beyond 20 kyr before present and confirm deep circulation of some native groundwater through multiple aquifers. Enriched values of groundwater δ13CDIC in the absence of SO42− imply enhanced anaerobic microbial methanogenesis. While secular equilibrium was observed for 234U/238U (activity ratios ~1) in host matrices, strong isotopic fractionation in these groundwater samples can be used to obtain information of adsorption/desorption kinetics. Calculated Ra residence times are short, and the associated desorption rate constant is about three orders of magnitude slower than that of the adsorption rate constant. Combined stable- and radio-isotopic results provide unique insights into aquifer

  17. The mechanism of oxygen isotopic fractionation during fungal denitrification - A pure culture study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrage-Moennig, Nicole; Rohe, Lena; Anderson, Traute-Heidi; Braker, Gesche; Flessa, Heinz; Giesemann, Annette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) from soil denitrification originates from bacteria and - to an unknown extent - also from fungi. During fungal denitrification, oxygen (O) exchange takes place between H2O and intermediates of the denitrification process as in bacterial exchange[1,2]. However, information about enzymes involved in fungal O exchanges and the associated fractionation effects is lacking. The objectives of this study were to estimate the O fractionation and O exchange during the fungal denitrifying steps using a conceptual model[2] adapted from concepts for bacterial denitrification[3], implementing controls of O exchange proposed by Aerssens, et al.[4] and using fractionation models by Snider et al.[5] Six different pure fungal cultures (five Hypocreales, one Sordariales) known to be capable of denitrification were incubated under anaerobic conditions, either with nitrite or nitrate. Gas samples were analyzed for N2O concentration and its isotopic signatures (SP, average δ15N, δ18O). To investigate O exchange, both treatments were also established with 18O-labelled water as a tracer in the medium. The Hypocreales strains showed O exchange mainly at NO2- reductase (Nir) with NO2- as electron acceptor and no additional O exchange at NO3- reductase (Nar) with NO3- as electron acceptor. The only Hypocreales species having higher O exchange with NO3- than with NO2- also showed O exchange at Nar. The Sordariales species tested seems capable of O exchange at NO reductase (Nor) additionally to O exchange at Nir with NO2-. The data will help to better interpret stable isotope values of N2O from soils. .[1] D. M. Kool, N. Wrage, O. Oenema, J. Dolfing, J. W. Van Groenigen. Oxygen exchange between (de)nitrification intermediates and H2O and its implications for source determination of NO?3- and N2O: a review. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec. 2007, 21, 3569. [2] L. Rohe, T.-H. Anderson, B. Braker, H. Flessa, A. Giesemann, N. Wrage-Mönnig, R. Well. Fungal Oxygen Exchange between

  18. Density Functional Theory Study of Controls on Equilibrium Fe Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Kubicki, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    Previous molecular orbital/density functional theory (MO/DFT) calculations of Fe(III) and Fe(II) complexed with oxalate and catechol was used to predict and compare the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation factors associated with changes to ligands bound to Fe and those associated with changes to the oxidation state of Fe. The predicted fractionation factors between Fe bound by different ligands was < 1.7‰ in vacuo and < 1.2‰ in solution. These values were consistently and significantly smaller than those for equilibrium between different oxidation states of Fe, predicted to be > 2.8‰ in vacuo and > 2.2‰ in solution. Curiously, a trend was originally found where 56Fe is partitioned into smaller ligands with lower Fe affinities and presumably weaker Fe-O bonds. This was the case for the ligands water, oxalate, and catechol, which show respectively increasing Fe affinities yet decreasing predicted 56Fe/^{54}Fe. Current research is using a model of a full siderophore to calculate the Fe isotope fractionation associated with organic complexation. Fractionation is more complicated upon the inclusion of the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB). The high affinity of DFOB for Fe(III) results in the highest predicted fractionation for 56Fe of all the complexes studied, reversing the unexpected fractionation trend mentioned above. We present the results of a detailed analysis of the bonding between Fe(III) and the ligands bound to it. We use natural bond order (NBO) analysis to show why the smaller ligands result in a larger partitioning of 56Fe to smaller ligands, and why DFOB has the highest 56Fe partitioning. This study will help elucidate the molecular controls on Fe isotope fractionation, and as such will be useful in placing experimental work in theoretical context and in helping drive future research questions. Accordingly, the implications of our results for the use of Fe isotopes as a biomarker and as a tracer of ocean redox history will be discussed, as

  19. Isotope Tracer Studies of Diffusion in Sillicates and of Geological Transport Processes Using Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, Gerald J

    2008-07-31

    The objectives were directed toward understanding the transport of chemical species in nature, with particular emphasis on aqueous transport in solution, in colloids, and on particles. Major improvements in measuring ultra-low concentrations of rare elements were achieved. We focused on two areas of studies: (1) Field, laboratory, and theoretical studies of the transport and deposition of U, Th isotopes and their daughter products in natural systems; and (2) Study of calcium isotope fractionation effects in marine carbonates and in carbonates precipitated in the laboratory, under controlled temperature, pH, and rates of precipitation. A major study of isotopic fractionation of Ca during calcite growth from solution has been completed and published. It was found that the isotopic shifts widely reported in the literature and attributed to biological processes are in fact due to a small equilibrium fractionation factor that is suppressed by supersaturation of the solution. These effects were demonstrated in the laboratory and with consideration of the solution conditions in natural systems, where [Ca{sup 2+}] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] + [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. The controlling rate is not the diffusion of Ca, as was earlier proposed, but rather the rate of supply of [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] ions to the interface. This now opens the issues of isotopic fractionation of many elements to a more physical-chemical approach. The isotopic composition of Ca {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) in calcite crystals has been determined relative to that in the parent solutions by TIMS using a double spike. Solutions were exposed to an atmosphere of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, provided by the decomposition of (NH4)2CO3. Alkalinity, pH, and concentrations of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, and CO{sub 2} in solution were determined. The procedures permitted us to determine {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) over a range of pH conditions, with the associated ranges of alkalinity. Two solutions with

  20. Automated image registration for FDOPA PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Yu, Dan-Chu; Melega, William; Barrio, Jorge R.; Phelps, Michael E.

    1996-12-01

    In this study, various image registration methods are investigated for their suitability for registration of L-6-[18F]-fluoro-DOPA (FDOPA) PET images. Five different optimization criteria including sum of absolute difference (SAD), mean square difference (MSD), cross-correlation coefficient (CC), standard deviation of pixel ratio (SDPR), and stochastic sign change (SSC) were implemented and Powell's algorithm was used to optimize the criteria. The optimization criteria were calculated either unidirectionally (i.e. only evaluating the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2) or bidirectionally (i.e. averaging the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2 and those for the sliced image 2 with the original image 1). Monkey FDOPA images taken at various known orientations were used to evaluate the accuracy of different methods. A set of human FDOPA dynamic images was used to investigate the ability of the methods for correcting subject movement. It was found that a large improvement in performance resulted when bidirectional rather than unidirectional criteria were used. Overall, the SAD, MSD and SDPR methods were found to be comparable in performance and were suitable for registering FDOPA images. The MSD method gave more adequate results for frame-to-frame image registration for correcting subject movement during a dynamic FDOPA study. The utility of the registration method is further demonstrated by registering FDOPA images in monkeys before and after amphetamine injection to reveal more clearly the changes in spatial distribution of FDOPA due to the drug intervention.

  1. Surface studies of water isotopes in Antarctica for quantitative interpretation of deep ice core data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, Amaelle; Casado, Mathieu; Prié, Frédéric; Magand, Olivier; Arnaud, Laurent; Ekaykin, Alexey; Petit, Jean-Robert; Picard, Ghislain; Fily, Michel; Minster, Bénédicte; Touzeau, Alexandra; Goursaud, Sentia; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Jouzel, Jean; Orsi, Anaïs

    2017-07-01

    Polar ice cores are unique climate archives. Indeed, most of them have a continuous stratigraphy and present high temporal resolution of many climate variables in a single archive. While water isotopic records (δD or δ18O) in ice cores are often taken as references for past atmospheric temperature variations, their relationship to temperature is associated with a large uncertainty. Several reasons are invoked to explain the limitation of such an approach; in particular, post-deposition effects are important in East Antarctica because of the low accumulation rates. The strong influence of post-deposition processes highlights the need for surface polar research programs in addition to deep drilling programs. We present here new results on water isotopes from several recent surface programs, mostly over East Antarctica. Together with previously published data, the new data presented in this study have several implications for the climatic reconstructions based on ice core isotopic data: (1) The spatial relationship between surface mean temperature and mean snow isotopic composition over the first meters in depth can be explained quite straightforwardly using simple isotopic models tuned to d-excess vs. δ18O evolution in transects on the East Antarctic sector. The observed spatial slopes are significantly higher (∼ 0.7-0.8‰·°C-1 for δ18O vs. temperature) than seasonal slopes inferred from precipitation data at Vostok and Dome C (0.35 to 0.46‰·°C-1). We explain these differences by changes in condensation versus surface temperature between summer and winter in the central East Antarctic plateau, where the inversion layer vanishes in summer. (2) Post-deposition effects linked to exchanges between the snow surface and the atmospheric water vapor lead to an evolution of δ18O in the surface snow, even in the absence of any precipitation event. This evolution preserves the positive correlation between the δ18O of snow and surface temperature, but is

  2. Surface studies of water isotopes in Antarctica for quantitative interpretation of deep ice core data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, Amaelle; Casado, Mathieu; Prié, Frédéric; Magand, Olivier; Arnaud, Laurent; Ekaykin, Alexey; Petit, Jean-Robert; Fily, Michel; Picard, Ghislain; Minster, Bénédicte; Touzeau, Alexandra; Goursaud, Sentia; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Jouzel, Jean; Orsi, Anaïs

