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Sample records for isotopically engineered silicon

  1. What controls silicon isotope fractionation during dissolution of diatom opal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, F.; de Souza, G. F.; Reynolds, B. C.

    2014-04-01

    The silicon isotope composition of opal frustules from photosynthesising diatoms is a promising tool for studying past changes in the marine silicon cycle, and indirectly that of carbon. Dissolution of this opal may be accompanied by silicon isotope fractionation that could disturb the pristine silicon isotope composition of diatom opal acquired in the surface ocean. It has previously been shown that dissolution of fresh and sediment trap diatom opal in seawater does fractionate silicon isotopes. However, as the mechanism of silicon isotope fractionation remained elusive, it is uncertain whether opal dissolution in general is associated with silicon isotope fractionation considering that opal chemistry and surface properties are spatially and temporally (i.e. opal of different age) diverse. In this study we dissolved sediment core diatom opal in 5 mM NaOH and found that this process is not associated with significant silicon isotope fractionation. Since no variability of the isotope effect was observed over a wide range of dissolution rates, we can rule out the suggestion that back-reactions had a significant influence on the net isotope effect. Similarly, we did not observe an impact of temperature, specific surface area, or degree of undersaturation on silicon isotope partitioning during dissolution, such that these can most likely also be ruled out as controlling factors. We discuss the potential impacts of the chemical composition of the dissolution medium and age of diatom opal on silicon isotope fractionation during dissolution. It appears most likely that the controlling mechanism of silicon isotope fractionation during dissolution is related to the reactivity, or potentially, aluminium content of the opal. Such a dependency would imply that silicon isotope fractionation during dissolution of diatom opal is spatially and temporally variable. However, since the isotope effects during dissolution are small, the silicon isotope composition of diatom opal

  2. Ultrahigh thermal conductivity of isotopically enriched silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inyushkin, Alexander V.; Taldenkov, Alexander N.; Ager, Joel W.; Haller, Eugene E.; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolay V.; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Becker, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Most of the stable elements have two and more stable isotopes. The physical properties of materials composed of such elements depend on the isotopic abundance to some extent. A remarkably strong isotope effect is observed in the phonon thermal conductivity, the principal mechanism of heat conduction in nonmetallic crystals. An isotopic disorder due to random distribution of the isotopes in the crystal lattice sites results in a rather strong phonon scattering and, consequently, in a reduction of thermal conductivity. In this paper, we present new results of accurate and precise measurements of thermal conductivity κ(T) for silicon single crystals having three different isotopic compositions at temperatures T from 2.4 to 420 K. The highly enriched crystal containing 99.995% of 28Si, which is one of the most perfect crystals ever synthesized, demonstrates a thermal conductivity of about 450 ± 10 W cm-1 K-1 at 24 K, the highest measured value among bulk dielectrics, which is ten times greater than the one for its counterpart natSi with the natural isotopic constitution. For highly enriched crystal 28Si and crystal natSi, the measurements were performed for two orientations [001] and [011], a magnitude of the phonon focusing effect on thermal conductivity was determined accurately at low temperatures. The anisotropy of thermal conductivity disappears above 31 K. The influence of the boundary scattering on thermal conductivity persists sizable up to much higher temperatures (˜80 K). The κ(T) measured in this work gives the most accurate approximation of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of single crystal silicon which is determined solely by the anharmonic phonon processes and diffusive boundary scattering over a wide temperature range.

  3. Silicon isotope amount ratios and molar masses for two silicon isotope reference materials: IRMM-018a and NBS28

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkiers, S.; Ding, T.; Inkret, M.; Ruße, K.; Taylor, P.

    2005-04-01

    A new 2 kg batch of SiO2 crystals, IRMM-018a as well as the existing NBS28 silica sand (or RM 8546, obtained by I. Friedman from U.S. Geological Survey) have been characterised for their "absolute" silicon isotope composition and molar mass. The amount-of-substance measurements needed for that purpose were performed on the IRMM amount comparator (Avogadro II) on samples from these batches, which were converted to gaseous silicon tetra-fluoride (SiF4). The isotope amount ratio measurements were calibrated by means of synthesized isotope amount ratios realized in the form of synthetic Si isotope mixtures, the measurement procedure of which makes them SI-traceable. IRMM-018a is intended to be used as Isotope Reference Material for isotope amount measurements in geochemical and other isotope abundance studies of silicon. It is distributed in samples of about 0.1 mol and will replace IRMM-018 (exhausted).

  4. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation of CAI-like Vacuum Evaporation Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K; Kita, N; Mendybaev, R

    2009-06-18

    Calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are often enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium and silicon relative to bulk solar system materials. It is likely that these isotopic enrichments resulted from evaporative mass loss of magnesium and silicon from early solar system condensates while they were molten during one or more high-temperature reheating events. Quantitative interpretation of these enrichments requires laboratory determinations of the evaporation kinetics and associated isotopic fractionation effects for these elements. The experimental data for the kinetics of evaporation of magnesium and silicon and the evaporative isotopic fractionation of magnesium is reasonably complete for Type B CAI liquidsmore » (Richter et al., 2002, 2007a). However, the isotopic fractionation factor for silicon evaporating from such liquids has not been as extensively studied. Here we report new ion microprobe silicon isotopic measurements of residual glass from partial evaporation of Type B CAI liquids into vacuum. The silicon isotopic fractionation is reported as a kinetic fractionation factor, {alpha}{sub Si}, corresponding to the ratio of the silicon isotopic composition of the evaporation flux to that of the residual silicate liquid. For CAI-like melts, we find that {alpha}{sub Si} = 0.98985 {+-} 0.00044 (2{sigma}) for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si with no resolvable variation with temperature over the temperature range of the experiments, 1600-1900 C. This value is different from what has been reported for evaporation of liquid Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (Davis et al., 1990) and of a melt with CI chondritic proportions of the major elements (Wang et al., 2001). There appears to be some compositional control on {alpha}{sub Si}, whereas no compositional effects have been reported for {alpha}{sub Mg}. We use the values of {alpha}Si and {alpha}Mg, to calculate the chemical compositions of the unevaporated precursors of a number of isotopically fractionated CAIs from CV chondrites

  5. Silicon isotope fractionation in bamboo and its significance to the biogeochemical cycle of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, T. P.; Zhou, J. X.; Wan, D. F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wang, C. Y.; Zhang, F.

    2008-03-01

    A systematic investigation on silica contents and silicon isotope compositions of bamboos was undertaken. Seven bamboo plants and related soils were collected from seven locations in China. The roots, stem, branch and leaves for each plant were sampled and their silica contents and silicon isotope compositions were determined. The silica contents and silicon isotope compositions of bulk and water-soluble fraction of soils were also measured. The silica contents of studied bamboo organs vary from 0.30% to 9.95%. Within bamboo plant the silica contents show an increasing trend from stem, through branch, to leaves. In bamboo roots the silica is exclusively in the endodermis cells, but in stem, branch and leaves, the silica is accumulated mainly in epidermal cells. The silicon isotope compositions of bamboos exhibit significant variation, from -2.3‰ to 1.8‰, and large and systematic silicon isotope fractionation was observed within each bamboo. The δ 30Si values decrease from roots to stem, but then increase from stem, through branch, to leaves. The ranges of δ 30Si values within each bamboo vary from 1.0‰ to 3.3‰. Considering the total range of silicon isotope composition in terrestrial samples is only 7‰, the observed silicon isotope variation in single bamboo is significant and remarkable. This kind of silicon isotope variation might be caused by isotope fractionation in a Rayleigh process when SiO 2 precipitated in stem, branches and leaves gradually from plant fluid. In this process the Si isotope fractionation factor between dissolved Si and precipitated Si in bamboo ( αpre-sol) is estimated to be 0.9981. However, other factors should be considered to explain the decrease of δ 30Si value from roots to stem, including larger ratio of dissolved H 4SiO 4 to precipitated SiO 2 in roots than in stem. There is a positive correlation between the δ 30Si values of water-soluble fractions in soils and those of bulk bamboos, indicating that the dissolved

  6. Silicon isotope fractionation in rice and cucumber plants over a life cycle: Laboratory studies at different external silicon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Wu, Lianghuan; Li, Xiaoyan; Sun, Li; Gao, Jianfei; Ding, Tiping

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the variations of silicon isotopes in terrestrial higher plants can be helpful toward elucidating the global biogeochemical silicon cycle. We studied silicon isotope fractionation in rice and cucumber plants over their entire life cycles. These two different silicon-absorbing plants were grown hydroponically at different external silicon concentrations. The ranges of δ30Si values in rice were -1.89‰ to 1.69‰, -1.81‰ to 1.96‰, and -2.08‰ to 2.02‰ at 0.17 mM, 1.70 mM, and 8.50 mM silicon concentrations, respectively. The ranges of δ30Si values in cucumber were -1.38‰ to 1.21‰, -1.33‰ to 1.26‰, and -1.62‰ to 1.40‰ at 0.085 mM, 0.17 mM, and 1.70 mM external silicon concentrations, respectively. A general increasing trend in δ30Si values from lower to upper plant parts reflected the preferential incorporation of lighter silicon isotopes from transpired water to biogenic opal. Furthermore, the active uptake mechanism regulated by several transporters might have also played an important role in the preferential transport of heavy silicon isotopes into aboveground plant parts. This suggested that silicon isotope fractionation in both rice and cucumber was a Rayleigh-like process. The data on δ30Si values for the whole plants and nutrient solutions indicated that biologically mediated silicon isotope fractionation occurred during silicon uptake by roots. At lower external silicon concentrations, heavy silicon isotopes entered plants more readily than light silicon isotopes. Conversely, at higher external silicon concentrations, light silicon isotopes entered plants more readily than heavy silicon isotopes.

  7. Silicon isotopes in angrites and volatile loss in planetesimals

    PubMed Central

    Moynier, Frédéric; Savage, Paul S.; Badro, James; Barrat, Jean-Alix

    2014-01-01

    Inner solar system bodies, including the Earth, Moon, and asteroids, are depleted in volatile elements relative to chondrites. Hypotheses for this volatile element depletion include incomplete condensation from the solar nebula and volatile loss during energetic impacts. These processes are expected to each produce characteristic stable isotope signatures. However, processes of planetary differentiation may also modify the isotopic composition of geochemical reservoirs. Angrites are rare meteorites that crystallized only a few million years after calcium–aluminum-rich inclusions and exhibit extreme depletions in volatile elements relative to chondrites, making them ideal samples with which to study volatile element depletion in the early solar system. Here we present high-precision Si isotope data that show angrites are enriched in the heavy isotopes of Si relative to chondritic meteorites by 50–100 ppm/amu. Silicon is sufficiently volatile such that it may be isotopically fractionated during incomplete condensation or evaporative mass loss, but theoretical calculations and experimental results also predict isotope fractionation under specific conditions of metal–silicate differentiation. We show that the Si isotope composition of angrites cannot be explained by any plausible core formation scenario, but rather reflects isotope fractionation during impact-induced evaporation. Our results indicate planetesimals initially formed from volatile-rich material and were subsequently depleted in volatile elements during accretion. PMID:25404309

  8. Silicon isotope fractionation by marine sponges and the reconstruction of the silicon isotope composition of ancient deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Rocha, Christina L.

    2003-05-01

    The silicon isotope composition (δ30Si) of biogenic opal provides a view of the silica cycle at times in the past. Reconstructions require the knowledge of silicon isotope fractionation during opal biomineralization. The δ30Si of specimens of hexactinellid sponges and demosponges growing in the modern ocean ranged from -1.2‰ to -3.7‰ (n = 6), corresponding to the production of opal that has a δ30Si value 3.8‰ ± 0.8‰ more negative than seawater silicic acid and a fractionation factor (α) of 0.9964. This is three times the fractionation observed during opal formation by marine diatoms and terrestrial plants and is the largest fractionation of silicon isotopes observed for any natural process on Earth. The δ30Si values of sponge spicules across the Eocene-Oligocene boundary at Ocean Drilling Program Site 689 on Maud Rise range from -1.1‰ to -3.0‰, overlapping the range observed for sponges growing in modern seawater.

  9. The silicon isotope composition of the upper continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Paul S.; Georg, R. Bastian; Williams, Helen M.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2013-05-01

    The upper continental crust (UCC) is the major source of silicon (Si) to the oceans and yet its isotopic composition is not well constrained. In an effort to investigate the degree of heterogeneity and provide a robust estimate for the average Si isotopic composition of the UCC, a representative selection of well-characterised, continentally-derived clastic sediments have been analysed using high-precision MC-ICPMS. Analyses of loess samples define a narrow range of Si isotopic compositions (δ30Si = -0.28‰ to -0.15‰). This is thought to reflect the primary igneous mineralogy and predominance of mechanical weathering in the formation of such samples. The average loess δ30Si is -0.22 ± 0.07‰ (2 s.d.), identical to average granite and felsic igneous compositions. Therefore, minor chemical weathering does not resolvably affect bulk rock δ30Si, and loess is a good proxy for the Si isotopic composition of unweathered, crystalline, continental crust. The Si isotopic compositions of shales display much more variability (δ30Si = -0.82‰ to 0.00‰). Shale Si isotope compositions do not correlate well with canonical proxies for chemical weathering, such as CIA values, but do correlate negatively with insoluble element concentrations and Al/Si ratios. This implies that more intensive or prolonged chemical weathering of a sedimentary source, with attendant desilicification, is required before resolvable negative Si isotopic fractionation occurs. Shale δ30Si values that are more positive than those of felsic igneous rocks most likely indicate the presence of marine-derived silica in such samples. Using the data gathered in this study, combined with already published granite Si isotope analyses, a weighted average composition of δ30Si = -0.25 ± 0.16‰ (2 s.d.) for the UCC has been calculated.

  10. Silicon and Zinc Isotopes in Ocean Island Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, E. A.; Savage, P. S.; Jackson, M. G.; Moreira, M. A.; Day, J. M.; Moynier, F.

    2013-12-01

    Analyses of Ocean Island Basalts (OIB) have shown that the Earth's mantle contains isotopically distinct components, but current debate about the degree and scale of compositional variability persists. Isotopic heterogeneities in OIB for both radiogenic (e.g. Sr, Nd, Pb) and stable (e.g. Li, O, Ca) isotope systems have been attributed to the presence of recycled materials in different mantle reservoirs [1]. The study of both silicon and zinc isotopes in OIB form a complimentary approach to investigate potential heterogeneities in the mantle. Both isotope systems show limited fractionation during igneous process [2,3]. However, both Si and Zn exhibit larger (>1‰) variability in low-temperature environments (e.g. as a result of chemical weathering and biological utilization). Therefore, Si and Zn isotopes may be useful as tracers for the presence of crustal material (derived from low-T surface processes) in OIB source regions. Furthermore, characterizing the isotopic composition of the mantle is of central importance to the use of these isotopic systems as a basis for interplanetary comparisons. Here we present high-precision Si and Zn isotopic data obtained by MC-ICPMS for a diverse suite of OIB representing the EM-1, EM-2, and HIMU mantle components. Samples represent locations in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans. Data are reported as the permil deviation (×2 sd) from NBS28 for Si (δ30Si) and JMC-Lyon for Zn (δ66Zn). Average δ30Si values for OIB from EM-1 (-0.32×0.09‰), EM-2 (-0.30×0.03‰), and HIMU (-0.34×0.12‰) are all in general agreement with previous estimates for the δ30Si value of Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) [4]. Similarly, the δ66Zn average values for OIB from the EM-1, EM-2, and HIMU components (0.31×0.06‰, 0.31×0.04‰, 0.31×0.05‰, respectively) agree well with previously published data for the δ66Zn value of BSE [3]. At the current levels of precision, both Si and Zn isotopes exhibit little variation in OIB, confirming the

  11. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second annual technical report entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, and includes work performed during the period February 16, 1986 to February 15, 1987. The program is conducted for NASA under contract NAS3-24384. The objective is the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. The fabrication methods used are to be adaptable for mass production of such parts on an economically sound basis. Injection molding is the forming method selected. This objective is to be accomplished in a two-phase program: (1) to achieve a 20 percent improvement in strength and a 100 percent increase in Weibull modulus of the baseline material; and (2) to produce a complex shaped part, a gas turbine rotor, for example, with the improved mechanical properties attained in the first phase. Eight tasks are included in the first phase covering the characterization of the properties of a baseline material, the improvement of those properties and the fabrication of complex shaped parts. Activities during the first contract year concentrated on two of these areas: fabrication and characterization of the baseline material (Task 1) and improvement of material and processes (Task 7). Activities during the second contract year included an MOR bar matrix study to improve mechanical properties (Task 2), materials and process improvements (Task 7), and a Ford-funded task to mold a turbocharger rotor with an improved material (Task 8).

  12. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    This is the third annual technical report for the program entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, for the period February 16, 1987 to February 15, 1988. The objective of the original program was the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. Injection molding is the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals of the revised program are to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in 4-point loading. Two tasks are discussed: Task 1 which involves materials and process improvements, and Task 2 which is a MOR bar matrix to improve strength and reliability. Many statistically designed experiments were completed under task 1 which improved the composition of the batches, the mixing of the powders, the sinter and anneal cycles. The best results were obtained by an attritor mixing process which yielded strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and an individual Weibull modulus of 16.8 for a 9-sample group. Strengths measured at 1200 and 1400 C were equal to the room temperature strength. Annealing of machined test bars significantly improved the strength. Molding yields were measured and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. The second iteration of the Task 2 matrix experiment is described.

  13. Silicon Isotope Fractionation During Acid Water-Igneous Rock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boorn, S. H.; van Bergen, M. J.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2007-12-01

    Silica enrichment by metasomatic/hydrothermal alteration is a widespread phenomenon in crustal environments where acid fluids interact with silicate rocks. High-sulfidation epithermal ore deposits and acid-leached residues at hot-spring settings are among the best known examples. Acid alteration acting on basalts has also been invoked to explain the relatively high silica contents of the surface of Mars. We have analyzed basaltic-andesitic lavas from the Kawah Ijen volcanic complex (East Java, Indonesia) that were altered by interaction with highly acid (pH~1) sulfate-chloride water of its crater lake and seepage stream. Quantitative removal of major elements during this interaction has led to relative increase in SiO2 contents. Our silicon isotope data, obtained by HR-MC-ICPMS and reported relative to the NIST RM8546 (=NBS28) standard, show a systematic increase in &δ&&30Si from -0.2‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for unaltered andesites and basalts to +1.5‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for the most altered/silicified rocks. These results demonstrate that silicification induced by pervasive acid alteration is accompanied by significant Si isotope fractionation, so that alterered products become isotopically heavier than the precursor rocks. Despite the observed enrichment in SiO2, the rocks have experienced an overall net loss of silicon upon alteration, if Nb is considered as perfectly immobile. The observed &δ&&30Si values of the alteration products appeared to correlate well with the inferred amounts of silicon loss. These findings would suggest that &28Si is preferentially leached during water-rock interaction, implying that dissolved silica in the ambient lake and stream water is isotopically light. However, layered opaline lake sediments, that are believed to represent precipitates from the silica-saturated water show a conspicuous &30Si-enrichment (+1.2 ± 0.2‰). Because anorganic precipitation is known to discriminate against the heavy isotope (e.g. Basile- Doelsch et al., 2006

  14. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Wimmer, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Silicon nitride is a high temperature material currently under consideration for heat engine and other applications. The objective is to improve the net shape fabrication technology of Si3N4 by injection molding. This is to be accomplished by optimizing the process through a series of statistically designed matrix experiments. To provide input to the matrix experiments, a wide range of alternate materials and processing parameters was investigated throughout the whole program. The improvement in the processing is to be demonstrated by a 20 percent increase in strength and a 100 percent increase in the Weibull modulus over that of the baseline material. A full characterization of the baseline process was completed. Material properties were found to be highly dependent on each step of the process. Several important parameters identified thus far are the starting raw materials, sinter/hot isostatic pressing cycle, powder bed, mixing methods, and sintering aid levels.

  15. Mechanisms controlling the silicon isotopic compositions of river waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georg, R. B.; Reynolds, B. C.; Frank, M.; Halliday, A. N.

    2006-09-01

    It has been proposed that silicon (Si) isotopes are fractionated during weathering and biological activity leading to heavy dissolved riverine compositions. In this study, the first seasonal variations of stable isotope compositions of dissolved riverine Si are reported and compared with concomitant changes in water chemistry. Four different rivers in Switzerland were sampled between March 2004 and July 2005. The unique high-resolution multi-collector ICP-MS Nu1700, has been used to provide simultaneous interference-free measurements of 28Si, 29Si and 30Si abundances with an average limiting precision of ± 0.04‰ on δ 30Si. This precision facilitates the clarification of small temporal variations in isotope composition. The average of all the data for the 40 samples is δ 30Si = + 0.84 ± 0.19‰ (± 1σ SD). Despite significant differences in catchment lithologies, biomass, climate, total dissolved solids and weathering fluxes the averaged isotopic composition of dissolved Si in each river is strikingly similar with means of + 0.70 ± 0.12‰ for the Birs,+ 0.95 ± 0.22‰ for the Saane,+ 0.93 ± 0.12‰ for the Ticino and + 0.79 ± 0.19‰ for the Verzasca. However, the δ 30Si undergoes seasonal variations of up to 0.6‰. Comparisons between δ 30Si and physico-chemical parameters, such as the concentration of dissolved Si and other cations, the discharge of the rivers, and the resulting weathering fluxes, permits an understanding of the processes that control the Si budget and the fate of dissolved Si within these rivers. The main mechanism controlling the Si isotope composition of the mountainous Verzasca River appears to be a two component mixing between the seepage of soil/ground waters, with heavier Si produced by clay formation and superficial runoff associated with lighter Si during high discharge events. A biologically-mediated fractionation can be excluded in this particular river system. The other rivers display increasing complexity with increases

  16. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines is studied. Injection molding was the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals were to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in four-point loading. Statistically designed experiments were performed throughout the program and a fluid mixing process employing an attritor mixer was developed. Compositional improvements in the amounts and sources of boron and carbon used and a pressureless sintering cycle were developed which provided samples of about 99 percent of theoretical density. Strengths were found to improve significantly by annealing in air. Strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) with Weibull modulus of about 9 were obtained. Further improvements in Weibull modulus to about 16 were realized by proof testing. This is an increase of 86 percent in strength and 100 percent in Weibull modulus over the baseline data generated at the beginning of the program. Molding yields were improved and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were found to be useful in characterizing the SiC powder and the sintered samples. Turbocharger rotors were molded and examined as an indication of the moldability of the mixes which were developed in this program.

  17. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hun C.; Fang, Ho T.

    1987-01-01

    The technology base required to fabricate silicon nitride components with the strength, reliability, and reproducibility necessary for actual heat engine applications is presented. Task 2 was set up to develop test bars with high Weibull slope and greater high temperature strength, and to conduct an initial net shape component fabrication evaluation. Screening experiments were performed in Task 7 on advanced materials and processing for input to Task 2. The technical efforts performed in the second year of a 5-yr program are covered. The first iteration of Task 2 was completed as planned. Two half-replicated, fractional factorial (2 sup 5), statistically designed matrix experiments were conducted. These experiments have identified Denka 9FW Si3N4 as an alternate raw material to GTE SN502 Si3N4 for subsequent process evaluation. A detailed statistical analysis was conducted to correlate processing conditions with as-processed test bar properties. One processing condition produced a material with a 97 ksi average room temperature MOR (100 percent of goal) with 13.2 Weibull slope (83 percent of goal); another condition produced 86 ksi (6 percent over baseline) room temperature strength with a Weibull slope of 20 (125 percent of goal).

  18. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation in a Tropical Soil-Plant System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opfergelt, S.; Delstanche, S.; Cardinal, D.; Andre, L.; Delvaux, B.

    2006-12-01

    -0.33 (Ovs) and -0.56 permil (Yvs), close to the fractionation factor previously measured in hydroponics (-0.40 permil). The average delta29Si of phytoliths in banana plants was +0.17 permil. In the topsoil, the isotopic composition of Yvs ( 0.21 permil) was close to that of unweathered pumice (-0.20 permil). The Ovs were significantly lighter (-0.73 permil), confirming published data pointing to lighter isotopic composition with increased weathering. Heavier bulk plants at Ovs might be related to a heavier residual soil solution due to: (i) the formation of lighter clay minerals at Ovs (clay fraction: -0.94 permil) than at Yvs (-0.60 permil), and (ii) the quantitative adsorption of silica onto iron oxides (see Delstanche et al., 2006, AGU), more abundant in weathered Ovs. Our data support the view that plants can induce a strong imprint on the continental cycle of silicon, just as clay formation and possibly Si adsorption onto iron oxides can do. The quantification of Si-isotopic fractionation in the soil-plant system requires, however, further studies involving all the Si pools to achieve a comprehensive understanding of this cycle.

  19. Energetic Beam Processing of Silicon to Engineer Optoelectronically Active Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recht, Daniel

    This thesis explores ways to use ion implantation and nanosecond pulsed laser melting, both energetic beam techniques, to engineer defects in silicon. These defects are chosen to facilitate the use of silicon in optoelectronic applications for which its indirect bandgap is not ideal. Chapter 2 develops a kinetic model for the use of point defects as luminescence centers for light-emitting diodes and demonstrates an experimental procedure capable of high-throughput screening of the electroluminescent properties of such defects. Chapter 3 discusses the dramatic change in optical absorption observed in silicon highly supersaturated (i.e., hyperdoped) with the chalcogens sulfur, selenium, and tellurium and reports the first measurements of the optical absorption of such materials for photon energies greater than the bandgap of silicon. Chapter 3 examines the use of silicon hyperdoped with chalcogens in light detectors and concludes that while these devices display strong internal gain that is coupled to a particular type of surface defect, hyperdoping with chalcogens does not lead directly to measurable sub-bandgap photoconductivity. Chapter 4 considers the potential for Silicon to serve as the active material in an intermediate-band solar cell and reports experimental progress on two proposed approaches for hyperdoping silicon for this application. The main results of this chapter are the use of native-oxide etching to control the surface evaporation rate of sulfur from silicon and the first synthesis of monocrystalline silicon hyperdoped with gold.

  20. Engineered Emitters for Improved Silicon Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Ronak A.

    In 2014, installation of 5.3GW of new Photovoltaic (PV) systems occurred in the United States, raising the total installed capacity to 16.36GW. Strong growth is predicted for the domestic PV market with analysts reporting goals of 696GW by 2020. Conventional single crystalline silicon cells are the technology of choice, accounting for 90% of the installations in the global commercial market. Cells made of GaAs offer higher efficiencies, but at a substantially higher cost. Thin film technologies such as CIGS and CdTe compete favorably with multi-crystalline Si (u-Si), but at 20% efficiency, still lag the c-Si cell in performance. The c-Si cell can be fabricated to operate at approximately 25% efficiency, but commercially the efficiencies are in the 18-21% range, which is a direct result of cost trade-offs between process complexity and rapid throughput. With the current cost of c-Si cell modules at nearly 0.60/W. The technology is well below the historic metric of 1/W for economic viability. The result is that more complex processes, once cost-prohibitive, may now be viable. An example is Panasonic's HIT cell which operates in the 22-24% efficiency range. To facilitate research and development of novel PV materials and techniques, RIT has developed a basic solar cell fabrication process. Student projects prior to this work had produced cells with 12.8% efficiency using p type substrates. This thesis reports on recent work to improve cell efficiencies while simultaneously expanding the capability of the rapid prototyping process. In addition to the p-Si substrates, cells have been produced using n-Si substrates. The cell emitter, which is often done with a single diffusion or implant has been re-engineered using a dual implant of the same dose. This dual-implanted emitter has been shown to lower contact resistance, increase Voc, and increase the efficiency. A p-Si substrate cell has been fabricated with an efficiency of 14.6% and n-Si substrate cell with a 13

  1. Iron and nickel isotope compositions of presolar silicon carbide grains from supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodolányi, János; Stephan, Thomas; Trappitsch, Reto; Hoppe, Peter; Pignatari, Marco; Davis, Andrew M.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    We report the carbon, silicon, iron, and nickel isotope compositions of twenty-five presolar SiC grains of mostly supernova (SN) origin. The iron and nickel isotope compositions were measured with the new Chicago Instrument for Laser Ionization, CHILI, which allows the analysis of all iron and nickel isotopes without the isobaric interferences that plagued previous measurements with the NanoSIMS. Despite terrestrial iron and nickel contamination, significant isotopic anomalies in 54Fe/56Fe, 57Fe/56Fe, 60Ni/58Ni, 61Ni/58Ni, 62Ni/58Ni, and 64Ni/58Ni were detected in nine SN grains (of type X). Combined multi-isotope data of three grains with the largest nickel isotope anomalies (>100‰ or <-100‰ in at least one isotope ratio, when expressed as deviation from the solar value) are compared with the predictions of two SN models, one with and one without hydrogen ingestion in the He shell prior to SN explosion. One grain's carbon-silicon-iron-nickel isotope composition is consistent with the prediction of the model without hydrogen ingestion, whereas the other two grains' isotope anomalies could not be reproduced using either SN models. The discrepancies between the measured isotope compositions and model predictions may indicate element fractionation in the SN ejecta prior to or during grain condensation, and reiterate the need for three-dimensional SN models.

  2. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, T. J.; Winterbottom, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed to develop silicon carbide materials of high strength and to form components of complex shape and high reliability is described. A beta-SiC powder and binder system was adapted to the injection molding process and procedures and process parameters developed capable of providing a sintered silicon carbide material with improved properties. The initial effort has been to characterize the baseline precursor materials (beta silicon carbide powder and boron and carbon sintering aids), develop mixing and injection molding procedures for fabricating test bars, and characterize the properties of the sintered materials. Parallel studies of various mixing, dewaxing, and sintering procedures have been carried out in order to distinguish process routes for improving material properties. A total of 276 MOR bars of the baseline material have been molded, and 122 bars have been fully processed to a sinter density of approximately 95 percent. The material has a mean MOR room temperature strength of 43.31 ksi (299 MPa), a Weibull characteristic strength of 45.8 ksi (315 MPa), and a Weibull modulus of 8.0. Mean values of the MOR strengths at 1000, 1200, and 14000 C are 41.4, 43.2, and 47.2 ksi, respectively. Strength controlling flaws in this material were found to consist of regions of high porosity and were attributed to agglomerates originating in the initial mixing procedures. The mean stress rupture lift at 1400 C of five samples tested at 172 MPa (25 ksi) stress was 62 hours and at 207 MPa (30 ksi) stress was 14 hours. New fluid mixing techniques have been developed which significantly reduce flaw size and improve the strength of the material. Initial MOR tests indicate the strength of the fluid-mixed material exceeds the baseline property by more than 33 percent.

  3. Isotopic Composition of Barium in Single Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savina, M. R.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Davis, A. M.; Clayton, R. N.; Lewis, R. S.; Amari, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have measured Ba isotope distributions in individual presolar SiC grains. We find that the Ba isotopic composition in mainstream SiC grains is consistent with models of nucleosynthesis in low to intermediate mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.; Mangels, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of silicon carbide materials of high strength was initiated and components of complex shape and high reliability were formed. The approach was to adapt a beta-SiC powder and binder system to the injection molding process and to develop procedures and process parameters capable of providing a sintered silicon carbide material with improved properties. The initial effort was to characterize the baseline precursor materials, develop mixing and injection molding procedures for fabricating test bars, and characterize the properties of the sintered materials. Parallel studies of various mixing, dewaxing, and sintering procedures were performed in order to distinguish process routes for improving material properties. A total of 276 modulus-of-rupture (MOR) bars of the baseline material was molded, and 122 bars were fully processed to a sinter density of approximately 95 percent. Fluid mixing techniques were developed which significantly reduced flaw size and improved the strength of the material. Initial MOR tests indicated that strength of the fluid-mixed material exceeds the baseline property by more than 33 percent. the baseline property by more than 33 percent.

  5. Simultaneous iron and nickel isotopic analyses of presolar silicon carbide grains

    DOE PAGES

    Trappitsch, Reto; Stephan, Thomas; Savina, Michael R.; ...

    2018-01-01

    Aside from recording stellar nucleosynthesis, a few elements in presolar grains can also provide insights into the galactic chemical evolution (GCE) of nuclides. We have studied the carbon, silicon, iron, and nickel isotopic compositions of presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to better understand GCE. Since only the neutron-rich nuclides in these grains have been heavily in uenced by the parent star, the neutron-poor nuclides serve as GCE proxies. Using CHILI, a new resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) instrument, we measured 74 presolar SiC grains for all iron and nickel isotopes. With the CHARISMA instrument,more » 13 presolar SiC grains were analyzed for iron isotopes. All grains were also measured by NanoSIMS for their carbon and silicon isotopic compositions. A comparison of the measured neutron-rich isotopes with models for AGB star nucleosynthesis shows that our measurements are consistent with AGB star predictions for low-mass stars between half-solar and solar metallicity. Furthermore, our measurements give an indication on the 22Ne( ,n) 25Mg reaction rate. In terms of GCE, we nd that the GCE-dominated iron and nickel isotope ratios, 54Fe/56Fe and 60Ni/ 58Ni, correlate with their GCE-dominated counterpart in silicon, 29Si/ 28Si. The measured GCE trends include the Solar System composition, showing that the Solar System is not a special case. However, as seen in silicon and titanium, many presolar SiC grains are more evolved for iron and nickel than the Solar System. This con rms prior ndings and agrees with observations of large stellar samples that a simple age-metallicity relationship for GCE cannot explain the composition of the solar neighborhood.« less

  6. Simultaneous iron and nickel isotopic analyses of presolar silicon carbide grains

    SciTech Connect

    Trappitsch, Reto; Stephan, Thomas; Savina, Michael R.

    Aside from recording stellar nucleosynthesis, a few elements in presolar grains can also provide insights into the galactic chemical evolution (GCE) of nuclides. We have studied the carbon, silicon, iron, and nickel isotopic compositions of presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to better understand GCE. Since only the neutron-rich nuclides in these grains have been heavily in uenced by the parent star, the neutron-poor nuclides serve as GCE proxies. Using CHILI, a new resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) instrument, we measured 74 presolar SiC grains for all iron and nickel isotopes. With the CHARISMA instrument,more » 13 presolar SiC grains were analyzed for iron isotopes. All grains were also measured by NanoSIMS for their carbon and silicon isotopic compositions. A comparison of the measured neutron-rich isotopes with models for AGB star nucleosynthesis shows that our measurements are consistent with AGB star predictions for low-mass stars between half-solar and solar metallicity. Furthermore, our measurements give an indication on the 22Ne( ,n) 25Mg reaction rate. In terms of GCE, we nd that the GCE-dominated iron and nickel isotope ratios, 54Fe/56Fe and 60Ni/ 58Ni, correlate with their GCE-dominated counterpart in silicon, 29Si/ 28Si. The measured GCE trends include the Solar System composition, showing that the Solar System is not a special case. However, as seen in silicon and titanium, many presolar SiC grains are more evolved for iron and nickel than the Solar System. This con rms prior ndings and agrees with observations of large stellar samples that a simple age-metallicity relationship for GCE cannot explain the composition of the solar neighborhood.« less

  7. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Harry C.; Fang, Ho T.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a four year program to improve the strength and reliability of injection-molded silicon nitride are summarized. Statistically designed processing experiments were performed to identify and optimize critical processing parameters and compositions. Process improvements were monitored by strength testing at room and elevated temperatures, and microstructural characterization by optical, scanning electron microscopes, and scanning transmission electron microscope. Processing modifications resulted in a 20 percent strength and 72 percent Weibull slope improvement of the baseline material. Additional sintering aids screening and optimization experiments succeeded in developing a new composition (GN-10) capable of 581.2 MPa at 1399 C. A SiC whisker toughened composite using this material as a matrix achieved a room temperature toughness of 6.9 MPa m(exp .5) by the Chevron notched bar technique. Exploratory experiments were conducted on injection molding of turbocharger rotors.

  8. Effects of growth and dissolution on the fractionation of silicon isotopes by estuarine diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaole; Olofsson, Martin; Andersson, Per S.; Fry, Brian; Legrand, Catherine; Humborg, Christoph; Mörth, Carl-Magnus

    2014-04-01

    Studies of silicon (Si) isotope fractionation during diatom growth in open ocean systems have documented lower Si isotopic values (δ30Si) in the biogenic silica of diatom frustules compared to dissolved silicon. Recent findings also indicate that Si isotope fractionation occurs during dissolution of diatom frustules, producing higher δ30Si values in the remaining biogenic silica. This study focuses on diatoms from high production areas in estuarine and coastal areas that represent approximately 30-50% of the global marine primary production. Two species of diatoms, Thalassiosira baltica and Skeletonema marinoi, were isolated from the brackish Baltic Sea, one of the largest estuarine systems in the world. These species were used for laboratory investigations of Si isotope fractionation during diatom growth and the subsequent dissolution of the diatom frustules. Both species of diatoms give an identical Si isotope fractionation factor during growth of -1.50 ± 0.36‰ (2σ) for 30Si, which falls in the range of -2.09‰ to -0.55‰ of published data. Our results also suggest a dissolution-induced Si isotope fractionation factor of -0.86‰ at early stage of dissolution, but this effect was observed only in DSi and no significant Si isotope change was observed for BSi. The growth and dissolution results are applied to a Baltic Sea sediment core to reconstruct DSi utilization by diatoms, and found to be in agreement with the observed DSi uptake rates in the overlying water column during diatom growth.

  9. A palaeotemperature curve for the Precambrian oceans based on silicon isotopes in cherts.

    PubMed

    Robert, François; Chaussidon, Marc

    2006-10-26

    The terrestrial sediment record indicates that the Earth's climate varied drastically in the Precambrian era (before 550 million years ago), ranging from surface temperatures similar to or higher than today's to global glaciation events. The most continuous record of sea surface temperatures of that time has been derived from variations in oxygen isotope ratios of cherts (siliceous sediments), but the long-term cooling of the oceans inferred from those data has been questioned because the oxygen isotope signature could have been reset through the exchange with hydrothermal fluids after deposition of the sediments. Here we show that the silicon isotopic composition of cherts more than 550 million years old shows systematic variations with age that support the earlier conclusion of long-term ocean cooling and exclude post-depositional exchange as the main source of the isotopic variations. In agreement with other lines of evidence, a model of the silicon cycle in the Precambrian era shows that the observed silicon isotope variations imply seawater temperature changes from about 70 degrees C 3,500 million years ago to about 20 degrees C 800 million years ago.

  10. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Wimmer, J. M.; Huang, H. H.; Rorabaugh, M. E.; Schienle, J.; Styhr, K. H.

    1985-01-01

    The AiResearch Casting Company baseline silicon nitride (92 percent GTE SN-502 Si sub 3 N sub 4 plus 6 percent Y sub 2 O sub 3 plus 2 percent Al sub 2 O sub 3) was characterized with methods that included chemical analysis, oxygen content determination, electrophoresis, particle size distribution analysis, surface area determination, and analysis of the degree of agglomeration and maximum particle size of elutriated powder. Test bars were injection molded and processed through sintering at 0.68 MPa (100 psi) of nitrogen. The as-sintered test bars were evaluated by X-ray phase analysis, room and elevated temperature modulus of rupture strength, Weibull modulus, stress rupture, strength after oxidation, fracture origins, microstructure, and density from quantities of samples sufficiently large to generate statistically valid results. A series of small test matrices were conducted to study the effects and interactions of processing parameters which included raw materials, binder systems, binder removal cycles, injection molding temperatures, particle size distribution, sintering additives, and sintering cycle parameters.

  11. Surface engineered porous silicon for stable, high performance electrochemical supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Landon; Westover, Andrew; Mares, Jeremy W; Chatterjee, Shahana; Erwin, William R; Bardhan, Rizia; Weiss, Sharon M; Pint, Cary L

    2013-10-22

    Silicon materials remain unused for supercapacitors due to extreme reactivity of silicon with electrolytes. However, doped silicon materials boast a low mass density, excellent conductivity, a controllably etched nanoporous structure, and combined earth abundance and technological presence appealing to diverse energy storage frameworks. Here, we demonstrate a universal route to transform porous silicon (P-Si) into stable electrodes for electrochemical devices through growth of an ultra-thin, conformal graphene coating on the P-Si surface. This graphene coating simultaneously passivates surface charge traps and provides an ideal electrode-electrolyte electrochemical interface. This leads to 10-40X improvement in energy density, and a 2X wider electrochemical window compared to identically-structured unpassivated P-Si. This work demonstrates a technique generalizable to mesoporous and nanoporous materials that decouples the engineering of electrode structure and electrochemical surface stability to engineer performance in electrochemical environments. Specifically, we demonstrate P-Si as a promising new platform for grid-scale and integrated electrochemical energy storage.

  12. Surface engineered porous silicon for stable, high performance electrochemical supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Landon; Westover, Andrew; Mares, Jeremy W.; Chatterjee, Shahana; Erwin, William R.; Bardhan, Rizia; Weiss, Sharon M.; Pint, Cary L.

    2013-10-01

    Silicon materials remain unused for supercapacitors due to extreme reactivity of silicon with electrolytes. However, doped silicon materials boast a low mass density, excellent conductivity, a controllably etched nanoporous structure, and combined earth abundance and technological presence appealing to diverse energy storage frameworks. Here, we demonstrate a universal route to transform porous silicon (P-Si) into stable electrodes for electrochemical devices through growth of an ultra-thin, conformal graphene coating on the P-Si surface. This graphene coating simultaneously passivates surface charge traps and provides an ideal electrode-electrolyte electrochemical interface. This leads to 10-40X improvement in energy density, and a 2X wider electrochemical window compared to identically-structured unpassivated P-Si. This work demonstrates a technique generalizable to mesoporous and nanoporous materials that decouples the engineering of electrode structure and electrochemical surface stability to engineer performance in electrochemical environments. Specifically, we demonstrate P-Si as a promising new platform for grid-scale and integrated electrochemical energy storage.

  13. Surface engineered porous silicon for stable, high performance electrochemical supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Landon; Westover, Andrew; Mares, Jeremy W.; Chatterjee, Shahana; Erwin, William R.; Bardhan, Rizia; Weiss, Sharon M.; Pint, Cary L.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon materials remain unused for supercapacitors due to extreme reactivity of silicon with electrolytes. However, doped silicon materials boast a low mass density, excellent conductivity, a controllably etched nanoporous structure, and combined earth abundance and technological presence appealing to diverse energy storage frameworks. Here, we demonstrate a universal route to transform porous silicon (P-Si) into stable electrodes for electrochemical devices through growth of an ultra-thin, conformal graphene coating on the P-Si surface. This graphene coating simultaneously passivates surface charge traps and provides an ideal electrode-electrolyte electrochemical interface. This leads to 10–40X improvement in energy density, and a 2X wider electrochemical window compared to identically-structured unpassivated P-Si. This work demonstrates a technique generalizable to mesoporous and nanoporous materials that decouples the engineering of electrode structure and electrochemical surface stability to engineer performance in electrochemical environments. Specifically, we demonstrate P-Si as a promising new platform for grid-scale and integrated electrochemical energy storage. PMID:24145684

  14. Silicon Isotope Fractionation by Banana Under Continuous Nutrient and Silica Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opfergelt, S.; Cardinal, D.; Henriet, C.; Delvaux, B.; André, L.

    2004-12-01

    Silicon is absorbed by plants as aqueous H4SiO4 with other essential nutrients, and precipitates in aerial parts of the plant as phytolith, a biogenic opal. Phytoliths are restored to the soil by decomposition of organic debris from plant material. The role of higher plants in the biogeochemical cycle of silicon is therefore major although it is still poorly studied. Biomineralization processes are known to fractionate the three stable silicon isotopes with a preferential uptake of light isotopes. Therefore, following some preliminary results from Douthitt (1982), and studies presented in recent conferences (Ziegler et al., 2002; Ding et al., 2003), we suspect that phytolith production by plants could also fractionate the silicon isotopes. Inversely, intensity of phytolith-related isotopic fractionations might contribute to a better understanding of the soil-plant silicon cycle. Our study focused on banana, a silicon accumulating plant (>1% Si, dry weight).Musa acuminata cv Grande Naine has been grown in hydroponics under controlled conditions (light, temperature, humidity, nutrients) during six weeks. The nutrient supply was kept constant: three batches of five plants were grown with a continuous nutrient solution flow of 5, 50 and 100 ppm SiO2 respectively. Si isotopic compositions were measured in the source solution, and in silica extracted from the various parts of banana (roots, pseudostems, midribs and petioles, leaves), using a Nu Plasma multicollector mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) operating in dry plasma mode. The results are expressed as δ 29Si relatively to the NBS28 standard, with an average precision of ± 0.03‰ . Silicon contents and morphological studies of phytoliths were also achieved. Banana δ 29Si varied between -0.18 and -0.76‰ with a source solution at -0.02‰ . Values of δ 29Si were less fractionated, relatively to the nutrient solution, in roots, where no phytoliths have been observed until now, than in upper parts of banana where

  15. Isotope Generated Electron Density in Silicon Carbide Direct Energy Converters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Al, and (c) Si . The view is 5 mm by 0.15 mm, and the slice is 0.15 mm thick, representing 30-5 µm partial- layers. The binning is stored in...from top to bottom) (a) SiC, (b) Al, and (c) Si . The data is taken along the central line of the layers, where each point represents 250 µm by 8 µm...device geometry is underway. Materials under investigation include silicon ( Si -2.3 g/cc), SiC (3.2 g/cc), gallium nitride (GaN - 6.15 g/cc), and CVD

  16. Silicon isotopes reveal recycled altered oceanic crust in the mantle sources of Ocean Island Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, Emily A.; Moynier, Frédéric; Savage, Paul S.; Jackson, Matthew G.; Moreira, Manuel; Day, James M. D.

    2016-09-01

    The study of silicon (Si) isotopes in Ocean Island Basalts (OIB) has the potential to discern between different models for the origins of geochemical heterogeneities in the mantle. Relatively large (∼several per mil per atomic mass unit) Si isotope fractionation occurs in low-temperature environments during biochemical and geochemical precipitation of dissolved Si, where the precipitate is preferentially enriched in the lighter isotopes relative to the dissolved Si. In contrast, only a limited range (∼tenths of a per mil) of Si isotope fractionation has been observed from high-temperature igneous processes. Therefore, Si isotopes may be useful as tracers for the presence of crustal material within OIB mantle source regions that experienced relatively low-temperature surface processes in a manner similar to other stable isotope systems, such as oxygen. Characterizing the isotopic composition of the mantle is also of central importance to the use of the Si isotope system as a basis for comparisons with other planetary bodies (e.g., Moon, Mars, asteroids). Here we present the first comprehensive suite of high-precision Si isotope data obtained by MC-ICP-MS for a diverse suite of OIB. Samples originate from ocean islands in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean basins and include representative end-members for the EM-1, EM-2, and HIMU mantle components. On average, δ30Si values for OIB (-0.32 ± 0.09‰, 2 sd) are in general agreement with previous estimates for the δ30Si value of Bulk Silicate Earth (-0.29 ± 0.07‰, 2 sd; Savage et al., 2014). Nonetheless, some small systematic variations are present; specifically, most HIMU-type (Mangaia; Cape Verde; La Palma, Canary Islands) and Iceland OIB are enriched in the lighter isotopes of Si (δ30Si values lower than MORB), consistent with recycled altered oceanic crust and lithospheric mantle in their mantle sources.

  17. ``Recycling'' Geophysics: Monitoring and Isotopic Analysis of Engineered Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, R.; Singh, K. P.; Ogle, N.; Ntarlagiannis, D.

    2010-12-01

    The emerging sub discipline of biogeophysics has provoked debate on the mechanisms of microbial processes that may contribute to geophysical signatures. At field scales geophysical signatures are often non unique due to the many parameters (physical, chemical, and biological) that are involved. It may be easier to apply geophysical techniques such as electrodic potential (EP), self potential (SP) and induced polarization (IP) to engineered biological systems where there is a degree of control over the design of the physical and chemical domain. Here we present results of a column experiment that was designed to anaerobically biodegrade dissolved organic matter in landfill leachate. The column utilises a recycled porous media (concrete) to help sequester organic carbon. Electrodic potential, self potential and induced polarisation are used in conjunction with chemical and isotopic techniques to monitor the effectiveness of this approach. Preliminary carbon and oxygen isotopic analysis on concrete from the column in contact with leachate show isotopic enrichment suggesting abiotic precipitation of carbonates.

  18. Modern Deep-sea Sponges as Recorders of Bottom Water Silicon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, K. R.; Georg, R. B.; Rickaby, R. E.; Robinson, L. F.; Halliday, A. N.

    2008-12-01

    Major zones of opal accumulation in the world oceans have experienced geographical shifts during the Cenozoic coincident with times of transition in oceanic circulation and climate. The global marine silica cycle is likely to respond to various large-scale changes including the distillation of Si and other nutrients in ocean basins; weathering and continental inputs; and biological productivity in surface waters. These processes could potentially be distinguished by their impact on the isotopic composition of dissolved silica in the world oceans. Although diatoms dominate uptake of silica in surface waters, box-modelling (de la Rocha and Bickle, 2005) suggests that sponges spicules have a greater potential to reflect whole ocean changes in the silica cycle, by recording deep-water silicon isotopes. Here, we introduce a new calibration study of modern deep- sea sponges collected on a transect cruise across the Drake Passage, in the Southern Ocean, from a range of depths and seawater silicic acid concentrations. Sponges were collected by benthic trawling, and dried immediately. The spicules were later isolated from cellular material and cleaned for surface contaminants, before dissolution and analysis by NuPlasma HR MC-ICP-MS in medium resolution mode. We discuss our preliminary data, the extent to which inter and intraspecies variations reflect environmental conditions, and the implications for palaeoreconstructions of the marine silicon cycle. de la Rocha, C. and M. Bickle (2005). Sensitivity of silicon isotopes to whole-ocean changes in the silica cycle. Marine Geology 217, 267-282.

  19. Silicon Isotopes of Marine Pore Water: Tracking the Destiny of Marine Biogenic Opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassarino, L.; Hendry, K. R.

    2017-12-01

    Silicon isotopes (δ30Si) are a powerful tool for the studying of the past and present silicon cycles, which is closely linked to the carbon cycle. Siliceous phytoplankton, such as diatoms, as one of the major conveyors of carbon to marine sediments. δ30Si from fossil diatoms has been shown to represent past silicic acid (DSi) utilization in the photic zone, since the lighter isotope is preferentially incorporated in their skeleton, the frustule. This assumes that species in the sediments depict past blooms and that frustules are preserved in their initial state during burial. Here we present new silicon isotopes data of sea water and pore water of deep marine sediments from two contrasted environments, the Equatorial Atlantic and West Antarctic Peninsula. δ30Si and DSi concentration, of both sea water and pore water, are negatively correlated. Marine biogenic opal dissolution can be tracked using δ30Si signature of pore water as lighter signals and high DSi concentrations are associated with the biogenic silica. Our data enhances post depositional and diagenesis processes during burial with a clear highlight on the sediment water interface exchanges.

  20. Species-dependent silicon isotope fractionation in unialgal cultures of marine diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, J. N.; Varela, D. E.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Beucher, C.

