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Sample records for isotropic loop quantum

  1. Chimera: A hybrid numerical approach for isotropic loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Peter; Gupt, Brajesh; Singh, Parampreet

    2013-04-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is one approach to the resolution of the problem of singularities in classical cosmologies. The evolution of a cosmological model in LQC is governed by a set difference equations. In the isotropic cosmology (1+1 dimensions) the discretization is uniform in the spatial dimension. The stable simulation of a widely spread semi-classical state requires a very large computational domain and would therefore be computationally very expensive. In this talk we present an efficient hybrid numerical scheme based on the fact that the difference equations can be approximated by a set of partial differential equations (PDE's) in the limit of large spatial volume. We therefore introduce a hybrid scheme where we solve the LQC difference equations in the small volume and the PDE's in the large volume regime. By a simple change of coordinates in the large volume regime, we can significantly reduce the computational cost and explore regions of parameter space previously unachievable. We will describe the numerical implementation, present selected results and discuss the extension of the scheme to other models.

  2. Duration of inflation and conditions at the bounce as a prediction of effective isotropic loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsefors, Linda; Barrau, Aurelien

    2013-06-01

    Loop quantum cosmology with a scalar field is known to be closely linked with an inflationary phase. In this article, we study probabilistic predictions for the duration of slow-roll inflation, by assuming a minimalist massive scalar field as the main content of the Universe. The phase of the field in its “prebounce” oscillatory state is taken as a natural random parameter. We find that the probability for a given number of inflationary e-folds is quite sharply peaked around 145, which is consistent with the most favored minimum values. In this precise sense, a satisfactory inflation is therefore a clear prediction of loop gravity. In addition, we derive an original and stringent upper limit on the Barbero-Immirzi parameter. The general picture of inflation, superinflation, deflation, and superdeflation is also much clarified in the framework of bouncing cosmologies.

  3. Higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity. In this paper, we generalize the structure of loop quantum cosmology to the theories with arbitrary spacetime dimensions. The isotropic and homogeneous cosmological model in n+1 dimensions is quantized by the loop quantization method. Interestingly, we find that the underlying quantum theories are divided into two qualitatively different sectors according to spacetime dimensions. The effective Hamiltonian and modified dynamical equations of n+1 dimensional LQC are obtained. Moreover, our results indicate that the classical big bang singularity is resolved in arbitrary spacetime dimensions by a quantum bounce. We also briefly discuss the similarities and differences between the n+1 dimensional model and the 3+1 dimensional one. Our model serves as a first example of higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology and offers the possibility to investigate quantum gravity effects in higher dimensional cosmology.

  4. Loop Quantum Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time.

  5. Loop Quantum Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations where classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical space-time inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding space-time is then modified. One particular realization is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. Main effects are introduced into effective classical equations which allow to avoid interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function which allows to extend space-time beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of space-time arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds new light on more general issues such as time.

  6. Elastic field of approaching dislocation loop in isotropic bimaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenwang; Xia, Re; Xu, Shucai; Qian, Guian; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2015-10-01

    A semi-analytical solution is developed for calculating interface traction stress (ITS) fields due to elastic modulus mismatch across the interface plane of isotropic perfectly bounded bimaterial system. Based on the semi-analytical approaches developed, ITS is used to correct the bulk elastic field of dislocation loop within infinite homogenous medium, and to produce continuous displacement and stress fields across the perfectly-bounded interface. Firstly, calculation examples of dislocation loops in Al-Cu bimaterial system are performed to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed semi-analytical approach; Then, the elastic fields of dislocation loops in twinning Cu and Cu-Nb bimaterial are analyzed; Finally, the effect of modulus mismatch across interface plane on the elastic field of bimaterial system is investigated, it is found that modulus mismatch has a drastic impact on the elastic fields of dislocation loops within bimaterial system.

  7. Loop Quantum Gravity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i) The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii) A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler's "spacetime foam" intuition. (iii) Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv) A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black-hole entropy. (v) Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  8. Uniqueness of measures in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hanusch, Maximilian

    2015-09-15

    In Ashtekar and Campiglia [Classical Quantum Gravity 29, 242001 (2012)], residual diffeomorphisms have been used to single out the standard representation of the reduced holonomy-flux algebra in homogeneous loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We show that, in the homogeneous isotropic case, unitarity of the translations with respect to the extended ℝ-action (exponentiated reduced fluxes in the standard approach) singles out the Bohr measure on both the standard quantum configuration space ℝ{sub Bohr} as well as on the Fleischhack one (ℝ⊔ℝ{sub Bohr}). Thus, in both situations, the same condition singles out the standard kinematical Hilbert space of LQC.

  9. Unstable anisotropic loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2009-09-15

    We study stability conditions of the full Hamiltonian constraint equation describing the quantum dynamics of the diagonal Bianchi I model in the context of loop quantum cosmology. Our analysis has shown robust evidence of an instability in the explicit implementation of the difference equation, implying important consequences for the correspondence between the full loop quantum gravity theory and loop quantum cosmology. As a result, one may question the choice of the quantization approach, the model of lattice refinement, and/or the role of the ambiguity parameters; all these should, in principle, be dictated by the full loop quantum gravity theory.

  10. Ekpyrotic loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2013-08-01

    We consider the ekpyrotic paradigm in the context of loop quantum cosmology. In loop quantum cosmology the classical big-bang singularity is resolved due to quantum gravity effects, and so the contracting ekpyrotic branch of the universe and its later expanding phase are connected by a smooth bounce. Thus, it is possible to explicitly determine the evolution of scalar perturbations, from the contracting ekpyrotic phase through the bounce and to the post-bounce expanding epoch. The possibilities of having either one or two scalar fields have been suggested for the ekpyrotic universe, and both cases will be considered here. In the case of a single scalar field, the constant mode of the curvature perturbations after the bounce is found to have a blue spectrum. On the other hand, for the two scalar field ekpyrotic model where scale-invariant entropy perturbations source additional terms in the curvature perturbations, the power spectrum in the post-bounce expanding cosmology is shown to be nearly scale-invariant and so agrees with observations.

  11. Characterizing error propagation in quantum circuits: the Isotropic Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca de Oliveira, André L.; Buksman, Efrain; Cohn, Ilan; García López de Lacalle, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a novel index in order to characterize error propagation in quantum circuits by separating the resultant mixed error state in two components: an isotropic component that quantifies the lack of information, and a disalignment component that represents the shift between the current state and the original pure quantum state. The Isotropic Triangle, a graphical representation that fits naturally with the proposed index, is also introduced. Finally, some examples with the analysis of well-known quantum algorithms degradation are given.

  12. Effective scenario of loop quantum cosmology.

    PubMed

    Ding, You; Ma, Yongge; Yang, Jinsong

    2009-02-06

    Semiclassical states in isotropic loop quantum cosmology are employed to show that the improved dynamics has the correct classical limit. The effective Hamiltonian for the quantum cosmological model with a massless scalar field is thus obtained, which incorporates also the next to leading order quantum corrections. The possibility that the higher order correction terms may lead to significant departure from the leading order effective scenario is revealed. If the semiclassicality of the model is maintained in the large scale limit, there are great possibilities for a k=0 Friedmann expanding universe to undergo a collapse in the future due to the quantum gravity effect. Thus the quantum bounce and collapse may contribute a cyclic universe in the new scenario.

  13. Loop quantum cosmology: Anisotropies and inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    In this dissertation we extend the improved dynamics of loop quantum cosmology from the homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space-times to cosmological models which allow anisotropies and inhomogeneities. Specifically, we consider the cases of the homogeneous but anisotropic Bianchi type I, II and IX models with a massless scalar field as well as the vacuum, inhomogeneous, linearly polarized Gowdy T3 model. For each case, we derive the Hamiltonian constraint operator and study its properties. In particular, we show how in all of these models the classical big bang and big crunch singularities are resolved due to quantum gravity effects. Since the Bianchi models play a key role in the Belinskii, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz conjecture regarding the nature of generic space-like singularities in general relativity, the quantum dynamics of the Bianchi cosmologies are likely to provide considerable intuition about the fate of such singularities in quantum gravity. In addition, the results obtained here provide an important step toward the full loop quantization of cosmological space-times that allow generic inhomogeneities; this would provide falsifiable predictions that could be compared to observations.

  14. Loop quantum cosmology gravitational baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-11-01

    Loop quantum cosmology is an appealing quantum completion of classical cosmology, which brings along various theoretical features which in many cases offer a remedy for or modify various classical cosmology aspects. In this paper we address the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism in the context of loop quantum cosmology. As we demonstrate, when loop quantum cosmology effects are taken into account in the resulting Friedmann equations for a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe, then even for a radiation-dominated Universe, the predicted baryon-to-entropy ratio from the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism is non-zero, in contrast to the Einstein-Hilbert case, in which case the baryon-to-entropy ratio is zero. We also discuss various other cases apart from the radiation domination case, and we discuss how the baryon-to-entropy ratio is affected from the parameters of the quantum theory. In addition, we use illustrative exact solutions of loop quantum cosmology and we investigate under which circumstances the baryon-to-entropy ratio can be compatible with the observational constraints.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo with directed loops.

    PubMed

    Syljuåsen, Olav F; Sandvik, Anders W

    2002-10-01

    We introduce the concept of directed loops in stochastic series expansion and path-integral quantum Monte Carlo methods. Using the detailed balance rules for directed loops, we show that it is possible to smoothly connect generally applicable simulation schemes (in which it is necessary to include backtracking processes in the loop construction) to more restricted loop algorithms that can be constructed only for a limited range of Hamiltonians (where backtracking can be avoided). The "algorithmic discontinuities" between general and special points (or regions) in parameter space can hence be eliminated. As a specific example, we consider the anisotropic S=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet in an external magnetic field. We show that directed-loop simulations are very efficient for the full range of magnetic fields (zero to the saturation point) and anisotropies. In particular, for weak fields and anisotropies, the autocorrelations are significantly reduced relative to those of previous approaches. The back-tracking probability vanishes continuously as the isotropic Heisenberg point is approached. For the XY model, we show that back tracking can be avoided for all fields extending up to the saturation field. The method is hence particularly efficient in this case. We use directed-loop simulations to study the magnetization process in the two-dimensional Heisenberg model at very low temperatures. For LxL lattices with L up to 64, we utilize the step structure in the magnetization curve to extract gaps between different spin sectors. Finite-size scaling of the gaps gives an accurate estimate of the transverse susceptibility in the thermodynamic limit: chi( perpendicular )=0.0659+/-0.0002.

  16. Singularities in loop quantum cosmology.

    PubMed

    Cailleteau, Thomas; Cardoso, Antonio; Vandersloot, Kevin; Wands, David

    2008-12-19

    We show that simple scalar field models can give rise to curvature singularities in the effective Friedmann dynamics of loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We find singular solutions for spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies with a canonical scalar field and a negative exponential potential, or with a phantom scalar field and a positive potential. While LQC avoids big bang or big rip type singularities, we find sudden singularities where the Hubble rate is bounded, but the Ricci curvature scalar diverges. We conclude that the effective equations of LQC are not in themselves sufficient to avoid the occurrence of curvature singularities.

  17. Loop expansion and the bosonic representation of loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, E.; Guglielmon, J.; Hackl, L.; Yokomizo, N.

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new loop expansion that provides a resolution of the identity in the Hilbert space of loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph. We work in the bosonic representation obtained by the canonical quantization of the spinorial formalism. The resolution of the identity gives a tool for implementing the projection of states in the full bosonic representation onto the space of solutions to the Gauss and area matching constraints of loop quantum gravity. This procedure is particularly efficient in the semiclassical regime, leading to explicit expressions for the loop expansions of coherent, heat kernel and squeezed states.

  18. Loop Quantum Cosmology: holonomy corrections to inflationary models

    SciTech Connect

    Artymowski, Michal; Lalak, Zygmunt; Szulc, Lukasz

    2009-01-15

    In the recent years the quantization methods of Loop Quantum Gravity have been successfully applied to the homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space-times. The resulting theory, called Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC), resolves the Big Bang singularity by replacing it with the Big Bounce. We argue that the LQC holonomy corrections generate also certain corrections to field theoretical inflationary scenarios. These corrections imply that in the LQC the effective sonic horizon becomes infinite at some point after the bounce and that the scale of the inflationary potential implied by the COBE normalisation increases. The evolution of scalar fields immediately after the Bounce becomes modified in an interesting way. We point out that one can use COBE normalisation to establish an upper bound on the quantum of length of LQG. LQC corrections other than the holonomy one are assumed to be subdominant.

  19. The consistent histories approach to loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David A.

    2016-06-01

    We review the application of the consistent (or decoherent) histories formulation of quantum theory to canonical loop quantum cosmology. Conventional quantum theory relies crucially on “measurements” to convert unrealized quantum potentialities into physical outcomes that can be assigned probabilities. In the early universe and other physical contexts in which there are no observers or measuring apparatus (or indeed, in any closed quantum system), what criteria determine which alternative outcomes may be realized and what their probabilities are? In the consistent histories formulation it is the vanishing of interference between the branch wave functions describing alternative histories — as determined by the system’s decoherence functional — that determines which alternatives may be assigned probabilities. We describe the consistent histories formulation and how it may be applied to canonical loop quantum cosmology, describing in detail the application to homogeneous and isotropic cosmological models with scalar matter. We show how the theory may be used to make definite physical predictions in the absence of “observers”. As an application, we demonstrate how the theory predicts that loop quantum models “bounce” from large volume to large volume, while conventional “Wheeler-DeWitt”-quantized universes are invariably singular. We also briefly indicate the relation to other work.

  20. Exact mapping between different dynamics of isotropically trapped quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamba, Etienne; Pelster, Axel; Anglin, James R.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments on trapped quantum gases can probe challenging regimes of quantum many-body dynamics, where strong interactions or non-equilibrium states prevent exact theoretical treatment. In this talk, we present a class of exact mappings between all the observables of different experiments, under the experimentally attainable conditions that the gas particles interact via a homogeneously scaling two-body potential which is in general time-dependent, and are confined in an isotropic harmonic trap. We express our result through an identity relating second-quantized field operators in the Heisenberg picture of quantum mechanics which makes it general. It applies to arbitrary measurements on possibly multi-component Bose or Fermi gases in arbitrary initial quantum states, no matter how highly excited or far from equilibrium. We use an example to show how the results of two different and currently feasible experiments can be mapped onto each other by our spacetime transformation. DAMOP sorting category: 6.11 Nonlinear dynamics and out-of-equilibrium trapped gases EW acknowledge the financial support from the Alexander von Humboldt foundation.

  1. Loop Quantum Gravity and Asymptotically Flat Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnsdorf, Matthias

    2002-12-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of non-perturbative (loop) quantum gravity in the last decade or so and it is now a rigorously defined kinematical theory (c.f. [5] for a review and references). We are now at the stage where physical applications of loop quantum gravity can be studied and used to provide checks for the consistency of the quantisation programme. Equally, old fundamental problems of canonical quantum gravity such as the problem of time or the interpretation of quantum cosmology need to be reevaluated seriously. These issues can be addressed most profitably in the asymptotically flat sector of quantum gravity. Indeed, it is likely that we should obtain a quantum theory for this special case even if it is not possible to quantise full general relativity. The purpose of this summary is to advertise the extension of loop quantum gravity to this sector that was developed in [1]...

  2. Anomaly freedom in perturbative loop quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bojowald, Martin; Hossain, Golam Mortuza; Kagan, Mikhail; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2008-09-15

    A fully consistent linear perturbation theory for cosmology is derived in the presence of quantum corrections as they are suggested by properties of inverse volume operators in loop quantum gravity. The underlying constraints present a consistent deformation of the classical system, which shows that the discreteness in loop quantum gravity can be implemented in effective equations without spoiling space-time covariance. Nevertheless, nontrivial quantum corrections do arise in the constraint algebra. Since correction terms must appear in tightly controlled forms to avoid anomalies, detailed insights for the correct implementation of constraint operators can be gained. The procedures of this article thus provide a clear link between fundamental quantum gravity and phenomenology.

  3. Cosmological footprints of loop quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Grain, J; Barrau, A

    2009-02-27

    The primordial spectrum of cosmological tensor perturbations is considered as a possible probe of quantum gravity effects. Together with string theory, loop quantum gravity is one of the most promising frameworks to study quantum effects in the early universe. We show that the associated corrections should modify the potential seen by gravitational waves during the inflationary amplification. The resulting power spectrum should exhibit a characteristic tilt. This opens a new window for cosmological tests of quantum gravity.

  4. Loop quantum cosmology: confronting the hybrid quantization approach with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Javier; Martin de Blas, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In loop quantum cosmology there are several approaches for the confrontation of the theory with observations. Here, we focus on the hybrid quantization approach. We provide an exhaustive analysis including scalar and tensor perturbations on effective (quantum-mechanically corrected) homogeneous and isotropic cosmologies coupled to a massive scalar field. We compute the primordial power spectrum of the perturbations at the end of inflation for a set of initial vacuum states defined at the deep quantum regime of the cosmological model. We then analyze the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the consistency relation between this quantity and the spectral index of the tensor power spectrum. Eventually, we compute the temperature-temperature, electric-electric, temperature-electric and magnetic-magnetic correlation functions predicted by this approach and compare them with present observations.

  5. Onset of inflation in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Germani, Cristiano; Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2007-08-15

    Using a Liouville measure, similar to the one proposed recently by Gibbons and Turok, we investigate the probability that single-field inflation with a polynomial potential can last long enough to solve the shortcomings of the standard hot big bang model, within the semiclassical regime of loop quantum cosmology. We conclude that, for such a class of inflationary models and for natural values of the loop quantum cosmology parameters, a successful inflationary scenario is highly improbable.

  6. Recent Advances in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parampreet

    2007-04-01

    Einstein's theory of classical general relativity explains the dynamics of our universe at low energies to an excellent precision. However, it breaks down at the Planck scale before the big bang singularity is reached. Relativity thus fails to tell us about the origin of our cosmos and leaves open various questions which are expected to be answered by a quantum theory of gravity. We will review recent developments in loop quantum cosmology which is a quantization of cosmological spacetimes based on loop quantum gravity -- a non-perturbative background independent quantization of gravity. Because, of fundamental discreteness of quantum geometry underlying loop quantum gravity, novel features arise. In particular, for quantum states representing a large classical universe at late times there is an upper bound on the gravitational curvature, of the order of 1/(Planck length)^2. Thus, non-perturbative quantum gravity effects forbid the cosmological dynamics from entering a regime where curvature or energy density blow up. Evolution in loop quantum cosmology is non-singular. In models studied so far, the backward evolution of our expanding universe does not lead to a big bang but a big bounce to a contracting branch when the gravitational curvature reaches Planck scale. These results which have now been established for various homogeneous spacetimes provide a new paradigm of the genesis of our universe and lead to useful insights on the generic resolution of space-like singularities through quantum gravity effects.

  7. Particle scattering in loop quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Modesto, Leonardo; Rovelli, Carlo

    2005-11-04

    We devise a technique for defining and computing -point functions in the context of a background-independent gravitational quantum field theory. We construct a tentative implementation of this technique in a perturbatively finite model defined using spin foam techniques in the context of loop quantum gravity.

  8. Chimera: a hybrid approach to numerical loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Peter; Gupt, Brajesh; Singh, Parampreet

    2014-01-01

    The existence of a quantum bounce in isotropic spacetimes is a key result in loop quantum cosmology (LQC), which has been demonstrated to arise in all the models studied so far. In most of the models, the bounce has been studied using numerical simulations involving states which are sharply peaked and which bounce at volumes much larger than the Planck volume. An important issue is to confirm the existence of the bounce for states which have a wide spread, or which bounce closer to the Planck volume. Numerical simulations with such states demand large computational domains, making them very expensive and practically infeasible with the techniques which have been implemented so far. To overcome these difficulties, we present an efficient hybrid numerical scheme using the property that at the small spacetime curvature, the quantum Hamiltonian constraint in LQC, which is a difference equation with uniform discretization in volume, can be approximated by a Wheeler-DeWitt differential equation. By carefully choosing a hybrid spatial grid allowing the use of partial differential equations at large volumes, and with a simple change of geometrical coordinate, we obtain a surprising reduction in the computational cost. This scheme enables us to explore regimes which were so far unachievable for the isotropic model in LQC. Our approach also promises to significantly reduce the computational cost for numerical simulations in anisotropic LQC using high performance computing.

  9. Observation of quantum decay of homogeneous, isotropic (grid) turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihas, Gary; Munday, Lydia; Yang, Jihee; Thompson, Kyle; Guo, Wei; Chapurin, Roman; Fisher, Shaun; McClintock, Peter; Vinen, W. F.

    2014-03-01

    In classical grid turbulence fluid is forced through a stationary grid. In the quantum case a grid moves through an initially stationary superfluid driven by a linear motor. We have developed a motor using superconducting drive coils and bearings, moving a grid at constant speed (0 and 15 cm/s). Stalp et al[2] report the decay of vortex-line density L in the grid's wake measured by 2nd sound attenuation. L decayed at large times as t - 3 / 2, interpreted as a quasi-classical Richardson cascade of energy-containing eddies size limited by channel width, associated with a Kolmogorov energy spectrum. It is assumed eddies produced on a scale of the grid mesh grow through the classical fluids mechanism.[3] We can now test a semi-quantitative theory with different mesh grids or channel sizes, relating to the possible existence of inverse turbulent cascades. Our 2nd sound system is conventional, but with a novel phase and amplitude feedback loop making stringent constant temperature unnecessary. Both t - 3 / 2 and non-t - 3 / 2 decays have been observed with 2 mesh sizes. US NSF DMR#0602778 and #1007937 and EPSRC EP/H04762X/1.

  10. Squeezed vacua in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, Lucas; Bianchi, Eugenio; Guglielmon, Jonathan; Yokomizo, Nelson

    2017-01-01

    Semi-classical states in quantum gravity are expected to exhibit long range correlations. In order to describe such states within the framework of loop quantum gravity, it is important to parametrize states in terms of their correlations. In this talk, I will introduce a new class of states with prescribed correlations, called squeezed vacua. They can be naturally understood in the bosonic Hilbert space representation where they are generated in two steps. First, we squeeze the Ashtekar-Lewandowski vacuum via the action of a quadratic exponential and second, we project the resulting states onto the kinematical Hilbert space of Loop quantum gravity. I will give explicit examples on how to construct states that are peaked on some classical geometry, but whose quantum fluctuations exhibit long range correlations.

  11. Loop-quantum-gravity vertex amplitude.

    PubMed

    Engle, Jonathan; Pereira, Roberto; Rovelli, Carlo

    2007-10-19

    Spin foam models are hoped to provide the dynamics of loop-quantum gravity. However, the most popular of these, the Barrett-Crane model, does not have the good boundary state space and there are indications that it fails to yield good low-energy n-point functions. We present an alternative dynamics that can be derived as a quantization of a Regge discretization of Euclidean general relativity, where second class constraints are imposed weakly. Its state space matches the SO(3) loop gravity one and it yields an SO(4)-covariant vertex amplitude for Euclidean loop gravity.

  12. The JWKB approximation in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David; Singh, Parampreet

    2017-01-01

    We explore the JWKB approximation in loop quantum cosmology in a flat universe with a scalar matter source. Exact solutions of the quantum constraint are studied at small volume in the JWKB approximation in order to assess the probability of tunneling to small or zero volume. Novel features of the approximation are discussed which appear due to the fact that the model is effectively a two-dimensional dynamical system. Based on collaborative work with Parampreet Singh.

  13. Radiation from quantum weakly dynamical horizons in loop quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Pranzetti, Daniele

    2012-07-06

    We provide a statistical mechanical analysis of quantum horizons near equilibrium in the grand canonical ensemble. By matching the description of the nonequilibrium phase in terms of weakly dynamical horizons with a local statistical framework, we implement loop quantum gravity dynamics near the boundary. The resulting radiation process provides a quantum gravity description of the horizon evaporation. For large black holes, the spectrum we derive presents a discrete structure which could be potentially observable.

  14. Loop quantum cosmology and the fate of cosmological singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parampreet

    2014-09-01

    Singularities in general relativity such as the big bang and big crunch, and exotic singularities such as the big rip are the boundaries of the classical spacetimes. These events are marked by a divergence in the curvature invariants and the breakdown of the geodesic evolution. Recent progress on implementing techniques of loop quantum gravity to cosmological models reveals that such singularities may be generically resolved because of the quantum gravitational effects. Due to the quantum geometry, which replaces the classical differential geometry at the Planck scale, the big bang is replaced by a big bounce without any assumptions on the matter content or any fine tuning. In this manuscript, we discuss some of the main features of this approach and the results on the generic resolution of singularities for the isotropic as well as anisotropic models. Using effective spacetime description of the quantum theory, we show the way quantum gravitational effects lead to the universal bounds on the energy density, the Hubble rate and the anisotropic shear. We discuss the geodesic completeness in the effective spacetime and the resolution of all of the strong singularities. It turns out that despite the bounds on energy density and the Hubble rate, there can be divergences in the curvature invariants. However such events are geodesically extendible, with tidal forces not strong enough to cause inevitable destruction of the in-falling objects.

  15. Quantum hyperbolic geometry in loop quantum gravity with cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Maïté; Girelli, Florian

    2013-06-01

    Loop quantum gravity (LQG) is an attempt to describe the quantum gravity regime. Introducing a nonzero cosmological constant Λ in this context has been a standing problem. Other approaches, such as Chern-Simons gravity, suggest that quantum groups can be used to introduce Λ into the game. Not much is known when defining LQG with a quantum group. Tensor operators can be used to construct observables in any type of discrete quantum gauge theory with a classical/quantum gauge group. We illustrate this by constructing explicitly geometric observables for LQG defined with a quantum group and show for the first time that they encode a quantized hyperbolic geometry. This is a novel argument pointing out the usefulness of quantum groups as encoding a nonzero cosmological constant. We conclude by discussing how tensor operators provide the right formalism to unlock the LQG formulation with a nonzero cosmological constant.

  16. Warm inflationary model in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Ramon

    2010-06-15

    A warm inflationary universe model in loop quantum cosmology is studied. In general we discuss the condition of inflation in this framework. By using a chaotic potential, V({phi}){proportional_to}{phi}{sup 2}, we develop a model where the dissipation coefficient {Gamma}={Gamma}{sub 0}=constant. We use recent astronomical observations for constraining the parameters appearing in our model.

  17. Loop quantum f(R) theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Ma, Yongge

    2011-09-01

    As modified gravity theories, the four-dimensional metric f(R) theories are cast into connection-dynamical formalism with real su(2) connections as configuration variables. This formalism enables us to extend the nonperturbative loop quantization scheme of general relativity to any metric f(R) theories. The quantum kinematical framework of f(R) gravity is rigorously constructed, where the quantum dynamics can be launched. Both Hamiltonian constraint operator and master constraint operator for f(R) theories are well defined. Our results show that the nonperturbative quantization procedure of loop quantum gravity are valid not only for general relativity but also for a rather general class of four-dimensional metric theories of gravity.

  18. Relating loop quantum cosmology to loop quantum gravity: symmetric sectors and embeddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, J.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we address the meaning of states in loop quantum cosmology (LQC), in the context of loop quantum gravity. First, we introduce a rigorous formulation of an embedding proposed by Bojowald and Kastrup, of LQC states into loop quantum gravity. Then, using certain holomorphic representations, a new class of embeddings, called b-embeddings, are constructed, following the ideas of Engle (2006 Quantum field theory and its symmetry reduction Class. Quantum Gravity 23 2861 94). We exhibit a class of operators preserving each of these embeddings, and show their consistency with the LQC quantization. In the b-embedding case, the classical analogues of these operators separate points in phase space. Embedding at the gauge and diffeomorphism invariant level is discussed briefly in the conclusions.

  19. Vertex amplitudes in spin foam loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David

    2016-03-01

    We discuss properties of the vertex expansion for homogeneous, isotropic loop quantum cosmological models sourced by a massless, minimally coupled scalar field, which in this model plays the role of an internal matter ``clock''. We show that the vertex expansion, first written down by Ashtekar, Campiglia and Henderson, must be thought of as a short-time expansion in the sense that the amplitude for volume transitions is constrained both by the order of the expansion and by the elapsed scalar field. To calculate the amplitude for significant volume changes or between large differences in the value of the scalar field requires the expansion be evaluated to very high order. This contribution describes work in collaboration with P. Singh.

  20. Loop quantum cosmology: a status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Singh, Parampreet

    2011-11-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the result of applying principles of loop quantum gravity (LQG) to cosmological settings. The distinguishing feature of LQC is the prominent role played by the quantum geometry effects of LQG. In particular, quantum geometry creates a brand new repulsive force which is totally negligible at low spacetime curvature but rises very rapidly in the Planck regime, overwhelming the classical gravitational attraction. In cosmological models, while Einstein's equations hold to an excellent degree of approximation at low curvature, they undergo major modifications in the Planck regime: for matter satisfying the usual energy conditions, any time a curvature invariant grows to the Planck scale, quantum geometry effects dilute it, thereby resolving singularities of general relativity. Quantum geometry corrections become more sophisticated as the models become richer. In particular, in anisotropic models, there are significant changes in the dynamics of shear potentials which tame their singular behavior in striking contrast to older results on anisotropies in bouncing models. Once singularities are resolved, the conceptual paradigm of cosmology changes and one has to revisit many of the standard issues—e.g. the 'horizon problem'—from a new perspective. Such conceptual issues as well as potential observational consequences of the new Planck scale physics are being explored, especially within the inflationary paradigm. These considerations have given rise to a burst of activity in LQC in recent years, with contributions from quantum gravity experts, mathematical physicists and cosmologists. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the current state of the art in LQC for three sets of audiences: young researchers interested in entering this area; the quantum gravity community in general and cosmologists who wish to apply LQC to probe modifications in the standard paradigm of the early universe. In this review, effort has been made to

  1. Regularization ambiguities in loop quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Alejandro

    2006-02-15

    One of the main achievements of loop quantum gravity is the consistent quantization of the analog of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation which is free of ultraviolet divergences. However, ambiguities associated to the intermediate regularization procedure lead to an apparently infinite set of possible theories. The absence of an UV problem--the existence of well-behaved regularization of the constraints--is intimately linked with the ambiguities arising in the quantum theory. Among these ambiguities is the one associated to the SU(2) unitary representation used in the diffeomorphism covariant 'point-splitting' regularization of the nonlinear functionals of the connection. This ambiguity is labeled by a half-integer m and, here, it is referred to as the m ambiguity. The aim of this paper is to investigate the important implications of this ambiguity. We first study 2+1 gravity (and more generally BF theory) quantized in the canonical formulation of loop quantum gravity. Only when the regularization of the quantum constraints is performed in terms of the fundamental representation of the gauge group does one obtain the usual topological quantum field theory as a result. In all other cases unphysical local degrees of freedom arise at the level of the regulated theory that conspire against the existence of the continuum limit. This shows that there is a clear-cut choice in the quantization of the constraints in 2+1 loop quantum gravity. We then analyze the effects of the ambiguity in 3+1 gravity exhibiting the existence of spurious solutions for higher representation quantizations of the Hamiltonian constraint. Although the analysis is not complete in 3+1 dimensions - due to the difficulties associated to the definition of the physical inner product - it provides evidence supporting the definitions quantum dynamics of loop quantum gravity in terms of the fundamental representation of the gauge group as the only consistent possibilities. If the gauge group is SO(3) we find

  2. Observational constraints on loop quantum cosmology.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin; Calcagni, Gianluca; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2011-11-18

    In the inflationary scenario of loop quantum cosmology in the presence of inverse-volume corrections, we give analytic formulas for the power spectra of scalar and tensor perturbations convenient to compare with observations. Since inverse-volume corrections can provide strong contributions to the running spectral indices, inclusion of terms higher than the second-order runnings in the power spectra is crucially important. Using the recent data of cosmic microwave background and other cosmological experiments, we place bounds on the quantum corrections.

  3. Regularization ambiguities in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Alejandro

    2006-02-01

    One of the main achievements of loop quantum gravity is the consistent quantization of the analog of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation which is free of ultraviolet divergences. However, ambiguities associated to the intermediate regularization procedure lead to an apparently infinite set of possible theories. The absence of an UV problem—the existence of well-behaved regularization of the constraints—is intimately linked with the ambiguities arising in the quantum theory. Among these ambiguities is the one associated to the SU(2) unitary representation used in the diffeomorphism covariant “point-splitting” regularization of the nonlinear functionals of the connection. This ambiguity is labeled by a half-integer m and, here, it is referred to as the m ambiguity. The aim of this paper is to investigate the important implications of this ambiguity. We first study 2+1 gravity (and more generally BF theory) quantized in the canonical formulation of loop quantum gravity. Only when the regularization of the quantum constraints is performed in terms of the fundamental representation of the gauge group does one obtain the usual topological quantum field theory as a result. In all other cases unphysical local degrees of freedom arise at the level of the regulated theory that conspire against the existence of the continuum limit. This shows that there is a clear-cut choice in the quantization of the constraints in 2+1 loop quantum gravity. We then analyze the effects of the ambiguity in 3+1 gravity exhibiting the existence of spurious solutions for higher representation quantizations of the Hamiltonian constraint. Although the analysis is not complete in 3+1 dimensions—due to the difficulties associated to the definition of the physical inner product—it provides evidence supporting the definitions quantum dynamics of loop quantum gravity in terms of the fundamental representation of the gauge group as the only consistent possibilities. If the gauge group is SO(3) we

  4. Behavior of nonlinear anisotropies in bouncing Bianchi I models of loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, D.-W.; Vandersloot, Kevin

    2007-10-15

    In homogeneous and isotropic loop quantum cosmology, gravity can behave repulsively at Planckian energy densities leading to the replacement of the big bang singularity with a big bounce. Yet in any bouncing scenario it is important to include nonlinear effects from anisotropies which typically grow during the collapsing phase. We investigate the dynamics of a Bianchi I anisotropic model within the framework of loop quantum cosmology. Using effective semiclassical equations of motion to study the dynamics, we show that the big bounce is still predicted with only differences in detail arising from the inclusion of anisotropies. We show that the anisotropic shear term grows during the collapsing phase, but remains finite through the bounce. Immediately following the bounce, the anisotropies decay and with the inclusion of matter with equation of state w<+1, the universe isotropizes in the expanding phase.

  5. Discrete symmetries in covariant loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovelli, Carlo; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2012-09-01

    We study time-reversal and parity—on the physical manifold and in internal space—in covariant loop gravity. We consider a minor modification of the Holst action which makes it transform coherently under such transformations. The classical theory is not affected but the quantum theory is slightly different. In particular, the simplicity constraints are slightly modified and this restricts orientation flips in a spin foam to occur only across degenerate regions, thus reducing the sources of potential divergences.

  6. Some Recent Advances in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    2012-05-01

    In my talk I discussed three recent advances in loop quantum cosmology: 1) Path integral formulation and its WKB approximation; 2) Cosmological spin foams and lessons they provide; and 3) Probability of a slow roll inflationary phase compatible with the 7 year WMAP data. In addition to presenting an overview, this discussion also provides the necessary background for a number of talks in the parallel sessions.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: A First Course in Loop Quantum Gravity A First Course in Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Bianca

    2012-12-01

    Students who are interested in quantum gravity usually face the difficulty of working through a large amount of prerequisite material before being able to deal with actual quantum gravity. A First Course in Loop Quantum Gravity by Rodolfo Gambini and Jorge Pullin, aimed at undergraduate students, marvellously succeeds in starting from the basics of special relativity and covering basic topics in Hamiltonian dynamics, Yang Mills theory, general relativity and quantum field theory, ending with a tour on current (loop) quantum gravity research. This is all done in a short 173 pages! As such the authors cannot cover any of the subjects in depth and indeed this book should be seen more as a motivation and orientation guide so that students can go on to follow the hints for further reading. Also, as there are many subjects to cover beforehand, slightly more than half of the book is concerned with more general subjects (special and general relativity, Hamiltonian dynamics, constrained systems, quantization) before the starting point for loop quantum gravity, the Ashtekar variables, are introduced. The approach taken by the authors is heuristic and uses simplifying examples in many places. However they take care in motivating all the main steps and succeed in presenting the material pedagogically. Problem sets are provided throughout and references for further reading are given. Despite the shortness of space, alternative viewpoints are mentioned and the reader is also referred to experimental results and bounds. In the second half of the book the reader gets a ride through loop quantum gravity; the material covers geometric operators and their spectra, the Hamiltonian constraints, loop quantum cosmology and, more broadly, black hole thermodynamics. A glimpse of recent developments and open problems is given, for instance a discussion on experimental predictions, where the authors carefully point out the very preliminary nature of the results. The authors close with an

  8. Embedding loop quantum cosmology without piecewise linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    An important goal is to understand better the relation between full loop quantum gravity (LQG) and the simplified, reduced theory known as loop quantum cosmology (LQC), directly at the quantum level. Such a firmer understanding would increase confidence in the reduced theory as a tool for formulating predictions of the full theory, as well as permitting lessons from the reduced theory to guide further development in the full theory. This paper constructs an embedding of the usual state space of LQC into that of standard LQG, that is, LQG based on piecewise analytic paths. The embedding is well defined even prior to solving the diffeomorphism constraint, at no point is a graph fixed and at no point is the piecewise linear category used. This motivates for the first time a definition of operators in LQC corresponding to holonomies along non-piecewise linear paths, without changing the usual kinematics of LQC in any way. The new embedding intertwines all operators corresponding to such holonomies, and all elements in its image satisfy an operator equation which classically implies homogeneity and isotropy. The construction is made possible by a recent result proven by Fleischhack. Communicated by P Singh

  9. Asymptotics of loop quantum gravity fusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Bianchi, Eugenio; Magliaro, Elena; Perini, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The fusion coefficients from SO(3) to SO(4) play a key role in the definition of spin foam models for the dynamics in loop quantum gravity. In this paper we give a simple analytic formula of the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine fusion coefficients. We study the large spin asymptotics and show that they map SO(3) semiclassical intertwiners into SU(2)L × SU(2)R semiclassical intertwiners. This non-trivial property opens the possibility for an analysis of the semiclassical behavior of the model.

  10. Effective loop quantum geometry of Schwarzschild interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Jerónimo; Cuervo, William; Morales-Técotl, Hugo A.; Ruelas, Juan C.

    2017-03-01

    The success of loop quantum cosmology to resolve classical singularities of homogeneous models has led to its application to the classical Schwarszchild black hole interior, which takes the form of a homogeneous Kantowski-Sachs model. The first steps of this were done in pure quantum mechanical terms, hinting at the traversable character of the would-be classical singularity, and then others were performed using effective heuristic models capturing quantum effects that allowed a geometrical description closer to the classical one but avoided its singularity. However, the problem of establishing the link between the quantum and effective descriptions was left open. In this work, we propose to fill in this gap by considering the path-integral approach to the loop quantization of the Kantowski-Sachs model corresponding to the Schwarzschild black hole interior. We show that the transition amplitude can be expressed as a path integration over the imaginary exponential of an effective action which just coincides, under some simplifying assumptions, with the heuristic one. Additionally, we further explore the consequences of the effective dynamics. We prove first that such dynamics imply some rather simple bounds for phase-space variables, and in turn—remarkably, in an analytical way—they imply that various phase-space functions that were singular in the classical model are now well behaved. In particular, the expansion rate, its time derivative, and the shear become bounded, and hence the Raychaudhuri equation is finite term by term, thus resolving the singularities of classical geodesic congruences. Moreover, all effective scalar polynomial invariants turn out to be bounded.

  11. Novel Numerical Approaches to Loop Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) is an (as yet incomplete) approach to the quantization of gravity. When applied to symmetry reduced cosmological spacetimes (Loop Quantum Cosmology or LQC) one of the predictions of the theory is that the Big Bang is replaced by a Big Bounce, i.e. a previously existing contracting universe underwent a bounce at finite volume before becoming our expanding universe. The evolution equations of LQC take the form of difference equations (with the discretization given by the theory) that in the large volume limit can be approximated by partial differential equations (PDEs). In this talk I will first discuss some of the unique challenges encountered when trying to numerically solve these difference equations. I will then present some of the novel approaches that have been employed to overcome the challenges. I will here focus primarily on the Chimera scheme that takes advantage of the fact that the LQC difference equations can be approximated by PDEs in the large volume limit. I will finally also briefly discuss some of the results that have been obtained using these numerical techniques by performing simulations in regions of parameter space that were previously unreachable. This work is supported by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation and by NSF grant PHYS1068743.

  12. Lorentz covariance of loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovelli, Carlo; Speziale, Simone

    2011-05-01

    The kinematics of loop gravity can be given a manifestly Lorentz-covariant formulation: the conventional SU(2)-spin-network Hilbert space can be mapped to a space K of SL(2,C) functions, where Lorentz covariance is manifest. K can be described in terms of a certain subset of the projected spin networks studied by Livine, Alexandrov and Dupuis. It is formed by SL(2,C) functions completely determined by their restriction on SU(2). These are square-integrable in the SU(2) scalar product, but not in the SL(2,C) one. Thus, SU(2)-spin-network states can be represented by Lorentz-covariant SL(2,C) functions, as two-component photons can be described in the Lorentz-covariant Gupta-Bleuler formalism. As shown by Wolfgang Wieland in a related paper, this manifestly Lorentz-covariant formulation can also be directly obtained from canonical quantization. We show that the spinfoam dynamics of loop quantum gravity is locally SL(2,C)-invariant in the bulk, and yields states that are precisely in K on the boundary. This clarifies how the SL(2,C) spinfoam formalism yields an SU(2) theory on the boundary. These structures define a tidy Lorentz-covariant formalism for loop gravity.

  13. Coherent semiclassical states for loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Montoya, Edison

    2011-08-01

    The spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model with a massless scalar field in loop quantum cosmology admits a description in terms of a completely solvable model. This has been used to prove that: (i) the quantum bounce that replaces the big bang singularity is generic; (ii) there is an upper bound on the energy density for all states, and (iii) semiclassical states at late times had to be semiclassical before the bounce. Here we consider a family of exact solutions to the theory, corresponding to generalized coherent Gaussian and squeezed states. We analyze the behavior of basic physical observables and impose restrictions on the states based on physical considerations. These turn out to be enough to select, from all the generalized coherent states, those that behave semiclassical at late times. We study then the properties of such states near the bounce where the most “quantum behavior” is expected. As it turns out, the states remain sharply peaked and semiclassical at the bounce and the dynamics is very well approximated by the “effective theory” throughout the time evolution. We compare the semiclassicality properties of squeezed states to those of the Gaussian semiclassical states and conclude that the Gaussians are better behaved. In particular, the asymmetry in the relative fluctuations before and after the bounce are negligible, thus ruling out claims of so-called “cosmic forgetfulness.”

  14. Invariant Connections in Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanusch, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Given a group {G}, and an abelian {C^*}-algebra {A}, the antihomomorphisms {Θ\\colon G→ {Aut}(A)} are in one-to-one with those left actions {Φ\\colon G× {Spec}(A)→ {Spec}(A)} whose translation maps {Φ_g} are continuous; whereby continuities of {Θ} and {Φ} turn out to be equivalent if {A} is unital. In particular, a left action {φ\\colon G × X→ X} can be uniquely extended to the spectrum of a {C^*}-subalgebra {A} of the bounded functions on {X} if {φ_g^*(A)subseteq A} holds for each {gin G}. In the present paper, we apply this to the framework of loop quantum gravity. We show that, on the level of the configuration spaces, quantization and reduction in general do not commute, i.e., that the symmetry-reduced quantum configuration space is (strictly) larger than the quantized configuration space of the reduced classical theory. Here, the quantum-reduced space has the advantage to be completely characterized by a simple algebraic relation, whereby the quantized reduced classical space is usually hard to compute.

  15. On the physical Hilbert space of loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Noui, Karim; Perez, Alejandro; Vandersloot, Kevin

    2005-02-15

    In this paper we present a model of Riemannian loop quantum cosmology with a self-adjoint quantum scalar constraint. The physical Hilbert space is constructed using refined algebraic quantization. When matter is included in the form of a cosmological constant, the model is exactly solvable and we show explicitly that the physical Hilbert space is separable, consisting of a single physical state. We extend the model to the Lorentzian sector and discuss important implications for standard loop quantum cosmology.

  16. Holographic bound in covariant loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    We investigate puncture statistics based on the covariant area spectrum in loop quantum gravity. First, we consider Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics with a Gibbs factor for punctures. We establish formulas which relate physical quantities such as horizon area to the parameter characterizing holographic degrees of freedom. We also perform numerical calculations and obtain consistency with these formulas. These results tell us that the holographic bound is satisfied in the large area limit and the correction term of the entropy-area law can be proportional to the logarithm of the horizon area. Second, we also consider Bose-Einstein statistics and show that the above formulas are also useful in this case. By applying the formulas, we can understand intrinsic features of Bose-Einstein condensate which corresponds to the case when the horizon area almost consists of punctures in the ground state. When this phenomena occurs, the area is approximately constant against the parameter characterizing the temperature. When this phenomena is broken, the area shows rapid increase which suggests the phase transition from quantum to classical area.

  17. Phenomenology with fluctuating quantum geometries in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agullo, Ivan; Ashtekar, Abhay; Gupt, Brajesh

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to probe phenomenological implications of large fluctuations of quantum geometry in the Planck era, using cosmology of the early universe. For the background (Friedmann, Lemaître, Robertson, Walker) quantum geometry, we allow ‘widely spread’ states in which the relative dispersions are as large as 168 % in the Planck regime. By introducing suitable methods to overcome the ensuing conceptual and computational issues, we calculate the power spectrum {{P}R}(k) and the spectral index n s (k) of primordial curvature perturbations. These results generalize the previous work in loop quantum cosmology which focused on those states which were known to remain sharply peaked throughout the Planck regime. Surprisingly, even though the fluctuations we now consider are large, their presence does not add new features to the final {{P}R}(k) and n s (k): within observational error bars, their effect is degenerate with a different freedom in the theory, namely the number of pre-inflationary e-folds {{N}\\text{B\\star}} between the bounce and the onset of inflation. Therefore, with regard to observational consequences, one can simulate the freedom in the choice of states with large fluctuations in the Planck era using the simpler, sharply peaked states, simply by allowing for different values of {{N}\\text{B \\star}} .

  18. Absence of a singularity in loop quantum cosmology.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, M

    2001-06-04

    It is shown that the cosmological singularity in isotropic minisuperspaces is naturally removed by quantum geometry. Already at the kinematical level, this is indicated by the fact that the inverse scale factor is represented by a bounded operator even though the classical quantity diverges at the initial singularity. The full demonstration comes from an analysis of quantum dynamics. Because of quantum geometry, the quantum evolution occurs in discrete time steps and does not break down when the volume becomes zero. Instead, space-time can be extended to a branch preceding the classical singularity independently of the matter coupled to the model. For large volume the correct semiclassical behavior is obtained.

  19. An introduction to spherically symmetric loop quantum gravity black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2015-03-26

    We review recent developments in the treatment of spherically symmetric black holes in loop quantum gravity. In particular, we discuss an exact solution to the quantum constraints that represents a black hole and is free of singularities. We show that new observables that are not present in the classical theory arise in the quantum theory. We also discuss Hawking radiation by considering the quantization of a scalar field on the quantum spacetime.

  20. Gravity quantized: Loop quantum gravity with a scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Domagala, Marcin; Kaminski, Wojciech; Giesel, Kristina; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2010-11-15

    ...''but we do not have quantum gravity.'' This phrase is often used when analysis of a physical problem enters the regime in which quantum gravity effects should be taken into account. In fact, there are several models of the gravitational field coupled to (scalar) fields for which the quantization procedure can be completed using loop quantum gravity techniques. The model we present in this paper consists of the gravitational field coupled to a scalar field. The result has similar structure to the loop quantum cosmology models, except that it involves all the local degrees of freedom of the gravitational field because no symmetry reduction has been performed at the classical level.

  1. Geometry of loop quantum gravity on a graph

    SciTech Connect

    Rovelli, Carlo; Speziale, Simone

    2010-08-15

    We discuss the meaning of geometrical constructions associated to loop quantum gravity states on a graph. In particular, we discuss the 'twisted geometries' and derive a simple relation between these and Regge geometries.

  2. Bouncing loop quantum cosmology in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, J.; Makarenko, A. N.; Myagky, A. N.; Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2015-12-01

    We develop an effective Gauss-Bonnet extension of loop quantum cosmology, by introducing holonomy corrections in modified F (G ) theories of gravity. Within the context of our formalism, we provide a perturbative expansion in the critical density, a parameter characteristic of loop quantum gravity theories, and we result in having leading order corrections to the classical F (G ) theories of gravity. After extensively discussing the formalism, we present a reconstruction method that makes it possible to find the loop quantum cosmology corrected F (G ) theory that can realize various cosmological scenarios. We exemplify our theoretical constructions by using bouncing cosmologies, and we investigate which loop quantum cosmology corrected Gauss-Bonnet modified gravities can successfully realize such cosmologies.

  3. Discretization parameter and operator ordering in loop quantum cosmology with the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Tomo; Amemiya, Fumitoshi; Shimano, Masahiro; Harada, Tomohiro; Tamaki, Takashi

    2011-05-15

    In loop quantum cosmology, the Hamiltonian reduces to a finite difference operator and quantum dynamics are controlled by the difference equation. In this framework, Bojowald [M. Bojowald, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 5227 (2001).] showed that the initial singularity is absent in the twofold sense: (i) the spectrum of the inverse scale factor operator is bounded from above; (ii) the wave function of the Universe can be uniquely extended beyond the point which was the initial singularity in classical theory. In this paper, we study the initial singularity in this sense and the large-volume limit against the ambiguities in the discretization and the operator ordering within a homogeneous, isotropic and spatially flat model with the cosmological constant. We find that the absence of the singularity strongly depends on the choice of the operator ordering and the requirement for the absence singles out a very small class of orderings. Moreover we find a general ordering rule required for the absence of the singularity. We also find that the large-volume limit naturally recovers a smooth wave function in the discretization where each step corresponds to a fixed volume increment but not in the one where each step corresponds to a fixed area increment. If loop quantum cosmology is to be a phenomenological realization of full loop quantum gravity, these results are important to fix the theoretical ambiguities.

  4. Chern-Simons expectation values and quantum horizons from loop quantum gravity and the Duflo map.

    PubMed

    Sahlmann, Hanno; Thiemann, Thomas

    2012-03-16

    We report on a new approach to the calculation of Chern-Simons theory expectation values, using the mathematical underpinnings of loop quantum gravity, as well as the Duflo map, a quantization map for functions on Lie algebras. These new developments can be used in the quantum theory for certain types of black hole horizons, and they may offer new insights for loop quantum gravity, Chern-Simons theory and the theory of quantum groups.

  5. One-loop quantum gravity repulsion in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Broda, Bogusław

    2011-03-11

    Perturbative quantum gravity formalism is applied to compute the lowest order corrections to the classical spatially flat cosmological Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker solution (for the radiation). The presented approach is analogous to the approach applied to compute quantum corrections to the Coulomb potential in electrodynamics, or rather to the approach applied to compute quantum corrections to the Schwarzschild solution in gravity. In the framework of the standard perturbative quantum gravity, it is shown that the corrections to the classical deceleration, coming from the one-loop graviton vacuum polarization (self-energy), have (UV cutoff free) opposite to the classical repulsive properties which are not negligible in the very early Universe. The repulsive "quantum forces" resemble those known from loop quantum cosmology.

  6. Conformal loop quantum gravity coupled to the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campiglia, Miguel; Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    We argue that a conformally invariant extension of general relativity coupled to the standard model is the fundamental theory that needs to be quantized. We show that it can be treated by loop quantum gravity techniques. Through a gauge fixing and a modified Higgs mechanism particles acquire mass and one recovers general relativity coupled to the standard model. The theory suggests new views with respect to the definition of the Hamiltonian constraint in loop quantum gravity, the semi-classical limit and the issue of finite renormalization in quantum field theory in quantum space-time. It also gives hints about the elimination of ambiguities that arise in quantum field theory in quantum space-time in the calculation of back-reaction.

  7. Path integrals and the WKB approximation in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Campiglia, Miguel; Henderson, Adam

    2010-12-01

    We follow the Feynman procedure to obtain a path integral formulation of loop quantum cosmology starting from the Hilbert space framework. Quantum geometry effects modify the weight associated with each path so that the effective measure on the space of paths is different from that used in the Wheeler-DeWitt theory. These differences introduce some conceptual subtleties in arriving at the WKB approximation. But the approximation is well defined and provides intuition for the differences between loop quantum cosmology and the Wheeler-DeWitt theory from a path integral perspective.

  8. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi type IX models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2010-08-01

    The loop quantum cosmology “improved dynamics” of the Bianchi type IX model are studied. The action of the Hamiltonian constraint operator is obtained via techniques developed for the Bianchi type I and type II models, no new input is required. It is shown that the big bang and big crunch singularities are resolved by quantum gravity effects. We also present effective equations which provide quantum geometry corrections to the classical equations of motion.

  9. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi type IX models

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2010-08-15

    The loop quantum cosmology 'improved dynamics' of the Bianchi type IX model are studied. The action of the Hamiltonian constraint operator is obtained via techniques developed for the Bianchi type I and type II models, no new input is required. It is shown that the big bang and big crunch singularities are resolved by quantum gravity effects. We also present effective equations which provide quantum geometry corrections to the classical equations of motion.

  10. Towards generic resolution of strong singularities in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parampreet

    2010-10-01

    Singularities are the boundaries of classical spacetime in General Relativity. It has been always hoped that quantum gravitational effects may resolve these singularities. In recent years, progress in loop quantum cosmology has provided insights on the resolution of big bang, big crunch and other spacelike singularities. In this talk we will give an update on the recent status of the generic resolution of strong spacelike singularities in loop quantum cosmology. We will show that for flat and curved Roberston-Walker backgrounds and also for Bianchi-I models, loop quantum gravity effects resolve all strong curvature singularities. However, weak curvature singularities, that is those beyond which geodesics can be continued, may not be resolved.