    2017-04-01

    Polar ice cores are unique climate archives. Indeed, most polar ice cores have a continuous stratigraphy and present high temporal resolution of many climate variables in a single archive. While water isotopic records (dD or d18O) in ice cores are often taken as reference for past atmospheric temperature variations, they are also associated with a large uncertainty in the quantification of past temperature changes. Several reasons are invoked to explain the limit of such an approach; in particular, post-deposition effects are especially important in East-Antarctica because of the low accumulation rate there. The strong influence of post-deposition processes highlight the need for surface polar programs in addition to deep drilling programs. We present here new results on water isotopes from several recent surface programs, mostly over East Antarctica. Together with previously published data, the new data presented in this study have several implications for the climatic reconstruction based on ice core isotopic data: 1- It has been shown that the spatial relationship between mean surface temperature and mean isotopic composition of precipitation can be explained quite straightforwardly using simple isotopic models tuned to d-excess vs 18O evolution in transects on the East Antarctic sector. The spatial slopes deduced from the transects are however quite high ( 0.7-0.8 ‰.°C-1 for 18O vs temperature) compared to the temporal slopes derivedat the annual scale from precipitation sampling at sites from East Antarctica like Vostok and Dome C (slope between d18O and temperature of 0.35 to 0.46 ‰.°C-1). Such a difference may well be explained by the vanishing inversion layer in summer (Landais et al., 2012; Casado et al. 2016). 2- Post-deposition effects linked to exchanges between the snow surface and the atmospheric water vapor lead to an evolution of d18O in the surface snow in the absence of any precipitation event. This evolution preserves the positive

  3. A stable carbon isotope and biological marker study of Polish bituminous coals and carbonaceous shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kotarba, M.J.; Clayton, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Biological marker and carbon isotopic compositions of coals and carbonaceous shales from the Upper Carboniferous strata of the Upper Silesian (USCB), Lower Silesian (LSCB), and Lublin (LCB) coal basins were determined to assess depositional conditions and sources of the organic matter. n-Alkane, sterane, and isoprenoid distribution, and carbon isotope ratios are consistent with an origin from higher plants. In some cases, pristane/phytane (Pr/Ph) ratios of carbonaceous shales (roof and floor shales) are < 1.0, while the associated coals have high ratios (??? 1.0). This suggests that reducing conditions prevailed during deposition of the shales, but a period of oxidizing conditions accompanied deposition of the coals. Steranes present in coal extracts are dominated by the 14??(H)17??(H)20R C29 stereoisomers, typical, but not conclusive, of higher plant origin. Carbonaceous shales exhibit a wider range of sterane composition, suggesting local, significant input of algal organic matter. Significant amounts of benzohopanes and gammacerane are present in some coals. Although benzohopanes are present at least in small amounts in samples from many different environments, they have been reported to occur most commonly in marine environments. The present study seems to provide the first example where benzohopanes have been reported in significant amounts in terrestrial organic matter. Gammacerane is abundant in rocks or sediments deposited in carbonate or highly saline marine environments. The finding of high gammacerane concentrations in the coals expands the depositional settings in which it has been observed and questions its utility as an independent indicator of hypersaline carbonate environments. Stable carbon isotope composition of coals, and type III kerogen in carbonaceous shales as well as correlation of stable carbon isotope composition of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons in carbonaceous shales from both the USCB and the LSCB indicate terrigenous origin

  4. Combined Study of Highly Siderophile Elements and Cr Isotopes in the Chondrules of Unequilibrated Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlag, Y.; Becker, H.

    2017-02-01

    We are presenting the highly siderophile element abundances and Re-Os isotope systematics and Cr isotope composition of bulk chondrule fractions from unequilibrated chondrites to understand the chondrule formation processes.

  5. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in the study of avian and mammalian trophic ecology

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey F. Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Differential fractionation of stable isotopes of carbon during photosynthesis causes C4 plants and C3 plants to have distinct carbon-isotope signatures. In addition, marine C3 plants have stable-isotope ratios of carbon that are intermediate between C4 and terrestrial C3 plants. The direct incorporation of the carbon-isotope ratio (13C/12C) of plants into consumers...

  6. Penn State's Visual Image User Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisciotta, Henry A.; Dooris, Michael J.; Frost, James; Halm, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Visual Image User Study (VIUS), an extensive needs assessment project at Penn State University, describes academic users of pictures and their perceptions. These findings outline the potential market for digital images and list the likely determinates of whether or not a system will be used. They also explain some key user requirements for…

  7. Penn State's Visual Image User Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisciotta, Henry A.; Dooris, Michael J.; Frost, James; Halm, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Visual Image User Study (VIUS), an extensive needs assessment project at Penn State University, describes academic users of pictures and their perceptions. These findings outline the potential market for digital images and list the likely determinates of whether or not a system will be used. They also explain some key user requirements for…

  8. Imaging retina to study dementia and stroke.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carol Yim-Lui; Ikram, M Kamran; Chen, Christopher; Wong, Tien Yin

    2017-03-01

    With increase in life expectancy, the number of persons suffering from common age-related brain diseases, including neurodegenerative (e.g., dementia) and cerebrovascular (e.g., stroke) disease is expected to rise substantially. As current neuro-imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging may not be able to detect subtle subclinical changes (resolution <100-500 μm) in dementia and stroke, there is an urgent need for other complementary techniques to probe the pathophysiology of these diseases. The retina - due to its anatomical, embryological and physiological similarities with the brain - offers a unique and accessible "window" to study correlates and consequences of subclinical pathology in the brain. Retinal components such as the microvasculature and retinal ganglion cell axons can now be visualized non-invasively using different retinal imaging techniques e.g., ocular fundus photography and optical coherence tomography. Advances in retinal imaging may provide new and potentially important insights into cerebrovascular neurodegenerative processes in addition to what is currently possible with neuro-imaging. In this review, we present an overview of the current literature on the application of retinal imaging in the study of dementia and stroke. We discuss clinical implications of these studies, novel state-of-the-art retinal imaging techniques and future directions aimed at evaluating whether retinal imaging can be an additional investigation tool in the study of dementia and stroke.

  9. Study of the influence of alcoholic fermentation and distillation on the oxygen-18/oxygen-16 isotope ratio of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Monsallier-Bitea, Claudia; Jamin, Eric; Lees, Michèle; Zhang, Ben-Li; Martin, Gérard J

    2006-01-25

    A laboratory procedure for the analysis of the oxygen-18/oxygen-16 isotope ratios of ethanol derived from sugars and fruit juices by pyrolysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been applied to the study of isotopic fractionation induced by the isotope effects of fermentation and distillation. For both processes, an experimental model has been established to describe and explain the observed fractionation phenomena. It is shown that reproducible results can be obtained when appropriate analytical conditions are used. Moreover, the ability of ethanol to act as a reliable indicator of the (18)O/(16)O ratio of sugars in orange juice (and therefore to be used as an internal reference for detecting water addition) is demonstrated both in theory and in practice.

  10. Influence of attenuation correction on transient left ventricular dilation in dual isotope myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Brodov, Yafim; Frenkel, Alex; Chouraqui, Pierre; Przewloka, Kinga; Rispler, Shmuel; Abadi, Sobhi; Keidar, Zohar

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of attenuation correction (AC) on left ventricular (LV) volumes and LV transient ischemic dilatation (TID) during dual-isotope single-photon emission computer tomographic (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Ninety-six patients (mean age 58 ± 11 years, 15% women, 38 patients completed exercise and 58 dipyridamole pharmacologic stress tests) assessed for known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent dual-isotope thallium-201 rest and technetium-99m sestamibi stress SPECT MPI with computed tomography-based AC. The TID ratio was calculated separately for non-AC and AC SPECT MPI studies as the ratio of the LV endocardial volume at stress divided by LV endocardial volume at rest. The mean and range of the gated LV ejection fraction during exercise and pharmacologic stress was 54 ± 12% (29% to 80%) and 58 ± 12% (27% to 80%), respectively. In the exercise stress group, the same mean LV endocardial volumes in non-AC and AC stress (76.4 ± 30 and 76.5 ± 28) and rest (66.3 ± 26 and 66.4 ± 24) studies were found (p = 0.90). There was no statistical difference between the mean exercise TID ratio in non-AC and AC studies (1.27 vs 1.31, respectively, p = 0.10). The same mean LV endocardial volumes in non-AC and AC in pharmacologic stress (79.9 ± 42 and 80 ± 41) and rest (71.4 ± 41 and 72.3 ± 37), respectively, were found (p = 0.50). There was no statistical difference between the mean dipyridamole TID ratio in non-AC and AC studies (1.20 vs 1.17, respectively, p = 0.10). In conclusion, LV volumes and TID indexes obtained on SPECT MPI with exercise or pharmacologic stress using dipyridamole are not affected by AC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ForCent model development and testing using the Enriched Background Isotope Study experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parton, W.J.; Hanson, P. J.; Swanston, C.; Torn, M.; Trumbore, S. E.; Riley, W.; Kelly, R.

    2010-10-01

    The ForCent forest ecosystem model was developed by making major revisions to the DayCent model including: (1) adding a humus organic pool, (2) incorporating a detailed root growth model, and (3) including plant phenological growth patterns. Observed plant production and soil respiration data from 1993 to 2000 were used to demonstrate that the ForCent model could accurately simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory deciduous forest. A comparison of ForCent versus observed soil pool {sup 14}C signature ({Delta} {sup 14}C) data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experiment (1999-2006) shows that the model correctly simulates the temporal dynamics of the {sup 14}C label as it moved from the surface litter and roots into the mineral soil organic matter pools. ForCent model validation was performed by comparing the observed Enriched Background Isotope Study experimental data with simulated live and dead root biomass {Delta} {sup 14}C data, and with soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C (mineral soil, humus layer, leaf litter layer, and total soil respiration) data. Results show that the model correctly simulates the impact of the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experimental treatments on soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C values for the different soil organic matter pools. Model results suggest that a two-pool root growth model correctly represents root carbon dynamics and inputs to the soil. The model fitting process and sensitivity analysis exposed uncertainty in our estimates of the fraction of mineral soil in the slow and passive pools, dissolved organic carbon flux out of the litter layer into the mineral soil, and mixing of the humus layer into the mineral soil layer.