    2011-12-01

    Variations in the natural abundance of stable isotopes of silicon (expressed as δ30Si in %) are a key tool for studying the marine silicon (Si) cycle in modern and ancient oceans. In particular, this tool can be used to track relative differences in silicic acid drawdown in surface waters by siliceous microplankton. Diatoms are siliceous phytoplankton that dominate the cycling of Si in the oceans. They represent a major source of primary production and are important in the transfer of Si, nitrogen, phosphorus, and atmospheric carbon to the deep sea. Previous investigations of Si isotope fractionation in diatom cultures have ruled out the influence of temperature (12-22°C) and shown that Si fractionation was invariant in different species of temperate diatoms (De La Rocha et al. 1997). However, the application of this proxy for marine paleo-silicon reconstructions has typically only been used in polar regions, such as the Southern Ocean, where high primary production rates give rise to diatom-rich sediments. Here, we present results on the fractionation of Si isotopes by four species of polar diatoms grown in semi-continuous cultures (Chaetoceros brevis, Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, Porosira glacialis, and Thalassiosira antarctica). To compare with previous studies (De La Rocha et al, 1997), we also tested Si isotope fractionation by two species of temperate diatoms (Thalassiosira pseudonana and Thalassiosira weissflogii). The temperate species yielded Si isotope fractionation (Δ30Si) values of -0.81 % (±0.12, SD, n=11) for T. pseudonana and -1.03% (±0.09, SD, n=3) for T. weissflogii, that are identical to the previously reported fractionation of -1.1 % (±0.4, SD, n=6) (De La Rocha et al. 1997). Similarly, our data for polar species F. kerguelensis, P. glacialis and T. antarctica suggest a fractionation of -0.7 to -1.1 %. Interestingly, our preliminary results from Chaetoceros brevis cultures show a Si isotope fractionation value of about -2.61 % (±0.05, SD

  1. Joining and Integration of Silicon Carbide for Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Coddington, Bryan; Asthana, Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    The critical need for ceramic joining and integration technologies is becoming better appreciated as the maturity level increases for turbine engine components fabricated from ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials. Ceramic components offer higher operating temperatures and reduced cooling requirements. This translates into higher efficiencies and lower emissions. For fabricating complex shapes, diffusion bonding of silicon carbide (SiC) to SiC is being developed. For the integration of ceramic parts to the surrounding metallic engine system, brazing of SiC to metals is being developed. Overcoming the chemical, thermal, and mechanical incompatibilities between dissimilar materials is very challenging. This presentation will discuss the types of ceramic components being developed by researchers and industry and the benefits of using ceramic components. Also, the development of strong, crack-free, stable bonds will be discussed. The challenges and progress in developing joining and integration approaches for a specific application, i.e. a SiC injector, will be presented.

  2. Silicon isotope fractionations in pure Si and Fe-Si systems and their geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X. Y.; Beard, B. L.; Reddy, T. R.; Roden, E. E.; Johnson, C.

    2016-12-01

    Amorphous Si or Si-bearing materials are ubiquitous in nature, and are likely precursors to various rock types, such as cherts and banded iron formations (BIFs). Si isotope exchange kinetics and fractionation factors between these materials and aqueous Si, however, are poorly constrained, preventing a mechanistic or quantitative understanding of geological δ30Si records. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted to provide better estimates on Si isotope exchange kinetics and fractionation factors. Equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors between Fe(III)-Si gel and aqueous Si (Δ30Sigel-aq) in artificial Archean seawater (AAS), determined by a three-isotope method with a 29Si tracer, are -2.3‰ where Fe2+ is absent from the solution, and -3.2‰ where Fe2+ is present in the solution[1]. Aqueous Fe2+ catalyzes Si isotope exchange, and causes larger Si isotope fractionation due to incorporation into the solid that may have changed Si bonding. In contrast, our preliminary results show that Δ30Sigel-aq between pure Si gel and aqueous Si at equilibrium is -0.13‰. Ongoing experiments are intended to approach the isotope equilibrium from multiple directions to resolve potential kinetic effects, and to explore temperature dependence. Nonetheless, the contrast in Δ30Sigel-aq between Fe-Si and pure Si systems highlights a significant impact of Fe on Si isotope fractionations. These results have important implications for Si isotopes in Precambrian cherts and BIFs, as well as in weathering systems in general. Silicon isotope fractionation was also studied in experiments that involved dissimilatory iron reduction of Fe(III)-Si gel by Desulfuromonas acetoxidans in AAS[2], and was found to become larger with progression of Fe reduction. A Δ30Sigel-aq of -3.5‰ was observed at 32% reduction of Fe3+. This result explains lower δ30Si values in magnetite-associated quartz that those in hematite-associated quartz in some BIFs. The large Si isotope fractionation

  3. Silicon Isotopic Measurements in Desolvated Samples by MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinal, D.; Alleman, L.; Ziegler, K.; de Jong, J.; Andre, L.

    2002-12-01

    Silicon, the most ubiquitous rock-forming element presents also a key role in biological processes. In particular, its biogeochemical cycle constitutes one of the most challenging issues in recent years due to its close relationship with the carbon cycle in marine environments (Tréguer et al., 1995; Ragueneau et al., 2000). The most recent silicon isotopic investigations on various natural samples have highlighted the great potential of this (palaeo)-proxy for oceanographers (De La Rocha et al., 1997, 1998). Better understanding the silicon isotope fractionation due to various biogeochemical processes can be achieved by facilitating its measurements through MC-ICPMS technique (De La Rocha et al., 2002; Alleman et al., 2002). In this regard we have developed an original method to analyze silicon isotopes under dry plasma conditions. We demonstrate that coupling a Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS with a Cetac Aridus desolvator allows the rapid acquisition of natural silicon isotope abundances with high sensitivity and accuracy. To adequately correct for the mass fractionation occurring at the interface between the plasma source and the mass spectrometer line, we combine external normalization using Mg as a dopant with standard-sample bracketing using NBS-28 as the reference. With the desolvating nebulization system, the measurement of 28Si and 29Si isotopes is not hampered by significant interferences. δ29Si values are obtained with an accuracy and repeatability better than 0.1 \\permil. The accuracy has been successfully calibrated against the laser fluorination line technique (De La Rocha et al., 1996; Alleman et al., 2002). We could demonstrate that the isotopic fractionation that might occur in the plasma or the desolvator was adequately corrected by combining Mg isotopes and the sample-standard bracketing procedure. Moreover, the preservation of the Si isotopic signatures of the samples is validated by the different chemical sample treatments required by these two

  4. Strontium and barium isotopes in presolar silicon carbide grains measured with CHILI-two types of X grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Thomas; Trappitsch, Reto; Davis, Andrew M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Rost, Detlef; Savina, Michael R.; Jadhav, Manavi; Kelly, Christopher H.; Gyngard, Frank; Hoppe, Peter; Dauphas, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    We used CHILI, the Chicago Instrument for Laser Ionization, a new resonance ionization mass spectrometer developed for isotopic analysis of small samples, to analyze strontium, zirconium, and barium isotopes in 22 presolar silicon carbide grains. Twenty of the grains showed detectable strontium and barium, but none of the grains had enough zirconium to be detected with CHILI. Nine grains were excluded from further consideration since they showed very little signals (<1000 counts) for strontium as well as for barium. Among the 11 remaining grains, we found three X grains. The discovery of three supernova grains among only 22 grains was fortuitous, because only ∼1% of presolar silicon carbide grains are type X, but was confirmed by silicon isotopic measurements of grain residues with NanoSIMS. While one of the X grains showed strontium and barium isotope patterns expected for supernova grains, the two other supernova grains have 87Sr/86Sr < 0.5, values never observed in any natural sample before. From their silicon isotope ratios, the latter two grains can be classified as X2 grains, while the former grain belongs to the more common X1 group. The differences of these grains in strontium and barium isotopic composition constrain their individual formation conditions in Type II supernovae.

  5. Strontium and barium isotopes in presolar silicon carbide grains measured with CHILI—two types of X grains

    DOE PAGES

    Stephan, Thomas; Trappitsch, Reto; Davis, Andrew M.; ...

    2017-05-10

    Here, we used CHILI, the Chicago Instrument for Laser Ionization, a new resonance ionization mass spectrometer developed for isotopic analysis of small samples, to analyze strontium, zirconium, and barium isotopes in 22 presolar silicon carbide grains. Twenty of the grains showed detectable strontium and barium, but none of the grains had enough zirconium to be detected with CHILI. Nine grains were excluded from further consideration since they showed very little signals (<1000 counts) for strontium as well as for barium. Among the 11 remaining grains, we found three X grains. The discovery of three supernova grains among only 22 grainsmore » was fortuitous, because only ~1% of presolar silicon carbide grains are type X, but was confirmed by silicon isotopic measurements of grain residues with NanoSIMS. And while one of the X grains showed strontium and barium isotope patterns expected for supernova grains, the two other supernova grains have 87Sr/86Sr < 0.5, values never observed in any natural sample before. From their silicon isotope ratios, the latter two grains can be classified as X2 grains, while the former grain belongs to the more common X1 group. The differences of these grains in strontium and barium isotopic composition constrain their individual formation conditions in Type II supernovae.« less

  6. Strontium and barium isotopes in presolar silicon carbide grains measured with CHILI—two types of X grains

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Thomas; Trappitsch, Reto; Davis, Andrew M.

    Here, we used CHILI, the Chicago Instrument for Laser Ionization, a new resonance ionization mass spectrometer developed for isotopic analysis of small samples, to analyze strontium, zirconium, and barium isotopes in 22 presolar silicon carbide grains. Twenty of the grains showed detectable strontium and barium, but none of the grains had enough zirconium to be detected with CHILI. Nine grains were excluded from further consideration since they showed very little signals (<1000 counts) for strontium as well as for barium. Among the 11 remaining grains, we found three X grains. The discovery of three supernova grains among only 22 grainsmore » was fortuitous, because only ~1% of presolar silicon carbide grains are type X, but was confirmed by silicon isotopic measurements of grain residues with NanoSIMS. And while one of the X grains showed strontium and barium isotope patterns expected for supernova grains, the two other supernova grains have 87Sr/86Sr < 0.5, values never observed in any natural sample before. From their silicon isotope ratios, the latter two grains can be classified as X2 grains, while the former grain belongs to the more common X1 group. The differences of these grains in strontium and barium isotopic composition constrain their individual formation conditions in Type II supernovae.« less

  7. Inverse design engineering of all-silicon polarization beam splitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandsen, Lars H.; Sigmund, Ole

    2016-03-01

    Utilizing the inverse design engineering method of topology optimization, we have realized high-performing all-silicon ultra-compact polarization beam splitters. We show that the device footprint of the polarization beam splitter can be as compact as ~2 μm2 while performing experimentally with a polarization splitting loss lower than ~0.82 dB and an extinction ratio larger than ~15 dB in the C-band. We investigate the device performance as a function of the device length and find a lower length above which the performance only increases incrementally. Imposing a minimum feature size constraint in the optimization is shown to affect the performance negatively and reveals the necessity for light to scatter on a sub-wavelength scale to obtain functionalities in compact photonic devices.

  8. Conversion electron spectrometry of Pu isotopes with a silicon drift detector.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Paepen, J; Peräjärvi, K; Turunen, J; Pöllänen, R

    2016-03-01

    An electron spectrometry set-up was built at IRMM consisting of a vacuum chamber with a moveable source holder and windowless Peltier-cooled silicon drift detector (SDD). The SDD is well suited for measuring low-energy x rays and electrons emitted from thin radioactive sources with low self-absorption. The attainable energy resolution is better than 0.5keV for electrons of 30keV. It has been used to measure the conversion electron spectra of three plutonium isotopes, i.e. (238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, as well as (241)Am (being a decay product of (241)Pu). The obtained mixed x-ray and electron spectra are compared with spectra obtained with a close-geometry set-up using another SDD in STUK and spectra measured with a Si(Li) detector at IRMM. The potential of conversion electron spectrometry for isotopic analysis of mixed plutonium samples is investigated. With respect to the (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratio, the conversion electron peaks of both isotopes are more clearly separated than their largely overlapping peaks in alpha spectra. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Substitution of ceramics for high temperature alloys. [advantages of using silicon carbides and silicon nitrides in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1978-01-01

    The high temperature capability of ceramics such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide can result in turbine engines of improved efficiency. Other advantages when compared to the nickel and cobalt alloys in current use are raw material availability, lower weight, erosion/corrosion resistance, and potentially lower cost. The use of ceramics in three different sizes of gas turbine is considered; these are the large utility turbines, advanced aircraft turbines, and small automotive turbines. Special consideration, unique to each of these applications, arise when one considers substituting ceramics for high temperature alloys. The effects of material substitutions are reviewed in terms of engine performance, operating economy, and secondary effects.

  10. Silicon isotope ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses.

    PubMed

    Gourgiotis, Alkiviadis; Ducasse, Thomas; Barker, Evelyne; Jollivet, Patrick; Gin, Stéphane; Bassot, Sylvain; Cazala, Charlotte

    2017-02-15

    High-level, long-lived nuclear waste arising from spent fuel reprocessing is vitrified in silicate glasses for final disposal in deep geologic formations. In order to better understand the mechanisms driving glass dissolution, glass alteration studies, based on silicon isotope ratio monitoring of 29 Si-doped aqueous solutions, were carried out in laboratories. This work explores the capabilities of the new type of quadrupole-based ICP-MS, the Agilent 8800 tandem quadrupole ICP-MS/MS, for accurate silicon isotope ratio determination for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses. In order to avoid silicon polyatomic interferences, a new analytical method was developed using O 2 as the reaction gas in the Octopole Reaction System (ORS), and silicon isotopes were measured in mass-shift mode. A careful analysis of the potential polyatomic interferences on SiO + and SiO 2 + ion species was performed, and we found that SiO + ion species suffer from important polyatomic interferences coming from the matrix of sample and standard solutions (0.5M HNO 3 ). For SiO 2 + , no interferences were detected, and thus, these ion species were chosen for silicon isotope ratio determination. A number of key settings for accurate isotope ratio analysis like, detector dead time, integration time, number of sweeps, wait time offset, memory blank and instrumental mass fractionation, were considered and optimized. Particular attention was paid to the optimization of abundance sensitivity of the quadrupole mass filter before the ORS. We showed that poor abundance sensitivity leads to a significant shift of the data away from the Exponential Mass Fractionation Law (EMFL) due to the spectral overlaps of silicon isotopes combined with different oxygen isotopes (i.e. 28 Si 16 O 18 O + , 30 Si 16 O 16 O + ). The developed method was validated by measuring a series of reference solutions with different 29 Si enrichment. Isotope ratio trueness, uncertainty and repeatability were found to be <0

  11. Electron-hole pairs generation rate estimation irradiated by isotope Nickel-63 in silicone using GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, I. V.; Sidorov, V. G.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Khoroshko, A. Y.; Lelekov, A. T.

    2015-10-01

    To optimize parameters of beta-electrical converter of isotope Nickel-63 radiation, model of the distribution of EHP generation rate in semiconductor must be derived. By using Monte-Carlo methods in GEANT4 system with ultra-low energy electron physics models this distribution in silicon calculated and approximated with Gauss function. Maximal efficient isotope layer thickness and maximal energy efficiency of EHP generation were estimated.

  12. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Lisa; Luhman, Dwight; Carr, Stephen; Borchardt, John; Bishop, Nathaniel; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel; Witzel, Wayne; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    In this talk we will discuss electron spin resonance experiments in single donor silicon qubit devices fabricated at Sandia National Labs. A self-aligned device structure consisting of a polysilicon gate SET located adjacent to the donor is used for donor electron spin readout. Using a cryogenic HEMT amplifier next to the silicon device, we demonstrate spin readout at 100 kHz bandwidth and Rabi oscillations with 0.96 visibility. Electron spin resonance measurements on these devices show a linewidth of 30 kHz and coherence times T2* = 10 us and T2 = 0.3 ms. We also discuss estimates of the fidelity of our donor electron spin qubit measurements using gate set tomography. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon.

  13. Sedimentary silicon isotope indicates the Kuroshio subsurface upwelling in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Yang, S.; Su, N.

    2017-12-01

    The Kuroshio as the western boundary current of the North Pacific subtropical circulation, originates from east of the Philippine Islands, and flows northeastward along the eastern coast of Taiwan. It's subsurface water intrudes the East China Sea (ECS) and forms a typical upwelling on the inner shelf, which may play an important role in the material and heat transport, biogeochemical process and marine ecosystem of the ECS.To date, most previous studies on the Kuroshio subsurface upwelling focuse on the seasonal and interannual variations, and few researches touch on the upwelling evolution in the geologic past. In this study, eight short sediment cores were taken along the ECS inner shelf (upwelling area), which allow us to reconstruct the upwelling history over the last several hundred years. Although conventional indexes of oceanographic changes, such as salinity, temperature and hydrogen and oxygen isotope, provide valuable constraints on the modern oceanic circulation and water mass movements, how to reconstruct them from geologic records is always a challenging work. In this contribution, we present the data of stable silicon isotope, biogenic opal, diatom assemblages, element geochemistry and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes of these core sediments, and aim to decipher the Kuroshio subsurface upwelling history on the ECS shelf. We will also illustrate the difference in δ30Si signals between small (<30 um) and large (>150 um) diatom fractions, and test whether it is an effective indicator for paleo-upwelling intensity.

  14. Constraining mechanisms of quartz precipitation in the Archean ocean using silicon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brengman, L. A.; Fedo, C.; Martin, W.

    2017-12-01

    To constrain reservoir values for the Archean silica cycle we measured silicon isotope compositions (δ30Si) of 28 igneous, siliciclastic sedimentary, hydrothermal, and chemical sedimentary rock samples from three Archean greenstone belts representing different times (>3.7 - 2.7 Ga) and tectonic regimes. We posit that silicon isotope compositions of quartz (746 analyses measured in situ by secondary ion mass spectrometry at the NORDSIM facility) are linked to changes in key geochemical parameters that vary within local depositional environments, coupled with a dependency on size and δ30Si composition of the source reservoir. Collectively, siliceous precipitates from even a single basin span a 7‰ range in δ30Si values. Such heterogeneity, regardless of basinal position or presence of Fe-phases demonstrates that δ30Si values of chemical sediments are linked to neither a well-mixed water column representative of a single ocean composition, nor a specific time in Earth history. Combining data from all three greenstone belts we discern that all measured Algoma-type iron formation (IF) and about 50% of associated chert samples possess δ30Si values <0‰, while the majority of silicified volcanic rocks and the remaining 50% of chert samples have δ30Si values >0‰. Negative values of Algoma-type IF can be explained by rate-dependent fractionation during precipitation and/or adsorption to Fe/Al. Combined experimental and natural data for quartz precipitates suggest slow precipitation rates coupled with closed system, Rayleigh type distillation could produce the isotopically heavy values. Such results suggest the quartz-precipitating fluid for these rocks evolves from an open system in disequilibrium, to one that is closed, and in equilibrium with the host rock. In contrast to the static range of values through time for Algoma-type IF, associated cherts and silicified rocks, compiled data for Superior-type IF from 3 - 1.8 Ga record a systematic increasing trend from

  15. Strong Photoluminescence Enhancement of Silicon Oxycarbide through Defect Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Brian; Tabassum, Natasha; Nikas, Vasileios; Gallis, Spyros

    2017-01-01

    The following study focuses on the photoluminescence (PL) enhancement of chemically synthesized silicon oxycarbide (SiCxOy) thin films and nanowires through defect engineering via post-deposition passivation treatments. SiCxOy materials were deposited via thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD), and exhibit strong white light emission at room-temperature. Post-deposition passivation treatments were carried out using oxygen, nitrogen, and forming gas (FG, 5% H2, 95% N2) ambients, modifying the observed white light emission. The observed white luminescence was found to be inversely related to the carbonyl (C=O) bond density present in the films. The peak-to-peak PL was enhanced ~18 and ~17 times for, respectively, the two SiCxOy matrices, oxygen-rich and carbon-rich SiCxOy, via post-deposition passivations. Through a combinational and systematic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and PL study, it was revealed that proper tailoring of the passivations reduces the carbonyl bond density by a factor of ~2.2, corresponding to a PL enhancement of ~50 times. Furthermore, the temperature-dependent and temperature-dependent time resolved PL (TDPL and TD-TRPL) behaviors of the nitrogen and forming gas passivated SiCxOy thin films were investigated to acquire further insight into the ramifications of the passivation on the carbonyl/dangling bond density and PL yield. PMID:28772802

  16. Plasmonic engineering of spontaneous emission from silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Goffard, Julie; Gérard, Davy; Miska, Patrice; Baudrion, Anne-Laure; Deturche, Régis; Plain, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals offer huge advantages compared to other semi-conductor quantum dots as they are made from an abundant, non-toxic material and are compatible with silicon devices. Besides, among a wealth of extraordinary properties ranging from catalysis to nanomedicine, metal nanoparticles are known to increase the radiative emission rate of semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we use gold nanoparticles to accelerate the emission of silicon nanocrystals. The resulting integrated hybrid emitter is 5-fold brighter than bare silicon nanocrystals. We also propose an in-depth analysis highlighting the role of the different physical parameters in the photoluminescence enhancement phenomenon. This result has important implications for the practical use of silicon nanocrystals in optoelectronic devices, for instance for the design of efficient down-shifting devices that could be integrated within future silicon solar cells.

  17. Fingerprints of carbon, nitrogen, and silicon isotopes in small interstellar SiC grains from the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Peter; Geiss, Johannes; Buehler, Fritz; Neuenschwander, Juerg; Amari, Sachiko; Lewis, Roy S.

    1993-01-01

    We report ion microprobe determinations of the carbon, nitrogen, and silicon isotopic compositions of small SiC grains from the Murchison CM2 chondrite. Analyses were made on samples containing variable numbers of grains and on 14 individual grains. In some cases the multiple-grain sample compositions were probably dominated by only one or two grains. Total ranges observed are given. Only a few grains show values near the range limits. Both the total ranges of carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions, and even the narrower ranges typical for the majority of the grains, are similar to those observed for larger SiC grains. Two rare components appear to be present in the smaller-size fraction, one characterized by C-12/C-13 about 12-16 and the other by very heavy nitrogen. The carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions qualitatively may reflect hydrostatic H-burning via the CNO cycle and He-burning in red giants, as well as explosive H-burning in novae. The silicon isotopic compositions of most grains qualitatively show what is the signature of He-burning. The silicon isotopic composition of one grain, however, suggests a different process.

  18. Magnesium and Silicon Isotopes in HASP Glasses from Apollo 16 Lunar Soil 61241

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, G. F.; Delaney, J. S.; Lindsay, F.; Alexander, C. M. O'D; Chakrabarti, R.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Whattam, S.; Korotev, R.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    The high-Al (>28 wt %), silica-poor (<45 wt %) (HASP) feldspathic glasses of Apollo 16 are widely regarded as the evaporative residues of impacts in the lunar regolith [1-3]. By virtue of their small size, apparent homogeneity, and high inferred formation temperatures, the HASP glasses appear to be good samples in which to study fractionation processes that may accompany open system evaporation. Calculations suggest that HASP glasses with present-day Al2O3 concentrations of up to 40 wt% may have lost 19 wt% of their original masses, calculated as the oxides of iron and silicon, via evaporation [4]. We report Mg and Si isotope abundances in 10 HASP glasses and 2 impact-glass spherules from a 64-105 m grain-size fraction taken from Apollo 16 soil sample 61241.

  19. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  20. Towards substrate engineering of graphene-silicon Schottky diode photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Selvi, Hakan; Unsuree, Nawapong; Whittaker, Eric; Halsall, Matthew P; Hill, Ernie W; Thomas, Andrew; Parkinson, Patrick; Echtermeyer, Tim J

    2018-02-15

    Graphene-silicon Schottky diode photodetectors possess beneficial properties such as high responsivities and detectivities, broad spectral wavelength operation and high operating speeds. Various routes and architectures have been employed in the past to fabricate devices. Devices are commonly based on the removal of the silicon-oxide layer on the surface of silicon by wet-etching before deposition of graphene on top of silicon to form the graphene-silicon Schottky junction. In this work, we systematically investigate the influence of the interfacial oxide layer, the fabrication technique employed and the silicon substrate on the light detection capabilities of graphene-silicon Schottky diode photodetectors. The properties of devices are investigated over a broad wavelength range from near-UV to short-/mid-infrared radiation, radiation intensities covering over five orders of magnitude as well as the suitability of devices for high speed operation. Results show that the interfacial layer, depending on the required application, is in fact beneficial to enhance the photodetection properties of such devices. Further, we demonstrate the influence of the silicon substrate on the spectral response and operating speed. Fabricated devices operate over a broad spectral wavelength range from the near-UV to the short-/mid-infrared (thermal) wavelength regime, exhibit high photovoltage responses approaching 10 6 V W -1 and short rise- and fall-times of tens of nanoseconds.

  1. Inductive Measurement of Optically Hyperpolarized Phosphorous Donor Nuclei in an Isotopically Enriched Silicon-28 Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumann, P.; Patange, O.; Ramanathan, C.; Haas, H.; Moussa, O.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Riemann, H.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Becker, P.; Pohl, H.-J.; Itoh, K. M.; Cory, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the first inductive readout of optically hyperpolarized phosphorus-31 donor nuclear spins in an isotopically enriched silicon-28 crystal. The concentration of phosphorus donors in the crystal was 1.5 ×1 015 cm-3 , 3 orders of magnitude lower than has previously been detected via direct inductive detection. The signal-to-noise ratio measured in a single free induction decay from a 1 cm3 sample (≈1015 spins) was 113. By transferring the sample to an X -band ESR spectrometer, we were able to obtain a lower bound for the nuclear spin polarization at 1.7 K of ˜64 % . The 31P -T2 measured with a Hahn echo sequence was 420 ms at 1.7 K, which was extended to 1.2 s with a Carr Purcell cycle. The T1 of the 31P nuclear spins at 1.7 K is extremely long and could not be determined, as no decay was observed even on a time scale of 4.5 h. Optical excitation was performed with a 1047 nm laser, which provided above-band-gap excitation of the silicon. The buildup of the hyperpolarization at 4.2 K followed a single exponential with a characteristic time of 577 s, while the buildup at 1.7 K showed biexponential behavior with characteristic time constants of 578 and 5670 s.

  2. Astrophysics of CAI formation as revealed by silicon isotope LA-MC-ICPMS of an igneous CAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Young, Edward D.

    2007-05-01

    Silicon isotope ratios of a typical CAI from the Leoville carbonaceous chondrite, obtained in situ by laser ablation MC-ICPMS, together with existing 25Mg/ 24Mg data, reveal a detailed picture of the astrophysical setting of CAI melting and subsequent heating. Models for the chemical and isotopic effects of evaporation of the molten CAI are used to produce a univariant relationship between PH 2 and time during melting. The result shows that this CAI was molten for a cumulative time of no more than 70 days and probably less than 15 days depending on temperature. The object could have been molten for an integrated time of just a few hours if isotope ratio zoning was eliminated after melting by high subsolidus temperatures (e.g., > 1300 K) for ˜ 500 yr. In all cases subsolidus heating sufficient to produce diffusion-limited isotope fractionation at the margin of the solidified CAI is required. These stable isotope data point to a two-stage history for this igneous CAI involving melting for a cumulative timescale of hours to months followed by subsolidus heating for years to hundreds of years. The thermobarometric history deduced from combining Si and Mg isotope ratio data implicates thermal processing in the disk, perhaps by passage through shockwaves, following melting. This study underscores the direct link between the meaning of stable isotope ratio zoning, or lack thereof, and the inferred astrophysical setting of melting and subsequent processing of CAIs.

  3. Deep ocean nutrients during the Last Glacial Maximum deduced from sponge silicon isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Katharine R.; Georg, R. Bastian; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.; Robinson, Laura F.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2010-04-01

    The relative importance of biological and physical processes within the Southern Ocean for the storage of carbon and atmospheric pCO 2 on glacial-interglacial timescales remains uncertain. Understanding the impact of surface biological production on carbon export in the past relies on the reconstruction of the nutrient supply from upwelling deep waters. In particular, the upwelling of silicic acid (Si(OH) 4) is tightly coupled to carbon export in the Southern Ocean via diatom productivity. Here, we address how changes in deep water Si(OH) 4 concentrations can be reconstructed using the silicon isotopic composition of deep-sea sponges. We report δ30Si of modern deep-sea sponge spicules and show that they reflect seawater Si(OH) 4 concentration. The fractionation factor of sponge δ30Si compared to seawater δ30Si shows a positive relationship with Si(OH) 4, which may be a growth rate effect. Application of this proxy in two down-core records from the Scotia Sea reveals that Si(OH) 4 concentrations in the deep Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) were no different than today. Our result does not support a coupling of carbon and nutrient build up in an isolated deep ocean reservoir during the LGM. Our data, combined with records of stable isotopes from diatoms, are only consistent with enhanced LGM Southern Ocean nutrient utilization if there was also a concurrent reduction in diatom silicification or a shift from siliceous to organic-walled phytoplankton.

  4. Silicon Isotope Geochemistry of Ocean Island Basalts: Search for Deep Mantle Heterogeneities and Evidence for Recycled Altered Oceanic Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, E. A.; Savage, P. S.; Jackson, M. G.; Moreira, M. A.; Day, J. M.; Moynier, F.

    2014-12-01

    Analyses of Ocean Island Basalts (OIB) have shown that the Earth's mantle contains isotopically distinct components, but debate about the degree and cause of variability persists. The study of silicon (Si) isotopes in OIBs has the potential to elucidate mantle heterogeneities. Relatively large (~several per mil) Si isotopic fractionation occurs in low-temperature environments during precipitation from dissolved Si, where the precipitate is preferentially enriched in the lighter isotopes [1], but only a limited range (~tenths of a per mil) of Si isotope fractionation has been observed due to high-temperature igneous processes [2]. Therefore, Si isotopes may be useful as tracers for the presence of crustal material in OIB source regions in a manner similar to more conventional stable isotope systems, such as oxygen. Here we present the first comprehensive suite of high-precision Si isotopic data obtained by MC-ICP-MS for a diverse set of OIBs representing the EM-1, EM-2, and HIMU mantle components. In general, the Si isotopic compositions of OIBs analyzed here are agreement with previous estimates for Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE). However, small systematic variations are present; the HIMU end-member Mangaia and HIMU-type Cape Verde island São Nicolau are enriched in the light isotopes of Si (δ30Si = -0.37 ± 0.06‰ and δ30Si = -0.39 ± 0.04‰, respectively; errors are 2sd), with compositions intermediary between Mid Ocean Ridge Basalts and chondritic values. Additionally, Iceland samples from volcanic complexes in the Northern Rift Zone show similar Si isotope compositions (on average, δ30Si = -0.40 ± 0.06‰). In contrast, the δ30Si averages of the EM-1 end-member Pitcairn (-0.28 ± 0.07‰), the EM-2 end-member Samoa (-0.31 ± 0.07‰) and other OIB localities do not show any significant difference from previous estimates for the δ30Si value of BSE [3]. The Si isotopic variability in some HIMU-type and Icelandic OIBs most likely reflects the incorporation of

  5. Silicon isotopes fractionation in meteoric chemical weathering and hydrothermal alteration systems of volcanic rocks (Mayotte)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Puyraveau, Romain-Arnaud; Guihou, Abel; Haurine, Frederic; Deschamps, Pierre; rad, Setareh; Nehlig, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Low temperature chemical weathering fractionates silicon (Si) isotopes while forming secondary silicates. The Si fractionation ranges of high temperature secondary phyllosilicates formed in hydrothermal alteration environments have not been investigated to date. Several parameters, including temperature, reaction rates, pH, ionic concentrations in solution, precipitation/dissolution series or kinetic versus equilibrium regime are not the same in hydrothermal alteration and surface weathering systems and may lead to different fractionation factors. In this work, we analyzed Si isotopes in these two types of alteration conditions in two profiles sampled on the volcanic island of Mayotte. In both profiles, Si-bearing secondary mineral was kaolinite. Both profiles showed 30Si depletion as a function of the degree of alteration but each with a distinct pattern. In the meteoric weathering profile, from the bottom to the top, a gradual decrease of the δ30Si from parent rock (-0.29 ± 0.13 ‰) towards the most weathered product (-2.05 ± 0.13 ‰) was observed. In the hydrothermal alteration profile, in which meteoric weathering was also superimposed at the top of the profile, an abrupt transition of the δ30Si was measured at the interface between parent-rock (-0.21 ± 0.11 ‰) and the altered products, with a minimum value of -3.06 ± 0.16 ‰˙ At the scale of Si-bearing secondary minerals, in the chemical weathering system, a Δ30Sikaol-parentrock of -1.9 ‰ was observed, in agreement with results in the literature. A low temperature kinetic fractionation 30ɛ of -2.29 ‰ was calculated using a simple steady state model. However, an unexpected Δ30Sikaol-parentrock of -2.85 ‰ was measured in the hydrothermal alteration site, pointing to possible mechanisms linked to dissolution/precipitation series and/or to ionic composition of the solution as the main controlling factors of fractionation in hydrothermal conditions. At the scale of the profiles, both δ30Si

  6. Processing study of injection molding of silicon nitride for engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorabaugh, M. E.; Yeh, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    The high hardness of silicon nitride, which is currently under consideration as a structural material for such hot engine components as turbine blades, renders machining of the material prohibitively costly; the near net shape forming technique of injection molding is accordingly favored as a means for component fabrication. Attention is presently given to the relationships between injection molding processing parameters and the resulting microstructural and mechanical properties of the resulting engine parts. An experimental program has been conducted under NASA sponsorship which tests the quality of injection molded bars of silicon nitride at various stages of processing.

  7. Silicon Isotope Geochemistry of Ocean Island Basalts: Mantle Heterogeneities and Contribution of Recycled Oceanic Crust and Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, E. A.; Moynier, F.; Savage, P. S.; Jackson, M. G.; Moreira, M. A.; Day, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The study of Silicon (Si) isotopes in Ocean Island Basalts (OIB) has the potential to elucidate between possible heterogeneities in the mantle. Relatively large (~several per mil per atomic mass unit) Si isotope fractionation occurs in low-temperature environments during biochemical and geochemical precipitation of dissolved Si, where the precipitate is preferentially enriched in the lighter isotopes [1]. In contrast, only a limited range (~tenths of a per mil) of Si isotope fractionation has been observed in high-temperature igneous processes [2]. Therefore, Si isotopes may be useful as tracers for the presence of crustal material (derived from low-temperature surface processes) in OIB source regions in a manner similar to more conventional stable isotope systems, such as O. Here we present the first comprehensive set of high-precision Si isotope data obtained by MC-ICP-MS for a diverse suite of OIBs, including new data for the Canary Islands. Samples represent the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean basins and include representative end-members for the EM-1, EM-2, and HIMU mantle components. Average δ30Si values for OIBs representing the EM-1 (-0.32 ± 0.06‰, 2 sd), EM-2 (-0.30 ± 0.01‰, 2 sd), and HIMU (-0.34 ± 0.09‰, 2 sd) mantle components are all in general agreement with previous estimates for the δ30Si value of Bulk Silicate Earth [3]. However, small systematic variations are present; HIMU (Mangaia, Cape Verde, La Palma) and Iceland OIBs are enriched in the lighter isotopes of Si (δ30Si values lower than MORB). Further, the difference in Si isotope composition between La Palma and El Heirro (Canary Islands) has previously been observed for O isotopes [4], suggesting a relationship between the Si and O isotope mantle systematics. The Si isotope variations among OIBs may be explained by the sampling of a primitive mantle reservoir enriched in the light isotopes of Si, as suggested by [5], but most likely reflects the incorporation of recycled

  8. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity in Nanowires by Combined Engineering of Crystal Phase and Isotope Disorder.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, S; Givan, U; Senz, S; de la Mata, M; Arbiol, J; Moutanabbir, O

    2018-05-09

    Nanowires are a versatile platform to investigate and harness phonon and thermal transport phenomena in nanoscale systems. With this perspective, we demonstrate herein the use of crystal phase and mass disorder as effective degrees of freedom to manipulate the behavior of phonons and control the flow of local heat in silicon nanowires. The investigated nanowires consist of isotopically pure and isotopically mixed nanowires bearing either a pure diamond cubic or a cubic-rhombohedral polytypic crystal phase. The nanowires with tailor-made isotopic compositions were grown using isotopically enriched silane precursors 28 SiH 4 , 29 SiH 4 , and 30 SiH 4 with purities better than 99.9%. The analysis of polytypic nanowires revealed ordered and modulated inclusions of lamellar rhombohedral silicon phases toward the center in otherwise diamond-cubic lattice with negligible interphase biaxial strain. Raman nanothermometry was employed to investigate the rate at which the local temperature of single suspended nanowires evolves in response to locally generated heat. Our analysis shows that the lattice thermal conductivity in nanowires can be tuned over a broad range by combining the effects of isotope disorder and the nature and degree of polytypism on phonon scattering. We found that the thermal conductivity can be reduced by up to ∼40% relative to that of isotopically pure nanowires, with the lowest value being recorded for the rhombohedral phase in isotopically mixed 28 Si x 30 Si 1- x nanowires with composition close to the highest mass disorder ( x ∼ 0.5). These results shed new light on the fundamentals of nanoscale thermal transport and lay the groundwork to design innovative phononic devices.

  9. Carbon, nitrogen, magnesium, silicon, and titanium isotopic compositions of single interstellar silicon carbide grains from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Peter; Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst; Ireland, Trevor; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    Seven hundred and twenty SiC grains from the Murchison CM2 chondrite, ranging in size from 1 to 10 micrometers, were analyzed by ion microprobe mass spectrometry for their C-isotopic compositions. Subsets of the grains were also analyzed for N (450 grains), Si (183 grains), Mg (179 grains), and Ti (28 grains) isotopes. These results are compared with previous measurements on 41 larger SiC grains (up to 15 x 26 micrometers) from a different sample of Murchison analyzed by Virag et al. (1992) and Ireland, Zinner, & Amari (1991a). All grains of the present study are isotopically anomalous with C-12/C-13 ratios ranging from 0.022 to 28.4 x solar, N-14/N-15 ratios from 0.046 to 30 x solar, Si-29/Si-28 from 0.54 to 1.20 x solar, Si-30/Si-28 from 0.42 to 1.14 x solar, Ti-49/Ti-48 from 0.96 to 1.95 x solar, and Ti-50/Ti-48 from 0.94 to 1.39 x solar. Many grains have large Mg-26 excesses from the decay of Al-26 with inferred Al-26/Al-27 ratios ranging up to 0.61, or 12,200 x the ratio of 5 x 10(exp -5) inferred for the early solar system. Several groups can be distinguished among the SiC grains. Most of the grains have C-13 and N-14 excesses, and their Si isotopic compositions (mostly excesses in Si-29 and Si-30) plot close to a slope 1.34 line on a Delta Si-29/Si-28 versus Delta Si-30/Si-28 three-isotope plot. Grains with small C-12/C-13 ratios (less than 10) tend to have smaller or no N-14 excesses and high Al-26/Al-27 ratios (up to 0.01). Grains with C-12/C-13 greater than 150 fall into two groups: grains X have N-15 excesses and Si-29 and Si-30 deficits and the highest (0.1 to 0.6) Al-26/Al-27 ratios; grains Y have N-14 excesses and plot on a slope 0.35 line on a Si three-isotope plot. In addition, large SiC grains of the Virag et al. (1992) study fall into three-distinct clusters according to their C-, Si-, and Ti-isotopic compositions. The isotopic diversity of the grains and the clustering of their isotopic compositions imply distinct and multiple stellar sources

  10. Understanding the mechanisms of Si-K-Ca glass alteration using silicon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verney-Carron, Aurélie; Sessegolo, Loryelle; Saheb, Mandana; Valle, Nathalie; Ausset, Patrick; Losno, Rémi; Mangin, Denis; Lombardo, Tiziana; Chabas, Anne; Loisel, Claudine

    2017-04-01

    It is important to understand glass alteration mechanisms and to determine their associated kinetics in order to develop models able to predict the alteration of nuclear, basaltic or archaeological glasses. Recent studies revealed that the respective contributions of diffusion, dissolution, condensation and precipitation processes in alteration are still a matter for debate. In this work, the alteration of a medieval-type glass (Si-K-Ca) was investigated as it presents a specific composition (without B and with low Al). Experiments were performed using a dynamic device, at 30 °C, at pH 8 and 9 and during 1 month in order to simulate alteration in contact with water (rainfall or condensation). The solution was doped in 29Si to discriminate between the silicon from glass (mainly 28Si) and from solution. The results showed that the external region of the alteration layer is devoid of modifier cations (K, Ca) and presents a 29Si/28Si ratio close to the solution one. This excludes that the alteration layer is a glass skeleton and highlights a progressive hydrolysis/condensation process, even if non-hydrolyzed silica tetrahedra could remain when the Si isotopic equilibrium is not reached. The internal zone appears to be gradually depleted in modifier cations and partly enriched in 29Si, but the thickness of this zone is overestimated using SEM-EDS and SIMS techniques. Even if in these experiments the dissolution mechanism is favored, the contribution of interdiffusion cannot be neglected to explain the weathering of ancient stained glassed windows in the atmosphere. The respective contribution of diffusion and dissolution are also discussed as a function of glass composition and surface texture, as well as of experimental conditions (alkaline pH, renewal of the solution).

  11. Processes controlling silicon isotopic fractionation in a forested tropical watershed: Mule Hole Critical Zone Observatory (Southern India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riotte, Jean; Meunier, Jean-Dominique; Zambardi, Thomas; Audry, Stéphane; Barboni, Doris; Anupama, Krishnamurthy; Prasad, Srinivasan; Chmeleff, Jérôme; Poitrasson, Franck; Sekhar, Muddu; Braun, Jean-Jacques

    2018-05-01

    Assessing the dynamics of the silica cycle in the critical zone remains challenging, particularly within the soil, where multiple processes are involved. To improve our understanding of this cycle in the Tropics, and more specifically the role played by vegetation, we combined elemental Si mass balance with the δ30Si signatures of the compartments involved in the water-plant-rock interactions of a tropical forested watershed, Mule Hole (Southern India). To accomplish this, we analysed (1) the δ30Si values of present-day litter phytoliths from tree leaves and grass, as well as soil amorphous silica (ASi); (2) the Si isotope fractionation induced by phytolith dissolution; (3) the silicon mass balance inferred from isotopes at the soil-plant scale; and (4) the consistency between water sources and the δ30Si signatures in the ephemeral stream. The δ30Si values of present-day litter phytoliths and soil ASi vary within a narrow range of 1.10-1.40‰ for all samples, but two deep vertisol samples which likely trapped phytoliths from different vegetation growing under more humid conditions, as indicated by pollen analysis. A homogeneous signature of litter is a minimum condition for using δ30Si as a proxy for the litter/phytolith source of Si. However, litter-ash dissolution experiments demonstrate that the incipient dissolution of phytoliths fractionates Si isotopes, with the preferential dissolution of 28Si over 30Si yielding δ30Si values as low as -1.41‰. Values close to the whole-sample signatures, i.e., above 1‰, were recovered in the solution after a few hours of water-ash interaction. At the soil-plant scale, the average δ30Si value of soil-infiltrating solutions is slightly lighter than the average phytolith signature, which suggests phytoliths as the source of soil dissolved Si. The isotopic budget of dissolved Si within the soil layer, which was obtained based on previous elemental fluxes, is imbalanced. Equilibrating the isotopic budget would imply

  12. Isotopic identification using Pulse Shape Analysis of current signals from silicon detectors: Recent results from the FAZIA collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, G.; Gruyer, D.; Ottanelli, P.; Le Neindre, N.; Pasquali, G.; Alba, R.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Bonnet, E.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Bruno, M.; Casini, G.; Chbihi, A.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Dueñas, J. A.; Fabris, D.; Francalanza, L.; Frankland, J. D.; Gramegna, F.; Henri, M.; Kordyasz, A.; Kozik, T.; Lombardo, I.; Lopez, O.; Morelli, L.; Olmi, A.; Pârlog, M.; Piantelli, S.; Poggi, G.; Santonocito, D.; Stefanini, A. A.; Valdré, S.; Verde, G.; Vient, E.; Vigilante, M.; FAZIA Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The FAZIA apparatus exploits Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) to identify nuclear fragments stopped in the first layer of a Silicon-Silicon-CsI(Tl) detector telescope. In this work, for the first time, we show that the isotopes of fragments having atomic number as high as Z∼20 can be identified. Such a remarkable result has been obtained thanks to a careful construction of the Si detectors and to the use of low noise and high performance digitizing electronics. Moreover, optimized PSA algorithms are needed. This work deals with the choice of the best algorithm for PSA of current signals. A smoothing spline algorithm is demonstrated to give optimal results without requiring too much computational resources.

  13. Selective modulation of cell response on engineered fractal silicon substrates

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Francesco; Medda, Rebecca; Cheng, Ling; Battista, Edmondo; Scopelliti, Pasquale E.; Milani, Paolo; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta A.; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of work has been dedicated to the analysis of cell behavior on substrates with ordered topographical features. However, the natural cell microenvironment is characterized by biomechanical cues organized over multiple scales. Here, randomly rough, self-affinefractal surfaces are generated out of silicon,where roughness Ra and fractal dimension Df are independently controlled. The proliferation rates, the formation of adhesion structures, and the morphology of 3T3 murine fibroblasts are monitored over six different substrates. The proliferation rate is maximized on surfaces with moderate roughness (Ra ~ 40 nm) and large fractal dimension (Df ~ 2.4); whereas adhesion structures are wider and more stable on substrates with higher roughness (Ra ~ 50 nm) and lower fractal dimension (Df ~ 2.2). Higher proliferation occurson substrates exhibiting densely packed and sharp peaks, whereas more regular ridges favor adhesion. These results suggest that randomly roughtopographies can selectively modulate cell behavior. PMID:23492898

  14. Strain engineering of the silicon-vacancy center in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesala, Srujan; Sohn, Young-Ik; Pingault, Benjamin; Shao, Linbo; Atikian, Haig A.; Holzgrafe, Jeffrey; Gündoǧan, Mustafa; Stavrakas, Camille; Sipahigil, Alp; Chia, Cleaven; Evans, Ruffin; Burek, Michael J.; Zhang, Mian; Wu, Lue; Pacheco, Jose L.; Abraham, John; Bielejec, Edward; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Atatüre, Mete; Lončar, Marko

    2018-05-01

    We control the electronic structure of the silicon-vacancy (SiV) color-center in diamond by changing its static strain environment with a nano-electro-mechanical system. This allows deterministic and local tuning of SiV optical and spin transition frequencies over a wide range, an essential step towards multiqubit networks. In the process, we infer the strain Hamiltonian of the SiV revealing large strain susceptibilities of order 1 PHz/strain for the electronic orbital states. We identify regimes where the spin-orbit interaction results in a large strain susceptibility of order 100 THz/strain for spin transitions, and propose an experiment where the SiV spin is strongly coupled to a nanomechanical resonator.

  15. A First Look at Oxygen and Silicon Isotope Variations in Diatom Silica from a Pliocene Antarctic Marine Sediment Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, T.; Dodd, J. P.; Hackett, H.; Scherer, R. P.

    2016-02-01

    Coupled oxygen (δ18O) and silicon (δ30Si) isotope variations in diatom silica (opal-A) are increasingly used as a proxy to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions (water temperatures, water mass mixing, nutrient cycling) in marine environments. Diatom silica is a particularly significant paleoenvironmental proxy in high latitude environments, such as the Southern Ocean, where diatom blooms are abundant and diatom frustules are well preserved in the sediment. The Andrill-1B (AND-1B) sediment core from the Ross Sea (Antarctica) preserves several Pliocene ( 4.5 Ma) age diatomite units. Here we present preliminary δ18O and δ30Si values for a diatomite subunit in the AND-1B sediment core. Initial isotope values for the AND-1B diatoms silica record relatively high variability (range δ18O: 36.3‰ to 39.9‰) that could be interpreted as large-scale changes in the water temperature and/or freshwater mixing in the Ross Sea; however, a significant concern with marine sediment of this age is isotope fractionation during diagenesis and the potential formation of opal-CT lepispheres. The effects of clay contamination on the diatom silica δ18O values have been addressed through sample purification and quantified through chemical and physical analyses of the diatom silica. The isotopic effects of opal-CT are not as clearly understood and more difficult to physically separate from the primary diatom silica. In order to better understand the isotope variations in the AND-1B diatoms, we also evaluated silicon and oxygen isotope fractionation during the transition from opal-A to opal-CT in a controlled laboratory experiment. Opal-A from cultured marine diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii) was subjected to elevated temperatures (150°C) in acid digestion vessels for 4 weeks to initiate opal-CT precipitation. Quantifying the effects of opal-CT formation on δ18O and δ30Si variations in biogenic silica improves our understanding of the use of diatom silica isotope values a

  16. The silicon isotopic composition of fine-grained river sediments and its relation to climate and lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayon, G.; Delvigne, C.; Ponzevera, E.; Borges, A. V.; Darchambeau, F.; De Deckker, P.; Lambert, T.; Monin, L.; Toucanne, S.; André, L.

    2018-05-01

    The δ30Si stable isotopic composition of silicon in soils and fine-grained sediments can provide insights into weathering processes on continents, with important implications on the Si budget of modern and past oceans. To further constrain the factors controlling the distribution of Si isotopes in sediments, we have analysed a large number (n = 50) of separate size-fractions of sediments and suspended particulate materials collected near the mouth of rivers worldwide. This includes some of the world's largest rivers (e.g. Amazon, Congo, Mackenzie, Mississippi, Murray-Darling, Nile, Yangtze) and rivers from the case study areas of the Congo River Basin and Northern Ireland. Silt-size fractions exhibit a mean Si isotopic composition (δ30Si = -0.21 ± 0.19‰; 2 s.d.) similar to that previously inferred for the upper continental crust. In contrast, clay-size fractions display a much larger range of δ30Si values from -0.11‰ to -2.16‰, which yield a global δ30Siclay of -0.57 ± 0.60‰ (2 s.d.) representative of the mean composition of the average weathered continental crust. Overall, these new data show that the Si isotopic signature transported by river clays is controlled by the degree of chemical weathering, as inferred from strong relationships with Al/Si ratios. At a global scale, the clay-bound Si isotopic composition of the world's largest river systems demonstrates a link with climate, defining a general correlation with mean annual temperature (MAT) in corresponding drainage basins. While the distribution of Si isotopes in river sediments also appears to be influenced by the tectonic setting, lithological effects and sediment recycling from former sedimentary cycles, our results pave the way for their use as paleo-weathering and paleo-climate proxies in the sedimentary record.

  17. Dispersion engineering of thick high-Q silicon nitride ring-resonators via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Riemensberger, Johann; Hartinger, Klaus; Herr, Tobias; Brasch, Victor; Holzwarth, Ronald; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2012-12-03

    We demonstrate dispersion engineering of integrated silicon nitride based ring resonators through conformal coating with hafnium dioxide deposited on top of the structures via atomic layer deposition. Both, magnitude and bandwidth of anomalous dispersion can be significantly increased. The results are confirmed by high resolution frequency-comb-assisted-diode-laser spectroscopy and are in very good agreement with the simulated modification of the mode spectrum.

  18. Laser photochemical lead isotopes separation for harmless nuclear power engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhan, P. A.; Fateev, N. V.; Kim, V. A.; Zakrevsky, D. E.