  11. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: Inclusion of inverse triad corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Karami, Asieh

    2016-06-01

    We consider the loop quantization of the (diagonal) Bianchi type IX cosmological model. We explore different quantization prescriptions that extend the work of Wilson-Ewing and Singh. In particular, we study two different ways of implementing the so-called inverse triad corrections. We construct the corresponding Hamiltonian constraint operators and show that the singularity is formally resolved. We find the effective equations associated with the different quantization prescriptions, and study the relation with the isotropic k = 1 model that, classically, is contained within the Bianchi IX model. Somewhat surprisingly, we find the most natural quantization does not reduce to the k = 1 model. We use geometrically defined scalar observables to explore the physical implications of each of these theories. This is the first part in a series of papers analyzing different aspects of the Bianchi IX model, with inverse corrections, within loop quantum cosmology (LQC).

  12. Triple quantum filtered spectroscopy of homonuclear three spin-1/2 systems employing isotropic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirwai, Amey; Chandrakumar, N.

    2016-08-01

    We report the design and performance evaluation of novel pulse sequences for triple quantum filtered spectroscopy in homonuclear three spin-1/2 systems, employing isotropic mixing (IM) to excite triple quantum coherence (TQC). Our approach involves the generation of combination single quantum coherences (cSQC) from antisymmetric longitudinal or transverse magnetization components employing isotropic mixing (IM). cSQC's are then converted to TQC by a selective 180° pulse on one of the spins. As IM ideally causes magnetization to evolve under the influence of the spin coupling Hamiltonian alone, TQC is generated at a faster rate compared to sequences involving free precession. This is expected to be significant when the spins have large relaxation rates. Our approach is demonstrated experimentally by TQC filtered 1D spectroscopy on a 1H AX2 system (propargyl bromide in the presence of a paramagnetic additive), as well as a 31P linear AMX system (ATP in agar gel). The performance of the IM-based sequences for TQC excitation are compared against the standard three pulse sequence (Ernst et al., 1987) and an AX2 spin pattern recognition sequence (Levitt and Ernst, 1983). The latter reaches the unitary bound on TQC preparation efficiency starting from thermal equilibrium in AX2 systems, not considering relaxation. It is shown that in systems where spins relax rapidly, the new IM-based sequences indeed perform significantly better than the above two known TQC excitation sequences, the sensitivity enhancement being especially pronounced in the case of the proton system investigated. An overview of the differences in relaxation behavior is presented for the different approaches. Applications are envisaged to Overhauser DNP experiments and to in vivo NMR.

  13. Loop quantum cosmology with self-dual variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Using the complex-valued self-dual connection variables, the loop quantum cosmology of a closed Friedmann space-time coupled to a massless scalar field is studied. It is shown how the reality conditions can be imposed in the quantum theory by choosing a particular inner product for the kinematical Hilbert space. While holonomies of the self-dual Ashtekar connection are not well defined in the kinematical Hilbert space, it is possible to introduce a family of generalized holonomylike operators of which some are well defined; these operators in turn are used in the definition of the Hamiltonian constraint operator where the scalar field can be used as a relational clock. The resulting quantum theory is closely related, although not identical, to standard loop quantum cosmology constructed from the Ashtekar-Barbero variables with a real Immirzi parameter. Effective Friedmann equations are derived which provide a good approximation to the full quantum dynamics for sharply peaked states whose volume remains much larger than the Planck volume, and they show that for these states quantum gravity effects resolve the big-bang and big-crunch singularities and replace them by a nonsingular bounce. Finally, the loop quantization in self-dual variables of a flat Friedmann space-time is recovered in the limit of zero spatial curvature and is identical to the standard loop quantization in terms of the real-valued Ashtekar-Barbero variables.

  14. Even-odd spatial nonequivalence for atomic quantum gases with isotropic spin-orbit couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G. S.; Gupta, Reena

    2014-05-01

    A general expression for the density of states (DOS) of power-law trapped d-dimensional ideal quantum gases with isotropic spin-orbit couplings (SOCs) is derived and is found to bifurcate into even- dand odd- d classes. The expressions for the grand potential and hence for several thermodynamic quantities are then shown to be amenable to exact analytical forms provided d is an odd integer. Also, a condition γ < 2 d is obtained in case of odd- d for appearance of the Bose-Einstein condensation with γ as the power-law exponent. It is thus established that isotropic SOCs render even and odd dimensional spaces nonequivalent for uniform as well as trapped gases, and that the DOS of one-dimensional (1D) ideal gases, uniform or trapped, remains unaffected by the SOC. Furthermore, the analytical study of the transition temperature and the condensate fraction in a 3D Bose gas under combined presence of the harmonic trapping and the Weyl coupling shows that the condensation is favored by the former but disfavored by the latter. This countering behavior is discussed to be in conformity with the exchange-symmetry-induced statistical interactions resulting from these two entities as enunciated recently [Phys. Rev. A 88, 053607 (2013)].

  15. Covariant effective action for loop quantum cosmology a la Palatini

    SciTech Connect

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Singh, Parampreet E-mail: psingh@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2009-01-15

    In loop quantum cosmology, non-perturbative quantum gravity effects lead to the resolution of the big bang singularity by a quantum bounce without introducing any new degrees of freedom. Though fundamentally discrete, the theory admits a continuum description in terms of an effective Hamiltonian. Here we provide an algorithm to obtain the corresponding effective action, establishing in this way the covariance of the theory for the first time. This result provides new insights on the continuum properties of the discrete structure of quantum geometry and opens new avenues to extract physical predictions such as those related to gauge invariant cosmological perturbations.

  16. Numerical simulations of a loop quantum cosmos: robustness of the quantum bounce and the validity of effective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Peter; Gupt, Brajesh; Singh, Parampreet

    2014-05-01

    A key result of isotropic loop quantum cosmology is the existence of a quantum bounce which occurs when the energy density of the matter field approaches a universal maximum close to the Planck density. Though the bounce has been exhibited in various matter models, due to severe computational challenges, some important questions have so far remained unaddressed. These include the demonstration of the bounce for widely spread states, its detailed properties for the states when matter field probes regions close to the Planck volume and the reliability of the continuum effective spacetime description in general. In this manuscript we rigorously answer these questions using the Chimera numerical scheme for the isotropic spatially flat model sourced with a massless scalar field. We show that, as expected from an exactly solvable model, the quantum bounce is a generic feature of states even with a very wide spread, and for those which bounce much closer to the Planck volume. We perform a detailed analysis of the departures from the effective description and find some expected, and some surprising results. At a coarse level of description, the effective dynamics can be regarded as a good approximation to the underlying quantum dynamics unless the states correspond to small scalar field momenta, in which case they bounce closer to the Planck volume or are very widely spread. Quantifying the amount of discrepancy between the quantum and the effective dynamics, we find that the departure between them depends in a subtle and non-monotonic way on the field momentum and different fluctuations. Interestingly, the departures are generically found to be such that the effective dynamics overestimates the spacetime curvature, and underestimates the volume at the bounce.

  17. On the Convergence in Effective Loop Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana; Zapata, Jose Antonio

    2010-07-12

    In Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) there is a discreteness parameter {lambda}, that has been heuristically associated to a fundamental granularity of quantum geometry. It is also possible to consider {lambda} as a regulator in the same spirit as that used in lattice field theory, where it specifies a regular lattice in the real line. A particular quantization of the k = 0 FLRW loop cosmological model yields a completely solvable model, known as solvable loop quantum cosmology(sLQC). In this contribution, we consider effective classical theories motivated by sLQC and study their {lambda}-dependence, with a special interest on the limit {lambda}{yields}0 and the role of the evolution parameter in the convergence of such limit.

  18. Closed-Loop and Robust Control of Quantum Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    For most practical quantum control systems, it is important and difficult to attain robustness and reliability due to unavoidable uncertainties in the system dynamics or models. Three kinds of typical approaches (e.g., closed-loop learning control, feedback control, and robust control) have been proved to be effective to solve these problems. This work presents a self-contained survey on the closed-loop and robust control of quantum systems, as well as a brief introduction to a selection of basic theories and methods in this research area, to provide interested readers with a general idea for further studies. In the area of closed-loop learning control of quantum systems, we survey and introduce such learning control methods as gradient-based methods, genetic algorithms (GA), and reinforcement learning (RL) methods from a unified point of view of exploring the quantum control landscapes. For the feedback control approach, the paper surveys three control strategies including Lyapunov control, measurement-based control, and coherent-feedback control. Then such topics in the field of quantum robust control as H∞ control, sliding mode control, quantum risk-sensitive control, and quantum ensemble control are reviewed. The paper concludes with a perspective of future research directions that are likely to attract more attention. PMID:23997680

  19. Extension of Loop Quantum Gravity to f(R) Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Ma, Yongge

    2011-04-01

    The four-dimensional metric f(R) theories of gravity are cast into connection-dynamical formalism with real su(2) connections as configuration variables. Through this formalism, the classical metric f(R) theories are quantized by extending the loop quantization scheme of general relativity. Our results imply that the nonperturbative quantization procedure of loop quantum gravity is valid not only for general relativity but also for a rather general class of four-dimensional metric theories of gravity.

  20. Extension of loop quantum gravity to f(R) theories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Ma, Yongge

    2011-04-29

    The four-dimensional metric f(R) theories of gravity are cast into connection-dynamical formalism with real su(2) connections as configuration variables. Through this formalism, the classical metric f(R) theories are quantized by extending the loop quantization scheme of general relativity. Our results imply that the nonperturbative quantization procedure of loop quantum gravity is valid not only for general relativity but also for a rather general class of four-dimensional metric theories of gravity.

  1. Spacetime-noncommutativity regime of loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Da Silva, Malú Maira; Ronco, Michele; Cesarini, Lorenzo; Lecian, Orchidea Maria

    2017-01-01

    A recent study by Bojowald and Paily [M. Bojowald and G. M. Paily, Phys. Rev. D 87, 044044 (2013)., 10.1103/PhysRevD.87.044044] provided a path toward the identification of an effective quantum-spacetime picture of loop quantum gravity, applicable in the "Minkowski regime," the regime where the large-scale (coarse-grained) spacetime metric is flat. A pivotal role in the analysis is played by loop-quantum-gravity-based modifications to the hypersurface deformation algebra, which leave a trace in the Minkowski regime. We here show that the symmetry-algebra results reported by Bojowald and Paily are consistent with a description of spacetime in the Minkowski regime given in terms of the κ -Minkowski noncommutative spacetime, whose relevance for the study of the quantum-gravity problem had already been proposed for independent reasons.

  2. Evolution of perturbations in anisotropic loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Sreenath; Agullo, Ivan; Olmedo, Javier

    2017-01-01

    In loop quantum cosmology the big bang singularity is replaced by a quantum bounce. The evolution of primordial perturbations through such a bounce in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe has been studied in great detail. However, it is well known that any tiny anisotropy will grow (up to an upper bound) as the universe contracts and undergoes a bounce. Anisotropies will then decrease and eventually dilute in the expanding branch, but quantum perturbations may retain memory of the anisotropic bounce. In this talk, we present our efforts in understanding the effect of anisotropies (of Bianchi-I type) on the evolution of primordial perturbations in loop quantum cosmology, and in exploring its phenomenological implications. This work is supported by the NSF Grant No. PHY-1403943.

  3. Probing loop quantum gravity with evaporating black holes.

    PubMed

    Barrau, A; Cailleteau, T; Cao, X; Diaz-Polo, J; Grain, J

    2011-12-16

    This Letter aims at showing that the observation of evaporating black holes should allow the usual Hawking behavior to be distinguished from loop quantum gravity (LQG) expectations. We present a full Monte Carlo simulation of the evaporation in LQG and statistical tests that discriminate between competing models. We conclude that contrarily to what was commonly thought, the discreteness of the area in LQG leads to characteristic features that qualify evaporating black holes as objects that could reveal quantum gravity footprints.

  4. Black hole state degeneracy in loop quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Agullo, Ivan; Diaz-Polo, Jacobo; Fernandez-Borja, Enrique

    2008-05-15

    The combinatorial problem of counting the black hole quantum states within the isolated horizon framework in loop quantum gravity is analyzed. A qualitative understanding of the origin of the band structure shown by the degeneracy spectrum, which is responsible for the black hole entropy quantization, is reached. Even when motivated by simple considerations, this picture allows to obtain analytical expressions for the most relevant quantities associated to this effect.

  5. Geodesic completeness and the lack of strong singularities in effective loop quantum Kantowski-Sachs spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Sahil; Singh, Parampreet

    2016-12-01

    Resolution of singularities in the Kantowski-Sachs model due to non-perturbative quantum gravity effects is investigated. Using the effective spacetime description for the improved dynamics version of loop quantum Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes, we show that even though expansion and shear scalars are universally bounded, there can exist events where curvature invariants can diverge. However, such events can occur only for very exotic equations of state when pressure or derivatives of energy density with respect to triads become infinite at a finite energy density. In all other cases curvature invariants are proved to remain finite for any evolution in finite proper time. We find the novel result that all strong singularities are resolved for arbitrary matter. Weak singularities pertaining to above potential curvature divergence events can exist. The effective spacetime is found to be geodesically complete for particle and null geodesics in finite time evolution. Our results add to a growing evidence for generic resolution of strong singularities using effective dynamics in loop quantum cosmology by generalizing earlier results on isotropic and Bianchi-I spacetimes.

  6. Linking loop quantum gravity quantization ambiguities with phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahma, Suddhasattwa; Ronco, Michele; Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Marcianò, Antonino

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that extracting viable testable predictions out of fundamental quantum gravity theories is notoriously difficult. In this paper, we aim to incorporate putative quantum corrections coming from loop quantum gravity in deriving modified dispersion relations for particles in a deformed Minkowski spacetime. We show how different choices of the Immirzi parameter can, in some cases, serendipitously lead to different outcomes for such modifications, depending on the quantization scheme chosen. This allows one to differentiate between these quantization choices via testable phenomenological predictions.

  7. Counting black hole microscopic states in loop quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, A.; Mitra, P.

    2006-09-15

    Counting of microscopic states of black holes is performed within the framework of loop quantum gravity. This is the first calculation of the pure horizon states using statistical methods, which reveals the possibility of additional states missed in the earlier calculations, leading to an increase of entropy. Also for the first time a microcanonical temperature is introduced within the framework.

  8. Projective loop quantum gravity. I. State space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanéry, Suzanne; Thiemann, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Instead of formulating the state space of a quantum field theory over one big Hilbert space, it has been proposed by Kijowski to describe quantum states as projective families of density matrices over a collection of smaller, simpler Hilbert spaces. Beside the physical motivations for this approach, it could help designing a quantum state space holding the states we need. In a latter work by Okolów, the description of a theory of Abelian connections within this framework was developed, an important insight being to use building blocks labeled by combinations of edges and surfaces. The present work generalizes this construction to an arbitrary gauge group G (in particular, G is neither assumed to be Abelian nor compact). This involves refining the definition of the label set, as well as deriving explicit formulas to relate the Hilbert spaces attached to different labels. If the gauge group happens to be compact, we also have at our disposal the well-established Ashtekar-Lewandowski Hilbert space, which is defined as an inductive limit using building blocks labeled by edges only. We then show that the quantum state space presented here can be thought as a natural extension of the space of density matrices over this Hilbert space. In addition, it is manifest from the classical counterparts of both formalisms that the projective approach allows for a more balanced treatment of the holonomy and flux variables, so it might pave the way for the development of more satisfactory coherent states.

  9. Dirac fields in loop quantum gravity and big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bojowald, Martin; Das, Rupam; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2008-04-15

    Big bang nucleosynthesis requires a fine balance between equations of state for photons and relativistic fermions. Several corrections to equation of state parameters arise from classical and quantum physics, which are derived here from a canonical perspective. In particular, loop quantum gravity allows one to compute quantum gravity corrections for Maxwell and Dirac fields. Although the classical actions are very different, quantum corrections to the equation of state are remarkably similar. To lowest order, these corrections take the form of an overall expansion-dependent multiplicative factor in the total density. We use these results, along with the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis, to place bounds on these corrections and especially the patch size of discrete quantum gravity states.

  10. Measure problem in slow roll inflation and loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Karami, Asieh

    2011-05-15

    We consider the measure problem in standard slow-roll inflationary models from the perspective of loop quantum cosmology (LQC). Following recent results by Ashtekar and Sloan, we study the probability of having enough e-foldings and focus on its dependence on the quantum gravity scale, including the transition of the theory to the limit where general relativity (GR) is recovered. Contrary to the standard expectation, the probability of having enough inflation, that is close to 1 in LQC, grows and tends to 1 as one approaches the GR limit. We study the origin of the tension between these results with those by Gibbons and Turok, and offer an explanation that brings these apparent contradictory results into a coherent picture. As we show, the conflicting results stem from different choices of initial conditions for the computation of probability. The singularity-free scenario of loop quantum cosmology offers a natural choice of initial conditions, and suggests that enough inflation is generic.

  11. Numerical evolution of squeezed and non-Gaussian states in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Peter; Gupt, Brajesh; Megevand, Miguel; Singh, Parampreet

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, numerical simulations with Gaussian initial states have demonstrated the existence of a quantum bounce in loop quantum cosmology in various models. A key issue pertaining to the robustness of the bounce and the associated physics is to understand the quantum evolution for more general initial states, which may depart significantly from Gaussianity and may have no well defined peakedness properties. The analysis of such states, including squeezed and highly non-Gaussian states, has been computationally challenging until now. In this paper, we overcome these challenges by using the Chimera scheme for the spatially flat, homogeneous and isotropic model sourced with a massless scalar field. We demonstrate that the quantum bounce in this model occurs even for states that are highly squeezed or are non-Gaussian with multiple peaks and with little resemblance to semi-classical states. The existence of the bounce is found to be robust, being independent of the properties of the states. The evolution of squeezed and non-Gaussian states turns out to be qualitatively similar to that of Gaussian states, and satisfies strong constraints on the growth of the relative fluctuations across the bounce. We also compare the results from the effective dynamics and find that, although it captures the qualitative aspects of the evolution for squeezed and highly non-Gaussian states, it always underestimates the bounce volume. We show that various properties of the evolution, such as the energy density at the bounce, are in excellent agreement with the predictions from an exactly solvable loop quantum cosmological model for arbitrary states.

  12. Phenomenological loop quantum geometry of the Schwarzschild black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, D.-W.

    2008-09-15

    The interior of a Schwarzschild black hole is investigated at the level of phenomenological dynamics with the discreteness corrections of loop quantum geometry implemented in two different improved quantization schemes. In one scheme, the classical black hole singularity is resolved by the quantum bounce, which bridges the black hole interior with a white hole interior. In the other scheme, the classical singularity is resolved and the event horizon is also diffused by the quantum bounce. Jumping over the quantum bounce, the black hole gives birth to a baby black hole with a much smaller mass. This lineage continues as each classical black hole brings forth its own descendant in the consecutive classical cycle, giving the whole extended spacetime fractal structure, until the solution eventually descends into the deep Planck regime, signaling a breakdown of the semiclassical description. The issues of scaling symmetry and no-hair theorem are also discussed.

  13. PREFACE: Loops 11: Non-Perturbative / Background Independent Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena Marugán, Guillermo A.; Barbero G, J. Fernando; Garay, Luis J.; Villaseñor, Eduardo J. S.; Olmedo, Javier

    2012-05-01

    Loops 11 The international conference LOOPS'11 took place in Madrid from the 23-28 May 2011. It was hosted by the Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (IEM), which belongs to the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientĺficas (CSIC). Like previous editions of the LOOPS meetings, it dealt with a wealth of state-of-the-art topics on Quantum Gravity, with special emphasis on non-perturbative background-independent approaches to spacetime quantization. The main topics addressed at the conference ranged from the foundations of Quantum Gravity to its phenomenological aspects. They encompassed different approaches to Loop Quantum Gravity and Cosmology, Polymer Quantization, Quantum Field Theory, Black Holes, and discrete approaches such as Dynamical Triangulations, amongst others. In addition, this edition celebrated the 25th anniversary of the introduction of the now well-known Ashtekar variables and the Wednesday morning session was devoted to this silver jubilee. The structure of the conference was designed to reflect the current state and future prospects of research on the different topics mentioned above. Plenary lectures that provided general background and the 'big picture' took place during the mornings, and the more specialised talks were distributed in parallel sessions during the evenings. To be more specific, Monday evening was devoted to Shape Dynamics and Phenomenology Derived from Quantum Gravity in Parallel Session A, and to Covariant Loop Quantum Gravity and Spin foams in Parallel Session B. Tuesday's three Parallel Sessions dealt with Black Hole Physics and Dynamical Triangulations (Session A), the continuation of Monday's session on Covariant Loop Quantum Gravity and Spin foams (Session B) and Foundations of Quantum Gravity (Session C). Finally, Thursday and Friday evenings were devoted to Loop Quantum Cosmology (Session A) and to Hamiltonian Loop Quantum Gravity (Session B). The result of the conference was very satisfactory and enlightening. Not

  14. Unified model of loop quantum gravity and matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Olson, S. Jay; Pullin, Jorge

    2006-04-01

    We reconsider the unified model of gravitation and Yang Mills interactions proposed by Chakraborty and Peldán, in the light of recent formal developments in loop quantum gravity. In particular, we show that one can promote the Hamiltonian constraint of the unified model to a well defined anomaly-free quantum operator using the techniques introduced by Thiemann, at least for the Euclidean theory. The Lorentzian version of the model can be consistently constructed, but at the moment appears to yield a correct weak field theory only under restrictive assumptions, and its quantization appears problematic.

  15. Spin-foams for all loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Wojciech; Kisielowski, Marcin; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2010-05-01

    The simplicial framework of Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine spin-foam models is generalized to match the diffeomorphism invariant framework of loop quantum gravity. The simplicial spin-foams are generalized to arbitrary linear 2-cell spin-foams. The resulting framework admits all the spin-network states of loop quantum gravity, not only those defined by triangulations (or cubulations). In particular, the notion of embedded spin-foam we use allows us to consider knotting or linking spin-foam histories. Also the main tools, the vertex structure and the vertex amplitude, are naturally generalized to an arbitrary valency case. The correspondence between all the SU(2) intertwiners and the SU(2)×SU(2) EPRL intertwiners is proved to be 1-1 in the case of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter |γ| >= 1.

  16. Towards loop quantum gravity without the time gauge.

    PubMed

    Cianfrani, Francesco; Montani, Giovanni

    2009-03-06

    The Hamiltonian formulation of the Holst action is reviewed and it provides a solution of second-class constraints corresponding to a generic local Lorentz frame. Within this scheme the form of rotation constraints can be reduced to a Gauss-like one by a proper generalization of Ashtekar-Barbero-Immirzi connections. This result emphasizes that the loop quantum gravity quantization procedure can be applied when the time-gauge condition does not stand.

  17. Towards Loop Quantum Gravity without the Time Gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfrani, Francesco; Montani, Giovanni

    2009-03-01

    The Hamiltonian formulation of the Holst action is reviewed and it provides a solution of second-class constraints corresponding to a generic local Lorentz frame. Within this scheme the form of rotation constraints can be reduced to a Gauss-like one by a proper generalization of Ashtekar-Barbero-Immirzi connections. This result emphasizes that the loop quantum gravity quantization procedure can be applied when the time-gauge condition does not stand.

  18. Single-loop multiple-pulse nonadiabatic holonomic quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herterich, Emmi; Sjöqvist, Erik

    2016-11-01

    Nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation provides the means to perform fast and robust quantum gates by utilizing the resilience of non-Abelian geometric phases to fluctuations of the path in state space. While the original scheme [E. Sjöqvist et al., New J. Phys. 14, 103035 (2012), 10.1088/1367-2630/14/10/103035] needs two loops in the Grassmann manifold (i.e., the space of computational subspaces of the full state space) to generate an arbitrary holonomic one-qubit gate, we propose single-loop one-qubit gates that constitute an efficient universal set of holonomic gates when combined with an entangling holonomic two-qubit gate. Our one-qubit gate is realized by dividing the loop into path segments, each of which is generated by a Λ -type Hamiltonian. We demonstrate that two path segments are sufficient to realize arbitrary single-loop holonomic one-qubit gates. We describe how our scheme can be implemented experimentally in a generic atomic system exhibiting a three-level Λ -coupling structure by utilizing carefully chosen laser pulses.

  19. The matter bounce scenario in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2013-03-01

    In the matter bounce scenario, a dust-dominated contracting space-time generates scale-invariant perturbations that, assuming a nonsingular bouncing cosmology, propagate to the expanding branch and set appropriate initial conditions for the radiation-dominated era. Since this scenario depends on the presence of a bounce, it seems appropriate to consider it in the context of loop quantum cosmology where a bouncing universe naturally arises. For a pressureless collapsing universe in loop quantum cosmology, the predicted power spectrum of the scalar perturbations after the bounce is scale-invariant and the tensor to scalar ratio is negligibly small. A slight red tilt can be given to the scale-invariance of the scalar perturbations by a scalar field whose equation of state is P = −ερ, where ε is a small positive number. Then, the power spectrum for tensor perturbations is also almost scale-invariant with the same red tilt as the scalar perturbations, and the tensor to scalar ratio is expected to be r ≈ 9 × 10{sup −4}. Finally, for the predicted amplitude of the scalar perturbations to agree with observations, the critical density in loop quantum cosmology must be of the order ρ{sub c} ∼ 10{sup −9}ρ{sub Pl}.

  20. Averaged null energy condition in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Li Lifang; Zhu Jianyang

    2009-02-15

    Wormholes and time machines are objects of great interest in general relativity. However, to support them it needs exotic matters which are impossible at the classical level. Semiclassical gravity introduces the quantum effects into the stress-energy tensor and constructs many self-consistent wormholes. But they are not traversable due to the averaged null energy condition. Loop quantum gravity (LQG) significantly modifies the Einstein equation in the deep quantum region. If we write the modified Einstein equation in the form of the standard one but with an effective stress-energy tensor, it is convenient to analyze the geometry in LQG through the energy condition. Loop quantum cosmology (LQC), an application of LQG, has an effective stress-energy tensor which violates some kinds of local energy conditions. So it is natural that the inflation emerges in LQC. In this paper, we investigate the averaged null energy condition in LQC in the framework of the effective Hamiltonian, and we find that the effective stress-energy tensor in LQC violates the averaged null energy condition in the massless scalar field coupled model.

  1. A new look at Lorentz-covariant loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiller, Marc; Lachièze-Rey, Marc; Noui, Karim

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we study the classical and quantum properties of the unique commutative Lorentz-covariant connection for loop quantum gravity. This connection has been found after solving the second-class constraints inherited from the canonical analysis of the Holst action without the time gauge. We show that it has the property of lying in the conjugacy class of a pure su(2) connection, a result which enables one to construct the kinematical Hilbert space of the Lorentz-covariant theory in terms of the usual SU(2) spin-network states. Furthermore, we show that there is a unique Lorentz-covariant electric field, up to trivial and natural equivalence relations. The Lorentz-covariant electric field transforms under the adjoint action of the Lorentz group, and the associated Casimir operators are shown to be proportional to the area density. This gives a very interesting algebraic interpretation of the area. Finally, we show that the action of the surface operator on the Lorentz-covariant holonomies reproduces exactly the usual discrete SU(2) spectrum of time-gauge loop quantum gravity. In other words, the use of the time gauge does not introduce anomalies in the quantum theory.

  2. Loop quantum cosmology: from pre-inflationary dynamics to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Barrau, Aurélien

    2015-12-01

    The Planck collaboration has provided us rich information about the early Universe, and a host of new observational missions will soon shed further light on the ‘anomalies’ that appear to exist on the largest angular scales. From a quantum gravity perspective, it is natural to inquire if one can trace back the origin of such puzzling features to Planck scale physics. Loop quantum cosmology provides a promising avenue to explore this issue because of its natural resolution of the big bang singularity. Thanks to advances over the last decade, the theory has matured sufficiently to allow concrete calculations of the phenomenological consequences of its pre-inflationary dynamics. In this article we summarize the current status of the ensuing two-way dialog between quantum gravity and observations.

  3. Superconducting quantum criticality of topological surface states at three loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerf, Nikolai; Lin, Chien-Hung; Maciejko, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    The semimetal-superconductor quantum phase transition on the two-dimensional (2D) surface of a 3D topological insulator is conjectured to exhibit an emergent N =2 supersymmetry, based on a one-loop renormalization group (RG) analysis in the ɛ expansion. We provide additional support for this conjecture by performing a three-loop RG analysis and showing that the supersymmetric fixed point found at this order survives the extrapolation to 2D. We compute critical exponents to order ɛ3, obtaining the more accurate value ν ≈0.985 for the correlation length exponent and confirming that the fermion and boson anomalous dimensions remain unchanged beyond one loop, as expected from non-renormalization theorems in supersymmetric theories. We further couple the system to a dynamical U(1) gauge field, and argue that the transition becomes fluctuation-induced first order in an appropriate type-I regime. We discuss implications of this result for quantum phase transitions between certain symmetry-preserving correlated surface states of 3D topological insulators.

  4. Implications of quantum ambiguities in k =1 loop quantum cosmology: Distinct quantum turnarounds and the super-Planckian regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, John L.; Singh, Parampreet

    2017-01-01

    The spatially closed Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker model in loop quantum cosmology admits two inequivalent consistent quantizations: one based on expressing the field strength in terms of the holonomies over closed loops and another using a connection operator and open holonomies. Using the effective dynamics, we investigate the phenomenological differences between the two quantizations for the single-fluid and the two-fluid scenarios with various equations of state, including the phantom matter. We show that a striking difference between the two quantizations is the existence of two distinct quantum turnarounds, either bounces or recollapses, in the connection quantization, in contrast to a single distinct quantum bounce or a recollapse in the holonomy quantization. These results generalize an earlier result on the existence of two distinct quantum bounces for stiff matter by Corichi and Karami. However, we find that in certain situations two distinct quantum turnarounds can become virtually indistinguishable. And depending on the initial conditions, a pure quantum cyclic universe can also exist undergoing a quantum bounce and a quantum recollapse. We show that for various equations of states, connection-based quantization leads to super-Planckian values of the energy density and the expansion scalar at quantum turnarounds. Interestingly, we find that very extreme energy densities can also occur for the holonomy quantization, breaching the maximum allowed density in the spatially flat loop quantized model. However, the expansion scalar in all these cases is bounded by a universal value.

  5. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: effective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Montoya, Edison

    2017-03-01

    We study solutions to the effective equations for the Bianchi IX class of spacetimes within loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We consider Bianchi IX models whose matter content is a massless scalar field, by numerically solving the loop quantum cosmology effective equations, with and without inverse triad corrections. The solutions are classified using certain geometrically motivated classical observables. We show that both effective theories—with lapse N  =  V and N  =  1—resolve the big bang singularity and reproduce the classical dynamics far from the bounce. Moreover, due to the positive spatial curvature, there is an infinite number of bounces and recollapses. We study the limit of large field momentum and show that both effective theories reproduce the same dynamics, thus recovering general relativity. We implement a procedure to identify amongst the Bianchi IX solutions, those that behave like k  =  0,1 FLRW as well as Bianchi I, II, and VII0 models. The effective solutions exhibit Bianchi I phases with Bianchi II transitions and also Bianchi VII0 phases, which had not been studied before. We comment on the possible implications of these results for a quantum modification to the classical BKL behaviour.

  6. 2-loop quantum Yang Mills condensate as dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, T. Y.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-11-01

    In seeking a model solving the coincidence problem, the effective Yang Mills condensate (YMC) is an alternative candidate for dark energy. A study is made for the model up to the 2-loop order of quantum corrections. It is found that, like in the 1-loop model, for generic initial conditions during the radiation era, there is always a desired tracking solution, yielding the current status Ω≃0.73 and Ω≃0.27. As the time t→∞ the dynamics is a stable attractor. Thus the model naturally solves the coincidence problem of dark energy. Moreover, if YMC decays into matter, its equation of state (EoS) crosses -1 and takes w˜-1.1, as indicated by the recent observations.

  7. Phenomenology of loop quantum cosmology and observational consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupt, Brajesh

    2016-03-01

    An important feature of singularity resolution in loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the occurrence of the quantum bounce when the spacetime curvature becomes Planckian leading the pre-inflationary evolution of the universe to be greatly modified. Due to the modified dynamics in the pre-inflationary era the initial conditions for both the background and cosmological perturbations are different from those in the standard inflationary scenario. We find that such modifications can lead to observational signatures on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy spectrum, and provide a new window to explore the CMB anomalies. In this talk we describe these initial conditions, discuss their consequences on the inflationary power spectrum, and compare our results with data from recent CMB experiments. NSF.

  8. Slow-roll approximation in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luc, Joanna; Mielczarek, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    The slow-roll approximation is an analytical approach to study dynamical properties of the inflationary universe. In this article, systematic construction of the slow-roll expansion for effective loop quantum cosmology is presented. The analysis is performed up to the fourth order in both slow-roll parameters and the parameter controlling the strength of deviation from the classical case. The expansion is performed for three types of the slow-roll parameters: Hubble slow-roll parameters, Hubble flow parameters and potential slow-roll parameters. An accuracy of the approximation is verified by comparison with the numerical phase space trajectories for the case with a massive potential term. The results obtained in this article may be helpful in the search for the subtle quantum gravitational effects with use of the cosmological data.

  9. Loop quantum cosmology of k=1 FRW models

    SciTech Connect

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Pawlowski, Tomasz; Singh, Parampreet; Vandersloot, Kevin

    2007-01-15

    The closed, k=1, FRW model coupled to a massless scalar field is investigated in the framework of loop quantum cosmology using analytical and numerical methods. As in the k=0 case, the scalar field can be again used as emergent time to construct the physical Hilbert space and introduce Dirac observables. The resulting framework is then used to address a major challenge of quantum cosmology: resolving the big-bang singularity while retaining agreement with general relativity at large scales. It is shown that the framework fulfills this task. In particular, for states which are semiclassical at some late time, the big bang is replaced by a quantum bounce and a recollapse occurs at the value of the scale factor predicted by classical general relativity. Thus, the 'difficulties' pointed out by Green and Unruh in the k=1 case do not arise in a more systematic treatment. As in k=0 models, quantum dynamics is deterministic across the deep Planck regime. However, because it also retains the classical recollapse, in contrast to the k=0 case one is now led to a cyclic model. Finally, we clarify some issues raised by Laguna's recent work addressed to computational physicists.

  10. Closed-loop quantum control utilizing time domain maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biteen, Julie S.; Geremia, J. M.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2003-05-01

    Closed-loop laser control of quantum dynamics phenomena may be accomplished through frequency domain manipulations in the laboratory guided by a learning algorithm. This paper presents an alternative method based on the use of nonlinear input→output maps generated in the time domain, although the actual experiments and control optimization are carried out in the frequency domain. The procedure first involves the construction of input→output maps relating the field structure to the observed control performance. These maps are utilized as a substitute for actual experiments in the subsequent optimization stage in order to find the field that drives the system to a specified target. This closed-loop learning process is repeated with a sufficient number of maps until a control field is found that yields the target observable as best as possible. The overall algorithm is simulated with two model quantum systems. It is shown that excellent quality control can be achieved through this sequential learning procedure, even with individual maps that have only modest global accuracy.

  11. Effective Hamiltonians by optimal control: solid-state NMR double-quantum planar and isotropic dipolar recoupling.

    PubMed

    Tosner, Zdenek; Glaser, Steffen J; Khaneja, Navin; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2006-11-14

    We report the use of optimal control algorithms for tailoring the effective Hamiltonians in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy through sophisticated radio-frequency (rf) pulse irradiation. Specifically, we address dipolar recoupling in solid-state NMR of powder samples for which case pulse sequences offering evolution under planar double-quantum and isotropic mixing dipolar coupling Hamiltonians are designed. The pulse sequences are constructed numerically to cope with a range of experimental conditions such as inhomogeneous rf fields, spread of chemical shifts, the intrinsic orientation dependencies of powder samples, and sample spinning. While the vast majority of previous dipolar recoupling sequences are operating through planar double-or zero-quantum effective Hamiltonians, we present here not only improved variants of such experiments but also for the first time homonuclear isotropic mixing sequences which transfers all I(x), I(y), and I(z) polarizations from one spin to the same operators on another spin simultaneously and with equal efficiency. This property may be exploited to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of two-dimensional experiments by a factor of square root 2 compared to conventional solid-state methods otherwise showing the same efficiency. The sequences are tested numerically and experimentally for a powder of (13)C(alpha),(13)C(beta)-L-alanine and demonstrate substantial sensitivity gains over previous dipolar recoupling experiments.

  12. Covariance in models of loop quantum gravity: Spherical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin; Brahma, Suddhasattwa; Reyes, Juan D.

    2015-08-01

    Spherically symmetric models of loop quantum gravity have been studied recently by different methods that aim to deal with structure functions in the usual constraint algebra of gravitational systems. As noticed by Gambini and Pullin, a linear redefinition of the constraints (with phase-space dependent coefficients) can be used to eliminate structure functions, even Abelianizing the more difficult part of the constraint algebra. The Abelianized constraints can then easily be quantized or modified by putative quantum effects. As pointed out here, however, the method does not automatically provide a covariant quantization, defined as an anomaly-free quantum theory with a classical limit in which the usual (off-shell) gauge structure of hypersurface deformations in space-time appears. The holonomy-modified vacuum theory based on Abelianization is covariant in this sense, but matter theories with local degrees of freedom are not. Detailed demonstrations of these statements show complete agreement with results of canonical effective methods applied earlier to the same systems (including signature change).

  13. 3D Lorentzian loop quantum gravity and the spinor approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girelli, Florian; Sellaroli, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    We consider the generalization of the "spinor approach" to the Lorentzian case, in the context of three-dimensional loop quantum gravity with cosmological constant Λ =0 . The key technical tool that allows this generalization is the recoupling theory between unitary infinite-dimensional representations and nonunitary finite-dimensional ones, obtained in the process of generalizing the Wigner-Eckart theorem to SU(1,1). We use SU(1,1) tensor operators to build observables and a solvable quantum Hamiltonian constraint, analogous to the one introduced by V. Bonzom and his collaborators in the Euclidean case (with both Λ =0 and Λ ≠0 ). We show that the Lorentzian Ponzano-Regge amplitude is the solution of the quantum Hamiltonian constraint by recovering the Biedenharn-Elliott relation [generalized to the case where unitary and nonunitary SU(1,1) representations are coupled to each other]. Our formalism is sufficiently general that both the Lorentzian and the Euclidean case can be recovered (with Λ =0 ).

  14. Tachyon field in loop quantum cosmology: Inflation and evolution picture

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Huaui; Zhu Jianyang

    2007-04-15

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) predicts a nonsingular evolution of the universne through a bounce in the high energy region. We show that this is always true in tachyon matter LQC. Differing from the classical Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology, the super inflation can appear in the tachyon matter LQC; furthermore, the inflation can be extended to the region where classical inflation stops. Using the numerical method, we give an evolution picture of the tachyon field with an exponential potential in the context of LQC. It indicates that the quantum dynamical solutions have the same attractive behavior as the classical solutions do. The whole evolution of the tachyon field is that in the distant past, the tachyon field--being in the contracting cosmology--accelerates to climb up the potential hill with a negative velocity; then at the boundary the tachyon field is bounced into an expanding universe with positive velocity rolling down to the bottom of the potential. In the slow roll limit, we compare the quantum inflation with the classical case in both an analytic and a numerical way.

  15. Quintessence and (anti-)Chaplygin gas in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Lamon, Raphael; Woehr, Andreas J.

    2010-01-15

    The concordance model of cosmology contains several unknown components such as dark matter and dark energy. Many proposals have been made to describe them by choosing an appropriate potential for a scalar field. We study four models in the realm of loop quantum cosmology: the Chaplygin gas, an inflationary and radiationlike potential, quintessence and an anti-Chaplygin gas. For the latter we show that all trajectories start and end with a type II singularity and, depending on the initial value, may go through a bounce. On the other hand the evolution under the influence of the first three scalar fields behaves classically at times far away from the big bang singularity and bounces as the energy density approaches the critical density.

  16. Anisotropic loop quantum cosmology with self-dual variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2016-04-01

    A loop quantization of the diagonal class A Bianchi models starting from the complex-valued self-dual connection variables is presented in this paper. The basic operators in the quantum theory correspond to areas and generalized holonomies of the Ashtekar connection, and the reality conditions are implemented via the choice of the inner product on the kinematical Hilbert space. The action of the Hamiltonian constraint operator is given explicitly for the case when the matter content is a massless scalar field (in which case the scalar field can be used as a relational clock), and it is shown that the big bang and big crunch singularities are resolved in the sense that singular and nonsingular states decouple under the action of the Hamiltonian constraint operator.

  17. Fusion basis for lattice gauge theory and loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcamp, Clement; Dittrich, Bianca; Riello, Aldo

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a new basis for the gauge-invariant Hilbert space of lattice gauge theory and loop quantum gravity in (2 + 1) dimensions, the fusion basis. In doing so, we shift the focus from the original lattice (or spin-network) structure directly to that of the magnetic (curvature) and electric (torsion) excitations themselves. These excitations are classified by the irreducible representations of the Drinfel'd double of the gauge group, and can be readily "fused" together by studying the tensor product of such representations. We will also describe in detail the ribbon operators that create and measure these excitations and make the quasi-local structure of the observable algebra explicit. Since the fusion basis allows for both magnetic and electric excitations from the onset, it turns out to be a precious tool for studying the large scale structure and coarse-graining flow of lattice gauge theories and loop quantum gravity. This is in neat contrast with the widely used spin-network basis, in which it is much more complicated to account for electric excitations, i.e. for Gauß constraint violations, emerging at larger scales. Moreover, since the fusion basis comes equipped with a hierarchical structure, it readily provides the language to design states with sophisticated multi-scale structures. Another way to employ this hierarchical structure is to encode a notion of subsystems for lattice gauge theories and (2 + 1) gravity coupled to point particles. In a follow-up work, we have exploited this notion to provide a new definition of entanglement entropy for these theories.

  18. Spacetime quanta?: the discrete spectrum of a quantum spacetime four-volume operator in unimodular loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunao, J.

    2017-02-01

    This study considers the operator \\hat{T} corresponding to the classical spacetime four-volume \\tilde{T} (on-shell) of a finite patch of spacetime in the context of unimodular loop quantum cosmology for the homogeneous and isotropic model with flat spatial sections and without matter sources. Since the spacetime four-volume is canonically conjugate to the cosmological ‘constant’, the operator \\hat{T} is constructed by solving its canonical commutation relation with {\\hat Λ } —the operator corresponding to the classical cosmological constant on-shell {\\tilde Λ } . This conjugacy, along with the action of \\hat{T} on definite volume states reducing to \\tilde{T} , allows us to interpret that \\hat{T} is indeed a quantum spacetime four-volume operator. The discrete spectrum of \\hat{T} is calculated by considering the set of all τ’s where the eigenvalue equation has a solution {{ Φ }τ} in the domain of \\hat{T} . It turns out that, upon assigning the maximal domain D≤ft(\\hat{T}\\right) to \\hat{T} , we have {{ Φ }τ}\\in D≤ft(\\hat{T}\\right) for all τ \\in {C} so that the spectrum of \\hat{T} is purely discrete and is the entire complex plane. A family of operators {{\\hat{T}}≤ft({{b0},{φ0}\\right)}} was also considered as possible self-adjoint versions of \\hat{T} . They represent the restrictions of \\hat{T} on their respective domains D≤ft({{\\hat{T}}≤ft({{b0},{φ0}\\right)}}\\right) which are just the maximal domain with additional quasi-periodic conditions. Their possible self-adjointness is motivated by their discrete spectra only containing real and discrete numbers {τm} for m=0,+/- 1,+/- 2,... .

  19. An embedding of loop quantum cosmology in (b,v) variables into a full theory context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodendorfer, N.

    2016-06-01

    Loop quantum cosmology in (b, v) variables, which is governed by a unit step size difference equation, is embedded into a full theory context based on similar variables. A full theory context here means a theory of quantum gravity arrived at using the quantisation techniques used in loop quantum gravity, however based on a different choice of elementary variables and classical gauge fixing suggested by loop quantum cosmology. From the full theory perspective, the symmetry reduction is characterised by the vanishing of certain phase space functions which are implemented as operator equations in the quantum theory. The loop quantum cosmology dynamics arise as the action of the full theory Hamiltonian on maximally coarse states in the kernel of the reduction constraints. An application of this reduction procedure to spherical symmetry is also sketched, with similar results, but only one canonical pair in (b, v) form.

  20. Symmetry reduced loop quantum gravity: A bird’s eye view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    2016-06-01

    This is a brief overview of the current status of symmetry reduced models in Loop Quantum Gravity. The goal is to provide an introduction to other more specialized and detailed reviews that follow. Since most of this work is motivated by the physics of the very early universe, I will focus primarily on Loop Quantum Cosmology and discuss quantum aspects of black holes only briefly.

  1. Observational test of inflation in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Bojowald, Martin; Calcagni, Gianluca; Tsujikawa, Shinji E-mail: calcagni@aei.mpg.de

    2011-11-01

    We study in detail the power spectra of scalar and tensor perturbations generated during inflation in loop quantum cosmology (LQC). After clarifying in a novel quantitative way how inverse-volume corrections arise in inhomogeneous settings, we show that they can generate large running spectral indices, which generally lead to an enhancement of power at large scales. We provide explicit formulæ for the scalar/tensor power spectra under the slow-roll approximation, by taking into account corrections of order higher than the runnings. Via a standard analysis, we place observational bounds on the inverse-volume quantum correction δ∝a{sup −σ} (σ > 0, a is the scale factor) and the slow-roll parameter ε{sub V} for power-law potentials as well as exponential potentials by using the data of WMAP 7yr combined with other observations. We derive the constraints on δ for two pivot wavenumbers k{sub 0} for several values of δ. The quadratic potential can be compatible with the data even in the presence of the LQC corrections, but the quartic potential is in tension with observations. We also find that the upper bounds on δ(k{sub 0}) for given σ and k{sub 0} are insensitive to the choice of the inflaton potentials.

  2. Loop quantum gravity, exact holographic mapping, and holographic entanglement entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Muxin; Hung, Ling-Yan

    2017-01-01

    The relation between loop quantum gravity (LQG) and tensor networks is explored from the perspectives of the bulk-boundary duality and holographic entanglement entropy. We find that the LQG spin-network states in a space Σ with boundary ∂Σ is an exact holographic mapping similar to the proposal in [X.-L. Qi, Exact holographic mapping and emergent space-time geometry, arXiv:1309.6282]. The tensor network, understood as the boundary quantum state, is the output of the exact holographic mapping emerging from a coarse-graining procedure of spin networks. Furthermore, when a region A and its complement A ¯ are specified on the boundary ∂Σ , we show that the boundary entanglement entropy S (A ) of the emergent tensor network satisfies the Ryu-Takayanagi formula in the semiclassical regime, i.e., S (A ) is proportional to the minimal area of the bulk surface attached to the boundary of A in ∂Σ .

  3. Deconfined Quantum Criticality, Scaling Violations, and Classical Loop Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahum, Adam; Chalker, J. T.; Serna, P.; Ortuño, M.; Somoza, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    Numerical studies of the transition between Néel and valence bond solid phases in two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnets give strong evidence for the remarkable scenario of deconfined criticality, but display strong violations of finite-size scaling that are not yet understood. We show how to realize the universal physics of the Néel-valence-bond-solid (VBS) transition in a three-dimensional classical loop model (this model includes the subtle interference effect that suppresses hedgehog defects in the Néel order parameter). We use the loop model for simulations of unprecedentedly large systems (up to linear size L =512 ). Our results are compatible with a continuous transition at which both Néel and VBS order parameters are critical, and we do not see conventional signs of first-order behavior. However, we show that the scaling violations are stronger than previously realized and are incompatible with conventional finite-size scaling, even if allowance is made for a weakly or marginally irrelevant scaling variable. In particular, different approaches to determining the anomalous dimensions ηVBS and ηN é el yield very different results. The assumption of conventional finite-size scaling leads to estimates that drift to negative values at large sizes, in violation of the unitarity bounds. In contrast, the decay with distance of critical correlators on scales much smaller than system size is consistent with large positive anomalous dimensions. Barring an unexpected reversal in behavior at still larger sizes, this implies that the transition, if continuous, must show unconventional finite-size scaling, for example, from an additional dangerously irrelevant scaling variable. Another possibility is an anomalously weak first-order transition. By analyzing the renormalization group flows for the noncompact CP n -1 field theory (the n -component Abelian Higgs model) between two and four dimensions, we give the simplest scenario by which an anomalously weak first

  4. Cosmological study in loop quantum cosmology through dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Rani, Shamaila; Salako, Ines G.; Gulshan, Faiza

    The interacting generalized ghost version of pilgrim dark energy (GGPDE) is discussed in the framework of loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We analyze the behavior of cosmological parameters (Hubble, equation of state (EoS), deceleration) and cosmological planes (ωD ‑ ωD‧ and r-s) in the present scenario (ωD represents the EoS parameter and ωD‧ indicates the evolution of the EoS parameter, r,s are statefinder parameters). It is observed that the deceleration parameter corresponds to the accelerated expansion of the universe. The EoS parameter lies in vacuum and phantom regions for all cases of u (pilgrim dark energy (PDE) parameter). The ωD ‑ ωD‧ plane lies in thawing region for all cases of u. The r ‑ s plane corresponds to Λ cold dark matter (CDM) and Chaplygin gas model. We have also mentioned the constraints on calculated cosmological parameters and found that all the trajectories of cosmological parameters and planes show the consistence behavior with the observational schemes.

  5. Non-Gaussian features from the inverse volume corrections in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li-Fang; Cai, Rong-Gen; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Hu, Bin

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we study the non-Gaussian features of the primordial fluctuations in loop quantum cosmology with the inverse volume corrections. The detailed analysis is performed in the single field slow-roll inflationary models. However, our results reflect the universal characteristics of bispectrum in loop quantum cosmology. The main corrections to the scalar bispectrum come from two aspects: one is the modifications to the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum, and the other is the corrections to the background dependent variables, such as slow-roll parameters. Our calculations show that the loop quantum corrections make fNL of the inflationary models increase 0.1%. Moreover, we find that two new shapes of non-Gaussian signal arise, which we name F1 and F2. The former gives a unique loop quantum feature, which is less correlated with the local, equilateral, and single types, while the latter is highly correlated with the local one.

  6. Upconverting core-shell nanocrystals with high quantum yield under low irradiance: On the role of isotropic and thick shells

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Stefan; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph; Johnson, Noah J. J.; Pichaandi, Jothirmayanantham; Veggel, Frank C. J. M. van

    2015-11-21

    Colloidal upconverter nanocrystals (UCNCs) that convert near-infrared photons to higher energies are promising for applications ranging from life sciences to solar energy harvesting. However, practical applications of UCNCs are hindered by their low upconversion quantum yield (UCQY) and the high irradiances necessary to produce relevant upconversion luminescence. Achieving high UCQY under practically relevant irradiance remains a major challenge. The UCQY is severely limited due to non-radiative surface quenching processes. We present a rate equation model for migration of the excitation energy to show that surface quenching does not only affect the lanthanide ions directly at the surface but also many other lanthanide ions quite far away from the surface. The average migration path length is on the order of several nanometers and depends on the doping as well as the irradiance of the excitation. Using Er{sup 3+}-doped β-NaYF{sub 4} UCNCs, we show that very isotropic and thick (∼10 nm) β-NaLuF{sub 4} inert shells dramatically reduce the surface-related quenching processes, resulting in much brighter upconversion luminescence at simultaneously considerably lower irradiances. For these UCNCs embedded in poly(methyl methacrylate), we determined an internal UCQY of 2.0% ± 0.2% using an irradiance of only 0.43 ± 0.03 W/cm{sup 2} at 1523 nm. Normalized to the irradiance, this UCQY is 120× higher than the highest values of comparable nanomaterials in the literature. Our findings demonstrate the important role of isotropic and thick shells in achieving high UCQY at low irradiances from UCNCs. Additionally, we measured the additional short-circuit current due to upconversion in silicon solar cell devices as a proof of concept and to support our findings determined using optical measurements.

  7. Highly polarized light emission by isotropic quantum dots integrated with magnetically aligned segmented nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Uran, Can; Erdem, Talha; Guzelturk, Burak; Perkgöz, Nihan Kosku; Jun, Shinae; Jang, Eunjoo; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2014-10-06

    In this work, we demonstrate a proof-of-concept system for generating highly polarized light from colloidal quantum dots (QDs) coupled with magnetically aligned segmented Au/Ni/Au nanowires (NWs). Optical characterizations reveal that the optimized QD-NW coupled structures emit highly polarized light with an s-to p-polarization (s/p) contrast as high as 15:1 corresponding to a degree of polarization of 0.88. These experimental results are supported by the finite-difference time-domain simulations, which demonstrate the interplay between the inter-NW distance and the degree of polarization.

  8. Teleparallel loop quantum cosmology in a system of intersecting branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Pradhan, Anirudh; Beesham, Aroonkumar; de Haro, Jaume

    2016-09-01

    Recently, some authors have removed the big bang singularity in teleparallel Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) and have shown that the universe may undergo a number of oscillations. We investigate the origin of this type of teleparallel theory in a system of intersecting branes in M-theory in which the angle between them changes with time. This system is constructed by two intersecting anti-D8-branes, one compacted D4-brane and a D3-brane. These branes are built by joining M0-branes which develop in decaying fundamental strings. The compacted D4-brane is located between two intersecting anti-D8 branes and glues to one of them. Our universe is located on the D3 brane which wraps around the D4 brane from one end and sticks to one of the anti-D8 branes from the other one. In this system, there are three types of fields, corresponding to compacted D4 branes, intersecting branes and D3-branes. These fields interact with each other and make the angle between branes oscillate. By decreasing this angle, the intersecting anti-D8 branes approach each other, the D4 brane rolls, the D3 brane wraps around the D4 brane, and the universe contracts. By separating the intersecting branes and increasing the angle, the D4 brane rolls in the opposite direction, the D3 brane separates from it and the expansion branch begins. Also, the interaction between branes in this system gives us the exact form of the relevant Lagrangian for teleparallel LQC.