  12. Isotopic enrichment in herbivorous insects: a comparative field-based study of variation.

    PubMed

    Spence, Kenneth O; Rosenheim, Jay A

    2005-11-01

    Researchers will be able to use stable isotope analysis to study community structure in an efficient way, without a need for extensive calibrations, if isotopic enrichment values are consistent, or if variation in enrichment values can be predicted. In this study, we generated an experimental data set of delta15N and delta13C enrichment means for 22 terrestrial herbivorous arthropods feeding on 18 different host plants. Mean enrichments observed across a single trophic transfer (plants to herbivores) were -0.53+/-0.26 per thousand for delta13C (range: -3.47 per thousand to 1.89 per thousand) and 1.88+/-0.37 per thousand for delta15N (range: -0.20 per thousand to 6.59 per thousand). The mean delta13C enrichment was significantly lower than that reported in recent literature surveys, whereas the mean delta15N enrichment was not significantly different. The experimental data set provided no support for recent hypotheses advanced to explain variation in enrichment values, including the proposed roles for consumer feeding mode, development type, and diet C:N ratio. A larger data set, formed by combining our experimental data with data from the literature, did suggest possible roles for feeding mode, nitrogen recycling, herbivore life stage, and host plant type. Our results indicate that species enrichment values are variable even in this relatively narrow defined group of organisms and that our ability to predict enrichment values of terrestrial herbivorous arthropods based on physiological, ecological, or taxonomic traits is low. The primary implications are that (1) mean enrichment may have to be measured empirically for each trophic link of interest, rather than relying on estimates from a broad survey of animal taxa and (2) the advantage of using stable isotope analysis to probe animal communities that are recalcitrant to other modes of study will be somewhat diminished as a consequence.

  13. ForCent model development and testing using the Enriched Background Isotope Study experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parton, William J.; Hanson, Paul J.; Swanston, Chris; Torn, Margaret; Trumbore, Susan E.; Riley, William; Kelly, Robin

    2010-12-01

    The ForCent forest ecosystem model was developed by making major revisions to the DayCent model including: (1) adding a humus organic pool, (2) incorporating a detailed root growth model, and (3) including plant phenological growth patterns. Observed plant production and soil respiration data from 1993 to 2000 were used to demonstrate that the ForCent model could accurately simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory deciduous forest. A comparison of ForCent versus observed soil pool 14C signature (Δ 14C) data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study 14C experiment (1999-2006) shows that the model correctly simulates the temporal dynamics of the 14C label as it moved from the surface litter and roots into the mineral soil organic matter pools. ForCent model validation was performed by comparing the observed Enriched Background Isotope Study experimental data with simulated live and dead root biomass Δ 14C data, and with soil respiration Δ 14C (mineral soil, humus layer, leaf litter layer, and total soil respiration) data. Results show that the model correctly simulates the impact of the Enriched Background Isotope Study 14C experimental treatments on soil respiration Δ 14C values for the different soil organic matter pools. Model results suggest that a two-pool root growth model correctly represents root carbon dynamics and inputs to the soil. The model fitting process and sensitivity analysis exposed uncertainty in our estimates of the fraction of mineral soil in the slow and passive pools, dissolved organic carbon flux out of the litter layer into the mineral soil, and mixing of the humus layer into the mineral soil layer.

  14. ForCent Model Development and Testing using the Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS) Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parton, William; Hanson, Paul J; Swanston, Chris; Torn, Margaret S.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Riley, William J.; Kelly, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The ForCent forest ecosystem model was developed by making major revisions to the DayCent model including: (1) adding a humus organic pool, (2) incorporating a detailed root growth model, and (3) including plant phenological growth patterns. Observed plant production and soil respiration data from 1993 to 2000 were used to demonstrate that the ForCent model could accurately simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory deciduous forest. A comparison of ForCent versus observed soil pool 14C signature (? 14C) data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study 14C experiment (1999-2006) shows that the model correctly simulates the temporal dynamics of the 14C label as it moved from the surface litter and roots into the mineral soil organic matter pools. ForCent model validation was performed by comparing the observed Enriched Background Isotope Study experimental data with simulated live and dead root biomass ? 14C data, and with soil respiration ? 14C (mineral soil, humus layer, leaf litter layer, and total soil respiration) data. Results show that the model correctly simulates the impact of the Enriched Background Isotope Study 14C experimental treatments on soil respiration ? 14C values for the different soil organic matter pools. Model results suggest that a two-pool root growth model correctly represents root carbon dynamics and inputs to the soil. The model fitting process and sensitivity analysis exposed uncertainty in our estimates of the fraction of mineral soil in the slow and passive pools, dissolved organic carbon flux out of the litter layer into the mineral soil, and mixing of the humus layer into the mineral soil layer.

  15. Oxygen and chlorine isotopic fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation: Laboratory results and implications for forensics and natural attenuation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturchio, N.C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Beloso, Abelardo D.; Streger, S.H.; Heraty, L.J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant having both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in a given sample of perchlorate may be used to distinguish its source(s). Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the extent of biodegradation of perchlorate, which is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant in groundwater. For this approach to be useful, however, the kinetic isotopic fractionations of O and Cl during perchlorate biodegradation must first be determined as a function of environmental variables such as temperature and bacterial species. A laboratory study was performed in which the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial strains (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10??C and 22??C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely reduced by both strains within 280 h at 22??C and 615 h at 10??C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were ??18O = -36.6 to -29.0??? and ??37Cl = -14.5 to -11.5???, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. An experiment using 18O-enriched water (??18O = +198???) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in the isotopically normal water (??18O = -8.1???) used in the other experiments, indicating negligible isotope exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio ??18O/??37Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 ?? 0.04. These data indicate that isotope ratio analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (??18O/??37Cl) also has significant implications for forensic studies. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  16. Self-diffusion of polycrystalline ice Ih under confining pressure: Hydrogen isotope analysis using 2-D Raman imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Naoki; Kubo, Tomoaki; Durham, William B.; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Ichiko

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a high-resolution technique based on micro Raman spectroscopy to measure hydrogen isotope diffusion profiles in ice Ih. The calibration curve for quantitative analysis of deuterium in ice Ih was constructed using micro Raman spectroscopy. Diffusion experiments using diffusion couples composed of dense polycrystalline H2O and D2O ice were carried out under a gas confining pressure of 100 MPa (to suppress micro-fracturing and pore formation) at temperatures from 235 K to 245 K and diffusion times from 0.2 to 94 hours. Two-dimensional deuterium profiles across the diffusion couples were determined by Raman imaging. The location of small spots of frost from room air could be detected from the shapes of the Raman bands of OH and OD stretching modes, which change because of the effect of the molar ratio of deuterium on the molecular coupling interaction. We emphasize the validity for screening the impurities utilizing the coupling interaction. Some recrystallization and grain boundary migration occurred in recovered diffusion couples, but analysis of two-dimensional diffusion profiles of regions not affected by grain boundary migration allowed us to measure a volume diffusivity for ice at 100 MPa of (2.8 ± 0.4) ×10-3exp[ -57.0 ± 15.4kJ /mol/RT ] m2 /s (R is the gas constant, T is temperature). Based on ambient pressure diffusivity measurements by others, this value indicates a high (negative) activation volume for volume diffusivity of -29.5 cm3/mol or more. We can also constrain the value of grain boundary diffusivity in ice at 100 MPa to be <104 that of volume diffusivity.

  17. [Applications of stable isotope analysis in the trophic ecology studies of cephalopods].

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Kai; Gong, Yi; Chen, Xin-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Cephalopods play an important role in marine food webs, however, knowledge about their complex life history, especially their feeding ecology, remains limited. With the rapidly increasing use of stable isotope analysis (SIA) in ecology, it becomes a powerful tool and complement of traditional methods for investigating the trophic ecology and migration patterns of invertebrates. Here, after summarizing the current methods for trophic ecology investigation of cephalopods, applications of SIA in studying the trophic ecology of cephalopods were reviewed, including the key issues such as standardization of available tissues for SIA analyzing, diet shift and migration patterns of cephalopods, with the aim of advancing its application in the biology of cephalopods in the future.

  18. Using stable Mg isotopes to distinguish dolomite formation mechanisms: A case study from the Peru Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Meister, Patrick; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2014-05-01

    Early diagenetic processes in marine sediments lead to formation of authigenic carbonates with distinctive chemical and isotopic compositions. Such environments represent one of the few geological settings where contemporaneous dolomite formation can be observed. In this study we examined diagenetic dolomites and their adjacent pore fluids in a 250 m thick sedimentary section drilled into the Peru Margin during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 201 (Site 1230) using stable Mg isotopes. Previous studies revealed the presence of two types of dolomite: type (I) dolomite forms at ~6 m below seafloor (mbsf) due to an increase in alkalinity associated with anaerobic methane oxidation, and type (II) forms at focused sites below 230 mbsf due to episodic inflow of deep-sourced fluids into an intense methanogenesis zone. The pore fluid δ26Mg values progressively increase with depth from values similar to seawater (i.e. -0.8 ) in the top few meters below seafloor (mbsf) to 0.8±0.2 o within the sediments located below 100 mbsf. Type I dolomites have a δ26Mg of -3.5 o and exhibit apparent dolomite-pore fluid fractionation factors of about -2.6 o consistent with previous studies of dolomite precipitation from seawater. In contrast, type II dolomites have δ26Mg values ranging from -2.5 to -3.0 o and exhibit apparent dolomite-fluid fractionation factors of -3.1 to -3.6‰The larger apparent fractionation factor of the type II dolomite could stem from 1) Rayleigh fractionation in a semi-closed system or 2) changes in fluid composition following dolomite precipitation. The difference in the Mg isotope composition of the studied dolomites demonstrates that Mg isotopes can aid to evaluate whether diagenetic phases formed under open or closed-system conditions in marine sediments. Hence they provide an additional tool to reconstruct geochemical conditions conducive to early diagenetic processes that can now be applied to the geological record.