    2016-09-01

    The collisional quenching of the metastable 3 P 1,2 and 1 D 2 lead atoms is studied experimentally in the gas flow of the lead atoms, reagent-molecules and a carrier gas Ar. The experimental parameters were similar to the conditions that are required in the operation of the experimental setup for photochemical isotope separation. Excited atoms are generated under electron impact conditions created by a gas glow discharge through the mixture of gases and monitored photoelectrically by attenuation of atomic resonance radiation from hollow cathode 208Pb lamp. The decay of the excited atoms has been studied in the presence various molecules and total cross section data are reported. The flow tube measurements has allowed to separate the physical and chemical quenching channels and measure the rates of the chemical reaction excited lead with N2O, CH2Cl2, SF6 and CuBr molecules. These results are discussed in the prospects of the obtaining isotopically modified lead as a promising coolant in the reactors on the fast-neutron.

  19. Isotope engineering of van der Waals interactions in hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuong, T. Q. P.; Liu, S.; van der Lee, A.; Cuscó, R.; Artús, L.; Michel, T.; Valvin, P.; Edgar, J. H.; Cassabois, G.; Gil, B.

    2018-02-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride is a model lamellar compound where weak, non-local van der Waals interactions ensure the vertical stacking of two-dimensional honeycomb lattices made of strongly bound boron and nitrogen atoms. We study the isotope engineering of lamellar compounds by synthesizing hexagonal boron nitride crystals with nearly pure boron isotopes (10B and 11B) compared to those with the natural distribution of boron (20 at% 10B and 80 at% 11B). On the one hand, as with standard semiconductors, both the phonon energy and electronic bandgap varied with the boron isotope mass, the latter due to the quantum effect of zero-point renormalization. On the other hand, temperature-dependent experiments focusing on the shear and breathing motions of adjacent layers revealed the specificity of isotope engineering in a layered material, with a modification of the van der Waals interactions upon isotope purification. The electron density distribution is more diffuse between adjacent layers in 10BN than in 11BN crystals. Our results open perspectives in understanding and controlling van der Waals bonding in layered materials.

  20. Isotope engineering of van der Waals interactions in hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Vuong, T Q P; Liu, S; Van der Lee, A; Cuscó, R; Artús, L; Michel, T; Valvin, P; Edgar, J H; Cassabois, G; Gil, B

    2018-02-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride is a model lamellar compound where weak, non-local van der Waals interactions ensure the vertical stacking of two-dimensional honeycomb lattices made of strongly bound boron and nitrogen atoms. We study the isotope engineering of lamellar compounds by synthesizing hexagonal boron nitride crystals with nearly pure boron isotopes ( 10 B and 11 B) compared to those with the natural distribution of boron (20 at% 10 B and 80 at% 11 B). On the one hand, as with standard semiconductors, both the phonon energy and electronic bandgap varied with the boron isotope mass, the latter due to the quantum effect of zero-point renormalization. On the other hand, temperature-dependent experiments focusing on the shear and breathing motions of adjacent layers revealed the specificity of isotope engineering in a layered material, with a modification of the van der Waals interactions upon isotope purification. The electron density distribution is more diffuse between adjacent layers in 10 BN than in 11 BN crystals. Our results open perspectives in understanding and controlling van der Waals bonding in layered materials.

  1. Silicon-slurry/aluminide coating. [protecting gas turbine engine vanes and blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Young, S. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A low cost coating protects metallic base system substrates from high temperatures, high gas velocity ovidation, thermal fatigue and hot corrosion and is particularly useful fo protecting vanes and blades in aircraft and land based gas turbine engines. A lacquer slurry comprising cellulose nitrate containing high purity silicon powder is sprayed onto the superalloy substrates. The silicon layer is then aluminized to complete the coating. The Si-Al coating is less costly to produce than advanced aluminides and protects the substrates from oxidation and thermal fatigue for a much longer period of time than the conventional aluminide coatings. While more expensive Pt-Al coatings and physical vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings may last longer or provide equal protection on certain substrates, the Si-Al coating exceeded the performance of both types of coatings on certain superalloys in high gas velocity oxidation and thermal fatigue and increased the resistance of certain superalloys to hot corrosion.

  2. Thermal conductivity engineering in width-modulated silicon nanowires and thermoelectric efficiency enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zianni, Xanthippi

    2018-03-01

    Width-modulated nanowires have been proposed as efficient thermoelectric materials. Here, the electron and phonon transport properties and the thermoelectric efficiency are discussed for dimensions above the quantum confinement regime. The thermal conductivity decreases dramatically in the presence of thin constrictions due to their ballistic thermal resistance. It shows a scaling behavior upon the width-modulation rate that allows for thermal conductivity engineering. The electron conductivity also decreases due to enhanced boundary scattering by the constrictions. The effect of boundary scattering is weaker for electrons than for phonons and the overall thermoelectric efficiency is enhanced. A ZT enhancement by a factor of 20-30 is predicted for width-modulated nanowires compared to bulk silicon. Our findings indicate that width-modulated nanostructures are promising for developing silicon nanostructures with high thermoelectric efficiency.

  3. Interface Optoelectronics Engineering for Mechanically Stacked Tandem Solar Cells Based on Perovskite and Silicon.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Hiroyuki; Uzum, Abdullah; Nishino, Hitoshi; Umeyama, Tomokazu; Imahori, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ito, Seigo

    2016-12-14

    Engineering of photonics for antireflection and electronics for extraction of the hole using 2.5 nm of a thin Au layer have been performed for two- and four-terminal tandem solar cells using CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 perovskite (top cell) and p-type single crystal silicon (c-Si) (bottom cell) by mechanically stacking. Highly transparent connection multilayers of evaporated-Au and sputtered-ITO films were fabricated at the interface to be a point-contact tunneling junction between the rough perovskite and flat silicon solar cells. The mechanically stacked tandem solar cell with an optimized tunneling junction structure was ⟨perovskite for the top cell/Au (2.5 nm)/ITO (154 nm) stacked-on ITO (108 nm)/c-Si for the bottom cell⟩. It was confirmed the best efficiency of 13.7% and 14.4% as two- and four-terminal devices, respectively.

  4. Atomic-Scale Engineering of Abrupt Interface for Direct Spin Contact of Ferromagnetic Semiconductor with Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Averyanov, Dmitry V.; Karateeva, Christina G.; Karateev, Igor A.; Tokmachev, Andrey M.; Vasiliev, Alexander L.; Zolotarev, Sergey I.; Likhachev, Igor A.; Storchak, Vyacheslav G.

    2016-01-01

    Control and manipulation of the spin of conduction electrons in industrial semiconductors such as silicon are suggested as an operating principle for a new generation of spintronic devices. Coherent injection of spin-polarized carriers into Si is a key to this novel technology. It is contingent on our ability to engineer flawless interfaces of Si with a spin injector to prevent spin-flip scattering. The unique properties of the ferromagnetic semiconductor EuO make it a prospective spin injector into silicon. Recent advances in the epitaxial integration of EuO with Si bring the manufacturing of a direct spin contact within reach. Here we employ transmission electron microscopy to study the interface EuO/Si with atomic-scale resolution. We report techniques for interface control on a submonolayer scale through surface reconstruction. Thus we prevent formation of alien phases and imperfections detrimental to spin injection. This development opens a new avenue for semiconductor spintronics. PMID:26957146

  5. Differences between mono-generic and mixed diatom silicon isotope compositions trace present and past nutrient utilisation off Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, Kristin; Ehlert, Claudia; Grasse, Patricia; Crosta, Xavier; Fleury, Sophie; Frank, Martin; Schneider, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    In this study we combine for the first time silicon (Si) isotope compositions of small mixed diatom species (δ30SibSiO2) and of large handpicked mono-generic (i.e. genus = Coscinodiscus) diatom samples (δ30SiCoscino) with diatom assemblages extracted from marine sediments in the Peruvian upwelling region in order to constrain present and past silicate utilisation. The extension of a previous core-top data set from the Peruvian shelf demonstrates that δ30SiCoscino values record near-complete Si utilisation, as these are similar to the isotopic composition of the subsurface source waters feeding the upwelling. In contrast, the δ30SibSiO2 of small mixed diatom species increase southward along the shelf as well as towards the shore. We attribute highest δ30SibSiO2 values partly to transient iron limitation but primarily to the gradual increase of Si isotope fractionation within the seasonal diatom succession, which are mainly recorded by small diatom species during intense bloom events. In contrast, lower δ30SibSiO2 values are related to initial Si isotope utilisation during periods of weak upwelling, when low Si(OH)4 concentrations do not permit intense blooms and small diatom species record substantially lower δ30Si signatures. As such, we propose that the intensity of the upwelling can be deduced from the offset between δ30SibSiO2 and δ30SiCoscino (Δ30Sicoscino-bSiO2), which is low for strong upwelling conditions and high for prevailing weak upwelling. We apply the information extracted from surface sediments to generate a record of the present-day main upwelling region covering the past 17,700 years and find that this location has also been characterized by a persistent offset (Δ30Sicoscino-bSiO2). By comparison with the diatom assemblages we show that the coastal upwelling system changed markedly between weak and strong upwelling conditions. In addition, our model calculations to quantify species-specific Si isotope fractionation effects based on the

  6. A review of materials engineering in silicon-based optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Noel; Gibson, Ursula; Peacock, Anna C.

    2018-02-01

    Semiconductor optical fibre technologies have grown rapidly in the last decade and there are now a range of production and post-processing techniques that allow for a vast degree of control over the core material's optoelectronic properties. These methodologies and the unique optical fibre geometry provide an exciting platform for materials engineering and fibres can now be produced with single crystal cores, low optical losses, tunable strain, and inscribable phase composition. This review discusses the state-of-the-art regarding the production of silicon optical fibres in amorphous and crystalline form and then looks at the post-processing techniques and the improved material quality and new functionality that they afford.

  7. Broadband telecom to mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in a dispersion-engineered silicon germanium waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ettabib, Mohamed A; Xu, Lin; Bogris, Adonis; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Belal, Mohammad; Lorent, Emerick; Labeye, Pierre; Nicoletti, Sergio; Hammani, Kamal; Syvridis, Dimitris; Shepherd, David P; Price, Jonathan H V; Richardson, David J; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate broadband supercontinuum generation (SCG) in a dispersion-engineered silicon-germanium waveguide. The 3 cm long waveguide is pumped by femtosecond pulses at 2.4 μm, and the generated supercontinuum extends from 1.45 to 2.79 μm (at the -30  dB point). The broadening is mainly driven by the generation of a dispersive wave in the 1.5-1.8 μm region and soliton fission. The SCG was modeled numerically, and excellent agreement with the experimental results was obtained.

  8. Engineering functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide nano-biomaterials to passivate the aggressive proliferation of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Premnath, P.; Tan, B.; Venkatakrishnan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the use of nano silicon in cancer therapy is limited as drug delivery vehicles and markers in imaging, not as manipulative/controlling agents. This is due to limited properties that native states of nano silicon and silicon oxides offers. We introduce nano-functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide biomaterials synthesized via ultrashort pulsed laser synthesis, with tunable properties that possess inherent cancer controlling properties that can passivate the progression of cancer. This nanostructured biomaterial is composed of individual functionalized nanoparticles made of a homogenous hybrid of multiple phases of silicon and silicon oxide in increasing concentration outwards from the core. The chemical properties of the proposed nanostructure such as number of phases, composition of phases and crystal orientation of each functionalized nanoparticle in the three dimensional nanostructure is defined based on precisely tuned ultrashort pulsed laser-material interaction mechanisms. The amorphous rich phased biomaterial shows a 30 fold (95%) reduction in number of cancer cells compared to bulk silicon in 48 hours. Further, the size of the cancer cells reduces by 76% from 24 to 48 hours. This method exposes untapped properties of combination of multiple phases of silicon oxides and its applications in cancer therapy. PMID:26190009

  9. Interface Engineering to Create a Strong Spin Filter Contact to Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Caspers, C.; Gloskovskii, A.; Gorgoi, M.; Besson, C.; Luysberg, M.; Rushchanskii, K. Z.; Ležaić, M.; Fadley, C. S.; Drube, W.; Müller, M.

    2016-01-01

    Integrating epitaxial and ferromagnetic Europium Oxide (EuO) directly on silicon is a perfect route to enrich silicon nanotechnology with spin filter functionality. To date, the inherent chemical reactivity between EuO and Si has prevented a heteroepitaxial integration without significant contaminations of the interface with Eu silicides and Si oxides. We present a solution to this long-standing problem by applying two complementary passivation techniques for the reactive EuO/Si interface: (i) an in situ hydrogen-Si (001) passivation and (ii) the application of oxygen-protective Eu monolayers–without using any additional buffer layers. By careful chemical depth profiling of the oxide-semiconductor interface via hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, we show how to systematically minimize both Eu silicide and Si oxide formation to the sub-monolayer regime–and how to ultimately interface-engineer chemically clean, heteroepitaxial and ferromagnetic EuO/Si (001) in order to create a strong spin filter contact to silicon. PMID:26975515

  10. Interface Engineering to Create a Strong Spin Filter Contact to Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspers, C.; Gloskovskii, A.; Gorgoi, M.; Besson, C.; Luysberg, M.; Rushchanskii, K. Z.; Ležaić, M.; Fadley, C. S.; Drube, W.; Müller, M.

    2016-03-01

    Integrating epitaxial and ferromagnetic Europium Oxide (EuO) directly on silicon is a perfect route to enrich silicon nanotechnology with spin filter functionality. To date, the inherent chemical reactivity between EuO and Si has prevented a heteroepitaxial integration without significant contaminations of the interface with Eu silicides and Si oxides. We present a solution to this long-standing problem by applying two complementary passivation techniques for the reactive EuO/Si interface: (i) an in situ hydrogen-Si (001) passivation and (ii) the application of oxygen-protective Eu monolayers-without using any additional buffer layers. By careful chemical depth profiling of the oxide-semiconductor interface via hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, we show how to systematically minimize both Eu silicide and Si oxide formation to the sub-monolayer regime-and how to ultimately interface-engineer chemically clean, heteroepitaxial and ferromagnetic EuO/Si (001) in order to create a strong spin filter contact to silicon.

  11. 3D gate-all-around bandgap-engineered SONOS flash memory in vertical silicon pillar with metal gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae-Sub; Yang, Seong-Dong; Lee, Sang-Youl; Kim, Young-Su; Kang, Min-Ho; Lim, Sung-Kyu; Lee, Hi-Deok; Lee, Ga-Won

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a gate-all-around bandgap-engineered silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon device with a vertical silicon pillar structure and a Ti metal gate are demonstrated for a potential solution to overcome the scaling-down of flash memory device. The devices were fabricated using CMOS-compatible technology and exhibited well-behaved memory characteristics in terms of the program/erase window, retention, and endurance properties. Moreover, the integration of the Ti metal gate demonstrated a significant improvement in the erase characteristics due to the efficient suppression of the electron back tunneling through the blocking oxide.

  12. Engineering Localized Surface Plasmon Interactions in Gold by Silicon Nanowire for Enhanced Heating and Photocatalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Agarwal, Daksh; Aspetti, Carlos O.; Cargnello, Matteo; ...

    2017-02-06

    The field of plasmonics has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of potential applications in various fields such as nanophotonics, photovoltaics, energy conversion, catalysis, and therapeutics. It is becoming increasing clear that intrinsic high losses associated with plasmons can be utilized to create new device concepts to harvest the generated heat. It is therefore important to design cavities, which can harvest optical excitations efficiently to generate heat. In this paper, we report a highly engineered nanowire cavity, which utilizes a high dielectric silicon core with a thin plasmonic film (Au) to create an effective metallic cavity to strongly confinemore » light, which when coupled with localized surface plasmons in the nanoparticles of the thin metal film produces exceptionally high temperatures upon laser irradiation. Raman spectroscopy of the silicon core enables precise measurements of the cavity temperature, which can reach values as high as 1000 K. The same Si–Au cavity with enhanced plasmonic activity when coupled with TiO 2 nanorods increases the hydrogen production rate by ~40% compared to similar Au–TiO 2 system without Si core, in ethanol photoreforming reactions. Finally, these highly engineered thermoplasmonic devices, which integrate three different cavity concepts (high refractive index core, metallo-dielectric cavity, and localized surface plasmons) along with the ease of fabrication demonstrate a possible pathway for designing optimized plasmonic devices with applications in energy conversion and catalysis.« less

  13. Engineering Localized Surface Plasmon Interactions in Gold by Silicon Nanowire for Enhanced Heating and Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Daksh; Aspetti, Carlos O; Cargnello, Matteo; Ren, MingLiang; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Murray, Christopher B; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-03-08

    The field of plasmonics has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of potential applications in various fields such as nanophotonics, photovoltaics, energy conversion, catalysis, and therapeutics. It is becoming increasing clear that intrinsic high losses associated with plasmons can be utilized to create new device concepts to harvest the generated heat. It is therefore important to design cavities, which can harvest optical excitations efficiently to generate heat. We report a highly engineered nanowire cavity, which utilizes a high dielectric silicon core with a thin plasmonic film (Au) to create an effective metallic cavity to strongly confine light, which when coupled with localized surface plasmons in the nanoparticles of the thin metal film produces exceptionally high temperatures upon laser irradiation. Raman spectroscopy of the silicon core enables precise measurements of the cavity temperature, which can reach values as high as 1000 K. The same Si-Au cavity with enhanced plasmonic activity when coupled with TiO 2 nanorods increases the hydrogen production rate by ∼40% compared to similar Au-TiO 2 system without Si core, in ethanol photoreforming reactions. These highly engineered thermoplasmonic devices, which integrate three different cavity concepts (high refractive index core, metallo-dielectric cavity, and localized surface plasmons) along with the ease of fabrication demonstrate a possible pathway for designing optimized plasmonic devices with applications in energy conversion and catalysis.

  14. Engineering Localized Surface Plasmon Interactions in Gold by Silicon Nanowire for Enhanced Heating and Photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Daksh; Aspetti, Carlos O.; Cargnello, Matteo

    The field of plasmonics has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of potential applications in various fields such as nanophotonics, photovoltaics, energy conversion, catalysis, and therapeutics. It is becoming increasing clear that intrinsic high losses associated with plasmons can be utilized to create new device concepts to harvest the generated heat. It is therefore important to design cavities, which can harvest optical excitations efficiently to generate heat. In this paper, we report a highly engineered nanowire cavity, which utilizes a high dielectric silicon core with a thin plasmonic film (Au) to create an effective metallic cavity to strongly confinemore » light, which when coupled with localized surface plasmons in the nanoparticles of the thin metal film produces exceptionally high temperatures upon laser irradiation. Raman spectroscopy of the silicon core enables precise measurements of the cavity temperature, which can reach values as high as 1000 K. The same Si–Au cavity with enhanced plasmonic activity when coupled with TiO 2 nanorods increases the hydrogen production rate by ~40% compared to similar Au–TiO 2 system without Si core, in ethanol photoreforming reactions. Finally, these highly engineered thermoplasmonic devices, which integrate three different cavity concepts (high refractive index core, metallo-dielectric cavity, and localized surface plasmons) along with the ease of fabrication demonstrate a possible pathway for designing optimized plasmonic devices with applications in energy conversion and catalysis.« less

  15. Molecular isotopic engineering (MIE): industrial manufacture of naproxen of predetermined stable carbon-isotopic compositions for authenticity and security protection and intellectual property considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, J. P.; Farina, P.; Pearson, A.; Mezes, P. S.; Sabatelli, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular Isotopic Engineering (MIE) is the directed stable-isotopic synthesis of chemical products for reasons of product identification and of product security, and also for intellectual property considerations. We report here a generally excellent correspondence between the observed and predicted stable carbon-isotopic (δ13C) results for a successful directed synthesis of racemic mixture from its immediate precursors. The observed results are readily explained by the laws of mass balance and isotope mass balance. Oxygen- and hydrogen isotopic results which require an additional assessment of the effects of O and H exchange, presumably due to interaction with water in the reaction solution, are addressed elsewhere. A previous, cooperative study with the US FDA-DPA showed that individual manufacturers of naproxen could readily be differentiated by their stable-isotopic provenance (δ13C, δ18O, and δD ref. 1). We suggest that MIE can be readily employed in the bio/pharmaceutical industry without alteration of present manufacturing processes other than isotopically selecting and/or monitoring reactants and products.

  16. Silicon Isotope Variations in Giant Spicules of the Deep-sea Sponge Monorhaphis chuni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, K. P.; Schuessler, J. A.; Wang, X.; Müller, W. E.; Andreae, M. O.

    2012-12-01

    The astonishing longevity of the deep-sea sponge Monorhaphis chuni and the stability of their spicules (Wang et al. 2009) provide the potential that single giant basal spicules can be used as paleoenvironmental archives spanning the entire Holocene (Jochum et al. 2012). According to Wille et al. (2010), the Si isotope fractionation is influenced by seawater Si concentration with lower values associated with sponges collected from waters high in Si. In order to track possible secular variations during the last 10000 years in the deep sea, we have therefore determined Si isotope ratios and trace element ratios along center-to-surface sections at a high resolution by femtosecond LA-(MC)-ICP-MS. Samples came from different locations of the East and South China Sea as well as the South Pacific Ocean (near New Caledonia) and were collected at depths between 1100 m and 2100 m. The external reproducibility of the fs LA-(MC)-ICP-MS method was found to be 0.14 ‰ and 0.27 ‰ (2 SD) for δ29Si and δ30Si, respectively. The relative uncertainty on trace element abundance ratios, such as Mg/Ca, is about 5 % (RSD). Significant variations in Si isotope ratios were observed in the giant spicules Q-B and SCS-4 from the East and South China Sea, respectively. The δ30Si values for the largest spicule collected so far (SCS-4, 2.5 m long) from a depth of 2100 m in the South China Sea, span a large range from -1.9 to -3.7 ‰. No obvious trend in Si isotope variability outside external reproducibility could be identified in smaller and presumably younger spicules; average δ30Si values of 4 different segments of the spicule MC from the South China Sea are about -1.3 ‰. Low δ30Si values of about -0.88 ‰ are found in the giant spicule V from the South Pacific. Mg/Ca ratios of most spicules show small, but significant trends from higher values at the rim to lower values in the core, which can be interpreted as an increase in seawater temperature of several degrees Celsius during

  17. Impurity engineering of Czochralski silicon used for ultra large-scaled-integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Deren; Chen, Jiahe; Ma, Xiangyang; Que, Duanlin

    2009-01-01

    Impurities in Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) used for ultra large-scaled-integrated (ULSI) circuits have been believed to deteriorate the performance of devices. In this paper, a review of the recent processes from our investigation on internal gettering in Cz-Si wafers which were doped with nitrogen, germanium and/or high content of carbon is presented. It has been suggested that those impurities enhance oxygen precipitation, and create both denser bulk microdefects and enough denuded zone with the desirable width, which is benefit of the internal gettering of metal contamination. Based on the experimental facts, a potential mechanism of impurity doping on the internal gettering structure is interpreted and, a new concept of 'impurity engineering' for Cz-Si used for ULSI is proposed.

  18. Application of isotope labeling experiments and (13)C flux analysis to enable rational pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    McAtee, Allison G; Jazmin, Lara J; Young, Jamey D

    2015-12-01

    Isotope labeling experiments (ILEs) and (13)C flux analysis provide actionable information for metabolic engineers to identify knockout, overexpression, and/or media optimization targets. ILEs have been used in both academic and industrial labs to increase product formation, discover novel metabolic functions in previously uncharacterized organisms, and enhance the metabolic efficiency of host cell factories. This review highlights specific examples of how ILEs have been used in conjunction with enzyme or metabolic engineering to elucidate host cell metabolism and improve product titer, rate, or yield in a directed manner. We discuss recent progress and future opportunities involving the use of ILEs and (13)C flux analysis to characterize non-model host organisms and to identify and subsequently eliminate wasteful byproduct pathways or metabolic bottlenecks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development and investigation of silicon converter beta radiation 63Ni isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, A. A.; Legotin, S. A.; Murashev, V. N.; Didenko, S. I.; Rabinovich, O. I.; Yurchuk, S. Yu; Omelchenko, Yu K.; Yakimov, E. B.; Starkov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper the results of the creation and researching characteristics of, experimental betavoltaic converters (BVC), based on silicon are discussed. It was presented the features of structural and technological performance of planar 2 D- structure of BVC. To study the parameters of the converter stream the beta particles of the radioisotope was simulated by 63Ni electron flux from scanning electron microscope. It was investigated the dependence of the collecting electrons efficiency from the beam energy current-voltage characteristic was measured when irradiated by an electron beam, from which the value of the short-circuit current density equal to 126 nA / cm2 and the value of the open circuit voltage of 150 mV were obtained. The maximum power density at 70 mV is 9.5 nW / cm2, and the conversion efficiency is 2.1%. It was presented the results of experimental studies of the current-voltage characteristics of samples by irradiating a film 63Ni. The values of load voltage 111 mV and short circuit current density of 27 nA / cm2 were obtained. Maximum power density was 1.52 nW / cm2.

  20. Improving isotopic identification with INDRA Silicon-CsI(Tl) telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, O.; Pârlog, M.; Borderie, B.; Rivet, M. F.; Lehaut, G.; Tabacaru, G.; Tassan-Got, L.; Pawłowski, P.; Bonnet, E.; Bougault, R.; Chbihi, A.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Frankland, J. D.; Galichet, E.; Gruyer, D.; La Commara, M.; Le Neindre, N.; Lombardo, I.; Manduci, L.; Marini, P.; Steckmeyer, J. C.; Verde, G.; Vient, E.; Wieleczko, J. P.; Indra Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    Profiting from previous works done with the INDRA multidetector on the description of the light response L of the CsI(Tl) crystals to different impinging nuclei, we propose an improved ΔE - L identification-calibration procedure for Silicon-Caesium Iodide (Si-CsI) telescopes, namely an Advanced Mass Estimate (AME) method. AME is compared to the usual, simple visual analysis of the corresponding two-dimensional map of ΔE - E type, by using INDRA experimental data from nuclear reactions induced by heavy ions in the Fermi energy regime. We show that the capability of such telescopes to identify both the atomic Z and the mass A numbers of light and heavy reaction products, can be quantitatively improved thanks to the proposed approach. This conclusion opens new possibilities to use INDRA for studying these reactions especially with radioactive beams. Indeed, the determination of the mass for charged reaction products becomes of paramount importance to shed light on the role of the isospin degree of freedom in the nuclear equation of state [1,2].

  1. Hydrogen, Oxygen and Silicon Isotope Systematics of Groundwater-Magma Interaction in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleine, B. I.; Stefansson, A.; Halldorsson, S. A.; Martin, W.; Barnes, J.; Jónasson, K.; Franzson, H.

    2016-12-01

    Magma often encounters groundwater (meteoric or seawater derived) when intruded into the crust. Magma-groundwater interactions result in the formation of hydrothermal fluids which can lead to contact metamorphism and elemental transport in the country rock. In fact, magma-hydrothermal fluid interaction (rather than magma-magmatic fluid interaction) may lead to classic contact metamorphic reactions. In order to explore the importance of hydrothermal fluid during contact metamorphism we use stable isotopes (δD, δ18O, δ30Si) from both active and extinct magma chambers and hydrothermal systems from across Iceland. Quartz grains from various hydrothermal systems, from crustal xenoliths from the Askja central volcano and from the Hafnarfjall pluton, as well as quartz grains associated with low-T zeolites were analysed for δ18O and δ30Si in-situ using SIMS. Whole rock material of these samples was analysed for δD values using a TCEA coupled to an IRMS. Our results indicate that low-T quartz (<150°C) are dominated by negative δ30Si values whereas positive δ30Si values prevail in quartz precipitated at higher T (>300°C). Combining the results from the analyses of δ18O and δD allows further division of samples into (i) seawater and/or rock dominated and (ii) meteoric water dominated hydrothermal systems. In order to isolate the effects of fluid-rock interaction, fluid source and formation temperature at the magma-groundwater contact, δD, δ18O and δ30Si values of rocks and fluids were modeled using the PHREEQC software. Comparison of analytical and model results shows that the isotopic compositions are influenced by multiple processes. In some cases, groundwater penetrates the contact zone and causes alteration at >400°C by groundwater-magma heat interaction. Other cases document "baked" contact zones without groundwater. Our analyses and modeling demonstrates that groundwater flow and permeability are crucial in setting the style of contact metamorphism

  2. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mughal, A; El Demellawi, J K; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-12-14

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material's luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon.

  3. Engineering in-plane silicon nanowire springs for highly stretchable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhaoguo; Dong, Taige; Zhu, Zhimin; Zhao, Yaolong; Sun, Ying; Yu, Linwei

    2018-01-01

    Crystalline silicon (c-Si) is unambiguously the most important semiconductor that underpins the development of modern microelectronics and optoelectronics, though the rigid and brittle nature of bulk c-Si makes it difficult to implement directly for stretchable applications. Fortunately, the one-dimensional (1D) geometry, or the line-shape, of Si nanowire (SiNW) can be engineered into elastic springs, which indicates an exciting opportunity to fabricate highly stretchable 1D c-Si channels. The implementation of such line-shape-engineering strategy demands both a tiny diameter of the SiNWs, in order to accommodate the strains under large stretching, and a precise growth location, orientation and path control to facilitate device integration. In this review, we will first introduce the recent progresses of an in-plane self-assembly growth of SiNW springs, via a new in-plane solid-liquid-solid (IPSLS) mechanism, where mono-like but elastic SiNW springs are produced by surface-running metal droplets that absorb amorphous Si thin film as precursor. Then, the critical growth control and engineering parameters, the mechanical properties of the SiNW springs and the prospects of developing c-Si based stretchable electronics, will be addressed. This efficient line-shape-engineering strategy of SiNW springs, accomplished via a low temperature batch-manufacturing, holds a strong promise to extend the legend of modern Si technology into the emerging stretchable electronic applications, where the high carrier mobility, excellent stability and established doping and passivation controls of c-Si can be well inherited. Project supported by the National Basic Research 973 Program (No. 2014CB921101), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61674075), the National Key Research and Development Program of China (No. 2017YFA0205003), the Jiangsu Excellent Young Scholar Program (No. BK20160020), the Scientific and Technological Support Program in Jiangsu Province (No. BE

  4. Engineering island-chain silicon nanowires via a droplet mediated Plateau-Rayleigh transformation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhaoguo; Xu, Mingkun; Zhao, Yaolong; Wang, Jimmy; Jiang, Xiaofan; Yu, Linwei; Wang, Junzhuan; Xu, Jun; Shi, Yi; Chen, Kunji; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2016-01-01

    The ability to program highly modulated morphology upon silicon nanowires (SiNWs) has been fundamental to explore new phononic and electronic functionalities. We here exploit a nanoscale locomotion of metal droplets to demonstrate a large and readily controllable morphology engineering of crystalline SiNWs, from straight ones into continuous or discrete island-chains, at temperature <350 °C. This has been accomplished via a tin (Sn) droplet mediated in-plane growth where amorphous Si thin film is consumed as precursor to produce crystalline SiNWs. Thanks to a significant interface-stretching effect, a periodic Plateau-Rayleigh instability oscillation can be stimulated in the liquid Sn droplet, and the temporal oscillation of the Sn droplets is translated faithfully, via the deformable liquid/solid deposition interface, into regular spatial modulation upon the SiNWs. Combined with a unique self-alignment and positioning capability, this new strategy could enable a rational design and single-run fabrication of a wide variety of nanowire-based optoelectronic devices. PMID:27682161

  5. Assembly and Delivery of Rabbit Capsules for Irradiation of Silicon Carbide Cladding Tube Specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Petrie, Christian M.

    Neutron irradiation of silicon carbide (SiC)-based fuel cladding under a high radial heat flux presents a critical challenge for SiC cladding concepts in light water reactors (LWRs). Fission heating in the fuel provides a high heat flux through the cladding, which, combined with the degraded thermal conductivity of SiC under irradiation, results in a large temperature gradient through the thickness of the cladding. The strong temperature dependence of swelling in SiC creates a complex stress profile in SiCbased cladding tubes as a result of differential swelling. The Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Program within the US Department of Energy Officemore » of Nuclear Energy is supporting research efforts to improve the scientific understanding of the effects of irradiation on SiC cladding tubes. Ultimately, the results of this project will provide experimental validation of multi-physics models for SiC-based fuel cladding during LWR operation. The first objective of this project is to irradiate tube specimens using a previously developed design that allows for irradiation testing of miniature SiC tube specimens subjected to a high radial heat flux. The previous “rabbit” capsule design uses the gamma heating in the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to drive a high heat flux through the cladding tube specimens. A compressible aluminum foil allows for a constant thermal contact conductance between the cladding tubes and the rabbit housing despite swelling of the SiC tubes. To allow separation of the effects of irradiation from those due to differential swelling under a high heat flux, a new design was developed under the NSUF program. This design allows for irradiation of similar SiC cladding tube specimens without a high radial heat flux. This report briefly describes the irradiation experiment design concepts, summarizes the irradiation test matrix, and reports on the successful delivery of six rabbit capsules to the HFIR. Rabbits of both low

  6. Abiologic silicon isotope fractionation between aqueous Si and Fe(III)-Si gel in simulated Archean seawater: Implications for Si isotope records in Precambrian sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xin-Yuan; Beard, Brian L.; Reddy, Thiruchelvi R.; Roden, Eric E.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2016-08-01

    Precambrian Si-rich sedimentary rocks, including cherts and banded iron formations (BIFs), record a >7‰ spread in 30Si/28Si ratios (δ30Si values), yet interpretation of this large variability has been hindered by the paucity of data on Si isotope exchange kinetics and equilibrium fractionation factors in systems that are pertinent to Precambrian marine conditions. Using the three-isotope method and an enriched 29Si tracer, a series of experiments were conducted to constrain Si isotope exchange kinetics and fractionation factors between amorphous Fe(III)-Si gel, a likely precursor to Precambrian jaspers and BIFs, and aqueous Si in artificial Archean seawater under anoxic conditions. Experiments were conducted at room temperature, and in the presence and absence of aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq). Results of this study demonstrate that Si solubility is significantly lower for Fe-Si gel than that of amorphous Si, indicating that seawater Si concentrations in the Precambrian may have been lower than previous estimates. The experiments reached ∼70-90% Si isotope exchange after a period of 53-126 days, and the highest extents of exchange were obtained where Fe(II)aq was present, suggesting that Fe(II)-Fe(III) electron-transfer and atom-exchange reactions catalyze Si isotope exchange through breakage of Fe-Si bonds. All experiments except one showed little change in the instantaneous solid-aqueous Si isotope fractionation factor with time, allowing extraction of equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors through extrapolation to 100% isotope exchange. The equilibrium 30Si/28Si fractionation between Fe(III)-Si gel and aqueous Si (Δ30Sigel-aqueous) is -2.30 ± 0.25‰ (2σ) in the absence of Fe(II)aq. In the case where Fe(II)aq was present, which resulted in addition of ∼10% Fe(II) in the final solid, creating a mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) Si gel, the equilibrium fractionation between Fe(II)-Fe(III)-Si gel and aqueous Si (Δ30Sigel-aqueous) is -3.23 ± 0.37‰ (2

  7. The role of nanostructured mesoporous silicon in discriminating in vitro calcification for electrospun composite tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Dongmei; Akkaraju, Giridhar R.; Couch, Ernest F.; CanhamCurrent Address, Intrinsiq Materials Ltd, Geraldine Road, Malvern Wr14 3SZ Uk, Leigh T.; Coffer, Jeffery L.

    2011-02-01

    The impact of mesoporous silicon (PSi) particles-embedded either on the surface, or totally encapsulated within electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers-on its properties as a tissue engineering scaffold is assessed. Our findings suggest that the resorbable porous silicon component can sensitively accelerate the necessary calcification process in such composites. Calcium phosphate deposition on the scaffolds was measured via in vitro calcification assays both at acellular and cellular levels. Extensive attachment of fibroblasts, human adult mesenchymal stem cells, and mouse stromal cells to the scaffold were observed. Complementary cell differentiation assays and ultrastructural measurements were also carried out; the levels of alkaline phosphatase expression, a specific biomarker for mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, show that the scaffolds have the ability to mediate such processes, and that the location of the Si plays a key role in levels of expression.

  8. Engineered porous silicon counter electrodes for high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Erwin, William R; Oakes, Landon; Chatterjee, Shahana; Zarick, Holly F; Pint, Cary L; Bardhan, Rizia

    2014-06-25

    In this work, we demonstrate for the first time, the use of porous silicon (P-Si) as counter electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with efficiencies (5.38%) comparable to that achieved with platinum counter electrodes (5.80%). To activate the P-Si for triiodide reduction, few layer carbon passivation is utilized to enable electrochemical stability of the silicon surface. Our results suggest porous silicon as a promising sustainable and manufacturable alternative to rare metals for electrochemical solar cells, following appropriate surface modification.

  9. Effect of dose and size on defect engineering in carbon cluster implanted silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Ryosuke; Masada, Ayumi; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Kadono, Takeshi; Hirose, Ryo; Koga, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Hidehiko; Kurita, Kazunari

    2018-01-01

    Carbon-cluster-ion-implanted defects were investigated by high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy toward achieving high-performance CMOS image sensors. We revealed that implantation damage formation in the silicon wafer bulk significantly differs between carbon-cluster and monomer ions after implantation. After epitaxial growth, small and large defects were observed in the implanted region of carbon clusters. The electron diffraction pattern of both small and large defects exhibits that from bulk crystalline silicon in the implanted region. On the one hand, we assumed that the silicon carbide structure was not formed in the implanted region, and small defects formed because of the complex of carbon and interstitial silicon. On the other hand, large defects were hypothesized to originate from the recrystallization of the amorphous layer formed by high-dose carbon-cluster implantation. These defects are considered to contribute to the powerful gettering capability required for high-performance CMOS image sensors.

  10. Silicon Isotopes doping experiments to measure quartz dissolution and precipitation rates at equilibrium and test the principle of detailed balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C.; Rimstidt, J. D.; Liu, Z.; Yuan, H.

    2016-12-01

    The principle of detailed balance (PDB) has been a cornerstone for irreversible thermodynamics and chemical kinetics for a long time, and its wide application in geochemistry has mostly been implicit and without experimental testing of its applicability. Nevertheless, many extrapolations based on PDB without experimental validation have far reaching impacts on society's mega environmental enterprises. Here we report an isotope doping method that independently measures simultaneous dissolution and precipitation rates and can test this principle. The technique reacts a solution enriched in a rare isotope of an element with a solid having natural isotopic abundances (Beck et al., 1992; Gaillardet, 2008; Gruber et al., 2013). Dissolution and precipitation rates are found from the changing isotopic ratios. Our quartz experiment doped with 29Si showed that the equilibrium dissolution rate remains unchanged at all degrees of undersaturation. We recommend this approach to test the validity of using the detailed balance relationship in rate equations for other substances.

  11. Laser-induced ferroelectric domain engineering in LiNbO3 crystals using an amorphous silicon overlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zisis, G.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Franz, Y.; Healy, N.; Masaud, T. M.; Chong, H. M. H.; Soergel, E.; Peacock, A. C.; Mailis, S.

    2017-08-01

    We report laser-induced poling inhibition and direct poling in lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO3), covered with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) light-absorbing layer, using a visible (488 nm) continuous wave laser source. Our results show that the use of the a-Si overlayer produces deeper poling inhibited domains with minimum surface damage, as compared to previously reported UV laser writing experiments on uncoated crystals, thus increasing the applicability of this method in the production of ferroelectric domain engineered structures for nonlinear optical applications. The characteristics of the poling inhibited domains were investigated using differential etching and piezoresponse force microscopy.

  12. Subwavelength engineered fiber-to-chip silicon-on-sapphire interconnects for mid-infrared applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Ramos, Carlos; Han, Zhaohong; Le Roux, Xavier; Lin, Hongtao; Singh, Vivek; Lin, Pao Tai; Tan, Dawn; Cassan, Eric; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vivien, Laurent; Wada, Kazumi; Hu, Juejun; Agarwal, Anuradha; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2016-05-01

    The mid-Infrared wavelength range (2-20 µm), so-called fingerprint region, contains the very sharp vibrational and rotational resonances of many chemical and biological substances. Thereby, on-chip absorption-spectrometry-based sensors operating in the mid-Infrared (mid-IR) have the potential to perform high-precision, label-free, real-time detection of multiple target molecules within a single sensor, which makes them an ideal technology for the implementation of lab-on-a-chip devices. Benefiting from the great development realized in the telecom field, silicon photonics is poised to deliver ultra-compact efficient and cost-effective devices fabricated at mass scale. In addition, Si is transparent up to 8 µm wavelength, making it an ideal material for the implementation of high-performance mid-IR photonic circuits. The silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology, typically used in telecom applications, relies on silicon dioxide as bottom insulator. Unfortunately, silicon dioxide absorbs light beyond 3.6 µm, limiting the usability range of the SOI platform for the mid-IR. Silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) has been proposed as an alternative solution that extends the operability region up to 6 µm (sapphire absorption), while providing a high-index contrast. In this context, surface grating couplers have been proved as an efficient means of injecting and extracting light from mid-IR SOS circuits that obviate the need of cleaving sapphire. However, grating couplers typically have a reduced bandwidth, compared with facet coupling solutions such as inverse or sub-wavelength tapers. This feature limits their feasibility for absorption spectroscopy applications that may require monitoring wide wavelength ranges. Interestingly, sub-wavelength engineering can be used to substantially improve grating coupler bandwidth, as demonstrated in devices operating at telecom wavelengths. Here, we report on the development of fiber-to-chip interconnects to ZrF4 optical fibers and integrated SOS

  13. Correlated silicon and titanium isotopic compositions of presolar SiC grains from the Murchison CM2 chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyngard, Frank; Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst; Marhas, Kuljeet Kaur

    2018-01-01

    We report correlated Si, and Ti isotopic compositions and elemental concentrations of 238 presolar SiC grains from the Murchison CM2 meteorite. Combined with measurements of the C and N isotopic compositions of these 238 grains, 220 were determined to be of type mainstream, 10 type AB, 4 type Y and 4 type Z. SiC grains of diameter ≳2.5 μm, to ensure enough material to attempt Ti measurements, were randomly chosen without any other prejudice. The Ti isotopic compositions of the majority of the grains are characterized by enrichments in 46Ti, 47Ti, 49Ti, and 50Ti relative to 48Ti, and show linear isotopic correlations indicative of galactic chemical evolution and neutron capture of the grains parent stars. The variability in the observed Ti signal as a function of depth in most of the grains indicates the presence of distinct subgrains, likely TiC that have been previously observed in TEM studies. Vandium-51 concentrations correlate with those of Ti, indicating V substitutes for Ti in the TiC matrix in many of the grains. No isotopic anomalies in 52Cr/53Cr ratios were observed, and Cr concentrations did not correlate with those of either Ti or V.

  14. Isotopic Tracing of Fuel Components in Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Garbak, J.

    2001-08-02

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope-ratio measurement technique developed in the late 1970s for tracing long-lived radioisotopes (e.g., {sup 14}C half life = 5760 y). The technique counts individual nuclei rather than waiting for their radioactive decay, allowing measurement of more than 100 low-level {sup 14}C samples per day (Vogel et al, 1995). The LLNL AMS system is shown in Fig.1. The contemporary quantity of {sup 14}C in living things ({sup 14}C/C = 1.2 x 10{sup -12} or 110 fmol {sup 14}C/ g C) is highly elevated compared to the quantity of {sup 14}C in petroleum-derived products. This isotopicmore » elevation is sufficient to trace the fate of bio-derived fuel components in the emissions of an engine without the use of radioactive materials. If synthesis of a fuel component from biologically-derived source material is not feasible, another approach is to purchase {sup 14}C-labeled material (e.g., dibutyl maleate (DBM)) and dilute it with petroleum-derived material to yield a contemporary level of {sup 14}C. In each case, the virtual absence of {sup 14}C in petroleum based fuels gives a very low {sup 14}C background that makes this approach to tracing fuel components practical. Regulatory pressure to significantly reduce the particulate emissions from diesel engines is driving research into understanding mechanisms of soot formation. If mechanisms are understood, then combustion modeling can be used to evaluate possible changes in fuel formulation and suggest possible fuel components that can improve combustion and reduce PM emissions. The combustion paradigm assumes that large molecules break down into small components and then build up again during soot formation. AMS allows us to label specific fuel components, including oxygenates, trace the carbon atoms, and test this combustion modeling paradigm. Volatile and non-volatile organic fractions (VOF, NVOF) in the PM can be further separated. The VOF of the PM can be oxidized with catalysts in

  15. Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles as an Effective Bioadhesive to Bond Collagen Containing Composite Gel Layers for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Attalla, Rana; Ling, Celine S N; Selvaganapathy, Ponnambalam Ravi

    2018-03-01

    Additive manufacturing via layer-by-layer adhesive bonding holds much promise for scalable manufacturing of tissue-like constructs, specifically scaffolds with integrated vascular networks for tissue engineering applications. However, there remains a lack of effective adhesives capable of composite layer fusion without affecting the integrity of patterned features. Here, the use of silicon carbide is introduced as an effective adhesive to achieve strong bonding (0.39 ± 0.03 kPa) between hybrid hydrogel films composed of alginate and collagen. The techniques have allowed us to fabricate multilayered, heterogeneous constructs with embedded high-resolution microchannels (150 µm-1 mm) that are precisely interspaced (500-600 µm). Hydrogel layers are effectively bonded with silicon carbide nanoparticles without blocking the hollow microchannels and high cell viability (90.61 ± 3.28%) is maintained within the scaffold. Nanosilica is also tested and found to cause clogging of smaller microchannels when used for interlayer bonding, but is successfully used to attach synthetic polymers (e.g., Tygon) to the hydrogels (32.5 ± 2.12 mN bond strength). This allows us to form inlet and outlet interconnections to the gel constructs. This ability to integrate hollow channel networks into bulk soft material structures for perfusion can be useful in 3D tissue engineering applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Iron and silicon isotope behaviour accompanying weathering in Icelandic soils, and the implications for iron export from peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opfergelt, S.; Williams, H. M.; Cornelis, J. T.; Guicharnaud, R. A.; Georg, R. B.; Siebert, C.; Gislason, S. R.; Halliday, A. N.; Burton, K. W.

    2017-11-01

    Incipient warming of peatlands at high latitudes is expected to modify soil drainage and hence the redox conditions, which has implications for Fe export from soils. This study uses Fe isotopes to assess the processes controlling Fe export in a range of Icelandic soils including peat soils derived from the same parent basalt, where Fe isotope variations principally reflect differences in weathering and drainage. In poorly weathered, well-drained soils (non-peat soils), the limited Fe isotope fractionation in soil solutions relative to the bulk soil (Δ57Fesolution-soil = -0.11 ± 0.12‰) is attributed to proton-promoted mineral dissolution. In the more weathered poorly drained soils (peat soils), the soil solutions are usually lighter than the bulk soil (Δ57Fesolution-soil = -0.41 ± 0.32‰), which indicates that Fe has been mobilised by reductive mineral dissolution and/or ligand-controlled dissolution. The results highlight the presence of Fe-organic complexes in solution in anoxic conditions. An additional constraint on soil weathering is provided by Si isotopes. The Si isotope composition of the soil solutions relative to the soil (Δ30Sisolution-soil = 0.92 ± 0.26‰) generally reflects the incorporation of light Si isotopes in secondary aluminosilicates. Under anoxic conditions in peat soils, the largest Si isotope fractionation in soil solutions relative to the bulk soil is observed (Δ30Sisolution-soil = 1.63 ± 0.40‰) and attributed to the cumulative contribution of secondary clay minerals and amorphous silica precipitation. Si supersaturation in solution with respect to amorphous silica is reached upon freezing when Al availability to form aluminosilicates is limited by the affinity of Al for metal-organic complexes. Therefore, the precipitation of amorphous silica in peat soils indirectly supports the formation of metal-organic complexes in poorly drained soils. These observations highlight that in a scenario of decreasing soil drainage with

  17. Observation of silicon self-diffusion enhanced by the strain originated from end-of-range defects using isotope multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Isoda, Taiga; Uematsu, Masashi; Itoh, Kohei M., E-mail: kitoh@appi.keio.ac.jp

    2015-09-21

    Si self-diffusion in the presence of end-of-range (EOR) defects is investigated using {sup nat}Si/{sup 28}Si isotope multilayers. The isotope multilayers were amorphized by Ge ion implantation, and then annealed at 800–950 °C. The behavior of Si self-interstitials is investigated through the {sup 30}Si self-diffusion. The experimental {sup 30}Si profiles show further enhancement of Si self-diffusion at the EOR defect region, in addition to the transient enhanced diffusion via excess Si self-interstitials by EOR defects. To explain this additional enhanced diffusion, we propose a model which takes into account enhanced diffusion by tensile strain originated from EOR defects. The calculation results basedmore » on this model have well reproduced the experimental {sup 30}Si profiles.« less

  18. Silicon and Ge in the deep sea deduced from Si isotope and Ge measurements in giant glass sponges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, K. P.; Schuessler, J. A.; Haug, G. H.; Andreae, M. O.; Froelich, P. N.

    2016-12-01

    Biogenic silica, such as giant glass spicules of the deep-sea sponge Monorhaphis chuni, is an archive to monitor paleo-Si and -Ge in past seawater. Here we report on Si isotopes and Ge/Si ratios in up to 2.7 m long spicules using LA-(MC)-ICP-MS. Isotope ratios of Si are suitable proxies for Si concentrations in seawater, because Si isotope fractionation into biogenic silica is a function of seawater dissolved Si concentration. The δ30Si values for our specimens range from about - 0.5 ‰ to - 3.6 ‰ and are much lower than modern (>1000 m) seawater δ30Si of about 1.3 ‰. Interestingly, there is a systematic Si isotopic and Ge variation from the rim to the center of the cross sections, which we interpret as seawater paleo-Si and -Ge changes. The lifetime of the giant sponges appears to be between about 6 and 14 ka. These age estimates were obtained by comparing our analytical data with various paleo-markers of the glacial-interglacial termination. Thus, the entire Holocene and the end of the last glacial period are contained in the oldest giant spicules. The derived Si and Ge seawater concentrations are ca. 12 % higher and 20 % lower, respectively, during the late glacial than at present. Possible explanations for changing Si, Ge and Ge/Si during the deglaciation could be changes in riverine, glacial, and/or eolian deliveries of silica to the oceans and changes in marine sedimentary reverse weathering, which removes Ge into marine sediments during opal dissolution and diagenesis.

  19. Isotopic Composition of Molybdenum and Barium in Single Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains of Type A+B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savina, M. R.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Davis, A. M.; Clayton, R. N.; Lewis, R. S.; Amari, S.