  9. Open-loop quantum control as a resource for secure communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, Davide

    2016-05-01

    Properties of unitary time evolution of quantum systems can be applied to define quantum cryptographic protocols. Dynamics of a qubit can be exploited as a data encryption/decryption procedure by means of timed measurements, implementation of an open-loop control scheme over a qubit increases robustness of a protocol employing this principle.

  10. How loopy is the quantum bounce? A heuristic analysis of higher order holonomy corrections in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, D.-W.; Li Lifang

    2009-03-15

    A well-motivated extension of higher order holonomy corrections in loop quantum cosmology (LQC) for the k=0 Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model is investigated at the level of heuristic effective dynamics. It reveals that the quantum bounce is generic, regardless of the order of corrections, and the matter density remains finite, bounded from above by an upper bound in the regime of the Planckian density, even if all orders of corrections are included. This observation provides further evidence that the quantum bounce is essentially a consequence of the loopy nature (i.e. intrinsic discreteness) of LQC and LQC is fundamentally different from the Wheeler-DeWitt theory; it also encourages one to construct the quantum theory of LQC with the higher order holonomy corrections, which might be understood as related to the higher j representations in the Hamiltonian operator of loop quantum gravity.

  11. Loop quantum cosmology: The horizon problem and the probability of inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Zhu, Jian-Yang

    2015-10-01

    Anomaly-free perturbations of loop quantum cosmology reveal a deformed space-time structure, in which the signature changes when the energy density is ρ =ρc/2 . Furthermore, in loop quantum cosmology, one can obtain an effective causal structure only for a low density region (ρ ≤ρc/2 ), which gives a natural initial condition to consider the horizon problem. Choosing the initial value at ρ (0 )=ρc/2 in this paper, we investigate the horizon problem and the probability of inflation in the framework of loop quantum cosmology. Two models are considered: the quadratic inflation and the natural inflation. We use the Liouville measure to calculate the probability of inflation which solves the horizon problem, and find that, for the quadratic inflation model, the probability is very close to unity, while for the natural inflation model, the probability is about 35%.

  12. Some implications of signature-change in cosmological models of loop quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bojowald, Martin; Mielczarek, Jakub E-mail: jakub.mielczarek@uj.edu.pl

    2015-08-01

    Signature change at high density has been obtained as a possible consequence of deformed space-time structures in models of loop quantum gravity. This article provides a conceptual discussion of implications for cosmological scenarios, based on an application of mathematical results for mixed-type partial differential equations (the Tricomi problem). While the effective equations from which signature change has been derived are shown to be locally regular and therefore reliable, the underlying theory of loop quantum gravity may face several global problems in its semiclassical solutions.

  13. Charge-driven feedback loop in the resonance fluorescence of a single quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, B.; Kurzmann, A.; Schulze, J.-H.; Strittmatter, A.; Geller, M.; Lorke, A.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a feedback loop that manifests itself in a strong hysteresis and bistability of the exciton resonance fluorescence signal. Field ionization of photogenerated quantum dot excitons leads to the formation of a charged interface layer that drags the emission line along over a frequency range of more than 30 GHz . These measurements are well described by a rate equation model. With a time-resolved resonance fluorescence measurement we determined the buildup times for the hole gas in the orders of milliseconds. This internal charge-driven feedback loop could be used to reduce the spectral wandering in the emission spectra of single self-assembled quantum dots.

  14. Reverse quantum state engineering using electronic feedback loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kießlich, Gerold; Emary, Clive; Schaller, Gernot; Brandes, Tobias

    2012-12-01

    We propose an all-electronic technique to manipulate and control interacting quantum systems by unitary single-jump feedback conditioned on the outcome of a capacitively coupled electrometer and, in particular, a single-electron transistor. We provide a general scheme for stabilizing pure states in the quantum system and use an effective Hamiltonian method for the quantum master equation to elaborate on the nature of stabilizable states and the conditions under which state purification can be achieved. The state engineering within the quantum feedback scheme is shown to be linked with the solution of an inverse eigenvalue problem. Two applications of the feedback scheme are presented in detail: (i) stabilization of delocalized pure states in a single charge qubit and (ii) entanglement stabilization in two coupled charge qubits. In the latter example, we demonstrate the stabilization of a maximally entangled Bell state for certain detector positions and local feedback operations.

  15. Quantum Faraday effect in a double-dot Aharonov-Bohm loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kicheon

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the role of Faraday's law of induction manifested in the quantum state of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) loops. In particular, a flux-switching experiment is proposed for a double-dot AB loop to verify the phase shift induced by Faraday's law. The induced Faraday phase is shown to be geometric and nontopological. This study demonstrates that the relation between the local phases of a ring at different fluxes is not arbitrary but is instead determined by Faraday's inductive law, which is in contrast to the arbitrary local phase of an AB loop for a given flux.

  16. Degeneration of Trigonometric Dynamical Difference Equations for Quantum Loop Algebras to Trigonometric Casimir Equations for Yangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagović, Martina

    2015-03-01

    We show that, under Drinfeld's degeneration (Proceedings of the International Congress of Mathematicians. American Mathematical Society, Providence, pp 798-820, 1987) of quantum loop algebras to Yangians, the trigonometric dynamical difference equations [Etingof and Varchenko (Adv Math 167:74-127, 2002)] for the quantum affine algebra degenerate to the trigonometric Casimir differential equations [Toledano Laredo (J Algebra 329:286-327, 2011)] for Yangians.

  17. Group field theory as the second quantization of loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    We construct a second quantized reformulation of canonical loop quantum gravity (LQG) at both kinematical and dynamical level, in terms of a Fock space of spin networks, and show in full generality that it leads directly to the group field theory (GFT) formalism. In particular, we show the correspondence between canonical LQG dynamics and GFT dynamics leading to a specific GFT model from any definition of quantum canonical dynamics of spin networks. We exemplify the correspondence of dynamics in the specific example of 3d quantum gravity. The correspondence between canonical LQG and covariant spin foam models is obtained via the GFT definition of the latter.

  18. Reconstructing the evolution of the Universe from loop quantum cosmology scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    We extend the scalar-tensor reconstruction techniques for classical cosmology frameworks, in the context of loop quantum cosmology. After presenting in some detail how the equations are generalized in the loop quantum cosmology case, we discuss which new features and limitations the quantum framework introduces, and we use various illustrative examples in order to demonstrate how the method works. As we show, the energy density has two different classes of solutions, and one of these yields the correct classical limit, while the second captures the quantum phenomena. We study in detail the scalar tensor reconstruction method for both of these solutions. We also discuss some scenarios for which the Hubble rate becomes unbounded at finite time, which corresponds for example to the case in which the big rip occurs. As we show, this issue is nontrivial and we discuss how this case should be treated in a consistent way. Finally, we investigate how the classical stability conditions for the scalar-tensor solutions are generalized in the loop quantum framework.

  19. Surface state decoherence in loop quantum gravity, a first toy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, Alexandre; Livine, Etera R.

    2017-02-01

    The quantum-to-classical transition through decoherence is a major facet of the semi-classical analysis of quantum models that are supposed to admit a classical regime, as quantum gravity should be. A particular problem of interest is the decoherence of black hole horizons and holographic screens induced by the bulk-boundary coupling with interior degrees of freedom. Here in this paper we present a first toy-model, in the context of loop quantum gravity, for the dynamics of a surface geometry as an open quantum system. We discuss the resulting decoherence and recoherence and compare the exact density matrix evolution to the commonly used master equation approximation à la Lindblad underlining its merits and limitations. The prospect of this study is to have a clearer understanding of the boundary decoherence of black hole horizons seen by outside observers.

  20. Minimal subtraction and momentum subtraction in quantum chromodynamics at two-loop order

    SciTech Connect

    Braaten, E.; Leveille, J.P.

    1981-09-01

    The momentum-subtraction coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub MOM/ yields consistently smaller one-loop corrections to many quantum-chromodynamics (QCD) processes than the minimal-subtraction couplings ..cap alpha../sub MS/ and ..cap alpha../sub M/S. By shifting the renormalization scale ..mu.. of ..cap alpha../sub MS/(..mu..), we obtain a minimal-subtraction coupling with the same small one-loop corrections. It is shown, by studying the effective charges of QCD, that at two-loop order this coupling constant will continue to yield corrections to physical quantities that are comparable to those obtained by momentum subtraction. We also introduce a momentum-subtraction scheme which treats the triple-gluon, quark, and ghost vertices equally at one-loop order and is more convenient for higher-order calculations than the MOM scheme.

  1. Frustrated honeycomb-lattice bilayer quantum antiferromagnet in a magnetic field: Unconventional phase transitions in a two-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokhmalskii, Taras; Baliha, Vasyl; Derzhko, Oleg; Schulenburg, Jörg; Richter, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    We consider the spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a bilayer honeycomb lattice including interlayer frustration in the presence of an external magnetic field. In the vicinity of the saturation field, we map the low-energy states of this quantum system onto the spatial configurations of hard hexagons on a honeycomb lattice. As a result, we can construct effective classical models (lattice-gas as well as Ising models) on the honeycomb lattice to calculate the properties of the frustrated quantum Heisenberg spin system in the low-temperature regime. We perform classical Monte Carlo simulations for a hard-hexagon model and adopt known results for an Ising model to discuss the finite-temperature order-disorder phase transition that is driven by a magnetic field at low temperatures. We also discuss an effective-model description around the ideal frustration case and find indications for a spin-flop-like transition in the considered isotropic spin model.

  2. Energy spectrum of gravitational waves in a loop quantum cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, João; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Henriques, Alfredo B.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the consequences of loop quantum cosmology (inverse-volume corrections) in the spectrum of the gravitational waves using the method of the Bogoliubov coefficients. These corrections are taken into account at the background level of the theory as well as at the first order in the perturbations theory framework. We show that these corrections lead to an intense graviton production during the loop superinflationary phase prior to the standard slow-roll era, which leave their imprints through new features on the energy spectrum of the gravitational waves as would be measured today, including a new maximum on the low frequency end of the spectrum.

  3. Tachyon field in loop quantum cosmology: An example of traversable singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Li Lifang; Zhu Jianyang

    2009-06-15

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) predicts a nonsingular evolution of the universe through a bounce in the high energy region. But LQC has an ambiguity about the quantization scheme. Recently, the authors in [Phys. Rev. D 77, 124008 (2008)] proposed a new quantization scheme. Similar to others, this new quantization scheme also replaces the big bang singularity with the quantum bounce. More interestingly, it introduces a quantum singularity, which is traversable. We investigate this novel dynamics quantitatively with a tachyon scalar field, which gives us a concrete example. Our result shows that our universe can evolve through the quantum singularity regularly, which is different from the classical big bang singularity. So this singularity is only a weak singularity.

  4. Does loop quantum cosmology replace the big rip singularity by a non-singular bounce?

    SciTech Connect

    Haro, Jaume de

    2012-11-01

    It is stated that holonomy corrections in loop quantum cosmology introduce a modification in Friedmann's equation which prevent the big rip singularity. Recently in [1] it has been proved that this modified Friedmann equation is obtained in an inconsistent way, what means that the results deduced from it, in particular the big rip singularity avoidance, are not justified. The problem is that holonomy corrections modify the gravitational part of the Hamiltonian of the system leading, after Legendre's transformation, to a non covariant Lagrangian which is in contradiction with one of the main principles of General Relativity. A more consistent way to deal with the big rip singularity avoidance is to disregard modification in the gravitational part of the Hamiltonian, and only consider inverse volume effects [2]. In this case we will see that, not like the big bang singularity, the big rip singularity survives in loop quantum cosmology. Another way to deal with the big rip avoidance is to take into account geometric quantum effects given by the the Wheeler-De Witt equation. In that case, even though the wave packets spread, the expectation values satisfy the same equations as their classical analogues. Then, following the viewpoint adopted in loop quantum cosmology, one can conclude that the big rip singularity survives when one takes into account these quantum effects. However, the spreading of the wave packets prevents the recover of the semiclassical time, and thus, one might conclude that the classical evolution of the universe come to and end before the big rip is reached. This is not conclusive because. as we will see, it always exists other external times that allows us to define the classical and quantum evolution of the universe up to the big rip singularity.

  5. Testing the master constraint programme for loop quantum gravity: V. Interacting field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, B.; Thiemann, T.

    2006-02-01

    This is the fifth and final paper in our series of five in which we test the master constraint programme for solving the Hamiltonian constraint in loop quantum gravity. Here we consider interacting quantum field theories, specifically we consider the non-Abelian Gauss constraints of Einstein Yang Mills theory and 2 + 1 gravity. Interestingly, while Yang Mills theory in 4D is not yet rigorously defined as an ordinary (Wightman) quantum field theory on Minkowski space, in background-independent quantum field theories such as loop quantum gravity (LQG) this might become possible by working in a new, background-independent representation. While for the Gauss constraint the master constraint can be solved explicitly, for the 2 + 1 theory we are only able to rigorously define the master constraint operator. We show that the, by other methods known, physical Hilbert is contained in the kernel of the master constraint, however, to systematically derive it by only using spectral methods is as complicated as for 3 + 1 gravity and we therefore leave the complete analysis for 3 + 1 gravity.

  6. Cosmological dynamics in spin-foam loop quantum cosmology: challenges and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David A.; Singh, Parampreet

    2017-04-01

    We explore the structure of the spin foam-like vertex expansion in loop quantum cosmology and discuss properties of the corresponding amplitudes, with the aim of elucidating some of the expansion’s useful properties and features. We find that the expansion is best suited for consideration of conceptual questions and for investigating short-time, highly quantum behavior. In order to study dynamics at cosmological scales, the expansion must be carried to very high order, limiting its direct utility as a calculational tool for such questions. Conversely, it is unclear that the expansion can be truncated at finite order in a controlled manner.

  7. Black holes in loop quantum gravity: the complete space-time.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2008-10-17

    We consider the quantization of the complete extension of the Schwarzschild space-time using spherically symmetric loop quantum gravity. We find an exact solution corresponding to the semiclassical theory. The singularity is eliminated but the space-time still contains a horizon. Although the solution is known partially numerically and therefore a proper global analysis is not possible, a global structure akin to a singularity-free Reissner-Nordström space-time including a Cauchy horizon is suggested.

  8. Black hole state counting in loop quantum gravity: a number-theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Agulló, Iván; Barbero G, J Fernando; Díaz-Polo, Jacobo; Fernández-Borja, Enrique; Villaseñor, Eduardo J S

    2008-05-30

    We give an efficient method, combining number-theoretic and combinatorial ideas, to exactly compute black hole entropy in the framework of loop quantum gravity. Along the way we provide a complete characterization of the relevant sector of the spectrum of the area operator, including degeneracies, and explicitly determine the number of solutions to the projection constraint. We use a computer implementation of the proposed algorithm to confirm and extend previous results on the detailed structure of the black hole degeneracy spectrum.

  9. One-loop calculations in quantum field theory: from Feynman diagrams to unitarity cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R. Keith; Kunszt, Zoltan; Melnikov, Kirill; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2012-09-01

    The success of the experimental program at the Tevatron re-inforced the idea that precision physics at hadron colliders is desirable and, indeed, possible. The Tevatron data strongly suggests that one-loop computations in QCD describe hard scattering well. Extrapolating this observation to the LHC, we conclude that knowledge of many short-distance processes at next-to-leading order may be required to describe the physics of hard scattering. While the field of one-loop computations is quite mature, parton multiplicities in hard LHC events are so high that traditional computational techniques become inefficient. Recently new approaches based on unitarity have been developed for calculating one-loop scattering amplitudes in quantum field theory. These methods are especially suitable for the description of multi-particle processes in QCD and are amenable to numerical implementations. We present a systematic pedagogical description of both conceptual and technical aspects of the new methods.

  10. Non-singular bounce scenarios in loop quantum cosmology and the effective field description

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Wilson-Ewing, Edward E-mail: wilson-ewing@phys.lsu.edu

    2014-03-01

    A non-singular bouncing cosmology is generically obtained in loop quantum cosmology due to non-perturbative quantum gravity effects. A similar picture can be achieved in standard general relativity in the presence of a scalar field with a non-standard kinetic term such that at high energy densities the field evolves into a ghost condensate and causes a non-singular bounce. During the bouncing phase, the perturbations can be stabilized by introducing a Horndeski operator. Taking the matter content to be a dust field and an ekpyrotic scalar field, we compare the dynamics in loop quantum cosmology and in a non-singular bouncing effective field model with a non-standard kinetic term at both the background and perturbative levels. We find that these two settings share many important properties, including the result that they both generate scale-invariant scalar perturbations. This shows that some quantum gravity effects of the very early universe may be mimicked by effective field models.

  11. Correlation effects and quantum oscillations in topological nodal-loop semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianpeng; Balents, Leon

    2017-02-01

    We study the unique physical properties of topological nodal-loop semimetals protected by the coexistence of time-reversal and inversion symmetries with negligible spin-orbit coupling. We argue that strong correlation effects occur at the surface of such systems for relatively small Hubbard interaction U , due to the narrow bandwidth of the "drumhead" surface states. In the Hartree-Fock approximation, at small U we obtain a surface ferromagnetic phase through a continuous quantum phase transition characterized by the surface-mode divergence of the spin susceptibility, while the bulk states remain very robust against local interactions and remain nonordered. At slightly increased interaction strength, the system quickly changes from a surface ferromagnetic phase to a surface charge-ordered phase through a first-order transition. When Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling is applied to the surface states, a canted ferromagnetic phase occurs at the surface for intermediate values of U . The quantum critical behavior of the surface ferromagnetic transition is nontrivial in the sense that the surface spin order parameter couples to Fermi-surface excitations from both surface and bulk states. This leads to unconventional Landau damping and consequently a naïve dynamical critical exponent z ≈1 when the Fermi level is close to the bulk nodal energy. We also show that, already without interactions, quantum oscillations arise due to bulk states, despite the absence of a Fermi surface when the chemical potential is tuned to the energy of the nodal loop. The bulk magnetic susceptibility diverges logarithmically whenever the nodal loop exactly overlaps with a quantized magnetic orbit in the bulk Brillouin zone. These correlation and transport phenomena are unique signatures of nodal-loop states.

  12. Kinematical uniqueness of homogeneous isotropic LQC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan; Hanusch, Maximilian

    2017-01-01

    In a paper by Ashtekar and Campiglia, invariance under volume preserving residual diffeomorphisms has been used to single out the standard representation of the reduced holonomy-flux algebra in homogeneous loop quantum cosmology (LQC). In this paper, we use invariance under all residual diffeomorphisms to single out the standard kinematical Hilbert space of homogeneous isotropic LQC for both the standard configuration space {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} , as well as for the Fleischhack one {R}\\sqcup {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} . We first determine the scale invariant Radon measures on these spaces, and then show that the Haar measure on {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} is the only such measure for which the momentum operator is hermitian w.r.t. the corresponding inner product. In particular, the measure is forced to be identically zero on {R} in the Fleischhack case, so that for both approaches, the standard kinematical LQC-Hilbert space is singled out.

  13. Exploring the Tomlin-Varadarajan quantum constraints in U (1 )3 loop quantum gravity: Solutions and the Minkowski theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Jerzy; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2017-03-01

    We explicitly solved the anomaly-free quantum constraints proposed by Tomlin and Varadarajan for the weak Euclidean model of canonical loop quantum gravity, in a large subspace of the model's kinematic Hilbert space, which is the space of the charge network states. In doing so, we first identified the subspace on which each of the constraints acts convergingly, and then by explicitly evaluating such actions we found the complete set of the solutions in the identified subspace. We showed that the space of solutions consists of two classes of states, with the first class having a property that involves the condition known from the Minkowski theorem on polyhedra, and the second class satisfying a weaker form of the spatial diffeomorphism invariance.

  14. A general transfer-function approach to noise filtering in open-loop quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Lorenza

    2015-03-01

    Hamiltonian engineering via unitary open-loop quantum control provides a versatile and experimentally validated framework for manipulating a broad class of non-Markovian open quantum systems of interest, with applications ranging from dynamical decoupling and dynamically corrected quantum gates, to noise spectroscopy and quantum simulation. In this context, transfer-function techniques directly motivated by control engineering have proved invaluable for obtaining a transparent picture of the controlled dynamics in the frequency domain and for quantitatively analyzing performance. In this talk, I will show how to identify a computationally tractable set of ``fundamental filter functions,'' out of which arbitrary filter functions may be assembled up to arbitrary high order in principle. Besides avoiding the infinite recursive hierarchy of filter functions that arises in general control scenarios, this fundamental set suffices to characterize the error suppression capabilities of the control protocol in both the time and frequency domain. I will show, in particular, how the resulting notion of ``filtering order'' reveals conceptually distinct, albeit complementary, features of the controlled dynamics as compared to the ``cancellation order,'' traditionally defined in the Magnus sense. Implications for current quantum control experiments will be discussed. Work supported by the U.S. Army Research Office under Contract No. W911NF-14-1-0682.

  15. Callan-Giddings-Harvey-Strominger vacuum in loop quantum gravity and singularity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Olmedo, Javier; Rastgoo, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    We study here a complete quantization of a Callan-Giddings-Harvey-Strominger vacuum model following loop quantum gravity techniques. Concretely, we adopt a formulation of the model in terms of a set of new variables that resemble the ones commonly employed in spherically symmetric loop quantum gravity. The classical theory consists of two pairs of canonical variables plus a scalar and diffeomorphism (first class) constraints. We consider a suitable redefinition of the Hamiltonian constraint such that the new constraint algebra (with structure constants) is well adapted to the Dirac quantization approach. For it, we adopt a polymeric representation for both the geometry and the dilaton field. On the one hand, we find a suitable invariant domain of the scalar constraint operator, and we construct explicitly its solution space. There, the eigenvalues of the dilaton and the metric operators cannot vanish locally, allowing us to conclude that singular geometries are ruled out in the quantum theory. On the other hand, the physical Hilbert space is constructed out of them, after group averaging the previous states with the diffeomorphism constraint. In turn, we identify the standard observable corresponding to the mass of the black hole at the boundary, in agreement with the classical theory. We also construct an additional observable on the bulk associated with the square of the dilaton field, with no direct classical analog.

  16. Quantum Chemical Studies on Stability and Chemical Activities in Calcium Ion Bound Calmodulin Loops.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Samapan; Ghosh, Mahua; De Raychaudhury, Molly; Chakrabarti, J

    2015-11-19

    Quantum chemical (QC) calculations for macromolecules require truncation of the molecule, highlighting the portion of interest due to heavy computation cost. As a result, an estimation of the effects of truncation is important to interpret the energy spectrum of such calculations. We perform density functional theory based QC calculations on calcium ion bound EF-hand loops of Calmodulin isolated from the crystal structure in an implicit solvent. We find that the terminal contributions of neutral capping are negligible across the entire ground-state energy spectrum. The coordination energy range and the nature of hybridization of the coordination state molecular orbitals remain qualitatively similar across these loops. While the HOMO and LUMO of loops in the N-terminal domain are dominated by the acidic aspartates, and the polar/hydrophobic residues, respectively, these levels of the C-terminal domain loops show strong localized electron density on the phenyl rings of the tyrosines. The Fukui index calculation identifies the hydroxyl oxygen in the phenyl ring of Y99 as a potent nucleophile. Our analysis indicates a general way of interpreting the electronic energy spectra to understand stability and functions of large biomolecules where the truncation of the molecule and, hence, the terminal capping effects are inevitable.

  17. Study of Tachyon Warm Intermediate and Logamediate Inflationary Universe from Loop Quantum Cosmological Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Mandal, Jyotirmay; Debnath, Ujjal

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the tachyon intermediate and logamediate warm inflation in loop quantum cosmological background by taking the dissipative co-efficient Γ = Γ0 (where Γ0 is a constant) in “intermediate” inflation and Γ = V(ϕ), (where V(ϕ) is the potential of tachyonic field) in “logamediate” inflation. We have assumed slow-roll condition to construct scalar field ϕ, potential V, N-folds, etc. Various slow-roll parameters have also been obtained. We have analyzed the stability of this model through graphical representations.

  18. Fine-grained state counting for black holes in loop quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Mitra, P

    2009-04-10

    A state of a black hole in loop quantum gravity is given by a distribution of spins on punctures on the horizon. The distribution is of the Boltzmann type, with the area playing the role of the energy. In investigations where the total area was kept approximately constant, there was a kind of thermal equilibrium between the spins which have the same analogue temperature and the entropy was proportional to the area. If the area is precisely fixed, however, multiple constraints appear, different spins have different analogue temperatures and the entropy is not strictly linear in the area, but is bounded by a linear rise.

  19. Inflation in loop quantum cosmology: Dynamics and spectrum of gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mielczarek, Jakub; Cailleteau, Thomas; Grain, Julien; Barrau, Aurelien

    2010-05-15

    Loop quantum cosmology provides an efficient framework to study the evolution of the Universe beyond the classical Big Bang paradigm. Because of holonomy corrections, the singularity is replaced by a 'bounce'. The dynamics of the background is investigated into the details, as a function of the parameters of the model. In particular, the conditions required for inflation to occur are carefully considered and are shown to be generically met. The propagation of gravitational waves is then investigated in this framework. By both numerical and analytical approaches, the primordial tensor power spectrum is computed for a wide range of parameters. Several interesting features could be observationally probed.

  20. Line Coupling Effects in the Isotropic Raman Spectra of N2: A Quantum Calculation at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibault, Franck; Boulet, Christian; Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-01

    We present quantum calculations of the relaxation matrix for the Q branch of N2 at room temperature using a recently proposed N2-N2 rigid rotor potential. Close coupling calculations were complemented by coupled states studies at high energies and provide about 10200 two-body state-to state cross sections from which the needed one-body cross-sections may be obtained. For such temperatures, convergence has to be thoroughly analyzed since such conditions are close to the limit of current computational feasibility. This has been done using complementary calculations based on the energy corrected sudden formalism. Agreement of these quantum predictions with experimental data is good, but the main goal of this work is to provide a benchmark relaxation matrix for testing more approximate methods which remain of a great utility for complex molecular systems at room (and higher) temperatures.

  1. Line coupling effects in the isotropic Raman spectra of N{sub 2}: A quantum calculation at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Thibault, Franck; Boulet, Christian; Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-28

    We present quantum calculations of the relaxation matrix for the Q branch of N{sub 2} at room temperature using a recently proposed N{sub 2}-N{sub 2} rigid rotor potential. Close coupling calculations were complemented by coupled states studies at high energies and provide about 10 200 two-body state-to state cross sections from which the needed one-body cross-sections may be obtained. For such temperatures, convergence has to be thoroughly analyzed since such conditions are close to the limit of current computational feasibility. This has been done using complementary calculations based on the energy corrected sudden formalism. Agreement of these quantum predictions with experimental data is good, but the main goal of this work is to provide a benchmark relaxation matrix for testing more approximate methods which remain of a great utility for complex molecular systems at room (and higher) temperatures.

  2. Scalar and tensor perturbations in loop quantum cosmology: high-order corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tao; Wang, Anzhong; Cleaver, Gerald; Kirsten, Klaus; Sheng, Qin; Wu, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) provides promising resolutions to the trans-Planckian issue and initial singularity arising in the inflationary models of general relativity. In general, due to different quantization approaches, LQC involves two types of quantum corrections, the holonomy and inverse-volume, to both of the cosmological background evolution and perturbations. In this paper, using the third-order uniform asymptotic approximations, we derive explicitly the observational quantities of the slow-roll inflation in the framework of LQC with these quantum corrections. We calculate the power spectra, spectral indices, and running of the spectral indices for both scalar and tensor perturbations, whereby the tensor-to-scalar ratio is obtained. We expand all the observables at the time when the inflationary mode crosses the Hubble horizon. As the upper error bounds for the uniform asymptotic approximation at the third-order are lesssim 0.15%, these results represent the most accurate results obtained so far in the literature. It is also shown that with the inverse-volume corrections, both scalar and tensor spectra exhibit a deviation from the usual shape at large scales. Then, using the Planck, BAO and SN data we obtain new constraints on quantum gravitational effects from LQC corrections, and find that such effects could be within the detection of the forthcoming experiments.

  3. Scalar and tensor perturbations in loop quantum cosmology: high-order corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Tao; Wang, Anzhong; Wu, Qiang; Cleaver, Gerald; Kirsten, Klaus; Sheng, Qin E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu E-mail: klaus_kirsten@baylor.edu E-mail: wuq@zjut.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) provides promising resolutions to the trans-Planckian issue and initial singularity arising in the inflationary models of general relativity. In general, due to different quantization approaches, LQC involves two types of quantum corrections, the holonomy and inverse-volume, to both of the cosmological background evolution and perturbations. In this paper, using the third-order uniform asymptotic approximations, we derive explicitly the observational quantities of the slow-roll inflation in the framework of LQC with these quantum corrections. We calculate the power spectra, spectral indices, and running of the spectral indices for both scalar and tensor perturbations, whereby the tensor-to-scalar ratio is obtained. We expand all the observables at the time when the inflationary mode crosses the Hubble horizon. As the upper error bounds for the uniform asymptotic approximation at the third-order are ∼< 0.15%, these results represent the most accurate results obtained so far in the literature. It is also shown that with the inverse-volume corrections, both scalar and tensor spectra exhibit a deviation from the usual shape at large scales. Then, using the Planck, BAO and SN data we obtain new constraints on quantum gravitational effects from LQC corrections, and find that such effects could be within the detection of the forthcoming experiments.

  4. Semiclassical analysis of black holes in loop quantum gravity: Modeling Hawking radiation with volume fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidmann, P.; Liu, H.; Noui, K.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce the notion of fluid approximation of a quantum spherical black hole in the context of loop quantum gravity. In this limit, the microstates of the black hole are intertwiners between "large" representations si that typically scale as si˜√{aH } where aH denotes the area of the horizon in Planck units. The punctures with large colors are, for the black hole horizon, similar to what the fluid parcels are for a classical fluid. We dub them puncels. Hence, in the fluid limit, the horizon is composed by puncels that are themselves interpreted as composed (in the sense of the tensor product) by a large number of more fundamental intertwiners. We study the spectrum of the Euclidean volume acting on puncels and we compute its quantum fluctuations. Then, we propose an interpretation of black hole radiation based on the properties of the quantum fluctuations of the Euclidean volume operator. We estimate a typical temperature of the black hole and we show that it scales as the Hawking temperature.

  5. Closed Loop Quantum Control and Quantum Information Sciences: Concepts and Laboratory Implementations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-30

    require only sequences of simple control pulses such as square wave pulses with finite rise and decay times or Gaussian wavepackets . To illustrate the...21. Quantum Optimal Control of Wave Packet Dynamics under the Influence of Dissipation. Optimal control within the density matrix formalism is...directly in terms of the physically relevant control field and the density matrix at the target time, including an elaboration of the topology around

  6. New solutions of the hamiltonian and diffeomorphism constraints of quantum gravity from a highest weight loop representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, V.; Navarro-Salas, J.

    1991-04-01

    We introduce a highest weight type representation of the Rovelli-Smolin algebra of loop observables for quantum gravity. In terms of this representation, new solutions of the hamiltonian and diffeomorphism constraints are given. Assuming the locality of the quantum hamiltonian constraint we show that any functional depending on the generalized link class of the disjoint union of arbitrary simple loops is a solution. Finally we argue that this is the general solution in the irreducible representation space. On leave of absence from the Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valencia, and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia - CSIC, Burjassot, Spain.

  7. Quantum memory effects in noninteracting cold-atom systems: Hysteresis loop and lattice transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chihchun; Metcalf, Mekena; Lai, Chenyen

    2016-05-01

    Memory effects are observable in magnetization, rechargeable batteries, and many systems exhibiting history-dependent states. Quantum memory effects are observable, for instance, in atomic superfluids. A counter-intuitive question is whether quantum memory effects can exist in noninteracting systems. Here we present two examples of cold-atom systems demonstrating memory effects in noninteracting systems. The first example is a ring-shaped potential loaded with noninteracting fermions. An artificial vector potential drives a current and with a tunable dissipative background, the current lags behind the driving and exhibits hysteresis loops. The dissipative energy can be controlled by the coupling between the fermions and the background. In the second example, cold atoms loaded in a tunable optical lattice transformed from the triangular to the kagome geometry. The kagome lattice supports a flat-band consisting of degenerate localized states. Quantum memory effects are observable after a lattice transformation as the steady-state density depends on the rate of the transformation. The versatility of memory effects in cold-atom systems promises novel applications in atomtronics.

  8. Scalar Matter Coupled to Quantum Gravity in the Causal Approach. One-Loop Calculations and Perturbative Gauge Invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillo, Nicola

    2001-02-01

    Quantum gravity coupled to scalar massive matter fields is investigated in the framework of causal perturbation theory using the Epstein-Glaser regularization/renormalization scheme. Detailed one-loop calculations include the matter loop graviton self-energy and the matter self-energy. The condition of perturbative operator gauge invariance to second order implies the usual Slavnov-Ward identities for the graviton two-point connected Green function in the loop graph sector and generates the correct quartic graviton-matter interaction in the tree graph sector. The mass zero case is also discussed.

  9. Quantum gravity slows inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsamis, N.C. |; Woodard, R.P.

    1996-02-01

    We consider the quantum gravitational back-reaction on an initially inflating, homogeneous and isotropic universe whose topology is T{sup 3} {times} {Re}. Although there is no secular effect at one loop, an explicit calculation shows that two-loop processes act to slow the rate of expansion by an amount which becomes non-pertubatively large at late times. By exploiting Feynman`s tree theorem we show that all higher loops act in the same sense. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  10. General Transfer-Function Approach to Noise Filtering in Open-Loop Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Silva, Gerardo A.; Viola, Lorenza

    2014-12-01

    We present a general transfer-function approach to noise filtering in open-loop Hamiltonian engineering protocols for open quantum systems. We show how to identify a computationally tractable set of fundamental filter functions, out of which arbitrary transfer filter functions may be assembled up to arbitrary high order in principle. Besides avoiding the infinite recursive hierarchy of filter functions that arises in general control scenarios, this fundamental filter-function set suffices to characterize the error suppression capabilities of the control protocol in both the time and the frequency domain. We prove that the resulting notion of filtering order reveals conceptually distinct, albeit complementary, features of the controlled dynamics as compared to the order of error cancellation, traditionally defined in the Magnus sense. Examples and implications are discussed.

  11. Quantum interference based Boolean gates in dangling bond loops on Si(100):H surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Gutierrez, Rafael; Joachim, Christian; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-09-15

    Implementing atomic and molecular scale electronic functionalities represents one of the major challenges in current nano-electronic developments. Engineered dangling bond nanostructures on Silicon or Germanium surfaces posses the potential to provide novel routes towards the development of non-conventional electronic circuits. These structures are built by selectively removing hydrogen atoms from an otherwise fully passivated Si(100) or Ge(100) substrate. In this theoretical study, we demonstrate how dangling bond loops can be used to implement different Boolean logic gates. Our approach exploits quantum interference effects in such ring-like structures combined with an appropriate design of the interfacing of the dangling bond system with mesoscopic electrodes. We show how OR, AND, and NOR gates can be realized by tuning either the global symmetry of the system in a multi-terminal setup—by arranging the position of the input and output electrodes—or, alternatively, by selectively applying electrostatic gates in a two-terminal configuration.

  12. Quantum interference based Boolean gates in dangling bond loops on Si(100):H surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Gutierrez, Rafael; Joachim, Christian; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-09-01

    Implementing atomic and molecular scale electronic functionalities represents one of the major challenges in current nano-electronic developments. Engineered dangling bond nanostructures on Silicon or Germanium surfaces posses the potential to provide novel routes towards the development of non-conventional electronic circuits. These structures are built by selectively removing hydrogen atoms from an otherwise fully passivated Si(100) or Ge(100) substrate. In this theoretical study, we demonstrate how dangling bond loops can be used to implement different Boolean logic gates. Our approach exploits quantum interference effects in such ring-like structures combined with an appropriate design of the interfacing of the dangling bond system with mesoscopic electrodes. We show how OR, AND, and NOR gates can be realized by tuning either the global symmetry of the system in a multi-terminal setup—by arranging the position of the input and output electrodes—or, alternatively, by selectively applying electrostatic gates in a two-terminal configuration.

  13. Superconducting-quantum-interference-device array magnetometers with directly coupled pickup loop and serial flux dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chiu-Hsien; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Ji-Cheng; Chen, Kuen-Lin; Chen, M. J.; Jeng, J. T.; Horng, Herng-Er

    2006-09-01

    In this work, we studied the engineering of high-transition-temperature superconductor Josephson junctions and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) by using step-edge or the bicrystal grain-boundary technologies. Serial Josephson junctions and bare SQUID array reveal high quality device characteristics. A high-Tc SQUID magnetometer exhibiting magnetic field sensitivity of 33fT/Hz1/2 in the white regime and 80fT/Hz1/2 at 1Hz was demonstrated by incorporating the flux dams and serial SQUID into the pickup loop of magnetometer. Furthermore, we demonstrate the opening of the flux dams by applying an external magnetic field to induce a current higher than the critical current of the serial flux dams. We show that the serial flux dams effectively suppress the low frequency 1/f-like noises.

  14. Slow-roll inflation in loop quantum cosmology of scalar-tensor theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu

    2015-07-01

    The slow-roll inflation of scalar-tensor theories (STTs) of gravity in the context of loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is investigated in this paper. After deriving the effective Hamiltonian, we obtain the semiclassical equations of motion for the background variables in both Jordan frame and Einstein frame of STTs. Then we apply these equations in the slow-roll limit and derive the LQC corrections to the scalar spectral index ns and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in the two frames of STTs. Finally, we take two special sectors of STTs as specific examples, namely the Starobinsky model and the non-minimally coupled scalar field model (with the coupling function ξϕ2R and the potential λ 4 ϕ4). We derive the detailed expressions of the LQC corrections to ns and r in terms of the e-folding number for these two models in both frames.

  15. Phenomenological dynamics of loop quantum cosmology in Kantowski-Sachs spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, D.-W.

    2008-08-15

    The fundamental theory and the semiclassical description of loop quantum cosmology (LQC) have been studied in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and Bianchi I models. As an extension to include both anisotropy and intrinsic curvature, this paper investigates the cosmological model of Kantowski-Sachs spacetime with a free massless scalar field at the level of phenomenological dynamics with the LQC discreteness corrections. The LQC corrections are implemented in two different improved quantization schemes. In both schemes, the big bang and big crunch singularities of the classical solution are resolved and replaced by the big bounces when the area or volume scale factor approaches the critical values in the Planck regime measured by the reference of the scalar field momentum. Symmetries of scaling are also noted and suggest that the fundamental spatial scale (area gap) may give rise to a temporal scale. The bouncing scenarios are in an analogous fashion of the Bianchi I model, naturally extending the observations obtained previously.

  16. Seeking the loop quantum gravity Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field in 4D, N=1 supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. James, Jr.; Ketov, Sergei V.; Yunes, Nicolás

    2009-09-01

    We embed the loop quantum gravity Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field within an action describing 4D, N=1 supergravity and thus within a low-energy effective action of superstring/M theory. We use the fully gauge-covariant description of supergravity in (curved) superspace. The gravitational constant is replaced with the vacuum expectation value of a scalar field, which in local supersymmetry is promoted to a complex, covariantly chiral scalar superfield. The imaginary part of this superfield couples to a supersymmetric Holst term. The Holst term also serves as a starting point in the loop quantum gravity action. This suggest the possibility of a relation between loop quantum gravity and supersymmetric string theory, where the Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field of the former play the role of the supersymmetric axion in the latter. Adding matter fermions in loop quantum gravity may require the extension of the Holst action through the Nieh-Yan topological invariant, while in pure, matter-free supergravity their supersymmetric extensions are the same. We show that, when the Barbero-Immirzi parameter is promoted to a field in the context of 4D supergravity, it is equivalent to adding a dynamical complex chiral (dilaton-axion) superfield with a nontrivial kinetic term (or Kähler potential), coupled to supergravity.

  17. Seeking the loop quantum gravity Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field in 4D, N=1 supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, S. James Jr.; Ketov, Sergei V.; Yunes, Nicolas

    2009-09-15

    We embed the loop quantum gravity Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field within an action describing 4D, N=1 supergravity and thus within a low-energy effective action of superstring/M theory. We use the fully gauge-covariant description of supergravity in (curved) superspace. The gravitational constant is replaced with the vacuum expectation value of a scalar field, which in local supersymmetry is promoted to a complex, covariantly chiral scalar superfield. The imaginary part of this superfield couples to a supersymmetric Holst term. The Holst term also serves as a starting point in the loop quantum gravity action. This suggest the possibility of a relation between loop quantum gravity and supersymmetric string theory, where the Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field of the former play the role of the supersymmetric axion in the latter. Adding matter fermions in loop quantum gravity may require the extension of the Holst action through the Nieh-Yan topological invariant, while in pure, matter-free supergravity their supersymmetric extensions are the same. We show that, when the Barbero-Immirzi parameter is promoted to a field in the context of 4D supergravity, it is equivalent to adding a dynamical complex chiral (dilaton-axion) superfield with a nontrivial kinetic term (or Kaehler potential), coupled to supergravity.

  18. Imaginary action, spinfoam asymptotics and the ‘transplanckian’ regime of loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodendorfer, N.; Neiman, Y.

    2013-10-01

    It was recently noted that the on-shell Einstein-Hilbert action with York-Gibbons-Hawking boundary term has an imaginary part, proportional to the area of the codimension-2 surfaces on which the boundary normal becomes null. We discuss the extension of this result to first-order formulations of gravity. As a side effect, we settle the issue of the Holst modification versus the Nieh-Yan density by demanding a variational principle with suitable boundary conditions. We then set out to find the imaginary action in the large-spin 4-simplex limit of the Lorentzian EPRL/FK spinfoam. It turns out that the spinfoam’s effective action indeed has the correct imaginary part, but only if the Barbero-Immirzi parameter γ is set to ±i after the quantum calculation. We point out an agreement between this effective action and a recent black hole state-counting calculation in the same limit. Finally, we propose that the large-spin limit of loop quantum gravity can be viewed as a high-energy ‘transplanckian’ regime.

  19. Effective dynamics, big bounces, and scaling symmetry in Bianchi type I loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2007-12-01

    The detailed formulation for loop quantum cosmology (LQC) in the Bianchi I model with a scalar massless field has been constructed. In this paper, its effective dynamics is studied in two improved strategies for implementing the LQC discreteness corrections. Both schemes show that the big bang is replaced by the big bounces, which take place up to 3 times, once in each diagonal direction, when the area or volume scale factor approaches the critical values in the Planck regime measured by the reference of the scalar field momentum. These two strategies give different evolutions: In one scheme, the effective dynamics is independent of the choice of the finite sized cell prescribed to make Hamiltonian finite; in the other, the effective dynamics reacts to the macroscopic scales introduced by the boundary conditions. Both schemes reveal interesting symmetries of scaling, which are reminiscent of the relational interpretation of quantum mechanics and also suggest that the fundamental spatial scale (area gap) may give rise to a temporal scale.

  20. Effective dynamics, big bounces, and scaling symmetry in Bianchi type I loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, D.-W.

    2007-12-15

    The detailed formulation for loop quantum cosmology (LQC) in the Bianchi I model with a scalar massless field has been constructed. In this paper, its effective dynamics is studied in two improved strategies for implementing the LQC discreteness corrections. Both schemes show that the big bang is replaced by the big bounces, which take place up to 3 times, once in each diagonal direction, when the area or volume scale factor approaches the critical values in the Planck regime measured by the reference of the scalar field momentum. These two strategies give different evolutions: In one scheme, the effective dynamics is independent of the choice of the finite sized cell prescribed to make Hamiltonian finite; in the other, the effective dynamics reacts to the macroscopic scales introduced by the boundary conditions. Both schemes reveal interesting symmetries of scaling, which are reminiscent of the relational interpretation of quantum mechanics and also suggest that the fundamental spatial scale (area gap) may give rise to a temporal scale.

  1. Quantum nature of the big bang: Improved dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Pawlowski, Tomasz; Singh, Parampreet

    2006-10-15

    An improved Hamiltonian constraint operator is introduced in loop quantum cosmology. Quantum dynamics of the spatially flat, isotropic model with a massless scalar field is then studied in detail using analytical and numerical methods. The scalar field continues to serve as ''emergent time'', the big bang is again replaced by a quantum bounce, and quantum evolution remains deterministic across the deep Planck regime. However, while with the Hamiltonian constraint used so far in loop quantum cosmology the quantum bounce can occur even at low matter densities, with the new Hamiltonian constraint it occurs only at a Planck-scale density. Thus, the new quantum dynamics retains the attractive features of current evolutions in loop quantum cosmology but, at the same time, cures their main weakness.

  2. 2D quantum gravity on compact Riemann surfaces and two-loop partition function: A first principles approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, Adel; Leduc, Laetitia

    2015-07-01

    We study two-dimensional quantum gravity on arbitrary genus Riemann surfaces in the Kähler formalism where the basic quantum field is the (Laplacian of the) Kähler potential. We do a careful first-principles computation of the fixed-area partition function Z [ A ] up to and including all two-loop contributions. This includes genuine two-loop diagrams as determined by the Liouville action, one-loop diagrams resulting from the non-trivial measure on the space of metrics, as well as one-loop diagrams involving various counterterm vertices. Contrary to what is often believed, several such counterterms, in addition to the usual cosmological constant, do and must occur. We consistently determine the relevant counterterms from a one-loop computation of the full two-point Green's function of the Kähler field. Throughout this paper we use the general spectral cutoff regularization developed recently and which is well-suited for multi-loop computations on curved manifolds. At two loops, while all "unwanted" contributions to ln ⁡ (Z [ A ] / Z [A0 ]) correctly cancel, it appears that the finite coefficient of ln ⁡ (A /A0) does depend on the finite part of a certain counterterm coefficient, i.e. on the finite renormalization conditions one has to impose. There exists a choice that reproduces the famous KPZ-scaling, but it seems to be only one consistent choice among others. Maybe, this hints at the possibility that other renormalization conditions could eventually provide a way to circumvent the famous c = 1 barrier.

  3. "Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory", 12th DESY Workshop on Elementary Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The bi-annual international conference "Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory" has been held at Weimar, Germany, from April 27 to May 02, 2014. It has been the 12th conference of this series, started in 1992. The main focus of the conference are precision calculations of multi- loop and multi-leg processes in elementary particle physics for processes at present and future high-energy facilities within and beyond the Standard Model. At present many physics questions studied deal with processes at the LHC and future facilities like the ILC. A growing number of contributions deals with important developments in the field of computational technologies and algorithmic methods, including large-scale computer algebra, efficient methods to compute large numbers of Feynman diagrams, analytic summation and integration methods of various kinds, new related function spaces, precise numerical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. The present conference has been attended by more than 110 participants from all over the world, presenting more than 75 contributions, most of which have been written up for these pro- ceedings. The present volume demonstrates in an impressive way the enormous development of the field during the last few years, reaching the level of 5-loop calculations in QCD and a like- wise impressive development in massive next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order processes. Computer algebraic and numerical calculations require terabyte storage and many CPU years, even after intense parallelization, to obtain state-of-the-art theoretical predictions. The city of Weimar gave a suitable frame to the conference, with its rich history, especially in literature, music, arts, and architecture. Goethe, Schiller, Wieland, Herder, Bach and Liszt lived there and created many of their masterpieces. The many young participants signal that our field is prosperous and faces an exciting future. The conference hotel "Kaiserin Augusta" offered a warm hospitality and

  4. Probing 'Parent Universe' in Loop Quantum Cosmology with B-mode Polarization in Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucky Chang, Wen-Hsuan; Proty Wu, Jiun-Huei

    2016-06-01

    We aim to use the observations of B-mode polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to probe the ‘parent universe’ under the context of Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC). In particular, we investigate the possibility for the gravitational waves (GW) such as those from the stellar binary systems in the parent universe to survive the big bounce and thus to be still observable today. Our study is based on the background dynamics with the zeroth-order holonomy correction using the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We propose a new framework in which transfer functions are invoked to bring the GWs in the parent universe through the big bounce, inflation, and big bang to reach today. This transparent and intuitive formalism allows us to accurately discuss the influence of the GWs from the parent universe on the B-mode polarization in the CMB today under backgrounds of different LQC parameters. These features can soon be tested by the forth-coming CMB observations and we note that the LQC backgrounds with symmetric bouncing scenarios are ruled out by the latest observational results from Planck and BICEP2/Keck experiments.

  5. Barbero-Immirzi parameter as a scalar field: K-inflation from loop quantum gravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taveras, Victor; Yunes, Nicolás

    2008-09-01

    We consider a loop-quantum gravity inspired modification of general relativity, where the Holst action is generalized by making the Barbero-Immirzi (BI) parameter a scalar field, whose value could be dynamically determined. The modified theory leads to a nonzero torsion tensor that corrects the field equations through quadratic first derivatives of the BI field. Such a correction is equivalent to general relativity in the presence of a scalar field with nontrivial kinetic energy. This stress energy of this field is automatically covariantly conserved by its own dynamical equations of motion, thus satisfying the strong equivalence principle. Every general relativistic solution remains a solution to the modified theory for any constant value of the BI field. For arbitrary time-varying BI fields, a study of cosmological solutions reduces the scalar-field stress energy to that of a pressureless perfect fluid in a comoving reference frame, forcing the scale-factor dynamics to be equivalent to those of a stiff equation of state. Upon ultraviolet completion, this model could provide a natural mechanism for k inflation, where the role of the inflaton is played by the BI field and inflation is driven by its nontrivial kinetic energy instead of a potential.

  6. Quantum interference based Boolean gates in dangling bond loops on Si(100):H surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Gutierrez, Rafael; Joachim, Christian; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-01-01

    Implementing atomic and molecular scale electronic functionalities represents one of the major challenges in current nano-electronic developments. Engineered dangling bond nanostructures on Silicon or Germanium surfaces posses the potential to provide novel routes towards the development of non-conventional electronic circuits. These structures are built by selectively removing hydrogen atoms from an otherwise fully passivated Si(100) or Ge(100) substrate. In this theoretical study, we demonstrate how dangling bond loops can be used to implement different Boolean logic gates. Our approach exploits quantum interference effects in such ring-like structures combined with an appropriate design of the interfacing of the dangling bond system with mesoscopic electrodes. We show how OR, AND, and NOR gates can be realized by tuning either the global symmetry of the system in a multi-terminal setup—by arranging the position of the input and output electrodes—or, alternatively, by selectively applying electrostatic gates in a two-terminal configuration. PMID:26370919

  7. Quantum spectral rototranslational collision-induced absorption (CIA) in CO2 and CO2-Rg pairs (Rg = He, Ar and Xe): An insightful analysis based on new empirical multi-property isotropic intermolecular potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kader, M. S. A.; Maroulis, G.

    2017-02-01

    The rototranslational collision-induced absorption (CIA) of carbon dioxide CO2 and of carbon dioxide with inert gas mixtures CO2-He, CO2-Ar and CO2-Xe at different temperature are analyzed in terms of new isotropic intermolecular potentials and multipole-induced dipole function models, using quantum spectral lineshape computations. The irreducible spherical form for the induced operator of light absorption mechanisms was determined. The quality of the present potentials have been checked by comparing between calculated and experimental thermo-physical and transport properties over a wide temperature range. Quite a good agreement is observed for all carbon dioxide noble gas mixtures.

  8. Quantum Einstein-Maxwell fields: A unified viewpoint from the loop representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    1993-06-01

    We propose a naive unification of electromagnetism and general relativity based on enlarging the gauge group of Ashtekar's variables. We construct the connection and loop representations and analyze the space of states. In the loop representation, the wave functions depend on two loops, each of them carrying information about both gravitation and electromagnetism. We find that the Chern-Simons form and the Jones polynomial play a role in the model.

  9. Safety of isotropic flywheels

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.W.

    1981-04-30

    A probabilistic safety criterion for isotropic flywheel rotors is established based on the tolerated noncontainment failure rates of commercial aircraft turbojet engine rotors. A technique is developed combining reliability with fracture mechanics, and a sample calculation provided, to show the energy-storage levels that isotropic flywheel rotors could achieve within the constraints of this safety criterion.

  10. Quantum Structure of Field Theory and Standard Model Based on Infinity-Free Loop Regularization/renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Liang

    2014-04-01

    To understand better the quantum structure of field theory and standard model in particle physics, it is necessary to investigate carefully the divergence structure in quantum field theories (QFTs) and work out a consistent framework to avoid infinities. The divergence has got us into trouble since developing quantum electrodynamics in 1930s. Its treatment via the renormalization scheme is satisfied not by all physicists, like Dirac and Feynman who have made serious criticisms. The renormalization group analysis reveals that QFTs can in general be defined fundamentally with the meaningful energy scale that has some physical significance, which motivates us to develop a new symmetry-preserving and infinity-free regularization scheme called loop regularization (LORE). A simple regularization prescription in LORE is realized based on a manifest postulation that a loop divergence with a power counting dimension larger than or equal to the space-time dimension must vanish. The LORE method is achieved without modifying original theory and leads the divergent Feynman loop integrals well-defined to maintain the divergence structure and meanwhile preserve basic symmetries of original theory. The crucial point in LORE is the presence of two intrinsic energy scales which play the roles of ultraviolet cutoff Mc and infrared cutoff μs to avoid infinities. As Mc can be made finite when taking appropriately both the primary regulator mass and number to be infinity to recover the original integrals, the two energy scales Mc and μs in LORE become physically meaningful as the characteristic energy scale and sliding energy scale, respectively. The key concept in LORE is the introduction of irreducible loop integrals (ILIs) on which the regularization prescription acts, which leads to a set of gauge invariance consistency conditions between the regularized tensor-type and scalar-type ILIs. An interesting observation in LORE is that the evaluation of ILIs with ultraviolet

  11. Quantum Structure of Field Theory and Standard Model Based on Infinity-Free Loop Regularization/renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Liang

    2014-02-01

    To understand better the quantum structure of field theory and standard model in particle physics, it is necessary to investigate carefully the divergence structure in quantum field theories (QFTs) and work out a consistent framework to avoid infinities. The divergence has got us into trouble since developing quantum electrodynamics in 1930s. Its treatment via the renormalization scheme is satisfied not by all physicists, like Dirac and Feynman who have made serious criticisms. The renormalization group analysis reveals that QFTs can in general be defined fundamentally with the meaningful energy scale that has some physical significance, which motivates us to develop a new symmetry-preserving and infinity-free regularization scheme called loop regularization (LORE). A simple regularization prescription in LORE is realized based on a manifest postulation that a loop divergence with a power counting dimension larger than or equal to the space-time dimension must vanish. The LORE method is achieved without modifying original theory and leads the divergent Feynman loop integrals well-defined to maintain the divergence structure and meanwhile preserve basic symmetries of original theory. The crucial point in LORE is the presence of two intrinsic energy scales which play the roles of ultraviolet cutoff Mc and infrared cutoff μs to avoid infinities. As Mc can be made finite when taking appropriately both the primary regulator mass and number to be infinity to recover the original integrals, the two energy scales Mc and μs in LORE become physically meaningful as the characteristic energy scale and sliding energy scale, respectively. The key concept in LORE is the introduction of irreducible loop integrals (ILIs) on which the regularization prescription acts, which leads to a set of gauge invariance consistency conditions between the regularized tensor-type and scalar-type ILIs. An interesting observation in LORE is that the evaluation of ILIs with ultraviolet

  12. Deconfining and chiral transitions of finite-temperature quantum chromodynamics in the presence of dynamical quark loops

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Ukawa, A.