  19. 2H Stable Isotope Analysis of Tooth Enamel: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holobinko, Anastasia; Kemp, Helen; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Prowse, Tracy; Ford, Susan

    2010-05-01

    Stable isotope analysis of biogenic tissues such as tooth enamel and bone mineral has become a well recognized and increasingly important method for determining provenance of human remains, and has been used successfully in bioarchaeological studies as well as forensic investigations (Lee-Thorp, 2008; Meier-Augenstein and Fraser, 2008). Particularly, 18O and 2H stable isotopes are well established proxies as environmental indicators of climate (temperature) and source water and are therefore considered as indicators of geographic life trajectories of animals and humans (Hobson et al., 2004; Schwarcz and Walker, 2006). While methodology for 2H analysis of human hair, fingernails, and bone collagen is currently used to determine geographic origin and identify possible migration patterns, studies involving the analysis of 2H in tooth enamel appear to be nonexistent in the scientific literature. The apparent lack of research in this area is believed to have two main reasons. (1) Compared to the mineral calcium hydroxylapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, in tooth enamel forming bio-apatite carbonate ions replace some of the hydroxyl ions at a rate of one CO32 replacing two OH, yet published figures for the degree of substitution vary (Wopenka and Pasteris, 2005). (2) Most probably due to the aforementioned no published protocols exist for sample preparation and analytical method to obtain δ2H-values from the hydroxyl fraction of tooth enamel. This dilemma has been addressed through a pilot study to establish feasibility of 2H stable isotope analysis of ground tooth enamel by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) coupled on-line to a high-temperature conversion elemental analyzer (TC/EA). An array of archaeological and modern teeth has been analyzed under different experimental conditions, and results from this pilot study are being presented. References: Lee-Thorp, J.A. (2008) Archaeometry, 50, 925-950 Meier-Augenstein, W. and Fraser, I. (2008) Science & Justice

  20. A Systematic Study of β- Decay of Neutron-Rich Rh and Ag Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-B.; Dendooven, P.; Huikari, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Lhersonneau, G.; Nieminen, A.; Nummela, S.; Penttilä, H.; Peräjärvi, K.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Szerypo, J.; Wang, J. C.; ńystö, J.

    2006-11-01

    Beta decay of neutron-rich even-mass 114-118Rh and 116-120Ag isotopes has been studied using on-line mass-separated sources that were produced by applying 25 MeV proton induced symmetric fission of natural uranium at the IGISOL facility. The β-γ and γ-γ coincidence spectroscopy is employed in all cases that enables for the construction of the decay scheme and for the deduction of the decay properties. Systematics for two-quasineutron states in 114,116,118Pd and for three-phonon multiplet in 114,116,118Cd are presented and discussed.

  1. Further isotopic studies of heavy nuclei in the 9/23/78 solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    The isotopes considered range from He to Mg (Z from 2 to 12). A more accurate value of the Ne-22/Ne-20 ratio is obtained by extending the energy interval for isotope analysis. A significant difference persists between the Ne-22/Ne-20 ratio in this flare and that for the solar wind. How the sun can apparently emit two distinct isotopic components remains a question. Although relatively little is known about the solar wind isotopic composition, it does not appear that the solar wind isotopes have been altered by a simple mass-dependent fractionation process. Reference is made to models that have been proposed which might produce selective enhancements.

  2. Functional data analysis in brain imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian Siva

    2010-01-01

    Functional data analysis (FDA) considers the continuity of the curves or functions, and is a topic of increasing interest in the statistics community. FDA is commonly applied to time-series and spatial-series studies. The development of functional brain imaging techniques in recent years made it possible to study the relationship between brain and mind over time. Consequently, an enormous amount of functional data is collected and needs to be analyzed. Functional techniques designed for these data are in strong demand. This paper discusses three statistically challenging problems utilizing FDA techniques in functional brain imaging analysis. These problems are dimension reduction (or feature extraction), spatial classification in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, and the inverse problem in magneto-encephalography studies. The application of FDA to these issues is relatively new but has been shown to be considerably effective. Future efforts can further explore the potential of FDA in functional brain imaging studies.

  3. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO sub 2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. How Trees Interact with Their Hydrologic Environment: a Stable Isotope Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierke, C.; Newton, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Sacramento Mountains of southeast New Mexico serve as the primary recharge area to adjacent regional aquifers, including the Roswell Artesian Basin, the Tularosa Basin and the Salt Basin. Under pressures of population growth and climate change, land and water managers are interested in identifying land management and forest restoration methods that may increase local and regional groundwater recharge in the high mountains. The Sacramento Mountain Watershed Study is designed to assess the effects of tree thinning in mountain watersheds as an effective method of increasing groundwater recharge. The project employs a soil water balance to quantify the partitioning of local precipitation before and after tree thinning. This study was designed to determine the role that trees play in the hydrologic cycle by using the stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to identify tree water sources. The study is being conducted in a 1st order watershed with no perennial outflow stream where vegetation is dominated by Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga Menziesii). Ridges are capped with San Andres Limestone while lower slopes and the valley bottom are underlain by the Yeso Formation which is composed of sandstones, mudstones and interbedded carbonate layers. The area has thin soils covering shallow fractured bedrock or epikarst features. Some of the fractures within the epikarst zone provide direct conduits to the larger groundwater system while others are isolated rendering the reservoir inactive. From March 2011 to February 2012, we collected soil and twig samples from which water was extracted by cryogenic vacuum distillation. Soil water was also sampled with passive capillary samplers (PCAPS). The isotopic composition of bulk soil water appears to be controlled by evaporation of snowmelt stored within the soil matrix. The isotopic composition of soil water sampled by wick samplers reflects mixing of non-evaporated rainfall with evaporated bulk soil water. As the monsoon season

  5. Isotopic decoupling during porous melt flow: A case-study in the Lherz peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, V.; Bodinier, J.-L.; Alard, O.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Griffin, W. L.

    2009-03-01

    Most peridotite massifs and mantle xenoliths show a wide range of isotopic variations, often involving significant decoupling between Hf, Nd and Sr isotopes. These variations are generally ascribed either to mingling of individual components of contrasted isotopic compositions or to time integration of parent-element enrichment by percolating melts/fluids, superimposed onto previous depletion event(s). However, strong isotopic decoupling may also arise during porous flow as a result of daughter-elements fractionation during solid-liquid interaction. Although porous flow is recognized as an important process in mantle rocks, its effects on mantle isotopic variability have been barely investigated so far. The peridotites of the Lherz massif (French Pyrenees) display a frozen melt percolation front separating highly refractory harzburgites from refertilized lherzolites. Isotopic signatures observed at the melt percolation front show a strong decoupling of Hf from Nd and Sr isotopes that cannot be accounted for by simple mixing involving the harzburgite protolith and the percolating melt. Using one dimensional percolation-diffusion and percolation-reaction modeling, we show that these signatures represent transient isotopic compositions generated by porous flow. These signatures are governed by a few critical parameters such as daughter element concentrations in melt and peridotite, element diffusivity, and efficiency of isotopic homogenization rather than by the chromatographic effect of melt transport and the refertilization reaction. Subtle variations in these parameters may generate significant inter-isotopic decoupling and wide isotopic variations in mantle rocks.

  6. Nitrogen isotope tracers of high-temperature fluid-rock interactions: Case study of the Catalina Schist, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, Gray E.

    1997-09-01

    Nitrogen isotope data for metasomatized rocks, veins, and pegmatites in the Catalina Schist subduction zone metamorphic complex allow futher characterization of complex, high-P/T metasomatic proceses and evaluation of the scales of isotopic equilibration and fluid transport during subduction-zone metamorphism. Throughout the Catalina Schist, N resides predominantly as NH 4+ in white mica, which occurs in nearly all bulk compositions (i.e., metasedimentary, metamafic and, to a lesser extent, metaultramafic mélange) at all grades. Within each metamorphic unit of the Catalina Schist (ranging in grade from lawsonite-albite to amphibolite facies), δ 15N values of mica in metasomatized metamafic and metaultramafic rocks are consistent with the metasomatic addition of N from nearby, devolatilizing metasedimentary rocks into the initially N-poor mafic and ultramafic rocks. Within each unit, uniformity of mica δ 15N in metasomatized rocks relative to the δ 15N of metasedimentary rocks in the same unit implies mixing of N from nearby, heterogeneous metasedimentary sources, perhaps producing fluids with unifrom δ 15N at up to the kilometer scale. However, the trend in δ 15N of metasedimentary sources, with increasing metamorphic grade is inconsistent with larger scale up-temperature transfer of fluid (in this case, N 2-bearing) in the Catalina Schist paleosubduction zone; such flow (at scales of up to tens of kilometers) has been inferred through previous oxygen isotope study. Nitrogen isotope compositions are instead believed to have been controlled at a more local scale than the O isotope systematics, due to the more rock-dominated fluid-rock mass balance for N. The δ 15N of muscovite in leucosomes and pegmatites in amphibolite-grade metasedimentary exposures matches that of muscovite in metasedimentary hosts, implying minimal N-isotope fractionation during migmatization processes and possible transfer of metasedimentary N-isotope signatures in silicate melts. These

  7. Lead isotopic analyses of selected soil samples from the USEPA Vasquez Blvd.-I-70 study area, Denver, CO

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unruh, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    can be correlated with potential sources of Pb with known isotopic compositions in order to determine the relative contribution of Pb from a specific source to the sample. The purpose of this study is to use Pb isotopic data obtained from a selected subset of samples to determine the Pb isotopic signatures of uncontaminated soils as well as those of potential sources of contamination. The data will eventually be used in conjunction with other geochemical data to help determine which source or sources of contamination are most likely responsible for the elevated arsenic levels in the residential soils.