    2003-01-01

    Presolar SiC grains fall into several groups based on C, N, and Si isotopic compositions. Approximately 93% are defined as mainstream, having 10 less than C-12/C-13 less than 100 and N-14/N-15 ranging from 50 to 20,000. A number of studies have shown that the most likely sources of mainstream grains are low mass asymptotic giant branch stars. Models of nucleosynthesis in AGB stars reproduce the s-process enhancements seen in the heavy elements in mainstream SiC grains. Among the less common grains, A+B grains, which comprise approximately 3-4% of presolar SiC, are perhaps the least well understood. Recent studies by Amari et al. show that A+B grains can be divided into at least 4 groups based on their trace element concentration patterns. Of 20 grains studied, 7 showed trace element patterns consistent with condensation from a gas of solar system composition, while the rest had varying degrees of process enhancements. Our previous measurements on 3 A+B grains showed Mo of solar isotopic composition, but Zr with a strong enhancement in 96Zr, which is an r-process isotope but can be made in an sprocess if the neutron density is high enough to bridge the unstable Zr-95 (T(sub 1/2)= 64 d). The observation of Mo with solar system isotopic composition in the same grains is puzzling however. Meyer et al. have recently shown that a neutron burst mechanism can produce a high Zr-96/Zr-94 without enhancing Mo-100, however this model leads to enhancements in Mo-95 and Mo-97 not observed in A+B grains. We report here results of Mo measurements on 7 additional A+B grains, and Ba measurements on 2 A+B grains, and compare these to the previous studies.

  20. Effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties and dislocation luminescence of isotopically enriched silicon {sup 29}Si:B

    SciTech Connect

    Koplak, O. V.; Shteynman, E. A.; Tereschenko, A. N.

    2015-09-15

    A correlation between the temperature dependences of the D1-line intensity of dislocation luminescence and the magnetic moment of plastically deformed isotopically enriched crystals {sup 29}Si:B is found. It is established that the magnetic susceptibility of the deformed crystals obtained by integration of the spectra of electron spin resonance and the D1-line intensity undergo similar nonmonotonic variations with temperature varying in the range of 20–32 K.

  1. Method of protecting a surface with a silicon-slurry/aluminide coating. [coatings for gas turbine engine blades and vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Young, S. G. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low cost coating for protecting metallic base system substrates from high temperatures, high gas velocity oxidation, thermal fatigue and hot corrosion is described. The coating is particularly useful for protecting vanes and blades in aircraft and land based gas turbine engines. A lacquer slurry comprising cellulose nitrate containing high purity silicon powder is sprayed onto the superalloy substrates. The silicon layer is then aluminized to complete the coating. The Si-Al coating is less costly to produce than advanced aluminides and protects the substrate from oxidation and thermal fatigue for a much longer period of time than the conventional aluminide coatings. While more expensive Pt-Al coatings and physical vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings may last longer or provide equal protection on certain substrates, the Si-Al coating exceeded the performance of both types of coatings on certain superalloys in high gas velocity oxidation and thermal fatigue. Also, the Si-Al coating increased the resistance of certain superalloys to hot corrosion.

  2. Simultaneous wavelength conversion of ASK and DPSK signals based on four-wave-mixing in dispersion engineered silicon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Ophir, Noam; Menard, Michael; Lau, Ryan Kin Wah; Turner-Foster, Amy C; Foster, Mark A; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L; Bergman, Keren

    2011-06-20

    We experimentally demonstrate four-wave-mixing (FWM)-based continuous wavelength conversion of optical differential-phase-shift-keyed (DPSK) signals with large wavelength conversion ranges as well as simultaneous wavelength conversion of dual-wavelength channels with mixed modulation formats in 1.1-cm-long dispersion-engineered silicon waveguides. We first validate up to 100-nm wavelength conversion range for 10-Gb/s DPSK signals, showcasing the capability to perform phase-preserving operations at high bit rates in chip-scale devices over wide conversion ranges. We further validate the wavelength conversion of dual-wavelength channels modulated with 10-Gb/s packetized phase-shift-keyed (PSK) and amplitude-shift-keyed (ASK) signals; demonstrate simultaneous operation on multiple channels with mixed formats in chip-scale devices. For both configurations, we measure the spectral and temporal responses and evaluate the performances using bit-error-rate (BER) measurements.

  3. Theoretical Prediction of an Antimony-Silicon Monolayer (penta-Sb2Si): Band Gap Engineering by Strain Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshedi, Hosein; Naseri, Mosayeb; Hantehzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Elahi, Seyed Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, using a first principles calculation, a two-dimensional structure of silicon-antimony named penta-Sb2Si is predicted. The structural, kinetic, and thermal stabilities of the predicted monolayer are confirmed by the cohesive energy calculation, phonon dispersion analysis, and first principles molecular dynamic simulation, respectively. The electronic properties investigation shows that the pentagonal Sb2Si monolayer is a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of about 1.53 eV (2.1 eV) from GGA-PBE (PBE0 hybrid functional) calculations which can be effectively engineered by employing external biaxial compressive and tensile strain. Furthermore, the optical characteristics calculation indicates that the predicted monolayer has considerable optical absorption and reflectivity in the ultraviolet region. The results suggest that a Sb2Si monolayer has very good potential applications in new nano-optoelectronic devices.

  4. Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley during the Rise of Silicon Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial (an engine of economic development). Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior…

  5. The source of dissolved silicon in soil surface solutions of a temperate forest ecosystem: Ge/Si and Si isotope ratios as biogeochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelis, J.; Delvaux, B.; Cardinal, D.; André, L.; Ranger, J.; Opfergelt, S.

    2010-12-01

    Understand the biogeochemical cycle of silicon (Si) in the Earth’s critical zone and the dissolved Si transfer from the litho-pedosphere into the hydrosphere is of great interest for the global balance of biogeochemical processes, including the global C cycle. Indeed, the interaction between Si and C cycles regulates the atmospheric CO2 through the chemical weathering of silicate minerals, the C sequestration in stable organo-mineral compounds and the Si nutrition of phytoplankton CO2-consumers in oceans. H4SiO4 released by mineral dissolution contributes to the critical zone evolution through neoformation of secondary minerals, adsorption onto hydroxyl-bearing phases and recycling by vegetation and return of phytoliths on topsoil. The neoformation of secondary precipitates (clay minerals and phytoliths polymerized in plants) and adsorption of Si onto Fe and Al (hydr)oxides are processes favoring the light Si isotope incorporation, generating rivers enriched in heavy Si isotopes. On the other hand, clay minerals and phytoliths display contrasting Ge/Si ratios since clay-sized weathering products are enriched in Ge and phytoliths are depleted in Ge. Thus stable Si isotope and Ge/Si ratios constitute very interesting proxies to trace transfer of Si in the critical zone. Here we report Si isotopic and Ge/Si ratios of the different Si pools in a temperate soil-tree system (Breuil experimental forest, France) involving various tree species grown on Alumnic Cambisol derived from granitic bedrock. Relative to granitic bedrock (δ30Si = -0.07 ‰; Ge/Si = 2.5 µmol/mol), clay-sized minerals are enriched in 28Si (-1.07 ‰) and Ge (6.2 µmol/mol) while phytoliths are enriched in 28Si (-0.28 to -0.64 ‰) and depleted in Ge (0.1 to 0.3 µmol/mol). This contrast allows us to infer the relative contribution of litho/pedogenic and biogenic mineral dissolution on the release of H4SiO4 in soil surface solutions. The Si-isotope signatures and Ge/Si ratios of forest floor

  6. NanoSIMS isotope studies of rare types of presolar silicon carbide grains from the Murchison meteorite: Implications for supernova models and the role of 14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Peter; Pignatari, Marco; Kodolányi, János; Gröner, Elmar; Amari, Sachiko

    2018-01-01

    We have conducted a NanoSIMS ion imaging survey of about 1800 presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains from the Murchison meteorite. A total of 21 supernova (SN) X grains, two SN C grains, and two putative nova grains were identified. Six particularly interesting grains, two X and C grains each and the two putative nova grains were subsequently studied in greater detail, namely, for C-, N-, Mg-Al-, Si-, S-, and Ca-Ti-isotopic compositions and for the initial presence of radioactive 26Al (half life 716,000 yr), 32Si (half life 153 yr), and 44Ti (half life 60 yr). Their isotope data along with those of three X grains from the literature were compared with model predictions for 15 M⊙ and 25 M⊙ Type II supernovae (SNe). The best fits were found for 25 M⊙ SN models that consider for the He shell the temperature and density of a 15 M⊙ SN and ingestion of H into the He shell before the explosion. In these models a C- and Si-rich zone forms at the bottom of the He burning zone (C/Si zone). The region above the C/Si zone is termed the O/nova zone and exhibits the isotopic fingerprints of explosive H burning. Satisfactory fits of measured C-, N-, and Si-isotopic compositions and of 26Al/27Al ratios require small-scale mixing of matter originating from a region extending over 0.2 M⊙ for X and C grains and over 0.4 M⊙ for one of the putative nova grains, involving matter from a thin Si-rich layer slightly below the C/Si zone, the C/Si zone, and the O/nova zone. Simultaneous fitting of 14N/15N and 26Al/27Al requires a C-N fractionation of a factor of 50 during SiC condensation. This leads to preferential incorporation of radioactive 14C (half life 5700 yr) over directly produced 14N and can account for the 14N/15N along with 26Al/27Al ratios as observed in the SiC grains. The good fit for one of the putative nova grains along with its high 26Al/27Al points towards a SN origin and supports previous suggestions that some grains classified as nova grains might be from SNe

  7. Identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds in chemical ionization GC-MS using a mass-to-structure (MTS) Search Engine with integral isotope pattern ranking.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wenta; Draper, William M

    2013-02-21

    The mass-to-structure or MTS Search Engine is an Access 2010 database containing theoretical molecular mass information for 19,438 compounds assembled from common sources such as the Merck Index, pesticide and pharmaceutical compilations, and chemical catalogues. This database, which contains no experimental mass spectral data, was developed as an aid to identification of compounds in atmospheric pressure ionization (API)-LC-MS. This paper describes a powerful upgrade to this database, a fully integrated utility for filtering or ranking candidates based on isotope ratios and patterns. The new MTS Search Engine is applied here to the identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds including pesticides, nitrosoamines and other pollutants. Methane and isobutane chemical ionization (CI) GC-MS spectra were obtained from unit mass resolution mass spectrometers to determine MH(+) masses and isotope ratios. Isotopes were measured accurately with errors of <4% and <6%, respectively, for A + 1 and A + 2 peaks. Deconvolution of interfering isotope clusters (e.g., M(+) and [M - H](+)) was required for accurate determination of the A + 1 isotope in halogenated compounds. Integrating the isotope data greatly improved the speed and accuracy of the database identifications. The database accurately identified unknowns from isobutane CI spectra in 100% of cases where as many as 40 candidates satisfied the mass tolerance. The paper describes the development and basic operation of the new MTS Search Engine and details performance testing with over 50 model compounds.

  8. Silicon in Mars' Core: A Prediction Based on Mars Model Using Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopes in SNC Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohapatra, R. K.; Murty, S. V. S.

    2002-01-01

    Chemical and (oxygen) isotopic compositions of SNC meteorites have been used by a number of workers to infer the nature of precursor materials for the accretion of Mars. The idea that chondritic materials played a key role in the formation of Mars has been the central assumption in these works. Wanke and Dreibus have proposed a mixture of two types of chondritic materials, differing in oxygen fugacity but having CI type bulk chemical composition for the nonvolatile elements, for Mars' precursor. But a number of studies based on high pressure and temperature melting experiments do not favor a CI type bulk planet composition for Mars, as it predicts a bulk planet Fe/Si ratio much higher than that reported from the recent Pathfinder data. Oxygen forms the bulk of Mars (approximately 40% by wt.) and might provide clues to the type of materials that formed Mars. But models based on the oxygen isotopic compositions of SNC meteorites predict three different mixtures of precursor materials for Mars: 90% H + 10% CM, 85% H + 11% CV + 4% CI and 45% EH + 55% H. As each of these models has been shown to be consistent with the bulk geophysical properties (such as mean density, and moment of inertia factor) of Mars, the nature of the material that accreted to form Mars remains ambiguous.

  9. Mid-infrared Raman amplification and wavelength conversion in dispersion engineered silicon-on-sapphire waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaolu; Liu, Hongjun; Huang, Nan; Sun, Qibing; Li, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Raman amplification based on stimulated Stokes Raman scattering (SSRS) and wavelength conversion based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) are theoretically investigated in silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) waveguides in the mid-infrared (IR) region. When the linear phase mismatch Δk is close to zero, the Stokes gain and conversion efficiency drop down quickly due to the effect of parametric gain suppression when the Stokes-pump input ratio is sufficiently large. The Stokes gain increases with the increase of Δk, whereas efficient wavelength conversion needs appropriate Δk under different pump intensities. The conversion efficiency at exact linear phase matching (Δk = 0) is smaller than that at optimal linear phase mismatch by a factor of about 28 dB when the pump intensity is 2 GW cm-2.

  10. Controllable surface-plasmon resonance in engineered nanometer epitaxial silicide particles embedded in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Ksendzov, A.; Iannelli, J. M.; George, T.

    1991-01-01

    Epitaxial CoSi2 particles in a single-crystal silicon matrix are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy using a technique that allows nanometer control over particle size in three dimensions. These composite layers exhibit resonant absorption predicted by effective-medium theory. Selection of the height and diameter of disklike particles through a choice of growth conditions allows tailoring of the depolarization factor and hence of the surface-plasmon resonance energy. Resonant absorption from 0.49 to 1.04 eV (2.5 to 1.2 micron) is demonstrated and shown to agree well with values predicted by the Garnett (1904, 1906) theory using the bulk dielectric constants for CoSi2 and Si.

  11. Surface engineering of porous silicon microparticles for intravitreal sustained delivery of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Alejandra; Hou, Huiyuan; Moon, Sang Woong; Sailor, Michael J; Freeman, William R; Cheng, Lingyun

    2015-01-22

    To understand the relationship between rapamycin loading/release and surface chemistries of porous silicon (pSi) to optimize pSi-based intravitreal delivery system. Three types of surface chemical modifications were studied: (1) pSi-COOH, containing 10-carbon aliphatic chains with terminal carboxyl groups grafted via hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid; (2) pSi-C12, containing 12-carbon aliphatic chains grafted via hydrosilylation of 1-dodecene; and (3) pSiO2-C8, prepared by mild oxidation of the pSi particles followed by grafting of 8-hydrocarbon chains to the resulting porous silica surface via a silanization. The efficiency of rapamycin loading follows the order (micrograms of drug/milligrams of carrier): pSiO2-C8 (105 ± 18) > pSi-COOH (68 ± 8) > pSi-C12 (36 ± 6). Powder X-ray diffraction data showed that loaded rapamycin was amorphous and dynamic drug-release study showed that the availability of the free drug was increased by 6-fold (compared with crystalline rapamycin) by using pSiO2-C8 formulation (P = 0.0039). Of the three formulations in this study, pSiO2-C8-RAP showed optimal performance in terms of simultaneous release of the active drug and carrier degradation, and drug-loading capacity. Released rapamycin was confirmed with the fingerprints of the mass spectrometry and biologically functional as the control of commercial crystalline rapamycin. Single intravitreal injections of 2.9 ± 0.37 mg pSiO2-C8-RAP into rabbit eyes resulted in more than 8 weeks of residence in the vitreous while maintaining clear optical media and normal histology of the retina in comparison to the controls. Porous silicon-based rapamycin delivery system using the pSiO2-C8 formulation demonstrated good ocular compatibility and may provide sustained drug release for retina. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  12. Engineering the thermal conductivity along an individual silicon nanowire by selective helium ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunshan; Liu, Dan; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Liyan; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Unocic, Raymond R; Burch, Matthew J; Kim, Songkil; Hao, Hanfang; Pickard, Daniel S; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T L

    2017-06-27

    The ability to engineer the thermal conductivity of materials allows us to control the flow of heat and derive novel functionalities such as thermal rectification, thermal switching and thermal cloaking. While this could be achieved by making use of composites and metamaterials at bulk length-scales, engineering the thermal conductivity at micro- and nano-scale dimensions is considerably more challenging. In this work, we show that the local thermal conductivity along a single Si nanowire can be tuned to a desired value (between crystalline and amorphous limits) with high spatial resolution through selective helium ion irradiation with a well-controlled dose. The underlying mechanism is understood through molecular dynamics simulations and quantitative phonon-defect scattering rate analysis, where the behaviour of thermal conductivity with dose is attributed to the accumulation and agglomeration of scattering centres at lower doses. Beyond a threshold dose, a crystalline-amorphous transition was observed.

  13. Consolidation of silicon nitride without additives. [for gas turbine engine efficiency increase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, P. F.; Yeh, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The use of ceramics for gas turbine engine construction might make it possible to increase engine efficiency by raising operational temperatures to values beyond those which can be tolerated by metallic alloys. The most promising ceramics being investigated in this connection are Si3N4 and SiC. A description is presented of a study which had the objective to produce dense Si3N4. The two most common methods of consolidating Si3N4 currently being used include hot pressing and reaction sintering. The feasibility was explored of producing a sound, dense Si3N4 body without additives by means of conventional gas hot isostatic pressing techniques and an uncommon hydraulic hot isostatic pressing technique. It was found that Si3N4 can be densified without additions to a density which exceeds 95% of the theoretical value

  14. Engineering the thermal conductivity along an individual silicon nanowire by selective helium ion irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Yunshan; Liu, Dan; Chen, Jie; ...

    2017-06-27

    The ability to engineer the thermal conductivity of materials allows us to control the flow of heat and derive novel functionalities such as thermal rectification, thermal switching and thermal cloaking. While this could be achieved by making use of composites and metamaterials at bulk length-scales, engineering the thermal conductivity at micro- and nano-scale dimensions is considerably more challenging. Here, we show that the local thermal conductivity along a single Si nanowire can be tuned to a desired value (between crystalline and amorphous limits) with high spatial resolution through selective helium ion irradiation with a well-controlled dose. The underlying mechanism ismore » understood through molecular dynamics simulations and quantitative phonon-defect scattering rate analysis, where the behaviour of thermal conductivity with dose is attributed to the accumulation and agglomeration of scattering centres at lower doses. Finally, we observed threshold dose beyond a crystalline-amorphous transition.« less

  15. Engineering the thermal conductivity along an individual silicon nanowire by selective helium ion irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunshan; Liu, Dan; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Liyan; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Burch, Matthew J.; Kim, Songkil; Hao, Hanfang; Pickard, Daniel S.; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T. L.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to engineer the thermal conductivity of materials allows us to control the flow of heat and derive novel functionalities such as thermal rectification, thermal switching and thermal cloaking. While this could be achieved by making use of composites and metamaterials at bulk length-scales, engineering the thermal conductivity at micro- and nano-scale dimensions is considerably more challenging. In this work, we show that the local thermal conductivity along a single Si nanowire can be tuned to a desired value (between crystalline and amorphous limits) with high spatial resolution through selective helium ion irradiation with a well-controlled dose. The underlying mechanism is understood through molecular dynamics simulations and quantitative phonon-defect scattering rate analysis, where the behaviour of thermal conductivity with dose is attributed to the accumulation and agglomeration of scattering centres at lower doses. Beyond a threshold dose, a crystalline-amorphous transition was observed. PMID:28653663

  16. Engineering the thermal conductivity along an individual silicon nanowire by selective helium ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yunshan; Liu, Dan; Chen, Jie

    The ability to engineer the thermal conductivity of materials allows us to control the flow of heat and derive novel functionalities such as thermal rectification, thermal switching and thermal cloaking. While this could be achieved by making use of composites and metamaterials at bulk length-scales, engineering the thermal conductivity at micro- and nano-scale dimensions is considerably more challenging. Here, we show that the local thermal conductivity along a single Si nanowire can be tuned to a desired value (between crystalline and amorphous limits) with high spatial resolution through selective helium ion irradiation with a well-controlled dose. The underlying mechanism ismore » understood through molecular dynamics simulations and quantitative phonon-defect scattering rate analysis, where the behaviour of thermal conductivity with dose is attributed to the accumulation and agglomeration of scattering centres at lower doses. Finally, we observed threshold dose beyond a crystalline-amorphous transition.« less

  17. Engineering and Optimization of Silicon-Iron-Manganese Nanoalloy Electrode for Enhanced Lithium-Ion Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaboina, Pankaj K.; Cho, Jong-Soo; Cho, Sung-Jin

    2017-10-01

    The electrochemical performance of a battery is considered to be primarily dependent on the electrode material. However, engineering and optimization of electrodes also play a crucial role, and the same electrode material can be designed to offer significantly improved batteries. In this work, Si-Fe-Mn nanomaterial alloy (Si/alloy) and graphite composite electrodes were densified at different calendering conditions of 3, 5, and 8 tons, and its influence on electrode porosity, electrolyte wettability, and long-term cycling was investigated. The active material loading was maintained very high ( 2 mg cm-2) to implement electrode engineering close to commercial loading scales. The densification was optimized to balance between the electrode thickness and wettability to enable the best electrochemical properties of the Si/alloy anodes. In this case, engineering and optimizing the Si/alloy composite electrodes to 3 ton calendering (electrode densification from 0.39 to 0.48 g cm-3) showed enhanced cycling stability with a high capacity retention of 100% over 100 cycles. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Silicon-Based Ceramic-Matrix Composites for Advanced Turbine Engines: Some Degradation Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U. J.

    2000-01-01

    SiC/BN/SiC composites are designed to take advantage of the high specific strengths and moduli of non-oxide ceramics, and their excellent resistance to creep, chemical attack, and oxidation, while circumventing the brittleness inherent in ceramics. Hence, these composites have the potential to take turbine engines of the future to higher operating temperatures than is achievable with metal alloys. However, these composites remain developmental and more work needs to be done to optimize processing techniques. This paper highlights the lingering issue of pest degradation in these materials and shows that it results from vestiges of processing steps and can thus be minimized or eliminated.

  19. Band-edge engineering of Silicon by Surface Functionalization: a Combined Ab-initio and Photoemission Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; O'Leary, Leslie; Lewis, Nathan; Galli, Giulia

    2012-02-01

    The electrode material choice is limited in solar to fuel formation devices because of the requirement of band-edge matching to the fixed fuel formation potential. This limitation can be relieved via band-edge engineering. The changes of band-edge positions of Si electrodes induced by the adsorption of H-, Cl-, Br- and short-chain alkyl groups were investigated by combining density functional (DFT), many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The band edge shifts are related to the formation of surface dipole moments, and determine the barrier height of electrons and holes in doped silicon surfaces. We find that the trends of the sign and magnitude of the computed surface dipoles as a function of the adsorbate may be explained by simple electronegative rules. We show that quasi-particle energies obtained within MBPT are in good agreement with experiment, while DFT values may exhibit substantial errors. However computed band edge differences are in good agreement with spectroscopic and electrical measurements even at the DFT level of theory. [1] Y. Li and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. B 82, 045321 (2010). [2] Y. Li, L. O'Leary, N. Lewis and G. Galli, to be submitted.

  20. An engineer at AeroVironment's Design Development Center inspects a set of silicon solar cells for p

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An engineer at AeroVironment's Design Development Center in Simi Valley, California, closely inspects a set of silicon solar cells for potential defects. The cells, fabricated by SunPower, Inc., of Sunnyvale, California, are among 64,000 solar cells which have been installed on the Helios Prototype solar-powered aircraft to provide power to its 14 electric motors and operating systems. Developed by AeroVironment under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, the Helios Prototype is the forerunner of a planned fleet of slow-flying, long duration, high-altitude aircraft which can perform atmospheric science missions and serve as telecommunications relay platforms in the stratosphere. Target goals set by NASA for the giant 246-foot span flying wing include reaching and sustaining subsonic horizontal flight at 100,000 feet altitude in 2001, and sustained continuous flight for at least four days and nights in 2003 with the aid of a regenerative fuel cell-based energy storage system now in development.

  1. Defect engineering and luminescence characterization in bulk and thin film polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshka, Yaroslav

    The passivation of recombination centers and the monitoring of passivation efficiency are critical for successful utilization of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) in solar cells and in thin-film transistors. Two important classes of poly-Si-thin films and bulk wafers-can respond differently to passivation processes (hydrogenation efficiency, possibilities of extrinsic and intrinsic gettering, etc.) and demand different approaches to their characterization. The effect of photoluminescence (PL) enhancement using ultrasound treatment (UST) was studied in poly-Si and amorphous-Si films on glass. In addition to the previously documented growth of the 0.7 eV oxygen related band in poly-Si films, generation and dramatic enhancement of a new luminescence maximum at about 0.98 eV occurs in films containing a superposition of poly-Si and alpha-Si phases. A model of ultrasound stimulated hydrogen detrapping followed by hydrogen diffusion and passivation of non-radiative centers was developed. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) mapping was used to monitor improvement of recombination properties in bulk photovoltaic poly-Si during solar cell fabrication. Analysis of the statistical distribution of the values of PL enhancement shows that the contribution of individual processing steps to the increasing PL are different in nature. A correlation between PL mapping and minority carrier diffusion length was performed and quantitatively described. A method of obtaining separate information about the recombination properties of the bulk and the p/n junction regions of solar cells was developed. The method is based on measurements of PL distribution under different biases applied to solar cells and under different intensities of the excitation light. A PL study at 0.8 eV spectral maximum and comparison with the band-to-band PL was performed. Influence of the defects responsible for the 0.8 eV defect band was insignificant in as-grown wafers. It was revealed, however, that these

  2. Surface Engineering of Porous Silicon Microparticles for Intravitreal Sustained Delivery of Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Alejandra; Hou, Huiyuan; Moon, Sang Woong; Sailor, Michael J.; Freeman, William R.; Cheng, Lingyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To understand the relationship between rapamycin loading/release and surface chemistries of porous silicon (pSi) to optimize pSi-based intravitreal delivery system. Methods. Three types of surface chemical modifications were studied: (1) pSi-COOH, containing 10-carbon aliphatic chains with terminal carboxyl groups grafted via hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid; (2) pSi-C12, containing 12-carbon aliphatic chains grafted via hydrosilylation of 1-dodecene; and (3) pSiO2-C8, prepared by mild oxidation of the pSi particles followed by grafting of 8-hydrocarbon chains to the resulting porous silica surface via a silanization. Results. The efficiency of rapamycin loading follows the order (micrograms of drug/milligrams of carrier): pSiO2-C8 (105 ± 18) > pSi-COOH (68 ± 8) > pSi-C12 (36 ± 6). Powder X-ray diffraction data showed that loaded rapamycin was amorphous and dynamic drug-release study showed that the availability of the free drug was increased by 6-fold (compared with crystalline rapamycin) by using pSiO2-C8 formulation (P = 0.0039). Of the three formulations in this study, pSiO2-C8-RAP showed optimal performance in terms of simultaneous release of the active drug and carrier degradation, and drug-loading capacity. Released rapamycin was confirmed with the fingerprints of the mass spectrometry and biologically functional as the control of commercial crystalline rapamycin. Single intravitreal injections of 2.9 ± 0.37 mg pSiO2-C8-RAP into rabbit eyes resulted in more than 8 weeks of residence in the vitreous while maintaining clear optical media and normal histology of the retina in comparison to the controls. Conclusions. Porous silicon–based rapamycin delivery system using the pSiO2-C8 formulation demonstrated good ocular compatibility and may provide sustained drug release for retina. PMID:25613937

  3. Nanostructured silicon via metal assisted catalyzed etch (MACE): chemistry fundamentals and pattern engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toor, Fatima; Miller, Jeffrey B.; Davidson, Lauren M.; Nichols, Logan; Duan, Wenqi; Jura, Michael P.; Yim, Joanne; Forziati, Joanne; Black, Marcie R.

    2016-10-01

    There are a range of different methods to generate a nanostructured surface on silicon (Si) but the most cost effective and optically interesting is the metal assisted wet chemical etching (MACE) (Koynov et al 2006 Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 203107). MACE of Si is a controllable, room-temperature wet-chemical technique that uses a thin layer of metal to etch the surface of Si, leaving behind various nano- and micro-scale surface features or ‘black silicon’. MACE-fabricated nanowires (NWs) provide improved antireflection and light trapping functionality (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66) compared with the traditional ‘iso-texturing’ (Campbell and Green 1987 J. Appl. Phys. 62 243-9). The resulting lower reflection and improved light trapping can lead to higher short circuit currents in NW solar cells (Toor et al 2011 Appl. Phys. Lett. 99 103501). In addition, NW cells can have higher fill factors and voltages than traditionally processed cells, thus leading to increased solar cell efficiencies (Cabrera et al 2013 IEEE J. Photovolt. 3 102-7). MACE NW processing also has synergy with next generation Si solar cell designs, such as thin epitaxial-Si and passivated emitter rear contact (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66). While several companies have begun manufacturing black Si, and many more are researching these techniques, much of the work has not been published in traditional journals and is publicly available only through conference proceedings and patent publications, which makes learning the field challenging. There have been three specialized review articles published recently on certain aspects of MACE or black Si, but do not present a full review that would benefit the industry (Liu et al 2014 Energy Environ. Sci. 7 3223-63 Yusufoglu et al 2015 IEEE J. Photovolt. 5 320-8 Huang et al 2011 Adv. Mater. 23 285-308). In this feature article, we review the chemistry of MACE and explore how changing parameters in the wet etch process effects the resulting

  4. Intravitreal Controlled Release of Dexamethasone from Engineered Microparticles of Porous Silicon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengyun; Hou, Huiyuan; Nan, Kaihui; Sailor, Michael J; Freeman, William R.; Cheng, Lingyun

    2014-01-01

    Dexamethasone is a glucocorticoid that is widely used in the ophthalmic arena. The recent FDA approved dexamethasone implant can provide a three month efficacy but with high rate of drug related cataract and high intraocular pressure (IOP). It seems that higher steroid in aqueous humor and around lens may be associated with these complications based on clinical fact that higher IOP was observed with intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (TA) than with subtenon TA. We hypothesize that placing a sustained dexamethasone release system near back of the eye through a fine needle can maximize efficacy while mitigate higher rate of IOP rise and cataract. To develop a sustained intravitreal dexamethasone delivery system, porous silicon dioxide (pSiO2) microparticles were fabricated and functionalized with amines as well as carboxyl groups. Dexamethasone was conjugated to pSiO2 through the Steglich Esterificaion Reaction between hydroxyl of dexamethasone and carboxyl groups on the pSiO2. The drug loading was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and loading efficiency was quantitated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In vitro release was conducted for three months and dexamethasone was confirmed in the released samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). A pilot ocular safety and determination of vitreous drug level was performed in rabbit eyes. The drug loading study demonstrated that loading efficiency was from 5.96% to 10.77% depending on the loading reaction time, being higher with longer loading reaction time before reaching saturation around 7 days. In vitro drug release study revealed that dexamethasone release from pSiO2 particles was sustainable for over 90 days and was 80 days longer than free dexamethasone or infiltration-loaded pSiO2 particle formulation in the same setting. Pilot in vivo study demonstrated no sign of ocular adverse reaction in rabbit eyes following a single 3 mg intravitreal injection and

  5. 800 C Silicon Carbide (SiC) Pressure Sensors for Engine Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    MEMS-based 4H-SiC piezoresistive pressure sensors have been demonstrated at 800 C, leading to the discovery of strain sensitivity recovery with increasing temperatures above 400 C, eventually achieving up to, or near, 100 recovery of the room temperature values at 800 C. This result will allow the insertion of highly sensitive pressure sensors closer to jet, rocket, and hypersonic engine combustion chambers to improve the quantification accuracy of combustor dynamics, performance, and increase safety margin. Also, by operating at higher temperature and locating closer to the combustion chamber, reduction of the length (weight) of pressure tubes that are currently used will be achieved. This will result in reduced costlb to access space.

  6. Lithium implantation at low temperature in silicon for sharp buried amorphous layer formation and defect engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Oliviero, E.; David, M. L.; Beaufort, M. F.

    The crystalline-to-amorphous transformation induced by lithium ion implantation at low temperature has been investigated. The resulting damage structure and its thermal evolution have been studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy channelling (RBS/C) and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Lithium low-fluence implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature is shown to produce a three layers structure: an amorphous layer surrounded by two highly damaged layers. A thermal treatment at 400 Degree-Sign C leads to the formation of a sharp amorphous/crystalline interfacial transition and defect annihilation of the front heavily damaged layer. After 600 Degree-Sign C annealing, complete recrystallization takes placemore » and no extended defects are left. Anomalous recrystallization rate is observed with different motion velocities of the a/c interfaces and is ascribed to lithium acting as a surfactant. Moreover, the sharp buried amorphous layer is shown to be an efficient sink for interstitials impeding interstitial supersaturation and {l_brace}311{r_brace} defect formation in case of subsequent neon implantation. This study shows that lithium implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature can be suitable to form a sharp buried amorphous layer with a well-defined crystalline front layer, thus having potential applications for defects engineering in the improvement of post-implantation layers quality and for shallow junction formation.« less

  7. Proposal of a neutron transmutation doping facility for n-type spherical silicon solar cell at high-temperature engineering test reactor.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hai Quan; Honda, Yuki; Motoyama, Mizuki; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Ishii, Toshiaki; Ishitsuka, Etsuo

    2018-05-01

    The p-type spherical silicon solar cell is a candidate for future solar energy with low fabrication cost, however, its conversion efficiency is only about 10%. The conversion efficiency of a silicon solar cell can be increased by using n-type silicon semiconductor as a substrate. This study proposed a new method of neutron transmutation doping silicon (NTD-Si) for producing the n-type spherical solar cell, in which the Si-particles are irradiated directly instead of the cylinder Si-ingot as in the conventional NTD-Si. By using a 'screw', an identical resistivity could be achieved for the Si-particles without a complicated procedure as in the NTD with Si-ingot. Also, the reactivity and neutron flux swing could be kept to a minimum because of the continuous irradiation of the Si-particles. A high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR), which is located in Japan, was used as a reference reactor in this study. Neutronic calculations showed that the HTTR has a capability to produce about 40t/EFPY of 10Ωcm resistivity Si-particles for fabrication of the n-type spherical solar cell. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental calibration of silicon and oxygen isotope fractionations between quartz and water at 250°C by in situ microanalysis of experimental products and application to zoned low δ 30Si quartz overgrowths

    DOE PAGES

    Pollington, Anthony D.; Kozdon, Reinhard; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; ...

    2015-12-01

    The interpretation of silicon isotope data for quartz is hampered by the lack of experimentally determined fractionation factors between quartz and fluid. Further, there is a large spread in published oxygen isotope fractionation factors at low temperatures, primarily due to extrapolation from experimental calibrations at high temperature. We report the first measurements of silicon isotope ratios from experimentally precipitated quartz and estimate the equilibrium fractionation vs. dissolved silica using a novel in situ analysis technique applying secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly analyze experimental products. These experiments also yield a new value for oxygen isotope fractionation. Quartz overgrowths up tomore » 235 μm thick were precipitated in silica–H 2O–NaOH–NaCl fluids, at pH 12–13 and 250 °C. At this temperature, 1000lnα 30Si(Qtz–fluid) = 0.55 ± 0.10‰ and 1000lnα 18O(Qtz–fluid) = 10.62 ± 0.13‰, yielding the relations 1000lnα 30Si(Qtz–fluid) = (0.15 ± 0.03) * 10 6/T 2 and 1000lnα 18O(Qtz–fluid) = (2.91 ± 0.04) * 10 6/T 2 when extended to zero fractionation at infinite temperature. Values of δ 30Si(Qtz) from diagenetic cement in sandstones from the basal Cambrian Mt. Simon Formation in central North America range from 0 to ₋5.4‰. Paired δ 18O and δ 30Si values from individual overgrowths preserve a record of Precambrian weathering and fluid transport. In conclusion, the application of the experimental quartz growth results to observations from natural sandstone samples suggests that precipitation of quartz at low temperatures in nature is dominated by kinetic, rather than equilibrium, processes.« less

  9. Silicon Qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2018-02-28

    Silicon is a promising material candidate for qubits due to the combination of worldwide infrastructure in silicon microelectronics fabrication and the capability to drastically reduce decohering noise channels via chemical purification and isotopic enhancement. However, a variety of challenges in fabrication, control, and measurement leaves unclear the best strategy for fully realizing this material’s future potential. In this article, we survey three basic qubit types: those based on substitutional donors, on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures, and on Si/SiGe heterostructures. We also discuss the multiple schema used to define and control Si qubits, which may exploit the manipulation and detection of amore » single electron charge, the state of a single electron spin, or the collective states of multiple spins. Far from being comprehensive, this article provides a brief orientation to the rapidly evolving field of silicon qubit technology and is intended as an approachable entry point for a researcher new to this field.« less

  10. Gluing silicon with silicone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Fox, H.; Moshous, B.; Richter, R. H.; Riechmann, K.; Rietz, M.; Riedl, J.; Denis, R. St; Wagner, W.

    1998-02-01

    Problems and solutions concerning the gluing of silicon detectors are discussed. The R & D work for the HERA- B vertex detector system led to gluing studies with epoxy and silicone-based adhesives used on ceramics and carbon fibre. The HERA- B solution using a silicone glue is presented.

  11. A silicon Brillouin laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otterstrom, Nils T.; Behunin, Ryan O.; Kittlaus, Eric A.; Wang, Zheng; Rakich, Peter T.

    2018-06-01

    Brillouin laser oscillators offer powerful and flexible dynamics as the basis for mode-locked lasers, microwave oscillators, and optical gyroscopes in a variety of optical systems. However, Brillouin interactions are markedly weak in conventional silicon photonic waveguides, stifling progress toward silicon-based Brillouin lasers. The recent advent of hybrid photonic-phononic waveguides has revealed Brillouin interactions to be one of the strongest and most tailorable nonlinearities in silicon. In this study, we have harnessed these engineered nonlinearities to demonstrate Brillouin lasing in silicon. Moreover, we show that this silicon-based Brillouin laser enters a regime of dynamics in which optical self-oscillation produces phonon linewidth narrowing. Our results provide a platform to develop a range of applications for monolithic integration within silicon photonic circuits.

  12. Using Carbon-14 Isotope Tracing to Investigate Molecular Structure Effects of the Oxygenate Dibutyl Maleate on Soot Emissions from a DI Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Upatnieks, A

    2004-01-07

    The effect of oxygenate molecular structure on soot emissions from a DI diesel engine was examined using carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) isotope tracing. Carbon atoms in three distinct chemical structures within the diesel oxygenate dibutyl maleate (DBM) were labeled with {sup 14}C. The {sup 14}C from the labeled DBM was then detected in engine-out particulate matter (PM), in-cylinder deposits, and CO{sub 2} emissions using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The results indicate that molecular structure plays an important role in determining whether a specific carbon atom either does or does not form soot. Chemical-kinetic modeling results indicate that structures that produce CO{submore » 2} directly from the fuel are less effective at reducing soot than structures that produce CO before producing CO{sub 2}. Because they can follow individual carbon atoms through a real combustion process, {sup 14}C isotope tracing studies help strengthen the connection between actual engine emissions and chemical-kinetic models of combustion and soot formation/oxidation processes.« less

  13. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N [Livermore, CA; Krulevitch, Peter [Pleasanton, CA; Hamilton, Julie [Tracy, CA

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  14. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  15. Cleanroom Garment Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, Wayne; Lepage, Colette

    2006-01-01

    The slide presentation reviews actions taken at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to eliminate contamination by silicone in clean rooms. Background information includes facilities and hardware affected by silicon contamination, a discussion of the negative aspects of silicone contamination, clean room garments, and how the problem was identified at GSFC. Actions taken by the GSFC Contamination Engineering Group and lessons learned are detailed. Results include: awareness of the silicone issue in laundry, increase in infrastructure and support of the testing lab, establishment of protocols for garment verification, closer relationship established with laundry and converter, specifications for laundry services and garments were strengthened, all consumables are tested before use in clean rooms, and established procedures were used to identify and treat silicone found on face masks.

  16. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The chemical engineering analysis of the preliminary process design of a process for producing solar cell grade silicon from dichlorosilane is presented. A plant to produce 1,000 MT/yr of silicon is analyzed. Progress and status for the plant design are reported for the primary activities of base case conditions (60 percent), reaction chemistry (50 percent), process flow diagram (35 percent), energy balance (10 percent), property data (10 percent) and equipment design (5 percent).

  17. Transmutation doping of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. F.; Westbrook, R. D.; Young, R. T.; Cleland, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Normal isotopic silicon contains 3.05% of Si-30 which transmutes to P-31 after thermal neutron absorption, with a half-life of 2.6 hours. This reaction is used to introduce extremely uniform concentrations of phosphorus into silicon, thus eliminating the areal and spatial inhomogeneities characteristic of chemical doping. Annealing of the lattice damage in the irradiated silicon does not alter the uniformity of dopant distribution. Transmutation doping also makes it possible to introduce phosphorus into polycrystalline silicon without segregation of the dopant at the grain boundaries. The use of neutron transmutation doped (NTD) silicon in solar cell research and development is discussed.

  18. Effect of Silicon on the Activity Coefficient of Rhenium in Fe-Si Liquids: Implications for HSE and Os Isotopes in Planetary Mantles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Yang, S.; Humayun, M.

    2018-01-01

    Metallic cores contain light alloying elements that can be a combination of S, C, Si, and O, all of which have important chemical and physical influences. For Earth, Si may be the most abundant light element in the core. Si dissolved into Fe liquids can have a large effect on the magnitude of the activity coefficient of siderophile elements (SE), and thus the partitioning behavior of those elements between core and mantle. The effect of Si on the highly siderophile elements is only beginning to be studied and the effects on Au, Pd and Pt are significant. Here we report new experiments designed to quantify the effect of Si on the partitioning of Re between metal and silicate melt. A solid understanding of Re partitioning is required for a complete understanding of the Re-Os isotopic systems. The results will be applied to understanding the HSEs and Os isotopic data for planetary mantles, and especially Earth.

  19. Stem cell engineered bone with calcium-phosphate coated porous titanium scaffold or silicon hydroxyapatite granules for revision total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    García-Gareta, Elena; Hua, Jia; Rayan, Faizal; Blunn, Gordon W

    2014-06-01

    Aseptic loosening in total joint replacements (TJRs) is mainly caused by osteolysis which leads to a reduction of the bone stock necessary for implant fixation in revision TJRs. Our aim was to develop bone tissue-engineered constructs based on scaffolds of clinical relevance in revision TJRs to reconstitute the bone stock at revision operations by using a perfusion bioreactor system (PBRS). The hypothesis was that a PBRS will enhance mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) proliferation and osteogenic differentiation and will provide an even distribution of MSCs throughout the scaffolds when compared to static cultures. A PBRS was designed and implemented. Scaffolds, silicon substituted hydroxyapatite granules and calcium-phosphate coated porous TiAl6V4 cylinders, were seeded with MSCs and cultured either in static conditions or in the PBRS at 0.75 mL/min. Statistically significant increased cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity was found in samples cultured in the PBRS. Histology revealed a more even cell distribution in the perfused constructs. SEM showed that cells arranged in sheets. Long cytoplasmic processes attached the cells to the scaffolds. We conclude that a novel tissue engineering approach to address the issue of poor bone stock at revision operations is feasible by using a PBRS.

  20. 70 nm resolution in subsurface optical imaging of silicon integrated-circuits using pupil-function engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrels, K. A.; Ramsay, E.; Reid, D. T.

    2009-02-01

    We present experimental evidence for the resolution-enhancing effect of an annular pupil-plane aperture when performing nonlinear imaging in the vectorial-focusing regime through manipulation of the focal spot geometry. By acquiring two-photon optical beam-induced current images of a silicon integrated-circuit using solid-immersion-lens microscopy at 1550 nm we achieved 70 nm resolution. This result demonstrates a reduction in the minimum effective focal spot diameter of 36%. In addition, the annular-aperture-induced extension of the depth-of-focus causes an observable decrease in the depth contrast of the resulting image and we explain the origins of this using a simulation of the imaging process.

  1. In(x)Ga(₁-x)As nanowires on silicon: one-dimensional heterogeneous epitaxy, bandgap engineering, and photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Cheol; Kim, Kyou Hyun; Yu, Ki Jun; Hu, Hefei; Yin, Leijun; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Rogers, John A; Zuo, Jian-Min; Li, Xiuling

    2011-11-09

    We report on the one-dimensional (1D) heteroepitaxial growth of In(x)Ga(1-x)As (x = 0.2-1) nanowires (NWs) on silicon (Si) substrates over almost the entire composition range using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) without catalysts or masks. The epitaxial growth takes place spontaneously producing uniform, nontapered, high aspect ratio NW arrays with a density exceeding 1 × 10(8)/cm(2). NW diameter (∼30-250 nm) is inversely proportional to the lattice mismatch between In(x)Ga(1-x)As and Si (∼4-11%), and can be further tuned by MOCVD growth condition. Remarkably, no dislocations have been found in all composition In(x)Ga(1-x)As NWs, even though massive stacking faults and twin planes are present. Indium rich NWs show more zinc-blende and Ga-rich NWs exhibit dominantly wurtzite polytype, as confirmed by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and photoluminescence spectra. Solar cells fabricated using an n-type In(0.3)Ga(0.7)As NW array on a p-type Si(111) substrate with a ∼ 2.2% area coverage, operates at an open circuit voltage, V(oc), and a short circuit current density, J(sc), of 0.37 V and 12.9 mA/cm(2), respectively. This work represents the first systematic report on direct 1D heteroepitaxy of ternary In(x)Ga(1-x)As NWs on silicon substrate in a wide composition/bandgap range that can be used for wafer-scale monolithic heterogeneous integration for high performance photovoltaics.

  2. Silicon Carbide Integrated Circuit Chip

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-17

    A multilevel interconnect silicon carbide integrated circuit chip with co-fired ceramic package and circuit board recently developed at the NASA GRC Smart Sensors and Electronics Systems Branch for high temperature applications. High temperature silicon carbide electronics and compatible packaging technologies are elements of instrumentation for aerospace engine control and long term inner-solar planet explorations.

  3. Ion beam nano-engineering of erbium doped silicon for enhanced light emission at 1.54 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naczas, Sebastian

    Erbium doped silicon is of great interest as a potential light source in Silicon Photonics research due to its light emission at 1.54 mum, which corresponds to the minimal loss of optical transmission in silica fibers for telecommunications. In this thesis a basic mechanism for excitation and de-excitation of Er in Si is reviewed. Based on such fundamental understanding, an innovative approach is proposed and implemented to improve Er luminescence properties through the formation of metal nanoparticles via impurity gettering in Si nanocavities. The first part of the work demonstrates the use of ion implantation combined with thermal treatments for forming Ag nanoparticles in the vicinity of Er luminescence centers in Si. The utilization of standard semiconductor fabrication equipment and moderate thermal budgets make this approach fully compatible with Si CMOS technologies. The presence of Ag nanoparticles leads to an enhancement in the Er photoluminescence intensity, its excitation cross section and the population of optically active Er, possibly due to the surface plasmon excitation effects related to Ag nanoparticles. The resulting structures were characterized by Hydrogen depth profiling (NRA), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), Photoluminescence (PL), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In order to optimize the Er luminescence properties in such a system it is necessary to understand how the sample conditions affect the formation of Ag nanoparticles in Si. Therefore in the second part of this project we investigate the role of surface oxide in point defect generation and recombination, and the consequence on nanocavity formation and defect retention in Si. Investigation of the surface oxide effects on nanocavity formation in hydrogen implanted silicon and the influence of resultant nanocavities on diffusion and gettering of implanted silver atoms. Two sets of Si samples were prepared, depending on whether the oxide layer was etched off before

  4. Engineered in situ bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer: assessment of mineralization based on alkalinity, inorganic carbon and stable carbon isotope balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunkeler, Daniel; Höhener, Patrick; Bernasconi, Stefano; Zeyer, Josef

    1999-04-01

    A concept is proposed to assess in situ petroleum hydrocarbon mineralization by combining data on oxidant consumption, production of reduced species, CH 4, alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with measurements of stable isotope ratios. The concept was applied to a diesel fuel contaminated aquifer in Menziken, Switzerland, which was treated by engineered in situ bioremediation. In the contaminated aquifer, added oxidants (O 2 and NO 3-) were consumed, elevated concentrations of Fe(II), Mn(II), CH 4, alkalinity and DIC were detected and the DIC was generally depleted in 13C compared to the background. The DIC production was larger than expected based on the consumption of dissolved oxidants and the production of reduced species. Stable carbon isotope balances revealed that the DIC production in the aquifer originated mainly from microbial petroleum hydrocarbon mineralization, and that geochemical reactions such as carbonate dissolution produced little DIC. This suggests that petroleum hydrocarbon mineralization can be underestimated if it is determined based on concentrations of dissolved oxidants and reduced species.

  5. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Engineering design of the third distillation column in the process was accomplished. The initial design is based on a 94.35% recovery of dichlorosilane in the distillate and a 99.9% recovery of trichlorosilane in the bottoms. The specified separation is achieved at a reflux ratio of 15 with 20 trays (equilibrium stages). Additional specifications and results are reported including equipment size, temperatures and pressure. Specific raw material requirements necessary to produce the silicon in the process are presented. The primary raw materials include metallurgical grade silicon, silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen, copper (catalyst) and lime (waste treatment). Hydrogen chloride is produced as by product in the silicon deposition. Cost analysis of the process was initiated during this reporting period.

  6. Defect engineering of the oxygen-vacancy clusters formation in electron irradiated silicon by isovalent doping: An infrared perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londos, C. A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Chroneos, A.

    2012-12-01

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the production and evolution of oxygen-vacancy (VOn for n = 1, 2, 3 and VmO for m = 1, 2, 3) clusters, in electron-irradiated Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) samples, doped with isovalent dopants. It was determined that the production of the VO pair is enhanced in Ge-doped Si but is suppressed in Sn and Pb-doped Si. The phenomenon is discussed in terms of the competition between isovalent dopants and oxygen atoms in capturing vacancies in the course of irradiation. In the case of Ge, only transient GeV pairs form, leading finally to an increase of the VO production. Conversely, for Sn and Pb the corresponding pairs with vacancies are stable, having an opposite impact on the formation of VO pairs. Regarding V2O and V3O clusters, our measurements indicate that Ge doping enhances their formation, although Sn and Pb dopants suppress it. Similar arguments as those for the VO pair could be put forward, based on the effect of isovalent impurities on the availability of vacancies. Additionally, it was found that the conversion ratio of VO to VO2 decreases as the covalent radius of the isovalent dopant increases. These results are discussed in terms of the local strains introduced by the isovalent dopants in the Si lattice. These local strains affect the balance of the intrinsic defects created as a result of irradiation, as well as the balance between the two main reactions (VO + Oi → VO2 and VO + SiI → Oi) participating in the VO annealing, leading finally to a decrease of the VO2 production. The larger the covalent radius of the isovalent dopant (rGe < rSn < rPb), the larger the introduced strains in the lattice and then the less the VO2 formation in accordance with our experimental results. Interestingly, an opposite trend was observed for the conversion ratio of VO2 to VO3. The phenomenon is attributed to the enhanced diffusivity of oxygen impurity as a result of the presence of isovalent dopants, leading to an enhanced formation

  7. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  8. Determination of Silicon in Hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Mark B.; Mast, Dion; Greene, Ben; Maes, Miguel J.