    1986-08-04

    Finite-temperature behavior of quantum chromodynamics is investigated with the Langevin technique including the dynamical quark loops. The deconfining and chiral transitions occur at the same temperature. The strength of transition weakens initially as the quark mass decreases from infinity, but at small quark masses it strengthens again and shows the characteristic of a first-order transition. We estimate the inverse coupling constant at zero quark mass to be beta/sub c/ = 6/g/sub c//sup 2/approx. =4.9--5.0 for four flavors on an 8/sup 3/ x 4 lattice.

  13. Inflationary spectra with inverse-volume corrections in loop quantum cosmology and their observational constraints from Planck 2015 data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Tao; Wang, Anzhong; Wu, Qiang; Kirsten, Klaus; Sheng, Qin; Cleaver, Gerald E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu E-mail: gerald_cleaver@baylor.edu E-mail: wuq@zjut.edu.cn

    2016-03-01

    We first derive the primordial power spectra, spectral indices and runnings of both scalar and tensor perturbations of a flat inflationary universe to the second-order approximations of the slow-roll parameters, in the framework of loop quantum cosmology with the inverse-volume quantum corrections. This represents an extension of our previous work in which the parameter σ was assumed to be an integer, where σ characterizes the quantum corrections and in general can take any of values from the range σ  element of  (0, 6]. Restricting to the first-order approximations of the slow-roll parameters, we find corrections to the results obtained previously in the literature, and point out the causes for such errors. To our best knowledge, these represent the most accurate calculations of scalar and tensor perturbations given so far in the literature. Then, fitting the perturbations to the recently released data by Planck (2015), we obtain the most severe constraints for various values of σ. Using these constraints as our referring point, we discuss whether these quantum gravitational corrections can lead to measurable signatures in the future cosmological observations. We show that, depending on the value of σ, the scale-dependent contributions to the relativistic inflationary spectra due to the inverse-volume corrections could be well within the range of the detectability of the forthcoming generations of experiments, such as the Stage IV experiments.

  14. Evidence for maximal acceleration and singularity resolution in covariant loop quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Carlo; Vidotto, Francesca

    2013-08-30

    A simple argument indicates that covariant loop gravity (spin foam theory) predicts a maximal acceleration and hence forbids the development of curvature singularities. This supports the results obtained for cosmology and black holes using canonical methods.

  15. Nonequilibrium phase transitions in isotropic Ashkin-Teller model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akıncı, Ümit

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic behavior of an isotropic Ashkin-Teller model in the presence of a periodically oscillating magnetic field has been analyzed by means of the mean field approximation. The dynamic equation of motion has been constructed with the help of a Glauber type stochastic process and solved for a square lattice. After defining the possible dynamical phases of the system, phase diagrams have been given and the behavior of the hysteresis loops has been investigated in detail. The hysteresis loop for specific order parameter of isotropic Ashkin-Teller model has been defined and characteristics of this loop in different dynamical phases have been given.

  16. Schrödinger-like quantum dynamics in loop quantized black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Olmedo, Javier; Pullin, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    We show, following a previous quantization of a vacuum spherically symmetric spacetime carried out in [R. Gambini, J. Olmedo and J. Pullin, Class. Quantum Grav. 31 (2014) 095009.] that this setting admits a Schrödinger-like picture. More precisely, the technique adopted there for the definition of parametrized Dirac observables (that codify local information of the quantum theory) can be extended in order to accommodate different pictures. In this new picture, the quantum states are parametrized in terms of suitable gauge parameters and the observables constructed out of the kinematical ones on this space of parametrized states.

  17. DMRG Study of the S >= 1 quantum Heisenberg Antiferromagnet on a Kagome-like lattice without loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberty, R. Zach; Changlani, Hitesh J.; Henley, Christopher L.

    2013-03-01

    The Kagome quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet, for spin up to S = 1 and perhaps S = 3 / 2 , is a prime candidate to realize a quantum spin liquid or valence bond crystal state, but theoretical or computational studies for S > 1 / 2 are difficult and few. We consider instead the same interactions and S >= 1 on the Husimi Cactus, a graph of corner sharing triangles whose centers are vertices of a Bethe lattice, using a DMRG procedure tailored for tree graphs. Since both lattices are locally identical, properties of the Kagome antiferromagnet dominated by nearest-neighbor spin correlations should also be exhibited on the Cactus, whereas loop-dependent effects will be absent on the loopless Cactus. Our study focuses on the possible transition(s) that must occur with increasing S for the Cactus antiferromagnet. (It has a disordered valence bond state at S = 1 / 2 but a 3-sublattice coplanar ordered state in the large S limit). We also investigate the phase diagram of the S = 1 quantum XXZ model with on-site anisotropy, which we expect to have three-sublattice and valence-bond-crystal phases similar to the kagome case. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation through a Graduate Research Fellowship to R. Zach Lamberty, as well as grant DMR-

  18. One-loop omega-potential of quantum fields with ellipsoid constant-energy surface dispersion law

    SciTech Connect

    Kazinski, P.O.; Shipulya, M.A.

    2011-10-15

    Rapidly convergent expansions of a one-loop contribution to the partition function of quantum fields with ellipsoid constant-energy surface dispersion law are derived. The omega-potential is naturally decomposed into three parts: the quasiclassical contribution, the contribution from the branch cut of the dispersion law, and the oscillating part. The low- and high-temperature expansions of the quasiclassical part are obtained. An explicit expression and a relation of the contribution from the cut with the Casimir term and vacuum energy are established. The oscillating part is represented in the form of the Chowla-Selberg expansion of the Epstein zeta function. Various resummations of this expansion are considered. The general procedure developed is then applied to two models: massless particles in a box both at zero and nonzero chemical potential, and electrons in a thin metal film. Rapidly convergent expansions of the partition function and average particle number are obtained for these models. In particular, the oscillations of the chemical potential of conduction electrons in graphene and a thin metal film due to a variation of size of the crystal are described. - Highlights: > We study quantum fields with ellipsoid constant-energy surface dispersion law. > Rapidly convergent expansions of the omega-potential are derived. > Various resummations of the Chowla-Selberg expansion are obtained. > We establish a relation of the Casimir term with the vacuum energy. > Oscillations of the chemical potential of electrons in graphene are described.

  19. Rainbow metric from quantum gravity: Anisotropic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assanioussi, Mehdi; Dapor, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we present a construction of effective cosmological models which describe the propagation of a massive quantum scalar field on a quantum anisotropic cosmological spacetime. Each obtained effective model is represented by a rainbow metric in which particles of distinct momenta propagate on different classical geometries. Our analysis shows that upon certain assumptions and conditions on the parameters determining such anisotropic models, we surprisingly obtain a unique deformation parameter β in the modified dispersion relation of the modes, hence, inducing an isotropic deformation despite the general starting considerations. We then ensure the recovery of the dispersion relation realized in the isotropic case, studied in [M. Assanioussi, A. Dapor, and J. Lewandowski, Phys. Lett. B 751, 302 (2015), 10.1016/j.physletb.2015.10.043], when some proper symmetry constraints are imposed, and we estimate the value of the deformation parameter for this case in loop quantum cosmology context.

  20. The isotropic Hamiltonian formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Vaisman, Izu

    2011-02-10

    A Hamiltonian formalism is a procedure that allows to associate a dynamical system to a function and that includes classical Hamiltonian mechanics as a particular case. The present, expository paper gives a survey of the Hamiltonian formalism defined by an isotropic subbundle of TM+T*M, in particular, by a Dirac structure. We discuss reduction and geometric quantization of the Hamiltonian dynamical systems provided by this formalism.

  1. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  2. Ground state cooling of a quantum electromechanical system with a silicon nitride membrane in a 3D loop-gap cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Rekishu; Ataka, Manabu; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Toyofumi; Usami, Koji; Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2016-10-01

    Cavity electro-(opto-)mechanics gives us a quantum tool to access mechanical modes in a massive object. Here we develop a quantum electromechanical system in which a vibrational mode of a SiN x membrane are coupled to a three-dimensional loop-gap superconducting microwave cavity. The tight confinement of the electric field across a mechanically compliant narrow-gap capacitor realizes the quantum strong coupling regime under a red-sideband pump field and the quantum ground state cooling of the mechanical mode. We also demonstrate strong coupling between two mechanical modes, which is induced by two-tone parametric drives and mediated by a virtual photon in the cavity.

  3. Testing the role of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter and the choice of connection in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achour, Jibril Ben; Geiller, Marc; Noui, Karim; Yu, Chao

    2015-05-01

    We study the role of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter γ and the choice of connection in the construction of (a symmetry-reduced version of) loop quantum gravity. We start with the four-dimensional Lorentzian Holst action that we reduce to three dimensions in a way that preserves the presence of γ . In the time gauge, the phase space of the resulting three-dimensional theory mimics exactly that of the four-dimensional one. Its quantization can be performed, and on the kinematical Hilbert space spanned by SU(2) spin network states the spectra of geometric operators are discrete and γ dependent. However, because of the three-dimensional nature of the theory, its SU(2) Ashtekar-Barbero Hamiltonian constraint can be traded for the flatness constraint of an s l (2 ,C ) connection, and we show that this latter has to satisfy a linear simplicitylike condition analogous to the one used in the construction of spin foam models. The physically relevant solution to this constraint singles out the noncompact subgroup SU(1, 1), which in turn leads to the disappearance of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter and to a continuous length spectrum, in agreement with what is expected from Lorentzian three-dimensional gravity.

  4. Quantum theory of optical temporal phase and instantaneous frequency. II. Continuous-time limit and state-variable approach to phase-locked loop design

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Mankei; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Lloyd, Seth

    2009-05-15

    We consider the continuous-time version of our recently proposed quantum theory of optical temporal phase and instantaneous frequency [M. Tsang et al., Phys. Rev. A 78, 053820 (2008)]. Using a state-variable approach to estimation, we design homodyne phase-locked loops that can measure the temporal phase with quantum-limited accuracy. We show that postprocessing can further improve the estimation performance if delay is allowed in the estimation. We also investigate the fundamental uncertainties in the simultaneous estimation of harmonic-oscillator position and momentum via continuous optical phase measurements from the classical estimation theory perspective. In the case of delayed estimation, we find that the inferred uncertainty product can drop below that allowed by the Heisenberg uncertainty relation. Although this result seems counterintuitive, we argue that it does not violate any basic principle of quantum mechanics.

  5. Viability of the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology for general potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume E-mail: jaume.amoros@upc.edu

    2014-12-01

    We consider the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) for phenomenological potentials that at early times provide a nearly matter dominated Universe in the contracting phase, having a reheating mechanism in the expanding or contracting phase, i.e., being able to release the energy of the scalar field creating particles that thermalize in order to match with the hot Friedmann Universe, and finally at late times leading to the current cosmic acceleration. For these potentials, numerically solving the dynamical perturbation equations we have seen that, for the particular F(T) model that we will name teleparallel version of LQC, and whose modified Friedmann equation coincides with the corresponding one in holonomy corrected LQC when one deals with the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry, the corresponding equations obtained from the well-know perturbed equations in F(T) gravity lead to theoretical results that fit well with current observational data. More precisely, in this teleparallel version of LQC there is a set of solutions which leads to theoretical results that match correctly with last BICEP2 data, and there is another set whose theoretical results fit well with Planck's experimental data. On the other hand, in the standard holonomy corrected LQC, using the perturbed equations obtained replacing the Ashtekar connection by a suitable sinus function and inserting some counter-terms in order to preserve the algebra of constrains, the theoretical value of the tensor/scalar ratio is smaller than in the teleparallel version, which means that there is always a set of solutions that matches with Planck's data, but for some potentials BICEP2 experimental results disfavours holonomy corrected LQC.

  6. Semiclassical States Associated with Isotropic Submanifolds of Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemin, V.; Uribe, A.; Wang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    We define classes of quantum states associated with isotropic submanifolds of cotangent bundles. The classes are stable under the action of semiclassical pseudo-differential operators and covariant under the action of semiclassical Fourier integral operators. We develop a symbol calculus for them; the symbols are symplectic spinors. We outline various applications.

  7. Entanglement of Formation for Werner States and Isotropic States via Logical Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, Cesarino; Chiara, Maria Luisa Dalla; Leporini, Roberto

    To what extent is a logical characterization of entanglement possible? We investigate some correlations that hold between the concept of entanglement of formation for Werner states and for isotropic states and the probabilistic behavior of some quantum logical gates.

  8. Isotropic Monte Carlo Grain Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.

    2013-04-25

    IMCGG performs Monte Carlo simulations of normal grain growth in metals on a hexagonal grid in two dimensions with periodic boundary conditions. This may be performed with either an isotropic or a misorientation - and incliantion-dependent grain boundary energy.

  9. Indentation of Transversely Isotropic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Talapady Srivatsa

    Instrumented indentation, as a tool for characterization of mechanical properties, has well been established in the past decades. Studies have been conducted to understand the behavior of isotropic materials under indentation and techniques to accurately predict isotropic material properties have also been reported. Further, within the isotropic regime, work has been done to predict the indentation hardness without having to investigate the area of contact during indentation. Studies have also reported the prospect of utilizing indentation to predict the fatigue behavior of isotropic materials. This dissertation is made with the intent of extending the use of indentation, as a characterization tool, to the anisotropic regime. The effect of transverse isotropy on the indentation response of materials is systematically studied here. Extensive computational analysis is performed to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanics of indentation of transversely isotropic materials. Owing to the anisotropy, indentation may be performed parallel or perpendicular to the plane of isotropy of the specimen. It is observed that the indentation response varies significantly for each of these cases. The two cases are treated as unique and an identical systematic analysis is carried for both. The indentation orientations shall henceforth be referred to as transverse and longitudinal indentation for indentation parallel and perpendicular to the plane of isotropy respectively. A technique is developed capable of extracting the elastic-plastic properties of transversely isotropic materials from interpretation of indentation response in either direction. The technique is rigorously tested for its robustness, accuracy and uniqueness of results. A sensitivity analysis is performed to determine how sensitive the technique is to errors in experimental results. Rigorous studies are performed to understand the variation in pile-up or sink-in during indentation with varying anisotropy in the

  10. Transversely isotropic poroelasticity arising from thin isotropic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    Percolation phenomena play central roles in the field of poroelasticity, where two distinct sets of percolating continua intertwine. A connected solid frame forms the basis of the elastic behavior of a poroelastic medium in the presence of confining forces, while connected pores permit a percolating fluid (if present) to influence the mechanical response of the system from within. The present paper discusses isotropic and anisotropic poroelastic media and establishes general formulas for the behavior of transversely isotropic poroelasticity arising from laminations of isotropic components. The Backus averaging method is shown to provide elementary means of constructing general formulas. The results for confined fluids are then compared with the more general Gassmann formulas that must be satisfied by any anisotropic poroelastic medium and found to be in complete agreement.

  11. Transversely isotropic elasticity and poroelasticity arising from thin isotropic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1997-07-01

    Since the classic work of Postma [1955] and Backus [1962], much has been learned about elastic constants in vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media when the anisotropy is due to fine layering of isotropic elastic materials. However, new results are still being discovered. For example, the P-wave anisotropy parameter c{sub 11}/c{sub 33} lies in the range 1/4 {<=} c{sub 11}/c{sub 33} {<=} <{lambda}+2{mu}><1/({lambda}+2{mu})>, when the layers are themselves composed of isotropic elastic materials with Lame constants {lambda} and {mu} and the vertical average of the layers is symbolized by <{center_dot}>. The lower bound corrects a result of Postma. For porous layers, a connected solid frame forms the basis of the elastic behavior of a poroelastic medium in the presence of confining forces, while connected pores permit a percolating fluid (if present) to influence the mechanical response of the system from within. For isotropic and anisotropic poroelastic media, we establish general formulas for the behavior of transversely isotropic poroelasticity arising from laminations of isotropic components. The Backus averaging method is shown to provide elementary means of constructing general formulas. The results for confined fluids are then compared with the more general Gassmann [1951] formulas that must be satisfied by any anisotropic poroelastic medium and found to be in complete agreement. Such results are important for applications to oil exploration using AVO (amplitude versus offset) since the presence or absence of a fluid component, as well as the nature of the fluid, is the critical issue and the ways in which the fluid influences seismic reflection data still need to be better understood.

  12. Quantum nature of the big bang.

    PubMed

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Pawlowski, Tomasz; Singh, Parampreet

    2006-04-14

    Some long-standing issues concerning the quantum nature of the big bang are resolved in the context of homogeneous isotropic models with a scalar field. Specifically, the known results on the resolution of the big-bang singularity in loop quantum cosmology are significantly extended as follows: (i) the scalar field is shown to serve as an internal clock, thereby providing a detailed realization of the "emergent time" idea; (ii) the physical Hilbert space, Dirac observables, and semiclassical states are constructed rigorously; (iii) the Hamiltonian constraint is solved numerically to show that the big bang is replaced by a big bounce. Thanks to the nonperturbative, background independent methods, unlike in other approaches the quantum evolution is deterministic across the deep Planck regime.

  13. Bi-isotropic constitutive relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihvola, A. H.; Lindell, I. V.

    1991-03-01

    The constitutive relations of general bi-isotropic media, requiring four material parameters, can be written in different ways to describe their electromagnetic behavior. This communication contains a two-way 'dictionary' between a proposed formulation of the constitutive relations with three other sets of relations, generalized from relations used for chiral materials.

  14. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  15. Three-point correlator and pion form factor in quantum chromodynamics: Methods of calculation for two-loop spectral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedir, Islam

    The methods are developed of two-loop calculation of spectral density for the 3-point correlation function of an electromagnetic current and two axial currents which are the basis of the pion form factor analysis within the framework of QCD sum rules and local quark-hadron duality approach. The nature of various types of contributions is established which are related to particular regions of momentum integrations inside Feynman integrals. The trace factors accompanying all six two-loop diagrams are calculated and classified. To regularize particular loop integrals, the dimensional regularization technique has been used. The calculation involves such methods as infinite-momentum frame approach, alpha-representation method, Sudakov parametrization of the integration momentum and covariant calculation in momentum space. It is shown that final results of integration are given by logarithms and di-logarithm functions. For the diagram with the gluon correction to the electromagnetic vertex, it is shown that its large momentum transfer behavior is dominated by the Feynman mechanism, in which the active quark carries the bulk of the hadron momentum both before and after collision with virtual photon. For this diagram, the Sudakov double logarithmic terms were obtained that are known to convert into the Sudakov form factor after summation over all orders. Another type of double-logarithmic term was found in the contribution of the diagrams with the gluon correction to the axial-current vertices. This term appears as a power correction to the leading power behavior of this diagram governed by a short-distance re-scattering subprocess in which the exchanged gluon has large virtuality. This subprocess corresponds to the asymptotic perturbative QCD contribution. This observation shows that the two double-logarithmic terms have different nature. The methods developed in this dissertation may be applied to other two-loop calculations within the QCD sum rule method.

  16. Emergent Friedmann dynamics with a quantum bounce from quantum gravity condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2016-11-01

    We study the effective cosmological dynamics, emerging as the hydrodynamics of simple condensate states, of a group field theory (GFT) model for quantum gravity coupled to a massless scalar field and reduced to its isotropic sector. The quantum equations of motion for these GFT condensate states are given in relational terms with respect to the scalar field, from which effective dynamics for spatially flat, homogeneous and isotropic space-times can be extracted. The result is a generalisation of the Friedmann equations, including quantum gravity modifications, in a specific regime of the theory corresponding to a Gross-Pitaevskii approximation where interactions are subdominant. The classical Friedmann equations of general relativity are recovered in a suitable semi-classical limit for some range of parameters of the microscopic dynamics. An important result is that the quantum geometries associated with these GFT condensate states are non-singular: a bounce generically occurs in the Planck regime. For some choices of condensate states, these modified Friedmann equations are very similar to those of loop quantum cosmology.

  17. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaswamy, V. G.; Vanstone, R. H.; Dame, L. T.; Laflen, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The unified constitutive theories for application to typical isotropic cast nickel base supperalloys used for air-cooled turbine blades were evaluated. The specific modeling aspects evaluated were: uniaxial, monotonic, cyclic, creep, relaxation, multiaxial, notch, and thermomechanical behavior. Further development of the constitutive theories to model thermal history effects, refinement of the material test procedures, evaluation of coating effects, and verification of the models in an alternate material will be accomplished in a follow-on for this base program.

  18. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  19. Are random fractal clusters isotropic\\?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Vicsek, Tamás; Meakin, Paul

    1985-08-01

    We have studied the shape of large clusters in the lattice-animal, percolation, and growing-percolation models. By calculating the radius of gyration tensor we find that in these models the clusters have an anisotropic shape. The results suggest that the critical droplets in related isotropic equilibrium models, such as the Ising model, may also be anisotropic. We have also determined the leading nonanalytic correction-to-scaling exponent by analyzing the anisotropy data and find that for percolation in two dimensions e~=0.47. .AE

  20. A Transversely Isotropic Thermoelastic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    A continuum theory is presented for representing the thermoelastic behavior of composites that can be idealized as transversely isotropic. This theory is consistent with anisotropic viscoplastic theories being developed presently at NASA Lewis Research Center. A multiaxial statement of the theory is presented, as well as plane stress and plane strain reductions. Experimental determination of the required material parameters and their theoretical constraints are discussed. Simple homogeneously stressed elements are examined to illustrate the effect of fiber orientation on the resulting strain distribution. Finally, the multiaxial stress-strain relations are expressed in matrix form to simplify and accelerate implementation of the theory into structural analysis codes.

  1. Loop quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolau, A.

    1988-10-01

    Loop unwinding is a known technique for reducing loop overhead, exposing parallelism, and increasing the efficiency of pipelining. Traditional loop unwinding is limited to the innermost loop in a group of nested loops and the amount of unwinding either is fixed or must be specified by the user, on a case by case basis. In this paper the authors present a general technique for automatically unwinding multiply nested loops, explain its advantages over other transformation techniques, and illustrate its practical effectiveness. Lopp Quantization could be beneficial by itself or coupled with other loop transformations.

  2. Dual radiofrequency drive quantum voltage standard with nanovolt resolution based on a closed-loop refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakopoulos, D.; Budovsky, I.; Hagen, T.; Sasaki, H.; Yamamori, H.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a programmable Josephson voltage standard that can produce voltages up to 20 V with a resolution of better than 0.1 µV over the whole voltage range and better than 1 nV for voltages up to 10 mV. The standard has two superconductor-normal metal-superconductor junction arrays connected in series and driven by two radiofrequency oscillators. The cryogenic part of the standard is based on a cryocooler. The new standard agrees with the primary quantum voltage standard maintained at the National Measurement Institute, Australia, within 10 nV and forms the basis of an automated calibration system for digital multimeters and voltage references.

  3. Isotropic Negative Thermal Expansion Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingling; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2016-07-13

    Negative thermal expansion materials are important and desirable in science and engineering applications. However, natural materials with isotropic negative thermal expansion are rare and usually unsatisfied in performance. Here, we propose a novel method to achieve two- and three-dimensional negative thermal expansion metamaterials via antichiral structures. The two-dimensional metamaterial is constructed with unit cells that combine bimaterial strips and antichiral structures, while the three-dimensional metamaterial is fabricated by a multimaterial 3D printing process. Both experimental and simulation results display isotropic negative thermal expansion property of the samples. The effective coefficient of negative thermal expansion of the proposed models is demonstrated to be dependent on the difference between the thermal expansion coefficient of the component materials, as well as on the circular node radius and the ligament length in the antichiral structures. The measured value of the linear negative thermal expansion coefficient of the three-dimensional sample is among the largest achieved in experiments to date. Our findings provide an easy and practical approach to obtaining materials with tunable negative thermal expansion on any scale.

  4. Measuring isotropic subsurface light transport.

    PubMed

    Happel, Kathrin; Dörsam, Edgar; Urban, Philipp

    2014-04-21

    Subsurface light transport can affect the visual appearance of materials significantly. Measuring and modeling this phenomenon is crucial for accurately reproducing colors in printing or for rendering translucent objects on displays. In this paper, we propose an apparatus to measure subsurface light transport employing a reference material to cancel out adverse signals that may bias the results. In contrast to other approaches, the setup enables improved focusing on rough surfaces (e.g. uncoated paper). We derive a measurement equation that may be used to deduce the point spread function (PSF) of subsurface light transport. Main contributions are the usage of spectrally-narrowband exchangeable LEDs allowing spectrally-resolved measurements and an approach based on quadratic programming for reconstructing PSFs in the case of isotropic light transport.

  5. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of nematic and isotropic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bomi; Song, Jang-Kun

    2016-03-01

    Dielectrophoresis can provide a delicate tool to control electrically neutral particles in colloid. The dielectrophoresis is usually applied to solid particles or heterogeneous liquid droplet in continuous liquid, but we devised and investigated the dielectrophoresis of isotropic droplets within nematic phase or vice versa. Using multi-components liquid crystal mixtures that exhibit relatively wide temperature range of nematic-isotropic coexistence, we achieved a field-induced phase separation between isotropic and nematic. We also fabricated the isotropic-nematic filaments that was achieved using a biased surface preference for either isotropic or nematic phase of the alignment layer [1]. The dielectrophoresis manipulations of isotropic and nematic droplets required much lower voltage compared to that for the electro wetting type devices. In addition, we observed the bi-directional actuation of isotropic droplets using anisotropic dielectric property of liquid crystal, which is not possible in usual dielectrophoresis. The bidirectional actuation was achieved by controlling the LC director within the cell so as to change the sign of the difference between the effective dielectric constant of nematic and isotropic liquid crystals. We simulated the bi-directional dielectrophoresis by performing the LC director calculation and the corresponding dielectrophoresis. The simulation results matched well with the experimental data. Thus, the bi-directional dielectrophoresis using isotropic and nematic droplets may open new possibility of electro- optical applications using liquid crystals.

  6. Macroscopic simulation of isotropic permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Vogler, Christoph; Heinrichs, Frank; Satz, Armin; Ausserlechner, Udo; Binder, Gernot; Koeck, Helmut; Suess, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Accurate simulations of isotropic permanent magnets require to take the magnetization process into account and consider the anisotropic, nonlinear, and hysteretic material behaviour near the saturation configuration. An efficient method for the solution of the magnetostatic Maxwell equations including the description of isotropic permanent magnets is presented. The algorithm can easily be implemented on top of existing finite element methods and does not require a full characterization of the hysteresis of the magnetic material. Strayfield measurements of an isotropic permanent magnet and simulation results are in good agreement and highlight the importance of a proper description of the isotropic material.

  7. Magnetic monopole in the loop representation

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Lorenzo; Lopez, Alexander

    2006-01-15

    We quantize, within the Loop Representation formalism, the electromagnetic field in the presence of a static magnetic pole. It is found that the loop-dependent physical wave functionals of the quantum Maxwell theory become multivalued, through a topological phase factor depending on the solid angle subtended at the monopole by a surface bounded by the loop. It is discussed how this fact generalizes what occurs in ordinary quantum mechanics in multiply connected spaces.

  8. Light-Steered Isotropic Semiconductor Micromotors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanrui; Mou, Fangzhi; Xu, Leilei; Wang, Shaofei; Guan, Jianguo; Feng, Zunpeng; Wang, Quanwei; Kong, Lei; Li, Wei; Wang, Joseph; Zhang, Qingjie

    2017-01-01

    Intelligent photoresponsive isotropic semiconductor micromotors are developed by taking advantage of the limited penetration depth of light to induce asymmetrical surface chemical reactions. Independent of the Brownian motion of themselves, the as-proposed isotropic micromotors are able to continuously move with both motion direction and speed just controlled by light, as well as precisely manipulate particles for nanoengineering.

  9. A direct current superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer with a digital signal processor controlled flux-locked loop and comparison with a conventional analog feedback scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, P.J.; Bracht, R.R.; Flynn, E.R.; Lewis, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    A double-washer dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometer with a flux-locked loop (FLL) based on a digital signal processor (DSP) has been developed for biomagnetic applications. All of the analog electronics in the conventional FLL are replaced and implemented by the DSP except for the low-noise field-effect transistor preamplifier at the front end of the signal recovery components. The DSP performs the signal demodulation by synchronously sampling the recovered signals and applying the appropriate full wave rectification. The signals are then integrated, filtered, and applied to the output. At 4.2 K, the white flux noise of the gradiometer measured in a DSP FLL mode is about 4{mu}{phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz and the noise at 1 Hz is 13 {mu}{phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz. The corresponding noise levels in the gradiometer operated by the conventional FLL are 1.8 and 3{mu}{phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz. The poorer system performance in the DSP FLL compared to the analog FLL is mainly caused by the ambient field noise and interference signals picked up through the connecting cables. Additional noise is also added to the overall noise floor by the instruments employed in the DSP system in the present prototype setup. Further improvement in the noise characteristics and the dynamic behavior of the DSP SQUID gradiometer is expected when a better configuration of DSP with the associated I/O devices is implemented. Additional improvements of the DSP programs are expected by incorporating higher-order integration, adaptive control, and noise reduction schemes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, Ulric S.; Chan, Kwai S.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the program is to evaluate and develop existing constitutive models for use in finite-element structural analysis of turbine engine hot section components. The class of constitutive equation studied is considered unified in that all inelastic deformation including plasticity, creep, and stress relaxation are treated in a single term rather than a classical separation of plasticity (time independent) and creep (time dependent) behavior. The unified theories employed also do not utilize the classical yield surface or plastic potential concept. The models are constructed from an appropriate flow law, a scalar kinetic relation between strain rate, temperature and stress, and evolutionary equations for internal variables describing strain or work hardening, both isotropic and directional (kinematic). This and other studies have shown that the unified approach is particularly suited for determining the cyclic behavior of superalloy type blade and vane materials and is entirely compatible with three-dimensional inelastic finite-element formulations. The behavior was examined of a second nickel-base alloy, MAR-M247, and compared it with the Bodner-Partom model, further examined procedures for determining the material-specific constants in the models, and exercised the MARC code for a turbine blade under simulated flight spectrum loading. Results are summarized.

  11. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Lindholm, U. S.; Bodner, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The third and fourth years of a 4-year research program, part of the NASA HOST Program, are described. The program goals were: (1) to develop and validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials, and (2) to demonstrate their usefulness for structural analysis of hot section components of gas turbine engines. The unified models selected for development and evaluation were those of Bodner-Partom and of Walker. The unified approach for elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations is a viable method for representing and predicting material response characteristics in the range where strain rate and temperature dependent inelastic deformations are experienced. This conclusion is reached by extensive comparison of model calculations against the experimental results of a test program of two high temperature Ni-base alloys, B1900+Hf and Mar-M247, over a wide temperature range for a variety of deformation and thermal histories including uniaxial, multiaxial, and thermomechanical loading paths. The applicability of the Bodner-Partom and the Walker models for structural applications has been demonstrated by implementing these models into the MARC finite element code and by performing a number of analyses including thermomechanical histories on components of hot sections of gas turbine engines and benchmark notch tensile specimens. The results of the 4-year program have been published in four annual reports. The results of the base program are summarized in this report. The tasks covered include: (1) development of material test procedures, (2) thermal history effects, and (3) verification of the constitutive model for an alternative material.

  12. How Isotropic is the Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadeh, Daniela; Feeney, Stephen M.; Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya V.; McEwen, Jason D.

    2016-09-01

    A fundamental assumption in the standard model of cosmology is that the Universe is isotropic on large scales. Breaking this assumption leads to a set of solutions to Einstein's field equations, known as Bianchi cosmologies, only a subset of which have ever been tested against data. For the first time, we consider all degrees of freedom in these solutions to conduct a general test of isotropy using cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization data from Planck. For the vector mode (associated with vorticity), we obtain a limit on the anisotropic expansion of (σV/H )0 <4.7 ×10-11 (95% C.L.), which is an order of magnitude tighter than previous Planck results that used cosmic microwave background temperature only. We also place upper limits on other modes of anisotropic expansion, with the weakest limit arising from the regular tensor mode, (σT ,reg/H )0 <1.0 ×10-6 (95% C.L.). Including all degrees of freedom simultaneously for the first time, anisotropic expansion of the Universe is strongly disfavored, with odds of 121 000:1 against.

  13. How Isotropic is the Universe?

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Daniela; Feeney, Stephen M; Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya V; McEwen, Jason D

    2016-09-23

    A fundamental assumption in the standard model of cosmology is that the Universe is isotropic on large scales. Breaking this assumption leads to a set of solutions to Einstein's field equations, known as Bianchi cosmologies, only a subset of which have ever been tested against data. For the first time, we consider all degrees of freedom in these solutions to conduct a general test of isotropy using cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization data from Planck. For the vector mode (associated with vorticity), we obtain a limit on the anisotropic expansion of (σ_{V}/H)_{0}<4.7×10^{-11} (95% C.L.), which is an order of magnitude tighter than previous Planck results that used cosmic microwave background temperature only. We also place upper limits on other modes of anisotropic expansion, with the weakest limit arising from the regular tensor mode, (σ_{T,reg}/H)_{0}<1.0×10^{-6} (95% C.L.). Including all degrees of freedom simultaneously for the first time, anisotropic expansion of the Universe is strongly disfavored, with odds of 121 000:1 against.

  14. Non-linear dielectric effect in the isotropic phase above the isotropic-cholesteric phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prabir K.; Chakraborty, Sumanta; Rzoska, Sylwester J.

    2011-11-01

    Using the Landau-de Gennes theory, the temperature, pressure and frequency dependence of the non-linear effect in the isotropic phase above the isotropic-cholesteric phase transition is calculated. The influence of pressure on the isotropic-cholesteric phase transition is discussed by varying the coupling between the orientational order parameter and the macroscopic polarization of polar cholesterics. Comparing the results of the calculations with existing data, we finally conclude that the model provides a description of the isotropic-cholesteric transition that takes all experimentally known features of the unusual negative and positive pretransitional effect in the isotropic phase of the system into account in a qualitatively correct way.

  15. A spatially homogeneous and isotropic Einstein-Dirac cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finster, Felix; Hainzl, Christian

    2011-04-01

    We consider a spatially homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model where Dirac spinors are coupled to classical gravity. For the Dirac spinors we choose a Hartree-Fock ansatz where all one-particle wave functions are coherent and have the same momentum. If the scale function is large, the universe behaves like the classical Friedmann dust solution. If however the scale function is small, quantum effects lead to oscillations of the energy-momentum tensor. It is shown numerically and proven analytically that these quantum oscillations can prevent the formation of a big bang or big crunch singularity. The energy conditions are analyzed. We prove the existence of time-periodic solutions which go through an infinite number of expansion and contraction cycles.

  16. Inertial currents in isotropic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, M.; Erickson, G. M.; Pontius, D. H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetospheric convection electric field contributes to Birkeland currents. The effects of the field are to polarize the plasma by displacing the bounce paths of the ions from those of electrons, to redistribute the pressure so that it is not constant along magnetic field lines, and to enhance the pressure gradient by the gradient of the bulk speed. Changes in the polarization charge during the convection of the plasma are neutralized by electrons in the form of field-aligned currents that close through the ionosphere. The pressure drives field-aligned currents through its gradient in the same manner as in quasi-static plasmas, but with modifications that are important if the bulk speed is of the order of the ion thermal speed; the variations in the pressure along field lines are maintained by a weak parallel potential drop. These effects are described in terms of the field-aligned currents in steady state, isotropic, MHD plasma. Solutions are developed by taking the MHD limit ot two-fluid solutions and illustrated in the special case of Maxwellian plasma for which the temperature is constant along magnetic field lines. The expression for the Birkeland current density is a generalization of Vasyliunas' expression for the field-aligned current density in quasi-static plasma and provides a unifying expression when both pressure gradients and ion inertia operate simultaneously as sources of field-aligned currents. It contains a full account of different aspects of the ion flow (parallel and perpendicular velocity and vorticity) that contribute to the currents. Contributions of ion inertia to field-aligned currents will occur in regions of strong velocity shear, electric field reversal, or large gradients in the parallel velocity or number density, and may be important in the low-latitude boundary layer, plasma sheet boundary layer, and the inner edge region of the plasma sheet.

  17. Time delay anisotropy in photoelectron emission from isotropic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuser, S.; Jiménez-Gálan, Á.; Cirelli, C.; Sabbar, M.; Boge, R.; Lucchini, M.; Gallmann, L.; Ivanov, I.; Kheifets, A.; Dahlström, J. M.; Lindroth, E.; Argenti, L.; Martín, F.; Keller, U.

    2015-09-01

    Time delays of electrons emitted from an isotropic initial state and leaving behind an isotropic ion are assumed to be angle-independent. Using an interferometric method involving XUV attosecond pulse trains and an IR probe field in combination with a detection scheme, which allows for full 3D momentum resolution, we show that measured time delays between electrons liberated from the $1s^2$ spherically symmetric ground state of helium depend on the emission direction of the electrons relative to the linear polarization axis of the ionizing XUV light. Such time-delay anisotropy, for which we measure values as large as 60 attoseconds, is caused by the interplay between final quantum states with different symmetry and arises naturally whenever the photoionization process involves the exchange of more than one photon in the field of the parent-ion. With the support of accurate theoretical models, the angular dependence of the time delay is attributed to small phase differences that are induced in the laser-driven continuum transitions to the final states. Since most measurement techniques tracing attosecond electron dynamics involve the exchange of at least two photons, this is a general, significant, and initially unexpected effect that must be taken into account in all such photoionization measurements.

  18. Interacting Generalized Ghost Dark Energy in Non-isotropic Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the generalized Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) ghost model of dark energy in the framework of Einstein gravity is investigated. At first, the non-interacting generalized ghost dark energy in a Bianchi type I (BI) background is discussed. Then the equation of state parameter, ω D = p D / ρ D , the deceleration parameter, and the evolution equation of the generalized ghost dark energy are obtained. It was found that, in this case, ω D cannot cross the phantom line (ω D >-1) and eventually the universe approaches a de-Sitter phase of expansion (ω D →-1). Then, this investigation was extended to the interacting ghost dark energy in a non-isotropic universe. It was found that the equation of state parameter of the interacting generalized ghost dark energy can cross the phantom line (ω D <-1) provided the parameters of the model are chosen suitably. It was considered a specific model which permits the standard continuity equation in this theory. Besides ΩΛ and Ω m in standard Einstein cosmology, another density parameter, Ω σ , is expected by the anisotropy. The anisotropy of the universe decreases and the universe transits to an isotropic flat FRW universe accommodating the present acceleration.

  19. Static spherically symmetric wormholes with isotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Liempi, Luis; Rodríguez, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study static spherically symmetric wormhole solutions sustained by matter sources with isotropic pressure. We show that such spherical wormholes do not exist in the framework of zero-tidal-force wormholes. On the other hand, it is shown that for the often used power-law shape function there are no spherically symmetric traversable wormholes sustained by sources with a linear equation of state p = ωρ for the isotropic pressure, independently of the form of the redshift function ϕ (r). We consider a solution obtained by Tolman at 1939 for describing static spheres of isotropic fluids, and show that it also may describe wormhole spacetimes with a power-law redshift function, which leads to a polynomial shape function, generalizing a power-law shape function, and inducing a solid angle deficit.

  20. Efficient modeling in transversely isotropic inhomogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhalifah, T.

    1993-11-01

    An efficient modeling technique for transversely isotropic, inhomogeneous media, is developed using a mix of analytical equations and numerical calculations. The analytic equation for the raypath in a factorized transversely isotropic (FTI) media with linear velocity variation, derived by Shearer and Chapman, is used to trace between two points. In addition, I derive an analytical equation for geometrical spreading in FTI media that aids in preserving program efficiency; however, the traveltime is calculated numerically. I then generalize the method to treat general transversely isotropic (TI) media that are not factorized anisotropic inhomogeneous by perturbing the FTI traveltimes, following the perturbation ideas of Cerveny and Filho. A Kirchhoff-summation-based program relying on Trorey`s (1970) diffraction method is used to generate synthetic seismograms for such a medium. For the type of velocity models treated, the program is much more efficient than finite-difference and general ray-trace modeling techniques.

  1. Negative Poisson's ratio materials via isotropic interactions.

    PubMed

    Rechtsman, Mikael C; Stillinger, Frank H; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-08-22

    We show that under tension a classical many-body system with only isotropic pair interactions in a crystalline state can, counterintuitively, have a negative Poisson's ratio, or auxetic behavior. We derive the conditions under which the triangular lattice in two dimensions and lattices with cubic symmetry in three dimensions exhibit a negative Poisson's ratio. In the former case, the simple Lennard-Jones potential can give rise to auxetic behavior. In the latter case, a negative Poisson's ratio can be exhibited even when the material is constrained to be elastically isotropic.

  2. The Two Isotropic Asymptotes of Fiber Composites,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Voigt and Reuss models of summed stiffness and compliance. The compliance quasi-isotropic asymptote, which >’-:’ has evidently not been discussed in the...i,j,e)de o0 The resulting pseudo -isotropic compliance (series-model) Hooke’s law matrix is similar but not identical to Eq. (3): W(1) W(4) 0 a aIE...given by 1 W( ) 14) E : - Vc Wc 4W(5) 2[W(1) - W()] (8) c W() W(14 12 Direct formulas for the pseudo -isctrcpic moduli, in terms of the ply 1s natural

  3. Biomimetic Isotropic Nanostructures for Structural Coloration

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, Jason D.; Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng Fatt; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Schreck, Carl F.; Yang, Lin; Park, Jin-Gyu; Prum, Richard O.; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; O'Hern, Corey S.; Cao, Hui; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2010-08-09

    The self-assembly of films that mimic color-producing nanostructures in bird feathers is described. These structures are isotropic and have a characteristic length-scale comparable to the wavelength of visible light. Structural colors are produced when wavelength-independent scattering is suppressed by limiting the optical path length through geometry or absorption.

  4. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  5. Using CMB data to constrain non-isotropic Planck-scale modifications to Electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Migliaccio, Marina; Pagano, Luca; Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Polenta, Gianluca E-mail: Marina.Migliaccio@roma2.infn.it E-mail: giovanni.amelino-camelia@roma1.infn.it E-mail: paolo.natoli@roma2.infn.it

    2011-11-01

    We develop a method to constrain non-isotropic features of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization, of a type expected to arise in some models describing quantum gravity effects on light propagation. We describe the expected signatures of this kind of anomalous light propagation on CMB photons, showing that it will produce a non-isotropic birefringence effect, i.e. a rotation of the CMB polarization direction whose observed amount depends in a peculiar way on the observation direction. We also show that the sensitivity levels expected for CMB polarization studies by the Planck satellite are sufficient for testing these effects if, as assumed in the quantum-gravity literature, their magnitude is set by the minute Planck length.

  6. Transversely isotropic elasticity imaging of cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Shore, Spencer W; Barbone, Paul E; Oberai, Assad A; Morgan, Elise F

    2011-06-01

    To measure spatial variations in mechanical properties of biological materials, prior studies have typically performed mechanical tests on excised specimens of tissue. Less invasive measurements, however, are preferable in many applications, such as patient-specific modeling, disease diagnosis, and tracking of age- or damage-related degradation of mechanical properties. Elasticity imaging (elastography) is a nondestructive imaging method in which the distribution of elastic properties throughout a specimen can be reconstructed from measured strain or displacement fields. To date, most work in elasticity imaging has concerned incompressible, isotropic materials. This study presents an extension of elasticity imaging to three-dimensional, compressible, transversely isotropic materials. The formulation and solution of an inverse problem for an anisotropic tissue subjected to a combination of quasi-static loads is described, and an optimization and regularization strategy that indirectly obtains the solution to the inverse problem is presented. Several applications of transversely isotropic elasticity imaging to cancellous bone from the human vertebra are then considered. The feasibility of using isotropic elasticity imaging to obtain meaningful reconstructions of the distribution of material properties for vertebral cancellous bone from experiment is established. However, using simulation, it is shown that an isotropic reconstruction is not appropriate for anisotropic materials. It is further shown that the transversely isotropic method identifies a solution that predicts the measured displacements, reveals regions of low stiffness, and recovers all five elastic parameters with approximately 10% error. The recovery of a given elastic parameter is found to require the presence of its corresponding strain (e.g., a deformation that generates ɛ₁₂ is necessary to reconstruct C₁₂₁₂), and the application of regularization is shown to improve accuracy. Finally

  7. Transversely Isotropic Elasticity Imaging of Cancellous Bone

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Spencer W.; Barbone, Paul E.; Oberai, Assad A.; Morgan, Elise F.

    2012-01-01

    To measure spatial variations in mechanical properties of biological materials, prior studies have typically performed mechanical tests on excised specimens of tissue. Less invasive measurements, however, are preferable in many applications, such as patient-specific modeling, disease diagnosis, and tracking of age- or damage-related degradation of mechanical properties. Elasticity imaging (elastography) is a nondestructive imaging method in which the distribution of elastic properties throughout a specimen can be reconstructed from measured strain or displacement fields. To date, most work in elasticity imaging has concerned incompressible, isotropic materials. This study presents an extension of elasticity imaging to three-dimensional, compressible, transversely isotropic materials. The formulation and solution of an inverse problem for an anisotropic tissue subjected to a combination of quasi-static loads is described, and an optimization and regularization strategy that indirectly obtains the solution to the inverse problem is presented. Several applications of transversely isotropic elasticity imaging to cancellous bone from the human vertebra are then considered. The feasibility of using isotropic elasticity imaging to obtain meaningful reconstructions of the distribution of material properties for vertebral cancellous bone from experiment is established. However, using simulation, it is shown that an isotropic reconstruction is not appropriate for anisotropic materials. It is further shown that the transversely isotropic method identifies a solution that predicts the measured displacements, reveals regions of low stiffness, and recovers all five elastic parameters with approximately 10% error. The recovery of a given elastic parameter is found to require the presence of its corresponding strain (e.g., a deformation that generates ε12 is necessary to reconstruct C1212), and the application of regularization is shown to improve accuracy. Finally, the effects

  8. Quantum nature of the big bang: An analytical and numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Pawlowski, Tomasz; Singh, Parampreet

    2006-06-15

    Analytical and numerical methods are developed to analyze the quantum nature of the big bang in the setting of loop quantum cosmology. They enable one to explore the effects of quantum geometry both on the gravitational and matter sectors and significantly extend the known results on the resolution of the big bang singularity. Specifically, the following results are established for the homogeneous isotropic model with a massless scalar field: (i) the scalar field is shown to serve as an internal clock, thereby providing a detailed realization of the 'emergent time' idea; (ii) the physical Hilbert space, Dirac observables, and semiclassical states are constructed rigorously; (iii) the Hamiltonian constraint is solved numerically to show that the big bang is replaced by a big bounce. Thanks to the nonperturbative, background independent methods, unlike in other approaches the quantum evolution is deterministic across the deep Planck regime. Our constructions also provide a conceptual framework and technical tools which can be used in more general models. In this sense, they provide foundations for analyzing physical issues associated with the Planck regime of loop quantum cosmology as a whole.

  9. Interactively variable isotropic resolution in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lapp, Robert M; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kachelriess, Marc; Wilharm, Sylvia; Kalender, Willi A

    2008-05-21

    An individual balancing between spatial resolution and image noise is necessary to fulfil the diagnostic requirements in medical CT imaging. In order to change influencing parameters, such as reconstruction kernel or effective slice thickness, additional raw-data-dependent image reconstructions have to be performed. Therefore, the noise versus resolution trade-off is time consuming and not interactively applicable. Furthermore, isotropic resolution, expressed by an equivalent point spread function (PSF) in every spatial direction, is important for the undistorted visualization and quantitative evaluation of small structures independent of the viewing plane. Theoretically, isotropic resolution can be obtained by matching the in-plane and through-plane resolution with the aforementioned parameters. Practically, however, the user is not assisted in doing so by current reconstruction systems and therefore isotropic resolution is not commonly achieved, in particular not at the desired resolution level. In this paper, an integrated approach is presented for equalizing the in-plane and through-plane spatial resolution by image filtering. The required filter kernels are calculated from previously measured PSFs in x/y- and z-direction. The concepts derived are combined with a variable resolution filtering technique. Both approaches are independent of CT raw data and operate only on reconstructed images which allows for their application in real time. Thereby, the aim of interactively variable, isotropic resolution is achieved. Results were evaluated quantitatively by measuring PSFs and image noise, and qualitatively by comparing the images to direct reconstructions regarded as the gold standard. Filtered images matched direct reconstructions with arbitrary reconstruction kernels with standard deviations in difference images of typically between 1 and 17 HU. Isotropic resolution was achieved within 5% of the selected resolution level. Processing times of 20-100 ms per frame

  10. Approaches to Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele

    2009-03-01

    Preface; Part I. Fundamental Ideas and General Formalisms: 1. Unfinished revolution C. Rovelli; 2. The fundamental nature of space and time G. 't Hooft; 3. Does locality fail at intermediate length scales R. Sorkin; 4. Prolegomena to any future quantum gravity J. Stachel; 5. Spacetime symmetries in histories canonical gravity N. Savvidou; 6. Categorical geometry and the mathematical foundations of quantum gravity L. Crane; 7. Emergent relativity O. Dreyer; 8. Asymptotic safety R. Percacci; 9. New directions in background independent quantum gravity F. Markopoulou; Questions and answers; Part II: 10. Gauge/gravity duality G. Horowitz and J. Polchinski; 11. String theory, holography and quantum gravity T. Banks; 12. String field theory W. Taylor; Questions and answers; Part III: 13. Loop Quantum Gravity T. Thiemann; 14. Covariant loop quantum gravity? E. LIvine; 15. The spin foam representation of loop quantum gravity A. Perez; 16. 3-dimensional spin foam quantum gravity L. Freidel; 17. The group field theory approach to quantum gravity D. Oriti; Questions and answers; Part IV. Discrete Quantum Gravity: 18. Quantum gravity: the art of building spacetime J. Ambjørn, J. Jurkiewicz and R. Loll; 19. Quantum Regge calculations R. Williams; 20. Consistent discretizations as a road to quantum gravity R. Gambini and J. Pullin; 21. The causal set approach to quantum gravity J. Henson; Questions and answers; Part V. Effective Models and Quantum Gravity Phenomenology: 22. Quantum gravity phenomenology G. Amelino-Camelia; 23. Quantum gravity and precision tests C. Burgess; 24. Algebraic approach to quantum gravity II: non-commutative spacetime F. Girelli; 25. Doubly special relativity J. Kowalski-Glikman; 26. From quantum reference frames to deformed special relativity F. Girelli; 27. Lorentz invariance violation and its role in quantum gravity phenomenology J. Collins, A. Perez and D. Sudarsky; 28. Generic predictions of quantum theories of gravity L. Smolin; Questions and

  11. Apparent anisotropy in inhomogeneous isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fan-Chi; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2011-09-01

    Surface waves propagating through a laterally inhomogeneous medium undergo wavefield complications such as multiple scattering, wave front healing, and backward scattering. Unless accounted for accurately, these effects will introduce a systematic isotropic bias in estimates of azimuthal anisotropy. We demonstrate with synthetic experiments that backward scattering near an observing station will introduce an apparent 360° periodicity into the azimuthal distribution of anisotropy near strong lateral variations in seismic wave speeds that increases with period. Because it violates reciprocity, this apparent 1ψ anisotropy, where ψ is the azimuthal angle, is non-physical for surface waves and is, therefore, a useful indicator of isotropic bias. Isotropic bias of the 2ψ (180° periodicity) component of azimuthal anisotropy, in contrast, is caused mainly by wave front healing, which results from the broad forward scattering part of the surface wave sensitivity kernel. To test these predictions, we apply geometrical ray theoretic (eikonal) tomography to teleseismic Rayleigh wave measurements across the Transportable Array component of USArray to measure the directional dependence of phase velocities between 30 and 80 s period. Eikonal tomography accounts for multiple scattering (ray bending) but not finite frequency effects such as wave front healing or backward scattering. At long periods (>50 s), consistent with the predictions from the synthetic experiments, a significant 1ψ component of azimuthal anisotropy is observed near strong isotropic structural contrasts with fast directions that point in the direction of increasing phase speeds. The observed 2ψ component of azimuthal anisotropy is more weakly correlated with synthetic predictions of isotropic bias, probably because of the imprint of intrinsic structural anisotropy. The observation of a 1ψ component of azimuthal anisotropy is a clear indicator of isotropic bias in the inversion caused by unmodelled

  12. ISOTROPIC INELASTIC COLLISIONS IN A MULTITERM ATOM WITH HYPERFINE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Belluzzi, Luca; Landi Degl’Innocenti, Egidio; Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2015-10-10

    A correct modeling of the scattering polarization profiles observed in some spectral lines of diagnostic interest, the sodium doublet being one of the most important examples, requires taking hyperfine structure (HFS) and quantum interference between different J-levels into account. An atomic model suitable for taking these physical ingredients into account is the so-called multiterm atom with HFS. In this work, we introduce and study the transfer and relaxation rates due to isotropic inelastic collisions with electrons, which enter the statistical equilibrium equations (SEE) for the atomic density matrix of this atomic model. Under the hypothesis that the electron–atom interaction is described by a dipolar operator, we provide useful relations between the rates describing the transfer and relaxation of quantum interference between different levels (whose numerical values are in most cases unknown) and the usual rates for the atomic level populations, for which experimental data and/or approximate theoretical expressions are generally available. For the particular case of a two-term atom with HFS, we present an analytical solution of the SEE for the spherical statistical tensors of the upper term, including both radiative and collisional processes, and we derive the expression of the emission coefficient in the four Stokes parameters. Finally, an illustrative application to the Na i D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} lines is presented.