  8. Isotopic study of the Manaslu granite (Himalaya, Nepal): inferences on the age and source of Himalayan leucogranites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniel, Catherine; Vidal, Philippe; Fernandez, Angel; Le Fort, Patrick; Peucat, Jean-Jacques

    1987-05-01

    A detailed isotopic study of the Manaslu leucogranite was carried out. A U-Pb age of 25 Ma and a whole rock Rb-Sr age isochron of 18 Ma were obtained, suggesting that the magmatic activity lasted at least 7 Ma. Initial Sr isotopic ratios are very high (0.740 to 0.760) and initial Nd isotopic ratios are low ( ɛ {Nd/in}: -13 to -16), and they show the existence of large isotopic variations even at the metre scale. These are not the result of perturbations by fluids but rather they reflect the initial isotopic heterogeneity of the source material which has not been obliterated by magmatic processes (e.g. fusion, mixing by convection). These results also support the crustal origin of this leucogranite. The Tibetan slab paragneisses, whose Sr and Nd isotopic ratios are very similar to those of the granite at an age of 20 Ma, are the most probable parental material. Nd model ages for both the leucogranite and the gneisses are in the range 1.5 2 Ga. A model of formation of the Manaslu granite by coalescence of different batches of magma is in agreement with the present data.

  9. Isotopic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.

    1981-03-10

    Method and apparatus for separating isotopes in an isotopic mixture of atoms or molecules by increasing the mass differential among isotopic species. The mixture containing a particular isotope is selectively irradiated so as to selectively excite the isotope. This preferentially excited species is then reacted rapidly with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product containing the specific isotope, but having a mass different than the original species initially containing the particular isotope. The product and the remaining balance of the mixture is then caused to flow through a device which separates the product from the mixture based upon the increased mass differential.

  10. Upper mantle-derived free gas exhalations in central Europe - an isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braeuer, K.; Kaempf, H.; Niedermann, S.; Strauch, G.; Weise, S. M.

    2003-04-01

    The results of geochemical mapping (about 100 locations) of free gas exhalations in the western Eger Rift (Czech-German border region) are compared with data of free gas exhalations from the surroundings of the Laacher See (East Eifel, Germany) and Le Mont Dore (Massif Central, France). In the western Eger Rift, three gas exhalation centres characterized by high gas flux (> 85 m^3 h-1), CO_2 concentrations > 99 vol. -%, δ13C between -2 and -4 per mil, and ^3He/^4He ratios up to 6 R_a could be distinguished. CO_2-rich gases consist of mantle-derived components with only small admixtures of dissolved air due to sampling after passing a water phase. The scatter in δ13C values of CO_2-rich gases is due to isotope fractionation between gaseous CO_2, dissolved CO_2 and HCO_3, respectively. As a result of long-term monitoring studies at four locations in the western Eger Rift, the natural variation range of the gas and isotope composition could be evaluated and as a consequence of numerous data sets reliable δ15N mean values could be specified. At the Bublak mofette (NW Bohemia), the transport velocity in the upper crust is estimated at about 400 m/d. The Bublak CO_2 is enriched in 13C (δ13C ≈ -2 per mil) relative to MORB values and its CO_2/^3He is ˜6.5x10^9. In addition to the ^3He/^4He ratio of ≈ 5.9 R_a, which is in the range of values for European sub-continental mantle xeno-liths, also the uncorrected δ15N values (-3.2±0.7, n=16) show an upper mantle signature. Corrected for air via O_2 contents and/or 40Ar/36Ar ratios, the 15N/14N ratios yield δ15N <= -5 per mil, corresponding to mantle-derived nitrogen contributions of about 50 %. The channel-like fluid supply at the Bublak mofette related with the high transport velocity indicates that its isotope ratios are not significantly altered during transport through the crust and represent probably the signature of the magmatic source in the European sub-continental mantle. Comparable distribution patterns of

  11. Isotope Trace Studies of Diffusion in Silicates and of Geological Transport Processes Using Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. G. J. Wasserburg

    2001-01-19

    Over the past year we have competed two studies of Os concentration and isotopic composition in rivers from the Himalayan uplift and in hydrothermal fluids from the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Both of these studies have been published. We have completed a study of paleo-climate in Soreq Cave, Israel, and have expanded our studies of the transport of U-Th through riverine and estuarine environments. We are completing two studies of weathering and transport in the vadose in two very different environments--one a tropical regime with a deep laterite profile and the other a northern arboreal forest with only a thin weathering zone. We have begun a new study of U-Th in aquifers with low water velocity.

  12. Changes in nuclear structure along the Mn isotopic chain studied via charge radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heylen, H.; Babcock, C.; Beerwerth, R.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Bonnard, J.; Campbell, P.; Cheal, B.; Day Goodacre, T.; Fedorov, D.; Fritzsche, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Geithner, W.; Geppert, Ch.; Gins, W.; Grob, L. K.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Lenzi, S. M.; Moore, I. D.; Maass, B.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Marsh, B.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Otsuka, T.; Papuga, J.; Rossel, R.; Rothe, S.; Sánchez, R.; Tsunoda, Y.; Wraith, C.; Xie, L.; Yang, X. F.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-11-01

    The hyperfine spectra of 51,53 -64Mn were measured in two experimental runs using collinear laser spectroscopy at ISOLDE, CERN. Laser spectroscopy was performed on the atomic 3 d54 s25/2 6S →3 d54 s 4 p 3/2 6P and ionic 3 d54 s 5S2→3 d54 p 5P3 transitions, yielding two sets of isotope shifts. The mass and field shift factors for both transitions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock framework and were combined with a King plot analysis in order to obtain a consistent set of mean-square charge radii which, together with earlier work on neutron-deficient Mn, allow the study of nuclear structure changes from N =25 across N =28 up to N =39 . A clear development of deformation is observed towards N =40 , confirming the conclusions of the nuclear moments studies. From a Monte Carlo shell-model study of the shape in the Mn isotopic chain, it is suggested that the observed development of deformation is not only due to an increase in static prolate deformation but also due to shape fluctuations and triaxiality. The changes in mean-square charge radii are well reproduced using the Duflo-Zuker formula except in the case of large deformation.

  13. Theoretical study of neutron-rich 107,109,111,113Rh isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Suram; Khosa, S. K.; Bharti, Arun; Bhat, G. H.; Sheikh, J. A.

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical study of the structure of some odd mass Rh nuclei in the A 100 mass region is carried out by using the angular momentum projection technique implemented in the projected shell model (PSM). The influence of the high-j orbitals (h11/2 for neutrons and g9/2 for protons) on the structure of 107-113Rh isotopes is investigated in the present case by assuming an axial symmetry in the deformed basis. For these isotopes, the structure of multi-quasi-particle qp bands is studied along the yrast line in detail. Further, the phenomenon of back-bending is also studied theoretically and is found to be in agreement with the experimental data. The reduced transition probabilities, i.e., B(E2) and B(M1) for the yrast band are also obtained from the PSM wave functions for the first time, thereby providing an opportunity for the experimentalists to work for this data.

  14. Spectroscopic study of jet-cooled deuterated porphycenes: unusual isotopic effects on proton tunneling.

    PubMed

    Mengesha, Ephriem T; Zehnacker-Rentien, Anne; Sepioł, J; Kijak, M; Waluk, J

    2015-02-12

    Porphycene (Pc) is a well-known model for studying double hydrogen transfer, which shows vibrational-mode-specific tunneling splitting when isolated in supersonic jets or helium nanodroplets. The effect of deuteration on tunneling splitting is reported for jet-cooled heterogeneous, deuterated Pc samples (Pc-d(mix)) with the prevailing contribution of Pc-d12 isotopologue. The sample introduced into the gas phase using laser desorption is studied by means of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and single vibronic level fluorescence (SVLF) measurements, in combination with quantum chemical calculations. The influence of molecular symmetry is studied by comparing Pc, Pc-d12, and Pc-d11. The spectra of Pc-d12 show strong similarity to those of the parent undeuterated porphycene (Pc). Comparable tunneling splitting is observed in the two isotopologues, both for the 0-0 transition and the most efficient promoting 2Ag mode. In contrast, an unusual isotopic effect is observed for the totally symmetrical 4Ag mode. While this vibration behaves as a neutral mode in Pc, neither enhancing nor decreasing the tunneling efficiency, it strongly promotes hydrogen transfer in Pc-d12. This observation is explained in terms of modification of the displacement vectors of the 4Ag mode upon deuteration. It demonstrates that isotope substitution affects hydrogen transfer even when the weak structural modifications are far from the reaction center, emphasizing the strongly multidimensional nature of the tunneling process.

  15. Image processing of angiograms: A pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, L. E.; Evans, R. A.; Roehm, J. O., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The technology transfer application this report describes is the result of a pilot study of image-processing methods applied to the image enhancement, coding, and analysis of arteriograms. Angiography is a subspecialty of radiology that employs the introduction of media with high X-ray absorption into arteries in order to study vessel pathology as well as to infer disease of the organs supplied by the vessel in question.