    2006-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a highly sensitive technique sometimes used for the trace determination of silicon at a mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio of 28, the most abundant natural isotope of silicon. Unfortunately, ICP-MS is unable to differentiate between other sources of m/z 28 and false positive results for silicon will result when other sources of m/z 28 are present. Nitrogen was a major source of m/z 28 and contributes to the m/z 28 signal when hydrazine sample or nitric acid preservative is introduced into the plasma. Accordingly, this work was performed to develop a sample preparation step coupled with an ICP-MS analysis that minimized non-silicon sources of m/z 28. In the preparatory step of this method, the hydrazine sample was first decomposed predominately to nitrogen gas and water with copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide. In the analysis step, ICP-MS was used without nitric acid preservative in samples or standards. Glass, a potential source of silicon contamination, was also avoided where possible. The method was sensitive, accurate, and reliable for the determination of silicon in monopropellant grade hydrazine (MPH) in AF-E-332 elastomer leaching tests. Results for silicon in MPH were comparable to those reported in the literature for other studies.

  9. Low cost silicon solar array project silicon materials task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A program was established to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. Preliminary technical evaluations and economic projections indicate not only that this process appears to be feasible, but that it also has the advantages of rapid, high capacity production of good quality molten silicon at a nominal cost.

  10. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1,000 metric tons/year capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished. Major activities in the chemical engineering analyses included base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provided detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process.

  11. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Chemical engineering analysis of the HSC process (Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation) for producing silicon from dichlorosilane in a 1,000 MT/yr plant was continued. Progress and status for the chemical engineering analysis of the HSC process are reported for the primary process design engineering activities: base case conditions (85%), reaction chemistry (85%), process flow diagram (60%), material balance (60%), energy balance (30%), property data (30%), equipment design (20%) and major equipment list (10%). Engineering design of the initial distillation column (D-01, stripper column) in the process was initiated. The function of the distillation column is to remove volatile gases (such as hydrogen and nitrogen) which are dissolved in liquid chlorosilanes. Initial specifications and results for the distillation column design are reported including the variation of tray requirements (equilibrium stages) with reflux ratio for the distillation.

  12. Choosing a Silicone Encapsulant for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velderrain, Michelle

    2011-12-01

    Growth in the solar industry has resulted in newer technologies, specifically concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules, to explore using new types of materials such as silicone encapsulants. CPV and LCPV module designs are to achieve the most efficient energy conversion possible however it is equally important to demonstrate long term reliability. Silicone is a material of interest due to its thermal stability and ability to absorb stresses incurred during thermal cycling. The refractive index of clear silicone adhesives is advantageous because it can be optimized using phenyl groups to match BK7 glass and other substrates to minimize light loss at the interfaces but it is relatively unknown how the optical properties change over time possibly yellowing in such a harsh environment. A 1.41 silicone encapsulant is compared to a 1.52 refractive index silicone. Optical Absorption (300 nm-1300 nm), Water Vapor Permeability, Moisture Absorption and effects of oxidation at elevated temperatures will be compared of these materials to aid the engineer in choosing a silicone for their CPV application. Non-phenyl containing 1.41 RI silicones have been used for several years for bonding solar arrays in the satellite industry. Phenyl groups on the siloxane polymer can change various properties of the silicone. Understanding how phenyl affects these properties allows the engineer to understand the benefits and risks when using a RI matching silicone to minimize light loss versus a non-phenyl containing silicone.

  13. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  14. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analysis was continued for the HSC process (Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation) in which solar cell silicon is produced in a 1,000 MT/yr plant. Progress and status are reported for the primary engineering activities involved in the preliminary process engineering design of the plant base case conditions (96%), reaction chemistry (96%), process flow diagram (85%), material balance (85%), energy balance (60%), property data (60%), equipment design (40%), major equipment list (30%) and labor requirements (10%). Engineering design of the second distillation column (D-02, TCS column) in the process was completed. The design is based on a 97% recovery of the light key (TCS, trichlorosilane) in the distillate and a 97% recovery of the heavy key (TET, silicon tetrachloride) in the bottoms. At a reflux ratio of 2, the specified recovery of TCS and TET is achieved with 20 trays (equilibrium stages, N=20). Respective feed tray locations are 9, 12 and 15 (NF sub 1 = 9, NF sub 2 = 12,, and NF sub 3 = 15). A total condenser is used for the distillation which is conducted at a pressure of 90 psia.

  15. Closed-cycle hydrogen-fueled engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laumann, E. A.; Reynolds, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    Innovation avoids pollution by retaining combustion products. Potential uses include applicability to pollution-free powerplant using intermittent solar energy. Engine parts are fabricated from silicon carbide, silicon nitride, stainless steel, and other high-tensile strength materials.

  16. Silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride deposition was studied as a method of passivation for silicon solar cell surfaces. The following three objectives were the thrust of the research: (1) the use of pecvd silicon nitride for passivation of silicon surfaces; (2) measurement techniques for surface recombination velocity; and (3) the importance of surface passivation to high efficiency solar cells.

  17. Development of a statistically proven injection molding method for reaction bonded silicon nitride, sintering reaction bonded silicon nitride, and sintered silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Matthias

    A statistically proven, series injection molding technique for ceramic components was developed for the construction of engines and gas turbines. The flow behavior of silicon injection-molding materials was characterized and improved. Hot-isostatic-pressing reaction bonded silicon nitride (HIPRBSN) was developed. A nondestructive component evaluation method was developed. An injection molding line for HIPRBSN engine components precombustion chamber, flame spreader, and valve guide was developed. This line allows the production of small series for engine tests.

  18. Silicon Carbide Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon carbide based semiconductor electronic devices and circuits are presently being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot adequately perform. Silicon carbide's ability to function under such extreme conditions is expected to enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from greatly improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric motor drives to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications to sensors and controls for cleaner-burning more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. In the particular area of power devices, theoretical appraisals have indicated that SiC power MOSFET's and diode rectifiers would operate over higher voltage and temperature ranges, have superior switching characteristics, and yet have die sizes nearly 20 times smaller than correspondingly rated silicon-based devices [8]. However, these tremendous theoretical advantages have yet to be widely realized in commercially available SiC devices, primarily owing to the fact that SiC's relatively immature crystal growth and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for reliable incorporation into most electronic systems. This chapter briefly surveys the SiC semiconductor electronics technology. In particular, the differences (both good and bad) between SiC electronics technology and the well-known silicon VLSI technology are highlighted. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are highlighted for several large-scale applications. Key crystal growth and device-fabrication issues that presently limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and high-power SiC electronics are identified.

  19. Isotope Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Karpius, Peter Joseph

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this training modules is to examine the process of using gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identification; apply pattern recognition to gamma spectra; identify methods of verifying energy calibration; and discuss potential causes of isotope misidentification.

  20. Stardust from Supernovae and Its Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Peter

    Primitive solar system materials, namely, meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, and cometary matter contain small quantities of nanometer- to micrometer-sized refractory dust grains that exhibit large isotopic abundance anomalies. These grains are older than our solar system and have been named "presolar grains." They formed in the winds of red giant and asymptotic giant stars and in the ejecta of stellar explosions, i.e., represent a sample of stardust that can be analyzed in terrestrial laboratories for isotopic compositions and other properties. The inventory of presolar grains is dominated by grains from red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars. Presolar grains from supernovae form a minor but important subpopulation. Supernova (SN) minerals identified to date include silicon carbide, graphite, silicon nitride, oxides, and silicates. Isotopic studies of major, minor, and trace elements in these dust grains have provided detailed insights into nucleosynthetic and mixing processes in supernovae and how dust forms in these violent environments.

  1. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  2. Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    None

    Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies andmore » diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1

  3. Radionuclides, stable isotopes, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Williams, L.M.; Campbell, L.J.

    1995-10-01

    The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy, samples 18 sites as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for selected radionuclides, stable isotopes, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds. The samples were collected from seven irrigation wells, seven domestic wells, two springs, one stock well, and one observation well. Two quality assurance samples also were collected and analyzed.more » None of the radionuclide, inorganic constituent, or organic compound concentrations exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Many of the radionuclide and inorganic constituent concentrations exceeded their respective reporting levels. All samples analyzed for dissolved organic carbon had concentrations that exceeded their minimum reporting levels.« less

  4. Radionuclides, stable isotopes, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Williams, L.M.; Campbell, L.J.

    1996-09-01

    The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, sampled 17 sites as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for selected radionuclides, stable isotopes, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds. The samples were collected from 11 irrigation wells, 2 domestic wells, 2 stock wells, 1 spring, and 1 public-supply well. Two quality assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. None of themore » radionuclide, inorganic constituents, or organic compound concentrations exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Many of the radionuclide and inorganic constituent concentrations were greater than their respective reporting levels. All samples analyzed for dissolved organic carbon had concentrations that were greater than the minimum reporting level.« less

  5. ISOTOPE SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, C.G.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

  6. Silicon production in a fluidized bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    Part of the development effort of the JPL in-house technology involved in the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project was the investigation of a low-cost process to produce semiconductor-grade silicon for terrestrial photovoltaic cell applications. The process selected was based on pyrolysis of silane in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). Following initial investigations involving 1- and 2-in. diameter reactors, a 6-in. diameter, engineering-scale FBR was constructed to establish reactor performance, mechanism of silicon deposition, product morphology, and product purity. The overall mass balance for all experiments indicates that more than 90% of the total silicon fed into the reactor is deposited on silicon seed particles and the remaining 10% becomes elutriated fines. Silicon production rates were demonstrated of 1.5 kg/h at 30% silane concentration and 3.5 kg/h at 80% silane concentration. The mechanism of silicon deposition is described by a six-path process: heterogeneous deposition, homogeneous decomposition, coalescence, coagulation, scavenging, and heterogeneous growth on fines. The bulk of the growth silicon layer appears to be made up of small diameter particles. This product morphology lends support to the concept of the scavenging of homogeneously nucleated silicon.

  7. Surface Engineering of Polycrystalline Silicon for Long-Term Mechanical Stress Endurance Enhancement in Flexible Low-Temperature Poly-Si Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Wei; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Hung, Yu-Ju; Huang, Shin-Ping; Chen, Hua-Mao; Liao, Po-Yung; Lin, Yu-Ho; Huang, Hui-Chun; Chiang, Hsiao-Cheng; Yang, Chung-I; Zheng, Yu-Zhe; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Li, Hung-Wei; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Lu, Hsueh-Hsing; Wang, Terry Tai-Jui; Chang, Tsu-Chiang

    2017-04-05

    The surface morphology in polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) film is an issue regardless of whether conventional excimer laser annealing (ELA) or the newer metal-induced lateral crystallization (MILC) process is used. This paper investigates the stress distribution while undergoing long-term mechanical stress and the influence of stress on electrical characteristics. Our simulated results show that the nonuniform stress in the gate insulator is more pronounced near the polysilicon/gate insulator edge and at the two sides of the polysilicon protrusion. This stress results in defects in the gate insulator and leads to a nonuniform degradation phenomenon, which affects both the performance and the reliability in thin-film transistors (TFTs). The degree of degradation is similar regardless of bending axis (channel-length axis, channel-width axis) or bending type (compression, tension), which means that the degradation is dominated by the protrusion effects. Furthermore, by utilizing long-term electrical bias stresses after undergoing long-tern bending stress, it is apparent that the carrier injection is severe in the subchannel region, which confirms that the influence of protrusions is crucial. To eliminate the influence of surface morphology in poly-Si, three kinds of laser energy density were used during crystallization to control the protrusion height. The device with the lowest protrusions demonstrates the smallest degradation after undergoing long-term bending.

  8. Process feasibility study in support of silicon material task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaws, C. L.; Li, K. Y.; Hopper, J. R.; Fang, C. S.; Hansen, K. C.

    1981-01-01

    Results for process system properties, chemical engineering and economic analyses of the new technologies and processes being developed for the production of lower cost silicon for solar cells are presented. Analyses of process system properties are important for chemical materials involved in the several processes under consideration for semiconductor and solar cell grade silicon production. Major physical, thermodynamic and transport property data are reported for silicon source and processing chemical materials.

  9. Solar energy innovation and Silicon Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2015-03-01

    The growth of the U. S. and global solar energy industry depends on a strong relationship between science and engineering innovation, manufacturing, and cycles of policy design and advancement. The mixture of the academic and industrial engine of innovation that is Silicon Valley, and the strong suite of environmental policies for which California is a leader work together to both drive the solar energy industry, and keep Silicon Valley competitive as China, Europe and other area of solar energy strength continue to build their clean energy sectors.

  10. Modeling of microporous silicon betaelectric converter with 63Ni plating in GEANT4 toolkit*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenkov, P. V.; Sidorov, V. G.; Lelekov, E. T.; Khoroshko, A. Y.; Bogdanov, S. V.; Lelekov, A. T.

    2016-04-01

    The model of electron-hole pairs generation rate distribution in semiconductor is needed to optimize the parameters of microporous silicon betaelectric converter, which uses 63Ni isotope radiation. By using Monte-Carlo methods of GEANT4 software with ultra-low energy electron physics models this distribution in silicon was calculated and approximated with exponential function. Optimal pore configuration was estimated.

  11. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  12. Development of high temperature, high radiation resistant silicon semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorl, C. A.; Evans, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a hardened silicon power transistor for operation in severe nuclear radiation environments at high temperature was studied. Device hardness and diffusion techniques are discussed along with the geometries of hardened power transistor chips. Engineering drawings of 100 amp and 5 amp silicon devices are included.

  13. Interface engineering and reliability characteristics of hafnium dioxide with poly silicon gate and dual metal (ruthenium-tantalum alloy, ruthenium) gate electrode for beyond 65 nm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Hee

    Chip density and performance improvements have been driven by aggressive scaling of semiconductor devices. In both logic and memory applications, SiO 2 gate dielectrics has reached its physical limit, direct tunneling resulting from scaling down of dielectrics thickness. Therefore high-k dielectrics have attracted a great deal of attention from industries as the replacement of conventional SiO2 gate dielectrics. So far, lots of candidate materials have been evaluated and Hf-based high-k dielectrics were chosen to the promising materials for gate dielectrics. However, lots of issues were identified and more thorough researches were carried out on Hf-based high-k dielectrics. For instances, mobility degradation, charge trapping, crystallization, Fermi level pinning, interface engineering, and reliability studies. In this research, reliability study of HfO2 were explored with poly gate and dual metal (Ru-Ta alloy, Ru) gate electrode as well as interface engineering. Hard breakdown and soft breakdown were compared and Weibull slope of soft breakdown was smaller than that of hard breakdown, which led to a potential high-k scaling issue. Dynamic reliability has been studied and the combination of trapping and detrapping contributed the enhancement of lifetime projection. Polarity dependence was shown that substrate injection might reduce lifetime projection as well as it increased soft breakdown behavior. Interface tunneling mechanism was suggested with dual metal gate technology. Soft breakdown (l st breakdown) was mainly due to one layer breakdown of bi-layer structure. Low weibull slope was in part attributed to low barrier height of HfO 2 compared to interface layer. Interface layer engineering was thoroughly studied in terms of mobility, swing, and short channel effect using deep sub-micron MOSFET devices. In fact, Hf-based high-k dielectrics could be scaled down to below EOT of ˜10A and it successfully achieved the competitive performance goals. However, it is

  14. Purified silicon production system

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2004-03-30

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  15. Isotopically enhanced triple-quantum-dot qubit

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Smith, Aaron; Borselli, Matthew G.; Kiselev, Andrey A.; Fong, Bryan H.; Holabird, Kevin S.; Hazard, Thomas M.; Huang, Biqin; Deelman, Peter W.; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele E.; Ross, Richard S.; Gyure, Mark F.; Hunter, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Like modern microprocessors today, future processors of quantum information may be implemented using all-electrical control of silicon-based devices. A semiconductor spin qubit may be controlled without the use of magnetic fields by using three electrons in three tunnel-coupled quantum dots. Triple dots have previously been implemented in GaAs, but this material suffers from intrinsic nuclear magnetic noise. Reduction of this noise is possible by fabricating devices using isotopically purified silicon. We demonstrate universal coherent control of a triple-quantum-dot qubit implemented in an isotopically enhanced Si/SiGe heterostructure. Composite pulses are used to implement spin-echo type sequences, and differential charge sensing enables single-shot state readout. These experiments demonstrate sufficient control with sufficiently low noise to enable the long pulse sequences required for exchange-only two-qubit logic and randomized benchmarking. PMID:26601186

  16. Silicon Micro- and Nanofabrication for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Daniel; Goodall, Randy; Bansal, Shyam S.; Chiappini, Ciro; Hosali, Sharath; van de Ven, Anne L.; Srinivasan, Srimeenkashi; Liu, Xuewu; Godin, Biana; Brousseau, Louis; Yazdi, Iman K.; Fernandez-Moure, Joseph; Tasciotti, Ennio; Wu, Hung-Jen; Hu, Ye; Klemm, Steve; Ferrari, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript constitutes a review of several innovative biomedical technologies fabricated using the precision and accuracy of silicon micro- and nanofabrication. The technologies to be reviewed are subcutaneous nanochannel drug delivery implants for the continuous tunable zero-order release of therapeutics, multi-stage logic embedded vectors for the targeted systemic distribution of both therapeutic and imaging contrast agents, silicon and porous silicon nanowires for investigating cellular interactions and processes as well as for molecular and drug delivery applications, porous silicon (pSi) as inclusions into biocomposites for tissue engineering, especially as it applies to bone repair and regrowth, and porous silica chips for proteomic profiling. In the case of the biocomposites, the specifically designed pSi inclusions not only add to the structural robustness, but can also promote tissue and bone regrowth, fight infection, and reduce pain by releasing stimulating factors and other therapeutic agents stored within their porous network. The common material thread throughout all of these constructs, silicon and its associated dielectrics (silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, etc.), can be precisely and accurately machined using the same scalable micro- and nanofabrication protocols that are ubiquitous within the semiconductor industry. These techniques lend themselves to the high throughput production of exquisitely defined and monodispersed nanoscale features that should eliminate architectural randomness as a source of experimental variation thereby potentially leading to more rapid clinical translation. PMID:23584841

  17. Methods of Si based ceramic components volatilization control in a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John; Dion Ouellet, Noemie

    A method of controlling volatilization of silicon based components in a gas turbine engine includes measuring, estimating and/or predicting a variable related to operation of the gas turbine engine; correlating the variable to determine an amount of silicon to control volatilization of the silicon based components in the gas turbine engine; and injecting silicon into the gas turbine engine to control volatilization of the silicon based components. A gas turbine with a compressor, combustion system, turbine section and silicon injection system may be controlled by a controller that implements the control method.

  18. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  19. The silicon monoxide radical and the atmosphere of alpha Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, R.; Lambert, D. L.; Sneden, C.

    1974-01-01

    We present new molecular constants, line positions, and transition probabilities for the first-overtone vibration-rotation bands in the X 1 Sigma+ electronic ground state of SiO, together with an estimate of the SiO abundance and silicon isotope ratios in the atmosphere of alpha Ori.

  20. Thermal management and mechanical structures for silicon detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehhauser, G.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the size of current silicon tracking systems system aspects have become a major design driver. This article discusses requirements for the engineering of the mechanical structures and thermal management of such systems and reviews solutions developed to satisfy them. Modern materials and fabrication techniques have been instrumental in constructing these devices and will be discussed here. Finally, this paper will describe current and potential future developments in the engineering of silicon tracking systems which will shape the silicon tracking systems of the future.

  1. Process for producing silicon

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Carleton, K.L.

    1982-06-10

    A process of producing silicon includes forming an alloy of copper and silicon and positioning the alloy in a dried, molten salt electrolyte to form a solid anode structure therein. An electrically conductive cathode is placed in the electrolyte for plating silicon thereon. The electrolyte is then purified to remove dissolved oxides. Finally, an electrical potential is applied between the anode and cathode in an amount sufficient to form substantially pure silicon on the cathode in the form of substantially dense, coherent deposits.

  2. Process for producing silicon

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Carleton, Karen L.

    1984-01-01

    A process for producing silicon includes forming an alloy of copper and silicon and positioning the alloy in a dried, molten salt electrolyte to form a solid anode structure therein. An electrically conductive cathode is placed in the electrolyte for plating silicon thereon. The electrolyte is then purified to remove dissolved oxides. Finally, an electrical potential is applied between the anode and cathode in an amount sufficient to form substantially pure silicon on the cathode in the form of substantially dense, coherent deposits.

  3. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    DOEpatents

    De Mattei, Robert C.; Elwell, Dennis; Feigelson, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is removed from the bath.

  4. EPITAXIAL GROWTH OF SILICON

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Epitaxial growth of silicon on a silicon substrate by hydrogen reduction of SiCl4 was investigated. The chemical and physical processes involved in...silicon layers were produced at temperatures between 1100 and 1300 C. The effects of the concentration of SiCl4 in H2, the flow rate of the gas, the

  5. Metabolic Profiling as Well as Stable Isotope Assisted Metabolic and Proteomic Analysis of RAW 264.7 Macrophages Exposed to Ship Engine Aerosol Emissions: Different Effects of Heavy Fuel Oil and Refined Diesel Fuel

    PubMed Central

    Sapcariu, Sean C.; Kanashova, Tamara; Dilger, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Oeder, Sebastian; Passig, Johannes; Radischat, Christian; Buters, Jeroen; Sippula, Olli; Streibel, Thorsten; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Krebs, Tobias; Karg, Erwin; Gröger, Thomas; Weiss, Carsten; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hiller, Karsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution resulting from fossil fuel combustion has been linked to multiple short-term and long term health effects. In a previous study, exposure of lung epithelial cells to engine exhaust from heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF), two of the main fuels used in marine engines, led to an increased regulation of several pathways associated with adverse cellular effects, including pro-inflammatory pathways. In addition, DF exhaust exposure was shown to have a wider response on multiple cellular regulatory levels compared to HFO emissions, suggesting a potentially higher toxicity of DF emissions over HFO. In order to further understand these effects, as well as to validate these findings in another cell line, we investigated macrophages under the same conditions as a more inflammation-relevant model. An air-liquid interface aerosol exposure system was used to provide a more biologically relevant exposure system compared to submerged experiments, with cells exposed to either the complete aerosol (particle and gas phase), or the gas phase only (with particles filtered out). Data from cytotoxicity assays were integrated with metabolomics and proteomics analyses, including stable isotope-assisted metabolomics, in order to uncover pathways affected by combustion aerosol exposure in macrophages. Through this approach, we determined differing phenotypic effects associated with the different components of aerosol. The particle phase of diluted combustion aerosols was found to induce increased cell death in macrophages, while the gas phase was found more to affect the metabolic profile. In particular, a higher cytotoxicity of DF aerosol emission was observed in relation to the HFO aerosol. Furthermore, macrophage exposure to the gas phase of HFO leads to an induction of a pro-inflammatory metabolic and proteomic phenotype. These results validate the effects found in lung epithelial cells, confirming the role of inflammation and cellular stress in the

  6. Radionuclides, stable isotopes, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area, Idaho, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Edwards, Daniel D.; Campbell, Linford J.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in response to a request from the U.S. Department of Energy, sampled 19 sites as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for selected radionuclides, stable isotopes, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds. The samples were collected from seven irrigation wells, four domestic wells, two springs, one stock well, three dairy wells, one observation well, and one commercial well. Two quality assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. None of the radionuclides, inorganic constituents, or organic compounds exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Most of the radionuclide and inorganic constituent concen- trations exceeded their respective laboratory reporting levels. All samples analyzed for surfactants and dissolved organic carbon had concentrations that exceeded their reporting level. Ethylbenzene concentrations exceeded the reporting level in one water sample.

  7. Silicon photonics cloud (SiCloud)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Peter T. S.; Jiang, Yunshan; Lynch, Michael; Miyatake, Taira; Carmona, Christopher; Chan, Andrew C.; Muniam, Kuhan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-02-01

    We present SiCloud (Silicon Photonics Cloud), the first free, instructional web-based research and education tool for silicon photonics. SiCloud's vision is to provide a host of instructional and research web-based tools. Such interactive learning tools enhance traditional teaching methods by extending access to a very large audience, resulting in very high impact. Interactive tools engage the brain in a way different from merely reading, and so enhance and reinforce the learning experience. Understanding silicon photonics is challenging as the topic involves a wide range of disciplines, including material science, semiconductor physics, electronics and waveguide optics. This web-based calculator is an interactive analysis tool for optical properties of silicon and related material (SiO2, Si3N4, Al2O3, etc.). It is designed to be a one stop resource for students, researchers and design engineers. The first and most basic aspect of Silicon Photonics is the Material Parameters, which provides the foundation for the Device, Sub-System and System levels. SiCloud includes the common dielectrics and semiconductors for waveguide core, cladding, and photodetection, as well as metals for electrical contacts. SiCloud is a work in progress and its capability is being expanded. SiCloud is being developed at UCLA with funding from the National Science Foundation's Center for Integrated Access Networks (CIAN) Engineering Research Center.

  8. Sampling Artifacts from Conductive Silicone Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Timko, Michael T.; Yu, Zhenhong; Kroll, Jesse

    2009-05-15

    We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: 1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and 2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that adsorb onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosolmore » mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and should, therefore, be used with caution. Gentle heating, physical and chemical properties of the particle carriers, exposure to solvents, and tubing age may influence siloxane uptake. The amount of contamination is expected to increase as the tubing surface area increases and as the particle surface area increases. The effect is observed at ambient temperature and enhanced by mild heating (<100 oC). Further evaluation is warranted.« less

  9. Intravitreal properties of porous silicon photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L; Anglin, E; Cunin, F; Kim, D; Sailor, M J; Falkenstein, I; Tammewar, A; Freeman, W R

    2009-01-01

    Aim To determine the suitability of porous silicon photonic crystals for intraocular drug-delivery. Methods A rugate structure was electrochemically etched into a highly doped p-type silicon substrate to create a porous silicon film that was subsequently removed and ultrasonically fractured into particles. To stabilise the particles in aqueous media, the silicon particles were modified by surface alkylation (using thermal hydrosilylation) or by thermal oxidation. Unmodified particles, hydrosilylated particles and oxidised particles were injected into rabbit vitreous. The stability and toxicity of each type of particle were studied by indirect ophthalmoscopy, biomicroscopy, tonometry, electroretinography (ERG) and histology. Results No toxicity was observed with any type of the particles during a period of >4 months. Surface alkylation led to dramatically increased intravitreal stability and slow degradation. The estimated vitreous half-life increased from 1 week (fresh particles) to 5 weeks (oxidised particles) and to 16 weeks (hydrosilylated particles). Conclusion The porous silicon photonic crystals showed good biocompatibility and may be used as an intraocular drug-delivery system. The intravitreal injectable porous silicon photonic crystals may be engineered to host a variety of therapeutics and achieve controlled drug release over long periods of time to treat chronic vitreoretinal diseases. PMID:18441177

  10. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  11. Method for separating isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-10-21

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

  12. Hydrogen molecules and hydrogen-related defects in crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukata, N.; Sasaki, S.; Murakami, K.; Ishioka, K.; Nakamura, K. G.; Kitajima, M.; Fujimura, S.; Kikuchi, J.; Haneda, H.

    1997-09-01

    We have found that hydrogen exists in molecular form in crystalline silicon treated with hydrogen atoms in the downstream of a hydrogen plasma. The vibrational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 4158 cm-1 for silicon samples hydrogenated between 180 and 500 °C. The assignment of the Raman line is confirmed by its isotope shift to 2990 cm-1 for silicon treated with deuterium atoms. The Raman intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 400 °C. The vibrational Raman line of the hydrogen molecules is broad and asymmetric. It consists of at least two components, possibly arising from hydrogen molecules in different occupation sites in crystalline silicon. The rotational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 590 cm-1. The Raman band of Si-H stretching is observed for hydrogenation temperatures between 100 and 500 °C and the intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 250 °C.

  13. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, K.S.

    1975-10-03

    A photochromatographic method for isotope separation is described. An isotopically mixed molecular species is adsorbed on an adsorptive surface, and the adsorbed molecules are irradiated with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thus separate them from the undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes. (BLM)

  14. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    1977-01-01

    An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

  15. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M [Livermore, CA

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  16. A silicon carbide array for electrocorticography and peripheral nerve recording.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Botia, C A; Luna, L E; Neely, R M; Chamanzar, M; Carraro, C; Carmena, J M; Sabes, P N; Maboudian, R; Maharbiz, M M

    2017-10-01

    Current neural probes have a limited device lifetime of a few years. Their common failure mode is the degradation of insulating films and/or the delamination of the conductor-insulator interfaces. We sought to develop a technology that does not suffer from such limitations and would be suitable for chronic applications with very long device lifetimes. We developed a fabrication method that integrates polycrystalline conductive silicon carbide with insulating silicon carbide. The technology employs amorphous silicon carbide as the insulator and conductive silicon carbide at the recording sites, resulting in a seamless transition between doped and amorphous regions of the same material, eliminating heterogeneous interfaces prone to delamination. Silicon carbide has outstanding chemical stability, is biocompatible, is an excellent molecular barrier and is compatible with standard microfabrication processes. We have fabricated silicon carbide electrode arrays using our novel fabrication method. We conducted in vivo experiments in which electrocorticography recordings from the primary visual cortex of a rat were obtained and were of similar quality to those of polymer based electrocorticography arrays. The silicon carbide electrode arrays were also used as a cuff electrode wrapped around the sciatic nerve of a rat to record the nerve response to electrical stimulation. Finally, we demonstrated the outstanding long term stability of our insulating silicon carbide films through accelerated aging tests. Clinical translation in neural engineering has been slowed in part due to the poor long term performance of current probes. Silicon carbide devices are a promising technology that may accelerate this transition by enabling truly chronic applications.

  17. Reliable Breakdown Obtained in Silicon Carbide Rectifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1997-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensor (HTIES) Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is currently developing silicon carbide (SiC) for use in harsh conditions where silicon, the semiconductor used in nearly all of today's electronics, cannot function. Silicon carbide's demonstrated ability to function under extreme high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions will enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and cellular communications, to sensor and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines.

  18. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Jalali, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    We propose a new class of photonic devices based on periodic stress fields in silicon that enable second-order nonlinearity as well as quasi-phase matching. Periodically poled silicon (PePSi) adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on second-order nonlinear effects. As an example of the utility of the PePSi technology, we present simulations showing that midwave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50%.

  19. Compounding with Silicones.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1940s, methylchlorosilanes have been used to treat glassware to prevent blood from clotting. The use of silicones in pharmaceutical and medical applications has grown to where today they are used in many life-saving devices (pacemakers, hydrocephalic shunts) and pharmaceutical applications from tubing, to excipients in topical formulations, to adhesives to affix transdermal drug delivery systems, and are also being used in products as active pharmaceutical ingredients, such as antiflatulents. About 60% of today's skin-care products now contain some type of silicone where they are considered safe and are known to provide a pleasant "silky-touch," non-greasy, and non-staining feel. Silicones exhibit many useful characteristics, and the safety of these agents supports their numerous applications; their biocompatibility is partially due to their low-chemical reactivity displayed by silicones, low-surface energy, and their hydrophobicity. Silicones are used both as active ingredients and as excipients. In addition is their use for "siliconization," or surface treatment, of many parenteral packaging components. Dimethicone and silicone oil are used as lubricants on stoppers to aid machineability, in syringes to aid piston movement, or on syringe needles to reduce pain upon injection. Silicones are also useful in pharmaceutical compounding as is discussed in this artiele included with this article are in developing formulations with silicones.

  20. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  1. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert A.; Seager, Carleton H.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  2. Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  3. Flat-plate solar array project: Experimental process system development unit for producing semiconductor-grade silicon using the silane-to-silicon process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The engineering design, fabrication, assembly, operation, economic analysis, and process support research and development for an Experimental Process System Development Unit for producing semiconductor-grade silicon using the slane-to-silicon process are reported. The design activity was completed. About 95% of purchased equipment was received. The draft of the operations manual was about 50% complete and the design of the free-space system continued. The system using silicon power transfer, melting, and shotting on a psuedocontinuous basis was demonstrated.

  4. Process Feasibility Study in Support of Silicon Material Task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. Y.; Hansen, K. C.; Yaws, C. L.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of process system properties was continued for silicon source materials under consideration for producing silicon. The following property data are reported for dichlorosilane which is involved in processing operations for silicon: critical constants, vapor pressure, heat of vaporization, heat capacity, density, surface tension, thermal conductivity, heat of formation and Gibb's free energy of formation. The properties are reported as a function of temperature to permit rapid engineering usage. The preliminary economic analysis of the process is described. Cost analysis results for the process (case A-two deposition reactors and six electrolysis cells) are presented based on a preliminary process design of a plant to produce 1,000 metric tons/year of silicon. Fixed capital investment estimate for the plant is $12.47 million (1975 dollars) ($17.47 million, 1980 dollars). Product cost without profit is 8.63 $/kg of silicon (1975 dollars)(12.1 $/kg, 1980 dollars).

  5. Electrochemistry of Silicon: Instrumentation, Science, Materials and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Volker

    2002-04-01

    Silicon has been and will most probably continue to be the dominant material in semiconductor technology. Although the defect-free silicon single crystal is one of the best understood systems in materails science, its electrochemistry to many people is still a kind of "alchemy". This view is partly due to the interdisciplinary aspects of the topic: Physics meets chemistry at the silicon-electrolyte interface. This book gives a comprehensive overview of this important aspect of silicon technology as well as examples of applications ranging from photonic crystals to biochips. It will serve materials scientists as well as engineers involved in silicon technology as a quick reference with its more than 150 technical tables and diagrams and ca. 1000 references cited for easy access of the original literature.

  6. Method and apparatus for stable silicon dioxide layers on silicon grown in silicon nitride ambient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, R. A.; Wheeler, R. K. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method and apparatus for thermally growing stable silicon dioxide layers on silicon is disclosed. A previously etched and baked silicon nitride tube placed in a furnace is used to grow the silicon dioxide. First, pure oxygen is allowed to flow through the tube to initially coat the inside surface of the tube with a thin layer of silicon dioxide. After the tube is coated with the thin layer of silicon dioxide, the silicon is oxidized thermally in a normal fashion. If the tube becomes contaminated, the silicon dioxide is etched off thereby exposing clean silicon nitride and then the inside of the tube is recoated with silicon dioxide. As is disclosed, the silicon nitride tube can also be used as the ambient for the pyrolytic decomposition of silane and ammonia to form thin layers of clean silicon nitride.

  7. Temperature Response of Emissivity in Intrinsic Silicon: A Selective Absorber for Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia, Cristian Alonso

    The National Academy of Engineers named affordable solar energy as one of the grand challenges for the twenty-first century. Even in sunniest U.S. locations, without subsidies, home generation is still cost prohibitive. To address the cost of solar energy, we investigated intrinsic silicon as a low emissivity selective absorber. We wanted to determine the emissivity of intrinsic silicon at elevated temperatures. At elevated temperatures, a selective absorber coupled to a heat engine could efficiently generate electrical power. Photothermal efficiency depends on the absorber's emissivity. I analyzed total hemispherical emissivity for graphite and intrinsic silicon using a thermal decay method inside a thermal isolation chamber. The results show low emissivity values for intrinsic silicon. Consequently, for temperatures less than 300 °C, intrinsic silicon has a small emissivity (0.16). This small value is in agreement with doped silicon experiments. However, unlike doped silicon, at elevated temperatures of 600 °C, intrinsic silicon emissivity values remain low (0.33). Our analysis suggests intrinsic silicon could convert more solar power into heat than an ideal blackbody. Specifically, the harvested heat could drive a heat engine for efficient power generation. Thus, a cost-effective electrical generating system can operate with a small land footprint using earth abundant silicon.

  8. Target molecules detection by waveguiding in a photonic silicon membrane

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia E [Livermore, CA; Van Buuren, Anthony [Livermore, CA; Terminello, Louis [Danville, CA; Hart, Bradley R [Brentwood, CA

    2006-12-26

    Disclosed herein is a porous silicon filter capable of binding and detecting biological and chemical target molecules in liquid or gas samples. A photonic waveguiding silicon filter with chemical and/or biological anchors covalently attached to the pore walls bind target molecules. The system uses transmission curve engineering principles to allow measurements to be made in situ and in real time to detect the presence of various target molecules and calculate the concentration of bound target.

  9. Target molecules detection by waveguiding in a photonic silicon membrane

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia; Van Buuren, Anthony; Terminello, Louis

    2004-08-31

    Disclosed herein is a photonic silicon filter capable of binding and detecting biological and chemical target molecules in liquid or gas samples. A photonic waveguiding silicon filter with chemical and/or biological anchors covalently attached to the pore walls selectively bind target molecules. The system uses transmission curve engineering principles to allow measurements to be made in situ and in real time to detect the presence of various target molecules and determine the concentration of bound target.

  10. Isotope effects on the optical spectra of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel; Thewalt, M. L. W.

    2005-10-01

    Since the end of the cold war, macroscopic amounts of separated stable isotopes of most elements have been available “off the shelf” at affordable prices. Using these materials, single crystals of many semiconductors have been grown and the dependence of their physical properties on isotopic composition has been investigated. The most conspicuous effects observed have to do with the dependence of phonon frequencies and linewidths on isotopic composition. These affect the electronic properties of solids through the mechanism of electron-phonon interaction, in particular, in the corresponding optical excitation spectra and energy gaps. This review contains a brief introduction to the history, availability, and characterization of stable isotopes, including their many applications in science and technology. It is followed by a concise discussion of the effects of isotopic composition on the vibrational spectra, including the influence of average isotopic masses and isotopic disorder on the phonons. The final sections deal with the effects of electron-phonon interaction on energy gaps, the concomitant effects on the luminescence spectra of free and bound excitons, with particular emphasis on silicon, and the effects of isotopic composition of the host material on the optical transitions between the bound states of hydrogenic impurities.

  11. Silicon nitride sintered body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    The sintering of silicon carbide and it production are described. The method of production is by calcination in which molding is followed by sintering without compression. The invention improves the composition of the silicon carbide ceramic. Six examples of the invention are illustrated and discussed.

  12. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  13. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  14. Cleaning up Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A development program that started in 1975 between Union Carbide and JPL, led to Advanced Silicon Materials LLC's, formerly ASiMI, commercial process for producing silane in viable quantities. The process was expanded to include the production of high-purity polysilicon for electronic devices. The technology came out of JPL's Low Cost Silicon Array Project.

  15. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  16. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  17. Silicone-containing composition

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Mustafa

    A silicone-containing composition comprises the reaction product of a first component and an excess of an isocyanate component relative to the first component to form an isocyanated intermediary. The first component is selected from one of a polysiloxane and a silicone resin. The first component includes a carbon-bonded functional group selected from one of a hydroxyl group and an amine group. The isocyanate component is reactive with the carbon-bonded functional group of the first component. The isocyanated intermediary includes a plurality of isocyanate functional groups. The silicone-containing composition comprises the further reaction product of a second component, which is selectedmore » from the other of the polysiloxane and the silicone resin. The second component includes a plurality of carbon-bonded functional groups reactive with the isocyanate functional groups of the isocyanated intermediary for preparing the silicone-containing composition.« less

  18. EDITORIAL: Special issue on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Graham; Paniccia, Mario; Wada, Kazumi; Mashanovich, Goran

    2008-06-01

    The technology now known as silicon photonics can be traced back to the pioneering work of Soref in the mid-1980s (see, for example, Soref R A and Lorenzo J P 1985 Electron. Lett. 21 953). However, the nature of the research conducted today, whilst it builds upon that early work, is unrecognizable in terms of technology metrics such as device efficiency, device data rate and device dimensions, and even in targeted applications areas. Today silicon photonics is still evolving, and is enjoying a period of unprecedented attention in terms of research focus. This has resulted in orders-of-magnitude improvement in device performance over the last few years to levels many thought were impossible. However, despite the existence of the research field for more than two decades, silicon is still regarded as a 'new' optical material, one that is being manipulated and modified to satisfy the requirements of a range of applications. This is somewhat ironic since silicon is one of the best known and most thoroughly studied materials, thanks to the electronics industry that has made silicon its material of choice. The principal reasons for the lack of study of this 'late developer' are that (i) silicon is an indirect bandgap material and (ii) it does not exhibit a linear electro-optic (Pockels) effect. The former condition means that it is difficult to make a laser in silicon based on the intrinsic performance of the material, and consequently, in recent years, researchers have attempted to modify the material to artificially engineer the conditions for lasing to be viable (see, for example, the review text, Jalali B et al 2008 Silicon Lasers in Silicon Photonics: The State of the Art ed G T Reed (New York: Wiley)). The latter condition means that optical modulators are intrinsically less efficient in silicon than in some other materials, particularly when targeting the popular telecommunications wavelengths around 1.55 μm. Therefore researchers have sought alternative

  19. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    PubMed Central

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  20. Isotope reference materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of the same isotopically homogeneous sample by any laboratory worldwide should yield the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty. International distribution of light element isotopic reference materials by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology enable laboratories to achieve this goal.

  1. Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-07-23

    Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

  2. Naturally occurring 32Si and low-background silicon dark matter detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, John L.; Arnquist, Isaac J.; Bliss, Mary

    Here, the naturally occurring radioisotope 32Si represents a potentially limiting background in future dark matter direct-detection experiments. We investigate sources of 32Si and the vectors by which it comes to reside in silicon crystals used for fabrication of radiation detectors. We infer that the 32Si concentration in commercial single-crystal silicon is likely variable, dependent upon the specific geologic and hydrologic history of the source (or sources) of silicon “ore” and the details of the silicon-refinement process. The silicon production industry is large, highly segmented by refining step, and multifaceted in terms of final product type, from which we conclude thatmore » production of 32Si-mitigated crystals requires both targeted silicon material selection and a dedicated refinement-through-crystal-production process. We review options for source material selection, including quartz from an underground source and silicon isotopically reduced in 32Si. To quantitatively evaluate the 32Si content in silicon metal and precursor materials, we propose analytic methods employing chemical processing and radiometric measurements. Ultimately, it appears feasible to produce silicon detectors with low levels of 32Si, though significant assay method development is required to validate this claim and thereby enable a quality assurance program during an actual controlled silicon-detector production cycle.« less

  3. Naturally occurring 32Si and low-background silicon dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrell, John L.; Arnquist, Isaac J.; Bliss, Mary; Bunker, Raymond; Finch, Zachary S.

    2018-05-01

    The naturally occurring radioisotope 32Si represents a potentially limiting background in future dark matter direct-detection experiments. We investigate sources of 32Si and the vectors by which it comes to reside in silicon crystals used for fabrication of radiation detectors. We infer that the 32Si concentration in commercial single-crystal silicon is likely variable, dependent upon the specific geologic and hydrologic history of the source (or sources) of silicon "ore" and the details of the silicon-refinement process. The silicon production industry is large, highly segmented by refining step, and multifaceted in terms of final product type, from which we conclude that production of 32Si-mitigated crystals requires both targeted silicon material selection and a dedicated refinement-through-crystal-production process. We review options for source material selection, including quartz from an underground source and silicon isotopically reduced in 32Si. To quantitatively evaluate the 32Si content in silicon metal and precursor materials, we propose analytic methods employing chemical processing and radiometric measurements. Ultimately, it appears feasible to produce silicon detectors with low levels of 32Si, though significant assay method development is required to validate this claim and thereby enable a quality assurance program during an actual controlled silicon-detector production cycle.

  4. Naturally occurring 32Si and low-background silicon dark matter detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Orrell, John L.; Arnquist, Isaac J.; Bliss, Mary; ...

    2018-02-10

    Here, the naturally occurring radioisotope 32Si represents a potentially limiting background in future dark matter direct-detection experiments. We investigate sources of 32Si and the vectors by which it comes to reside in silicon crystals used for fabrication of radiation detectors. We infer that the 32Si concentration in commercial single-crystal silicon is likely variable, dependent upon the specific geologic and hydrologic history of the source (or sources) of silicon “ore” and the details of the silicon-refinement process. The silicon production industry is large, highly segmented by refining step, and multifaceted in terms of final product type, from which we conclude thatmore » production of 32Si-mitigated crystals requires both targeted silicon material selection and a dedicated refinement-through-crystal-production process. We review options for source material selection, including quartz from an underground source and silicon isotopically reduced in 32Si. To quantitatively evaluate the 32Si content in silicon metal and precursor materials, we propose analytic methods employing chemical processing and radiometric measurements. Ultimately, it appears feasible to produce silicon detectors with low levels of 32Si, though significant assay method development is required to validate this claim and thereby enable a quality assurance program during an actual controlled silicon-detector production cycle.« less

  5. Naturally occurring 32 Si and low-background silicon dark matter detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, John L.; Arnquist, Isaac J.; Bliss, Mary

    The naturally occurring radioisotope Si-32 represents a potentially limiting background in future dark matter direct-detection experiments. We investigate sources of Si-32 and the vectors by which it comes to reside in silicon crystals used for fabrication of radiation detectors. We infer that the Si-32 concentration in commercial single-crystal silicon is likely variable, dependent upon the specific geologic and hydrologic history of the source (or sources) of silicon “ore” and the details of the silicon-refinement process. The silicon production industry is large, highly segmented by refining step, and multifaceted in terms of final product type, from which we conclude that productionmore » of Si-32-mitigated crystals requires both targeted silicon material selection and a dedicated refinement-through-crystal-production process. We review options for source material selection, including quartz from an underground source and silicon isotopically reduced in Si-32. To quantitatively evaluate the Si-32 content in silicon metal and precursor materials, we propose analytic methods employing chemical processing and radiometric measurements. Ultimately, it appears feasible to produce silicon-based detectors with low levels of Si-32, though significant assay method development is required to validate this claim and thereby enable a quality assurance program during an actual controlled silicon-detector production cycle.« less

  6. HELIX: The High Energy Light Isotope Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakely, Scott

    This is the lead proposal for a new suborbital program, HELIX (High-Energy Light Isotope eXperiment), designed to make measurements of the isotopic composition of light cosmic-ray nuclei from ~200 MeV/nuc to ~10 GeV/nuc. Past measurements of this kind have provided profound insights into the nature and origin of cosmic rays, revealing, for instance, information on acceleration and confinement time scales, and exposing some conspicuous discrepancies between solar and cosmic-ray abundances. The most detailed information currently available comes from the ACE/CRIS mission, but is restricted to energies below a few 100 MeV/nuc. HELIX aims at extending this energy range by over an order of magnitude, where, in most cases, no measurements of any kind exist, and where relativistic time dilation affects the apparent lifetime of radioactive clock nuclei. The HELIX measurements will provide essential information for understanding the propagation history of cosmic rays in the galaxy. This is crucial for properly interpreting several intriguing anomalies reported in recent cosmic-ray measurements, pertaining to the energy spectra of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei, and to the anomalous rise in the positron fraction at higher energy. HELIX employs a high-precision magnet spectrometer to provide measurements which are not achievable by any current or planned instrument. The superconducting magnet originally used for the HEAT payload in five successful high-altitude flights will be combined with state-of-the-art detectors to measure the charge, time-of-flight, magnetic rigidity, and velocity of cosmic-ray particles with high precision. The instrumentation includes plastic scintillators, silicon-strip detectors repurposed from Fermilab's CDF detector, a high-performance gas drift chamber, and a ring-imaging Cherenkov counter employing aerogel radiators and silicon photomultipliers. To reduce cost and technical risk, the HELIX program will be structured in two stages. The first

  7. Martian Chemical and Isotopic Reference Standards in Earth-based Laboratories — An Invitation for Geochemical, Astrobiological, and Engineering Dialog on Considering a Weathered Chondrite for Mars Sample Return.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J. W.; Tait, A. W.; Velbel, M. A.; Boston, P. J.; Carrier, B. L.; Cohen, B. A.; Schröder, C.; Bland, P.

    2017-12-01

    Exogenic rocks (meteorites) found on Mars 1) have unweathered counterparts on Earth; 2) weather differently than indigenous rocks; and 3) may be ideal habitats for putative microorganisms and subsequent biosignature preservation. These attributes show the potential of meteorites for addressing hypothesis-driven science. They raise the question of whether chondritic meteorites, of sufficient weathering intensity, might be considered as candidates for sample return in a potential future mission. Pursuant to this discussion are the following questions. A) Is there anything to be learned from the laboratory study of a martian chondrite that cannot be learned from indigenous materials; and if so, B) is the science value high enough to justify recovery? If both A and B answer affirmatively, then C) what are the engineering constraints for sample collection for Mars 2020 and potential follow-on missions; and finally D) what is the likelihood of finding a favorable sample? Observations relevant to these questions include: i) Since 2005, 24 candidate and confirmed meteorites have been identified on Mars at three rover landing sites, demonstrating their ubiquity and setting expectations for future finds. All have been heavily altered by a variety of physical and chemical processes. While the majority of these are irons (not suitable for recovery), several are weathered stony meteorites. ii) Exogenic reference materials provide the only chemical/isotope standards on Mars, permitting quantification of alteration rates if residence ages can be attained; and possibly enabling the removal of Late Amazonian weathering overprints from other returned samples. iii) Recent studies have established the habitability of chondritic meteorites with terrestrial microorganisms, recommending their consideration when exploring astrobiological questions. High reactivity, organic content, and permeability show stony meteorites to be more attractive for colonization and subsequent biosignature

  8. ISOTOPE CONVERSION DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of tbe type utilizing a liquid fuel and designed to convert a non-thermally fissionable isotope to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A tank containing a reactive composition of a thermally fissionable isotope dispersed in a liquid moderator is disposed within an outer tank containing a slurry of a non-thermally fissionable isotope convertible to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A control rod is used to control the chain reaction in the reactive composition and means are provided for circulating and cooling the reactive composition and slurry in separate circuits.

  9. Process for purification of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rath, H. J.; Sirtl, E.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1981-01-01

    The purification of metallurgically pure silicon having a silicon content of more than 95% by weight is accomplished by leaching with an acidic solution which substantially does not attack silicon. A mechanical treatment leading to continuous particle size reduction of the granulated silicon to be purified is combined with the chemical purification step.

  10. Process for making silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  11. A fault-tolerant addressable spin qubit in a natural silicon quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kenta; Kamioka, Jun; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Yoneda, Jun; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R; Amaha, Shinichi; Allison, Giles; Kodera, Tetsuo; Oda, Shunri; Tarucha, Seigo

    2016-08-01

    Fault-tolerant quantum computing requires high-fidelity qubits. This has been achieved in various solid-state systems, including isotopically purified silicon, but is yet to be accomplished in industry-standard natural (unpurified) silicon, mainly as a result of the dephasing caused by residual nuclear spins. This high fidelity can be achieved by speeding up the qubit operation and/or prolonging the dephasing time, that is, increasing the Rabi oscillation quality factor Q (the Rabi oscillation decay time divided by the π rotation time). In isotopically purified silicon quantum dots, only the second approach has been used, leaving the qubit operation slow. We apply the first approach to demonstrate an addressable fault-tolerant qubit using a natural silicon double quantum dot with a micromagnet that is optimally designed for fast spin control. This optimized design allows access to Rabi frequencies up to 35 MHz, which is two orders of magnitude greater than that achieved in previous studies. We find the optimum Q = 140 in such high-frequency range at a Rabi frequency of 10 MHz. This leads to a qubit fidelity of 99.6% measured via randomized benchmarking, which is the highest reported for natural silicon qubits and comparable to that obtained in isotopically purified silicon quantum dot-based qubits. This result can inspire contributions to quantum computing from industrial communities.