  13. Isotropic Inelastic Collisions in a Multiterm Atom with Hyperfine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belluzzi, Luca; Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio; Trujillo Bueno, Javier

    2015-10-01

    A correct modeling of the scattering polarization profiles observed in some spectral lines of diagnostic interest, the sodium doublet being one of the most important examples, requires taking hyperfine structure (HFS) and quantum interference between different J-levels into account. An atomic model suitable for taking these physical ingredients into account is the so-called multiterm atom with HFS. In this work, we introduce and study the transfer and relaxation rates due to isotropic inelastic collisions with electrons, which enter the statistical equilibrium equations (SEE) for the atomic density matrix of this atomic model. Under the hypothesis that the electron-atom interaction is described by a dipolar operator, we provide useful relations between the rates describing the transfer and relaxation of quantum interference between different levels (whose numerical values are in most cases unknown) and the usual rates for the atomic level populations, for which experimental data and/or approximate theoretical expressions are generally available. For the particular case of a two-term atom with HFS, we present an analytical solution of the SEE for the spherical statistical tensors of the upper term, including both radiative and collisional processes, and we derive the expression of the emission coefficient in the four Stokes parameters. Finally, an illustrative application to the Na i D1 and D2 lines is presented.

  14. Conservation law for linked cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.

    1992-05-01

    Taking a cue from the connection between fluid helicity and the linkage between closed vortices in ordinary turbulent flow, we examine topological restrictions on the linkage of cosmic string loops (or superfluid quantum vortex rings). The analog of helicity in these cases vanishes, but loops (and vortex rings) can link together, the extent of linkage (knotting included) being related to the contorsion of the loops or rings by a topological conservation law. This law is respected by intercommunication. One consequence is that total loop contorsion is quantized in integers.

  15. WYPIWYG hyperelasticity for isotropic, compressible materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, José; Latorre, Marcos; Montáns, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays the most common approach to model elastic behavior at large strains is through hyperelasticity. Hyperelastic models usually specify the shape of the stored energy function. This shape is modulated by some material parameters that are computed so the predicted stresses best fit the experimental data. Many stored energy functions have been proposed in the literature for isotropic and anisotropic materials, either compressible or incompressible. What-You-Prescribe-Is-What-You-Get (WYPIWYG) formulations present a different approach which may be considered an extension of the infinitesimal framework. The shape of the stored energy is not given beforehand but computed numerically from experimental data solving the equilibrium equations. The models exactly fit the experimental data without any material parameter. WYPIWYG procedures have comparable efficiency in finite element procedures as classical hyperelasticity. In this work we present a WYPIWYG numerical procedure for compressible isotropic materials and we motivate the formulation through an equivalent infinitesimal model.

  16. Infinite Products of Random Isotropically Distributed Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yn, A. S.; Sirota, V. A.; Zybin, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    Statistical properties of infinite products of random isotropically distributed matrices are investigated. Both for continuous processes with finite correlation time and discrete sequences of independent matrices, a formalism that allows to calculate easily the Lyapunov spectrum and generalized Lyapunov exponents is developed. This problem is of interest to probability theory, statistical characteristics of matrix T-exponentials are also needed for turbulent transport problems, dynamical chaos and other parts of statistical physics.

  17. Transport rates and momentum isotropization of gluon matter in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2007-08-15

    To describe momentum isotropization of gluon matter produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, the transport rate of gluon drift and the transport collision rates of elastic (gg{r_reversible}gg) as well as inelastic (gg{r_reversible}ggg) perturbative quantum chromodynamics- (pQCD) scattering processes are introduced and calculated within the kinetic parton cascade Boltzmann approach of multiparton scatterings (BAMPS), which simulates the space-time evolution of partons. We define isotropization as the development of an anisotropic system as it reaches isotropy. The inverse of the introduced total transport rate gives the correct time scale of the momentum isotropization. The contributions of the various scattering processes to the momentum isotropization can be separated into the transport collision rates. In contrast to the transport cross section, the transport collision rate has an indirect but correctly implemented relationship with the collision-angle distribution. Based on the calculated transport collision rates from BAMPS for central Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies, we show that pQCD gg{r_reversible}ggg bremsstrahlung processes isotropize the momentum five times more efficiently than elastic scatterings. The large efficiency of the bremsstrahlung stems mainly from its large momentum deflection. Due to kinematics, 2{yields}N (N>2) production processes allow more particles to become isotropic in momentum space and thus kinetically equilibrate more quickly than their back reactions or elastic scatterings. We also show that the relaxation time in the relaxation time approximation, which is often used, is strongly momentum dependent and thus cannot serve as a global quantity that describes kinetic equilibration.

  18. DNS of Shock / Isotropic Turbulence Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, Nathan; Taylor, Ellen; Martín, Pino

    2010-11-01

    We discuss DNS of Shock / Isotropic Turbulence Interactions (SITI). We vary the incoming turbulence Mach number up to 0.8 and the convective Mach number up to 5 in order to determine their effects on the interaction. These cases are challenging due to the presence of shocklets in the incoming turbulence as well as significant motion of the main shock. Shock-capturing must be used at all points while still maintaining low enough numerical dissipation to preserve the turbulent fluctuations. We use the linearly- and nonlinearly-optimized Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) method[1,2]. Particular attention is paid to the inflow boundary condition, where we find the use of snapshots of "frozen" turbulence from decaying isotropic box simulations to be unsatisfactory. We instead use time-varying inflow data generated by a separate forced isotropic turbulence simulation with a specified convection speed. This allows us to access flow conditions where the assumptions of Taylor's Hypothesis are not met. 1.) Mart'in, M.P., Taylor, E.M., Wu, M., and Weirs, V.G., JCP 220(1) 270-89, 2006. 2.) Taylor, E.M., Wu, M., and Mart'in, M.P., JCP 223(1) 384-97, 2007.

  19. Isotropic Contraction Of Mercury Due To Despinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Isamu; Bills, B. G.

    2009-09-01

    Mercury's slow rotation period of 59 days is presumably the result of solar tides driving its initial rotational state to the present 3:2 spin-orbit resonance. The observed large gravity coefficients can be explained as due to a remnant rotational bulge recording an initial rotation period of a few days (Matsuyama and Nimmo 2009). Despinning changes the shape of the rotational bulge, generating both compressional and extensional stresses (Melosh 1977). However, Mercury's surface is dominated by compressional tectonic features (Watters et al. 1998), and the inferred global contraction has been explained as due to thermal cooling (Solomon 1976). In addition to non-isotropic changes associated with the rotational flattening, despinning causes isotropic contraction of the entire planet. We consider the effect of the compressional stresses generated by this isotropic contraction on the predicted tectonic pattern. References Matsuyama and Nimmo. Gravity and tectonic patterns of Mercury: Effect of tidal deformation, spin-orbit resonance, nonzero eccentricity, despinning, and reorientation. J. Geophys. Res. (2009) vol. 114 pp. E01010 Melosh. Global tectonics of a despun planet. Icarus (1977) vol. 31 pp. 221-243 Solomon. Some aspects of core formation in Mercury. Icarus (1976) vol. 28 pp. 509-521 Watters et al. Topography of lobate scarps on Mercury: New constraints on the planet's contraction. Geology (1998) vol. 26 pp. 991-994

  20. Non-singular dislocation loops in gradient elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Markus

    2012-04-01

    Using gradient elasticity, we give in this Letter the non-singular fields produced by arbitrary dislocation loops in isotropic media. We present the ‘modified’ Mura, Peach-Koehler and Burgers formulae in the framework of gradient elasticity theory.

  1. Non-anticommutative quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. W.

    2015-06-01

    A calculation of the one loop gravitational self-energy graph in non-anticommutative quantum gravity reveals that graviton loops are damped by internal momentum dependent factors in the modified propagator and the vertex functions. The non-anticommutative quantum gravity perturbation theory is finite for matter-free gravity and for matter interactions.

  2. Isotropic homogeneous universe with viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, N.O.; Dias, R.S.; Banerjee, A.

    1985-04-01

    Exact solutions are obtained for the isotropic homogeneous cosmological model with viscous fluid. The fluid has only bulk viscosity and the viscosity coefficient is taken to be a power function of the mass density. The equation of state assumed obeys a linear relation between mass density and pressure. The models satisfying Hawking's energy conditions are discussed. Murphy's model is only a special case of this general set of solutions and it is shown that Murphy's conclusion that the introduciton of bulk viscosity can avoid the occurrence of space-time singularity at finite past is not, in general, valid.

  3. Small scale dynamics of isotropic viscoelastic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, M. Quan; Delache, Alexandre; Simoëns, Serge; Bos, Wouter J. T.; El Hajem, Mamoud

    2016-12-01

    The comparison of the results of direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence of Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid provides evidence that viscoelasticity modifies qualitatively the behavior of the smallest scales: we observe a power law in the far dissipation range of the fluid kinetic energy spectrum and we show that it is a robust feature, roughly independent of the large scale dynamics. A detailed analysis of the energy transfer shows that at these scales energy is injected into the fluid flow through polymer relaxation. It is further shown that a part of the total energy is transferred among scales through an interaction of the velocity field with the polymer field.

  4. Isotropization of nematic liquid crystals by TMDSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Dadmun, M.; Zhang, Ge; Boller, A.; Wunderlich, B. |

    1997-12-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) and traditional DSC are used to study the transition between the nematic liquid crystalline state and the isotropic liquid for two small molecules [4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole and N,N`-bis(4-n-octyloxybenzal)-1,4-phenylenediamine] and one macromolecule (4,4{prime}-dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene copolymerized with a 1:1 molar mixture of 1,7-dibromoheptane and 1,9-dibromononane). The DSC measurements with 4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole were used for temperature calibration with varying heating and cooling rates. Quasi-isothermal TMDSC with small temperature amplitude and standard TMDSC with underlying heating and cooling rates were utilized to analyze the breadth of the transitions. It could be verified that the isotropization transition of a nematic liquid crystal is, indeed, reversible for all three molecules. The nature of the transition changes, however, from relatively sharp, for small, rigid molecules, to about three kelvins wide for the small molecule with flexible ends, to as broad as 20 K for the macromolecule. It was also demonstrated that quantitative heats of fusion of sharp transitions can be extracted from TMDSC, but only from the time-domain heat-flow signal.

  5. Cyclic networks of quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabauy, Peter

    In this thesis we first give an introduction to the basic aspects of quantum computation followed by an analysis of networks of quantum logic gates where the qubit lines are loops (cyclic). Thus far, investigations into cyclic networks of quantum logic gates have not been examined (as far as we know) by the quantum information community. In our investigations of cyclic quantum networks we have studied simple, one and two qubit systems. The analysis includes: classifying networks into groups, the dynamics of the qubits in a cyclic quantum network, and the perturbation effects of an external qubit acting on a cyclic quantum network. The analysis will be followed by a discussion on quantum algorithms and quantum information processing with cyclic quantum networks, a novel implementation of a cyclic network quantum memory and a discussion of quantum sensors via cyclic quantum networks.

  6. Loop Optimization for Tensor Network Renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuo; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a tensor renormalization group scheme for coarse graining a two-dimensional tensor network that can be successfully applied to both classical and quantum systems on and off criticality. The key innovation in our scheme is to deform a 2D tensor network into small loops and then optimize the tensors on each loop. In this way, we remove short-range entanglement at each iteration step and significantly improve the accuracy and stability of the renormalization flow. We demonstrate our algorithm in the classical Ising model and a frustrated 2D quantum model.

  7. Water Stream "Loop-the-Loop"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefimenko, Oleg

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design of a modified loop-the-loop apparatus in which a water stream is used to illustrate centripetal forces and phenomena of high-velocity hydrodynamics. Included are some procedures of carrying out lecture demonstrations. (CC)

  8. Isotropic MD simulations of dynamic brittle fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Espanol, P.; Rubio, M.A.; Zuniga, I.

    1996-12-01

    The authors present results obtained by molecular dynamics simulations on the propagation of fast cracks in triangular 2D lattices. Their aim is to simulate Mode 1 fracture of brittle isotropic materials. They propose a force law that respects the isotropy of the material. The code yields the correct imposed sound c{sub {parallel}}, shear c{sub {perpendicular}} and surface V{sub R} wave speeds. Different notch lengths are systematically studied. They observed that initially the cracks are linear and always branch at a particular critical velocity c* {approx} 0.8V{sub R} and that this occurs when the crack tip reaches the position of a front emitted from the initial crack tip and propagating at a speed c = 0.68V{sub R}.

  9. Constitutive model development for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective is to develop a unified constitutive model for finite-element structural analysis of turbine engine hot section components. This effort constitutes a different approach for nonlinear finite-element computer codes which were heretofore based on classical inelastic methods. A unified constitutive theory will avoid the simplifying assumptions of classical theory and should more accurately represent the behavior of superalloy materials under cyclic loading conditions and high temperature environments. Model development will be directed toward isotropic, cast nickel-base alloys used for aircooled turbine blades and vanes. The contractor will select a base material for model development and an alternate material for verification purposes from a list of three alloys specified by NASA. The candidate alloys represent a cross-section of turbine blade and vane materials of interest to both large and small size engine manufacturers. Material stock for the base and alternate materials will be supplied to the Contractor by the government.

  10. Isotropic cosmological singularities: other matter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tod, K. P.

    2003-02-01

    Isotropic cosmological singularities are singularities which can be removed by rescaling the metric. In some cases already studied, the existence and uniqueness of cosmological models with data at the singularity has been established (Anguige K and Tod K P 1999 Ann. Phys., NY 276 257-93, 294-320, Anguige K 2000 Ann. Phys., NY 285 395-419). These were cosmologies with, as source, either perfect fluids with linear equations of state or massless, collisionless particles. In this paper, we consider how to extend these results to a variety of other matter models. These are scalar fields, massive collisionless matter, the Yang-Mills plasma given by Choquet-Bruhat (Choquet-Bruhat Y 1996 Yang-Mills plasmas Global Structure and Evolution in General Relativity (Springer Lecture Notes in Physics vol 460) ed S Cotsakis and G W Gibbons (Berlin: Springer)) and matter satisfying the Einstein-Boltzmann equation.

  11. Viscous propulsion in active transversely isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupples, G.; Dyson, R. J.; Smith, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    Taylor's swimming sheet is a classical model of microscale propulsion and pumping. Many biological fluids and substances are fibrous, having a preferred direction in their microstructure; for example cervical mucus is formed of polymer molecules which create an oriented fibrous network. Moreover, suspensions of elongated motile cells produce a form of active oriented matter. To understand how these effects modify viscous propulsion, we extend Taylor's classical model of small-amplitude zero-Reynolds-number propulsion of a 'swimming sheet' via the transversely-isotropic fluid model of Ericksen, which is linear in strain rate and possesses a distinguished direction. The energetic costs of swimming are significantly altered by all rheological parameters and the initial fibre angle. Propulsion in a passive transversely-isotropic fluid produces an enhanced mean rate of working, independent of the initial fibre orientation, with an approximately linear dependence of energetic cost on the extensional and shear enhancements to the viscosity caused by fibres. In this regime the mean swimming velocity is unchanged from the Newtonian case. The effect of the constant term in Ericksen's model for the stress, which can be identified as a fibre tension or alternatively a stresslet characterising an active fluid, is also considered. This stress introduces an angular dependence and dramatically changes the streamlines and flow field; fibres aligned with the swimming direction increase the energetic demands of the sheet. The constant fibre stress may result in a reversal of the mean swimming velocity and a negative mean rate of working if sufficiently large relative to the other rheological parameters.

  12. Velocity analysis for transversely isotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhalifah, T.; Tsvankin, I.

    1994-08-01

    The main difficulty in extending seismic processing to anisotropic media is the recovery of anisotropic velocity fields from surface reflection data. Velocity analysis for transversely isotropic (TI) media can be done by inverting the dependence of P-wave moveout velocities on the ray parameter. P-wave NMO velocity in homogeneous TI media with a vertical symmetry axis depends just on the zero-dip value V{sub nmo} and a new effective parameter {eta} that reduces to the difference between Thomsen parameters {epsilon} and {delta} in the limit of weak anisotropy. It is possible to obtain {eta} and reconstruct the NMO velocity as a function of ray parameter using moveout velocities for two different dips. Moreover, V{sub nmo}(0) and {eta} determine not only the NMO velocity, but also also long-spread (nonhyperbollic) P-wave moveout for horizontal reflectors and time-migration impulse response. Inversion of dip-moveout information allows performance of all time-processing steps in TI media using only surface P-wave data. Isotropic time-processing methods remain entirely valid for elliptical anisotropy ({epsilon} = {delta}). Accurate time-to-depth conversion, however, requires the vertical velocity V{sub P0} be resolved independently. If I-P0 is known, then allisotropies {epsilon} and {delta} can be found by inverting two P-wave NMO velocities corresponding to a horizontal and a dipping reflector. If no information is available, all three parameters (V {sub P0}, {epsilon}, and {delta}) can be obtained by combining inversion results with shear-wave information. such as the P-SV or SV-SV wave NMO velocities for a horizontal reflector. Generalization of Tsvankin`s single-layer NMO equation for layered anisotropic media with a dipping reflector provides a basis for extending anisotropic velocity analysis to vertically inhomogeneous media. The influence of a stratified overburden on moveout velocity can be stripped through a Dix-type differentiation procedure.

  13. Long distance quantum communication using quantum error correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingrich, R. M.; Lee, H.; Dowling, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a quantum error correction scheme that can increase the effective absorption length of the communication channel. This device can play the role of a quantum transponder when placed in series, or a cyclic quantum memory when inserted in an optical loop.

  14. 3D phase-field modelling of dislocation loop sink strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuinet, L.; Rouchette, H.; Legris, A.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a 3D phase-field model to correctly evaluate dislocation loop sink strength. This method is applied to a wide range of microstructures (dislocation loops of various types with isotropic or anisotropic elasticity, like in Zr, cohabitation of different types of loop in the same calculation domain), which allows to exhibit several original results. Among them, in the case of isotropic elasticity, our model shows that the sink strength of vacancy loops is higher than that of interstitial ones for low loop radii. In the case of Zr, the effect on sink biases of the shape anisotropy of self-interstitial atoms, already exhibited in the case of straight dislocations, is enhanced for loops and stabilizes basal vacancy and prism-plane interstitial ones. Moreover, isotropic elastic interactions promote the coexistence of parallel vacancy and interstitial loops. This result is still valid in the case of prism-plane loops in Zr, which could provide explanations to several experimental facts.

  15. Theoretical and experimental plastic strain ratios in planar isotropic textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Insoo

    1996-06-01

    The plastic strain ratios of planar isotropic sheet specimens were studied by using unidirectionally solidified commercial Al. Sn and Al-Cu alloy sheets and Cu sheets electrodeposited under the various electrolysis conditions. The measured plastic strain ratios of [100] planar isotropic sheets by using unidirectionally solidified Al and Al-Cu alloy are about 0.17-0.52, that of [110] planar isotropic sheets using unidirectionally solidified Sn(BCT) are about 2.5, that of [110] planar isotropic sheets using electrodeposited Cu are 1.38-2.05 and that of [111] planar isotropic sheets using electrodeposited Cu are 2.61-2.85. There is a substantial discrepancy between the experimental plastic strain ratios which are measured from planar isotropic sheets and theoretical plastic strain ratios which are calculated by Backofen method and Bunge method, but the measured plastic strain ratio of [100] planar isotropic sheet using unidirectionally solidified Al and Al-Cu alloy is in good agreement with Bunge method and the measured plastic strain ratio of [110] and [111] planar isotropic sheets using electrodeposited Cu are in good agreement with Backofen method.

  16. Quantum field theory of fluids.

    PubMed

    Gripaios, Ben; Sutherland, Dave

    2015-02-20

    The quantum theory of fields is largely based on studying perturbations around noninteracting, or free, field theories, which correspond to a collection of quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillators. The quantum theory of an ordinary fluid is "freer", in the sense that the noninteracting theory also contains an infinite collection of quantum-mechanical free particles, corresponding to vortex modes. By computing a variety of correlation functions at tree and loop level, we give evidence that a quantum perfect fluid can be consistently formulated as a low-energy, effective field theory. We speculate that the quantum behavior is radically different from both classical fluids and quantum fields.

  17. On the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrbek, L.; Stalp, Steven R.

    2000-08-01

    Decaying homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is investigated using a phenomenological model based on the three-dimensional turbulent energy spectra. We generalize the approach first used by Comte-Bellot and Corrsin [J. Fluid Mech. 25, 657 (1966)] and revised by Saffman [J. Fluid Mech. 27, 581 (1967); Phys. Fluids 10, 1349 (1967)]. At small wave numbers we assume the spectral energy is proportional to the wave number to an arbitrary power. The specific case of power 2, which follows from the Saffman invariant, is discussed in detail and is later shown to best describe experimental data. For the spectral energy density in the inertial range we apply both the Kolmogorov -5/3 law, E(k)=Cɛ2/3k-5/3, and the refined Kolmogorov law by taking into account intermittency. We show that intermittency affects the energy decay mainly by shifting the position of the virtual origin rather than altering the power law of the energy decay. Additionally, the spectrum is naturally truncated due to the size of the wind tunnel test section, as eddies larger than the physical size of the system cannot exist. We discuss effects associated with the energy-containing length scale saturating at the size of the test section and predict a change in the power law decay of both energy and vorticity. To incorporate viscous corrections to the model, we truncate the spectrum at an effective Kolmogorov wave number kη=γ(ɛ/v3)1/4, where γ is a dimensionless parameter of order unity. We show that as the turbulence decays, viscous corrections gradually become more important and a simple power law can no longer describe the decay. We discuss the final period of decay within the framework of our model, and show that care must be taken to distinguish between the final period of decay and the change of the character of decay due to the saturation of the energy containing length scale. The model is applied to a number of experiments on decaying turbulence. These include the downstream decay of turbulence in

  18. How quantum is the big bang?

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin

    2008-06-06

    When quantum gravity is used to discuss the big bang singularity, the most important, though rarely addressed, question is what role genuine quantum degrees of freedom play. Here, complete effective equations are derived for isotropic models with an interacting scalar to all orders in the expansions involved. The resulting coupling terms show that quantum fluctuations do not affect the bounce much. Quantum correlations, however, do have an important role and could even eliminate the bounce. How quantum gravity regularizes the big bang depends crucially on properties of the quantum state.

  19. Loop gravity: An application and an extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taveras, Victor Manuel

    In this thesis we address two issues in the area of loop quantum gravity. The first concerns the semiclassical limit in loop quantum cosmology via the use of so-called effective equations. In loop quantum cosmology the quantum dynamics is well understood. We can approximate the full quantum dynamics in the infinite dimensional Hilbert space by projecting it on a finite dimensional submanifold thereof, spanned by suitably chosen semiclassical states. This submanifold is isomorphic with the classical phase space and the projected dynamical flow provides effective equations incorporating the leading quantum corrections to the classical equations of motion. Numerical work has been done in the full theory using quantum states which are semiclassical at late times. These states follow the classical trajectory until the density is on the order of 1% of the Planck density then deviate strongly from the classical trajectory. The effective equations we obtain reproduce this behavior to surprising accuracy. The second issue concerns generalizations of the classical action which is the starting point for loop quantum gravity. In loop quantum gravity one begins with the Einstein-Hilbert action, modified by the addition of the so-called Holst term. Classically, this term does not affect the equations of motion, but it leads to a well-known quantization ambiguity in the quantum theory parametrized by the Barbero-Immirzi parameter, which rescales the eigenvalues of the area and volume operators. We consider the theory obtained by promoting the Barbero-Immirzi parameter to a field. The resulting theory, called Modified Holst Gravity, is equivalent to General Relativity coupled to a pseudo-scalar field. However, this theory turns out to have an unconventional kinetic term for the Barbero-Immirzi field and a rather unnatural coupling with fermions. We then propose a further generalization of the Holst action, which we call Modified Nieh-Yan Gravity, which yields a theory of gravity

  20. Microplane constitutive model for porous isotropic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baant, Zdenk P.; Zi, Goangseup

    2003-01-01

    The paper deals with constitutive modelling of contiguous rock located between rock joints. A fully explicit kinematically constrained microplane-type constitutive model for hardening and softening non-linear triaxial behaviour of isotropic porous rock is developed. The microplane framework, in which the constitutive relation is expressed in terms of stress and strain vectors rather than tensors, makes it possible to model various microstructural physical mechanisms associated with oriented internal surfaces, such as cracking, slip, friction and splitting of a particular orientation. Formulation of the constitutive relation is facilitated by the fact that it is decoupled from the tensorial invariance restrictions, which are satisfied automatically. In its basic features, the present model is similar to the recently developed microplane model M4 for concrete, but there are significant improvements and modifications. They include a realistic simulation of (1) the effects of pore collapse on the volume changes during triaxial loading and on the reduction of frictional strength, (2) recovery of frictional strength during shearing, and (3) the shear-enhanced compaction in triaxial tests, manifested by a deviation from the hydrostatic stress-strain curve. The model is calibrated by optimal fitting of extensive triaxial test data for Salem limestone, and good fits are demonstrated. Although these data do not cover the entire range of behaviour, credence in broad capabilities of the model is lend by its similarity to model M4 for concrete - an artificial rock. The model is intended for large explicit finite-element programs.

  1. Near isotropic behavior of turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Dinesh; Pandey, Ambrish; Kumar, Abhishek; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the anisotropy in turbulent convection in a three-dimensional (3D) box using direct numerical simulation. We compute the anisotropic parameter A =u⊥2/(2 u∥2) , where u⊥ and u∥ are the components of velocity perpendicular and parallel to the buoyancy direction, the shell and ring spectra, and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We observe that the flow is nearly isotropic for the Prandtl number Pr ≈1 , but the anisotropy increases with the Prandtl number. For Pr =∞ ,A ≈0.3 , anisotropy is not very significant even in extreme cases. We also observe that u∥ feeds energy to u⊥ via pressure. The computation of shell-to-shell energy transfers reveals that the energy transfer in turbulent convection is local and forward, similar to hydrodynamic turbulence. These results are consistent with the Kolmogorov's spectrum observed by Kumar et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 023016 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.023016] for turbulent convection.

  2. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, U. S.; Chan, K. S.; Bodner, S. R.; Weber, R. M.; Walker, K. P.; Cassenti, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of the second year of work on a problem which is part of the NASA HOST Program. Its goals are: (1) to develop and validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials, and (2) to demonstrate their usefulness for structural analyses of hot section components of gas turbine engines. The unified models selected for development and evaluation are that of Bodner-Partom and Walker. For model evaluation purposes, a large constitutive data base is generated for a B1900 + Hf alloy by performing uniaxial tensile, creep, cyclic, stress relation, and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) tests as well as biaxial (tension/torsion) tests under proportional and nonproportional loading over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures. Systematic approaches for evaluating material constants from a small subset of the data base are developed. Correlations of the uniaxial and biaxial tests data with the theories of Bodner-Partom and Walker are performed to establish the accuracy, range of applicability, and integability of the models. Both models are implemented in the MARC finite element computer code and used for TMF analyses. Benchmark notch round experiments are conducted and the results compared with finite-element analyses using the MARC code and the Walker model.

  3. Nonlinear elastic inclusions in isotropic solids

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Arash; Goriely, Alain

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a geometric framework to calculate the residual stress fields and deformations of nonlinear solids with inclusions and eigenstrains. Inclusions are regions in a body with different reference configurations from the body itself and can be described by distributed eigenstrains. Geometrically, the eigenstrains define a Riemannian 3-manifold in which the body is stress-free by construction. The problem of residual stress calculation is then reduced to finding a mapping from the Riemannian material manifold to the ambient Euclidean space. Using this construction, we find the residual stress fields of three model systems with spherical and cylindrical symmetries in both incompressible and compressible isotropic elastic solids. In particular, we consider a finite spherical ball with a spherical inclusion with uniform pure dilatational eigenstrain and we show that the stress in the inclusion is uniform and hydrostatic. We also show how singularities in the stress distribution emerge as a consequence of a mismatch between radial and circumferential eigenstrains at the centre of a sphere or the axis of a cylinder. PMID:24353470

  4. Isotropical conductive adhesives filled with silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Xia, Y. P.; Zhang, G. Q.; Wu, H. P.; Tao, G. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this study, a solution-phase method was demonstrated to generate silver (Ag) nanowires with diameters in the range of 30~50nm and lengths of up to ~50μm, which was proceed by reducing silver nitrate with ethylene glycol in the presence of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). Fundamental material characterizations including X-ray diffraction transmission electro microscopy (TEM) and scanning electro microscopy (SEM) were conducted on these Ag nanowires. A novel kind of isotropical conductive adhesives (ICA) was prepared by using these Ag nanowires as conductive filler. Electrical property including bulk resistivity and mechanical property including shear strength were investigated and compared with that of conventional ICA filled with micrometer-sized Ag particles or nanometer-sized Ag particles. The average diameter of these Ag particles is about 1μm and 100 nm respectively. The results shown that ICA filled Ag nanowires exhibited higher conductivity, higher shear strength and low percolation threshold value than traditional ICA. Possible conductive mechanism was discussed based on theory calculation.

  5. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, Ulric S.; Chan, Kwai S.; Bodner, S. R.; Weber, R. M.; Walker, K. P.; Cassenti, B. N.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the first year of work on a program to validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials utilized in high temperature regions of gas turbine engines and to demonstrate their usefulness in computing stress-strain-time-temperature histories in complex three-dimensional structural components. The unified theories combine all inelastic strain-rate components in a single term avoiding, for example, treating plasticity and creep as separate response phenomena. An extensive review of existing unified theories is given and numerical methods for integrating these stiff time-temperature-dependent constitutive equations are discussed. Two particular models, those developed by Bodner and Partom and by Walker, were selected for more detailed development and evaluation against experimental tensile, creep and cyclic strain tests on specimens of a cast nickel base alloy, B19000+Hf. Initial results comparing computed and test results for tensile and cyclic straining for temperature from ambient to 982 C and strain rates from 10(exp-7) 10(exp-3) s(exp-1) are given. Some preliminary date correlations are presented also for highly non-proportional biaxial loading which demonstrate an increase in biaxial cyclic hardening rate over uniaxial or proportional loading conditions. Initial work has begun on the implementation of both constitutive models in the MARC finite element computer code.

  6. Analytical investigation of stratified isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vytovtov, Konstantin A.

    2005-04-01

    A rigorous analytical approach for investigating a stratified medium with an arbitrary finite number of homogeneous isotropic layers in a period is developed. The approach is based on the translation matrix method. It is well known that the translation matrix for a period must be found as the product of the layer matrices. It is proved that this matrix can be represented as a finite sum of trigonometric matrices, and thus the dispersion relation of a stratified medium is written in an analytical form. All final expressions are obtained in terms of the constitutive parameters. To this author's knowledge, this is the first time that the new sign function that allows us to develop the presented analytical results has been described. The condition of the existence of a wave with an arbitrary period divisible by a structure period is found in analytical form. It is proved that changing the layer arrangement within the period does not affect the structure of the transmission and absorption bands.

  7. Spectra and statistics in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianchun; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Spectra and one-point statistics of velocity and thermodynamic variables in isotropic turbulence of compressible fluid are examined by using numerical simulations with solenoidal forcing at the turbulent Mach number Mt from 0.05 to 1.0 and at the Taylor Reynolds number Reλ from 40 to 350. The velocity field is decomposed into a solenoidal component and a compressible component in terms of the Helmholtz decomposition, and the compressible velocity component is further decomposed into a pseudosound component, namely, the hydrodynamic component associated with the incompressible field and an acoustic component associated with sound waves. It is found that the acoustic mode dominates over the pseudosound mode at turbulent Mach numbers Mt≥0.4 in our numerical simulations. At turbulent Mach numbers Mt≤0.4 , there exists a critical wave number kc beyond which the pseudosound mode dominates while the acoustic mode dominates at small wave numbers k

  8. Crossover from isotropic to directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zongzheng; Yang, Ji; Ziff, Robert M.; Deng, Youjin

    2012-08-01

    We generalize the directed percolation (DP) model by relaxing the strict directionality of DP such that propagation can occur in either direction but with anisotropic probabilities. We denote the probabilities as p↓=ppd and p↑=p(1-pd), with p representing the average occupation probability and pd controlling the anisotropy. The Leath-Alexandrowicz method is used to grow a cluster from an active seed site. We call this model with two main growth directions biased directed percolation (BDP). Standard isotropic percolation (IP) and DP are the two limiting cases of the BDP model, corresponding to pd=1/2 and pd=0,1 respectively. In this work, besides IP and DP, we also consider the 1/2

  9. Isotropic microscale mechanical properties of coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Pasquini, Luca; Molinari, Alan; Fantazzini, Paola; Dauphen, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Levy, Oren; Dubinsky, Zvy; Caroselli, Erik; Prada, Fiorella; Goffredo, Stefano; Di Giosia, Matteo; Reggi, Michela; Falini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian corals are a major source of biogenic calcium carbonate, yet the relationship between their skeletal microstructure and mechanical properties has been scarcely studied. In this work, the skeletons of two coral species: solitary Balanophyllia europaea and colonial Stylophora pistillata, were investigated by nanoindentation. The hardness HIT and Young's modulus EIT were determined from the analysis of several load–depth data on two perpendicular sections of the skeletons: longitudinal (parallel to the main growth axis) and transverse. Within the experimental and statistical uncertainty, the average values of the mechanical parameters are independent on the section's orientation. The hydration state of the skeletons did not affect the mechanical properties. The measured values, EIT in the 76–77 GPa range, and HIT in the 4.9–5.1 GPa range, are close to the ones expected for polycrystalline pure aragonite. Notably, a small difference in HIT is observed between the species. Different from corals, single-crystal aragonite and the nacreous layer of the seashell Atrina rigida exhibit clearly orientation-dependent mechanical properties. The homogeneous and isotropic mechanical behaviour of the coral skeletons at the microscale is correlated with the microstructure, observed by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and with the X-ray diffraction patterns of the longitudinal and transverse sections. PMID:25977958

  10. Shocklet statistics in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianchun; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    Shocklet statistics in compressible isotropic turbulence are studied by using numerical simulations with solenoidal forcing, at the turbulent Mach number Mt ranging from 0.5 up to 1.0 and at the Taylor Reynolds number Reλ ranging from 110 to 250. A power-law region of the probability density function (PDF) of the shocklet strength Mn-1 (Mn is the normal shock Mach number) is observed. The magnitude of the power-law exponent is found to decrease with the increase of Mt. We show that the most probable shocklet strength is proportional to Mt3, and the shocklet thickness corresponding to the most probable shock Mach number is proportional to Mt-2 in our numerical simulations. The PDFs of the jumps of the velocity and thermodynamic variables across a shocklet exhibit a similar power-law scaling. The statistics of the jumps of the velocity and thermodynamic variables are further investigated by conditioned average. Nonlinear models for the conditional average of the jumps of the velocity and thermodynamic variables are developed and verified.

  11. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  12. The preprocessed doacross loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel H.; Mirchandaney, Ravi

    1990-01-01

    Dependencies between loop iterations cannot always be characterized during program compilation. Doacross loops typically make use of a-priori knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies to carry out required synchronizations. A type of doacross loop is proposed that allows the scheduling of iterations of a loop among processors without advance knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies. The method proposed for loop iterations requires that parallelizable preprocessing and postprocessing steps be carried out during program execution.

  13. OPE for super loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro; Wang, Tianheng

    2011-11-01

    We extend the Operator Product Expansion for Null Polygon Wilson loops to the Mason-Skinner-Caron-Huot super loop dual to non MHV gluon amplitudes. We explain how the known tree level amplitudes can be promoted into an infinite amount of data at any loop order in the OPE picture. As an application, we re-derive all one loop NMHV six gluon amplitudes by promoting their tree level expressions. We also present some new all loops predictions for these amplitudes.

  14. Minisuperspace model of Machian resolution of Problem of Time. I. Isotropic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Edward

    2014-05-01

    A local resolution to the Problem of Time that is Machian and was previously demonstrated for relational mechanics models is here shown to work for a more widely studied quantum cosmological model. I.e., closed isotropic minisuperspace GR with minimally coupled scalar field matter. This resolution uses work firstly along the lines of Barbour's at the classical level. Secondly, it uses a Machianized version of the semiclassical approach to quantum cosmology (the resolution given is not more than semiclassical). Finally, it uses a Machianized version of a combined semiclassical histories timeless records scheme along the lines of Halliwell's work. This program's goal is the treatment of inhomogeneous perturbations about the present paper's model. This draws both from this paper's minisuperspace work and from qualitative parallels with relational particle mechanics, since both have nontrivial notions of inhomogeneity/structure (clumping) as well as nontrivial linear constraints.

  15. A note on local unitary equivalence of isotropic-like states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting-Gui; Hua, Bo-Bo; Li, Ming; Zhao, Ming-Jing; Yang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    We consider the local unitary equivalence of a class of quantum states in a bipartite case and a multipartite case. The necessary and sufficient condition is presented. As special cases, the local unitary equivalent classes of isotropic state and Werner state are provided. Then we study the local unitary similar equivalence of this class of quantum states and analyze the necessary and sufficient condition. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11401032, 61473325, 11501153, 11105226, 11275131, and 11401106), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 15CX08011A and 24720122013), the Natural Science Foundation of Hainan Province, China (Grant Nos. 20151005 and 20151010), and the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry.

  16. Dirac Loops in Carbon Allotropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Kieran; Uchoa, Bruno; Glatzhofer, D.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a family of structures that have ``Dirac loops'': closed lines in momentum space with Dirac-like quasiparticles, on which the density of states vanishes linearly with energy. The structures all possess the planar trigonal connectivity present in graphene, but are three dimensional. We discuss the consequences of their multiply-connected Fermi surface for transport, including the presence of three dimensional Integer Quantum Hall effect. In the presence of spin-orbit coupling, we show that those structures may have topological surface states. We discuss the feasibility of realizing the structures as an allotrope of carbon. Work supported by NSF Grants DMR-1310407 and DMR-1352604.

  17. The radiated noise from isotropic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    1993-01-01

    The noise radiated from isotropic turbulence at low Mach numbers and high Reynolds numbers, as derived by Proudman (1952), was the first application of Lighthill's Theory of Aerodynamic Noise to a complete flow field. The theory presented by Proudman involves the assumption of the neglect of retarded time differences and so replaces the second-order retarded-time and space covariance of Lighthill's stress tensor, Tij, and in particular its second time derivative, by the equivalent simultaneous covariance. This assumption is a valid approximation in the derivation of the second partial derivative of Tij/derivative of t exp 2 covariance at low Mach numbers, but is not justified when that covariance is reduced to the sum of products of the time derivatives of equivalent second-order velocity covariances as required when Gaussian statistics are assumed. The present paper removes these assumptions and finds that although the changes in the analysis are substantial, the change in the numerical result for the total acoustic power is small. The present paper also considers an alternative analysis which does not neglect retarded times. It makes use of the Lighthill relationship, whereby the fourth-order Tij retarded-time covariance is evaluated from the square of similar second order covariance, which is assumed known. In this derivation, no statistical assumptions are involved. This result, using distributions for the second-order space-time velocity squared covariance based on the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) results of both Sarkar and Hussaini(1993) and Dubois(1993), is compared with the re-evaluation of Proudman's original model. These results are then compared with the sound power derived from a phenomenological model based on simple approximations to the retarded-time/space covariance of Txx. Finally, the recent numerical solutions of Sarkar and Hussaini(1993) for the acoustic power are compared with the results obtained from the analytic solutions.

  18. Investigating source processes of isotropic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Andrea

    explosion. In contrast, recovering the announced explosive yield using seismic moment estimates from moment tensor inversion remains challenging but we can begin to put error bounds on our moment estimates using the NSS technique. The estimation of seismic source parameters is dependent upon having a well-calibrated velocity model to compute the Green's functions for the inverse problem. Ideally, seismic velocity models are calibrated through broadband waveform modeling, however in regions of low seismicity velocity models derived from body or surface wave tomography may be employed. Whether a velocity model is 1D or 3D, or based on broadband seismic waveform modeling or the various tomographic techniques, the uncertainty in the velocity model can be the greatest source of error in moment tensor inversion. These errors have not been fully investigated for the nuclear discrimination problem. To study the effects of unmodeled structures on the moment tensor inversion, we set up a synthetic experiment where we produce synthetic seismograms for a 3D model (Moschetti et al., 2010) and invert these data using Green's functions computed with a 1D velocity mode (Song et al., 1996) to evaluate the recoverability of input solutions, paying particular attention to biases in the isotropic component. The synthetic experiment results indicate that the 1D model assumption is valid for moment tensor inversions at periods as short as 10 seconds for the 1D western U.S. model (Song et al., 1996). The correct earthquake mechanisms and source depth are recovered with statistically insignificant isotropic components as determined by the F-test. Shallow explosions are biased by the theoretical ISO-CLVD tradeoff but the tectonic release component remains low, and the tradeoff can be eliminated with constraints from P wave first motion. Path-calibration to the 1D model can reduce non-double-couple components in earthquakes, non-isotropic components in explosions and composite sources and improve

  19. Liquid crystal alignment at macroscopically isotropic polymer surfaces: Effect of an isotropic-nematic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryasova, Natalie; Reznikov, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of an isotropic-nematic (I -N ) phase transition on the liquid crystal alignment at untreated polymer surfaces. We demonstrate that the pattern at the untreated substrate in the planar cell where the other substrate is uniformly rubbed strongly depends on the temperature gradient across the cell during the I -N phase transition, being macroscopically isotropic if the untreated substrate is cooled faster, but becoming almost homogeneous along the rubbing direction in the opposite temperature gradient. We interpret the observed effect using complementary models of heat transfer and nematic elasticity. Based on the heat transfer model we show that the asymmetric temperature conditions in our experiments provide unidirectional propagation of the I -N interface during the phase transition and determine the initial director orientation pattern at the test's untreated surface. Using the Frank-Oseen model of nematic elasticity, we represent the three-dimensional director field in the nematic cell as a two-dimensional (2D) pattern at the untreated surface and perform 2D numeric simulations. The simulations explain the experimental results: Different initial director orientations at the untreated surface evolve into different stationary patterns.

  20. Consistent quantum prediction in spin-foam quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David

    2015-04-01

    A complete ``consistent histories'' framework is given for a covariant ``spin-foam'' quantum cosmological model, a highly symmetry-reduced (FLRW) model of covariant loop quantum gravity. A decoherence functional is constructed through which probabilities may be consistently extracted from quantum amplitudes. Branch wave functions corresponding to different possible quantum histories of the universe are described, such as whether the universe ``bounces'' at small volume or becomes singular. We discuss the construction and calculation of such branch wave functions, with an emphasis on the crucial role played by the decoherence of histories in arriving at self-consistent quantum predictions for these closed quantum systems. [Based on joint work with Parampreet Singh].

  1. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Lindholm, Ulric S.; Bodner, S. R.; Hill, Jeff T.; Weber, R. M.; Meyer, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the third year of work on a program which is part of the NASA Hot Section Technology program (HOST) are presented. The goals of this program are: (1) the development of unified constitutive models for rate dependent isotropic materials; and (2) the demonstration of the use of unified models in structural analyses of hot section components of gas turbine engines. The unified models selected for development and evaluation are those of Bodner-Partom and of Walker. A test procedure was developed for assisting the generation of a data base for the Bodner-Partom model using a relatively small number of specimens. This test procedure involved performing a tensile test at a temperature of interest that involves a succession of strain-rate changes. The results for B1900+Hf indicate that material constants related to hardening and thermal recovery can be obtained on the basis of such a procedure. Strain aging, thermal recovery, and unexpected material variations, however, preluded an accurate determination of the strain-rate sensitivity parameter is this exercise. The effects of casting grain size on the constitutive behavior of B1900+Hf were studied and no particular grain size effect was observed. A systematic procedure was also developed for determining the material constants in the Bodner-Partom model. Both the new test procedure and the method for determining material constants were applied to the alternate material, Mar-M247 . Test data including tensile, creep, cyclic and nonproportional biaxial (tension/torsion) loading were collected. Good correlations were obtained between the Bodner-Partom model and experiments. A literature survey was conducted to assess the effects of thermal history on the constitutive behavior of metals. Thermal history effects are expected to be present at temperature regimes where strain aging and change of microstructure are important. Possible modifications to the Bodner-Partom model to account for these effects are outlined

  2. Pseudonoise code tracking loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laflame, D. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A delay-locked loop is presented for tracking a pseudonoise (PN) reference code in an incoming communication signal. The loop is less sensitive to gain imbalances, which can otherwise introduce timing errors in the PN reference code formed by the loop.

  3. 3D Loop Models and the CPn-1 Sigma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahum, Adam; Chalker, J. T.; Serna, P.; Ortuño, M.; Somoza, A. M.

    2011-09-01

    Many statistical mechanics problems can be framed in terms of random curves; we consider a class of three-dimensional loop models that are prototypes for such ensembles. The models show transitions between phases with infinite loops and short-loop phases. We map them to CPn-1 sigma models, where n is the loop fugacity. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we find continuous transitions for n=1, 2, 3, and first order transitions for n≥5. The results are relevant to line defects in random media, as well as to Anderson localization and (2+1)-dimensional quantum magnets.

  4. Topological insulating phases from two-dimensional nodal loop semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linhu; Araújo, Miguel A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Starting from a minimal model for a two-dimensional nodal loop semimetal, we study the effect of chiral mass gap terms. The resulting Dirac loop anomalous Hall insulator's Chern number is the phase-winding number of the mass gap terms on the loop. We provide simple lattice models, analyze the topological phases, and generalize a previous index characterizing topological transitions. The responses of the Dirac loop anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators to a magnetic field's vector potential are also studied both in weak- and strong-field regimes, as well as the edge states in a ribbon geometry.

  5. Loops in inflationary correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takahiro; Urakawa, Yuko

    2013-12-01

    We review the recent progress regarding the loop corrections to the correlation functions in the inflationary universe. A naive perturbation theory predicts that the loop corrections generated during inflation suffer from various infrared (IR) pathologies. Introducing an IR cutoff by hand is neither satisfactory nor enough to fix the problem of a secular growth, which may ruin the predictive power of inflation models if the inflation lasts sufficiently long. We discuss the origin of the IR divergences and explore the regularity conditions of the loop corrections for the adiabatic perturbation, the iso-curvature perturbation, and the tensor perturbation, in turn. These three kinds of perturbations have qualitative differences, but in discussing the IR regularity there is a feature common to all cases, which is the importance of the proper identification of observable quantities. Genuinely, observable quantities should respect the gauge invariance from the view point of a local observer. Interestingly, we find that the requirement of the IR regularity restricts the allowed quantum states.

  6. Re-entrant isotropic-nematic phase behavior in polymer-depleted amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianguo; Li, Chaoxu; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils dispersed in water exhibit both isotropic (I) and nematic (N) phases, depending on concentration, but their coexistence, expected from the first order nature of the I - N thermodynamic transition is seldom observed. By adding a non-absorbing polymer to an amyloid fibrils suspension, we report, for the first time, an unusual closed-loop phase behavior. The phase diagrams reveal that the I + N coexistence does emerge, but only when the depleting polymer is present at intermediate concentrations. We combine depletion potentials in the dilute and semi-dilute polymer regime with the DLVO theory and the principle of equivalent law of corresponding states to calculate variations of the second virial coefficient with increasing polymer concentrations. We conclude that the decrease of the depletion potential range in the semi-dilute regime plays a pivotal role in the observed re-stabilization, leading to a closure of the I + N coexistence region.

  7. Toward loop quantization of plane gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterleitner, Franz; Major, Seth

    2012-03-01

    The polarized Gowdy model in terms of Ashtekar-Barbero variables is reduced with an additional constraint derived from the Killing equations for plane gravitational waves with parallel rays. The new constraint is formulated in a diffeomorphism invariant manner and, when it is included in the model, the resulting constraint algebra is first class, in contrast to the prior work done in special coordinates. Using an earlier work by Banerjee and Date, the constraints are expressed in terms of classical quantities that have an operator equivalent in loop quantum gravity, making these plane gravitational wave spacetimes accessible to loop quantization techniques.

  8. A new family of 1D exchange biased heterometal single-molecule magnets: observation of pronounced quantum tunneling steps in the hysteresis loops of quasi-linear {Mn2Ni3} clusters.

    PubMed

    Das, Animesh; Gieb, Klaus; Krupskaya, Yulia; Demeshko, Serhiy; Dechert, Sebastian; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Kataev, Vladislav; Büchner, Bernd; Müller, Paul; Meyer, Franc

    2011-03-16

    First members of a new family of heterometallic Mn/Ni complexes [Mn(2)Ni(3)X(2)L(4)(LH)(2)(H(2)O)(2)] (X = Cl: 1; X = Br: 2) with the new ligand 2-{3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl}ethanol (H(2)L) have been synthesized, and single crystals obtained from CH(2)Cl(2) solutions have been characterized crystallographically. The molecular structures feature a quasi-linear Mn(III)-Ni(II)-Ni(II)-Ni(II)-Mn(III) core with six-coordinate metal ions, where elongated axes of all the distorted octahedral coordination polyhedra are aligned parallel and are fixed with respect to each other by intramolecular hydrogen bonds. 1 and 2 exhibit quite strong ferromagnetic exchange interactions throughout (J(Mn-Ni) ≈ 40 K (1) or 42 K (2); J(Ni-Ni) ≈ 22 K (1) or 18 K (2)) that lead to an S(tot) = 7 ground state, and a sizable uniaxial magnetoanisotropy with D(mol) values -0.55 K (1) and -0.45 K (2). These values are directly derived also from frequency- and temperature-dependent high-field EPR spectra. Slow relaxation of the magnetization at low temperatures and single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior are evident from frequency-dependent peaks in the out-of-phase ac susceptibilities and magnetization versus dc field measurements, with significant energy barriers to spin reversal U(eff) = 27 K (1) and 22 K (2). Pronounced quantum tunnelling steps are observed in the hysteresis loops of the temperature- and scan rate-dependent magnetization data, but with the first relaxation step shifted above (1) or below (2) the zero crossing of the magnetic field, despite the very similar molecular structures. The different behavior of 1 and 2 is interpreted in terms of antiferromagnetic (1) or ferromagnetic (2) intermolecular interactions, which are discussed in view of the subtle differences of intermolecular contacts within the crystal lattice.

  9. Empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient for a rectangular internal-loop airlift bioreactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient was developed for a pilot scale internal-loop rectangular airlift bioreactor that was designed for biotechnology. The empirical correlation combines classic turbulence theory, Kolmogorov’s isotropic turbulence theory with Higbie’s pen...

  10. Topological Quantum Entanglement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-19

    quantum Hall (FQH) state – the most likely FQH state to host such quasiparticles – is the so-called even-odd effect predicted for quantum interference...Whether or not the interference occurs depends on the parity of Ising anyons inside the interference loop. While some indications of this effect ...Coulomb blockade effects in such systems. Our conclusion, reported in [P. Bonderson, C. Nayak, K. Shtengel, Phys. Rev. B 81, 165308 (2010), Editor’s

  11. The energy decay in self-preserving isotropic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Bernard, Peter S.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of self-preservation allows for an analytical determination of the energy decay in isotropic turbulence. Here, the self-preserving isotropic decay problem is analyzed, yielding a more complete picture of self-serving isotropic turbulence. It is proven rigorously that complete self-serving isotropic turbulence admits two general types of asymptotic solutions: one where the turbulent kinetic energy K approximately t (exp -1) and one where K approximately t (sup alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) and where K approximately t (sup -alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotically consistent high Reynolds number solution; the K approximately 1 (sup -alpha) decay law is only achieved in the limit as t yields infinity and the turbulence Reynolds number vanishes. Arguments are provided which indicate that a K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotic state toward which a complete self-preserving isotropic turbulence is driven at high Reynolds numbers in order to resolve the imbalance between vortex stretching and viscous diffusion.

  12. The energy decay in self-preserving isotropic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Bernard, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    The assumption of self-preservation allows for an analytical determination of the energy decay in isotropic turbulence. Here, the self-preserving isotropic decay problem is analyzed, yielding a more complete picture of self-serving isotropic turbulence. It is proven rigorously that complete self-serving isotropic turbulence admits two general types of asymptotic solutions: one where the turbulent kinetic energy K approximately t (exp -1) and one where K approximately t (sup alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) and where K approximately t (sup -alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotically consistent high Reynolds number solution; the K approximately 1 (sup - alpha) decay law is only achieved in the limit as t yields infinity and the turbulence Reynolds number vanishes. Arguments are provided which indicate that a K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotic state towards which a complete self-preseving isotropic turbulence is driven at high Reynolds numbers in order to resolve the imbalance between vortex stretching and viscous diffusion.

  13. Scaling of Lyapunov Exponents in Homogeneous, Isotropic DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Nicholas; Malaya, Nicholas; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Lyapunov exponents measure the rate of separation of initially infinitesimally close trajectories in a chaotic system. Using the exponents, we are able to probe the chaotic nature of homogeneous isotropic turbulence and study the instabilities of the chaotic field. The exponents are measured by calculating the instantaneous growth rate of a linear disturbance, evolved with the linearized Navier-Stokes equation, at each time step. In this talk, we examine these exponents in the context of homogeneous isotropic turbulence with two goals: 1) to investigate the scaling of the exponents with respect to the parameters of forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence, and 2) to characterize the instabilities that lead to chaos in turbulence. Specifically, we explore the scaling of the Lyapunov exponents with respect to the Reynolds number and with respect to the ratio of the integral length scale and the computational domain size.