  16. Cryogenic Carbonate Formation on Mars: Clues from Stable Isotope Variations Seen in Experimental Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Fu, Qi; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Discoveries of large deposits of sedimentary materials on the planet Mars by landers and orbiters have confirmed the widely held hypothesis that water has played a crucial role in the development of the martian surface. Recent studies have indicated that both water ice and liquid water may have been present and in the case of water ice perhaps is still present on or near the surface of Mars. However, there remains much controversy about the prevailing atmospheric conditions and climate of Mars during its history and whether liquid water existed on the martian surface simply during discrete geological events or whether this water was present over relatively much longer geologic time periods. The recent identification of Ca-rich carbonate by the Phoenix lander as well as its measurement of the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 has shown the importance of understanding the carbonates on Mars as an important sink of atmospheric carbon. This work compliments that of our past experiments where we produced cryogenic calcite in open containers, as analogs for terrestrial aufeis formation, and as a means for evaluating the fractionation of C-13 in CO2 during bicarbonate freezing [13]. Unlike our previous experiments in which carbonates were grown in ambient laboratory condition in open containers (atmospheric pressure and composition), this work attempts to quantify the amount of delta C-13 enrichment possible in both fluids and secondary carbonates formed from freezing of bicarbonate fluids under martian-like atmospheric conditions. Morphologic textures of produced carbonates in these experiments are also examined under SEM in order to identify the effect that the cryogenic freezing process has on the mineral's mineralogy. Understanding the role of kinetic isotope fractionation during formation of carbonates under martian-like conditions will aid in our ability to quantify the isotopic composition of the carbonate sink furthering our ability to model the climate

  17. Quantifying MTBE biodegradation in the Vandenberg Air Force Base ethanol release study using stable carbon isotopes.

    PubMed

    McKelvie, Jennifer R; Mackay, Douglas M; de Sieyes, Nicholas R; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2007-12-07

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) was used to assess biodegradation of MTBE and TBA during an ethanol release study at Vandenberg Air Force Base. Two continuous side-by-side field releases were conducted within a preexisting MTBE plume to form two lanes. The first involved the continuous injection of site groundwater amended with benzene, toluene and o-xylene ("No ethanol lane"), while the other involved the continuous injection of site groundwater amended with benzene, toluene and o-xylene and ethanol ("With ethanol lane"). The delta(13)C of MTBE for all wells in the "No ethanol lane" remained constant during the experiment with a mean value of -31.3 +/- 0.5 per thousand (n=40), suggesting the absence of any substantial MTBE biodegradation in this lane. In contrast, substantial enrichment in (13)C of MTBE by 40.6 per thousand, was measured in the "With ethanol lane", consistent with the effects of biodegradation. A substantial amount of TBA (up to 1200 microg/L) was produced by the biodegradation of MTBE in the "With ethanol lane". The mean value of delta(13)C for TBA in groundwater samples in the "With ethanol lane" was -26.0 +/- 1.0 per thousand (n=32). Uniform delta(13)C TBA values through space and time in this lane suggest that substantial anaerobic biodegradation of TBA did not occur during the experiment. Using the reported range in isotopic enrichment factors for MTBE of -9.2 per thousand to -15.6 per thousand, and values of delta(13)C of MTBE in groundwater samples, MTBE first-order biodegradation rates in the "With ethanol lane" were 12.0 to 20.3 year(-1) (n=18). The isotope-derived rate constants are in good agreement with the previously published rate constant of 16.8 year(-1) calculated using contaminant mass-discharge for the "With ethanol lane".

  18. Psychophysical study of image orientation perception.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiebo; Crandall, David; Singhal, Amit; Boutell, Matthew; Gray, Robert T

    2003-01-01

    The experiment reported here investigates the perception of orientation of color photographic images. A collection of 1000 images (mix of professional photos and consumer snapshots) was used in this study. Each image was examined by at least five observers and shown at varying resolutions. At each resolution, observers were asked to indicate the image orientation, the level of confidence, and the cues they used to make the decision. The results show that for typical images, accuracy is close to 98% when using all available semantic cues from high-resolution images, and 84% when using only low-level vision features and coarse semantics from thumbnails. The accuracy by human observers suggests an upper bound for the performance of an automatic system. In addition, the use of a large, carefully chosen image set that spans the 'photo space' (in terms of occasions and subject matter) and extensive interaction with the human observers reveals cues used by humans at various image resolutions: sky and people are the most useful and reliable among a number of important semantic cues.

  19. Reconnaissance isotopic and hydrochemical study of Cuatro Ciénegas groundwater, Coahuila, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, Karen H.; Cortés, Alejandra; Kilroy, Kathryn C.

    2004-10-01

    The springs of the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson (Four Marshes basin), Coahuila, México, support more than 70 endemic species of biota. The specifics of the groundwater flow regime, however, remain a mystery. Water samples were collected from a series of springs and pools and one canal in the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson and analyzed for field parameters (temperature, pH, conductivity, alkalinity) and stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in an attempt to begin a systematic study of the hydrogeology of the region. Groundwaters discharging directly along a fault-controlled spring line in Cretaceous carbonate rocks of the Cupido-Aurora aquifer are the most dilute (lowest conductivities) and warmest of those sampled. Cuatro Ciénegas waters are characterized by circumneutral pH (6.9-7.7) and reasonably low alkalinity (160-215 mg/kg as HCO 3). The δ18O values of Cuatro Ciénegas waters range from -8.2 to -5.7‰, with a mean of -6.5±0.82‰, whereas δD ranges from -52 to -43‰, with a mean of -46.6±3.2‰. The majority of the water samples plot subparallel and beneath the local meteoric water line; those samples collected farthest from the spring line exhibit the most enriched δ18O and δD values. The stable isotope data indicate that isotopic enrichment of groundwaters by evaporation following discharge and subsequent surface flow is an important process within the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson. The isotope data also suggest that a fraction of Cuatro Ciénegas groundwater originates with local recharge in mountains surrounding the bolson. Those springs that issue from the western base of the Sierra de San Marcos mountain range are recharged in part in these mountains, whereas groundwaters discharging from Laguna Anteojo in the northern part of the bolson are more likely recharged in the higher San de la Madera mountain range. An estimate of the water balance suggests that interbasin flow also may contribute to the considerable groundwater discharge.

  20. Tracing amino acid exchange during host-pathogen interaction by combined stable-isotope time-resolved Raman spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Boitor, Radu A.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the temporal and spatial interchange of the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) between human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) and tachyzoites of the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is combined with Raman micro-spectroscopy to selectively monitor the incorporation of deuterium-labelled Phe into proteins in individual live tachyzoites. Our results show a very rapid uptake of L-Phe(D8) by the intracellular growing parasite. T. gondii tachyzoites are capable of extracting L-Phe(D8) from host cells as soon as it invades the cell. L-Phe(D8) from the host cell completely replaces the L-Phe within T. gondii tachyzoites 7–9 hours after infection. A quantitative model based on Raman spectra allowed an estimation of the exchange rate of Phe as 0.5–1.6 × 104 molecules/s. On the other hand, extracellular tachyzoites were not able to consume L-Phe(D8) after 24 hours of infection. These findings further our understanding of the amino acid trafficking between host cells and this strictly intracellular parasite. In particular, this study highlights new aspects of the metabolism of amino acid Phe operative during the interaction between T. gondii and its host cell.

  1. A Benchmark Study of Kinetic Isotope Effects and Barrier Heights for the Finkelstein Reaction.

    PubMed

    Żaczek, Szymon; Gelman, Faina; Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka

    2017-03-30

    Herein, we present a combined (experimental and computational) study of the Finkelstein reaction in condensed phase, where bromine is substituted by iodine in 2-bromoethylbenzene, in the presence of either acetone or acetonitrile as a solvent. Performance of various density functional theory and ab initio methods were tested for reaction barrier heights as well as for bromine and carbon kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). Two different implicit solvation models were examined (PCM and SMD). Theoretically predicted KIEs were compared with experimental values, while reaction barrier heights were assessed using the CCSD(T)-level and experimental energies as reference. In general, although the tested parameters (energies and KIEs) do not exhibit any substantial difference upon a change of the solvent, the different behavior of the theoretical methods was observed depending on the solvent. With respect to isotope effects, both PCM and SMD seem to perform very similarly, though results obtained with PCM are slightly closer to the experimental values. For predicting reaction barriers, utilization of either PCM or SMD solvation models yielded different results. Functionals from the ωB97 family: ωB97, ωB97X, and ωB97X-D provide the most accurate results for the studied system.

  2. Developments towards in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy studies of actinium isotopes at LISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeder, S.; Bastin, B.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Delahaye, P.; Ferrer, R.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Ghys, L.; Gaffney, L. P.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Luton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martinez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Traykov, E.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2016-06-01

    To study exotic nuclides at the borders of stability with laser ionization and spectroscopy techniques, highest efficiencies in combination with a high spectral resolution are required. These usually opposing requirements are reconciled by applying the in-gas-laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) technique in the supersonic gas jet produced by a de Laval nozzle installed at the exit of the stopping gas cell. Carrying out laser ionization in the low-temperature and low density supersonic gas jet eliminates pressure broadening, which will significantly improve the spectral resolution. This article presents the required modifications at the Leuven Isotope Separator On-Line (LISOL) facility that are needed for the first on-line studies of in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy. Different geometries for the gas outlet and extraction ion guides have been tested for their performance regarding the acceptance of laser ionized species as well as for their differential pumping capacities. The specifications and performance of the temporarily installed high repetition rate laser system, including a narrow bandwidth injection-locked Ti:sapphire laser, are discussed and first preliminary results on neutron-deficient actinium isotopes are presented indicating the high capability of this novel technique.