  12. A fault-tolerant addressable spin qubit in a natural silicon quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kenta; Kamioka, Jun; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Yoneda, Jun; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Amaha, Shinichi; Allison, Giles; Kodera, Tetsuo; Oda, Shunri; Tarucha, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    Fault-tolerant quantum computing requires high-fidelity qubits. This has been achieved in various solid-state systems, including isotopically purified silicon, but is yet to be accomplished in industry-standard natural (unpurified) silicon, mainly as a result of the dephasing caused by residual nuclear spins. This high fidelity can be achieved by speeding up the qubit operation and/or prolonging the dephasing time, that is, increasing the Rabi oscillation quality factor Q (the Rabi oscillation decay time divided by the π rotation time). In isotopically purified silicon quantum dots, only the second approach has been used, leaving the qubit operation slow. We apply the first approach to demonstrate an addressable fault-tolerant qubit using a natural silicon double quantum dot with a micromagnet that is optimally designed for fast spin control. This optimized design allows access to Rabi frequencies up to 35 MHz, which is two orders of magnitude greater than that achieved in previous studies. We find the optimum Q = 140 in such high-frequency range at a Rabi frequency of 10 MHz. This leads to a qubit fidelity of 99.6% measured via randomized benchmarking, which is the highest reported for natural silicon qubits and comparable to that obtained in isotopically purified silicon quantum dot–based qubits. This result can inspire contributions to quantum computing from industrial communities. PMID:27536725

  13. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O'Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  14. Extreme-Environment Silicon-Carbide (SiC) Wireless Sensor Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop an integrated silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite capable of in situ measurements of critical characteristics of NTP engine; Compose silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite of: Extreme-environment sensors center, Dedicated high-temperature (450 deg C) silicon-carbide electronics that provide power and signal conditioning capabilities as well as radio frequency modulation and wireless data transmission capabilities center, An onboard energy harvesting system as a power source.

  15. Loss of oxygen, silicon, sulfur, and potassium from the lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Hurd, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    The processes of formation and maturation of lunar soils lead to enrichments in the heavy stable isotopes of oxygen, silicon, sulfur, and potassium. The isotopic enrichment implies substantial losses of these elements from the moon. Vaporization by micrometeorite impact and by ion sputtering have removed at least 1% of the mass of the regolith. The losses of sulfur and potassium amount to at least 20-30% of their original abundance in the regolith.

  16. Silicon micromachined vibrating gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Ralf

    1997-09-01

    This work gives an overview of silicon micromachined vibrating gyroscopes. Market perspectives and fields of application are pointed out. The advantage of using silicon micromachining is discussed and estimations of the desired performance, especially for automobiles are given. The general principle of vibrating gyroscopes is explained. Vibrating silicon gyroscopes can be divided into seven classes. for each class the characteristic principle is presented and examples are given. Finally a specific sensor, based on a tuning fork for automotive applications with a sensitivity of 250(mu) V/degrees is described in detail.

  17. Microstructured silicon radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Derzon, Mark S.; Draper, Bruce L.

    2017-03-14

    A radiation detector comprises a silicon body in which are defined vertical pores filled with a converter material and situated within silicon depletion regions. One or more charge-collection electrodes are arranged to collect current generated when secondary particles enter the silicon body through walls of the pores. The pores are disposed in low-density clusters, have a majority pore thickness of 5 .mu.m or less, and have a majority aspect ratio, defined as the ratio of pore depth to pore thickness, of at least 10.

  18. Recrystallization of polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lall, C.; Kulkarni, S. B.; Graham, C. D., Jr.; Pope, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Optical metallography is used to investigate the recrystallization properties of polycrystalline semiconductor-grade silicon. It is found that polycrystalline silicon recrystallizes at 1380 C in relatively short times, provided that the prior deformation is greater than 30%. For a prior deformation of about 40%, the recrystallization process is essentially complete in about 30 minutes. Silicon recrystallizes at a substantially slower rate than metals at equivalent homologous temperatures. The recrystallized grain size is insensitive to the amount of prestrain for strains in the range of 10-50%.

  19. Iron Isotope Constraints on Planetesimal Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, M.; Young, E. D.

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of iron in both planetary cores and silicate mantles renders the element a valuable tool for understanding core formation. Magmatic iron meteorites exhibit an enrichment in 57Fe/54Fe relative to chondrites and HED meteorites. This is suggestive of heavy Fe partitioning into the cores of differentiated bodies. If iron isotope fractionation accompanies core formation, we can elucidate details about the history of accretion for planetary bodies as well as their compositions and relative core sizes. The equilibrium 57Fe/54Fe between metal and silicate is necessary for understanding observed iron isotope compositions and placing constraints on core formation. We measure this fractionation in two Aubrite meteorites, Norton County and Mount Egerton, which have known temperatures of equilibration and equilibrated silicon isotopes. Iron was purified using ion-exchange chromatography. Data were collected on a ThermoFinnigan NeptuneTM multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma-source mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) run in wet plasma mode. The measured fractionation Δ57Femetal-silicate is 0.08‰ ± 0.039 (2 SE) for Norton County and 0.09‰ ± 0.019 (2 SE) for Mount Egerton, indicating that the heavy isotopes of Fe partition into the metallic phase. These rocks are in isotopic equilibrium at a temperature of 1130 K and 1200 K ± 80 K, respectively. The concentration of the heavy isotopes of iron in the metallic phase is consistent with recent experimental studies. Using our measured metal-silicate Fe isotope fractionation and the resulting temperature calibration, while taking into account impurities in the metallic phase and temperatures of equilibration, determine that core formation could explain the observed difference between magmatic iron meteorites and chondrites if parent bodies have small cores. In order to verify that Rayleigh distillation during fractional crystallization was not a cause of iron isotope fractionation in iron meteorites, we measured

  20. Process Feasibility Study in Support of Silicon Material, Task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. Y.; Hansen, K. C.; Yaws, C. L.

    1979-01-01

    During this reporting period, major activies were devoted to process system properties, chemical engineering and economic analyses. Analyses of process system properties was continued for materials involved in the alternate processes under consideration for solar cell grade silicon. The following property data are reported for silicon tetrafluoride: critical constants, vapor pressure, heat of varporization, heat capacity, density, surface tension, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat of formation and Gibb's free energy of formation. Chemical engineering analysis of the BCL process was continued with primary efforts being devoted to the preliminary process design. Status and progress are reported for base case conditions; process flow diagram; reaction chemistry; material and energy balances; and major process equipment design.

  1. Visualizing a silicon quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Barry C.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Edmundson, Darran; Edmundson, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Quantum computation is a fast-growing, multi-disciplinary research field. The purpose of a quantum computer is to execute quantum algorithms that efficiently solve computational problems intractable within the existing paradigm of 'classical' computing built on bits and Boolean gates. While collaboration between computer scientists, physicists, chemists, engineers, mathematicians and others is essential to the project's success, traditional disciplinary boundaries can hinder progress and make communicating the aims of quantum computing and future technologies difficult. We have developed a four minute animation as a tool for representing, understanding and communicating a silicon-based solid-state quantum computer to a variety of audiences, either as a stand-alone animation to be used by expert presenters or embedded into a longer movie as short animated sequences. The paper includes a generally applicable recipe for successful scientific animation production.

  2. The eight micron band of silicon monoxide in the expanding cloud around VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geballe, T. R.; Lacy, J. H.; Beck, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of vibration-rotation transitions of silicon monoxide in VY CMa show that the lines originate in accelerating, expanding, and cool (600 K) layers of a circumstellar cloud at a distance of roughly 0.15 minutes from the central star. The central stellar velocity, as estimated from observed SiO P Cygni line profiles, is somewhat redshifted from the midpoint of the maser emission features. Most of the silicon is probably in the form of dust grains. The isotopic ratios of silicon are nearly terrestrial.

  3. The 8 micron band of silicon monoxide in the expanding cloud around VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geballe, T. R.; Lacy, J. H.; Beck, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of vibration-rotation transitions of silicon monoxide in VY CMa show that the lines originate in accelerating, expanding, and cool (about 600 K) layers of a circumstellar cloud at a distance of approximately 0.15 arcsec from the central star. The central stellar velocity, as estimated from observed SiO P Cygni line profiles, is somewhat redshifted from the midpoint of the maser emission features. Most of the silicon is probably in the form of dust grains. The isotopic ratios of silicon are nearly terrestrial.

  4. Strong coupling of a single electron in silicon to a microwave photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, X.; Cady, J. V.; Zajac, D. M.; Deelman, P. W.; Petta, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Silicon is vital to the computing industry because of the high quality of its native oxide and well-established doping technologies. Isotopic purification has enabled quantum coherence times on the order of seconds, thereby placing silicon at the forefront of efforts to create a solid-state quantum processor. We demonstrate strong coupling of a single electron in a silicon double quantum dot to the photonic field of a microwave cavity, as shown by the observation of vacuum Rabi splitting. Strong coupling of a quantum dot electron to a cavity photon would allow for long-range qubit coupling and the long-range entanglement of electrons in semiconductor quantum dots.

  5. Silicone azide fireproof material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Finely powdered titanium oxide was added to silicone azide as the sintering agent to produce a nonflammable material. Mixing proportions, physical properties, and chemical composition of the fireproofing material are included.

  6. Silicon MOS inductor

    DOEpatents

    Balberg, Isaac

    1981-01-01

    A device made of amorphous silicon which exhibits inductive properties at certain voltage biases and in certain frequency ranges in described. Devices of the type described can be made in integrated circuit form.

  7. Porous Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    In this minreview, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures — single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion battery, gas sensor and drug delivery. PMID:21869999

  8. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  9. Silicon microengineering for accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satchell, D. W.

    Silicon microengineering enables the excellent mechanical properties of silicon to be combined with electronic ones to produce accelerometers of good performance, small size and low cost. The design and fabrication of two types of analogue accelerometer, using this technique, are described. One employs implanted strain gauges to give a dc output, while the other has a strain-sensitive resonant structure which gives a varying frequency signal.

  10. Nanostructured silicon for thermoelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranz, A.; Kähler, J.; Waag, A.; Peiner, E.

    2011-06-01

    Thermoelectric modules convert thermal energy into electrical energy and vice versa. At present bismuth telluride is the most widely commercial used material for thermoelectric energy conversion. There are many applications where bismuth telluride modules are installed, mainly for refrigeration. However, bismuth telluride as material for energy generation in large scale has some disadvantages. Its availability is limited, it is hot stable at higher temperatures (>250°C) and manufacturing cost is relatively high. An alternative material for energy conversion in the future could be silicon. The technological processing of silicon is well advanced due to the rapid development of microelectronics in recent years. Silicon is largely available and environmentally friendly. The operating temperature of silicon thermoelectric generators can be much higher than of bismuth telluride. Today silicon is rarely used as a thermoelectric material because of its high thermal conductivity. In order to use silicon as an efficient thermoelectric material, it is necessary to reduce its thermal conductivity, while maintaining high electrical conductivity and high Seebeck coefficient. This can be done by nanostructuring into arrays of pillars. Fabrication of silicon pillars using ICP-cryogenic dry etching (Inductive Coupled Plasma) will be described. Their uniform height of the pillars allows simultaneous connecting of all pillars of an array. The pillars have diameters down to 180 nm and their height was selected between 1 micron and 10 microns. Measurement of electrical resistance of single silicon pillars will be presented which is done in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with nanomanipulators. Furthermore, measurement of thermal conductivity of single pillars with different diameters using the 3ω method will be shown.

  11. Dynamic Silicon Nanophotonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-31

    sensitive to fabrication imperfections and small temperature changes, therefore they are challenging to integrate into high yield mass production ... Cocoa Beach, Florida, September 2012. 15. Ali Wanis Elshaari, “Photon Manipulation in Silicon Nanophotonic Circuits,” Ph.D. Dissertation, Rochester...1.5-micron Light using Silicon Nanocrystals,” 2012 IEEE Avionics, Fiber Optics and Photonics Conference (AVFOP 2012), ThB3, Cocoa Beach, Florida

  12. SPS silicon reference system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The design analysis of a silicon power conversion system for the solar power satellite (SPS) is summarized. The solar array, consisting of glass encapsulated 50 micrometer silicon solar cells, is described. The general scheme for power distribution to the array/antenna interface is described. Degradation by proton irradiation is considered. The interface between the solar array and the klystron equipped power transmitter is described.

  13. Experimentally determined Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe metal and implications for Earth's core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Ziegler, Karen; Young, Edward D.; Ricolleau, Angele; Schauble, Edwin A.; Fei, Yingwei

    2009-10-01

    Stable isotope fractionation amongst phases comprising terrestrial planets and asteroids can be used to elucidate planet-forming processes. To date, the composition of the Earth's core remains largely unknown though cosmochemical and geophysical evidence indicates that elements lighter than iron and nickel must reside there. Silicon is often cited as a light element that could explain the seismic properties of the core. The amount of silicon in the core, if any, can be deduced from the difference in 30Si/ 28Si between meteorites and terrestrial rocks if the Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe-rich metal is known. Recent studies (e.g., [Georg R.B., Halliday A.N., Schauble E.A., Reynolds B.C., 2007. Silicon in the Earth's core. Nature 447 (31), 1102-1106.]; [Fitoussi, C., Bourdon, B., Kleine, T., Oberli, F., Reynolds, B. C., 2009. Si isotope systematics of meteorites and terrestrial peridotites: implications for Mg/Si fractionation in the solar nebula and for Si in the Earth's core. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 287, 77-85.]) showing (sometimes subtle) differences between 30Si/ 28Si in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggest that Si missing from terrestrial rocks might be in the core. However, any conclusion based on Earth-meteorite comparisons depends on the veracity of the 30Si/ 28Si fractionation factor between silicates and metals at appropriate conditions. Here we present the first direct experimental evidence that silicon isotopes are not distributed uniformly between iron metal and rock when equilibrated at high temperatures. High-precision measurements of the silicon isotope ratios in iron-silicon alloy and silicate equilibrated at 1 GPa and 1800 °C show that Si in silicate has higher 30Si/ 28Si than Si in metal, by at least 2.0‰. These findings provide an experimental foundation for using isotope ratios of silicon as indicators of terrestrial planet formation processes. They imply that if Si isotope equilibrium existed during segregation of Earth

  14. Quantum Control and Entanglement of Spins in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, Paul

    Over the past several decades silicon carbide (SiC) has matured into a versatile material platform for high-power electronics and optoelectronic and micromechanical devices. Recent advances have also established SiC as a promising host for quantum technologies based on the spin of intrinsic defects, with the potential of leveraging existing device fabrication protocols alongside solid-state quantum control. Among these defects are the divacancies and related color centers, which have ground-state electron-spin triplets with coherence times as long as one millisecond and built-in optical interfaces operating near the telecommunication wavelengths. This rapidly developing field has prompted research into the SiC material host to understand how defect-bound electron spins interact with their surrounding nuclear spin bath. Although nuclear spins are a major source of decoherence in color-center spin systems, they are also a valuable resource since they can have coherence times that are orders of magnitude longer than electron spins. In this talk I will discuss our recent efforts to interface defect-bound electron spins in SiC with the nuclear spins of naturally occurring 29Si and 13C isotopic defects. I will discuss how the hyperfine interaction can be used to strongly initialize them, to coherently control them, to read them out, and to produce genuine electron-nuclear ensemble entanglement, all at ambient conditions. These demonstrations motivate further research into spins in SiC for prospective quantum technologies. In collaboration with A. Falk, D. Christle, K. Miao, H. Seo, V. Ivady, A. Gali, G. Galli, and D. D. Awschalom. This research was supported by the AFOSR, the NSF DMR-1306300, and the NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.

  15. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  16. Fine Collimator Grids Using Silicon Metering Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Carol

    1998-01-01

    The project Fine Collimator Grids Using Silicon Metering Structure was managed by Dr. Carol Eberhard of the Electromagnetic Systems & Technology Department (Space & Technology Division) of TRW who also wrote this final report. The KOH chemical etching of the silicon wafers was primarily done by Dr. Simon Prussin of the Electrical Engineering Department of UCLA at the laboratory on campus. Moshe Sergant of the Superconductor Electronics Technology Department (Electronics Systems & Technology Division) of TRW and Dr. Prussin were instrumental in developing the low temperature silicon etching processes. Moshe Sergant and George G. Pinneo of the Microelectronics Production Department (Electronics Systems & Technology Division) of TRW were instrumental in developing the processes for filling the slots etched in the silicon wafers with metal-filled materials. Their work was carried out in the laboratories at the Space Park facility. Moshe Sergant is also responsible for the impressive array of Scanning Electron Microscope images with which the various processes were monitored. Many others also contributed their time and expertise to the project. I wish to thank them all.

  17. Dual Si and O Isotope Measurement of Lunar Samples Using IRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, N.; Hill, P. J. A.; Osinski, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    The use of isotopic systems and their associated theoretical models have become an increasingly sophisticated tool for investigating the origin of planetary bodies in the solar system. It was originally hypothesized that evidence for the impact origin of Moon would manifest itself as an isotopic heterogeneity between lunar and terrestrial samples; however, most isotope systems show no difference between the bulk Earth and Moon. The stable isotopes of both silicon (Si) and oxygen (O) have been essential in further understanding planetary processes including core formation. Historically the analysis of the Si and O isotope ratios in terrestrial and extraterrestrial material has primarily been measured independent of each other through three main techniques: isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). Each technique has its own strength and weakness in regards to resolution and precision; however, one of the main limiting factors in all three of these techniques rests on the requirement of multiple aliquots. As most literature focuses on the measurement of oxygen or silicon isotopes, this unique line allows for the precise analysis of Si and O isotopes from the same aliquot of bulk sample, which cannot be done with SIMS or ICP-MS analysis. To deal with this problem a unique laser line system has been developed in the Laboratory for Stable Isotope Science at Western University, Canada, that simultaneously extracts SiF4 and O2 from the same 1-2 mg aliquot. We present the application of analyzing both isotopic systems from the sample aliquot to Apollo, meteoritic, and terrestrial samples and its implication for the formation of the Moon. Preliminary results from this line suggest that although the O isotopes ratios are consistent with a homogenous Moon-Earth system, a difference is observed in Si isotopes between Apollo and terrestrial samples compared to

  18. HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, R.W.

    1958-08-12

    The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

  19. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, J.

    1991-06-18

    A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus. 2 figures.

  20. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Jakob

    1991-01-01

    A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

  1. Second-harmonic generation in substoichiometric silicon nitride layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Emanuele; Capretti, Antonio; Miano, Giovanni; Dal Negro, Luca

    2013-03-01

    Harmonic generation in optical circuits offers the possibility to integrate wavelength converters, light amplifiers, lasers, and multiple optical signal processing devices with electronic components. Bulk silicon has a negligible second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility owing to its crystal centrosymmetry. Silicon nitride has its place in the microelectronic industry as an insulator and chemical barrier. In this work, we propose to take advantage of silicon excess in silicon nitride to increase the Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) efficiency. Thin films have been grown by reactive magnetron sputtering and their nonlinear optical properties have been studied by femtosecond pumping over a wide range of excitation wavelengths, silicon nitride stoichiometry and thermal processes. We demonstrate SHG in the visible range (375 - 450 nm) using a tunable 150 fs Ti:sapphire laser, and we optimize the SH emission at a silicon excess of 46 at.% demonstrating a maximum SHG efficiency of 4x10-6 in optimized films. Polarization properties, generation efficiency, and the second order nonlinear optical susceptibility are measured for all the investigated samples and discussed in terms of an effective theoretical model. Our findings show that the large nonlinear optical response demonstrated in optimized Si-rich silicon nitride materials can be utilized for the engineering of nonlinear optical functions and devices on a Si chip.

  2. Computational Silicon Nanophotonic Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing

    Photonic integration circuits (PICs) have received overwhelming attention in the past few decades due to various advantages over electronic circuits including absence of Joule effect and huge bandwidth. The most significant problem obstructing their commercial application is the integration density, which is largely determined by a signal wavelength that is in the order of microns. In this dissertation, we are focused on enhancing the integration density of PICs to warrant their practical applications. In general, we believe there are three ways to boost the integration density. The first is to downscale the dimension of individual integrated optical component. As an example, we have experimentally demonstrated an integrated optical diode with footprint 3 x 3 mum2, an integrated polarization beamsplitter with footprint 2.4 x 2.4 mum2, and a waveguide bend with effective bend radius as small as 0.65 mum. All these devices offer the smallest footprint when compared to their alternatives. A second option to increase integration density is to combine the function of multiple devices into a single compact device. To illustrate the point, we have experimentally shown an integrated mode-converting polarization beamsplitter, and a free-space to waveguide coupler and polarization beamsplitter. Two distinct functionalities are offered in one single device without significantly sacrificing the footprint. A third option for enhancing integration density is to decrease the spacing between the individual devices. For this case, we have experimentally demonstrated an integrated cloak for nonresonant (waveguide) and resonant (microring-resonator) devices. Neighboring devices are totally invisible to each other even if they are separated as small as lambda/2 apart. Inverse design algorithm is employed in demonstrating all of our devices. The basic premise is that, via nanofabrication, we can locally engineer the refractive index to achieve unique functionalities that are otherwise

  3. Further Investigations of Hypersonic Engine Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.

    2004-01-01

    Durable, flexible sliding seals are required in advanced hypersonic engines to seal the perimeters of movable engine ramps for efficient, safe operation in high heat flux environments at temperatures of 2000 to 2500 F. Current seal designs do not meet the demanding requirements for future engines, so NASA's Glenn Research Center is developing advanced seals and preloading devices to overcome these shortfalls. An advanced ceramic wafer seal design and two silicon nitride compression spring designs were evaluated in a series of compression, scrub, and flow tests. Silicon nitride wafer seals survived 2000 in. (50.8 m) of scrubbing at 2000 F against a silicon carbide rub surface with no chips or signs of damage. Flow rates measured for the wafers before and after scrubbing were almost identical and were up to 32 times lower than those recorded for the best braided rope seal flow blockers. Silicon nitride compression springs showed promise conceptually as potential seal preload devices to help maintain seal resiliency.

  4. Study on Silicon Microstructure Processing Technology Based on Porous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yingqi; Zhang, Linchao; Qi, Hong; Wu, Yalin; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Jing

    2018-03-01

    Aiming at the heterogeneity of micro - sealed cavity in silicon microstructure processing technology, the technique of preparing micro - sealed cavity of porous silicon is proposed. The effects of different solutions, different substrate doping concentrations, different current densities, and different etching times on the rate, porosity, thickness and morphology of the prepared porous silicon were studied. The porous silicon was prepared by different process parameters and the prepared porous silicon was tested and analyzed. For the test results, optimize the process parameters and experiments. The experimental results show that the porous silicon can be controlled by optimizing the parameters of the etching solution and the doping concentration of the substrate, and the preparation of porous silicon with different porosity can be realized by different doping concentration, so as to realize the preparation of silicon micro-sealed cavity, to solve the sensor sensitive micro-sealed cavity structure heterogeneous problem, greatly increasing the application of the sensor.

  5. Total synthesis of isotopically enriched Si-29 silica NPs as potential spikes for isotope dilution quantification of natural silica NPs.

    PubMed

    Pálmai, Marcell; Szalay, Roland; Bartczak, Dorota; Varga, Zoltán; Nagy, Lívia Naszályi; Gollwitzer, Christian; Krumrey, Michael; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-05-01

    A new method was developed for the preparation of highly monodisperse isotopically enriched Si-29 silica nanoparticles ((29)Si-silica NPs) with the purpose of using them as spikes for isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) quantification of silica NPs with natural isotopic distribution. Si-29 tetraethyl orthosilicate ((29)Si-TEOS), the silica precursor was prepared in two steps starting from elementary silicon-29 pellets. In the first step Si-29 silicon tetrachloride ((29)SiCl4) was prepared by heating elementary silicon-29 in chlorine gas stream. By using a multistep cooling system and the dilution of the volatile and moisture-sensitive (29)SiCl4 in carbon tetrachloride as inert medium we managed to reduce product loss caused by evaporation. (29)Si-TEOS was obtained by treating (29)SiCl4 with absolute ethanol. Structural characterisation of (29)Si-TEOS was performed by using (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. For the NP preparation, a basic amino acid catalysis route was used and the resulting NPs were analysed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. Finally, the feasibility of using enriched NPs for on-line field-flow fractionation coupled with multi-angle light scattering and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FFF/MALS/ICP-MS) has been demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  7. Nonclassical light sources for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajoni, Daniele; Galli, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Quantum photonics has recently attracted a lot of attention for its disruptive potential in emerging technologies like quantum cryptography, quantum communication and quantum computing. Driven by the impressive development in nanofabrication technologies and nanoscale engineering, silicon photonics has rapidly become the platform of choice for on-chip integration of high performing photonic devices, now extending their functionalities towards quantum-based applications. Focusing on quantum Information Technology (qIT) as a key application area, we review recent progress in integrated silicon-based sources of nonclassical states of light. We assess the state of the art in this growing field and highlight the challenges that need to be overcome to make quantum photonics a reliable and widespread technology.

  8. Development of a direct procedure for the measurement of sulfur isotope variability in beers by MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Giner Martínez-Sierra, J; Santamaria-Fernandez, R; Hearn, R; Marchante Gayón, J M; García Alonso, J I

    2010-04-14

    In this work, a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) was evaluated for the direct measurement of sulfur stable isotope ratios in beers as a first step toward a general study of the natural isotope variability of sulfur in foods and beverages. Sample preparation consisted of a simple dilution of the beers with 1% (v/v) HNO(3). It was observed that different sulfur isotope ratios were obtained for different dilutions of the same sample indicating that matrix effects affected differently the transmission of the sulfur ions at masses 32, 33, and 34 in the mass spectrometer. Correction for mass bias related matrix effects was evaluated using silicon internal standardization. For that purpose, silicon isotopes at masses 29 and 30 were included in the sulfur cup configuration and the natural silicon content in beers used for internal mass bias correction. It was observed that matrix effects on differential ion transmission could be corrected adequately using silicon internal standardization. The natural isotope variability of sulfur has been evaluated by measuring 26 different beer brands. Measured delta(34)S values ranged from -0.2 to 13.8 per thousand. Typical combined standard uncertainties of the measured delta(34)S values were < or = 2 per thousand. The method has therefore great potential to study sulfur isotope variability in foods and beverages.

  9. Bond Sensitivity to Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, G. A.; Hudson, W. D.; Hudson, W. D.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Currently during fabrication of the Space Shuttle booster rocket motors, the use of silicone and silicone-containing products is prohibited in most applications. Many shop aids and other materials containing silicone have the potential, if they make contact with a bond surface, to transfer some of the silicone to the substrates being bonded. Such transfer could result in a reduction of the bond strength or even failure of the subsequent bonds. This concern is driving the need to understand the effect of silicones and the concentration needed to affect a given bond-line strength. Additionally, as silicone detection methods used for materials acceptance improve what may have gone unnoticed earlier is now being detected. Thus, realistic silicone limits for process materials (below which bond performance is satisfactory) are needed rather than having an absolute no silicone permitted policy.

  10. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Impact energy absorbing layers (EALs) comprised of partially densified silicon carbide were formed in situ on fully sinterable silicon carbide substrates. After final sintering, duplex silicon carbide structures resulted which were comprised of a fully sintered, high density silicon carbide substrate or core, overlayed with an EAL of partially sintered silicon carbide integrally bonded to its core member. Thermal cycling tests proved such structures to be moderately resistant to oxidation and highly resistant to thermal shock stresses. The strength of the developed structures in some cases exceeded but essentially it remained the same as the fully sintered silicon carbide without the EAL. Ballistic impact tests indicated that substantial improvements in the toughness of sintered silicon carbide were achieved by the use of the partially densified silicon carbide EALs.

  11. Hybrid III-V Silicon Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, John

    2014-03-01

    Abstract: A number of important breakthroughs in the past decade have focused attention on Si as a photonic platform. We review here recent progress in this field, focusing on efforts to make lasers, amplifiers, modulators and photodetectors on or in silicon. We also describe optimum quantum well design and distributed feedback cavity design to reduce the threshold and increase the efficiency and power output. The impact active silicon photonic integrated circuits could have on interconnects, telecommunications and on silicon electronics is reviewed. Biography: John Bowers holds the Fred Kavli Chair in Nanotechnology, and is the Director of the Institute for Energy Efficiency and a Professor in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials at UCSB. He is a cofounder of Aurrion, Aerius Photonics and Calient Networks. Dr. Bowers received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University and worked for AT&T Bell Laboratories and Honeywell before joining UC Santa Barbara. Dr. Bowers is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the IEEE, OSA and the American Physical Society. He is a recipient of the OSA/IEEE Tyndall Award, the OSA Holonyak Prize, the IEEE LEOS William Streifer Award and the South Coast Business and Technology Entrepreneur of the Year Award. He and coworkers received the EE Times Annual Creativity in Electronics (ACE) Award for Most Promising Technology for the hybrid silicon laser in 2007. Bowers' research is primarily in optoelectronics and photonic integrated circuits. He has published ten book chapters, 600 journal papers, 900 conference papers and has received 54 patents. He has published 180 invited papers and conference papers, and given 16 plenary talks at conferences. As well as Chong Zhang.

  12. Coated silicon comprising material for protection against environmental corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazel, Brian Thomas (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, an article is disclosed. The article comprises a gas turbine engine component substrate comprising a silicon material; and an environmental barrier coating overlying the substrate, wherein the environmental barrier coating comprises cerium oxide, and the cerium oxide reduces formation of silicate glass on the substrate upon exposure to corrodant sulfates.

  13. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayne, C. K.; Smith, D. H.

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers.

  14. ICT: isotope correction toolbox.

    PubMed

    Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Neubauer, Stefan; Mairinger, Teresa; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Hann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Isotope tracer experiments are an invaluable technique to analyze and study the metabolism of biological systems. However, isotope labeling experiments are often affected by naturally abundant isotopes especially in cases where mass spectrometric methods make use of derivatization. The correction of these additive interferences--in particular for complex isotopic systems--is numerically challenging and still an emerging field of research. When positional information is generated via collision-induced dissociation, even more complex calculations for isotopic interference correction are necessary. So far, no freely available tools can handle tandem mass spectrometry data. We present isotope correction toolbox, a program that corrects tandem mass isotopomer data from tandem mass spectrometry experiments. Isotope correction toolbox is written in the multi-platform programming language Perl and, therefore, can be used on all commonly available computer platforms. Source code and documentation can be freely obtained under the Artistic License or the GNU General Public License from: https://github.com/jungreuc/isotope_correction_toolbox/ {christian.jungreuthmayer@boku.ac.at,juergen.zanghellini@boku.ac.at} Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A silicon carbide array for electrocorticography and peripheral nerve recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Botia, C. A.; Luna, L. E.; Neely, R. M.; Chamanzar, M.; Carraro, C.; Carmena, J. M.; Sabes, P. N.; Maboudian, R.; Maharbiz, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Current neural probes have a limited device lifetime of a few years. Their common failure mode is the degradation of insulating films and/or the delamination of the conductor-insulator interfaces. We sought to develop a technology that does not suffer from such limitations and would be suitable for chronic applications with very long device lifetimes. Approach. We developed a fabrication method that integrates polycrystalline conductive silicon carbide with insulating silicon carbide. The technology employs amorphous silicon carbide as the insulator and conductive silicon carbide at the recording sites, resulting in a seamless transition between doped and amorphous regions of the same material, eliminating heterogeneous interfaces prone to delamination. Silicon carbide has outstanding chemical stability, is biocompatible, is an excellent molecular barrier and is compatible with standard microfabrication processes. Main results. We have fabricated silicon carbide electrode arrays using our novel fabrication method. We conducted in vivo experiments in which electrocorticography recordings from the primary visual cortex of a rat were obtained and were of similar quality to those of polymer based electrocorticography arrays. The silicon carbide electrode arrays were also used as a cuff electrode wrapped around the sciatic nerve of a rat to record the nerve response to electrical stimulation. Finally, we demonstrated the outstanding long term stability of our insulating silicon carbide films through accelerated aging tests. Significance. Clinical translation in neural engineering has been slowed in part due to the poor long term performance of current probes. Silicon carbide devices are a promising technology that may accelerate this transition by enabling truly chronic applications.

  16. Thick silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Hall mobility measurements on a number of single crystal silicon ribbons grown from graphite dies have shown some ribbons to have mobilities consistent with their resistivities. The behavior of other ribbons appears to be explained by the introduction of impurities of the opposite sign. Growth of a small single crystal silicon ribbon has been achieved from a beryllia dia. Residual internal stresses of the order of 7 to 18,000 psi have been determined to exist in some silicon ribbon, particularly those grown at rates in excess of 1 in./min. Growth experiments have continued toward definition of a configuration and parameters to provide a reasonable yield of single crystal ribbons. High vacuum outgassing of graphite dies and evacuation and backfilling of growth chambers have provided significant improvements in surface quality of ribbons grown from graphite dies.

  17. Silicon carbide thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  18. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  19. Athermal Annealing of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. P.; Grun, J.; Ting, A.; Felix, C.; Peckerar, M.; Fatemi, M.; Manka, C. K.

    1999-11-01

    Current semiconductor annealing methods are based on thermal processes which are accompanied by diffusion that degrades the definition of device features or causes other problems. This will be a serious obstacle for the production of next-generation ultra-high density, low power semiconductor devices. Experiments underway at NRL utilize a new annealing method which is much faster than thermal annealing and does not depend upon thermal energy (J. Grun, et al)., Phys. Rev. Letters 78, 1584 (1997).. A 10 J, 30 nsec, 1.053 nm wavelength laser pulse is focussed to approximately 1 mm diameter on a silicon sample. Acoustic and shock waves propagate from the impact region, which deposit mechanical energy into the material and anneal the silicon. Experimental results will be presented on annealing neutron-transmutation-doped (NTD) and ion implanted silicon samples with impurity concentrations from 1 × 10^15-3 × 10^20/cm^3.

  20. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E.; Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale.

  1. Crystal growth for high-efficiency silicon solar cells workshop: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    The state of the art in the growth of silicon crystals for high-efficiency solar cells are reviewed, sheet requirements are defined, and furture areas of research are identified. Silicon sheet material characteristics that limit cell efficiencies and yields were described as well as the criteria for the ideal sheet-growth method. The device engineers wish list to the material engineer included: silicon sheet with long minority carrier lifetime that is uniform throughout the sheet, and which doesn't change during processing; and sheet material that stays flat throughout device processing, has uniform good mechanical strength, and is low cost. Impurities in silicon solar cells depreciate cell performance by reducing diffusion length and degrading junctions. The impurity behavior, degradation mechanisms, and variations in degradation threshold with diffusion length for silicon solar cells were described.

  2. Removal of inclusions from silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftja, Arjan; Engh, Thorvald Abel; Tangstad, Merete; Kvithyld, Anne; Øvrelid, Eivind Johannes

    2009-11-01

    The removal of inclusions from molten silicon is necessary to satisfy the purity requirements for solar grade silicon. This paper summarizes two methods that are investigated: (i) settling of the inclusions followed by subsequent directional solidification and (infiltration by ceramic foam filters. Settling of inclusions followed by directional solidification is of industrial importance for production of low-cost solar grade silicon. Filtration is reported as the most efficient method for removal of inclusions from the top-cut silicon scrap.

  3. Photochemical isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Greiner, Norman R.; Boyer, Keith

    1987-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

  4. Laser isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Reed, J.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Boyer, K.; Greiner, N.R.

    1975-11-26

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light is described. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  5. Laser isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Boyer, Keith; Greiner, Norman R.

    1988-01-01

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  6. Photochemical isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Greiner, N.R.; Boyer, K.

    1987-04-28

    A process is described for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium. 8 figs.

  7. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, J.W.

    1994-01-11

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

  8. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR).

  9. The Satellite Telescope Nina for Nuclear and Isotopic Investigations in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Circella, M.; Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; de Pascale, M. P.; Morselli, A.; Furano, G.; Picozza, P.; Scoscini, A.; Sparvoli, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bonvicini, W.; Cirami, R.; Schiavon, P.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, N.; Ambriola, M.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Ciacio, F.; de Marzo, C.; Bartalucci, S.; Giuntoli, S.; Ricci, M.; Papini, P.; Piccardi, S.; Spillantini, P.; Bakaldin, A.; Batishev, A.; Galper, A. M.; Koldashov, S.; Mikhailov, V.; Murashov, A.; Voronov, S.; Boezio, M.

    2000-09-01

    NINA is a satellite silicon detector designed to perform measurements of the nuclear and isotopic composition of the galactic and anomalous components of cosmic rays, as well as of the energetic particles associated with solar flares. It has been orbiting the Earth onboard the Russian satellite Resource 01 n. 4 since July 1998. It can perform nuclear discrimination from hydrogen to iron as well as isotopic analyses at least up to the beryllium isotopes in a large energy range. NINA is the first step of the wide scientific program WiZard-RIM, which includes the design and deployment of the PAMELA magnet spectrometer.

  10. Isotopic Abundances as Tracers of the Processes of Lunar Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, K.

    2011-12-01

    different, if the Moon preferentially forms from the liquid or vapor relative to the Earth, mass-dependent isotopic differences at the planetary scale may arise. The large density contrast between liquid and vapor makes phase separation possible. (3) The precision with which planetary isotopic compositions can be determined has increased such that measurements are sensitive to even small degrees of high-temperature phase separation. Using thermodynamic models of silicate liquids to determine the partial vaporization behavior of the major elements, we will present calculations of isotopic fractionation due to liquid-vapor separation for the elements iron, magnesium, silicon, and oxygen. Improvements in analytical precision have largely settled the question of the source of the lunar material - the Earth's mantle - and isotopic measurements are now beginning to yield insight into the high-temperatures processes operating during lunar formation.

  11. Short Shot Tower for Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Hill, D. M.; Jewett, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    Drop length necessary to convert molten silicon to shot reduced by proposed new process. Conversion of silicon from powder or chunks to shot often simplifies processing. Shot is more easily handled in most processing equipment. Drops of liquid silicon fall through protective cloud of argon, then through rapidly cooling bath of methanol, where they quickly turn into solid shot.

  12. Quantum Optomechanics with Silicon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    Mechanical resonators are the most basic and ubiquitous physical systems known. In on-chip form, they are used to process high frequency signals in every cell phone, television, and laptop. They have also been in the last few decades in different shapes and forms, a critical part of progress in quantum information sciences with kilogram scale mirrors for gravitational wave detection measuring motion at its quantum limits, and the motion of single ions being used to link qubits for quantum computation. Optomechanics is a field primarily concerned with coupling light to the motion of mechanical structures. This thesis contains descriptions of recent work with mechanical systems in the megahertz to gigahertz frequency range, formed by nanofabricating novel photonic/phononic structures on a silicon chip. These structures are designed to have both optical and mechanical resonances, and laser light is used to address and manipulate their motional degrees of freedom through radiation pressure forces. We laser cool these mechanical resonators to their ground states, and observe for the first time the quantum zero-point motion of a nanomechanical resonator. Conversely, we show that engineered mechanical resonances drastically modify the optical response of our structures, creating large effective optical nonlinearities not present in bulk silicon. We experimentally demonstrate aspects of these nonlinearities by proposing and observing ``electromagnetically induced transparency'' and light slowed down to 6 m/s, as well as wavelength conversion, and generation of nonclassical optical radiation. Finally, the application of optomechanics to longstanding problems in quantum and classical communications are proposed and investigated.

  13. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  14. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  15. Powder Injection Molding of Ceramic Engine Components for Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Juergen; Enneti, Ravi K.; Onbattuvelli, Valmikanathan; Kate, Kunal; Martin, Renee; Atre, Sundar

    2012-03-01

    Silicon nitride has been the favored material for manufacturing high-efficiency engine components for transportation due to its high temperature stability, good wear resistance, excellent corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, and low density. The use of silicon nitride in engine components greatly depends on the ability to fabricate near net-shape components economically. The absence of a material database for design and simulation has further restricted the engineering community in developing parts from silicon nitride. In this paper, the design and manufacturability of silicon nitride engine rotors for unmanned aerial vehicles by the injection molding process are discussed. The feedstock material property data obtained from experiments were used to simulate the flow of the material during injection molding. The areas susceptible to the formation of defects during the injection molding process of the engine component were identified from the simulations. A test sample was successfully injection molded using the feedstock and sintered to 99% density without formation of significant observable defects.

  16. Natural occurrence of silicon carbide in a diamondiferous kimberlite from Fuxian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leung, I.; Guo, W.; Friedman, I.; Gleason, J.

    1990-01-01

    Considerable debate surrounds the existence of silicon carbide in nature, mostly owing to the problem of possible contamination by man-made SiC. Recently, Gurney1 reviewed reports of rare SiC inclusions in diamonds, and noted that SiC can only be regarded as a probable rather than proven cogenetic mineral. Here we report our observation of clusters of SiC coexisting with diamond in a kimberlite from Fuxian, China. Macrocrysts of ??-SiC are overgrown epitaxially by ??-SiC, and both polymorphs are structurally well ordered. We have also measured the carbon isotope compositions of SiC and diamonds from Fuxian. We find that SiC is more enriched in 12C than diamond by 20% relative to the PDB standard. Isotope fractionation might have occurred through an isotope exchange reaction in a common carbon reservoir. Silicon carbide may thus ultimately provide information on carbon cycling in the Earth's mantle.

  17. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction.

    PubMed

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-05-05

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth's history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth's crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  18. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; ...

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more » i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  19. Meteoritic Sulfur Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Funds were requested to continue our program in meteoritic sulfur isotopic analysis. We have recently detected a potential nucleosynthetic sulfur isotopic anomaly. We will search for potential carriers. The documentation of bulk systematics and the possible relation to nebular chemistry and oxygen isotopes will be explored. Analytical techniques for delta(sup 33), delta(sup 34)S, delta(sup 36)S isotopic analysis were improved. Analysis of sub milligram samples is now possible. A possible relation between sulfur isotopes and oxygen was detected, with similar group systematics noted, particularly in the case of aubrites, ureilites and entstatite chondrites. A possible nucleosynthetic excess S-33 has been noted in bulk ureilites and an oldhamite separate from Norton County. High energy proton (approximately 1 GeV) bombardments of iron foils were done to experimentally determine S-33, S-36 spallogenic yields for quantitation of isotopic measurements in iron meteorites. Techniques for measurement of mineral separates were perfected and an analysis program initiated. The systematic behavior of bulk sulfur isotopes will continue to be explored.

  20. Workshop summary: New silicon cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.; Iles, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The workshop on new silicon cells held during SPRAT12 is summarized. A smaller than average group attended this workshop reflecting the reduction in research dollars available to this portion of the photovoltaics community. Despite the maturity of the silicon technology, a core of the group maintained an excitement about new developments and potential opportunities. The group addressed both the implications and the applications of recent developments. Topics discussed include: light trapping and ultrathin silicon cells; different uses for silicon cells; new silicon cell developments; and radiation tolerant high efficiency cells.

  1. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Jones (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H20. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  2. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H2O. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  3. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  4. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  5. Black thin film silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koynov, Svetoslav; Brandt, Martin S.; Stutzmann, Martin

    2011-08-01

    "Black etching" has been proposed previously as a method for the nanoscale texturing of silicon surfaces, which results in an almost complete suppression of reflectivity in the spectral range of absorption relevant for photovoltaics. The method modifies the topmost 150 to 300 nm of the material and thus also is applicable for thin films of silicon. The present work is focused on the optical effects induced by the black-etching treatment on hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline silicon thin films, in particular with respect to their application in solar cells. In addition to a strong reduction of the reflectivity, efficient light trapping within the modified thin films is found. The enhancement of the optical absorption due to the light trapping is investigated via photometric measurements and photothermal deflection spectroscopy. The correlation of the texture morphology (characterized via atomic force microscopy) with the optical effects is discussed in terms of an effective medium with gradually varying optical density and in the framework of the theory of statistical light trapping. Photoconductivity spectra directly show that the light trapping causes a significant prolongation of the light path within the black silicon films by up to 15 μm for ˜1 μm thick films, leading to a significant increase of the absorption in the red.

  6. Silicon graphene Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Capmany, José; Domenech, David; Muñoz, Pascual

    2014-03-10

    We propose the use of interleaved graphene sections on top of a silicon waveguide to implement tunable Bragg gratings. The filter central wavelength and bandwidth can be controlled changing the chemical potential of the graphene sections. Apodization techniques are also presented.

  7. Silicon Carbide Metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescoat, F.; Tanguy, F.; Durand, P.

    2016-05-01

    A study has been done to assess the feasibility of metallization of Silicon Carbide (SiC) in order to simplify design and mounting of one or more ground reference rail needed to provide an electrical reference for electronics mounted on an SiC structure.

  8. Sintering silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Sanders, William A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Oxides having a composition of (Ba(1-x)Sr(x))O-Al2O3-2SiO2 are used as sintering aids for producing an improved silicon nitride ceramic material. The x must be greater than 0 to insure the formation of the stable monoclinic celsian glass phase.

  9. Protease sensing using nontoxic silicon quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoyu; McVey, Benjamin F P; Robinson, Andrew B; Longatte, Guillaume; O'Mara, Peter B; Tan, Vincent T G; Thordarson, Pall; Tilley, Richard D; Gaus, Katharina; Justin Gooding, John

    2017-08-01

    Herein is presented a proof-of-concept study of protease sensing that combines nontoxic silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The SiQDs serve as the donor and an organic dye as the acceptor. The dye is covalently attached to the SiQDs using a peptide linker. Enzymatic cleavage of the peptide leads to changes in FRET efficiency. The combination of interfacial design and optical imaging presented in this work opens opportunities for use of nontoxic SiQDs relevant to intracellular sensing and imaging. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  10. ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Kudravetz, M.K.; Greene, H.B.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to control systems for a calutron and, in particular, describes an electro-mechanical system for interrupting the collection of charged particles when the ratio between the two isotopes being receivcd deviates from a predetermined value. One embodiment of the invention includes means responsive to the ratio between two isotopes being received for opening a normally closed shutter over the receiver entrance when the isotope ratio is the desired value. In another form of the invention the collection operation is interrupted by changing the beam accelerating voltage to deflect the ion beam away from the receiver.

  11. Porous silicon confers bioactivity to polycaprolactone composites in vitro.

    PubMed

    Henstock, J R; Ruktanonchai, U R; Canham, L T; Anderson, S I

    2014-04-01

    Silicon is an essential element for healthy bone development and supplementation with its bioavailable form (silicic acid) leads to enhancement of osteogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. Porous silicon (pSi) is a novel material with emerging applications in opto-electronics and drug delivery which dissolves to yield silicic acid as the sole degradation product, allowing the specific importance of soluble silicates for biomaterials to be investigated in isolation without the elution of other ionic species. Using polycaprolactone as a bioresorbable carrier for porous silicon microparticles, we found that composites containing pSi yielded more than twice the amount of bioavailable silicic acid than composites containing the same mass of 45S5 Bioglass. When incubated in a simulated body fluid, the addition of pSi to polycaprolactone significantly increased the deposition of calcium phosphate. Interestingly, the apatites formed had a Ca:P ratio directly proportional to the silicic acid concentration, indicating that silicon-substituted hydroxyapatites were being spontaneously formed as a first order reaction. Primary human osteoblasts cultured on the surface of the composite exhibited peak alkaline phosphatase activity at day 14, with a proportional relationship between pSi content and both osteoblast proliferation and collagen production over 4 weeks. Culturing the composite with J744A.1 murine macrophages demonstrated that porous silicon does not elicit an immune response and may even inhibit it. Porous silicon may therefore be an important next generation biomaterial with unique properties for applications in orthopaedic tissue engineering.

  12. Silicon oxidation in fluoride solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon is produced in a NaF, Na2SiF6, and Na matrix when SiF4 is reduced by metallic sodium. Hydrogen is evolved during acid leaching to separate the silicon from the accompanying reaction products, NaF and Na2SiF6. The hydrogen evolution reaction was studied under conditions simulating leaching conditions by making suspensions of the dry silicon powder in aqueous fluoride solutions. The mechanism for the hydrogen evolution is discussed in terms of spontaneous oxidation of silicon resulting from the cooperative effects of (1) elemental sodium in the silicon that reacts with water to remove a protective silica layer, leaving clean reactive silicon, and (2) fluoride in solution that complexes with the oxidized silicon in solution and retards formation of a protective hydrous oxide gel.

  13. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques were employed to apply or otherwise form porous layers of various materials on the surface of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramic. From mechanical properties measurements and studies, it was concluded that although porous layers could be applied to the silicon carbide ceramic, sufficient damage was done to the silicon carbide surface by the processing required so as to drastically reduce its mechanical strength. It was further concluded that there was little promise of success in forming an effective energy absorbing layer on the surface of already densified silicon carbide ceramic that would have the mechanical strength of the untreated or unsurfaced material. Using a process for the pressureless sintering of silicon carbide powders it was discovered that porous layers of silicon carbide could be formed on a dense, strong silicon carbide substrate in a single consolidation process.

  14. Isotope-abundance variations of selected elements (IUPAC technical report)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; De Bievre, P.; Ding, T.; Holden, N.E.; Hopple, J.A.; Krouse, H.R.; Lamberty, A.; Peiser, H.S.; Revesz, K.; Rieder, S.E.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Roth, E.; Taylor, P.D.P.; Vocke, R.D.; Xiao, Y.K.

    2002-01-01

    Documented variations in the isotopic compositions of some chemical elements are responsible for expanded uncertainties in the standard atomic weights published by the Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. This report summarizes reported variations in the isotopic compositions of 20 elements that are due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay) and their effects on the standard atomic-weight uncertainties. For 11 of those elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, copper, and selenium), standard atomic-weight uncertainties have been assigned values that are substantially larger than analytical uncertainties because of common isotope-abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin. For 2 elements (chromium and thallium), recently reported isotope-abundance variations potentially are large enough to result in future expansion of their atomic-weight uncertainties. For 7 elements (magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium), documented isotope variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin are too small to have a significant effect on their standard atomic-weight uncertainties. This compilation indicates the extent to which the atomic weight of an element in a given material may differ from the standard atomic weight of the element. For most elements given above, data are graphically illustrated by a diagram in which the materials are specified in the ordinate and the compositional ranges are plotted along the abscissa in scales of (1) atomic weight, (2) mole fraction of a selected isotope, and (3) delta value of a selected isotope ratio.

  15. Study of the mechanism of diatom cell division by means of 29Si isotope tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audinot, J.-N.; Guignard, C.; Migeon, H.-N.; Hoffmann, L.

    2006-07-01

    Diatoms are delicate unicellular organisms enclosed in a silica frustule, that is made up of two valves. Multiplication of the diatoms occurs by ordinary mitotic cell division. During cell division each cell produces two daughter cells, each of them keeping one of the two valves of the mother cell and producing a new valve by absorbing the silicon present in the environment. The NanoSIMS 50 allows ion imaging to be performed on diatoms in order to determine the site of fixation of silicon. The aim of this study was to observe and compare the mechanism of the construction of the new valve after cell division. To this end, different types of diatoms have been transferred in a culture medium enriched with 29Si and after several days, the distribution of the different isotopes of silicon has been determined by NanoSIMS50 imaging. The construction of new valves has been observed and the isotopic ratio has been determined.