  14. Sudden relaminarisation and lifetimes in forced isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Morozov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate an unexpected connection between isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows. We perform direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence forced at large scales at moderate Reynolds numbers and observe sudden transitions from chaotic dynamics to a spatially simple flow, analogous to the laminar state in wall bounded shear flows. We find that the survival probabilities of turbulence are exponential and the typical lifetimes increase super-exponentially with the Reynolds number, similar to results on relaminarisation of localised turbulence in pipe and plane Couette flow. Results from simulations subjecting the observed large-scale flow to random perturbations of variable amplitude demonstrate that it is a linearly stable simple exact solution that can be destabilised by a finite-amplitude perturbation, like the Hagen-Poiseuille profile in pipe flow. Our results suggest that both isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows qualitatively share the same phase-space dynamics.

  15. Stress waves in transversely isotropic media: The homogeneous problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marques, E. R. C.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The homogeneous problem of stress wave propagation in unbounded transversely isotropic media is analyzed. By adopting plane wave solutions, the conditions for the existence of the solution are established in terms of phase velocities and directions of particle displacements. Dispersion relations and group velocities are derived from the phase velocity expressions. The deviation angles (e.g., angles between the normals to the adopted plane waves and the actual directions of their propagation) are numerically determined for a specific fiber-glass epoxy composite. A graphical method is introduced for the construction of the wave surfaces using magnitudes of phase velocities and deviation angles. The results for the case of isotropic media are shown to be contained in the solutions for the transversely isotropic media.

  16. Comparative analysis of isotropic diffusion weighted imaging sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellmer, Sebastian; Stirnberg, Rüdiger; Edelhoff, Daniel; Suter, Dieter; Stöcker, Tony; Maximov, Ivan I.

    2017-02-01

    Visualisation of living tissue structure and function is a challenging problem of modern imaging techniques. Diffusion MRI allows one to probe in vivo structures on a micrometer scale. However, conventional diffusion measurements are time-consuming procedures, because they require several measurements with different gradient directions. Considerable time savings are therefore possible by measurement schemes that generate an isotropic diffusion weighting in a single shot. Multiple approaches for generating isotropic diffusion weighting are known and have become very popular as useful tools in clinical research. Thus, there is a strong need for a comprehensive comparison of different isotropic weighting approaches. In the present work we introduce two new sequences based on simple (co)sine modulations and compare their performance to established q-space magic-angle spinning sequences and conventional DTI, using a diffusion phantom assembled from microcapillaries and in vivo experiments at 7 T. The advantages and disadvantages of all compared schemes are demonstrated and discussed.

  17. Isotropic and anisotropic bouncing cosmologies in Palatini gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Barragan, Carlos; Olmo, Gonzalo J.

    2010-10-15

    We study isotropic and anisotropic (Bianchi I) cosmologies in Palatini f(R) and f(R,R{sub {mu}{nu}R}{sup {mu}{nu}}) theories of gravity with a perfect fluid and consider the existence of nonsingular bouncing solutions in the early universe. We find that all f(R) models with isotropic bouncing solutions develop shear singularities in the anisotropic case. On the contrary, the simple quadratic model R+aR{sup 2}/R{sub P}+R{sub {mu}{nu}R}{sup {mu}{nu}/}R{sub P} exhibits regular bouncing solutions in both isotropic and anisotropic cases for a wide range of equations of state, including dust (for a<0) and radiation (for arbitrary a). It thus represents a purely gravitational solution to the big bang singularity and anisotropy problems of general relativity without the need for exotic (w>1) sources of matter/energy or extra degrees of freedom.

  18. Line mixing effects in isotropic Raman spectra of pure N2: a classical trajectory study.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Sergey V; Boulet, Christian; Buzykin, Oleg G; Thibault, Franck

    2014-11-14

    Line mixing effects in the Q branch of pure N2 isotropic Raman scattering are studied at room temperature using a classical trajectory method. It is the first study using an extended modified version of Gordon's classical theory of impact broadening and shift of rovibrational lines. The whole relaxation matrix is calculated using an exact 3D classical trajectory method for binary collisions of rigid N2 molecules employing the most up-to-date intermolecular potential energy surface (PES). A simple symmetrizing procedure is employed to improve off-diagonal cross-sections to make them obeying exactly the principle of detailed balance. The adequacy of the results is confirmed by the sum rule. The comparison is made with available experimental data as well as with benchmark fully quantum close coupling [F. Thibault, C. Boulet, and Q. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044303 (2014)] and refined semi-classical Robert-Bonamy [C. Boulet, Q. Ma, and F. Thibault, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 084310 (2014)] results. All calculations (classical, quantum, and semi-classical) were made using the same PES. The agreement between classical and quantum relaxation matrices is excellent, opening the way to the analysis of more complex molecular systems.

  19. Line mixing effects in isotropic Raman spectra of pure N2: A classical trajectory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Sergey V.; Boulet, Christian; Buzykin, Oleg G.; Thibault, Franck

    2014-11-01

    Line mixing effects in the Q branch of pure N2 isotropic Raman scattering are studied at room temperature using a classical trajectory method. It is the first study using an extended modified version of Gordon's classical theory of impact broadening and shift of rovibrational lines. The whole relaxation matrix is calculated using an exact 3D classical trajectory method for binary collisions of rigid N2 molecules employing the most up-to-date intermolecular potential energy surface (PES). A simple symmetrizing procedure is employed to improve off-diagonal cross-sections to make them obeying exactly the principle of detailed balance. The adequacy of the results is confirmed by the sum rule. The comparison is made with available experimental data as well as with benchmark fully quantum close coupling [F. Thibault, C. Boulet, and Q. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044303 (2014)] and refined semi-classical Robert-Bonamy [C. Boulet, Q. Ma, and F. Thibault, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 084310 (2014)] results. All calculations (classical, quantum, and semi-classical) were made using the same PES. The agreement between classical and quantum relaxation matrices is excellent, opening the way to the analysis of more complex molecular systems.

  20. Gaussian effective potential: Quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. M.

    1984-10-01

    We advertise the virtues of the Gaussian effective potential (GEP) as a guide to the behavior of quantum field theories. Much superior to the usual one-loop effective potential, the GEP is a natural extension of intuitive notions familiar from quantum mechanics. A variety of quantum-mechanical examples are studied here, with an eye to field-theoretic analogies. Quantum restoration of symmetry, dynamical mass generation, and "quantum-mechanical resuscitation" are among the phenomena discussed. We suggest how the GEP could become the basis of a systematic approximation procedure. A companion paper will deal with scalar field theory.

  1. Visualization and computer graphics on isotropically emissive volumetric displays.

    PubMed

    Mora, Benjamin; Maciejewski, Ross; Chen, Min; Ebert, David S

    2009-01-01

    The availability of commodity volumetric displays provides ordinary users with a new means of visualizing 3D data. Many of these displays are in the class of isotropically emissive light devices, which are designed to directly illuminate voxels in a 3D frame buffer, producing X-ray-like visualizations. While this technology can offer intuitive insight into a 3D object, the visualizations are perceptually different from what a computer graphics or visualization system would render on a 2D screen. This paper formalizes rendering on isotropically emissive displays and introduces a novel technique that emulates traditional rendering effects on isotropically emissive volumetric displays, delivering results that are much closer to what is traditionally rendered on regular 2D screens. Such a technique can significantly broaden the capability and usage of isotropically emissive volumetric displays. Our method takes a 3D dataset or object as the input, creates an intermediate light field, and outputs a special 3D volume dataset called a lumi-volume. This lumi-volume encodes approximated rendering effects in a form suitable for display with accumulative integrals along unobtrusive rays. When a lumi-volume is fed directly into an isotropically emissive volumetric display, it creates a 3D visualization with surface shading effects that are familiar to the users. The key to this technique is an algorithm for creating a 3D lumi-volume from a 4D light field. In this paper, we discuss a number of technical issues, including transparency effects due to the dimension reduction and sampling rates for light fields and lumi-volumes. We show the effectiveness and usability of this technique with a selection of experimental results captured from an isotropically emissive volumetric display, and we demonstrate its potential capability and scalability with computer-simulated high-resolution results.

  2. Nuclear relaxation in an electric field enables the determination of isotropic magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that in contrast to the case of nuclear relaxation in a magnetic field B, simultaneous application of the magnetic field B and an additional electric field E causes transverse relaxation of a spin-1/2 nucleus with the rate proportional to the square of the isotropic part of the magnetic shielding tensor. This effect can contribute noticeably to the transverse relaxation rate of heavy nuclei in molecules that possess permanent electric dipole moments. Relativistic quantum mechanical computations indicate that for 205Tl nucleus in a Pt-Tl bonded complex, Pt(CN)5Tl, the transverse relaxation rate induced by the electric field is of the order of 1 s-1 at E = 5 kV/mm and B = 10 T.

  3. Driven isotropic Heisenberg spin chain with arbitrary boundary twisting angle: Exact results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popkov, V.; Karevski, D.; Schütz, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    We consider an open isotropic Heisenberg quantum spin chain, coupled at the ends to boundary reservoirs polarized in different directions, which sets up a twisting gradient across the chain. Using a matrix product ansatz, we calculate the exact magnetization profiles and magnetization currents in the nonequilibrium steady state of a chain with N sites. The magnetization profiles are harmonic functions with a frequency proportional to the twisting angle θ. The currents of the magnetization components lying in the twisting plane and in the orthogonal direction behave qualitatively differently: In-plane steady-state currents scale as 1/N2 for fixed and sufficiently large boundary coupling, and vanish as the coupling increases, while the transversal current increases with the coupling and saturates to 2θ/N.

  4. On the preferential sampling of helicity by isotropic helicoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biferale, Luca; Gustavsson, Kristian; Scatamacchia, Riccardo

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical study on the motion of isotropic helicoids in complex flows. These are particles whose motion is invariant under rotations but not under mirror reflections of the particle. This is the simplest, yet unexplored, extension of the much studied case of small spherical particles. We show that heavy isotropic helicoids, due to the coupling between translational and rotational degrees of freedom, preferentially sample different helical regions in laminar or chaotic advecting flows. This opens the way to control and engineer particles able to track complex flow structures with potential applications to microfluidics and turbulence. ERC AdG Grant NewTURB no. 339032.

  5. Flow birefringence in lyotropic mixtures in the isotropic phase

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, P.R.G.; Figueiredo Neto, A.M. )

    1995-01-01

    The flow-induced birefringence ([delta][ital n]) in lyotropic mixtures in the isotropic phase (ISO) was measured by means of optical techniques. As a function of temperature, the ISO is surrounded by two lamellar (LAM) phases. The shear flow produced by a perturbation in ISO induces a birefringent phase, which relaxes back to ISO with a typical relaxation time [tau]. [tau] increases near the transition to the more ordered LAM phases, and the behavior of [tau] versus temperature indicates the existence of a virtual nematic phase in the isotropic domain.

  6. Unexpected collapses during isotropic consolidation of model granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doanh, Thiep; Le Bot, Alain; Abdelmoula, Nouha; Gribaa, Lassad; Hans, Stéphane; Boutin, Claude

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the unexpected instantaneous instabilities of idealized granular materials under simple isotropic drained compression. Specimens of monosized glass beads submitted to isotropic compression exhibit a series of local collapses under undetermined external stress with partial liquefaction, experience sudden volumetric compaction and axial contraction of various amplitude. Short-lived excess pore water pressure vibrates like an oscillating underdamped system in the first dynamic transient phase and rapidly disperses in the subsequent longer dissipation phase. However, very dense samples maintain a collapse-free behaviour below a threshold void ratio e0col at 30 kPa of stress. The potential mechanisms that could explain these spontaneous collapses are discussed.

  7. A note on antenna models in a warm isotropic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1980-01-01

    The electron-transparent and electron-reflecting models of antennas in a warm isotropic plasma are reexamined. It is shown that a purely electrical treatment of both the models without an explicit use of the boundary condition on electron velocity yields the same results as those previously obtained through an electromechanical treatment. The essential difference between the two models is that for the electron-reflecting model, fields are nonzero only in the exterior region, while for the electron-transparent model, they are nonzero both in the exterior and interior regions of the antenna. This distinction helps in clarifying some misconceptions about these models of antennas in warm isotropic plasma.

  8. Quantum entanglement in the multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Pérez, S.; González-Díaz, P. F.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the quantum state of a multiverse made up of classically disconnected regions of the space-time, whose dynamical evolution is dominated by a homogeneous and isotropic fluid, is given by a squeezed state. These are typical quantum states that have no classical counterpart and therefore allow analyzing the violation of classical inequalities as well as the EPR argument in the context of the quantum multiverse. The thermodynamical properties of entanglement are calculated for a composite quantum state of two universes whose states are quantum-mechanically correlated. The energy of entanglement between the positive and negative modes of a scalar field, which correspond to the expanding and contracting branches of a phantom universe, are also computed.

  9. Explicit solution of the Lindblad equation for nearly isotropic boundary driven XY spin 1/2 chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žunkovič, Bojan; Prosen, Tomaž

    2010-08-01

    Explicit solution for the two-point correlation function in a non-equilibrium steady state of a nearly isotropic boundary driven open XY spin 1/2 chain in the Lindblad formulation is provided. A non-equilibrium quantum phase transition from exponentially decaying correlations to long range order is discussed analytically. In the regime of long range order a new phenomenon of correlation resonances is reported, where the correlation response of the system is unusually high for certain discrete values of the external bulk parameter, e.g. the magnetic field.

  10. Loop quantization of the Schwarzschild interior revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Singh, Parampreet

    2016-03-01

    The loop quantization of the Schwarzschild interior region, as described by a homogeneous anisotropic Kantowski-Sachs model, is re-examined. As several studies of different—inequivalent—loop quantizations have shown, to date there exists no fully satisfactory quantum theory for this model. This fact poses challenges to the validity of some scenarios to address the black hole information problem. Here we put forward a novel viewpoint to construct the quantum theory that builds from some of the models available in the literature. The final picture is a quantum theory that is both independent of any auxiliary structure and possesses a correct low curvature limit. It represents a subtle but non-trivial modification of the original prescription given by Ashtekar and Bojowald. It is shown that the quantum gravitational constraint is well defined past the singularity and that its effective dynamics possesses a bounce into an expanding regime. The classical singularity is avoided, and a semiclassical spacetime satisfying vacuum Einstein’s equations is recovered on the ‘other side’ of the bounce. We argue that such a metric represents the interior region of a white-hole spacetime, but for which the corresponding ‘white hole mass’ differs from the original black hole mass. Furthermore, we find that the value of the white hole mass is proportional to the third power of the starting black hole mass.

  11. Equation of State and Sound Velocities from Isotropic Continuum Mechanics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    of state and the shear and longitudinal velocity to fifth order elastic constants. The resulting expressions are implicit in terms of the pressure...The methods of finite elasticity in continuum mechanics of homogeneous isotropic materials are used to obtain the pressure dependence of the equation

  12. A Simple Mechanical Model for the Isotropic Harmonic Oscillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nita, Gelu M.

    2010-01-01

    A constrained elastic pendulum is proposed as a simple mechanical model for the isotropic harmonic oscillator. The conceptual and mathematical simplicity of this model recommends it as an effective pedagogical tool in teaching basic physics concepts at advanced high school and introductory undergraduate course levels. (Contains 2 figures.)

  13. Switch isotropic/anisotropic wettability via dual-scale rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Jiang, Chengyu; Wang, Shengkun; Ma, Zhibo; Yuan, Weizheng

    2014-10-01

    It is the first time to demonstrate the comparison of isotropic/anisotropic wettability between dual-scale micro-nano-rods and single-scale micro-rods. Inspired by the natural structures of rice leaf, a series of micro-nano-rods and micro-rods with different geometric parameters were fabricated using micro-fabrication technology. Experimental measured apparent contact angles and advancing and receding contact angles from orthogonal orientations were characterized. The difference of contact angles from orthogonal orientation on dual-scale rods was much smaller than those on single-scale rods in both static and dynamic situation. It indicated that the dual-scale micro-nano-rods showed isotropic wettability, while single-scale micro-rods showed anisotropic wettability. The switch of isotropic/anisotropic wettability could be illustrated by different wetting state and contact line moving. It offers a facial way to switch isotropic/anisotropic wettability of the surface via dual-scale or single-scale structure.

  14. Transformation to zero offset in transversely isotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhalifah, T.

    1995-02-01

    Nearly all dip moveout correction (DMO) implementations to date assume isotropic homogeneous media. Usually, this has been acceptable considering the tremendous cost savings of homogeneous isotropic DMO and considering the difficulty of obtaining the anisotropy parameters required for effective implementation. In the presence of typical anisotropy, however, ignoring the anisotropy can yield inadequate results. Since anisotropy may introduce large deviations from hyperbolic moveout, accurate transformation to zero-offset in anisotropic media should address such nonhyperbolic moveout behavior of reflections. Artley and Hale`s (1994) v(z) ray tracing-based DMO, developed for isotropic media, provides an attractive approach to treating such problems. By using a ray-tracing procedure crafted for anisotropic media, the author modifies some aspects of Artley and Hale`s DMO so that it can work for v(z) anisotropic media. Application of this anisotropic DMO to data from offshore Africa resulted in a considerably better alignment of reflections from horizontal and dipping reflectors in common-midpoint gather than that obtained using an isotropic DMO. Even the presence of vertical inhomogeneity in this medium could not eliminate the importance of considering the shale induced anisotropy.

  15. Loop quantization of Schwarzschild interior revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parampreet; Corichi, Alejandro

    2016-03-01

    Several studies of different inequivalent loop quantizations have shown, that there exists no fully satisfactory quantum theory for the Schwarzschild interior. Existing quantizations fail either on dependence on the fiducial structure or on the lack of the classical limit. Here we put forward a novel viewpoint to construct the quantum theory that overcomes all of the known problems of the existing quantizations. It is shown that the quantum gravitational constraint is well defined past the singularity and that its effective dynamics possesses a bounce into an expanding regime. The classical singularity is avoided, and a semiclassical spacetime satisfying vacuum Einstein's equations is recovered on the ``other side'' of the bounce. We argue that such metric represents the interior region of a white-hole spacetime, but for which the corresponding ``white-hole mass'' differs from the original black hole mass. We compare the differences in physical implications with other quantizations.

  16. Single-ion magnetic anisotropy and isotropic magnetic couplings in the metal-organic framework Fe2(dobdc).

    PubMed

    Maurice, Rémi; Verma, Pragya; Zadrozny, Joseph M; Luo, Sijie; Borycz, Joshua; Long, Jeffrey R; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2013-08-19

    The metal-organic framework Fe2(dobdc) (dobdc(4-) = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate), often referred to as Fe-MOF-74, possesses many interesting properties such as a high selectivity in olefin/paraffin separations. This compound contains open-shell Fe(II) ions with open coordination sites which may have large single-ion magnetic anisotropies, as well as isotropic couplings between the nearest and next nearest neighbor magnetic sites. To complement a previous analysis of experimental data made by considering only isotropic couplings [Bloch et al. Science 2012, 335, 1606], the magnitude of the main magnetic interactions are here assessed with quantum chemical calculations performed on a finite size cluster. It is shown that the single-ion anisotropy is governed by same-spin spin-orbit interactions (i.e., weak crystal-field regime), and that this effect is not negligible compared to the nearest neighbor isotropic couplings. Additional magnetic data reveal a metamagnetic behavior at low temperature. This effect can be attributed to various microscopic interactions, and the most probable scenarios are discussed.

  17. Effects of Coulomb collisions on cyclotron maser and plasma wave growth in magnetic loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Petrosian, Vahe

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of nonthermal electrons accelerated in magnetic loops is determined by solving the kinetic equation, including magnetic field convergence and Coulomb collisions in order to determine the effects of these interactions on the induced cyclotron maser and plasma wave growth. It is found that the growth rates are larger and the possibility of cyclotron maser action is stronger for smaller loop column density, for larger magnetic field convergence, for a more isotropic injected electron pitch angle distribution, and for more impulsive acceleration. For modest values of the column density in the coronal portion of a flaring loop, the growth rates of instabilities are significantly reduced, and the reduction is much larger for the cyclotron modes than for the plasma wave modes. The rapid decrease in the growth rates with increasing loop column density suggests that, in flare loops when such phenomena occur, the densities are lower than commonly accepted.

  18. Control of quantum correlations in solid state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.

    2015-11-01

    The quantum correlations between two independent qubits immersed in an anisotropic and isotropic photonic band-gab (PBG) crystal have been studied without Born or Markovian approximation. We show that the amount of the entanglement and quantum discord between the qubits in the photonic crystal is greatly different from that of qubits in vacuum or that subjected to the usual non-Markovian reservoir. The results also show that, for PBG materials as environment, high values of quantum correlation trapping can be achieved and thus prevention of correlation sudden drop occurs, which seriously enhances the coherence and increase the amount of the correlations. Moreover, we show that the quantum correlations in the isotropic PBG are more easily preserved than that in the anisotropic PBG under the same condition. These features make the quantum systems in PBG materials as a good candidate for implementation of different schemes of quantum optics and information with high performance.

  19. Multiprotein DNA Looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose M. G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2006-06-01

    DNA looping plays a fundamental role in a wide variety of biological processes, providing the backbone for long range interactions on DNA. Here we develop the first model for DNA looping by an arbitrarily large number of proteins and solve it analytically in the case of identical binding. We uncover a switchlike transition between looped and unlooped phases and identify the key parameters that control this transition. Our results establish the basis for the quantitative understanding of fundamental cellular processes like DNA recombination, gene silencing, and telomere maintenance.

  20. Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. This course will discuss operating principles and performance characteristics of a loop heat pipe. Topics include: 1) pressure profiles in the loop; 2) loop operating temperature; 3) operating temperature control; 4) loop startup; 4) loop shutdown; 5) loop transient behaviors; 6) sizing of loop components and determination of fluid inventory; 7) analytical modeling; 8) examples of flight applications; and 9) recent LHP developments.

  1. Multiproperty empirical isotropic interatomic potentials for CH4-inert gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    El-Kader, M S A

    2013-11-01

    An approximate empirical isotropic interatomic potentials for CH4-inert gas mixtures are developed by simultaneously fitting the Exponential-Spline-Morse-Spline-van der Waals (ESMSV) potential form to viscosity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion factors, diffusion coefficient, interaction second pressure virial coefficient and scattering cross-section data. Quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA) at different temperatures for CH4-He and at T = 87 K for CH4-Ar are computed using theoretical values for overlap, octopole and hexadecapole mechanisms and interaction potential as input. Also, the quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced light scattering (CILS) for the mixtures CH4-Ar and CH4-Xe at room temperature are calculated. The spectra of scattering consist essentially of an intense, purely translational component which includes scattering due to free pairs and bound dimers, and the other is due to the induced rotational scattering. These spectra have been interpreted by means of pair-polarizability terms, which arise from a long-range dipole-induced-dipole (DID) with small dispersion corrections and a short-range interaction mechanism involving higher-order dipole-quadrupole A and dipole-octopole E multipole polarizabilities. Good agreement between computed and experimental lineshapes of both absorption and scattering is obtained when the models of potential, interaction-induced dipole and polarizability components are used.

  2. Perturbative quantum field theory in the framework of the fermionic projector

    SciTech Connect

    Finster, Felix

    2014-04-15

    We give a microscopic derivation of perturbative quantum field theory, taking causal fermion systems and the framework of the fermionic projector as the starting point. The resulting quantum field theory agrees with standard quantum field theory on the tree level and reproduces all bosonic loop diagrams. The fermion loops are described in a different formalism in which no ultraviolet divergences occur.

  3. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.

  4. Gravitational Landau damping for an isotropic cluster of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Salman; Kandrup, Henry E.; Yip, Ping F.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of ascertaining the dynamical stability and the existence of Landau damping in static, isotropic 'collisionless' star clusters is addressed. The second-order formalism of Kandrup and Sygnet (1985) is applied to a homogeneous and isotropic plasma, demonstrating formally that the unperturbed configuration will always be stable and that the modes must be purely oscillatory. The form of these modes is explicitly examined, culminating in an analytic expression for the time evolution of the density induced by an initial perturbation. It is shown how these considerations can be adapted trivially to localized, nonradial disturbances of a self-gravitating system of stars. The possible existence of gravitational Landau damping for more generic perturbations is discussed.

  5. The structure of foam cells: Isotropic Plateau polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgenfeldt, S.; Kraynik, A. M.; Reinelt, D. A.; Sullivan, J. M.

    2004-08-01

    A mean-field theory for the geometry and diffusive growth rate of soap bubbles in dry 3D foams is presented. Idealized foam cells called isotropic Plateau polyhedra (IPPs), with F identical spherical-cap faces, are introduced. The geometric properties (e.g., surface area S, curvature R, edge length L, volume V) and growth rate Script G of the cells are obtained as analytical functions of F, the sole variable. IPPs accurately represent average foam bubble geometry for arbitrary F >= 4, even though they are only constructible for F = 4,6,12. While R/V1/3, L/V1/3 and Script G exhibit F1/2 behavior, the specific surface area S/V2/3 is virtually independent of F. The results are contrasted with those for convex isotropic polyhedra with flat faces.

  6. Transformation media producing quasi-perfect isotropic emission.

    PubMed

    Tichit, Paul-Henri; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; de Lustrac, André

    2011-10-10

    Using the idea of wave manipulation via transformation optics, we propose a way to create a quasi-perfect isotropic emission from a directional one. The manipulation is enabled by composite metamaterials that correspond to a space stretching around the source. It is shown that the directive radiation of a plane source larger than the operating wavelength can be transformed into an isotropic one by modifying the electromagnetic properties of the space around it. A set of parameters allowing practical realization of the proposed device is defined. Numerical simulations using Finite Element Method (FEM) are performed to illustrate the proposed coordinate transformation. This idea, which consists in strongly reducing the apparent size of a radiating source, can find various applications in novel antenna design techniques.

  7. Reynolds number scaling of velocity increments in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Kartik P.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Yeung, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Using the largest database of isotropic turbulence available to date, generated by the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations on an 81923 periodic box, we show that the longitudinal and transverse velocity increments scale identically in the inertial range. By examining the DNS data at several Reynolds numbers, we infer that the contradictory results of the past on the inertial-range universality are artifacts of low Reynolds number and residual anisotropy. We further show that both longitudinal and transverse velocity increments scale on locally averaged dissipation rate, just as postulated by Kolmogorov's refined similarity hypothesis, and that, in isotropic turbulence, a single independent scaling adequately describes fluid turbulence in the inertial range.

  8. Anomalous postcritical refraction behavior for certain transversely isotropic media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fa, L.; Brown, R.L.; Castagna, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Snell's law at the boundary between two transversely isotropic media with a vertical axis of symmetry (VTI media) can be solved by setting up a fourth order polynomial for the sine of the reflection/transmission angles. This approach reveals the possible presence of an anomalous postcritical angle for certain transversely isotropic media. There are thus possibly three incident angle regimes for the reflection/refraction of longitudinal or transverse waves incident upon a VTI medium: precritical, postcritical/preanomalous, and postanomalous. The anomalous angle occurs for certain strongly anisotropic media where the required root to the phase velocity equation must be switched in order to obey Snell's law. The reflection/transmission coefficients, polarization directions, and the phase velocity are all affected by both the anisotropy and the incident angle. The incident critical angles are also effected by the anisotropy. ?? 2006 Acoustical Society of America.

  9. An endochronic theory for transversely isotropic fibrous composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, M. J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A rational methodology of modelling both nonlinear and elastic dissipative response of transversely isotropic fibrous composites is developed and illustrated with the aid of the observed response of graphite-polyimide off-axis coupons. The methodology is based on the internal variable formalism employed within the text of classical irreversible thermodynamics and entails extension of Valanis' endochronic theory to transversely isotropic media. Applicability of the theory to prediction of various response characteristics of fibrous composites is illustrated by accurately modelling such often observed phenomena as: stiffening reversible behavior along fiber direction; dissipative response in shear and transverse tension characterized by power-laws with different hardening exponents; permanent strain accumulation; nonlinear unloading and reloading; and stress-interaction effects.

  10. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of the mixture of isotropic and nematic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Dong; Lee, Bomi; Kang, Shin-Woong; Song, Jang-Kun

    2015-08-01

    In various applications involving liquid crystals, the manipulation of the nanoscale molecular assembly and microscale director alignment is highly useful. Here we show that a nematic-isotropic mixture, a unique bi-liquid system, has potential for the fabrication of microstructures having an ordered phase within a disordered phase, or vice versa. The volume expansion and shrinkage, migration, splitting, mergence and elongation of one phase within the other are easily accomplished via thermal treatment and dielectrophoretic manipulation. This is particularly achievable when one phase is suspended in the middle. In that case, a highly biased ordered-phase preference of surfaces, that is, the nematic-philic nature of a polyimide layer and the nematic-phobic nature of a self-assembled monolayer of chlorosilane derivatives, is used. Further, by combining this approach with photopolymerization, the patterned microstructure is solidified as a patterned polymer film having both isotropic and anisotropic molecular arrangements simultaneously, or as a template with a morphological variation.

  11. Anomalous postcritical refraction behavior for certain transversely isotropic media.

    PubMed

    Fa, Lin; Brown, Ray L; Castagna, John P

    2006-12-01

    Snell's law at the boundary between two transversely isotropic media with a vertical axis of symmetry (VTI media) can be solved by setting up a fourth order polynomial for the sine of the reflection/transmission angles. This approach reveals the possible presence of an anomalous postcritical angle for certain transversely isotropic media. There are thus possibly three incident angle regimes for the reflection/refraction of longitudinal or transverse waves incident upon a VTI medium: precritical, postcritical/preanomalous, and postanomalous. The anomalous angle occurs for certain strongly anisotropic media where the required root to the phase velocity equation must be switched in order to obey Snell's law. The reflection/transmission coefficients, polarization directions, and the phase velocity are all affected by both the anisotropy and the incident angle. The incident critical angles are also effected by the anisotropy.

  12. Particle dynamics during the transition from isotropic to anisotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Min; Gylfason, Armann; Toschi, Federico

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent fluctuations play an important role on the dynamics of particles in turbulence, enhancing their dispersion and mixing. In recent years the statistical properties of particles in several statistically stationary turbulent flows have been the subject of many numerical and experimental studies. In many natural and industrial environments, however, one deals with turbulence in a transient state. As a prototype system, we investigate the transition from an isotropic to an anisotropic flow, namely looking at the influence of a developing mean flow on the dynamics of particles. We simulate, via direct numerical simulation, stationary homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and then suddenly impose a mean shear or strain. This allows us to quantify the effects of the mean flow on particle dynamics in these transient periods. Preliminary results on single particle properties, such as velocities and accelerations will be reported.

  13. Classical kinematics for isotropic, minimal Lorentz-violating fermion operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this article a particular classical, relativistic Lagrangian based on the isotropic fermion sector of the Lorentz-violating (minimal) Standard Model extension is considered. The motion of the associated classical particle in an external electromagnetic field is studied, and the evolution of its spin, which is introduced by hand, is investigated. It is shown that the particle travels along trajectories that are scaled versions of the standard ones. Furthermore there is no spin precession due to Lorentz violation, but the rate is modified at which the longitudinal and transverse spin components transform into each other. This demonstrates that it is practical to consider classical physics within such an isotropic Lorentz-violating framework and it opens the pathway to study a curved background in that context.

  14. Forward Analysis of Transversely Isotropic Thin Film by Indentation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Zheng

    Instrument indentation based methods for determining elasto-plastic properties of bulk specimen or thin film have received considerable and continue growing attention for recent decades, due to its simplicity, operability, and potential applications. However, the researches of transversely isotropic thin film are still at the beginning stage. In order to obtain a deeper understand of the relationship between P -- h curve and thin film properties, both dimensional analysis method and finite element method were applied in the present work. Extensive computational analysis of 630 sets of materials properties was carried out here. Through systematical studies, a more reasonable and intrinsic relationship, between indenter displacement h and the force P on it, was revealed. Also, an effect of materials transverse isotropic properties was summarized. Moreover, accurate and powerful forward analysis functions were established at the end of this thesis. These functions were, then, tested and mismatches were studied.

  15. Explaining Warm Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Patsourakos, Spiros

    2008-01-01

    One of the great mysteries of coronal physics that has come to light in the last few years is the discovery that warn (- 1 INK) coronal loops are much denser than expected for quasi-static equilibrium. Both the excess densities and relatively long lifetimes of the loops can be explained with bundles of unresolved strands that are heated impulsively to very high temperatures. Since neighboring strands are at different stages of cooling, the composite loop bundle is multi-thermal, with the distribution of temperatures depending on the details of the "nanoflare storm." Emission hotter than 2 MK is predicted, but it is not clear that such emission is always observed. We consider two possible explanations for the existence of over-dense warm loops without corresponding hot emission: (1) loops are bundles of nanoflare heated strands, but a significant fraction of the nanoflare energy takes the form of a nonthermal electron beam rather then direct plasma heating; (2) loops are bundles of strands that undergo thermal nonequilibrium that results when steady heating is sufficiently concentrated near the footpoints. We present numerical hydro simulations of both of these possibilities and explore the observational consequences, including the production of hard X-ray emission and absorption by cool material in the corona.

  16. Newtonian cosmology with a quantum bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargueño, P.; Bravo Medina, S.; Nowakowski, M.; Batic, D.

    2016-10-01

    It has been known for some time that the cosmological Friedmann equation deduced from general relativity can also be obtained within the Newtonian framework under certain assumptions. We use this result together with quantum corrections to the Newtonian potentials to derive a set a of quantum corrected Friedmann equations. We examine the behavior of the solutions of these modified cosmological equations paying special attention to the sign of the quantum corrections. We find different quantum effects crucially depending on this sign. One such a solution displays a qualitative resemblance to other quantum models like Loop quantum gravity or non-commutative geometry.

  17. Plane Waves in a Transparent Isotropic Chiral Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisanov, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    A homogeneous isotropic transparent chiral medium supports two normal plane waves with left and right circular polarization and differently valued positive wave numbers. The presence or absence of forward and backward Beltrami waves and their helicity are regulated by the signs of the permittivity and permeability and the strength of the chirality. The ray refractive index is a universal parameter whose sign differentiates the forward and backward waves.

  18. Cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Smith, Charles W.; Matthaeus, William H.

    1988-01-01

    A dissipation range is incorporated in the turbulence model to reconcile the divergent conclusions from studies of cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in isotropic magnetic turbulence. The Fokker-Planck coefficient for pitch-angle scattering is calculated. It is shown that the slab form of the Fokker-Plank coefficient (Jokipii, 1966) is valid at very low energies, while the nonslab form (Fisk, 1974) is valid at intermediate energies.

  19. Rodlike localized structure in isotropic pattern-forming systems.

    PubMed

    Bordeu, Ignacio; Clerc, Marcel G

    2015-10-01

    Stationary two-dimensional localized structures have been observed in a wide variety of dissipative systems. The existence, stability properties, dynamical evolution, and bifurcation diagram of an azimuthal symmetry breaking, rodlike localized structure in the isotropic prototype model of pattern formation, the Swift-Hohenberg model, is studied. These rodlike structures persist under the presence of nongradient perturbations. Interaction properties of the rodlike structures are studied. This allows us to envisage the possibility of different crystal-like configurations.

  20. Depth migration in transversely isotropic media with explicit operators

    SciTech Connect

    Uzcategui, Omar

    1994-12-01

    The author presents and analyzes three approaches to calculating explicit two-dimensional (2D) depth-extrapolation filters for all propagation modes (P, SV, and SH) in transversely isotropic media with vertical and tilted axis of symmetry. These extrapolation filters are used to do 2D poststack depth migration, and also, just as for isotropic media, these 2D filters are used in the McClellan transformation to do poststack 3D depth migration. Furthermore, the same explicit filters can also be used to do depth-extrapolation of prestack data. The explicit filters are derived by generalizations of three different approaches: the modified Taylor series, least-squares, and minimax methods initially developed for isotropic media. The examples here show that the least-squares and minimax methods produce filters with accurate extrapolation (measured in the ability to position steep reflectors) for a wider range of propagation angles than that obtained using the modified Taylor series method. However, for low propagation angles, the modified Taylor series method has smaller amplitude and phase errors than those produced by the least-squares and minimax methods. These results suggest that to get accurate amplitude estimation, modified Taylor series filters would be somewhat preferred in areas with low dips. In areas with larger dips, the least-squares and minimax methods would give a distinctly better delineation of the subsurface structures.

  1. Dynamics of a discotic liquid crystal in the isotropic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Fruchey, Kendall; Fayer, M. D.

    2006-11-01

    Optically heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) experiments are conducted to study the orientational dynamics of a discotic liquid crystal 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakis(pentyloxy)triphenylene (HPT) in the isotropic phase near the columnar-isotropic (C-I) phase transition. The OHD-OKE signal of HPT is characterized by an intermediate power law t-0.76±0.02 at short times (a few picoseconds), a von Schweidler power law t-0.26±0.01 at intermediate times (hundreds of picoseconds), and an exponential decay at long times (tens of nanoseconds). The exponential decay has Arrhenius temperature dependence. The functional form of the total time dependent decay is identical to the one observed previously for a large number of molecular supercooled liquids. The mode coupling theory schematic model based on the Sjögren [Phys. Rev. A 33, 1254 (1986)] model is able to reproduce the HPT data over a wide range of times from <1ps to tens of nanoseconds. The studies indicate that the HPT C-I phase transition is a strong first order transition, and the dynamics in the isotropic phase display a complex time dependent profile that is common to other molecular liquids that lack mesoscopic structure.

  2. Studies of Shock Wave Interactions with Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briassulis, G.; Agui, J.; Watkins, C. B.; Andreopoulos, Y.

    1998-01-01

    A nearly homogeneous nearly isotropic compressible turbulent flow interacting with a normal shock wave has been studied experimentally in a large shock tube facility. Spatial resolution of the order of 8 Kolmogorov viscous length scales was achieved in the measurements of turbulence. A variety of turbulence generating grids provide a wide range of turbulence scales. Integral length scales were found to substantially decrease through the interaction with the shock wave in all investigated cases with flow Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 and shock Mach numbers from 1.2 to 1.6. The outcome of the interaction depends strongly on the state of compressibility of the incoming turbulence. The length scales in the lateral direction are amplified at small Mach numbers and attenuated at large Mach numbers. Even at large Mach numbers amplification of lateral length scales has been observed in the case of fine grids. In addition to the interaction with the shock the present work has documented substantial compressibility effects in the incoming homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow. The decay of Mach number fluctuations was found to follow a power law similar to that describing the decay of incompressible isotropic turbulence. It was found that the decay coefficient and the decay exponent decrease with increasing Mach number while the virtual origin increases with increasing Mach number. A mechanism possibly responsible for these effects appears to be the inherently low growth rate of compressible shear layers emanating from the cylindrical rods of the grid.

  3. Delamination of isotropic and orthotropic multi-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Shri Hari

    Inter-layer debonding or delamination is a prevalent damage phenomenon in multi-layered components in applications such as coatings, microelectronics, parts made by layered manufacturing methods and resin matrix composites. A common thread in these applications is the existence of multi-layered configurations with interfaces which are potential sites for damage initiation and growth in the form of interfacial cracks. In this thesis, fundamental concepts until now used in analyzing debonding between isotropic bimaterials are extended to the study of interfacial delamination in multi-layer configurations. The thesis is divided into two main sections. In the first section, focus is on the use of energy release rate quantities within the framework of interfacial fracture mechanics, to predict susceptibility to delamination of two-dimensional isotropic multi-layers under residual stress. Bounds on energy release rates are obtained analytically for two generic isotropic multi-layer configurations and numerical results are presented for a number of cases, verifying theoretical predictions. In the second section, effort is centered on developing interfacial fracture mechanics methods for application to debonding in resin-matrix composites which can be modeled as orthotropic multi-layers. Two specific issues are addressed, namely those of: (i) extracting non-oscillatory measures of mode mix from oscillatory models and (ii) designation of mode mix in composite debonding problems. The methods are developed for application to resin-matrix composites; however, the scope is not limited to composites but any orthotropic interfacial fracture problem.

  4. Quantum self-gravitating collapsing matter in a quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campiglia, Miguel; Gambini, Rodolfo; Olmedo, Javier; Pullin, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    The problem of how space-time responds to gravitating quantum matter in full quantum gravity has been one of the main questions that any program of quantization of gravity should address. Here we analyze this issue by considering the quantization of a collapsing null shell coupled to spherically symmetric loop quantum gravity. We show that the constraint algebra of canonical gravity is Abelian both classically and when quantized using loop quantum gravity techniques. The Hamiltonian constraint is well defined and suitable Dirac observables characterizing the problem were identified at the quantum level. We can write the metric as a parameterized Dirac observable at the quantum level and study the physics of the collapsing shell and black hole formation. We show how the singularity inside the black hole is eliminated by loop quantum gravity and how the shell can traverse it. The construction is compatible with a scenario in which the shell tunnels into a baby universe inside the black hole or one in which it could emerge through a white hole.

  5. On microstates counting in many body polymer quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon-Acosta, Guillermo; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2011-10-14

    Polymer quantum systems are mechanical models quantized in a similar way as loop quantum gravity but in which loops/graphs resembling polymers are replaced by discrete sets of points. Such systems have allowed to study in a simpler context some novel aspects of loop quantum gravity. Although thermal aspects play a crucial role in cosmology and black hole physics little attention has been given to the thermostatistics of many body polymer quantum systems. In this work we explore how the features of a one-dimensional effective polymer gas, affect its microstate counting and hence the corresponding thermodynamical quantities.

  6. Isotropic behavior of an anisotropic material: single crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarter, Douglas R.; Paquin, Roger A.

    2013-09-01

    Zero defect single crystal silicon (Single-Crystal Si), with its diamond cubic crystal structure, is completely isotropic in most properties important for advanced aerospace systems. This paper will identify behavior of the three most dominant planes of the Single-Crystal Si cube (110), (100) and (111). For example, thermal and optical properties are completely isotropic for any given plane. The elastic and mechanical properties however are direction dependent. But we show through finite element analysis that in spite of this, near-isotropic behavior can be achieved with component designs that utilize the optimum elastic modulus in directions with the highest loads. Using glass frit bonding to assemble these planes is the only bonding agent that doesn't degrade the performance of Single-Crystal Si. The most significant anisotropic property of Single-Crystal Si is the Young's modulus of elasticity. Literature values vary substantially around a value of 145 GPa. The truth is that while the maximum modulus is 185 GPa, the most useful <110< crystallographic direction has a high 169 GPa, still higher than that of many materials such as aluminum and invar. And since Poisson's ratio in this direction is an extremely low 0.064, distortion in the plane normal to the load is insignificant. While the minimum modulus is 130 GPa, a calculated average value is close to the optimum at approximately 160 GPa. The minimum modulus is therefore almost irrelevant. The (111) plane, referred to as the natural cleave plane survives impact that would overload the (110) and/or (100) plane due to its superior density. While mechanical properties vary from plane to plane each plane is uniform and response is predictable. Understanding the Single-Crystal Si diamond cube provides a design and manufacture path for building lightweight Single-Crystal Si systems with near-isotropic response to loads. It is clear then that near-isotropic elastic behavior is achievable in Single-Crystal Si

  7. Topological Characterization of Extended Quantum Ising Models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Song, Z

    2015-10-23

    We show that a class of exactly solvable quantum Ising models, including the transverse-field Ising model and anisotropic XY model, can be characterized as the loops in a two-dimensional auxiliary space. The transverse-field Ising model corresponds to a circle and the XY model corresponds to an ellipse, while other models yield cardioid, limacon, hypocycloid, and Lissajous curves etc. It is shown that the variation of the ground state energy density, which is a function of the loop, experiences a nonanalytical point when the winding number of the corresponding loop changes. The winding number can serve as a topological quantum number of the quantum phases in the extended quantum Ising model, which sheds some light upon the relation between quantum phase transition and the geometrical order parameter characterizing the phase diagram.

  8. From chiral quark dynamics with Polyakov loop to the hadron resonance gas model

    SciTech Connect

    Arriola, E. R.; Salcedo, L. L.; Megias, E.

    2013-03-25

    Chiral quark models with Polyakov loop at finite temperature have been often used to describe the phase transition. We show how the transition to a hadron resonance gas is realized based on the quantum and local nature of the Polyakov loop.

  9. An Analysis of the Decay of Saint-Venant End Effects in a Transversely Isotropic Matrix with an Isotropic Covering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystrov, V. M.; Kokhanenko, Yu. V.

    2002-03-01

    A calculation model is proposed for a numerical analysis of the decay of Saint-Venant end effects in a laminate material of irregular structure to which corresponds a transversely isotropic matrix with an isotropic covering. The elastic properties of the matrix correspond to those of a unidirectional glass-fiber-reinforced plastic. The problem is investigated within the framework of the concept of a representative element of the material. The decay of the end effect in the direction perpendicular to the isotropy plane of a transversely isotropic matrix for the case of symmetric deformation of the material is considered. The source of the end effect is simulated by a piecewise-constant periodic surface load. This load is local for the calculated region and changes within a part of the boundary comparable with the typical size of the structural heterogeneity of the material. The equations of the linear elasticity theory of orthotropic bodies, a model of piecewise-homogeneous media, and quantitative criteria of decay of the end effect are used. Starting from the base system of equations, a discrete problem is constructed and solved. The results of a computing experiment for the choice of a representative element and the results of determining the maximum extent of the end-effect zone for this element are presented.

  10. Gradiometer Using Middle Loops as Sensing Elements in a Low-Field SQUID MRI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2009-01-01

    A new gradiometer scheme uses middle loops as sensing elements in lowfield superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This design of a second order gradiometer increases its sensitivity and makes it more uniform, compared to the conventional side loop sensing scheme with a comparable matching SQUID. The space between the two middle loops becomes the imaging volume with the enclosing cryostat built accordingly.

  11. Phenomenological Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimberly, Dagny; Magueijo, Joa~O.

    2005-08-01

    These notes summarize a set of lectures on phenomenological quantum gravity which one of us delivered and the other attended with great diligence. They cover an assortment of topics on the border between theoretical quantum gravity and observational anomalies. Specifically, we review non-linear relativity in its relation to loop quantum gravity and high energy cosmic rays. Although we follow a pedagogic approach we include an open section on unsolved problems, presented as exercises for the student. We also review varying constant models: the Brans-Dicke theory, the Bekenstein varying α model, and several more radical ideas. We show how they make contact with strange high-redshift data, and perhaps other cosmological puzzles. We conclude with a few remaining observational puzzles which have failed to make contact with quantum gravity, but who knows... We would like to thank Mario Novello for organizing an excellent school in Mangaratiba, in direct competition with a very fine beach indeed.

  12. Quantum cosmology, polymer matter, and modified collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreienbuehl, Andreas

    In this dissertation I address the following three questions: 1) how do different clocks compare in regard of the avoidance of the big bang singularity, 2) what is the high energy behavior of polymer quantized matter, and 3) how do quantum gravity effects modify the formation and the properties of black holes? To discuss 1), I consider an isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology sourced by a non-negative cosmological constant and a massless scalar field. I choose the scale factor as clock and, using a trick by Dirac, Schrodinger quantize the reduced square root Hamiltonian. From the resulting spinor equation I show that no semiclassical wave packet avoids the big bang. I compare this work with that in loop quantum cosmology, where the scalar field is chosen as time variable and the big bang is avoided. As for 2), I explain the details of a project with Professor Husain in which we study a scalar field on a curved background and perform a polymer Fock quantization of the matter degrees of freedom. The quantization is based on the assumption that the underlying field space is discrete and it therefore comes with a fundamental scale. This renders the usual operators on the Fock space scale dependent and causes a transition from a bosonic to a fermionic behavior in the ultraviolet regime. Finally for 3), I present work with Professor Husain and Professor Seahra on a modification of the Hamiltonian formulation of a massless scalar field minimally coupled to a spherically symmetric spacetime. The modification is designed to mimic polymer quantum effects in the region where the scalar field collapses and it is implemented in such a way that the symmetry group of general relativity is preserved. This causes a drastic change in the way black holes form and, thus, in their properties. Namely, the scalar field has to overcome a repulsion and black holes form with a finite mass. Furthermore, the modification gives rise to oscillations in the relation between the black

  13. Fluctuation energies in quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Quantum fluctuations or other moments of a state contribute to energy expectation values and can imply interesting physical effects. In quantum cosmology, they turn out to be important for a discussion of density bounds and instabilities of initial-value problems in the presence of signature change in loop-quantized models. This paper provides an effective description of these issues, accompanied by a comparison with existing numerical results and an extension to squeezed states. The comparison confirms that canonical effective methods are well suited for computations of properties of physical states. As a side product, an example is found for a simple state in which quantum fluctuations can cancel holonomy modifications of loop quantum cosmology.

  14. Smart feedback loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurnov, A. S.; Gribov, I. V.; Gudkov, K. A.; Shumakov, A. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.

    1994-12-01

    It is necessary to find the golden mean in allocating the processing resources of a computer control system. Traditionally, feedback loops operate at the lower levels to ensure safe and stable operation of the accelerator. At present we use analogue and digital feedback loops. Some systems, such as the RF, require more complex algorithms. A possible way of providing these, using digital signal processors is described. The results of tests with the Race-Track Microtron Linac are given and the sources of the main internal and external disturbances have been analysed.

  15. Concentric Loop Surface Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Flores, R.; Rodríguez-González, A. O.; Salgado-Lujambio, P.; Barrios-Alvarez, F. A.

    2002-08-01

    A surface coil for MRI consisted of two concentric loops was developed for brain imaging. Prior to build the coil prototype, the magnetic field (B1) generated by the coil was numerically simulated. This field simulation is based on the Biot-Savart law for the circular- and square-shaped loops. From these theoretical results, we can appreciate an improvement on the B1 homogeneity. Brain images obtained at 1.5 Tesla show a good sensitivity in a particular region of interest. Also, these images compared well against images obtained with a circular-shaped coil. This receiver coil can generate high quality brain images.

  16. Wilson-loop instantons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.

    1987-01-01

    Wilson-loop symmetry breaking is considered on a space-time of the form M4 x K, where M4 is a four-dimensional space-time and K is an internal space with nontrivial and finite fundamental group. It is shown in a simple model that the different vacua obtained by breaking a non-Abelian gauge group by Wilson loops are separated in the space of gauge potentials by a finite energy barrier. An interpolating gauge configuration is then constructed between these vacua and shown to have minimum energy. Finally some implications of this construction are discussed.

  17. Identifying Isotropic Events Using a Regional Moment Tensor Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R

    2008-11-04

    We calculate the deviatoric and isotropic source components for 17 explosions at the Nevada Test Site, as well as 12 earthquakes and 3 collapses in the surrounding region of the western US, using a regional time-domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Confidence regions of the model parameters are estimated from the data misfit by assuming normally distributed parameter values. We investigate the sensitivity of the resolved parameters of an explosion to imperfect Earth models, inaccurate event depths, and data with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assuming a reasonable azimuthal distribution of stations. In the band of interest (0.02-0.10 Hz) the source-type calculated from complete moment tensor inversion is insensitive to velocity models perturbations that cause less than a half-cycle shift (<5 sec) in arrival time error if shifting of the waveforms is allowed. The explosion source-type is insensitive to an incorrect depth assumption (for a true depth of 1 km), and the goodness-of-fit of the inversion result cannot be used to resolve the true depth of the explosion. Noise degrades the explosive character of the result, and a good fit and accurate result are obtained when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is greater than 5. We assess the depth and frequency dependence upon the resolved explosive moment. As the depth decreases from 1 km to 200 m, the isotropic moment is no longer accurately resolved and is in error between 50-200%. However, even at the most shallow depth the resultant moment tensor is dominated by the explosive component when the data have a good SNR.

  18. Characterization of Small Isotropic Bicelles with Various Compositions.

    PubMed

    Mineev, K S; Nadezhdin, K D; Goncharuk, S A; Arseniev, A S

    2016-07-05

    Structural studies of membrane proteins are of great importance and interest, with solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy being very promising tools for that task. However, such investigations are hindered by a number of obstacles, and in the first place by the fact that membrane proteins need an adequate environment that models the cell membrane. One of the most widely used and prospective membrane mimetics is isotropic bicelles. While large anisotropic bicelles are well-studied, the field of small bicelles contains a lot of "white spots". The present work reports the radii of particles and concentration of the detergents in the monomeric state in solutions of isotropic bicelles, formed by 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS), 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-2-hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPSO), and sodium cholate, as a function of lipid/detergent ratio and temperature. These parameters were measured using (1)H NMR diffusion spectroscopy for the bicelles composed of lipids with saturated fatty chains of different length and lipids, containing unsaturated fatty acid residue. The influence of a model transmembrane protein (membrane domain of rat TrkA) on the properties of bicelles and the effect of the bicelle size and composition on the properties of the transmembrane protein were investigated with heteronuclear NMR and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy. We show that isotropic bicelles that are applicable for solution NMR spectroscopy behave as predicted by the theoretical models and are likely to be bicelles rather than mixed micelles. Using the obtained data, we propose a simple approach to control the size of bicelles at low concentrations. On the basis of our results, we compared different rim-forming agents and selected CHAPS as a detergent of choice for structural studies in bicelles, if the deuteration of the detergent is not required.

  19. Random shearing direction models for isotropic turbulent diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majda, Andrew J.