  3. Potential of Opuntia ficus-indica for air pollution biomonitoring: a lead isotopic study.

    PubMed

    El Hayek, Eliane; El Samrani, Antoine; Lartiges, Bruno; Kazpard, Veronique; Benoit, Mathieu; Munoz, Marguerite

    2015-11-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica (Ofi) is a long-domesticated cactus that is widespread throughout arid and semiarid regions. Ofi is grown for both its fruits and edible cladodes, which are flattened photosynthetic stems. Young cladodes develop from mother cladodes, thus forming series of cladodes of different ages. Therefore, successive cladodes may hold some potential for biomonitoring over several years the local atmospheric pollution. In this study, cladodes, roots, dust deposited onto the cladodes, and soil samples were collected in the vicinity of three heavily polluted sites, i.e., a fertilizer industry, the road side of a highway, and mine tailings. The lead content was analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) was used to characterize the cladode surfaces and the nature of dust deposit, and the lead isotopes were analyzed to identify the origin of Pb. The results show that (i) Ofi readily bioaccumulates Pb, (ii) the lead isotopic composition of cladodes evidences a foliar pathway of lead into Ofi and identifies the relative contributions of local Pb sources, and (iii) an evolution of air quality is recorded with successive cladodes, which makes Ofi a potential biomonitor to be used in environmental and health studies.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation and experimental studies of the production of neutron-rich medical isotopes using a particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necsoiu Rosencranz, Daniela

    The developments of nuclear medicine lead to an increasing demand for the production of radioisotopes with suitable nuclear and chemical properties. Furthermore, from the literature it is evident that the production of radioisotopes using charged-particle accelerators instead of nuclear reactors is gaining increasing popularity. The main advantages of producing medical isotopes with accelerators are carrier free radionuclides of short lived isotopes, improved handling, reduction of the radioactive waste, and lower cost of isotope fabrication. Proton-rich isotopes are the result of nuclear interactions between enriched stable isotopes and energetic protons. An interesting observation is that during the production of proton-rich isotopes, fast and intermediately fast neutrons from nuclear reactions such as (p,xn) are also produced as a by-product in the nuclear reactions. This observation suggests that it is perhaps possible to use these neutrons to activate secondary targets for the production of neutron-rich isotopes. The study of secondary radioisotope production with fast neutrons from (p,xn) reactions using a particle accelerator is the main goal of the research in this thesis. Yttrium-90 (90Y) is a good example of an isotope that can be made in combination with proton-rich isotope production. Traditionally, 90Y is obtained from a 90Sr/90Y generator. In order to produce a carrier free isotope, a chemical separation of 90Sr must be performed. The main disadvantage of 90Sr is a high toxicity level. 90Sr is well known to cause bone marrow suppressions, and it has a long half-life of 28.78 y. Therefore, special waste handling and storage conditions are required. In this study, 90Y has been produced with (p,xn) fast neutrons using the 90Zr(n,p)90Y reaction. Fast neutrons for the activation process were produced during proton irradiation of natural tungsten targets. The proton beam used was produced by a 33 MeV linear accelerator (LINAC). Since 90Y is a pure beta

  5. Imaging study of the painful heel syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L.; Smibert, J.G.; Cox, R.; Mitchell, R.; Klenerman, L.

    1987-06-01

    A total of 45 patients with the painful heel syndrome without evidence of an associated inflammatory arthritis, seven of whom had pain in both heels, were studied using technetium-99 isotope bone scans and lateral and 45 degrees medial oblique radiographs of both feet. Of the 52 painful heels 31 (59.6%) showed increased uptake of tracer at the calcaneum. Patients with scans showing increased uptake tended to have more severe heel pain and responded more frequently to a local hydrocortisone injection. On plain x-ray, 39 of 52 painful heels (75%) and 24 of the 38 opposite nonpainful heels (63%) showed plantar spurs, compared with five of 63 (7.9%) heels in 59 age- and sex-matched controls. No evidence of stress fractures was seen.

  6. Changes in the lead isotopic composition of blood, diet and air in Australia over a decade: Globalization and implications for future isotopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gulson, Brian . E-mail: bgulson@gse.mq.edu.au; Mizon, Karen; Korsch, Michael; Taylor, Alan

    2006-01-15

    Source apportionment in biological or environmental samples using the lead isotope method, where there are diverse sources of lead, relies on a significant difference between the isotopic composition in the target media and the sources. Because of the unique isotopic composition of Australian lead, source apportionment has been relatively successful in the past. Over the period of a decade, the {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratio for Australian (mainly female) adults has shown an increase from a geometric mean of 16.8-17.3. Associated with this increase, there has been a decrease in mean blood lead concentration from 4.7 to 2.3 {mu}g/dL, or about 5% per year, similar to that observed in other countries. Lead in air, which up until 2000 was derived largely from the continued use of leaded gasoline, showed an overall increase in the {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratio during 1993-2000 from 16.5 to 17.2. Since 1998 the levels of lead in air were less than 0.2 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and would contribute negligibly to blood lead. Over the 10-year period, the {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratio in diet, based mainly on quarterly 6-day duplicate diets, increased from 16.9 to 18.3. The lead concentration in diet showed a small decrease from 8.7 to 6.4 {mu}g Pb/kg although the daily intake increased markedly from 7.4 to 13.9 {mu}g Pb/day during the latter part of the decade probably reflecting differences in demographics. The changes in blood lead from sources such as lead in bone or soil or dust is not dominant because of the low {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratios in these media. Unless there are other sources not identified and analysed for these adults, it would appear that in spite of our earlier conclusions to the contrary, diet does make an overall contribution to blood lead, and this is certainly the case for specific individuals. Certain population groups from south Asia, south-east Asia, the Middle East and Europe (e.g. UK) are unsuitable for some studies as their isotopic ratios in blood are

  7. Neuromyelitis optica: a diffusional kurtosis imaging study.

    PubMed

    Doring, T M; Lopes, F C R; Kubo, T T A; Tukamoto, G; Kimura, M C; Strecker, R M; Domingues, R C; Gasparetto, E L

    2014-12-01

    Conventional MR imaging typically yields normal images of the brain or indicates lesions in areas of high aquaporin expression in patients with neuromyelitis optica. Diffusional kurtosis imaging was applied in patients with neuromyelitis optica to determine whether this technique could detect alterations in diffusion and diffusional kurtosis parameters in normal-appearing white matter and to explore the relationship between diffusional kurtosis imaging and DTI parameters. Thirteen patients with neuromyelitis optica and 13 healthy controls underwent MR imaging of the brain with conventional and diffusional kurtosis imaging sequences. Tract-based spatial statistics and region-of-interest-based analyses were conducted to identify differences between patients with neuromyelitis optica and controls through conventional DTI and diffusional kurtosis imaging parameters. The parameters were correlated to determine the potential relationship between them. Compared with healthy controls, several diffusional kurtosis imaging and DTI parameters were altered in various fiber tracts of patients with neuromyelitis optica (P < .05). A significant decrease (P < .05) in radial kurtosis was observed in the corpus callosum and anterior corona radiata and left optic radiation. Differences (P < .1) in mean kurtosis were found in patients with neuromyelitis optica. We found a negative correlation between diffusional kurtosis imaging (radial kurtosis, axial kurtosis, mean kurtosis) and the corresponding DTI parameters (radial diffusivity, axial diffusivity, mean diffusivity). Positive correlations were found for radial kurtosis and mean kurtosis with fractional anisotropy. This study demonstrated differences in conventional diffusion and diffusional kurtosis parameters, especially radial kurtosis, in the normal-appearing white matter of patients with neuromyelitis optica compared with healthy controls. Larger studies of patients with neuromyelitis optica should be performed to assess the

  8. The zooplankton food web under East Antarctic pack ice - A stable isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhongnan; Swadling, Kerrie M.; Meiners, Klaus M.; Kawaguchi, So; Virtue, Patti

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how sea ice serves zooplankton species during the food-limited season is crucial information to evaluate the potential responses of pelagic food webs to changes in sea-ice conditions in the Southern Ocean. Stable isotope analyses (13C/12C and 15N/14N) were used to compare the dietary preferences and trophic relationships of major zooplankton species under pack ice during two winter-spring transitions (2007 and 2012). During sampling, furcilia of Euphausia superba demonstrated dietary plasticity between years, herbivory when feeding on sea-ice biota, and with a more heterotrophic diet when feeding from both the sea ice and the water column. Carbon isotope signatures suggested that the pteropod Limacina helicina, small copepods Oithona spp., ostracods and amphipods relied heavily on sea-ice biota. Post larval E. superba and omnivorous krill Thysanoessa macrura consumed both water column and ice biota, but further investigations are needed to estimate the contribution from each source. Large copepods and chaetognaths overwintered on a water column-based diet. Our study suggests that warm and permeable sea ice is more likely to provide food for zooplankton species under the ice than the colder ice.

  9. Sources of precipitation over South-Eastern Spain and groundwater recharge. An isotopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-San Julian, J.; Araguas, L.; Rozanski, K.; Benavente, J.; Cardenal, J.; Hidalgo, M. C.; Garcia-Lopez, S.; Martinez-Garrido, J. C.; Moral, F.; Olias, M.

    1992-07-01

    The deuterium and oxygen-18 compositions were monitored in several single rain events in south-eastern Spain from November 1989 till April 1990. Large variations in both δ D and δ18O, as well as in the value of deuterium excess (d-value) of up to + 27‰, were recorded during this time period. The observed variations are clearly related to different source regions of the vapour (Atlantic Ocean or Mediterranean Sea) as well as to different trajectories of precipitating air masses. Whereas the rains of Atlantic origin were characterized by d-values close to + 10‰, the Mediterranean-derived precipitation showed much higher values, of up to + 27‰. The apparent correlation between altitude of the sampling site and the d-value of the corresponding rain can be attributed to two mechanisms: the evaporative isotopic enrichment of rain drops below the clouds, especially at initial stages of the given precipitation event, and/or precipitation from air masses with different isotopic signature (d-value) of the water vapour. The range of the d-values observed in samples from local springs and wells (between + 10 and + 13‰) suggests that groundwater in the studied areas is recharged predominantly by the Atlantic-derived precipitation.

  10. Hydrogeochemical and isotope study of perched aquifers in the Cuvelai-Etosha Basin, Namibia.

    PubMed

    Hamutoko, Josefina T; Wanke, Heike; Koeniger, Paul; Beyer, Matthias; Gaj, Marcel

    2017-08-01

    A hydrogeochemical and stable isotope study ((2)H and (18)O) was carried out in the Cuvelai-Etosha Basin in order to characterize available groundwater and to identify possible recharge mechanisms for the perched aquifers. Data were collected during seven field campaigns between 2013 and 2015 from a total of 24 shallow and deep groundwater hand-dug wells. In the investigated groundwaters, hydrogencarbonate is the dominating anion in both well types, whereas cations vary between calcium and magnesium in deep wells, and sodium and potassium in shallow wells. Groundwater chemistry is controlled by dissolution of carbonate minerals, silicate weathering and ion exchange. Stable isotopic composition suggests that deep groundwater is recharged by high-intensity/large rainfall events, whereas the shallow wells can even be recharged by less-intense/small rainfall events. Water in deep wells reflect a mixture of water influenced by evaporation during or before infiltration and water that infiltrated through fast preferential pathways, whereas shallow wells are strongly influenced by evaporation. The findings of this research contribute to improve the understanding of hydrogeochemistry, recharge paths and temporal variations of perched aquifers.