  16. Resistance of Silicon Nitride Turbine Components to Erosion and Hot Corrosion/oxidation Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangmen, Thomas E.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride turbine components are under intensive development by AlliedSignal to enable a new generation of higher power density auxiliary power systems. In order to be viable in the intended applications, silicon nitride turbine airfoils must be designed for survival in aggressive oxidizing combustion gas environments. Erosive and corrosive damage to ceramic airfoils from ingested sand and sea salt must be avoided. Recent engine test experience demonstrated that NT154 silicon nitride turbine vanes have exceptional resistance to sand erosion, relative to superalloys used in production engines. Similarly, NT154 silicon nitride has excellent resistance to oxidation in the temperature range of interest - up to 1400 C. Hot corrosion attack of superalloy gas turbine components is well documented. While hot corrosion from ingested sea salt will attack silicon nitride substantially less than the superalloys being replaced in initial engine applications, this degradation has the potential to limit component lives in advanced engine applications. Hot corrosion adversely affects the strength of silicon nitride in the 850 to 1300 C range. Since unacceptable reductions in strength must be rapidly identified and avoided, AlliedSignal and the NASA Lewis Research Center have pioneered the development of an environmental life prediction model for silicon nitride turbine components. Strength retention in flexure specimens following 1 to 3300 hour exposures to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion has been measured and used to calibrate the life prediction model. Predicted component life is dependent upon engine design (stress, temperature, pressure, fuel/air ratio, gas velocity, and inlet air filtration), mission usage (fuel sulfur content, location (salt in air), and times at duty cycle power points), and material parameters. Preliminary analyses indicate that the hot corrosion resistance of NT154 silicon nitride is adequate for AlliedSignal's initial engine

  17. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.

  18. Self-Diffusion in Amorphous Silicon by Local Bond Rearrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, J.; Teuber, T.; Donner, A.; Radek, M.; Bougeard, D.; Böttger, R.; Hansen, J. Lundsgaard; Larsen, A. Nylandsted; Posselt, M.; Bracht, H.

    2018-06-01

    Experiments on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon (Si) were performed at temperatures between 460 to 600 ° C . The amorphous structure was prepared by Si ion implantation of single crystalline Si isotope multilayers epitaxially grown on a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The Si isotope profiles before and after annealing were determined by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry. Isothermal diffusion experiments reveal that structural relaxation does not cause any significant intermixing of the isotope interfaces whereas self-diffusion is significant before the structure recrystallizes. The temperature dependence of self-diffusion is described by an Arrhenius law with an activation enthalpy Q =(2.70 ±0.11 ) eV and preexponential factor D0=(5.5-3.7+11.1)×10-2 cm2 s-1 . Remarkably, Q equals the activation enthalpy of hydrogen diffusion in amorphous Si, the migration of bond defects determining boron diffusion, and the activation enthalpy of solid phase epitaxial recrystallization reported in the literature. This close agreement provides strong evidence that self-diffusion is mediated by local bond rearrangements rather than by the migration of extended defects as suggested by Strauß et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 025901 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.025901).

  19. Aligned carbon nanotube-silicon sheets: a novel nano-architecture for flexible lithium ion battery electrodes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun; Yildiz, Ozkan; Bhanushali, Hardik; Wang, Yongxin; Stano, Kelly; Xue, Leigang; Zhang, Xiangwu; Bradford, Philip D

    2013-09-25

    Aligned carbon nanotube sheets provide an engineered scaffold for the deposition of a silicon active material for lithium ion battery anodes. The sheets are low-density, allowing uniform deposition of silicon thin films while the alignment allows unconstrained volumetric expansion of the silicon, facilitating stable cycling performance. The flat sheet morphology is desirable for battery construction. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Engineering Encounters: Engineering Adaptations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatling, Anne; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

    2015-01-01

    Engineering is not a subject that has historically been taught in elementary schools, but with the emphasis on engineering in the "Next Generation Science Standards," curricula are being developed to explicitly teach engineering content and design. However, many of the scientific investigations already conducted with students have…

  1. A surface code quantum computer in silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Charles D.; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J.; House, Matthew G.; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel—posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited. PMID:26601310

  2. A surface code quantum computer in silicon.

    PubMed

    Hill, Charles D; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J; House, Matthew G; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2015-10-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel-posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited.

  3. Perchlorate isotope forensics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.M.; Jackson, W.A.; Batista, J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses ( 37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/ 16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  4. Stable isotopes in mineralogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Stable isotope fractionations between minerals are functions of the fundamental vibrational frequencies of the minerals and therefore bear on several topics of mineralogical interest. Isotopic compositions of the elements H, C, O, Si, and S can now be determined routinely in almost any mineral. A summary has been made of both published and new results of laboratory investigations, analyses of natural materials, and theoretical considerations which bear on the importance of temperature, pressure, chemical composition and crystal structure to the isotopic properties of minerals. It is shown that stable isotope studies can sometimes provide evidence for elucidating details of crystal structure and can be a powerful tool for use in tracing the reaction paths of mineralogical reactions. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Silicon Modulators, Switches and Sub-systems for Optical Interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi

    Silicon photonics is emerging as a promising platform for manufacturing and integrating photonic devices for light generation, modulation, switching and detection. The compatibility with existing CMOS microelectronic foundries and high index contrast in silicon could enable low cost and high performance photonic systems, which find many applications in optical communication, data center networking and photonic network-on-chip. This thesis first develops and demonstrates several experimental work on high speed silicon modulators and switches with record performance and novel functionality. A 8x40 Gb/s transmitter based on silicon microrings is first presented. Then an end-to-end link using microrings for Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation and demodulation is shown, and its performance with conventional BPSK modulation/ demodulation techniques is compared. Next, a silicon traveling-wave Mach- Zehnder modulator is demonstrated at data rate up to 56 Gb/s for OOK modulation and 48 Gb/s for BPSK modulation, showing its capability at high speed communication systems. Then a single silicon microring is shown with 2x2 full crossbar switching functionality, enabling optical interconnects with ultra small footprint. Then several other experiments in the silicon platform are presented, including a fully integrated in-band Optical Signal to Noise Ratio (OSNR) monitor, characterization of optical power upper bound in a silicon microring modulator, and wavelength conversion in a dispersion-engineered waveguide. The last part of this thesis is on network-level application of photonics, specically a broadcast-and-select network based on star coupler is introduced, and its scalability performance is studied. Finally a novel switch architecture for data center networks is discussed, and its benefits as a disaggregated network are presented.

  6. Helium isotope study of geothermal features in Chile with field and laboratory data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dobson, Patrick

    2013-02-11

    Helium isotope and stable isotope data from the El Tatio, Tinginguirica, Chillan, and Tolhuaca geothermal systems, Chile. Data from this submission are discussed in: Dobson, P.F., Kennedy, B.M., Reich, M., Sanchez, P., and Morata, D. (2013) Effects of volcanism, crustal thickness, and large scale faulting on the He isotope signatures of geothermal systems in Chile. Proceedings, 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Feb. 11-13, 2013

  7. Progress in performance enhancement methods for capacitive silicon resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Toan, Nguyen; Ono, Takahito

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we review the progress in recent studies on the performance enhancement methods for capacitive silicon resonators. We provide information on various fabrication technologies and design considerations that can be employed to improve the performance of capacitive silicon resonators, including low motional resistance, small insertion loss, and high quality factor (Q). This paper contains an overview of device structures and working principles, fabrication technologies consisting of hermetic packaging, deep reactive-ion etching and neutral beam etching, and design considerations including mechanically coupled, movable electrode structures and piezoresistive heat engines.

  8. Advanced process control and novel test methods for PVD silicon and elastomeric silicone coatings utilized on ion implant disks, heatsinks and selected platens

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, J.; Allen, B.; Wriggins, W.

    Coatings play multiple key roles in the proper functioning of mature and current ion implanters. Batch and serial implanters require strategic control of elemental and particulate contamination which often includes scrutiny of the silicon surface coatings encountering direct beam contact. Elastomeric Silicone Coatings must accommodate wafer loading and unloading as well as direct backside contact during implant plus must maintain rigid elemental and particulate specifications. The semiconductor industry has had a significant and continuous effort to obtain ultra-pure silicon coatings with sustained process performance and long life. Low particles and reduced elemental levels for silicon coatings are a major requirementmore » for process engineers, OEM manufacturers, and second source suppliers. Relevant data will be presented. Some emphasis and detail will be placed on the structure and characteristics of a relatively new PVD Silicon Coating process that is very dense and homogeneous. Wear rate under typical ion beam test conditions will be discussed. The PVD Silicon Coating that will be presented here is used on disk shields, wafer handling fingers/fences, exclusion zones of heat sinks, beam dumps and other beamline components. Older, legacy implanters can now provide extended process capability using this new generation PVD silicon - even on implanter systems that were shipped long before the advent of silicon coating for contamination control. Low particles and reduced elemental levels are critical performance criteria for the silicone elastomers used on disk heatsinks and serial implanter platens. Novel evaluation techniques and custom engineered tools are used to investigate the surface interaction characteristics of multiple Elastomeric Silicone Coatings currently in use by the industry - specifically, friction and perpendicular stiction. These parameters are presented as methods to investigate the critical wafer load and unload function. Unique tools and

  9. Advanced process control and novel test methods for PVD silicon and elastomeric silicone coatings utilized on ion implant disks, heatsinks and selected platens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, J.; Allen, B.; Wriggins, W.; Kuzbyt, R.; Sinclair, R.

    2012-11-01

    Coatings play multiple key roles in the proper functioning of mature and current ion implanters. Batch and serial implanters require strategic control of elemental and particulate contamination which often includes scrutiny of the silicon surface coatings encountering direct beam contact. Elastomeric Silicone Coatings must accommodate wafer loading and unloading as well as direct backside contact during implant plus must maintain rigid elemental and particulate specifications. The semiconductor industry has had a significant and continuous effort to obtain ultra-pure silicon coatings with sustained process performance and long life. Low particles and reduced elemental levels for silicon coatings are a major requirement for process engineers, OEM manufacturers, and second source suppliers. Relevant data will be presented. Some emphasis and detail will be placed on the structure and characteristics of a relatively new PVD Silicon Coating process that is very dense and homogeneous. Wear rate under typical ion beam test conditions will be discussed. The PVD Silicon Coating that will be presented here is used on disk shields, wafer handling fingers/fences, exclusion zones of heat sinks, beam dumps and other beamline components. Older, legacy implanters can now provide extended process capability using this new generation PVD silicon - even on implanter systems that were shipped long before the advent of silicon coating for contamination control. Low particles and reduced elemental levels are critical performance criteria for the silicone elastomers used on disk heatsinks and serial implanter platens. Novel evaluation techniques and custom engineered tools are used to investigate the surface interaction characteristics of multiple Elastomeric Silicone Coatings currently in use by the industry - specifically, friction and perpendicular stiction. These parameters are presented as methods to investigate the critical wafer load and unload function. Unique tools and test

  10. Flat-plate solar array project: Experimental process system development unit for producing semiconductor-grade silicon using the silane-to-silicon process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The process technology for the manufacture of semiconductor-grade silicon in a large commercial plant by 1986, at a price less than $14 per kilogram of silicon based on 1975 dollars is discussed. The engineering design, installation, checkout, and operation of an Experimental Process System Development unit was discussed. Quality control of scaling-up the process and an economic analysis of product and production costs are discussed.

  11. Thin-film reliability and engineering overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The reliability and engineering technology base required for thin film solar energy conversions modules is discussed. The emphasis is on the integration of amorphous silicon cells into power modules. The effort is being coordinated with SERI's thin film cell research activities as part of DOE's Amorphous Silicon Program. Program concentration is on temperature humidity reliability research, glass breaking strength research, point defect system analysis, hot spot heating assessment, and electrical measurements technology.

  12. Thin-film reliability and engineering overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1984-10-01

    The reliability and engineering technology base required for thin film solar energy conversions modules is discussed. The emphasis is on the integration of amorphous silicon cells into power modules. The effort is being coordinated with SERI's thin film cell research activities as part of DOE's Amorphous Silicon Program. Program concentration is on temperature humidity reliability research, glass breaking strength research, point defect system analysis, hot spot heating assessment, and electrical measurements technology.

  13. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project are presented. Task 3 is directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulating system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials. The technical approach of the contract effort is divided into four special tasks: (1) technology review; (2) generation of concepts for screening and processing silicon encapsulation systems; (3) assessment of encapsulation concepts; and (4) evaluation of encapsulation concepts. The candidate silicon materials are reviewed. The silicon and modified silicon resins were chosen on the basis of similarity to materials with known weatherability, cost, initial tangential modulus, accelerated dirt pick-up test results and the ratio of the content of organic phenyl substitution of methyl substitution on the backbone of the silicon resin.

  14. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  15. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  16. Silicon microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ying; Dai, Daoxin

    2018-05-01

    Silicon microring resonators (MRRs) are very popular for many applications because of the advantages of footprint compactness, easy scalability, and functional versatility. Ultra-compact silicon MRRs with box-like spectral responses are realized with a very large free-spectral range (FSR) by introducing bent directional couplers. The measured box-like spectral response has an FSR of >30 nm. The permanent wavelength-alignment techniques for MRRs are also presented, including the laser-induced local-oxidation technique as well as the local-etching technique. With these techniques, one can control finely the permanent wavelength shift, which is also large enough to compensate the random wavelength variation due to the random fabrication errors.

  17. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  18. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  19. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  20. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-03-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  1. Sintered silicon nitrode recuperator fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatti, A.; Chiu, W. S.; Mccreight, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    The preliminary design and a demonstration of the feasibility of fabricating submodules of an automotive Stirling engine recuperator for waste heat recovery at 370 C are described. Sinterable silicon nitride (Sialon) tubing and plates were fabricated by extrusion and hydrostatic pressing, respectively, suitable for demonstrating a potential method of constructing ceramic recuperator-type heat exchangers. These components were fired in nitrogen atmosphere to 1800 C without significant scale formation so that they can be used in the as-fired condition. A refractory glass composition (Al2O3 x 4.5 CaO.MgO x 11SiO2) was used to join and seal component parts by a brazing technique which formed strong recuperator submodules capable of withstanding repeated thermal cycling to 1370 C. The corrosion resistance of these materials to Na2SO4 + NaCl carbon mixtures was also assessed in atmospheres of air, hydrogen and CO2-N2-H2O mixtures at both 870 C and 1370 C for times to 1000 hours. No significant reaction was observed under any of these test conditions.

  2. Germanium Isotopes - the Global Budget and Paleoceanographic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronas, J. J.; Hammond, D. E.; Rouxel, O. J.

    2017-12-01

    The distribution of element isotope ratios in rocks, sediments, rivers, and seawater can provide key insights about the operation and coupling of various biogeochemical cycles that are directly or indirectly responsible for the climate and habitability of the Earth surface environment. Germanium (Ge) is a trace element that shares many chemical similarities with silicon (Si), in addition to some siderophilic, chalcophilic, and organophilic properties. As a result, Ge stable isotope ratios (δ74Ge) and Ge/Si ratios can be used to trace various biogeochemical processes. These include silicate rock weathering, which modulates atmospheric pCO2 and supplies nutrients to ecosystems, biogenic silica formation, which is coupled to ocean productivity, and marine sediment diagenesis, which ultimately controls the removal of material from the Earth's surface. I will present an overview of my dissertation research concerning the global Ge isotope cycle, with insights into Ge isotope fractionation during secondary mineral precipitation during weathering on continents and during authigenesis in marine sediments. I will also discuss the potential for the δ74Ge sedimentary record to be used as a paleoceanographic proxy, given the constraints on the global Ge isotope budget.

  3. Silicon dendritic web growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, S.

    1984-01-01

    Technological goals for a silicon dendritic web growth program effort are presented. Principle objectives for this program include: (1) grow long web crystals front continuously replenished melt; (2) develop temperature distribution in web and melt; (3) improve reproductibility of growth; (4) develop configurations for increased growth rates (width and speed); (5) develop new growth system components as required for improved growth; and (6) evaluate quality of web growth.

  4. Electrometallurgy of Silicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    wind, plants, and water impounded in elevated reservoirs. Photovoltaic or solar cells, which convert sunlight directly to electricity, belongs tc, the...on record is that of St. Claire DeVille, who claimed that silicon was produced by electrolysing an impure melt of NaAlC14, but his material did not...this composition and purified melts were electrolysed at about 14500C in graphite crucible and using graphite electrodes. Applied potentials were

  5. Silicon Solar Cell Optimization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    from the surface. (b) Oxide mask formation Etching grooves into the silicon requires an effective alkaline-resistant mask which will withstand the...face. This technique employs a very viscous photoresist, Furt #206, in conjunction with multiple spin-applications and bake periods, to effectively ...175 80 125 78 75 74 To compare the effects of groove depth, substrate thick- ness and bulk resistivity, an experiment was conducted. Using identical

  6. Silicon and Civilization,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-04

    less form, or so-called amorphous, as strata of diatomaceous earth , or also in the form of the precious stone--opal. As mentioned, silicon dioxide...skeletons and those of water creatures, which after mortification fall to the bottom of the waters creating strata of diatomaceous earth are also built of...reactions. Likewise, diatomaceous earth has a well developed surface and great adsorptive capa- bility, among others it can absorb a triple excess of

  7. Thermometry of Silicon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Zutter, Brian; Regan, B. C.

    2018-01-01

    Current thermometry techniques lack the spatial resolution required to see the temperature gradients in typical, highly scaled modern transistors. As a step toward addressing this problem, we measure the temperature dependence of the volume plasmon energy in silicon nanoparticles from room temperature to 1250 °C , using a chip-style heating sample holder in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The plasmon energy changes as expected for an electron gas subject to the thermal expansion of silicon. Reversing this reasoning, we find that measurements of the plasmon energy provide an independent measure of the nanoparticle temperature consistent with that of the heater chip's macroscopic, dual-function heater-and-thermometer to within the 5% accuracy of the thermometer's calibration. Thus, silicon has the potential to provide its own high-spatial-resolution thermometric readout signal via measurements of its volume plasmon energy. Furthermore, nanoparticles can, in general, serve as convenient nanothermometers for in situ electron-microscopy experiments.

  8. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  9. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  10. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  11. Silicon-graphene photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yanlong; Li, Jiang; Xu, Yang; Tsang, Hon Ki; Dai, Daoxin

    2018-06-01

    Silicon photonics has attracted much attention because of the advantages of CMOS (complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor) compatibility, ultra-high integrated density, etc. Great progress has been achieved in the past decades. However, it is still not easy to realize active silicon photonic devices and circuits by utilizing the material system of pure silicon due to the limitation of the intrinsic properties of silicon. Graphene has been regarded as a promising material for optoelectronics due to its unique properties and thus provides a potential option for realizing active photonic integrated devices on silicon. In this paper, we present a review on recent progress of some silicon-graphene photonic devices for photodetection, all-optical modulation, as well as thermal-tuning. Project supported by the National Major Research and Development Program (No. 2016YFB0402502), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11374263, 61422510, 61431166001, 61474099, 61674127), and the National Key Research and Development Program (No. 2016YFA0200200).

  12. Europium Silicide – a Prospective Material for Contacts with Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Averyanov, Dmitry V.; Tokmachev, Andrey M.; Karateeva, Christina G.; Karateev, Igor A.; Lobanovich, Eduard F.; Prutskov, Grigory V.; Parfenov, Oleg E.; Taldenkov, Alexander N.; Vasiliev, Alexander L.; Storchak, Vyacheslav G.

    2016-01-01

    Metal-silicon junctions are crucial to the operation of semiconductor devices: aggressive scaling demands low-resistive metallic terminals to replace high-doped silicon in transistors. It suggests an efficient charge injection through a low Schottky barrier between a metal and Si. Tremendous efforts invested into engineering metal-silicon junctions reveal the major role of chemical bonding at the interface: premier contacts entail epitaxial integration of metal silicides with Si. Here we present epitaxially grown EuSi2/Si junction characterized by RHEED, XRD, transmission electron microscopy, magnetization and transport measurements. Structural perfection leads to superb conductivity and a record-low Schottky barrier with n-Si while an antiferromagnetic phase invites spin-related applications. This development opens brand-new opportunities in electronics. PMID:27211700

  13. Europium Silicide - a Prospective Material for Contacts with Silicon.

    PubMed

    Averyanov, Dmitry V; Tokmachev, Andrey M; Karateeva, Christina G; Karateev, Igor A; Lobanovich, Eduard F; Prutskov, Grigory V; Parfenov, Oleg E; Taldenkov, Alexander N; Vasiliev, Alexander L; Storchak, Vyacheslav G

    2016-05-23

    Metal-silicon junctions are crucial to the operation of semiconductor devices: aggressive scaling demands low-resistive metallic terminals to replace high-doped silicon in transistors. It suggests an efficient charge injection through a low Schottky barrier between a metal and Si. Tremendous efforts invested into engineering metal-silicon junctions reveal the major role of chemical bonding at the interface: premier contacts entail epitaxial integration of metal silicides with Si. Here we present epitaxially grown EuSi2/Si junction characterized by RHEED, XRD, transmission electron microscopy, magnetization and transport measurements. Structural perfection leads to superb conductivity and a record-low Schottky barrier with n-Si while an antiferromagnetic phase invites spin-related applications. This development opens brand-new opportunities in electronics.

  14. Electrical Manipulation of Donor Spin Qubits in Silicon and Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigillito, Anthony James

    Many proposals for quantum information devices rely on electronic or nuclear spins in semiconductors because of their long coherence times and compatibility with industrial fabrication processes. One of the most notable qubits is the electron spin bound to phosphorus donors in silicon, which offers coherence times exceeding seconds at low temperatures. These donors are naturally isolated from their environments to the extent that silicon has been coined a "semiconductor vacuum". While this makes for ultra-coherent qubits, it is difficult to couple two remote donors so quantum information proposals rely on high density arrays of qubits. Here, single qubit addressability becomes an issue. Ideally one would address individual qubits using electric fields which can be easily confined. Typically these schemes rely on tuning a donor spin qubit onto and off of resonance with a magnetic driving field. In this thesis, we measure the electrical tunability of phosphorus donors in silicon and use the extracted parameters to estimate the effects of electric-field noise on qubit coherence times. Our measurements show that donor ionization may set in before electron spins can be sufficiently tuned. We therefore explore two alternative options for qubit addressability. First, we demonstrate that nuclear spin qubits can be directly driven using electric fields instead of magnetic fields and show that this approach offers several advantages over magnetically driven spin resonance. In particular, spin transitions can occur at half the spin resonance frequency and double quantum transitions (magnetic-dipole forbidden) can occur. In a second approach to realizing tunable qubits in semiconductors, we explore the option of replacing silicon with germanium. We first measure the coherence and relaxation times for shallow donor spin qubits in natural and isotopically enriched germanium. We find that in isotopically enriched material, coherence times can exceed 1 ms and are limited by a

  15. Silicon crystal growth in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1982-01-01

    The most developed process for silicon crystal growth is the Czochralski (CZ) method which was in production for over two decades. In an effort to reduce cost of single crystal silicon for photovoltaic applications, a directional solidification technique, Heat Exchanger Method (HEM), was adapted. Materials used in HEM and CZ furnaces are quite similar (heaters, crucibles, insulation, etc.). To eliminate the cost of high purity argon, it was intended to use vacuum operation in HEM. Two of the major problems encountered in vacuum processing of silicon are crucible decomposition and silicon carbide formation in the melt.

  16. Noncovalent Hydrogen Isotope Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Breslavskaya, N. N.

    2018-02-01

    Zero-point energies (ZPE) and isotope effects, induced by intermolecular, noncovalent vibrations, are computed and tested by experimental data. The ZPE differences of H- and D-complexes of water with hydrogen, methane, and water molecules are about 100-300 cal/mol; they result to isotope effects IE of 1.20-1.70. Semi-ionic bonds between metal ions and water ligands in M(H2O) 6 2+ complexes are much stronger; their ZPEs are about 12-14 kcal/mol per molecule and result to IE of 1.9-2.1 at 300 K. Protonated (deuterated) water and biwater exhibit the largest ZPE differences and isotope effects; the latter are 25-28 and 12-13 for water and biwater, respectively. Noncovalent IEs contribute markedly into the experimentally measured effects and explain many anomalous and even magic properties of the effects, such as the dependence of IE on the solvents and on the presence of the third substances, enormously large isotope effects at the mild conditions, the difference between IEs measured in the reactions of individual protiated and deuterated compounds and those measured in their mixture. Noncovalent IEs are not negligible and should be taken into account to make correct and substantiated conclusions on the reaction mechanisms. The kinetic equations are derived for the total isotope effects, which include noncovalent IEs as additive factors.

  17. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DOEpatents

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  18. Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Breast Implants Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Description: Silicone gel-filled breast implants have a silicone outer ...

  19. Solar silicon from directional solidification of MG silicon produced via the silicon carbide route

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustioni, M.; Margadonna, D.; Pirazzi, R.; Pizzini, S.

    1986-01-01

    A process of metallurgical grade (MG) silicon production is presented which appears particularly suitable for photovoltaic (PV) applications. The MG silicon is prepared in a 240 KVA, three electrode submerged arc furnace, starting from high grade quartz and high purity silicon carbide. The silicon smelted from the arc furnace was shown to be sufficiently pure to be directionally solidified to 10 to 15 kg. After grinding and acid leaching, had a material yield larger than 90%. With a MG silicon feedstock containing 3 ppmw B, 290 ppmw Fe, 190 ppmw Ti, and 170 ppmw Al, blended with 50% of off grade electronic grade (EG) silicon to reconduct the boron content to a concentration acceptable for solar cell fabrication, the 99% of deep level impurities were concentrated in the last 5% of the ingot. Quite remarkably this material has OCV values higher tham 540 mV and no appreciable shorts due to SiC particles.

  20. Electrical leakage phenomenon in heteroepitaxial cubic silicon carbide on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeepkumar, Aiswarya; Zielinski, Marcin; Bosi, Matteo; Verzellesi, Giovanni; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Iacopi, Francesca

    2018-06-01

    Heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC films on silicon substrates are of technological interest as enablers to integrate the excellent electrical, electronic, mechanical, thermal, and epitaxial properties of bulk silicon carbide into well-established silicon technologies. One critical bottleneck of this integration is the establishment of a stable and reliable electronic junction at the heteroepitaxial interface of the n-type SiC with the silicon substrate. We have thus investigated in detail the electrical and transport properties of heteroepitaxial cubic silicon carbide films grown via different methods on low-doped and high-resistivity silicon substrates by using van der Pauw Hall and transfer length measurements as test vehicles. We have found that Si and C intermixing upon or after growth, particularly by the diffusion of carbon into the silicon matrix, creates extensive interstitial carbon traps and hampers the formation of a stable rectifying or insulating junction at the SiC/Si interface. Although a reliable p-n junction may not be realistic in the SiC/Si system, we can achieve, from a point of view of the electrical isolation of in-plane SiC structures, leakage suppression through the substrate by using a high-resistivity silicon substrate coupled with deep recess etching in between the SiC structures.

  1. Isotope separation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Arnush, Donald; MacKenzie, Kenneth R.; Wuerker, Ralph F.

    1980-01-01

    Isotope separation apparatus consisting of a plurality of cells disposed adjacent to each other in an evacuated container. A common magnetic field is established extending through all of the cells. A source of energetic electrons at one end of the container generates electrons which pass through the cells along the magnetic field lines. Each cell includes an array of collector plates arranged in parallel or in tandem within a common magnetic field. Sets of collector plates are disposed adjacent to each other in each cell. Means are provided for differentially energizing ions of a desired isotope by applying energy at the cyclotron resonant frequency of the desired isotope. As a result, the energized desired ions are preferentially collected by the collector plates.

  2. Engineering Encounters: Reverse Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Veronica Cassone; Ventura, Marcia; Bell, Philip

    2017-01-01

    This column presents ideas and techniques to enhance your science teaching. This month's issue shares information on how students' everyday experiences can support science learning through engineering design. In this article, the authors outline a reverse-engineering model of instruction and describe one example of how it looked in our fifth-grade…

  3. Texturing Silicon Nanowires for Highly Localized Optical Modulation of Cellular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yin; Jiang, Yuanwen; Acaron Ledesma, Hector; Yi, Jaeseok; Gao, Xiang; Weiss, Dara E; Shi, Fengyuan; Tian, Bozhi

    2018-06-18

    Engineered silicon-based materials can display photoelectric and photothermal responses under light illumination, which may lead to further innovations at the silicon-biology interfaces. Silicon nanowires have small radial dimensions, promising as highly localized cellular modulators, however the single crystalline form typically has limited photothermal efficacy due to the poor light absorption and fast heat dissipation. In this work, we report strategies to improve the photothermal response from silicon nanowires by introducing nanoscale textures on the surface and in the bulk. We next demonstrate high-resolution extracellular modulation of calcium dynamics in a number of mammalian cells including glial cells, neurons, and cancer cells. The new materials may be broadly used in probing and modulating electrical and chemical signals at the subcellular length scale, which is currently a challenge in the field of electrophysiology or cellular engineering.

  4. Ames Engineering Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Veronica J.

    2017-01-01

    The Ames Engineering Directorate is the principal engineering organization supporting aerospace systems and spaceflight projects at NASA's Ames Research Center in California's Silicon Valley. The Directorate supports all phases of engineering and project management for flight and mission projects-from R&D to Close-out-by leveraging the capabilities of multiple divisions and facilities.The Mission Design Center (MDC) has full end-to-end mission design capability with sophisticated analysis and simulation tools in a collaborative concurrent design environment. Services include concept maturity level (CML) maturation, spacecraft design and trades, scientific instruments selection, feasibility assessments, and proposal support and partnerships. The Engineering Systems Division provides robust project management support as well as systems engineering, mechanical and electrical analysis and design, technical authority and project integration support to a variety of programs and projects across NASA centers. The Applied Manufacturing Division turns abstract ideas into tangible hardware for aeronautics, spaceflight and science applications, specializing in fabrication methods and management of complex fabrication projects. The Engineering Evaluation Lab (EEL) provides full satellite or payload environmental testing services including vibration, temperature, humidity, immersion, pressure/altitude, vacuum, high G centrifuge, shock impact testing and the Flight Processing Center (FPC), which includes cleanrooms, bonded stores and flight preparation resources. The Multi-Mission Operations Center (MMOC) is composed of the facilities, networks, IT equipment, software and support services needed by flight projects to effectively and efficiently perform all mission functions, including planning, scheduling, command, telemetry processing and science analysis.

  5. Hall mobility in multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, F.; Geilker, J.; Kwapil, W.; Warta, W.; Schubert, M. C.

    2011-08-01

    Knowledge of the carrier mobility in silicon is of utmost importance for photovoltaic applications, as it directly influences the diffusion length and thereby the cell efficiency. Moreover, its value is needed for a correct quantitative evaluation of a variety of lifetime measurements. However, models that describe the carrier mobility in silicon are based on theoretical calculations or fits to experimental data in monocrystalline silicon. Multicrystalline (mc) silicon features crystal defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries, with the latter possibly leading to potential barriers through the trapping of charge carriers and thereby influencing the mobility, as shown, for example, by Maruska et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 36, 381 (1980)]. To quantify the mobilities in multicrystalline silicon, we performed Hall measurements in p-type mc-Si samples of various resistivities and different crystal structures and compared the data to majority carrier Hall mobilities in p-type monocrystalline floatzone (FZ) silicon. For lack of a model that provides reliable values of the Hall mobility in silicon, an empirical fit similar to existing models for conductivity mobilities is proposed based on Hall measurements of monocrystalline p-type FZ silicon. By comparing the measured Hall mobilities obtained from mc silicon with the corresponding Hall mobilities in monocrystalline silicon of the same resistivity, we found that the mobility reduction due to the presence of crystal defects in mc-Si ranges between 0% and 5% only. Mobility decreases of up to 30% as reported by Peter et al. [Proceedings of the 23rd European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Valencia, Spain, 1-5 September 2008], or even of a factor of 2 to 3 as detected by Palais et al. [Mater. Sci. Eng. B 102, 184 (2003)], in multicrystalline silicon were not observed.

  6. Optimizing isotope substitution in graphene for thermal conductivity minimization by genetic algorithm driven molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Michael; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Balasubramanian, Ganesh

    2017-03-01

    We present results from a computational framework integrating genetic algorithm and molecular dynamics simulations to systematically design isotope engineered graphene structures for reduced thermal conductivity. In addition to the effect of mass disorder, our results reveal the importance of atomic distribution on thermal conductivity for the same isotopic concentration. Distinct groups of isotope-substituted graphene sheets are identified based on the atomic composition and distribution. Our results show that in structures with equiatomic compositions, the enhanced scattering by lattice vibrations results in lower thermal conductivities due to the absence of isotopic clusters.

  7. The oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex Brown, B.

    The properties of the oxygen isotopes provide diverse examples of progress made in experiments and theory. This chain of isotopes has been studied from beyond the proton drip line in 12O to beyond the neutron drip line in 25,26O. This short survey starts with the microscopic G matrix approach for 18O of Kuo and Brown in the 1960's and shows how theory has evolved. The nuclear structure around the doubly-magic nucleus 24O is particularly simple in terms of the nuclear shell model. The nuclear structure around the doubly-magic nucleus 16O exhibits the coexistence of single-particle and collective structure.

  8. Iron Isotopes in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehm, K.; Alexander, C. M.; Hauri, E. H.

    2001-12-01

    The recent identification of naturally occurring isotopic mass fractionation of the transition met-als on the Earth has prompted a search for similar variability in meteorites. Studies of Cu, Zn, and Fe, for example, have revealed per-mil level and larger mass fractionations between different bulk meteorites. Such variations can result from temperature-sensitive isotope exchange reactions and kinetic processes, and therefore may reflect conditions in the solar nebula and on meteorite parent bodies. Recent advances in ICP-MS have permitted isotope studies of transition metals and other elements with similarly small isotopic mass dispersions. Among the transition metals, Fe is perhaps the most difficult to analyze by ICP-MS because plasma sources are copious producers of argide molecules that interfere with the measurement of iron isotopes. However, the stable isotope behavior of Fe is of special interest because it is a non-refractory major element in meteorites, present in a variety of mineral associations and redox states. Considerable effort has gone into overcoming the inherent analytical difficulties of measuring Fe using ICP-MS. We recently reported on a technique that achieves argide reduction by operating the plasma source in so-called 'cold' mode. In this presentation, we report results from this ongoing work. To date, analyses of nine different meteorites, and eight individual Tieschitz (H3) chondrules have been completed, along with a number of measurements of the Hawaiian basalt sample Kil1919. All of the bulk meteorite compositions, which include both chondrites and irons, have identical 56Fe/54Fe to within ~ 0.14 per mil (2 sigma), and are indistinguishable from the composition of the terrestrial basalt. The Tieschitz chondrules, on the other hand, tend to have isotopically light compositions. This could reflect formation from fractionated starting material. Alternatively, Fe condensation, under non-equilibrium conditions can enrich light isotopes

  9. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  10. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  11. Silicon Web Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hill, F. E.; Heimlich, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development of techniques to grow silicon web at 25 wq cm/min output rate is reported. Feasibility of web growth with simultaneous melt replenishment is discussed. Other factors covered include: (1) tests of aftertrimmers to improve web width; (2) evaluation of growth lid designs to raise speed and output rate; (3) tests of melt replenishment hardware; and (4) investigation of directed gas flow systems to control unwanted oxide deposition in the system and to improve convective cooling of the web. Compatibility with sufficient solar cell performance is emphasized.

  12. Photodegradation in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, J. W.; Jaworowski, A.; Kleinhenz, R. L.; Pierce, C. B.; Wilsey, N. D.

    1980-01-01

    The state of knowledge concerning the following defects in silicon is briefly surveyed: substitutional impurities; vacancy-related defects; interstitial-related defects; defect pairs. Although a great deal is known, it is argued that not enough is yet known to model radiation damage production in the bulk or in the vicinity of the junction of a solar cell. The results on photon degradation (and enhancement) of solar cells are then reviewed, and it is suggested that defect pairs may be the defects responsible. Mechanisms for photon-induced dissociation of pairs are discussed but a more detailed understanding awaits the identification of the actual defects.

  13. Solar abundance of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Holweger, H.

    1973-07-01

    An analysis of 19 photospheric Si I lines whose oscillator strengths have recently been detertmined by Garz (1973) leads to a solar abundance of silicon, log epsilon /sub Si/ = 7.65 plus or minus 0.07, on the scale where log epsilon /sub H/ = 12. Together with the sodium abundance determained earlier by the same method, a solar abundance ratio /sup epsilon /Na//sup epsilon /Si = 0.045 ( plus or minus 10%) results. Within the error limits this a grees wtth the meteoritic ratio found in carbonaceous chondrites. Results concerning line-broadening by hydrogen are discussed. (auth)

  14. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, C. R.; Gould, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon in volume at low cost were studied. Experiments were performed to evaluate product separation and collection processes, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes, determine the effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction, and make preliminary engineering and economic analyses of a scaled-up process.

  15. DEEP WATER ISOTOPIC CURRENT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, W.H.

    1964-04-21

    A deepwater isotopic current analyzer, which employs radioactive isotopes for measurement of ocean currents at various levels beneath the sea, is described. The apparatus, which can determine the direction and velocity of liquid currents, comprises a shaft having a plurality of radiation detectors extending equidistant radially therefrom, means for releasing radioactive isotopes from the shaft, and means for determining the time required for the isotope to reach a particular detector. (AEC)

  16. Smoother Scribing of Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed new tool used to scribe silicon wafers into chips more smoothly than before. New scriber produces surface that appears ductile. Scribed groove cuts have relatively smooth walls. Scriber consists of diamond pyramid point on rigid shaft. Ethanol flows through shaft and around point, like ink in ballpoint pen. Ethanol has significantly different effect for scribing silicon than water, used in conventional diamond scribers.

  17. Luneburg lens in silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Di Falco, Andrea; Kehr, Susanne C; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2011-03-14

    The Luneburg lens is an aberration-free lens that focuses light from all directions equally well. We fabricated and tested a Luneburg lens in silicon photonics. Such fully-integrated lenses may become the building blocks of compact Fourier optics on chips. Furthermore, our fabrication technique is sufficiently versatile for making perfect imaging devices on silicon platforms.

  18. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  19. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    MedlinePlus

    ... sticky fluid that closely mimics the feel of human fat. Most women feel that silicone breast implants look and feel more like natural breast tissue. Silicone breast implants are available to women 22 and older for breast augmentation and to women of any age for breast ...

  20. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  1. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

  2. Endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy without silicone stent.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Je Yeob; Shim, Woo Sub

    2012-06-01

    In nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction patients that undergo endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR), creation of a patent rhinostomy with adequate epithelialization can be accomplished without a stent. However, in common canalicular obstruction patients, a silicone stent seems to have a beneficial role and to bear more favorable results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcome of endoscopic DCR without the use of a silicone stent. In all, 36 patients (41 eyes) who underwent endoscopic DCR were enrolled in this study. The patients were classified into a DCR with silicone stent group and a DCR without silicone stent group. Then each of the groups was subdivided into common canalicular obstruction group and NLD obstruction group. Surgical outcomes were evaluated by postoperative symptom improvement and patency of the rhinostomy under nasal endoscopic exam. The epiphora was improved in 84.2% of the silicone stent group and 81.8% of the non-silicone stent group. Categorized by the level of obstruction, in common canalicular obstruction, the success rate was 84.5% (11/13) in the silicone stent group and 57.1% (4/7) in the no stent group. In NLD obstruction, the success rate was 83.0% (5/6) in the silicone stent group and 93.3% (14/15) in the no stent group.

  3. Method for separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1978-01-01

    A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

  4. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  5. Isotope-abundance variations and atomic weights of selected elements: 2016 (IUPAC Technical Report)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Shrestha, Yesha

    2016-01-01

    There are 63 chemical elements that have two or more isotopes that are used to determine their standard atomic weights. The isotopic abundances and atomic weights of these elements can vary in normal materials due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay). These variations are well known for 12 elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, bromine, and thallium), and the standard atomic weight of each of these elements is given by IUPAC as an interval with lower and upper bounds. Graphical plots of selected materials and compounds of each of these elements have been published previously. Herein and at the URL http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7GF0RN2, we provide isotopic abundances, isotope-delta values, and atomic weights for each of the upper and lower bounds of these materials and compounds.

  6. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals, phase 1 and phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, C. R.; Gould, R. K.; Felder, W.

    1981-01-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon are described. Product separation and collection processes were evaluated, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes and effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction were determined, and preliminary engineering and economic analysis of a scaled up process were made. The feasibility of the basic process to make and collect silicon was demonstrated. The jet impaction/separation process was demonstrated to be a purification process. The rate at which gas phase species from silicon particle precursors, the time required for silane decomposition to produce particles, and the competing rate of growth of silicon seed particles injected into a decomposing silane environment were determined. The extent of silane decomposition as a function of residence time, temperature, and pressure was measured by infrared absorption spectroscopy. A simplistic model is presented to explain the growth of silicon in a decomposing silane enviroment.

  7. SILICON AND BONE HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    JUGDAOHSINGH, R.

    2009-01-01

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health. PMID:17435952

  8. Silicon nanowire Esaki diodes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Heinz; Bessire, Cedric; Björk, Mikael T; Schenk, Andreas; Riel, Heike

    2012-02-08

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon nanowire tunnel diodes. The silicon nanowires were grown on p-type Si substrates using Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth and in situ n-type doping. Electrical measurements reveal Esaki diode characteristics with peak current densities of 3.6 kA/cm(2), peak-to-valley current ratios of up to 4.3, and reverse current densities of up to 300 kA/cm(2) at 0.5 V reverse bias. Strain-dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements exhibit a decrease of the peak tunnel current with uniaxial tensile stress and an increase of 48% for 1.3 GPa compressive stress along the <111> growth direction, revealing the strain dependence of the Si band structure and thus the tunnel barrier. The contributions of phonons to the indirect tunneling process were probed by conductance measurements at 4.2 K. These measurements show phonon peaks at energies corresponding to the transverse acoustical and transverse optical phonons. In addition, the low-temperature conductance measurements were extended to higher biases to identify potential impurity states in the band gap. The results demonstrate that the most likely impurity, namely, Au from the catalyst particle, is not detectable, a finding that is also supported by the excellent device properties of the Esaki diodes reported here. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  9. Multimode Silicon Nanowire Transistors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The combined capabilities of both a nonplanar design and nonconventional carrier injection mechanisms are subject to recent scientific investigations to overcome the limitations of silicon metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. In this Letter, we present a multimode field effect transistors device using silicon nanowires that feature an axial n-type/intrinsic doping junction. A heterostructural device design is achieved by employing a self-aligned nickel-silicide source contact. The polymorph operation of the dual-gate device enabling the configuration of one p- and two n-type transistor modes is demonstrated. Not only the type but also the carrier injection mode can be altered by appropriate biasing of the two gate terminals or by inverting the drain bias. With a combined band-to-band and Schottky tunneling mechanism, in p-type mode a subthreshold swing as low as 143 mV/dec and an ON/OFF ratio of up to 104 is found. As the device operates in forward bias, a nonconventional tunneling transistor is realized, enabling an effective suppression of ambipolarity. Depending on the drain bias, two different n-type modes are distinguishable. The carrier injection is dominated by thermionic emission in forward bias with a maximum ON/OFF ratio of up to 107 whereas in reverse bias a Schottky tunneling mechanism dominates the carrier transport. PMID:25303290

  10. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  11. Study of 236U/238U ratio at CIRCE using a 16-strip silicon detector with a TOF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, M.; De Cesare, N.; D'Onofrio, A.; Gialanella, L.; Terrasi, F.

    2015-04-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is presently the most sensitive technique for the measurement of long-lived actinides, e.g. 236U and xPu isotopes. A new actinide AMS system, based on a 3-MV pelletron tandem accelerator, is operated at the Center for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage (CIRCE) in Caserta, Italy. In this paper we report on the procedure adopted to increase the 236U abundance sensitivity as low as possible. The energy and position determinations of the 236U ions, using a 16-strip silicon detector have been obtained. A 236U/238U isotopic ratio background level of about 2.9×10-11 was obtained, summing over all the strips, using a Time of Flight-Energy (TOF-E) system with a 16-strip silicon detector (4.9×10-12 just with one strip).

  12. Layered Systems Engineering Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Overman, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    A notation is described for depicting the relationships between multiple, contemporaneous systems engineering efforts undertaken within a multi-layer system-of-systems hierarchy. We combined the concepts of remoteness of activity from the end customer, depiction of activity on a timeline, and data flow to create a new kind of diagram which we call a "Layered Vee Diagram." This notation is an advance over previous notations because it is able to be simultaneously precise about activity, level of granularity, product exchanges, and timing; these advances provide systems engineering managers a significantly improved ability to express and understand the relationships between many systems engineering efforts. Using the new notation, we obtain a key insight into the relationship between project duration and the strategy selected for chaining the systems engineering effort between layers, as well as insights into the costs, opportunities, and risks associated with alternate chaining strategies.

  13. Suitability of selected free-gas and dissolved-gas sampling containers for carbon isotopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Eby, P; Gibson, J J; Yi, Y

    2015-07-15

    Storage trials were conducted for 2 to 3 months using a hydrocarbon and carbon dioxide gas mixture with known carbon isotopic composition to simulate typical hold times for gas samples prior to isotopic analysis. A range of containers (both pierced and unpierced) was periodically sampled to test for δ(13)C isotopic fractionation. Seventeen containers were tested for free-gas storage (20°C, 1 atm pressure) and 7 containers were tested for dissolved-gas storage, the latter prepared by bubbling free gas through tap water until saturated (20°C, 1 atm) and then preserved to avoid biological activity by acidifying to pH 2 with phosphoric acid and stored in the dark at 5°C. Samples were extracted using valves or by piercing septa, and then introduced into an isotope ratio mass spectrometer for compound-specific δ(13)C measurements. For free gas, stainless steel canisters and crimp-top glass serum bottles with butyl septa were most effective at preventing isotopic fractionation (pierced and unpierced), whereas silicone and PTFE-butyl septa allowed significant isotopic fractionation. FlexFoil and Tedlar bags were found to be effective only for storage of up to 1 month. For dissolved gas, crimp-top glass serum bottles with butyl septa were again effective, whereas silicone and PTFE-butyl were not. FlexFoil bags were reliable for up to 2 months. Our results suggest a range of preferred containers as well as several that did not perform very well for isotopic analysis. Overall, the results help establish better QA/QC procedures to avoid isotopic fractionation when storing environmental gas samples. Recommended containers for air transportation include steel canisters and glass serum bottles with butyl septa (pierced and unpierced). Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project, directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulation system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials, are reported. Results of the following are discussed: (1) weather-ometer stressing vs. weathering history of silicon and silicon modified materials; (2) humidity/temperature cycling exposure; (3) exposure at high humidity/high temperature; (4) outdoor exposure stress; (5) thermal cycling stress; and (6) UV screening agents. The plans for the next quarter are outlined.

  15. Crystalline silicon growth in nickel/a-silicon bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohiddon, Md Ahamad; Naidu, K. Lakshun; Dalba, G.; Rocca, F.; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam

    2013-02-01

    The effect of substrate temperature on amorphous Silicon crystallization, mediated by metal impurity is reported. Bilayers of Ni(200nm)/Si(400nm) are deposited on fused silica substrate by electron beam evaporator at 200 and 500 °C. Raman mapping shows that, 2 to 5 micron size crystalline silicon clusters are distributed over the entire surface of the sample. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies demonstrate silicon crystallizes over the metal silicide seeds and grow with the annealing temperature.

  16. Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1981-01-01

    Advanced RTG concepts utilizing improved thermoelectric materials and converter concepts are under study at Fairchild for DOE. The design described here is based on DOE's newly developed radioisotope heat source, and on an improved silicon-germanium material and multicouple converter module under development at Syncal. Fairchild's assignment was to combine the above into an attractive power system for use in space, and to assess the specific power and other attributes of that design.

  17. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, S.D.; Weimer, A.W.; Carroll, D.F.; Eisman, G.A.; Cochran, G.A.; Susnitzky, D.W.; Beaman, D.R.; Nilsen, K.J.

    1997-07-01

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  18. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    2002-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  19. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    1999-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  20. Extracting Silicon From Sodium-Process Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapur, V.; Sanjurjo, A.; Sancier, K. M.; Nanis, L.

    1982-01-01

    New acid leaching process purifies silicon produced in reaction between silicon fluoride and sodium. Concentration of sodium fluoride and other impurities and byproducts remaining in silicon are within acceptable ranges for semi-conductor devices. Leaching process makes sodium reduction process more attractive for making large quantities of silicon for solar cells.

  1. Ultrasonic Measurement Of Silicon-Growth Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    Position of interface between silicon melt and growing ribbon of silicon measured with aid of reflected ultrasound, according to proposal. Reflections reveal characteristics of ribbon and melt. Ultrasound pulses travel through rods to silicon ribbon growing by dendritic-web process. Rods return reflections of pulses to sonic transducers. Isolate transducers thermally, but not acoustically, from hot silicon melt.

  2. Adjustable Lid Aids Silicon-Ribbon Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, J. P.; Steidensticker, R. G.; Duncan, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Closely-spaced crucible cover speeds up solidification. Growth rate of dendritic-web silicon ribbon from molten silicon increased by controlling distance between crucible susceptor lid and liquid/solid interface. Lid held in relatively high position when crucible newly filled with chunks of polycrystalline silicon. As silicon melts and forms pool of liquid at lower level, lid gradually lowered.

  3. Mitotic trafficking of silicon microparticles†

    PubMed Central

    Serda, Rita E.; Ferrati, Silvia; Godin, Biana; Tasciotti, Ennio; Liu, XueWu

    2010-01-01

    Multistage carriers were recently introduced by our laboratory, with the concurrent objectives of co-localized delivery of multiple therapeutic agents, the “theranostic” integration of bioactive moieties with imaging contrast, and the selective, potentially personalized bypassing of the multiplicity of biological barriers that adversely impact biodistribution of vascularly injected particulates. Mesoporous (“nanoporous”) silicon microparticles were selected as primary carriers in multi-stage devices, with targets including vascular endothelia at pathological lesions. The objective of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility of mesoporous silicon microparticles with endothelial cells using in vitro assays with an emphasis on microparticle compatibility with mitotic events. We observed that vascular endothelial cells, following internalization of silicon microparticles, maintain cellular integrity, as demonstrated by cellular morphology, viability and intact mitotic trafficking of vesicles bearing silicon microparticles. The presence of gold or iron oxide nanoparticles within the porous matrix did not alter the cellular uptake of particles or the viability of endothelial cells subsequent to engulfment of microparticles. Endothelial cells maintained basal levels of IL-6 and IL-8 release in the presence of silicon microparticles. This is the first study that demonstrates polarized, ordered partitioning of endosomes based on tracking microparticles. The finding that mitotic sorting of endosomes is unencumbered by the presence of nanoporous silicon microparticles advocates the use of silicon microparticles for biomedical applications. PMID:20644846

  4. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  5. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  6. Silicon-on-Insulator Pin Diodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Thin (0.5 Micron) Silicon-on-Oxidized Silicon Fig. 2.8 SEM Photographs of CVD Silicon Dioxide on Aluminum 28 After 1500 0 C Anneal in Oxygen...silicon nitride over the silicon dioxide encapsu- -9- lation layer and by depositing the silicon dioxide with a plasma CVD process which uses N20 as...relief via thermal expansion matching varies lin- -27- A B Figure 2.8: SEM Photographs of CVD Silicon Dioxide on Aluminum after 15000 C Anneal in Oxygen

  7. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  8. Predicting silicon pore optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacanti, Giuseppe; Barriére, Nicolas; Bavdaz, Marcos; Chatbi, Abdelhakim; Collon, Maximilien; Dekker, Danielle; Girou, David; Günther, Ramses; van der Hoeven, Roy; Landgraf, Boris; Sforzini, Jessica; Vervest, Mark; Wille, Eric

    2017-09-01

    Continuing improvement of Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) calls for regular extension and validation of the tools used to model and predict their X-ray performance. In this paper we present an updated geometrical model for the SPO optics and describe how we make use of the surface metrology collected during each of the SPO manufacturing runs. The new geometrical model affords the user a finer degree of control on the mechanical details of the SPO stacks, while a standard interface has been developed to make use of any type of metrology that can return changes in the local surface normal of the reflecting surfaces. Comparisons between the predicted and actual performance of samples optics will be shown and discussed.