    1994-06-01

    Recently, a rigorous renormalization theory for various scalar statistics has been developed for special modes of random advection diffusion involving random shear layer velocity fields with long-range spatiotemporal correlations. New random shearing direction models for isotropic turbulent diffusion are introduced here. In these models the velocity field has the spatial second-order statistics of an arbitrary prescribed stationary incompressible isotropic random field including long-range spatial correlations with infrared divergence, but the temporal correlations have finite range. The explicit theory of renormalization for the mean and second-order statistics is developed here. With ɛ the spectral parameter, for -∞<ɛ<4 and measuring the strength of the infrared divergence of the spatial spectrum, the scalar mean statistics rigorously exhibit a phase transition from mean-field behavior for ɛ<2 to anomalous behavior for ɛ with 2<ɛ<4 as conjectured earlier by Avellaneda and the author. The universal inertial range renormalization for the second-order scalar statistics exhibits a phase transition from a covariance with a Gaussian functional form for ɛ with ɛ<2 to an explicit family with a non-Gaussian covariance for ɛ with 2<ɛ<4. These non-Gaussian distributions have tails that are broader than Gaussian as ɛ varies with 2<ɛ<4 and behave for large values like exp(- C c | x|4-ɛ), with C c an explicit constant. Also, here the attractive general principle is formulated and proved that every steady, stationary, zero-mean, isotropic, incompressible Gaussian random velocity field is well approximated by a suitable superposition of random shear layers.

  20. Identifying isotropic events using a regional moment tensor inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Sean R.; Dreger, Douglas S.; Walter, William R.

    2009-01-17

    We calculate the deviatoric and isotropic source components for 17 explosions at the Nevada Test Site, as well as 12 earthquakes and 3 collapses in the surrounding region of the western United States, using a regional time domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Confidence regions of the model parameters are estimated from the data misfit by assuming normally distributed parameter values. We investigate the sensitivity of the resolved parameters of an explosion to imperfect Earth models, inaccurate event depths, and data with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assuming a reasonable azimuthal distribution of stations. In the band of interest (0.02–0.10 Hz) the source-type calculated from complete moment tensor inversion is insensitive to velocity model perturbations that cause less than a half-cycle shift (<5 s) in arrival time error if shifting of the waveforms is allowed. The explosion source-type is insensitive to an incorrect depth assumption (for a true depth of 1 km), and the goodness of fit of the inversion result cannot be used to resolve the true depth of the explosion. Noise degrades the explosive character of the result, and a good fit and accurate result are obtained when the signal-to-noise ratio is greater than 5. We assess the depth and frequency dependence upon the resolved explosive moment. As the depth decreases from 1 km to 200 m, the isotropic moment is no longer accurately resolved and is in error between 50 and 200%. Furthermore, even at the most shallow depth the resultant moment tensor is dominated by the explosive component when the data have a good SNR.

  1. Identifying isotropic events using a regional moment tensor inversion

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, Sean R.; Dreger, Douglas S.; Walter, William R.

    2009-01-17

    We calculate the deviatoric and isotropic source components for 17 explosions at the Nevada Test Site, as well as 12 earthquakes and 3 collapses in the surrounding region of the western United States, using a regional time domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Confidence regions of the model parameters are estimated from the data misfit by assuming normally distributed parameter values. Wemore » investigate the sensitivity of the resolved parameters of an explosion to imperfect Earth models, inaccurate event depths, and data with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assuming a reasonable azimuthal distribution of stations. In the band of interest (0.02–0.10 Hz) the source-type calculated from complete moment tensor inversion is insensitive to velocity model perturbations that cause less than a half-cycle shift (<5 s) in arrival time error if shifting of the waveforms is allowed. The explosion source-type is insensitive to an incorrect depth assumption (for a true depth of 1 km), and the goodness of fit of the inversion result cannot be used to resolve the true depth of the explosion. Noise degrades the explosive character of the result, and a good fit and accurate result are obtained when the signal-to-noise ratio is greater than 5. We assess the depth and frequency dependence upon the resolved explosive moment. As the depth decreases from 1 km to 200 m, the isotropic moment is no longer accurately resolved and is in error between 50 and 200%. Furthermore, even at the most shallow depth the resultant moment tensor is dominated by the explosive component when the data have a good SNR.« less

  2. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R. D.

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizations and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.

  3. Computation of large-scale statistics in decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasnov, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of decaying isotropic turbulence to test the prediction of self-similar decay of the energy spectrum and to compute the decay exponents of the kinetic energy. In general, good agreement between the simulation results and the assumption of self-similarity were obtained. However, the statistics of the simulations were insufficient to compute the value of gamma which corrects the decay exponent when the spectrum follows a k(exp 4) wave number behavior near k = 0. To obtain good statistics, it was found necessary to average over a large ensemble of turbulent flows.

  4. Rotation of slender swimmers in isotropic-drag media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koens, Lyndon; Lauga, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The drag anisotropy of slender filaments is a critical physical property allowing swimming in low-Reynolds number flows, and without it linear translation is impossible. Here we show that, in contrast, net rotation can occur under isotropic drag. We first demonstrate this result formally by considering the consequences of the force- and torque-free conditions on swimming bodies and we then illustrate it with two examples (a simple swimmers made of three rods and a model bacterium with two helical flagellar filaments). Our results highlight the different role of hydrodynamic forces in generating translational versus rotational propulsion.

  5. On Transport Properties of Isotropic Quasiperiodic XY Spin Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachkovskiy, Ilya

    2016-07-01

    We consider isotropic XY spin chains whose magnetic potentials are quasiperiodic and the effective one-particle Hamiltonians have absolutely continuous spectra. For a wide class of such XY spin chains, we obtain lower bounds on their Lieb-Robinson velocities {mathfrak{v}} in terms of group velocities of their effective Hamiltonians: mathfrak{v}{≥slant} {mathop {ess sup}_{[0,1]}}2/πdE/dN. where E is considered as a function of the integrated density of states.

  6. Cluster Monte Carlo simulations of the nematic-isotropic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priezjev, N. V.; Pelcovits, Robert A.

    2001-06-01

    We report the results of simulations of the three-dimensional Lebwohl-Lasher model of the nematic-isotropic transition using a single cluster Monte Carlo algorithm. The algorithm, first introduced by Kunz and Zumbach to study two-dimensional nematics, is a modification of the Wolff algorithm for spin systems, and greatly reduces critical slowing down. We calculate the free energy in the neighborhood of the transition for systems up to linear size 70. We find a double well structure with a barrier that grows with increasing system size. We thus obtain an upper estimate of the value of the transition temperature in the thermodynamic limit.

  7. P-wave seismic imaging through dipping transversely isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Jennifer Meryl

    2000-10-01

    P-wave seismic anisotropy is of growing concern to the exploration industry. The transmissional effects through dipping anisotropic strata, such as shales, cause substantial depth and lateral positioning errors when imaging subsurface targets. Using anisotropic physical models the limitations of conventional isotropic migration routines were determined to be significant. In addition, these models were used to validate both anisotropic depth migration routines and an anisotropic, numerical raytracer. In order to include anisotropy in these processes, one must be able to quantify the anisotropy using two parameters, epsilon and delta. These parameters were determined from headwave velocity measurements on anisotropic strata, in the parallel-, perpendicular- and 45°-to-bedding directions. This new method was developed using refraction seismic techniques to measure the necessary velocities in the Wapiabi Formation shales, the Brazeau Group interbedded sandstones and shales, the Cardium Formation sandstones and the Palliser Formation limestones. The Wapiabi Formation and Brazeau Group rocks were determined to be anisotropic with epsilon = 0.23 +/- 0.05, delta = --0.05 +/- 0.07 and epsilon = 0.11 +/- 0.04, delta = 0.42 +/- 0.06, respectively. The sandstones and limestones of the Cardium and Palliser formations were both determined to be isotropic, in these studies. In a complementary experiment, a new procedure using vertical seismic profiling (VSP) techniques was developed to measure the anisotropic headwave velocities. Using a multi-offset source configuration on an appropriately dipping, uniform panel of anisotropic strata, the required velocities were measured directly and modelled. In this study, the geologic model was modelled using an anisotropic raytracer, developed for the experiment. The anisotropy was successfully modelled using anisotropic parameters based on the refraction seismic results. With a firm idea of the anisotropic parameters from the

  8. Neutral shielding and cloaking of magnetic fields using isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Lars; Järrendahl, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    A method for designing magnetic shields that do not perturb applied multipole fields in the static regime is developed. Cylindrical core-shell structures with two layers characterized by homogeneous isotropic permeabilities are found to support neutral shielding of multipole fields and unique cloaking solutions of arbitrary multipole order. An extra degree of freedom is provided by every layer added to the structure which may be exploited with an effective design formula for cloaking of additional field terms. The theory is illustrated with numerical simulations.

  9. Identifying Isotropic Events Using a Regional Moment Tensor Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Dreger, D S; Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2009-08-03

    In our previous work the deviatoric and isotropic source components for 17 explosions at the Nevada Test Site, as well as 12 earthquakes and 4 collapses in the surrounding region of the western US, were calculated using a regional time-domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor (Dreger et al., 2008; Ford et al., 2008; Ford et al., 2009a). The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Confidence regions of the model parameters are estimated from the data misfit by assuming normally distributed parameter values. We developed a new Network Sensitivity Solution (NSS) in which the fit of sources distributed over a source-type plot (Hudson et al., 1989) show the resolution of the source parameters. The NSS takes into account the unique station distribution, frequency band, and signal-to-noise ratio of a given event scenario. The NSS compares both a hypothetical pure source (for example an explosion or an earthquake) and the actual data with several thousand sets of synthetic data from a uniform distribution of all possible sources. The comparison with a hypothetical pure source provides the theoretically best-constrained source-type region for a given set of stations, and with it one can determine whether further analysis with the data is warranted. We apply the NSS to a NTS nuclear explosion, and earthquake, as well as the 2006 North Korean explosion, and a nearby earthquake. The results show that explosions and earthquakes are distinguishable, however the solution space depends strongly on the station coverage. Finally, on May 25, 2009 a second North Korean test took place. Our preliminary results show that the explosive nature of the event may be determined using the regional distance moment tensor method. Results indicate that

  10. Phenomenological Theory of Isotropic-Genesis Nematic Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Ye, Fangfu; Xing, Xiangjun; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    We consider the impact of the elastomer network on the nematic structure and fluctuations in isotropic-genesis nematic elastomers, via a phenomenological model that underscores the role of network compliance. The model contains a network-mediated nonlocal interaction as well as a new kind of random field that reflects the memory of the nematic order present at network formation and also encodes local anisotropy due to localized nematogenic polymers. This model enables us to predict regimes of short-ranged oscillatory spatial correlations (thermal and glassy) in the nematic alignment.

  11. Cluster Monte Carlo simulations of the nematic-isotropic transition.

    PubMed

    Priezjev, N V; Pelcovits, R A

    2001-06-01

    We report the results of simulations of the three-dimensional Lebwohl-Lasher model of the nematic-isotropic transition using a single cluster Monte Carlo algorithm. The algorithm, first introduced by Kunz and Zumbach to study two-dimensional nematics, is a modification of the Wolff algorithm for spin systems, and greatly reduces critical slowing down. We calculate the free energy in the neighborhood of the transition for systems up to linear size 70. We find a double well structure with a barrier that grows with increasing system size. We thus obtain an upper estimate of the value of the transition temperature in the thermodynamic limit.

  12. Symmetric point four-point functions at one loop in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracey, J. A.

    2017-03-01

    We evaluate the quartic ghost and quark Green's functions as well as the gluon-ghost, gluon-quark and ghost-quark four-point functions of quantum chromodynamics at one loop at the fully symmetric point in a linear covariant gauge. Similar expressions for the analogous Green's functions in quantum electrodynamics are also provided.

  13. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-24

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  14. Closing the Loop Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

    Closing the Loop (CTL) is a science curriculum designed to introduce students to integrated waste management through awareness. This document presents five lesson plans focusing on developing an understanding of natural resources, solid wastes, conservation, and the life of landfills. Contents include: (1) "What Are Natural Resources?"; (2)…

  15. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  16. New 'phase' of quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charles H-T

    2006-12-15

    The emergence of loop quantum gravity over the past two decades has stimulated a great resurgence of interest in unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics. Among a number of appealing features of this approach is the intuitive picture of quantum geometry using spin networks and powerful mathematical tools from gauge field theory. However, the present form of loop quantum gravity suffers from a quantum ambiguity, owing to the presence of a free (Barbero-Immirzi) parameter. Following the recent progress on conformal decomposition of gravitational fields, we present a new phase space for general relativity. In addition to spin-gauge symmetry, the new phase space also incorporates conformal symmetry making the description parameter free. The Barbero-Immirzi ambiguity is shown to occur only if the conformal symmetry is gauge fixed prior to quantization. By withholding its full symmetries, the new phase space offers a promising platform for the future development of loop quantum gravity. This paper aims to provide an exposition, at a reduced technical level, of the above theoretical advances and their background developments. Further details are referred to cited references.

  17. Even harmonic generation in isotropic media of dissociating homonuclear molecules

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R. E. F.; Rivière, P.; Morales, F.; Smirnova, O.; Ivanov, M.; Martín, F.

    2016-01-01

    Isotropic gases irradiated by long pulses of intense IR light can generate very high harmonics of the incident field. It is generally accepted that, due to the symmetry of the generating medium, be it an atomic or an isotropic molecular gas, only odd harmonics of the driving field can be produced. Here we show how the interplay of electronic and nuclear dynamics can lead to a marked breakdown of this standard picture: a substantial part of the harmonic spectrum can consist of even rather than odd harmonics. We demonstrate the effect using ab-initio solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for and its isotopes in full dimensionality. By means of a simple analytical model, we identify its physical origin, which is the appearance of a permanent dipole moment in dissociating homonuclear molecules, caused by light-induced localization of the electric charge during dissociation. The effect arises for sufficiently long laser pulses and the region of the spectrum where even harmonics are produced is controlled by pulse duration. Our results (i) show how the interplay of femtosecond nuclear and attosecond electronic dynamics, which affects the charge flow inside the dissociating molecule, is reflected in the nonlinear response, and (ii) force one to augment standard selection rules found in nonlinear optics textbooks by considering light-induced modifications of the medium during the generation process. PMID:27596609

  18. Fluctuational shift of nematic-isotropic phase transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we discuss a macroscopic counterpart to the microscopic mechanism of the straightening dimer mesogens conformations, proposed recently by S.M. Saliti, M.G.Tamba, S.N. Sprunt, C.Welch, G.H.Mehl, A. Jakli, J.T. Gleeson (Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 217801 (2016)) to explain their experimental observation of the unprecedentedly large shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our interpretation is based on singular longitudinal fluctuations of the nematic order parameter. Since these fluctuations are governed by the Goldstone director fluctuations they exist only in the nematic state. External magnetic field suppresses the singular longitudinal fluctuations of the order parameter (similarly as it is the case for the transverse director fluctuations, although with a different scaling over the magnetic field). The reduction of the fluctuations changes the equilibrium value of the modulus of the order parameter in the nematic state. Therefore it leads to additional (with respect to the mean field contribution) fluctuational shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our mechanism works for any nematic liquid crystals, however the magnitude of the fluctuational shift increases with decrease of the Frank elastic moduli. Since some of these moduli supposed to be anomalously small for so-called bent-core or dimer nematic liquid crystals, just these liquid crystals are promising candidates for the observation of the predicted fluctuational shift of the phase transition temperature.

  19. Penetrative phototactic bioconvection in an isotropic scattering suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, M. K.; Ghorai, S.

    2013-07-01

    Phototaxis is a directed swimming response dependent upon the light intensity sensed by micro-organisms. Positive (negative) phototaxis denotes the motion directed towards (away from) the source of light. Using the phototaxis model of Ghorai, Panda, and Hill ["Bioconvection in a suspension of isotropically scattering phototactic algae," Phys. Fluids 22, 071901 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3457163, we investigate two-dimensional phototactic bioconvection in an absorbing and isotropic scattering suspension in the nonlinear regime. The suspension is confined by a rigid bottom boundary, and stress-free top and lateral boundaries. The governing equations for phototactic bioconvection consist of Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible fluid coupled with a conservation equation for micro-organisms and the radiative transfer equation for light transport. The governing system is solved efficiently using a semi-implicit second-order accurate conservative finite-difference method. The radiative transfer equation is solved by the finite volume method using a suitable step scheme. The resulting bioconvective patterns differ qualitatively from those found by Ghorai and Hill ["Penetrative phototactic bioconvection," Phys. Fluids 17, 074101 (2005)], 10.1063/1.1947807 at a higher critical wavelength due to the effects of scattering. The solutions show transition from steady state to periodic oscillations as the governing parameters are varied. Also, we notice the accumulation of micro-organisms in two horizontal layers at two different depths via their mean swimming orientation profile for some governing parameters at a higher scattering albedo.

  20. Computation of the sound generated by isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic radiation from isotropic turbulence is computed numerically. A hybrid direct numerical simulation approach which combines direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the turbulent flow with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. It is demonstrated that the hybrid DNS method is a feasible approach to the computation of sound generated by turbulent flows. The acoustic efficiency in the simulation of isotropic turbulence appears to be substantially less than that in subsonic jet experiments. The dominant frequency of the computed acoustic pressure is found to be somewhat larger than the dominant frequency of the energy-containing scales of motion. The acoustic power in the simulations is proportional to epsilon (M(sub t))(exp 5) where epsilon is the turbulent dissipation rate and M(sub t) is the turbulent Mach number. This is in agreement with the analytical result of Proudman (1952), but the constant of proportionality is smaller than the analytical result. Two different methods of computing the acoustic power from the DNS data bases yielded consistent results.

  1. Direction of unsaturated flow in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Kaya, Basak Sener; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of soil moisture in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope is a transient, variably saturated physical process controlled by rainfall characteristics, hillslope geometry, and the hydrological properties of the hillslope materials. The major driving mechanisms for moisture movement are gravity and gradients in matric potential. The latter is solely controlled by gradients of moisture content. In a homogeneous and isotropic saturated hillslope, absent a gradient in moisture content and under the driving force of gravity with a constant pressure boundary at the slope surface, flow is always in the lateral downslope direction, under either transient or steady state conditions. However, under variably saturated conditions, both gravity and moisture content gradients drive fluid motion, leading to complex flow patterns. In general, the flow field near the ground surface is variably saturated and transient, and the direction of flow could be laterally downslope, laterally upslope, or vertically downward. Previous work has suggested that prevailing rainfall conditions are sufficient to completely control these flow regimes. This work, however, shows that under time-varying rainfall conditions, vertical, downslope, and upslope lateral flow can concurrently occur at different depths and locations within the hillslope. More importantly, we show that the state of wetting or drying in a hillslope defines the temporal and spatial regimes of flow and when and where laterally downslope and/or laterally upslope flow occurs.

  2. Direction of unsaturated flow in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Kaya, B.S.; Godt, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of soil moisture in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope is a transient, variably saturated physical process controlled by rainfall characteristics, hillslope geometry, and the hydrological properties of the hillslope materials. The major driving mechanisms for moisture movement are gravity and gradients in matric potential. The latter is solely controlled by gradients of moisture content. In a homogeneous and isotropic saturated hillslope, absent a gradient in moisture content and under the driving force of gravity with a constant pressure boundary at the slope surface, flow is always in the lateral downslope direction, under either transient or steady state conditions. However, under variably saturated conditions, both gravity and moisture content gradients drive fluid motion, leading to complex flow patterns. In general, the flow field near the ground surface is variably saturated and transient, and the direction of flow could be laterally downslope, laterally upslope, or vertically downward. Previous work has suggested that prevailing rainfall conditions are sufficient to completely control these flow regimes. This work, however, shows that under time-varying rainfall conditions, vertical, downslope, and upslope lateral flow can concurrently occur at different depths and locations within the hillslope. More importantly, we show that the state of wetting or drying in a hillslope defines the temporal and spatial regimes of flow and when and where laterally downslope and/or laterally upslope flow occurs. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Interplay of directional and isotropic interactions in self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audus, Debra; Starr, Francis; Douglas, Jack

    Patchy particle models, composed of hard spheres with decorated with attractive patches, have been introduced as models of micron-sized particles with anisotropic interactions, as well as solutions of globular proteins. Here, we extend the canonical model of the patchy particles to include a short-ranged isotropic interaction in order to probe of the coupling of the directional and isotropic interactions on the self-assembly process. In particular, we evaluate basic properties characterizing self-assembly including average cluster mass and the fraction of particles in the clustered state using both Monte Carlo simulation and analytic Wertheim theory. This combination allows for validation of the theory and for insight into analyzing experimental data. We also find that Flory-Stockmayer theory describes the cluster size distribution data found in our simulations remarkably well, despite its erroneous mass-scaling exponent. This result, coupled with Wertheim theory, predicts both a master curve for the average cluster mass and a method to parameterize patchy particle models using experimental data.

  4. Large Deformation Constitutive Laws for Isotropic Thermoelastic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Plohr, Bradley J.; Plohr, Jeeyeon N.

    2012-07-25

    We examine the approximations made in using Hooke's law as a constitutive relation for an isotropic thermoelastic material subjected to large deformation by calculating the stress evolution equation from the free energy. For a general thermoelastic material, we employ the volume-preserving part of the deformation gradient to facilitate volumetric/shear strain decompositions of the free energy, its first derivatives (the Cauchy stress and entropy), and its second derivatives (the specific heat, Grueneisen tensor, and elasticity tensor). Specializing to isotropic materials, we calculate these constitutive quantities more explicitly. For deformations with limited shear strain, but possibly large changes in volume, we show that the differential equations for the stress components involve new terms in addition to the traditional Hooke's law terms. These new terms are of the same order in the shear strain as the objective derivative terms needed for frame indifference; unless the latter terms are negligible, the former cannot be neglected. We also demonstrate that accounting for the new terms requires that the deformation gradient be included as a field variable

  5. Nematic - isotropic phase transition in turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Guenter; Weiss, Stephan

    2013-11-01

    The nematic-isotropic transition of a liquid crystal (LC) at a temperature TNI is an example of a soft phase transition, where fluid properties, although discontinuous, change only very little and where the latent heat is small. Understanding thermal convection in the presence of such a phase change is relevant to convection in Earth's mantle where discontinuous changes of the crystalline structure occur. We report on turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection of a nematic LC while it undergoes a transition from the nematic to the isotropic phase in a cylindrical convection cell with aspect ratio Γ (height over diameter) of 0.50. The difference between the top- and the bottom-plate temperature ΔT =Tb -Tt was held constant, while the average temperature Tm = (Tb +Tt) / 2 was varied. There was a significant increase of heat transport when TNI was between Tb and Tt. Measurements of the temperatures along the side wall as a function of Tm showed several ranges with qualitatively different behavior of quantities such as the time-averaged side-wall temperature, temperature gradient, or temperature fluctuations. We interpret these different ranges in terms of processes in the thermal boundary layers close to the top and bottom plates. SW acknowledges support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation through Grant No. DMR11-58514.

  6. An Areal Isotropic Spline Filter for Surface Metrology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Tong, Mingsi; Chu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of the spline filter as an areal filter for surface metrology. A profile (2D) filter is often applied in orthogonal directions to yield an areal filter for a three-dimensional (3D) measurement. Unlike the Gaussian filter, the spline filter presents an anisotropic characteristic when used as an areal filter. This disadvantage hampers the wide application of spline filters for evaluation and analysis of areal surface topography. An approximation method is proposed in this paper to overcome the problem. In this method, a profile high-order spline filter serial is constructed to approximate the filtering characteristic of the Gaussian filter. Then an areal filter with isotropic characteristic is composed by implementing the profile spline filter in the orthogonal directions. It is demonstrated that the constructed areal filter has two important features for surface metrology: an isotropic amplitude characteristic and no end effects. Some examples of applying this method on simulated and practical surfaces are analyzed.

  7. Charge pariticle transport in the non-isotropic turbulences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The scattering and diffusion of energetic charged particles is not only important for understanding phenomena such as diffusive shock acceleration but it also is a natural probe of the statistical characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Although Parker's transport equation (Parker 1965) allows us to describe the propagation of charged particles, the transport coefficients needed in the equation must be determined. Using Quasi-Linear Theory (QLT, e.g. Jokipii (1966)), one finds that coefficients can be related to the correlation function or power spectrum of homogeneous magnetic turbulence. However, different turbulence models will generally have a different influence on particle's scattering and diffusion. Among those models developed in MHD Turbulence, such as isotropic, Slab plus 2D (Tu & Marsch 1993; Gray et al 1996; Bieber et al 1996), etc. Here, using test-particle orbit simulations to calculate the transport coefficients, we study particle transport in synthesized asymmetric turbulence using the form first proposed by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995). We developed and introduce a systematic method to synthesize scale-dependent non-isotropic magnetic turbulences. We also developed and introduce a method to synthesize the 3d turbulent magnetic field from the observed solar wind time series dataset. We present the comparison of their effects on charge particle transport with previous theories and models.

  8. Imaging tilted transversely isotropic media with a generalised screen propagator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sung-Il; Byun, Joongmoo; Seol, Soon Jee

    2015-01-01

    One-way wave equation migration is computationally efficient compared with reverse time migration, and it provides a better subsurface image than ray-based migration algorithms when imaging complex structures. Among many one-way wave-based migration algorithms, we adopted the generalised screen propagator (GSP) to build the migration algorithm. When the wavefield propagates through the large velocity variation in lateral or steeply dipping structures, GSP increases the accuracy of the wavefield in wide angle by adopting higher-order terms induced from expansion of the vertical slowness in Taylor series with each perturbation term. To apply the migration algorithm to a more realistic geological structure, we considered tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media. The new GSP, which contains the tilting angle as a symmetric axis of the anisotropic media, was derived by modifying the GSP designed for vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media. To verify the developed TTI-GSP, we analysed the accuracy of wave propagation, especially for the new perturbation parameters and the tilting angle; the results clearly showed that the perturbation term of the tilting angle in TTI media has considerable effects on proper propagation. In addition, through numerical tests, we demonstrated that the developed TTI-GS migration algorithm could successfully image a steeply dipping salt flank with high velocity variation around anisotropic layers.

  9. The decay of isotropic turbulence in a rapidly rotating frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, C. G.; Mansour, N. N.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation of the decay of initially isotropic turbulence in a rapidly rotating frame was conducted. This 128 x 128 x 128 simulation was completed for a Reynolds number Re sub lambda = 15.3 and a Rossby number Ro sub lambda = 0.07 based on the initial turbulent kinetic energy and Taylor microscale. The numerical results indicate that the turbulence remains essentially isotropic during the major part of the decay (i.e., beyond the point where the turbulent kinetic energy has decayed to less than 10 percent of its initial value). The rapid rotation has the primary effect of shutting off the energy transfer so that the turbulence dissipation (and hence the rate of decay of the turbulent kinetic energy) is substantially reduced. Consequently, the anisotropy tensor remains essentially unchanged while the energy spectrum undergoes a nearly linear viscous decay (the same results that are predicted by Rapid Distortion Theory which is only formally valid for much shorter elapsed times. Surprisingly, no Taylor-Proudman reorganization of the flow to a two-dimensional state is observed. The implications that these results have on turbulence modeling are discussed briefly along with prospective future research.

  10. COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, TJ

    2003-10-22

    A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement

  11. Line-space description of resonant four-wave mixing: theory for isotropic molecular states.

    PubMed

    Kouzov, A; Radi, P

    2014-05-21

    Based on the quantum Liouville formalism, a theory of the two-color, triply resonant four-wave mixing is developed for molecules with isotropically oriented angular momenta. The approach allows to strictly incorporate the relaxation matrices Γ((r)) (r = 0, 1, 2) into the third-order susceptibility χ((3)) whose expression acquires therewith the form of a scalar product in the line space. Thanks to this representation, isolation of all resonance terms from χ((3)) becomes a routine task. Some of these terms correspond to the case when a molecule initially interacts with two pump photons of the same frequency. Such interactions give rise to the grating line-space vectors which have the same (zero) eigenfrequency. Due to this degeneracy, the latter are easily mixed by rotationally inelastic collisions which shows up in a state-resolved coherence transfer. The satellite signals induced thereby provide a great scope to study the state-to-state inelastic rates in situ by purely optical means. If the diagonal form of Γ is assumed, the satellites become forbidden and our results reduce to conventional expressions for the main resonances. Polarization configurations are designed for direct measurements of the population (r = 0), orientation (r = 1), and alignment (r = 2) contributions to χ((3)). Finally, depending on the photon-molecule interaction sequence, the resonance terms of χ((3)) are shown to be differently affected by velocity averaging, the effect which conspicuously manifests itself when Doppler broadening becomes paramount.

  12. Loop Heat Pipes and Capillary Pumped Loops: An Applications Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Theodore; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLS) and loop heat pipes (LHPS) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices which have recently gained increasing acceptance in space applications. Both systems work based on the same principles and have very similar designs. Nevertheless, some differences exist in the construction of the evaporator and the hydro-accumulator, and these differences lead to very distinct operating characteristics for each loop. This paper presents comparisons of the two loops from an applications perspective, and addresses their impact on spacecraft design, integration, and test. Some technical challenges and issues for both loops are also addressed.

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of DOA estimation using AML algorithm for an isotropic and non-isotropic 3D array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Shadnaz; Ali, Andreas M.; Collier, Travis C.; Yao, Yuan; Hudson, Ralph E.; Yao, Kung; Taylor, Charles E.

    2007-09-01

    The focus of most direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation problems has been based mainly on a two-dimensional (2D) scenario where we only need to estimate the azimuth angle. But in various practical situations we have to deal with a three-dimensional scenario. The importance of being able to estimate both azimuth and elevation angles with high accuracy and low complexity is of interest. We present the theoretical and the practical issues of DOA estimation using the Approximate-Maximum-Likelihood (AML) algorithm in a 3D scenario. We show that the performance of the proposed 3D AML algorithm converges to the Cramer-Rao Bound. We use the concept of an isotropic array to reduce the complexity of the proposed algorithm by advocating a decoupled 3D version. We also explore a modified version of the decoupled 3D AML algorithm which can be used for DOA estimation with non-isotropic arrays. Various numerical results are presented. We use two acoustic arrays each consisting of 8 microphones to do some field measurements. The processing of the measured data from the acoustic arrays for different azimuth and elevation angles confirms the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  14. The quantum state of the universe from deformation quantization and classical-quantum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashki, M.; Jalalzadeh, S.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we study the quantum cosmology of homogeneous and isotropic cosmology, via the Weyl-Wigner-Groenewold-Moyal formalism of phase space quantization, with perfect fluid as a matter source. The corresponding quantum cosmology is described by the Moyal-Wheeler-DeWitt equation which has exact solutions in Moyal phase space, resulting in Wigner quasiprobability distribution functions peaking around the classical paths for large values of scale factor. We show that the Wigner functions of these models are peaked around the non-singular universes with quantum modified density parameter of radiation.

  15. 3D loop models and the CP(n-1) sigma model.

    PubMed

    Nahum, Adam; Chalker, J T; Serna, P; Ortuño, M; Somoza, A M

    2011-09-09

    Many statistical mechanics problems can be framed in terms of random curves; we consider a class of three-dimensional loop models that are prototypes for such ensembles. The models show transitions between phases with infinite loops and short-loop phases. We map them to CP(n-1) sigma models, where n is the loop fugacity. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we find continuous transitions for n=1, 2, 3, and first order transitions for n≥5. The results are relevant to line defects in random media, as well as to Anderson localization and (2+1)-dimensional quantum magnets.

  16. Wilson loops from supergravity and string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, J.

    2000-03-01

    We present a theorem that determines the value of the Wilson loop associated with a Nambu-Goto action which generalizes the action of the AdS 5 × S 5 model. In particular, we derive sufficient conditions for confining behaviour. We then apply this theorem to various string models. We go beyond the classical string picture by incorporating quadratic quantum fluctuations. We show that the bosonic determinant of Dp -branes with 16 supersymmetries yields a Lüscher term. We confirm that the free energy associated with a BPS configuration of a single quark is free from divergences. We show that unlike for a string in flat spacetime in the case of AdS 5 × S 5 the fermionic determinant does not cancel the bosonic one. For a set-up that corresponds to a confining gauge theory the correction to the potential is attractive. We determine the form of the Wilson loop for actions that include non-trivial B µicons/Journals/Common/nu" ALT="nu" ALIGN="TOP"/> field. The issue of an exact determination of the value of the stringy Wilson loop is discussed.

  17. Toward precision holography with supersymmetric Wilson loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraggi, Alberto; Pando Zayas, Leopoldo A.; Silva, Guillermo A.; Trancanelli, Diego

    2016-04-01

    We consider certain 1/4 BPS Wilson loop operators in SU( N) N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, whose expectation value can be computed exactly via supersymmetric localization. Holographically, these operators are mapped to fundamental strings in AdS 5 × S 5. The string on-shell action reproduces the large N and large coupling limit of the gauge theory expectation value and, according to the AdS/CFT correspondence, there should also be a precise match between subleading corrections to these limits. We perform a test of such match at next-to-leading order in string theory, by deriving the spectrum of quantum fluctuations around the classical string solution and by computing the corresponding 1-loop effective action. We discuss in detail the supermultiplet structure of the fluctuations. To remove a possible source of ambiguity in the ghost zero mode measure, we compare the 1/4 BPS configuration with the 1/2 BPS one, dual to a circular Wilson loop. We find a discrepancy between the string theory result and the gauge theory prediction, confirming a previous result in the literature. We are able to track the modes from which this discrepancy originates, as well as the modes that by themselves would give the expected result.

  18. Aurora Australis, Sinuous Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the Aurora Australis or Southern Lights (location unknown) shows a sinuous looping band of airglow above the Earth Limb. Calculated to be in the 80 - 120 km altitude region, auroral activity is due to exitation of atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere by radiation from the van Allen Radiation Belts and is most common above the 65 degree north and south latitude range during the spring and fall of the year.

  19. Identifying isotropic events using a regional moment tensor inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R

    2008-07-16

    The deviatoric and isotropic source components for 17 explosions at the Nevada Test Site, as well as 12 earthquakes and 3 collapses in the surrounding region of the western US, are calculated using a regional time-domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Confidence regions of the model parameters are estimated from the data misfit by assuming normally distributed parameter values. We investigate the sensitivity of the resolved parameters of an explosion to imperfect Earth models, inaccurate event depths, and data with a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assuming a reasonable azimuthal distribution of stations. In the band of interest (0.02-0.10 Hz) the source-type calculated from complete moment tensor inversion is insensitive to velocity models perturbations that cause less than a half-cycle shift (<5 sec) in arrival time error if shifting of the waveforms is allowed. The explosion source-type is insensitive to an incorrect depth assumption (for a true depth of 1 km), but the goodness-of-fit of the inversion result cannot be used to resolve the true depth of the explosion. Noise degrades the explosive character of the result, and a good fit and accurate result are obtained when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is greater than 5. We assess the depth and frequency dependence upon the resolved explosive moment. As the depth decreases from 1 km to 200 m, the isotropic moment is no longer accurately resolved and is in error between 50-200%. However, even at the most shallow depth the resultant moment tensor is dominated by the explosive component when the data has a good SNR. The sensitivity investigation is extended via the introduction of the network sensitivity solution, which takes

  20. Loops of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opolski, Antoni

    2014-12-01

    Professor Antoni Opolski was actively interested in astronomy after his retirement in 1983. He especially liked to study the works of the famous astronomer Copernicus getting inspiration for his own work. Opolski started his work on planetary loops in 2011 continuing it to the end of 2012 . During this period calculations, drawings, tables, and basic descriptions of all the planets of the Solar System were created with the use of a piece of paper and a pencil only. In 2011 Antoni Opolski asked us to help him in editing the manuscript and preparing it for publication. We have been honored having the opportunity to work on articles on planetary loops with Antoni Opolski in his house for several months. In the middle of 2012 the detailed material on Jupiter was ready. However, professor Opolski improved the article by smoothing the text and preparing new, better drawings. Finally the article ''Loops of Jupiter'', written by the 99- year old astronomer, was published in the year of his 100th birthday.

  1. Verification of Loop Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Lionello, R.; Mok, Y.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Many different techniques have been used to characterize the plasma in the solar corona: density-sensitive spectral line ratios are used to infer the density, the evolution of coronal structures in different passbands is used to infer the temperature evolution, and the simultaneous intensities measured in multiple passbands are used to determine the emission measure. All these analysis techniques assume that the intensity of the structures can be isolated through background subtraction. In this paper, we use simulated observations from a 3D hydrodynamic simulation of a coronal active region to verify these diagnostics. The density and temperature from the simulation are used to generate images in several passbands and spectral lines. We identify loop structures in the simulated images and calculate the loop background. We then determine the density, temperature and emission measure distribution as a function of time from the observations and compare with the true temperature and density of the loop. We find that the overall characteristics of the temperature, density, and emission measure are recovered by the analysis methods, but the details of the true temperature and density are not. For instance, the emission measure curves calculated from the simulated observations are much broader than the true emission measure distribution, though the average temperature evolution is similar. These differences are due, in part, to inadequate background subtraction, but also indicate a limitation of the analysis methods.

  2. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  3. Quantum tunneling from the charged non-rotating BTZ black hole with GUP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Jafar; Reza Shajiee, Vahid

    2017-03-01

    In the present paper, the quantum corrections to the temperature, entropy and specific heat capacity of the charged non-rotating BTZ black hole are studied by the generalized uncertainty principle in the tunneling formalism. It is shown that quantum corrected entropy would be of the form of predicted entropy in quantum gravity theories like string theory and loop quantum gravity.

  4. Line mixing effects in isotropic Raman spectra of pure N{sub 2}: A classical trajectory study

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Sergey V.; Boulet, Christian; Buzykin, Oleg G.; Thibault, Franck

    2014-11-14

    Line mixing effects in the Q branch of pure N{sub 2} isotropic Raman scattering are studied at room temperature using a classical trajectory method. It is the first study using an extended modified version of Gordon's classical theory of impact broadening and shift of rovibrational lines. The whole relaxation matrix is calculated using an exact 3D classical trajectory method for binary collisions of rigid N{sub 2} molecules employing the most up-to-date intermolecular potential energy surface (PES). A simple symmetrizing procedure is employed to improve off-diagonal cross-sections to make them obeying exactly the principle of detailed balance. The adequacy of the results is confirmed by the sum rule. The comparison is made with available experimental data as well as with benchmark fully quantum close coupling [F. Thibault, C. Boulet, and Q. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044303 (2014)] and refined semi-classical Robert-Bonamy [C. Boulet, Q. Ma, and F. Thibault, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 084310 (2014)] results. All calculations (classical, quantum, and semi-classical) were made using the same PES. The agreement between classical and quantum relaxation matrices is excellent, opening the way to the analysis of more complex molecular systems.

  5. On some physical aspects of isotropic cosmology in Riemann-Cartan spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Minkevich, A.V.; Garkun, A.S.; Kudin, V.I. E-mail: awm@matman.uwm.edu.pl E-mail: kudzin_w@tut.by

    2013-03-01

    Isotropic cosmology built in the framework of the Poincaré gauge theory of gravity based on sufficiently general expression of gravitational Lagrangian is considered. The derivation of cosmological equations and equations for torsion functions in the case of the most general homogeneous isotropic models is given. Physical aspects of isotropic cosmology connected with possible solution of dark energy problem and problem of cosmological singularity are discussed.

  6. Fluctuation pressure of a membrane between walls through five loops.

    PubMed

    Kastening, Boris

    2002-12-01

    An earlier four-loop calculation of the fluctuation pressure of a fluid membrane between two infinite walls is extended to five loops. Variational perturbation theory is used to extract the hard-wall limit from perturbative results obtained with a smooth potential. Comparison with a structurally similar quantum mechanics problem of a particle in a box is used for an alternative way of extracting the membrane pressure and also to estimate the quality of the results. Our values lie above the best available Monte Carlo data.

  7. Three-Loop Superfiniteness of N=8 Supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.; Carrasco, J.J.; Dixon, L.J.; Johansson, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Roiban, R.

    2007-02-20

    We construct the three-loop four-point amplitude of N = 8 supergravity using the unitarity method. The amplitude is ultraviolet finite in four dimensions. Novel cancellations, not predicted by traditional superspace power-counting arguments, render its degree of divergence in D dimensions to be no worse than that of N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory--a finite theory in four dimensions. Similar cancellations can be identified at all loop orders in certain unitarity cuts, suggesting that N = 8 supergravity may be a perturbatively finite theory of quantum gravity.

  8. The modified cumulant expansion for two-dimensional isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, T.; Yanase, S.

    1981-09-01

    The two-dimensional isotropic turbulence in an incompressible fluid is investigated using the modified zero fourth-order cumulant approximation. The dynamical equation for the energy spectrum obtained under this approximation is solved numerically and the similarity laws governing the solution in the energy-containing and enstrophy-dissipation ranges are derived analytically. At large Reynolds numbers the numerical solutions yield the k to the -3rd power inertial subrange spectrum which was predicted by Kraichnan (1967), Leith (1968) and Batchelor (1969), assuming a finite enstrophy dissipation in the inviscid limit. The energy-containing range is found to satisfy an inviscid similarity while the enstrophy-dissipation range is governed by the quasi-equilibrium similarity with respect to the enstrophy dissipation as proposed by Batchelor (1969). There exists a critical time which separates the initial period and the similarity period in which the enstrophy dissipation vanishes and remains non-zero respectively in the inviscid limit.

  9. A spiral vortex model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Keith; Ooi, Andrew; Chong, Min

    2002-11-01

    The Lundgren-Townsend model of turbulent fine scales has been successful in predicting some of the properties of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Lundgren obtained these results by averaging over an ensemble of nearly axisymmetric, unsteady, stretched spiral vortices. These vortical structures are represented in the model by a large-time asymptotic solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Extending on the work of Pullin & Saffman [Phys. Fluids 8, 3072 (1996)], we calculate the energy spectrum and longitudinal velocity structure functions for a specific realisation of the Lundgren-Townsend model. Here the members of our ensemble are time-evolving spiral vortex structures resulting from the merging of stretched Burgers vortex tubes. The merging is computed numerically following the method of Buntine & Pullin [JFM 205, 263 (1989)]. We present results for a range of vortex Reynolds numbers.

  10. Synthesis of isotropic carbon fibers from coal extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Kimber, G.M.; Vego, A.; Rantell, T.D.; Fowler, C.; Johnson, A.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1996-12-31

    General Purpose Carbon Fibers (GPCF) are produced commercially from isotropic petroleum and coal-tar pitch precursors. Their lower cost makes them more attractive than high performance PAN (polyacrylonitrile) based or mesophase pitch-based fibers for applications where ultra-high strength or stiffness is not required. In recent years there has also been a growing interest in the use of activated carbon fibers in environmental and gas separation applications. Potentially low cost fiber precursors could be produced from coals by solvent extraction. Such extracts can be obtained in much higher yields than coal tar pitch (e.g., >50 wt.% versus <5 wt.% of coal). There is also the opportunity to widely vary the coal extract properties by control of reaction conditions (e.g., coal rank, type of solvent, reactant gas, heat treatment temperature and time) and thus alter the conditions required for fiber synthesis and the properties of the carbonized and activated fiber products.

  11. Shape memory polymers: three-dimensional isotropic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, Olaniyi; Mo, Changki

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive three-dimensional isotropic numerical simulation for a thermo-mechanical constitutive model of shape memory polymers (SMPs). In order to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of SMPs, a one-dimensional rheological thermo-mechanical constitutive model is adopted, translated into a three-dimensional form and a time discrete form of the three-dimensional model is then presented. Numerical simulation of this model was developed using the UMAT subroutine capabilities of the finite element software ABAQUS. Evolution of the analysis was conducted by making use of the backward difference scheme, which was applied to all quantities within the model, including the material properties. A comparison of the numerical simulation results was carried out with the available experimental data. Numerical simulation results clearly exhibit the thermo-mechanical properties of the material which include shape fixity, shape recovery, and recovery stress. Finally, a prediction for the transverse and shear directions of the material is presented.

  12. Bubble shapes in foams: The importance of being isotropic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Kraynik, Andrew; Reinelt, Douglas; Sullivan, John

    2004-03-01

    Foams, and by extension a whole class of random cellular materials are characterized by minimizing total interfacial area between the cells. Both structure and evolution of such materials by aging (coarsening) are ill-understood because of our lack of knowledge of the cell geometry. Combining Plateau's rules and certain symmetry requirements, we analytically determine the geometry of generic polyhedral cells we call Isotropic Plateau Polyhedra (IPPs). Their properties, such as surface area, edge length, or coarsening rate, are exactly known and very close approximations to the corresponding properties of average, random foam bubbles. Certain IPPs can also be found experimentally in soap foam. We show that measuring the coarsening rate of these bubbles allows for the simple computation of the soap film thickness, which is found to vary with foam age.

  13. Stress waves in isotropic elastic plate excited by circular transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Karagulle, H.

    1986-01-01

    Steady state harmonic stress waves in an isotropic elastic plate excited on one face by a circular transducer are analyzed theoretically. The transmitting transducer transforms an electrical voltage into a uniform normal stress at the top of the plate. To solve the boundary value problem,the radiation into a half-space is considered. The receiving transducer produces an electrical voltage proportional to the average spatially integrated normal stress over its face due to an incident wave. A numerical procedure is given to evaluate the frequency response at a receiving point due to a multiply reflected wave in the near field. Its stability and convergence are discussed. Parameterization plots which determine the particular wave whose frequency response has maximum magnitude compared with other multiple reflected waves are given for a range of values of dimensionless parameters. The effects of changes in the values of the parameters are discussed.

  14. Graphene as a Tunable Anisotropic or Isotropic Plasmonic Metasurface.

    PubMed

    Huidobro, Paloma A; Kraft, Matthias; Maier, Stefan A; Pendry, John B

    2016-05-24

    We demonstrate a tunable plasmonic metasurface by considering a graphene sheet subject to a periodically patterned doping level. The unique optical properties of graphene result in electrically tunable plasmons that allow for extreme confinement of electromagnetic energy in the technologically significant regime of THz frequencies. Here, we add an extra degree of freedom by using graphene as a metasurface, proposing to dope it with an electrical gate patterned in the micron or submicron scale. By extracting the effective conductivity of the sheet, we characterize metasurfaces periodically modulated along one or two directions. In the first case, and making use of the analytical insight provided by transformation optics, we show an efficient control of THz radiation for one polarization. In the second case, we demonstrate a metasurface with an isotropic response that is independent of wave polarization and orientation.

  15. Dynamic Green's function for homogeneous and isotropic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahay, Pratap N.

    2001-12-01

    The source terms that are meaningful in dynamic poroelasticity are those exciting the centre-of-mass field and the internal field. These fields are the sum of the mass weighted motion and the difference motion of the solid and fluid constituents, respectively. The corresponding homogeneous and isotropic Green's function valid for a uniform whole-space is obtained using Kupradze's method after the vector differential equations for these two fields are combined and expressed as a 6×6 matrix differential operator. The solution is quite amenable to numerical calculations and the results for a saturated Berea sandstone show that the fast P and S waves correspond to those usually detected by geophones at large distances from the source. The slow P wave, which is associated with fluid flow, is rapidly attenuated with distance from the source while the slow S wave, which is part of the solution, dies off rapidly in the near-neighbourhood of the source.

  16. Giant isotropic magnetostrain of GaCMn3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X. G.; Tong, P.; Lin, J. C.; Yang, C.; Zhang, K.; Lin, S.; Song, W. H.; Sun, Y. P.

    2017-02-01

    Normal magnetostriction (MS), which comes from the gradual rotation of magnetic domains in ferromagnets, is anisotropic and smoothly dependent on the applied magnetic field. In cubic antiperovskite compound GaCMn3, a sharp shrink of lattice volume takes place at the antiferromagnetic (AFM) to intermediate magnetic (IM) phase transition. Below the Neel temperature (˜143 K), the AFM-IM transformation can be driven by external magnetic field, leading to a giant isotropic MS of ˜1700 ppm comparable to that of commercial Terfenol-D. In contrast to normal MS, the field-induced magnetostrain exhibits a rapid switch behavior at the critical field. Furthermore, good reversibility and stability were demonstrated for the giant MS of GaCMn3 compound.

  17. Direct simulation of particle dispersion in a decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elghobashi, S.; Truesdell, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a numerical investigation of the dispersion of solid particles in decaying isotropic turbulence are presented. The 3D time-dependent velocity field of a homogeneous nonstationary turbulence is computed using the method of direct numerical simulation (DNS). The dispersion characteristics of three different solid particles (corn, copper, and glass) injected in the flow are obtained by integrating the complete equation of particle motion along the instantaneous trajectories of 22-cubed particles for each particle type, and then by performing ensemble averaging. Good agreement was achieved between the present DNS results and the measured time development of the mean-square displacement of the particles. Questions of how and why the dispersion statistics of a solid particle differ from those of its corresponding fluid point and surrounding fluid and what influences inertia and gravity have on these statistics are also discussed.

  18. Dispersion of waves in relativistic plasmas with isotropic particle distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.

    2009-03-15

    The dispersion laws of Langmuir and transverse waves are calculated in the relativistic nonmagnetized formalism for several isotropic particle distributions: thermal, power law, relativistic Lorentzian {kappa}, and hybrid {beta}. For Langmuir waves the parameters of superluminal undamped, subluminal damped principal, and higher modes are determined for a range of distribution parameters. The undamped and principal damped modes are found to match smoothly. Principal damped and second damped modes are found not to match smoothly. The presence of maximum wavenumber is discovered above that no longitudinal modes formally exist. The higher damped modes are discovered to be qualitatively different for thermal and certain nonthermal distributions. Consistently with the known results, the Landau damping is calculated to be stronger for nonthermal power-law-like distributions. The dispersion law is obtained for the single undamped transverse mode. The analytic results for the simplest distributions are provided.

  19. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Wan, M.; Montgomery, D.

    2013-12-01

    Study of the transport and diffusion of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider Diffusion of charged particles in fully three dimensional statistically isotropic magnetic field turbulence with no mean field which is pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We classify different regions of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius of the charged particle to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. We propose three different theoretical models to calculate the diffusion coefficient each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared with those from computer simulations, showing very good agreement.

  20. A new approach to Lagrangian investigations of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barjona, Manuel; B. da Silva, Carlos; Idmec Team

    2016-11-01

    A new numerical approach is used in conjunction with direct numerical simulations (DNS) of statistically stationary (forced) isotropic turbulence to investigate the high Reynolds number scaling properties of turbulence characteristics in a Lagrangian frame. The new method provides an alternative route to the determination of the classical Lagrangian turbulence quantities, such as the second order Lagrangian velocity structure function and two point particle separation, at a much higher Reynolds number than as obtained in previous numerical simulations, and displays excellent agreement with the classical theoretical predictions and existing numerical simulations and experimental data. The authors acknowledge the Laboratory for Advanced Computing at University of Coimbra for providing HPC, computing, consulting resources that have contributed to the research results reported within this paper. URL http://www.lca.uc.pt.

  1. Isotropic cosmological models in F(T,TG) theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Nazir, Kanwal

    2016-09-01

    This paper is devoted to study evolution of the isotropic universe models in the framework of F(T,TG) gravity (T represents torsion scalar and TG is the teleparallel equivalent of the Gauss-Bonnet (GB) term). We construct F(T,TG) models by taking different eras of the universe like non-relativistic and relativistic matter eras, dark energy (DE) dominated era and their combinations. It is found that the reconstructed models indicate decreasing behavior for DE dominated era and its combination with other eras. We also discuss stability of each reconstructed model. Finally, we evaluate equation of state (EoS) parameter by considering two models and study its behavior graphically.

  2. Assessing the Structure of Isotropic and Anisotropic Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Holden, Lisa; Grayson, Lindsay; Wallace, Kirk

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent magnetic fields permeate our universe, impacting a wide range of astronomical phenomena across all cosmic scales. A clear example is the magnetic field that threads the interstellar medium (ISM), which impacts the motion of cosmic rays through that medium. Understanding the structure of magnetic turbulence within the ISM and how it relates to the physical quantities that characterize it can thus inform our analysis of particle transport within these regions. Toward that end, we probe the structure of magentic turbulence through the use of Lyapunov exponents for a suite of isotropic and nonisotropic Alfvénic turbulence profiles. Our results provide a means of calculating a “turbulence lengthscale” that can then be connected to how cosmic rays propagate through magentically turbulent environments, and we perform such an analysis for molecular cloud environments.

  3. Diffusion of Heat from a Line Source in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uberoi, Mahinder S; Corrsin, Stanley

    1953-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been made of some features of the turbulent heat diffusion behind a line heated wire stretched perpendicular to a flowing isotropic turbulence. The mean temperature distributions have been measured with systematic variations in wind speed, size of turbulence-producing grid, and downstream location of heat source. The nature of the temperature fluctuation field has been studied. A comparison of Lagrangian and Eulerian analyses for diffusion in a nondecaying turbulence yields an expression for turbulent-heat-transfer coefficient in terms of turbulence velocity and a Lagrangian "scale." the ratio of Eulerian to Lagrangian microscale has been determined theoretically by generalization of a result of Heisenberg and with arbitrary constants taken from independent sources, shows rough agreement with experimental results. A convenient form has been deduced for the criterion of interchangeability of instantaneous space and time derivatives in a flowing turbulence.

  4. Helicity statistics in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Ganapati; De Pietro, Massimo; Biferale, Luca

    2017-02-01

    We study the statistical properties of helicity in direct numerical simulations of fully developed homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and in a class of turbulence shell models. We consider correlation functions based on combinations of vorticity and velocity increments that are not invariant under mirror symmetry. We also study the scaling properties of high-order structure functions based on the moments of the velocity increments projected on a subset of modes with either positive or negative helicity (chirality). We show that mirror symmetry is recovered at small scales, i.e., chiral terms are subleading and they are well captured by a dimensional argument plus anomalous corrections. These findings are also supported by a high Reynolds numbers study of helical shell models with the same chiral symmetry of Navier-Stokes equations.

  5. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Blasi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.; Chuychai, P.; Dmitruk, P.; Wan, M.; Parashar, T. N.; Chhiber, R.

    2017-03-01

    The investigation of the diffusive transport of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider the diffusion of charged particles in fully three-dimensional isotropic turbulent magnetic fields with no mean field, which may be pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We identify different ranges of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. Two different theoretical models are proposed to calculate the diffusion coefficient, each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared to those from computer simulations, showing good agreement.