  11. Inferences of paleoenvironment from petrographic, chemical and stable-isotope studies of calcretes and fracture calcites

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Whelan, J.F.

    1994-03-01

    Past research has indicated a genetic connection between calcite formed in calcretes at the surface of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and calcites deposited in underlying fractures of the unsaturated zone. This common genesis suggests that paleoenvironmental information, as well as the timing and pathways of past recharge episodes, might be obtained from studies of the deposits in both the calcretes and the unsaturated fractures. Chemical and isotopic modification of calcite-precipitating fluids appears to begin at the surface, largely under the influence of plant roots and their decay products. Chemical characteristics of the deeper calcites are either initiated or largely defined within the first few meters of fluid migration into the unsaturated tuffs beneath the calcretes. However, petrographic and isotopic data indicate a very unique low-{delta}{sup 13}C microenvironment that is localized at the upper surfaces of the calcretes. These surfaces form an interface in the soil horizon where infiltration may pond above the underlying carbonate ``plug.`` In order to decipher the chemistry and petrology of past recharge events, it is important to first understand microenvironments such as this that contribute to mineral precipitation/dissolution events in the pedogenic environment.

  12. Stable Isotope Probing Approaches to Study Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Degradation and Degraders.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Carsten; Lueders, Tillmann; Richnow, Hans H; Krüger, Martin; von Bergen, Martin; Seifert, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques have become state-of-the-art in microbial ecology over the last 10 years, allowing for the targeted detection and identification of organisms, metabolic pathways and elemental fluxes active in specific processes within complex microbial communities. For studying anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading microbial communities, four stable isotope techniques have been used so far: DNA/RNA-SIP, PLFA (phospholipid-derived fatty acids)-SIP, protein-SIP, and single-cell-SIP by nanoSIMS (nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry) or confocal Raman microscopy. DNA/RNA-SIP techniques are most frequently applied due to their most meaningful phylogenetic resolution. Especially using 13C-labeled benzene and toluene as model substrates, many new hydrocarbon degraders have been identified by SIP under various electron acceptor conditions. This has extended the current perspective of the true diversity of anaerobic hydrocarbon degraders relevant in the environment. Syntrophic hydrocarbon degradation was found to be a common mechanism for various electron acceptors. Fundamental concepts and recent advances in SIP are reflected here. A discussion is presented concerning how these techniques generate direct insights into intrinsic hydrocarbon degrader populations in environmental systems and how useful they are for more integrated approaches in the monitoring of contaminated sites and for bioremediation.

  13. Bioavailability of organic phosphorus to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata as affected by phosphorus starvation: an isotope dilution study.

    PubMed

    Van Moorleghem, Christoff; De Schutter, Nynke; Smolders, Erik; Merckx, Roel

    2013-06-01

    Phosphorus (P) starved algae have a capacity to rapidly take up P when resupplied to P. This study was set-up to measure to what extent P starvation enhances the potential of algae to utilize organic P forms. The initial (<0.5 h) PO4 uptake rates of cells of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata increased up to 18-fold with increasing starvation. Algae from different levels of P starvation were subsequently exposed to different model organic P forms and carrier-free (33)PO4. Uptake (1h) of P from organic P-increased up to 5-fold with increasing P starvation. The bioavailability of organic P, relative to PO4, was calculated from uptake of (31)P and (33)P isotopes assuming no isotopic exchange with organic P-forms. This relative bioavailability ranged from 0 to 57% and remained generally unaffected by the extent of P-starvation. This result was found for cells that were either or not treated by a wash method to remove extracellular phosphatases. Short-term P uptake rate sharply increases with decreasing internal P content of the algal cells but the bioavailability of organic P, relative to PO4, is not enhanced. Such finding suggests that P-starvation enhances PO4 uptake capacity and organic P hydrolysis capacity to about the same extent.

  14. An isotopic study of biogeochemical relationships between carbonates and organic carbon in the Greenhorn Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Popp, Brian N.; Takigiku, Ray; Johnson, Marcus W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of total carbonate, inoceramid carbonate, micritic carbonate, secondary cements, total organic carbon, and geoporphyrins have been measured in 76 different beds within a 17-m interval of a core through the Greenhorn Formation, an interbedded limestone and calcareous shale unit of Cretaceous age from the Western Interior Seaway of North America. Results are considered in terms of variations in the processes of primary production and in secondary processes. It is shown that the porphyrin isotopic record reflects primary isotopic variations more closely than the TOC isotopic record and that, in these sediments, TOC is enriched in C-13 relative to its primary precursor by 0.6 to 2.8 percent. This enrichment is attributed to isotope effects within the consumer foodweb and is associated with respiratory heterotrophy. Variation in this secondary enrichment are correlated with variations in the isotopic composition of marine carbonate.

  15. Onset of deformation in neutron-deficient Bi isotopes studied by laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2017-04-01

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for bismuth isotopes at the 306.77-nm atomic transition has been carried out at the Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. New data on isotope shifts and hyperfine structure for Bi ground states and isomers (189,190 m 1,190 m 2,191,192,192 m,194,194 m,198 mBi) have been obtained. The changes in the mean-square charge radii δ and magnetic-moment values have been deduced. For Bi nuclei a marked deviation from the isotopic trend of δ in lead and thallium isotopic chains has been demonstrated at N <111 . This has been interpreted as an indication of the onset of quadrupole deformation. Analysis of the magnetic moments for odd-odd Bi isotopes also points to the possible increase in deformation at N <111 .

  16. An isotopic study of biogeochemical relationships between carbonates and organic carbon in the Greenhorn Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Popp, Brian N.; Takigiku, Ray; Johnson, Marcus W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of total carbonate, inoceramid carbonate, micritic carbonate, secondary cements, total organic carbon, and geoporphyrins have been measured in 76 different beds within a 17-m interval of a core through the Greenhorn Formation, an interbedded limestone and calcareous shale unit of Cretaceous age from the Western Interior Seaway of North America. Results are considered in terms of variations in the processes of primary production and in secondary processes. It is shown that the porphyrin isotopic record reflects primary isotopic variations more closely than the TOC isotopic record and that, in these sediments, TOC is enriched in C-13 relative to its primary precursor by 0.6 to 2.8 percent. This enrichment is attributed to isotope effects within the consumer foodweb and is associated with respiratory heterotrophy. Variation in this secondary enrichment are correlated with variations in the isotopic composition of marine carbonate.

  17. Carbon Isotopic Studies of Assimilated and Ecosystem Respired CO2 in a Southeastern Pine Forest. Final Report and Conference Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Conte, Maureen H

    2008-04-10

    Carbon dioxide is the major “greenhouse” gas responsible for global warming. Southeastern pine forests appear to be among the largest terrestrial sinks of carbon dioxide in the US. This collaborative study specifically addressed the isotopic signatures of the large fluxes of carbon taken up by photosynthesis and given off by respiration in this ecosystem. By measuring these isotopic signatures at the ecosystem level, we have provided data that will help to more accurately quantify the magnitude of carbon fluxes on the regional scale and how these fluxes vary in response to climatic parameters such as rainfall and air temperature. The focus of the MBL subcontract was to evaluate how processes operating at the physiological and ecosystem scales affects the resultant isotopic signature of plant waxes that are emitted as aerosols into the convective boundary layer. These wax aerosols provide a large-spatial scale integrative signal of isotopic discrimination of atmospheric carbon dioxide by terrestrial photosynthesis (Conte and Weber 2002). The ecosystem studies have greatly expanded of knowledge of wax biosynthetic controls on their isootpic signature The wax aerosol data products produced under this grant are directly applicable as input for global carbon modeling studies that use variations in the concentration and carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide to quantify the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of carbon uptake on the global scale.

  18. A Study of Imaging Interferometer Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Ronald J.

    2002-01-01

    Several new space science mission concepts under development at NASA-GSFC for astronomy are intended to carry out synthetic imaging using Michelson interferometers or direct (Fizeau) imaging with sparse apertures. Examples of these mission concepts include the Stellar Imager (SI), the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT), the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI). We have been developing computer-based simulators for these missions. These simulators are aimed at providing a quantitative evaluation of the imaging capabilities of the mission by modelling the performance on different realistic targets in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, and dynamic range. Both Fizeau and Michelson modes of operation can be considered. Our work is based on adapting a computer simulator called imSIM, which was initially written for the Space Interferometer Mission in order to simulate the imaging mode of new missions such as those listed. In a recent GSFC-funded study we have successfully written a preliminary version of a simulator SISIM for the Stellar Imager and carried out some preliminary studies with it. In a separately funded study we have also been applying these methods to SPECS/SPIRIT.

  19. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, S. C.

    1998-01-14

    A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

  20. Decay and In-Beam Studies of Neutron-Deficient Po and Ra Isotopes at JYFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, M.; Allatt, R. G.; Andreyev, A. N.; Cocks, J. F. C.; Dorvaux, O.; Enqvist, T.; Eskola, K.; Helariutta, K.; Huyse, M.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kankaanpaeae, H.; Keenan, A.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Muikku, M.; Rahkila, P.; Savelius, A.; Trzaska, W. H.; Uusitalo, J.; van Duppen, P.

    1999-05-01

    An extensive program to study the production, decay properties, and nuclear structure of very neutron-deficient polonium and radium nuclei is underway at the Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland (JYFL). The main tools used in these studies are the gas-filled recoil separator RITU and various germanium gamma-ray arrays. In the course of these studies, among others the following new isotopes have been produced: 204Ra, 203Ra, and 202Ra. Isomeric alpha decaying states have been discovered in 203Ra and 191Po. Fine structure in the decay of 192Po to the oblate and prolate band heads in 188Pb has been observed. In-beam gamma-ray spectra have been, for the first time, measured for 192Po, 206Ra, 208Ra, and 210Ra. Development of collectivity in nuclei in the Po-Ra region and the systematics of reduced alpha widths will be discussed.