  9. Measuring silicon pore optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacanti, Giuseppe; Barrière, Nicolas; Bavdaz, Marcos; Chatbi, Abdelhakim; Collon, Maximilien; Dekker, Daniëlle; Girou, David; Günther, Ramses; van der Hoeven, Roy; Krumrey, Michael; Landgraf, Boris; Müller, Peter; Schreiber, Swenja; Vervest, Mark; Wille, Eric

    2017-09-01

    While predictions based on the metrology (local slope errors and detailed geometrical details) play an essential role in controlling the development of the manufacturing processes, X-ray characterization remains the ultimate indication of the actual performance of Silicon Pore Optics (SPO). For this reason SPO stacks and mirror modules are routinely characterized at PTB's X-ray Pencil Beam Facility at BESSY II. Obtaining standard X-ray results quickly, right after the production of X-ray optics is essential to making sure that X-ray results can inform decisions taken in the lab. We describe the data analysis pipeline in operations at cosine, and how it allows us to go from stack production to full X-ray characterization in 24 hours.

  10. Crystallization of Silicon Ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Purity constraints for reasonable solar-cell efficiency require that silicon-ribbon growth for photovoltaics occur in a regime in which constitutional supercooling or other compositional effects on the crystallization front are not important. A major consideration in the fundamentals of crystallization is the removal of the latent heat of fusion. The direction of removal, compared with the growth direction, has a major influence on the crystallization rate and the development of localized stresses. The detailed shape of the crystallization front appears to have two forms: that required for dendritic-web growth, and that occurring in all others. After the removal of the latent heat of fusion, the thermal-mechanical behavior of all ribbons appears similar within the constraints of the exothermal gradient. The technological constraints in achieving the required thermal and mechanical conditions vary widely among the growth processes.

  11. Formation of porous silicon oxide from substrate-bound silicon rich silicon oxide layers by continuous-wave laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Fricke-Begemann, Th.; Peretzki, P.; Ihlemann, J.; Seibt, M.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon oxide that show room temperature photoluminescence (PL) have great potential in silicon light emission applications. Nanocrystalline silicon particle formation by laser irradiation has the unique advantage of spatially controlled heating, which is compatible with modern silicon micro-fabrication technology. In this paper, we employ continuous wave laser irradiation to decompose substrate-bound silicon-rich silicon oxide films into crystalline silicon particles and silicon dioxide. The resulting microstructure is studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques with considerable emphasis on the formation and properties of laser damaged regions which typically quench room temperature PL from the nanoparticles. It is shown that such regions consist of an amorphous matrix with a composition similar to silicon dioxide which contains some nanometric silicon particles in addition to pores. A mechanism referred to as "selective silicon ablation" is proposed which consistently explains the experimental observations. Implications for the damage-free laser decomposition of silicon-rich silicon oxides and also for controlled production of porous silicon dioxide films are discussed.

  12. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George C. (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fluidized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  13. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fludized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  14. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A cost effective encapsulant system was identified and a silicone acrylic cover material containing a durable ultraviolet screening agent was prepared. The effectiveness of the cover material in protecting photo-oxidatively sensitive polymers was demonstrated.

  15. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  16. Silicon biogeochemical processes in a large river (Cauvery, India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameswari Rajasekaran, Mangalaa; Arnaud, Dapoigny; Jean, Riotte; Sarma Vedula, V. S. S.; Nittala, S. Sarma; Sankaran, Subramanian; Gundiga Puttojirao, Gurumurthy; Keshava, Balakrishna; Cardinal, Damien

    2016-04-01

    Silicon (Si), one of the key nutrients for diatom growth in ocean, is principally released during silicate weathering on continents and then exported by rivers. Phytoplankton composition is determined by the availability of Si relative to other nutrients, mainly N and P, which fluxes in estuarine and coastal systems are affected by eutrophication due to land use and industrialization. In order to understand the biogeochemical cycle of Si and its supply to the coastal ocean, we studied a tropical monsoonal river from Southern India (Cauvery) and compare it with other large and small rivers. Cauvery is the 7th largest river in India with a basin covering 85626 sq.km. The major part of the basin (˜66%) is covered by agriculture and inhabited by more than 30 million inhabitants. There are 96 dams built across the basin. As a consequence, 80% of the historical discharge is diverted, mainly for irrigation (Meunier et al. 2015). This makes the Cauvery River a good example of current anthropogenic pressure on silicon biogeochemical cycle. We measured amorphous silica contents (ASi) and isotopic composition of dissolved silicon (δ30Si-DSi) in the Cauvery estuary, including freshwater end-member and groundwater as well as along a 670 km transect along the river course. Other Indian rivers and estuaries have also been measured, including some less impacted by anthropogenic pressure. The average Cauvery δ30Si signature just upstream the estuary is 2.21±0.15 ‰ (n=3) which is almost 1‰ heavier than the groundwater isotopic composition (1.38±0.03). The δ30Si-DSi of Cauvery water is also almost 1‰ heavier than the world river supply to the ocean estimated so far and 0.4‰ heavier than other large Indian rivers like Ganges (Frings et al 2015) and Krishna. On the other hand, the smaller watersheds (Ponnaiyar, Vellar, and Penna) adjacent to Cauvery also display heavy δ30Si-DSi. Unlike the effect of silicate weathering, the heavy isotopic compositions in the river

  17. Isotope Brayton space power systems and their technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, H.

    1972-01-01

    The objectives of the NASA Brayton Space Power Program and the advantages of achieving an isotope Brayton space power system are enumerated. The paper describes the 2-15 kWe Brayton engine, its subsystems, and major components and summarizes the status of the test program. Two areas of Brayton constituent technology are discussed-gas bearings and heat exchangers. A summary is given of a 500-2500 W isotope Brayton space power system study that showed very attractive performance, simplicity, and low cost for a system in this power range.

  18. Corrosion Characteristics of Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Munro, R. G.; Dapkunas, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    The present work is a review of the substantial effort that has been made to measure and understand the effects of corrosion with respect to the properties, performance, and durability of various forms of silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The review encompasses corrosion in diverse environments, usually at temperatures of 1000 °C or higher. The environments include dry and moist oxygen, mixtures of hot gaseous vapors, molten salts, molten metals, and complex environments pertaining to coal ashes and slags. PMID:28053489

  19. The oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. Alex

    The properties of the oxygen isotopes provide diverse examples of progress made in experiments and theory. This chain of isotopes has been studied from beyond the proton drip line in 12O to beyond the neutron drip line in 25,26O. This short survey starts with the microscopic G matrix approach for 18O of Kuo and Brown in the 1960’s and shows how theory has evolved. The nuclear structure around the doubly-magic nucleus 24O is particularly simple in terms of the nuclear shell model. The nuclear structure around the doubly-magic nucleus 16O exhibits the coexistence of single-particle and collective structure.

  20. Osmium isotopic homogeneity in the CK carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goderis, Steven; Brandon, Alan D.; Mayer, Bernhard; Humayun, Munir

    2017-11-01

    Variable proportions of isotopically diverse presolar components are known to account for nucleosynthetic isotopic anomalies for a variety of elements (e.g., Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Sr, Zr, Mo, Ru, Pd, Ba, Nd, and Sm) in both bulk chondrites and achondrites. However, although large Os isotopic anomalies have been measured in acid leachates and residues of unequilibrated chondrites, bulk chondrites of various groups, iron meteorites, and pallasites exhibit Os isotopic compositions that are indistinguishable from terrestrial or bulk solar isotopic abundances. Since the magnitude of nucleosynthetic anomalies is typically largest in the carbonaceous chondrites, this study reports high-precision Os isotopic compositions and highly siderophile element (HSE) concentrations for ten CK chondrites. The isotope dilution concentration data for HSE and high-precision Os isotope ratios were determined on the same digestion aliquots, to precisely correct for radiogenic contributions to 186Os and 187Os. While acid leached bulk unequilibrated carbonaceous chondrites show deficits of s-process Os components to the same extent as revealed by unequilibrated enstatite, ordinary, and Rumuruti chondrites, equilibrated bulk CK chondrites exhibit no resolvable Os isotopic anomalies. These observations support the idea that acid-resistant, carbon-rich presolar grains, such as silicon carbide (SiC) or graphite, are major carriers for nucleosynthetic isotopic anomalies of Os. The destruction of these presolar grains, which are omnipresent in unequilibrated meteorites, must have occurred during aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism, early in the CK chondrite parent body history. The dispersal of CK chondrites along the IIIAB iron meteorite isochron on a 187Os/188Os versus 187Re/188Os diagram, with Re/Os ratios from 0.032 to 0.083, in combination with the observed redistribution of other HSE (e.g., Pt, Pd), highlights the influence of parent body processes, overprinted by effects of recent

  1. Strong coupling of a single electron in silicon to a microwave photon.

    PubMed

    Mi, X; Cady, J V; Zajac, D M; Deelman, P W; Petta, J R

    2017-01-13

    Silicon is vital to the computing industry because of the high quality of its native oxide and well-established doping technologies. Isotopic purification has enabled quantum coherence times on the order of seconds, thereby placing silicon at the forefront of efforts to create a solid-state quantum processor. We demonstrate strong coupling of a single electron in a silicon double quantum dot to the photonic field of a microwave cavity, as shown by the observation of vacuum Rabi splitting. Strong coupling of a quantum dot electron to a cavity photon would allow for long-range qubit coupling and the long-range entanglement of electrons in semiconductor quantum dots. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. A review of the silicon material task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutwack, R.

    1984-01-01

    The Silicon Material Task of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project was assigned the objective of developing the technology for low-cost processes for producing polysilicon suitable for terrestrial solar-cell applications. The Task program comprised sections for process developments for semiconductor-grade and solar-cell-grade products. To provide information for deciding upon process designs, extensive investigations of the effects of impurities on material properties and the performance of cells were conducted. The silane process of the Union Carbide Corporation was carried through several stages of technical and engineering development; a pilot plant was the culmination of this effort. The work to establish silane fluidized-bed technology for a low-cost process is continuing. The advantages of the use of dichlorosilane is a siemens-type were shown by Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation. The development of other processes is described.

  3. A review of the silicon material task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutwack, R.

    1984-02-01

    The Silicon Material Task of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project was assigned the objective of developing the technology for low-cost processes for producing polysilicon suitable for terrestrial solar-cell applications. The Task program comprised sections for process developments for semiconductor-grade and solar-cell-grade products. To provide information for deciding upon process designs, extensive investigations of the effects of impurities on material properties and the performance of cells were conducted. The silane process of the Union Carbide Corporation was carried through several stages of technical and engineering development; a pilot plant was the culmination of this effort. The work to establish silane fluidized-bed technology for a low-cost process is continuing. The advantages of the use of dichlorosilane is a siemens-type were shown by Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation. The development of other processes is described.

  4. Brillouin Optomechanics in Coupled Silicon Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinel, Y. A. V.; Santos, F. G. S.; Luiz, G. O.; Alegre, T. P. Mayer; Wiederhecker, G. S.

    2017-03-01

    The simultaneous control of optical and mechanical waves has enabled a range of fundamental and technological breakthroughs, from the demonstration of ultra-stable frequency reference devices, to the exploration of the quantum-classical boundaries in optomechanical laser-cooling experiments. More recently, such an optomechanical interaction has been observed in integrated nano-waveguides and microcavities in the Brillouin regime, where short-wavelength mechanical modes scatter light at several GHz. Here we engineer coupled optical microcavities to enable a low threshold excitation of mechanical travelling-wave modes through backward stimulated Brillouin scattering. Exploring the backward scattering we propose silicon microcavity designs based on laterally coupled single and double-layer cavities, the proposed structures enable optomechanical coupling with very high frequency modes (11 to 25 GHz) and large optomechanical coupling rates (g0/2π) from 50 kHz to 90 kHz.

  5. Carbon isotopic characterization of formaldehyde emitted by vehicles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ping; Wen, Sheng; Liu, Yonglin; Bi, Xinhui; Chan, Lo Yin; Feng, Jialiang; Wang, Xinming; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2014-04-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant carbonyl compound in the atmosphere, and vehicle exhaust emission is one of its important anthropogenic sources. However, there is still uncertainty regarding HCHO flux from vehicle emission as well as from other sources. Herein, automobile source was characterized using HCHO carbon isotopic ratio to assess its contributions to atmospheric flux and demonstrate the complex production/consumption processes during combustion in engine cylinder and subsequent catalytic treatment of exhaust. Vehicle exhausts were sampled under different idling states and HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were measured by gas chromatograph-combustion-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). The HCHO directly emitted from stand-alone engines (gasoline and diesel) running at different load was also sampled and measured. The HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were from -30.8 to -25.7‰ for gasoline engine, and from -26.2 to -20.7‰ for diesel engine, respectively. For diesel vehicle without catalytic converter, the HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were -22.1 ± 2.1‰, and for gasoline vehicle with catalytic converter, the ratios were -21.4 ± 0.7‰. Most of the HCHO carbon isotopic ratios were heavier than the fuel isotopic ratios (from -29 to -27‰). For gasoline vehicle, the isotopic fractionation (Δ13C) between HCHO and fuel isotopic ratios was 7.4 ± 0.7‰, which was higher than that of HCHO from stand-alone gasoline engine (Δ13Cmax = 2.7‰), suggesting additional consumption by the catalytic converter. For diesel vehicle without catalytic converter, Δ13C was 5.7 ± 2.0‰, similar to that of stand-alone diesel engine. In general, the carbon isotopic signatures of HCHO emitted from automobiles were not sensitive to idling states or to other vehicle parameters in our study condition. On comparing these HCHO carbon isotopic data with those of past studies, the atmospheric HCHO in a bus station in Guangzhou might mainly come from vehicle emission for

  6. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  7. [Study of purity tests for silicone resins].

    PubMed

    Sato, Kyoko; Otsuki, Noriko; Ohori, Akio; Chinda, Mitsuru; Furusho, Noriko; Osako, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    In the 8th edition of Japan's Specifications and Standards for Food Additives, the purity test for silicone resins requires the determination of the refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the extracted silicone oil, and allows for only a limited amount of silicon dioxide. In the purity test, carbon tetrachloride is used to separate the silicone oil and silicon dioxide. To exclude carbon tetrachloride, methods were developed for separating the silicone oil and silicon dioxide from silicone resin, which use hexane and 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane. For silicone oil, the measured refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the silicone oil obtained from the hexane extract were shown to be equivalent to those of the intact silicone oil. In regard to silicon dioxide, it was confirmed that, following the separation with 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane, the level of silicon dioxide in silicone resin can be accurately determined. Therefore, in this study, we developed a method for testing the purity of silicone resins without the use of carbon tetrachloride, which is a harmful reagent.

  8. Evaluation of Sustainability of the Carbon and Silicon Ecosystem: From Nanoparticles to Macroworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolin, V.

    Rapid development of nanotechnologies has led to a complicated problem of utilization, storage and treatment of waste nanodevices of silicon and carbon origin. The processes of physico-chemical and biogeochemical destruction of carbon—silicon—uranium nanoparticles of Chernobyl origin has been studied. The period of half-destruction assessed by leaching of different radionuclide from particles is between 5 and 25 years. Natural ecosystems are generally of carbon and silicon origin. The behavior of radionuclide in natural media is observed over a period of 20 years. For the balance calculations we have utilized the Geochemical Transition Factor (GTF) that represents the quantity of substance, which is accumulated by living matter from the area unit. The main part of total carbon is involved in biogeochemical cycles in the forest ecosystem. Anthropogenic activity leads to a considerable imbalance of carbon isotopes. The distribution of carbon isotopes between different biotic levels demonstrates that radiocarbon of artificial emission is substantially less bio-available than those from natural sources. The environmental ability to recovery, lies in decontamination of carbon trophic circuits, is an order of magnitude greater than the rate of natural attenuation and corresponds to the removal of artificial matter from natural silicon media. The modern sustainability of the silicon and carbon ecosystem is determined by an insignificant quantity of artificial matter involved in biogeochemical cycles.

  9. Isotope scattering and phonon thermal conductivity in light atom compounds: LiH and LiF

    DOE PAGES

    Lindsay, Lucas R.

    2016-11-08

    Engineered isotope variation is a pathway toward modulating lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of a material through changes in phonon-isotope scattering. The effects of isotope variation on intrinsic thermal resistance is little explored, as varying isotopes have relatively small differences in mass and thus do not affect bulk phonon dispersions. However, for light elements isotope mass variation can be relatively large (e.g., hydrogen and deuterium). Using a first principles Peierls-Boltzmann transport equation approach the effects of isotope variance on lattice thermal transport in ultra-low-mass compound materials LiH and LiF are characterized. The isotope mass variance modifies the intrinsic thermal resistance viamore » modulation of acoustic and optic phonon frequencies, while phonon-isotope scattering from mass disorder plays only a minor role. This leads to some unusual cases where values of isotopically pure systems ( 6LiH, 7Li 2H and 6LiF) are lower than the values from their counterparts with naturally occurring isotopes and phonon-isotope scattering. However, these differences are relatively small. The effects of temperature-driven lattice expansion on phonon dispersions and calculated κ are also discussed. This work provides insight into lattice thermal conductivity modulation with mass variation and the interplay of intrinsic phonon-phonon and phonon-isotope scattering in interesting light atom systems.« less

  10. Martian Rocks Rich in Silicon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-11

    Data from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer APXS instrument on NASA Mars rover Curiosity show an unusual enrichment of silicon in the rocks dubbed Wildrose and Bonanza King, relative to other rocks studied at Gale Crater on Mars.

  11. Silicon chemistry in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    A new model of interstellar silicon chemistry is presented that explains the lack of SiO detections in cold clouds and contains an exponential temperature dependence for the SiO abundance. A key aspect of the model is the sensitivity of SiO production by neutral silicon reactions to density and temperature, which arises from the dependence of the rate coefficients on the population of the excited fine-structure levels of the silicon atom. As part of the explanation of the lack of SiO detections at low temperatures and densities, the model also emphasizes the small efficiencies of the production routes and the correspondingly long times needed to reach equilibrium. Measurements of the abundance of SiO, in conjunction with theory, can provide information on the physical properties of interstellar clouds such as the abundance of oxygen bearing molecules and the depletion of interstellar silicon.

  12. Morphological Characterization of Silicone Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gido, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Silicone hydrogel materials are used in the latest generation of extended wear soft contact lenses. To ensure comfort and eye health, these materials must simultaneously exhibit high oxygen permeability and high water permeability / hydrophilicity. The materials achieve these opposing requirements based on bicontinuous composite of nanoscale domains of oxygen permeable (silicones) and hydrophilic (water soluble polymer) materials. The microphase separated morphology of silicone hydrogel contact lens materials was imaged using field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Additional morphological information was provided by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). These results all indicate a nanophase separated structure of silicone rich (oxygen permeable) and carbon rich (water soluble polymer) domains separated on a length scale of about 10 nm.

  13. Laser isotope separation of erbium and other isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Haynam, Christopher A.; Worden, Earl F.

    1995-01-01

    Laser isotope separation is accomplished using at least two photoionization pathways of an isotope simultaneously, where each pathway comprises two or more transition steps. This separation method has been applied to the selective photoionization of erbium isotopes, particularly for the enrichment of .sup.167 Er. The hyperfine structure of .sup.167 Er was used to find two three-step photoionization pathways having a common upper energy level.

  14. Laser isotope separation of erbium and other isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Haynam, C.A.; Worden, E.F.

    1995-08-22

    Laser isotope separation is accomplished using at least two photoionization pathways of an isotope simultaneously, where each pathway comprises two or more transition steps. This separation method has been applied to the selective photoionization of erbium isotopes, particularly for the enrichment of {sup 167}Er. The hyperfine structure of {sup 167}Er was used to find two three-step photoionization pathways having a common upper energy level. 3 figs.

  15. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  16. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor); Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  17. Silicon Hot-Electron Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas R.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Mitchell, Robert R.; Isenberg, Hal D.; Stahle, Carl M.; Cao, Nga T.; Schneider, Gideon; Travers, Douglas E.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a new type of direct detector, a silicon hot-electron bolometer, for measurements in the far-infrared and submillimeter spectral ranges. High performance bolometers can be made using the electron-phonon conductance in heavily doped silicon to provide thermal isolation from the cryogenic bath. Noise performance is expected to be near thermodynamic limits, allowing background limited performance for many far infrared and submillimeter photometric and spectroscopic applications.

  18. Low cost solar silicon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mede, Matt

    2009-08-01

    The worldwide demand for solar grade silicon reached an all time high between 2007 and 2008. Although growth in the solar industry is slowing due to the current economic downturn, demand is expected to rebound in 2011 based on current cost models. However, demand will increase even more than currently anticipated if costs are reduced. This situation creates an opportunity for new and innovative approaches to the production of photovoltaic grade silicon, especially methods which can demonstrate cost reductions over currently utilized processes.

  19. Low cost silicon solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, K. V.; Serreze, H. B.; Bates, H. E.; Morrison, A. D.; Jewett, D. N.; Ho, J. C. T.; Schwuttke, G. H.; Ciszek, T. F.; Kran, A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous growth methodology for silicon solar cell ribbons deals with capillary effects, die effects, thermal effects and crystal shape effects. Emphasis centers on the shape of the meniscus at the ribbon edge as a factor contributing to ribbon quality with respect to defect densities. Structural and electrical characteristics of edge defined, film-fed grown silicon ribbons are elaborated. Ribbon crystal solar cells produce AMO efficiencies of 6 to 10%.

  20. Metallization of Large Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    A metallization scheme was developed which allows selective plating of silicon solar cell surfaces. The system is comprised of three layers. Palladium, through the formation of palladium silicide at 300 C in nitrogen, makes ohmic contact to the silicon surface. Nickel, plated on top of the palladium silicide layer, forms a solderable interface. Lead-tin solder on the nickel provides conductivity and allows a convenient means for interconnection of cells. To apply this metallization, three chemical plating baths are employed.

  1. Soul on Silicon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurzweil, Raymond C.

    1994-01-01

    Summarizes recent advances in computer simulation and "reverse engineering" technologies, highlighting the Human Genome Project to scan the human genetic code; artificial retina chips to copy the human retina's neural organization; high-speed, high-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanners; and the virtual book. Discusses…

  2. Eastern Europe's Silicon Rush

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Colin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents how the fast expansion of information technology industry in eastern Slovakia is putting a strain on its labor supply. Suddenly, computer-science graduates have become one of the former Eastern Bloc's greatest assets, attracting multinational technology companies hungry for skilled programmers, technicians, and engineers.…

  3. Method of making silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  4. Silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  5. Semiconductor Chemical Reactor Engineering and Photovoltaic Unit Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, T. W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the nature of semiconductor chemical reactor engineering, illustrating the application of this engineering with research in physical vapor deposition of cadmium sulfide at both the laboratory and unit operations scale and chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon at the laboratory scale. (JN)

  6. Silicon photonics: Design, fabrication, and characterization of on-chip optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, I.-Wei

    In recent years, the research field of silicon photonics has been developing rapidly from a concept to a demonstrated technology, and has gathered much attention from both academia and industry communities. Its many potential applications in long-haul telecommunication, mid-range data-communication, on-chip optical interconnection networks, and nano-scale sensing as well as its compatibility with electronic integrated circuits have driven much effort in realizing silicon photonics both as a disruptive technology for existing markets and as an enabling technology for new ones. Despite the promising future of silicon photonics, many fundamental issues still remain to be understood---both in the linear- and nonlinear-optical regimes. There are also many engineering challenges to make silicon photonics the gold standard in photonic integrated circuits. In this thesis, we focus on the design, fabrication, and characterization of active and passive silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic devices. The SOI material system differs from most conventional optical material platforms because of its high-refractive-index-contrast, which enables engineers to design very compact integrated photonic networks with sub-micron transverse waveguide dimensions and sharp bends. On the other hand, because most analytical formulas for designing waveguide devices are valid only in low-index-contrast cases, SOI photonic devices need to be analyzed numerically for accurate results. The second chapter of this thesis describes some common numerical methods such as Beam Propagation Method (BPM) and Finite Element Method (FEM) for waveguide-design simulations, and presents two design studies based on these methods. The compatibility of silicon photonic integrated circuits with conventional CMOS fabrication technology is another important aspect that distinguishes silicon photonics from others such as III-V materials and lithium niobate. However, the requirements for fabricating silicon photonic

  7. Polycrystalline silicon on tungsten substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevolo, A. J.; Schmidt, F. A.; Shanks, H. R.; Campisi, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    Thin films of electron-beam-vaporized silicon were deposited on fine-grained tungsten substrates under a pressure of about 1 x 10 to the -10th torr. Mass spectra from a quadrupole residual-gas analyzer were used to determine the partial pressure of 13 residual gases during each processing step. During separate silicon depositions, the atomically clean substrates were maintained at various temperatures between 400 and 780 C, and deposition rates were between 20 and 630 A min. Surface contamination and interdiffusion were monitored by in situ Auger electron spectrometry before and after cleaning, deposition, and annealing. Auger depth profiling, X-ray analysis, and SEM in the topographic and channeling modes were utilized to characterize the samples with respect to silicon-metal interface, interdiffusion, silicide formation, and grain size of silicon. The onset of silicide formation was found to occur at approximately 625 C. Above this temperature tungsten silicides were formed at a rate faster than the silicon deposition. Fine-grain silicon films were obtained at lower temperatures.

  8. Engineering and Software Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Michael

    The phrase ‘software engineering' has many meanings. One central meaning is the reliable development of dependable computer-based systems, especially those for critical applications. This is not a solved problem. Failures in software development have played a large part in many fatalities and in huge economic losses. While some of these failures may be attributable to programming errors in the narrowest sense—a program's failure to satisfy a given formal specification—there is good reason to think that most of them have other roots. These roots are located in the problem of software engineering rather than in the problem of program correctness. The famous 1968 conference was motivated by the belief that software development should be based on “the types of theoretical foundations and practical disciplines that are traditional in the established branches of engineering.” Yet after forty years of currency the phrase ‘software engineering' still denotes no more than a vague and largely unfulfilled aspiration. Two major causes of this disappointment are immediately clear. First, too many areas of software development are inadequately specialised, and consequently have not developed the repertoires of normal designs that are the indispensable basis of reliable engineering success. Second, the relationship between structural design and formal analytical techniques for software has rarely been one of fruitful synergy: too often it has defined a boundary between competing dogmas, at which mutual distrust and incomprehension deprive both sides of advantages that should be within their grasp. This paper discusses these causes and their effects. Whether the common practice of software development will eventually satisfy the broad aspiration of 1968 is hard to predict; but an understanding of past failure is surely a prerequisite of future success.

  9. Light emission from silicon: Some perspectives and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiory, A. T.; Ravindra, N. M.

    2003-10-01

    Research on efficient light emission from silicon devices is moving toward leading-edge advances in components for nano-optoelectronics and related areas. A silicon laser is being eagerly sought and may be at hand soon. A key advantage is in the use of silicon-based materials and processing, thereby using high yield and low-cost fabrication techniques. Anticipated applications include an optical emitter for integrated optical circuits, logic, memory, and interconnects; electro-optic isolators; massively parallel optical interconnects and cross connects for integrated circuit chips; lightwave components; high-power discrete and array emitters; and optoelectronic nanocell arrays for detecting biological and chemical agents. The new technical approaches resolve a basic issue with native interband electro-optical emission from bulk Si, which competes with nonradiative phonon- and defect-mediated pathways for electron-hole recombination. Some of the new ways to enhance optical emission efficiency in Si diode devices rely on carrier confinement, including defect and strain engineering in the bulk material. Others use Si nanocrystallites, nanowires, and alloying with Ge and crystal strain methods to achieve the carrier confinement required to boost radiative recombination efficiency. Another approach draws on the considerable progress that has been made in high-efficiency, solar-cell design and uses the reciprocity between photo- and light-emitting diodes. Important advances are also being made with silicon-oxide materials containing optically active rare-earth impurities.

  10. Surface etching technologies for monocrystalline silicon wafer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Muzhi

    With more than 200 GW of accumulated installations in 2015, photovoltaics (PV) has become an important green energy harvesting method. The PV market is dominated by solar cells made from crystalline silicon wafers. The engineering of the wafer surfaces is critical to the solar cell cost reduction and performance enhancement. Therefore, this thesis focuses on the development of surface etching technologies for monocrystalline silicon wafer solar cells. It aims to develop a more efficient alkaline texturing method and more effective surface cleaning processes. Firstly, a rapid, isopropanol alcohol free texturing method is successfully demonstrated to shorten the process time and reduce the consumption of chemicals. This method utilizes the special chemical properties of triethylamine, which can form Si-N bonds with wafer surface atoms. Secondly, a room-temperature anisotropic emitter etch-back process is developed to improve the n+ emitter passivation. Using this method, 19.0% efficient screen-printed aluminium back surface field solar cells are developed that show an efficiency gain of 0.15% (absolute) compared with conventionally made solar cells. Finally, state-of-the-art silicon surface passivation results are achieved using hydrogen plasma etching as a dry alternative to the classical hydrofluoric acid wet-chemical process. The effective native oxide removal and the hydrogenation of the silicon surface are shown to be the reasons for the excellent level of surface passivation achieved with this novel method.

  11. Enhanced Raman scattering in porous silicon grating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiajia; Jia, Zhenhong; Lv, Changwu

    2018-03-19

    The enhancement of Raman signal on monocrystalline silicon gratings with varying groove depths and on porous silicon grating were studied for a highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response. In the experiment conducted, porous silicon gratings were fabricated. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were then deposited on the porous silicon grating to enhance the Raman signal of the detective objects. Results show that the enhancement of Raman signal on silicon grating improved when groove depth increased. The enhanced performance of Raman signal on porous silicon grating was also further improved. The Rhodamine SERS response based on Ag NPs/ porous silicon grating substrates was enhanced relative to the SERS response on Ag NPs/ porous silicon substrates. Ag NPs / porous silicon grating SERS substrate system achieved a highly sensitive SERS response due to the coupling of various Raman enhancement factors.

  12. Review Application of Nanostructured Black Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jian; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Yingchun; Li, Shibin

    2018-04-01

    As a widely used semiconductor material, silicon has been extensively used in many areas, such as photodiode, photodetector, and photovoltaic devices. However, the high surface reflectance and large bandgap of traditional bulk silicon restrict the full use of the spectrum. To solve this problem, many methods have been developed. Among them, the surface nanostructured silicon, namely black silicon, is the most efficient and widely used. Due to its high absorption in the wide range from UV-visible to infrared, black silicon is very attractive for using as sensitive layer of photodiodes, photodetector, solar cells, field emission, luminescence, and other photoelectric devices. Intensive study has been performed to understand the enhanced absorption of black silicon as well as the response extended to infrared spectrum range. In this paper, the application of black silicon is systematically reviewed. The limitations and challenges of black silicon material are also discussed. This article will provide a meaningful introduction to black silicon and its unique properties.

  13. Photonuclear Production of Medical Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinandt, Nick

    2011-10-01

    Every year, more than 20 million people in the United States receive a nuclear medicine procedure. Many of the isotopes needed for these procedures are under-produced. Suppliers of the isotopes are usually located outside the United States, which presents a problem when the desired isotopes have short half-lives. Linear accelerators were investigated as a possible method of meeting isotope demand. Linear accelerators are cheaper, safer, and have lower decommissioning costs compared to nuclear reactors. By using (γ,p) reactions, the desired isotope can be separated from the target material due to the different chemical nature of each isotope. Isotopes investigated were Cu-67, In-111, and Lu-111. Using the results the photon flux Monte Carlo simulations, the expected activity of isotopes can be calculated. After samples were irradiated, a high purity germanium detector and signal processing apparatus were used to count the samples. The activity at the time of irradiation stop was then calculated. The uses of medical isotopes will also be presented. Thanks to Idaho State University, the Idaho Accelerator Center, and the National Science Foundation for supporting the research.

  14. Silicon carbide ceramic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwanmethanond, Varaporn

    This dissertation focuses on the preparation of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic membranes on SiC substrates. An original technique of SiC porous substrate preparation using sintering methods was developed during the work for the completion of the dissertation. The resulting SiC substrates have demonstrated high porosity, high internal surface area, well interconnected surface pore network and, at the same time, good thermal, chemical and mechanical stability. In a further development, sol-gel techniques were used to deposit micro-porous SiC membranes on these SiC porous substrates. The SiC membranes were characterized by a variety of techniques: ideal gas selectivity (He and N2), XRD, BET, SEM, XPS, and AFM. The characterization results confirmed that the asymmetric sol-gel SiC membranes were of high quality, with no cracks or pinholes, and exhibiting high resistance to corrosion and high hydro-thermal stability. In conclusion, the SiC ceramic membrane work was successfully completed. Two publications in international peer reviewed journals resulted out of this work.

  15. Silicon force sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload uponmore » the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.« less

  16. Containerless crystallization of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuribayashi, K.; Aoyama, T.

    2002-04-01

    Crystallization from undercooled melt of silicon was carried out by means of electro-magnetic levitation method under controlled undercooling. The measured growth rate vs. undercooling was categorized into three regions, I, II and III, respectively, from the point of the interface morphology. Thin plate crystals whose interface consisted of both faceted (1 1 1) plane and wavy edge plane like saw-tooth were observed in the region I where the undercooling is less than 100 K. The growth rate of the wavy edge plane was well described by the dendrite growth model. The morphology of growing crystals was abruptly changed to faceted dendrite in the region II, though there was no abrupt change in the growth rate. Seeding at temperatures in the region I changes the drop to a mono-crystalline sphere, if the growth rate along the normal direction of the thin plate crystal is controlled by step-wise growth on the faceted plane. Actually, the sample of 5 mm in diameter seeded at undercooling of 26 K was a quasi-single crystal with large grain, except for a small area where twinning and cracking are observed. The result suggests that the single crystal could be grown, if a smaller sample, 1 or 2 mm in diameter, that is difficult to be levitated by electro-magnetic force were processed with other methods such as free fall in a drop tube.

  17. Silicon MINP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.; Addis, F. W.; Miller, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The MINP solar cell concept refers to a cell structure designed to be a base region dominated device. Thus, it is desirable that recombination losses are reduced to the point that they occur only in the base region. The most unique feature of the MINP cell design is that a tunneling contact is utilized for the metallic contact on the front surface. The areas under the collector grid and bus bar are passivated by a thin oxide of tunneling thickness. Efforts must also be taken to minimize recombination at the surface between grid lines, at the junction periphery and within the emitter. Results of both theoretical and experimental studies of silicon MINP cells are given. Performance calculations are described which give expected efficiencies as a function of base resistivity and junction depth. Fabrication and characterization of cells are discussed which are based on 0.2 ohm-cm substrates, diffused emitters on the order of 0.15 to 0.20 microns deep, and with Mg MIS collector grids. A total area AM 1 efficiency of 16.8% was achieved. Detailed analyses of photocurrent and current loss mechanisms are presented and utilized to discuss future directions of research. Finally, results reported by other workers are discussed.

  18. Silicon Photomultiplier charaterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Leonel; Osornio, Leo; Para, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Silicon Photo Multiples (SiPM's) are relatively new photon detectors. They offer many advantages compared to photo multiplier tubes (PMT's) such as insensitivity to magnetic field, robustness at varying lighting levels, and low cost. The SiPM output wave forms are poorly understood. The experiment conducted collected waveforms of responses of Hamamatsu SiPM to incident laser pulse at varying temperatures and bias voltages. Ambient noise was characterized at all temperatures and bias voltages by averaging the waveforms. Pulse shape of the SiPM response was determined under different operating conditions: the pulse shape is nearly independent of the bias voltage but exhibits strong variation with temperature, consistent with the temperature variation of the quenching resistor. Amplitude of responses of the SiPM to low intensity laser light shows many peaks corresponding to the detection of 1,2,3 etc. photons. Amplitude of these pulses depends linearly on the bias voltage, enabling determination of the breakdown voltage at each temperature. Poisson statistics has been used to determine the average number of detected photons at each operating conditions. Department of Education Grant No. P0315090007 and the Department of Energy/ Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

  19. Large area Czochralski silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Gleim, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    The overall cost effectiveness of the Czochralski process for producing large-area silicon was determined. The feasibility of growing several 12 cm diameter crystals sequentially at 12 cm/h during a furnace run and the subsequent slicing of the ingot using a multiblade slurry saw were investigated. The goal of the wafering process was a slice thickness of 0.25 mm with minimal kerf. A slice + kerf of 0.56 mm was achieved on 12 cm crystal using both 400 grit B4C and SiC abrasive slurries. Crystal growth experiments were performed at 12 cm diameter in a commercially available puller with both 10 and 12 kg melts. Several modifications to the puller hoz zone were required to achieve stable crystal growth over the entire crystal length and to prevent crystallinity loss a few centimeters down the crystal. The maximum practical growth rate for 12 cm crystal in this puller design was 10 cm/h, with 12 to 14 cm/h being the absolute maximum range at which melt freeze occurred.

  20. Nanoscale Silicon as a Catalyst for Graphene Growth: Mechanistic Insight from in Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Share, Keith; Carter, Rachel E.; Nikolaev, Pavel; ...

    2016-06-08

    Nanoscale carbons are typically synthesized by thermal decomposition of a hydrocarbon at the surface of a metal catalyst. Whereas the use of silicon as an alternative to metal catalysts could unlock new techniques to seamlessly couple carbon nanostructures and semiconductor materials, stable carbide formation renders bulk silicon incapable of the precipitation and growth of graphitic structures. In this article, we provide evidence supported by comprehensive in situ Raman experiments that indicates nanoscale grains of silicon in porous silicon (PSi) scaffolds act as catalysts for hydrocarbon decomposition and growth of few-layered graphene at temperatures as low as 700 K. Self-limiting growthmore » kinetics of graphene with activation energies measured between 0.32–0.37 eV elucidates the formation of highly reactive surface-bound Si radicals that aid in the decomposition of hydrocarbons. Nucleation and growth of graphitic layers on PSi exhibits striking similarity to catalytic growth on nickel surfaces, involving temperature dependent surface and subsurface diffusion of carbon. Lastly, this work elucidates how the nanoscale properties of silicon can be exploited to yield catalytic properties distinguished from bulk silicon, opening an important avenue to engineer catalytic interfaces combining the two most technologically important materials for modern applications—silicon and nanoscale carbons.« less

  1. Spherical silicon-shell photonic band gap structures fabricated by laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Yang, Z. Y.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-02-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition was applied in fabricating three-dimensional (3D) spherical-shell photonic band gap (PBG) structures by depositing silicon shells covering silica particles, which had been self-assembled into 3D colloidal crystals. The colloidal crystals of self-assembled silica particles were formed on silicon substrates using the isothermal heating evaporation approach. A continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (1064nm wavelength) was used to deposit silicon shells by thermally decomposing disilane gas. Periodic silicon-shell/silica-particle PBG structures were obtained. By removing the silica particles enclosed in the silicon shells using hydrofluoric acid, hollow spherical silicon-shell arrays were produced. This technique is capable of fabricating structures with complete photonic band gaps, which is predicted by simulations with the plane wave method. The techniques developed in this study have the potential to flexibly engineer the positions of the PBGs by varying both the silica particle size and the silicon-shell thickness. Ellipsometry was used to investigate the specific photonic band gaps for both structures.

  2. In vivo time-gated fluorescence imaging with biodegradable luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gu, Luo; Hall, David J; Qin, Zhengtao; Anglin, Emily; Joo, Jinmyoung; Mooney, David J; Howell, Stephen B; Sailor, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is one of the most versatile and widely used visualization methods in biomedical research. However, tissue autofluorescence is a major obstacle confounding interpretation of in vivo fluorescence images. The unusually long emission lifetime (5-13 μs) of photoluminescent porous silicon nanoparticles can allow the time-gated imaging of tissues in vivo, completely eliminating shorter-lived (<10 ns) emission signals from organic chromophores or tissue autofluorescence. Here using a conventional animal imaging system not optimized for such long-lived excited states, we demonstrate improvement of signal to background contrast ratio by >50-fold in vitro and by >20-fold in vivo when imaging porous silicon nanoparticles. Time-gated imaging of porous silicon nanoparticles accumulated in a human ovarian cancer xenograft following intravenous injection is demonstrated in a live mouse. The potential for multiplexing of images in the time domain by using separate porous silicon nanoparticles engineered with different excited state lifetimes is discussed.

  3. Natural isotope correction of MS/MS measurements for metabolomics and (13)C fluxomics.

    PubMed

    Niedenführ, Sebastian; ten Pierick, Angela; van Dam, Patricia T N; Suarez-Mendez, Camilo A; Nöh, Katharina; Wahl, S Aljoscha

    2016-05-01

    Fluxomics and metabolomics are crucial tools for metabolic engineering and biomedical analysis to determine the in vivo cellular state. Especially, the application of (13)C isotopes allows comprehensive insights into the functional operation of cellular metabolism. Compared to single MS, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides more detailed and accurate measurements of the metabolite enrichment patterns (tandem mass isotopomers), increasing the accuracy of metabolite concentration measurements and metabolic flux estimation. MS-type data from isotope labeling experiments is biased by naturally occurring stable isotopes (C, H, N, O, etc.). In particular, GC-MS(/MS) requires derivatization for the usually non-volatile intracellular metabolites introducing additional natural isotopes leading to measurements that do not directly represent the carbon labeling distribution. To make full use of LC- and GC-MS/MS mass isotopomer measurements, the influence of natural isotopes has to be eliminated (corrected). Our correction approach is analyzed for the two most common applications; (13)C fluxomics and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) based metabolomics. Natural isotopes can have an impact on the calculated flux distribution which strongly depends on the substrate labeling and the actual flux distribution. Second, we show that in IDMS based metabolomics natural isotopes lead to underestimated concentrations that can and should be corrected with a nonlinear calibration. Our simulations indicate that the correction for natural abundance in isotope based fluxomics and quantitative metabolomics is essential for correct data interpretation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Quantitative Determination of Isotope Ratios from Experimental Isotopic Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parminder; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Isotope variability due to natural processes provides important information for studying a variety of complex natural phenomena from the origins of a particular sample to the traces of biochemical reaction mechanisms. These measurements require high-precision determination of isotope ratios of a particular element involved. Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS) are widely employed tools for such a high-precision analysis, which have some limitations. This work aims at overcoming the limitations inherent to IRMS by estimating the elemental isotopic abundance from the experimental isotopic distribution. In particular, a computational method has been derived which allows the calculation of 13C/12C ratios from the whole isotopic distributions, given certain caveats, and these calculations are applied to several cases to demonstrate their utility. The limitations of the method in terms of the required number of ions and S/N ratio are discussed. For high-precision estimates of the isotope ratios, this method requires very precise measurement of the experimental isotopic distribution abundances, free from any artifacts introduced by noise, sample heterogeneity, or other experimental sources. PMID:17263354

  5. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  6. ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Clewett, G.H.; Lee, DeW.A.

    1958-05-20

    A new method is described for isotopic enrichment of uranium. It has been found that when an aqueous acidic solution of ionic tetravalent uraniunn is contacted with chelate complexed tetravalent uranium, the U/sup 238/ preferentially concentrates in the complexed phase while U/sup 235/ concentrates in the ionic phase. The effect is enhanced when the chelate compound is water insoluble and is dissolved in a water-immiscible organic solvent. Cupferron is one of a number of sultable complexing agents, and chloroform is a suitable organic solvent.

  7. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, F.T.

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu/sub 5/ type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo/sub 4/ and CaNi/sub 5/, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen cn produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL ISOTOPES FOR RESOLUTION OF HYDROLOGY PROBLEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of environmental isotopes as tracers in the hydrosphere is increasing as analytical instrumentation improves and more applications are discovered. There exists still misconceptions on the role of isotopes in resolving hydrology problems. Naturally occurring isotopes in th...

  9. Tellurium Stable Isotope Fractionation in Chondritic Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, M. A.; Hammond, S. J.; Parkinson, I. J.

    2014-09-01

    New Te double spike procedures were set up to obtain high-precision accurate Te stable isotope data. Tellurium stable isotope data for 16 chondrite falls are presented, providing evidence for significant Te stable isotope fractionation.

  10. Evaluation and ranking of candidate ceramic wafer engine seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    Modern engineered ceramics offer high temperature capabilities not found in even the best superalloy metals. The high temperature properties of several selected ceramics including aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride are reviewed as they apply to hypersonic engine seal design. A ranking procedure is employed to objectively differentiate among four different monolithic ceramic materials considered, including: a cold-pressed and sintered aluminum oxide; a sintered alpha-phase silicon carbide; a hot-isostatically pressed silicon nitride; and a cold-pressed and sintered silicon nitride. This procedure is used to narrow the wide range of potential ceramics considered to an acceptable number for future detailed and costly analyses and tests. The materials are numerically scored according to their high temperature flexural strength; high temperature thermal conductivity; resistance to crack growth; resistance to high heating rates; fracture toughness; Weibull modulus; and finally according to their resistance to leakage flow, where materials having coefficients of thermal expansion closely matching the engine panel material resist leakage flow best. The cold-pressed and sintered material (Kyocera SN-251) ranked the highest in the overall ranking especially when implemented in engine panels made of low expansion rate materials being considered for the engine, including Incoloy and titanium alloys.

  11. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  12. Investigation of silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Sin sub x grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVO) for passivating silicon surfaces was studied. The application of PECVO SiN sub x films for passivations of silicon N+/P or P+/N solar cells is of particular interest. This program has involved the following areas of investigation: (1) Establishment of PECVO system and development of procedures for growth of SiN sub x; (2) Optical characterization of SiN sub x films; (3) Characterization of the SiN sub x/Si interface; (4) Surface recombination velocity deduced from photoresponse; (5) Current-Voltage analyses of silicon N+/P cells; and (6) Gated diode device studies.

  13. Thermally induced hydrosilylation at deuterium-terminated silicon nanoparticles: an investigation of the radical chain propagation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jason; Roberts, Jeffrey T

    2009-06-16

    Isotopic labeling techniques were employed to study alkene addition to hydrogen- and deuterium-terminated silicon nanoparticles. Deuterium-terminated silicon nanoparticle synthesis is described, as is the characterization of fresh deuterium-terminated particles by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Particles were refluxed in pure 1-dodecene and subsequently characterized by FTIR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. (1)H NMR results showed features consistent with dodecyl-terminated nanoparticles. Infrared absorption spectra of refluxed particles showed strong evidence of new C-D bond formation, which is consistent with a radical chain mechanism for alkene addition by hydrosilylation.

  14. Research pressure instrumentation for NASA Space Shuttle main engine, modification no. 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. J.; Johnson, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Research concerning the utilization of silicon piezoresistive strain sensing technology for space shuttle main engine applications is reported. The following specific topics were addressed: (1) transducer design and materials, (2) silicon piezoresistor characterization at cryogenic temperatures, (3) chip mounting characterization, and (4) frequency response optimization.

  15. Silicon nitride equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert C.; Swaminathan, Pazhayannur K.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the development of a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4).1 Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonal β-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data that have indicated a complex and slow time dependent phase change to the c-Si3N4 phase. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products; however, the need for a kinetic approach is suggested to combine with the single component solid models to simulate and further investigate the global phase coexistences.

  16. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  17. Si Isotopes of Brownleeite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, Scott R.; Ito, M.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Jones, J. H.; Tatsuoka, H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Tatsuoka, H.

    2010-01-01

    Brownleeite is a manganese silicide, ideally stoichiometric MnSi, not previously observed in nature until its discovery within an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) that likely originated from a comet [1]. Three discrete brownleeite grains in the IDP L2055 I3 (4 microns in size, hereafter IDP I3) were identified with maximum dimensions of 100, 250 and 600 nm and fully analyzed using scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) [1]. One of the grains (100 nm in size) was poikilitically enclosed by low-Fe, Mn-enriched (LIME) olivine. LIME olivine is epitaxial to the brownleeite with the brownleeite (200) parallel to the olivine c* [1]. LIME olivine is an enigmatic phase first reported from chondritic porous IDPs and some unequilibrated ordinary chondrites [ 2], that is commonly observed in chondritic-porous IDPs. Recently, LIME olivine has been also found in comet Wild-2 (Stardust) samples [3], indicating that LIME olivine is a common mineral component of comets. LIME olivine has been proposed to form as a high temperature condensate in the protosolar nebula [2]. Brownleeite grains also likely formed as high-temperature condensates either in the early Solar System or in the outflow of an evolved star or supernova explosion [1]. The isotopic composition of the brownleeite grains may strongly constrain their ultimate source. To test this hypothesis, we performed isotopic analyses of the brownleeite and the associated LIME olivine, using the NASA/JSC NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe.

  18. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  19. Evaluation of silicon carbide fiber/titanium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jech, R. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Izod impact, tensile, and modulus of elasticity were determined for silicon carbide fiber/titanium composites to evaluate their potential usefulness as substitutes for titanium alloys or stainless steel in stiffness critical applications for aircraft turbine engines. Variations in processing conditions and matrix ductility were examined to produce composites having good impact strength in both the as-fabricated condition and after air exposure at elevated temperature. The impact strengths of composites containing 36 volume percent silicon carbide (SiC) fiber in an unalloyed (A-40) titanium matrix were found to be equal to unreinforced titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy; the tensile strengths of the composites were marginally better than the unreinforced unalloyed (A-70) matrix at elevated temperature, though not at room temperature. At room temperature the modulus of elasticity of the composites was 48 percent higher than titanium or its alloys and 40 percent higher than that of stainless steel.

  20. Nanostructured silicon membranes for control of molecular transport.

    PubMed

    Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Retterer, Scott T; Fowlkes, Jason D; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-11-01

    A membrane that allows selective transport of molecular species requires precise engineering on the nanoscale. Membrane permeability can be tuned by controlling the physical structure and surface chemistry of the pores. Here, a combination of electron beam and optical lithography, along with cryogenic deep reactive ion etching, has been used to fabricate silicon membranes that are physically robust, have uniform pore sizes, and are directly integrated into a microfluidic network. Additional reductions in pore size were achieved using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide to coat membrane surfaces. Cross sectioning of the membranes using focused ion beam milling was used to determine the physical shape of the membrane pores before and after coating. Functional characterization of the membranes was performed by using quantitative fluorescence microscopy to document the transport of molecular species across the membrane.