  6. Circular random motion in diatom gliding under isotropic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Jiménez Guerra, Andrés; Peña Maldonado, Ana Iris; Covarrubias Rubio, Yadiralia; Viridiana García Meza, Jessica

    2014-12-01

    How cells migrate has been investigated primarily for the case of trajectories composed by joined straight segments. In contrast, little is known when cellular motion follows intrinsically curved paths. Here, we use time-lapse optical microscopy and automated trajectory tracking to investigate how individual cells of the diatom Nitzschia communis glide across surfaces under isotropic environmental conditions. We find a distinct kind of random motion, where trajectories are formed by circular arcs traveled at constant speed, alternated with random stoppages, direction reversals and changes in the orientation of the arcs. Analysis of experimental and computer-simulated trajectories show that the circular random motion of diatom gliding is not optimized for long-distance travel but rather for recurrent coverage of limited surface area. These results suggest that one main biological role for this type of diatom motility is to efficiently build the foundation of algal biofilms.

  7. Measuring order in the isotropic packing of elastic rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, E.; Deboeuf, S.; Corson, F.; Boudaoud, A.; Adda-Bedia, M.

    2011-08-01

    The packing of elastic bodies has emerged as a paradigm for the study of macroscopic disordered systems. However, progress is hampered by the lack of controlled experiments. Here we consider a model experiment for the isotropic two-dimensional confinement of a rod by a central force. We seek to measure how ordered is a folded configuration and we identify two key quantities. A geometrical characterization is given by the number of superposed layers in the configuration. Using temporal modulations of the confining force, we probe the mechanical properties of the configuration and we define and measure its effective susceptibility. These two quantities may be used to build a statistical framework for packed elastic systems.

  8. Acoustoelastic lamb wave propagation in a homogeneous, isotropic aluminum plate

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Navneet; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Lee, Sang Jun

    2011-06-23

    The effect of stress on Lamb wave propagation is relevant to both nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring because of changes in received signals due to both the associated strain and the acoustoelastic effect. A homogeneous plate that is initially isotropic becomes anisotropic under uniaxial stress, and dispersion of propagating waves becomes directionally dependent. The problem is similar to Lamb wave propagation in an anisotropic plate, except the fourth order tensor in the resulting wave equation does not have the same symmetry as that for the unstressed anisotropic plate, and the constitutive equation relating incremental stress to incremental strain is more complicated. Here we consider the theory of acoustoelastic Lamb wave propagation and show how dispersion curves shift anisotropically for an aluminum plate under uniaxial tension. Theoretical predictions of changes in phase velocity as a function of propagation direction are compared to experimental results for a single wave mode.

  9. Dynamics of Aerosol Particles in Stationary, Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Lance R.; Meng, Hui

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study of the dynamics of sub-Kolmogorov-size aerosol particles in stationary isotropic turbulence has been performed. The study combined direct numerical simulations (DNS; directed by Prof. Collins) and high-resolution experimental measurements (directed by Prof. Meng) under conditions of nearly perfect geometric and parametric overlap. The goal was to measure the accumulation of particles in low-vorticity regions of the flow that arises from the effect commonly referred to as preferential concentration. The grant technically was initiated on June 13, 2000; however, funding was not available until July 11, 2000. The grant was originally awarded to Penn State University (numerical simulations) and SUNY-Buffalo (experiments); however, Prof. Collins effort was moved to Cornell University on January 2002 when he joined that university. He completed the study there. A list of the specific tasks that were completed under this study is presented.

  10. The Local Bubble as a cosmic-ray isotropizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, I.; Weinreuter, M.; Kunz, S.; Gaggero, D.

    2015-07-01

    The arrival directions of energetic positrons and electrons convey fundamental information on their origin. PAMELA, and more recently AMS, have measured an anomalous population of energetic positrons, which cannot be explained in standard cosmic ray propagation models. Two possible sources have been extensively discussed: astrophysical point sources, such as local pulsars, and dark matter. In the first case an anisotropy in the flux of energetic particles is expected. Reliable predictions of the level of anisotropy need to account for the Sun's peculiar environment: the Sun resides in the so-called Local Bubble, an underdense region, embedded in a dense wall of molecular clouds. This structure is expected to act as an efficient cosmic-ray isotropizer. Using realistic assumptions on the impact of the Local Bubble on cosmic-ray diffusion, we demonstrate that the Local Bubble can indeed dilute the directional information of energetic positrons and electrons.

  11. The signature of initial production mechanisms in isotropic turbulence decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldi, M.

    2016-03-01

    In the present work the quantification of the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms in homogeneous isotropic turbulence decay is addressed. The analysis is developed through the use of theoretical tools as well as numerical calculations based on the eddy damped quasinormal Markovian (EDQNM) model. In both cases a modified Lin equation is used, which accounts for production mechanisms as proposed by Meldi, Lejemble, and Sagaut ["On the emergence of non-classical decay regimes in multiscale/fractal generated isotropic turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 756, 816-843 (2014)]. The approaches used show that an exponential decay law can be observed if the intensity of the forcing is strong enough to drive the turbulence dynamics, before a power-law decay is eventually attained. The EDQNM numerical results indicate that the exponential regime can persist for long evolution times, longer than the observation time in grid turbulence experiments. A rigorous investigation of the self-similar behavior of the pressure spectrum has been performed by a comprehensive comparison of EDQNM data with direct numerical simulation (DNS)/experiments in the literature. While DNS and free decay EDQNM simulations suggest the need of a very high Reλ threshold in order to observe a clear -7/3 slope of the pressure inertial range, experimental data and forced EDQNM calculations indicate a significantly lower value. This observation suggests that the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms, which cannot be excluded in experiments, play a role in the lack of general agreement with classical numerical approaches. These results reinforce the urge to evolve the numerical simulation state of the art towards the prediction of realistic physical states.

  12. Mechanical metamaterials at the theoretical limit of isotropic elastic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Berger, J B; Wadley, H N G; McMeeking, R M

    2017-02-20

    A wide variety of high-performance applications require materials for which shape control is maintained under substantial stress, and that have minimal density. Bio-inspired hexagonal and square honeycomb structures and lattice materials based on repeating unit cells composed of webs or trusses, when made from materials of high elastic stiffness and low density, represent some of the lightest, stiffest and strongest materials available today. Recent advances in 3D printing and automated assembly have enabled such complicated material geometries to be fabricated at low (and declining) cost. These mechanical metamaterials have properties that are a function of their mesoscale geometry as well as their constituents, leading to combinations of properties that are unobtainable in solid materials; however, a material geometry that achieves the theoretical upper bounds for isotropic elasticity and strain energy storage (the Hashin-Shtrikman upper bounds) has yet to be identified. Here we evaluate the manner in which strain energy distributes under load in a representative selection of material geometries, to identify the morphological features associated with high elastic performance. Using finite-element models, supported by analytical methods, and a heuristic optimization scheme, we identify a material geometry that achieves the Hashin-Shtrikman upper bounds on isotropic elastic stiffness. Previous work has focused on truss networks and anisotropic honeycombs, neither of which can achieve this theoretical limit. We find that stiff but well distributed networks of plates are required to transfer loads efficiently between neighbouring members. The resulting low-density mechanical metamaterials have many advantageous properties: their mesoscale geometry can facilitate large crushing strains with high energy absorption, optical bandgaps and mechanically tunable acoustic bandgaps, high thermal insulation, buoyancy, and fluid storage and transport. Our relatively simple

  13. The curvature of material surfaces in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, S. B.; Yeung, P. K.; Girimaji, S. S.

    1989-12-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to study the curvature of material surfaces in isotropic turbulence. The Navier-Stokes equation is solved by a 643 pseudospectral code for constant-density homogeneous isotropic turbulence, which is made statistically stationary by low-wavenumber forcing. The Taylor-scale Reynolds number is 39. An ensemble of 8192 infinitesimal material surface elements is tracked through the turbulence. For each element, a set of exact ordinary differential equations is integrated in time to determine, primarily, the two principal curvatures k1 and k2. Statistics are then deduced of the mean-square curvature M= (1)/(2) (k21+k22), and of the mean radius of curvature R=(k21+k22)-1/2. Curvature statistics attain an essentially stationary state after about 15 Kolmogorov time scales. Then the area-weighted expectation of R is found to be 12η, where η is the Kolmogorov length scale. For moderate and small radii (less than 10η) the probability density function (pdf) of R is approximately uniform, there being about 5% probability of R being less than η. The uniformity of the pdf of R, for small R, implies that the expectation of M is infinite. It is found that the surface elements with large curvatures are nearly cylindrical in shape (i.e., ‖k1‖≫‖k2‖ or ‖k2‖≫‖k1‖), consistent with the folding of the surface along nearly straight lines. Nevertheless the variance of the Gauss curvature K=k1k2 is infinite.

  14. Mechanical metamaterials at the theoretical limit of isotropic elastic stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, J. B.; Wadley, H. N. G.; McMeeking, R. M.

    2017-02-01

    A wide variety of high-performance applications require materials for which shape control is maintained under substantial stress, and that have minimal density. Bio-inspired hexagonal and square honeycomb structures and lattice materials based on repeating unit cells composed of webs or trusses, when made from materials of high elastic stiffness and low density, represent some of the lightest, stiffest and strongest materials available today. Recent advances in 3D printing and automated assembly have enabled such complicated material geometries to be fabricated at low (and declining) cost. These mechanical metamaterials have properties that are a function of their mesoscale geometry as well as their constituents, leading to combinations of properties that are unobtainable in solid materials; however, a material geometry that achieves the theoretical upper bounds for isotropic elasticity and strain energy storage (the Hashin–Shtrikman upper bounds) has yet to be identified. Here we evaluate the manner in which strain energy distributes under load in a representative selection of material geometries, to identify the morphological features associated with high elastic performance. Using finite-element models, supported by analytical methods, and a heuristic optimization scheme, we identify a material geometry that achieves the Hashin–Shtrikman upper bounds on isotropic elastic stiffness. Previous work has focused on truss networks and anisotropic honeycombs, neither of which can achieve this theoretical limit. We find that stiff but well distributed networks of plates are required to transfer loads efficiently between neighbouring members. The resulting low-density mechanical metamaterials have many advantageous properties: their mesoscale geometry can facilitate large crushing strains with high energy absorption, optical bandgaps and mechanically tunable acoustic bandgaps, high thermal insulation, buoyancy, and fluid storage and transport. Our relatively simple

  15. Estimation of crystallinity in isotropic isotactic polypropylene with Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Minogianni, Chrysa; Gatos, Konstantinos G; Galiotis, Costas

    2005-09-01

    The Raman spectrum of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) has been found to exhibit vibrational peaks in the region of 750 to 880 cm(-1) that are sensitive to the degree of crystallinity. These features are broadly assigned to various modes of methyl group rocking, rho(CH2), and there have been various attempts to assess crystallinity based on the integrated intensities of these bands. Various vibrational analyses performed in the past in combination with experimental studies have concluded that the presence of crystalline order with trans-gauche conformation gives rise to a peak at 809 cm(-1), which is assigned to a rho(CH2) mode coupled with the skeletal stretching mode. However, the presence of additional peaks at 830 cm(-1), 841 cm(-1), and 854 cm(-1), within the same envelope, have been the subject of controversy. In this work isotropic films of iPP derived from the same precursor of identical tacticity have been subjected to various degrees of annealing and the integrated intensities of the Raman bands were measured. The results showed that true 3d crystallinity in isotropic iPP can only be expressed by the 809 cm(-1) band whereas the band at 841 cm(-1) corresponds to an uncoupled rho(CH2) fundamental mode and thus is a measure of the amorphous content. The less intense satellite bands at 830 cm(-1) and 854 cm(-1) of solid iPP cannot be distinguished from the 841 cm(-1) band in the melt and are generally considered as intermediate phases possibly related to non-crystalline components with 3(1)-helical conformations. Independent differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) crystallinity measurements were in broad agreement with the Raman measurements based on the normalized intensity of the 809 cm(-1) Raman band. By comparing the Raman with the DSC data a new value for the theoretical heat of fusion for the 100% crystalline iPP has been proposed.

  16. Linear and Nonlinear Plasmonics from Isotropic and Anisotropic Integrated Nanocomposites for Quantum Information Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-09

    Esqueda UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL AUTÓNOMA DE MÉXICO 01/09/2014 Final Report DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AIR FORCE...Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Ciudad Universitaria, México, AFOSR DIST A General objective: Showing that our...information applications. Contact information Dr. Jorge-Alejandro Reyes-Esqueda. Assistant Professor. Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma

  17. Parity-dependent non-commutative quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Won Sang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the non-commutative quantum mechanics (NCQM) with parity (or space reflection) in two dimensions. Using the parity operators Ri, we construct the deformed Heisenberg algebra with parity in the non-commutative plane. We use this algebra to discuss the isotropic harmonic Hamiltonian with parity.

  18. Quantum graph as a quantum spectral filter

    SciTech Connect

    Turek, Ondrej; Cheon, Taksu

    2013-03-15

    We study the transmission of a quantum particle along a straight input-output line to which a graph {Gamma} is attached at a point. In the point of contact we impose a singularity represented by a certain properly chosen scale-invariant coupling with a coupling parameter {alpha}. We show that the probability of transmission along the line as a function of the particle energy tends to the indicator function of the energy spectrum of {Gamma} as {alpha}{yields}{infinity}. This effect can be used for a spectral analysis of the given graph {Gamma}. Its applications include a control of a transmission along the line and spectral filtering. The result is illustrated with an example where {Gamma} is a loop exposed to a magnetic field. Two more quantum devices are designed using other special scale-invariant vertex couplings. They can serve as a band-stop filter and as a spectral separator, respectively.

  19. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Sarkisian, Paul H.; Reimann, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  20. Formation and evolution of structure in loop cosmology.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin; Kagan, Mikhail; Singh, Parampreet; Hernández, Hector H; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2007-01-19

    Inhomogeneous cosmological perturbation equations are derived in loop quantum gravity, taking into account corrections, in particular, in gravitational parts. This provides a framework for calculating the evolution of modes in structure formation scenarios related to inflationary or bouncing models. Applications here are corrections to the Newton potential and to the evolution of large scale modes which imply nonconservation of curvature perturbations possibly noticeable in a running spectral index. These effects are sensitive to quantization procedures and test the characteristic behavior of correction terms derived from quantum gravity.

  1. Mirage phenomena in superconducting quantum corrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Kampf, A. P.

    2005-09-01

    [Dedicated to Bernhard Mühlschlegel on the occasion ofhis 80th birthday]We investigate the local density of states and the order parameter structure inside an elliptic quantum corral on surfaces of isotropic and anisotropic superconductors. The Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations are solved in the presence of non-magnetic and magnetic impurities. We observe and discuss a variety of mirage and anti-mirage phenomena, which specifically reflect the nature of the superconducting pairing state.

  2. Bouncing cosmologies from quantum gravity condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2017-02-01

    We show how the large-scale cosmological dynamics can be obtained from the hydrodynamics of isotropic group field theory condensate states in the Gross–Pitaevskii approximation. The correct Friedmann equations are recovered in the classical limit for some choices of the parameters in the action for the group field theory, and quantum gravity corrections arise in the high-curvature regime causing a bounce which generically resolves the big-bang and big-crunch singularities.

  3. Optical parametric loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, K.; Morioka, T.; Saruwatari, M.

    1995-06-01

    A novel configuration for four-wave mixing (FWM) is proposed that offers the remarkable feature of inherently separating the FWM wave from the input pump and signal waves and suppressing their background amplified stimulated emission without optical filtering. In the proposed configuration, an optical parametric loop mirror, two counterpropagating FWM waves generated in a Sagnac interferometer interfere with a relative phase difference that is introduced deliberately. FWM frequency-conversion experiments in a polarization-maintaining fiber achieved more than 35 dB of input-wave suppression against the FWM wave.

  4. Closing the loop.

    PubMed

    Dassau, E; Atlas, E; Phillip, M

    2011-02-01

    Closed-loop algorithms can be found in every aspect of everyday modern life. Automation and control are used constantly to provide safety and to improve quality of life. Closed-loop systems and algorithms can be found in home appliances, automobiles, aviation and more. Can one imagine nowadays driving a car without ABS, cruise control or even anti-sliding control? Similar principles of automation and control can be used in the management of diabetes mellitus (DM). The idea of an algorithmic/technological way to control glycaemia is not new and has been researched for more than four decades. However, recent improvements in both glucose-sensing technology and insulin delivery together with advanced control and systems engineering made this dream of an artificial pancreas possible. The artificial pancreas may be the next big step in the treatment of DM since the use of insulin analogues. An artificial pancreas can be described as internal or external devices that use continuous glucose measurements to automatically manage exogenous insulin delivery with or without other hormones in an attempt to restore glucose regulation in individuals with DM using a control algorithm. This device as described can be internal or external; can use different types of control algorithms with bi-hormonal or uni-hormonal design; and can utilise different ways to administer them. The different designs and implementations have transitioned recently from in silico simulations to clinical evaluation stage with practical applications in mind. This may mark the beginning of a new era in diabetes management with the introduction of semi-closed-loop systems that can prevent or minimise nocturnal hypoglycaemia, to hybrid systems that will manage blood glucose (BG) levels with minimal user intervention to finally fully automated systems that will take the user out of the loop. More and more clinical trials will be needed for the artificial pancreas to become a reality but initial encouraging

  5. Higher-Loop Amplitude Monodromy Relations in String and Gauge Theory.

    PubMed

    Tourkine, Piotr; Vanhove, Pierre

    2016-11-18

    The monodromy relations in string theory provide a powerful and elegant formalism to understand some of the deepest properties of tree-level field theory amplitudes, like the color-kinematics duality. This duality has been instrumental in tremendous progress on the computations of loop amplitudes in quantum field theory, but a higher-loop generalization of the monodromy construction was lacking. In this Letter, we extend the monodromy relations to higher loops in open string theory. Our construction, based on a contour deformation argument of the open string diagram integrands, leads to new identities that relate planar and nonplanar topologies in string theory. We write one and two-loop monodromy formulas explicitly at any multiplicity. In the field theory limit, at one-loop we obtain identities that reproduce known results. At two loops, we check our formulas by unitarity in the case of the four-point N=4 super-Yang-Mills amplitude.

  6. UV/IR mixing in non-Fermi liquids: higher-loop corrections in different energy ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Ipsita

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the Ising-nematic quantum critical point with an m-dimensional Fermi surface by applying a dimensional regularization scheme, introduced in [I. Mandal, S.S. Lee, Phys. Rev. B 92, 035141 (2015)]. We compute the contribution from two-loop and three-loop diagrams in the intermediate energy range controlled by a crossover scale. We find that for m = 2, the corrections continue to be one-loop exact for both the infrared and intermediate energy regimes.

  7. High temperature storage loop :

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  8. Space–time domain velocity distributions in isotropic radiative transfer in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetto, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    We compute the exact solutions of the radiative transfer equation in two dimensions for isotropic scattering. The intensity and the radiance are given in the space–time domain when the source is punctual and isotropic or unidirectional. These analytical results are compared to Monte-Carlo simulations in four particular situations.

  9. Coupled quantum Otto cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, George; Johal, Ramandeep S.

    2011-03-01

    We study the one-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg model of two spin-1/2 systems as a quantum heat engine. The engine undergoes a four-step Otto cycle where the two adiabatic branches involve changing the external magnetic field at a fixed value of the coupling constant. We find conditions for the engine efficiency to be higher than in the uncoupled model; in particular, we find an upper bound which is tighter than the Carnot bound. A domain of parameter values is pointed out which was not feasible in the interaction-free model. Locally, each spin seems to cause a flow of heat in a direction opposite to the global temperature gradient. This feature is explained by an analysis of the local effective temperature of the spins.

  10. Isotropic three-dimensional MRI-Fricke-infused gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Nai-Yu; Chu, Woei-Chyn; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Chung, Wen-Yuh; Guo, Wan-Yuo

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Fricke-infused gel has been shown to be a simple and attainable method for the conformal measurement of absorbed radiation dose. Nevertheless, its accuracy is seriously hindered by the irreversible ferric ion diffusion during magnetic resonance imaging, particularly when three-dimensional (3D) dose measurement in radiosurgery is considered. In this study, the authors developed a fast three-dimensional spin-echo based Fricke gel dosimetry technique to reduce the adverse effects of ferric ion diffusion and to obtain an accurate isotropic 3D dose measurement. Methods: A skull shaped phantom containing Fricke-infused gel was irradiated using Leksell Gamma Knife. The rapid image-based dosimetry technique was applied with the use of a 3D fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging sequence. The authors mathematically derived and experimentally validated the correlations between dose-response characteristics and parameters of the 3D fast spin-echo MR imaging sequence. Absorbed dose profiles were assessed and compared to the calculated profiles given by the Gamma Knife treatment planning system. Coefficient of variance (CV%) and coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) were used to evaluate the precision of dose-response curve estimation. The agreement between the measured and the planned 3D dose distributions was quantified by gamma-index analysis of two acceptance criteria. Results: Proper magnetic resonance imaging parameters were explored to render an accurate three-dimensional absorbed dose mapping with a 1 mm{sup 3} isotropic image resolution. The efficacy of the dose-response estimation was approved by an R{sup 2} > 0.99 and an average CV% of 1.6%. Average gamma pass-rate between the experimentally measured and GammaPlan calculated dose distributions were 83.8% and 99.7% for 2%/2 and 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. Conclusions: With the designed MR imaging sequence and parameters, total 3D MR acquisition time was confined to within 20 min postirradiation

  11. Modification of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence by solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wontae

    2005-12-01

    Particle-laden flows are prevalent in natural and industrial environments. Dilute loadings of small, heavy particles have been observed to attenuate the turbulence levels of the carrier-phase flow, up to 80% in some cases. We attempt to increase the physical understanding of this complex phenomenon by studying the interaction of solid particles with the most fundamental type of turbulence, which is homogeneous and isotropic with no mean flow. A flow facility was developed that could create air turbulence in a nearly-spherical chamber by means of synthetic jet actuators mounted on the corners. Loudspeakers were used as the actuators. Stationary turbulence and natural decaying turbulence were investigated using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry for the base flow qualification. Results indicated that the turbulence was fairly homogeneous throughout the measurement domain and very isotropic, with small mean flow. The particle-laden flow experiments were conducted in two different environments, the lab and in micro-gravity, to examine the effects of particle wakes and flow structure distortion caused by settling particles. The laboratory experiments showed that glass particles with diameters on the order of the turbulence Kolmogorov length scale attenuated the fluid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and dissipation rate with increasing particle mass loadings. The main source of fluid TKE production in the chamber was the speakers, but the loss of potential energy of the settling particles also resulted in a significant amount of production of extra TKE. The sink of TKE in the chamber was due to the ordinary fluid viscous dissipation and extra dissipation caused by particles. This extra dissipation could be divided into "unresolved" dissipation caused by local velocity disturbances in the vicinity of the small particles and dissipation caused by large-scale flow distortions from particle wakes and particle clusters. The micro-gravity experiments in NASA's KC-135

  12. Design and Experimental Evaluation of Modified Square Loop Feeding for UHF RFID Tags.

    PubMed

    Rokunuzzaman, Md; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Arshad, Haslina; Jit Singh, Mandeep; Misran, Norbahiah

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the performance evaluation of a modified square loop antenna design for UHF RFID applications that is excited through a narrow feed line connected to a square loop, an impedance matching network. The square loop dimensions are modified to reach a conjugate impedance matching. A gap is fixed between the feed-lines to link the chip. To achieve impedance matching, the structures of the feed-line are optimized accordingly. In addition, the antenna consists of a straightforward geometry. An 11.9-meter maximum read range is achieved using a compact size of 80 × 44 mm2 and 3.2 W for the effective isotropic radiated power. Additional findings reveal that the proposed tag antenna is able to provide a stable resonance response in the near field of a large metallic surface.

  13. Design and Experimental Evaluation of Modified Square Loop Feeding for UHF RFID Tags

    PubMed Central

    Rokunuzzaman, Md.; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Arshad, Haslina; Jit Singh, Mandeep; Misran, Norbahiah

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the performance evaluation of a modified square loop antenna design for UHF RFID applications that is excited through a narrow feed line connected to a square loop, an impedance matching network. The square loop dimensions are modified to reach a conjugate impedance matching. A gap is fixed between the feed-lines to link the chip. To achieve impedance matching, the structures of the feed-line are optimized accordingly. In addition, the antenna consists of a straightforward geometry. An 11.9-meter maximum read range is achieved using a compact size of 80 × 44 mm2 and 3.2 W for the effective isotropic radiated power. Additional findings reveal that the proposed tag antenna is able to provide a stable resonance response in the near field of a large metallic surface. PMID:26177376

  14. Completely inverted hysteresis loops: Inhomogeneity effects or experimental artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C. Cui, B.; Pan, F.; Yu, H. Y.

    2013-11-14

    Completely inverted hysteresis loops (IHL) are obtained by the superconducting quantum interference device with large cooling fields (>10 kOe) in (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3} films with self-assembled LaSrMnO{sub 4}, an antiferromagnetic interface. Although the behaviours of measured loops show many features characteristic to the IHL, its origin, however, is not due to the exchange coupling between (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3}/LaSrMnO{sub 4}, an often accepted view on IHL. Instead, we demonstrate that the negative remanence arises from the hysteresis of superconducting coils, which drops abruptly when lower cooling fields are utilized. Hence the completely inverted hysteresis loops are experimental artifacts rather than previously proposed inhomogeneity effects in complicated materials.

  15. Isotropic-Cholesteric Co-Existence and Magnetic Field-Induced Isotropic-Nematic Transition of Filamentous Bacteriophage FD in Aqueous Suspension.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianxin

    1995-01-01

    Isotropic to liquid crystalline phase transition for a lyotropic suspension of geometrically asymmetric macromolecules occurs to a wild class of synthetic polymers and biopolymers. Although in decades statistical mechanical theories have been developed to predict the thermodynamic conditions and the properties of such transition, quantitative comparison with theory has been compounded with complications such as charge, shape, polydispersity in size, and additional interactions with the solvent and among the macromolecules themselves. We chose the aqueous suspension of the filamentous bacteriophage fd as a model system to study the isotropic to liquid crystalline transition. The co-existence concentrations, as a function of ionic strength, were measured directly by spectrophotometry. Our data confirm quantitatively the predictions of a statistical mechanic treatment first described by Onsager, modified to include the effects of charge and flexibility of rodlike particles. We have also extended a previous study of the pretransitional angular correlations in the isotropic solutions of fd through the measurement of the magnetic-field-induced birefringence, i.e. the measurement of the Cotton-Mouton constant. At several ionic strengths the magnetic-field-induced birefringence, which is proportional to the number of particles in a correlation volume N_{rm corr}, was measured for fd concentrations spanning the entire isotropic region. From this data the limiting concentration of stability (spinodal) of the isotropic phase is obtained. A theoretical expression for the magnetic birefringence of persistent polymers was derived and agreed well with the data with the exception that N_{rm corr} at the isotropic to liquid crystal transition was smaller than predicted. In the proximity of the highest possible isotropic concentration, that is the isotropic in co-existence with anisotropic, we studied the effect of a high magnetic field. A first order field-induced isotropic

  16. Subcarrier multiplexing multiple-input multiple-output quantum key distribution scheme with orthogonal quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hailin; Zhang, Zhongshan

    2017-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) system is presently being developed for providing high-security transmission in future free-space optical communication links. However, current QKD technique restricts quantum secure communication to a low bit rate. To improve the QKD bit rate, we propose a subcarrier multiplexing multiple-input multiple-output quantum key distribution (SCM-MQKD) scheme with orthogonal quantum states. Specifically, we firstly present SCM-MQKD system model and drive symmetrical SCM-MQKD system into decoherence-free subspaces. We then utilize bipartite Werner and isotropic states to construct multiple parallel single photon with orthogonal quantum states that are invariant for unitary operations. Finally, we derive the density matrix and the capacity of SCM-MQKD system, respectively. Theoretical analysis and numerical results show that the capacity of SCM-MQKD system will increase {log _2}(N^2+1) times than that of single-photon QKD system.

  17. The double loop mattress suture

    PubMed Central

    Biddlestone, John; Samuel, Madan; Creagh, Terry; Ahmad, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    An interrupted stitch type with favorable tissue characteristics will reduce local wound complications. We describe a novel high-strength, low-tension repair for the interrupted closure of skin, cartilage, and muscle, the double loop mattress stitch, and compare it experimentally with other interrupted closure methods. The performance of the double loop mattress technique in porcine cartilage and skeletal muscle is compared with the simple, mattress, and loop mattress interrupted sutures in both a novel porcine loading chamber and mechanical model. Wound apposition is assessed by electron microscopy. The performance of the double loop mattress in vivo was confirmed using a series of 805 pediatric laparotomies/laparoscopies. The double loop mattress suture is 3.5 times stronger than the loop mattress in muscle and 1.6 times stronger in cartilage (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, the double loop mattress reduces tissue tension by 66% compared with just 53% for the loop mattress (p ≤ 0.001). Wound gapping is equal, and wound eversion appears significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) compared with the loop mattress in vitro. In vivo, the double loop mattress performs as well as the loop mattress and significantly better than the mattress stitch in assessments of wound eversion and dehiscence. There were no episodes of stitch extrusion in our series of patients. The mechanical advantage of its intrinsic pulley arrangement gives the double loop mattress its favorable properties. Wound dehiscence is reduced because this stitch type is stronger and exerts less tension on the tissue than the mattress stitch. We advocate the use of this novel stitch wherever a high-strength, low-tension repair is required. These properties will enhance wound repair, and its application will be useful to surgeons of all disciplines. PMID:24698436

  18. Enhancement of surface nonwettability by grafting loops.

    PubMed

    Pei, Han-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Li; Liu, Hong; Zhu, You-Liang; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2017-02-08

    We present a computer simulation study on the nonwettability of a flat surface tethered with deformable looped polymer chains. Two kinds of loops are studied: monodispersed loops (loops with the same length) and polydispersed loops (loops with different lengths). Both kinds of loops include two arrangements: with regularly tethered sites and with randomly tethered sites. Regularly grafted loops form typical grooves on the surface, while randomly grafted loops form a more rugged surface. For monodispersed loops, we analyze the factors that influence the nonwettability when varying the rigidity of the loops. The loops are divided into two categories based on their rigidity according to our previous analysis procedure (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 18767-18775): rigid loops and flexible loops. It is found that the loop can partially form a re-entrant-like structure, which is helpful to increase the nonwettability of the surface. The surfaces with grafted loops have increased nonwettability, especially those grafted with flexible chains. However, the contact angle on the loop structure cannot further increase for the rigid chains due to a large top layer density (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 18767-18775). For polydispersed loops, the contact angle is highly related to the rigidity of the long loops that contact the droplet. Different from monodispersed loops, the mechanism of the nonwettability of polydispersed loops is attributed to the supporting ability (rigidity) of long loops.

  19. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  20. The structure of intense vorticity in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, J.; Wray, A. A.; Saffman, P. G.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the intense vorticity regions is studied in numerically simulated homogeneous, isotropic, equilibrium turbulent flow fields at four different Reynolds numbers in the range Re(sub lambda) = 36-171. In accordance with previous investigators, this vorticity is found to be organized in coherent, cylindrical or ribbon-like, vortices ('worms'). A statistical study suggests that they are just especially intense features of the background, O(omega'), vorticity. Their radii scale with the Kolmogorov microscale and their lengths with the integral scale of the flow. An interesting observation is that the Reynolds number based on the circulation of the intense vortices, gamma/nu, increases monotonically with Re(sub lambda), raising the question of the stability of the structures in the limit of Re(sub lambda) approaching infinity. One and two-dimensional statistics of vorticity and strain are presented; they are non-gaussian, and the behavior of their tails depends strongly on the Reynolds number. There is no evidence of convergence to a limiting distribution in our range of Re(sub lambda), even though the energy spectra and the energy dissipation rate show good asymptotic properties in the higher Reynolds number cases. Evidence is presented to show that worms are natural features of the flow and that they do not depend on the particular forcing scheme.

  1. A Comprehensive Theory of Yielding and Failure for Isotropic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, R M

    2006-08-10

    A theory of yielding and failure for homogeneous and isotropic materials is given. The theory is calibrated by two independent, measurable properties and from those it predicts possible failure for any given state of stress. It also differentiates between ductile yielding and brittle failure. The explicit ductile-brittle criterion depends not only upon the material specification through the two properties, but also and equally importantly depends upon the type of imposed stress state. The Mises criterion is a special (limiting) case of the present theory. A close examination of this case shows that the Mises material idealization does not necessarily imply ductile behavior under all conditions, only under most conditions. When the first invariant of the yield/failure stress state is sufficiently large relative to the distortional part, brittle failure will be expected to occur. For general material types, it is shown that it is possible to have a state of spreading plastic flow, but as the elastic-plastic boundary advances, the conditions for yielding on it can change over to conditions for brittle failure because of the evolving stress state. The general theory is of a three dimensional form and it applies to full density materials for which the yield/failure strength in uniaxial tension is less than or at most equal to the magnitude of that in uniaxial compression.

  2. Energy transfer and dissipation in forced isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; McComb, W. David; Berera, Arjun; Yoffe, Samuel

    2014-11-01

    A model for the Reynolds number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate Cɛ is derived from the dimensionless Kármán-Howarth equation, resulting in Cɛ =Cɛ , ∞ + C /RL , where RL is the integral scale Reynolds number. The coefficients C and Cɛ , ∞ arise from asymptotic expansions of the dimensionless second- and third-order structure functions. The model equation is fitted to data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of forced isotropic turbulence for integral scale Reynolds numbers up to RL = 5875 (Rλ = 435), which results in an asymptote for Cɛ in the infinite Reynolds number limit Cɛ , ∞ = 0 . 47 +/- 0 . 01 . Since the coefficients in the model equation are scale-dependent while the dimensionless dissipation rate is not, we modelled the scale dependences of the coefficients by an ad hoc profile function such that they cancel out, leaving the model equation scale-independent, as it must be. The profile function was compared to DNS data to very good agreement, provided we restrict the comparison to scales small enough to be well resolved in our simulations. This work has made use of the resources provided by the UK supercomputing service HECToR, made available through the Edinburgh Compute and Data Facility (ECDF). A.B. is supported by STFC, S.R.Y. and M.F.L. are funded by EPSRC.

  3. Isotropically sensitive optical filter employing atomic resonance transitions

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1981-01-01

    An ultra-high Q isotropically sensitive optical filter or optical detector employing atomic resonance transitions. More specifically, atomic resonance transitions utilized in conjunction with two optical bandpass filters provide an optical detector having a wide field of view (.about.2.pi. steradians) and very narrow acceptance bandwidth approaching 0.01 A. A light signal to be detected is transmitted through an outer bandpass filter into a resonantly absorbing atomic vapor, the excited atomic vapor then providing a fluorescence signal at a different wavelength which is transmitted through an inner bandpass filter. The outer and inner bandpass filters have no common transmission band, thereby resulting in complete blockage of all optical signals that are not resonantly shifted in wavelength by the intervening atomic vapor. Two embodiments are disclosed, one in which the light signal raises atoms contained in the atomic vapor from the ground state to an excited state from which fluorescence occurs, and the other in which a pump laser is used to raise the atoms in the ground state to a first excited state from which the light signal then is resonantly absorbed, thereby raising the atoms to a second excited state from which fluorescence occurs. A specific application is described in which an optical detector according to the present invention can be used as an underwater detector for light from an optical transmitter which could be located in an orbiting satellite.

  4. Isotropically sensitive optical filter employing atomic resonance transitions

    DOEpatents

    Marling, J.B.

    An ultra-high Q isotropically sensitive optical filter or optical detector is disclosed employing atomic resonance transitions. More specifically, atomic resonance transitions utilized in conjunction with two optical bandpass filters provide an optical detector having a wide field of view (approx. 2 ..pi.. steradians) and very narrow acceptance bandwidth approaching 0.01A. A light signal to be detected is transmitted through an outer bandpass filter into a resonantly absorbing atomic vapor, the excited atomic vapor than providing a fluorescence signal at a different wavelength which is transmitted through an inner bandpass filters have no common transmission band, therby resulting in complete blockage of all optical signals that are not resonantly shifted in wavelength by the intervening atomic vapor. Two embodiments are disclosed, one in which the light signal raises atoms contained in the atomic vapor from the ground state to an excited state from which fluorescence occurs, and the other in which a pump laser is used to raise the atoms in the ground state to a first excited state from which the light signal then is resonantly absorbed, thereby raising the atoms to a second excited state from which fluorescence occurs. A specific application is described in which an optical detector according to the present invention can be located in an orbiting satellite.

  5. Simulations of (An)Isotropic Diffusion on Curved Biological Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Hayer, Arnold; Helenius, Ari; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-01-01

    We present a computational particle method for the simulation of isotropic and anisotropic diffusion on curved biological surfaces that have been reconstructed from image data. The method is capable of handling surfaces of high curvature and complex shape, which are often encountered in biology. The method is validated on simple benchmark problems and is shown to be second-order accurate in space and time and of high parallel efficiency. It is applied to simulations of diffusion on the membrane of endoplasmic reticula (ER) in live cells. Diffusion simulations are conducted on geometries reconstructed from real ER samples and are compared to fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments in the same ER samples using the transmembrane protein tsO45-VSV-G, C-terminally tagged with green fluorescent protein. Such comparisons allow derivation of geometry-corrected molecular diffusion constants for membrane components from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data. The results of the simulations indicate that the diffusion behavior of molecules in the ER membrane differs significantly from the volumetric diffusion of soluble molecules in the lumen of the same ER. The apparent speed of recovery differs by a factor of ∼4, even when the molecular diffusion constants of the two molecules are identical. In addition, the specific shape of the membrane affects the recovery half-time, which is found to vary by a factor of ∼2 in different ER samples. PMID:16284262

  6. Simulations of (an)isotropic diffusion on curved biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Hayer, Arnold; Helenius, Ari; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-02-01

    We present a computational particle method for the simulation of isotropic and anisotropic diffusion on curved biological surfaces that have been reconstructed from image data. The method is capable of handling surfaces of high curvature and complex shape, which are often encountered in biology. The method is validated on simple benchmark problems and is shown to be second-order accurate in space and time and of high parallel efficiency. It is applied to simulations of diffusion on the membrane of endoplasmic reticula (ER) in live cells. Diffusion simulations are conducted on geometries reconstructed from real ER samples and are compared to fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments in the same ER samples using the transmembrane protein tsO45-VSV-G, C-terminally tagged with green fluorescent protein. Such comparisons allow derivation of geometry-corrected molecular diffusion constants for membrane components from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data. The results of the simulations indicate that the diffusion behavior of molecules in the ER membrane differs significantly from the volumetric diffusion of soluble molecules in the lumen of the same ER. The apparent speed of recovery differs by a factor of approximately 4, even when the molecular diffusion constants of the two molecules are identical. In addition, the specific shape of the membrane affects the recovery half-time, which is found to vary by a factor of approximately 2 in different ER samples.

  7. Clustering of vertically constrained passive particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pietro, Massimo; van Hinsberg, Michel A. T.; Biferale, Luca; Clercx, Herman J. H.; Perlekar, Prasad; Toschi, Federico

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of small particles vertically confined, by means of a linear restoring force, to move within a horizontal fluid slab in a three-dimensional (3D) homogeneous isotropic turbulent velocity field. The model that we introduce and study is possibly the simplest description for the dynamics of small aquatic organisms that, due to swimming, active regulation of their buoyancy, or any other mechanism, maintain themselves in a shallow horizontal layer below the free surface of oceans or lakes. By varying the strength of the restoring force, we are able to control the thickness of the fluid slab in which the particles can move. This allows us to analyze the statistical features of the system over a wide range of conditions going from a fully 3D incompressible flow (corresponding to the case of no confinement) to the extremely confined case corresponding to a two-dimensional slice. The background 3D turbulent velocity field is evolved by means of fully resolved direct numerical simulations. Whenever some level of vertical confinement is present, the particle trajectories deviate from that of fluid tracers and the particles experience an effectively compressible velocity field. Here, we have quantified the compressibility, the preferential concentration of the particles, and the correlation dimension by changing the strength of the restoring force. The main result is that there exists a particular value of the force constant, corresponding to a mean slab depth approximately equal to a few times the Kolmogorov length scale η , that maximizes the clustering of the particles.

  8. Pressure and higher-order spectra for homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The spectra of the pressure, and other higher-order quantities including the dissipation, the enstrophy, and the square of the longitudinal velocity derivative are computed using data obtained from direct numerical simulation of homogeneous isotropic turbulence at Taylor-Reynolds numbers R(sub lambda) in the range 38 - 170. For the pressure spectra we find reasonable collapse in the dissipation range (of the velocity spectrum) when scaled in Kolmogorov variables and some evidence, which is not conclusive, for the existence of a k(exp -7/3) inertial range where k = absolute value of K, is the modulus of the wavenumber. The power spectra of the dissipation, the enstrophy, and the square of the longitudinal velocity derivative separate in the dissipation range, but appear to converge together in the short inertial range of the simulations. A least-squares curve-fit in the dissipation range for one value of R(sub lambda) = 96 gives a form for the spectrum of the dissipation as k(exp 0)exp(-Ck eta), for k(eta) greater than 0.2, where eta is the Kolmogorov length and C is approximately equal to 2.5.

  9. Component separation of a isotropic Gravitational Wave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, Abhishek; Mitra, Sanjit; Jhingan, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    A Gravitational Wave Background (GWB) is expected in the universe from the superposition of a large number of unresolved astrophysical sources and phenomena in the early universe. Each component of the background (e.g., from primordial metric perturbations, binary neutron stars, milli-second pulsars etc.) has its own spectral shape. Many ongoing experiments aim to probe GWB at a variety of frequency bands. In the last two decades, using data from ground-based laser interferometric gravitational wave (GW) observatories, upper limits on GWB were placed in the frequency range of 0~ 50-100 Hz, considering one spectral shape at a time. However, one strong component can significantly enhance the estimated strength of another component. Hence, estimation of the amplitudes of the components with different spectral shapes should be done jointly. Here we propose a method for "component separation" of a statistically isotropic background, that can, for the first time, jointly estimate the amplitudes of many components and place upper limits. The method is rather straightforward and needs negligible amount of computation. It utilises the linear relationship between the measurements and the amplitudes of the actual components, alleviating the need for a sampling based method, e.g., Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) or matched filtering, which are computationally intensive and cumbersome in a multi-dimensional parameter space. Using this formalism we could also study how many independent components can be separated using a given dataset from a network of current and upcoming ground based interferometric detectors.

  10. Thermo-elasto-viscoplasticity of isotropic porous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaliangos, A.; Anand, L.

    1993-06-01

    A RATE AND temperature dependent elastic-plastic model for isotropic, moderately porous metallic materials is formulated. This model is intended for material rate-sensitivities in the entire range spanning from highly rate-dependent behavior at high homologous temperatures to nearly rate-insensitive behavior at low homologous temperatures. The predictive capabilities of the constitutive model are verified by comparing results from finite element calculations against results from physical experiments. Specifically, example calculations are presented for: (a) isothermal hot compression of a tapered disk made from an initially porous material. This calculation illustrates the effect of secondary tensile stresses on hot workability of metals, (b) Tension tests, under isothermal conditions at low homologous temperatures, on axisymmetric notched bars made from initially porous materials. This calculation illustrates the effects of nonuniform multiaxial tensile stress states on void growth. Predictions from the computational procedures for both examples agree well with experimental results. The new state variable rate and temperature dependent constitutive model for microporous materials and the associated computational procedures form a basis for the simulation and design of deformation processing operations. This new capability should be useful for the prediction of formation of defects during both cold-working when the material rate sensitivity is low, as well as hot-working when the material is highly rate sensitive. The computational capability should also be useful in simulating the late stages of densification of powder metallurgical products in complex forming operations.

  11. Calculation of Theoretical Isotropic Compton Profile for Many Particle Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzubadi, Ali A.; Albayati, Khalil H.

    Theoretical isotropic (spherically symmetric) Compton profiles (ICP) have been calculated for many particle systems' He, Li, Be and B atoms in their ground states. Our calculations were performed using Roothan-Hartree-Fock (RHF) wave function, HF wave function of Thakkar and re-optimized HF wave function of Clementi-Roetti, taking into account the impulse approximation. The theoretical analysis included a decomposition of the various intra and inter shells and their contributions in the total ICP. A high momentum region of up to 4 a.u. was investigated and a non-negligible tail was observed in all ICP curves. The existence of a high momentum tail was mainly due to the electron-electron interaction. The ICP for the He atom has been compared with the available experimental data and it is found that the ICP values agree very well with them. A few low order radial momentum expectation values and the total energy for these atomic systems have also been calculated and compared with their counterparts' wave functions.

  12. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.

    1983-01-01

    The Hot Section Technology (HOST) program, creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic), is reviewed. The program is aimed at improving the high temperature crack initiation life prediction technology for gas turbine hot section components. Significant results include: (1) cast B1900 and wrought IN 718 selected as the base and alternative materials respectively; (2) fatigue test specimens indicated that measurable surface cracks appear early in the specimen lives, i.e., 15% of total life at 871 C and 50% of life at 538 c; (3) observed crack initiation sites are all surface initiated and are associated with either grain boundary carbides or local porosity, transgrannular cracking is observed at the initiation site for all conditions tested; and (4) an initial evaluation of two life prediction models, representative of macroscopic (Coffin-Mason) and more microscopic (damage rate) approaches, was conducted using limited data generated at 871 C and 538 C. It is found that the microscopic approach provides a more accurate regression of the data used to determine crack initiation model constants, but overpredicts the effect of strain rate on crack initiation life for the conditions tested.

  13. Brain activation inhomogeneity highlighted by the Isotropic Anomalous Diffusion filter.

    PubMed

    Senra Filho, Antonio Carlos da S; Rondinoni, Carlo; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Murta, Luiz O

    2014-01-01

    The visual appealing nature of the now popular BOLD fMRI may give the false impression of extreme simplicity, as if the the functional maps could be generated with the press of a single button. However, one can only get plausible maps after long and cautious processing, considering that time and noise come into play during acquisition. One of the most popular ways to account for noise and individual variability in fMRI is the use of a Gaussian spatial filter. Although very robust, this filter may introduce excessive blurring, given the strong dependence of results on the central voxel value. Here, we propose the use of the Isotropic Anomalous Diffusion (IAD) approach, aiming to reduce excessive homogeneity while retaining the natural variability of signal across brain space. We found differences between Gaussian and IAD filters in two parameters gathered from Independent Component maps (ICA), identified on brain areas responsible for auditory processing during rest. Analysis of data gathered from 7 control subjects shows that the IAD filter rendered more localized active areas and higher contrast-to-noise ratios, when compared to equivalent Gaussian filtered data (Student t-test, p<0.05). The results seem promising, since the anomalous filter performs satisfactorily in filtering noise with less distortion of individual localized brain responses.

  14. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.

    1983-01-01

    The activities performed during the first year of the NASA HOST Program, Creep Fatigue Life Prediction for Engine Hot Section Materials (Isotropic), being conducted by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft are summarized. The program is a 5 year, two part effort aimed at improving the high temperature crack initiation prediction technology for gas turbine hot section components. Significant results of the program produced thus far are discussed. Cast B1900 + Hf and wrought IN 718 were selected as the base and alternate materials, respectively. A single heat of B1900 + Hf was obtained and test specimens fabricated. The material was characterized with respect to grain size, gamma prime size, carbide distribution, and dislocation density. Monotonic tensile and creep testing has shown engineering properties within anticipated scatter for this material. Examination of the tensile tests has shown a transition from inhomogeneous planar slip within the grains at lower temperatures to more homogeneous matrix deformation. Examination of the creep tests has shown a transgranular failure mode at 1400 F and an intergranular failure mode at 1600 F and 1800 F.

  15. Spark ignition of aviation fuel in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisman, Alex; Lu, Tianfeng; Borghesi, Giulio; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent spark ignition occurs in combustion engines where the spark must establish a viable flame kernel that leads to stable combustion. A competition exists between kernel growth, due to flame propagation, and kernel attenuation, due to flame stretch and turbulence. This competition can be measured by the Karlovitz number, Ka, and kernel viability decreases rapidly for Ka >> 1 . In this study, the evolution of an initially spherical flame kernel in a turbulent field is investigated at two cases: Ka- (Ka = 25) and Ka+ (Ka = 125) using direct numerical simulation (DNS). A detailed chemical mechanism for jet fuel (Jet-A) is used, which is relevant for many practical conditions, and the mechanism includes a pyrolysis sub-model which is important for the ignition of large hydrocarbon fuels. An auxiliary non-reacting DNS generates the initial field of isotropic turbulence with a turbulent Reynolds number of 500 (Ka-) and 1,500 (Ka+). The kernel is then imposed at the center of the domain and the reacting DNS is performed. The Ka- case survives and the Ka+ case is extinguished. An analysis of the turbulence chemistry interactions is performed and the process of extinction is described. Department of Energy - Office of Basic Energy Science under Award No. DE-SC0001198.

  16. Magnetic birefringence study of isotropic suspensions of tobacco mosaic virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Photinos, P.; Rosenblatt, C.; Schuster, T. M.; Saupe, A.

    1987-12-01

    The magnetic field induced birefringence in isotropic aqueous suspensions of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was measured as a function of temperature and concentration in high magnetic fields (100 kG). The temperature range was between 15 and 50 °C and the concentration range was between 4 and 20 mg/cm3. We find that the Cotton-Mouton constant (C) increases with decreasing temperature by 15%-20% over the entire range and extrapolates to infinity at a finite temperature of 110 to 150 K. At constant temperature, the measured ρ/C(ρ=number of TMV particles per cm3 of suspension) can be expanded in a power series of ρ, where the coefficients are expressed by the irreducible cluster integrals. At 20 °C the experimental values can be fitted to the linear form: ρ/λC=(2.09×1030-1.35×1015ρ)G2/cm3. For rigid cylindrical particles with l=3000 Å and d=180 Å, and using the rigid hard particle interaction model, we find for the first order coefficient 0.62×1015, i.e., a significant deviation for the rigid hard-rod model. This deviation is also indicated by the variation of C with temperature. We discuss the results on TMV and of similar measurements on phage fd in terms of the interparticle interaction and rigidity of the particles.

  17. Fully Isotropic Fast Marching Methods on Cartesian Grids.

    PubMed

    Appia, Vikram; Yezzi, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The existing Fast Marching methods which are used to solve the Eikonal equation use a locally continuous model to estimate the accumulated cost, but a discontinuous (discretized) model for the traveling cost around each grid point. Because the accumulated cost and the traveling (local) cost are treated differently, the estimate of the accumulated cost at any point will vary based on the direction of the arriving front. Instead we propose to estimate the traveling cost at each grid point based on a locally continuous model, where we will interpolate the traveling cost along the direction of the propagating front. We further choose an interpolation scheme that is not biased by the direction of the front. Thus making the fast marching process truly isotropic. We show the significance of removing the directional bias in the computation of the cost in certain applications of fast marching method. We also compare the accuracy and computation times of our proposed methods with the existing state of the art fast marching techniques to demonstrate the superiority of our method.

  18. Crossing fields in thin films of isotropic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Colauto, F.; Buzdin, A. A.; Carmo, D.; Andrade, A. M. H.; Oliveira, A. A. M.; Ortiz, W. A.; Rosenmann, D.; Kwok, W.-K.

    2016-11-01

    We study interactions of perpendicular and longitudinal magnetic fields in niobium films of different thickness in a wide range of temperatures below the superconducting transition temperature (TC) . In 100-nm Nb film at all temperatures the longitudinal field H|| practically does not influence the dynamics of the normal flux. However, in 200-nm Nb film, a considerable anisotropy in the vortex motion is found with advanced propagation of the normal flux along H|| at T >TC/2 and the preferential jumpwise growth of the thermomagnetic flux dendrites across H|| at T isotropic normal flux dynamics in the thinner film. Our results open an alternative way of manipulating both slow vortex motion and fast thermomagnetic avalanches.

  19. Magnetic hysteresis measurements of thin films under isotropic stress.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Patrick; Dubey, Archana; Geerts, Wilhelmus

    2000-10-01

    Nowadays, ferromagnetic thin films are widely applied in devices for information technology (credit cards, video recorder tapes, floppies, hard disks) and sensors (air bags, anti-breaking systems, navigation systems). Thus, with the increase in the use of magnetic media continued investigation of magnetic properties of materials is necessary to help in determining the useful properties of materials for new or improved applications. We are currently interested in studying the effect of applied external stress on Kerr hysteresis curves of thin magnetic films. The Ni and NiFe films were grown using DC magnetron sputtering with Ar as the sputter gas (pAr=4 mTorr; Tsub=55-190 C). Seed and cap layers of Ti were used on all films for adhesion and oxidation protection, respectively. A brass membrane pressure cell was designed to apply in-plane isotropic stress to thin films. In this pressure cell, gas pressure is used to deform a flexible substrate onto which a thin magnetic film has been sputtered. The curvature of the samples could be controlled by changing the gas pressure to the cell. Magneto-Optical in-plane hysteresis curves at different values of strain were measured. The results obtained show that the stress sensitivity is dependent on the film thickness. For the 500nm NiFe films, the coercivity strongly decreased as a function of the applied stress.

  20. Interacting scales and energy transfer in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1993-01-01

    The dependence of the energy transfer process on the disparity of the interacting scales is investigated in the inertial and far-dissipation ranges of isotropic turbulence. The strategy for generating the simulated flow fields and the choice of a disparity parameter to characterize the scaling of the interactions is discussed. The inertial range is found to be dominated by relatively local interactions, in agreement with the Kolmogorov assumption. The far-dissipation is found to be dominated by relatively non-local interactions, supporting the classical notion that the far-dissipation range is slaved to the Kolmogorov scales. The measured energy transfer is compared with the classical models of Heisenberg, Obukhov, and the more detailed analysis of Tennekes and Lumley. The energy transfer statistics measured in the numerically simulated flows are found to be nearly self-similar for wave numbers in the inertial range. Using the self-similar form measured within the limited scale range of the simulation, an 'ideal' energy transfer function and the corresponding energy flux rate for an inertial range of infinite extent are constructed. From this flux rate, the Kolmogorov constant is calculated to be 1.5, in excellent agreement with experiments.